Science.gov

Sample records for inorganic carbon uptake

  1. Uptake of inorganic carbon and nitrate by marine plankton and the Redfield ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Banse, K. )

    1994-03-01

    This paper reexamines the previously studied question of uptake ratios of dissolved inorganic carbon and nitrate in plankton blooms. The author concludes that unless explicit justification is provided, nitrate consumption cannot be converted into community net production of particulate and dissolved organic carbon. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Laboratory investigation of inorganic carbon uptake by cryoconite debris from Werenskioldbreen, Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stibal, Marek; Tranter, Martyn

    2007-12-01

    Laboratory experiments were undertaken to determine the inorganic carbon uptake rate and the interactions between photosynthesis and water chemistry, particularly pH and nutrient concentrations, for cryoconite debris from Werenskioldbreen, a well-researched Svalbard glacier. Microorganisms in cryoconite debris took up inorganic carbon at rates between 0.6 and 15 μg C L-1 h-1 and fixed it as organic carbon. Cyanobacterial photosynthesis (75-93%) was the main process responsible for inorganic carbon fixation, while heterotrophic uptake (6-15%) only accounted for a minor part. The microbes in cryoconite debris were active shortly after melt and fixed carbon as long as there were favorable conditions. They were not truly psychrophilic: their physiological optimum temperature was higher than is prevalent in cryoconite holes. The pH was also a factor affecting photosynthesis in the cryoconite slurry. The highest dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) uptake rates per liter of slurry occurred at pH ˜7, and there was a significant correlation between the initial pH and DIC fixation on a per cell basis, showing increasing DIC uptake rates when pH increased from ˜5.5 to 9. Inorganic carbon fixation resulted in an increased pH in solution. However, the microbes were able to photosynthesize in a wide range of pH from ˜4 to ˜10. The average C:N:P molar ratios in solution were ˜350:75:1. Unlike nitrogen, phosphorus concentrations decreased with increasing carbon uptake, and when the rate approached ˜15 μg C L-1 h-1, all available dissolved phosphorus was utilized within 6 h. Hence phosphorus is probably biolimiting in this system.

  3. Carbon uptake in low dissolved inorganic carbon environments: the effect of limited carbon availability on photosynthetic organisms in thermal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, K. D.; Omelon, C. R.; Bennett, P.

    2010-12-01

    Photosynthesis is the primary carbon fixation process in thermal waters below 70°C, but some hydrothermal waters have extremely low dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), potentially limiting the growth of inorganic carbon fixing organisms such as algae and cyanobacteria. To address the issue of how carbon is assimilated by phototrophs in these environments, we conducted experiments to compare inorganic carbon uptake mechanisms by two phylogenetically distinct organisms collected from geographically distinct carbon limited systems: the neutral pH geothermal waters of El Tatio, Chile, and the acidic geothermal waters of Tantalus Creek in Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park. Discharge waters at El Tatio have low total DIC concentrations (2 to 6 ppm) found mainly as HCO3-; this is in contrast to even lower measured DIC values in Tantalus Creek (as low as 0.13 ppm) that, due to a measured pH of 2.5, exists primarily as CO2. Cyanobacteria and algae are innately physiologically plastic, and we are looking to explore the possibility that carbon limitation in these environments is extreme enough to challenge that plasticity and lead to a suite of carbon uptake adaptations. We hypothesize that these microorganisms utilize adaptive modes of Ci uptake that allow them to survive under these limiting conditions. Cyanobacteria (primarily Synechococcus spp.) isolated from El Tatio can utilize either passive CO2 uptake or active HCO3- uptake mechanisms, in contrast to the eukaryotic alga Cyanidium spp. from Tantalus Creek, which is restricted to an energy-dependent CO2 uptake mechanism. To test this hypothesis, we conducted pH drift experiments (Omelon et al., 2008) to examine changes in pH and [DIC] under a range of pH and [DIC] culture conditions. This work provides baseline information upon which we will begin to investigate the effects of low [DIC] on the growth of phototrophs collected from these and other less carbon limited systems.

  4. Regulation of carbonic-anhydrase activity, inorganic-carbon uptake and photosynthetic biomass yield inChlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Patel, B N; Merrett, M J

    1986-03-01

    The regulation of carbonic anhydrase by environmental conditions was determined forChlamydomonas reinhardtii. The depression of carbonic anhydrase in air-grown cells was pH-dependent. Growth of cells on air at acid pH, corresponding to 10 μm CO2 in solution, resulted in complete repression of carbonic-anhydrase activity. At pH 6.9, increasing the CO2 concentration to 0.15% (v/v) in the gas phase, corresponding to 11 μM in solution, was sufficient to completely repress carbonic-anhydrase activity. Photosynthesis and intracellular inorganic carbon were measured in air-grown and high-CO2-grown cells using a silicone-oil centrifugation technique. With carbonic anhydrase repressed cells limited inorganic-carbon accumulation resulted from non-specific binding of CO2. With air-grown cells, inorganic-carbon uptake at acid pH, i.e. 5.5, was linear up to 0.5 mM external inorganic-carbon concentration whereas at alkaline pH, i.e. 7.5, the accumulation ratio decreased with increase in external inorganic-carbon concentration. It is suggested that in air-grown cells at acid pH, CO2 is the inorganic carbon species that crosses the plasmalemma. The conversion of CO2 to HCO 3 (-) by carbonic anhydrase in the cytosol results in inorganic-carbon accumulation and maintains the diffusion gradient for carbon dioxide across the cell boundary. However, this mechanism will not account for energy-dependent accumulation of inorganic carbon when there is little difference in pH between the exterior and cytosol. PMID:24232432

  5. Inorganic carbon uptake during photosynthesis. II. Uptake by isolated Asparagus mesophyll cells during isotopic disequilibrium. [Asparagus sprengeri

    SciTech Connect

    Espie, G.S.; Owttrim, G.W.; Colman, B.

    1986-04-01

    The species of inorganic carbon (CO/sub 2/ or HCO/sub 3//sup -/) taken up as a source of substrate for photosynthetic fixation by isolated Asparagus sprengeri mesophyll cells is investigated. Discrimination between CO/sub 2/ or HCO/sub 3//sup -/ transport, during steady state photosynthesis, is achieved by monitoring the changes (by /sup 14/C fixation) which occur in the specific activity of the intracellular pool of inorganic carbon when the inorganic carbon present in the suspending medium is in a state of isotopic disequilibrium. Quantitative comparisons between theoretical (CO/sub 2/ or HCO/sub 3//sup -/ transport) and experimental time-courses of /sup 14/C incorporation, over the pH range of 5.2 to 7.5, indicate that the specific activity of extracellular CO/sub 2/, rather than HCO/sub 3//sup -/, is the appropriate predictor of the intracellular specific activity. It is concluded, therefore, that CO/sub 2/ is the major source of exogenous inorganic carbon taken up by Asparagus cells. However, at high pH (8.5), a component of net DIC uptake may be attributable to HCO/sub 3//sup -/ transport, as the incorporation of /sup 14/C during isotopic disequilibrium exceeds the maximum possible incorporation predicted on the basis of CO/sub 2/ uptake alone. The contribution of HCO/sub 3//sup -/ to net inorganic carbon uptake (pH 8.5) is variable, ranging from 5 to 16%, but is independent of the extracellular HCO/sub 3//sup -/ concentration. The evidence for direct HCO/sub 3//sup -/ transport is subject to alternative explanations and must, therefore, be regarded as equivocal. Nonlinear regression analysis of the rate of /sup 14/C incorporation as a function of time indicates the presence of a small extracellular resistance to the diffusion of CO/sub 2/, which is partially alleviated by a high extracellular concentration of HCO/sub 3//sup -/.

  6. Dissolved inorganic carbon enhanced growth, nutrient uptake, and lipid accumulation in wastewater grown microalgal biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kesaano, Maureen; Gardner, Robert D; Moll, Karen; Lauchnor, Ellen; Gerlach, Robin; Peyton, Brent M; Sims, Ronald C

    2015-03-01

    Microalgal biofilms grown to evaluate potential nutrient removal options for wastewaters and feedstock for biofuels production were studied to determine the influence of bicarbonate amendment on their growth, nutrient uptake capacity, and lipid accumulation after nitrogen starvation. No significant differences in growth rates, nutrient removal, or lipid accumulation were observed in the algal biofilms with or without bicarbonate amendment. The biofilms possibly did not experience carbon-limited conditions because of the large reservoir of dissolved inorganic carbon in the medium. However, an increase in photosynthetic rates was observed in algal biofilms amended with bicarbonate. The influence of bicarbonate on photosynthetic and respiration rates was especially noticeable in biofilms that experienced nitrogen stress. Medium nitrogen depletion was not a suitable stimulant for lipid production in the algal biofilms and as such, focus should be directed toward optimizing growth and biomass productivities to compensate for the low lipid yields and increase nutrient uptake. PMID:25585252

  7. Synergistic effects of dissolved organic carbon and inorganic nitrogen on methane uptake in forest soils without and with freezing treatment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haohao; Xu, Xingkai; Duan, Cuntao; Li, Tuansheng; Cheng, Weiguo

    2016-01-01

    There is limited knowledge about how the interaction of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and inorganic nitrogen (N) released into the soil just after freezing can affect methane (CH4) uptake in forest soils. Here, we present how freezing treatment and glucose, as a DOC source, can affect the roles of NH4(+)-N and NO3(-)-N in inhibiting soil CH4 uptake, by using soil-core incubation experiments. A long-term freezing at low temperature reduced cumulative CH4 uptake in the soils sampled from two temperate forest stands without carbon (C) and N addition. The inhibition effects of N addition as NH4Cl and KNO3 on the soil CH4 uptake were much larger than C addition. Freezing treatment eliminated the inhibition effect of NH4Cl and KNO3 addition on CH4 uptake, and this response was affected by glucose addition and forest types. The addition of glucose eliminated the inhibition effect of NO3(-)-N on CH4 uptake in the forest soils without and with freezing treatment, while the addition of NH4(+)-N and glucose inhibited synergistically the soil CH4 uptake. The results highlight the importance of synergistic effects of DOC and N inputs on the soil CH4 uptake under forest stands during soil wetting and thawing periods. PMID:27572826

  8. Synergistic effects of dissolved organic carbon and inorganic nitrogen on methane uptake in forest soils without and with freezing treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haohao; Xu, Xingkai; Duan, Cuntao; Li, Tuansheng; Cheng, Weiguo

    2016-01-01

    There is limited knowledge about how the interaction of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and inorganic nitrogen (N) released into the soil just after freezing can affect methane (CH4) uptake in forest soils. Here, we present how freezing treatment and glucose, as a DOC source, can affect the roles of NH4+-N and NO3−-N in inhibiting soil CH4 uptake, by using soil-core incubation experiments. A long-term freezing at low temperature reduced cumulative CH4 uptake in the soils sampled from two temperate forest stands without carbon (C) and N addition. The inhibition effects of N addition as NH4Cl and KNO3 on the soil CH4 uptake were much larger than C addition. Freezing treatment eliminated the inhibition effect of NH4Cl and KNO3 addition on CH4 uptake, and this response was affected by glucose addition and forest types. The addition of glucose eliminated the inhibition effect of NO3−-N on CH4 uptake in the forest soils without and with freezing treatment, while the addition of NH4+-N and glucose inhibited synergistically the soil CH4 uptake. The results highlight the importance of synergistic effects of DOC and N inputs on the soil CH4 uptake under forest stands during soil wetting and thawing periods. PMID:27572826

  9. Genetic diversity of inorganic carbon uptake systems causes variation in CO2 response of the cyanobacterium Microcystis

    PubMed Central

    Sandrini, Giovanni; Matthijs, Hans C P; Verspagen, Jolanda M H; Muyzer, Gerard; Huisman, Jef

    2014-01-01

    Rising CO2 levels may act as an important selective factor on the CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM) of cyanobacteria. We investigated genetic diversity in the CCM of Microcystis aeruginosa, a species producing harmful cyanobacterial blooms in many lakes worldwide. All 20 investigated Microcystis strains contained complete genes for two CO2 uptake systems, the ATP-dependent bicarbonate uptake system BCT1 and several carbonic anhydrases (CAs). However, 12 strains lacked either the high-flux bicarbonate transporter BicA or the high-affinity bicarbonate transporter SbtA. Both genes, bicA and sbtA, were located on the same operon, and the expression of this operon is most likely regulated by an additional LysR-type transcriptional regulator (CcmR2). Strains with only a small bicA fragment clustered together in the phylogenetic tree of sbtAB, and the bicA fragments were similar in strains isolated from different continents. This indicates that a common ancestor may first have lost most of its bicA gene and subsequently spread over the world. Growth experiments showed that strains with sbtA performed better at low inorganic carbon (Ci) conditions, whereas strains with bicA performed better at high Ci conditions. This offers an alternative explanation of previous competition experiments, as our results reveal that the competition at low CO2 levels was won by a specialist with only sbtA, whereas a generalist with both bicA and sbtA won at high CO2 levels. Hence, genetic and phenotypic variation in Ci uptake systems provide Microcystis with the potential for microevolutionary adaptation to changing CO2 conditions, with a selective advantage for bicA-containing strains in a high-CO2 world. PMID:24132080

  10. Dissolved inorganic carbon uptake in Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2 is Δp- and ATP-sensitive and enhances RubisCO-mediated carbon fixation.

    PubMed

    Menning, Kristy J; Menon, Balaraj B; Fox, Gordon; Scott, Kathleen M

    2016-03-01

    The gammaproteobacterium Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2 is an aerobic sulfur-oxidizing hydrothermal vent chemolithoautotroph that has a CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM), which generates intracellular dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentrations much higher than extracellular, thereby providing substrate for carbon fixation at sufficient rate. This CCM presumably requires at least one active DIC transporter to generate the elevated intracellular concentrations of DIC measured in this organism. In this study, the half-saturation constant (K CO2) for purified carboxysomal RubisCO was measured (276 ± 18 µM) which was much greater than the K CO2 of whole cells (1.03 µM), highlighting the degree to which the CCM facilitates CO2 fixation under low CO2 conditions. To clarify the bioenergetics powering active DIC uptake, cells were incubated in the presence of inhibitors targeting ATP synthesis (DCCD) or proton potential (CCCP). Incubations with each of these inhibitors resulted in diminished intracellular ATP, DIC, and fixed carbon, despite an absence of an inhibitory effect on proton potential in the DCCD-incubated cells. Electron transport complexes NADH dehydrogenase and the bc 1 complex were found to be insensitive to DCCD, suggesting that ATP synthase was the primary target of DCCD. Given the correlation of DIC uptake to the intracellular ATP concentration, the ABC transporter genes were targeted by qRT-PCR, but were not upregulated under low-DIC conditions. As the T. crunogena genome does not include orthologs of any genes encoding known DIC uptake systems, these data suggest that a novel, yet to be identified, ATP- and proton potential-dependent DIC transporter is active in this bacterium. This transporter serves to facilitate growth by T. crunogena and other Thiomicrospiras in the many habitats where they are found. PMID:26581415

  11. Strains of the Harmful Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa Differ in Gene Expression and Activity of Inorganic Carbon Uptake Systems at Elevated CO2 Levels.

    PubMed

    Sandrini, Giovanni; Jakupovic, Dennis; Matthijs, Hans C P; Huisman, Jef

    2015-11-01

    Cyanobacteria are generally assumed to be effective competitors at low CO2 levels because of their efficient CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM), and yet how bloom-forming cyanobacteria respond to rising CO2 concentrations is less clear. Here, we investigate changes in CCM gene expression at ambient CO2 (400 ppm) and elevated CO2 (1,100 ppm) in six strains of the harmful cyanobacterium Microcystis. All strains downregulated cmpA encoding the high-affinity bicarbonate uptake system BCT1, whereas both the low- and high-affinity CO2 uptake genes were expressed constitutively. Four strains downregulated the bicarbonate uptake genes bicA and/or sbtA, whereas two strains showed constitutive expression of the bicA-sbtA operon. In one of the latter strains, a transposon insert in bicA caused low bicA and sbtA transcript levels, which made this strain solely dependent on BCT1 for bicarbonate uptake. Activity measurements of the inorganic carbon (Ci) uptake systems confirmed the CCM gene expression results. Interestingly, genes encoding the RuBisCO enzyme, structural carboxysome components, and carbonic anhydrases were not regulated. Hence, Microcystis mainly regulates the initial uptake of inorganic carbon, which might be an effective strategy for a species experiencing strongly fluctuating Ci concentrations. Our results show that CCM gene regulation of Microcystis varies among strains. The observed genetic and phenotypic variation in CCM responses may offer an important template for natural selection, leading to major changes in the genetic composition of harmful cyanobacterial blooms at elevated CO2. PMID:26319871

  12. Strains of the Harmful Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa Differ in Gene Expression and Activity of Inorganic Carbon Uptake Systems at Elevated CO2 Levels

    PubMed Central

    Sandrini, Giovanni; Jakupovic, Dennis; Matthijs, Hans C. P.

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are generally assumed to be effective competitors at low CO2 levels because of their efficient CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM), and yet how bloom-forming cyanobacteria respond to rising CO2 concentrations is less clear. Here, we investigate changes in CCM gene expression at ambient CO2 (400 ppm) and elevated CO2 (1,100 ppm) in six strains of the harmful cyanobacterium Microcystis. All strains downregulated cmpA encoding the high-affinity bicarbonate uptake system BCT1, whereas both the low- and high-affinity CO2 uptake genes were expressed constitutively. Four strains downregulated the bicarbonate uptake genes bicA and/or sbtA, whereas two strains showed constitutive expression of the bicA-sbtA operon. In one of the latter strains, a transposon insert in bicA caused low bicA and sbtA transcript levels, which made this strain solely dependent on BCT1 for bicarbonate uptake. Activity measurements of the inorganic carbon (Ci) uptake systems confirmed the CCM gene expression results. Interestingly, genes encoding the RuBisCO enzyme, structural carboxysome components, and carbonic anhydrases were not regulated. Hence, Microcystis mainly regulates the initial uptake of inorganic carbon, which might be an effective strategy for a species experiencing strongly fluctuating Ci concentrations. Our results show that CCM gene regulation of Microcystis varies among strains. The observed genetic and phenotypic variation in CCM responses may offer an important template for natural selection, leading to major changes in the genetic composition of harmful cyanobacterial blooms at elevated CO2. PMID:26319871

  13. Expression of genes involved in the uptake of inorganic carbon in the gill of a deep-sea vesicomyid clam harboring intracellular thioautotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hongo, Yuki; Ikuta, Tetsuro; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Shimamura, Shigeru; Shigenobu, Shuji; Maruyama, Tadashi; Yoshida, Takao

    2016-07-10

    Deep-sea vesicomyid clams, including the genus Phreagena (formerly Calyptogena), harbor thioautotrophic bacterial symbionts in the host symbiosome, which consists of cytoplasmic vacuoles in gill epithelial cells called bacteriocytes. The symbiont requires inorganic carbon (Ci), such as CO2, HCO3(-), and CO3(2-), to synthesize organic compounds, which are utilized by the host clam. The dominant Ci in seawater is HCO3(-), which is impermeable to cell membranes. Within the bacteriocyte, cytoplasmic carbonic anhydrase (CA) from the host, which catalyzes the inter-conversion between CO2 and HCO3(-), has been shown to be abundant and is thought to supply intracellular CO2 to symbionts in the symbiosome. However, the mechanism of Ci uptake by the host gill from seawater is poorly understood. To elucidate the influx pathway of Ci into the bacteriocyte, we isolated the genes related to Ci uptake via the pyrosequencing of cDNA from the gill of Phreagena okutanii, and investigated their expression patterns. Using phylogenetic and amino acid sequence analyses, three solute carrier family 4 (SLC4) bicarbonate transporters (slc4co1, slc4co2, and slc4co4) and two membrane-associated CAs (mcaco1 and mcaco2) were identified as candidate genes for Ci uptake. In an in situ hybridization analysis of gill sections, the expression of mcaco1 and mcaco2 was detected in the bacteriocytes and asymbiotic non-ciliated cells, respectively, and the expression of slc4co1 and slc4co2 was detected in the asymbiotic cells, including the intermediate cells of the inner area and the non-ciliated cells of the external area. Although subcellular localizations of the products of these genes have not been fully elucidated, they may play an important role in the uptake of Ci into the bacteriocytes. These findings will improve our understanding of the Ci transport system in the symbiotic relationships of chemosynthetic bivalves. PMID:27016297

  14. Estimating the compensation irradiance in the ocean: The importance of accounting for non-photosynthetic uptake of inorganic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laws, Edward A.; Letelier, Ricardo M.; Karl, David M.

    2014-11-01

    The compensation irradiance, the irradiance at which net photosynthesis is zero over a 24-h period, was estimated at station ALOHA (22°45‧N, 158°W) from analysis of 14C uptake rates measured from 8 January 1989 to 13 June 1990 at depths ranging from 5 to 175 m. The estimates were made on the basis of linear regressions of the difference between light bottle and dark bottle 14C uptake in the light-limited region of the euphotic zone and determination of the depth at which the difference between the uptake rates was zero. About half of the non-photosynthetic 14C uptake at the compensation irradiance could be attributed to chemolithoautotrophy; the remainder was presumably due to anaplerotic processes. Deriving the compensation irradiance by extrapolating dawn-to-dawn light-bottle uptake above the compensation irradiance to zero resulted in underestimation of the compensation irradiance by a factor of 2. We estimated the compensation irradiance at station ALOHA to be 0.054 mol-photons m-2 d-1, about 0.11% of surface 400-700 nm radiation and 1% of surface 475-nm (blue) light.

  15. Effect of dissolved inorganic carbon on oxygen evolution and uptake by Chlamydomonas reinhardtii suspensions adapted to ambient and CO2-enriched air.

    PubMed

    Sültemeyer, D F; Klug, K; Fock, H P

    1987-01-01

    Mass spectrometric measurements of (16)O2 and (18)O2 isotopes were used to compare the rates of gross O2 evolution (E0), O2 uptake (U0) and net O2 evolution (NET) in relation to different concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) by Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells grown in air (air-grown), in air enriched with 5% CO2 (CO2-grown) and by cells grown in 5% CO2 and then adapted to air for 6h (air-adapted).At a photon fluence rate (PFR) saturating for photosynthesis (700 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)), pH=7.0 and 28°C, U0 equalled E0 at the DIC compensation point which was 10μM DIC for CO2-grown and zero for air-grown cells. Both E0 and U0 were strongly dependent on DIC and reached DIC saturation at 480 μM and 70 μM for CO2-grown and air-grown algae respectively. U0 increased from DIC compensation to DIC saturation. The U0 values were about 40 (CO2-grown), 165 (air-adapted) and 60 μmol O2 mg Chl(-1) h(-1) (air-grown). Above DIC compensation the U0/E0 ratios of air-adapted and air-grown algae were always higher than those of CO2-grown cells. These differences in O2 exchange between CO2- and air-grown algae seem to be inducable since air-adapted algae respond similarly to air-grown cells.For all algae, the rates of dark respiratory O2 uptake measured 5 min after darkening were considerably lower than the rates of O2 uptake just before darkening. The contribution of dark respiration, photorespiration and the Mehler reaction to U0 is discussed and the energy requirement of the inducable CO2/HCO3 (-) concentrating mechanism present in air-adapted and air-grown C. reinhardtii cells is considered. PMID:24435578

  16. Reactive uptake of N2O5 to internally mixed inorganic and organic particles: the role of organic carbon oxidation state and inferred organic phase separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaston, C. J.; Thornton, J. A.; Ng, N. L.

    2014-06-01

    We measured N2O5 reactive uptake onto mixed organic/inorganic submicron particles using organic compounds with a variety of oxidation states (using mainly atomic O : C ratios as a proxy) and molecular weights. The organic mass fraction, organic molecular composition, and relative humidity (RH) were varied to assess their effects separately on the N2O5 uptake coefficient, γ(N2O5). At a constant RH, mixtures of organic components having an O : C < 0.5 with ammonium bisulfate significantly suppressed the uptake of N2O5(g) compared to pure ammonium bisulfate, even at small organic mass fractions (e.g., ≤ 15%). The effect of the organic component became less pronounced at higher RH. In general, highly oxygenated organic components (O : C > 0.8) had a smaller or even negligible impact on N2O5(g) uptake at all RHs probed; however, a few exceptions were observed. Notably, γ(N2O5) for mixtures of ammonium bisulfate with polyethylene glycol (PEG), PEG-300 (O : C = 0.56), decreased nearly linearly as the PEG mass fraction increased at constant RH until leveling off at the value measured for pure PEG. The response of γ(N2O5) to increasing PEG mass fraction was similar to that measured on ambient atmospheric particles as a function of organic mass fraction. The effects of the organic mass fraction on γ(N2O5), for mixtures having an O : C < ~0.8, were best described using a standard resistor model of reactive uptake assuming the particles had an RH-dependent inorganic core-organic shell morphology. This model suggests that the N2O5 diffusivity and/or solubility in the organic layer is up to a factor of 20 lower compared to aqueous solution particles, and that the diffusivity, solubility, and reactivity of N2O5 within organic coatings and particles depend upon both RH and the molecular composition of the organic medium. We use these dependencies and ambient measurements of organic aerosol from the global aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) database to show that the typical

  17. Organic and inorganic nitrogen uptake in lichens.

    PubMed

    Dahlman, Lena; Persson, Jörgen; Palmqvist, Kristin; Näsholm, Torgny

    2004-07-01

    In order to learn more about nitrogen (N) acquisition in lichens, and to see whether different lichens differ in their affinity to various N sources, N uptake was measured in 14 various lichen associations ("species"). These species represented various morphologies (fruticose or foliose), contrasting microhabitat preferences (epiphytic or terricolous), and had green algal, cyanobacterial or both forms of photobionts. N was supplied under non-limiting conditions as an amino acid mixture, ammonium, or nitrate, using 15N to quantify uptake. Carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) was used to separate active and passive uptake. Thallus N, amino acids, soluble polyol concentrations, and the biont-specific markers chlorophyll a and ergosterol were quantified, aiming to test if these metabolites or markers were correlated with N uptake capacity. Ammonium uptake was significantly greater and to a higher extent passive, relative to the other two N sources. Nitrate uptake differed among lichen photobiont groups, cyanobacterial lichens having a lower uptake rate. All lichens had the capacity to assimilate amino acids, in many species at rates equal to nitrate uptake or even higher, suggesting that organic N compounds could potentially have an important role in the N nutrition of these organisms. There were no clear correlations between N uptake rates and any of the measured metabolites or markers. The relative uptake rates of ammonium, nitrate and amino acids were not related to morphology or microhabitat. PMID:15060826

  18. Bicarbonate uptake via an anion exchange protein is the main mechanism of inorganic carbon acquisition by the giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera (Laminariales, Phaeophyceae) under variable pH.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Pamela A; Hurd, Catriona L; Roleda, Michael Y

    2014-12-01

    Macrocystis pyrifera is a widely distributed, highly productive, seaweed. It is known to use bicarbonate (HCO3 (-) ) from seawater in photosynthesis and the main mechanism of utilization is attributed to the external catalyzed dehydration of HCO3 (-) by the surface-bound enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CAext ). Here, we examined other putative HCO3 (-) uptake mechanisms in M. pyrifera under pHT 9.00 (HCO3 (-) : CO2  = 940:1) and pHT 7.65 (HCO3 (-) : CO2  = 51:1). Rates of photosynthesis, and internal CA (CAint ) and CAext activity were measured following the application of AZ which inhibits CAext , and DIDS which inhibits a different HCO3 (-) uptake system, via an anion exchange (AE) protein. We found that the main mechanism of HCO3 (-) uptake by M. pyrifera is via an AE protein, regardless of the HCO3 (-) : CO2 ratio, with CAext making little contribution. Inhibiting the AE protein led to a 55%-65% decrease in photosynthetic rates. Inhibiting both the AE protein and CAext at pHT 9.00 led to 80%-100% inhibition of photosynthesis, whereas at pHT 7.65, passive CO2 diffusion supported 33% of photosynthesis. CAint was active at pHT 7.65 and 9.00, and activity was always higher than CAext , because of its role in dehydrating HCO3 (-) to supply CO2 to RuBisCO. Interestingly, the main mechanism of HCO3 (-) uptake in M. pyrifera was different than that in other Laminariales studied (CAext -catalyzed reaction) and we suggest that species-specific knowledge of carbon uptake mechanisms is required in order to elucidate how seaweeds might respond to future changes in HCO3 (-) :CO2 due to ocean acidification. PMID:26988782

  19. Inorganic carbon acquisition in some synurophyte algae.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Shabana; Colman, Brian

    2008-05-01

    Some characteristics of photosynthesis of three synurophyte algae, Synura petersenii, Synura uvella and Tessellaria volvocina were investigated to determine the mechanism of inorganic carbon (C(i)) uptake. All three species were found to have no external carbonic anhydrase, no capacity for direct bicarbonate uptake and a low whole-cell affinity for C(i). The internal pH of S. petersenii determined using (14)C-benzoic acid and [2-(14)C]-5,5-dimethyloxazolidine-2,4-dione was pH 7.0-7.5, over an external pH range of 5.0-7.5. Thus, the pH difference between the cell interior of S. petersenii and the external medium was large enough, over the alga's growth range, to allow the accumulation of C(i) by the diffusive uptake of CO(2). Monitoring O(2) evolution and CO(2) uptake by suspensions of S. petersenii at pH 7.0 by mass spectrometry did not indicate a rapid uptake of CO(2), and the final CO(2) compensation concentration reached was 24 +/- 0.7 microM. Furthermore, when the cells were darkened, a brief burst of CO(2) occurred before a steady rate of dark respiration was established, suggesting a loss of CO(2) by photorespiration. An examination of the kinetics of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in homogenates of cells of S. petersenii, S. uvella and Mallomonas papillosa showed that values of the K(m) (CO(2)) were 28.4, 41.8 and 18.2 microM, respectively. These species lack the characteristics of cells with a CO(2)-concentrating mechanism because the cell affinity for C(i) appears to be determined by the relatively high CO(2) affinity of the Rubisco of these algae. PMID:18298411

  20. Uptake of glyoxal by organic and Inorganic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Ashley L; Hanley, Sean W; De Haan, David O

    2008-06-15

    The uptake of glyoxal by a variety of organic and inorganic aerosol types was examined in a Teflon chamber. Rapid glyoxal uptake was observed for all liquid-phase aerosols at all relative humidity levels tested (< 5 to 50% RH). Even for aerosol with known water content, Henry's Law cannot predict glyoxal uptake: H* > (3 +/- 1.5) x 10(8) mol kg(-1) atm(-1) for l-tartaric acid, H* > (1 +/- 0.5) x 10(8) for dl-malic acid and H* = (2 +/- 1) x 10(7) for malonic acid aerosol. Other liquid-phase aerosol particles containing amine functional groups (arginine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid) took up even more glyoxal (H* > 3 x 10(8)). The trend of higher glyoxal uptake onto aerosol containing more nucleophilic organic compounds suggests that glyoxal is reacting with organic compounds in the aerosol phase. Solid-phase aerosol showed RH-dependent glyoxal uptake, likely due to the existence of surface water layers. However, particle growth rates were the highestfor sodium sulfate aerosol. For organic aerosol, growth rates correlated with the acidity of the carboxylic acid groups of the aerosol material, suggesting that glyoxal uptake is enhanced by mildly acidic conditions. PMID:18605566

  1. (Inorganic carbon surveys of oceanic basins)

    SciTech Connect

    Wilke, R.J.

    1991-04-25

    Measurements were made aboard the F. S. Meteor, along the 19 degree South cruise track of the following chemical parameters: total dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, pCO2, CFC-12, CFC-11, CFC-113, CC14. This was the first cruise of OASD's newly formed CO2 group. The purpose was to survey World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) line A9 for inorganic carbon for the Department of Energy's Office of CO2 Research. 1 fig.

  2. Ocean uptake of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Tsung-Hung ); Takahashi, Taro . Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory)

    1993-01-01

    Factors controlling the capacity of the ocean for taking up anthropogenic C0[sup 2] include carbon chemistry, distribution of alkalinity, pCO[sup 2] and total concentration of dissolved C0[sup 2], sea-air pCO[sup 2] difference, gas exchange rate across the sea-air interface, biological carbon pump, ocean water circulation and mixing, and dissolution of carbonate in deep sea sediments. A general review of these processes is given and models of ocean-atmosphere system based on our understanding of these regulating processes axe used to estimate the magnitude of C0[sup 2] uptake by the ocean. We conclude that the ocean can absorb up to 35% of the fossil fuel emission. Direct measurements show that 55% Of C0[sup 2] from fossil fuel burning remains in the atmosphere. The remaining 10% is not accounted for by atmospheric increases and ocean uptake. In addition, it is estimated that an amount equivalent to 30% of recent annual fossil fuel emissions is released into the atmosphere as a result of deforestation and farming. To balance global carbon budget, a sizable carbon sink besides the ocean is needed. Storage of carbon in terrestrial biosphere as a result of C0[sup 2] fertilization is a potential candidate for such missing carbon sinks.

  3. Ocean uptake of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Tsung-Hung; Takahashi, Taro

    1993-06-01

    Factors controlling the capacity of the ocean for taking up anthropogenic C0{sup 2} include carbon chemistry, distribution of alkalinity, pCO{sup 2} and total concentration of dissolved C0{sup 2}, sea-air pCO{sup 2} difference, gas exchange rate across the sea-air interface, biological carbon pump, ocean water circulation and mixing, and dissolution of carbonate in deep sea sediments. A general review of these processes is given and models of ocean-atmosphere system based on our understanding of these regulating processes axe used to estimate the magnitude of C0{sup 2} uptake by the ocean. We conclude that the ocean can absorb up to 35% of the fossil fuel emission. Direct measurements show that 55% Of C0{sup 2} from fossil fuel burning remains in the atmosphere. The remaining 10% is not accounted for by atmospheric increases and ocean uptake. In addition, it is estimated that an amount equivalent to 30% of recent annual fossil fuel emissions is released into the atmosphere as a result of deforestation and farming. To balance global carbon budget, a sizable carbon sink besides the ocean is needed. Storage of carbon in terrestrial biosphere as a result of C0{sup 2} fertilization is a potential candidate for such missing carbon sinks.

  4. Simulating the effects of light intensity and carbonate system composition on particulate organic and inorganic carbon production in Emiliania huxleyi.

    PubMed

    Holtz, Lena-Maria; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter; Thoms, Silke

    2015-05-01

    Coccolithophores play an important role in the marine carbon cycle. Variations in light intensity and external carbonate system composition alter intracellular carbon fluxes and therewith the production rates of particulate organic and inorganic carbon. Aiming to find a mechanistic explanation for the interrelation between dissolved inorganic carbon fluxes and particulate carbon production rates, we develop a numerical cell model for Emiliania huxleyi, one of the most abundant coccolithophore species. The model consists of four cellular compartments, for each of which the carbonate system is resolved dynamically. The compartments are connected to each other and to the external medium via substrate fluxes across the compartment-confining membranes. By means of the model we are able to explain several pattern observed in particulate organic and inorganic carbon production rates for different strains and under different acclimation conditions. Particulate organic and inorganic carbon production rates for instance decrease at very low external CO2 concentrations. Our model suggests that this effect is caused mainly by reduced HCO3(-) uptake rates, not by CO2 limitation. The often observed decrease in particulate inorganic carbon production rates under Ocean Acidification is explained by a downregulation of cellular HCO3(-) uptake. PMID:25747776

  5. Interactions between uptake of amino acids and inorganic nitrogen in wheat plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioseffi, E.; de Neergaard, A.; Schjoerring, J. K.

    2012-04-01

    Soil-borne amino acids may constitute a source of nitrogen (N) for plants in various terrestrial ecosystems but their importance for total N nutrition is unclear, particularly in nutrient-rich arable soils. One reason for this uncertainty is lack of information on how the absorption of amino acids by plant roots is affected by the simultaneous presence of inorganic N forms. The objective of the present study was to study absorption of glycine (Gly) and glutamine (Gln) by wheat roots and their interactions with nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+) during uptake. The underlying hypothesis was that amino acids, when present in nutrient solution together with inorganic N, may lead to down-regulation of the inorganic N uptake, thereby resulting in similar total N uptake rates. Amino acids were enriched with double-labelled 15N and 13C, while NO3- and NH4+ acquisition was determined by their rate of removal from the nutrient solution surrounding the roots. The uptake rates of NO3- and NH4+ did not differ from each other and were generally about twice as high as the uptake rate of organic N when the different N forms were supplied separately in concentrations of 2 mM. Nevertheless, replacement of 50% of the inorganic N with organic N was able to restore the N uptake to the same level as that in the presence of only inorganic N. Co-provision of NO3- did not affect glycine uptake, while the presence of glycine down-regulated NO3- uptake. The ratio between 13C and 15N were lower in shoots than in roots and also lower than the theoretical values, reflecting higher C losses via respiratory processes compared to N losses. It is concluded that organic N can constitute a significant N-source for wheat plants and that there is an interaction between the uptake of inorganic and organic N.

  6. Interactions between uptake of amino acids and inorganic nitrogen in wheat plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioseffi, E.; de Neergaard, A.; Schjoerring, J. K.

    2011-11-01

    Soil-borne amino acids may constitute a nitrogen (N) source for plants in various terrestrial ecosystems but their importance for total N nutrition is unclear, particularly in nutrient-rich arable soils. One reason for this uncertainty is lack of information on how the absorption of amino acids by plant roots is affected by the simultaneous presence of inorganic N forms. The objective of the present study was to study absorption of glycine (Gly) and glutamine (Gln) by wheat roots and their interactions with nitrate (NO3-) and (NH4+) during uptake. The underlying hypothesis was that amino acids, when present in nutrient solution together with inorganic N, may lead to down-regulation of the inorganic N uptake. Amino acids were enriched with double-labelled 15N and 13C, while NO3- and NH4+ acquisition was determined by their rate of removal from the nutrient solution surrounding the roots. The uptake rates of NO3- and NH4+ did not differ from each other and were about twice as high as the uptake rate of organic N when the different N forms were supplied separately in concentrations of 2 mM. Nevertheless, replacement of 50 % of the inorganic N with organic N was able to restore the N uptake to the same level as that in the presence of only inorganic N. Co-provision of NO3- did not affect glycine uptake, while the presence of glycine down-regulated NO3- uptake. The ratio between 13C and 15N were lower in shoots than in roots and also lower than the theoretical values, reflecting higher C losses via respiratory processes compared to N losses. It is concluded that organic N can constitute a significant N-source for wheat plants and that there is an interaction between the uptake of inorganic and organic nitrogen.

  7. Carbon dioxide removal with inorganic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, R.R.; Fain, D.E.

    1993-12-31

    The increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases, particularly carbon dioxide, in the atmosphere has sparked a great deal of interest in the removal of CO{sub 2} from flue gases of fossil fueled plants. Presently, several techniques for the removal of CO{sub 2} are considered to have potential, but are lacking in practicality. For example, amine scrubbing of flue gas streams is potential, but are lacking in practically. For example, amine scrubbing of flue gas streams is effective in removing CO{sub 2}, but costs are high; efficiency suffers; and other acid gases must be removed prior to amine stripping. Membrane systems for CO{sub 2} removal are held in high regard, and inorganic, particularly ceramic, membranes offer the potential for high temperature, thus energy saving, removal.

  8. In situ spectrophotometric measurement of dissolved inorganic carbon in seawater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liua, Xuewu; Byrne, Robert H.; Adornato, Lori; Yates, Kimberly K.; Kaltenbacher, Eric; Ding, Xiaoling; Yang, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Autonomous in situ sensors are needed to document the effects of today’s rapid ocean uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide (e.g., ocean acidification). General environmental conditions (e.g., biofouling, turbidity) and carbon-specific conditions (e.g., wide diel variations) present significant challenges to acquiring long-term measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) with satisfactory accuracy and resolution. SEAS-DIC is a new in situ instrument designed to provide calibrated, high-frequency, long-term measurements of DIC in marine and fresh waters. Sample water is first acidified to convert all DIC to carbon dioxide (CO2). The sample and a known reagent solution are then equilibrated across a gas-permeable membrane. Spectrophotometric measurement of reagent pH can thereby determine the sample DIC over a wide dynamic range, with inherent calibration provided by the pH indicator’s molecular characteristics. Field trials indicate that SEAS-DIC performs well in biofouling and turbid waters, with a DIC accuracy and precision of ∼2 μmol kg–1 and a measurement rate of approximately once per minute. The acidic reagent protects the sensor cell from biofouling, and the gas-permeable membrane excludes particulates from the optical path. This instrument, the first spectrophotometric system capable of automated in situ DIC measurements, positions DIC to become a key parameter for in situ CO2-system characterizations.

  9. Analytical electron microscopy of biogenic and inorganic carbonates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F.

    1989-01-01

    In the terrestrial sedimentary environment, the mineralogically predominant carbonates are calcite-type minerals (rhombohedral carbonates) and aragonite-type minerals (orthorhombic carbonates). Most common minerals precipitating either inorganically or biogenically are high magnesium calcite and aragonite. High magnesium calcite (with magnesium carbonate substituting for more than 7 mole percent of the calcium carbonate) is stable only at temperatures greater than 700 C or thereabouts, and aragonite is stable only at pressures exceeding several kilobars of confining pressure. Therefore, these carbonates are expected to undergo chemical stabilization in the diagenetic environment to ultimately form stable calcite and dolomite. Because of the strong organic control of carbonate deposition in organisms during biomineralization, the microchemistry and microstructure of invertebrate skeletal material is much different than that present in inorganic carbonate cements. The style of preservation of microstructural features in skeletal material is therefore often quite distinctive when compared to that of inorganic carbonate even though wholesale recrystallization of the sediment has taken place. Microstructural and microchemical comparisons are made between high magnesium calcite echinoderm skeletal material and modern inorganic high magnesium calcite inorganic cements, using analytical electron microscopy and related techniques. Similar comparisons are made between analogous materials which have undergone stabilization in the diagenetic environment. Similar analysis schemes may prove useful in distinguishing between biogenic and inorganic carbonates in returned Martian carbonate samples.

  10. Storage of Organic and Inorganic Carbon in Human Settlements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churkina, G.

