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Sample records for inos mediate bacterial

  1. Increases in Calmodulin Abundance and Stabilization of Activated iNOS Mediate Bacterial Killing in RAW 264.7 Macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, Heather S.; Shi, Liang; Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-08-01

    The rapid activation of macrophages in response to bacterial antigens is central to the innate immune system that permits the recognition and killing of pathogens to limit infection. To understand regulatory mechanisms underlying macrophage activation, we have investigated changes in the abundance of calmodulin (CaM) and iNOS in response to the bacterial cell wall component lipopolysaccharide (LPS) using RAW 264.7 macrophages. Critical to these measurements was the ability to differentiate free iNOS from the CaM-bound (active) form of iNOS associated with nitric oxide generation. We observe a rapid two-fold increase in CaM abundance during the first 30 minutes that is blocked by inhibition of NF?B nuclear translocation or protein synthesis. A similar two-fold increase in the abundance of the complex between CaM and iNOS is observed with the same time dependence. In contrast, there are no detectable increases in the CaM-free (i.e., inactive) form of iNOS within the first hour; it remains at a very low abundance during the initial phase of macrophage activation. Increasing cellular CaM levels in stably transfected cells results in a corresponding increase in the abundance of the CaM/iNOS complex that promotes effective bacterial killing following challenge by Salmonella typhimurium. Thus, LPS-dependent increases in CaM abundance function in the stabilization and activation of iNOS on the rapid time-scale associated with macrophage activation and bacterial killing. These results explain how CaM and iNOS coordinately function to form a stable complex that is part of a rapid host-response that functions within the first 30 minutes following bacterial infection to up-regulate the innate immune system involving macrophage activation.

  2. Burkholderia pseudomallei rpoS mediates iNOS suppression in human hepatocyte (HC04) cells

    PubMed Central

    Sanongkiet, Sucharat; Ponnikorn, Saranyoo; Udomsangpetch, Rachanee; Tungpradabkul, Sumalee

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is an intracellular Gram-negative bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of melioidosis, a widespread disease in Southeast Asia. Reactive nitrogen, in an intermediate form of nitric oxide (NO), is one of the first lines of defense used by host cells to eliminate intracellular pathogens, through the stimulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Studies in phagocytotic cells have shown that the iNOS response is muted in B. pseudomallei infection, and implicated the rpoS sigma factor as a key regulatory factor mediating suppression. The liver is a main visceral organ affected by B. pseudomallei, and there is little knowledge about the interaction of liver cells and B. pseudomallei. This study investigated the induction of iNOS, as well as autophagic flux and light-chain 3 (LC3) localization in human liver (HC04) cells in response to infection with B. pseudomallei and its rpoS deficient mutant. Results showed that the rpoS mutant was unable to suppress iNOS induction and that the mutant showed less induction of autophagy and lower co-localization with LC3, and this was coupled with a lower intracellular growth rate. Combining these results suggest that B. pseudomallei rpoS is an important factor in establishing infection in liver cells. PMID:27324398

  3. Burkholderia pseudomallei rpoS mediates iNOS suppression in human hepatocyte (HC04) cells.

    PubMed

    Sanongkiet, Sucharat; Ponnikorn, Saranyoo; Udomsangpetch, Rachanee; Tungpradabkul, Sumalee

    2016-08-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is an intracellular Gram-negative bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of melioidosis, a widespread disease in Southeast Asia. Reactive nitrogen, in an intermediate form of nitric oxide (NO), is one of the first lines of defense used by host cells to eliminate intracellular pathogens, through the stimulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Studies in phagocytotic cells have shown that the iNOS response is muted in B. pseudomallei infection, and implicated the rpoS sigma factor as a key regulatory factor mediating suppression. The liver is a main visceral organ affected by B. pseudomallei, and there is little knowledge about the interaction of liver cells and B. pseudomallei This study investigated the induction of iNOS, as well as autophagic flux and light-chain 3 (LC3) localization in human liver (HC04) cells in response to infection with B. pseudomallei and its rpoS deficient mutant. Results showed that the rpoS mutant was unable to suppress iNOS induction and that the mutant showed less induction of autophagy and lower co-localization with LC3, and this was coupled with a lower intracellular growth rate. Combining these results suggest that B. pseudomallei rpoS is an important factor in establishing infection in liver cells. PMID:27324398

  4. Lymphocytes and not IFNγ mediate expression of iNOS by intestinal epithelium in murine cryptosporidiosis

    PubMed Central

    Nordone, S.K.; Gookin, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    We hypothesized that unrecognized differences in epithelial expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), resulting from engineered immunodeficiency, could explain the contradictory findings of prior studies regarding the importance of nitric oxide (NO) in murine models of C. parvum infection. Severe combined immunodeficient mice (SCID) failed to constitutively or inducibly express epithelial iNOS or increase NO synthesis in response to C. parvum infection. In contrast, mice lacking IFNγ alone induced both epithelial iNOS expression and NO synthesis in response to infection. Accordingly, lymphocytes mediate epithelial expression of iNOS and NO synthesis independent of IFNγ in response to C. parvum infection. These findings in large part explain the contradictory conclusions of prior studies regarding the role of iNOS in C. parvum infection. PMID:20352449

  5. INO80 governs superenhancer-mediated oncogenic transcription and tumor growth in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bingying; Wang, Li; Zhang, Shu; Bennett, Brian D; He, Fan; Zhang, Yan; Xiong, Chengliang; Han, Leng; Diao, Lixia; Li, Pishun; Fargo, David C; Cox, Adrienne D; Hu, Guang

    2016-06-15

    Superenhancers (SEs) are large genomic regions with a high density of enhancer marks. In cancer, SEs are found near oncogenes and dictate cancer gene expression. However, how oncogenic SEs are regulated remains poorly understood. Here, we show that INO80, a chromatin remodeling complex, is required for SE-mediated oncogenic transcription and tumor growth in melanoma. The expression of Ino80, the SWI/SNF ATPase, is elevated in melanoma cells and patient melanomas compared with normal melanocytes and benign nevi. Furthermore, Ino80 silencing selectively inhibits melanoma cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, tumorigenesis, and tumor maintenance in mouse xenografts. Mechanistically, Ino80 occupies >90% of SEs, and its occupancy is dependent on transcription factors such as MITF and Sox9. Ino80 binding reduces nucleosome occupancy and facilitates Mediator recruitment, thus promoting oncogenic transcription. Consistently, genes co-occupied by Ino80 and Med1 are selectively expressed in melanomas compared with melanocytes. Together, our results reveal an essential role of INO80-dependent chromatin remodeling in SE function and suggest a novel strategy for disrupting SEs in cancer treatment. PMID:27340176

  6. Lymphocytes and not IFN-gamma mediate expression of iNOS by intestinal epithelium in murine cryptosporidiosis.

    PubMed

    Nordone, Shila K; Gookin, Jody L

    2010-05-01

    We hypothesized that unrecognized differences in epithelial expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), resulting from engineered immunodeficiency, could explain the contradictory findings of prior studies regarding the importance of nitric oxide (NO) in murine models of Cryptosporidium parvum infection. Severe combined immunodeficient mice (SCID) failed to constitutively or inducibly express epithelial iNOS or increase NO synthesis in response to C. parvum infection. In contrast, mice lacking IFN-gamma alone induced both epithelial iNOS expression and NO synthesis in response to infection. Accordingly, lymphocytes mediate epithelial expression of iNOS and NO synthesis independent of IFN-gamma in response to C. parvum infection. These findings in large part explain the contradictory conclusions of prior studies regarding the role of iNOS in C. parvum infection. PMID:20352449

  7. CPEB1 modulates lipopolysaccharide-mediated iNOS induction in rat primary astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ki Chan; Hyun Joo, So; Shin, Chan Young

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} Expression and phosphorylation of CPEB1 is increased by LPS stimulation in rat primary astrocytes. {yields} JNK regulates expression and phosphorylation of CPEB1 in reactive astrocytes. {yields} Down-regulation of CPEB1 using siRNA inhibits oxidative stress and iNOS induction by LPS stimulation. {yields} CPEB1 may play an important role in regulating inflammatory responses in reactive astrocytes induced by LPS. -- Abstract: Upon CNS damage, astrocytes undergo a series of biological changes including increased proliferation, production of inflammatory mediators and morphological changes, in a response collectively called reactive gliosis. This process is an essential part of the brains response to injury, yet much is unknown about the molecular mechanism(s) that induce these changes. In this study, we investigated the role of cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein 1 (CPEB1) in the regulation of inflammatory responses in a model of reactive gliosis, lipopolysaccharide-stimulated astrocytes. CPEB1 is an mRNA-binding protein recently shown to be expressed in astrocytes that may play a role in astrocytes migration. After LPS stimulation, the expression and phosphorylation of CPEB1 was increased in rat primary astrocytes in a JNK-dependent process. siRNA-induced knockdown of CPEB1 expression inhibited the LPS-induced up-regulation of iNOS as well as NO and ROS production, a hallmark of immunological activation of astrocytes. The results from the study suggest that CPEB1 is actively involved in the regulation of inflammatory responses in astrocytes, which might provide new insights into the regulatory mechanism after brain injury.

  8. NF-kappaB-mediated expression of iNOS promotes epithelial defense against infection by Cryptosporidium parvum in neonatal piglets.

    PubMed

    Gookin, Jody L; Chiang, Sophia; Allen, Jessica; Armstrong, Martha U; Stauffer, Stephen H; Finnegan, Colleen; Murtaugh, Michael P

    2006-01-01

    Cryptosporidium sp. parasitizes intestinal epithelium, resulting in enterocyte loss, villous atrophy, and malabsorptive diarrhea. We have shown that mucosal expression of inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS) is increased in infected piglets and that inhibition of iNOS in vitro has no short-term effect on barrier function. NO exerts inhibitory effects on a variety of pathogens; nevertheless, the specific sites of iNOS expression, pathways of iNOS induction, and mechanism of NO action in cryptosporidiosis remain unclear. Using an in vivo model of Cryptosporidium parvum infection, we have examined the location, mechanism of induction, specificity, and consequence of iNOS expression in neonatal piglets. In acute C. parvum infection, iNOS expression predominated in the villous epithelium, was NF-kappaB dependent, and was not restricted to infected enterocytes. Ongoing treatment of infected piglets with a selective iNOS inhibitor resulted in significant increases in villous epithelial parasitism and oocyst excretion but was not detrimental to maintenance of mucosal barrier function. Intensified parasitism could not be attributed to attenuated fluid loss or changes in epithelial proliferation or replacement rate, inasmuch as iNOS inhibition did not alter severity of diarrhea, piglet hydration, Cl- secretion, or kinetics of bromodeoxyuridine-labeled enterocytes. These findings suggest that induction of iNOS represents a nonspecific response of the epithelium that mediates enterocyte defense against C. parvum infection. iNOS did not contribute to the pathogenic sequelae of C. parvum infection. PMID:16123198

  9. Bacterially mediated mineralization of vaterite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos; Jimenez-Lopez, Concepcion; Rodriguez-Navarro, Alejandro; Gonzalez-Muñoz, Maria Teresa; Rodriguez-Gallego, Manuel

    2007-03-01

    Myxococcus xanthus, a common soil bacterium, plays an active role in the formation of spheroidal vaterite. Bacterial production of CO 2 and NH 3 and the transformation of the NH 3 to NH4+ and OH -, thus increasing solution pH and carbonate alkalinity, set the physicochemical conditions (high supersaturation) leading to vaterite precipitation in the microenvironment around cells, and directly onto the surface of bacterial cells. In the latter case, fossilization of bacteria occurs. Vaterite crystals formed by aggregation of oriented nanocrystals with c-axis normal to the bacterial cell-wall, or to the core of the spherulite when bacteria were not encapsulated. While preferred orientation of vaterite c-axis appears to be determined by electrostatic affinity (ionotropic effect) between vaterite crystal (0001) planes and the negatively charged functional groups of organic molecules on the bacterium cell-wall or on extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), analysis of the changes in the culture medium chemistry as well as high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observations point to polymorph selection by physicochemical (kinetic) factors (high supersaturation) and stabilization by organics, both connected with bacterial activity. The latter is in agreement with inorganic precipitation of vaterite induced by NH 3 and CO 2 addition in the protein-rich sterile culture medium. Our results as well as recent studies on vaterite precipitation in the presence of different types of bacteria suggest that bacterially mediated vaterite precipitation is not strain-specific, and could be more common than previously thought.

  10. Attenuation of iNOS and COX2 by blueberry polyphenols is mediated through the suppression of NF-KB activation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Treatment of BV2 microglial cells with blueberry extracts has been shown to be effective in reducing lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pro-inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1Beta), inducible NO synthase (iNOS), and cyclo-...

  11. Protection against filarial infection by 45-49 kDa molecules of Brugia malayi via IFN-γ-mediated iNOS induction.

    PubMed

    Verma, Shiv K; Joseph, Sujith K; Verma, Richa; Kushwaha, Vikas; Parmar, Naveen; Yadav, Pawan K; Thota, Jagadeshwar Reddy; Kar, Susanta; Murthy, P Kalpana

    2015-01-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) mediated mechanisms have been implicated in killing of some life-stages of Brugia malayi/Wuchereria bancrofti and protect the host through type 1 responses and IFN-γ stimulated toxic mediators' release. However, the identity of NO stimulating molecules of the parasites is not known. Three predominantly NO-stimulating SDS-PAGE resolved fractions F8 (45.24-48.64 kDa), F11 (33.44-38.44 kDa) and F12 (28.44-33.44 kDa) from B. malayi were identified and their proteins were analyzed by 2-DE and MALDI-TOF/TOF. Tropomyosin, calponin and de novo peptides were identified by 2-DE and MALDI-TOF/TOF in F8 and immunization with F8 conferred most significant protection against L3-initiated infection in Mastomys coucha. Immunized animals showed upregulated F8-induced NO, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-10, TGF-β release, cellular proliferative responses and specific IgG and IgG1. Anti-IFN-γ, anti-TNF-α, and anti-IL-1β significantly reduced F8-mediated NO generation and iNOS induction at protein levels. Anti-IFN-γ treated cells showed maximum reduction (>74%) in NO generation suggesting a predominant role of IFN-γ in iNOS induction. In conclusion, the findings suggest that F8 which contains tropomyosin, calponin and de novo peptides protects the host via IFN-γ mediated iNOS induction and may hold promise as vaccine candidate(s). This is also the first report of identification of tropomyosin and calponin in B. malayi. PMID:25454090

  12. Selective inhibition of JAK2/STAT1 signaling and iNOS expression mediates the anti-inflammatory effects of coniferyl aldehyde.

    PubMed

    Akram, Muhammad; Kim, Kyeong-A; Kim, Eun-Sun; Shin, Young-Jun; Noh, Dabi; Kim, Eunji; Kim, Jeong-Hyeon; Majid, Arshad; Chang, Sun-Young; Kim, Jin-Ki; Bae, Ok-Nam

    2016-08-25

    Urgent needs still exist for selective control of excessive inflammation. Despite the therapeutic potential of natural compounds against inflammation-associated chronic conditions, lack of specific molecular targets renders these bioactive compounds difficult for further development. Here we examined the bioactivity of coniferyl aldehyde (CA), a natural phenolic compound found in several dietary substances and medicinal plants, elucidating its efficacy both in vivo and in vitro with underlying molecular mechanisms. IFN-γ/TNF-α-stimulated human keratinocytes and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine macrophages were used to examine the effect of CA in vitro and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. In vivo models of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA)-induced ear edema and carrageenan (CRG)-induced paw edema were employed to investigate the topical and systemic anti-inflammatory effects of CA, respectively. CA significantly reduced nitric oxide (NO) production and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in LPS-stimulated macrophages. While nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs) pathways, the representative cellular pathways for iNOS induction, were not affected by CA, phosphorylation of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription 1 (STAT1) and subsequent nuclear translocation of p-STAT1 were significantly decreased by CA. The effect of CA on JAK2-STAT1-iNOS axis was also observed in human keratinocytes stimulated with IFN-γ/TNF-α. Topical application of CA to mice produced significant protection against TPA-induced ear edema along with suppressed epidermal hyperproliferation and leucocyte infiltration. Systemic administration of CA significantly reduced CRG-induced paw edema in rats, where CRG-induced iNOS expression and STAT1 phosphorylation were decreased by CA. In summary, CA has significant anti-inflammatory properties both in vitro and in vivo, mediated by

  13. Thyroid Hormone Enhances Nitric Oxide-Mediated Bacterial Clearance and Promotes Survival after Meningococcal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Altenbacher, Georg; Hagner, Matthias; Berglund, Pernilla; Gao, Yumin; Lu, Ting; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Sjölinder, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Euthyroid sick syndrome characterized by reduced levels of thyroid hormones (THs) is observed in patients with meningococcal shock. It has been found that the level of THs reflects disease severity and is predictive for mortality. The present study was conducted to investigate the impact of THs on host defense during meningococcal infection. We found that supplementation of thyroxine to mice infected with Neisseria meningitidis enhanced bacterial clearance, attenuated the inflammatory responses and promoted survival. In vitro studies with macrophages revealed that THs enhanced bacteria-cell interaction and intracellular killing of meningococci by stimulating inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNos)-mediated NO production. TH treatment did not activate expression of TH receptors in macrophages. Instead, the observed TH-directed actions were mediated through nongenomic pathways involving the protein kinases PI3K and ERK1/2 and initiated at the membrane receptor integrin αvβ3. Inhibition of nongenomic TH signaling prevented iNos induction, NO production and subsequent intracellular bacterial killing by macrophages. These data demonstrate a beneficial role of THs in macrophage-mediated N. meningitidis clearance. TH replacement might be a novel option to control meningococcal septicemia. PMID:22844479

  14. Tetramethylpyrazine attenuates TNF-α-induced iNOS expression in human endothelial cells: Involvement of Syk-mediated activation of PI3K-IKK-IκB signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Zhen; Li, Zhiliang; Chen, Song; Pan, Jieyi; Ma, Xiaochun

    2013-08-15

    Endothelial cells produce nitric oxide (NO) by activation of constitutive nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and transcription of inducible NO synthase (iNOS). We explored the effect of tetramethylpyrazine (TMP), a compound derived from chuanxiong, on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced iNOS in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and explored the signal pathways involved by using RT-PCR and Western blot. TMP suppressed TNF-α-induced expression of iNOS by inhibiting IκB kinase (IKK) phosphorylation, IκB degradation and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) nuclear translocation, which were required for NO gene transcription. Exposure to wortmannin abrogated IKK/IκB/NF-κB-mediated iNOS expression, suggesting activation of such a signal pathway might be phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) dependent. Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) inhibitor piceatannol significantly inhibited NO production. Furthermore, piceatannol obviously suppressed TNF-α-induced IκB phosphorylation and the downstream NF-κB activation, suggesting that Syk is an upstream key regulator in the activation of PI3K/IKK/IκB-mediated signaling. TMP significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced phosphorylation of Syk and PI3K. Our data indicate that TMP might repress iNOS expression, at least in part, through its inhibitory effect of Syk-mediated PI3K phosphorylation in TNF-α-stimulated HUVECs. -- Highlights: •TMP suppressed TNF-α-induced expression of iNOS by inhibiting IKK/IκB/NF-κB pathway. •PI3K inhibitor wortmannin abrogated IKK/IκB/NF-κB-mediated iNOS expression. •Syk inhibitor piceatannol repressed PI3K/IKK/IκB mediated NO production. •Syk is an upstream regulator in the activation of PI3K/IKK/IκB-mediated signaling. •TMP might repress iNOS expression through Syk-mediated PI3K pathway.

  15. Inhibition of iNOS expression and NO production by anti-inflammatory steroids. Reversal by histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hämäläinen, Mari; Lilja, Riikka; Kankaanranta, Hannu; Moilanen, Eeva

    2008-01-01

    In inflammation, nitric oxide (NO) is produced by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) induced by bacterial products and cytokines, and NO acts as a regulatory and pro-inflammatory mediator. Glucocorticoids are powerful anti-inflammatory agents that inhibit the expression of iNOS and various other inflammatory factors. Histone deacetylation has been recently described as a novel mechanism how glucocorticoids down-regulate transcriptional activation of some inflammatory genes. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of inhibitors of histone deacetylation on the suppressive effects of glucocorticoids on NO production and iNOS expression. Dexamethasone and a dissociated glucocorticoid RU24858 inhibited NO production, and iNOS protein and mRNA expression in macrophages exposed to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In the presence of a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist mifepristone, dexamethasone and RU24858 had no effect on NO production. The role of histone deacetylation in the glucocorticoid effect was studied by using three structurally different inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs): trichostatin A, apicidin and MC1293. HDAC inhibitors reversed the effects of dexamethasone and RU24858 on iNOS expression and NO production. Stably transfected A549/8 cells containing luciferase gene under the control of human iNOS promoter were used in promoter-activity studies. iNOS promoter activity induced by IL-1beta was inhibited by dexamethasone and the inhibitory effect was reversed by HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A. The results suggest that glucocorticoids inhibit iNOS expression and NO production by a GR-mediated and GRE-independent manner through histone deacetylation and transcriptional silencing. PMID:17913526

  16. Angiopoietin-like 4 Stimulates STAT3-mediated iNOS Expression and Enhances Angiogenesis to Accelerate Wound Healing in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Han Chung; Chan, Jeremy Soon Kiat; Goh, Chi Qin; Gounko, Natalia V; Luo, Baiwen; Wang, Xiaoling; Foo, Selin; Wong, Marcus Thien Chong; Choong, Cleo; Kersten, Sander; Tan, Nguan Soon

    2014-01-01

    Impaired wound healing is a major source of morbidity in diabetic patients. Poor outcome has, in part, been related to increased inflammation, poor angiogenesis, and deficiencies in extracellular matrix components. Despite the enormous impact of these chronic wounds, effective therapies are lacking. Here, we showed that the topical application of recombinant matricellular protein angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4) accelerated wound reepithelialization in diabetic mice, in part, by improving angiogenesis. ANGPTL4 expression is markedly elevated upon normal wound injury. In contrast, ANGPTL4 expression remains low throughout the healing period in diabetic wounds. Exogenous ANGPTL4 modulated several regulatory networks involved in cell migration, angiogenesis, and inflammation, as evidenced by an altered gene expression signature. ANGPTL4 influenced the expression profile of endothelial-specific CD31 in diabetic wounds, returning its profile to that observed in wild-type wounds. We showed ANGPTL4-induced nitric oxide production through an integrin/JAK/STAT3-mediated upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in wound epithelia, thus revealing a hitherto unknown mechanism by which ANGPTL4 regulated angiogenesis via keratinocyte-to-endothelial-cell communication. These data show that the replacement of ANGPTL4 may be an effective adjunctive or new therapeutic avenue for treating poor healing wounds. The present finding also confirms that therapeutic angiogenesis remains an attractive treatment modality for diabetic wound healing. PMID:24903577

  17. Infectious Keratitis: Secreted Bacterial Proteins That Mediate Corneal Damage

    PubMed Central

    Marquart, Mary E.; O'Callaghan, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Ocular bacterial infections are universally treated with antibiotics, which can eliminate the organism but cannot reverse the damage caused by bacterial products already present. The three very common causes of bacterial keratitis—Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumoniae—all produce proteins that directly or indirectly cause damage to the cornea that can result in reduced vision despite antibiotic treatment. Most, but not all, of these proteins are secreted toxins and enzymes that mediate host cell death, degradation of stromal collagen, cleavage of host cell surface molecules, or induction of a damaging inflammatory response. Studies of these bacterial pathogens have determined the proteins of interest that could be targets for future therapeutic options for decreasing corneal damage. PMID:23365719

  18. Bacterial floc mediated rapid streamer formation in creeping flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanpourfard, Mahtab; Nikakhtari, Zahra; Ghosh, Ranajay; Das, Siddhartha; Thundat, Thomas; Kumar, Aloke

    2015-11-01

    One of the contentious problems regarding the interaction of low Reynolds number (Re << 1) fluid flow with bacterial biomass is the formation of filamentous structures called streamers. Recently, we discovered that streamers can be formed from flow-induced deformation of the pre-formed bacterial flocs over extremely small timescales (less than a second). However, these streamers are different than the ones that mediated by biofilms. To optically probe the inception process of these streamers formation, bacterial flocs were embedded with 200 nm red fluorescent polystyrene beads that served as tracers. We also showed that at their inception the deformation of the flocs is dominated by large recoverable strains indicating significant elasticity. These strains subsequently increase tremendously to produce filamentous streamers. At time scales larger than streamers formation time scale, viscous response was observed from streamers. Finally, rapid clogging of microfluidic devices occurred after these streamers formed.

  19. Bacterial floc mediated rapid streamer formation in creeping flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanpourfard, Mahtab; Nikakhtari, Zahra; Ghosh, Ranajay; Das, Siddhartha; Thundat, Thomas; Liu, Yang; Kumar, Aloke

    2015-08-01

    One of the central puzzles concerning the interaction of low Reynolds number fluid transport with bacterial biomass is the formation of filamentous structures called streamers. In this manuscript, we report our discovery of a new kind of low Re bacterial streamers, which appear from pre-formed bacterial flocs. In sharp contrast to the biofilm-mediated streamers, these streamers form over extremely small timescales (less than a second). Our experiments, carried out in a microchannel with micropillars rely on fluorescence microscopy techniques to illustrate that floc-mediated streamers form when a freely-moving floc adheres to the micropillar wall and gets rapidly sheared by the background flow. We also show that at their inception the deformation of the flocs is dominated by recoverable large strains indicating significant elasticity. These strains subsequently increase tremendously to produce filamentous streamers. Interestingly, we find that these fully formed streamers are not static structures and show viscous response at time scales larger than their formation time scales. Finally, we show that such novel streamer formation can lead to rapid clogging of microfluidic devices.

  20. Bacterial floc mediated rapid streamer formation in creeping flows.

    PubMed

    Hassanpourfard, Mahtab; Nikakhtari, Zahra; Ghosh, Ranajay; Das, Siddhartha; Thundat, Thomas; Liu, Yang; Kumar, Aloke

    2015-01-01

    One of the central puzzles concerning the interaction of low Reynolds number fluid transport with bacterial biomass is the formation of filamentous structures called streamers. In this manuscript, we report our discovery of a new kind of low Re bacterial streamers, which appear from pre-formed bacterial flocs. In sharp contrast to the biofilm-mediated streamers, these streamers form over extremely small timescales (less than a second). Our experiments, carried out in a microchannel with micropillars rely on fluorescence microscopy techniques to illustrate that floc-mediated streamers form when a freely-moving floc adheres to the micropillar wall and gets rapidly sheared by the background flow. We also show that at their inception the deformation of the flocs is dominated by recoverable large strains indicating significant elasticity. These strains subsequently increase tremendously to produce filamentous streamers. Interestingly, we find that these fully formed streamers are not static structures and show viscous response at time scales larger than their formation time scales. Finally, we show that such novel streamer formation can lead to rapid clogging of microfluidic devices. PMID:26278133

  1. Bacterial floc mediated rapid streamer formation in creeping flows

    PubMed Central

    Hassanpourfard, Mahtab; Nikakhtari, Zahra; Ghosh, Ranajay; Das, Siddhartha; Thundat, Thomas; Liu, Yang; Kumar, Aloke

    2015-01-01

    One of the central puzzles concerning the interaction of low Reynolds number fluid transport with bacterial biomass is the formation of filamentous structures called streamers. In this manuscript, we report our discovery of a new kind of low Re bacterial streamers, which appear from pre-formed bacterial flocs. In sharp contrast to the biofilm-mediated streamers, these streamers form over extremely small timescales (less than a second). Our experiments, carried out in a microchannel with micropillars rely on fluorescence microscopy techniques to illustrate that floc-mediated streamers form when a freely-moving floc adheres to the micropillar wall and gets rapidly sheared by the background flow. We also show that at their inception the deformation of the flocs is dominated by recoverable large strains indicating significant elasticity. These strains subsequently increase tremendously to produce filamentous streamers. Interestingly, we find that these fully formed streamers are not static structures and show viscous response at time scales larger than their formation time scales. Finally, we show that such novel streamer formation can lead to rapid clogging of microfluidic devices. PMID:26278133

  2. Perspective: Adhesion Mediated Signal Transduction in Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Moorthy, Sudha; Keklak, Julia; Klein, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    During the infection process, pathogenic bacteria undergo large-scale transcriptional changes to promote virulence and increase intrahost survival. While much of this reprogramming occurs in response to changes in chemical environment, such as nutrient availability and pH, there is increasing evidence that adhesion to host-tissue can also trigger signal transduction pathways resulting in differential gene expression. Determining the molecular mechanisms of adhesion-mediated signaling requires disentangling the contributions of chemical and mechanical stimuli. Here we highlight recent work demonstrating that surface attachment drives a transcriptional response in bacterial pathogens, including uropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli), and discuss the complexity of experimental design when dissecting the specific role of adhesion-mediated signaling during infection. PMID:26901228

  3. Perspective: Adhesion Mediated Signal Transduction in Bacterial Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, Sudha; Keklak, Julia; Klein, Eric A

    2016-01-01

    During the infection process, pathogenic bacteria undergo large-scale transcriptional changes to promote virulence and increase intrahost survival. While much of this reprogramming occurs in response to changes in chemical environment, such as nutrient availability and pH, there is increasing evidence that adhesion to host-tissue can also trigger signal transduction pathways resulting in differential gene expression. Determining the molecular mechanisms of adhesion-mediated signaling requires disentangling the contributions of chemical and mechanical stimuli. Here we highlight recent work demonstrating that surface attachment drives a transcriptional response in bacterial pathogens, including uropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli), and discuss the complexity of experimental design when dissecting the specific role of adhesion-mediated signaling during infection. PMID:26901228

  4. Susceptibility allele-specific loss of miR-1324-mediated silencing of the INO80B chromatin-assembly complex gene in pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Oudejans, Cees B M; Michel, Omar J; Janssen, Rob; Habets, Rob; Poutsma, Ankie; Sistermans, Erik A; Weiss, Marjan M; Incarnato, Danny; Oliviero, Salvatore; Kleiverda, Gunilla; Van Dijk, Marie; Arngrímsson, Reynir

    2015-01-01

    In humans, the elucidation of the genetics underlying multifactorial diseases such as pre-eclampsia remains complex. Given the current day availability of genome-wide linkage- and expression data pools, we applied pathway-guided genome-wide meta-analysis guided by the premise that the functional network underlying these multifactorial syndromes is under selective genetic pressure. This approach drastically reduced the genomic region of interest, i.e. 2p13 linked with pre-eclampsia in Icelandic families, from 8 679 641 bp (region with linkage) to 45 264 bp (coding exons of prioritized genes) (0.83%). Mutation screening of the candidate genes (n = 13) rapidly reduced the minimal critical region and showed the INO80B gene, encoding a novel winged helix domain (pfam14465) and part of the chromatin-remodeling complex, to be linked to pre-eclampsia. The functional defect in placental cells involved a susceptibility allele-dependent loss-of-gene silencing due to increased INO80B RNA stability as a consequence of differential binding of miR-1324 to the susceptibility allele of rs34174194. This risk allele is located at position 1 in an absolutely conserved 7-mer (UUGUCUG) in the 3-UTR of INO80B immediately downstream of a variant Pumillio Recognition Element (UGUANAAG). These data support that pre-eclampsia genes affect a conserved fundamental mechanism that evolved as a consequence of hemochorial placentation. Functionally, this involves founder-dependent, placentally expressed paralogous genes that regulate an essential trophoblast differentiation pathway but act at different entry points. PMID:25143393

  5. Magnesium isotope fractionation in bacterial mediated carbonate precipitation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, I. J.; Pearce, C. R.; Polacskek, T.; Cockell, C.; Hammond, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    Magnesium is an essential component of life, with pivotal roles in the generation of cellular energy as well as in plant chlorophyll [1]. The bio-geochemical cycling of Mg is associated with mass dependant fractionation (MDF) of the three stable Mg isotopes [1]. The largest MDF of Mg isotopes has been recorded in carbonates, with foraminiferal tests having δ26Mg compositions up to 5 ‰ lighter than modern seawater [2]. Magnesium isotopes may also be fractionated during bacterially mediated carbonate precipitation and such carbonates are known to have formed in both modern and ancient Earth surface environments [3, 4], with cyanobacteria having a dominant role in carbonate formation during the Archean. In this study, we aim to better constrain the extent to which Mg isotope fractionation occurs during cellular processes, and to identify when, and how, this signal is transferred to carbonates. To this end we have undertaken biologically-mediated carbonate precipitation experiments that were performed in artificial seawater, but with the molar Mg/Ca ratio set to 0.6 and with the solution spiked with 0.4% yeast extract. The bacterial strain used was marine isolate Halomonas sp. (gram-negative). Experiments were run in the dark at 21 degree C for two to three months and produced carbonate spheres of various sizes up to 300 μm in diameter, but with the majority have diameters of ~100 μm. Control experiments run in sterile controls (`empty` medium without bacteria) yielded no precipitates, indicating a bacterial control on the precipitation. The carbonate spheres are produced are amenable to SEM, EMP and Mg isotopic analysis by MC-ICP-MS. Our new data will shed light on tracing bacterial signals in carbonates from the geological record. [1] Young & Galy (2004). Rev. Min. Geochem. 55, p197-230. [2] Pogge von Strandmann (2008). Geochem. Geophys. Geosys. 9 DOI:10.1029/2008GC002209. [3] Castanier, et al. (1999). Sed. Geol. 126, 9-23. [4] Cacchio, et al. (2003