    2009-12-01

    It has been shown that urban areas have carbon density comparable with tropical forest. Carbon density of urban areas may be even higher, because the density of organic carbon only was taking into account. Human settlements store carbon in two forms such as organic and inorganic. Carbon is stored in organic form in living biomass such as trees, grasses or in artifacts derived from biomass such as wooden furniture, building structures, paper, clothes and shoes made from natural materials. Inorganic carbon or fossil carbon, meanwhile, is primarily stored in objects fabricated by people like concrete, plastic, asphalt, and bricks. The key difference between organic and inorganic forms of carbon is how they return to the gaseous state. Organic carbon can be returned to the atmosphere without applying additional artificial energy through decomposition of organic matter, whereas energy input such as burning is needed to release inorganic carbon. In this study I compare inorganic with organic carbon storage, discuss their carbon residence time, decomposition rates, and possible implications for carbon emissions.

  11. Autonomous Sensing of Particulate Inorganic Carbon Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, G. A.; Bishop, J. K.; Strubhar, W. D.; Wood, T.

    2011-12-01

    Particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) is produced by coccolithophore phytoplankton and shelled foraminifera and pterpod microzooplankton. These calcite and aragonite particles contribute to excess density of aggregate particles enabling carbon export from surface waters; they are sensitive to the effects of ocean acidification. Concentrations in surface waters range from below 100 nM in oligotrophic waters to 40 uM in the North Atlantic. Very limited ship observations in the Oyashio and subarctic NE Pacific show short term PIC variability of more than one order of magitude over 10 days and 3 months, respectively. At depth concentrations can drop to near zero in waters deeper than the carbonate saturation horizon. Seasonal variations of a factor of two or more at 1000 m depth have been observed. Near surface variability is impossible to follow from ships. We are working on the development of a robust PIC sensor capable of deployment on platforms ranging from CTD's to floats and thus address the gap in observations. The sensor, which uses cross polarized optics, detects the photons that have interacted with birefringent minerals (of which calcite dominates) in the water column. The detection of this very weak signal - which can be 10-6 of the primary beam energy is a daunting task. Here we report results from incomparison deployments of a 'next gen' and prototype sensor during recent expeditions to California coastal and offshore waters (NE Pacific Gyre, Santa Barbara Basin (June 2009); Santa Catalina Basin (October 2010), Santa Cruz Basin (May 2011), California Current and Coastal Waters (July 2011; September 2011). In addition we report calibrations the sensors based on particulate samples filtered from 1L samples and analyzed by HR-ICP-MS.

  12. Lack of Control in Inorganic Phosphate Uptake by Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don Cells (Cytoplasmic Inorganic Phosphate Homeostasis Depends on the Tonoplast Inorganic Phosphate Transport System?).

    PubMed Central

    Sakano, K.; Yazaki, Y.; Okihara, K.; Mimura, T.; Kiyota, S.

    1995-01-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) uptake by Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don cells was studied in relation to its apparent uncontrolled uptake using 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Kinetics of Pi uptake by the cells indicated that apparent Km and Vm were about 7 [mu]M and 20 [mu]mol g-1 fresh weight h-1, respectively. Pi uptake in Murashige-Skoog medium under different Pi concentrations and different initial cell densities followed basically the same kinetics. When supplied with abundant Pi, cells absorbed Pi at a constant rate (Vm) for the first hours and accumulated it in the vacuole. As the endogenous pool expanded, the rate of Pi uptake gradually decreased to nil. Maximum Pi accumulation was 100 to 120 [mu]mol g-1 fresh weight if cell swelling during Pi uptake (about 2-fold in cell volume) was not considered. Results indicated that (a) the rate of Pi uptake by Catharanthus cells was independent of initial cell density and was constant over a wide range of Pi concentrations (2 mM to about 10 [mu]M) unless the cells were preloaded with excess Pi, and (b) there was no apparent feedback control over the Pi uptake process in the plasma membrane to avoid Pi toxicity. The importance of the tonoplast Pi transport system in cytoplasmic Pi homeostasis is discussed. PMID:12228474

  13. Inorganic Carbon Limitation and Chemical Composition of Two Freshwater Green Microalgae †

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Joel C.; Graham, Stephen J.

    1981-01-01

    Two freshwater chlorophytes, Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus obliquus, were grown in inorganic carbon-limited continuous cultures in which HCO3− was the sole source of inorganic carbon. The response of the steady-state growth rate to the external total inorganic carbon concentration was reasonably well described by the Monod equation; however, the response to the internal nutrient concentration was only moderately well represented by the Droop equation when the internal carbon concentration was defined on a cellular basis. The Droop equation was totally inapplicable when total biomass (dry weight) was used to define internal carbon because the ratio of carbon to dry weight did not vary over the entire growth rate spectrum. In batch cultures, maximum growth rates were achieved at the CO2 levels present in atmospheric air and at HCO3− concentrations of 3 mM. No growth was observed at 100% CO2. Both nitrogen uptake and chlorophyll synthesis were tightly coupled to carbon assimilation, as indicated by the constant C/N and C/chlorophyll ratios found at all growth rates. The main influence of inorganic carbon limitation appears to be not on the chemical structure of the biomass, but rather on cell size; higher steady-state growth rates lead to bigger cells. PMID:16345701

  14. Inorganic carbon limitation and chemical composition of two freshwater green microalgae

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, J.C.; Graham, S.J.

    1981-01-01

    Two freshwater Chlorophytes, Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus obliquus, were grown in inorganic carbon-limited continuous cultures in which HCO/sub 3//sup -/ was the sole source of inorganic carbon. The response of the steady-state growth rate to the external total inorganic carbon concentration was reasonably well described by the Monod equation; however, the response to the internal nutrient concentration was only moderately well represented by the Droop equation when the internal carbon concentration was defined on a cellular basis. The Droop equation was totally inapplicable when total biomass (dry weight) was used to define internal carbon because the ratio of carbon to dry weight did not vary over the entire growth rate spectrum. In batch cultures, maximum growth rates were achieved at the CO/sub 2/ levels present in atmospheric air and at HCO/sub 3//sup -/ concentrations of 3 mM. No growth was observed at 100% CO/sub 2/. Both nitrogen uptake and chlorophyll synthesis were tightly coupled to carbon assimilation, as indicated by the constant C/N and C/chlorophyll ratios found at all growth rates. The main influence of inorganic carbon limitation appears to be not on the chemical structure of the biomass, but rather on cell size; higher steady-state growth rates lead to bigger cells.

  15. Gravimetric Determination of Inorganic Carbon in Calcareous Soils Using the Carbonate-Meter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic carbon affects many important physical, chemical and microbiological soil properties. In calcareous soils, the inorganic carbon has to be measured and subtracted from the total carbon to obtain organic carbon. Our objective was to develop a gravimetric technique to quantify inorganic carbon ...

  16. Incorporation of inorganic carbon by Antarctic cryptoendolithic fungi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, R. J. Jr; Friedmann, E. I.

    1988-01-01

    Fungi isolated from the cryptoendolithic community of the Ross Desert are capable of fixing inorganic carbon. Results suggest that lichen mycobionts and parasymbionts are adapted to different water regimes in the cryptoendolithic environment.

  17. COMPARISON OF METHODS FOR DETERMINATION OF DISSOLVED INORGANIC CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation reviews several approaches for determining dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in drinking water. xperimental studies compared the accuracy and precision of DIC determination obtained by either direct analysis using a coulometric titration technique, or by comutatio...

  18. 75 FR 29534 - Inorganic Nitrates-Nitrite, Carbon and Carbon Dioxide, and Sulfur Registration Review; Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ... AGENCY Inorganic Nitrates-Nitrite, Carbon and Carbon Dioxide, and Sulfur Registration Review; Draft... draft ecological risk assessment for the registration review of inorganic nitrates - nitrites, carbon and carbon dioxide, and gas cartridge uses of sulfur, and opens a public comment period on...

  19. Coupled transformation of inorganic stable carbon-13 and nitrogen-15 isotopes into higher trophic levels in a eutrophic shallow lake

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    Enclosure and bag experiments were done in a eutrophic shallow lake with simultaneous use of inorganic /sup 13/C and /sup 15/N isotopes. It was demonstrated that coupled transformation of inorganic carbon and nitrogen can occur into herbivorous zooplankton through phytoplankton. Direct evidence is provided that there is an apparent coupling between photosynthesis and organic nitrogen uptake by phytoplankton during daytime under natural conditions and that the coupling occurs at a constant ratio.

  20. Uptake of inorganic phosphate is a limiting factor for Saccharomyces cerevisiae during growth at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Vicent, Isabel; Navarro, Alfonso; Mulet, Jose M; Sharma, Sukesh; Serrano, Ramón

    2015-05-01

    The fermenting ability of Saccharomyces at low temperatures is crucial for the development of alcoholic beverages, but the key factors for the cold tolerance of yeast are not well known. In this report, we present the results of a screening for genes able to confer cold tolerance by overexpression in a laboratory yeast strain auxotrophic for tryptophan. We identified genes of tryptophan permeases (TAT1 and TAT2), suggesting that the first limiting factor in the growth of tryptophan auxotrophic yeast at low temperatures is tryptophan uptake. This fact is of little relevance to industrial strains which are prototrophic for tryptophan. Then, we screened for genes able to confer growth at low temperatures in tryptophan-rich media and found several genes related to phosphate uptake (PHO84, PHO87, PHO90 and GTR1). This suggests that without tryptophan limitation, uptake of inorganic phosphate becomes the limiting factor. We have found that overexpression of the previously uncharacterized ORF YCR015c/CTO1 increases the uptake of inorganic phosphate. Also, genes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis (NSG2) cause improvement of growth at 10°C, dependent on tryptophan uptake, while the gluconeogenesis gene PCK1 and the proline biosynthesis gene PRO2 cause an improvement in growth at 10°C, independent of tryptophan and phosphate uptake. PMID:25725023

  1. Polyamine Uptake, Kinetics, and Competition among Polyamines and between Polyamines and Inorganic Cations.

    PubMed

    Pistocchi, R; Bagni, N; Creus, J A

    1986-02-01

    Polyamine uptake, the kinetics of this uptake, and the competition among polyamines and between polyamines and inorganic cations were studied in petals of Saintpaulia ionantha Wendl. Uptake experiments using (14)C-labeled polyamines were carried out on single petals, at room temperaure (20 degrees C) and in the light. The results show that putrescine, spermidine, and spermine uptake was dependent on the external pH and occurred up to high external polyamine concentrations with K(m) values of 8.6, 1.2, and 2.1 millimolar, respectively, with spermidine being the most absorbed at low concentration (17 micromolar). Putrescine and spermidine did not seem to compete for the same site of absorption. Furthermore, putrescine and spermidine uptake was not inhibited by Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and K(+) at the same concentrations (17 micromolar), whereas 1.7 millimolar Ca(2+) inhibited and K(+) enhanced spermidine uptake. The intracellular localization of the absorbed putrescine was determined using two different methods. Very little label was found in the apoplast, while most of it was localized in the 98,500g supernatant. According to our data the vacuole, which represents a substantial part of Saintpaulia parenchyma cells, could be a site of putrescine accumulation. 2,4-Dinitrophenol and diethylstilbestrol did not inhibit uptake; however, at 0 degrees C there was a 35% inhibition of spermidine uptake, compared with the controls kept at 20 degrees C as well as a 68% inhibition with 20 millimolar NaSCN. PMID:16664661

  2. Elevated CO2 increases plant uptake of organic and inorganic N in the desert shrub Larrea tridentata.

    PubMed

    Jin, Virginia L; Evans, R D

    2010-05-01

    Resource limitations, such as the availability of soil nitrogen (N), are expected to constrain continued increases in plant productivity under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)). One potential but under-studied N source for supporting increased plant growth under elevated CO(2) is soil organic N. In arid ecosystems, there have been no studies examining plant organic N uptake to date. To assess the potential effects of elevated atmospheric CO(2) on plant N uptake dynamics, we quantified plant uptake of organic and inorganic N forms in the dominant desert shrub Larrea tridentata under controlled environmental conditions. Seedlings of L. tridentata were grown in the Mojave Desert (NV, USA) soils that had been continuously exposed to ambient or elevated atmospheric CO(2) for 8 years at the Nevada Desert FACE Facility. After 6 months of growth in environmentally controlled chambers under ambient (380 micromol mol(-1)) or elevated (600 micromol mol(-1)) CO(2), pots were injected with stable isotopically labeled sole-N sources ((13)C-[2]-(15)N glycine, (15)NH(4) (+), or (15)NO(3) (-)) and moved back to their respective chambers for the remainder of the study. Plants were destructively harvested at 0, 2, 10, 24, and 49 days. Plant uptake of soil N derived from glycine, NH(4) (+), and NO(3) (-) increased under elevated CO(2) at days 2 and 10. Further, root uptake of organic N as glycine occurred as intact amino acid within the first hour after N treatment, indicated by approximately 1:1 M enrichment ratios of (13)C:(15)N. Plant N uptake responses to elevated CO(2) are often species-specific and could potentially shift competitive interactions between co-occurring species. Thus, physiological changes in root N uptake dynamics coupled with previously observed changes in the availability of soil N resources could impact plant community structure as well as ecosystem nutrient cycling under increasing atmospheric CO(2) levels in the Mojave Desert. PMID:20094733

  3. Solute-specific scaling of inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus uptake in streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, R. O., Jr.; Baker, M. A.; Rosi-Marshall, E. J.; Tank, J. L.; Newbold, J. D.

    2013-11-01

    Stream ecosystem processes such as nutrient cycling may vary with stream position in the network. Using a scaling approach, we examined the relationship between stream size and nutrient uptake length, which represents the mean distance that a dissolved solute travels prior to removal from the water column. Ammonium (NH4+) uptake length increased proportionally with stream size measured as specific discharge (discharge/stream width) with a scaling exponent = 1.01. In contrast, uptake lengths for nitrate (NO3-) and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) increased more rapidly than increases in specific discharge (scaling exponents = 1.19 for NO3- and 1.35 for SRP). Additionally, the ratio of inorganic nitrogen (N) uptake length to SRP uptake length declined with stream size; there was relatively lower demand for SRP compared to N as stream size increased. Finally, we related the scaling of uptake length with specific discharge to that of stream length using Hack's law and downstream hydraulic geometry. Ammonium uptake length increased less than proportionally with distance from the headwaters, suggesting a strong role for larger streams and rivers in regulating nutrient transport.

  4. Coastal-ocean uptake of anthropogenic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, Timothée; Orr, James C.; Resplandy, Laure; Terhaar, Jens; Ethé, Christian; Gehlen, Marion; Bopp, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    Anthropogenic changes in atmosphere-ocean and atmosphere-land CO2 fluxes have been quantified extensively, but few studies have addressed the connection between land and ocean. In this transition zone, the coastal ocean, spatial and temporal data coverage is inadequate to assess its global budget. Thus we use a global ocean biogeochemical model to assess the coastal ocean's global inventory of anthropogenic CO2 and its spatial variability. We used an intermediate resolution, eddying version of the NEMO-PISCES model (ORCA05), varying from 20 to 50 km horizontally, i.e. coarse enough to allow multiple century-scale simulations but finer than coarse-resolution models (˜ 200 km) to better resolve coastal bathymetry and complex coastal currents. Here we define the coastal zone as the continental shelf area, excluding the proximal zone. Evaluation of the simulated air-sea fluxes of total CO2 for 45 coastal regions gave a correlation coefficient R of 0.8 when compared to observation-based estimates. Simulated global uptake of anthropogenic carbon results averaged 2.3 Pg C yr-1 during the years 1993-2012, consistent with previous estimates. Yet only 0.1 Pg C yr-1 of that is absorbed by the global coastal ocean. That represents 4.5 % of the anthropogenic carbon uptake of the global ocean, less than the 7.5 % proportion of coastal-to-global-ocean surface areas. Coastal uptake is weakened due to a bottleneck in offshore transport, which is inadequate to reduce the mean anthropogenic carbon concentration of coastal waters to the mean level found in the open-ocean mixed layer.

  5. Influence of Cd, Co, and Zn on inorganic carbon acquisition and carbon metabolism in Emiliania huxleyi.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, J. N.; Boye, M.; De La Broise, D.; Probert, I.

    2014-12-01

    Trace elements are essential micronutrients for primary producers; hence they influence the global carbon cycle and contribute to the regulation of Earth's climate. Over the past 25 years, the influence of Fe concentration on phytoplankton production has been well studied and this research has been instrumental in our understanding of the influence that biology has on the sequestration of atmospheric CO2. However, other trace elements that are directly involved in carbon metabolism by primary producers, such as Zn, Cd, and Co, have received less attention. We examined the physiological response of two strains of Emiliania huxleyi to a range of realistic trace element concentrations (Zn, Cd, Co) in the marine environment under batch, semi-continuous, and continuous culture conditions. In addition, the continuous culture system was maintained at a pH of 8.15 ±0.02 by a sensor and regulator-controlled CO2­ injection system. The results from this study will highlight the influence that trace element composition of seawater has on the growth rate, elemental quota, inorganic carbon uptake, and carbon metabolism of Emiliania huxleyi. Potential limitations for the interpretation of paleo-productivity records will be discussed.

  6. Significant fraction of CO2 emissions from boreal lakes derived from hydrologic inorganic carbon inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.; Kosten, Sarian; Wallin, Marcus B.; Tranvik, Lars J.; Jeppesen, Erik; Roland, Fabio

    2015-12-01

    Annual CO2 emissions from lakes and other inland waters into the atmosphere are estimated to almost entirely compensate the total annual carbon uptake by oceans. CO2 supersaturation in lakes, which results in CO2 emissions, is frequently attributed to CO2 produced within the lake. However, lateral inorganic carbon flux through watersheds can also be sizeable. Here we calculated lake surface water CO2 concentrations and emissions using lake pH, alkalinity and temperature from a compilation of data from 5,118 boreal lakes. Autumn surface water CO2 concentrations and CO2 emissions from the 5,118 lakes co-varied with lake internal autumn CO2 production. However, using a mass balance approach we found that CO2 emission in the majority of lakes was sustained by inorganic carbon loading from the catchment rather than by internal CO2 production. Small lakes with high dissolved organic carbon and phosphorus concentrations, shorter retention times and longer ice-free seasons had the highest CO2 concentrations. CO2 emissions from these small lakes was twice that of comparable lakes in colder regions, and similar to emissions from subtropical and tropical lakes. We conclude that changes in land use and climate that increase dissolved inorganic carbon may cause emission levels from boreal lakes to approach those of lakes in warmer regions.

  7. Contributing factors in foliar uptake of dissolved inorganic nitrogen at leaf level.

    PubMed

    Wuyts, Karen; Adriaenssens, Sandy; Staelens, Jeroen; Wuytack, Tatiana; Van Wittenberghe, Shari; Boeckx, Pascal; Samson, Roeland; Verheyen, Kris

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the influence of leaf traits, rainwater chemistry, and pedospheric nitrogen (N) fertilisation on the aqueous uptake of inorganic N by physiologically active tree leaves. Leaves of juvenile silver birch and European beech trees, supplied with NH₄NO₃ to the soil at rates from 0 to 200 kg N ha(-1)y(-1), were individually exposed to 100 μl of artificial rainwater containing (15)NH₄(+) or (15)NO₃(-) at two concentration levels for one hour. In the next vegetative period, the experiment was repeated with NH₄(+) at the highest concentration only. The N form and the N concentration in the applied rainwater and, to a lesser extent, the pedospheric N treatment and the leaf traits affected the aqueous foliar N uptake. The foliar uptake of NH₄(+) by birch increased when leaves were more wettable. High leaf N concentration and leaf mass per area enhanced the foliar N uptake, and NO₃(-) uptake in particular, by birch. Variation in the foliar N uptake by the beech trees could not be explained by the leaf traits considered. In the first experiment, N fertilisation stimulated the foliar N uptake in both species, which was on average 1.42-1.78 times higher at the highest soil N dose than at the zero dose. However, data variability was high and the effect was not appreciable in the second experiment. Our data suggest that next to rainwater chemistry (N form and concentration) also forest N status could play a role in the partitioning of N entering the ecosystem through the soil and the canopy. Models of canopy uptake of aqueous N at the leaf level should take account of leaf traits such as wettability and N concentration. PMID:25461099

  8. Isotopic fractionation during the uptake and elimination of inorganic mercury by a marine fish.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the mass dependent (MDF) and independent fractionation (MIF) of stable mercury isotopes in fish during the uptake and elimination of inorganic species. Mercury accumulation during the exposure led to re-equilibration of organ isotopic compositions with the external sources, and elimination terminated the equilibrating with isotope ratios moving back to the original values. Generally, the isotopic behaviors corresponded to the changes of Hg accumulation in the muscle and liver, causing by the internal transportation, organ redistribution, and mixing of different sources. A small degree of MDF caused by biotransformation of Hg in the liver was documented during the elimination, whereas MIF was not observed. The absence of MIF during geochemical and metabolic processes suggested that mercury isotopes can be used as source tracers. Additionally, fish liver is a more responsive organ than muscle to track Hg source when it is mainly composed of inorganic species. PMID:26184584

  9. Carbon uptake by karsts in the Houzhai Basin, southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Junhua; Wang, Y. P.; Zhou, Guoyi; Li, Shenggong; Yu, Guirui; Li, Kun

    2011-12-01

    Using an estimated bicarbonate concentration ([HCO3-]) in water and discharge rates of surface water and underground water from the Houzhai Basin, southwest China, from 1986 to 2007, we estimate that the mean carbon uptake rate was 20.7 g C m-2 yr-1. The surface water and underground water contribute about equally to the total carbon uptake from 1986 to 2007. About 97% of the interannual variation of annual carbon uptake can be explained by the discharge rate. Within a year, the net carbon uptake rate by karst during the wet season (May-October) was found to be about 2.4 times that during the dry season (November-April). If the seasonal variations of discharge rate and bicarbonate concentrations are not accounted for, estimates of annual net carbon uptake by karst can be biased by >25%, but that bias becomes very small (<5%) when averaged from 1986 to 2007 for the Houzhai Basin. We also found that one of the empirical models as used in global modeling overestimated the net carbon uptake by karst at Houzhai Basin by 29%. Carbon uptake from chemical weathering of all karsts in China is estimated to be about 12 Tg C yr-1 at present (1 Tg = 1012 g), or about 57% of the rate of net carbon accumulated in the forest biomass from 1981 to 1998 in China; we therefore recommend the inclusion of carbon uptake from chemical weathering in the regional carbon budget of China.

  10. Contribution of fish to the marine inorganic carbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Wilson, R W; Millero, F J; Taylor, J R; Walsh, P J; Christensen, V; Jennings, S; Grosell, M

    2009-01-16

    Oceanic production of calcium carbonate is conventionally attributed to marine plankton (coccolithophores and foraminifera). Here we report that marine fish produce precipitated carbonates within their intestines and excrete these at high rates. When combined with estimates of global fish biomass, this suggests that marine fish contribute 3 to 15% of total oceanic carbonate production. Fish carbonates have a higher magnesium content and solubility than traditional sources, yielding faster dissolution with depth. This may explain up to a quarter of the increase in titratable alkalinity within 1000 meters of the ocean surface, a controversial phenomenon that has puzzled oceanographers for decades. We also predict that fish carbonate production may rise in response to future environmental changes in carbon dioxide, and thus become an increasingly important component of the inorganic carbon cycle. PMID:19150840

  11. Water uptake of multicomponent organic mixtures and their influence on hygroscopicity of inorganic salts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Jing, Bo; Guo, Yucong; Li, Junling; Tong, Shengrui; Zhang, Yunhong; Ge, Maofa

    2016-07-01

    The hygroscopic behaviors of atmospherically relevant multicomponent water soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) and their effects on ammonium sulfate (AS) and sodium chloride were investigated using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) in the relative humidity (RH) range of 5%-90%. The measured hygroscopic growth was compared with predictions from the Extended-Aerosol Inorganics Model (E-AIM) and Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) method. The equal mass multicomponent WSOCs mixture containing levoglucosan, succinic acid, phthalic acid and humic acid showed gradual water uptake without obvious phase change over the whole RH range. It was found that the organic content played an important role in the water uptake of mixed particles. When organic content was dominant in the mixture (75%), the measured hygroscopic growth was higher than predictions from the E-AIM or ZSR relation, especially under high RH conditions. For mass fractions of organics not larger than 50%, the hygroscopic growth of mixtures was in good agreement with model predictions. The influence of interactions between inorganic and organic components on the hygroscopicity of mixed particles was related to the salt type and organic content. These results could contribute to understanding of the hygroscopic behaviors of multicomponent aerosol particles. PMID:27372129

  12. Conversion of Elemental Substances and Inorganic Compounds to Carbon Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutsenko, V. G.

    Chlorinated derivatives of methane were used for conversion of Si, Ge, Ti, Sn, Fe, SiC, GaSb, FeSi, and ZrN to microporous nanocarbons. The conversion represents the substitution of non-carbon atoms in the lattice by carbon atoms at 500-1100°C. Carbon nanofibers were produced from SiC whiskers, using both chlorine and chlorinated methane derivatives. The chlorination and the properties of the nanofibers were found to depend on the twinning and inversion of the type of SiC conductivity. We observed the formation of nanocrystalline diamond-like carbon. The conversion of carbides and other inorganic substances to carbon nanostructures was possible in the treatment with chlorinated methane derivatives.

  13. Uptake dynamics of inorganic mercury and methylmercury by the earthworm Pheretima guillemi.

    PubMed

    Dang, Fei; Zhao, Jie; Zhou, Dongmei

    2016-02-01

    Mercury uptake dynamics in the earthworm Pheretima guillemi, including the dissolved uptake rate constant (ku) from pore-water and assimilation efficiencies (AEs) from mercury-contaminated soil, was quantified in this study. Dissolved uptake rate constants were 0.087 and 0.553 L g(-1) d(-1) for inorganic mercury (IHg) and methylmercury (MeHg), respectively. Assimilation efficiency of IHg in field-contaminated soil was 7.2%, lower than 15.4% of spiked soil. In contrast, MeHg exhibited comparable AEs for both field-contaminated and spiked soil (82.4-87.2%). Within the framework of biodynamic model, we further modelled the exposure pathways (dissolved exposure vs soil ingestion) to source the accumulated mercury in Pheretima guillemi. The model showed that the relative importance of soil ingestion to mercury bioaccumulation depended largely on mercury partitioning coefficients (K(d)), and was also influenced by soil ingestion rate of earthworms. In the examined field-contaminated soil, almost (>99%) accumulated IHg and MeHg was predicted to derive from soil ingestion. Therefore, soil ingestion should be carefully considered when assessing mercury exposure risk to earthworms. PMID:26583294

  14. Sodium-dependent uptake of inorganic phosphate by the intracellular malaria parasite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliba, Kevin J.; Martin, Rowena E.; Bröer, Angelika; Henry, Roselani I.; Siobhan McCarthy, C.; Downie, Megan J.; Allen, Richard J. W.; Mullin, Kylie A.; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Bröer, Stefan; Kirk, Kiaran

    2006-10-01

    As the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, grows within its host erythrocyte it induces an increase in the permeability of the erythrocyte membrane to a range of low-molecular-mass solutes, including Na+ and K+ (ref. 1). This results in a progressive increase in the concentration of Na+ in the erythrocyte cytosol. The parasite cytosol has a relatively low Na+ concentration and there is therefore a large inward Na+ gradient across the parasite plasma membrane. Here we show that the parasite exploits the Na+ electrochemical gradient to energize the uptake of inorganic phosphate (Pi), an essential nutrient. Pi was taken up into the intracellular parasite by a Na+-dependent transporter, with a stoichiometry of 2Na+:1Pi and with an apparent preference for the monovalent over the divalent form of Pi. A Pi transporter (PfPiT) belonging to the PiT family was cloned from the parasite and localized to the parasite surface. Expression of PfPiT in Xenopus oocytes resulted in Na+-dependent Pi uptake with characteristics similar to those observed for Pi uptake in the parasite. This study provides new insight into the significance of the malaria-parasite-induced alteration of the ionic composition of its host cell.

  15. Evidence for an Inorganic Carbon-Concentrating Mechanism in the Symbiotic Dinoflagellate Symbiodinium sp.1

    PubMed Central

    Leggat, William; Badger, Murray R.; Yellowlees, David

    1999-01-01

    The presence of a carbon-concentrating mechanism in the symbiotic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium sp. was investigated. Its existence was postulated to explain how these algae fix inorganic carbon (Ci) efficiently despite the presence of a form II Rubisco. When the dinoflagellates were isolated from their host, the giant clam (Tridacna gigas), CO2 uptake was found to support the majority of net photosynthesis (45%–80%) at pH 8.0; however, 2 d after isolation this decreased to 5% to 65%, with HCO3− uptake supporting 35% to 95% of net photosynthesis. Measurements of intracellular Ci concentrations showed that levels inside the cell were between two and seven times what would be expected from passive diffusion of Ci into the cell. Symbiodinium also exhibits a distinct light-activated intracellular carbonic anhydrase activity. This, coupled with elevated intracellular Ci and the ability to utilize both CO2 and HCO3− from the medium, suggests that Symbiodinium sp. does possess a carbon-concentrating mechanism. However, intracellular Ci levels are not as large as might be expected of an alga utilizing a form II Rubisco with a poor affinity for CO2. PMID:10594111

  16. Bony fish and their contribution to marine inorganic carbon cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, Michael; Perry, Chris; Wilson, Rod; Harborne, Alistair

    2016-04-01

    Conventional understanding of the marine inorganic carbon cycle holds that CaCO3 (mostly as low Mg-calcite and aragonite) precipitates in the upper reaches of the ocean and sinks to a point where it either dissolves or is deposited as sediment. Thus, it plays a key role controlling the distribution of DIC in the oceans and in regulating their capacity to absorb atmospheric CO2. However, several aspects of this cycle remain poorly understood and have long perplexed oceanographers, such as the positive alkalinity anomaly observed in the upper water column of many of the world's oceans, above the aragonite and calcite saturation horizons. This anomaly would be explained by extensive dissolution of a carbonate phase more soluble than low Mg-calcite or aragonite, but major sources for such phases remain elusive. Here we highlight marine bony fish as a potentially important primary source of this 'missing' high-solubility CaCO3. Precipitation of CaCO3 takes place within the intestines of all marine bony fish as part of their normal physiological functioning, and global production models suggest it could account for up to 45 % of total new marine CaCO3 production. Moreover, high Mg-calcite containing >25 % mol% MgCO3 - a more soluble phase than aragonite - is a major component of these precipitates. Thus, fish CaCO3 may at least partially explain the alkalinity anomaly in the upper water column. However, the issue is complicated by the fact that carbonate mineralogy actually varies among fish species, with high Mg-calcite (HMC), low Mg-calcite (LMC), aragonite, and amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) all being common products. Using data from 22 Caribbean fish species, we have generated a novel production model that resolves phase proportions. We evaluate the preservation/dissolution potential of these phases and consider potential implications for marine inorganic carbon cycling. In addition, we consider the dramatic changes in fish biomass structure that have resulted

  17. Inorganic carbon parameters responding to summer hypoxia outside the Changjiang Estuary and the related implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Chen, Jianfang; Jin, Haiyan; Li, Hongliang; Xu, Jie

    2013-12-01

    The eutrophication, hypoxia and coastal acidification are attracting more and more attention. In this study, inorganic carbon parameters, including dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total alkalinity (TA) and calculated partial pressure of CO2 ( pCO2), obtained from a summer cruise in August, 2009, were used to investigate their integrated response to biological processes accompanying the oxygen depletion in the areas off the Changjiang Estuary. According to the observations, the typical hypoxia occurred in the bottom water just outside the Changjiang Estuary with Dissolved Oxygen (DO) lower than 2.00 mg L-1. The biological uptake in the surface water and the decomposition of organic matter in the bottom water were fully coupled with each other. The high concentration of Chl_ a (Chl_ a = 10.9 μg L-1) and DO (9.25 mg L-1), profoundly decreased DIC concentration (1828 μmol kg-1) and elevated pH (8.42) was observed in the surface water. The correspondingly increased DIC and depletion of oxygen were observed in the bottom water. The semi-quantitative analysis proved that the locally-produced phytoplankton, determined by primary productivity, was deposited to the bottom and contributed about 76% of total amount of the organic carbon decomposition in the bottom. However, in the bottom hypoxia (DO = 2.05 mg L-1) area observed in the Southern Zhejiang coastal water, the responding patterns of inorganic carbon parameters deviated from the previous one. The expanding of Changjiang Diluted Water (CDW), the adding of Hangzhou Bay water (with high DIC concentration) and Coastal Current together modify the DIC background value in this area, and the local degeneration and upwelling process may also help to offset the local DIC removed by net biological uptake in surface water. In addition, when the mixing occurring in autumn, which may break the summer stratification, the excess release of high DIC in the bottom water to the subsurface water could have an important influence on

  18. Factors influencing anthropogenic carbon dioxide uptake in the North Atlantic in models of the ocean carbon cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.S.; Marotzke, J.

    2008-09-30

    The uptake and storage of anthropogenic carbon in the North Atlantic is investigated using different configurations of ocean general circulation/carbon cycle models. We investigate how different representations of the ocean physics in the models, which represent the range of models currently in use, affect the evolution of CO{sub 2} uptake in the North Atlantic. The buffer effect of the ocean carbon system would be expected to reduce ocean CO{sub 2} uptake as the ocean absorbs increasing amounts of CO{sub 2}. We find that the strength of the buffer effect is very dependent on the model ocean state, as it affects both the magnitude and timing of the changes in uptake. The timescale over which uptake of CO{sub 2} in the North Atlantic drops to below preindustrial levels is particularly sensitive to the ocean state which sets the degree of buffering; it is less sensitive to the choice of atmospheric CO{sub 2} forcing scenario. Neglecting physical climate change effects, North Atlantic CO{sub 2} uptake drops below preindustrial levels between 50 and 300 years after stabilisation of atmospheric CO{sub 2} in different model configurations. Storage of anthropogenic carbon in the North Atlantic varies much less among the different model configurations, as differences in ocean transport of dissolved inorganic carbon and uptake of CO{sub 2} compensate each other. This supports the idea that measured inventories of anthropogenic carbon in the real ocean cannot be used to constrain the surface uptake. Including physical climate change effects reduces anthropogenic CO{sub 2} uptake and storage in the North Atlantic further, due to the combined effects of surface warming, increased freshwater input, and a slowdown of the meridional overturning circulation. The timescale over which North Atlantic CO{sub 2} uptake drops to below preindustrial levels is reduced by about one-third, leading to an estimate of this timescale for the real world of about 50 years after the stabilisation

  19. Ultraviolet-B radiation effects on inorganic nitrogen uptake by natural assemblages of oceanic plankton

    SciTech Connect

    Behrenfeld, M.J.; Lean, D.R.S.; Lee, H. II

    1995-02-01

    Ultraviolet-B radiation (UVBR: 290-320 nm) inhibited ammonium uptake ({rho}{sub NH4}) and nitrate uptake ({rho}{sub NO3}) in natural plankton assemblages collected during a transect from 37{degrees}N to 55{degrees}N in the Pacific Ocean. Comparison of responses in {rho}{sub NH4} to ambient solar- and lamp-enhanced UVBR spectra allowed calculation of an action spectrum for {rho}{sub NH4} inhibition. The slope of the action spectrum for {rho}{sub NH4} is half as steep as action spectra for UVBR inhibition of photosynthetic carbon uptake. Consequently, UVBR-induced photoinhibition of {rho}{sub NH4} extends to greater depths than inhibition of carbon fixation due to the greater relative effect of longer UVBR wavelengths. Inhibition of {rho}{sub NH4} was dependent upon UVBR dose when doses were weighted by the {rho}{sub NH4} action spectrum. Dependence of UVBR inhibition of {rho}{sub NH4} on dose rate was not apparent. We found that near-surface {rho}{sub NH4} and {rho}{sub NO3} can be overestimated in excess of 50% when measured using standard incubation vessels made of UVBR-absorbing materials such as polycarbonate. 68 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Effects of inorganic and organic amendments on the uptake of lead and trace elements by Brassica chinensis grown in an acidic red soil.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xianjin; Li, Xia; Liu, Xingmei; Hashmi, Muhammad Z; Xu, Jianming; Brookes, Philip C

    2015-01-01

    A greenhouse study was conducted to investigate the effects of inorganic (phosphate rock, single superphosphate and calcium magnesium phosphate) and organic amendments (peat, straw manure and pig manure) on the uptake of lead (Pb) and trace elements by Chinese Cabbage (Brassica chinensis) grown in an acidic red soil. The application of all organic amendments increased the soil pH while inorganic amendments such as single superphosphate did not. Both inorganic and organic amendments decreased the availability and uptake of Pb while the organic amendments were superior to the inorganic (phosphate) amendments in reducing the availability of the more labile (soluble and exchangeable Pb) forms of soil Pb. More Pb was taken up by roots than shoots with all soil amendments. Among the organic amendments, straw manure and pig manure caused the largest decrease in Pb availability at 456.5 and 457.3 mg kg(-1), respectively, when a high level of 30 g organic amendments kg(-1) was applied. The organic amendments greatly increased the fraction D targeted to Fe-Mn oxides bound Pb, and decreased the fraction A (water-soluble), B (exchangeable), and C (carbonate-bound), thereby decreasing the solubility and mobility of Pb in soil. The organic amendments also significantly improved the concentrations of Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn in the soil and shoots (except Fe in shoots and/or roots), which are essential for plant nutrition. The organic amendments of straw and pig manure lowered the availability and uptake of Pb but not that of other trace metals. Thus, these amendments have the potential to remediate Pb-contaminated soils in situ. PMID:24992219

  1. Are we overestimating organic carbon concentrations in soils containing inorganic carbon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunliffe, Andrew; Brazier, Richard; Vernon, Ian

    2014-05-01

    The concentration of carbon in soils is often measured via chromatographic analysis of elemental gases following dry combustion of a soil sample. This quantifies total carbon (TC), and, in soils which can be assumed to contain no inorganic carbon (IC), TC can be interpreted as organic carbon (OC). Soils containing IC are commonly subjected to an acid digestion to remove IC, prior to analysis for OC concentration; with IC being assigned as the difference between TC and OC. However, the removal of IC reduces the sample mass. Therefore, analysing acid-washed samples reveals the carbon concentration of the non-inorganic carbon sample mass, rather than the actual sample mass, as is generally assumed. This results in the overestimation of OC concentrations and consequent underestimation of IC concentrations, although TC concentrations are correct. The magnitude of the error is proportional to both IC concentration, and the ratio OC/IC, and consequently is greater in carbonate-rich samples. We present a revised protocol for accurately calculating OC and IC concentrations, using the carbon concentrations of the total sample and the acid-washed sample. The revised protocol is easily applicable to existing data, and corrects a known bias in apportioning carbon between organic and inorganic pools. Propagating the error through an example dataset from a semiarid environment, we find it can make a substantial (>10%) difference to estimated total OC pools. We recommend that this new protocol is used whenever elemental analysers are used to quantify OC concentrations in acid-washed sediments.

  2. Mechanism of Photosynthetic Carbon Dioxide Uptake by the Red Macroalga, Chondrus crispus

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ronald G.; Bidwell, R.G.S.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how Chondrus crispus, a marine red macroalga, acquires the inorganic carbon (Ci) it utilizes for photosynthetic carbon fixation. Analyses of Ci uptake were done using silicone oil centrifugation (using multicellular fragments of thallus), infrared gas analysis, and gas chromatography. Inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase (CA), the band 3 anion exchange protein and Na+/K+ exchange were used in the study. It was found that: (a) C. crispus does not accumulate Ci internally above the concentration attainable by diffusion; (b) the initial Ci fixtion rate of C. crispus fragments saturates at approximately 3 to 4 millimolar Ci; (c) CA is involved in carbon uptake; its involvement is greatest at high HCO3− and low CO2 concentration, suggesting its participation in the dehydration of HCO3− to CO2; (d) C. crispus has an intermediate Ci compensation point; and (e) no evidence of any active or facilitated mechanism for the transport of HCO3− was detected. These data support the view that photosynthetic Ci uptake does not involve active transport. Rather, CO2, derived from HCO3− catalyzed by external CA, passively diffuses across the plasma membrane of C. crispus. Intracellular CA also enhances the fixation of carbon in C. crispus. PMID:16666552

  3. Electrosorption of inorganic salts from aqueous solution using carbon aerogels.

    PubMed

    Gabelich, Christopher J; Tran, Tri D; Suffet, I H Mel

    2002-07-01

    Capacitive deionization (CDI) with carbon aerogels has been shown to remove various inorganic species from aqueous solutions, though no studies have shown the electrosorption behavior of multisolute systems in which ions compete for limited surface area. Several experiments were conducted to determine the ion removal capacity and selectivity of carbon aerogel electrodes, using both laboratory and natural waters. Although carbon aerogel electrodes have been treated as electrical double-layer capacitors, this study showed that ion sorption followed a Langmuir isotherm, indicating monolayer adsorption. The sorption capacity of carbon aerogel electrodes was approximately 1.0-2.0 x 10(-4) equiv/g aerogel, with ion selectivity being based on ionic hydrated radius. Monovalent ions (e.g., sodium) with smaller hydrated radii were preferentially removed from solution over multivalent ions (e.g., calcium) on a percent or molar basis. Because of the relatively small average pore size (4-9 nm) of the carbon aerogel material, only 14-42 m2/g aerogel surface area was available for ion sorption. Natural organic matter may foul the aerogel surface and limit CDI effectiveness in treating natural waters. PMID:12144279

  4. Carbon balance in an irrigated corn field after inorganic fertilizer or manure application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about inorganic fertilizer or manure effects on organic carbon (OC) and inorganic C (IC) losses from a furrow irrigated field, particularly in the context of other system C gains or losses. In 2003 and 2004, we measured dissolved organic and inorganic C (DOC, DIC), particulate OC an...

  5. Manure and inorganic fertilizer effects on carbon balance and losses in irrigated corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about inorganic fertilizer or manure effects on organic carbon (OC) and inorganic C (IC) losses from a furrow irrigated field, particularly in the context of other system C gains or losses. In 2003 and 2004, we measured dissolved organic and inorganic C (DOC, DIC), particulate OC an...