  6. A fragrant neighborhood: volatile mediated bacterial interactions in soil

    PubMed Central

    Schulz-Bohm, Kristin; Zweers, Hans; de Boer, Wietse; Garbeva, Paolina

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play essential roles in communication and competition between soil microorganisms. Here we assessed volatile-mediated interactions of a synthetic microbial community in a model system that mimics the natural conditions in the heterogeneous soil environment along the rhizosphere. Phylogenetic different soil bacterial isolates (Burkholderia sp., Dyella sp., Janthinobacterium sp., Pseudomonas sp., and Paenibacillus sp.) were inoculated as mixtures or monoculture in organic-poor, sandy soil containing artificial root exudates (ARE) and the volatile profile and growth were analyzed. Additionally, a two-compartment system was used to test if volatiles produced by inter-specific interactions in the rhizosphere can stimulate the activity of starving bacteria in the surrounding, nutrient-depleted soil. The obtained results revealed that both microbial interactions and shifts in microbial community composition had a strong effect on the volatile emission. Interestingly, the presence of a slow-growing, low abundant Paenibacillus strain significantly affected the volatile production by the other abundant members of the bacterial community as well as the growth of the interacting strains. Furthermore, volatiles released by mixtures of root-exudates consuming bacteria stimulated the activity and growth of starved bacteria. Besides growth stimulation, also an inhibition in growth was observed for starving bacteria exposed to microbial volatiles. The current work suggests that volatiles produced during microbial interactions in the rhizosphere have a significant long distance effect on microorganisms in the surrounding, nutrient-depleted soil. PMID:26579111

  7. A fragrant neighborhood: volatile mediated bacterial interactions in soil.

    PubMed

    Schulz-Bohm, Kristin; Zweers, Hans; de Boer, Wietse; Garbeva, Paolina

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play essential roles in communication and competition between soil microorganisms. Here we assessed volatile-mediated interactions of a synthetic microbial community in a model system that mimics the natural conditions in the heterogeneous soil environment along the rhizosphere. Phylogenetic different soil bacterial isolates (Burkholderia sp., Dyella sp., Janthinobacterium sp., Pseudomonas sp., and Paenibacillus sp.) were inoculated as mixtures or monoculture in organic-poor, sandy soil containing artificial root exudates (ARE) and the volatile profile and growth were analyzed. Additionally, a two-compartment system was used to test if volatiles produced by inter-specific interactions in the rhizosphere can stimulate the activity of starving bacteria in the surrounding, nutrient-depleted soil. The obtained results revealed that both microbial interactions and shifts in microbial community composition had a strong effect on the volatile emission. Interestingly, the presence of a slow-growing, low abundant Paenibacillus strain significantly affected the volatile production by the other abundant members of the bacterial community as well as the growth of the interacting strains. Furthermore, volatiles released by mixtures of root-exudates consuming bacteria stimulated the activity and growth of starved bacteria. Besides growth stimulation, also an inhibition in growth was observed for starving bacteria exposed to microbial volatiles. The current work suggests that volatiles produced during microbial interactions in the rhizosphere have a significant long distance effect on microorganisms in the surrounding, nutrient-depleted soil. PMID:26579111

  8. Defense against HSV-1 in a murine model is mediated by iNOS and orchestrated by the activation of TLR2 and TLR9 in trigeminal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Herpes simplex 1 (HSV-1) causes various human clinical manifestations, ranging from simple cold sores to encephalitis. Innate immune cells recognize pathogens through Toll-like receptors (TLRs), thus initiating the immune response. Previously, we demonstrated that the immune response against HSV-1 is dependent on TLR2 and TLR9 expression and on IFN gamma production in the trigeminal ganglia (TG) of infected mice. In this work, we further investigated the cells, molecules, and mechanisms of HSV-1 infection control, especially those that are TLR-dependent. Methods C57BL/6 wild-type (WT), TLR2−/−, TLR9−/−, and TLR2/9−/− mice were intranasally infected with HSV-1. On the viral peak day, the TG and brains were collected from mice and TLR expression was measured in the TG and brain and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression was measured in the TG by real-time PCR. Immunofluorescence assays were performed in mice TG to detect iNOS production by F4/80+ cells. Intraperitoneal macrophages nitric oxide (NO) production was evaluated by the Griess assay. WT, CD8−/−, RAG−/−, and iNOS−/− mice were intranasally infected in a survival assay, and their cytokine expression was measured in the TG by real-time PCR. Results Infected WT mice exhibited significantly increased TLR expression, compared with their respective controls, in the TG but not in the brain. TLR-deficient mice had moderately increased TLR expression in the TG and brain in compare with the non-infected animals. iNOS expression in the WT infected mice TG was higher than in the other groups with increased production by macrophages in the WT infected mice, which did not occur in the TLR2/9−/− mice. Additionally, the intraperitoneal macrophages of the WT mice had a higher production of NO compared with those of the TLR-deficient mice. The CD8−/−, RAG−/−, and iNOS−/− mice had 100% mortality after the HSV-1 infection compared with 10% of the WT mice. Cytokines

  9. Genes Encoding Phospholipases A2 Mediate Insect Nodulation Reactions to Bacterial Challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We propose that expression of four genes encoding secretory phospholipases A2 (sPLA2) mediates insect nodulation responses to bacterial infection. Nodulation is the quantitatively predominant cellular defense reaction to bacterial infection. This reaction is mediated by eicosanoids, the biosynthesis...

  10. Microfabrication services at INO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alain, Christine; Jerominek, Hubert; Topart, Patrice A.; Pope, Timothy D.; Picard, Francis; Cayer, Felix; Larouche, Carl; Leclair, Sebastien; Tremblay, Bruno

    2003-01-01

    MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) technology has expanded widely over the last decade in terms of its use in devices and instrumentation for diverse applications. However, access to versatile foundry services for MEMS fabrication is still limited. At INO, the presence of a multidisciplinary team and a complete tool set allow us to offer unique MEMS foundry-type services. These services include: design, prototyping, fabrication, packaging and testing of various MEMS and MOEMS devices. The design of a device starts with the evaluation of different structures adapted to a given application. Computer simulation tools, like IntelliSuite, ANSYS or custom software are used to evaluate the mechanical, optical, thermal and electromechanical performances. Standard IC manufacturing techniques such as metal, dielectric and semiconductor film deposition and etching as well as photolithographic pattern transfer are available. In addition, some unique techniques such as on-wafer lithography by laser writing, gray-scale mask lithography, thick photoresist lithography, selective electroplating, injection moulding and UV-assisted moulding are available to customers. The hermetic packaging and a novel patented wafer-level micropackaging are also applied. This multifaceted expertise has been utilized to manufacturing of several types of MEMS devices as well as complex instruments including micromirror-type devices, microfilters, IR microbolometric detector arrays, complete cameras and multipurpose sensors.

  11. iNOS signaling interacts with COX-2 pathway in colonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingting; Zhu, Min; Lance, Peter

    2012-10-01

    COX-2 and iNOS are two major inflammatory mediators implicated in colorectal inflammation and cancer. Previously, the role of colorectal fibroblasts involved in regulation of COX-2 and iNOS expression was largely ignored. In addition, the combined interaction of COX-2 and iNOS signalings and their significance in the progression of colorectal inflammation and cancer within the fibroblasts have received little investigation. To address those issues, we investigated the role of colonic fibroblasts in the regulation of COX-2 and iNOS gene expression, and explored possible mechanisms of interaction between COX-2 and iNOS signalings using a colonic CCD-18Co fibroblast line and LPS, a potential stimulator of COX-2 and iNOS. Our results clearly demonstrated that LPS activated COX-2 gene expression and enhanced PGE(2) production, stimulated iNOS gene expression and promoted NO production in the fibroblasts. Interestingly, activation of COX-2 signaling by LPS was not involved in activation of iNOS signaling, while activation of iNOS signaling by LPS contributed in part to activation of COX-2 signaling. Further analysis indicated that PKC plays a major role in the activation and interaction of COX-2 and iNOS signalings induced by LPS in the fibroblasts. PMID:22683859

  12. Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS) in Microglia of the Developing Quail Retina

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Ana; Navascués, Julio; Cuadros, Miguel A.; Calvente, Ruth; Martín-Oliva, David; Ferrer-Martín, Rosa M.; Martín-Estebané, María; Carrasco, María-Carmen; Marín-Teva, José L.

    2014-01-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which produce large amounts of nitric oxide (NO), is induced in macrophages and microglia in response to inflammatory mediators such as LPS and cytokines. Although iNOS is mainly expressed by microglia that become activated in different pathological and experimental situations, it was recently reported that undifferentiated amoeboid microglia can also express iNOS during normal development. The aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of iNOS expression in microglial cells during normal development and after their activation with LPS by using the quail retina as model. iNOS expression was analyzed by iNOS immunolabeling, western-blot, and RT-PCR. NO production was determined by using DAR-4M AM, a reliable fluorescent indicator of subcellular NO production by iNOS. Embryonic, postnatal, and adult in situ quail retinas were used to analyze the pattern of iNOS expression in microglial cells during normal development. iNOS expression and NO production in LPS-treated microglial cells were investigated by an in vitro approach based on organotypic cultures of E8 retinas, in which microglial cell behavior is similar to that of the in situ retina, as previously demonstrated in our laboratory. We show here that amoeboid microglia in the quail retina express iNOS during normal development. This expression is stronger in microglial cells migrating tangentially in the vitreal part of the retina and is downregulated, albeit maintained, when microglia differentiate and become ramified. LPS treatment of retina explants also induces changes in the morphology of amoeboid microglia compatible with their activation, increasing their lysosomal compartment and upregulating iNOS expression with a concomitant production of NO. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that immature microglial cells express iNOS during normal development, suggesting a certain degree of activation. Furthermore, LPS treatment induces overactivation of amoeboid

  13. A Common Fold Mediates Vertebrate Defense and Bacterial Attack

    SciTech Connect

    Rosado, Carlos J.; Buckle, Ashley M.; Law, Ruby H.P.; Butcher, Rebecca E.; Kan, Wan-Ting; Bird, Catherina H.; Ung, Kheng; Browne, Kylie A.; Baran, Katherine; Bashtannyk-Puhalovich, Tanya A.; Faux, Noel G.; Wong, Wilson; Porter, Corrine J.; Pike, Robert N.; Ellisdon, Andrew M.; Pearce, Mary C.; Bottomley, Stephen P.; Emsley, Jonas; Smith, A. Ian; Rossjohn, Jamie; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; Voskoboinik, Ilia; Trapani, Joseph A.; Bird, Phillip I.; Dunstone, Michelle A.; Whisstock, James C.

    2008-10-02

    Proteins containing membrane attack complex/perforin (MACPF) domains play important roles in vertebrate immunity, embryonic development, and neural-cell migration. In vertebrates, the ninth component of complement and perforin form oligomeric pores that lyse bacteria and kill virus-infected cells, respectively. However, the mechanism of MACPF function is unknown. We determined the crystal structure of a bacterial MACPF protein, Plu-MACPF from Photorhabdus luminescens, to 2.0 angstrom resolution. The MACPF domain reveals structural similarity with poreforming cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs) from Gram-positive bacteria. This suggests that lytic MACPF proteins may use a CDC-like mechanism to form pores and disrupt cell membranes. Sequence similarity between bacterial and vertebrate MACPF domains suggests that the fold of the CDCs, a family of proteins important for bacterial pathogenesis, is probably used by vertebrates for defense against infection.

  14. Receptors, Mediators, and Mechanisms Involved in Bacterial Sepsis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Van Amersfoort, Edwin S.; Van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Kuiper, Johan

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial sepsis and septic shock result from the overproduction of inflammatory mediators as a consequence of the interaction of the immune system with bacteria and bacterial wall constituents in the body. Bacterial cell wall constituents such as lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycans, and lipoteichoic acid are particularly responsible for the deleterious effects of bacteria. These constituents interact in the body with a large number of proteins and receptors, and this interaction determines the eventual inflammatory effect of the compounds. Within the circulation bacterial constituents interact with proteins such as plasma lipoproteins and lipopolysaccharide binding protein. The interaction of the bacterial constituents with receptors on the surface of mononuclear cells is mainly responsible for the induction of proinflammatory mediators by the bacterial constituents. The role of individual receptors such as the toll-like receptors and CD14 in the induction of proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules is discussed in detail. In addition, the roles of a number of other receptors that bind bacterial compounds such as scavenger receptors and their modulating role in inflammation are described. Finally, the therapies for the treatment of bacterial sepsis and septic shock are discussed in relation to the action of the aforementioned receptors and proteins. PMID:12857774

  15. TAL effector-mediated susceptibility to bacterial blight of cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial blight of cotton (BBC) caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. malvacearum (Xcm) is a destructive disease that has recently re-emerged in the U.S. Xcm injects transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors that directly induce the expression of host susceptibility (S) or resistance (R) genes. ...

  16. A simple and novel modification of comet assay for determination of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Krishna; Sanmukh, Swapnil; Chandekar, Rajshree; Paunikar, Waman

    2014-07-01

    The comet assay is the widely used method for in vitro toxicity testing which is also an alternative to the use of animal models for in vivo testing. Since, its inception in 1984 by Ostling and Johansson, it is being modified frequently for a wide range of application. In spite of its wide applicability, unfortunately there is no report of its application in bacteriophages research. In this study, a novel application of comet assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis was described. The conventional methods in bacteriophage research for studying bacterial lysis by bacteriophages are plaque assay method. It is time consuming, laborious and costly. The lytic activity of bacteriophage devours the bacterial cell which results in the release of bacterial genomic material that gets detected by ethidium bromide staining method by the comet assay protocol. The objective of this study was to compare efficacy of comet assay with different assay used to study phage mediated bacterial lysis. The assay was performed on culture isolates (N=80 studies), modified comet assay appear to have relatively higher sensitivity and specificity than other assay. The results of the study showed that the application of comet assay can be an economical, time saving and less laborious alternative to conventional plaque assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis. PMID:24681053

  17. CRISPR-mediated control of the bacterial initiation of replication.

    PubMed

    Wiktor, Jakub; Lesterlin, Christian; Sherratt, David J; Dekker, Cees

    2016-05-01

    Programmable control of the cell cycle has been shown to be a powerful tool in cell-biology studies. Here, we develop a novel system for controlling the bacterial cell cycle, based on binding of CRISPR/dCas9 to the origin-of-replication locus. Initiation of replication of bacterial chromosomes is accurately regulated by the DnaA protein, which promotes the unwinding of DNA at oriC We demonstrate that the binding of CRISPR/dCas9 to any position within origin or replication blocks the initiation of replication. Serial-dilution plating, single-cell fluorescence microscopy, and flow-cytometry experiments show that ongoing rounds of chromosome replication are finished upon CRISPR/dCas9 binding, but no new rounds are initiated. Upon arrest, cells stay metabolically active and accumulate cell mass. We find that elevating the temperature from 37 to 42°C releases the CRISR/dCas9 replication inhibition, and we use this feature to recover cells from the arrest. Our simple and robust method of controlling the bacterial cell cycle is a useful asset for synthetic biology and DNA-replication studies in particular. The inactivation of CRISPR/dCas9 binding at elevated temperatures may furthermore be of wide interest for CRISPR/Cas9 applications in genomic engineering. PMID:27036863

  18. CRISPR-mediated control of the bacterial initiation of replication

    PubMed Central

    Wiktor, Jakub; Lesterlin, Christian; Sherratt, David J.; Dekker, Cees

    2016-01-01

    Programmable control of the cell cycle has been shown to be a powerful tool in cell-biology studies. Here, we develop a novel system for controlling the bacterial cell cycle, based on binding of CRISPR/dCas9 to the origin-of-replication locus. Initiation of replication of bacterial chromosomes is accurately regulated by the DnaA protein, which promotes the unwinding of DNA at oriC. We demonstrate that the binding of CRISPR/dCas9 to any position within origin or replication blocks the initiation of replication. Serial-dilution plating, single-cell fluorescence microscopy, and flow-cytometry experiments show that ongoing rounds of chromosome replication are finished upon CRISPR/dCas9 binding, but no new rounds are initiated. Upon arrest, cells stay metabolically active and accumulate cell mass. We find that elevating the temperature from 37 to 42°C releases the CRISR/dCas9 replication inhibition, and we use this feature to recover cells from the arrest. Our simple and robust method of controlling the bacterial cell cycle is a useful asset for synthetic biology and DNA-replication studies in particular. The inactivation of CRISPR/dCas9 binding at elevated temperatures may furthermore be of wide interest for CRISPR/Cas9 applications in genomic engineering. PMID:27036863

  19. Bacterial mediation, red matrices diagenesis, Devonian, Montagne Noire (southern France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Préat, Alain; Mamet, Bernard; Bernard, Alain; Gillan, David

    1999-07-01

    Two Devonian red carbonate rock sections are studied in the Montagne Noire, at Coumiac (Frasnian/Famennian) and at the Pic de Vissou (Eifelian/Givetian). The sediments are grey-red mudstones and wackestones rich in pelagic fossils. They are characteristic of an outer ramp. The Coumiac sequence is condensed with numerous hardgrounds and hiatuses. The Pic de Vissou succession is more complete and of shallower origin. In both cases, the origin of the red coloration of the micritic matrix is probably linked to bacterial activity which produced submicronic hematite. Both iron and manganese concentrations are low (average 0.2%). Bacteria form ferruginous microstromatolites, blisters, microtufts, `hedgehogs' filling sponge perforations and thin continuous mineralized films (probably biofilms). Hardgrounds are underlined by ferruginous microstromatolites. The origin of the matrix color is probably related to the destruction of these bacterial constructions, the submicronic hematite ultimately coating the crystal faces of the calcite mosaic. During early lithification, microfissures appeared and were invaded by microbial colonies. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that these colonies are composed of spheroidal beads. This suggests continuity of the bacterial activity during early diagenesis. Later on, these early fissures were cut by burrows. Subsequently a secondary fissure network transected all the previously mentioned sedimentary structures. This late fissure network is characterized by diagenetically remobilized hematite and/or calcite. The latest alterations are stylolites and ultimate tectonic fractures.

  20. Evolution of simple sequence repeat-mediated phase variation in bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, Christopher D; Palmer, Michael E

    2012-09-01

    Mutability as mechanism for rapid adaptation to environmental challenge is an alluringly simple concept whose apotheosis is realized in simple sequence repeats (SSR). Bacterial genomes of several species contain SSRs with a proven role in adaptation to environmental fluctuations. SSRs are hypermutable and generate reversible mutations in localized regions of bacterial genomes, leading to phase variable ON/OFF switches in gene expression. The application of genetic, bioinformatic, and mathematical/computational modeling approaches are revolutionizing our current understanding of how genomic molecular forces and environmental factors influence SSR-mediated adaptation and led to evolution of this mechanism of localized hypermutation in bacterial genomes. PMID:22954215

  1. Redox-stable cyclic peptide inhibitors of the SPSB2-iNOS interaction.

    PubMed

    Yap, Beow Keat; Harjani, Jitendra R; Leung, Eleanor W W; Nicholson, Sandra E; Scanlon, Martin J; Chalmers, David K; Thompson, Philip E; Baell, Jonathan B; Norton, Raymond S

    2016-03-01

    SPSB2 mediates the proteasomal degradation of iNOS. Inhibitors of SPSB2-iNOS interaction are expected to prolong iNOS lifetime and thereby enhance killing of persistent pathogens. Here, we describe the synthesis and characterization of two redox-stable cyclized peptides containing the DINNN motif required for SPSB2 binding. Both analogues bind with low nanomolar affinity to the iNOS binding site on SPSB, as determined by SPR and (19)F NMR, and efficiently displace full-length iNOS from binding to SPSB2 in macrophage cell lysates. These peptides provide a foundation for future development of redox-stable, potent ligands for SPSB proteins as a potential novel class of anti-infectives. PMID:26921848

  2. Surface Proteoglycans as Mediators in Bacterial Pathogens Infections

    PubMed Central

    García, Beatriz; Merayo-Lloves, Jesús; Martin, Carla; Alcalde, Ignacio; Quirós, Luis M.; Vazquez, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diseases remain an important global health problem. The interaction of a wide range of pathogen bacteria with host cells from many different tissues is frequently mediated by proteoglycans. These compounds are ubiquitous complex molecules which are not only involved in adherence and colonization, but can also participate in other steps of pathogenesis. To overcome the problem of microbial resistance to antibiotics new therapeutic agents could be developed based on the characteristics of the interaction of pathogens with proteoglycans. PMID:26941735

  3. Reactive oxygen species-mediated bacterial killing by B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Kovács, István; Horváth, Magdolna; Lányi, Árpád; Petheő, Gábor L; Geiszt, Miklós

    2015-06-01

    Regulated production of ROS is mainly attributed to Nox family enzymes. In neutrophil granulocytes and macrophages, Nox2 has a crucial role in bacterial killing, and the absence of phagocytic ROS production leads to the development of CGD. Expression of Nox2 was also described in B lymphocytes, where the role of the enzyme is still poorly understood. Here, we show that peritoneal B cells, which were shown recently to possess phagocytic activity, have a high capacity to produce ROS in a Nox2-dependent manner. In phagocytosing B cells, intense intraphagosomal ROS production is detected. Finally, by studying 2 animal models of CGD, we demonstrate that phagocyte oxidase-deficient B cells have a reduced capacity to kill bacteria. Our observations extend the number of immune cell types that produce ROS to kill pathogens. PMID:25821233

  4. Influence of Calcium in Extracellular DNA Mediated Bacterial Aggregation and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Koop, Leena; Wong, Yie Kuan; Ahmed, Safia; Siddiqui, Khawar Sohail; Manefield, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) has an important structural role in guaranteeing the integrity of the outer lipopolysaccharide layer and cell walls of bacterial cells. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) being part of the slimy matrix produced by bacteria promotes biofilm formation through enhanced structural integrity of the matrix. Here, the concurrent role of Ca2+ and eDNA in mediating bacterial aggregation and biofilm formation was studied for the first time using a variety of bacterial strains and the thermodynamics of DNA to Ca2+ binding. It was found that the eDNA concentrations under both planktonic and biofilm growth conditions were different among bacterial strains. Whilst Ca2+ had no influence on eDNA release, presence of eDNA by itself favours bacterial aggregation via attractive acid-base interactions in addition, its binding with Ca2+ at biologically relevant concentrations was shown further increase in bacterial aggregation via cationic bridging. Negative Gibbs free energy (ΔG) values in iTC data confirmed that the interaction between DNA and Ca2+ is thermodynamically favourable and that the binding process is spontaneous and exothermic owing to its highly negative enthalpy. Removal of eDNA through DNase I treatment revealed that Ca2+ alone did not enhance cell aggregation and biofilm formation. This discovery signifies the importance of eDNA and concludes that existence of eDNA on bacterial cell surfaces is a key facilitator in binding of Ca2+ to eDNA thereby mediating bacterial aggregation and biofilm formation. PMID:24651318

  5. Bacterially Mediated Breakdown of Cinnabar and Metacinnabar and Environmental Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jew, A. D.; Rogers, S. B.; Rytuba, J.; Spormann, A. M.; Brown, G. E.

    2006-12-01

    Mercury in the forms of cinnabar (α-HgS) and metacinnabar (β-HgS) is considered by the EPA to be unreactive and of little environmental concern because of their relatively low solubilities. To determine if this current belief is valid, a consortium of bacteria (including a Thiomonas intermedia-like bacterium) was taken from the acid mine drainage (AMD) pond at the New Idria Hg Mine, San Benito Co., CA, and inoculated into filter-sterilized AMD pond water containing either ground cinnabar or metacinnabar crystals (<45μm in diameter), with sampling occurring approximately every 3 days. Under aerobic conditions the samples showed a pronounced increase in aqueous Hg concentration over background water concentrations (390(±20)ng/L). Bacteria growing on α-HgS increased the Hg concentration to 297(±10)μg/L, while bacteria growing on β-HgS resulted in levels of 4.6(±0.2)mg/L; both maxima occurred at 18 days incubation. Experiments conducted with (1) α-HgS or β-HgS in the presence of killed bacteria (anaerobic), (2) α-HgS with pond water (abiotic), and (3) β-HgS with pond water (abiotic) showed drops in aqueous Hg to below the detection limit (0.1ng/L) within 12 days. Anaerobic growth of the bacterial consortium showed a pattern similar to those of the water and HgS experiments, except that Hg levels dropped below detection limit within 6 days. These combined results suggest that HgS degradation by this bacterial consortium is an aerobic process. Killed bacteria incubated aerobically showed a slight increase in Hg levels over background water levels (<10x increase) then dropped below detection limit. This observation suggests that enzymes might be involved in the dissolution of HgS and were still viable for ~6 days after sterilization. The New Idria AMD pond consists of an inlet stream and an outlet pipe, separated from each other by ~3m. The Hg concentration in the ferrihydrite-rich sediments at the inlet is 37mg/kg, dry weight, while the concentration at the

  6. Host-induced bacterial cell wall decomposition mediates pattern-triggered immunity in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaokun; Grabherr, Heini M; Willmann, Roland; Kolb, Dagmar; Brunner, Frédéric; Bertsche, Ute; Kühner, Daniel; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Amin, Bushra; Felix, Georg; Ongena, Marc; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Gust, Andrea A

    2014-01-01

    Peptidoglycans (PGNs) are immunogenic bacterial surface patterns that trigger immune activation in metazoans and plants. It is generally unknown how complex bacterial structures such as PGNs are perceived by plant pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and whether host hydrolytic activities facilitate decomposition of bacterial matrices and generation of soluble PRR ligands. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana, upon bacterial infection or exposure to microbial patterns, produces a metazoan lysozyme-like hydrolase (lysozyme 1, LYS1). LYS1 activity releases soluble PGN fragments from insoluble bacterial cell walls and cleavage products are able to trigger responses typically associated with plant immunity. Importantly, LYS1 mutant genotypes exhibit super-susceptibility to bacterial infections similar to that observed on PGN receptor mutants. We propose that plants employ hydrolytic activities for the decomposition of complex bacterial structures, and that soluble pattern generation might aid PRR-mediated immune activation in cell layers adjacent to infection sites. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01990.001 PMID:24957336

  7. Bacterial-mediated DNA delivery to tumour associated phagocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Byrne, W L; Murphy, C T; Cronin, M; Wirth, T; Tangney, M

    2014-12-28

    Phagocytic cells including macrophages, dendritic cells and neutrophils are now recognised as playing a negative role in many disease settings including cancer. In particular, macrophages are known to play a pathophysiological role in multiple diseases and present a valid and ubiquitous therapeutic target. The technology to target these phagocytic cells in situ, both selectively and efficiently, is required in order to translate novel therapeutic modalities into clinical reality. We present a novel delivery strategy using non-pathogenic bacteria to effect gene delivery specifically to tumour-associated phagocytic cells. Non-invasive bacteria lack the ability to actively enter host cells, except for phagocytic cells. We exploit this natural property to effect 'passive transfection' of tumour-associated phagocytic cells following direct administration of transgene-loaded bacteria to tumour regions. Using an in vitro-differentiated human monocyte cell line and two in vivo mouse models (an ovarian cancer ascites and a solid colon tumour model) proof of delivery is demonstrated with bacteria carrying reporter constructs. The results confirm that the delivery strategy is specific for phagocytic cells and that the bacterial vector itself recruits more phagocytic cells to the tumour. While proof of delivery to phagocytic cells is demonstrated in vivo for solid and ascites tumour models, this strategy may be applied to other settings, including non-cancer related disease. PMID:25466954

  8. Impact of flow on ligand-mediated bacterial flocculation

    PubMed Central

    Sircar, Sarthok; Bortz, David M.

    2013-01-01

    To understand the adhesion-fragmentation dynamics of bacterial aggregates (i.e., flocs), we model the aggregates as two ligand-covered rigid spheres. We develop and investigate a model for the attachment/detachment dynamics in a fluid subject to a homogeneous planar shear-flow. The binding ligands on the surface of the flocs experience attractive and repulsive surface forces in an ionic medium and exhibit finite resistance to rotation (via bond tilting). For certain range of material and fluid parameters, our results predict a nonlinear or hysteretic relationship between the binding/unbinding of the floc surface and the net floc velocity (translational plus rotational velocity). We show that the surface adhesion is promoted by increased fluid flow until a critical value, beyond which the bonds starts to yield. Moreover, adhesion is not promoted in a medium with low ionic strength, or flocs with bigger size or higher binder stiffness. The numerical simulations of floc-aggregate number density studies support these findings. PMID:23917245

  9. Interleukin-10 Gene Therapy-Mediated Amelioration of Bacterial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Daniel F.; Foss, Dennis L.; Murtaugh, Michael P.

    2000-01-01

    Respiratory infection by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae causes a highly pathogenic necrotizing pleuropneumonia with severe edema, hemorrhage and fever. Acute infection is characterized by expression of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6 and IL-8. To determine if high level production of inflammatory cytokines contributed to disease pathogenesis, we investigated if inhibiting macrophage activation with adenovirus type 5-expressed IL-10 (Ad-5/IL-10) reduced the severity of acute disease. Porcine tracheal epithelial cells infected with Ad-5/IL-10 produced bioactive human IL-10. When pigs were intratracheally infected with A. pleuropneumoniae, pigs pretreated with Ad-5/IL-10 showed a significant reduction in the amount of lung damage when compared to adenovirus type 5-expressing β-galactosidase (Ad-5/β-Gal)-treated and untreated pigs. In addition, serum zinc levels were unchanged, the lung weight/body weight ratio (an indicator of vascular leakage) was significantly reduced, and lung pathology scores were reduced. Myeloperoxidase activity in lung lavage fluid samples, an indicator of neutrophil invasion, was decreased to levels similar to that seen in pigs not infected with A. pleuropneumoniae. Reduction in inflammatory cytokine levels in lung lavage fluid samples correlated with the clinical observations in that pigs pretreated with Ad-5/IL-10 showed a corresponding reduction of IL-1 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) compared with untreated and Ad-5/β-Gal-treated pigs. IL-6 levels were unaffected by pretreatment with Ad-5/IL-10, consistent with observations that IL-6 was not derived from alveolar macrophages. Since inflammatory cytokines are expressed at high levels in acute bacterial pleuropneumonia, these results indicate that macrophage activation, involving overproduction of IL-1 and TNF, is a prime factor in infection-related cases of massive lung injury. PMID:10899882

  10. Hydrogen Peroxide- and Nitric Oxide-mediated Disease Control of Bacterial Wilt in Tomato Plants

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jeum Kyu; Kang, Su Ran; Kim, Yeon Hwa; Yoon, Dong June; Kim, Do Hoon; Kim, Hyeon Ji; Sung, Chang Hyun; Kang, Han Sol; Choi, Chang Won; Kim, Seong Hwan; Kim, Young Shik

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in tomato plants by Ralstonia solanacearum infection and the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide in tomato bacterial wilt control were demonstrated. During disease development of tomato bacterial wilt, accumulation of superoxide anion (O2−) and H2O2 was observed and lipid peroxidation also occurred in the tomato leaf tissues. High doses of H2O2and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) nitric oxide donor showed phytotoxicity to detached tomato leaves 1 day after petiole feeding showing reduced fresh weight. Both H2O2and SNP have in vitro antibacterial activities against R. solanacearum in a dose-dependent manner, as well as plant protection in detached tomato leaves against bacterial wilt by 106 and 107 cfu/ml of R. solanacearum. H2O2- and SNP-mediated protection was also evaluated in pots using soil-drench treatment with the bacterial inoculation, and relative ‘area under the disease progressive curve (AUDPC)’ was calculated to compare disease protection by H2O2 and/or SNP with untreated control. Neither H2O2 nor SNP protect the tomato seedlings from the bacterial wilt, but H2O2+ SNP mixture significantly decreased disease severity with reduced relative AUDPC. These results suggest that H2O2 and SNP could be used together to control bacterial wilt in tomato plants as bactericidal agents. PMID:25288967

  11. TRPA1 channels mediate acute neurogenic inflammation and pain produced by bacterial endotoxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meseguer, Victor; Alpizar, Yeranddy A.; Luis, Enoch; Tajada, Sendoa; Denlinger, Bristol; Fajardo, Otto; Manenschijn, Jan-Albert; Fernández-Peña, Carlos; Talavera, Arturo; Kichko, Tatiana; Navia, Belén; Sánchez, Alicia; Señarís, Rosa; Reeh, Peter; Pérez-García, María Teresa; López-López, José Ramón; Voets, Thomas; Belmonte, Carlos; Talavera, Karel; Viana, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial infections are accompanied by inflammation and somatic or visceral pain. These symptoms are generally attributed to sensitization of nociceptors by inflammatory mediators released by immune cells. Nociceptor sensitization during inflammation occurs through activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signalling pathway by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a toxic by-product of bacterial lysis. Here we show that LPS exerts fast, membrane delimited, excitatory actions via TRPA1, a transient receptor potential cation channel that is critical for transducing environmental irritant stimuli into nociceptor activity. Moreover, we find that pain and acute vascular reactions, including neurogenic inflammation (CGRP release) caused by LPS are primarily dependent on TRPA1 channel activation in nociceptive sensory neurons, and develop independently of TLR4 activation. The identification of TRPA1 as a molecular determinant of direct LPS effects on nociceptors offers new insights into the pathogenesis of pain and neurovascular responses during bacterial infections and opens novel avenues for their treatment.

  12. Hyperglycemia induces iNOS gene expression and consequent nitrosative stress via JNK activation

    PubMed Central

    YANG, Peixin; CAO, Yuanning; LI, Hua

    2010-01-01

    Objective Maternal diabetes adversely impacts embryonic development. We test the hypothesis that hyperglycemia-induced JNK1/2 activation mediates iNOS induction. Study Design Levels of iNOS mRNA and nitrosylated protein were determined in cultured C57BL/6J conceptuses exposed to hyperglycemia (300 mg/dl glucose) and C57BL/6J embryos exposed to streptozotocin-induced diabetes. iNOS-luciferase activity and endogenous reactive nitrogen species were determined in transfected PYS-2 (mouse teratocarcinoma) cells exposed to hyperglycemia (450 mg/dl glucose). Results Hyperglycemia increased iNOS mRNA and SP600125, a potent JNK1/2 inhibitor, abolished this effect. Hyperglycemia increased iNOS-luciferase activities and SP600125 blocked this effect. Diabetes increased iNOS mRNA and jnk2 gene deletion abrogated this effect. Correlated with iNOS gene induction, both hyperglycemia in vitro and diabetes in vivo enhanced the production of reactive nitrogen species and increased protein nitrosylation. jnk2 gene deletion blocked diabetes-induced protein nitrosylation. Conclusion JNK1/2 activation mediates hyperglycemia-induced iNOS gene expression and consequent nitrosative stress in diabetic embryopathy. PMID:20541731

  13. Advantages of mixing bioinformatics and visualization approaches for analyzing sRNA-mediated regulatory bacterial networks

    PubMed Central

    Bourqui, Romain; Benchimol, William; Gaspin, Christine; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Uricaru, Raluca; Dutour, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The revolution in high-throughput sequencing technologies has enabled the acquisition of gigabytes of RNA sequences in many different conditions and has highlighted an unexpected number of small RNAs (sRNAs) in bacteria. Ongoing exploitation of these data enables numerous applications for investigating bacterial transacting sRNA-mediated regulation networks. Focusing on sRNAs that regulate mRNA translation in trans, recent works have noted several sRNA-based regulatory pathways that are essential for key cellular processes. Although the number of known bacterial sRNAs is increasing, the experimental validation of their interactions with mRNA targets remains challenging and involves expensive and time-consuming experimental strategies. Hence, bioinformatics is crucial for selecting and prioritizing candidates before designing any experimental work. However, current software for target prediction produces a prohibitive number of candidates because of the lack of biological knowledge regarding the rules governing sRNA–mRNA interactions. Therefore, there is a real need to develop new approaches to help biologists focus on the most promising predicted sRNA–mRNA interactions. In this perspective, this review aims at presenting the advantages of mixing bioinformatics and visualization approaches for analyzing predicted sRNA-mediated regulatory bacterial networks. PMID:25477348

  14. Inositol Mutants of SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE: Mapping the ino1 Locus and Characterizing Alleles of the ino1, ino2 and ino4 Loci

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, Thomas F.; Henry, Susan A.

    1981-01-01

    An extensive genetic analysis of inositol auxotrophic mutants of yeast is reported. The analysis includes newly isolated mutants, as well as those previously reported (Culbertson and Henry 1975). Approximately 70% of all inositol auxotrophs isolated are shown to be alleles of the ino1 locus, the structural gene for inositol-1-phosphate synthase, the major enzyme involved in inositol biosynthesis. Alleles of two other loci, ino2 and ino4, comprise 9% of total mutants, with the remainder representing unique loci or complementation groups. The ino1 locus was mapped by trisomic analysis with an n + 1 disomic strain constructed with complementing alleles at this locus. The ino1 locus is shown to be located between ura2 (11.1 cm) and cdc6 (21.8 cm) on chromosome X. An extended map of chromosome X of yeast is presented. Unlike most yeast loci, but similar to the his1 locus, the ino1 locus lacks allelic representatives that are suppressible by known suppressors. This finding suggests that premature termination of translation of the ino1 gene product may be incompatible with cell viability. PMID:17249096

  15. Flexible and monolithic zinc oxide bionanocomposite foams by a bacterial cellulose mediated approach for antibacterial applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peipei; Zhao, Jun; Xuan, Ruifei; Wang, Yun; Zou, Chen; Zhang, Zhiquan; Wan, Yizao; Xu, Yan

    2014-05-14

    The use of self-assembled biomacromolecules in the development of functional bionanocomposite foams is one of the best lessons learned from nature. Here, we show that monolithic, flexible and porous zinc oxide bionanocomposite foams with a hierarchical architecture can be assembled through the mediation of bacterial cellulose. The assembly is achieved by controlled hydrolysis and solvothermal crystallization using a bacterial cellulose aerogel as a template in a non-aqueous polar medium. The bionanocomposite foam with a maximum zinc oxide loading of 70 wt% is constructed of intimately packed spheres of aggregated zinc oxide nanocrystals exhibiting a BET surface area of 92 m(2) g(-1). The zinc oxide bionanocomposite foams show excellent antibacterial activity, which give them potential value as self-supporting wound dressing and water sterilization materials. PMID:24647467

  16. Internalin must be on the bacterial surface to mediate entry of Listeria monocytogenes into epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, M; Mengaud, J; Ohayon, H; Nato, F; Cossart, P

    1996-08-01

    Entry of Listeria monocytogenes into cultured epithelial cells requires production of internalin, a protein with features characteristic of some Gram-positive bacterial surface proteins, in particular an LPXTG motif preceding a hydrophobic sequence and a few basic residues at its C-terminal end. By immunofluorescence and immunogold labelling, we show that in wild-type L. monocytogenes, internalin is present on the cell surface and has a polarized distribution similar to that of ActA, another surface protein of L. monocytogenes involved in actin assembly. Through a genetic analysis, we establish that the C-terminal region of internalin is necessary for cell-surface association, and that although internalin is partially released in the culture medium, its location on the bacterial surface is required to promote entry. Finally, using a 'domain-swapping' strategy-replacement of the cell wall anchor of IniA by the membrane anchor of ActA- we show that the reduced ability to adhere and enter cells of strains expressing IniA-ActA correlates with a lower amount of surface-exposed internalin. Taken together, these results suggest that internalin exposed on the bacterial surface mediates direct contact between the bacterium and the host cell. PMID:8866480

  17. A common clathrin-mediated machinery coordinates cell-cell adhesion and bacterial internalization

    PubMed Central

    Bonazzi, Matteo; Kühbacher, Andreas; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Mallet, Adeline; Vasudevan, Lavanya; Pizarro-Cerdá, Javier; Brodsky, Frances M.; Cossart, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    Invasive bacterial pathogens often target cellular proteins involved in adhesion as a first event during infection. For example, Listeria monocytogenes uses the bacterial protein InlA to interact with E-cadherin, hijack the host adherens junction machinery, and invade non-phagocytic cells by a clathrin-dependent mechanism. Here we investigate a potential role for clathrin in cell-cell adhesion. We observed that the initial steps of adherens junction formation trigger the phosphorylation of clathrin, and its transient localization at forming cell-cell contacts. Furthermore, we show that clathrin serves as a hub for the recruitment of proteins that are necessary for the actin rearrangements that accompany the maturation of adherens junctions. Using an InlA/E-cadherin chimera, we show that adherent cells expressing the chimera form adherens junctions with cells expressing E-cadherin. To model bacterial invasion, we demonstrate that non-adherent cells expressing the InlA chimera can be internalized by E-cadherin-expressing adherent cells. Together these results reveal that a common clathrin-mediated machinery may regulate internalization and cell adhesion and that the relative mobility of one of the interacting partners plays an important role in the commitment to either one of these processes. PMID:22984946

  18. Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles Mediate Cytosolic Localization of LPS and Caspase-11 Activation.

    PubMed

    Vanaja, Sivapriya Kailasan; Russo, Ashley J; Behl, Bharat; Banerjee, Ishita; Yankova, Maya; Deshmukh, Sachin D; Rathinam, Vijay A K

    2016-05-19

    Sensing of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the cytosol triggers caspase-11 activation and is central to host defense against Gram-negative bacterial infections and to the pathogenesis of sepsis. Most Gram-negative bacteria that activate caspase-11, however, are not cytosolic, and the mechanism by which LPS from these bacteria gains access to caspase-11 in the cytosol remains elusive. Here, we identify outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) produced by Gram-negative bacteria as a vehicle that delivers LPS into the cytosol triggering caspase-11-dependent effector responses in vitro and in vivo. OMVs are internalized via endocytosis, and LPS is released into the cytosol from early endosomes. The use of hypovesiculating bacterial mutants, compromised in their ability to generate OMVs, reveals the importance of OMVs in mediating the cytosolic localization of LPS. Collectively, these findings demonstrate a critical role for OMVs in enabling the cytosolic entry of LPS and, consequently, caspase-11 activation during Gram-negative bacterial infections. PMID:27156449

  19. Phytoplankton-bacterial interactions mediate micronutrient colimitation at the coastal Antarctic sea ice edge.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Erin M; McCrow, John P; Moustafa, Ahmed; Zheng, Hong; McQuaid, Jeffrey B; Delmont, Tom O; Post, Anton F; Sipler, Rachel E; Spackeen, Jenna L; Xu, Kai; Bronk, Deborah A; Hutchins, David A; Allen, Andrew E

    2015-08-11

    Southern Ocean primary productivity plays a key role in global ocean biogeochemistry and climate. At the Southern Ocean sea ice edge in coastal McMurdo Sound, we observed simultaneous cobalamin and iron limitation of surface water phytoplankton communities in late Austral summer. Cobalamin is produced only by bacteria and archaea, suggesting phytoplankton-bacterial interactions must play a role in this limitation. To characterize these interactions and investigate the molecular basis of multiple nutrient limitation, we examined transitions in global gene expression over short time scales, induced by shifts in micronutrient availability. Diatoms, the dominant primary producers, exhibited transcriptional patterns indicative of co-occurring iron and cobalamin deprivation. The major contributor to cobalamin biosynthesis gene expression was a gammaproteobacterial population, Oceanospirillaceae ASP10-02a. This group also contributed significantly to metagenomic cobalamin biosynthesis gene abundance throughout Southern Ocean surface waters. Oceanospirillaceae ASP10-02a displayed elevated expression of organic matter acquisition and cell surface attachment-related genes, consistent with a mutualistic relationship in which they are dependent on phytoplankton growth to fuel cobalamin production. Separate bacterial groups, including Methylophaga, appeared to rely on phytoplankton for carbon and energy sources, but displayed gene expression patterns consistent with iron and cobalamin deprivation. This suggests they also compete with phytoplankton and are important cobalamin consumers. Expression patterns of siderophore- related genes offer evidence for bacterial influences on iron availability as well. The nature and degree of this episodic colimitation appear to be mediated by a series of phytoplankton-bacterial interactions in both positive and negative feedback loops. PMID:26221022

  20. Phytoplankton–bacterial interactions mediate micronutrient colimitation at the coastal Antarctic sea ice edge

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Erin M.; McCrow, John P.; Moustafa, Ahmed; Zheng, Hong; McQuaid, Jeffrey B.; Delmont, Tom O.; Post, Anton F.; Sipler, Rachel E.; Spackeen, Jenna L.; Xu, Kai; Bronk, Deborah A.; Hutchins, David A.; Allen, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    Southern Ocean primary productivity plays a key role in global ocean biogeochemistry and climate. At the Southern Ocean sea ice edge in coastal McMurdo Sound, we observed simultaneous cobalamin and iron limitation of surface water phytoplankton communities in late Austral summer. Cobalamin is produced only by bacteria and archaea, suggesting phytoplankton–bacterial interactions must play a role in this limitation. To characterize these interactions and investigate the molecular basis of multiple nutrient limitation, we examined transitions in global gene expression over short time scales, induced by shifts in micronutrient availability. Diatoms, the dominant primary producers, exhibited transcriptional patterns indicative of co-occurring iron and cobalamin deprivation. The major contributor to cobalamin biosynthesis gene expression was a gammaproteobacterial population, Oceanospirillaceae ASP10-02a. This group also contributed significantly to metagenomic cobalamin biosynthesis gene abundance throughout Southern Ocean surface waters. Oceanospirillaceae ASP10-02a displayed elevated expression of organic matter acquisition and cell surface attachment-related genes, consistent with a mutualistic relationship in which they are dependent on phytoplankton growth to fuel cobalamin production. Separate bacterial groups, including Methylophaga, appeared to rely on phytoplankton for carbon and energy sources, but displayed gene expression patterns consistent with iron and cobalamin deprivation. This suggests they also compete with phytoplankton and are important cobalamin consumers. Expression patterns of siderophore- related genes offer evidence for bacterial influences on iron availability as well. The nature and degree of this episodic colimitation appear to be mediated by a series of phytoplankton–bacterial interactions in both positive and negative feedback loops. PMID:26221022

  1. Atorvastatin along with imipenem attenuates acute lung injury in sepsis through decrease in inflammatory mediators and bacterial load.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Soumen; Kandasamy, Kannan; Maruti, Bhojane Somnath; Addison, M Pule; Kasa, Jaya Kiran; Darzi, Sazad A; Singh, Thakur Uttam; Parida, Subhashree; Dash, Jeevan Ranjan; Singh, Vishakha; Mishra, Santosh Kumar

    2015-10-15

    Lung is one of the vital organs which is affected during the sequential development of multi-organ dysfunction in sepsis. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether combined treatment with atorvastatin and imipenem could attenuate sepsis-induced lung injury in mice. Sepsis was induced by caecal ligation and puncture. Lung injury was assessed by the presence of lung edema, increased vascular permeability, increased inflammatory cell infiltration and cytokine levels in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Treatment with atorvastatin along with imipenem reduced the lung bacterial load and pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and TNFα) level in BALF. The markers of pulmonary edema such as microvascular leakage and wet-dry weight ratio were also attenuated. This was further confirmed by the reduced activity of MPO and ICAM-1 mRNA expression, indicating the lesser infiltration and adhesion of inflammatory cells to the lungs. Again, expression of mRNA and protein level of iNOS in lungs was also reduced in the combined treatment group. Based on the above findings it can be concluded that, combined treatment with atorvastatin and imipenem dampened the inflammatory response and reduced the bacterial load, thus seems to have promising therapeutic potential in sepsis-induced lung injury in mice. PMID:26375251

  2. Post-transcriptional regulation of the human inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression by the cytosolic poly(A)-binding protein (PABP).

    PubMed

    Casper, Ingrid; Nowag, Sebastian; Koch, Kathrin; Hubrich, Thomas; Bollmann, Franziska; Henke, Jenny; Schmitz, Katja; Kleinert, Hartmut; Pautz, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    Affinity purification using the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of the human inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA identified the cytosolic poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) as a protein interacting with the human iNOS 3'-UTR. Downregulation of PABP expression by RNA interference resulted in a marked reduction of cytokine-induced iNOS mRNA expression without changes in the expression of mRNAs coding for the major subunit of the RNA polymerase II (Pol 2A) or β2-microglobuline (β2M). Along with the mRNA also iNOS protein expression was reduced by siPABP-treatment, whereas in the same cells protein expression of STAT-1α, NF-κB p65, or GAPDH was not altered. Reporter gene analyses showed no change of the inducibility of the human 16kb iNOS promoter in siPABP cells. In contrast, the siPABP-mediated decline of iNOS expression correlated with a reduction in the stability of the iNOS mRNA. As the stability of the Pol 2A and β2M mRNA was not changed, siPABP-treatment seems to have a specific effect on iNOS mRNA decay. UV-crosslinking experiments revealed that PABP interacts with one binding site in the 5'-UTR and two different binding sites in the 3'-UTR of the human iNOS mRNA. Mutation or deletion of the binding site in the 5'-UTR but not in the 3'-UTR reduced luciferase expression in DLD-1 cells transfected with iNOS-5'-UTR or iNOS-3'-UTR luciferase reporter constructs. In summary, our data demonstrate that PABP by binding to specific sequence elements in the 5'-UTR post-transcriptionally enhances human iNOS mRNA stability and thereby iNOS expression. PMID:23711718

  3. Exposure to Diesel Exhaust Up-regulates iNOS Expression in ApoE Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Ni; Kido, Takashi; Kavanagh, Terrance J.; Kaufman, Joel D.; Rosenfeld, Michael E.; van Breemen, Cornelis; van Eeden, Stephan F.

    2012-01-01

    Traffic related particulate matter air pollution is a risk factor for cardiovascular events; however, the biological mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesize that diesel exhaust (DE) inhalation induces up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which is known to contribute to vascular dysfunction, progression of atherosclerosis and ultimately cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Methods ApoE knockout mice (30-week) were exposed to DE (at 200µg/m3 of particulate matter) or filtered-air (control) for 7 weeks (6h/day, 5days/week). iNOS expression in the blood vessels and heart was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blotting analysis. To examine iNOS activity, thoracic aortae were mounted in a wire myograph, and vasoconstriction stimulated by phenylephrine (PE) was measured with and without the presence of the specific inhibitor for iNOS (1400W). NF-κB (p65) activity was examined by ELISA. The mRNA expression of iNOS and NF-κB (p65) was determined by real-time PCR. Results DE exposure significantly enhanced iNOS expression in the thoracic aorta (4-fold) and heart (1.5 fold). DE exposure significantly attenuated PE-stimulated vasoconstriction by ~20%, which was partly reversed by 1400W. The mRNA expression of iNOS and NF-κB was significantly augmented after DE exposure. NF-κB activity was enhanced 2-fold after DE inhalation, and the augmented NF-κB activity was positively correlated with iNOS expression (R2= 0.5998). Conclusions We show that exposure to DE increases iNOS expression and activity possibly via NF-κB-mediated pathway. We suspect that DE exposure-caused up-regulation of iNOS contributes to vascular dysfunction and atherogenesis, which could ultimately lead to urban air pollution-associated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:21722660

  4. Exposure to diesel exhaust up-regulates iNOS expression in ApoE knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Ni; Kido, Takashi; Kavanagh, Terrance J.; Kaufman, Joel D.; Rosenfeld, Michael E.; Breemen, Cornelis van; Eeden, Stephan F. van

    2011-09-01

    Traffic related particulate matter air pollution is a risk factor for cardiovascular events; however, the biological mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesize that diesel exhaust (DE) inhalation induces up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which is known to contribute to vascular dysfunction, progression of atherosclerosis and ultimately cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Methods: ApoE knockout mice (30-week) were exposed to DE (at 200 {mu}g/m{sup 3} of particulate matter) or filtered-air (control) for 7 weeks (6 h/day, 5 days/week). iNOS expression in the blood vessels and heart was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blotting analysis. To examine iNOS activity, thoracic aortae were mounted in a wire myograph, and vasoconstriction stimulated by phenylephrine (PE) was measured with and without the presence of the specific inhibitor for iNOS (1400 W). NF-{kappa}B (p65) activity was examined by ELISA. The mRNA expression of iNOS and NF-{kappa}B (p65) was determined by real-time PCR. Results: DE exposure significantly enhanced iNOS expression in the thoracic aorta (4-fold) and heart (1.5 fold). DE exposure significantly attenuated PE-stimulated vasoconstriction by {approx} 20%, which was partly reversed by 1400 W. The mRNA expression of iNOS and NF-{kappa}B was significantly augmented after DE exposure. NF-{kappa}B activity was enhanced 2-fold after DE inhalation, and the augmented NF-{kappa}B activity was positively correlated with iNOS expression (R{sup 2} = 0.5998). Conclusions: We show that exposure to DE increases iNOS expression and activity possibly via NF-{kappa}B-mediated pathway. We suspect that DE exposure-caused up-regulation of iNOS contributes to vascular dysfunction and atherogenesis, which could ultimately lead to urban air pollution-associated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. - Highlights: > Exposed ApoE knockout mice (30-week) to diesel exhaust (DE) for 7 weeks. > Examine iNOS expression and activity in the

  5. A pathogenic bacterium triggers epithelial signals to form a functional bacterial receptor that mediates actin pseudopod formation.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenshine, I; Ruschkowski, S; Stein, M; Reinscheid, D J; Mills, S D; Finlay, B B

    1996-01-01

    Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) belongs to a group of bacterial pathogens that induce actin accumulation beneath adherent bacteria. We found that EPEC adherence to epithelial cells mediates the formation of fingerlike pseudopods (up to 10 microm) beneath bacteria. These actin-rich structures also contain tyrosine phosphorylated host proteins concentrated at the pseudopod tip beneath adherent EPEC. Intimate bacterial adherence (and pseudopod formation) occurred only after prior bacterial induction of tyrosine phosphorylation of an epithelial membrane protein, Hp90, which then associates directly with an EPEC adhesin, intimin. These interactions lead to cytoskeletal nucleation and pseudopod formation. This is the first example of a bacterial pathogen that triggers signals in epithelial cells which activates receptor binding activity to a specific bacterial ligand and subsequent cytoskeletal rearrangement. Images PMID:8654358

  6. Hyperglycemia Impairs Neutrophil-Mediated Bacterial Clearance in Mice Infected with the Lyme Disease Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Javid, Ashkan; Zlotnikov, Nataliya; Pětrošová, Helena; Tang, Tian Tian; Zhang, Yang; Bansal, Anil K.; Ebady, Rhodaba; Parikh, Maitry; Ahmed, Mijhgan; Sun, Chunxiang; Newbigging, Susan; Kim, Yae Ram; Santana Sosa, Marianna; Glogauer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-insufficient type 1 diabetes is associated with attenuated bactericidal function of neutrophils, which are key mediators of innate immune responses to microbes as well as pathological inflammatory processes. Neutrophils are central to immune responses to the Lyme pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi. The effect of hyperglycemia on host susceptibility to and outcomes of B. burgdorferi infection has not been examined. The present study investigated the impact of sustained obesity-independent hyperglycemia in mice on bacterial clearance, inflammatory pathology and neutrophil responses to B. burgdorferi. Hyperglycemia was associated with reduced arthritis incidence but more widespread tissue colonization and reduced clearance of bacterial DNA in multiple tissues including brain, heart, liver, lung and knee joint. B. burgdorferi uptake and killing were impaired in neutrophils isolated from hyperglycemic mice. Thus, attenuated neutrophil function in insulin-insufficient hyperglycemia was associated with reduced B. burgdorferi clearance in target organs. These data suggest that investigating the effects of comorbid conditions such as diabetes on outcomes of B. burgdorferi infections in humans may be warranted. PMID:27340827

  7. TIR Domain-Containing Adapter-Inducing Beta Interferon (TRIF) Mediates Immunological Memory against Bacterial Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kanagavelu, Saravana; Flores, Claudia; Termini, J M; Romero, Laura; Riveron, Reldy; Ruiz, Jose; Arditi, Moshe; Schesser, Kurt; Fukata, Masayuki

    2015-11-01

    Induction of adaptive immunity leads to the establishment of immunological memory; however, how innate immunity regulates memory T cell function remains obscure. Here we show a previously undefined mechanism in which innate and adaptive immunity are linked by TIR domain-containing adapter-inducing beta interferon (TRIF) during establishment and reactivation of memory T cells against Gram-negative enteropathogens. Absence of TRIF in macrophages (Mϕs) but not dendritic cells led to a predominant generation of CD4(+) central memory T cells that express IL-17 during enteric bacterial infection in mice. TRIF-dependent type I interferon (IFN) signaling in T cells was essential to Th1 lineage differentiation and reactivation of memory T cells. TRIF activated memory T cells to facilitate local neutrophil influx and enhance bacterial elimination. These results highlight the importance of TRIF as a mediator of the innate and adaptive immune interactions in achieving the protective properties of memory immunity against Gram-negative bacteria and suggest TRIF as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26351279

  8. Hyperglycemia Impairs Neutrophil-Mediated Bacterial Clearance in Mice Infected with the Lyme Disease Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Javid, Ashkan; Zlotnikov, Nataliya; Pětrošová, Helena; Tang, Tian Tian; Zhang, Yang; Bansal, Anil K; Ebady, Rhodaba; Parikh, Maitry; Ahmed, Mijhgan; Sun, Chunxiang; Newbigging, Susan; Kim, Yae Ram; Santana Sosa, Marianna; Glogauer, Michael; Moriarty, Tara J

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-insufficient type 1 diabetes is associated with attenuated bactericidal function of neutrophils, which are key mediators of innate immune responses to microbes as well as pathological inflammatory processes. Neutrophils are central to immune responses to the Lyme pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi. The effect of hyperglycemia on host susceptibility to and outcomes of B. burgdorferi infection has not been examined. The present study investigated the impact of sustained obesity-independent hyperglycemia in mice on bacterial clearance, inflammatory pathology and neutrophil responses to B. burgdorferi. Hyperglycemia was associated with reduced arthritis incidence but more widespread tissue colonization and reduced clearance of bacterial DNA in multiple tissues including brain, heart, liver, lung and knee joint. B. burgdorferi uptake and killing were impaired in neutrophils isolated from hyperglycemic mice. Thus, attenuated neutrophil function in insulin-insufficient hyperglycemia was associated with reduced B. burgdorferi clearance in target organs. These data suggest that investigating the effects of comorbid conditions such as diabetes on outcomes of B. burgdorferi infections in humans may be warranted. PMID:27340827

  9. Gustatory-mediated avoidance of bacterial lipopolysaccharides via TRPA1 activation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Soldano, Alessia; Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Boonen, Brett; Franco, Luis; López-Requena, Alejandro; Liu, Guangda; Mora, Natalia; Yaksi, Emre; Voets, Thomas; Vennekens, Rudi; Hassan, Bassem A; Talavera, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Detecting pathogens and mounting immune responses upon infection is crucial for animal health. However, these responses come at a high metabolic price (McKean and Lazzaro, 2011, Kominsky et al., 2010), and avoiding pathogens before infection may be advantageous. The bacterial endotoxins lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are important immune system infection cues (Abbas et al., 2014), but it remains unknown whether animals possess sensory mechanisms to detect them prior to infection. Here we show that Drosophila melanogaster display strong aversive responses to LPS and that gustatory neurons expressing Gr66a bitter receptors mediate avoidance of LPS in feeding and egg laying assays. We found the expression of the chemosensory cation channel dTRPA1 in these cells to be necessary and sufficient for LPS avoidance. Furthermore, LPS stimulates Drosophila neurons in a TRPA1-dependent manner and activates exogenous dTRPA1 channels in human cells. Our findings demonstrate that flies detect bacterial endotoxins via a gustatory pathway through TRPA1 activation as conserved molecular mechanism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13133.001 PMID:27296646

  10. Interparticle interactions mediated superspin glass to superferromagnetic transition in Ni-bacterial cellulose aerogel nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiruvengadam, V.; Vitta, Satish

    2016-06-01

    The interparticle interactions in the magnetic nanocomposites play a dominant role in controlling phase transitions: superparamagnetic to superspin glass and to superferromagnetic. These interactions can be tuned by controlling the size and number density of nanoparticles. The aerogel composites, 0.3Ni-BC and 0.7Ni-BC, consisting of Ni nanoparticles distributed in the bacterial cellulose have been used as a model system to study these interactions. Contrary to conventional approach, size of Ni-nanoparticles is not controlled and allowed to form naturally in bacterial cellulose template. The uncontrolled growth of Ni results in the formation of nanoparticles with 3 different size distributions - <10 nm particles along the length of fibrils, 50 nm particles in the intermediate spaces between the fibrils, and >100 nm particles in voids formed by reticulate structure. At room temperature, the composites exhibit a weakly ferromagnetic behaviour with a coercivity of 40 Oe, which increases to 160 Oe at 10 K. The transition from weakly ferromagnetic state to superferromagnetic state at low temperatures is mediated by the superspin glass state at intermediate temperatures via the interparticle interactions aided by nanoparticles present along the length of fibres. A temperature dependent microstructural model has been developed to understand the magnetic behaviour of nanocomposite aerogels.

  11. Acacia ferruginea inhibits tumor progression by regulating inflammatory mediators-(TNF-a, iNOS, COX-2, IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ, IL-2, GM-CSF) and pro-angiogenic growth factor- VEGF.

    PubMed

    Sakthivel, Kunnathur Murugesan; Guruvayoorappan, Chandrasekaran

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the effect of A ferruginea extract on Dalton's lymphoma ascites (DLA) induced tumours in BALB/c mice. Experimental animals received A ferruginea extract (10 mg/ kg.b.wt) intraperitoneally for 14 consecutive days after DLA tumor challenge. Treatment with extract significantly increased the life span, total white blood cell (WBC) count and haemoglobin (Hb) content and decreased the level of serum aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma glutamyl transferase (γ-GT) and nitric oxide (NO) in DLA bearing ascites tumor models. In addition, administration of extract significantly decreased the tumour volume and body weight in a DLA bearing solid tumor model. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and granulocyte monocyte-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), as well as pro-angiogenic growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were elevated in solid tumour controls, but significantly reduced by A ferruginea administration. On the other hand, the extract stimulated the production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) in animals with DLA induced solid tumours. Increase in CD4+ T-cell population suggested strong immunostimulant activity for this extract. GC/MS and LC/MS analysis showed quinone, quinoline, imidazolidine, pyrrolidine, cyclopentenone, thiazole, pyrazole, catechin and coumarin derivatives as major compounds present in the A ferruginea methanolic extract. Thus, the outcome of the present study suggests that A ferruginea extract has immunomodulatory and tumor inhibitory activities and has the potential to be developed as a natural anticancer agent. PMID:23886206

  12. Gene therapy with iNOS provides long-term protection against myocardial infarction without adverse functional consequences

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qianhong; Guo, Yiru; Tan, Wei; Stein, Adam B.; Dawn, Buddhadeb; Wu, Wen-Jian; Zhu, Xiaoping; Lu, Xiaoqin; Xu, Xiaoming; Siddiqui, Tariq; Tiwari, Sumit; Bolli, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that gene therapy with inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protects against myocardial infarction at 3 days after gene transfer. However, the long-term effects of iNOS gene therapy on myocardial ischemic injury and cardiac function are unknown. To address this issue, we used a recombinant adenovirus 5 (Ad5) vector (Av3) with deletions of the E1, E2a, and E3 regions, which enables long-lasting recombinant gene expression for at least 2 mo due to lack of inflammation. Mice received intramyocardial injections in the left ventricular (LV) anterior wall of Av3/LacZ (LacZ group) or Av3/iNOS (iNOS group); 1 or 2 mo later, they were subjected to myocardial infarction (30-min coronary occlusion followed by 4 h of reperfusion). Cardiac iNOS gene expression was confirmed by immunoblotting and activity assays at 1 and 2 mo after gene transfer. In the iNOS group, infarct size (percentage of risk region) was significantly reduced (P < 0.05) both at 1 mo (24.2 ± 3.4%, n = 6, vs. 48.0 ± 3.6%, n = 8, in the LacZ group) and at 2 mo (23.4 ± 3.1%, n = 8, vs. 36.6 ± 2.4%, n = 7). The infarct-sparing effects of iNOS gene therapy were as powerful as those observed 24 h after ischemic preconditioning (23.1 ± 3.4%, n = 10). iNOS gene transfer had no effect on LV function or dimensions up to 8 wk later (echocardiography). These data demonstrate that iNOS gene therapy mediated by the Av3 vector affords long-term (2 mo) cardioprotection without inflammation or adverse functional consequences, a finding that provides a rationale for further preclinical testing of this therapy. PMID:16172153

  13. Integrated analysis, transcriptome-lipidome, reveals the effects of INO-level (INO2 and INO4) on lipid metabolism in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, genes containing UASINO sequences are regulated by the Ino2/Ino4 and Opi1 transcription factors, and this regulation controls lipid biosynthesis. The expression level of INO2 and INO4 genes (INO-level) at different nutrient limited conditions might lead to various responses in yeast lipid metabolism. Methods In this study, we undertook a global study on how INO-levels (transcription level of INO2 and INO4) affect lipid metabolism in yeast and we also studied the effects of single and double deletions of the two INO-genes (deficient effect). Using 2 types of nutrient limitations (carbon and nitrogen) in chemostat cultures operated at a fixed specific growth rate of 0.1 h-1 and strains having different INO-level, we were able to see the effect on expression level of the genes involved in lipid biosynthesis and the fluxes towards the different lipid components. Through combined measurements of the transcriptome, metabolome, and lipidome it was possible to obtain a large dataset that could be used to identify how the INO-level controls lipid metabolism and also establish correlations between the different components. Results In this study, we undertook a global study on how INO-levels (transcription level of INO2 and INO4) affect lipid metabolism in yeast and we also studied the effects of single and double deletions of the two INO-genes (deficient effect). Using 2 types of nutrient limitations (carbon and nitrogen) in chemostat cultures operated at a fixed specific growth rate of 0.1 h-1 and strains having different INO-level, we were able to see the effect on expression level of the genes involved in lipid biosynthesis and the fluxes towards the different lipid components. Through combined measurements of the transcriptome, metabolome, and lipidome it was possible to obtain a large dataset that could be used to identify how the INO-level controls lipid metabolism and also establish correlations between the different

  14. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) regulatory region variation in non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Roodgar, Morteza; Ross, Cody T.; Kenyon, Nicholas J.; Marcelino, Gretchen; Smith, David Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is an enzyme that plays a key role in intracellular immune response against respiratory infections. Since various species of nonhuman primates exhibit different levels of susceptibility to infectious respiratory diseases, and since variation in regulatory regions of genes is thought to play a key role in expression levels of genes, two candidate regulatory regions of iNOS were mapped, sequenced, and compared across five species of nonhuman primates: African green monkeys (chlorocebus sabeus), pig-tailed macaques (Macaca mulatta), cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis), Indian rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), and Chinese rhesus macaques (M. mulatta). In addition, we conducted an in silico analysis of the transcription factor binding sites associated with genetic variation in these two candidate regulatory regions across species. We found that only one of the two candidate regions showed strong evidence of involvement in iNOS regulation. Specifically, we found evidence of 13 conserved binding site candidates linked to iNOS regulation: AP-1, C/EBPB, CREB, GATA-1, GATA-3, NF-AT, NF-AT5, NF-κB, KLF4, Oct-1, PEA3, SMAD3, and TCF11. Additionally, we found evidence of interspecies variation in binding sites for several regulatory elements linked to iNOS (GATA-3, GATA-4, KLF6, SRF, STAT-1, STAT-3, OLF-1 and HIF-1) across species, especially in African green monkeys relative to other species. Given the key role of iNOS in respiratory immune response, the findings of this study might help guide the direction of future studies aimed to uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying the increased susceptibility of African green monkeys to several viral and bacterial respiratory infections. PMID:25675838