  6. Soil Inorganic Carbon Formation: Can Parent Material Overcome Climate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanbery, C.; Will, R. M.; Seyfried, M. S.; Benner, S. G.; Flores, A. N.; Guilinger, J.; Lohse, K. A.; Good, A.; Black, C.; Pierce, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Soil carbon is the third largest carbon reservoir and is composed of both organic and inorganic constituents. However, the storage and flux of soil carbon within the global carbon cycle are not fully understood. While organic carbon is often the focus of research, the factors controlling the formation and dissolution of soil inorganic carbon (SIC) are complex. Climate is largely accepted as the primary control on SIC, but the effects of soil parent material are less clear. We hypothesize that effects of parent material are significant and that SIC accumulation will be greater in soils formed from basalts than granites due to the finer textured soils and more abundant calcium and magnesium cations. This research is being conducted in the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW) in southwestern Idaho. The watershed is an ideal location because it has a range of gradients in precipitation (250 mm to 1200 mm), ecology (sagebrush steppe to juniper), and parent materials (a wide array of igneous and sedimentary rock types) over a relatively small area. Approximately 20 soil profiles will be excavated throughout the watershed and will capture the effects of differing precipitation amounts and parent material on soil characteristics. Several samples at each site will be collected for analysis of SIC content and grain size distribution using a pressure calcimeter and hydrometers, respectively. Initial field data suggests that soils formed over basalts have a higher concentration of SIC than those on granitic material. If precipitation is the only control on SIC, we would expect to see comparable amounts in soils formed on both rock types within the same precipitation zone. However, field observations suggest that for all but the driest sites, soils formed over granite had no SIC detected while basalt soils with comparable precipitation had measurable amounts of SIC. Grain size distribution appears to be a large control on SIC as the sandier, granitic soils promote

  7. Salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) inhibition of the dissolved inorganic carbon concentrating process in unicellular green algae

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, A.; Tolbert, N.E. )

    1990-03-01

    Rates of photosynthetic O{sub 2} evolution, for measuring K{sub 0.5}(CO{sub 2} + HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) at pH 7, upon addition of 50 micromolar HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} to air-adapted Chlamydomonas, Dunaliella, or Scenedesmus cells, were inhibited up to 90% by the addition of 1.5 to 4.0 millimolar salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) to the aqueous medium. The apparent K{sub i}(SHAM) for Chlamydomonas cells was about 2.5 millimolar, but due to low solubility in water effective concentrations would be lower. Salicylhydroxamic acid did not inhibit oxygen evolution or accumulation of bicarbonate by Scenedesmus cells between pH 8 to 11 or by isolated intact chloroplasts from Dunaliella. Thus, salicylhydroxamic acid appears to inhibit CO{sub 2} uptake, whereas previous results indicate that vanadate inhibits bicarbonate uptake. These conclusions were confirmed by three test procedures with three air-adapted algae at pH 7. Salicylhydroxamic acid inhibited the cellular accumulation of dissolved inorganic carbon, the rate of photosynthetic O{sub 2} evolution dependent on low levels of dissolved inorganic carbon (50 micromolar NaHCO{sub 3}), and the rate of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} fixation with 100 micromolar ({sup 14}C)HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. Salicylhydroxamic acid inhibition of O{sub 2} evolution and {sup 14}CO{sub 2}-fixation was reversed by higher levels of NaHCO{sub 3}. Thus, salicylhydroxamic acid inhibition was apparently not affecting steps of photosynthesis other than CO{sub 2} accumulation. Although salicylhydroxamic acid is an inhibitor of alternative respiration in algae, it is not known whether the two processes are related.

  8. RAPID AND PRECISE METHOD FOR MEASURING STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIOS OF DISSOLVED INORGANIC CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe a method for rapid preparation, concentration and stable isotopic analysis of dissolved inorganic carbon (d13C-DIC). Liberation of CO2 was accomplished by placing 100 ?l phosphoric acid and 0.9 ml water in an evacuated 1.7-ml gas chromatography (GC) injection vial. Fo...

  9. The effects of combined application of inorganic Martian dust simulant and carbon dots on glutamate transport rat brain nerve terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Nazarova, Anastasiya; Borysov, Arseniy; Pastukhov, Artem; Pozdnyakova, Natalia; Dudarenko, Marina

    2016-07-01

    During inhalation, nano-/microsized particles are efficiently deposited in nasal, tracheobronchial, and alveolar regions and can be transported to the central nervous system (Oberdorster et al., 2004). Recently, the research team of this study found the minor fractions of nanoparticles with the size ~ 50 -60 nm in Lunar and Martian dust stimulants (JSC-1a and JSC, ORBITEC Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, Wisconsin), whereas the average size of the simulants was 1 mm and 4mm, respectively (Krisanova et al., 2013). Also, the research team of this study discovered new phenomenon - the neuromodulating and neurotoxic effect of carbon nano-sized particles - Carbon dots (C-dots), originated from ash of burned carbon-containing product (Borisova et al, 2015). The aims of this study was to analyse acute effects of upgraded stimulant of inorganic Martian dust derived from volcanic ash (JSC-1a/JSC, ORBITEC Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, Wisconsin) by the addition of carbon components, that is, carbon dots, on the key characteristic of synaptic neurotransmission. Acute administration of carbon-containing Martian dust analogue resulted in a significant decrease in transporter-mediated uptake of L-[14C]glutamate (the major excitatory neurotransmitter) by isolated rat brain nerve terminals. The ambient level of the neurotransmitter in the preparation of nerve terminals increased in the presence of carbon dot-contained Martian dust analogue. These effects were associated with action of carbon component of the upgraded Martian dust stimulant but not with its inorganic constituent.

  10. Uptake Mechanism for Iodine Species to Black Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Choung, Sungwook; Um, Wooyong; Kim, Min Kyung; Kim, Min-Gyu

    2013-08-13

    Natural organic matter (NOM) plays an important role in determining the fate and transport of iodine species such as iodide (I-) and iodate (IO3-) in groundwater system. Although NOM exists as diverse forms in environments, prior iodine studies have mainly focused on uptake processes of iodide and iodate to humic materials. This study was conducted to determine the iodide and iodate uptake potential for a particulate NOM (i.e., black carbon [BC]). A laboratory-produced BC and commercial humic acid were used for batch experiments to compare their iodine uptake properties. The BC exhibited >100 times greater uptake capability for iodide than iodate at low pH~3, while iodide uptake was negligible for the humic acid. The uptake properties of both solids strongly depend on the initial iodine aqueous concentrations. After uptake reaction of iodide to the BC, X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy results indicated that the iodide was converted to electrophilic species, and iodine was covalently bound to carbon atom in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons present in the BC. The computed distribution coefficients (i.e., Kd values) suggest that the BC materials retard significantly the transport of iodide at low pH in environmental systems containing even a small amount of BC.

  11. Fractional carbon monoxide uptake in an employed population

    PubMed Central

    Stebbings, James H.

    1974-01-01

    Stebbings, J. H. (1974).Thorax, 29, 505-510. Fractional carbon monoxide uptake in an employed population. The fractional carbon monoxide uptake in 913 New York City transit workers was studied. A prediction equation for white males, based on nonsmokers, was obtained: fractional CO uptake = 0·58032 − 0·00204 × age + 0·0004 × weight (kilograms). Weight was the index of body size most strongly correlated with the fractional CO uptake. Decline in function with age by amount of tobacco smoked is described. A correction factor for respiration, based on results from 581 workers with two or more tests, was calculated: − 0·123654 × (standard tidal volume − observed tidal volume). Tidal volume was the most important contributor to individual variability of the fractional CO uptake, and minute volume or respiration rate do not add significantly to it. For epidemiological or screening uses, prediction equations are given for the fractional CO uptake corrected to 0·5 1. tidal volume. Respiration variables explain only 1·5% of individual variability, and individual variability over a mean period of 16·6 months was much larger (an individual standard error of 0·07) than the unexplained population variability (a population standard error of 0·01−0·02); thus the usefulness of the fractional CO uptake as a test of respiratory function is in doubt. PMID:4428451

  12. Corals concentrate dissolved inorganic carbon to facilitate calcification.

    PubMed

    Allison, Nicola; Cohen, Itay; Finch, Adrian A; Erez, Jonathan; Tudhope, Alexander W

    2014-01-01

    The sources of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) used to produce scleractinian coral skeletons are not understood. Yet this knowledge is essential for understanding coral biomineralization and assessing the potential impacts of ocean acidification on coral reefs. Here we use skeletal boron geochemistry to reconstruct the DIC chemistry of the fluid used for coral calcification. We show that corals concentrate DIC at the calcification site substantially above seawater values and that bicarbonate contributes a significant amount of the DIC pool used to build the skeleton. Corals actively increase the pH of the calcification fluid, decreasing the proportion of DIC present as CO2 and creating a diffusion gradient favouring the transport of molecular CO2 from the overlying coral tissue into the calcification site. Coupling the increases in calcification fluid pH and [DIC] yields high calcification fluid [CO3(2-)] and induces high aragonite saturation states, favourable to the precipitation of the skeleton. PMID:25531981

  13. Seafloor Weathering Dependence on Temperature and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbot, D. S.; Farahat, N. X.; Archer, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    Most thinking on Earth's carbon cycle implicates silicate weathering as the dominant control of atmospheric CO2 concentration over long timescales. Recent analyses of alteration of basalt at the seafloor, however, suggest that seafloor weathering (low-temperature (<60C) chemical alteration of the upper oceanic crust due to hydrothermal seawater circulation) increases dramatically in warm, high CO2 periods of Earth's history. This raises the possibility that seafloor weathering could complement silicate weathering in maintaining Earth's long term climate stability. Moreover, seafloor weathering would be the only type of weathering available on an exoplanet entirely covered by water, so understanding how it might work is essential for understanding the habitable zones of such waterworlds. We have built a 2D numerical model of the flow of seawater through porous basalt coupled to chemical alteration reactions that can calculate alkalinity fluxes and carbonate deposition (seafloor weathering). I will present simulations in which we vary the seawater temperature and dissolved inorganic carbon concentration, which are boundary conditions to our model, over large ranges. These results will provide a constraint on the ability of seafloor weathering to act as an effective climate buffer on Earth and other planets. I can't give you a preview of the results yet because at the time of writing this abstract we haven't completed the simulations!

  14. Lead uptake and lead loss in the fresh water field crab, Barytelphusa guerini, on exposure to organic and inorganic lead

    SciTech Connect

    Tulasi, S.J.; Yasmeen, R.; Reddy, C.P.; Rao, J.V.R.

    1987-07-01

    Lead is a heavy metal which is widely used in paint industry, pigments, dyes, electrical components and electronics, plastic chemicals and in various other things. Since some of the lead salts are soluble in water, lead presents a potential threat to aquatic organisms. Studies dealing with invertebrates include those on mortality, growth and lead uptake in Lymnaea palustris and bioaccumulation of heavy metals in oysters and mussels. Little information exists regarding the effect of lead on the fresh water crustaceans. Hence the present investigation has been undertaken to study the uptake and loss of lead on exposure to subtoxic levels or organic and inorganic lead.

  15. Adhesion of preceramic inorganic polymer coatings to carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhry, T.M.; Drzal, L.T.; Ho, H.; Laine, R.

    1996-12-31

    To determine whether the preceramic inorganic polymer coating can provide not only the thermal oxidative protection during both processing and use in metal matrix composites or ceramic matrix composites but also the appropriate composite properties, it is desirable to know how and at what point in the thermal processing cycle the coating-carbon fiber interface undergoes changes that affect the interfacial adhesion and failure mode. Also, it is important to identify the locus of interfacial failure i.e. between fiber and coating or between coating and matrix. This work is directed at determining the interfacial changes and the locus of failure in order to optimize both the coating chemistry and the conversion process. The characteristics of the benchmark interface coating material, silicon oxycarbide, SiO{sub x}C{sub y} or black glass have been studied. SiO{sub x}C{sub y} was chosen because (1) SiO{sub x}C{sub y} is amorphous, (2) it is possible to prepare very well-defined materials, where the chemistry and the evolution of the material with time and temperature are known in detail, and (3) SiO{sub x}C{sub y} is a matrix material used in commercial composites. It has been shown that these coatings are effective in increasing the oxidation resistance of the carbon fibers themselves.

  16. The role of carbon in fungal nutrient uptake and transport

    PubMed Central

    Fellbaum, Carl R.; Mensah, Jerry A.; Pfeffer, Philip E.; Kiers, E. Toby; Bücking, Heike

    2012-01-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, which forms between plant hosts and ubiquitous soil fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota, plays a key role for the nutrient uptake of the majority of land plants, including many economically important crop species. AM fungi take up nutrients from the soil and exchange them for photosynthetically fixed carbon from the host. While our understanding of the exact mechanisms controlling carbon and nutrient exchange is still limited, we recently demonstrated that (i) carbon acts as an important trigger for fungal N uptake and transport, (ii) the fungus changes its strategy in response to an exogenous supply of carbon, and that (iii) both plants and fungi reciprocally reward resources to those partners providing more benefit. Here, we summarize recent research findings and discuss the implications of these results for fungal and plant control of resource exchange in the AM symbiosis. PMID:22990447

  17. Spring Hydrology Determines Summer Net Carbon Uptake in Northern Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Yonghong; Kimball, John; Reichle, Rolf H.

    2014-01-01

    Increased photosynthetic activity and enhanced seasonal CO2 exchange of northern ecosystems have been observed from a variety of sources including satellite vegetation indices (such as the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index; NDVI) and atmospheric CO2 measurements. Most of these changes have been attributed to strong warming trends in the northern high latitudes (greater than or equal to 50N). Here we analyze the interannual variation of summer net carbon uptake derived from atmospheric CO2 measurements and satellite NDVI in relation to surface meteorology from regional observational records. We find that increases in spring precipitation and snow pack promote summer net carbon uptake of northern ecosystems independent of air temperature effects. However, satellite NDVI measurements still show an overall benefit of summer photosynthetic activity from regional warming and limited impact of spring precipitation. This discrepancy is attributed to a similar response of photosynthesis and respiration to warming and thus reduced sensitivity of net ecosystem carbon uptake to temperature. Further analysis of boreal tower eddy covariance CO2 flux measurements indicates that summer net carbon uptake is positively correlated with early growing-season surface soil moisture, which is also strongly affected by spring precipitation and snow pack based on analysis of satellite soil moisture retrievals. This is attributed to strong regulation of spring hydrology on soil respiration in relatively wet boreal and arctic ecosystems. These results document the important role of spring hydrology in determining summer net carbon uptake and contrast with prevailing assumptions of dominant cold temperature limitations to high-latitude ecosystems. Our results indicate potentially stronger coupling of boreal/arctic water and carbon cycles with continued regional warming trends.

  18. An observing system simulation for Southern Ocean carbon dioxide uptake.

    PubMed

    Majkut, Joseph D; Carter, Brendan R; Frölicher, Thomas L; Dufour, Carolina O; Rodgers, Keith B; Sarmiento, Jorge L

    2014-07-13

    The Southern Ocean is critically important to the oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2. Up to half of the excess CO2 currently in the ocean entered through the Southern Ocean. That uptake helps to maintain the global carbon balance and buffers transient climate change from fossil fuel emissions. However, the future evolution of the uptake is uncertain, because our understanding of the dynamics that govern the Southern Ocean CO2 uptake is incomplete. Sparse observations and incomplete model formulations limit our ability to constrain the monthly and annual uptake, interannual variability and long-term trends. Float-based sampling of ocean biogeochemistry provides an opportunity for transforming our understanding of the Southern Ocean CO2 flux. In this work, we review current estimates of the CO2 uptake in the Southern Ocean and projections of its response to climate change. We then show, via an observational system simulation experiment, that float-based sampling provides a significant opportunity for measuring the mean fluxes and monitoring the mean uptake over decadal scales. PMID:24891388

  19. Sustainable carbon uptake - important ecosystem service within sustainable forest management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorana Ostrogović Sever, Maša; Anić, Mislav; Paladinić, Elvis; Alberti, Giorgio; Marjanović, Hrvoje

    2016-04-01

    Even-aged forest management with natural regeneration under continuous cover (i.e. close to nature management) is considered to be sustainable regarding the yield, biodiversity and stability of forest ecosystems. Recently, in the context of climate change, there is a raising question of sustainable forest management regarding carbon uptake. Aim of this research was to explore whether current close to nature forest management approach in Croatia can be considered sustainable in terms of carbon uptake throughout the life-time of Pedunculate oak forest. In state-owned managed forest a chronosequence experiment was set up and carbon stocks in main ecosystem pools (live biomass, dead wood, litter and mineral soil layer), main carbon fluxes (net primary production, soil respiration (SR), decomposition) and net ecosystem productivity were estimated in eight stands of different age (5, 13, 38, 53, 68, 108, 138 and 168 years) based on field measurements and published data. Air and soil temperature and soil moisture were recorded on 7 automatic mini-meteorological stations and weekly SR measurements were used to parameterize SR model. Carbon balance was estimated at weekly scale for the growing season 2011 (there was no harvesting), as well as throughout the normal rotation period of 140 years (harvesting was included). Carbon stocks in different ecosystem pools change during a stand development. Carbon stocks in forest floor increase with stand age, while carbon stocks in dead wood are highest in young and older stands, and lowest in middle-aged, mature stands. Carbon stocks in mineral soil layer were found to be stable across chronosequence with no statistically significant age-dependent trend. Pedunculate Oak stand, assuming successful regeneration, becomes carbon sink very early in a development phase, between the age of 5 and 13 years, and remains carbon sink even after the age of 160 years. Greatest carbon sink was reached in the stand aged 53 years. Obtained results

  20. Atypical Hydrogen Uptake on Chemically Activated, Ultramicroporous Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Vinay V; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C; Baker, Frederick S

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen adsorption at near-ambient temperatures on ultramicroporous carbon (UMC), derived through secondary chemical activation from a wood-based activated carbon was studied using volumetric and gravimetric methods. The results showed that physisorption is accompanied by a process of different nature that causes slow uptake at high pressures and hysteresis on desorption. In combination, this results in unusually high levels of hydrogen uptake at near-ambient temperatures and pressures (e.g. up to 0.8 wt % at 25 oC and 2 MPa). The heat of adsorption corresponding to the slow process leading to high uptake (17 20 kJ/mol) is higher than usually reported for carbon materials, but the adsorption kinetics is slow, and the isotherms exhibit pronounced hysteresis. These unusual properties were attributed to contributions from polarization-enhanced physisorption caused by traces of alkali metals residual from chemical activation. The results support the hypothesis that polarization-induced physisorption in high surface area carbons modified with traces of alkali metal ions is an alternate route for increasing the hydrogen storage capacity of carbon adsorbents.

  1. Inorganic carbon fluxes across the vadose zone of planted and unplanted soil mesocosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaysen, E. M.; Jacques, D.; Jessen, S.; Andersen, C. E.; Laloy, E.; Ambus, P.; Postma, D.; Jakobsen, I.

    2014-12-01

    The efflux of carbon dioxide (CO2) from soils influences atmospheric CO2 concentrations and thereby climate change. The partitioning of inorganic carbon (C) fluxes in the vadose zone between emission to the atmosphere and to the groundwater was investigated to reveal controlling underlying mechanisms. Carbon dioxide partial pressure in the soil gas (pCO2), alkalinity, soil moisture and temperature were measured over depth and time in unplanted and planted (barley) mesocosms. The dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) percolation flux was calculated from the pCO2, alkalinity and the water flux at the mesocosm bottom. Carbon dioxide exchange between the soil surface and the atmosphere was measured at regular intervals. The soil diffusivity was determined from soil radon-222 (222Rn) emanation rates and soil air Rn concentration profiles and was used in conjunction with measured pCO2 gradients to calculate the soil CO2 production. Carbon dioxide fluxes were modeled using the HP1 module of the Hydrus 1-D software. The average CO2 effluxes to the atmosphere from unplanted and planted mesocosm ecosystems during 78 days of experiment were 0.1 ± 0.07 and 4.9 ± 0.07 μmol C m-2 s-1, respectively, and grossly exceeded the corresponding DIC percolation fluxes of 0.01 ± 0.004 and 0.06 ± 0.03 μmol C m-2 s-1. Plant biomass was high in the mesocosms as compared to a standard field situation. Post-harvest soil respiration (Rs) was only 10% of the Rs during plant growth, while the post-harvest DIC percolation flux was more than one-third of the flux during growth. The Rs was controlled by production and diffusivity of CO2 in the soil. The DIC percolation flux was largely controlled by the pCO2 and the drainage flux due to low solution pH. Modeling suggested that increasing soil alkalinity during plant growth was due to nutrient buffering during root nitrate uptake.

  2. Bioengineering aspects of inorganic carbon supply to mass algal cultures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, J.C.

    1980-06-01

    The work included in this report is part of an ongoing study (currently funded by the Solar Energy Research Institute - Subcontract No. XR-9-8144-1) on the inorganic carbon requirements of microalgae under mass culture conditions and covers the period June 1, 1978 through May 31, 1979. It is divided into two parts appended herein. The first part is a literature review on the inorganic carbon chemical system in relation to algal growth requirements, and the second part deals with the kinetics of inorganic carbon-limited growth of two freshwater chlorophytes including the effect of carbon limitation on cellular chemical composition. Additional experiment research covered under this contract was reported in the Proceedings of the 3rd Annual Biomass Energy Systems Conferences, pp. 25-32, Bioengineering aspects of inorganic carbon supply to mass algal cultures. Report No. SERI/TP-33-285.

  3. The evolution of inorganic carbon concentrating mechanisms in photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Raven, John A; Cockell, Charles S; De La Rocha, Christina L

    2008-08-27

    Inorganic carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) catalyse the accumulation of CO(2) around rubisco in all cyanobacteria, most algae and aquatic plants and in C(4) and crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) vascular plants. CCMs are polyphyletic (more than one evolutionary origin) and involve active transport of HCO(3)(-), CO(2) and/or H(+), or an energized biochemical mechanism as in C(4) and CAM plants. While the CCM in almost all C(4) plants and many CAM plants is constitutive, many CCMs show acclimatory responses to variations in the supply of not only CO(2) but also photosynthetically active radiation, nitrogen, phosphorus and iron. The evolution of CCMs is generally considered in the context of decreased CO(2) availability, with only a secondary role for increasing O(2). However, the earliest CCMs may have evolved in oxygenic cyanobacteria before the atmosphere became oxygenated in stromatolites with diffusion barriers around the cells related to UV screening. This would decrease CO(2) availability to cells and increase the O(2) concentration within them, inhibiting rubisco and generating reactive oxygen species, including O(3). PMID:18487130

  4. Impact of anthropogenic atmospheric nitrogen and sulfur deposition on ocean acidification and the inorganic carbon system.

    PubMed

    Doney, Scott C; Mahowald, Natalie; Lima, Ivan; Feely, Richard A; Mackenzie, Fred T; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Rasch, Phil J

    2007-09-11

    Fossil fuel combustion and agriculture result in atmospheric deposition of 0.8 Tmol/yr reactive sulfur and 2.7 Tmol/yr nitrogen to the coastal and open ocean near major source regions in North America, Europe, and South and East Asia. Atmospheric inputs of dissociation products of strong acids (HNO(3) and H2SO(4)) and bases (NH(3)) alter surface seawater alkalinity, pH, and inorganic carbon storage. We quantify the biogeochemical impacts by using atmosphere and ocean models. The direct acid/base flux to the ocean is predominately acidic (reducing total alkalinity) in the temperate Northern Hemisphere and alkaline in the tropics because of ammonia inputs. However, because most of the excess ammonia is nitrified to nitrate (NO(3)(-)) in the upper ocean, the effective net atmospheric input is acidic almost everywhere. The decrease in surface alkalinity drives a net air-sea efflux of CO(2), reducing surface dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC); the alkalinity and DIC changes mostly offset each other, and the decline in surface pH is small. Additional impacts arise from nitrogen fertilization, leading to elevated primary production and biological DIC drawdown that reverses in some places the sign of the surface pH and air-sea CO(2) flux perturbations. On a global scale, the alterations in surface water chemistry from anthropogenic nitrogen and sulfur deposition are a few percent of the acidification and DIC increases due to the oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO(2). However, the impacts are more substantial in coastal waters, where the ecosystem responses to ocean acidification could have the most severe implications for mankind. PMID:17804807

  5. On the reactive adsorption of ammonia on activated carbons modified by impregnation with inorganic compounds.

    PubMed

    Bandosz, Teresa J; Petit, Camille

    2009-10-15

    Ammonia adsorption was studied under dynamic conditions, at room temperature, on activated carbons of different origins (coal-based, wood-based and coconut-shell-based carbons) before and after their impregnation with various inorganic compounds including metal chlorides, metal oxides and polycations. The role of humidity was evaluated by running tests in both dry and moist conditions. Adsorbents were analyzed before and after exposure to ammonia by thermal analyses, sorption of nitrogen, potentiometric titration, X-ray diffraction and FTIR spectroscopy. Results of breakthrough tests show significant differences in terms of adsorption capacity depending on the parent carbon, the impregnates and the experimental conditions. It is found that surface chemistry governs ammonia adsorption on the impregnated carbons. More precisely, it was demonstrated that a proper combination of the surface pH, the strength, type and amount of functional groups present on the adsorbents' surface is a key point in ammonia uptake. Water can have either positive or negative effects on the performance of adsorbents. It can enhance NH(3) adsorption capacity since it favors ammonia dissolution and thus enables reaction between ammonium ions and carboxylic groups from the carbons' surface. On the other hand, water can also reduce the performance from the strength of adsorption standpoint. It promotes dissolution of ammonia and that ammonia is first removed from the system when the adsorbent bed is purged with air. Ammonia, besides adsorption by van der Waals forces and dissolution in water, is also retained on the surface via reactive mechanisms such as acid-base reactions (Brønsted and Lewis) or complexation. Depending on the materials used and the experimental conditions, 6-47% ammonia adsorbed is strongly retained on the surface even when the bed is purged with air. PMID:19615690

  6. On the reactive adsorption of ammonia on activated carbons modified by impregnation with inorganic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Bandosz, T.J.; Petit, C.

    2009-10-15

    Ammonia adsorption was studied under dynamic conditions, at room temperature, on activated carbons of different origins (coal-based, wood-based and coconut-shell-based carbons) before and after their impregnation with various inorganic compounds including metal chlorides, metal oxides and polycations. The role of humidity was evaluated by running tests in both dry and moist conditions. Adsorbents were analyzed before and after exposure to ammonia by thermal analyses, sorption of nitrogen, potentiometric titration, X-ray diffraction and FTIR spectroscopy. Results of breakthrough tests show significant differences in terms of adsorption capacity depending on the parent carbon, the impregnates and the experimental conditions. It is found that surface chemistry governs ammonia adsorption on the impregnated carbons. More precisely, it was demonstrated that a proper combination of the surface pH, the strength, type and amount of functional groups present on the adsorbents' surface is a key point in ammonia uptake. Water can have either positive or negative effects on the performance of adsorbents. It can enhance NH{sub 3} adsorption capacity since it favors ammonia dissolution and thus enables reaction between ammonium ions and carboxylic groups from the carbons' surface. On the other hand, water can also reduce the performance from the strength of adsorption standpoint. It promotes dissolution of ammonia and that ammonia is first removed from the system when the adsorbent bed is purged with air. Ammonia, besides adsorption by van der Waals forces and dissolution in water, is also retained on the surface via reactive mechanisms such as acid-base reactions (Bronsted and Lewis) or complexation. Depending on the materials used and the experimental conditions, 6-47% ammonia adsorbed is strongly retained on the surface even when the bed is purged with air.

  7. Comparative studies of inorganic carbon utilization in Emiliania huxleyi and some non-calcifying marine microalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang-Feng, Dong; Merrett, M. J.; Chao-Yuan, Wu

    1999-09-01

    Inorganic carbon utilization in the non-calcifying marine microalgae, Nannochloropsis oculata, Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Porphyridium purpureum was compared with high- and low-calcifying strains of Emiliania huxleyi grown in artificial seawater medium aerated with either air (0.03% V/V CO2) or CO2-free air. For high-calcifying strain of E. oculata and P. tricornutem, similar growth patterns were observed in air-and CO2-free air-grown cultures. P. purpureum showed a less final cell density in CO2-free air than in air-grown culture. However, low-calcifying strain of E. huxleyi was able to grow only in air-grown culture, but not in CO2-free air-grown culture. Measurements of alkalinity, pH, concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and free CO2 showed different patterns of DIC utilization. With N. oculata, P. tricornutum and P. purpureum the pattern of DIC utilization was characterized by an increase of pH and a decrease of DIC but a constant alkalinity in the cultures aerated with air or CO2-free air, suggesting that bicarbonate utilization was concomitant with an efflux of OH-. Both alkalinity and pH were maintained rather constant in air-grown culture of low-calcifying strain of E. huxleyi, suggesting that diffusive entry of CO2 could meet the requirement of DIC for its photosynthesis and growth. High-calcifying strain of E. huxleyi, however, showed a pattern of decrease of alkalinity and DIC but an almost constant pH, indicating that bicarbonate was the major form of inorganic carbon utilised by this organism and bicarbonate uptake is unlikely to be accompanied by an efflux of OH-. The final pH values reached by N. oculata, P. tricornutum and P. purpureum in a closed system were 10.75, 10.60 and 9.85 respectively, showing that bicarbonate utilisation is concomitant with an efflux of OH-. While the final pH of 8.4 in high-calcifying E. huxleyi suggests that bicarbonate utilization was not accompanied by an efflux of OH-.

  8. Inorganic carbon acquisition in potentially toxic and non-toxic diatoms: the effect of pH-induced changes in seawater carbonate chemistry.

    PubMed

    Trimborn, Scarlett; Lundholm, Nina; Thoms, Silke; Richter, Klaus-Uwe; Krock, Bernd; Hansen, Per Juel; Rost, Björn

    2008-05-01

    The effects of pH-induced changes in seawater carbonate chemistry on inorganic carbon (C(i)) acquisition and domoic acid (DA) production were studied in two potentially toxic diatom species, Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries and Nitzschia navis-varingica, and the non-toxic Stellarima stellaris. In vivo activities of carbonic anhydrase (CA), photosynthetic O(2) evolution and CO(2) and HCO(3)(-) uptake rates were measured by membrane inlet MS in cells acclimated to low (7.9) and high pH (8.4 or 8.9). Species-specific differences in the mode of carbon acquisition were found. While extracellular carbonic anhydrase (eCA) activities increased with pH in P. multiseries and S. stellaris, N. navis-varingica exhibited low eCA activities independent of pH. Half-saturation concentrations (K(1/2)) for photosynthetic O(2) evolution, which were highest in S. stellaris and lowest in P. multiseries, generally decreased with increasing pH. In terms of carbon source, all species took up both CO(2) and HCO(3)(-). K(1/2) values for inorganic carbon uptake decreased with increasing pH in two species, while in N. navis-varingica apparent affinities did not change. While the contribution of HCO(3)(-) to net fixation was more than 85% in S. stellaris, it was about 55% in P. multiseries and only approximately 30% in N. navis-varingica. The intracellular content of DA increased in P. multiseries and N. navis-varingica with increasing pH. Based on our data, we propose a novel role for eCA acting as C(i)-recycling mechanism. With regard to pH-dependence of growth, the 'HCO(3)(-) user' S. stellaris was as sensitive as the 'CO(2) user' N. navis-varingica. The suggested relationship between DA and carbon acquisition/C(i) limitation could not be confirmed. PMID:18405335

  9. External carbonic anhydrase in three Caribbean corals: quantification of activity and role in CO2 uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tansik, Anna L.; Fitt, William K.; Hopkinson, Brian M.

    2015-09-01

    Scleractinian corals have complicated inorganic carbon ( C i) transport pathways to support both photosynthesis, by their symbiotic dinoflagellates, and calcification. The first step in C i acquisition, uptake into the coral, is critical as the diffusive boundary layer limits the supply of CO2 to the surface and HCO3 - uptake is energy intensive. An external carbonic anhydrase (eCA) on the oral surface of corals is thought to facilitate CO2 uptake by converting HCO3 - into CO2, helping to overcome the limitation imposed by the boundary layer. However, this enzyme has not yet been identified or detected in corals, nor has its activity been quantified. We have developed a method to quantify eCA activity using a reaction-diffusion model to analyze data on 18O removal from labeled C i. Applying this technique to three species of Caribbean corals ( Orbicella faveolata, Porites astreoides, and Siderastrea radians) showed that all species have eCA and that the potential rates of CO2 generation by eCA greatly exceed photosynthetic rates. This demonstrates that eCA activity is sufficient to support its hypothesized role in CO2 supply. Inhibition of eCA severely reduces net photosynthesis in all species (on average by 46 ± 27 %), implying that CO2 generated by eCA is a major carbon source for photosynthesis. Because of the high permeability of membranes to CO2, CO2 uptake is likely driven by a concentration gradient across the cytoplasmic membrane. The ubiquity of eCA in corals from diverse genera and environments suggests that it is fundamental for photosynthetic CO2 supply.

  10. Effects of upwelling, tides and biological processes on the inorganic carbon system of a coastal lagoon in Baja California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribas-Ribas, M.; Hernández-Ayón, J. M.; Camacho-Ibar, V. F.; Cabello-Pasini, A.; Mejia-Trejo, A.; Durazo, R.; Galindo-Bect, S.; Souza, A. J.; Forja, J. M.; Siqueiros-Valencia, A.

    2011-12-01

    The role of coastal lagoons and estuaries as sources or sinks of inorganic carbon in upwelling areas has not been fully understood. During the months of May-July, 2005, we studied the dissolved inorganic carbon system in a coastal lagoon of northwestern Mexico during the strongest period of upwelling events. Along the bay, different scenarios were observed for the distributions of pH, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) as a result of different combinations of upwelling intensity and tidal amplitude. DIC concentrations in the outer part of the bay were controlled by mixing processes. At the inner part of the bay DIC was as low as 1800 μmol kg -1, most likely due to high water residence times and seagrass CO 2 uptake. It is estimated that 85% of San Quintín Bay, at the oceanic end, acted as a source of CO 2 to the atmosphere due to the inflow of CO 2-rich upwelled waters from the neighboring ocean with high positive fluxes higher than 30 mmol C m -2 d -1. In contrast, there was a net uptake of CO 2 and HCO 3- by the seagrass bed Zostera marina in the inner part of the bay, so the pCO 2 in this zone was below the equilibrium value and slightly negative CO 2 fluxes of -6 mmol C m -2 d -1. Our positive NEP and ΔDIC values indicate that Bahía San Quintín was a net autotrophic system during the upwelling season during 2005.

  11. Methodologies for extraction of dissolved inorganic carbon for stable carbon isotope studies : evaluation and alternatives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hassan, Afifa Afifi

    1982-01-01

    The gas evolution and the strontium carbonate precipitation techniques to extract dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) for stable carbon isotope analysis were investigated. Theoretical considerations, involving thermodynamic calculations and computer simulation pointed out several possible sources of error in delta carbon-13 measurements of the DIC and demonstrated the need for experimental evaluation of the magnitude of the error. An alternative analytical technique, equilibration with out-gassed vapor phase, is proposed. The experimental studies revealed that delta carbon-13 of the DIC extracted from a 0.01 molar NaHC03 solution by both techniques agreed within 0.1 per mil with the delta carbon-13 of the DIC extracted by the precipitation technique, and an increase of only 0.27 per mil in that extracted by the gas evolution technique. The efficiency of extraction of DIC decreased with sulfate concentration in the precipitation technique but was independent of sulfate concentration in the gas evolution technique. Both the precipitation and gas evolution technique were found to be satisfactory for extraction of DIC from different kinds of natural water for stable carbon isotope analysis, provided appropriate precautions are observed in handling the samples. For example, it was found that diffusion of atmospheric carbon dioxide does alter the delta carbon-13 of the samples contained in polyethylene bottles; filtration and drying in the air change the delta carbon-13 of the samples contained in polyethylene bottles; filtration and drying in the air change the delta carbon-13 of the precipitation technique; hot manganese dioxide purification changes the delta carbon-13 of carbon dioxide. (USGS)

  12. A simple, gravimetric method to quantify inorganic carbon in calcareous soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total carbon (TC) in calcareous soils has two components: inorganic carbon (IC) as calcite and or dolomite and organic carbon (OC) in the soil organic matter. The IC must be measured and subtracted from TC to obtain OC. Our objective was to develop a simple gravimetric technique to quantify IC. Th...

  13. Rapid Field Measurement of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Based on CO{sub 2} Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    VESPER, DJ, Edenborn, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) is commonly measured in water and is an important parameter for understanding carbonate equilibrium, carbon cycling, and water-rock interaction. While accurate measurements can be made in the analytical laboratory, we have developed a rapid, portable technique that can be used to obtain accurate and precise data in the field as well.

  14. Uptake of natural and anthropogenic carbon by the Labrador Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terenzi, F.; Hall, T. M.; Khatiwala, S.; Rodehacke, C. B.; LeBel, D. A.

    2007-03-01

    We apply to Classical Labrador Sea Water (CLSW) the transit-time distribution (TTD) method to estimate the inventory and uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (C ant ). A model of TTDs representing bulk-advection and diffusive mixing is constrained with CFC11 data. The constrained TTDs are used to propagate C ant into CLSW, allowing the air-sea disequilibrium to evolve consistently. C ant in the Labrador Sea (LS) surface waters cannot keep pace with increasing atmospheric CO2 and is highly undersaturated. Our best estimate for 2001 is an anthropogenic inventory of 1.0 Gt C and an uptake of 0.02 Gt C/year. By additionally using the constraint of present-day CO2 measurements, we estimate that the preindustrial LS was neutral or a weak source of CO2 to the atmosphere. Our estimates are subject to possible error due to the assumption of steady-state transport and carbon biochemistry.

  15. Controls of streamwater dissolved inorganic carbon dynamics in a forested watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finlay, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    I investigated controls of stream dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) sources and cycling along a stream size and productivity gradient in a temperate forested watershed in northern California. Dissolved CO2 (CO2 (aq)) dynamics in heavily shaded streams contrasted strongly with those of larger, open canopied sites. In streams with canopy cover > 97%, CO2 (aq) was highest during baseflow periods (up to 540 ??M) and was negatively related to discharge. Effects of algal photosynthesis on CO2 (aq) were minimal and stream CO2 (aq) was primarily controlled by groundwater CO2 (aq) inputs and degassing losses to the atmosphere. In contrast to the small streams. CO2 (aq) in larger, open-canopied streams was often below atmospheric levels at midday during baseflow and was positively related to discharge. Here, stream CO2 (aq) was strongly influenced by the balance between autotrophic and heterotrophic processes. Dynamics of HCO3- were less complex. HCO3- and Ca2+ were positively correlated, negatively related to discharge, and showed no pattern with stream size. Stable carbon isotope ratios of DIC (i.e. ??13C DIC) increased with stream size and discharge, indicating contrasting sources of DIC to streams and rivers. During summer baseflows, ??13C DIC were 13C-depleted in the smallest streams (minimum of -17.7???) due to the influence of CO2 (aq) derived from microbial respiration and HCO3- derived from carbonate weathering. ??13C DIC were higher (up to -6.6???) in the larger streams and rivers due to invasion of atmospheric CO2 enhanced by algal CO2 (aq) uptake. While small streams were influenced by groundwater inputs, patterns in CO2 (aq) and evidence from stable isotopes demonstrate the strong influence of stream metabolism and CO2 exchange with the atmosphere on stream and river carbon cycles.

  16. Solute specific scaling of inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus uptake in streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, R. O., Jr.; Baker, M. A.; Rosi-Marshall, E. J.; Tank, J. L.

    2013-04-01

    Stream ecosystem processes such as nutrient cycling may vary with stream position in the watershed. Using a scaling approach, we examined the relationship between stream size and nutrient uptake length, which represents the mean distance that a dissolved solute travels prior to removal from the water column. Ammonium uptake length increased proportionally with stream size measured as specific discharge (discharge/stream width) with a scaling exponent = 1.01. In contrast, the scaling exponent for nitrate (NO3-) was 1.19 and for soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) was 1.35, suggesting that uptake lengths for these nutrients increased more rapidly than increases in specific discharge. Additionally, the ratio of nitrogen (N) uptake length to SRP uptake length declined with stream size; there was lower demand for SRP relative to N as stream size increased. Ammonium and NO3- uptake velocity positively related with stream metabolism, while SRP did not. Finally, we related the scaling of uptake length and specific discharge to that of stream length using Hack's law and downstream hydraulic geometry. Ammonium uptake length increased less than proportionally with distance from the headwaters, suggesting a strong role for larger streams and rivers in regulating nutrient transport.

  17. ULTRAVIOLET-B RADIATION EFFECTS ON INORGANIC NITROGEN UPTAKE BY NATURAL ASSEMBLAGES OF OCEANIC PLANKTON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ultraviolet-B radiation (UVBR: 290-320 nm) inhibited ammonium uptake (PNH4) and nitrate uptake (PNO4) in natural plankton assemblages collected during a transect from 37 degrees N in the Pacific Ocean. omparison of responses in PNH4 to ambient solar- and lamp-enhanced UVBR spectr...

  18. UPTAKE OF INORGANIC LEAD IN VITRO BY ISOLATED MITOCHONDRIA AND TISSUE SLICES OF RAT RENAL CORTEX

    EPA Science Inventory

    Slices of rat renal cortex were shown to take up Pb2+ during incubation in vitro; Pb2+ was also shown to enter mitochondria within the slices. The uptake of Pb2+ by isolated mitochondria was inhibited by N3-, La3+ and ruthenium red. A steady state of uptake was attained within 60...

  19. Global ocean carbon uptake: magnitude, variability and trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanninkhof, R.; Park, G.-H.; Takahashi, T.; Sweeney, C.; Feely, R.; Nojiri, Y.; Gruber, N.; Doney, S. C.; McKinley, G. A.; Lenton, A.; Le Quéré, C.; Heinze, C.; Schwinger, J.; Graven, H.; Khatiwala, S.