  15. Negative Regulation of p21Waf1/Cip1 by Human INO80 Chromatin Remodeling Complex Is Implicated in Cell Cycle Phase G2/M Arrest and Abnormal Chromosome Stability

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lingling; Ding, Jian; Dong, Liguo; Zhao, Jiayao; Su, Jiaming; Wang, Lingyao; Sui, Yi; Zhao, Tong; Wang, Fei; Jin, Jingji; Cai, Yong

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified an ATP-dependent human Ino80 (INO80) chromatin remodeling complex which shares a set of core subunits with yeast Ino80 complex. Although research evidence has suggested that INO80 complex functions in gene transcription and genome stability, the precise mechanism remains unclear. Herein, based on gene expression profiles from the INO80 complex-knockdown in HeLa cells, we first demonstrate that INO80 complex negatively regulates the p21Waf1/Cip1 (p21) expression in a p53-mediated mechanism. In chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and a sequential ChIP (Re-ChIP) assays, we determined that the INO80 complex and p53 can bind to the same promoter region of p21 gene (-2.2kb and -1.0kb upstream of the p21 promoter region), and p53 is required for the recruitment of the INO80 complex to the p21 promoter. RNAi knockdown strategies of INO80 not only led to prolonged progression of cell cycle phase G2/M to G1, but it also resulted in abnormal chromosome stability. Interestingly, high expression of p21 was observed in most morphologically-changed cells, suggesting that negative regulation of p21 by INO80 complex might be implicated in maintaining the cell cycle process and chromosome stability. Together, our findings will provide a theoretical basis to further elucidate the cellular mechanisms of the INO80 complex. PMID:26340092

  16. M-CSF Mediates Host Defense during Bacterial Pneumonia by Promoting the Survival of Lung and Liver Mononuclear Phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Bettina, Alexandra; Zhang, Zhimin; Michels, Kathryn; Cagnina, R Elaine; Vincent, Isaah S; Burdick, Marie D; Kadl, Alexandra; Mehrad, Borna

    2016-06-15

    Gram-negative bacterial pneumonia is a common and dangerous infection with diminishing treatment options due to increasing antibiotic resistance among causal pathogens. The mononuclear phagocyte system is a heterogeneous group of leukocytes composed of tissue-resident macrophages, dendritic cells, and monocyte-derived cells that are critical in defense against pneumonia, but mechanisms that regulate their maintenance and function during infection are poorly defined. M-CSF has myriad effects on mononuclear phagocytes but its role in pneumonia is unknown. We therefore tested the hypothesis that M-CSF is required for mononuclear phagocyte-mediated host defenses during bacterial pneumonia in a murine model of infection. Genetic deletion or immunoneutralization of M-CSF resulted in reduced survival, increased bacterial burden, and greater lung injury. M-CSF was necessary for the expansion of lung mononuclear phagocytes during infection but did not affect the number of bone marrow or blood monocytes, proliferation of precursors, or recruitment of leukocytes to the lungs. In contrast, M-CSF was essential to survival and antimicrobial functions of both lung and liver mononuclear phagocytes during pneumonia, and its absence resulted in bacterial dissemination to the liver and hepatic necrosis. We conclude that M-CSF is critical to host defenses against bacterial pneumonia by mediating survival and antimicrobial functions of mononuclear phagocytes in the lungs and liver. PMID:27183631

  17. Bacterially-mediated precipitation of ferric iron during the leaching of basaltic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnittker, K.; Navarrete, J. U.; Cappelle, I. J.; Borrok, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    The bacterially-mediated oxidation of ferrous [Fe(II)] iron in environments where its oxidation is otherwise unfavorable (i.e., acidic and/or anaerobic conditions) results in the formation of ferric iron [Fe(III)] precipitates. The mineralogy and morphologies of these precipitates are dictated by solution biochemistry. In this study, we evaluated Fe(III) precipitates that formed during aerobic bioleaching experiments with Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and ilmenite (FeTiO3) and Lunar or Martian basaltic stimulant rocks. Growth media was supplied to support the bacteria; however, all the Fe(II) for chemical energy was supplied by the mineral or rock. During the experiments, the bacteria actively oxidized Fe(II) to Fe(III), resulting in the formation of white and yellow-colored precipitates. In our initial experiments with both ilmentite and basalt, High-Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopic (HRSEM) analysis indicated that the precipitates where small (diameters were less than 5μm and mostly nanometer-scaled), white, and exhibited a platy texture. Networks of mineralized bacterial biofilm were also abundant. In these cases the white precipitates coated the bacteria, forming rod-shaped minerals 5-10μm long by about 1μm in diameter. Many of the rod-shaped minerals formed elongated chains. Energy Dispersive Spectra (EDS) analysis showed that the precipitates were largely composed of Fe and phosphorous (P) with an atomic Fe:P ratio of ˜1. Limited sulfur (S) was also identified as part of the agglomerated precipitates with an atomic Fe:S ratio that ranged from 5 to 10. Phosphorous and S were introduced into the system in considerable amounts as part of the growth media. Additional experiments were performed where we altered the growth media to lower the amount of available P by an order of magnitude. In this case, the experimental behavior remained the same, but the precipitates were more yellow or orange in color relative to those in the experiments using the

  18. New protein kinase and protein phosphatase families mediate signal transduction in bacterial catabolite repression.

    PubMed

    Galinier, A; Kravanja, M; Engelmann, R; Hengstenberg, W; Kilhoffer, M C; Deutscher, J; Haiech, J

    1998-02-17

    Carbon catabolite repression (CCR) is the prototype of a signal transduction mechanism. In enteric bacteria, cAMP was considered to be the second messenger in CCR by playing a role reminiscent of its actions in eukaryotic cells. However, recent results suggest that CCR in Escherichia coli is mediated mainly by an inducer exclusion mechanism. In many Gram-positive bacteria, CCR is triggered by fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, which activates HPr kinase, presumed to be one of the most ancient serine protein kinases. We here report cloning of the Bacillus subtilis hprK and hprP genes and characterization of the encoded HPr kinase and P-Ser-HPr phosphatase. P-Ser-HPr phosphatase forms a new family of phosphatases together with bacterial phosphoglycolate phosphatase, yeast glycerol-3-phosphatase, and 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate phosphatase whereas HPr kinase represents a new family of protein kinases on its own. It does not contain the domain structure typical for eukaryotic protein kinases. Although up to now the HPr modifying/demodifying enzymes were thought to exist only in Gram-positive bacteria, a sequence comparison revealed that they also are present in several Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria. PMID:9465101

  19. Bacterially mediated mineralisation processes lead to biodeterioration of artworks in Maltese catacombs.

    PubMed

    Zammit, Gabrielle; Sánchez-Moral, Sergio; Albertano, Patrizia

    2011-06-15

    Mineral structures formed by bacterial and microalgal biofilms growing on the archaeological surface in Maltese hypogea were studied using Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) coupled to Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM), X-ray micro-diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). These techniques have shown that mineral structures having different morphologies and chemical composition were associated with the microorganisms in the subaerophytic biofilm. Salt efflorescences and mineral deposits on the archaeological surface were often formed from gypsum (CaSO(4)∙2H(2)O), halite (NaCl) and calcite (CaCO(3)). Biogenic carbonates produced by microbial activities were a common occurrence. These assumed different forms, such as the production of mineral coats around cyanobacterial sheaths and the occurrence of calcite fibres with different morphologies on the surface of the biofilms. Moreover, vaterite (CaCO(3)) spherulites which appeared hollow in cross-section were observed. The presence of struvite was recorded from one catacomb site. These investigations have facilitated the study of the neoformation of metastable minerals by microbially mediated processes, which potentially contribute to a better understanding of the biodeterioration of artworks in Maltese palaeo-Christian catacombs. PMID:21550635

  20. Inflammatory bowel disease: an immunity-mediated condition triggered by bacterial infection with Helicobacter hepaticus.

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, R J; Foltz, C J; Fox, J G; Dangler, C A; Powrie, F; Schauer, D B

    1997-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is thought to result from either an abnormal immunological response to enteric flora or a normal immunological response to a specific pathogen. No study to date has combined both factors. The present studies were carried out with an immunologically manipulated mouse model of IBD. Mice homozygous for the severe combined immunodeficiency (scid) mutation develop IBD with adoptive transfer of CD4+ T cells expressing high levels of CD45RB (CD45RB(high) CD4+ T cells). These mice do not develop IBD in germfree conditions, implicating undefined intestinal flora in the pathogenesis of lesions. In controlled duplicate studies, the influence of a single murine pathogen, Helicobacter hepaticus, in combination with the abnormal immunological response on the development of IBD was assessed. The combination of H. hepaticus infection and CD45RB(high) CD4+ T-cell reconstitution resulted in severe disease expression similar to that observed in human IBD. This study demonstrates that IBD develops in mice as a consequence of an abnormal immune response in the presence of a single murine pathogen, H. hepaticus. The interaction of host immunity and a single pathogen in this murine system provides a novel model of human IBD, an immunity-mediated condition triggered by bacterial infection. PMID:9234764

  1. Cosmic ray test of INO RPC stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuyan, M.; Datar, V. M.; Kalmani, S. D.; Lahamge, S. M.; Mondal, N. K.; Nagaraj, P.; Pal, S.; Reddy, L. V.; Redij, A.; Samuel, D.; Saraf, M. N.; Satyanarayana, B.; Shinde, R. R.; Verma, P.

    2012-01-01

    The India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) collaboration is planning to build a 50 kt magnetised iron calorimeter (ICAL) detector using glass Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) as active detector elements. A stack of 12 such glass RPCs of 1 m ×1 m in area is tracking cosmic ray muons for over three years. In this paper, we will review the constructional aspects of the stack and discuss the performance of the RPCs using this cosmic ray data.

  2. Review of terahertz technology development at INO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Denis; Marchese, Linda; Terroux, Marc; Oulachgar, Hassane; Généreux, Francis; Doucet, Michel; Mercier, Luc; Tremblay, Bruno; Alain, Christine; Beaupré, Patrick; Blanchard, Nathalie; Bolduc, Martin; Chevalier, Claude; D'Amato, Dominic; Desroches, Yan; Duchesne, François; Gagnon, Lucie; Ilias, Samir; Jerominek, Hubert; Lagacé, François; Lambert, Julie; Lamontagne, Frédéric; Le Noc, Loïc; Martel, Anne; Pancrati, Ovidiu; Paultre, Jacques-Edmond; Pope, Tim; Provençal, Francis; Topart, Patrice; Vachon, Carl; Verreault, Sonia; Bergeron, Alain

    2015-10-01

    Over the past decade, INO has leveraged its expertise in the development of uncooled microbolometer detectors for infrared imaging to produce terahertz (THz) imaging systems. By modifying its microbolometer-based focal plane arrays to enhance absorption in the THz bands and by developing custom THz imaging lenses, INO has developed a leading-edge THz imaging system, the IRXCAM-THz-384 camera, capable of exploring novel applications in the emerging field of terahertz imaging and sensing. Using appropriate THz sources, results show that the IRXCAM-THz-384 camera is able to image a variety of concealed objects of interest for applications such as non-destructive testing and weapons detections. By using a longer wavelength (94 GHz) source, it is also capable of sensing the signatures of various objects hidden behind a drywall panel. This article, written as a review of THz research at INO over the past decade, describes the technical components that form the IRXCAM-THz-384 camera and the experimental setup used for active THz imaging. Image results for concealed weapons detection experiments, an exploration of wavelength choice on image quality, and the detection of hidden objects behind drywall are also presented.

  3. Adenoviral augmentation of elafin protects the lung against acute injury mediated by activated neutrophils and bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Simpson, A J; Wallace, W A; Marsden, M E; Govan, J R; Porteous, D J; Haslett, C; Sallenave, J M

    2001-08-01

    During acute pulmonary infection, tissue injury may be secondary to the effects of bacterial products or to the effects of the host inflammatory response. An attractive strategy for tissue protection in this setting would combine antimicrobial activity with inhibition of human neutrophil elastase (HNE), a key effector of neutrophil-mediated tissue injury. We postulated that genetic augmentation of elafin (an endogenous inhibitor of HNE with intrinsic antimicrobial activity) could protect the lung against acute inflammatory injury without detriment to host defense. A replication-deficient adenovirus encoding elafin cDNA significantly protected A549 cells against the injurious effects of both HNE and whole activated human neutrophils in vitro. Intratracheal replication-deficient adenovirus encoding elafin cDNA significantly protected murine lungs against injury mediated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vivo. Genetic augmentation of elafin therefore has the capacity to protect the lung against the injurious effects of both bacterial pathogens resistant to conventional antibiotics and activated neutrophils. PMID:11466403

  4. MEMS/MOEMS foundry services at INO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Blanco, Sonia; Ilias, Samir; Williamson, Fraser; Généreux, Francis; Le Noc, Loïc; Poirier, Michel; Proulx, Christian; Tremblay, Bruno; Provençal, Francis; Desroches, Yan; Caron, Jean-Sol; Larouche, Carl; Beaupré, Patrick; Fortin, Benoit; Topart, Patrice; Picard, Francis; Alain, Christine; Pope, Timothy; Jerominek, Hubert

    2010-06-01

    In the MEMS manufacturing world, the "fabless" model is getting increasing importance in recent years as a way for MEMS manufactures and startups to minimize equipment costs and initial capital investment. In order for this model to be successful, the fabless company needs to work closely with a MEMS foundry service provider. Due to the lack of standardization in MEMS processes, as opposed to CMOS microfabrication, the experience in MEMS development processes and the flexibility of the MEMS foundry are of vital importance. A multidisciplinary team together with a complete microfabrication toolset allows INO to offer unique MEMS foundry services to fabless companies looking for low to mid-volume production. Companies that benefit from their own microfabrication facilities can also be interested in INO's assistance in conducting their research and development work during periods where production runs keep their whole staff busy. Services include design, prototyping, fabrication, packaging, and testing of various MEMS and MOEMS devices on wafers fully compatible with CMOS integration. Wafer diameters ranging typically from 1 inch to 6 inches can be accepted while 8-inch wafers can be processed in some instances. Standard microfabrication techniques such as metal, dielectric, and semiconductor film deposition and etching as well as photolithographic pattern transfer are available. A stepper permits reduction of the critical dimension to around 0.4 μm. Metals deposited by vacuum deposition methods include Au, Ag, Al, Al alloys, Ti, Cr, Cu, Mo, MoCr, Ni, Pt, and V with thickness varying from 5 nm to 2 μm. Electroplating of several materials including Ni, Au and In is also available. In addition, INO has developed and built a gold black deposition facility to answer customer's needs for broadband microbolometric detectors. The gold black deposited presents specular reflectance of less than 10% in the wavelength range from 0.2 μm to 100 μm with thickness ranging from

  5. Incorporation of a non-human glycan mediates human susceptibility to a bacterial toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Byres, Emma; Paton, Adrienne W.; Paton, James C.; Löfling, Jonas C.; Smith, David F.; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Talbot, Ursula M.; Chong, Damien C.; Yu, Hai; Huang, Shengshu; Chen, Xi; Varki, Nissi M.; Varki, Ajit; Rossjohn, Jamie; Beddoe, Travis

    2009-01-30

    AB{sub 5} toxins comprise an A subunit that corrupts essential eukaryotic cell functions, and pentameric B subunits that direct target-cell uptake after binding surface glycans. Subtilase cytotoxin (SubAB) is an AB{sub 5} toxin secreted by Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC), which causes serious gastrointestinal disease in humans. SubAB causes haemolytic uraemic syndrome-like pathology in mice through SubA-mediated cleavage of BiP/GRP78, an essential endoplasmic reticulum chaperone. Here we show that SubB has a strong preference for glycans terminating in the sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc), a monosaccharide not synthesized in humans. Structures of SubB-Neu5Gc complexes revealed the basis for this specificity, and mutagenesis of key SubB residues abrogated in vitro glycan recognition, cell binding and cytotoxicity. SubAB specificity for Neu5Gc was confirmed using mouse tissues with a human-like deficiency of Neu5Gc and human cell lines fed with Neu5Gc. Despite lack of Neu5Gc biosynthesis in humans, assimilation of dietary Neu5Gc creates high-affinity receptors on human gut epithelia and kidney vasculature. This, and the lack of Neu5Gc-containing body fluid competitors in humans, confers susceptibility to the gastrointestinal and systemic toxicities of SubAB. Ironically, foods rich in Neu5Gc are the most common source of STEC contamination. Thus a bacterial toxin's receptor is generated by metabolic incorporation of an exogenous factor derived from food.

  6. Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin Expresses Antimicrobial Activity by Interfering with l-Norepinephrine-Mediated Bacterial Iron Acquisition▿

    PubMed Central

    Miethke, Marcus; Skerra, Arne

    2010-01-01

    l-norepinephrine (NE) is a neuroendocrine catecholamine that supports bacterial growth by mobilizing iron from a primary source such as holotransferrin to increase its bioavailability for cellular uptake. Iron complexes of NE resemble those of bacterial siderophores that are scavenged by human neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) as part of the innate immune defense. Here, we show that NGAL binds iron-complexed NE, indicating physiological relevance for both bacterial and human iron metabolism. The fluorescence titration of purified recombinant NGAL with the FeIII·(NE)3 iron complex revealed high affinity for this ligand, with a KD of 50.6 nM. In contrast, the binding protein FeuA of Bacillus subtilis, which is involved in the bacterial uptake of triscatecholate iron complexes, has a KD for FeIII·(NE)3 of 1.6 μM, indicating that NGAL is an efficient competitor. Furthermore, NGAL was shown to inhibit the NE-mediated growth of both E. coli and B. subtilis strains that either are capable or incapable of producing their native siderophores enterobactin and bacillibactin, respectively. These experiments suggest that iron-complexed NE directly serves as an iron source for bacterial uptake systems, and that NGAL can function as an antagonist of this iron acquisition process. Interestingly, a functional FeuABC uptake system was shown to be necessary for NE-mediated growth stimulation as well as its NGAL-dependent inhibition. This study demonstrates for the first time that human NGAL not only neutralizes pathogen-derived virulence factors but also can effectively scavenge an iron-chelate complex abundant in the host. PMID:20086155

  7. INO prototype detector and data acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behere, Anita; Bhatia, M. S.; Chandratre, V. B.; Datar, V. M.; Mukhopadhyay, P. K.; Jena, Satyajit; Viyogi, Y. P.; Bhattacharya, Sudeb; Saha, Satyajit; Bhide, Sarika; Kalmani, S. D.; Mondal, N. K.; Nagaraj, P.; Nagesh, B. K.; Rao, Shobha K.; Reddy, L. V.; Saraf, M.; Satyanarayana, B.; Shinde, R. R.; Upadhya, S. S.; Verma, P.; Biswas, Saikat; Chattopadhyay, Subhasish; Sarma, P. R.

    2009-05-01

    India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) collaboration is proposing to build a 50 kton magnetised iron calorimetric (ICAL) detector in an underground laboratory to be located in South India. Glass resistive plate chambers (RPCs) of about 2 m×2 m in size will be used as active elements for the ICAL detector. As a first step towards building the ICAL detector, a 35 ton prototype of the same is being set up over ground to track cosmic muons. Design and construction details of the prototype detector and its data acquisition system will be discussed. Some of the preliminary results from the detector stack will also be highlighted.

  8. Mediation analysis to estimate direct and indirect milk losses associated with bacterial load in bovine subclinical mammary infections.

    PubMed

    Detilleux, J; Theron, L; Duprez, J-N; Reding, E; Moula, N; Detilleux, M; Bertozzi, C; Hanzen, C; Mainil, J

    2016-08-01

    Milk losses associated with mastitis can be attributed to either effects of pathogens per se (i.e. direct losses) or to effects of the immune response triggered by the presence of mammary pathogens (i.e. indirect losses). Test-day milk somatic cell counts (SCC) and number of bacterial colony forming units (CFU) found in milk samples are putative measures of the level of immune response and of the bacterial load, respectively. Mediation models, in which one independent variable affects a second variable which, in turn, affects a third one, are conceivable models to estimate direct and indirect losses. Here, we evaluated the feasibility of a mediation model in which test-day SCC and milk were regressed toward bacterial CFU measured at three selected sampling dates, 1 week apart. We applied this method on cows free of clinical signs and with records on up to 3 test-days before and after the date of the first bacteriological samples. Most bacteriological cultures were negative (52.38%), others contained either staphylococci (23.08%), streptococci (9.16%), mixed bacteria (8.79%) or were contaminated (6.59%). Only losses mediated by an increase in SCC were significantly different from null. In cows with three consecutive bacteriological positive results, we estimated a decreased milk yield of 0.28 kg per day for each unit increase in log2-transformed CFU that elicited one unit increase in log2-transformed SCC. In cows with one or two bacteriological positive results, indirect milk loss was not significantly different from null although test-day milk decreased by 0.74 kg per day for each unit increase of log2-transformed SCC. These results highlight the importance of milk losses that are mediated by an increase in SCC during mammary infection and the feasibility of decomposing total milk loss into its direct and indirect components. PMID:26923826

  9. Investigation of antibacterial mechanism and identification of bacterial protein targets mediated by antibacterial medicinal plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Yong, Ann-Li; Ooh, Keng-Fei; Ong, Hean-Chooi; Chai, Tsun-Thai; Wong, Fai-Chu

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we investigated the antibacterial mechanism and potential therapeutic targets of three antibacterial medicinal plants. Upon treatment with the plant extracts, bacterial proteins were extracted and resolved using denaturing gel electrophoresis. Differentially-expressed bacterial proteins were excised from the gels and subjected to sequence analysis by MALDI TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. From our study, seven differentially expressed bacterial proteins (triacylglycerol lipase, N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase, flagellin, outer membrane protein A, stringent starvation protein A, 30S ribosomal protein s1 and 60 kDa chaperonin) were identified. Additionally, scanning electron microscope study indicated morphological damages induced on bacterial cell surfaces. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first time these bacterial proteins are being reported, following treatments with the antibacterial plant extracts. Further studies in this direction could lead to the detailed understanding of their inhibition mechanism and discovery of target-specific antibacterial agents. PMID:25976788

  10. Reduced iNOS expression in adenoids from children with otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Granath, Anna; Norrby-Teglund, Anna; Uddman, Rolf; Cardell, Lars-Olaf

    2010-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a key mediator in the local immune response of human airways. Inducible NO-synthases (iNOS), and endothelial NO-synthases (eNOS) are two enzymes known to regulate its production. The role of NO in middle ear disease is not fully known. Previous studies suggest that NO might have a dual role, both promoting and suppressing middle ear inflammation. The aim of the present study was to compare the eNOS and iNOS expression in adenoids obtained from children with otitis media with effusion (OME) with the expression seen in adenoids derived from children without middle ear disease. In addition, the expression of IL-1β and TNF-α were analyzed, because of their role in the iNOS-induction pathway. The iNOS and eNOS expression were analyzed with real-time PCR in 8 OME and 11 control adenoids. The corresponding proteins were demonstrated by immunohistochemical staining of adenoid tissue. A Luminex(®) assay was performed to analyze IL-1β and TNF-α in nasopharyngeal secretion in 10 OME and 8 controls, and immunohistochemistry was performed on adenoid tissue and imprints from the adenoid surface. Children with OME exhibited lower levels of iNOS than controls without middle ear disease. No such difference was seen for eNOS. The corresponding proteins were found mainly in conjunction with surface epithelium. No significant changes were seen among the cytokines tested. The present results indicate that local induction of iNOS in adenoids might be of importance for preventing development of OME. PMID:21073541

  11. Ternary complex formation of Ino2p-Ino4p transcription factors and Apl2p adaptin beta subunit in yeast.

    PubMed

    Nikawa, Jun-ichi; Yata, Masako; Motomura, Miki; Miyoshi, Nobutaka; Ueda, Tsuyoshi; Hisada, Daisuke

    2006-11-01

    Yeast Ino2p-Ino4p heterodimeric complex is well known as a transcriptional activator for the genes regulated by inositol and choline, such as the INO1 gene. Apl2p is a large subunit of the yeast adaptin complex, an adaptor complex required for the clathrin coat to bind to the membrane. We found that Ino2p, Ino4p, and Apl2p form a ternary complex. This interaction was initially observed in a yeast two-hybrid study and subsequently verified by co-immunoprecipitation. Ino2p and Ino4p bind to Apl2p in the same region of Apl2p, viz., at the middle part and the C-terminal part. Ino2p and Ino4p bind to Apl2p independently, but more strongly when both are present. Furthermore, a disruption of APL2 together with INO2 or INO4 rendered yeast cells sensitive to oxidative stress. INO2-APL2 double disruptants also showed growth inability in non-fermentable carbon sources, such as glycerol. These results indicate a genetic interaction between APL2, INO2 and INO4 and uncovere novel functions of the Ino2p-Ino4p-Apl2p complex in yeast. PMID:17090927

  12. Non-canonical inflammasome activation of caspase-4/caspase-11 mediates epithelial defenses against enteric bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Knodler, Leigh A.; Crowley, Shauna M.; Sham, Ho Pan; Yang, Hyungjun; Wrande, Marie; Ma, Caixia; Ernst, Robert K.; Steele-Mortimer, Olivia; Celli, Jean; Vallance, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Inflammasome-mediated host defenses have been extensively studied in innate immune cells. Whether inflammasomes function for innate defense in intestinal epithelial cells, which represent the first line of defense against enteric pathogens, remains unknown. We observed enhanced Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium colonization in the intestinal epithelium of caspase-11 deficient mice, but not at systemic sites. In polarized epithelial monolayers, siRNA-mediated depletion of caspase-4, a human orthologue of caspase-11, also led to increased bacterial colonization. Decreased rates of pyroptotic cell death, a host defense mechanism that extrudes S. Typhimurium infected cells from the polarized epithelium, accounted for increased pathogen burdens. The caspase-4 inflammasome also governs activation of the proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin (IL)-18, in response to intracellular (S. Typhimurium) and extracellular (enteropathogenic Escherichia coli) enteric pathogens, via intracellular LPS sensing. Therefore an epithelial cell intrinsic non-canonical inflammasome plays a critical role in antimicrobial defense at the intestinal mucosal surface. PMID:25121752

  13. Nitric oxide associated with iNOS expression inhibits acetylcholinesterase activity and induces memory impairment during acute hypobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Udayabanu, M; Kumaran, D; Nair, R Unnikrishnan; Srinivas, P; Bhagat, Neeta; Aneja, R; Katyal, Anju

    2008-09-16

    The mechanisms responsible for cholinergic dysfunction associated learning and memory impairment during hypoxia are not well-understood. However it is known that inflammatory mediators like inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) hamper the functions of cholinergic neurons. In this present experiment we made an effort to study the iNOS expression mediated retrograde and anterograde memory impairment in Balb/c mice following acute hypobaric hypoxia (at an altitude of 23,000ft for 6h) using elevated plus maze and passive avoidance step-through tasks. Our results demonstrated that hypoxia transiently impairs the retrograde memory without affecting the anterograde memory functions, accompanied with a substantial rise in iNOS expression and nitric oxide levels in cerebral cortex on days 2 and 3 post hypoxia. Treatment with aminoguanidine (iNOS inhibitor ), resulted in down-regulation of the iNOS expression, attenuation of the surge of nitric oxide (NO) in cerebral cortex and reversal of retrograde memory impairment due to hypoxia. Moreover the reduced AChE activity and elevated lipid peroxidation in cerebral cortex were evident during post hypoxia re-oxygenation period, which was not observed in the hippocampus. Additionally, NO donor spermine NONOate could inhibit the AChE activity in brain homogenates in a concentration-dependent manner, which further substantiate that nitric oxide produced during post hypoxia re-oxygenation, primarily contributes to the observed inhibition of cortical AChE activity. Based on these experiments we hypothesize that the NO burst as a result of iNOS upregulation during hypoxia interrupts the memory consolidation by altering the cholinergic functions. PMID:18639532

  14. Bacterial Membrane Vesicles Mediate the Release of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Lipoglycans and Lipoproteins from Infected Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Athman, Jaffre J; Wang, Ying; McDonald, David J; Boom, W Henry; Harding, Clifford V; Wearsch, Pamela A

    2015-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an intracellular pathogen that infects lung macrophages and releases microbial factors that regulate host defense. M. tuberculosis lipoproteins and lipoglycans block phagosome maturation, inhibit class II MHC Ag presentation, and modulate TLR2-dependent cytokine production, but the mechanisms for their release during infection are poorly defined. Furthermore, these molecules are thought to be incorporated into host membranes and released from infected macrophages within exosomes, 40-150-nm extracellular vesicles that derive from multivesicular endosomes. However, our studies revealed that extracellular vesicles released from infected macrophages include two distinct, largely nonoverlapping populations: one containing host cell markers of exosomes (CD9, CD63) and the other containing M. tuberculosis molecules (lipoglycans, lipoproteins). These vesicle populations are similar in size but have distinct densities, as determined by separation on sucrose gradients. Release of lipoglycans and lipoproteins from infected macrophages was dependent on bacterial viability, implicating active bacterial mechanisms in their secretion. Consistent with recent reports of extracellular vesicle production by bacteria (including M. tuberculosis), we propose that bacterial membrane vesicles are secreted by M. tuberculosis within infected macrophages and subsequently are released into the extracellular environment. Furthermore, extracellular vesicles released from M. tuberculosis-infected cells activate TLR2 and induce cytokine responses by uninfected macrophages. We demonstrate that these activities derive from the bacterial membrane vesicles rather than exosomes. Our findings suggest that bacterial membrane vesicles are the primary means by which M. tuberculosis exports lipoglycans and lipoproteins to impair effector functions of infected macrophages and circulate bacterial components beyond the site of infection to regulate immune responses by uninfected

  15. Tyrosine-Phosphorylated Caveolin-1 Blocks Bacterial Uptake by Inducing Vav2-RhoA-Mediated Cytoskeletal Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Kaushansky, Alexis; Pompaiah, Malvika; Thorn, Hans; Brinkmann, Volker; MacBeath, Gavin; Meyer, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    Certain bacterial adhesins appear to promote a pathogen's extracellular lifestyle rather than its entry into host cells. However, little is known about the stimuli elicited upon such pathogen host-cell interactions. Here, we report that type IV pili (Tfp)-producing Neisseria gonorrhoeae (P+GC) induces an immediate recruitment of caveolin-1 (Cav1) in the host cell, which subsequently prevents bacterial internalization by triggering cytoskeletal rearrangements via downstream phosphotyrosine signaling. A broad and unbiased analysis of potential interaction partners for tyrosine-phosphorylated Cav1 revealed a direct interaction with the Rho-family guanine nucleotide exchange factor Vav2. Both Vav2 and its substrate, the small GTPase RhoA, were found to play a direct role in the Cav1-mediated prevention of bacterial uptake. Our findings, which have been extended to enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, highlight how Tfp-producing bacteria avoid host cell uptake. Further, our data establish a mechanistic link between Cav1 phosphorylation and pathogen-induced cytoskeleton reorganization and advance our understanding of caveolin function. PMID:20808760

  16. Bacterial photodynamic inactivation mediated by methylene blue and red light is enhanced by synergistic effect of potassium iodide.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Daniela; Gupta, Asheesh; Huang, Liyi; Landi, Giacomo; Avci, Pinar; Rodas, Andrea; Hamblin, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    The inexorable increase of antibiotic resistance occurring in different bacterial species is increasing the interest in developing new antimicrobial treatments that will be equally effective against multidrug-resistant strains and will not themselves induce resistance. One of these alternatives may be photodynamic inactivation (PDI), which uses a combination of nontoxic dyes, called photosensitizers (PS), excited by harmless visible light to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) by type 1 (radical) and type 2 (singlet oxygen) pathways. In this study, we asked whether it was possible to improve the efficacy of PDI in vitro and in vivo by addition of the inert salt potassium iodide (KI) to a commonly investigated PS, the phenothiazinium dye methylene blue (MB). By adding KI, we observed a consistent increase of red light-mediated bacterial killing of Gram-positive and Gram-negative species in vitro and in vivo. In vivo, we also observed less bacterial recurrence in wounds in the days posttreatment. The mechanism of action is probably due to formation of reactive iodine species that are produced quickly with a short lifetime. This finding may have a relevant clinical impact by reducing the risk of amputation and, in some cases, the risk of death, leading to improvement in the care of patients affected by localized infections. PMID:26077247

  17. Bacterial Photodynamic Inactivation Mediated by Methylene Blue and Red Light Is Enhanced by Synergistic Effect of Potassium Iodide

    PubMed Central

    Vecchio, Daniela; Gupta, Asheesh; Huang, Liyi; Landi, Giacomo; Avci, Pinar; Rodas, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The inexorable increase of antibiotic resistance occurring in different bacterial species is increasing the interest in developing new antimicrobial treatments that will be equally effective against multidrug-resistant strains and will not themselves induce resistance. One of these alternatives may be photodynamic inactivation (PDI), which uses a combination of nontoxic dyes, called photosensitizers (PS), excited by harmless visible light to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) by type 1 (radical) and type 2 (singlet oxygen) pathways. In this study, we asked whether it was possible to improve the efficacy of PDI in vitro and in vivo by addition of the inert salt potassium iodide (KI) to a commonly investigated PS, the phenothiazinium dye methylene blue (MB). By adding KI, we observed a consistent increase of red light-mediated bacterial killing of Gram-positive and Gram-negative species in vitro and in vivo. In vivo, we also observed less bacterial recurrence in wounds in the days posttreatment. The mechanism of action is probably due to formation of reactive iodine species that are produced quickly with a short lifetime. This finding may have a relevant clinical impact by reducing the risk of amputation and, in some cases, the risk of death, leading to improvement in the care of patients affected by localized infections. PMID:26077247

  18. A family of conserved bacterial effectors inhibits salicylic acid-mediated basal immunity and promotes disease necrosis in plants.

    PubMed

    DebRoy, Sruti; Thilmony, Roger; Kwack, Yong-Bum; Nomura, Kinya; He, Sheng Yang

    2004-06-29

    Salicylic acid (SA)-mediated host immunity plays a central role in combating microbial pathogens in plants. Inactivation of SA-mediated immunity, therefore, would be a critical step in the evolution of a successful plant pathogen. It is known that mutations in conserved effector loci (CEL) in the plant pathogens Pseudomonas syringae (the Delta CEL mutation), Erwinia amylovora (the dspA/E mutation), and Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii (the wtsE mutation) exert particularly strong negative effects on bacterial virulence in their host plants by unknown mechanisms. We found that the loss of virulence in Delta CEL and dspA/E mutants was linked to their inability to suppress cell wall-based defenses and to cause normal disease necrosis in Arabidopsis and apple host plants. The Delta CEL mutant activated SA-dependent callose deposition in wild-type Arabidopsis but failed to elicit high levels of callose-associated defense in Arabidopsis plants blocked in SA accumulation or synthesis. This mutant also multiplied more aggressively in SA-deficient plants than in wild-type plants. The hopPtoM and avrE genes in the CEL of P. syringae were found to encode suppressors of this SA-dependent basal defense. The widespread conservation of the HopPtoM and AvrE families of effectors in various bacteria suggests that suppression of SA-dependent basal immunity and promotion of host cell death are important virulence strategies for bacterial infection of plants. PMID:15210989

  19. Rapid and sensitive detection of Citrus Bacterial Canker by loop-mediated isothermal amplification combined with simple visual evaluation methods

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Citrus Bacterial Canker (CBC) is a major, highly contagious disease of citrus plants present in many countries in Asia, Africa and America, but not in the Mediterranean area. There are three types of Citrus Bacterial Canker, named A, B, and C that have different genotypes and posses variation in host range within citrus species. The causative agent for type A CBC is Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, while Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. aurantifolii, strain B causes type B CBC and Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. aurantifolii strain C causes CBC type C. The early and accurate identification of those bacteria is essential for the protection of the citrus industry. Detection methods based on bacterial isolation, antibodies or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have been developed previously; however, these approaches may be time consuming, laborious and, in the case of PCR, it requires expensive laboratory equipment. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), which is a novel isothermal DNA amplification technique, is sensitive, specific, fast and requires no specialized laboratory equipment. Results A loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for the diagnosis of Citrus Bacterial Canker (CBC-LAMP) was developed and evaluated. DNA samples were obtained from infected plants or cultured bacteria. A typical ladder-like pattern on gel electrophoresis was observed in all positive samples in contrast to the negative controls. In addition, amplification products were detected by visual inspection using SYBRGreen and using a lateral flow dipstick, eliminating the need for gel electrophoresis. The sensitivity and specificity of the assay were evaluated in different conditions and using several sample sources which included purified DNA, bacterium culture and infected plant tissue. The sensitivity of the CBC-LAMP was 10 fg of pure Xcc DNA, 5 CFU in culture samples and 18 CFU in samples of infected plant tissue. No cross reaction was observed with DNA of other phytopathogenic

  20. Reactive Oxygen Species Mediated Bacterial Biofilm Inhibition via Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles and Their Statistical Determination

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Sourabh; Wahab, Rizwan; Khan, Farheen; Mishra, Yogendra K.; Musarrat, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.

    2014-01-01

    The formation of bacterial biofilm is a major challenge in clinical applications. The main aim of this study is to describe the synthesis, characterization and biocidal potential of zinc oxide nanoparticles (NPs) against bacterial strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These nanoparticles were synthesized via soft chemical solution process in a very short time and their structural properties have been investigated in detail by using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy measurements. In this work, the potential of synthesized ZnO-NPs (∼10–15 nm) has been assessed in-vitro inhibition of bacteria and the formation of their biofilms was observed using the tissue culture plate assays. The crystal violet staining on biofilm formation and its optical density revealed the effect on biofilm inhibition. The NPs at a concentration of 100 µg/mL significantly inhibited the growth of bacteria and biofilm formation. The biofilm inhibition by ZnO-NPs was also confirmed via bio-transmission electron microscopy (Bio-TEM). The Bio-TEM analysis of ZnO-NPs treated bacteria confirmed the deformation and damage of cells. The bacterial growth in presence of NPs concluded the bactericidal ability of NPs in a concentration dependent manner. It has been speculated that the antibacterial activity of NPs as a surface coating material, could be a feasible approach for controlling the pathogens. Additionally, the obtained bacterial solution data is also in agreement with the results from statistical analytical methods. PMID:25402188

  1. L-arginine mediated renaturation enhances yield of human, α6 type IV collagen non-collagenous domain from bacterial inclusion bodies

    PubMed Central

    Gunda, Venugopal; Boosani, Chandra Shekhar; Verma, Raj Kumar; Guda, Chittibabu; Akul Sudhakar, Yakkanti

    2012-01-01

    The anti-angiogenic, carboxy terminal non-collagenous domain (NC1) derived from human Collagen type IV alpha 6 chain, [α6(IV)NC1] or hexastatin, was earlier obtained using different recombinant methods of expression in bacterial systems. However, the effect of L-arginine mediated renaturation in enhancing the relative yields of this protein from bacterial inclusion bodies has not been evaluated. In the present study, direct stirring and on-column renaturation methods using L-arginine and different size exclusion chromatography matrices were applied for enhancing the solubility in purifying the recombinant α6(IV)NC1 from bacterial inclusion bodies. This methodology enabled purification of higher quantities of soluble protein from inclusion bodies, which inhibited endothelial cell proliferation, migration and tube formation. Thus, the scope for L-arginine mediated renaturation in obtaining higher yields of soluble, biologically active NC1 domain from bacterial inclusion bodies was evaluated. PMID:22512648

  2. India-based Neutrino Observatory(INO): A Status Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, M. V. N.

    2011-11-01

    We present a status report on the proposed India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). Various aspects of the INO project such as its location, the present status of the detector development, physics goals and simulation studies are discussed briefly. In particular we focus on physics studies possible with an iron calorimeter detector (ICAL) and the logistics of constructing this detector at INO. Such a detector would make precision measurements of neutrino oscillation parameters with atmospheric neutrinos in the first phase with the possibility of acting as a far-end detector of a future neutrino factory or beta beam.

  3. Essential roles for platelets during neutrophil-dependent or lymphocyte-mediated defense against bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Dongxia; Sun, Chengming; Bao, Cuixia; Yi, Maoli; Xing, Li; Luo, Deyan

    2016-09-01

    Emerging evidence from animal models suggests that platelets may participate in a wide variety of processes including the immune response against infection. More than 200 whole blood samples from patients and healthy controls were run in the System XE-5000 analyzer, and plasma fractions were separated for the following tests by ELISA, Luminex and light scattering. We describe two mechanisms by which platelets may contribute to immune function against various bacterial pathogens based on increased mean platelet volume in gram-positive bacterial infections and increased platelet counts in gram-negative bacterial infections. Gram-negative bacteria activate platelets to recruit neutrophils, which participate in the immune response against infection. During this process, fractalkine, macrophage inflammatory protein-1β, interleukin-17A, tumor necrosis factor-α and platelet-activating factor were higher in patients infected with Escherichia coli; additionally, giant platelets were observed under the microscope. Meanwhile, we found that platelets played a different role in gram-positive bacterial infections. Specifically, they could actively adhere to gram-positive bacteria in circulation and transfer them to immune sites to promote antibacterial lymphocyte expansion. During this process, complement C3 and factor XI were more highly expressed in patients infected with Staphylococcus aureus; additionally, we detected more small platelets under the microscope. Platelets participate in the immune response against both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, although the mechanisms differ. These results will help us understand the complex roles of platelets during infections, and direct our use of antibiotics based on clinical platelet data. PMID:26588444

  4. Igg Subclasses Targeting the Flagella of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Can Mediate Phagocytosis and Bacterial Killing

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Yun Shan; Armour, Kathryn L; Clark, Michael R; Grant, Andrew J; Mastroeni, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella are a common cause of invasive disease in immuno-compromised individuals and in children. Multi-drug resistance poses challenges to disease control, with a critical need for effective vaccines. Flagellin is an attractive vaccine candidate due to surface exposure and high epitope copy number, but its potential as a target for opsonophacytic antibodies is unclear. We examined the effect of targeting flagella with different classes of IgG on the interaction between Salmonella Typhimurium and a human phagocyte-like cell line, THP-1. We tagged the FliC flagellar protein with a foreign CD52 mimotope (TSSPSAD) and bacteria were opsonized with a panel of humanised CD52 antibodies with the same antigen-binding V-region, but different constant regions. We found that IgG binding to flagella increases bacterial phagocytosis and reduces viable intracellular bacterial numbers. Opsonisation with IgG3, followed by IgG1, IgG4, and IgG2, resulted in the highest level of bacterial uptake and in the highest reduction in the intracellular load of viable bacteria. Taken together, our data provide proof-of-principle evidence that targeting flagella with antibodies can increase the antibacterial function of host cells, with IgG3 being the most potent subclass. These data will assist the rational design of urgently needed, optimised vaccines against iNTS disease. PMID:27366588

  5. Reduced bacterial adhesion to hydrocephalus shunt catheters mediated by cerebrospinal fluid proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Brydon, H L; Bayston, R; Hayward, R; Harkness, W

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Prosthetic infections are a major problem, requiring complex and lengthy management. The role of blood proteins in the pathogenesis of implant infection has been investigated, but research into the role of CSF protein in shunt infections has not been undertaken, even though a high CSF protein has been assumed to increase the risk of such infections. METHODS--New shunt catheters were exposed to either CSF or individual protein solutions, and the numbers of radiolabelled staphylococci that adhered to them were compared with controls that had been exposed to saline only. RESULTS--A significant reduction in bacteria adhering to the test catheter was found in each instance. Furthermore, the CSF with the highest protein content, from a patient with intraventricular haemorrhage, had the greatest inhibitory effect on bacterial adhesion. The effect of the solutions on the hydrophobicity of the silicone rubber was also investigated. The silicone rubber was more hydrophilic, and bacterial adhesion was less, with solutions containing a higher protein content, and these findings were in keeping with the current theories on the mechanism of bacterial adhesion to polymers. CONCLUSIONS--A high CSF protein content does not predispose to the development of shunt infections. PMID:8648336

  6. Pyramidal Wavefront Sensor Demonstrator at INO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Olivier; Véran, Jean-Pierre; Anctil, Geneviève; Bourqui, Pascal; Châteauneuf, François; Gauvin, Jonny; Goyette, Philippe; Lagacé, François; Turbide, Simon; Wang, Min

    2014-08-01

    Wavefront sensing is one of the key elements of an Adaptive Optics System. Although Shack-Hartmann WFS are the most commonly used whether for astronomical or biomedical applications, the high-sensitivity and large dynamic-range of the Pyramid-WFS (P-WFS) technology is promising and needs to be further investigated for proper justification in future Extremely Large Telescopes (ELT) applications. At INO, center for applied research in optics and technology transfer in Quebec City, Canada, we have recently set to develop a Pyramid wavefront sensor (P-WFS), an option for which no other research group in Canada had any experience. A first version had been built and tested in 2013 in collaboration with NRC-HIA Victoria. Here we present a second iteration of demonstrator with an extended spectral range, fast modulation capability and low-noise, fast-acquisition EMCCD sensor. The system has been designed with compactness and robustness in mind to allow on-sky testing at Mont Mégantic facility, in parallel with a Shack- Hartmann sensor so as to compare both options.

  7. Transcription of INO2 and INO4 is regulated by the state of protein N-myristoylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Cok, S J; Martin, C G; Gordon, J I

    1998-01-01

    Inositol regulates transcription of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes required for de novo synthesis of acylCoAs and phospholipids. Removal of inositol results in transcriptional activation by heterodimeric complexes of two bHLH proteins, Ino2p and Ino4p. In the presence of inositol, transcription is repressed by Opi1p. MyristoylCoA:protein N-myristoyltransferase (Nmt1p) is an essential enzyme whose activity is influenced by cellular myristoylCoA pool size and availability. nmt451Dp contains a Gly451-->Asp substitution that produces temperature-dependent reductions in affinity for myristoylCoA and associated reductions in acylation of cellular N-myristoylproteins. The conditional lethality produced by nmt1-451D is rescued at temperatures up to 33 degreesC by withdrawal of inositol. We tested the hypothesis that N-myristoylproteins function to regulate INO2, INO4 and/or OPI1 transcription, thereby affecting the expression of inositol-sensitive genes that influence myristoylCoA metabolism. The effect of nmt1-451D on INO2 , INO4 and OPI1 promoter activities was examined by introducing episomes, containing their 5' non-transcribed domains linked to reporters, into isogenic NMT1 and nmt1-451D cells. The activity of INO2 is significantly higher, INO4 significantly lower and OPI1 unaffected in nmt1-451D cells, both in the presence and absence of inositol. These changes are associated with a net increase in expression of some inositol target genes, including FAS1 . FAS1 encodes one of the subunits of the fatty acid synthase complex that catalyzes de novo acylCoA (including myristoylCoA) biosynthesis. Augmented expression of FAS1 overcomes the kinetic defects in nmt451Dp. FAS1 expression is Ino2p-dependent in NMT1 cells at 24-33 degreesC. In contrast, FAS1 expression becomes Ino2p-independent in nmt1-451D cells at temperatures where efficient acylation of cellular N-myristoylproteins is jeopardized. The ability to maintain expression of FAS1 in nmt1-451Dino2 Delta cells

  8. EDS1 mediates pathogen resistance and virulence function of a bacterial effector in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) and phytoalexin deficient 4 (PAD4) are well known regulators of both basal and resistance (R) protein-mediated plant defense. We identified two EDS1- (GmEDS1a/b) and one PAD4-like (GmPAD4) protein that are required for resistance signaling in soybean. Consist...

  9. Fungal and bacterial mediated denitrification in wetlands: influence of sediment redox condition.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong Cheol; DeLaune, R D

    2010-04-01

    Fungal and bacterial denitrification rates were determined under a range of redox conditions in sediment from a Louisiana swamp forest used for wastewater treatment. Sediment was incubated in microcosms at 6 Eh levels (-200, -100, 0, +100, +250 and +400 mV) ranging from strongly reducing to moderately oxidizing conditions. Denitrification was determined using the substrate-induced respiration (SIR) inhibition and acetylene inhibition methods. Cycloheximide (C15H23NO4) was used as the fungal inhibitor and streptomycin (C21H39N7O12) as the bacterial inhibitor. At Eh values of +250 mV and +400 mV, denitrification rates by fungi and bacteria were 34.3-35.1% and 1.46-1.59% of total denitrification, respectively, indicating that fungi were responsible for most of the denitrification under aerobic or weakly reducing conditions. On the other hand, at Eh -200 mV, denitrification rates of fungi and bacteria were 17.6% and 64.9% of total denitrification, respectively, indicating that bacteria were responsible for most of the denitrification under strongly reducing conditions. Results show fungal denitrification was dominant under moderately reducing to weakly oxidizing conditions (Eh>+250 mV), whereas bacterial denitrification was dominant under strongly reducing condition (Eh<-100 mV). At Eh values between -100 to +100 mV, denitrification by fungi and bacteria were 37.9-43.2% and 53.0-51.1% of total denitrification, respectively, indicating that both bacteria and fungi contributed significantly to denitrification under these redox conditions. Because N2O is an important gaseous denitrification product in sediment, fungal denitrification could be of greater ecological significance under aerobic or moderately reducing conditions contributing to greenhouse gas emission and global warming potential (GWP). PMID:20122708

  10. Elasticity-mediated nematiclike bacterial organization in model extracellular DNA matrix.

    PubMed

    Smalyukh, Ivan I; Butler, John; Shrout, Joshua D; Parsek, Matthew R; Wong, Gerard C L

    2008-09-01

    DNA is a common extracellular matrix component of bacterial biofilms. We find that bacteria can spontaneously order in a matrix of aligned concentrated DNA, in which rod-shaped cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa follow the orientation of extended DNA chains. The alignment of bacteria is ensured by elasticity and liquid crystalline properties of the DNA matrix. These findings show how behavior of planktonic bacteria may be modified in extracellular polymeric substances of biofilms and illustrate the potential of using complex fluids to manipulate embedded nanosized and microsized active particles. PMID:18850984

  11. Malaria-Induced NLRP12/NLRP3-Dependent Caspase-1 Activation Mediates Inflammation and Hypersensitivity to Bacterial Superinfection

    PubMed Central

    Ataide, Marco A.; Andrade, Warrison A.; Zamboni, Dario S.; Wang, Donghai; Souza, Maria do Carmo; Franklin, Bernardo S.; Elian, Samir; Martins, Flaviano S.; Pereira, Dhelio; Reed, George; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic paroxysm and high fever are hallmarks of malaria and are associated with high levels of pyrogenic cytokines, including IL-1β. In this report, we describe a signature for the expression of inflammasome-related genes and caspase-1 activation in malaria. Indeed, when we infected mice, Plasmodium infection was sufficient to promote MyD88-mediated caspase-1 activation, dependent on IFN-γ-priming and the expression of inflammasome components ASC, P2X7R, NLRP3 and/or NLRP12. Pro-IL-1β expression required a second stimulation with LPS and was also dependent on IFN-γ-priming and functional TNFR1. As a consequence of Plasmodium-induced caspase-1 activation, mice produced extremely high levels of IL-1β upon a second microbial stimulus, and became hypersensitive to septic shock. Therapeutic intervention with IL-1 receptor antagonist prevented bacterial-induced lethality in rodents. Similar to mice, we observed a significantly increased frequency of circulating CD14+CD16−Caspase-1+ and CD14dimCD16+Caspase-1+ monocytes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from febrile malaria patients. These cells readily produced large amounts of IL-1β after stimulation with LPS. Furthermore, we observed the presence of inflammasome complexes in monocytes from malaria patients containing either NLRP3 or NLRP12 pyroptosomes. We conclude that NLRP12/NLRP3-dependent activation of caspase-1 is likely to be a key event in mediating systemic production of IL-1β and hypersensitivity to secondary bacterial infection during malaria. PMID:24453977

  12. Liver-resident macrophage necroptosis orchestrates type 1 microbicidal inflammation and type-2-mediated tissue repair during bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Blériot, Camille; Dupuis, Théo; Jouvion, Grégory; Eberl, Gérard; Disson, Olivier; Lecuit, Marc

    2015-01-20

    Kupffer cells, the phagocytes of fetal origin that line the liver sinusoids, are key contributors of host defense against enteroinvasive bacteria. Here, we found that infection by Listeria monocytogenes induced the early necroptotic death of Kupffer cells, which was followed by monocyte recruitment and an anti-bacterial type 1 inflammatory response. Kupffer cell death also triggered a type 2 response that involved the hepatocyte-derived alarmin interleukin-33 (IL-33) and basophil-derived interleukin-4 (IL-4). This led to the alternative activation of the monocyte-derived macrophages recruited to the liver, which thereby replaced ablated Kupffer cells and restored liver homeostasis. Kupffer cell death is therefore a key signal orchestrating type 1 microbicidal inflammation and type-2-mediated liver repair upon infection. This indicates that beyond the classical dichotomy of type 1 and type 2 responses, these responses can develop sequentially in the context of a bacterial infection and act interdependently, orchestrating liver immune responses and return to homeostasis, respectively. PMID:25577440

  13. Proteasomal Degradation of Nod2 Protein Mediates Tolerance to Bacterial Cell Wall Components*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyoung-Hee; Biswas, Amlan; Liu, Yuen-Joyce; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune system serves as the first line of defense by detecting microbes and initiating inflammatory responses. Although both Toll-like receptor (TLR) and nucleotide binding domain and leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins are important for this process, their excessive activation is hazardous to hosts; thus, tight regulation is required. Endotoxin tolerance is refractory to repeated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation and serves as a host defense mechanism against septic shock caused by an excessive TLR4 response during Gram-negative bacterial infection. Gram-positive bacteria as well as their cell wall components also induce shock. However, the mechanism underlying tolerance is not understood. Here, we show that activation of Nod2 by its ligand, muramyl dipeptide (MDP) in the bacterial cell wall, induces rapid degradation of Nod2, which confers MDP tolerance in vitro and in vivo. Nod2 is constitutively associated with a chaperone protein, Hsp90, which is required for Nod2 stability and protects Nod2 from degradation. Upon MDP stimulation, Hsp90 rapidly dissociates from Nod2, which subsequently undergoes ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. The SOCS-3 protein induced by Nod2 activation further facilitates this degradation process. Therefore, Nod2 protein stability is a key factor in determining responsiveness to MDP stimulation. This indicates that TLRs and NLRs induce a tolerant state through distinct molecular mechanisms that protect the host from septic shock. PMID:23019338

  14. Bioavailability of hydrocarbons to bacterial consortia during Triton X-100 mediated biodegradation in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Pęziak, Daria; Piotrowska, Aleksandra; Marecik, Roman; Lisiecki, Piotr; Woźniak, Marta; Szulc, Alicja; Ławniczak, Łukasz; Chrzanowski, Łukasz

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of Triton X-100 on the biodegradation efficiency of hexadecane and phenanthrene carried out by two bacterial consortia. It was established that the tested consortia were not able to directly uptake compounds closed in micelles. It was observed that in micellar systems the nonionic synthetic surfactant was preferentially degraded (the degradation efficiency of Triton X-100 after 21 days was 70% of the initial concentration - 500 mg/l), followed by a lesser decomposition of hydrocarbon released from the micelles (30% for hexadecane and 20% for phenanthrene). However, when hydrocarbons were used as the sole carbon source, 70% of hexadecane and 30% of phenanthrene were degraded. The degradation of the surfactant did not contribute to notable shifts in bacterial community dynamics, as determined by Real-Time PCR. The obtained results suggest that if surfactant-supplementation is to be used as an integral part of a bioremediation process, then possible bioavailability decrease due to entrapment of the contaminant into surfactant micelles should also be taken into consideration, as this phenomenon may have a negative impact on the biodegradation efficiency. Surfactant-induced mobilization of otherwise recalcitrant hydrocarbons may contribute to the spreading of contaminants in the environment and prevent their biodegradation. PMID:24432333

  15. TLR4-mediated immunomodulatory properties of the bacterial metalloprotease arazyme in preclinical tumor models.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Felipe V; Melo, Amanda C L; de Melo, Filipe M; Mourão-Sá, Diego; Silva, Priscila; Berzaghi, Rodrigo; Herbozo, Carolina C A; Coelho-Dos-Reis, Jordana; Scutti, Jorge A; Origassa, Clarice S T; Pereira, Rosana M; Juliano, Luis; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Carmona, Adriana K; Câmara, Niels O S; Tsuji, Moriya; Travassos, Luiz R; Rodrigues, Elaine G

    2016-07-01

    Despite the recent approval of new agents for metastatic melanoma, its treatment remains challenging. Moreover, few available immunotherapies induce a strong cellular immune response, and selection of the correct immunoadjuvant is crucial for overcoming this obstacle. Here, we studied the immunomodulatory properties of arazyme, a bacterial metalloprotease, which was previously shown to control metastasis in a murine melanoma B16F10-Nex2 model. The antitumor activity of arazyme was independent of its proteolytic activity, since heat-inactivated protease showed comparable properties to the active enzyme; however, the effect was dependent on an intact immune system, as antitumor properties were lost in immunodeficient mice. The protective response was IFNγ-dependent, and CD8(+) T lymphocytes were the main effector antitumor population, although B and CD4(+) T lymphocytes were also induced. Macrophages and dendritic cells were involved in the induction of the antitumor response, as arazyme activation of these cells increased both the expression of surface activation markers and proinflammatory cytokine secretion through TLR4-MyD88-TRIF-dependent, but also MAPK-dependent pathways. Arazyme was also effective in the murine breast adenocarcinoma 4T1 model, reducing primary and metastatic tumor development, and prolonging survival. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a bacterial metalloprotease interaction with TLR4 and subsequent receptor activation that promotes a proinflammatory and tumor protective response. Our results show that arazyme has immunomodulatory properties, and could be a promising novel alternative for metastatic melanoma treatment. PMID:27622031

  16. Prevalence of plasmid mediated pesticide resistant bacterial assemblages in crop fields.

    PubMed

    Umamaheswari, S; Murali, M

    2010-11-01

    Three crop fields namely paddy sugarcane and tomato exposed to bavistin [Methyl (1H-benzimidazol-2-yl) carbomate], monocrotophos[Dimethyl(E)-1-methyl-2-(methyl-carbamoyl) vinyl phosphate] and kinado plus [(EZ)-2-chloro-3-dimethoxyphosphinoyloxy-X1, X1-diethylbut-2-enamide], respectively were chosen for the present investigation to know the bacterial population and degradation of pesticides. The chemical nature of the soil and water samples from the pesticide contaminated fields was analysed along with counting of the total heterotrophic bacteria (THB), Staphylococci and Enterococcci population. Mean calcium, phosphate and biological oxygen demand were maximum in tomato field water Field water recorded maximum phophate and silicate content, whereas, sugarcane field water elicited maximum dissolved oxygen content. On the other hand, available phosphate and exchangeable potassium were maximum is sugarcane field soil. Significant variations in the bacterial population were evident between the treatments in sugarcane field soil and tomato field water exposed to monocrotophos and kinado plus, respectively In addition, significant variations between THB, Staphlyococci and Enterococci population were also evinced in both the sugarcane andtomato fields. The dominant pesticide resistant bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeuroginosa harboured plasmids and the resistant trait observed were found to be plasmid borne. PMID:21506482

  17. Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein promotes complement activation for neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis on bacterial surface

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, H; Gogami, A; Miyagawa, Y; Nanbo, A; Murakami, Y; Baba, T; Nagasawa, S

    2001-01-01

    The neutrophil bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) has both bactericidal and lipopolysaccharide-neutralizing activities. The present study suggests that BPI also plays an important role in phagocytosis of Escherichia coli by neutrophils through promotion of complement activation on the bacterial surface. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that fluorescein-labelled E. coli treated with BPI were phagocytosed in the presence of serum at two- to five-fold higher levels than phagocytosis of the bacteria without the treatment. In contrast, phagocytosis of the fluoresceined bacteria with or without treatment by BPI did not occur at all in the absence of serum. The phagocytosis stimulated by BPI and serum was dose-dependent. The effect of BPI on phagocytosis in the presence of serum was not observed on Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus). Interestingly, the complement C3b/iC3b fragments were deposited onto the bacterial surface also as a function of the BPI concentration under conditions similar to those for phagocytosis. Furthermore, the BPI-promoted phagocytosis was blocked completely by anti-C3 F(ab′)2 and partially by anti-complement receptor (CR) type 1 and/or anti-CR type 3. These findings suggest that BPI accelerates complement activation to opsonize bacteria with complement-derived fragments, leading to stimulation of phagocytosis by neutrophils via CR(s). PMID:11529944

  18. The Weak Shall Inherit: Bacteriocin-Mediated Interactions in Bacterial Populations

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, Hadeel; Lampert, Adam; Ghazaryan, Lusine; Gillor, Osnat

    2013-01-01

    Background Evolutionary arms race plays a major role in shaping biological diversity. In microbial systems, competition often involves chemical warfare and the production of bacteriocins, narrow-spectrum toxins aimed at killing closely related strains by forming pores in their target’s membrane or by degrading the target’s RNA or DNA. Although many empirical and theoretical studies describe competitive exclusion of bacteriocin-sensitive strains by producers of bacteriocins, the dynamics among producers are largely unknown. Methodology/Principal findings We used a reporter-gene assay to show that the bacterial response to bacteriocins’ treatment mirrors the inflicted damage Potent bacteriocins are lethal to competing strains, but at sublethal doses can serve as strong inducing agents, enhancing their antagonists’ bacteriocin production. In contrast, weaker bacteriocins are less toxic to their competitors and trigger mild bacteriocin expression. We used empirical and numerical models to explore the role of cross-induction in the arms race between bacteriocin-producing strains. We found that in well-mixed, unstructured environments where interactions are global, producers of weak bacteriocins are selectively advantageous and outcompete producers of potent bacteriocins. However, in spatially structured environments, where interactions are local, each producer occupies its own territory, and competition takes place only in “no man’s lands” between territories, resulting in much slower dynamics. Conclusion/Significance The models we present imply that producers of potent bacteriocins that trigger a strong response in neighboring bacteriocinogenic strains are doomed, while producers of weak bacteriocins that trigger a mild response in bacteriocinogenic strains flourish. This counter-intuitive outcome might explain the preponderance of weak bacteriocin producers in nature. However, the described scenario is prolonged in spatially structured environments thus

  19. Two apextrin-like proteins mediate extracellular and intracellular bacterial recognition in amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guangrui; Huang, Shengfeng; Yan, Xinyu; Yang, Ping; Li, Jun; Xu, Weiya; Zhang, Lingling; Wang, Ruihua; Yu, Yingcai; Yuan, Shaochun; Chen, Shangwu; Luo, Guangbin; Xu, Anlong

    2014-09-16

    Animals exploit different germ-line-encoded proteins with various domain structures to detect the signature molecules of pathogenic microbes. These molecules are known as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), and the host proteins that react with PAMPs are called pattern recognition proteins (PRPs). Here, we present a novel type of protein domain structure capable of binding to bacterial peptidoglycan (PGN) and the minimal PGN motif muramyl dipeptide (MDP). This domain is designated as apextrin C-terminal domain (ApeC), and its presence was confirmed in several invertebrate phyla and subphyla. Two apextrin-like proteins (ALP1 and ALP2) were identified in a basal chordate, the Japanese amphioxus Branchiostoma japonicum (bj). bjALP1 is a mucosal effector secreted into the gut lumen to agglutinate the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus via PGN binding. Neutralization of secreted bjALP1 by anti-bjALP1 monoclonal antibodies caused serious damage to the gut epithelium and rapid death of the animals after bacterial infection. bjALP2 is an intracellular PGN sensor that binds to TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and prevents TRAF6 from self-ubiquitination and hence from NF-κB activation. MDP was found to compete with TRAF6 for bjALP2, which released TRAF6 to activate the NF-κB pathway. BjALP1 and bjALP2 therefore play distinct and complementary functions in amphioxus gut mucosal immunity. In conclusion, discovery of the ApeC domain and the functional analyses of amphioxus ALP1 and ALP2 allowed us to define a previously undocumented type of PRP that is represented across different animal phyla. PMID:25187559

  20. Inflammatory modulating effects of low level laser therapy on iNOS expression by means of bioluminescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriyama, Yumi; Moriyama, Eduardo H.; Blackmore, Kristina; Akens, Margarete K.; Lilge, Lothar

    2005-09-01

    This study investigates the efficacy of low level laser therapy (LLLT) in modulating inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression as molecular marker of the inflammation signaling pathway. LLLT was mediated by different therapeutic wavelengths using transgenic animals with the luciferase gene under control of the iNOS gene expression. Inflammation in 30 transgenic mice (iNOS-luc mice, from FVB strain) was induced by intra-articular injection of Zymosan-A in both knee joints. Four experimental groups were treated with one of four different wavelengths (λ=635, 785, 808 and 905nm) and one not laser-irradiated control group. Laser treatment (25 mW cm-2, 5 J cm-2) was applied to the knees 15 minutes after inflammation induction. Measurements of iNOS expression were performed at multiple times (0, 3, 5, 7, 9 and 24h) post-LLLT by measuring the bioluminescence signal using a highly sensitive charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The responsivity of BLI was sufficient to demonstrate a significant increase in bioluminescence signals after laser irradiation of 635nm when compared to non-irradiated animals and the other LLLT treated groups, showing the wavelength-dependence of LLLT on iNOS expression during the acute inflammatory process.