    2013-03-01

    The globally integrated sea-air anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) flux from 1990 to 2009 is determined from models and data-based approaches as part of the Regional Carbon Cycle Assessment and Processes (RECCAP) project. Numerical methods include ocean inverse models, atmospheric inverse models, and ocean general circulation models with parameterized biogeochemistry (OBGCMs). The median value of different approaches shows good agreement in average uptake. The best estimate of anthropogenic CO2 uptake for the time period based on a compilation of approaches is -2.0 Pg C yr-1. The interannual variability in the sea-air flux is largely driven by large-scale climate re-organizations and is estimated at 0.2 Pg C yr-1 for the two decades with some systematic differences between approaches. The largest differences between approaches are seen in the decadal trends. The trends range from -0.13 (Pg C yr-1) decade-1 to -0.50 (Pg C yr-1) decade-1 for the two decades under investigation. The OBGCMs and the data-based sea-air CO2 flux estimates show appreciably smaller decadal trends than estimates based on changes in carbon inventory suggesting that methods capable of resolving shorter timescales are showing a slowing of the rate of ocean CO2 uptake. RECCAP model outputs for five decades show similar differences in trends between approaches.

  20. Ecological Uptake and Depuration of Carbon Nanotubes by Lumbriculus variegatus

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Elijah J.; Huang, Qingguo; Weber, Walter J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Carbon nanotubes represent a class of nanomaterials having broad application potentials and documented cellular uptake and ecotoxicological effects that raise the possibility that they may bioaccumulate in living organisms. Objectives Radioactively labeled nanotubes were synthesized using a novel methane chemical vapor deposition procedure. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), and pyrene were spiked to sediment samples, and the respective uptake and depuration of these nanotubes and pyrene were assessed by the oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus. Results 14C-labeled carbon nanotubes were developed for these experiments to overcome significant previous limitations for quantifying nanotube materials in environmental and biological media. Biota-sediment accumulation factors for SWNTs and MWNTs were observed to be almost an order of magnitude lower than those for pyrene, a four-ringed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). The depuration behaviors of the oligochaete suggested that the nanotubes detected in these organisms were associated with sediments remaining in the organism guts and not absorbed into cellular tissues as was the pyrene. The results suggest that, unlike PAHs, purified carbon nanotubes do not readily absorb into organism tissues. PMID:18414633

  1. Elevated CO2 increases root uptake of organic and inorganic N in the desert shrub, Larrea tridentata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We quantified the effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 on root nitrogen (N) uptake and leaf carbon (C) turnover in the desert shrub, Larrea tridentata. We also examined the impact of elevated CO2 on soil N fluxes and plant-soil feedbacks. Seedlings of L. tridentata were grown in reconstituted Mojave...

  2. Determination of total dissolved inorganic carbon in freshwaters by reagent-free ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Polesello, Stefano; Tartari, Gabriele; Giacomotti, Paola; Mosello, Rosario; Cavalli, Silvano

    2006-06-16

    Studies of inorganic carbon cycle in natural waters provide important information on the biological productivity and buffer capacity. Determination of total inorganic carbon, alkalinity and dissolved carbon dioxide gives an indication of the balance between photosynthesis and respiration by biota, both within the water column and sediments, and carbon dioxide transfers from the water column to the atmosphere. There are few methods to measure and distinguish the different forms of inorganic carbon, but all require a measure or an indirect quantification of total inorganic carbon. A direct measurement of TIC in water is made possible by the introduction of electrolytic generated hydroxide eluent in ion chromatography which allows to detect a chromatographic peak for carbonate. The advantage of this method is that all the inorganic forms of carbon are converted in carbonate at eluent pH and can be detected as a single peak by conductivity detection. Repeatability of carbonate peak was evaluated at different levels from 0.02 to 6 mequiv.l(-1) both in high purity water and in real samples and ranged from 1 to 9%. The calibration curve was not linear and has to be fitted by a quadratic curve. Limit of detection was estimated to be 0.02 mequiv.l(-1). Accuracy has been estimated by comparing ion chromatography method with total inorganic carbon calculated from alkalinity and pH. The correlation between the two methods was good (R(2)=0.978, n=141). The IC method has been applied to different typologies of surface waters (alpine and subalpine lakes and rivers) characterised by different chemical characteristics (alkalinity from 0.05 to 2 mequiv.l(-1) and pH from 6.7 to 8.5) and low total organic carbon concentrations. This analytical method allowed to describe the distribution of TIC along the water column of two Italian deep lakes. PMID:16620857

  3. Coral Uptake of Inorganic Phosphorus and Nitrogen Negatively Affected by Simultaneous Changes in Temperature and pH

    PubMed Central

    Godinot, Claire; Houlbrèque, Fanny

    2011-01-01

    The effects of ocean acidification and elevated seawater temperature on coral calcification and photosynthesis have been extensively investigated over the last two decades, whereas they are still unknown on nutrient uptake, despite their importance for coral energetics. We therefore studied the separate and combined impacts of increases in temperature and pCO2 on phosphate, ammonium, and nitrate uptake rates by the scleractinian coral S. pistillata. Three experiments were performed, during 10 days i) at three pHT conditions (8.1, 7.8, and 7.5) and normal temperature (26°C), ii) at three temperature conditions (26°, 29°C, and 33°C) and normal pHT (8.1), and iii) at three pHT conditions (8.1, 7.8, and 7.5) and elevated temperature (33°C). After 10 days of incubation, corals had not bleached, as protein, chlorophyll, and zooxanthellae contents were the same in all treatments. However, photosynthetic rates significantly decreased at 33°C, and were further reduced for the pHT 7.5. The photosynthetic efficiency of PSII was only decreased by elevated temperature. Nutrient uptake rates were not affected by a change in pH alone. Conversely, elevated temperature (33°C) alone induced an increase in phosphate uptake but a severe decrease in nitrate and ammonium uptake rates, even leading to a release of nitrogen into seawater. Combination of high temperature (33°C) and low pHT (7.5) resulted in a significant decrease in phosphate and nitrate uptake rates compared to control corals (26°C, pHT = 8.1). These results indicate that both inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus metabolism may be negatively affected by the cumulative effects of ocean warming and acidification. PMID:21949839

  4. Photoproduction of dissolved inorganic carbon in Swedish lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, B.; Landelius, T.; Tranvik, L. J.

    2012-04-01

    A substantial fraction of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in inland waters is mineralized to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) during passage towards the sea. Both microbial and photochemical mineralization have a share but there is currently no landscape-scale estimate of the contribution of photomineralization to total lake carbon dioxide emissions, restricting our understanding of inland-water C cycling. We use 1) DOC absorbance spectra measured during autumn 2009 in water samples from 1074 lakes distributed across Sweden, 2) light attenuation coefficients estimated based on correlations with absorption coefficients as established from literature data, 3) cloud-corrected, below-water-surface downwelling scalar irradiance spectra derived by modeling radiative transfer in the atmosphere and transmission into the water and 4) an apparent quantum yield spectrum determined in a humic lake, to calculate spectra of DIC photoproduction from 280 to 600 nm and from the water surface down to the mean lake depths. For each lake, we calculate DIC photoproduction rates on a daily base and integrate to obtain yearly flux estimates. Preliminary model results calculated for July 2009 show that, even though water color differed largely (25%- and 75%-quantiles of specific UV absorption coefficients at 254 nm (SUV A254) of 6.4 and 9.6 L mg C-1 m-1, respectively), depth-integrated DIC photoproduction rates showed a relatively small variation with a 25%-quantile of 12.0 and a 75%-quantile of 13.1 mg C m-2 day-1. These rather similar DIC photoproduction rates are explained by their different depth distributions: The brownest lake with a SUV A254 of 12.9 L mg C-1 m-1 had large surface DIC photoproduction rates of 887.9 mg C m-3 day-1 but photons were quickly attenuated with depth, with DIC photoproduction rates falling below 1 mg C m-3 day-1 already at ¯ 0.2 m depth (depth-integrated rate of 14.2 mg C m-2 day-1). The clearest lake with a SUV A254 of 1.4 L mg C-1 m-1 had nearly 100

  5. Enhancement of inorganic Martian dust simulant with carbon component and its effects on key characteristics of glutamatergic neurotransmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Nazarova, Anastasiya; Borysov, Arseniy; Pastukhov, Artem; Pozdnyakova, Natalia; Dudarenko, Marina

    2016-07-01

    Evidence on the past existence of subsurface organic-bearing fluids on Mars was recently achieved basing on the investigation of organic carbon from the Tissint Martian meteorite (Lin et al., 2014). Tremendous amount of meteorites containing abundant carbon and carbon-enriched dust particles have reached the Earth daily (Pizzarello and Shock 2010). National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences/National Institute of Health panel of research scientists revealed recently that accumulating evidences suggest that nano-sized air pollution may have a significant impact on central nervous system in health and disease (Block et al., Neurotoxicology, 2012). During inhalation, nano-/microsized particles are efficiently deposited in nasal, tracheobronchial, and alveolar regions and can be transported to the central nervous system (Oberdorster et al., 2004). Based on above facts, the aims of this study were: 1) to upgrade inorganic Martian dust stimulant derived from volcanic ash (JSC-1a/JSC, ORBITEC Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, Wisconsin) by the addition of carbon components, that is, nanodiamonds; 2) to analyse acute effects of upgraded stimulant on the key characteristic of synaptic neurotransmission and to compare its effects with those of inorganic dust and carbon components per se. Acute administration of carbon-containing Martian dust analogue resulted in a significant decrease in Na+-dependent uptake of L-[14C]glutamate that is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS). The ambient level of the neurotransmitter in the preparation of isolated rat brain nerve terminals increased in the presence of carbon-contained Martian dust analogue. This fact indicated that carbon component of native Martian dust can have deleterious effects on extracellular glutamate homeostasis in the CNS, and so glutamatergic neurtransmission.

  6. Effects of land use on soil inorganic carbon stocks in the Russian Chernozem.

    PubMed

    Mikhailova, Elena A; Post, Christopher J

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about changes in soil inorganic carbon (SIC) stocks with depth and with land use in grassland ecosystems. This study was conducted to determine SIC stocks under different management regimes in the Mollisol, one of the typical soils in grasslands. Four sites were sampled: a native grassland field (not cultivated for at least 300 yr), an adjacent 50-yr continuous fallow field, a yearly cut hay field in the V.V. Alekhin Central-Chernozem Biosphere State Reserve in the Kursk region of Russia, and a continuously cropped field in the Experimental Station of the Kursk Institute of Agronomy and Soil Erosion Control. All sampled soils were classified as fine-silty, mixed, frigid Pachic Hapludolls. Significant differences occurred in SIC stocks between cultivated and grassland soil. The inorganic carbon stocks in the top 2 m were 107 Mg ha(-1) for the native grassland, 91 Mg ha(-1) for the yearly cut hay field, 242 Mg ha(-1) for the continuously cropped field, and 196 Mg ha(-1) for the 50-yr continuous fallow. The SIC was in the form of calcium carbonate and was mostly stored below the 1-m depth. The largest difference between inorganic carbon stocks was observed between the continuously cropped field and native grassland. The increase in inorganic carbon in the continuously cropped field and continuous fallow was attributed to initial cultivation and fertilization. Soil inorganic carbon in Mollisols is not accounted for in the current global carbon estimates. PMID:16825458

  7. Carbonation and CO{sub 2} uptake of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Keun-Hyeok; Seo, Eun-A; Tae, Sung-Ho

    2014-04-01

    This study developed a reliable procedure to assess the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) uptake of concrete by carbonation during the service life of a structure and by the recycling of concrete after demolition. To generalize the amount of absorbable CO{sub 2} per unit volume of concrete, the molar concentration of carbonatable constituents in hardened cement paste was simplified as a function of the unit content of cement, and the degree of hydration of the cement paste was formulated as a function of the water-to-cement ratio. The contribution of the relative humidity, type of finishing material for the concrete surface, and the substitution level of supplementary cementitious materials to the CO{sub 2} diffusion coefficient in concrete was reflected using various correction factors. The following parameters varying with the recycling scenario were also considered: the carbonatable surface area of concrete crusher-runs and underground phenomena of the decreased CO{sub 2} diffusion coefficient and increased CO{sub 2} concentration. Based on the developed procedure, a case study was conducted for an apartment building with a principal wall system and an office building with a Rahmen system, with the aim of examining the CO{sub 2} uptake of each structural element under different exposure environments during the service life and recycling of the building. As input data necessary for the case study, data collected from actual surveys conducted in 2012 in South Korea were used, which included data on the surrounding environments, lifecycle inventory database, life expectancy of structures, and recycling activity scenario. Ultimately, the CO{sub 2} uptake of concrete during a 100-year lifecycle (life expectancy of 40 years and recycling span of 60 years) was estimated to be 15.5%–17% of the CO{sub 2} emissions from concrete production, which roughly corresponds to 18%–21% of the CO{sub 2} emissions from the production of ordinary Portland cement. - Highlights: • CO

  8. Inorganic membranes for carbon capture and power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snider, Matthew T.

    Inorganic membranes are under consideration for cost-effective reductions of carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants, both in the capture of pollutants post-firing and in the direct electrochemical conversion of coal-derived fuels for improved plant efficiency. The suitability of inorganic membrane materials for these purposes stems as much from thermal and chemical stability in coal plant operating conditions as from high performance in gas separations and power generation. Hydrophilic, micro-porous zeolite membrane structures are attractive for separating CO2 from N2 in gaseous waste streams due to the attraction of CO2 to the membrane surface and micropore walls that gives the advantage to CO2 transport. Recent studies have indicated that retention of the templating agent used in zeolite synthesis can further block N2 from the micropore interior and significantly improve CO2/N2 selectivity. However, the role of the templating agent in micro-porous transport has not been well investigated. In this work, gas sorption studies were conducted by high-pressure thermo-gravimetric analysis on Zeolite Y membrane materials to quantify the effect of the templating agent on CO2, N2, and H2O adsorption/desorption, as well as to examine the effect of humidification on overall membrane performance. In equilibrium conditions, the N2 sorption enthalpy was nearly unchanged by the presence of the templating agent, but the N2 pore occupation was reduced ˜1000x. Thus, the steric nature of the blocking of N2 from the micropores by the templating agent was confirmed. CO2 and H2O sorption enthalpies were similarly unaffected by the templating agent, and the micropore occupations were only reduced as much as the void volume taken up by the templating agent. Thus, the steric blocking effect did not occur for molecules more strongly attracted to the micropore walls. Additionally, in time-transient measurements the CO 2 and H2O mobilities were significantly enhanced by the presence

  9. Inorganic membranes for carbon capture and power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snider, Matthew T.

    Inorganic membranes are under consideration for cost-effective reductions of carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants, both in the capture of pollutants post-firing and in the direct electrochemical conversion of coal-derived fuels for improved plant efficiency. The suitability of inorganic membrane materials for these purposes stems as much from thermal and chemical stability in coal plant operating conditions as from high performance in gas separations and power generation. Hydrophilic, micro-porous zeolite membrane structures are attractive for separating CO2 from N2 in gaseous waste streams due to the attraction of CO2 to the membrane surface and micropore walls that gives the advantage to CO2 transport. Recent studies have indicated that retention of the templating agent used in zeolite synthesis can further block N2 from the micropore interior and significantly improve CO2/N2 selectivity. However, the role of the templating agent in micro-porous transport has not been well investigated. In this work, gas sorption studies were conducted by high-pressure thermo-gravimetric analysis on Zeolite Y membrane materials to quantify the effect of the templating agent on CO2, N2, and H2O adsorption/desorption, as well as to examine the effect of humidification on overall membrane performance. In equilibrium conditions, the N2 sorption enthalpy was nearly unchanged by the presence of the templating agent, but the N2 pore occupation was reduced ˜1000x. Thus, the steric nature of the blocking of N2 from the micropores by the templating agent was confirmed. CO2 and H2O sorption enthalpies were similarly unaffected by the templating agent, and the micropore occupations were only reduced as much as the void volume taken up by the templating agent. Thus, the steric blocking effect did not occur for molecules more strongly attracted to the micropore walls. Additionally, in time-transient measurements the CO 2 and H2O mobilities were significantly enhanced by the presence

  10. Dissolved inorganic and organic nitrogen uptake in the coastal North Sea: A seasonal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moneta, Alessia; Veuger, Bart; van Rijswijk, Pieter; Meysman, Filip; Soetaert, Karline; Middelburg, Jack J.

    2014-06-01

    Nitrogen incorporation into total particulate suspended matter, hydrolysable amino acids and bacterial biomarker D-Alanine was assessed seasonally in the coastal North Sea using 15N-labeled ammonium, nitrate, nitrite and 15N- and 13C-labeled urea, glycine, leucine, phenylalanine, and two complex pools of dissolved organic matter (DOM) derived from algal and bacterial cultures (A-DOM, B-DOM). We investigated: 1) uptake rates for the various substrates and their contribution to total N uptake; 2) microbial preferences for the different N sources; 3) the coupling of C and N uptake from organic substrates; 4) the contribution of bacteria to the total microbial uptake of these substrates, and 5) the role of a complex pool of organic matter for plankton nutrition. Seasonality in the preferences for N substrates was observed, with A-DOM and B-DOM being preferred in autumn and winter whereas NH4+ was preferentially taken up in spring and summer. C and N uptake was coupled for all the organic substrates, except urea that was mainly used as a nitrogen source in summer and spring. Bacterial contribution to the uptake of A-DOM and B-DOM was, on an annual average, the lowest among the N-substrates. This suggests an important role for phytoplankton in the incorporation of complex organic matter and the importance of DOM for phytoplankton nutrition.

  11. Revised budget for the oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sarmiento, J.L.; Sundquist, E.T.

    1992-01-01

    TRACER-CALIBRATED models of the total uptake of anthropogenic CO2 by the world's oceans give estimates of about 2 gigatonnes carbon per year1, significantly larger than a recent estimate2 of 0.3-0.8 Gt C yr-1 for the synoptic air-to-sea CO2 influx. Although both estimates require that the global CO2 budget must be balanced by a large unknown terrestrial sink, the latter estimate implies a much larger terrestrial sink, and challenges the ocean model calculations on which previous CO2 budgets were based. The discrepancy is due in part to the net flux of carbon to the ocean by rivers and rain, which must be added to the synoptic air-to-sea CO2 flux to obtain the total oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2. Here we estimate the magnitude of this correction and of several other recently proposed adjustments to the synoptic air-sea CO2 exchange. These combined adjustments minimize the apparent inconsistency, and restore estimates of the terrestrial sink to values implied by the modelled oceanic uptake.

  12. The Stoichiometry between CO2 and H+ Fluxes Involved in the Transport of Inorganic Carbon in Cyanobacteria 1

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Teruo; Kaplan, Aaron

    1987-01-01

    The pH of the medium during CO2 uptake into the intracellular inorganic carbon (Ci) pool of a high CO2-requiring mutant (E1) and wild type of Anacystis nidulans R2 was measured. Experiments were performed under conditions where photosynthetic CO2 fixation is inhibited. There was an acidification of the medium during CO2 uptake in the light and an alkalization during CO2 efflux after darkening. A one to one stoichiometry existed between the amounts of H+ appearing in the medium and CO2 taken up into the intracellular Ci pool, regardless of the carbon species transported. The results indicate that (a) CO2 is taken up simultaneously with an efflux of equimolar H+, probably produced as a result of CO2 hydration during transport and (b) HCO3− produced by hydration of CO2 in the medium was transported into the cells without accompanying net flux of H+ or OH−. The influx and efflux of Ci during Ci transport produced nonequilibrium between CO2 and HCO3− in the medium, with the concentration of HCO3− being higher than that expected under equilibrium conditions. The nonequilibrium was present even under the conditions where the influx of Ci is compensated by its efflux. The direction of this nonequilibrium suggested that efflux of HCO3− occurs during uptake of Ci. PMID:16665357

  13. Carbons for lithium ion cells prepared using sepiolite as an inorganic template.

    SciTech Connect

    Sandi, G.

    1998-12-09

    Carbon anodes for Li ion cells have been prepared by the in situ polymerization of olefins such as propylene and ethylene in the channels of sepiolite clay mineral. Upon dissolution of the inorganic framework, a disordered carbon was obtained. The carbon was tested as anode in coin cells, yielding a reversible capacity of 633 mAh/g, 1.70 times higher than the capacity delivered by graphitic carbon, assuming 100% efficiency. The coulombic efficiency was higher than 90%.

  14. Inorganic and organic nitrogen uptake by phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria in the stratified Mid-Atlantic Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Paul B.; Sanderson, Marta P.; Frischer, Marc E.; Brofft, Jennifer; Booth, Melissa G.; Kerkhof, Lee J.; Bronk, Deborah A.

    2010-08-01

    Little is known about the relative importance of inorganic and organic nitrogen (N) sources in fueling production of phytoplankton versus heterotrophic bacteria on the continental shelf. This issue was addressed during two diel experiments conducted in the Mid-Atlantic Bight at the Long-term Ecosystem Observatory, LEO-15, off southern New Jersey. Uptake of 15N-labeled ammonium (NH 4+), nitrate (NO 3-), and nitrite (NO 2-), and dual-labeled ( 15N and 13C) urea and dissolved free amino acids was measured in water taken from the surface and bottom mixed layers approximately every 4 h over two 24 h periods in July 2002. Two methods were used to quantify 15N uptake rates: (1) traditional filtration into various phytoplankton and bacterial size classes, and (2) flow cytometric (FCM) sorting of autotrophic cells based on the presence of chlorophyll autofluorescence. Due to a strong pycnocline, the nutrient composition was quite distinct between the surface and bottom mixed layers. Dissolved organic N (DON) comprised >99% of the total dissolved N (TDN) pool in surface waters, whereas the bottom-water TDN pool was roughly divided between NH 4+, NO 3-, and DON. Urea was the dominant N form used by all fractions at the surface, and although phytoplankton >3 μm was responsible for most of the urea uptake, bacterial use was detected using stable isotopes and also suggested by ureC sequence analysis. The majority of ureC sequences recovered from the 0.2-0.8 μm fraction belonged to members of the Alphaproteobacteria (46%), whereas those of the 0.8-3.0 μm size class consisted primarily of Cyanobacteria (70%). In contrast to the surface, N uptake in the bottom layer was dominated by NH 4+. The bacterial fraction was responsible for 20-49% of the size-fractionated NH 4+ and NO 3- uptake in surface samples and 36-93% at the bottom. These results suggest that organic N, such as urea, is a viable source of N nutrition to phytoplankton forced to compete with heterotrophic bacteria

  15. Temperature Dependence of Photodegradation of Dissolved Organic Matter to Dissolved Inorganic Carbon and Particulate Organic Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Porcal, Petr; Dillon, Peter J.; Molot, Lewis A.

    2015-01-01

    Photochemical transformation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) has been studied for more than two decades. Usually, laboratory or “in-situ” experiments are used to determine photodegradation variables. A common problem with these experiments is that the photodegradation experiments are done at higher than ambient temperature. Five laboratory experiments were done to determine the effect of temperature on photochemical degradation of DOM. Experimental results showed strong dependence of photodegradation on temperature. Mathematical modeling of processes revealed that two different pathways engaged in photochemical transformation of DOM to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) strongly depend on temperature. Direct oxidation of DOM to DIC dominated at low temperatures while conversion of DOM to intermediate particulate organic carbon (POC) prior to oxidation to DIC dominated at high temperatures. It is necessary to consider this strong dependence when the results of laboratory experiments are interpreted in regard to natural processes. Photodegradation experiments done at higher than ambient temperature will necessitate correction of rate constants. PMID:26106898

  16. Inorganic carbon and fossil organic carbon are source of bias for quantification of sequestered carbon in mine spoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vindušková, Olga; Frouz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Carbon sequestration in mine soils has been studied as a possibility to mitigate the rising atmospheric CO2 levels and to improve mine soil quality (Vindu\\vsková and Frouz, 2013). Moreover, these soils offer an unique opportunity to study soil carbon dynamics using the chronosequence approach (using a set of sites of different age on similar parent material). However, quantification of sequestered carbon in mine soils is often complicated by fossil organic carbon (e.g., from coal or kerogen) or inorganic carbon present in the spoil. We present a methodology for quantification of both of these common constituents of mine soils. Our recommendations are based on experiments done on post-mining soils in Sokolov basin, Czech Republic. Here, fossil organic carbon is present mainly as kerogen Type I and II and represents 2-6 wt.% C in these soils. Inorganic carbon in these soils is present mainly as siderite (FeCO3), calcite (CaCO3), and dolomite (CaMg(CO3)2). All of these carbonates are often found in the overburden of coal seams thus being a common constituent of post-mining soils in the world. Vindu\\vsková O, Frouz J, 2013. Soil carbon accumulation after open-cast coal and oil shale mining in Northern Hemisphere: a quantitative review. ENVIRONMENTAL EARTH SCIENCES, 69: 1685-1698. Vindu\\vsková O, Dvořáček V, Prohasková A, Frouz J. 2014. Distinguishing recent and fossil organic matter - A critical step in evaluation of post-mining soil development - using near infrared spectroscopy. ECOLOGICAL ENGINEERING. 73: 643-648. Vindu\\vsková O, Sebag D, Cailleau G, Brus J, Frouz J. 2015. Methodological comparison for quantitative analysis of fossil and recently derived carbon in mine soils with high content of aliphatic kerogen. ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY, 89-90:14-22.

  17. Bioengineering Aspects of Inorganic Carbon Supply to Mass Algal Cultures: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, J. C.

    1981-04-01

    Regardless of the application, the basic biotechnology of large-scale outdoor cultures involves many common features, particularly in the requirement for adequate nutrients such as carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus to ensure that light is the sole limiting yield determinant. Whereas the required quantities of nitrogen and phosphorus are fairly simple, to estimate, those for inorganic carbon are far more complex.

  18. Anomalous carbon uptake in Australia as seen by GOSAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detmers, R. G.; Hasekamp, O.; Aben, I.; Houweling, S.; Leeuwen, T. T.; Butz, A.; Landgraf, J.; Köhler, P.; Guanter, L.; Poulter, B.

    2015-10-01

    One of the unanswered questions of climate change is how the biospheric uptake of carbon responds to events such as droughts and floods. Especially, semiarid regions have received interest recently, as they can respond very rapidly to changing environmental conditions. Here we report on a large enhanced carbon sink over Australia from the end of 2010 to early 2012 detected using the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT). This enhanced sink coincides with the strong La Niña episode, accompanied by record-breaking amounts of precipitation. This precipitation led to an enhanced growth of vegetation, resulting in large increases in biospheric carbon uptake in line with increased levels of vegetation fluorescence. An inversion based on the satellite retrievals confirms this strong anomaly in the sink of roughly 0.77 ± 0.10 Pg C yr-1 or 1.5 ± 0.2 Pg C in total for the April 2010 to December 2011 period, which corresponds to 25% of the multiyear annual average gross primary production of the Australian biosphere.

  19. Inorganic carbon turnover caused by digestion of carbonate sands and metabolic activity of holothurians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Kenneth; Silverman, Jacob; Kravitz, Ben; Rivlin, Tanya; Schneider-Mor, Aya; Barbosa, Sergio; Byrne, Maria; Caldeira, Ken

    2013-11-01

    Recent measurements have shown that holothurians (sea cucumbers) may play an important role in the cycling of CaCO3 in tropical coral reef systems through ingestion and processing of carbonate sediment. In this report, we present estimates of inorganic carbon turnover rates determined from laboratory incubations of Holothuria atra, Holothuria leucospilota and Stichopus herrmanni. The pH values of the gut lumen ranged from 7.0 to 7.6 when digestive tracts were filled with sediment compared with 6.1-6.7 in animals with empty digestive tracts. Empty gut volume estimates for H. atra and S. herrmanni were 36 ± 4 mL and 151 ± 14 mL, respectively. Based on these measurements and the density and porosity of carbonate sediments of coral reefs, it is estimated that these species process 19 ± 2 kg and 80 ± 7 kg CaCO3 sand yr-1 per individual, respectively. The annual CaCO3 dissolution rates per H. atra and S. herrmanni individual are estimated to be 6.5 ± 1.9 g and 9.6 ± 1.4 g, respectively, suggesting that 0.05 ± 0.02% and 0.1 ± 0.02% of the CaCO3 processed through their gut annually is dissolved. During incubations the CaCO3 dissolution of the fecal casts was 0.07 ± 0.01%, 0.04 ± 0.01% and 0.21 ± 0.05% for H. atra, H. leucospilota and S. herrmanni, respectively. The CaCO3 saturation state in the incubation seawater decreased markedly due to a greater increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) relative to total alkalinity (AT) as a result of respiration by the animals. Our results support the hypothesis that deposit feeders such as sea cucumbers play an important ecological role in the coral reef CaCO3 cycle.

  20. Adsorption uptake of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes and activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, A. J.; Lim, Hyung-nam; Kilduff, James E.

    2012-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise as high performance materials for adsorbing priority pollutants from water and wastewater. This study compared uptake of two contaminants of interest in drinking water treatment (atrazine and trichloroethylene) by nine different types of carbonaceous adsorbents: three different types of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), three different sized multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs), two granular activated carbons (GACs) and a powdered activated carbon (PAC). On a mass basis, the activated carbons exhibited the highest uptake, followed by SWNTs and MWNTs. However, metallic impurities in SWNTs and multiple walls in MWNTs contribute to adsorbent mass but do not contribute commensurate adsorption sites. Therefore, when uptake was normalized by purity (carbon content) and surface area (instead of mass), the isotherms collapsed and much of the CNT data was comparable to the activated carbons, indicating that these two characteristics drive much of the observed differences between activated carbons and CNT materials. For the limited data set here, the Raman D:G ratio as a measure of disordered non-nanotube graphitic components was not a good predictor of adsorption from solution. Uptake of atrazine by MWNTs having a range of lengths and diameters was comparable and their Freundlich isotherms were statistically similar, and we found no impact of solution pH on the adsorption of either atrazine or trichloroethylene in the range of naturally occurring surface water (pH = 5.7-8.3). Experiments were performed using a suite of model aromatic compounds having a range of π-electron energy to investigate the role of π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions on organic compound uptake by SWNTs. For the compounds studied, hydrophobic interactions were the dominant mechanism in the uptake by both SWNTs and activated carbon. However, comparing the uptake of naphthalene and phenanthrene by activated carbon and SWNTs, size exclusion effects

  1. Adsorption uptake of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes and activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Brooks, A J; Lim, Hyung-nam; Kilduff, James E

    2012-07-27

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise as high performance materials for adsorbing priority pollutants from water and wastewater. This study compared uptake of two contaminants of interest in drinking water treatment (atrazine and trichloroethylene) by nine different types of carbonaceous adsorbents: three different types of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), three different sized multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs), two granular activated carbons (GACs) and a powdered activated carbon (PAC). On a mass basis, the activated carbons exhibited the highest uptake, followed by SWNTs and MWNTs. However, metallic impurities in SWNTs and multiple walls in MWNTs contribute to adsorbent mass but do not contribute commensurate adsorption sites. Therefore, when uptake was normalized by purity (carbon content) and surface area (instead of mass), the isotherms collapsed and much of the CNT data was comparable to the activated carbons, indicating that these two characteristics drive much of the observed differences between activated carbons and CNT materials. For the limited data set here, the Raman D:G ratio as a measure of disordered non-nanotube graphitic components was not a good predictor of adsorption from solution. Uptake of atrazine by MWNTs having a range of lengths and diameters was comparable and their Freundlich isotherms were statistically similar, and we found no impact of solution pH on the adsorption of either atrazine or trichloroethylene in the range of naturally occurring surface water (pH = 5.7-8.3). Experiments were performed using a suite of model aromatic compounds having a range of π-electron energy to investigate the role of π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions on organic compound uptake by SWNTs. For the compounds studied, hydrophobic interactions were the dominant mechanism in the uptake by both SWNTs and activated carbon. However, comparing the uptake of naphthalene and phenanthrene by activated carbon and SWNTs, size exclusion effects

  2. Dissolved inorganic carbon budgets in the eastern subpolar North Atlantic in the 2000s from in situ data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunino, Patricia; Lherminier, Pascale; Mercier, Herlé; Padín, Xose A.; Ríos, Aida F.; Pérez, Fiz F.

    2015-11-01

    The subpolar North Atlantic (SPNA) is important in the global carbon cycle because of the deep water ventilation processes that lead to both high uptake of atmospheric CO2 and large inventories of anthropogenic CO2 (Cant). Thus, it is crucial to understand its response to increasing anthropogenic pressures. In this work, the budgets of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), Cant and natural DIC (DICnat) in the eastern SPNA in the 2000s, are jointly analyzed using in situ data. The DICnat budget is found to be in steady state, confirming a long-standing hypothesis from in situ data for the first time. The biological activity is driving the uptake of natural CO2 from the atmosphere. The Cant increase in the ocean is solely responsible of the DIC storage rate which is explained by advection of Cant from the subtropics (65%) and Cant air-sea flux (35%). These results demonstrate that the Cant is accumulating in the SPNA without affecting the natural carbon cycle.

  3. AVAILABILITY AND UPTAKE OF INORGANIC NITROGEN IN A MIXED OLD-GROWTH CONIFEROUS FOREST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rates of nitrogen mineralization, nitrification and an index of ammonium and nitrate uptake were monitored in a mixed old-growth stand of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) and western redcedar (Thuja plicata) over a two year period. uried ba...

  4. On the role of heat fluxes in the uptake of anthropogenic carbon in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VöLker, Christoph; Wallace, Douglas W. R.; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter A.

    2002-12-01

    The influence of the overturning circulation on the anthropogenic carbon sink in the North Atlantic is investigated with a simple box model. The net air-sea flux of anthropogenic carbon in the North Atlantic is the result of two opposing fluxes: The first is the uptake caused by the disequilibrium between the rapidly rising atmospheric pCO2 and the dissolved carbon content in the ocean, depending mainly on the water exchange rate between mixed layer and interior North Atlantic ocean. Superimposed is a second flux, related to the northward transport of heat within the Atlantic basin, that is directed out of the ocean, contrary to conventional wisdom. It is caused by a latitudinal gradient in the ratio of seawater alkalinity to total dissolved inorganic carbon that in turn is related to the cooling and freshening of surface water on its way north. This flux depends strongly on the vertical structure of the upper branch of the overturning circulation and on the distribution of undersaturation and supersaturation of CO2 in Atlantic surface waters. A data-based estimate of anthropogenic carbon inventory in the North Atlantic is consistent with a dominance of the disequilibrium flux over the heat-flux-related outgassing at the present time, but, in our model, does not place a strong constraint on the net anthropogenic air-sea flux. Stabilization of the atmospheric pCO2 on a higher level will change the relative role of the two opposing fluxes, making the North Atlantic a source of anthropogenic carbon to the atmosphere. We discuss implications for the interpretation of numerical carbon cycle models.

  5. Inorganic Carbon Turnover caused by Digestion of Carbonate Sands and Metabolic Activity of Holothurians

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Kenneth; Silverman, Jacob; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Rivlin, Tanya; Schneider-Mor, Aya; Barbosa, Sergio; Byrne, Maria; Caldeira, Ken

    2013-11-20

    Recent measurements have shown that holothurians (sea cucumbers) play an important role in the cycling of CaCO3 in tropical coral reef systems through ingestion and processing of carbonate sediment. In this study inorganic additional aspects of carbon turnover were determined in laboratory incubations of Holothuria atra, H. leucospilota and Stichopus herrmanni from One Tree Reef, Great Barrier Reef. The pH values of the gut lumen ranged from 6.1 to 6.7 in animals with empty digestive tracts as opposed to 7.0 to 7.6 when digestive tracts were filled with sediment. Empty gut volume estimates for H. atra and S. herrmanni were 36 ± 4 mL and 151 ± 14 mL, respectively. Based on these measurements it is estimated that these species process 19 ± 2kg and 80 ± 7kg CaCO3 sand yr-1 per individual, respectively. The annual dissolution rates of H. atra and S. herrmanni of 6.5±1.9g and 9.6±1.4g, respectively, suggest that 0.05±0.02% and 0.1±0.02% of the CaCO3 processed through their gut annually is dissolved. During the incubations the CaCO3 dissolution was 0.07±0.01%, 0.04±0.01% and 0.21±0.05% of the fecal casts for H. atra, H. leucospilota and S. herrmanni, respectively. The CaCO3 saturation state for both aragonite and calcite minerals during laboratory incubations decreased markedly due to a greater increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) relative to total alkalinity (AT) as a result of respiration by the animals. Our results support the hypothesis that deposit feeders such as sea cucumbers play an important ecological role in the coral reef CaCO3 cycle.

  6. Manure and fertilizer effects on organic and inorganic carbon losses and budget for an irrigated corn field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about inorganic fertilizer or manure effects on organic carbon (OC) and inorganic C (IC) losses from a furrow irrigated field, particularly in the context of other system C gains or losses. In 2003 and 2004, we measured dissolved organic and inorganic C (DOC, DIC), particulate OC and...

  7. A green sorbent of esterified egg-shell membrane for highly selective uptake of arsenate and speciation of inorganic arsenic.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Li; Gu, Cui-Bo; Yang, Ting; Sun, Yan; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2013-11-15

    Egg-shell membrane (ESM) is a promising adsorbent for heavy metal uptake. However, carboxylic groups on ESM surface barrier arsenic adsorption. Herein, ESM is modified by esterification and the methyl esterified egg-shell membrane (MESM) possesses positive charge within pH 1-9. As a novel green sorbent material, MESM exhibits 200-fold improvement on sorption capacity of arsenate with respect to bare ESM. It presents an ultra-high selectivity of 256:1 toward arsenate against arsenite. At pH 6, 100% sorption efficiency is achieved for 2 μg L(-1) As(V) by 10 mg MESM, while virtually no adsorption of As(III) is observed. This provides great potential for selective sorption of arsenate in the presence of arsenite. By loading 4.0 mL sample within 0.05-5.00 μg L(-1) As(V) followed by elution with 300 μL HCl (1.5 mol L(-1)), a detection limit of 15 ng L(-1) is obtained along with a RSD of 3.5% at 0.5 μg L(-1). Total inorganic arsenic is achieved by converting As(III) to As(V) and following the same sorption process. This procedure is applied for arsenate determination and inorganic arsenic speciation in Hijiki and water samples. The results are confirmed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and spiking recovery. PMID:24148462

  8. Inorganic nitrogen control in wastewater treatment ponds from a fish farm (Orbetello, Italy): denitrification versus Ulva uptake.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, Marco; Nizzoli, Daniele; Naldi, Mariachiara; Vezzulli, Luigi; Porrello, Salvatore; Lenzi, Mauro; Viaroli, Pierluigi

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the N removal efficiency of an Ulva-based phytotreatment system receiving wastewaters from a land-based fish farm (Orbetello, Italy), to identify the main biogeochemical pathways involved and to provide basic guidelines for treatment implementation and management. Fluxes of O2 and nutrients in bare and in Ulva colonised sediments were assessed by light/dark core incubations; denitrification by the isotope pairing technique and Ulva growth by in situ incubation of macroalgal disks in cages. O2 and nutrient budgets were estimated as sum of individual processes and further verified by 24-h investigations of overall inlet and outlet loads. Ulva uptake (up to 7.8 mmol Nm(-2) h(-1)) represented a net sink for water column and regenerated NH4+ whilst N removal via denitrification (10-170 micromol Nm(-2) h(-1)) accounted for a small percentage of inorganic nitrogen load (<5%). Laboratory experiments demonstrated a high potential for denitrification (over 800 microM Nm(-2) h(-1)) indicating that N loss could be enhanced. The control of Ulva standing stocks by optimised harvesting of surplus biomass may represent an effective strategy to maximise DIN removal and could result in the assimilation of approximately 50% of produced inorganic nitrogen. PMID:16045942

  9. Assessment of methods for organic and inorganic carbon quantification in carbonate-containing Mediterranean soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apesteguia, Marcos; Virto, Iñigo; Plante, Alain

    2014-05-01

    Quantification of soil organic matter (SOM) stocks and fluxes continues to be an important endeavor in assessments of soil quality, and more broadly in assessments of ecosystem functioning. The quantification of SOM in alkaline, carbonate-containing soils, such as those found in Mediterranean areas, is complicated by the need to differentiate between organic carbon (OC) and inorganic carbon (IC), which continues to present methodological challenges. Acidification is frequently used to eliminate carbonates prior to soil OC quantification, but when performed in the liquid phase, can promote the dissolution and loss of a portion of the OC. Acid fumigation (AF) is increasingly preferred for carbonate removal, but its effectiveness is difficult to assess using conventional elemental and isotopic analyses. In addition, the potential effects of AF on SOM are not well characterized. The objective of the current study was to apply a multi-method approach to determine the efficacy of carbonate removal by AF and its effects on the residual SOM. We selected a set of 24 surface agricultural soils representing a large range of textures, SOM contents and presumed carbonate contents. For each soil, OC was determined using wet combustion (Walkley-Black) and IC was determined using the calcimeter method. Samples were then subjected to elemental (total C) and isotopic (δ13C) analyses by dry combustion using a Costech autoanalyzer coupled to a Thermo Finnigan Delta Plus isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) before and after AF. IC was equated to total C determined after fumigation, and OC was estimated as the different in total C before and after AF. Samples were also subjected to ramped oxidation using a Netzsch STA109 PC Luxx thermal analyzer coupled to a LICOR 820A infrared gas analyzer (IRGA). Quantification of OC was performed using evolved gas analysis of CO2 (CO2-EGA) in the exothermic region 200-500° C associated with organic matter combustion. IC was quantified by CO2-EGA

  10. Inorganic metal hydroxide nanoparticles for targeted cellular uptake through clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jae-Min; Choi, Soo-Jin; Lee, Go-Eun; Kim, Jung-Eun; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2009-01-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) are biocompatible materials which can be used as drug-delivery nanovehicles. In order to define the optimum size of LDH nanoparticles for efficient cellular uptake and drug-delivery pathway, we prepared different sized LDH nanoparticles with narrow size distribution by modulating the crystal growth rate, and labelled each LDH particle with a fluorophore using a silane coupling reaction. The cellular uptake rate of LDHs was found to be highly dependent on particle size (50 > 200 > or = 100 > 350 nm), whose range of 50 to 200 nm was selectively internalized into cells through clathrin-mediated endocytosis with enhanced permeability and retention. Our study clearly shows that not only the particle size plays an important role in the endocytic pathway and processing, but also the size control of LDH nanoparticles results in their targeted uptake to site-specific clathrin-mediated endocytosis. This result provides a new perspective for the design of LDH nanoparticles with maximum ability towards targeted drug delivery. PMID:18988236

  11. Temperature dependence of inorganic nitrogen uptake: Reduced affinity for nitrate at suboptimal temperatures in both algae and bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Reay, D.S.; Nedwell, D.B.; Priddle, J.; Ellis-Evans, J.C.