  1. Effect of ultrasound irradiation on bacterial internalization and bacteria-mediated gene transfer to cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Kazuaki; Yamada, Ryuji; Meisaku, Hitomi; Shimizu, Nobuaki

    2014-05-01

    The present study demonstrates that ultrasound irradiation can facilitate bacteria-mediated gene delivery (bactofection). Escherichia coli modified with avidin were employed as a vehicle for delivery of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene, a model heterologous gene, into the breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Avidin-mediated binding of E. coli to MCF-7 cells enhanced the internalization of E. coli by approximately 17%, irrespective of the use of ultrasound irradiation. Furthermore, the use of ultrasound irradiation increased the internalization by approximately 5%, irrespective of the presence of avidin on the E. coli cell surface. The percentages of GFP-expressing MCF-7 cells at 24h after bactofection were below 0.5% and 2% for the case with only avidin-modification of E. coli cell surface and only ultrasound irradiation, respectively. However, combining avidin modification with the ultrasound treatment increased this value to 8%. Thus, the use of avidin-modified bacteria in conjunction with ultrasound irradiation has potential as an effective strategy for tumor-targeted bactofection. PMID:24373691

  2. Bacterial-Mediated Knockdown of Tumor Resistance to an Oncolytic Virus Enhances Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Michelle; Le Boeuf, Fabrice; Murphy, Carola; Roy, Dominic G; Falls, Theresa; Bell, John C; Tangney, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) and bacteria share the property of tumor-selective replication following systemic administration. In the case of nonpathogenic bacteria, tumor selectivity relates to their ability to grow extracellularly within tumor stroma and is therefore ideally suited to restricting the production of bacterially produced therapeutic agents to tumors. We have previously shown the ability of the type 1 interferon antagonist B18R to enhance the replication and spread of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) by overcoming related cellular innate immunity. In this study, we utilized nonpathogenic bacteria (E. coli) expressing B18R to facilitate tumor-specific production of B18R, resulting in a microenvironment depleted of bioactive antiviral cytokine, thus “preconditioning” the tumor to enhance subsequent tumor destruction by the OV. Both in vitro and in vivo infection by VSVΔ51 was greatly enhanced by B18R produced from E. coli. Moreover, a significant increase in therapeutic efficacy resulted from intravenous (IV) injection of bacteria to tumor-bearing mice 5 days prior to IV VSVΔ51 administration, as evidenced by a significant reduction in tumor growth and increased survival in mice. Our strategy is the first example where two such diverse microorganisms are rationally combined and demonstrates the feasibility of combining complementary microorganisms to improve therapeutic outcome. PMID:24569832

  3. Ankyrin-mediated self-protection during cell invasion by the bacterial predator Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Carey; Cadby, Ian T.; Till, Rob; Bui, Nhat Khai; Lerner, Thomas R.; Hughes, William S.; Lee, David J.; Alderwick, Luke J.; Vollmer, Waldemar; Sockett, Elizabeth R.; Lovering, Andrew L.

    2015-01-01

    Predatory Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus are natural antimicrobial organisms, killing other bacteria by whole-cell invasion. Self-protection against prey-metabolizing enzymes is important for the evolution of predation. Initial prey entry involves the predator's peptidoglycan DD-endopeptidases, which decrosslink cell walls and prevent wasteful entry by a second predator. Here we identify and characterize a self-protection protein from B. bacteriovorus, Bd3460, which displays an ankyrin-based fold common to intracellular pathogens of eukaryotes. Co-crystal structures reveal Bd3460 complexation of dual targets, binding a conserved epitope of each of the Bd3459 and Bd0816 endopeptidases. Complexation inhibits endopeptidase activity and cell wall decrosslinking in vitro. Self-protection is vital — ΔBd3460 Bdellovibrio deleteriously decrosslink self-peptidoglycan upon invasion, adopt a round morphology, and lose predatory capacity and cellular integrity. Our analysis provides the first mechanistic examination of self-protection in Bdellovibrio, documents protection-multiplicity for products of two different genomic loci, and reveals an important evolutionary adaptation to an invasive predatory bacterial lifestyle. PMID:26626559

  4. Structure and primase-mediated activation of a bacterial dodecameric replicative helicase

    PubMed Central

    Bazin, Alexandre; Cherrier, Mickaël V.; Gutsche, Irina; Timmins, Joanna; Terradot, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Replicative helicases are essential ATPases that unwind DNA to initiate chromosomal replication. While bacterial replicative DnaB helicases are hexameric, Helicobacter pylori DnaB (HpDnaB) was found to form double hexamers, similar to some archaeal and eukaryotic replicative helicases. Here we present a structural and functional analysis of HpDnaB protein during primosome formation. The crystal structure of the HpDnaB at 6.7 Å resolution reveals a dodecameric organization consisting of two hexamers assembled via their N-terminal rings in a stack-twisted mode. Using fluorescence anisotropy we show that HpDnaB dodecamer interacts with single-stranded DNA in the presence of ATP but has a low DNA unwinding activity. Multi-angle light scattering and small angle X-ray scattering demonstrate that interaction with the DnaG primase helicase-binding domain dissociates the helicase dodecamer into single ringed primosomes. Functional assays on the proteins and associated complexes indicate that these single ringed primosomes are the most active form of the helicase for ATP hydrolysis, DNA binding and unwinding. These findings shed light onto an activation mechanism of HpDnaB by the primase that might be relevant in other bacteria and possibly other organisms exploiting dodecameric helicases for DNA replication. PMID:26264665

  5. Ankyrin-mediated self-protection during cell invasion by the bacterial predator Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Carey; Cadby, Ian T; Till, Rob; Bui, Nhat Khai; Lerner, Thomas R; Hughes, William S; Lee, David J; Alderwick, Luke J; Vollmer, Waldemar; Sockett, R Elizabeth; Sockett, Elizabeth R; Lovering, Andrew L

    2015-01-01

    Predatory Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus are natural antimicrobial organisms, killing other bacteria by whole-cell invasion. Self-protection against prey-metabolizing enzymes is important for the evolution of predation. Initial prey entry involves the predator's peptidoglycan DD-endopeptidases, which decrosslink cell walls and prevent wasteful entry by a second predator. Here we identify and characterize a self-protection protein from B. bacteriovorus, Bd3460, which displays an ankyrin-based fold common to intracellular pathogens of eukaryotes. Co-crystal structures reveal Bd3460 complexation of dual targets, binding a conserved epitope of each of the Bd3459 and Bd0816 endopeptidases. Complexation inhibits endopeptidase activity and cell wall decrosslinking in vitro. Self-protection is vital - ΔBd3460 Bdellovibrio deleteriously decrosslink self-peptidoglycan upon invasion, adopt a round morphology, and lose predatory capacity and cellular integrity. Our analysis provides the first mechanistic examination of self-protection in Bdellovibrio, documents protection-multiplicity for products of two different genomic loci, and reveals an important evolutionary adaptation to an invasive predatory bacterial lifestyle. PMID:26626559

  6. hPepT1 mediates bacterial tripeptide fMLP uptake in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Charrier, Laetitia; Driss, Adel; Yan, Yutao; Nduati, Vivienne; Klapproth, Jan-Michael; Sitaraman, Shanthi V; Merlin, Didier

    2006-05-01

    Here, we examined hPepT1 expression in the monocytic cell line, KG-1. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that hPepT1 is expressed in KG-1 cells, while cDNA cloning and direct sequencing confirmed the sequence of KG-1 hPepT1 (accession number, AY634368). Immunoblotting of cell lysates from KG-1 cells or macrophages isolated from human peripheral blood revealed a approximately 100 kDa immunoreactive band mainly present in the membrane fraction. Uptake experiments showed that the transport of 20 microM radiolabeled Gly-Sarcosine ([14C]Gly-Sar) in KG-1 cells was Na+, Cl- dependent and disodium 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (DIDS)-sensitive. In addition, hPepT1 activity was likely to be coupled to a Na+/H+ exchanger, as evidenced by the fact that [14C]Gly-Sar uptake was not affected by the absence of Na+ when cells were incubated at low pH (5.2). Interestingly, hPepT1-mediated transport was reduced in KG-1 cells incubated at low pH as it was also observed in nonpolarized Caco2-BBE cells. This pattern of pH-dependence is due to a disruption of the driving force of hPepT1-mediated transport events. This was supported by our finding that nonpolarized cells, Caco2-BBE cells and KG-1 cells, have an increased permeability to H+ when compared to polarized Caco2-BBE cells. Finally, we showed that hPepT1 is responsible for transporting fMLP into undifferentiated and differentiated (macrophage-like) KG-1 cells. Together, these results show that hPepT1 is expressed in nonpolarized immune cells, such as macrophages, where the transporter functions best at the physiological pH 7.2. Furthermore, we provide evidence for hPepT1-mediated fMLP transport, which might constitute a novel immune cell activation pathway during intestinal inflammation. PMID:16568107

  7. Impacts of pH-mediated EPS structure on probiotic bacterial pili-whey proteins interactions.

    PubMed

    Burgain, Jennifer; Scher, Joel; Lebeer, Sarah; Vanderleyden, Jos; Corgneau, Magda; Guerin, Justine; Caillet, Céline; Duval, Jérôme F L; Francius, Gregory; Gaiani, Claire

    2015-10-01

    Probiotic bacteria are routinely incorporated into dairy foods because of the health benefits they can provide when consumed. In this work, the marked pH-dependence of the pili/EPS organization at the outer surface of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is characterized in detail by Single Cell Force Microscopy and cell electrophoretic mobility measurements analyzed according to formalisms for nanomechanical contact and soft particle electrokinetics, respectively. At pH 6.8, LGG pili are easily accessible by AFM tips functionalized with whey proteins for specific binding, while at pH 4.8 the collapsed EPS surface layer significantly immobilized the LGG pili. This resulted in their reduced accessibility to the specific whey-coated AFM tip, and to stronger whey protein-pili rupture forces. Thus, pili interactions with whey proteins are screened to an extent that depends on the pH-mediated embedment of the pili within the EPS layer. PMID:26209966

  8. Bacterial Synthesis of Unusual Sulfonamide and Sulfone Antibiotics by Flavoenzyme-Mediated Sulfur Dioxide Capture.

    PubMed

    Baunach, Martin; Ding, Ling; Willing, Karsten; Hertweck, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Sulfa drugs, such as sulfonilamide and dapsone, are classical antibiotics that have been in clinical use worldwide. Despite the relatively simple architectures, practically no natural products are known to feature such aromatic sulfonamide or diarylsulfone substructures. We report the unexpected discovery of three fully unprecedented, sulfonyl-bridged alkaloid dimers (sulfadixiamycins A-C) from recombinant Streptomyces species harboring the entire xiamycin biosynthesis gene cluster. Sulfadixiamycins exhibit moderate antimycobacterial activities and potent antibiotic activities even against multidrug-resistant bacteria. Gene inactivation, complementation, and biotransformation experiments revealed that a flavin-dependent enzyme (XiaH) plays a key role in sulfadixiamycin biosynthesis. XiaH mediates a radical-based, three-component reaction involving two equivalents of xiamycin and sulfur dioxide, which is reminiscent of radical styrene/SO2 copolymerization. PMID:26366473

  9. Regulation of adenovirus-mediated elafin transgene expression by bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Simpson, A J; Cunningham, G A; Porteous, D J; Haslett, C; Sallenave, J M

    2001-07-20

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a mediator of inflammatory lung injury. Selective augmentation of host defense molecules such as elafin (an elastase inhibitor with antimicrobial activity) at the onset of pulmonary inflammation is an attractive potential therapeutic strategy. The aim of this study was to determine whether elafin expression could be induced by LPS administered after transfection with adenovirus (Ad) encoding human elafin downstream of the murine cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter (known to be potentially responsive to LPS). In addition, we aimed to determine the effect of local elafin augmentation on neutrophil migration to the lung. LPS significantly up-regulated elafin expression from pulmonary epithelial cells transfected with Ad-elafin in vitro. In murine airways expression of human elafin was achieved using doses low enough (3 x 10(7) plaque forming units) to circumvent overt vector-induced inflammation. LPS significantly up-regulated human elafin secretion in murine airways treated with Ad-elafin [117 ng/ml in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) after LPS administration, 5.9 ng/ml after PBS, p < 0.01)]. Over-expression of elafin significantly augmented LPS-mediated neutrophil migration into the airways in vivo (1.30 x 10(6) neutrophils in BALF after Ad-elafin/LPS treatment, 0.54 x 10(6) after Ad-lacZ/LPS (p < 0.05), 0.63 x 10(6) after PBS/LPS (p < 0.05)) and significantly enhanced human neutrophil migration in vitro. These data suggest novel functions for elafin in neutrophil migration, and that judicious selection of promoters may allow single, low-dose adenoviral administration to effect inflammation-specific expression of potentially therapeutic transgenes. PMID:11485631

  10. The application of loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) in food testing for bacterial pathogens and fungal contaminants.

    PubMed

    Niessen, Ludwig; Luo, Jie; Denschlag, Carla; Vogel, Rudi F

    2013-12-01

    Bacterial pathogens and toxicants, parasites as well as mycotoxin producing fungi are the major biotic factors influencing the safety of food. Moreover, viral infections and prions may be present as quasi biotic challenging factors. A vast array of culture dependent analytical methods and protocols for food safety testing has been developed during the past decades. Presently, protocols involving molecular biological techniques such as PCR-based nucleic acid amplification and hybridization have become available for many of the known pathogens with their major advantages being rapidness, high sensitivity and specificity. However, this type of assays is still quite labor- and cost intensive and mostly cannot be operated directly in the field. Recently, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) of DNA has emerged as an alternative to the use of PCR-based methods not only in food safety testing but also in a wide array of application. Its advantages over PCR-based techniques are even shorter reaction time, no need for specific equipment, high sensitivity and specificity as well as comparably low susceptibility to inhibitors present in sample materials which enables detection of the pathogens in sample materials even without time consuming sample preparation. The present article presents a critical review of the application of LAMP-based methods and their usefulness in detecting and identifying food borne bacterial pathogens and toxicants as well as mycotoxin producing food borne fungi as compared to other methods. Moreover does it elaborate on new developments in the design and automation of LAMP-based assays and their implications for the future developments of food testing. PMID:24010598

  11. Specific changes in the Arabidopsis proteome in response to bacterial challenge: differentiating basal and R-gene mediated resistance.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alexandra M E; Thomas, Vincent; Truman, Bill; Lilley, Kathryn; Mansfield, John; Grant, Murray

    2004-06-01

    Alterations in the proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves during early responses to challenge by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (DC3000) were analysed using two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis. Protein changes characteristic of the establishment of basal resistance and R-gene mediated resistance were examined by comparing responses to DC3000, a hrp mutant and DC3000 expressing avrRpm1 respectively. The abundance of selected transcripts was also analysed in GeneChip experiments. Here we present data from the soluble fraction of leaf protein, highlighting changes in two antioxidant enzyme groups; the glutathione S-transferases (GSTs F2, F6, F7 and F8) and peroxiredoxins (PrxA, B and IIE). Members of both enzyme groups showed signs of specific post-translational modifications, represented by multiple spots on gels. We suggest that oxidation of specific residues is responsible for some of the spot shifts. All forms of the GST proteins identified here increased following inoculation with bacteria. GSTF8 showed particularly dynamic responses to pathogen challenge, the corresponding transcript was significantly up-regulated by 2 h after inoculation, and the protein showed post-translational modifications specific to an incompatible interaction. Differential changes were observed with the peroxiredoxin proteins; PrxIIE and to a lesser extent PrxB, no change was observed with PrxA, but a truncated form PrxA-L was greatly reduced in abundance following bacterial challenges. Our data suggest that bacterial challenge generally induces Prxs and the antioxidants GSTs, however individual members of these families may be specifically modified dependent upon the virulence of the DC3000 strain and outcome of the interaction. Finally, proteomic and transcriptomic data derived from the same inoculation system are compared and the advantages offered by 2D gel analysis discussed in light of our results. PMID:15276439

  12. Host Genetic Background Influences the Response to the Opportunistic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection Altering Cell-Mediated Immunity and Bacterial Replication

    PubMed Central

    Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Rossi, Giacomo; Cigana, Cristina; De Fino, Ida; Iraqi, Fuad A.; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of healthcare-associated infections including pneumonia, bloodstream, urinary tract, and surgical site infections. The clinical outcome of P. aeruginosa infections may be extremely variable among individuals at risk and patients affected by cystic fibrosis. However, risk factors for P. aeruginosa infection remain largely unknown. To identify and track the host factors influencing P. aeruginosa lung infections, inbred immunocompetent mouse strains were screened in a pneumonia model system. A/J, BALB/cJ, BALB/cAnNCrl, BALB/cByJ, C3H/HeOuJ, C57BL/6J, C57BL/6NCrl, DBA/2J, and 129S2/SvPasCRL mice were infected with P. aeruginosa clinical strain and monitored for body weight and mortality up to seven days. The most deviant survival phenotypes were observed for A/J, 129S2/SvPasCRL and DBA/2J showing high susceptibility while BALB/cAnNCrl and C3H/HeOuJ showing more resistance to P. aeruginosa infection. Next, one of the most susceptible and resistant mouse strains were characterized for their deviant clinical and immunological phenotype by scoring bacterial count, cell-mediated immunity, cytokines and chemokines profile and lung pathology in an early time course. Susceptible A/J mice showed significantly higher bacterial burden, higher cytokines and chemokines levels but lower leukocyte recruitment, particularly neutrophils, when compared to C3H/HeOuJ resistant mice. Pathologic scores showed lower inflammatory severity, reduced intraluminal and interstitial inflammation extent, bronchial and parenchymal involvement and diminished alveolar damage in the lungs of A/J when compared to C3H/HeOuJ. Our findings indicate that during an early phase of infection a prompt inflammatory response in the airways set the conditions for a non-permissive environment to P. aeruginosa replication and lock the spread to other organs. Host gene(s) may have a role in the reduction of cell-mediated immunity playing a critical role in the control of P

  13. Host genetic background influences the response to the opportunistic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection altering cell-mediated immunity and bacterial replication.

    PubMed

    De Simone, Maura; Spagnuolo, Lorenza; Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Rossi, Giacomo; Cigana, Cristina; De Fino, Ida; Iraqi, Fuad A; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of healthcare-associated infections including pneumonia, bloodstream, urinary tract, and surgical site infections. The clinical outcome of P. aeruginosa infections may be extremely variable among individuals at risk and patients affected by cystic fibrosis. However, risk factors for P. aeruginosa infection remain largely unknown. To identify and track the host factors influencing P. aeruginosa lung infections, inbred immunocompetent mouse strains were screened in a pneumonia model system. A/J, BALB/cJ, BALB/cAnNCrl, BALB/cByJ, C3H/HeOuJ, C57BL/6J, C57BL/6NCrl, DBA/2J, and 129S2/SvPasCRL mice were infected with P. aeruginosa clinical strain and monitored for body weight and mortality up to seven days. The most deviant survival phenotypes were observed for A/J, 129S2/SvPasCRL and DBA/2J showing high susceptibility while BALB/cAnNCrl and C3H/HeOuJ showing more resistance to P. aeruginosa infection. Next, one of the most susceptible and resistant mouse strains were characterized for their deviant clinical and immunological phenotype by scoring bacterial count, cell-mediated immunity, cytokines and chemokines profile and lung pathology in an early time course. Susceptible A/J mice showed significantly higher bacterial burden, higher cytokines and chemokines levels but lower leukocyte recruitment, particularly neutrophils, when compared to C3H/HeOuJ resistant mice. Pathologic scores showed lower inflammatory severity, reduced intraluminal and interstitial inflammation extent, bronchial and parenchymal involvement and diminished alveolar damage in the lungs of A/J when compared to C3H/HeOuJ. Our findings indicate that during an early phase of infection a prompt inflammatory response in the airways set the conditions for a non-permissive environment to P. aeruginosa replication and lock the spread to other organs. Host gene(s) may have a role in the reduction of cell-mediated immunity playing a critical role in the control of P

  14. Glycoconjugates as Mediators of Nitric Oxide Production upon Exposure to Bacterial Spores by Macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiani, Mohamed; Soderberg, Lee; Tarasenko, Olga

    2011-06-01

    Phagocytes generate nitric oxide (NO) in large quantities to combat bacteria. The spore-producing Gram-positive organisms of Bacillus cereus family are causative agents from mild to a life threatening infection in humans and domestic animals. Our group have shown that glycoconjugates (GCs) activate macrophages and enhance killing of Bacillus spores. In this investigation, we will explore the effect of different GCs structures on NO production. The objective of this study is to study effects of GCs 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 on NO release upon exposure to B. cereus and Bacillus anthracis spores by macrophages. Our results demonstrated that GCs activated macrophages and increased NO production using studied GCs ligands compared to macrophage only (p<0.001). GC2 and GC8 were able to further increase NO production in macrophages compared to the B. anthracis spores treated macrophages (p<0.001). Our finding suggests that GCs could be used as potential mediators of NO production in macrophages to fight B. anthracis and other pathogens.

  15. Self-potential and Geochemical Measurements of Microbially Mediated Bacterial Sulfate Reduction in Saturated Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Wolf, L. W.; Lee, M.; Saunders, J.

    2004-12-01

    In situ bioremediation is a non-invasive groundwater remediation technique that stimulates microorganisms to catalyze desirable redox reactions. Using a series of laboratory experiments, we explored the suitability of self-potential methods for monitoring bioremediation of metals contamination. Each experiment was designed to quantify the relationship between electrical potential and changing redox conditions and to determine factors influencing this relationship. In the first experiment, we introduced sulfate-reducting bacteria (SRB) into a Plexiglas tank containing autoclaved quartz sand saturated with an iron-rich Desulfovibrio (a sulfate-reducing bacteria) media. An array of non-polarizable electrodes positioned on the sediment surface was used to record electrical potentials both prior to and after inoculation for about 40 days. Changes in water chemistry were determined through a series of samples taken before, during and after the experiments. A significant decrease in total iron occurred after 3 days near the injection site; however, a clearly discernable decrease in electrical potential was not perceived until ~ day 10. Contoured SP data indicate that the redox front migrated away from the injection site over time. This change probably reflects the changing water chemistry as well as bacterial migration, as iron close to the injection site was consumed. The second experiment consisted of 4 glass columns, two of which were inoculated with SRB. The first pair contained sediment similar to the tank experiment saturated with an iron-rich media. The second pair contained the same sediment but was saturated with acid-mine drainage (AMD) collected from a contaminated field site. Each column was identically instrumented with a system of four electrodes. In the active columns, an increase in pH, a decrease in sulfate and a significant decrease in total iron in the media column accompany a decrease in electrical potential after about 10 days. Results of the study

  16. RPC detector characteristics and performance for INO-ICAL experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.; Gaur, A.; Hasbuddin, Md.; Naimuddin, Md.

    2016-03-01

    The India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) is an approved multi-institutional collaboration neutrino physics project, aimed at building an underground laboratory in the southern India. INO will utilize a large magnetized Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) detector to study the atmospheric neutrinos, and to explore the unresolved issues related to neutrinos. The Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs), interleaved in between iron absorber layers, are going to be used as the active signal readouts for the ICAL experiment at INO. The research and development is carried out to find structural quality and electrical response for RPC electrode materials available within local domain. The assembled 2 mm gap RPCs are tested using cosmic muons for their detection performance. The study also incorporates preliminary results on detector timing and signal induced charge measurements.

  17. Effects of ghrelin on protein expression of antioxidative enzymes and iNOS in the rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Dobutovic, Branislava; Sudar, Emina; Tepavcevic, Snezana; Djordjevic, Jelena; Djordjevic, Ana; Radojcic, Marija

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We investigated the effects of ghrelin on protein expression of the liver antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutases (SODs), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR), nuclear factor κB (NFκB) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Furthermore, we aimed to investigate whether extracellular regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2) and protein kinase B (Akt) are involved in ghrelin-regulated liver antioxidant enzymes and iNOS protein expression. Material and methods Male Wistar rats were treated with ghrelin (0.3 nmol/5 µl) injected into the lateral cerebral ventricle every 24 h for 5 days, and 2 h after the last treatment the animals were sacrificed and the liver excised. The Western blot method was used to determine expression of antioxidant enzymes, iNOS, phosphorylation of Akt, ERK1/2 and nuclear factor κB (NFκB) subunits 50 and 65. Results There was significantly higher protein expression of CuZnSOD (p < 0.001), MnSOD (p < 0.001), CAT (p < 0.001), GPx, (p < 0.001), and GR (p < 0.01) in the liver isolated from ghrelin-treated animals compared with control animals. In contrast, ghrelin significantly (p < 0.01) reduced protein expression of iNOS. In addition, phosphorylation of NFκB subunits p65 and p50 was significantly (p < 0.001 for p65; p < 0.05 for p50) reduced by ghrelin when compared with controls. Phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and of Akt was significantly higher in ghrelin-treated than in control animals (p < 0.05 for ERK1/2; p < 0.01 for Akt). Conclusions The results show that activation of Akt and ERK1/2 is involved in ghrelin-mediated regulation of protein expression of antioxidant enzymes and iNOS in the rat liver. PMID:25276168

  18. A Bacterial Parasite Effector Mediates Insect Vector Attraction in Host Plants Independently of Developmental Changes.

    PubMed

    Orlovskis, Zigmunds; Hogenhout, Saskia A

    2016-01-01

    Parasites can take over their hosts and trigger dramatic changes in host appearance and behavior that are typically interpreted as extended phenotypes that promote parasite survival and fitness. For example, Toxoplasma gondii is thought to manipulate the behaviors of infected rodents to aid transmission to cats and parasitic trematodes of the genus Ribeiroia alter limb development in their amphibian hosts to facilitate predation of the latter by birds. Plant parasites and pathogens also reprogram host development and morphology. However, whereas some parasite-induced morphological alterations may have a direct benefit to the fitness of the parasite and may therefore be adaptive, other host alterations may be side effects of parasite infections having no adaptive effects on parasite fitness. Phytoplasma parasites of plants often induce the development of leaf-like flowers (phyllody) in their host plants, and we previously found that the phytoplasma effector SAP54 generates these leaf-like flowers via the degradation of plant MADS-box transcription factors (MTFs), which regulate all major aspects of development in plants. Leafhoppers prefer to reproduce on phytoplasma-infected and SAP54-trangenic plants leading to the hypothesis that leafhopper vectors are attracted to plants with leaf-like flowers. Surprisingly, here we show that leafhopper attraction occurs independently of the presence of leaf-like flowers. First, the leafhoppers were also attracted to SAP54 transgenic plants without leaf-like flowers and to single leaves of these plants. Moreover, leafhoppers were not attracted to leaf-like flowers of MTF-mutant plants without the presence of SAP54. Thus, the primary role of SAP54 is to attract leafhopper vectors, which spread the phytoplasmas, and the generation of leaf-like flowers may be secondary or a side effect of the SAP54-mediated degradation of MTFs. PMID:27446117

  19. A Bacterial Parasite Effector Mediates Insect Vector Attraction in Host Plants Independently of Developmental Changes

    PubMed Central

    Orlovskis, Zigmunds; Hogenhout, Saskia A.

    2016-01-01

    Parasites can take over their hosts and trigger dramatic changes in host appearance and behavior that are typically interpreted as extended phenotypes that promote parasite survival and fitness. For example, Toxoplasma gondii is thought to manipulate the behaviors of infected rodents to aid transmission to cats and parasitic trematodes of the genus Ribeiroia alter limb development in their amphibian hosts to facilitate predation of the latter by birds. Plant parasites and pathogens also reprogram host development and morphology. However, whereas some parasite-induced morphological alterations may have a direct benefit to the fitness of the parasite and may therefore be adaptive, other host alterations may be side effects of parasite infections having no adaptive effects on parasite fitness. Phytoplasma parasites of plants often induce the development of leaf-like flowers (phyllody) in their host plants, and we previously found that the phytoplasma effector SAP54 generates these leaf-like flowers via the degradation of plant MADS-box transcription factors (MTFs), which regulate all major aspects of development in plants. Leafhoppers prefer to reproduce on phytoplasma-infected and SAP54-trangenic plants leading to the hypothesis that leafhopper vectors are attracted to plants with leaf-like flowers. Surprisingly, here we show that leafhopper attraction occurs independently of the presence of leaf-like flowers. First, the leafhoppers were also attracted to SAP54 transgenic plants without leaf-like flowers and to single leaves of these plants. Moreover, leafhoppers were not attracted to leaf-like flowers of MTF-mutant plants without the presence of SAP54. Thus, the primary role of SAP54 is to attract leafhopper vectors, which spread the phytoplasmas, and the generation of leaf-like flowers may be secondary or a side effect of the SAP54-mediated degradation of MTFs. PMID:27446117

  20. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification of specific endoglucanase gene sequence for detection of the bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Lenarčič, Rok; Morisset, Dany; Pirc, Manca; Llop, Pablo; Ravnikar, Maja; Dreo, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    The increased globalization of crops production and processing industries also promotes the side-effects of more rapid and efficient spread of plant pathogens. To prevent the associated economic losses, and particularly those related to bacterial diseases where their management relies on removal of the infected material from production, simple, easy-to-perform, rapid and cost-effective tests are needed. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assays that target 16S rRNA, fliC and egl genes were compared and evaluated as on-site applications. The assay with the best performance was that targeted to the egl gene, which shows high analytical specificity for diverse strains of the betaproteobacterium Ralstonia solanacearum, including its non-European and non-race 3 biovar 2 strains. The additional melting curve analysis provides confirmation of the test results. According to our extensive assessment, the egl LAMP assay requires minimum sample preparation (a few minutes of boiling) for the identification of pure cultures and ooze from symptomatic material, and it can also be used in a high-throughput format in the laboratory. This provides sensitive and reliable detection of R. solanacearum strains of different phylotypes. PMID:24763488

  1. Ambient UV-B exposure reduces the binding of ofloxacin with bacterial DNA gyrase and induces DNA damage mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jyoti; Dwivedi, Ashish; Mujtaba, Syed Faiz; Singh, Krishna P; Pal, Manish Kumar; Chopra, Deepti; Goyal, Shruti; Srivastav, Ajeet K; Dubey, Divya; Gupta, Shailendra K; Haldar, Chandana; Ray, Ratan Singh

    2016-04-01

    Ofloxacin (OFLX) is a broad spectrum antibiotic, which generates photo-products under sunlight exposure. Previous studies have failed to explain the attenuated anti-bacterial activity of OFLX. The study was extended to explore the unknown molecular mechanism of photogenotoxicity on human skin cell line (HaCaT) under environmental UV-B irradiation. Photochemically OFLX generates ROS and caused 2'-dGuO photodegradation. We have addressed the binding affinity of OFLX and its photo-products against DNA gyrase. Significant free radical generation such as (1)O2, O2(•-) and (•)OH reduces antioxidants and demonstrated the ROS mediated OFLX phototoxicity. However, the formation of micronuclei and CPDs showed photogenotoxic potential of OFLX. OFLX induced cell cycle arrest in sub-G1 peak. OFLX triggers apoptosis via permeabilization of mitochondrial membrane with the downregulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and caspase-3 whereas, upregulation of pro-apoptotic Bax and Cyto-C proteins. Our study illustrated that binding affinity of OFLX photo-products with DNA gyrase was mainly responsible for the attenuated antimicrobial activity. It was proved through molecular docking study. Thus, study suggests that sunlight exposure should avoid by drug users especially during peak hours for their safety from photosensitivity. Clinicians may guide patients regarding the safer use of photosensitive drugs during treatment. PMID:26812543

  2. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for rapid detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mona; Soliman, Hatem; El-Matbouli, Mansour

    2008-08-27

    A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay was developed for rapid, specific and sensitive detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum in 1 h without thermal cycling. A fragment of R. salmoninarum p57 gene was amplified at 63 degrees C in the presence of Bst polymerase and a specially designed primer mixture. The specificity of the BKD-LAMP assay was demonstrated by the absence of any cross reaction with other bacterial strains, followed by restriction digestion of the amplified products. Detections of BKD-LAMP amplicons by visual inspection, agrose gel electrophoresis, and real-time monitoring using a turbidimeter were equivalently sensitive. The BKD-LAMP assay has the sensitivity of the nested PCR method, and 10 times the sensitivity of one-round PCR assay. The lower detection limit of BKD-LAMP and nested PCR is 1 pg genomic R. salmoninarum DNA, compared to 10 pg genomic R. salmoninarum DNA for one-round PCR assay. In comparison to other available diagnostic methods, the BKD-LAMP assay is rapid, simple, sensitive, specific, and cost effective with a high potential for field application. PMID:18924379

  3. Bacterial Colonization and the Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase in Murine Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Eric; Reichner, Jonathan; Robinson Bostom, Leslie; Mastrofrancesco, Balduino; Henry, William; Albina, Jorge

    2002-01-01

    The expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in two different murine wound models was investigated. Animals were subjected to either full-thickness linear skin incision with subcutaneous implantation of sterile polyvinyl alcohol sponges, or to 1.5 × 1.5-cm dorsal skin excision. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction detected iNOS mRNA in all cell samples retrieved from the sponges. Immunoblotting of lysates of inflammatory cells harvested from the sponges failed to detect iNOS protein, and immunohistochemistry of the incisional wound was mildly positive. Inflammatory cells of excisional wounds stained strongly positive for iNOS. Cutaneous wounds were found to be colonized with Staphylococcus aureus. The detection of iNOS in cells from sponges inoculated in vivo with heat-killed bacteria and the reduction of immunohistochemical signal for iNOS in excisional wounds of animals treated with antibiotics support a role of bacteria in the induction of iNOS in wounds. The expression of iNOS in excisional wounds requires interferon-γ and functional lymphocytes because interferon-γ knockout and SCID-Beige mice exhibited attenuated iNOS staining in excisional wounds. The expression of iNOS in the inflammatory cells of murine wounds is a response to bacterial colonization and not part of the normal repair process elicited by sterile tissue injury. PMID:12466130

  4. ER stress upregulated PGE2/IFNγ-induced IL-6 expression and down-regulated iNOS expression in glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoi, Toru; Honda, Miya; Oba, Tatsuya; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2013-12-01

    The disruption of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) function can lead to neurodegenerative disorders, in which inflammation has also been implicated. We investigated the possible correlation between ER stress and immune function using glial cells. We demonstrated that ER stress synergistically enhanced prostaglandin (PG) E2 + interferon (IFN) γ-induced interleukin (IL)-6 production. This effect was mediated through cAMP. Immune-activated glial cells produced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Interestingly, ER stress inhibited PGE2 + IFNγ-induced iNOS expression. Similar results were obtained when cells were treated with dbcAMP + IFNγ. Thus, cAMP has a dual effect on immune reactions; cAMP up-regulated IL-6 expression, but down-regulated iNOS expression under ER stress. Therefore, our results suggest a link between ER stress and immune reactions in neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Mec1, INO80, and the PAF1 complex cooperate to limit transcription replication conflicts through RNAPII removal during replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Jérôme; Gerhold, Christian-Benedikt; Tosi, Alessandro; Hustedt, Nicole; Seeber, Andrew; Sack, Ragna; Herzog, Franz; Pasero, Philippe; Shimada, Kenji; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Gasser, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how cells ensure DNA replication in the face of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII)-mediated transcription, especially under conditions of replicative stress. Here we present genetic and proteomic analyses from budding yeast that uncover links between the DNA replication checkpoint sensor Mec1–Ddc2 (ATR–ATRIP), the chromatin remodeling complex INO80C (INO80 complex), and the transcription complex PAF1C (PAF1 complex). We found that a subset of chromatin-bound RNAPII is degraded in a manner dependent on Mec1, INO80, and PAF1 complexes in cells exposed to hydroxyurea (HU). On HU, Mec1 triggers the efficient removal of PAF1C and RNAPII from transcribed genes near early firing origins. Failure to evict RNAPII correlates inversely with recovery from replication stress: paf1Δ cells, like ino80 and mec1 mutants, fail to restart forks efficiently after stalling. Our data reveal unexpected synergies between INO80C, Mec1, and PAF1C in the maintenance of genome integrity and suggest a mechanism of RNAPII degradation that reduces transcription–replication fork collision. PMID:26798134

  6. Stimulation of Microbially Mediated Arsenic Release in Bangladesh Aquifers by Young Carbon Indicated by Radiocarbon Analysis of Sedimentary Bacterial Lipids.

    PubMed

    Whaley-Martin, K J; Mailloux, B J; van Geen, A; Bostick, B C; Silvern, R F; Kim, C; Ahmed, K M; Choudhury, I; Slater, G F

    2016-07-19

    The sources of reduced carbon driving the microbially mediated release of arsenic to shallow groundwater in Bangladesh remain poorly understood. Using radiocarbon analysis of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and potential carbon pools, the abundance and carbon sources of the active, sediment-associated, in situ bacterial communities inhabiting shallow aquifers (<30 m) at two sites in Araihazar, Bangladesh, were investigated. At both sites, sedimentary organic carbon (SOC) Δ(14)C signatures of -631 ± 54‰ (n = 12) were significantly depleted relative to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of +24 ± 30‰ and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of -230 ± 100‰. Sediment-associated PLFA Δ(14)C signatures (n = 10) at Site F (-167‰ to +20‰) and Site B (-163‰ to +21‰) were highly consistent and indicated utilization of carbon sources younger than the SOC, likely from the DOC pool. Sediment-associated PLFA Δ(14)C signatures were consistent with previously determined Δ(14)C signatures of microbial DNA sampled from groundwater at Site F indicating that the carbon source for these two components of the subsurface microbial community is consistent and is temporally stable over the two years between studies. These results demonstrate that the utilization of relatively young carbon sources by the subsurface microbial community occurs at sites with varying hydrology. Further they indicate that these young carbon sources drive the metabolism of the more abundant sediment-associated microbial communities that are presumably more capable of Fe reduction and associated release of As. This implies that an introduction of younger carbon to as of yet unaffected sediments (such as those comprising the deeper Pleistocene aquifer) could stimulate microbial communities and result in arsenic release. PMID:27333443

  7. Cigarette Smoke Exposure Impairs Pulmonary Bacterial Clearance and Alveolar Macrophage Complement-Mediated Phagocytosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae▿

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, John C.; Aronoff, David M.; Curtis, Jeffrey L.; Goel, Deepti; O'Brien, Edmund; Mancuso, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cigarette smoke exposure increases the risk of pulmonary and invasive infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, the most commonly isolated organism from patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Despite this association, the mechanisms by which cigarette smoke exposure diminishes host defense against S. pneumoniae infections are poorly understood. In this study, we compared the responses of BALB/c mice following an intratracheal challenge with S. pneumoniae after 5 weeks of exposure to room air or cigarette smoke in a whole-body exposure chamber in vivo and the effects of cigarette smoke on alveolar macrophage phagocytosis of S. pneumoniae in vitro. Bacterial burdens in cigarette smoke-exposed mice were increased at 24 and 48 h postinfection, and this was accompanied by a more pronounced clinical appearance of illness, hypothermia, and increased lung homogenate cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). We also found greater numbers of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid recovered from cigarette smoke-exposed mice following a challenge with heat-killed S. pneumoniae. Interestingly, overnight culture of alveolar macrophages with 1% cigarette smoke extract, a level that did not affect alveolar macrophage viability, reduced complement-mediated phagocytosis of S. pneumoniae, while the ingestion of unopsonized bacteria or IgG-coated microspheres was not affected. This murine model provides robust additional support to the hypothesis that cigarette smoke exposure increases the risk of pneumococcal pneumonia and defines a novel cellular mechanism to help explain this immunosuppressive effect. PMID:20008540

  8. Prophage-Mediated Dynamics of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ Populations, the Destructive Bacterial Pathogens of Citrus Huanglongbing

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lijuan; Powell, Charles A.; Li, Wenbin; Irey, Mike; Duan, Yongping

    2013-01-01

    Prophages are highly dynamic components in the bacterial genome and play an important role in intraspecies variations. There are at least two prophages in the chromosomes of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las) Floridian isolates. Las is both unculturable and the most prevalent species of Liberibacter pathogens that cause huanglongbing (HLB), a worldwide destructive disease of citrus. In this study, seven new prophage variants resulting from two hyper-variable regions were identified by screening clone libraries of infected citrus, periwinkle and psyllids. Among them, Types A and B share highly conserved sequences and localize within the two prophages, FP1 and FP2, respectively. Although Types B and C were abundant in all three libraries, Type A was much more abundant in the libraries from the Las-infected psyllids than from the Las-infected plants, and Type D was only identified in libraries from the infected host plants but not from the infected psyllids. Sequence analysis of these variants revealed that the variations may result from recombination and rearrangement events. Conventional PCR results using type-specific molecular markers indicated that A, B, C and D are the four most abundant types in Las-infected citrus and periwinkle. However, only three types, A, B and C are abundant in Las-infected psyllids. Typing results for Las-infected citrus field samples indicated that mixed populations of Las bacteria present in Floridian isolates, but only the Type D population was correlated with the blotchy mottle symptom. Extended cloning and sequencing of the Type D region revealed a third prophage/phage in the Las genome, which may derive from the recombination of FP1 and FP2. Dramatic variations in these prophage regions were also found among the global Las isolates. These results are the first to demonstrate the prophage/phage-mediated dynamics of Las populations in plant and insect hosts, and their correlation with insect transmission and disease

  9. REDUCED NITRIC OXIDE PRODUCTION AND INOS MRNA EXPRESSION IN IFN-G STIMULATED CHICKEN MACROPHAGES TRANSFECTED WITH INOS SIRNAS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Utilizing RNA interference technology with siRNA in the HD-11 macrophage cell line, we determined how the inhibition or knock-down of the iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) gene affected IFN-y' induced macrophage production of nitric oxide (NO) and mRNA expression of genes involved in this biolo...

  10. Interaction of the Chromatin Remodeling Protein hINO80 with DNA

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shruti; Kaur, Taniya; Brahmachari, Vani

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a highly conserved DNA binding domain in INO80 subfamily predicted that INO80 directly interacts with DNA and we demonstrated its DNA binding activity in vitro. Here we report the consensus motif recognized by the DBINO domain identified by SELEX method and demonstrate the specific interaction of INO80 with the consensus motif. We show that INO80 significantly down regulates the reporter gene expression through its binding motif, and the repression is dependent on the presence of INO80 but not YY1 in the cell. The interaction is lost if specific residues within the consensus motif are altered. We identify a large number of potential target sites of INO80 in the human genome through in silico analysis that can grouped into three classes; sites that contain the recognition sequence for INO80 and YY1, only YY1 and only INO80. We demonstrate the binding of INO80 to a representative set of sites in HEK cells and the correlated repressive histone modifications around the binding motif. In the light of the role of INO80 in homeotic gene regulation in Drosophila as an Enhancer of trithorax and polycomb protein (ETP) that can modify the effect of both repressive complexes like polycomb as well as the activating complex like trithorax, it remains to be seen if INO80 can act as a recruiter of chromatin modifying complexes. PMID:27428271

  11. Phosphorylation of human INO80 is involved in DNA damage tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Dai; Waki, Mayumi; Umezawa, Masaki; Aoki, Yuka; Utsugi, Takahiko; Ohtsu, Masaya; Murakami, Yasufumi

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depletion of hINO80 significantly reduced PCNA ubiquitination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depletion of hINO80 significantly reduced nuclear dots intensity of RAD18 after UV irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Western blot analyses showed phosphorylated hINO80 C-terminus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of phosphorylation mutant hINO80 reduced PCNA ubiquitination. -- Abstract: Double strand breaks (DSBs) are the most serious type of DNA damage. DSBs can be generated directly by exposure to ionizing radiation or indirectly by replication fork collapse. The DNA damage tolerance pathway, which is conserved from bacteria to humans, prevents this collapse by overcoming replication blockages. The INO80 chromatin remodeling complex plays an important role in the DNA damage response. The yeast INO80 complex participates in the DNA damage tolerance pathway. The mechanisms regulating yINO80 complex are not fully understood, but yeast INO80 complex are necessary for efficient proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) ubiquitination and for recruitment of Rad18 to replication forks. In contrast, the function of the mammalian INO80 complex in DNA damage tolerance is less clear. Here, we show that human INO80 was necessary for PCNA ubiquitination and recruitment of Rad18 to DNA damage sites. Moreover, the C-terminal region of human INO80 was phosphorylated, and overexpression of a phosphorylation-deficient mutant of human INO80 resulted in decreased ubiquitination of PCNA during DNA replication. These results suggest that the human INO80 complex, like the yeast complex, was involved in the DNA damage tolerance pathway and that phosphorylation of human INO80 was involved in the DNA damage tolerance pathway. These findings provide new insights into the DNA damage tolerance pathway in mammalian cells.

  12. Pathogenesis of Streptococcus urinary tract infection depends on bacterial strain and β-hemolysin/cytolysin that mediates cytotoxicity, cytokine synthesis, inflammation and virulence.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Sophie Y; Sullivan, Matthew J; Ipe, Deepak S; Smith, Joshua P; Cripps, Allan W; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae can cause urinary tract infection (UTI) including cystitis and asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU). The early host-pathogen interactions that occur during S. agalactiae UTI and subsequent mechanisms of disease pathogenesis are poorly defined. Here, we define the early interactions between human bladder urothelial cells, monocyte-derived macrophages, and mouse bladder using uropathogenic S. agalactiae (UPSA) 807 and ABU-causing S. agalactiae (ABSA) 834 strains. UPSA 807 adhered, invaded and killed bladder urothelial cells more efficiently compared to ABSA 834 via mechanisms including low-level caspase-3 activation, and cytolysis, according to lactate dehydrogenase release measures and cell viability. Severe UPSA 807-induced cytotoxicity was mediated entirely by the bacterial β-hemolysin/cytolysin (β-H/C) because an β-H/C-deficient UPSA 807 isogenic mutant, UPSA 807ΔcylE, was not cytotoxic in vitro; the mutant was also significantly attenuated for colonization in the bladder in vivo. Analysis of infection-induced cytokines, including IL-8, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in vitro and in vivo revealed that cytokine and chemokine responses were dependent on expression of β-H/C that also elicited severe bladder neutrophilia. Thus, virulence of UPSA 807 encompasses adhesion to, invasion of and killing of bladder cells, pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine responses that elicit neutrophil infiltration, and β-H/C-mediated subversion of innate immune-mediated bacterial clearance from the bladder. PMID:27383371

  13. Pathogenesis of Streptococcus urinary tract infection depends on bacterial strain and β-hemolysin/cytolysin that mediates cytotoxicity, cytokine synthesis, inflammation and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Leclercq, Sophie Y.; Sullivan, Matthew J.; Ipe, Deepak S.; Smith, Joshua P.; Cripps, Allan W.; Ulett, Glen C.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae can cause urinary tract infection (UTI) including cystitis and asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU). The early host-pathogen interactions that occur during S. agalactiae UTI and subsequent mechanisms of disease pathogenesis are poorly defined. Here, we define the early interactions between human bladder urothelial cells, monocyte-derived macrophages, and mouse bladder using uropathogenic S. agalactiae (UPSA) 807 and ABU-causing S. agalactiae (ABSA) 834 strains. UPSA 807 adhered, invaded and killed bladder urothelial cells more efficiently compared to ABSA 834 via mechanisms including low-level caspase-3 activation, and cytolysis, according to lactate dehydrogenase release measures and cell viability. Severe UPSA 807-induced cytotoxicity was mediated entirely by the bacterial β-hemolysin/cytolysin (β-H/C) because an β-H/C-deficient UPSA 807 isogenic mutant, UPSA 807ΔcylE, was not cytotoxic in vitro; the mutant was also significantly attenuated for colonization in the bladder in vivo. Analysis of infection-induced cytokines, including IL-8, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in vitro and in vivo revealed that cytokine and chemokine responses were dependent on expression of β-H/C that also elicited severe bladder neutrophilia. Thus, virulence of UPSA 807 encompasses adhesion to, invasion of and killing of bladder cells, pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine responses that elicit neutrophil infiltration, and β-H/C-mediated subversion of innate immune-mediated bacterial clearance from the bladder. PMID:27383371

  14. Comparative metabolomic analysis highlights the involvement of sugars and glycerol in melatonin-mediated innate immunity against bacterial pathogen in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yongqiang; Tan, Dun-Xian; Reiter, Russel J.; Shi, Haitao

    2015-01-01

    Melatonin is an important secondary messenger in plant innate immunity against the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringe pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 in the salicylic acid (SA)- and nitric oxide (NO)-dependent pathway. However, the metabolic homeostasis in melatonin-mediated innate immunity is unknown. In this study, comparative metabolomic analysis found that the endogenous levels of both soluble sugars (fructose, glucose, melibose, sucrose, maltose, galatose, tagatofuranose and turanose) and glycerol were commonly increased after both melatonin treatment and Pst DC3000 infection in Arabidopsis. Further studies showed that exogenous pre-treatment with fructose, glucose, sucrose, or glycerol increased innate immunity against Pst DC3000 infection in wild type (Col-0) Arabidopsis plants, but largely alleviated their effects on the innate immunity in SA-deficient NahG plants and NO-deficient mutants. This indicated that SA and NO are also essential for sugars and glycerol-mediated disease resistance. Moreover, exogenous fructose, glucose, sucrose and glycerol pre-treatments remarkably increased endogenous NO level, but had no significant effect on the endogenous melatonin level. Taken together, this study highlights the involvement of sugars and glycerol in melatonin-mediated innate immunity against bacterial pathogen in SA and NO-dependent pathway in Arabidopsis. PMID:26508076

  15. The dual role of iNOS in cancer☆

    PubMed Central

    Vanini, Frederica; Kashfi, Khosrow; Nath, Niharika

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the 10 smallest molecules found in nature. It is a simple gaseous free radical whose predominant functions is that of a messenger through cGMP. In mammals, NO is synthesized by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) of which there are three isoforms. Neuronal (nNOS, NOS1) and endothelial (eNOS, NOS3) are constitutive calcium-dependent forms of the enzyme that regulate neural and vascular function respectively. The third isoform (iNOS, NOS2), is calcium-independent and is inducible. In many tumors, iNOS expression is high, however, the role of iNOS during tumor development is very complex and quite perplexing, with both promoting and inhibiting actions having been described. This review will aim to summarize the dual actions of iNOS-derived NO showing that the microenvironment of the tumor is a contributing factor to these observations and ultimately to cellular outcomes. PMID:26335399

  16. An eco-friendly and water mediated product selective synthesis of 2-aminopyrimidines and their in vitro anti-bacterial evaluation.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Sangaraiah; Shanmugavelan, Poovan; Sathishkumar, Murugan; Selvi, Ramasamy; Ponnuswamy, Alagusundaram; Harikrishnan, Hariharan; Shanmugaiah, Vellasamy; Murugavel, Saminathan

    2014-11-01

    A greener water mediated protocol for the efficient synthesis of a library of 2-amino-6-styryl pyrimidines (4) and their dihydro analogues (3) has been reported. Most of the saturated compounds (3) rather than their unsaturated analogues (4) showed better anti-bacterial (in vitro) activity against three human pathogens viz. Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumonia and Escherichia coli. In particular, three of them (3 b, 3 i &3 k) exhibited high inhibition against the growth of all the three pathogens comparable with that of the reference drug, tetracycline. PMID:25280779

  17. New evidence for Cu-decorated binary-oxides mediating bacterial inactivation/mineralization in aerobic media.

    PubMed

    Rtimi, S; Pulgarin, C; Bensimon, M; Kiwi, J

    2016-08-01

    Binary oxide semiconductors TiO2-ZrO2 and Cu-decorated TiO2-ZrO2 (TiO2-ZrO2-Cu) uniform films were sputtered on polyester (PES). These films were irradiated under low intensity solar simulated light and led to bacterial inactivation in aerobic and anaerobic media as evaluated by CFU-plate counting. But bacterial mineralization was only induced by TiO2-ZrO2-Cu in aerobic media. The highly oxidative radicals generated on the films surface under light were identified by the use of appropriate scavengers. The hole generated on the TiO2-ZrO2 films is shown to be the main specie leading to bacterial inactivation. TiO2-ZrO2 and Cu-decorated TiO2-ZrO2 films release Zr and Ti <1ppb and Cu 4.6ppb/cm(2) as determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) This level is far below the citotoxicity permitted level allowed for mammalian cells suggesting that bacterial disinfection proceeds through an oligodynamic effect. By Fourier transform attenuated infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) the systematic shift of the predominating νs(CH2) vibrational-rotational peak making up most of the bacterial cell-wall content in C was monitored. Based on this evidence a mechanism suggested leading to CH bond stretching followed by cell lysis and cell death. Bacterial inactivation cycling was observed on TiO2-ZrO2-Cu showing the stability of these films leading to bacterial inactivation. PMID:27088192

  18. Lead ions abrogate lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric monoxide toxicity by reducing the expression of STAT1 and iNOS.

    PubMed

    Dörpinghaus, Michael; Brieger, Anne; Panichkina, Olga; Rink, Lothar; Haase, Hajo

    2016-09-01

    Lead is a widespread environmental pollutant and the highly poisonous metal compromises multiple organs in the body. Among other tissues and cells, lead ions (Pb(2+)) can affect macrophages and microglia cells. The present study observed a concentration-dependent protection of BV-2 microglia and RAW 264.7 macrophages by Pb(2+) against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced toxicity. Both cell lines are potent producers of two substances that have previously been shown to mediate cytotoxic effects of LPS. These are the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and nitric monoxide (NO), which creates nitrosative stress, hampering the distribution of invading pathogens and tumor cells. While the expression of TNF-α was unaffected by Pb(2+), the production of NO was significantly inhibited. Moreover, blocking NO synthesis by low molecular weight inhibitors prevented LPS-mediated toxicity, confirming the role of NO in these events. Pb(2+) exposure led to a downregulation of LPS-induced expression of the transcription factor STAT1, which is involved in iNOS transcription. Moreover, iNOS mRNA and protein levels were reduced in the presence of Pb(2+), explaining the reduced formation of NO and a subsequent increase of cellular viability in vitro. In vivo, the effect might limit collateral damage caused by excessive NO production, but also impair the efficiency of NO as a central mediator of the defense against various pathogens. PMID:27134082

  19. Near-infrared surface-enhanced-Raman-scattering (SERS) mediated detection of single optically trapped bacterial spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Troy A.; Pellegrino, Paul M.; Gillespie, James B.

    2003-08-01

    A novel methodology has been developed for the investigation of bacterial spores. Specifically, this method has been used to probe the spore coat composition of two different Bacillus stearothermophilus variants. This technique may be useful in many applications; most notably, development of novel detection schemes toward potentially harmful bacteria. This method would also be useful as an ancillary environmental monitoring system where sterility is of importance (i.e., food preparation areas as well as invasive and minimally invasive medical applications). This unique detection scheme is based on the near-infrared (NIR) Surface-Enhanced-Raman-Scattering (SERS) from single, optically trapped, bacterial spores. The SERS spectra of bacterial spores in aqueous media have been measured using SERS substrates based on ~60-nm diameter gold colloids bound to 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane derivatized glass. The light from a 787-nm laser diode was used to trap/manipulate as well as simultaneously excite the SERS of an individual bacterial spore. The collected SERS spectra were examined for uniqueness and the applicability of this technique for the strain discrimination of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores. Comparison of normal Raman and SERS spectra reveal not only an enhancement of the normal Raman spectral features but also the appearance of spectral features absent in the normal Raman spectrum.

  20. Near-infrared Surface-Enhanced-Raman-Scattering (SERS) mediated discrimination of single optically trapped bacterial spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Troy A.; Pellegrino, Paul M.; Gillespie, James B.

    2004-03-01

    A novel methodology has been developed for the investigation of bacterial spores. Specifically, this method has been used to probe the spore coat composition of two different Bacillus stearothermophilus variants. This technique may be useful in many applications; most notably, development of novel detection schemes toward potentially harmful bacteria. This method would also be useful as an ancillary environmental monitoring system where sterility is of importance (i.e., food preparation areas as well as invasive and minimally invasive medical applications). This unique detection scheme is based on the near-infrared (NIR) Surface-Enhanced-Raman- Scattering (SERS) from single, optically trapped, bacterial spores. The SERS spectra of bacterial spores in aqueous media have been measured using SERS substrates based on ~60-nm diameter gold colloids bound to 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane derivatized glass. The light from a 787-nm laser diode was used to trap/manipulate as well as simultaneously excite the SERS of an individual bacterial spore. The collected SERS spectra were examined for uniqueness and the applicability of this technique for the strain discrimination of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores. Comparison of normal Raman and SERS spectra reveal not only an enhancement of the normal Raman spectral features but also the appearance of spectral features absent in the normal Raman spectrum.

  1. Prophage-mediated dynamics of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ populations, the destructive bacterial pathogens of Citrus Huanglongbing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prophages are highly dynamic components in the bacterial genome and play an important role in intraspecies variations. There are at least two prophages in the chromosomes of Floridian ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las) isolates. In this study, seven additional types of variants were identifie...

  2. Acacia ferruginea inhibits inflammation by regulating inflammatory iNOS and COX-2.

    PubMed

    Sakthivel, Kunnathur Murugesan; Guruvayoorappan, Chandrasekaran

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is a local defensive reaction of a host to cellular injury or infection. Prolonged inflammation can contribute to pathogenesis of many disorders. Identification of naturally occurring phytoconstituents that can suppress inflammatory mediators can lead to the discovery of anti-inflammatory therapeutics. Acacia ferruginea is used traditionally to treat numerous ailments including hemorrhage, irritable bowel syndrome and leprosy. The present study evaluated the anti-inflammatory activity of A. ferruginea extract against acute (carrageenan) and chronic (formaldehyde) inflammation in Balb/c mice. Pre-treatment with A. ferruginea extract (10 mg/kg BW) for 5 consecutive days via intraperitonial (IP) administration significantly inhibited subsequent induction of paw edema in both models; the effects were comparable to that of the standard drug indomethacin. The results also showed the A. ferruginea extract significantly inhibited nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and iNOS expression (as measured in serum), diminished inflammation in - and neutrophil infiltration to - the paw tissues and led to a reduction in the number of COX-2(+) immunoreative cells (as evidenced by histologic and immunohistochemical analyses) in the paws relative to those in paws of mice that received the irritants only. Further, in vitro studies showed the extract could significantly scavenge free radicals generated as in DPPH and NO radical generating assays. Taken together, the results showed that A. ferruginea extract imparted potent anti-oxidant and -inflammatory effects, in part by maintaining oxidative homeostasis, inhibiting NO synthesis and suppressing iNOS and COX-2 expression and so could potentially be exploited as a potential plant-based medication against inflammatory disorders. PMID:25738525

  3. Modulation of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Expression by the Attaching and Effacing Bacterial Pathogen Citrobacter rodentium in Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vallance, Bruce A.; Deng, Wanyin; De Grado, Myriam; Chan, Crystal; Jacobson, Kevan; Finlay, B. Brett

    2002-01-01

    Citrobacter rodentium belongs to the attaching and effacing family of enteric bacterial pathogens that includes both enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. These bacteria infect their hosts by colonizing the intestinal mucosal surface and intimately attaching to underlying epithelial cells. The abilities of these pathogens to exploit the cytoskeleton and signaling pathways of host cells are well documented, but their interactions with the host's antimicrobial defenses, such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), are poorly understood. To address this issue, we infected mice with C. rodentium and found that iNOS mRNA expression in the colon significantly increased during infection. Immunostaining identified epithelial cells as the major source for immunoreactive iNOS. Finding that nitric oxide (NO) donors were bacteriostatic for C. rodentium in vitro, we examined whether iNOS expression contributed to host defense by infecting iNOS-deficient mice. Loss of iNOS expression caused a small but significant delay in bacterial clearance without affecting tissue pathology. Finally, immunofluorescence staining was used to determine if iNOS expression was localized to infected cells by staining for the C. rodentium virulence factor, translocated intimin receptor (Tir), as well as iNOS. Interestingly, while more than 85% of uninfected epithelial cells expressed iNOS, fewer than 15% of infected (Tir-positive) cells expressed detectable iNOS. These results demonstrate that both iNOS and intestinal epithelial cells play an active role in host defense during C. rodentium infection. However, the selective expression of iNOS by uninfected but not infected cells suggests that this pathogen has developed mechanisms to locally limit its exposure to host-derived NO. PMID:12379723

  4. Nitrosyl iodide, INO: A combined ab initio and high-resolution spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailleux, S.; Duflot, D.; Aiba, S.; Nakahama, S.; Ozeki, H.

    2016-04-01

    In the nitrosyl halides series (XNO, where X = F, Cl, Br, I), INO is the only chemical species whose rotational spectrum has not been reported. Nitrosyl iodide, together with the nitryl (INO2), nitrite (IONO) and nitrate (IONO2) iodides, is believed to impact tropospheric ozone levels. Guided by our quantum chemical calculations, we report the detection of INO in the gas phase by high-resolution spectroscopy for the first time. INO was generated by mixing continuously I2 and NO. The measurement and least-squares analysis of 173 a-type rotational transitions resulted in the accurate determination of molecular parameters.

  5. Enhanced Disease Susceptibility1 Mediates Pathogen Resistance and Virulence Function of a Bacterial Effector in Soybean1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jialin; Shine, M.B.; Gao, Qing-Ming; Navarre, Duroy; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Chunyan; Chen, Qingshan; Hu, Guohua; Kachroo, Aardra

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced disease susceptibility1 (EDS1) and phytoalexin deficient4 (PAD4) are well-known regulators of both basal and resistance (R) protein-mediated plant defense. We identified two EDS1-like (GmEDS1a/GmEDS1b) proteins and one PAD4-like (GmPAD4) protein that are required for resistance signaling in soybean (Glycine max). Consistent with their significant structural conservation to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) counterparts, constitutive expression of GmEDS1 or GmPAD4 complemented the pathogen resistance defects of Arabidopsis eds1 and pad4 mutants, respectively. Interestingly, however, the GmEDS1 and GmPAD4 did not complement pathogen-inducible salicylic acid accumulation in the eds1/pad4 mutants. Furthermore, the GmEDS1a/GmEDS1b proteins were unable to complement the turnip crinkle virus coat protein-mediated activation of the Arabidopsis R protein Hypersensitive reaction to Turnip crinkle virus (HRT), even though both interacted with HRT. Silencing GmEDS1a/GmEDS1b or GmPAD4 reduced basal and pathogen-inducible salicylic acid accumulation and enhanced soybean susceptibility to virulent pathogens. The GmEDS1a/GmEDS1b and GmPAD4 genes were also required for Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv glycinea2 (Rpg2)-mediated resistance to Pseudomonas syringae. Notably, the GmEDS1a/GmEDS1b proteins interacted with the cognate bacterial effector AvrA1 and were required for its virulence function in rpg2 plants. Together, these results show that despite significant structural similarities, conserved defense signaling components from diverse plants can differ in their functionalities. In addition, we demonstrate a role for GmEDS1 in regulating the virulence function of a bacterial effector. PMID:24872380

  6. Development of glass resistive plate chambers for INO experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datar, V. M.; Jena, Satyajit; Kalmani, S. D.; Mondal, N. K.; Nagaraj, P.; Reddy, L. V.; Saraf, M.; Satyanarayana, B.; Shinde, R. R.; Verma, P.

    2009-05-01

    The India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) collaboration is planning to build a massive 50 kton magnetised Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) detector, to study atmospheric neutrinos and to make precision measurements of the parameters related to neutrino oscillations. Glass Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) of about 2 m×2 m in size are going to be used as active elements for the ICAL detector. We have fabricated a large number of glass RPC prototypes of 1 m×1 m in size and have studied their performance and long term stability. In the process, we have developed and produced a number of materials and components required for fabrication of RPCs. We have also designed and optimised a number of fabrication and quality control procedures for assembling the gas gaps. In this paper we will review our various activities towards development of glass RPCs for the INO ICAL detector. We will present results of the characterisation studies of the RPCs and discuss our plans to prototype 2 m×2 m sized RPCs.

  7. Endothelial glutathione-S-transferase A4-4 protects against oxidative stress and modulates iNOS expression through NF-{kappa}B translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yongzhen; Yang Yusong; Xu Ya; Lick, Scott D.; Awasthi, Yogesh C.; Boor, Paul J.

    2008-07-15

    Our recent work in endothelial cells and human atherosclerotic plaque showed that overexpression of glutathione-S-tranferases (GSTs) in endothelium protects against oxidative damage from aldehydes such as 4-HNE. Nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B plays a crucial role during inflammation and immune responses by regulating the expression of inducible genes such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). 4-HNE induces apoptosis and affects NF-{kappa}B mediated gene expression, but conflicting results on 4-HNE's effect on NF-{kappa}B have been reported. We compared the effect of 4-HNE on iNOS and the NF-{kappa}B pathway in control mouse pancreatic islet endothelial (MS1) cells and those transfected with mGSTA4, a {alpha}-class GST with highest activity toward 4-HNE. When treated with 4-HNE, mGSTA4-transfected cells showed significant upregulation of iNOS and nitric oxide (NO) through (NF)-{kappa}B (p65) translocation in comparison with wild-type or vector-transfected cells. Immunohistochemical studies of early human plaques showed lower 4-HNE content and upregulation of iNOS, which we take to indicate that GSTA4-4 induction acts as an enzymatic defense against high levels of 4-HNE, since 4-HNE accumulated in more advanced plaques, when detoxification and exocytotic mechanisms are likely to be overwhelmed. These studies suggest that GSTA4-4 may play an important defensive role against atherogenesis through detoxification of 4-HNE and upregulation of iNOS.