    1999-06-01

    Nitrate utilization and ammonium utilization were studied by using three algal isolates, six bacterial isolates, and a range of temperatures in chemostat and batch cultures. The authors quantified affinities for both substrates by determining specific affinities based on estimates of kinetic parameters obtained from chemostat experiments. At suboptimal temperatures, the residual concentrations of nitrate in batch cultures and the steady-state concentrations of nitrate in chemostat cultures both increased. The specific affinity for nitrate was strongly dependent on temperature and consistently decreased at temperatures below the optimum temperature. In contrast, the steady-state concentrations of ammonium remained relatively constant over the same temperature range, and the specific affinity for ammonium exhibited no clear temperature dependence. This is the first time that a consistent effect of low temperature on affinity for nitrate has been identified for psychrophilic, mesophilic, and thermophilic bacteria and algae. The different responses of nitrate uptake and ammonium uptake to temperature imply that there is increasing dependence on ammonium as an inorganic nitrogen source at low temperatures.

  12. Interannual stability of organic to inorganic carbon production on a coral atoll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, Lester; Albright, Rebecca; Hosfelt, Jessica; Nebuchina, Yana; Ninokawa, Aaron; Rivlin, Tanya; Sesboüé, Marine; Wolfe, Kennedy; Caldeira, Ken

    2016-04-01

    Ocean acidification has the potential to adversely affect marine calcifying organisms, with substantial ocean ecosystem impacts projected over the 21st century. Characterizing the in situ sensitivity of calcifying ecosystems to natural variability in carbonate chemistry may improve our understanding of the long-term impacts of ocean acidification. We explore the potential for intensive temporal sampling to isolate the influence of carbonate chemistry on community calcification rates of a coral reef and compare the ratio of organic to inorganic carbon production to previous studies at the same location. Even with intensive temporal sampling, community calcification displays only a weak dependence on carbonate chemistry variability. However, across three years of sampling, the ratio of organic to inorganic carbon production is highly consistent. Although further work is required to quantify the spatial variability associated with such ratios, this suggests that these measurements have the potential to indicate the response of coral reefs to ongoing disturbance, ocean acidification, and climate change.

  13. Nitric oxide generated by nitrate reductase increases nitrogen uptake capacity by inducing lateral root formation and inorganic nitrogen uptake under partial nitrate nutrition in rice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huwei; Li, Jiao; Song, Wenjing; Tao, Jinyuan; Huang, Shuangjie; Chen, Si; Hou, Mengmeng; Xu, Guohua; Zhang, Yali

    2015-05-01

    Increasing evidence shows that partial nitrate nutrition (PNN) can be attributed to improved plant growth and nitrogen-use efficiency (NUE) in rice. Nitric oxide (NO) is a signalling molecule involved in many physiological processes during plant development and nitrogen (N) assimilation. It remains unclear whether molecular NO improves NUE through PNN. Two rice cultivars (cvs Nanguang and Elio), with high and low NUE, respectively, were used in the analysis of NO production, nitrate reductase (NR) activity, lateral root (LR) density, and (15)N uptake under PNN, with or without NO production donor and inhibitors. PNN increased NO accumulation in cv. Nanguang possibly through the NIA2-dependent NR pathway. PNN-mediated NO increases contributed to LR initiation, (15)NH₄(+)/(15)NO₃(-) influx into the root, and levels of ammonium and nitrate transporters in cv. Nanguang but not cv. Elio. Further results revealed marked and specific induction of LR initiation and (15)NH₄(+)/(15)NO₃(-) influx into the roots of plants supplied with NH₄(+)+sodium nitroprusside (SNP) relative to those supplied with NH₄(+) alone, and considerable inhibition upon the application of cPTIO or tungstate (NR inhibitor) in addition to PNN, which is in agreement with the change in NO fluorescence in the two rice cultivars. The findings suggest that NO generated by the NR pathway plays a pivotal role in improving the N acquisition capacity by increasing LR initiation and the inorganic N uptake rate, which may represent a strategy for rice plants to adapt to a fluctuating nitrate supply and increase NUE. PMID:25784715

  14. Nitric oxide generated by nitrate reductase increases nitrogen uptake capacity by inducing lateral root formation and inorganic nitrogen uptake under partial nitrate nutrition in rice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Huwei; Li, Jiao; Song, Wenjing; Tao, Jinyuan; Huang, Shuangjie; Chen, Si; Hou, Mengmeng; Xu, Guohua; Zhang, Yali

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that partial nitrate nutrition (PNN) can be attributed to improved plant growth and nitrogen-use efficiency (NUE) in rice. Nitric oxide (NO) is a signalling molecule involved in many physiological processes during plant development and nitrogen (N) assimilation. It remains unclear whether molecular NO improves NUE through PNN. Two rice cultivars (cvs Nanguang and Elio), with high and low NUE, respectively, were used in the analysis of NO production, nitrate reductase (NR) activity, lateral root (LR) density, and 15N uptake under PNN, with or without NO production donor and inhibitors. PNN increased NO accumulation in cv. Nanguang possibly through the NIA2-dependent NR pathway. PNN-mediated NO increases contributed to LR initiation, 15NH4 +/15NO3 – influx into the root, and levels of ammonium and nitrate transporters in cv. Nanguang but not cv. Elio. Further results revealed marked and specific induction of LR initiation and 15NH4 +/15NO3 – influx into the roots of plants supplied with NH4 ++sodium nitroprusside (SNP) relative to those supplied with NH4 + alone, and considerable inhibition upon the application of cPTIO or tungstate (NR inhibitor) in addition to PNN, which is in agreement with the change in NO fluorescence in the two rice cultivars. The findings suggest that NO generated by the NR pathway plays a pivotal role in improving the N acquisition capacity by increasing LR initiation and the inorganic N uptake rate, which may represent a strategy for rice plants to adapt to a fluctuating nitrate supply and increase NUE. PMID:25784715

  15. Organic-inorganic hybrid of chitosan/organoclay bionanocomposites for hexavalent chromium uptake.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sadanand; Mishra, Shivani B

    2011-09-15

    Organic-inorganic hybrid of chitosan and nanoclay (Cloisite 10A) was chosen to develop a nanomaterial with combine properties of hydrophilicity of an organic polycation and adsorption capacity of inorganic polyanion. The chitosan/clay nanocomposite (CCN) was prepared by solvent casting method. The material synthesis was found most efficient in adsorbent behavior was studied in detail taking Cr(VI) as representative ion. The chemical, structural and textural characteristics of the material were determined by FTIR, XRD, TEM, SEM and EDAX analysis. XRD and TEM results indicated that an exfoliated structure was formed with addition of small amounts of MMT-Na+(montmorillonite-Na(+)) to the chitosan matrix. These composite material were used for the removal of chromium(VI) from aqueous solution. The conditions for the adsorption by the composite have been optimized and kinetics and thermodynamic studies were performed. Though the adsorption takes place in wide pH range, pH 3 was found most suitable and at this pH the adsorption data were modeled using the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms at 15 °C and 35 °C, where the data fitted satisfactorily to Langmuir isotherms, the R(2) values being 0.998 and 0.999 respectively indicating unilayer adsorption. Based on Langmuir model, Q(o) was calculated to be 357.14 mg/g. The adsorption showed pseudo second order kinetics with a rate constant of 8.0763 × 10(-4) g mg(-1) min(-1) at 100 ppm Cr(VI) concentration. PMID:21679960

  16. Impacts of Labile Organic Carbon Concentration on Organic and Inorganic Nitrogen Utilization by a Stream Biofilm Bacterial Community

    PubMed Central

    Leff, Laura G.

    2013-01-01

    In aquatic ecosystems, carbon (C) availability strongly influences nitrogen (N) dynamics. One manifestation of this linkage is the importance in the dissolved organic matter (DOM) pool of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), which can serve as both a C and an N source, yet our knowledge of how specific properties of DOM influence N dynamics are limited. To empirically examine the impact of labile DOM on the responses of bacteria to DON and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), bacterial abundance and community composition were examined in controlled laboratory microcosms subjected to various combinations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), DON, and DIN treatments. Bacterial communities that had colonized glass beads incubated in a stream were treated with various glucose concentrations and combinations of inorganic and organic N (derived from algal exudate, bacterial protein, and humic matter). The results revealed a strong influence of C availability on bacterial utilization of DON and DIN, with preferential uptake of DON under low C concentrations. Bacterial DON uptake was affected by the concentration and by its chemical nature (labile versus recalcitrant). Labile organic N sources (algal exudate and bacterial protein) were utilized equally well as DIN as an N source, but this was not the case for the recalcitrant humic matter DON treatment. Clear differences in bacterial community composition among treatments were observed based on terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms (T-RFLP) of 16S rRNA genes. C, DIN, and DON treatments likely drove changes in bacterial community composition that in turn affected the rates of DON and DIN utilization under various C concentrations. PMID:24038688

  17. Stable carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon for a zonal transect across the subpolar North Atlantic Ocean in summer 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, Matthew P.; Greatrix, Florence M.; Tynan, Eithne; Achterberg, Eric P.; Griffiths, Alex M.; Fry, Claudia H.; Garley, Rebecca; McDonald, Alison; Boyce, Adrian J.

    2016-06-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) in seawater was measured in samples collected during June-July 2014 in the subpolar North Atlantic. Sample collection was carried out on the RRS James Clark Ross cruise JR302, part of the "Radiatively Active Gases from the North Atlantic Region and Climate Change" (RAGNARoCC) research programme. The observed δ13CDIC values for cruise JR302 fall in a range from -0.07 to +1.95 ‰, relative to the Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite standard. From duplicate samples collected during the cruise, the 1σ precision for the 341 results is 0.08 ‰, which is similar to our previous work and other studies of this kind. We also performed a cross-over analysis using nearby historical δ13CDIC data, which indicated that there were no significant systematic offsets between our measurements and previously published results. We also included seawater reference material (RM) produced by A. G. Dickson (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, USA) in every batch of analysis, enabling us to improve upon the calibration and quality-control procedures from a previous study. The δ13CDIC is consistent within each RM batch, although its value is not certified. We report δ13CDIC values of 1.15 ± 0.03 ‰ and 1.27 ± 0.05 ‰ for batches 141 and 144 respectively. Our JR302 δ13CDIC data can be used - along with measurements of other biogeochemical variables - to constrain the processes that control DIC in the interior ocean, in particular the oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide and the biological carbon pump. Our δ13CDIC results are available from the British Oceanographic Data Centre - doi:10.5285/22235f1a-b7f3-687f-e053-6c86abc0c8a6.

  18. Does canopy nitrogen uptake enhance carbon sequestration by trees?

    PubMed

    Nair, Richard K F; Perks, Micheal P; Weatherall, Andrew; Baggs, Elizabeth M; Mencuccini, Maurizio

    2016-02-01

    Temperate forest (15) N isotope trace experiments find nitrogen (N) addition-driven carbon (C) uptake is modest as little additional N is acquired by trees; however, several correlations of ambient N deposition against forest productivity imply a greater effect of atmospheric nitrogen deposition than these studies. We asked whether N deposition experiments adequately represent all processes found in ambient conditions. In particular, experiments typically apply (15) N to directly to forest floors, assuming uptake of nitrogen intercepted by canopies (CNU) is minimal. Additionally, conventional (15) N additions typically trace mineral (15) N additions rather than litter N recycling and may increase total N inputs above ambient levels. To test the importance of CNU and recycled N to tree nutrition, we conducted a mesocosm experiment, applying 54 g N/(15) N ha(-1)  yr(-1) to Sitka spruce saplings. We compared tree and soil (15) N recovery among treatments where enrichment was due to either (1) a (15) N-enriched litter layer, or mineral (15) N additions to (2) the soil or (3) the canopy. We found that 60% of (15) N applied to the canopy was recovered above ground (in needles, stem and branches) while only 21% of (15) N applied to the soil was found in these pools. (15) N recovery from litter was low and highly variable. (15) N partitioning among biomass pools and age classes also differed among treatments, with twice as much (15) N found in woody biomass when deposited on the canopy than soil. Stoichiometrically calculated N effect on C uptake from (15) N applied to the soil, scaled to real-world conditions, was 43 kg C kg N(-1) , similar to manipulation studies. The effect from the canopy treatment was 114 kg C kg N(-1) . Canopy treatments may be critical to accurately represent N deposition in the field and may address the discrepancy between manipulative and correlative studies. PMID:26391113

  19. Cellular inorganic carbon fluxes in Trichodesmium: a combined approach using measurements and modelling.

    PubMed

    Eichner, Meri; Thoms, Silke; Kranz, Sven A; Rost, Björn

    2015-02-01

    To predict effects of climate change on phytoplankton, it is crucial to understand how their mechanisms for carbon acquisition respond to environmental conditions. Aiming to shed light on the responses of extra- and intracellular inorganic C (Ci) fluxes, the cyanobacterium Trichodesmium erythraeum IMS101 was grown with different nitrogen sources (N2 vs NO3 (-)) and pCO2 levels (380 vs 1400 µatm). Cellular Ci fluxes were assessed by combining membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS), (13)C fractionation measurements, and modelling. Aside from a significant decrease in Ci affinity at elevated pCO2 and changes in CO2 efflux with different N sources, extracellular Ci fluxes estimated by MIMS were largely unaffected by the treatments. (13)C fractionation during biomass production, however, increased with pCO2, irrespective of the N source. Strong discrepancies were observed in CO2 leakage estimates obtained by MIMS and a (13)C-based approach, which further increased under elevated pCO2. These offsets could be explained by applying a model that comprises extracellular CO2 and HCO3 (-) fluxes as well as internal Ci cycling around the carboxysome via the CO2 uptake facilitator NDH-14. Assuming unidirectional, kinetic fractionation between CO2 and HCO3 (-) in the cytosol or enzymatic fractionation by NDH-14, both significantly improved the comparability of leakage estimates. Our results highlight the importance of internal Ci cycling for (13)C composition as well as cellular energy budgets of Trichodesmium, which ought to be considered in process studies on climate change effects. PMID:25429001

  20. Cellular inorganic carbon fluxes in Trichodesmium: a combined approach using measurements and modelling

    PubMed Central

    Eichner, Meri; Thoms, Silke; Kranz, Sven A.; Rost, Björn

    2015-01-01

    To predict effects of climate change on phytoplankton, it is crucial to understand how their mechanisms for carbon acquisition respond to environmental conditions. Aiming to shed light on the responses of extra- and intracellular inorganic C (Ci) fluxes, the cyanobacterium Trichodesmium erythraeum IMS101 was grown with different nitrogen sources (N2 vs NO3 –) and pCO2 levels (380 vs 1400 µatm). Cellular Ci fluxes were assessed by combining membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS), 13C fractionation measurements, and modelling. Aside from a significant decrease in Ci affinity at elevated pCO2 and changes in CO2 efflux with different N sources, extracellular Ci fluxes estimated by MIMS were largely unaffected by the treatments. 13C fractionation during biomass production, however, increased with pCO2, irrespective of the N source. Strong discrepancies were observed in CO2 leakage estimates obtained by MIMS and a 13C-based approach, which further increased under elevated pCO2. These offsets could be explained by applying a model that comprises extracellular CO2 and HCO3 – fluxes as well as internal Ci cycling around the carboxysome via the CO2 uptake facilitator NDH-14. Assuming unidirectional, kinetic fractionation between CO2 and HCO3 – in the cytosol or enzymatic fractionation by NDH-14, both significantly improved the comparability of leakage estimates. Our results highlight the importance of internal Ci cycling for 13C composition as well as cellular energy budgets of Trichodesmium, which ought to be considered in process studies on climate change effects. PMID:25429001

  1. Developing inorganic carbon-based radiocarbon chronologies for Holocene lake sediments in arid NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiawu; Ma, Xueyang; Qiang, Mingrui; Huang, Xiaozhong; Li, Shuang; Guo, Xiaoyan; Henderson, Andrew C. G.; Holmes, Jonathan A.; Chen, Fahu

    2016-07-01

    Inorganic carbonates are often used to establish radiocarbon (14C) chronologies for lake sediments when terrestrial plant remains (TPR) are rare or when bulk organic matter is insufficient for dating, a problem that is common for many lakes in arid regions. However, the reservoir effect (RE), as well as old carbon contributed from the lakes catchment make it difficult to establish reliable chronologies. Here we present a systematic study of inorganic 14C ages of two lake-sediment sequences, one from a small-enclosed saline lake - Lake Gahai in Qaidam Basin, and the other from a large freshwater lake - Lake Bosten in Xinjiang. Modern dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of the lakes, paleo-lake sediments exposed in the catchment, and mollusk shells in core sediments from Lake Gahai were dated to assess the RE and the contribution of pre-aged carbon to the old ages in the cores. We propose a statistical regression to assess more than one RE for the 14C carbonate ages within our sedimentary sequences. Old radiocarbon ages contributed by detrital carbonates were assessed by comparing the ages of mollusk shells with those of carbonates at the same sediment depths. We established the RE of the authigenic component and assessed detrital old carbon contributions to our two sites, and this was used to correct the 14C ages. Based on this approach, we developed age models for both cores, and tested them using 210Pb ages in both cores and TPR-based 14C-ages recovered from Lake Bosten. We further tested our age models by comparing carbonate-based oxygen isotope (δ18O) records from both lakes to an independently-dated regional speleothem δ18O record. Our results suggest if sedimentary sequences are densely dated and the RE and the contribution of old carbon from detrital carbonates can be ascertained, robust chronological frameworks based on carbonate-based 14C determinations can be established.

  2. Tuning Electrical Conductivity of Inorganic Minerals with Carbon Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, Anton A; Tour, James M

    2015-12-01

    Conductive powders based on Barite or calcium carbonate with chemically converted graphene (CCG) were successfully synthesized by adsorption of graphene oxide (GO) or graphene oxide nanoribbons (GONRs) onto the mineral surfaces and subsequent chemical reduction with hydrazine. The efficient adsorption of GO or GONRs on the surface of Barite and calcium carbonate-based mineral particles results in graphene-wrapped hybrid materials that demonstrate a concentration dependent electrical conductivity that increases with the GO or GONR loading. PMID:26544547

  3. Cytoplasmic Acidification Induced by Inorganic Phosphate Uptake in Suspension Cultured Catharanthus roseus Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sakano, Katsuhiro; Yazaki, Yoshiaki; Mimura, Tetsuro

    1992-01-01

    Cytoplasmic acidification during inorganic phosphate (Pi) absorption by Catharanthus roseus cells were studied by means of a fluorescent pH indicator, 2′,7′-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5 carboxyfluorescein (acetomethylester) (BCECF), and 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Cytoplasmic acidification measured by decrease in the fluorescence intensity started immediately after Pi application. Within a minute or so, a stable state was attained and no further acidification occurred, whereas Pi absorption was still proceeding. As soon as Pi in the medium was exhausted, cytoplasmic pH started to recover. Coincidentally, the medium pH started to recover toward the original acidic pH. The Pi-induced changes in the cytoplasmic pH were confirmed by 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance study. Maximum acidification of the cytoplasm induced by 1.7 millimolar Pi was 0.2 pH units. Vacuolar pH was also affected by Pi. In some experiments, but not all, pH decreased reversibly by 0.2 to 0.3 pH units during Pi absorption. Results suggest that the cytoplasmic pH is regulated by proton pumps in the plasma membrane and in the tonoplast. In addition, other mechanisms that could consume extra protons in the cytoplasm are suggested. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:16668939

  4. Further modification of pressure-calcimeter method for soil inorganic carbon analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inorganic carbon (IC) in soil is important when considering C fluxes and processes in the environment that involve C. Here data are presented for measurement of IC in soils using the pressure calcimeter method of Sherrod et al. (2002) with modifications to decrease analysis time while preserving met...

  5. Urea Uptake and Carbon Fixation by Marine Pelagic Bacteria and Archaea during the Arctic Summer and Winter Seasons

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, Tara L.; Baer, Steven E.; Cooper, Joshua T.; Bronk, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    How Arctic climate change might translate into alterations of biogeochemical cycles of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) with respect to inorganic and organic N utilization is not well understood. This study combined 15N uptake rate measurements for ammonium, nitrate, and urea with 15N- and 13C-based DNA stable-isotope probing (SIP). The objective was to identify active bacterial and archeal plankton and their role in N and C uptake during the Arctic summer and winter seasons. We hypothesized that bacteria and archaea would successfully compete for nitrate and urea during the Arctic winter but not during the summer, when phytoplankton dominate the uptake of these nitrogen sources. Samples were collected at a coastal station near Barrow, AK, during August and January. During both seasons, ammonium uptake rates were greater than those for nitrate or urea, and nitrate uptake rates remained lower than those for ammonium or urea. SIP experiments indicated a strong seasonal shift of bacterial and archaeal N utilization from ammonium during the summer to urea during the winter but did not support a similar seasonal pattern of nitrate utilization. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences obtained from each SIP fraction implicated marine group I Crenarchaeota (MGIC) as well as Betaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, SAR11, and SAR324 in N uptake from urea during the winter. Similarly, 13C SIP data suggested dark carbon fixation for MGIC, as well as for several proteobacterial lineages and the Firmicutes. These data are consistent with urea-fueled nitrification by polar archaea and bacteria, which may be advantageous under dark conditions. PMID:25063662

  6. The influence of dissolved organic carbon on bacterial phosphorus uptake and bacteria-phytoplankton dynamics in two Minnesota lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stets, E.G.; Cotner, J.B.

    2008-01-01

    The balance of production in any ecosystem is dependent on the flow of limiting nutrients into either the autotrophic or heterotrophic components of the food web. To understand one of the important controls on the flow of inorganic nutrients between phytoplankton and bacterioplankton in lakes, we manipulated dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in two lakes of different trophic status. We hypothesized that labile DOC additions would increase bacterial phosphorus (P) uptake and decrease the response of phytoplankton to nutrient additions. Supplemental nutrients and carbon (C), nitrogen (N, 1.6 ??mol NH4Cl L-1 d-1), P (0.1 ??mol KH 2PO4 L-1 d-1), and DOC (glucose, 15 ??mol C L-1 d-1) were added twice daily to 8-liter experimental units. We tested the effect of added DOC on chlorophyll concentration, bacterial production, biomass, and P uptake using size-fractionated 33P-PO4 uptake. In the oligotrophic lake, DOC additions stimulated bacterial production and increased bacterial biomass-specific P uptake. Bacteria consumed added DOC, and chlorophyll concentrations were significantly lower in carboys receiving DOC additions. In the eutrophic lake, DOC additions had less of a stimulatory effect on bacterial production and biomass-specific P uptake. DOC accumulated over the time period, and there was little evidence for a DOC-induced decrease in phytoplankton biomass. Bacterial growth approached the calculated ??max and yet did not accumulate biomass, indicating significant biomass losses, which may have constrained bacterial DOC consumption. Excess bacterial DOC consumption in oligotrophic lakes may result in greater bacterial P affinity and enhanced nutrient uptake by the heterotrophic compartment of the food web. On the other hand, constraints on bacterial biomass accumulation in eutrophic lakes, from either viral lysis or bacterial grazing, can allow labile DOC to accumulate, thereby negating the effect of excess DOC on the planktonic food web. ?? 2008, by the American

  7. Inorganic Carbon-Stimulated O2 Photoreduction Is Suppressed by NO2- Assimilation in Air-Grown Cells of Synechococcus UTEX 625.

    PubMed

    Mir, N. A.; Salon, C.; Canvin, D. T.

    1995-12-01

    The effect of NO2- assimilation on O2 exchange and CO2 fixation of the cyanobacterium, Synechococcus UTEX 625, was studied mass spectrometrically. Upon addition of 1 mM inorganic carbon to the medium, inorganic carbon pools developed and accelerated O2 photoreduction 5-fold when CO2 fixation was inhibited. During steady-state photosynthesis at saturating light, O2 uptake represented 32% of O2 evolution and balanced that portion of O2 evolution that could not be accounted for by CO2 fixation. Under these conditions, NO2- assimilation reduced O2 uptake by 59% but had no influence on CO2 fixation. NO2- assimilation decreased both CO2 fixation and O2 photoreduction at low light and and increased net O2 evolution at all light intensities. The increase in net O2 evolution observed during simultaneous assimilation of carbon and nitrogen over carbon alone was due to a suppression of O2 photoreduction by NO2- assimilation. When CO2 fixation was precluded, NO2- assimilation inhibited O2 photoreduction and stimulated O2 evolution. When the electron supply was limiting (low light), competition among O2, CO2, and NO2- for electrons could be observed, but when the electron supply was not limiting (saturating light), O2 photoreduction and/or NO2- reduction caused electron transport that was additive to that for maximum CO2 fixation. PMID:12228670

  8. Multiyear precipitation reduction strongly decreases carbon uptake over northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wenping; Liu, Dan; Dong, Wenjie; Liu, Shuguang; Zhou, Guangsheng; Yu, Guirui; Zhao, Tianbao; Feng, Jinming; Ma, Zhuguo; Chen, Jiquan; Chen, Yang; Chen, Shiping; Han, Shijie; Huang, Jianping; Li, Linghao; Liu, Huizhi; Liu, Shaoming; Ma, Mingguo; Wang, Yanfeng; Xia, Jiangzhou; Xu, Wenfang; Zhang, Qiang; Zhao, Xinquang; Zhao, Liang

    2014-05-01

    Drought has been a concern in global and regional water, carbon, and energy cycles. From 1999 to 2011, northern China experienced a multiyear precipitation reduction that significantly decreased water availability as indicated by the Palmer Drought Severity Index and soil moisture measurements. In this study, a light use efficiency model (EC-LUE) and an ecosystem physiological model (IBIS) were used to characterize the impacts of long-term drought on terrestrial carbon fluxes in northern China. EC-LUE and IBIS models showed the reduction of averaged GPP of 0.09 and 0.05 Pg C yr-1 during 1999-2011 compared with 1982-1998. Based on the IBIS model, simulated ecosystem respiration experienced an insignificant decrease from 1999 to 2011. The multiyear precipitation reduction changed the regional carbon uptake of 0.011 Pg C yr-1 from 1982 to 1998 to a net source of 0.018 Pg C yr-1 from 1999 to 2011. Moreover, a pronounced decrease in maize yield in almost all provinces in the study region was found from 1999 to 2011 versus the average of yield from1978 to 2011. The largest maize yield reduction occurred in Beijing (2499 kg ha-1 yr-1), Jilin (2180 kg ha-1 yr-1), Tianjing (1923 kg ha-1 yr-1), and Heilongjiang (1791 kg ha-1 yr-1), and the maize yield anomaly was significantly correlated with the annual precipitation over the entire study area. Our results revealed that recent climate change, especially drought-induced water stress, is the dominant cause of the reduction in the terrestrial carbon sink over northern China.

  9. Characterizing the metabolic trade-off in Nitrosomonas europaea in response to changes in inorganic carbon supply.

    PubMed

    Jiang, D; Khunjar, W O; Wett, B; Murthy, S N; Chandran, K

    2015-02-17

    The link between the nitrogen and one-carbon cycles forms the metabolic basis for energy and biomass synthesis in autotrophic nitrifying organisms, which in turn are crucial players in engineered nitrogen removal processes. To understand how autotrophic nitrifying organisms respond to inorganic carbon (IC) conditions that could be encountered in engineered partially nitrifying systems, we investigated the response of one of the most extensively studied model ammonia oxidizing bacteria, Nitrosomonas europaea (ATCC19718), to three IC availability conditions: excess gaseous and excess ionic IC supply (40× stoichiometric requirement), excess gaseous IC supply (4× stoichiometric requirement in gaseous form only), and limiting IC supply (0.25× stoichiometric requirement). We found that, when switching from excess gaseous and excess ionic IC supply to excess gaseous IC supply, N. europaea chemostat cultures demonstrated an acclimation period that was characterized by transient decreases in the ammonia removal efficiency and transient peaks in the specific oxygen uptake rate. Limiting IC supply led to permanent reactor failures (characterized by biomass washout and failure of ammonia removal) that were preceded by similar decreases in the ammonia removal efficiency and peaks in the specific oxygen uptake rate. Notably, both excess gaseous IC supply and limiting IC supply elicited a previously undocumented increase in nitric and nitrous oxide emissions. Further, gene expression patterns suggested that excess gaseous IC supply and limiting IC supply led to consistent up-regulation of ammonia respiration genes and carbon assimilation genes. Under these conditions, interrogation of the N. europaea proteome revealed increased levels of carbon fixation and transport proteins and decreased levels of ammonia oxidation proteins (active in energy synthesis pathways). Together, the results indicated that N. europaea mobilized enhanced IC scavenging pathways for biosynthesis and

  10. The influence of root assimilated inorganic carbon on nitrogen acquisition/assimilation and carbon partitioning.

    PubMed

    Viktor, A; Cramer, M D

    2005-01-01

    Understanding of the influences of root-zone CO2 concentration on nitrogen (N) metabolism is limited. The influences of root-zone CO2 concentration on growth, N uptake, N metabolism and the partitioning of root assimilated 14C were determined in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). Root, but not leaf, nitrate reductase activity was increased in plants supplied with increased root-zone CO2. Root phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity was lower with NO3(-)- than with NH4(+)-nutrition, and in the latter, was also suppressed by increased root-zone CO2. Increased growth rate in NO3(-)-fed plants with elevated root-zone CO2 concentrations was associated with transfer of root-derived organic acids to the shoot and conversion to carbohydrates. With NH4(+)-fed plants, growth and total N were not altered by elevated root-zone CO2 concentrations, although 14C partitioning to amino acid synthesis was increased. Effects of root-zone CO2 concentration on N uptake and metabolism over longer periods (> 1 d) were probably limited by feedback inhibition. Root-derived organic acids contributed to the carbon budget of the leaves through decarboxylation of the organic acids and photosynthetic refixation of released CO2. PMID:15720630

  11. Carbon availability for the fungus triggers nitrogen uptake and transport in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is characterized by a transfer of nutrients in exchange for carbon. We tested the effect of the carbon availability for the AM fungus Glomus intraradices on nitrogen (N) uptake and transport in the symbiosis. We followed the uptake and transport of 15N and ...

  12. New insights into iron acquisition by cyanobacteria: an essential role for ExbB-ExbD complex in inorganic iron uptake

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hai-Bo; Lou, Wen-Jing; Ke, Wen-Ting; Song, Wei-Yu; Price, Neil M; Qiu, Bao-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are globally important primary producers that have an exceptionally large iron requirement for photosynthesis. In many aquatic ecosystems, the levels of dissolved iron are so low and some of the chemical species so unreactive that growth of cyanobacteria is impaired. Pathways of iron uptake through cyanobacterial membranes are now being elucidated, but the molecular details are still largely unknown. Here we report that the non-siderophore-producing cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 contains three exbB-exbD gene clusters that are obligatorily required for growth and are involved in iron acquisition. The three exbB-exbDs are redundant, but single and double mutants have reduced rates of iron uptake compared with wild-type cells, and the triple mutant appeared to be lethal. Short-term measurements in chemically well-defined medium show that iron uptake by Synechocystis depends on inorganic iron (Fe′) concentration and ExbB-ExbD complexes are essentially required for the Fe′ transport process. Although transport of iron bound to a model siderophore, ferrioxamine B, is also reduced in the exbB-exbD mutants, the rate of uptake at similar total [Fe] is about 800-fold slower than Fe′, suggesting that hydroxamate siderophore iron uptake may be less ecologically relevant than free iron. These results provide the first evidence that ExbB-ExbD is involved in inorganic iron uptake and is an essential part of the iron acquisition pathway in cyanobacteria. The involvement of an ExbB-ExbD system for inorganic iron uptake may allow cyanobacteria to more tightly maintain iron homeostasis, particularly in variable environments where iron concentrations range from limiting to sufficient. PMID:25012898

  13. Parallel trends in organic and inorganic carbon isotopes across the Permian/Triassic boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Magaritz, M. ); Krishnamurthy, R.V. ); Holser, W.T. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY )

    1992-12-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios in both inorganic and organic reservoirs have been widely applied to model environmental and sedimentological changes on a global scale. Most studies dealing with major extinction events have used the record of inorganic carbon. In this paper the authors report the relation between shifts in carbon-13 content of organic matter and coexisting carbonate fractions at a major extinction event, the Permian/Triassic boundary. They found that both [delta][sup 13]C[sub carb] and [delta][sup 13]C[sub org] of the surface ocean varied dramatically across the boundary, but the fractionation [Delta][sup 13]C between organic matter and carbonate remained constant. This result appreciably restricts the interpretation of changes in the carbon cycle during this critical interval. The new data are best explained by a combination of two mechanisms for variation in [delta][sup 13]C[sub carb]: (1) burial and erosion of organic carbon, with a long time constant; and (2) sequestration of organic carbon into shallow and deep oceanic reservoirs, with a shorter time constant. For application to their case, the first mechanism is limited by possible buildup of marine pCO[sub 2], which would increase the isotopic fractionation factor. The second mechanism is limited in application to short-term transient variations in [delta][sup 13]C. Modeling of the carbon cycle and its variations of [delta][sup 13]C must take both mechanisms into account.

  14. Interaction of carbon nanohorns with plants: Uptake and biological effects

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lahiani, Mohamed H.; Chen, Jihua; Irin, Fahmida; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Green, Micah J.; Khodakovskaya, Mariya V.

    2014-10-07

    Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns (SWCNHs) are a unique carbon-based nanomaterial with promising application in different fields including, medicine, genetic engineering and horticulture. Here, we investigated the biological response of six crop species (barley, corn, rice, soybean, switchgrass, tomato) and tobacco cell culture to the exposure of SWCNHs. We found that SWCNHs can activate seed germination of selected crops and enhance growth of different organs of corn, tomato, rice and soybean. At cellular level, growth of tobacco cells was increased in response to exposure of SWCNHs (78% increase compared to control). Uptake of SWCNHs by exposed crops and tobacco cells was confirmedmore » by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and quantified by microwave induced heating (MIH) technique. At genetic level, SWCNHs were able to affect expression of a number of tomato genes that are involved in stress responses, cellular responses and metabolic processes. Our conclusion is that SWCNHs can be used as plant growth regulators and have the potential for plant-related applications.« less

  15. Interaction of carbon nanohorns with plants: Uptake and biological effects

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiani, Mohamed H.; Chen, Jihua; Irin, Fahmida; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Green, Micah J.; Khodakovskaya, Mariya V.

    2014-10-07

    Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns (SWCNHs) are a unique carbon-based nanomaterial with promising application in different fields including, medicine, genetic engineering and horticulture. Here, we investigated the biological response of six crop species (barley, corn, rice, soybean, switchgrass, tomato) and tobacco cell culture to the exposure of SWCNHs. We found that SWCNHs can activate seed germination of selected crops and enhance growth of different organs of corn, tomato, rice and soybean. At cellular level, growth of tobacco cells was increased in response to exposure of SWCNHs (78% increase compared to control). Uptake of SWCNHs by exposed crops and tobacco cells was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and quantified by microwave induced heating (MIH) technique. At genetic level, SWCNHs were able to affect expression of a number of tomato genes that are involved in stress responses, cellular responses and metabolic processes. Our conclusion is that SWCNHs can be used as plant growth regulators and have the potential for plant-related applications.

  16. Inorganic carbon and emission of ammonia from manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal agriculture, and manure in particular, is a major source of ammonia emissions, and numerous models have been developed for predicting ammonia emission from manure. However, even the most comprehensive models are often inaccurate. Ammonia emission is complicated by volatilization of carbon dio...

  17. Inorganic carbon fixation by chemosynthetic ectosymbionts and nutritional transfers to the hydrothermal vent host-shrimp Rimicaris exoculata

    PubMed Central

    Ponsard, Julie; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne; Zbinden, Magali; Lepoint, Gilles; Joassin, André; Corbari, Laure; Shillito, Bruce; Durand, Lucile; Cueff-Gauchard, Valérie; Compère, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The shrimp Rimicaris exoculata dominates several hydrothermal vent ecosystems of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and is thought to be a primary consumer harbouring a chemoautotrophic bacterial community in its gill chamber. The aim of the present study was to test current hypotheses concerning the epibiont's chemoautotrophy, and the mutualistic character of this association. In-vivo experiments were carried out in a pressurised aquarium with isotope-labelled inorganic carbon (NaH13CO3 and NaH14CO3) in the presence of two different electron donors (Na2S2O3 and Fe2+) and with radiolabelled organic compounds (14C-acetate and 3H-lysine) chosen as potential bacterial substrates and/or metabolic by-products in experiments mimicking transfer of small biomolecules from epibionts to host. The bacterial epibionts were found to assimilate inorganic carbon by chemoautotrophy, but many of them (thick filaments of epsilonproteobacteria) appeared versatile and able to switch between electron donors, including organic compounds (heterotrophic acetate and lysine uptake). At least some of them (thin filamentous gammaproteobacteria) also seem capable of internal energy storage that could supply chemosynthetic metabolism for hours under conditions of electron donor deprivation. As direct nutritional transfer from bacteria to host was detected, the association appears as true mutualism. Import of soluble bacterial products occurs by permeation across the gill chamber integument, rather than via the digestive tract. This first demonstration of such capabilities in a decapod crustacean supports the previously discarded hypothesis of transtegumental absorption of dissolved organic matter or carbon as a common nutritional pathway. PMID:22914596

  18. Inorganic carbon fixation by chemosynthetic ectosymbionts and nutritional transfers to the hydrothermal vent host-shrimp Rimicaris exoculata.

    PubMed

    Ponsard, Julie; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne; Zbinden, Magali; Lepoint, Gilles; Joassin, André; Corbari, Laure; Shillito, Bruce; Durand, Lucile; Cueff-Gauchard, Valérie; Compère, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The shrimp Rimicaris exoculata dominates several hydrothermal vent ecosystems of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and is thought to be a primary consumer harbouring a chemoautotrophic bacterial community in its gill chamber. The aim of the present study was to test current hypotheses concerning the epibiont's chemoautotrophy, and the mutualistic character of this association. In-vivo experiments were carried out in a pressurised aquarium with isotope-labelled inorganic carbon (NaH(13)CO(3) and NaH(14)CO(3)) in the presence of two different electron donors (Na(2)S(2)O(3) and Fe(2+)) and with radiolabelled organic compounds ((14)C-acetate and (3)H-lysine) chosen as potential bacterial substrates and/or metabolic by-products in experiments mimicking transfer of small biomolecules from epibionts to host. The bacterial epibionts were found to assimilate inorganic carbon by chemoautotrophy, but many of them (thick filaments of epsilonproteobacteria) appeared versatile and able to switch between electron donors, including organic compounds (heterotrophic acetate and lysine uptake). At least some of them (thin filamentous gammaproteobacteria) also seem capable of internal energy storage that could supply chemosynthetic metabolism for hours under conditions of electron donor deprivation. As direct nutritional transfer from bacteria to host was detected, the association appears as true mutualism. Import of soluble bacterial products occurs by permeation across the gill chamber integument, rather than via the digestive tract. This first demonstration of such capabilities in a decapod crustacean supports the previously discarded hypothesis of transtegumental absorption of dissolved organic matter or carbon as a common nutritional pathway. PMID:22914596

  19. Understanding on Soil Inorganic Carbon Transformation in North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guitong; Yang, Lifang; Zhang, Chenglei; Zhang, Hongjie

    2015-04-01

    Soil total carbon balance in long-term fertilization field experiments in North China Plain. Four long-term fertilization experiments (20-30 years) were investigated on SOC in 40 cm, calcium carbonate and active carbonate (AC) in 180 or 100 cm soil profile, δ13C values of SOC and δ13C and δ18O values of carbonate in soil profile, particle distribution of SOC and SIC in main soil layers, and ratios of pedogenic carbonate (PC) in SIC and C3-SOC in SOC. The most important conclusion is that fertilization of more than 20 years can produce detectable impact on pool size, profile distribution, ratio of active component and PC of SIC, which make it clear that SIC pool must be considered in the proper evaluation of the response of soil carbon balance to human activities in arid and semi-arid region. Land use impact on soil total carbon pool in Inner Mongolia. With the data of the second survey of soils in Inner Mongolia and the 58 soil profile data from Wu-lan-cha-bu-meng and Xi-lin-hao-te, combining with the 13C and 18O techniques, SIC density and stock in Inner Mongolia is estimated. The main conclusion is that soils in inner Mongolia have the same level of SOC and SIC, with the density in 100cm pedons of 8.97 kg•m-2 and 8.61 kg•m-2, respectively. Meanwhile, the significantly positive relationship between SOC and SIC in A layer indicates co-sequestration of SOC and SIC exist. Evaluation of the methods for measuring CA enzyme activity in soil. In laboratory, method in literature to measure CA activity in soil sample was repeated, and found it was not valid indeed. The failure could not attribute to the disturbance of common ions like NO3-, SO42-, Ca2+, and Mg2+. The adsorption of CA to soil material was testified as the main reason for that failure. A series of extractants were tested but no one can extract the adsorbed CA and be used in measuring CA activity in soil sample. Carbonate transformation in field with straw returned and biochar added. In 2009, a field

  20. Diversity of freshwater Epsilonproteobacteria and dark inorganic carbon fixation in the sulphidic redoxcline of a meromictic karstic lake.

    PubMed

    Noguerola, Imma; Picazo, Antonio; Llirós, Marc; Camacho, Antonio; Borrego, Carles M

    2015-07-01

    Sulfidic redoxclines are a suitable niche for the growth and activity of different chemo- and photolithotrophic sulphide-oxidizing microbial groups such as the Epsilonproteobacteria and the green sulfur bacteria (GSB). We have investigated the diversity, abundance and contribution to inorganic carbon uptake of Epsilonproteobacteria in a meromictic basin of Lake Banyoles. CARD-FISH counts revealed that Epsilonproteobacteria were prevalent at the redoxcline in winter (maximum abundance of 2 × 10(6) cells mL(-1), ≈60% of total cells) but they were nearly absent in summer, when GSB bloomed. This seasonal trend was supported by 16S rRNA gene pyrotag datasets, which revealed that the epsilonproteobacterial community was mainly composed of a member of the genus Arcobacter. In situ incubations using NaH(14)CO3 and MAR-CARD-FISH observations showed that this population assimilated CO2 in the dark, likely being mainly responsible for the autotrophic activity at the redoxcline in winter. Clone libraries targeting the aclB gene provided additional evidence of the potential capacity of these epsilonproteobacteria to fix carbon via rTCA cycle. Our data reinforce the key role of Epsilonproteobacteria in linking carbon and sulphur cycles, extend their influence to freshwater karstic lakes and raise questions about the actual contribution of chemolithotrophy at their redoxcline and euxinic water compartments. PMID:26195601

  1. Carbon isotopic ratio of dissolved inorganic carbon in the spring water around Asama volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hidekazu; Tase, Norio

    In order to determine the source and formation process of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in spring water and to evaluate quantitatively the contribution of volcanic gas to water chemistry of springs distributed on and around Asama volcano, the carbon isotopic ratio of DIC (δ13CDIC) with major dissolved solids has been measured. The measurements of carbon isotopic ratios of volcanic and soil CO2, which are the source materials of DIC, were also carried out in Jigokudani fumarole and in the forest soil of several points of volcano flank, respectively. The spring waters in Asama volcano have been classified into nine groups (A∼I) based on the physicochemical characteristics, such as water temperature, electrical conductivity and chemical compositions. As δ13CDIC increase with increasing DIC content, the origin of DIC in spring water from Asama volcano was can be assessed by mixing process between isotopically light soil CO2 (organic origin) and 13C-enriched volcanic CO2 (deep origin with mantle component), except for the springs of group B. On the basis of two components mixing, the contribution rate of volcanic CO2 to DIC in spring water was computed by using the carbon isotopic ratio of CO2 equilibrated with DIC (δ13CCO2) as an indicator. Consequently, the contribution rates of volcanic CO2 were ranged from 40 to 60% in the groups C, F and H located on the flank of the mountain. In particular, the strong contribution of more than 90% was confirmed in the group I located on the higher part of the mountain, that is near the crater. These groups were correspondent with those in which influence of volcanic gases was assumed from the geochemical characteristics of spring water. By contrast, influence of volcanic CO2 was almost not found in other groups A, D, E and G. The spring waters of group B which are not plotted on the two components mixing line and located at the terminal of Onioshidashi lava flow have highest δ13CDIC in spite of low DIC content. These 13C

  2. Global ocean carbon uptake: magnitude, variability and trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanninkhof, R.; Park, G.-H.; Takahashi, T.; Sweeney, C.; Feely, R.; Nojiri, Y.; Gruber, N.; Doney, S. C.; McKinley, G. A.; Lenton, A.; Le Quéré, C.; Heinze, C.; Schwinger, J.; Graven, H.; Khatiwala, S.

    2012-08-01

    Estimates of the anthropogenic global-integrated sea-air carbon dioxide (CO2) flux from 1990 to 2009, based on different models and measurements, range from -1.4 to -2.6 Pg C yr-1. The median values of anthropogenic CO2 for each method show better agreement and are: -1.9 for Pg C yr-1 for numerical ocean general circulation hind cast models (OGCMs) with parameterized biogeochemistry; -2.1 Pg C yr-1 for atmospheric inverse models; -1.9 Pg C yr-1 for global atmospheric constraints based on O2 / N2 ratios for 1990-2000; and -2.4 Pg C yr-1 for oceanic inverse models. An updated estimate of this anthropogenic CO2 flux based on a climatology of sea-air partial pressure of CO2 differences (ΔpCO2) (Takahashi et al., 2009) and a bulk formulation of gas transfer with wind speed for year 2000 is -2.0 Pg C yr-1. Using this ΔpCO2 climatology and empirical relationships of pCO2 with sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies (Park et al., 2010a), the interannual variability of the contemporary CO2 flux is estimated to be 0.20 Pg C yr-1 (1σ) from 1990 through 2009. This is similar to the variability estimated by the OGCMs of 0.16 Pg C yr-1 but smaller than the interannual variability from atmospheric inverse estimates of 0.40 Pg C yr-1. The variability is largely driven by large-scale climate re-organizations. The decadal trends for different methods range from -0.13 (Pg C yr-1) decade-1 to -0.50 (Pg C yr-1) decade-1. The OGCMs and the data based sea-air CO2 flux estimates show smaller uptakes and appreciably smaller decadal trends than estimates based on changes in carbon inventory suggesting that methods capable of resolving shorter timescales are showing a slowing of the rate of ocean CO2 uptake. It is not clear if this large difference in trend is a methodological issue or a real natural feedback.

  3. Can frequent precipitation moderate drought impact on peatmoss carbon uptake in northern peatlands?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijp, Jelmer; Limpens, Juul; Metselaar, Klaas; van der Zee, Sjoerd; Berendse, Frank; Robroek, Bjorn

    2014-05-01

    Northern peatlands represent one of the largest global carbon stores that can potentially be released by water table drawdown during extreme summer droughts. Small precipitation events may moderate negative impacts of deep water levels on carbon uptake by sustaining photosynthesis of peatmoss (Sphagnum spp.), the key species in these ecosystems. We experimentally assessed the importance of the temporal distribution of precipitation for Sphagnum water supply and carbon uptake during a stepwise decrease in water levels in a growth chamber. CO2 exchange and the water balance were measured for intact cores of three peatmoss species representative of three contrasting habitats in northern peatlands (Sphagnum fuscum, S. balticum and S. majus). For shallow water levels, capillary rise was the most important source of water for peatmoss photosynthesis and precipitation did not promote carbon uptake irrespective of peatmoss species. For deep water levels, however, precipitation dominated over capillary rise and moderated adverse effects of drought on carbon uptake by peat mosses. The ability to use the transient water supply by precipitation was species-specific: carbon uptake of S. fuscum increased linearly with precipitation frequency for deep water levels, whereas S. balticum and S. majus showed depressed carbon uptake at intermediate precipitation frequencies. Our results highlight the importance of precipitation for carbon uptake by peatmosses. The potential of precipitation to moderate drought impact, however, is species specific and depends on the temporal distribution of precipitation and water level. These results also suggest that modelling approaches in which water level depth is used as the only state variable determining water availability in the living moss layer and (in)directly linked to Sphagnum carbon uptake may have serious drawbacks. The predictive power of peatland ecosystem models may be reduced when deep water levels prevail, as precipitation

  4. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes in alfalfa and wheat: toxicology and uptake

    PubMed Central

    Miralles, Pola; Johnson, Errin; Church, Tamara L.; Harris, Andrew T.

    2012-01-01

    Data on the bioavailability and toxicity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the environment, and, in particular, on their interactions with vascular plants, are limited. We investigated the effects of industrial-grade multiwalled CNTs (75 wt% CNTs) and their impurities on alfalfa and wheat. Phytotoxicity assays were performed during both seed germination and seedling growth. The germinations of both species were tolerant of up to 2560 mg l−1 CNTs, and root elongation was enhanced in alfalfa and wheat seedlings exposed to CNTs. Remarkably, catalyst impurities also enhanced root elongation in alfalfa seedlings as well as wheat germination. Thus the impurities, not solely the CNTs, impacted the plants. CNT internalization by plants was investigated using electron microscopy and two-dimensional Raman mapping. The latter showed that CNTs were adsorbed onto the root surfaces of alfalfa and wheat without significant uptake or translocation. Electron microscopy investigations of internalization were inconclusive owing to poor contrast, so Fe3O4-functionalized CNTs were prepared and studied using energy-filter mapping of Fe3O4. CNTs bearing Fe3O4 nanoparticles were detected in the epidermis of one wheat root tip only, suggesting that internalization was possible but unusual. Thus, alfalfa and wheat tolerated high concentrations of industrial-grade multiwalled CNTs, which adsorbed onto their roots but were rarely taken up. PMID:22977097

  5. Calcium Carbonate Formation by Genetically Engineered Inorganic Binding Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gresswell, Carolyn Gayle

    Understanding how organisms are capable of forming (synthesize, crystallize, and organize) solid minerals into complex architectures has been a fundamental question of biomimetic materials chemistry and biomineralization for decades. This study utilizes short peptides selected using a cell surface display library for the specific polymorphs of calcium carbonate, i.e., aragonite and calcite, to identify two sets of sequences which can then be used to examine their effects in the formation, crystal structure, morphology of the CaCO3 minerals. A procedure of counter selection, along with fluorescence microscopy (FM) characterization, was adapted to insure that the sequences on the cells were specific to their respective substrate, i.e., aragonite or calcite. From the resulting two sets of sequences selected, five distinct strong binders were identified with a variety of biochemical characteristics and synthesized for further study. Protein derived peptides, using the known sequences of the proteins that are associated with calcite or aragonite, were also designed using a bioinformatics-based similarity analysis of the two sets of binders. In particular, an aragonite binding protein segment, AP7, a protein found in nacre, was chosen for this design and the resulting effects of the designed peptides and the AP7 were examined. Specifically, the binding affinities of the selected and the protein derived peptides off the cells were then tested using FM; these studies resulted in different binding characteristics of the synthesized and cellular bound peptides. Two of the peptides that displayed strong binding on the cells bound to neither of the CaCO 3 substrates and both the high and low similarity protein-derived peptides bound to both polymorphs. However, two of the peptides were found to only bind to their respective polymorph showing; these results are significant in that with this study it is demonstrated that the designed peptides based on experimental library

  6. Modelling carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon and methane in marine porewaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Patrick; Liu, Bo; Khalili, Arzhang; Barker Jørgensen, Bo

    2014-05-01

    Carbon isotope compositions of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and methane (CH4) in marine sedimentary porewaters at near surface temperatures show extremely large variation in apparent fractionation covering a range from -100 ‰ to +30 ‰. This fractionation is essentially the result of microbial activity, but the mechanisms and factors controlling this fractionation are still incompletely understood. This study provides a reaction transport model approach to evaluate the effects of the most important processes and factors on carbon isotope distribution with the goal to better understand carbon isotope distribution in modern sediment porewaters and in the geological record. Our model results show that kinetic fractionation during methanogenesis, both through the acetoclastic and autotrophic pathways, results in a nearly symmetrical distribution of δ13C values in DIC and CH4 with respect to the isotope value of buried organic matter. An increased fractionation factor during methanogenesis leads to a larger difference between δ13CDIC and δ13CCH4. Near the sulphate methane transition zone, DIC is more depleted in 13C due to diffusive mixing with DIC produced by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and organoclastic sulphate reduction. The model also shows that an upward decrease in δ13CCH4 near the SMT can only be caused by equilibrium fractionation during AOM including a backward "leakage" of carbon from DIC to CH4 through the enzymatic pathway. However, this effect of reversibility has no influence on the DIC pool as long as methane is completely consumed at the SMT. Only a release of methane at the sediment-water interface, due to a fraction of the methane escaping re-oxidation, results in a small shift towards more positive δ13CDIC values. Methane escape at the SMT is possible if either the methane flux is too high to be entirely oxidized by AOM, or if bubbles of methane gas by-pass the sulphate reduction zone and escape episodically into the water column

  7. Inorganic nitrate supplementation improves muscle oxygenation, O₂ uptake kinetics, and exercise tolerance at high but not low pedal rates.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Stephen J; Varnham, Richard L; DiMenna, Fred J; Breese, Brynmor C; Wylie, Lee J; Jones, Andrew M

    2015-06-01

    We tested the hypothesis that inorganic nitrate (NO3 (-)) supplementation would improve muscle oxygenation, pulmonary oxygen uptake (V̇o2) kinetics, and exercise tolerance (Tlim) to a greater extent when cycling at high compared with low pedal rates. In a randomized, placebo-controlled cross-over study, seven subjects (mean ± SD, age 21 ± 2 yr, body mass 86 ± 10 kg) completed severe-intensity step cycle tests at pedal cadences of 35 rpm and 115 rpm during separate nine-day supplementation periods with NO3 (-)-rich beetroot juice (BR) (providing 8.4 mmol NO3 (-)/day) and placebo (PLA). Compared with PLA, plasma nitrite concentration increased 178% with BR (P < 0.01). There were no significant differences in muscle oxyhemoglobin concentration ([O2Hb]), phase II V̇o2 kinetics, or Tlim between BR and PLA when cycling at 35 rpm (P > 0.05). However, when cycling at 115 rpm, muscle [O2Hb] was higher at baseline and throughout exercise, phase II V̇o2 kinetics was faster (47 ± 16 s vs. 61 ± 25 s; P < 0.05), and Tlim was greater (362 ± 137 s vs. 297 ± 79 s; P < 0.05) with BR compared with PLA. These results suggest that short-term BR supplementation can increase muscle oxygenation, expedite the adjustment of oxidative metabolism, and enhance exercise tolerance when cycling at a high, but not a low, pedal cadence in healthy recreationally active subjects. These findings support recent observations that NO3 (-) supplementation may be particularly effective at improving physiological and functional responses in type II muscle fibers. PMID:25858494

  8. Organic aerosol formation from the reactive uptake of isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) onto non-acidified inorganic seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. B.; Coggon, M. M.; Bates, K. H.; Zhang, X.; Schwantes, R. H.; Schilling, K. A.; Loza, C. L.; Flagan, R. C.; Wennberg, P. O.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2014-04-01

    The reactive partitioning of cis and trans β-IEPOX was investigated on hydrated inorganic seed particles, without the addition of acids. No organic aerosol (OA) formation was observed on dry ammonium sulfate (AS); however, prompt and efficient OA growth was observed for the cis and trans β-IEPOX on AS seeds at liquid water contents of 40-75% of the total particle mass. OA formation from IEPOX is a kinetically limited process, thus the OA growth continues if there is a reservoir of gas-phase IEPOX. There appears to be no differences, within error, in the OA growth or composition attributable to the cis / trans isomeric structures. Reactive uptake of IEPOX onto hydrated AS seeds with added base (NaOH) also produced high OA loadings, suggesting the pH dependence for OA formation from IEPOX is weak for AS particles. No OA formation, after particle drying, was observed on seed particles where Na+ was substituted for NH4+. The Henry's Law partitioning of IEPOX was measured on NaCl particles (ionic strength ~9 M) to be 3 × 107 M atm-1 (-50 / +100%). A small quantity of OA was produced when NH4+ was present in the particles, but the chloride (Cl-) anion was substituted for sulfate (SO42-), possibly suggesting differences in nucleophilic strength of the anions. Online time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry and offline filter analysis provide evidence of oxygenated hydrocarbons, organosulfates, and amines in the particle organic composition. The results are consistent with weak correlations between IEPOX-derived OA and particle acidity or liquid water observed in field studies, as the chemical system is nucleophile-limited and not limited in water or catalyst activity.

  9. Sources of dissolved inorganic carbon to the Canada Basin halocline: A multitracer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Kristina A.; McLaughlin, Fiona; Tortell, Philippe D.; Yamamoto-Kawai, Michiyo; Francois, Roger

    2016-05-01

    We examine the dissolved inorganic carbon maximum in the Canada Basin halocline using a suite of geochemical tracers to gain insight into the factors that contribute to the persistence of this feature. Hydrographic and geochemical samples were collected in the upper 500 m of the southwestern Canada Basin water column in the summer of 2008 and fall of 2009. These observations were used to identify conservative and nonconservative processes that contribute dissolved inorganic carbon to halocline source waters, including shelf sediment organic matter remineralization, air-sea gas exchange, and sea-ice brine export. Our results indicate that the remineralization of organic matter that occurs along the Bering and Chukchi Sea shelves is the overwhelming contributor of dissolved inorganic carbon to Pacific Winter Water that occupies the middle halocline in the southwestern Canada Basin. Nonconservative contributions from air-sea exchange and sea-ice brine are not significant. The broad salinity range associated with the DIC maximum, compared to the narrow salinity range of the nutrient maximum, is due to mixing between Pacific and Atlantic water and not abiotic addition of DIC.

  10. Watershed scale spatial variability in dissolved and total organic and inorganic carbon in contrasting UK catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumberland, S.; Baker, A.; Hudson, N. J.

    2006-12-01

    Approximately 800 organic and inorganic carbon analyses have been undertaken from watershed scale and regional scale spatial surveys in various British catchments. These include (1) a small (<100 sq-km) urban catchment (Ouseburn, N England); (2) a headwater, lowland agricultural catchment (River Tern, C England) (3) a large UK catchment (River Tyne, ~3000 sq-km) and (4) a spatial survey of ~300 analyses from rivers from SW England (~1700 sq-km). Results demonstrate that: (1) the majority of organic and inorganic carbon is in the dissolved (DOC and DIC) fractions; (2) that with the exception of peat rich headwaters, DIC concentration is always greater than DOC; (3) In the rural River Tern, riverine DOC and DIC are shown to follow a simple end- member mixing between DIC (DOC) rich (poor) ground waters and DOC (DIC) rich (poor) riparian wetlands for all sample sites. (4) In the urbanized Ouseburn catchment, although many sample sites also show this same mixing trend, some tributaries follow a pollutant trend of simultaneous increases in both DOC and DIC. The Ouseburn is part of the larger Tyne catchment: this larger catchment follows the simple groundwater DIC- soil water DOC end member mixing model, with the exception of the urban catchments which exhibit an elevated DIC compared to rural sites. (5) Urbanization is demonstrated to increase DIC compared to equivalent rural catchments; this DIC has potential sources including diffuse source inputs from the dissolution of concrete, point sources such as trade effluents and landfill leachates, and bedrock derived carbonates relocated to the soil dissolution zone by urban development. (6) DIC in rural SW England demonstrates that spatial variability in DIC can be attributed to variations in geology; but that DIC concentrations in the SW England rivers dataset are typically lower than the urbanized Tyne catchments despite the presence of carbonate bedrock in many of the sample catchments in the SW England dataset. (7

  11. Thermochemical chlorination of carbon indirectly driven by an unexpected sulfide of copper with inorganic chloride.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Takashi; Takaoka, Masaki

    2011-12-15

    Unintentional anthropogenic thermal chlorination of carbon is known to be a contributor to global environmental pollution of organochlorine compounds. We found unexpected, serious chlorination of carbon promoted by a "sulfide" of copper, which has been generally thought of and studied as an inactive metal catalyst. Our quantitative and X-ray spectroscopic results show that a fraction of cupric sulfide indirectly promoted thermochemical solid-phase formation of a large quantity of organochlorine compounds such as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans, biphenyls, and benzenes that used inactive inorganic chloride as chlorine storage, which partly caused environmental pollution by organochlorine compounds. PMID:22004834

  12. Inorganic markers, carbonaceous components and stable carbon isotope from biomass burning aerosols in northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, F.; Zhang, Y.; Kawamura, K.

    2015-12-01

    To better characterize the sources of fine particulate matter (i.e. PM2.5) in Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China, aerosol chemical composition such total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), and inorganic ions were studied as well as stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of TC. Intensively open biomass burning episodes were identified from late September to early October by satellite fire and aerosol optical depth maps. During the biomass burning episodes, concentrations of PM2.5, OC, EC, and WSOC increased by a factor of 4-12 compared to non-biomass-burning periods. Non-sea-salt potassium is strongly correlated with PM2.5, OC, EC and WSOC, suggesting an important contribution of biomass burning emission. The enrichment in both the non-sea-salt potassium and chlorine is significantly larger than other inorganic species, indicating that biomass burning aerosols in Sanjiang Plain is mostly fresh and less aged. In addition, WSOC to OC ratio is relatively lower compared to that reported in biomass burning aerosols in tropical regions, supporting that biomass burning aerosols in Sanjiang Plain is mostly primary and secondary organic aerosols is not significant. A lower average δ13C value (-26.2‰) is found for the biomass-burning aerosols, suggesting a dominant contribution from combustion of C3 plants in the studied region.

  13. CONTINUOUS, AUTOMATED AND SIMULTANEOUS MEASUREMENT OF OXYGEN UPTAKE AND CARBON DIOXIDE EVOLUTION IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Commercial respirometers are capable of continuously and automatically measuring oxygen uptake in bioreactors. A method for continuously and automatically measuring carbon dioxide evolution can be retrofitted to commercial respirometers. Continuous and automatic measurements of...

  14. Carbon Isotope Composition of Caribbean Sea Surface Waters: Response to the Uptake of Anthropogenic CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, D. E.; Thunell, R.; Wejnert, K. E.; Astor, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The burning of fossil fuels and deforestation have significantly increased atmospheric CO2 levels, from ~280 ppm prior to the industrial revolution to the present value of ~390 ppm. Suess (1955) was the first to show that the carbon isotopic composition of the atmosphere is changing in response to the anthropogenic input of radiocarbon-dead, 13C depleted CO2 from fossil fuel combustion. While biological processes may be the primary mechanism controlling the δ13C of marine carbon, air-sea gas exchange should allow for the transfer of the so-called 13C Suess effect (Keeling, 1979) from the atmosphere to the surface ocean. The first measurements of the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon of ocean surface waters were made in 1970 (Kroopnick, 1974) and serve as a baseline for assessing how the carbon isotopic composition of the oceans have changed in response to the invasion of fossil fuel CO2 over the last 40 years. However, in order to gain a longer and more complete picture of the marine δ13C Suess effect, we must rely on indirect measures of changes in surface water δ13C, most notably those preserved in carbonate secreting marine organisms. The Cariaco Basin is one of the rare locations where one can directly compare sediment records with modern instrumental data. Here we report a high resolution planktonic foraminiferal δ13C record from the basin for the last 300 years that clearly resolves the timing and magnitude of the marine 13C Suess effect associated with the oceanic uptake of anthropogenically derived CO2. Cariaco Basin sediment trap and upper-most box core sediment δ13C match both the trend and magnitude of observed δ13C changes in atmospheric CO2 over the last 15 years. The longer sediment record suggests the marine Suess effect to be -0.75 % from pre-industrial values, with most of the change occurring since 1950, coincident with the rapid rise in atmospheric CO2 noted in ice core and instrumental data. If the current anthropogenic CO2 emission

  15. Does Ocean Color Data Assimilation Improve Estimates of Global Ocean Inorganic Carbon?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson

    2012-01-01

    Ocean color data assimilation has been shown to dramatically improve chlorophyll abundances and distributions globally and regionally in the oceans. Chlorophyll is a proxy for phytoplankton biomass (which is explicitly defined in a model), and is related to the inorganic carbon cycle through the interactions of the organic carbon (particulate and dissolved) and through primary production where inorganic carbon is directly taken out of the system. Does ocean color data assimilation, whose effects on estimates of chlorophyll are demonstrable, trickle through the simulated ocean carbon system to produce improved estimates of inorganic carbon? Our emphasis here is dissolved inorganic carbon, pC02, and the air-sea flux. We use a sequential data assimilation method that assimilates chlorophyll directly and indirectly changes nutrient concentrations in a multi-variate approach. The results are decidedly mixed. Dissolved organic carbon estimates from the assimilation model are not meaningfully different from free-run, or unassimilated results, and comparisons with in situ data are similar. pC02 estimates are generally worse after data assimilation, with global estimates diverging 6.4% from in situ data, while free-run estimates are only 4.7% higher. Basin correlations are, however, slightly improved: r increase from 0.78 to 0.79, and slope closer to unity at 0.94 compared to 0.86. In contrast, air-sea flux of C02 is noticeably improved after data assimilation. Global differences decline from -0.635 mol/m2/y (stronger model sink from the atmosphere) to -0.202 mol/m2/y. Basin correlations are slightly improved from r=O.77 to r=0.78, with slope closer to unity (from 0.93 to 0.99). The Equatorial Atlantic appears as a slight sink in the free-run, but is correctly represented as a moderate source in the assimilation model. However, the assimilation model shows the Antarctic to be a source, rather than a modest sink and the North Indian basin is represented incorrectly as a sink

  16. Effects of inorganic carbon concentration on carbon formation, nitrate utilization, biomass and oil accumulation of Nannochloropsis oculata CS 179.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiang; Gu, Na; Li, Gang; Lin, Junda; Huang, Liangmin; Tan, LingLing

    2012-05-01

    This investigation examined the effects of the inorganic carbon concentration (4, 0.8 and 0 g/L NaHCO(3)) on the carbon formation, nitrate utilization, growth and fatty acids compositions of Nannochloropsis oculata. The dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration in the three treatments decreased sharply during the first 6 days, and the percentage of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (% of total organic carbon (TOC)) decreased with the depletion of the DIC. The NO(3)(-) assimilation of the algae was correlated with the DIC concentration. The algae in the highest DIC treatment had the highest specific grow rate (0.0843 d(-1)) (P<0.0001), and their biomass and fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) productivity were 84.00 and 9.69 mg/L/d, respectively (P<0.0001). Contents of C16 and C18 series (% of FAME) were high and the C16:0 increased with the decrease of C18:1 during the cultivation. The iodine value (IV) of the algae was low at the low DIC media. PMID:22386465

  17. Net carbon uptake has increased through warming-induced changes in temperate forest phenology

    SciTech Connect

    Keenan, Trevor; Gray, Josh; Friedl, Mark; Toomey, Michael; Bohrer, Gil; Hollinger, David; Munger, J. William; OKeefe, John; Hans, Schmid; Wing, Ian; Yang, Bai; Richardson, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    The timing of phenological events exerts a strong control over ecosystem function and leads to multiple feedbacks to the climate system1. Phenology is inherently sensitive to temperature (though the exact sensitivity is disputed2) and recent warming is reported to have led to earlier spring, later autumn3,4 and increased vegetation activity5,6. Such greening could be expected to enhance ecosystem carbon uptake7,8, though reports also suggest decreased uptake for boreal forests4,9. Here we assess changes in phenology of temperate forests over the eastern US during the past two decades, and quantify the resulting changes in forest carbon storage. We combine long-term ground observations of phenology, satellite indices, and ecosystem-scale carbon dioxide flux measurements, along with 18 terrestrial biosphere models. We observe a strong trend of earlier spring and later autumn. In contrast to previous suggestions4,9 we show that carbon uptake through photosynthesis increased considerably more than carbon release through respiration for both an earlier spring and later autumn. The terrestrial biosphere models tested misrepresent the temperature sensitivity of phenology, and thus the effect on carbon uptake. Our analysis of the temperature-phenology-carbon coupling suggests a current and possible future enhancement of forest carbon uptake due to changes in phenology. This constitutes a negative feedback to climate change, and is serving to slow the rate of warming.

  18. Spatial sensitivity of inorganic carbon to model setup: North Sea and Baltic Sea with ECOSMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castano Primo, Rocio; Schrum, Corinna; Daewel, Ute

    2015-04-01

    In ocean biogeochemical models it is critical to capture the key processes adequately so they do not only reproduce the observations but that those processes are reproduced correctly. One key issue is the choice of parameters, which in most cases are estimates with large uncertainties. This can be the product of actual lack of detailed knowledge of the process, or the manner the processes are implemented, more or less complex. In addition, the model sensitivity is not necessarily homogenous across the spatial domain modelled, which adds another layer of complexity to biogeochemical modelling. In the particular case of the inorganic carbon cycle, there are several sets of carbonate constants that can be chosen. The calculated air-sea CO2 flux is largely dependent on the parametrization chosen. In addition, the different parametrizations all the underlying processes that in some way impact the carbon cycle beyond the carbonate dissociation and fluxes give results that can be significantly different. Examples of these processes are phytoplankton growth rates or remineralization rates. Despite their geographical proximity, the North and Baltic Seas exhibit very different dynamics. The North Sea receives important inflows of Atlantic waters, while the Baltic Sea is an almost enclosed system, with very little exchange from the North Sea. Wind, tides, and freshwater supply act very differently, but dominantly structure the ecosystem dynamics on spatial and temporal scales. The biological community is also different. Cyanobacteria, which are important due to their ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen, and they are only present in the Baltic Sea. These differentiating features have a strong impact in the biogeochemical cycles and ultimately shape the variations in the carbonate chemistry. Here the ECOSMO model was employed on the North Sea and Baltic Sea. The model is set so both are modelled at the same time, instead of having them run separately. ECOSMO is a 3-D coupled

  19. Activation and splitting of carbon dioxide on the surface of an inorganic electride material

    PubMed Central

    Toda, Yoshitake; Hirayama, Hiroyuki; Kuganathan, Navaratnarajah; Torrisi, Antonio; Sushko, Peter V.; Hosono, Hideo

    2013-01-01

    Activation of carbon dioxide is the most important step in its conversion into valuable chemicals. Surfaces of stable oxide with a low work function may be promising for this purpose. Here we report that the surfaces of the inorganic electride [Ca24Al28O64]4+(e−)4 activate and split carbon dioxide at room temperature. This behaviour is attributed to a high concentration of localized electrons in the near-surface region and a corrugation of the surface that can trap oxygen atoms and strained carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide molecules. The [Ca24Al28O64]4+(e−)4 surface exposed to carbon dioxide is studied using temperature-programmed desorption, and spectroscopic methods. The results of these measurements, corroborated with ab initio simulations, show that both carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide adsorb on the [Ca24Al28O64]4+(e−)4 surface at RT and above and adopt unusual configurations that result in desorption of molecular carbon monoxide and atomic oxygen upon heating. PMID:23986101

  20. Isotopic Composition of Organic and Inorganic Carbon in Desert Biological Soil Crust Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, K.; Hartnett, H.; Anbar, A.; Beraldi, H.; Garcia-Pichel, F.

    2006-12-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are microbial communities that colonize soil surfaces in many arid regions. BSCs are important sources for fixed carbon and nitrogen in these ecosystems, and they greatly influence the structure, function, and appearance of desert soils. Biological activity of BSCs occurs during pulses of hydration requiring desert crusts to tolerate extremes in UV radiation, temperature, and desiccation. These characteristics make desert crusts unique systems that have received little consideration in the study of biogeochemical processes in extreme environments. This project investigates the impact of BSCs on carbon dynamics within desert soils. Soil cores ranging in depth from 8 to 12 cm were taken in March, 2006 from deserts near Moab, Utah. Two major BSC classes were identified: lichen-dominated (dark and pinnacled) soil crusts and cyanobacteria-dominated (light and flat) soil crusts. These two surface morphologies are related to the different biological communities. Carbon content and stable carbon isotopic composition were determined for the bulk carbon pool, as well as for the organic and inorganic carbon fractions of the soils. Expectedly, there was a net decrease in organic carbon content with depth (0.39-0.27 percent). Stable carbon isotope values for the organic fraction ranged from -5.8 per mil to -24.0 per mil (Avg: -14.4 per mil, S.D: 6.42 per mil). Stable carbon isotope values for the inorganic fraction ranged from 0.3 per mil to -3.6 per mil (Avg: -2.4 per mil, S.D.: 1.05 per mil). The variation in the isotopic composition of the organic carbon was due to a strong depletion below the surface soil value occurring between 3 and 5 cm depth, with an enrichment above the original surface value at depths below 6 to 10 cm. These data suggest that within desert soil crust systems the carbon isotopic signal is complex with both a clear biological imprint (lighter organic carbon) as well as evidence for some mechanism that results in

  1. Effects of inorganic anions on carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of trichloroethene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunde; Zhou, Aiguo; Gan, Yiqun; Li, Xiaoqian

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the magnitude and variability in isotope fractionation with respect to specific processes is crucial to the application of stable isotopic analysis as a tool to infer and quantify transformation processes. The variability of carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) in the presence of different inorganic ions (nitrate, sulfate, and chloride), was investigated to evaluate the potential effects of inorganic anions on carbon isotope enrichment factor (ε value). A comparison of ε values obtained in deionized water, nitrate solution, and sulfate solution demonstrated that the ε values were identical and not affected by the presence of nitrate and sulfate. In the presence of chloride, however, the ε values (ranging from -6.3±0.8 to 10±1.3‰) were variable and depended on the chloride concentration, indicating that chloride could significantly affect carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of TCE. Thus, caution should be exercised in selecting appropriate ε values for the field application of stable isotope analysis, as various chloride concentrations may be present due to naturally present or introduced with pH adjustment and iron salts during Fenton-like remediation. Furthermore, the effects of chloride on carbon isotope fractionation may be able to provide new insights about reaction mechanisms of Fenton-like processes. PMID:26835895

  2. Oceanic Carbon Dioxide Uptake in a Model of Century-Scale Global Warming

    PubMed

    Sarmiento; Le Quéré C

    1996-11-22

    In a model of ocean-atmosphere interaction that excluded biological processes, the oceanic uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) was substantially reduced in scenarios involving global warming relative to control scenarios. The primary reason for the reduced uptake was the weakening or collapse of the ocean thermohaline circulation. Such a large reduction in this ocean uptake would have a major impact on the future growth rate of atmospheric CO2. Model simulations that include a simple representation of biological processes show a potentially large offsetting effect resulting from the downward flux of biogenic carbon. However, the magnitude of the offset is difficult to quantify with present knowledge. PMID:8910268

  3. Carbon Balance in an Irrigated Corn Field after Inorganic Fertilizer or Manure Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentz, R. D.; Lehrsch, G. A.

    2014-12-01

    Little is known about inorganic fertilizer or manure effects on organic carbon (OC) and inorganic C (IC) losses from a furrow irrigated field, particularly in the context of other system C gains or losses. In 2003 and 2004, we measured dissolved organic and inorganic C (DOC, DIC), particulate OC and IC (POC, PIC) concentrations in irrigation inflow, runoff, and percolation waters (6-7 irrigations/y); C inputs from soil amendments and crop biomass; harvested C; and gaseous C emissions from field plots cropped to silage corn (Zea mays L.) in southern Idaho. Annual treatments included: (M) 13 (y 1) and 34 Mg/ha (y 2) stockpiled dairy manure; (F) 78 (yr 1) and 195 kg N/ha (y 2) inorganic N fertilizer; or (NA) no amendment--control. The mean annual total C input into M plots averaged 16.1 Mg/ha, 1.4-times greater than that for NA (11.5 Mg/ha) or F (11.1 Mg/ha), while total C outputs for the three treatments were similar, averaging 11.8 Mg/ha. Thus, the manure plots ended each growing season with an average net gain of 3.8 Mg C/ha (a positive net C flux), while the control (-0.5 Mg C/ha) and fertilizer (-0.4 Mg C/ha) treatments finished the season with a net C loss. Atmospheric CO2 incorporated into the crop biomass contributed 96% of the mean annual C input to NA and F plots but only 68% to M plots. We conclude that nutrient amendments substantially influence the short-term carbon balance of our furrow-irrigated system. Amendments had both direct and indirect influences on individual C components, such as the losses of DIC and POC in runoff and DOC in percolation water, producing temporally complex outcomes which may depend on environmental conditions external to the field.

  4. Mathematical models of the uptake of carbon monoxide on hemoglobin at low carbon monoxide levels.

    PubMed Central

    Joumard, R; Chiron, M; Vidon, R; Maurin, M; Rouzioux, J M

    1981-01-01

    Coburn's differential equation for the uptake of carbon monoxide by hemoglobin and two particular types of solution of this equation were considered and the solutions verified for a group of healthy adults consisting of 73 nonsmoking pedestrians or car passengers exposed to low levels of carbon monoxide as experienced in the city of Lyon. The CO levels at the breathing level and the walking speed of the subjects was continually measured, and the carboxyhemoglobin levels determined at the beginning and the end of each test journey. The values of all the other relevant parameters were also determined. The half-life of carboxyhemoglobin was studied as a function of the degree of activity, the age, the sex and the height of the subjects. Finally a mathematical model was set up to represent a periodic uptake of CO which made it possible to estimate the variations in the carboxyhemoglobin level for any subject during a period of a day or a week without any need to know the initial level. PMID:7333242

  5. Measurements of the stable carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon in the northeastern Atlantic and Nordic Seas during summer 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, M. P.; Achterberg, E. P.; Griffiths, A. M.; McDonald, A.; Boyce, A. J.

    2015-06-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) in seawater was measured in a batch process for 552 samples collected during two cruises in the northeastern Atlantic and Nordic Seas from June to August 2012. One cruise was part of the UK Ocean Acidification research programme, and the other was a repeat hydrographic transect of the Extended Ellett Line. In combination with measurements made of other variables on these and other cruises, these data can be used to constrain the anthropogenic component of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the interior ocean, and to help to determine the influence of biological carbon uptake on surface ocean carbonate chemistry. The measurements have been processed, quality-controlled and submitted to an in-preparation global compilation of seawater δ13CDIC data, and are available from the British Oceanographic Data Centre. The observed δ13CDIC values fall in a range from -0.58 to +2.37 ‰, relative to the Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite standard. The mean of the absolute differences between samples collected in duplicate in the same container type during both cruises and measured consecutively is 0.10 ‰, which corresponds to a 1σ uncertainty of 0.09 ‰, and which is within the range reported by other published studies of this kind. A crossover analysis was performed with nearby historical δ13CDIC data, indicating that any systematic offsets between our measurements and previously published results are negligible. Data doi:10.5285/09760a3a-c2b5-250b-e053-6c86abc037c0 (northeastern Atlantic), doi:10.5285/09511dd0-51db-0e21-e053-6c86abc09b95 (Nordic Seas).

  6. Turgor Regulation in Osmotically Stressed Arabidopsis Epidermal Root Cells. Direct Support for the Role of Inorganic Ion Uptake as Revealed by Concurrent Flux and Cell Turgor Measurements1

    PubMed Central

    Shabala, Sergey N.; Lew, Roger R.

    2002-01-01

    Hyperosmotic stress is known to significantly enhance net uptake of inorganic ions into plant cells. Direct evidence for cell turgor recovery via such a mechanism, however, is still lacking. In the present study, we performed concurrent measurements of net ion fluxes (with the noninvasive microelectrode ion flux estimation technique) and cell turgor changes (with the pressure-probe technique) to provide direct evidence that inorganic ion uptake regulates turgor in osmotically stressed Arabidopsis epidermal root cells. Immediately after onset of hyperosmotic stress (100/100 mm mannitol/sorbitol treatment), the cell turgor dropped from 0.65 to about 0.25 MPa. Turgor recovery started within 2 to 10 min after the treatment and was accompanied by a significant (30–80 nmol m−2 s−1) increase in uptake of K+, Cl−, and Na+ by root cells. In most cells, almost complete (>90% of initial values) recovery of the cell turgor was observed within 40 to 50 min after stress onset. In another set of experiments, we combined the voltage-clamp and the microelectrode ion flux estimation techniques to show that this process is, in part, mediated by voltage-gated K+ transporters at the cell plasma membrane. The possible physiological significance of these findings is discussed. PMID:12011359

  7. Switching predominance of organic versus inorganic carbon exports from an intermediate-size subarctic watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dornblaser, Mark M.; Striegl, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Hydrologic exports of dissolved inorganic and organic carbon (DIC, DOC) reflect permafrost conditions in arctic and subarctic river basins. DIC yields in particular, increase with decreased permafrost extent. We investigated the influence of permafrost extent on DIC and DOC yield in a tributary of the Yukon River, where the upper watershed has continuous permafrost and the lower watershed has discontinuous permafrost. Our results indicate that DIC versus DOC predominance switches with interannual changes in water availability and flow routing in intermediate-size watersheds having mixed permafrost coverage. Large water yield and small concentrations from mountainous headwaters and small water yield and high concentrations from lowlands produced similar upstream and downstream carbon yields. However, DOC export exceeded DIC export during high-flow 2011 while DIC predominated during low-flow 2010. The majority of exported carbon derived from near-surface organic sources when landscapes were wet or frozen and from mineralized subsurface sources when infiltration increased.

  8. A systematic investigation of the preparation and properties of composite carbon molecular sieves containing inorganic oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foley, Henry C.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this research is to define the methodology for the preparation and characterization of new carbon-based molecular sieves with composite structures. Carbon molecular sieves have found increasing application in the field of separation and purification of gases. These materials are relatively easy to prepare and their surfaces can be modified to some extent. It is expected that by combining inorganic oxides with the carbonaceous structure one can begin to design composite materials with a wider range of possible chemical and physical properties. In this way, the IOM-CMS materials may confer distinct advantages over pure carbon molecular sieves, not just for separation, but also for catalysis. The most recent results in the design and characterization of these IOM-CMS materials are reviewed and summarized. Directions for further research are also presented.

  9. Shallow Remineralization in the Sargasso Sea Estimated from Seasonal Variations in Oxygen and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, S.; Ennyu, A.; Najjar, R. G.; Bates, N.

    1998-01-01

    A diagnostic model of the mean annual cycles of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and oxygen below the mixed layer at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site is presented and used to estimate organic carbon remineralization in the seasonal thermocline. The model includes lateral and vertical advection as well as vertical, diffusion. Very good agreement is found for the remineralization estimates based on oxygen and DIC. Net remineralization averaged from mid-spring to early fall is found to be a maximum between 120 and 140 in. Remineralization integrated between 100 (the compensation depth) and 250 m during this period is estimated to be about 1 mol C/sq m. This flux is consistent with independent estimates of the loss of particulate and dissolved organic carbon.

  10. Carbon isotope fractionation of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) due to outgassing of carbon dioxide from a headwater stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doctor, D.H.; Kendall, C.; Sebestyen, S.D.; Shanley, J.B.; Ohte, N.; Boyer, E.W.

    2008-01-01

    The stable isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (??13C-DIC) was investigated as a potential tracer of streamflow generation processes at the Sleepers River Research Watershed, Vermont, USA. Downstream sampling showed ?? 13C-DIC increased between 3-5??? from the stream source to the outlet weir approximately 0??5 km downstream, concomitant with increasing pH and decreasing PCO2. An increase in ??13C-DIC of 2.4 ?? 0??1??? per log unit decrease of excess PCO2 (stream PCO2 normalized to atmospheric PCO2) was observed from downstream transect data collected during snowmelt. Isotopic fractionation of DIC due to CO2 outgassing rather than exchange with atmospheric CO2 may be the primary cause of increased ?? 13C-DIC values downstream when PCO2 of surface freshwater exceeds twice the atmospheric CO2 concentration. Although CO2 outgassing caused a general increase in stream ??13C-DIC values, points of localized groundwater seepage into the stream were identified by decreases in ??13C-DIC and increases in DIC concentration of the stream water superimposed upon the general downstream trend. In addition, comparison between snowmelt, early spring and summer seasons showed that DIC is flushed from shallow groundwater flowpaths during snowmelt and is replaced by a greater proportion of DIC derived from soil CO2 during the early spring growing season. Thus, in spite of effects from CO2 outgassing, ??13C of DIC can be a useful indicator of groundwater additions to headwater streams and a tracer of carbon dynamics in catchments. Copyright ?? 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Measurements of the stable carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon in the Northeastern Atlantic and Nordic Seas during summer 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, M. P.; Achterberg, E. P.; Griffiths, A. M.; McDonald, A.; Boyce, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) in seawater was measured in samples collected during two cruises in the Northeastern Atlantic and Nordic Seas from June to August 2012. One cruise was part of the UK Ocean Acidification research programme, and the other was a repeat hydrographic transect of the Extended Ellett Line. In combination with measurements made of various other variables on these and other cruises, these data can be used to constrain the anthropogenic component of DIC in the interior ocean, and also assist in determining the influence of biological carbon uptake on surface ocean carbonate chemistry. The measurements have been processed, quality-controlled and submitted to an in-preparation global compilation of seawater δ13CDIC data, and are available from the British Oceanographic Data Centre. The observed δ13CDIC values fall in a range from -0.58 to +2.37‰, relative to the Vienna Peedee Belemnite standard. From duplicate samples collected during both cruises, the precision for the 552 results is 0.07‰, which is similar to other published studies of this kind. Data doi:10.5285/09760a3a-c2b5-250b-e053-6c86abc037c0 (Northeastern Atlantic), doi:10.5285/09511dd0-51db-0e21-e053-6c86abc09b95 (Nordic Seas).

  12. Carbonate concretions as a significant component of ancient marine carbon cycles: Insights from paired organic and inorganic carbon isotope analyses of a Cretaceous shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyd, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate concretions often occur within fine-grained, organic-rich sedimentary rocks. This association reflects the common production of diagenetic minerals through biologic cycling of organic matter. Chemical analysis of carbonate concretions provides the rare opportunity to explore ancient shallow diagenetic environments, which are inherently transient due to progressive burial but are an integral component of the marine carbon cycle. The late Cretaceous Holz Shale (~80 Ma) contains abundant calcite concretions that exhibit textural and geochemical characteristics indicative of relatively shallow formation (i.e., near the sediment-water interface). Sampled concretions contain between 5.4 and 9.8 wt.% total inorganic carbon (TIC), or ~45 and 82 wt.% CaCO3, compared to host shale values which average ~1.5 wt.% TIC. Organic carbon isotope compositions (δ13Corg) are relatively constant in host and concretion samples ranging from ­-26.3 to -24.0‰ (VPDB). Carbonate carbon isotope compositions (δ13Ccarb) range from -22.5 to -3.4‰, indicating a significant but not entirely organic source of carbon. Concretions of the lower Holz Shale exhibit considerably elevated δ13Ccarb values averaging -4.8‰, whereas upper Holz Shale concretions express an average δ13Ccarb value of -17.0‰. If the remaining carbonate for lower Holz Shale concretions is sourced from marine fluids and/or dissolved marine carbonate minerals (e.g., shells), a simple mass balance indicates that ~28% of concretion carbon was sourced from organic matter and ~72% from late Cretaceous marine inorganic carbon (with δ13C ~ +2.5‰). Upper Holz Shale calculations indicate a ~73% contribution from organic matter and a ~27% contribution from inorganic carbon. When normalized for carbonate, organic contents within the concretions are ~2-13 wt.% enriched compared to host contents. This potentially reflects the protective nature of cementation that acts to limit permeability and chemical destruction of

  13. Two decades of inorganic carbon dynamics along the West Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauri, C.; Doney, S. C.; Takahashi, T.; Erickson, M.; Jiang, G.; Ducklow, H. W.

    2015-11-01

    We present 20 years of seawater inorganic carbon measurements collected along the western shelf and slope of the Antarctic Peninsula. Water column observations from summertime cruises and seasonal surface underway pCO2 measurements provide unique insights into the spatial, seasonal, and interannual variability in this dynamic system. Discrete measurements from depths > 2000 m align well with World Ocean Circulation Experiment observations across the time series and underline the consistency of the data set. Surface total alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon data showed large spatial gradients, with a concomitant wide range of Ωarag (< 1 up to 3.9). This spatial variability was mainly driven by increasing influence of biological productivity towards the southern end of the sampling grid and meltwater input along the coast towards the northern end. Large inorganic carbon drawdown through biological production in summer caused high near-shore Ωarag despite glacial and sea-ice meltwater input. In support of previous studies, we observed Redfield behavior of regional C / N nutrient utilization, while the C / P (80.5 ± 2.5) and N / P (11.7 ± 0.3) molar ratios were significantly lower than the Redfield elemental stoichiometric values. Seasonal salinity-based predictions of Ωarag suggest that surface waters remained mostly supersaturated with regard to aragonite throughout the study. However, more than 20 % of the predictions for winters and springs between 1999 and 2013 resulted in Ωarag < 1.2. Such low levels of Ωarag may have implications for important organisms such as pteropods. Even though we did not detect any statistically significant long-term trends, the combination of on-going ocean acidification and freshwater input may soon induce more unfavorable conditions than the ecosystem experiences today.

  14. Forest Carbon Uptake and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zobitz, John

    2013-01-01

    Using the fundamental theorem of calculus and numerical integration, we investigate carbon absorption of ecosystems with measurements from a global database. The results illustrate the dynamic nature of ecosystems and their ability to absorb atmospheric carbon.

  15. Subsurface Monitor for Dissolved Inorganic Carbon at Geological Sequestration Site Phase 1 SBIR Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng Wu

    2012-08-03

    Phase I research of this SBIR contract has yielded anticipated results and enable us to develop a practical new instrument to measure the Dissolved Inorganic Carbons (DIC) as well as Supercritical (SC) CO2 in underground brine water at higher sensitivity, lower cost, higher frequency and longer period of time for the Monitoring, Verification & Accounting (MVA) of CO2 sequestration as well as Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). We show that reduced cost and improved performance are possible; both future and emerging market exist for the proposed new instrument.

  16. [Dissolved inorganic carbon and its carbon isotope composition in cascade reservoir of the Maotiao River during summer and autumn].

    PubMed

    Li, Gan-rong; Liu, Cong-qiang; Chen, Chuan; Wang, Bao-li; Li, Jun; Li, Si-liang; Liu, Xiao-long; Wang, Fu-shun

    2009-10-15

    Water samples along water column in the front of dams and samples at 0.5 m below surface water from tributary rivers were collected in July and October, 2007. The water chemistry, concentrations of dissolve inorganic carbon and its carbon isotopic compositions were determined, in order to investigate the geochemical behavior of carbon in the Maotiao River. This study aimed to understand the variations of the concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and delta13 C(DIC) during its transport along the cascade reservoirs and river system. The results showed that DIC concentrations in summer were lower than that in autumn. In summer, the DIC concentrations were 1.35-2.84 mmol/L, with an average value of 2.12 mmol/L; and in autumn they fell into 2.03-3.98 mmol/L, with an average value of 2.67 mmol/L. The delta13 CD1 in surface water along Maotiao River ranged from -10.3% per hundred to -5.1% per hundred in summer, with a value of -8.6% per hundred in average, and in autumn, delta3 C(DIC) became more negative, and had a range from -13.0% per hundred to -6.9% per hundred, with an average value of -9.0% per hundred. Generally, DIC in surface water showed a trend to decrease from the upper reaches to lower reaches along Maotiao River, and t3 Cc1 gradually becam me more negative downstream. On the water column, DIC concentrations were higher in hypolimnion, while a delta13 C(DIC) had a reverse trend with higher values occurred in epilimnion. The results indicated that the hydrochemistry of river could be significantly changed by river damming processes. As for carbon, reservoir should be an important place for the transformation among the different carbon species. PMID:19968103

  17. PHOTOSYNTHETIC CARBON UPTAKE AND BELOW GROUND PARTITIONING IN TEMPERATE PASTURES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term carbon sequestration is influenced by the ability of the plant community to fix carbon dioxide, and by the amount and distribution of carbon that is partitioned to roots where it becomes less susceptible to re-release into the atmosphere. We examined the effects of harvest strategy (graze...

  18. High-rate nitrogen removal by the Anammox process with a sufficient inorganic carbon source.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiachun; Zhang, Li; Fukuzaki, Yasuhiro; Hira, Daisuke; Furukawa, Kenji

    2010-12-01

    This study focused on high-rate nitrogen removal by the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) process with a sufficient inorganic carbon (IC) source. Experiments were carried out in an up-flow column Anammox reactor fed with synthetic inorganic wastewater for 110 days. The IC source was added into the influent tank in the form of bicarbonate. The results confirmed the positive impact of inorganic matter on stimulating Anammox activity. After the addition of sufficient IC, the nitrogen removal rate sharply increased from 5.2 to 11.8 kg-Nm(-3)day(-1) within only 32 days. NO(2)-N inhibition was not observed even at NO(2)-N concentrations greater than 460 mgN/L, indicating the enriched Anammox consortium adapted to high NO(2)-N concentrations. The ratio of NO(2)-N removal, NO(3)-N production and NH(4)-N removal for the reactor was correspondingly changed from 1.21:0.21:1 to 1.24:0.18:1. Simultaneously, the sludge volume index of the Anammox granules decreased markedly from 36.8 to 21.5 mL/g, which was attributed to the implementation of proper operational strategy. In addition, DNA analysis revealed that a shift from the KSU-1 strain to the KU2 strain occurred in the Anammox community. PMID:20709538

  19. [Biogeochemical processes of the major ions and dissolved inorganic carbon in the Guijiang River].

    PubMed

    Tang, Wen-Kui; Tao, Zhen; Gao, Quan-Zhou; Mao, Hai-Ruo; Jiang, Guang-Hui; Jiao, Shu-Lin; Zheng, Xiong-Bo; Zhang, Qian-Zhu; Ma, Zan-Wen

    2014-06-01

    Within the drainage basin, information about natural processes and human activities can be recorded in the chemical composition of riverine water. The analysis of the Guijiang River, the first level tributary of the Xijiang River, demonstrated that the chemical composition of water in the Guijiang River was mainly influenced by the chemical weathering of carbonate rocks within the drainage basin, in which CO2 was the main erosion medium, and that the weathering of carbonate rock by H2SO4 had a remarkable impact on the water chemical composition in the Guijiang River. Precipitation, human activities, the weathering of carbonate rocks and silicate rocks accounted for 2.7%, 6.3%, 72.8% and 18.2% of the total dissolved load, respectively. The stable isotopic compositions of dissolved inorganic carbon (delta13C(DIC)) indicated that DIC in the Guijiang River had been assimilated by the phytoplankton in photosynthesis. The primary production of phytoplankton contributed to 22.3%-30.9% of particulate organic carbon (POC) in the Guijiang River, which implies that phytoplankton can transform DIC into POC by photosynthesis, and parts of POC will sink into the bottom of the river in transit, which leads into the formation of burial organic carbon. PMID:25158483

  20. Integration of inorganic nanostructures with polydopamine-derived carbon: tunable morphologies and versatile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Junhua; Seyed Shahabadi, Seyed Ismail; Lu, Xuehong

    2016-01-01

    Polydopamine (PDA), a mussel adhesive-inspired biomimetic polymer, has attracted tremendous attention owing to its extremely versatile adhesion properties, facile aqueous coating process, capability of self-assembly to form nanostructures, and abundant surface functional groups for secondary modification. PDA is also a fantastic carbon source because it gives nitrogen (N)-doped graphite-like carbon in high yield, and the carbonized PDA (C-PDA) thin coatings have similar properties to those of N-doped multilayered graphene, i.e., they exhibit high electrical conductivity, and good electrochemical and mechanical properties. In comparison with other carbon sources, an outstanding feature of PDA lies in its ease of integration with inorganic nanostructures and capability for easy tailoring the structure and morphology of the resultant composite nanostructures. In this article, different routes for the preparation of C-PDA-based composite nanostructures, such as carbon/metal oxide and carbon/Si hollow, mesoporous, core-shell, yolk-shell nanostructures, are introduced with typical examples. The structures, morphologies and properties of the C-PDA-based composite nanostructures are also reviewed, and their potential applications in various engineering fields, such as energy storage, solar water splitting, flexible electronics, catalysis, sensing and environmental engineering, are highlighted. Finally a future outlook for this fascinating composite-nanostructure enabler is also presented.

  1. Integration of inorganic nanostructures with polydopamine-derived carbon: tunable morphologies and versatile applications.

    PubMed

    Kong, Junhua; Seyed Shahabadi, Seyed Ismail; Lu, Xuehong

    2016-01-28

    Polydopamine (PDA), a mussel adhesive-inspired biomimetic polymer, has attracted tremendous attention owing to its extremely versatile adhesion properties, facile aqueous coating process, capability of self-assembly to form nanostructures, and abundant surface functional groups for secondary modification. PDA is also a fantastic carbon source because it gives nitrogen (N)-doped graphite-like carbon in high yield, and the carbonized PDA (C-PDA) thin coatings have similar properties to those of N-doped multilayered graphene, i.e., they exhibit high electrical conductivity, and good electrochemical and mechanical properties. In comparison with other carbon sources, an outstanding feature of PDA lies in its ease of integration with inorganic nanostructures and capability for easy tailoring the structure and morphology of the resultant composite nanostructures. In this article, different routes for the preparation of C-PDA-based composite nanostructures, such as carbon/metal oxide and carbon/Si hollow, mesoporous, core-shell, yolk-shell nanostructures, are introduced with typical examples. The structures, morphologies and properties of the C-PDA-based composite nanostructures are also reviewed, and their potential applications in various engineering fields, such as energy storage, solar water splitting, flexible electronics, catalysis, sensing and environmental engineering, are highlighted. Finally a future outlook for this fascinating composite-nanostructure enabler is also presented. PMID:26750427

  2. On the relations between the oceanic uptake of CO{sub 2} and its carbon isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Heimann, M.; Maier-Reimer, E.

    1996-03-01

    The first part of this paper reviews the derivation and compares the results of three methods to determine the oceanic uptake of excess carbon dioxide. For the time period 1970 to 1990, the three methods yield inconsistent uptake rates; however, a consistent scenario was established by using a nonlinear estimation to account for uncertainties in the available carbon cycle data. Parametric and sensitivity analyses show that the dynamic constraint and the ocean-atmosphere Carbon 13 budget methods appear to yield smaller errors in estimation of carbon dioxide uptake with respect to uncertainties in carbon cycle data. In the second part of this paper, two simulations of the three calculation methods are reported. The simulations used the three-dimensional Hamburg model of the ocean carbon cycle to determine the extent to which Carbon 13 and bomb radiocarbon may be used to track the fate of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the ocean. Analysis of the simulation results shows that the Carbon 13 isotope tracks the oceanic penetration of man-made carbon dioxide, while bomb produced radiocarbon does not correlate as well. 52 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Regeneration of spent powdered activated carbon saturated with inorganic ions by cavitation united with ion exchange method.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Gao, Hong; Li, Yansheng; Yang, Huixin

    2011-06-01

    Using ion exchange resin as transfer media, regenerate powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorbed inorganic ions by cavitation to enhance the transfer; we studied how the regeneration time and the mass ratio of resin and PAC influence the regeneration rate respectively through re-adsorption. The result showed that the effective regeneration of PAC saturated with inorganic ions was above 90% using ion exchange resin as media and transfer carrier, the quantity of PAC did not reduced but activated in the process. PMID:25084579

  4. Photosynthetic use of inorganic carbon in deep-water kelps from the Strait of Gibraltar.

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, María Jesús; Delgado-Huertas, Antonio; Fernández, José Antonio; Flores-Moya, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    Mechanisms of inorganic carbon assimilation were investigated in the four deep-water kelps inhabiting sea bottoms at the Strait of Gibraltar; these species are distributed at different depths (Saccorhiza polysiches at shallower waters, followed by Laminaria ochroleuca, then Phyllariopsis brevipes and, at the deepest bottoms, Phyllariopsis purpurascens). To elucidate the capacity to use HCO3 (-) as a source of inorganic carbon for photosynthesis in the kelps, different experimental approaches were used. Specifically, we measured the irradiance-saturated gross photosynthetic rate versus pH at a constant dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration of 2 mM, the irradiance-saturated apparent photosynthesis (APS) rate versus DIC, the total and the extracellular carbonic anhydrase (CAext), the observed and the theoretical photosynthetic rates supported by the spontaneous dehydration of HCO3 (-) to CO2, and the δ(13)C signature in tissues of the algae. While S. polyschides and L. ochroleuca showed photosynthetic activity at pH 9.5 (around 1.0 µmol O2 m(-2) s(-1)), the activity was close to zero in both species of Phyllariopsis. The APS versus DIC was almost saturated for the DIC values of natural seawater (2 mM) in S. polyschides and L. ochroleuca, but the relationship was linear in P. brevipes and P. purpurascens. The four species showed total and CAext activities but the inhibition of the CAext originated the observed photosynthetic rates at pH 8.0 to be similar to the theoretical rates that could be supported by the spontaneous dehydration of HCO3 (-). The isotopic (13)C signatures ranged from -17.40 ± 1.81 to -21.11 ± 1.73 ‰ in the four species. Additionally, the δ(13)C signature was also measured in the deep-water Laminaria rodriguezii growing at 60-80 m, showing even a more negative value of -26.49 ± 1.25 ‰. All these results suggest that the four kelps can use HCO3 (-) as external carbon source for photosynthesis mainly by the action of

  5. The effects of estuarine processes on the fluxes of inorganic and organic carbon in the Yellow River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Dianjun; Zhang, Longjun; Jiang, Liqing

    2009-12-01

    Riverine carbon flux is an important component of the global carbon cycle. The spatial and temporal variations of organic and inorganic carbon were examined during both dry and wet seasons in the Yellow River estuary. Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the Yellow River during dry seasons were higher than those during wet seasons. The effective concentrations of DOC (CDOC*) were higher than the observed DOC at zero salinity. This input of DOC in the Yellow River estuary was due to sediment desorption processes in low salinity regions. In contrast to DOC, the effective concentrations of DIC were 10% lower than the DIC measured at freshwater end, and the loss of DIC was caused by CaCO3 precipitation in low salinity region. Particulate organic carbon (POC) and particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) contents of the particles stabilized to constant values (0.5%±0.05% and 1.8%±0.2%, respectively) within the turbidity maximum zone (TMZ) and showed no noticeable seasonal variations. A rapid drop of PIC and rise of POC occurred simultaneously outside the TMZ due to an intense dilution of riverine inorganic-rich particles being transported into a pool of aquatic organic-poor particles outside the TMZ. Annually, the Yellow River transported 6.95×105 t of DIC, 0.64×105 t of DOC, 78.58×105 t of PIC and 2.29×105 t of POC to the sea.

  6. Biological uptake of polychlorinated biphenyls by Macoma balthica from sediment amended with activated carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLeod, Pamela B.; van den Heuvel-Greve, Martine J.; Luoma, S.N.; Luthy, R.G.

    2007-01-01

    This work characterizes the efficacy of activated carbon amendment in reducing polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) bioavailability to clams (Macoma balthica) from field-contaminated sediment (Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay, CA, USA) Test methods were developed for the use of clams to investigate the effects of sediment amendment on biological uptake. Sediment was mixed with activated carbon for one month. Bioaccumulation tests (28 d) were employed to assess the relationships between carbon dose and carbon particle size on observed reductions in clam biological uptake of PCBs. Extraction and cleanup protocols were developed for the clam tissue. Efficacy of activated carbon treatment was found to increase with both increasing carbon dose and decreasing carbon particle size. Average reductions in bioaccumulation of 22, 64, and 84% relative to untreated Hunters Point sediment were observed for carbon amendments of 0.34, 1.7, and 3.4%, respectively. Average bioaccumulation reductions of 41, 73, and 89% were observed for amendments (dose = 1.7% dry wt) with carbon particles of 180 to 250, 75 to 180, and 25 to 75 ??m, respectively, in diameter, indicating kinetic phenomena in these tests. Additionally, a biodynamic model quantifying clam PCB uptake from water and sediment as well as loss through elimination provided a good fit of experimental data. Model predictions suggest that the sediment ingestion route contributed 80 to 95% of the PCB burdens in the clams. ?? 2007 SETAC.

  7. B/Ca in coccoliths and relationship to calcification vesicle pH and dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, Heather; Langer, Gerald; Shimizu, Nobumichi; Kanamaru, Kinuyo

    2012-03-01

    Coccolithophorid algae are microscopic but prolific calcifiers in modern and ancient oceans. When the pH of seawater is modified, as may occur in the future due to ocean acidification, different species and strains of coccolithophorids have exhibited diverse calcification responses in laboratory culture. Since their biomineralization is a completely intracellular process, it is unclear why their response should be affected by extracellular seawater pH. Variations in the B/Ca in coccoliths are potential indicators of pH shifts in the intracellular coccolith vesicle where calcification occurs, because B/Ca in abiogenic calcites increases at higher pH due to the greater abundance of borate ions, the only B species incorporated into calcite. We used a SIMS ion probe to measure B/Ca of coccoliths from three different strains of Emiliania huxleyi and one strain of Coccolithus braarudii braarudii cultured under different seawater pH conditions to ascertain if the B/Ca can be used to elucidate how coccolithophorids respond to changing ocean pH. These data are interpreted with the aid of a conceptual model of cellular boron acquisition by coccolithophorids. Based on uptake in other plants, we infer that boron uptake by coccolithophorid cells is dominated by passive uptake of boric acid across the lipid bilayer. Subsequently, in the alkaline coccolith vesicle (C.V.), boron speciates according to the C.V. pH, and borate is incorporated into the coccolith. At increasing seawater pH, the relative abundance of the neutral boric acid in seawater decreases, lowering the potential B flux into the cell. Homeostasis or constant pH of the coccolith vesicle results in a decrease of the B/Ca in the coccolith with increasing seawater pH. In contrast, if coccolith vesicle pH increases with increasing seawater pH, then the B/Ca will increase as the fraction of borate in the coccolith vesicle increases. The coccolith B/Ca is also expected to depend inversely on the dissolved inorganic

  8. Dissolved inorganic carbon isotopic composition of the Gulf of Mexico deep-water masses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintanilla-Terminel, J. G.; Herguera, J. C.; Ferreira-Bartrina, V.; Hernández-Ayón, J. M.; Camacho-Ibar, V.

    2014-12-01

    This study provides new data for the establishment of a carbon biogeochemical dynamics baseline in the deep Gulf of Mexico (GM) based on carbon isotopes in dissolved inorganic carbon. Water samples from 40 deep-water stations south of 25˚N were collected during XIXIMI-2 cruise, July 2011, aboard BO/Justo Sierra. Vertical profiles of temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen (DO) were further measured in each station. In the Stable Isotopes Laboratory at CICESE we determined the carbon isotopic composition of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) (δ13CDIC). Remarkably, density, DO and δ13CCID profiles showed a clear difference between the Loop current and the deep-waters of the GM south of 25˚N. We found the following average δ13CCID values in the Loop current and in the deep-waters of the Gulf: subtropical underwater (SUW): 0.73±0.06‰ and 0.86±0.04‰; 18 degree water (18W): 0.76 ± 0.08‰ and 0.58± 0.06‰; North Atlantic central water (NACW): 0.77 ± 0.05‰ and 0.71 ± 0.09‰; South Atlantic central water (SACW): 0.80 ± 0.08‰ and 0.77 ± 0.07‰; Antartic intermediate water (AAIW): 1.00 ± 0.06‰ and 0.90 ± 0.08‰; North Atlantic deep water (NADW): 1.03 ± 0.06‰ and 1.01 ± 0.10‰. We will discuss how the biological component, δ13CCID-BIO, of subsurface water masses match very closely the apparent oxygen utilization relation described by Kroopnick, 1985, with the exception of SUW, and as a consequence the 18W is probably the water mass most affected by organic carbon remineralization processes in the GM south of 25˚N. We further show how these waters seem to store a larger proportion of anthropogenic carbon than the deeper water masses.

  9. Inorganic carbon fluxes across the vadose zone of planted and unplanted soil mesocosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaysen, E. M.; Jacques, D.; Jessen, S.; Andersen, C. E.; Laloy, E.; Ambus, P.; Postma, D.; Jakobsen, I.

    2014-03-01

    The efflux of carbon dioxide (CO2) from soils influences atmospheric CO2 concentrations and thereby climate change. The partitioning of inorganic carbon fluxes in the vadose zone between emission to the atmosphere and to the groundwater was investigated. Carbon dioxide partial pressure in the soil gas (pCO2), alkalinity, soil moisture and temperature were measured over depth and time in unplanted and planted (barley) mesocosms. The dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) percolation flux was calculated from the pCO2, alkalinity and the water flux at the mesocosm bottom. Carbon dioxide exchange between the soil surface and the atmosphere was measured at regular intervals. The soil diffusivity was determined from soil radon-222 (222Rn) emanation rates and soil air Rn concentration profiles, and was used in conjunction with measured pCO2 gradients to calculate the soil CO2 production. Carbon dioxide fluxes were modelled using the HP1 module of the Hydrus 1-D software. The average CO2 effluxes to the atmosphere from unplanted and planted mesocosm ecosystems during 78 days of experiment were 0.1 ± 0.07 and 4.9 ± 0.07 μmol carbon (C) m-2 s-1, respectively, and largely exceeded the corresponding DIC percolation fluxes of 0.01 ± 0.004 and 0.06 ± 0.03 μmol C m-2 s-1. Post-harvest soil respiration (Rs) was only 10% of the Rs during plant growth, while the post-harvest DIC percolation flux was more than one third of the flux during growth. The Rs was controlled by production and diffusivity of CO2 in the soil. The DIC percolation flux was largely controlled by the pCO2 and the drainage flux due to low solution pH. Plant biomass and soil pCO2 were high in the mesocosms as compared to a standard field situation. Our results indicate no change of the cropland C balance under elevated atmospheric CO2 in a warmer future climate, in which plant biomass and soil pCO2 are expected to increase.

  10. Contrast of volatile fatty acid driven and inorganic acid or base driven phosphorus release and uptake in enhanced biological phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Randall, Andrew A

    2012-04-01

    Addition of an inorganic acid or base was detrimental to net phosphorus removals in short-term batch experiments, suggesting there might be system upset when pH changes. In contrast, addition of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) increased anaerobic phosphorus release and aerobic phosphorus uptake while maintaining or improving net phosphorus removals. The effect of pH change differed if the acid or base added was inorganic versus organic. Volatile fatty acids that resulted in poly-3-hydroxy-butyrate rather than poly-3-hydroxy-valerate resulted in greater net phosphorus removals, and this corresponded to differences in consumption of reducing equivalents. Acetic acid resulted in improved net phosphorus removal compared to sodium acetate, suggesting that acid forms of VFAs might be superior as supplemental VFAs. It is hypothesized that anaerobic phosphorus release following addition of inorganic acid is primarily a result of phosphorus and proton (H+) symport (excretion from the cell) for pH homeostasis, whereas addition of VFAs results in phosphorus and H+ release to maintain the proton motive force. PMID:22834218

  11. Determination of the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon in water; RSIL lab code 1710

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singleton, Glenda L.; Revesz, Kinga; Coplen, Tyler B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 1710 is to present a method to determine the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of water. The DIC of water is precipitated using ammoniacal strontium chloride (SrCl2) solution to form strontium carbonate (SrCO3). The δ13C is analyzed by reacting SrCO3 with 100-percent phosphoric acid (H3PO4) to liberate carbon quantitatively as carbon dioxide (CO2), which is collected, purified by vacuum sublimation, and analyzed by dual inlet isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (DI-IRMS). The DI-IRMS is a DuPont double-focusing mass spectrometer. One ion beam passes through a slit in a forward collector and is collected in the rear collector. The other measurable ion beams are collected in the front collector. By changing the ion-accelerating voltage under computer control, the instrument is capable of measuring mass/charge (m/z) 45 or 46 in the rear collector and m/z 44 and 46 or 44 and 45, respectively, in the front collector. The ion beams from these m/z values are as follows: m/z 44 = CO2 = 12C16O16O, m/z 45 = CO2 = 13C16O16O primarily, and m/z 46 = CO2 = 12C16O18O primarily. The data acquisition and control software calculates δ13C values.

  12. Inorganic Carbon Cycling and Biogeochemical Processes in an Arctic Inland Sea (Hudson Bay)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, William; Thomas, Helmuth; Miller, Lisa; Granskog, Mats; Papakyriakou, Tim; Pengelly, Leah

    2016-04-01

    The distributions of CO2 system parameters in Hudson Bay, which not only receives nearly one third of Canada's river discharge, but is also subject to annual cycles of sea-ice formation and melt, indicate that the timing and magnitude of freshwater inputs play an important role in carbon biogeochemistry and ocean acidification in this unique Arctic ecosystem. This study uses basin-wide measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA), as well as stable isotope tracers (δ18OH2O and δ13CDIC), to provide a detailed assessment of carbon cycling processes throughout the bay. Surface distributions of carbonate parameters reveal the particular importance of freshwater inputs in the southern portion of the bay. Riverine TA end-members vary significantly both regionally and with small changes in near-surface depths, highlighting the importance of careful surface water sampling in highly stratified waters. In an along-shore transect, large increases in subsurface DIC are accompanied by equivalent decreases in δ13CDIC with no discernable change in TA, indicating a respiratory DIC production on the order of 100 μmol/kg during deep water circulation around the bay. Based on TA data we surmise that the deep waters in the Hudson Bay are of Pacific origin.

  13. Determination of the origin of dissolved inorganic carbon in groundwater around a reclaimed landfill in Otwock using stable carbon isotopes.

    PubMed

    Porowska, Dorota

    2015-05-01

    Chemical and isotopic analyses of groundwater from piezometers located around a reclaimed landfill in Otwock (Poland) were performed in order to trace the origin of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the groundwater. Due to differences in the isotopic composition of carbon from different sources, an analysis of stable carbon isotopes in the groundwater, together with the Keeling plot approach and a two-component mixing model allow us to evaluate the relative contributions of carbon from these sources in the groundwater. In the natural (background) groundwater, DIC concentrations and the isotopic composition of DIC (δ(13)CDIC) comes from two sources: decomposition of organic matter and carbonate dissolution within the aquifer sediments, whereas in the leachate-contaminated groundwater, DIC concentrations and δ(13)CDIC values depend on the degradation of organic matter within the aquifer sediments and biodegradation of organic matter stored in the landfill. From the mixing model, about 4-54% of the DIC pool is derived from organic matter degradation and 96-46% from carbonate dissolution in natural conditions. In the leachate-contaminated groundwater, about 20-53% of the DIC is derived from organic matter degradation of natural origin and 80-47% from biodegradation of organic matter stored in the landfill. Partial pressure of CO2 (P CO2) was generally above the atmospheric, hence atmospheric CO2 as a source of carbon in DIC pool was negligible in the aquifer. P CO2 values in the aquifer in Otwock were always one to two orders of magnitude above the atmospheric P CO2, and thus CO2 escaped directly into the vadose zone. PMID:25727747

  14. Elevated CO2 maintains grassland net carbon uptake under a future heat and drought extreme

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Jacques; Picon-Cochard, Catherine; Augusti, Angela; Benot, Marie-Lise; Thiery, Lionel; Darsonville, Olivier; Landais, Damien; Piel, Clément; Defossez, Marc; Devidal, Sébastien; Escape, Christophe; Ravel, Olivier; Fromin, Nathalie; Volaire, Florence; Milcu, Alexandru; Bahn, Michael; Soussana, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Extreme climatic events (ECEs) such as droughts and heat waves are predicted to increase in intensity and frequency and impact the terrestrial carbon balance. However, we lack direct experimental evidence of how the net carbon uptake of ecosystems is affected by ECEs under future elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2). Taking advantage of an advanced controlled environment facility for ecosystem research (Ecotron), we simulated eCO2 and extreme cooccurring heat and drought events as projected for the 2050s and analyzed their effects on the ecosystem-level carbon and water fluxes in a C3 grassland. Our results indicate that eCO2 not only slows down the decline of ecosystem carbon uptake during the ECE but also enhances its recovery after the ECE, as mediated by increases of root growth and plant nitrogen uptake induced by the ECE. These findings indicate that, in the predicted near future climate, eCO2 could mitigate the effects of extreme droughts and heat waves on ecosystem net carbon uptake. PMID:27185934

  15. Elevated CO2 maintains grassland net carbon uptake under a future heat and drought extreme.

    PubMed

    Roy, Jacques; Picon-Cochard, Catherine; Augusti, Angela; Benot, Marie-Lise; Thiery, Lionel; Darsonville, Olivier; Landais, Damien; Piel, Clément; Defossez, Marc; Devidal, Sébastien; Escape, Christophe; Ravel, Olivier; Fromin, Nathalie; Volaire, Florence; Milcu, Alexandru; Bahn, Michael; Soussana, Jean-François

    2016-05-31

    Extreme climatic events (ECEs) such as droughts and heat waves are predicted to increase in intensity and frequency and impact the terrestrial carbon balance. However, we lack direct experimental evidence of how the net carbon uptake of ecosystems is affected by ECEs under future elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2). Taking advantage of an advanced controlled environment facility for ecosystem research (Ecotron), we simulated eCO2 and extreme cooccurring heat and drought events as projected for the 2050s and analyzed their effects on the ecosystem-level carbon and water fluxes in a C3 grassland. Our results indicate that eCO2 not only slows down the decline of ecosystem carbon uptake during the ECE but also enhances its recovery after the ECE, as mediated by increases of root growth and plant nitrogen uptake induced by the ECE. These findings indicate that, in the predicted near future climate, eCO2 could mitigate the effects of extreme droughts and heat waves on ecosystem net carbon uptake. PMID:27185934

  16. The effect of dimensionality of nanostructured carbon on the architecture of organic-inorganic hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Misra, R D K; Depan, D; Shah, J

    2013-08-21

    The natural tendency of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to agglomerate is an underlying reason that prevents the realization of their full potential. On the other hand, covalent functionalization of CNTs to control dispersion leads to disruption of π-conjugation in CNTs and the non-covalent functionalization leads to a weak CNT-polymer interface. To overcome these challenges, we describe the characteristics of fostering of direct nucleation of polymers on nanostructured carbon (CNTs of diameters (~2-200 nm), carbon nanofibers (~200-300 nm), and graphene), which culminates in interfacial adhesion, resulting from electrostatic and van der Waals interaction in the hybrid nanostructured carbon-polymer architecture. Furthermore, the structure is tunable through a change in undercooling. High density polyethylene and polypropylene were selected as two model polymers and two sets of experiments were carried out. The first set of experiments was carried out using CNTs of diameter ~2-5 nm to explore the effect of undercooling and polymer concentration. The second set of experiments was focused on studying the effect of dimensionality on geometrical confinements. The periodic crystallization of polyethylene on small diameter CNTs is demonstrated to be a consequence of the geometrical confinement effect, rather than epitaxy, such that petal-like disks nucleate on large diameter CNTs, carbon nanofibers, and graphene. The application of the process is illustrated in terms of fabricating a system for cellular uptake and bioimaging. PMID:23817610

  17. Two decades of inorganic carbon dynamics along the Western Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauri, C.; Doney, S. C.; Takahashi, T.; Erickson, M.; Jiang, G.; Ducklow, H. W.

    2015-05-01

    We present 20 years of seawater inorganic carbon measurements collected along the western shelf and slope of the Antarctic Peninsula. Water column observations from summertime cruises and seasonal surface underway pCO2 measurements provide unique insights into the spatial, seasonal and interannual variability of the dynamic system. The discrete measurements from depths > 2000 m align well with World Ocean Circulation Experiment observations across the time-series and underline the consistency of the data set. Analysis shows large spatial gradients in surface alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon content, with a concomitant wide range of Ωarag from values < 1 up to 3.9. This spatial variability was mainly driven by increasing influence of biological productivity towards the southern end of the sampling grid and melt water input along the coast towards the northern end. Large inorganic carbon drawdown through biological production in summer caused high near-shore Ωarag despite glacial and sea-ice melt water input. In support of previous studies, we observed Redfield behavior of regional C / N nutrient utilization, while the C / P (80.5 ± 2.5) and N / P (11.7 ± 0.3) molar ratios were significantly lower than the Redfield elemental stoichiometric values. Seasonal predictions of Ωarag suggest that surface waters remained mostly supersaturated with regard to aragonite throughout the study. However, more than a third of the predictions for winters between 1999 and 2013 resulted in Ωarag < 1.3. Such low levels of Ωarag may have implications for important organisms such as pteropods. Despite large interannual variability, surface pCO2 measurements indicate a statistically significant increasing trend of up to 23 μatm per decade in fall and spring and a concomitant decreasing pH, pointing towards first signs of ocean acidification in the region. The combination of ongoing ocean acidification and freshwater input may soon provoke more unfavorable conditions than

  18. Tracing source, mixing and uptaking processes of carbon in an epikarst spring-pond system in southeastern Guizhou of China by carbon isotopes (13C-14C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, M.; Chen, B.; Liu, Z.; Li, H. C.; Yang, R.

    2015-12-01

    δ13C and Δ14C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), particulate organic carbon (POC) and aquatic plants from a karst spring and two spring-fed ponds in Laqiao, Maolan County, Guizhou Province in January, July and October of 2013 were measured to understand the roles of aquatic photosynthesis through DIC uptake in karst surface waters. The mean Δ14C and δ13C values of DIC for the spring pool, midstream and downstream ponds are -60.6±26.3‰ and -13.53±1.97‰, -62.8±62.9‰ and -11.72±2.72‰, and -54.2±56.5‰ and -9.40±2.03‰, respectively. Both Δ14C and δ13C show seasonal variations, with lower Δ14C values but heavier δ13C values in dry season and vice versa in summer rainy season. This observation indicates that (1) the main carbon source of the spring DIC is from limestone bedrock dissolution and soil CO2 with higher contribution in summer due to higher productivity; and (2) 13C and 14C have different behaviors during DIC uptake by aquatic plants and during CO2 exchange between DIC and the atmospheric CO2. Biological uptake of CO2 will not affect the Δ14C of DIC, but lead to δ13CDIC enrichment. CO2 exchange between DIC and the atmospheric CO2 should elevate both the Δ14C and δ13C of DIC. In Laqiao spring-pond system, it seems that the effect of biological uptake on the Δ14C and δ13C of DIC is much stronger than that of CO2 exchange with the atmosphere. The mean Δ14C values of POC from the spring pool, midstream and downstream ponds are -308.1 ±64.3‰, -164.4±84.4‰ and -195.1±108.5‰, respectively, indicating mixture of aquatic algae and detrital particle (clay and dust). More aquatic algae were formed in the stream ponds especially in the summer. SEM results of the POC samples support this conclusion. Furthermore, the Δ14C values of the submerged aquatic plants range from -200.0‰ to -51.3 ‰ and were similar to those of the DIC, indicating that the aquatic plants used DIC for photosynthesis. The Δ14C value of an emergent plant

  19. Geochemistry of dissolved inorganic carbon in a Coastal Plain aquifer. 2. Modeling carbon sources, sinks, and δ13C evolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, Peter B.; Chapelle, Francis H.

    1991-01-01

    Stable isotope data for dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), carbonate shell material and cements, and microbial CO2 were combined with organic and inorganic chemical data from aquifer and confining-bed pore waters to construct geochemical reaction models along a flowpath in the Black Creek aquifer of South Carolina. Carbon-isotope fractionation between DIC and precipitating cements was treated as a Rayleigh distillation process. Organic matter oxidation was coupled to microbial fermentation and sulfate reduction. All reaction models reproduced the observed chemical and isotopic compositions of final waters. However, model 1, in which all sources of carbon and electron-acceptors were assumed to be internal to the aquifer, was invalidated owing to the large ratio of fermentation CO2 to respiration CO2 predicted by the model (5–49) compared with measured ratios (two or less). In model 2, this ratio was reduced by assuming that confining beds adjacent to the aquifer act as sources of dissolved organic carbon and sulfate. This assumption was based on measured high concentrations of dissolved organic acids and sulfate in confining-bed pore waters (60–100 μM and 100–380 μM, respectively) relative to aquifer pore waters (from less than 30 μM and 2–80 μM, respectively). Sodium was chosen as the companion ion to organic-acid and sulfate transport from confining beds because it is the predominant cation in confining-bed pore waters. As a result, excessive amounts of Na-for-Ca ion exchange and calcite precipitation (three to four times more cement than observed in the aquifer) were required by model 2 to achieve mass and isotope balance of final water. For this reason, model 2 was invalidated. Agreement between model-predicted and measured amounts of carbonate cement and ratios of fermentation CO2 to respiration CO2 were obtained in a reaction model that assumed confining beds act as sources of DIC, as well as organic acids and sulfate. This assumption was

  20. Laboratory appraisal of organic carbon changes in mixtures made with different inorganic wastes.

    PubMed

    Arbestain, M Camps; Ibargoitia, M L; Madinabeitia, Z; Gil, M V; Virgel, S; Morán, A; Pereira, R Calvelo; Macías, F

    2009-12-01

    Mixtures of organic and inorganic wastes were incubated to examine the changes in organic C (OC) contents. An anaerobic sludge and a CaO-treated aerobic sludge, with OC concentrations of 235 and 129 gkg(-1), were used. The inorganic wastes used - referred to as "conditioners" - were shot blasting scrap, fettling, Linz-Donawitz slag, foundry sand (FS), and fly ash from wood bark combustion (FA). The total OC (TOC) and KMnO(4)(-) oxidized OC were determined. DTA-TGA profiles and FTIR spectra were also obtained. Mixtures made with the FS contained significantly lower (P<0.05) amounts of TOC (45 gkg(-1)) than the rest of mixtures, which was attributed to the non-existence of reactive surfaces in the conditioner and the increased aeration induced by this material. Those made with FA contained significantly higher (P<0.05) amounts of TOC (170 gkg(-1)), which was attributed to: (i) the addition of an extra source of C - black carbon (BC) - in the FA, and (ii) the inhibition of mineralization from the compounds present in this conditioner (e.g., amorphous aluminosilicates, BC). The results highlight the importance of the characteristics of the conditioners on the fate of the OM originating from the sludges. PMID:19632821

  1. Recent Advances in Inorganic Heterogeneous Electrocatalysts for Reduction of Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dong Dong; Liu, Jin Long; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2016-05-01

    In view of the climate changes caused by the continuously rising levels of atmospheric CO2 , advanced technologies associated with CO2 conversion are highly desirable. In recent decades, electrochemical reduction of CO2 has been extensively studied since it can reduce CO2 to value-added chemicals and fuels. Considering the sluggish reaction kinetics of the CO2 molecule, efficient and robust electrocatalysts are required to promote this conversion reaction. Here, recent progress and opportunities in inorganic heterogeneous electrocatalysts for CO2 reduction are discussed, from the viewpoint of both experimental and computational aspects. Based on elemental composition, the inorganic catalysts presented here are classified into four groups: metals, transition-metal oxides, transition-metal chalcogenides, and carbon-based materials. However, despite encouraging accomplishments made in this area, substantial advances in CO2 electrolysis are still needed to meet the criteria for practical applications. Therefore, in the last part, several promising strategies, including surface engineering, chemical modification, nanostructured catalysts, and composite materials, are proposed to facilitate the future development of CO2 electroreduction. PMID:26996295

  2. Southern Ocean heat and carbon uptake: mechanisms, recent trends, and future changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froelicher, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Southern Ocean's dominant influence on the global heat balance and nutrient and carbon cycles stems from the fact that it is the primary gateway through which Earth's cold, centuries old and nutrient rich deep and bottom waters interact with the atmosphere. The westerly winds in the Southern Hemisphere drive a strongly divergent surface flow that draws up water from below in a wide ring circling the Antarctic continent. In the first part of the talk, we assess the uptake, transport, and storage of oceanic anthropogenic carbon and heat in the Southern Ocean over the period 1861-2005 in a new set of carbon-climate Earth System Models. Simulations show that the Southern Ocean south of 30°S, covering only 30% of the global surface ocean area, accounts for more than 40% of global anthropogenic carbon uptake. Furthermore, the Southern Ocean takes up three quarters of the total excess heat generated by the increasing levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Anthropogenic carbon and heat storage show a common broad-scale pattern of change, but ocean heat storage is more structured than ocean carbon storage suggesting that different mechanisms are important. The Southern Ocean, however, remains the region where models differ the most in the representation of anthropogenic carbon and, in particular, heat uptake. While the Southern Ocean carbon uptake has increased considerably in recent decades, as expected based on the substantial increase in atmospheric CO2, there is considerable concern that this sink will saturate or even reverse in response to warming, changing ocean circulation and chemistry. In the second part of the talk, novel multi-millennial global warming simulations with a comprehensive Earth System Model under a 1% yr-1 atmospheric CO2 increase to 2xCO2 and constant forcing thereafter scenario will be used to explore future long-term changes in the Southern Ocean carbon uptake. We show that after full equilibration of the model with doubling of

  3. Nitrogen feedbacks increase future terrestrial ecosystem carbon uptake in an individual-based dynamic vegetation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wårlind, D.; Smith, B.; Hickler, T.; Arneth, A.

    2014-11-01

    Recently a considerable amount of effort has been put into quantifying how interactions of the carbon and nitrogen cycle affect future terrestrial carbon sinks. Dynamic vegetation models, representing the nitrogen cycle with varying degree of complexity, have shown diverging constraints of nitrogen dynamics on future carbon sequestration. In this study, we use LPJ-GUESS, a dynamic vegetation model employing a detailed individual- and patch-based representation of vegetation dynamics, to evaluate how population dynamics and resource competition between plant functional types, combined with nitrogen dynamics, have influenced the terrestrial carbon storage in the past and to investigate how terrestrial carbon and nitrogen dynamics might change in the future (1850 to 2100; one representative "business-as-usual" climate scenario). Single-factor model experiments of CO2 fertilisation and climate change show generally similar directions of the responses of C-N interactions, compared to the C-only version of the model as documented in previous studies using other global models. Under an RCP 8.5 scenario, nitrogen limitation suppresses potential CO2 fertilisation, reducing the cumulative net ecosystem carbon uptake between 1850 and 2100 by 61%, and soil warming-induced increase in nitrogen mineralisation reduces terrestrial carbon loss by 31%. When environmental changes are considered conjointly, carbon sequestration is limited by nitrogen dynamics up to the present. However, during the 21st century, nitrogen dynamics induce a net increase in carbon sequestration, resulting in an overall larger carbon uptake of 17% over the full period. This contrasts with previous results with other global models that have shown an 8 to 37% decrease in carbon uptake relative to modern baseline conditions. Implications for the plausibility of earlier projections of future terrestrial C dynamics based on C-only models are discussed.

  4. Preliminary Study: Application of Off-Axis ICOS to Determine Stable Carbon Isotope in Dissolved Inorganic Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. T.; Lee, J. M.; Hwang, J. H.; Piao, J.; Woo, N. C.

    2015-12-01

    CO2 is one of the major causes for global climate change. Because stable carbon isotope ratio is used to trace carbon source, several analytical techniques likes IRMS (Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry) and LAS (Laser Absorption Spectrometry) were extensively used. Off-axis ICOS, a kind of LAS, has merits on long-term stability and field application, therefore it is widely being used in CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage) field. The aim of this study is to extend the application scope of OA-ICOS to determine dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Because OA-ICOS showed dependence of δ13C on CO2 concentration, data processing is required. We tested CO2 Carbon Isotope Analyzer (CCIA-36-EP, Los Gatos Research) with both reference gas (δ13C= -28.28‰) and aqueous solutions prepared by dissolving sodium bicarbonate standards (δ13C= -12.26‰ and +3.96‰). The differences of δ13C between reference and measurement values are plotted by CO2 concentrations, then compared. At first, we checked the similarity between our curve pattern for reference gas and Guillon's research (δ13C= -43.99‰) by other Analyzer. To analyze aqueous samples, more errors can be caused than gas analysis. The carbon isotope fractionation occurs during dissolving standard reagents and extracting DIC as CO2 gas form. This effect is mixed with CO2 concentration dependence effect, therefore the curve patterns are different with that for reference gas. Our experiments are done for various δ13C values. It could be an important point to use OA-ICOS to analyze DIC, too.

  5. Effect of Nutrient/Carbon Supplements on Biological Phosphate and Nitrate Uptake by Protozoan Isolates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpor, O. B.; Momba, M. N. B.; Okonkwo, J.

    This study was aimed at investigating the effect of nine different nutrient/carbon supplements in mixed liquor on nutrient uptake ability of three wastewater protozoan isolates, which have previously been screened for phosphate and nitrate uptake efficiency. The results revealed that over 50% of phosphate was removed in the presence of sodium acetate, glucose or sucrose. Similarly, nitrate uptake of over 60% was observed in the presence of sodium acetate, sodium succinate, glucose or sucrose. These trends were common in all the isolates. Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) removal in the mixed liquor was only found to be significantly removed in mixed liquors that were supplemented with glucose, sucrose or sodium succinate. In the presence of sodium acetate, COD was observed to increase. The findings of this investigation have revealed that nutrient uptake and COD removal by the test protozoan isolates may be dependent primarily on the initial nutrient supplement in mixed liquor.

  6. Deuterium Uptake in Magnetic-Fusion Devices with Lithium-Conditioned Carbon Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Krstic, Predrag S.; Allain, J. P.; Taylor, C. N.; Dadras, J.; Morokuma, K.; Jakowski, J.; Allouche, A.; Skinner, C. H.

    2013-01-01

    Lithium wall conditioning has lowered hydrogenic recycling and dramatically improved plasma performance in many magnetic-fusion devices. In this Letter, we report quantum-classical atomistic simulations and laboratory experiments that elucidate the roles of lithium and oxygen in the uptake of hydrogen in amorphous carbon. Surprisingly, we show that lithium creates a high oxygen concentration on a carbon surface when bombarded by deuterium. Furthermore, surface oxygen, rather than lithium, plays the key role in trapping hydrogen.

  7. Inorganic arsenic speciation by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry using thoria nanoparticles-carbon paste electrodes.

    PubMed

    Pereira, F J; Vázquez, M D; Debán, L; Aller, A J

    2016-05-15

    Two novel thoria (ThO2) nanoparticles-carbon paste electrodes were used to evaluate an anodic stripping voltammetric method for the direct determination of arsenite and total inorganic arsenic (arsenite plus arsenate) in water samples. The effect of Ag((I)), Cu((II)), Hg((II)), Sb((III)) and Se((IV)) ions on the electrochemical response of arsenic was assayed. The developed electroanalytical method offers a rapid procedure with improved analytical characteristics including good repeatability (3.4%) at low As((III)) concentrations, high selectivity, lower detection limit (0.1 μg L(-1)) and high sensitivity (0.54 μA μg(-1) L). The analytical capability of the optimized method was demonstrated by the determination of arsenic in certified reference materials (trace elements in natural water, trace elements in water and coal fly ash). PMID:26992513

  8. Determination of the origin of dissolved inorganic carbon in groundwater around a reclaimed landfill in Otwock using stable carbon isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Porowska, Dorota

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Research showed the origin of DIC in the groundwater around a reclaimed landfill. • Carbon isotope was used to evaluate the contributions of carbon from different sources. • The leachate-contaminated water was isotopically distinct from the natural groundwater. • DIC in the natural groundwater comes from organic matter and dissolution of carbonates. • In the contaminated water, DIC comes from organic matter in the aquifer and landfill. - Abstract: Chemical and isotopic analyses of groundwater from piezometers located around a reclaimed landfill in Otwock (Poland) were performed in order to trace the origin of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the groundwater. Due to differences in the isotopic composition of carbon from different sources, an analysis of stable carbon isotopes in the groundwater, together with the Keeling plot approach and a two-component mixing model allow us to evaluate the relative contributions of carbon from these sources in the groundwater. In the natural (background) groundwater, DIC concentrations and the isotopic composition of DIC (δ{sup 13}C{sub DIC}) comes from two sources: decomposition of organic matter and carbonate dissolution within the aquifer sediments, whereas in the leachate-contaminated groundwater, DIC concentrations and δ{sup 13}C{sub DIC} values depend on the degradation of organic matter within the aquifer sediments and biodegradation of organic matter stored in the landfill. From the mixing model, about 4–54% of the DIC pool is derived from organic matter degradation and 96–46% from carbonate dissolution in natural conditions. In the leachate-contaminated groundwater, about 20–53% of the DIC is derived from organic matter degradation of natural origin and 80–47% from biodegradation of organic matter stored in the landfill. Partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (P CO{sub 2}) was generally above the atmospheric, hence atmospheric CO{sub 2} as a source of carbon in DIC pool was negligible in the

  9. Lithium isotopes in foraminifera shells as a novel proxy for the ocean dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigier, Nathalie; Rollion-Bard, Claire; Levenson, Yaël; Erez, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Past ocean pH and pCO2 are critical parameters for establishing relationships between Earth's climate and the carbon cycle. Previous pCO2 estimates are associated with large uncertainties and are debated. In this study, laboratory cultures of the foraminiferan genus Amphistegina were performed in order to examine the possible factors that control the Li isotope composition (δ7Li) of their shells. δ7Li is insensitive to temperature and pH variations but correlates positively with the Dissolved Inorganic Carbon (DIC) of seawater. Li/Ca ratio in the shells shows negative correlation with δ7Li, consistent with published data for planktonic foraminifera from core tops and from short periods during the Cenozoic. We propose that the sensitivity of δ7Li and Li/Ca ratio to DIC is a biological phenomenon and is related to biomineralization mechanisms in foraminifera. We used the published foraminiferal δ7Li records, and our experimental results, to determine the paleo-ocean DIC and pH for the last glacial-interglacial cycle. The results are consistent with published estimates of pH and pCO2 based on boron isotopes and ice cores. We suggest Li and its isotopes may serve as a new complementary proxy for the paleo-ocean carbonate chemistry.

  10. Benthic Primary Production in a Saltmarsh Pond: Insights from Fluxes of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon and Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karolewski, J. S.; Stanley, R. H.; Howard, E. M.; Spivak, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    Salt marshes are important carbon sinks that exist at continental margins and act as mediators in the exchange of nutrients and carbon between terrestrial and marine environments. Within salt marshes, 10-20% of total surface area is covered by marshtop ponds. The fractional area of marshtop ponds is predicted to increase as sea level rises. Despite their potential importance, the balance between autotrophic and heterotrophic processes within such ponds remain poorly understood. To quantify the balance of metabolic fluxes within salt marsh ponds, chemical fluxes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved oxygen (DO) were measured in July, 2014 in benthic flux chambers inserted into a salt marsh pond in the Plum Island Estuary Long-Term Ecosystem Research (PIE-LTER) site. Light and dark chambers were used to enable separation of rates of photosynthesis and respiration. Separate chambers were used to enclose sediment covered by primarily benthic microalgae and primarily benthic macroalgae. Net ecosystem metabolism in the microalgae was ~10 and in the macroalgae ~15 mmol C/m2/hour. Respiration rates were ~10 mmol C/m2/ hour for both microalgae and macroalgae. The resulting fluxes of net ecosystem production in the ponds will be compared with overall marsh net ecosystem flux as measured by an eddy flux tower that was located 100 meters from the pond. Additionally, concurrent measurements of DIC and DO allow quantification of the C:O ratio during respiration (i.e. respiratory quotient) in this system.

  11. Oceanic carbon dioxide uptake in a model of century-scale global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Sarmiento, J.L.; Le Quere, C.

    1996-11-22

    In a model of ocean-atmosphere interaction that excluded biological processes, the oceanic uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) was substantially reduced in scenarios involving global warming relative to control scenarios. The primary reason for the reduced uptake was the weakening or collapse of the ocean thermohaline circulation. Such a large reduction in this ocean uptake would have a major impact o the future growth rate of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Model simulations that include a simple representation of biological processes show a potentially large offsetting effect resulting from the downward flux of biogenic carbon. However, the magnitude of the offset is difficult to quantify with present knowledge. 19 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Direct uptake of organic carbon by grass roots and allocation in leaves and phytoliths: 13C labeling evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre, A.; Balesdent, J.; Cazevieille, P.; Chevassus-Rosset, C.; Signoret, P.; Mazur, J.-C.; Harutyunyan, A.; Doelsch, E.; Basile-Doelsch, I.; Miche, H.; Santos, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    In the rhizosphere, the uptake of low molecular weight carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) by plant roots has been well documented. While organic N uptake relatively to total uptake is important, organic C uptake is supposed to be low relatively to the plant's C budget. Recently, radiocarbon analyses demonstrated that a fraction of C from the soil was occluded in amorphous silica micrometric particles that precipitate in plant cells (phytoliths). Here, we investigated whether and in which extent organic C absorbed by grass roots, under the form of either intact amino acids (AAs) or microbial metabolites, can feed the organic C occluded in phytoliths. For this purpose we added 13C- and 15N-labeled AAs to the silicon-rich hydroponic solution of the grass Festuca arundinacea. The experiment was designed to prevent C leakage from the labeled nutritive solution to the chamber atmosphere. After 14 days of growth, the 13C and 15N enrichments (13C-excess and 15N-excess) in the roots, stems and leaves, and phytoliths, as well as the 13C-excess in AAs extracted from roots and stems and leaves, were quantified relatively to a control experiment in which no labelled AAs were added. The net uptake of 13C derived from the labeled AAs supplied to the nutritive solution (AA-13C) by Festuca arundinacea represented 4.5 % of the total AA-13C supply. AA-13C fixed in the plant represented only 0.13 % of total C. However, the experimental conditions may have underestimated the extent of the process under natural and field conditions. Previous studies showed that 15N and 13C can be absorbed by the roots in several organic and inorganic forms. In the present experiment, the fact that phenylalanine and methionine, that were supplied in high amount to the nutritive solution, were more 13C-enriched than other AAs in the roots and stems and leaves strongly suggested that part of AA-13C was absorbed and translocated in its original AA form. The concentration of AA-13C represented only 0.15 % of the

  13. Inorganic carbon in a high latitude estuary-fjord system in Canada's eastern Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turk, D.; Bedard, J. M.; Burt, W. J.; Vagle, S.; Thomas, H.; Azetsu-Scott, K.; McGillis, W. R.; Iverson, S. J.; Wallace, D. W. R.

    2016-09-01

    Rapidly changing conditions in the Arctic can have a significant impact on biogeochemical cycles and can be particularly important in high latitude estuary-fjord systems with abundant and diverse freshwater sources. This study provides a first look into the inorganic carbon system and its relation to freshwater sources in Cumberland Sound in the east coast of Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada. These data contribute to the very limited set of inorganic carbon measurements in high latitude estuary-fjord systems. During the ice-free conditions in August 2011, the meteoric freshwater fractions (MW) in the upper 40 m ranged from 11 to 21% and no sea ice melt (SIM) was present in the Sound. Surface waters were undersaturated with pCO2 (260 and 300 μatm), and DIC and TA ranged between 1779 and 1966 μmol DIC kg-1, and 1922 and 2140 μmol TA kg-1, respectively. Aragonite saturation (ΩAr) state ranged from 1.9 in the surface to 1.4 in the subsurface waters. Data show decreasing TA and ΩAr with increasing MW fraction and suggest that Cumberland Sound waters would become aragonite undersaturated (ΩAr < 1) at MW = 0.37 (95% CI: 0.29 to 0.56). Estimated local δ18O (-19.2‰) and TA (174 μmol TA kg-1) end-members indicate MW was most likely a mixture of river water and glacial melt. In August 2012, MW fractions at the surface were between 8 and 11.5%, and SIM between 7 and 23%. Significant interannual variability of summertime SIM could potentially result in ΩAr undersaturation.

  14. Low oxygen and high inorganic carbon on the Vancouver Island Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianucci, L.; Denman, K. L.; Ianson, D.

    2011-07-01

    Recently, independent concerns about declining oxygen and pH conditions in the coastal ocean have emerged. In coastal upwelling regions, hypoxia can be driven by onshore advection of oxygen-depleted offshore waters as well as by local biological consumption triggered by high productivity. As both mechanisms can also decrease pH and carbonate saturation states, coupled studies of oxygen and carbon are imperative. A quasi two-dimensional model coupling carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen was developed for the summer wind-driven upwelling region off southern Vancouver Island, using the Regional Ocean Modeling System. The physical model is coupled to an ecosystem module that tracks 11 state variables and allows nonfixed C:N ratios for detritus and dissolved organic matter. Given uncertainties in sediment parameterizations in biophysical models, three sediment models are compared and discussed. Results demonstrate that sediment-associated processes play a dominant role in consuming oxygen from, and releasing inorganic carbon to, the bottom waters over the shelf. This study also examines the unique characteristics of the southern Vancouver Island shelf. Two key features distinguish this region from other shelves in the California Current System and protect inner shelf waters from severe hypoxia and corrosive (i.e., undersaturated in aragonite) conditions. First, the near-shore Vancouver Island Coastal Current provides a source of oxygen and nutrients and forms a barrier that prevents upwelled waters (depleted in oxygen and rich in carbon) from penetrating the inner shelf. Second, the greater width of the shelf dilutes these upwelled offshore waters and reduces their penetration onto the shallower shelf region.

  15. Estimating global carbon uptake by lichens and bryophytes with a process-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porada, P.; Weber, B.; Elbert, W.; Pöschl, U.; Kleidon, A.

    2013-11-01

    Lichens and bryophytes are abundant globally and they may even form the dominant autotrophs in (sub)polar ecosystems, in deserts and at high altitudes. Moreover, they can be found in large amounts as epiphytes in old-growth forests. Here, we present the first process-based model which estimates the net carbon uptake by these organisms at the global scale, thus assessing their significance for biogeochemical cycles. The model uses gridded climate data and key properties of the habitat (e.g. disturbance intervals) to predict processes which control net carbon uptake, namely photosynthesis, respiration, water uptake and evaporation. It relies on equations used in many dynamical vegetation models, which are combined with concepts specific to lichens and bryophytes, such as poikilohydry or the effect of water content on CO2 diffusivity. To incorporate the great functional variation of lichens and bryophytes at the global scale, the model parameters are characterised by broad ranges of possible values instead of a single, globally uniform value. The predicted terrestrial net uptake of 0.34 to 3.3 Gt yr-1 of carbon and global patterns of productivity are in accordance with empirically-derived estimates. Considering that the assimilated carbon can be invested in processes such as weathering or nitrogen fixation, lichens and bryophytes may play a significant role in biogeochemical cycles.

  16. Estimating global carbon uptake by lichens and bryophytes with a process-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porada, P.; Weber, B.; Elbert, W.; Pöschl, U.; Kleidon, A.

    2013-02-01

    Lichens and bryophytes are abundant globally and they may even form the dominant autotrophs in (sub)polar ecosystems, in deserts and at high altitudes. Moreover, they can be found in large amounts as epiphytes in old-growth forests. Here, we present the first process-based model which estimates the net carbon uptake by these organisms at the global scale, thus assessing their significance for biogeochemical cycles. The model uses gridded climate data and key properties of the habitat (e.g. disturbance intervals) to predict processes which control net carbon uptake, namely photosynthesis, respiration, water uptake and evaporation. It relies on equations used in many dynamical vegetation models, which are combined with concepts specific to lichens and bryophytes, such as poikilohydry or the effect of water content on CO2 diffusivity. To incorporate the great functional variation of lichens and bryophytes at the global scale, the model parameters are characterised by broad ranges of possible values instead of a single, globally uniform value. The predicted terrestrial net carbon uptake of 0.34 to 3.3 (Gt C) yr-1 and global patterns of productivity are in accordance with empirically-derived estimates. Considering that the assimilated carbon can be invested in processes such as weathering or nitrogen fixation, lichens and bryophytes may play a significant role in biogeochemical cycles.

  17. Carbon uptake, microbial community structure, and mineralization of layered mats from Imperial Geyser, Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woycheese, K. M.; Grabenstatter, J.; Haddad, A.; Ricci, J. N.; Johnson, H.; Berelson, W.; Spear, J. R.; Caporaso, J. G.; International Geobiology Course 2011

    2011-12-01

    Layered microbial mats provide an analog for early microbial communities, and remain one of the few microbiological structures consistently preserved in the geologic record. Despite this, growth rates, metabolic capabilities, and methods of mineralization in modern communities are poorly understood. Imperial Geyser, an alkaline siliceous hot spring in Yellowstone National Park, provides a useful setting to study these parameters. Mat and water samples (T = 64-40 °C) were collected for 13C analysis and 13C-spiked bicarbonate and acetate incubation experiments. Carbon isotopes were measured for the stream water, pore water and biomass. We experimentally determined rates of bicarbonate uptake, acetate uptake and mineral content. Bicarbonate uptake rates ranged from 0 - 0.4% per day, while acetate uptake rates ranged from 0 - 2.0% per day. These results indicate that the mat biomass is capable of turnover in about 300 days resulting in potential growth rates of 1-2 cm/year. Organic carbon content (% dry weight) ranged from 2 to 16%, and decreased with depth in the mat. The mineral content of these mats is predominantly amorphous SiO2. An inverse correlation between mineral percent and bicarbonate uptake rate was observed, suggesting that there may be a link between metabolism and the prevention of mineralization. Comparing the 13C and carbon uptake rates with 16S rDNA pyrosequencing data we were able to hypothesize the carbon fixation pathways and heterotrophic interactions occurring in this environment. In general, two patterns of 13C values were observed. The first pattern was characterized by increased heterotrophy with depth. In the other, preliminary evidence supporting a photoheterotrophic lifestyle for Roseiflexus spp. was found.

  18. Variations in phytodetritus derived carbon uptake of the intertidal foraminifera Ammonia tepida and Haynesina germanica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wukovits, Julia; Bukenberger, Patrick; Enge, Annekatrin; Wanek, Wolfgang; Watzka, Margarete; Heinz, Petra

    2016-04-01

    Phytodetritus represents a major component of particulate organic carbon in intertidal mudflats. Estuaries and tidal currents yield an extensive amount of these particles that display a substantial nutrient source for littoral food webs. For benthic foraminifera, a group of marine protists, phytodetritus serves as the main food source. Foraminifera are considered to play a significant role in marine carbon turnover processes and show seasonally very high population densities in intertidal sediments. Therefore, it is important to gather explicit data about the specific carbon uptake behavior of intertidal foraminiferal species. In this study, laboratory feeding experiments were carried out to observe phytodetrital carbon uptake of foraminiferal specimen collected in the German Wadden Sea. Artificially produced phytodetritus was labelled with 13C to follow carbon ingestion into foraminiferal cytoplasm over time at different simulated conditions. The experiments were performed with monocultures under exclusion of other meiofauna. Chlorophyte detritus (Dunaliella tertiolecta) was fed to the two common species Ammonia tepida and Haynesina germanica. Ammonia tepida showed a significantly higher affinity to this food source than H. germanica. Testing the effect of temperature revealed a significant decrease of carbon ingestion with increasing temperature in H. germanica. Observations focusing on A. tepida showed a rising phytodetrital carbon content in the biomass of juvenile individuals in contrast to adult foraminifera. In general, carbon uptake reaches saturation levels a few hours after food supply. Furthermore, A. tepida benefits from constant availability of fresh food rather than from a high amount of phytodetritus derived from a single food pulse. Our investigations showed that the foraminiferal impact on intertidal processing of phytodetrital carbon sources is species specific, temperature related and depends on developmental stage and input dynamics

  19. Coherence between woody carbon uptake and net ecosystem productivity at five eddy-covariance sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babst, F.; Bouriaud, O.; Papale, D.; Gielen, B.; Janssens, I.; Nikinmaa, E.; Ibrom, A.; Wu, J.; Bernhofer, C.; Koestner, B.; Gruenwald, T.; Seufert, G.; Ciais, P.; Frank, D. C.

    2013-12-01

    Forest growth ranks amongst the most important processes that determine the carbon balance of terrestrial ecosystems. Quantifications of forest carbon cycling can be made e.g. using biometric and eddy-covariance (EC) techniques. Both offer different perspectives on carbon uptake and attempts to combine them have been inconsistent and variably successful in the past. This contributes to persistent uncertainties regarding carbon allocation in forest ecosystems and complicates precise vegetation model parameterization. Aiming to reconcile assessments of carbon cycling from biometric and EC techniques, we measured radial tree growth and wood density at five long-term EC stations across Europe. The resulting records were used to calculate annual carbon uptake during above-ground wood formation and compared to monthly and seasonal CO2-flux measurements. Efforts were made to identify i) the time periods when EC and tree-ring data correspond best in different parts of Europe and ii) the fraction of eddy-fluxes which is associated with changes in above-ground woody carbon stocks. Biometric measurements and net ecosystem productivity (NEP) proved largely compatible at seasonal time scales while relationships with gross primary productivity (GPP) were often weaker. Results suggest a partitioning of sequestered carbon mainly used for volume increase (January-June) and a combination of cell-wall thickening and storage (July-September). The inter-annual variability in above-ground woody carbon uptake was significantly linked with absolute productivity ranging between 69-366 g C m-2 y-1 at boreal and temperate sites, thereby accounting for 10-25% of GPP, 15-32% of TER, and 25-80% of NEP. These findings from sites representing the major European climate zones and tree species contribute to improved quantification of above-ground carbon allocation in forests. Furthermore, they refine knowledge on processes driving ecosystem productivity important for e.g. vegetation models and

  20. Remote Sensing of Evapotranspiration and Carbon Uptake at Harvard Forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, Qilong; Lin, Bing

    2005-01-01

    A land surface vegetation index, defined as the difference of microwave land surface emissivity at 19 and 37 GHz, was calculated for a heavily forested area in north central Massachusetts. The microwave emissivity difference vegetation index (EDVI) was estimated from satellite SSM/I measurements at the defined wavelengths and used to estimate land surface turbulent fluxes. Narrowband visible and infrared measurements and broadband solar radiation observations were used in the EDVI retrievals and turbulent flux estimations. The EDVI values represent physical properties of crown vegetation such as vegetation water content of crown canopies. The collocated land surface turbulent and radiative fluxes were empirically linked together by the EDVI values. The EDVI values are statistically sensitive to evapotranspiration fractions (EF) with a correlation coefficient (R) greater than 0.79 under all-sky conditions. For clear skies, EDVI estimates exhibit a stronger relationship with EF than normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Furthermore, the products of EDVI and input energy (solar and photosynthetically-active radiation) are statistically significantly correlated to evapotranspiration (R=0.95) and CO2 uptake flux (R=0.74), respectively.

  1. The effects of accelerated carbonation on CO(2) uptake and metal release from incineration APC residues.

    PubMed

    Baciocchi, Renato; Costa, Giulia; Di Bartolomeo, Elisabetta; Polettini, Alessandra; Pomi, Raffaella

    2009-12-01

    This work presents the results of a study on accelerated carbonation of incinerator air pollution control residues, with a particular focus on the modifications in the leaching behaviour of the ash. Aqueous carbonation experiments were carried out using 100% CO(2) at different temperatures, pressures and liquid-to-solid ratios, in order to assess their influence on process kinetics, CO(2) uptake and the leaching behaviour of major and trace elements. The ash showed a particularly high reactivity towards CO(2), owing to the abundance of calcium hydroxides phases, with a maximum CO(2) uptake of approximately 250g/kg. The main effects of carbonation on trace metal leaching involved a significant decrease in mobility for Pb, Zn and Cu at high pH values, a slight change or mobilization for Cr and Sb, and no major effects on the release of As and soluble salts. Geochemical modelling of leachates indicated solubility control by different minerals after carbonation. In particular, in the stability pH range of carbonates, solubility control by a number of metal carbonates was clearly suggested by modelling results. These findings indicate that accelerated carbonation of incinerator ashes has the potential to convert trace contaminants into sparingly soluble carbonate forms, with an overall positive effect on their leaching behaviour. PMID:19700299

  2. The Impact of Land Use Change on Primary Stream Organic and Inorganic Carbon Export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelsey, S. A.; Bauer, J. E.; Grottoli, A. G.; Huey Sanders, T. M.; Matsui, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial land use may impact both the amounts of and characteristics of organic and inorganic carbon (OC and IC, respectively) entering aquatic ecosystems. Better understanding of how different land uses alter carbon characteristics and export fluxes from watersheds may lead to better management practices for retaining OC in terrestrial habitats and therefore mitigate CO2 emissions from freshwater ecosystems where terrestrial OC may be more rapidly respired. We examined the fluxes and δ13C and ∆14C signatures of dissolved IC (DIC), dissolved OC (DOC), and particulate OC (POC) exported from 6 watersheds with differing land use at the North Appalachian Experimental Watershed (NAEW) in Coshocton county in northeastern Ohio to assess whether differences in land use are related to variability in the export fluxes and isotopic characteristics of OC and IC pools. We used a Bayesian mixing model (MixSIR) to determine how the relative contributions of potential carbon sources to DIC, DOC, and POC change as a function of watershed land use. Mixing model results from each season were used to approximate relative annual contributions of potential sources to DIC, DOC, and POC export fluxes from each watershed. We found that agricultural land uses (i.e., corn, under both conventional till and no-till management) experienced the greatest degree of disturbance and had the greatest carbon export fluxes. However, the relative extent to which soil OC contributed to export fluxes compared to corn biomass varied as a function of tillage practices. In addition, nonparametric multidimensional scaling (NMDS), based on the δ13C and ∆14C data and mixing model results for DIC, DOC and POC export fluxes, separated non-corn watersheds into 2 further classes of disturbance: moderate disturbance (pasture and mixed land use) and low disturbance (forest). These findings suggest that land use has a measurable impact on the concentration and characteristics of watershed C export fluxes.

  3. Uptake of chloride and carbonate ions by calcium monosulfoaluminate hydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Mesbah, Adel; Cau-dit-Coumes, Celine; Frizon, Fabien

    2012-08-15

    Decommissioning of old nuclear reactors may produce waste streams containing chlorides and carbonates, including radioactive {sup 36}Cl{sup -} and {sup 14}CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}. Their insolubilization by calcium monosulfoaluminate hydrate was investigated. Carbonates were readily depleted from the solution, giving at thermodynamic equilibrium monocarboaluminate, monocarboaluminate + calcite, or calcite only, depending on the initial ratio between the anion and calcium monosulfoaluminate hydrate. Chloride ions reacted more slowly and were precipitated as Kuzel's salt, Kuzel's and Friedel's salts, or Friedel's salt only. Rietveld refinement of X-Ray powder diffraction patterns was successfully used to quantify the phase distributions, which were compared to thermodynamic calculations. Moreover, analysing the lattice parameters of Kuzel's salt as a function of its chloride content showed the occurrence of a restricted solid solution towards the sulfate side with general formula 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}xCaCl{sub 2}{center_dot}(1 - x)CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}(12 - 2x){center_dot}H{sub 2}O (0.36 {<=} x {<=} 0.50).

  4. Evidence of Substantial Carbon Isotope Fractionation among Substrate, Inorganic Carbon, and Biomass during Aerobic Mineralization of 1,2-Dichloroethane by Xanthobacter autotrophicus

    PubMed Central

    Hunkeler, D.; Aravena, R.

    2000-01-01

    Carbon isotope fractionation during aerobic mineralization of 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) by Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 was investigated. A strong enrichment of 13C in residual 1,2-DCA was observed, with a mean fractionation factor α ± standard deviation of 0.968 ± 0.0013 to 0.973 ± 0.0015. In addition, a large carbon isotope fractionation between biomass and inorganic carbon occurred. A mechanistic model that links the fractionation factor α to the rate constants of the first catabolic enzyme was developed. Based on the model, it was concluded that the strong enrichment of 13C in 1,2-DCA arises because the first irreversible step of the initial enzymatic transformation of 1,2-DCA consists of an SN2 nucleophilic substitution. SN2 reactions are accompanied by a large kinetic isotope effect. The substantial carbon isotope fractionation between biomass and inorganic carbon could be explained by the kinetic isotope effect associated with the initial 1,2-DCA transformation and by the metabolic pathway of 1,2-DCA degradation. Carbon isotope fractionation during 1,2-DCA mineralization leads to 1,2-DCA, inorganic carbon, and biomass with characteristic carbon isotope compositions, which may be used to trace the process in contaminated environments. PMID:11055937

  5. Multidecadal change in the dissolved inorganic carbon in a long-term ocean state estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, Toshimasa; Osafune, Satoshi; Sugiura, Nozomi; Kouketsu, Shinya; Murata, Akihiko; Masuda, Shuhei; Toyoda, Takahiro

    2015-12-01

    By using a four-dimensional variational data assimilation system capable of estimating physical and biogeochemical variables for the global ocean, we investigated multidecadal changes in the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the ocean. The system was newly constructed with a pelagic ecosystem model and an oceanic general circulation model to integrate available ocean observations obtained with a wide range of observation tools. The distribution of estimated DIC was by and large consistent with previous reports. We validated the changes in DIC along the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) Hydrographic Program sections. The correlation coefficients of the modeled versus observed decadal difference patterns of DIC ranged from 0.25 to 0.51 in the Pacific Ocean, from 0.36 to 0.62 in the Atlantic Ocean, and from 0.23 to 0.57 in the Indian Ocean, and were significant at the 95% confidence level. Thus, at basin scale, the reproducibility of long-term climate change was similar. Estimation of vertical DIC fluxes in each basin showed that the fluxes changed on a multidecadal time scale in our system. These changes were possibly due to changes in the dynamical state of CO2 absorption and to changes in ocean circulation. Our integrated data set on the basis of a dynamically self-consistent ocean state is a promising tool for examining long-term changes in the ocean carbon cycle.

  6. Effects of inorganic carbon limitation on anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) activity.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuya; Isaka, Kazuichi; Kazama, Futaba

    2011-03-01

    Anammox bacteria are chemoautotrophic bacteria that oxidize ammonium with nitrite as the electron acceptor and with CO(2) as the main carbon source. The effects of inorganic carbon (IC) limitation on anammox bacteria were investigated using continuous feeding tests. In this study, a gel carrier with entrapped anammox sludge was used. It was clearly shown that the anammox activity deteriorated with a decrease in the influent IC concentration. The relationship between the influent IC concentration and the anammox activity was analyzed using Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and the apparent K(m) was determined to be 1.2mg-C/L. The activity could be recovered by adding IC to the influent. The consumption ratio of IC to ammonium was not constant and mainly depended on the influent ratio of the IC to ammonium concentrations (inf.IC/inf.NH(4)-N). The results indicated that an inf.IC/inf.NH(4)-N ratio of 0.2 in the anammox reactor was ideal for the anammox process using gel cubes. PMID:21256745

  7. Enhancing the adsorption of ionic liquids onto activated carbon by the addition of inorganic salts

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Catarina M. S. S.; Lemus, Jesús; Freire, Mara G.; Palomar, Jose; Coutinho, João A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Most ionic liquids (ILs) are either water soluble or present a non-negligible miscibility with water that may cause some harmful effects upon their release into the environment. Among other methods, adsorption of ILs onto activated carbon (AC) has shown to be an effective technique to remove these compounds from aqueous solutions. However, this method has proved to be viable only for hydrophobic ILs rather than for the hydrophilic that, being water soluble, have a larger tendency for contamination. In this context, an alternative approach using the salting-out ability of inorganic salts is here proposed to enhance the adsorption of hydrophilic ILs onto activated carbon. The effect of the concentrations of Na2SO4 on the adsorption of five ILs onto AC was investigated. A wide range of ILs that allow the inspection of the IL cation family (imidazolium- and pyridinium-based) and the anion nature (accounting for its hydrophilicity and fluorination) through the adsorption onto AC was studied. In general, it is shown that the use of Na2SO4 enhances the adsorption of ILs onto AC. In particular, this effect is highly relevant when dealing with hydrophilic ILs that are those that are actually poorly removed by AC. In addition, the COnductor like Screening MOdel for Real Solvents (COSMO-RS) was used aiming at complementing the experimental data obtained. This work contributes with the development of novel methods to remove ILs from water streams aiming at creating “greener” processes. PMID:25516713

  8. Estimating the carbon budget and maximizing future carbon uptake for a temperate forest region in the U.S.

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Forests of the Midwest U.S. provide numerous ecosystem services. Two of these, carbon sequestration and wood production, are often portrayed as conflicting. Currently, carbon management and biofuel policies are being developed to reduce atmospheric CO2 and national dependence on foreign oil, and increase carbon storage in ecosystems. However, the biological and industrial forest carbon cycles are rarely studied in a whole-system structure. The forest system carbon balance is the difference between the biological (net ecosystem production) and industrial (net emissions from forest industry) forest carbon cycles, but to date this critical whole system analysis is lacking. This study presents a model of the forest system, uses it to compute the carbon balance, and outlines a methodology to maximize future carbon uptake in a managed forest region. Results We used a coupled forest ecosystem process and forest products life cycle inventory model for a regional temperate forest in the Midwestern U.S., and found the net system carbon balance for this 615,000 ha forest was positive (2.29 t C ha-1 yr-1). The industrial carbon budget was typically less than 10% of the biological system annually, and averaged averaged 0.082 t C ha-1 yr-1. Net C uptake over the next 100-years increased by 22% or 0.33 t C ha-1 yr-1 relative to the current harvest rate in the study region under the optized harvest regime. Conclusions The forest’s biological ecosystem current and future carbon uptake capacity is largely determined by forest harvest practices that occurred over a century ago, but we show an optimized harvesting strategy would increase future carbon sequestration, or wood production, by 20-30%, reduce long transportation chain emissions, and maintain many desirable stand structural attributes that are correlated to biodiversity. Our results for this forest region suggest that increasing harvest over the next 100 years increases the strength of

  9. Temperature responses of carbon monoxide and hydrogen uptake by vegetated and unvegetated volcanic cinders

    PubMed Central

    King, Caitlin E; King, Gary M

    2012-01-01

    Ecosystem succession on a large deposit of volcanic cinders emplaced on Kilauea Volcano in 1959 has resulted in a mosaic of closed-canopy forested patches and contiguous unvegetated patches. Unvegetated and unshaded surface cinders (Bare) experience substantial diurnal temperature oscillations ranging from moderate (16 °C) to extreme (55 °C) conditions. The surface material of adjacent vegetated patches (Canopy) experiences much smaller fluctuations (14–25 °C) due to shading. To determine whether surface material from these sites showed adaptations by carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen (H2) consumption to changes in ambient temperature regimes accompanying succession, we measured responses of CO and H2 uptake to short-term variations in temperature and long-term incubations at elevated temperature. Based on its broader temperature optimum and lower activation energy, Canopy H2 uptake was less sensitive than Bare H2 uptake to temperature changes. In contrast, Bare and Canopy CO uptake responded similarly to temperature during short-term incubations, indicating no differences in temperature sensitivity. However, during extended incubations at 55 °C, CO uptake increased for Canopy but not Bare material, which indicated that the former was capable of thermal adaptation. H2 uptake for material from both sites was completely inhibited at 55 °C throughout extended incubations. These results indicated that plant development during succession did not elicit differences in short-term temperature responses for Bare and Canopy CO uptake, in spite of previously reported differences in CO oxidizer community composition, and differences in average daily and extreme temperatures. Differences associated with vegetation due to succession did, however, lead to a notable capacity for thermophilic CO uptake by Canopy but not Bare material. PMID:22258097

  10. TOPICAL REVIEW Recent developments in inorganically filled carbon nanotubes: successes and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Ujjal K.; Costa, Pedro M. F. J.; Bando, Yoshio; Fang, Xiaosheng; Li, Liang; Imura, Masataka; Golberg, Dmitri

    2010-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a unique class of nanomaterials that can be imagined as rolled graphene sheets. The inner hollow of a CNT provides an extremely small, one-dimensional space for storage of materials. In the last decade, enormous effort has been spent to produce filled CNTs that combine the properties of both the host CNT and the guest filling material. CNTs filled with various inorganic materials such as metals, alloys, semiconductors and insulators have been obtained using different synthesis approaches including capillary filling and chemical vapor deposition. Recently, several potential applications have emerged for these materials, such as the measurement of temperature at the nanoscale, nano-spot welding, and the storage and delivery of extremely small quantities of materials. A clear distinction between this class of materials and other nanostructures is the existence of an enormous interfacial area between the CNT and the filling matter. Theoretical investigations have shown that the lattice mismatch and strong exchange interaction of CNTs with the guest material across the interface should result in reordering of the guest crystal structure and passivation of the surface dangling bonds and thus yielding new and interesting physical properties. Despite preliminary successes, there remain many challenges in realizing applications of CNTs filled with inorganic materials, such as a comprehensive understanding of their growth and physical properties and control of their structural parameters. In this article, we overview research on filled CNT nanomaterials with special emphasis on recent progress and key achievements. We also discuss the future scope and the key challenges emerging out of a decade of intensive research on these fascinating materials.