  8. Microbubble-mediated ultrasound promotes accumulation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell to the prostate for treating chronic bacterial prostatitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Shanhong; Han, Guangwei; Shang, Yonggang; Liu, Chengcheng; Cui, Dong; Yu, Shuangjiang; Liao, Bin; Ao, Xiang; Li, Guangzhi; Li, Longkun

    2016-01-01

    Chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) is an intractable disease. Although bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) are able to regulate inflammation in CBP, the effect of microbubble-mediated ultrasound- induced accumulation of BMMSCs on CBP remains unclear. To address this gap, a model of CBP was established in SD rats, which were then treated with BMMSCs alone (BMMSC group), BMMSCs with ultrasound (ultrasound group), BMMSCs with microbubble-mediated ultrasound (MMUS group) and compared with a healthy control group. A therapeutic-ultrasound apparatus was used to treat the prostate in the presence of circulating microbubbles and BMMSCs. The BMMSC distribution was assessed with in vivo imaging, and the prostate structure with light microscopy. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR, ELISA, and immunohistochemistry were used to assess the expressions of TNF-α and IL-1β. More BMMSCs were found in the prostate in the MMUS group than in the CBP, ultrasound, and BMMSC groups. Inflammatory cell infiltration, fibrous tissue hyperplasia, and tumor-like epithelial proliferation were significantly reduced in the MMUS group, as were the mRNA and protein expressions of TNF-α and IL-1β. Microbubble-mediated ultrasound-induced accumulation of BMMSCs can inhibit inflammation and decrease TNF-α and IL-1β expressions in the prostate of CBP rats, suggesting that this method may be therapeutic for CPB. PMID:26797392

  9. Opa+ Neisseria gonorrhoeae Exhibits Reduced Survival in Human Neutrophils Via Src Family Kinase-Mediated Bacterial Trafficking Into Mature Phagolysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, M. Brittany; Ball, Louise M.; Daily, Kylene P.; Martin, Jennifer N.; Columbus, Linda; Criss, Alison K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary During gonorrheal infection, there is a heterogeneous population of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Gc) varied in their expression of opacity-associated (Opa) proteins. While Opa proteins are important for bacterial attachment and invasion of epithelial cells, Opa+ Gc has a survival defect after exposure to neutrophils. Here, we use constitutively Opa- and OpaD+ Gc in strain background FA1090 to show that Opa+ Gc is more sensitive to killing inside adherent, chemokine-treated primary human neutrophils due to increased bacterial residence in mature, degradative phagolysosomes that contain primary and secondary granule antimicrobial content. Although Opa+ Gc stimulates a potent oxidative burst, neutrophil killing of Opa+ Gc was instead attributable to non-oxidative components, particularly neutrophil proteases and the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein. Blocking interaction of Opa+ Gc with carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) or inhibiting Src family kinase signaling, which is downstream of CEACAM activation, enhanced the survival of Opa+ Gc in neutrophils. Src family kinase signaling was required for fusion of Gc phagosomes with primary granules to generate mature phagolysosomes. Conversely, ectopic activation of Src family kinases or coinfection with Opa+ Gc resulted in decreased survival of Opa- Gc in neutrophils. From these results, we conclude that Opa protein expression is an important modulator of Gc survival characteristics in neutrophils by influencing phagosome dynamics and thus bacterial exposure to neutrophils’ full antimicrobial arsenal. PMID:25346239

  10. SIV Infection-Mediated Changes in Gastrointestinal Bacterial Microbiome and Virome Are Associated with Immunodeficiency and Prevented by Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Handley, Scott A; Desai, Chandni; Zhao, Guoyan; Droit, Lindsay; Monaco, Cynthia L; Schroeder, Andrew C; Nkolola, Joseph P; Norman, Megan E; Miller, Andrew D; Wang, David; Barouch, Dan H; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-03-01

    AIDS caused by simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection is associated with gastrointestinal disease, systemic immune activation, and, in cross-sectional studies, changes in the enteric virome. Here we performed a longitudinal study of a vaccine cohort to define the natural history of changes in the fecal metagenome in SIV-infected monkeys. Matched rhesus macaques were either uninfected or intrarectally challenged with SIV, with a subset receiving the Ad26 vaccine, an adenovirus vector expressing the viral Env/Gag/Pol antigens. Progression of SIV infection to AIDS was associated with increased detection of potentially pathogenic viruses and bacterial enteropathogens. Specifically, adenoviruses were associated with an increased incidence of gastrointestinal disease and AIDS-related mortality. Viral and bacterial enteropathogens were largely absent from animals protected by the vaccine. These data suggest that the SIV-associated gastrointestinal disease is associated with the presence of both viral and bacterial enteropathogens and that protection against SIV infection by vaccination prevents enteropathogen emergence. PMID:26962943

  11. Bacterial Transposons Are Co-Transferred with T-DNA to Rice Chromosomes during Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Ryul; An, Gynheung

    2012-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is widely utilized for delivering a foreign gene into a plant’s genome. We found the bacterial transposon Tn5393 in transgenic rice plants. Analysis of the flanking sequences of the transferred-DNA (T-DNA) identified that a portion of the Tn5393 sequence was present immediately next to the end of the T-DNA. Because this transposon was present in A. tumefaciens strain LBA4404, but not in EHA105 and GV3101, our findings indicated that Tn5393 was transferred from LBA4404 into the rice genome during the transformation process. We also noted that another bacterial transposon, Tn5563, is present in transgenic plants. Analyses of 331 transgenic lines revealed that 26.0% carried Tn5393 and 2.1% contained Tn5563. In most of the lines, an intact transposon was integrated into the T-DNA and transferred to the rice chromosome. More than one copy of T-DNA was introduced into the plants, often at a single locus. This resulted in T-DNA repeats of normal and transposon-carrying T-DNA that generated deletions of a portion of the T-DNA, joining the T-DNA end to the bacterial transposon. Based on these data, we suggest that one should carefully select the appropriate Agrobacterium strain to avoid undesirable transformation of such sequences. PMID:22570148

  12. Highly selective detection of bacterial alarmone ppGpp with an off-on fluorescent probe of copper-mediated silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pu; Wang, Yi; Chang, Yong; Xiong, Zu Hong; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2013-11-15

    In this study, a facile strategy for highly selective and sensitive detection of bacterial alarmone, ppGpp, which is generated when bacteria face stress circumstances such as nutritional deprivation, has been established by developing an off-on fluorescent probe of Cu(2+)-mediated silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs). This work not only achieves highly selective detection of ppGpp in a broad range concentration of 2-200 μM, but also improves our understanding of the specific recognitions among DNA-Ag NCs, Cu(2+), and ppGpp. The present strategy, together with other reports on the Ag NCs-related analytical methods, has also identified that Ag NCs functionalized with different molecules on their surfaces can be engineered fluorescent probes for a wide range of applications such as biosensing and bioimaging. PMID:23810912

  13. Cell-penetrating peptides mediated protein cross-membrane delivery and its use in bacterial vector vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jimei; Xu, Jinmei; Guan, Lingyu; Hu, Tianjian; Liu, Qin; Xiao, Jingfan; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2014-07-01

    It is an attractive strategy to develop a recombinant bacterial vector vaccine by expressing exogenous protective antigen to induce the immune response, and the main concern is how to enhance the cellular internalization of antigen produced by bacterial vector. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short cationic/amphipathic peptides which facilitate cellular uptake of various molecular cargoes and therefore have great potentials in vector vaccine design. In this work, eleven different CPPs were fused to the C-terminus of EGFP respectively, and the resultant EGFP-CPP fusion proteins were expressed and purified to assay their cross-membrane transport in macrophage J774 A.1 cells. Among the tested CPPs, TAT showed an excellent capability to deliver the cargo protein EGFP into cytoplasm. In order to establish an efficient antigen delivery system in Escherichia coli, the EGFP-TAT synthesis circuit was combined with an in vivo inducible lysis circuit PviuA-E in E. coli to form an integrated antigen delivery system, the resultant E. coli was proved to be able to lyse upon the induction of a mimic in vivo signal and thus release intracellular EGFP-TAT intensively, which were assumed to undergo a more efficient intracellular delivery by CPP to evoke protective immune responses. Based on the established antigen delivery system, the protective antigen gene flgD from an invasive intracellular fish pathogen Edwardsiella tarda EIB202, was applied to establish an E. coli recombinant vector vaccine. This E. coli vector vaccine presented superior immune protection (RPS = 63%) under the challenge with E. tarda EIB202, suggesting that the novel antigen delivery system had great potential in bacterial vector vaccine applications. PMID:24746937

  14. Multiple modes of regulation of the human Ino80 SNF2 ATPase by subunits of the INO80 chromatin-remodeling complex

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu; Conaway, Ronald C.; Conaway, Joan W.

    2013-01-01

    SNF2 family ATPases are ATP-dependent motors that often function in multisubunit complexes to regulate chromatin structure. Although the central role of SNF2 ATPases in chromatin biology is well established, mechanisms by which their catalytic activities are regulated by additional subunits of chromatin-remodeling complexes are less well understood. Here we present evidence that the human Inositol auxotrophy 80 (Ino80) SNF2 ATPase is subject to regulation at multiple levels in the INO80 chromatin-remodeling complex. The zinc finger histidine triad domain-containing protein Ies2 (Ino Eighty Subunit 2) functions as a potent activator of the intrinsic catalytic activity of the Ino80 ATPase, whereas the YL-1 family Ies6 (Ino Eighty Subunit 6) and actin-related Arp5 proteins function together to promote binding of the Ino80 ATPase to nucleosomes. These findings support the idea that both substrate recognition and the intrinsic catalytic activities of SNF2 ATPases have evolved as important sites for their regulation. PMID:24297934

  15. Packaging of live Legionella pneumophila into pellets expelled by Tetrahymena spp. does not require bacterial replication and depends on a Dot/Icm-mediated survival mechanism.

    PubMed

    Berk, Sharon G; Faulkner, Gary; Garduño, Elizabeth; Joy, Mark C; Ortiz-Jimenez, Marco A; Garduño, Rafael A

    2008-04-01

    The freshwater ciliate Tetrahymena sp. efficiently ingested, but poorly digested, virulent strains of the gram-negative intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila. Ciliates expelled live legionellae packaged in free spherical pellets. The ingested legionellae showed no ultrastructural indicators of cell division either within intracellular food vacuoles or in the expelled pellets, while the number of CFU consistently decreased as a function of time postinoculation, suggesting a lack of L. pneumophila replication inside Tetrahymena. Pulse-chase feeding experiments with fluorescent L. pneumophila and Escherichia coli indicated that actively feeding ciliates maintain a rapid and steady turnover of food vacuoles, so that the intravacuolar residence of the ingested bacteria was as short as 1 to 2 h. L. pneumophila mutants with a defective Dot/Icm virulence system were efficiently digested by Tetrahymena sp. In contrast to pellets of virulent L. pneumophila, the pellets produced by ciliates feeding on dot mutants contained very few bacterial cells but abundant membrane whorls. The whorls became labeled with a specific antibody against L. pneumophila OmpS, indicating that they were outer membrane remnants of digested legionellae. Ciliates that fed on genetically complemented dot mutants produced numerous pellets containing live legionellae, establishing the importance of the Dot/Icm system to resist digestion. We thus concluded that production of pellets containing live virulent L. pneumophila depends on bacterial survival (mediated by the Dot/Icm system) and occurs in the absence of bacterial replication. Pellets of virulent L. pneumophila may contribute to the transmission of Legionnaires' disease, an issue currently under investigation. PMID:18245233

  16. Detection of bacterial pyrogens on the basis of their effects on gamma interferon-mediated formation of neopterin or nitrite in cultured monocyte cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Werner-Felmayer, G; Baier-Bitterlich, G; Fuchs, D; Hausen, A; Murr, C; Reibnegger, G; Werner, E R; Wachter, H

    1995-01-01

    In a number of mammalian cell types, pteridine biosynthesis from guanosine 5'-triphosphate and formation of nitric oxide from L-arginine are induced by gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We assessed the possibility of using such metabolic alterations for the in vitro detection of pyrogens. Products from gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria and related synthetic compounds were tested for their potential to induce either of these pathways. Stimulation of pteridine biosynthesis was monitored as the formation of neopterin in the human myelomonocytic cell line THP-1. The formation of nitric oxide was determined as nitrite in murine J774A.1 macrophage cultures. The substances tested included toxic and detoxified parts of LPS and lipid A from Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella minnesota, and Klebsiella pneumoniae as well as lipoteichoic acid and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 from Staphylococcus aureus. Furthermore, two cell wall compounds from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate and N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine, which are active components of Freund's adjuvant, were used. When applied as a single stimulus, only the whole LPS molecule potently stimulated neopterin or nitrite formation. Lipid A and products from gram-positive bacteria were weakly active. For neopterin formation, lipid A required the presence of fetal calf serum. Besides detoxified LPS and independently from the presence of serum, all bacterial compounds tested strongly increased the effects mediated by IFN-gamma. Our results show that bacterial pyrogens can be detected by monitoring the formation of neopterin or nitrite. This may provide a basis for the development of an in vitro assay for the detection of pyrogenic contamination with the aim of replacing the currently used animal test. PMID:7664177

  17. Siderophore-mediated iron acquisition influences motility and is required for full virulence of the xylem-dwelling bacterial phytopathogen Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii.

    PubMed

    Burbank, Lindsey; Mohammadi, Mojtaba; Roper, M Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Iron is a key micronutrient for microbial growth but is often present in low concentrations or in biologically unavailable forms. Many microorganisms overcome this challenge by producing siderophores, which are ferric-iron chelating compounds that enable the solubilization and acquisition of iron in a bioactive form. Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, the causal agent of Stewart's wilt of sweet corn, produces a siderophore under iron-limiting conditions. The proteins involved in the biosynthesis and export of this siderophore are encoded by the iucABCD-iutA operon, which is homologous to the aerobactin biosynthetic gene cluster found in a number of enteric pathogens. Mutations in iucA and iutA resulted in a decrease in surface-based motility that P. stewartii utilizes during the early stages of biofilm formation, indicating that active iron acquisition impacts surface motility for P. stewartii. Furthermore, bacterial movement in planta is also dependent on a functional siderophore biosynthesis and uptake pathway. Most notably, siderophore-mediated iron acquisition is required for full virulence in the sweet corn host, indicating that active iron acquisition is essential for pathogenic fitness for this important xylem-dwelling bacterial pathogen. PMID:25326304

  18. Siderophore-Mediated Iron Acquisition Influences Motility and Is Required for Full Virulence of the Xylem-Dwelling Bacterial Phytopathogen Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii

    PubMed Central

    Burbank, Lindsey; Mohammadi, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    Iron is a key micronutrient for microbial growth but is often present in low concentrations or in biologically unavailable forms. Many microorganisms overcome this challenge by producing siderophores, which are ferric-iron chelating compounds that enable the solubilization and acquisition of iron in a bioactive form. Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, the causal agent of Stewart's wilt of sweet corn, produces a siderophore under iron-limiting conditions. The proteins involved in the biosynthesis and export of this siderophore are encoded by the iucABCD-iutA operon, which is homologous to the aerobactin biosynthetic gene cluster found in a number of enteric pathogens. Mutations in iucA and iutA resulted in a decrease in surface-based motility that P. stewartii utilizes during the early stages of biofilm formation, indicating that active iron acquisition impacts surface motility for P. stewartii. Furthermore, bacterial movement in planta is also dependent on a functional siderophore biosynthesis and uptake pathway. Most notably, siderophore-mediated iron acquisition is required for full virulence in the sweet corn host, indicating that active iron acquisition is essential for pathogenic fitness for this important xylem-dwelling bacterial pathogen. PMID:25326304

  19. A sensitive loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, causative agent of bacterial kidney disease in salmonids.

    PubMed

    Gahlawat, S K; Ellis, A E; Collet, B

    2009-06-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a novel technique for nucleic acid amplification with high specificity, sensitivity and rapidity and does not require expensive equipment or reagents. In the present study, we developed and evaluated a LAMP method for the rapid detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum causing the bacterial kidney disease in salmonids. This method was more sensitive than quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Using DNA template extracted from cultured R. salmoninarum, the LAMP method gave an amplification signal from template diluted to 10(-8) while the limit of detection of qPCR was10(-7). The LAMP method was also highly specific and did not amplify DNA purified from five other Gram-positive and -negative bacterial fish pathogens. The method also worked well using extracts of macrophages infected with R. salmoninarum and kidney material from rainbow trout, which were positive for R. salmoninarum by qPCR and crude R. salmoninarum culture. There was some evidence for inhibitors of the LAMP reaction in the kidney samples, which was overcome by diluting the sample. PMID:19538642

  20. Latest developments in active remote sensing at INO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babin, F.; Forest, R.; Bourliaguet, B.; Cantin, D.; Cottin, P.; Pancrati, O.; Turbide, S.; Lambert-Girard, S.; Cayer, F.; Lemieux, D.; Cormier, J.-F.; Châteauneuf, F.

    2012-09-01

    Remote sensing or stand-off detection using controlled light sources is a well known and often used technique for atmospheric and surface spatial mapping. Today, ground based, vehicle-borne and airborne systems are able to cover large areas with high accuracy and good reliability. This kind of detection based on LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) or active Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technologies, measures optical responses from controlled illumination of targets. Properties that can be recorded include volume back-scattering, surface reflectivity, molecular absorption, induced fluorescence and Raman scattering. The various elastic and inelastic backscattering responses allow the identification or characterization of content of the target volumes or surfaces. INO has developed instrumentations to measure distance to solid targets and monitor particles suspended in the air or in water in real time. Our full waveform LiDAR system is designed for use in numerous applications in environmental or process monitoring such as dust detection systems, aerosol (pesticide) drift monitoring, liquid level sensing or underwater bathymetric LiDARs. Our gated imaging developments are used as aids in visibility enhancement or in remote sensing spectroscopy. Furthermore, when coupled with a spectrograph having a large number of channels, the technique becomes active multispectral/hyperspectral detection or imaging allowing measurement of ultra-violet laser induced fluorescence (UV LIF), time resolved fluorescence (in the ns to ms range) as well as gated Raman spectroscopy. These latter techniques make possible the stand-off detection of bio-aerosols, drugs, explosives as well as the identification of mineral content for geological survey. This paper reviews the latest technology developments in active remote sensing at INO and presents on-going projects conducted to address future applications in environmental monitoring.

  1. The gills are an important site of iNOS expression in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss after challenge with the gram-positive pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Campos-Perez, J J; Ward, M; Grabowski, P S; Ellis, A E; Secombes, C J

    2000-01-01

    Following injection challenge of rainbow trout with the Gram-positive pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum, serum nitrate levels increased indicative of NO production. The timing and amount of nitrate produced varied with the virulence of the bacterial strain used, with the highest levels seen in fish challenged with the most virulent (autoaggregating) strain. Immunization with a killed R. salmoninarum preparation in Freund's incomplete adjuvant significantly increased nitrate levels after challenge. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) transcript expression was detectable in rainbow trout tissues after injection challenge with R. salmoninarum, and its induction in the gills was both quick (between 3 and 6 hr) and relatively prolonged (lasting several days). iNOS expression in the kidney was also seen at a later stage (24 hr) but appeared to switch off relatively rapidly. Bath challenge with R. salmoninarum also induced iNOS expression in gill, and a variable expression in the gut and kidney also occurred. These results highlight the importance of the gills, not only as a point of entry of pathogens but also as a tissue capable of mounting an immune response. PMID:10651954

  2. The gills are an important site of iNOS expression in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss after challenge with the Gram‐positive pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum

    PubMed Central

    Campos‐perez, J J; Ward, M; Grabowski, P S; Ellis, A E; Secombes, C J

    2000-01-01

    Following injection challenge of rainbow trout with the Gram‐positive pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum, serum nitrate levels increased indicative of NO production. The timing and amount of nitrate produced varied with the virulence of the bacterial strain used, with the highest levels seen in fish challenged with the most virulent (autoaggregating) strain. Immunization with a killed R. salmoninarum preparation in Freund’s incomplete adjuvant significantly increased nitrate levels after challenge. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) transcript expression was detectable in rainbow trout tissues after injection challenge with R. salmoninarum, and its induction in the gills was both quick (between 3 and 6 hr) and relatively prolonged (lasting several days). iNOS expression in the kidney was also seen at a later stage (24 hr) but appeared to switch off relatively rapidly. Bath challenge with R. salmoninarum also induced iNOS expression in gill, and a variable expression in the gut and kidney also occurred. These results highlight the importance of the gills, not only as a point of entry of pathogens but also as a tissue capable of mounting an immune response. PMID:10651954

  3. Rapid and efficient introduction of a foreign gene into bacterial artificial chromosome-cloned varicella vaccine by Tn7-mediated site-specific transposition

    SciTech Connect

    Somboonthum, Pranee; Koshizuka, Tetsuo; Okamoto, Shigefumi; Matsuura, Masaaki; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Michiaki; Yamanishi, Koichi; Mori, Yasuko

    2010-06-20

    Using a rapid and reliable system based on Tn7-mediated site-specific transposition, we have successfully constructed a recombinant Oka varicella vaccine (vOka) expressing the mumps virus (MuV) fusion protein (F). The backbone of the vector was our previously reported vOka-BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) genome. We inserted the transposon Tn7 attachment sequence, LacZ{alpha}-mini-attTn7, into the region between ORF12 and ORF13 to generate a vOka-BAC-Tn genome. The MuV-F expressing cassette was transposed into the vOka-BAC genome at the mini-attTn7 transposition site. MuV-F protein was expressed in recombinant virus, rvOka-F infected cells. In addition, the MuV-F protein was cleaved in the rvOka-F infected cells as in MuV-infected cells. The growth of rvOka-F was similar to that of the original recombinant vOka without the F gene. Thus, we show that Tn7-mediated transposition is an efficient method for introducing a foreign gene expression cassette into the vOka-BAC genome as a live virus vector.

  4. The peroxidase-mediated biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in a H2O2-induced SBR using in-situ production of peroxidase: Biodegradation experiments and bacterial identification.

    PubMed

    Shekoohiyan, Sakine; Moussavi, Gholamreza; Naddafi, Kazem

    2016-08-01

    A bacterial peroxidase-mediated oxidizing process was developed for biodegrading total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). Almost complete biodegradation (>99%) of high TPH concentrations (4g/L) was attained in the bioreactor with a low amount (0.6mM) of H2O2 at a reaction time of 22h. A specific TPH biodegradation rate as high as 44.3mgTPH/gbiomass×h was obtained with this process. The reaction times required for complete biodegradation of TPH concentrations of 1, 2, 3, and 4g/L were 21, 22, 28, and 30h, respectively. The catalytic activity of hydrocarbon catalyzing peroxidase was determined to be 1.48U/mL biomass. The biodegradation of TPH in seawater was similar to that in fresh media (no salt). A mixture of bacteria capable of peroxidase synthesis and hydrocarbon biodegradation including Pseudomonas spp. and Bacillus spp. were identified in the bioreactor. The GC/MS analysis of the effluent indicated that all classes of hydrocarbons could be well-degraded in the H2O2-induced SBR. Accordingly, the peroxidase-mediated process is a promising method for efficiently biodegrading concentrated TPH-laden saline wastewater. PMID:27060866

  5. Immunoglobulin isotype isolated from human placental extract does not interfere in complement-mediated bacterial opsonization within the wound milieu

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Kanika; Bhattacharyya, Debasish

    2015-01-01

    The wound healing potency of an aqueous extract of placenta can be evaluated through the presence of numerous regulatory components. The presence of glycans was detected by thin layer chromatography and fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed the existence of multiple fragments of immunoglobulin G (IgG). IgG was present in the extract at a concentration of 25.2 ± 3.97 μg/ml. IgG possesses anti-complementary activity by diverting the complement activation from target surface. Thus, effect of placental IgG on complement–bacteria interaction was investigated through classical and alternative pathway and the preparation was ascertained to be safe with respect to their interference in the process of bacterial opsonization. PMID:25984442

  6. A2B Adenosine Receptor Blockade Enhances Macrophage-Mediated Bacterial Phagocytosis and Improves Polymicrobial Sepsis Survival in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Belikoff, Bryan G.; Hatfield, Stephen; Georgiev, Peter; Ohta, Akio; Lukashev, Dmitriy; Buras, Jon A.; Remick, Daniel G.; Sitkovsky, Michail

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial treatment strategies must improve to reduce the high mortality rates in septic patients. In noninfectious models of acute inflammation, activation of A2B adenosine receptors (A2BR) in extracellular adenosine-rich microenvironments causes immunosuppression. We examined A2BR in antibacterial responses in the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model of sepsis. Antagonism of A2BR significantly increased survival, enhanced bacterial phagocytosis, and decreased IL-6 and MIP-2 (a CXC chemokine) levels after CLP in outbred (ICR/CD-1) mice. During the CLP-induced septic response in A2BR knockout mice, hemodynamic parameters were improved compared with wild-type mice in addition to better survival and decreased plasma IL-6 levels. A2BR deficiency resulted in a dramatic 4-log reduction in peritoneal bacteria. The mechanism of these improvements was due to enhanced macrophage phagocytic activity without augmenting neutrophil phagocytosis of bacteria. Following ex vivo LPS stimulation, septic macrophages from A2BR knockout mice had increased IL-6 and TNF-α secretion compared with wild-type mice. A therapeutic intervention with A2BR blockade was studied by using a plasma biomarker to direct therapy to those mice predicted to die. Pharmacological blockade of A2BR even 32 h after the onset of sepsis increased survival by 65% in those mice predicted to die. Thus, even the late treatment with an A2BR antagonist significantly improved survival of mice (ICR/CD-1) that were otherwise determined to die according to plasma IL-6 levels. Our findings of enhanced bacterial clearance and host survival suggest that antagonism of A2BRs offers a therapeutic target to improve macrophage function in a late treatment protocol that improves sepsis survival. PMID:21242513

  7. Use of bacterial and firefly luciferases as reporter genes in DEAE-dextran-mediated transfection of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Pazzagli, M; Devine, J H; Peterson, D O; Baldwin, T O

    1992-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare three different luciferase genes by placing them in a single reporter vector and expressing them in the same mammalian cell type. The luciferase genes investigated were the luc genes from the fireflies Photinus pyralis (PP) and Luciola mingrelica (LM) and the lux AB5 gene, a translational fusion of the two subunits of the bacterial luciferase from Vibrio harveyi (VH). The chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene was also included in this study for comparison. The performances of the assay methods of the corresponding enzymes were evaluated using reference materials and the results of the expressed enzymes following transfection were calculated using calibration curves. All of the bioluminescent assays possess high reproducibility both within and between the batches (less than 15%). The comparison of the assay methods shows that firefly luciferases have the highest detection sensitivity (0.05 and 0.08 amol for PP and LM, respectively) whereas the VH bacterial luciferase has 5 amol and CAT 100 amol. On the other hand, the transfection of the various plasmids shows that the content of the expressed enzyme within the cells is much higher for CAT than for the other luciferase genes. VH luciferase is expressed at very low levels in mammalian cells due to the relatively high temperature of growing of the mammalian cells that seems to impair the correct folding of the active enzyme. PP and LM luciferases are both expressed at picomolar level but usually 10 to 70 times less in content with respect to CAT within the transfected cells. On the basis of these results the overall improvement in sensitivity related to the use of firefly luciferases as reporter genes in mammalian cells is about 30 to 50 times with respect to that of CAT. PMID:1443530

  8. PPARgamma inhibits osteogenesis via the down-regulation of the expression of COX-2 and iNOS in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Hung; Yang, Rong-Sen; Tang, Chih-Hsin; Lin, Chih-Peng; Fu, Wen-Mei

    2007-10-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), a ligand-activated transcription factor, is considered as an anti-osteoblastic factor associated with adiposity and the elderly osteoporosis due to a defect in osteoblastogenesis. We have found that oral administration of PPARgamma activator rosiglitazone decreased tibia BMD and serum ALP but left serum calcium and osteoclast marker C-terminal telopeptide unaffected. In addition, we examined the inhibitory mechanisms of PPARgamma on the bone formation by using PPARgamma activators ciglitazone and 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin-J2 (15d-PGJ2). Our data indicated that PPARgamma ligands decreased both mineralized bone nodules and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities in cultured primary osteoblasts. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed that the expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and osteocalcin (OCN) was inhibited by ciglitizone and 15d-PGJ2. Furthermore, PPARgamma ligands inhibited NF-kappaB associated downstream COX-2 and iNOS osteogenic signaling. The ultrasound (US)-induced elevation of COX-2 and iNOS expression and nitric oxide (NO) production were attenuated in the presence of PPARgamma ligands. Furthermore, local administration of PPARgamma ligands into the metaphysis of rat tibia decreased the bone volume in secondary spongiosa. These results suggest that the activation of PPARgamma inhibits osteoblastic differentiation and the expression of several anabolic mediators involved in bone formation. These data may reflect osteoporosis and less bone formation in the aging people and patients treated with thiazolidinediones. PMID:17669705

  9. Role of Human CD36 in Bacterial Recognition, Phagocytosis and Pathogen-Induced C-Jun N-Terminal Kinase (JNK) - Mediated Signaling 1

    PubMed Central

    Baranova, Irina N.; Kurlander, Roger; Bocharov, Alexander V.; Vishnyakova, Tatyana G.; Chen, Zhigang; Remaley, Alan T.; Csako, Gyorgy; Patterson, Amy P.; Eggerman, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    Scavenger receptor CD36 mediates Staphylococcus aureus phagocytosis and initiates TLR2/6-signaling. We analyzed the role of CD36 in the uptake and TLR-independent signaling of various bacteria, including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella typhimurium, S. aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. Expression of human CD36 in HeLa cells increased the uptake of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria compared with the control mock-transfected cells. Bacterial adhesion was associated with pathogen phagocytosis. Upon CD36-transfection, HEK293 cells, which demonstrate no TLR2/4 expression, acquired LPS responsiveness as assessed by IL-8 production. The cells demonstrated a marked 5- to 15-fold increase in cytokine release upon exposure to Gram-negative bacteria, while the increase was much smaller (1.5- to 3-fold) with Gram-positive bacteria and lipotechoic acid. CD36 down-regulation utilizing CD36 small interfering RNA reduced cytokine release by 40%–50% in human fibroblasts induced by both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria as well as LPS. Of all MAP kinase signaling cascade inhibitors tested, only the inhibitor of JNK, a stress activated protein kinase, potently blocked E. coli/LPS-stimulated cytokine production. NF-κB inhibitors were ineffective, indicating direct TLR-independent signaling. JNK activation was confirmed by Western blot analyses of phosphorylated JKN1/2 products. Synthetic amphipathic peptides with an α-helical motif were shown to be efficient inhibitors of E. coli- and LPS-induced IL-8 secretion as well as JNK1/2 activation/phosphorylation in CD36-overexpressing cells. These results indicate that CD36 functions as a phagocytic receptor for a variety of bacteria and mediates signaling induced by Gram-negative bacteria and LPS via a JNK-mediated signaling pathway in a TLR2/4-independent manner. PMID:18981136

  10. TNF-Α May Mediate Inflammasome Activation in the Absence of Bacterial Infection in More than One Way

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez, Susana; Muñoz-Fernández, Ma Ángeles

    2013-01-01

    Members of the mammalian nucleotide binding domain, leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing receptor family of proteins are key modulators of innate immunity regulating inflammation. To date, microbial pathogen-associated molecules and toxins have been identified as key triggers of activation of inflammasomes. However, recently, environmental, and neurodegenerative stimuli have been identified that lead to IL-1β release by means of inflammasomes. IL-1β plays a crucial role during brain inflammation, and caspase-1 appears to be a key modulator of IL-1β bioactivity and the consequent transcriptional regulation of gene expression within the brain during inflammation. We show here that exposure of a human neuroblastoma cell line (SK-N-MC cells) to TNF-α promotes ROS-mediated caspase-1 activation and IL-1β secretion. The involvement of NF-κB in the regulation of IL-1β synthesis is investigated through specific inhibition of this transcription factor. The effect of TNF-α was abolished in the presence of ROS inhibitors as NAC, or DPI. Remarkably, SK-N-MC cells do not respond to ATP stimulation in spite of P2X7R expression. These results provide a mechanism by which danger signals and particulate matter mediate inflammation via the inflammasome in the absence of microbial infection. PMID:23940760

  11. The mammalian INO80 chromatin remodeling complex is required for replication stress recovery

    PubMed Central

    Vassileva, Ivelina; Yanakieva, Iskra; Peycheva, Michaela; Gospodinov, Anastas; Anachkova, Boyka

    2014-01-01

    A number of studies have implicated the yeast INO80 chromatin remodeling complex in DNA replication, but the function of the human INO80 complex during S phase remains poorly understood. Here, we have systematically investigated the involvement of the catalytic subunit of the human INO80 complex during unchallenged replication and under replication stress by following the effects of its depletion on cell survival, S-phase checkpoint activation, the fate of individual replication forks, and the consequences of fork collapse. We report that INO80 was specifically needed for efficient replication elongation, while it was not required for initiation of replication. In the absence of the Ino80 protein, cells became hypersensitive to hydroxyurea and displayed hyperactive ATR-Chk1 signaling. Using bulk and fiber labeling of DNA, we found that cells deficient for Ino80 and Arp8 had impaired replication restart after treatment with replication inhibitors and accumulated double-strand breaks as evidenced by the formation of γ-H2AX and Rad51 foci. These data indicate that under conditions of replication stress mammalian INO80 protects stalled forks from collapsing and allows their subsequent restart. PMID:25016522

  12. Presence of hsp65 in bacterial extracts (OM-89): a possible mediator of orally-induced tolerance?

    PubMed

    Polla, B S; Baladi, S; Fuller, K; Rook, G

    1995-08-16

    Heat shock proteins (HSP) have been implicated in rodent models of autoimmunity, particularly arthritis, and there is suggestive though inconclusive evidence that they may also play a role in human autoimmune disease. The simplest hypothesis is based on molecular mimicry due to the amino-acid sequence homology between mammalian and microbial HSP. Recently OM-89, an extract of several strains of Escherichia coli, has shown some efficacy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) when taken orally. Using species-specific antibodies, we show here that OM-89 contains the 65 kDa HSP (hsp65), while hsp65 was not detected in another bacterial extract containing other microorganisms, including Staphylococcus aureus (OM-85). We suggest that if the human homologue of hsp65 is a relevant target antigen in the human disease, the efficacy of the preparation could be due to induction of oral tolerance or to switching the Th1 response towards Th2. Alternatively, even if the human hsp65 is not a target molecule in RA joints, OM-89 may evoke bystander suppression of joint inflammation via induction of TGF beta-secreting effector cells. These hypotheses should be tested in further studies. PMID:7649235

  13. The Oligopeptide Permease Opp Mediates Illicit Transport of the Bacterial P-site Decoding Inhibitor GE81112 †

    PubMed Central

    Maio, Alessandro; Brandi, Letizia; Donadio, Stefano; Gualerzi, Claudio O.

    2016-01-01

    GE81112 is a tetrapeptide antibiotic that binds to the 30S ribosomal subunit and specifically inhibits P-site decoding of the mRNA initiation codon by the fMet-tRNA anticodon. GE81112 displays excellent microbiological activity against some Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in both minimal and complete, chemically defined, broth, but is essentially inactive in complete complex media. This is due to the presence of peptides that compete with the antibiotic for the oligopeptide permease system (Opp) responsible for its illicit transport into the bacterial cells as demonstrated in the cases of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. Mutations that inactivate the Opp system and confer GE81112 resistance arise spontaneously with a frequency of ca. 1 × 10−6, similar to that of the mutants resistant to tri-l-ornithine, a known Opp substrate. On the contrary, cells expressing extrachromosomal copies of the opp genes are extremely sensitive to GE81112 in rich medium and GE81112-resistant mutations affecting the molecular target of the antibiotic were not detected upon examining >109 cells of this type. However, some mutations introduced in the 16S rRNA to confer kasugamycin resistance were found to reduce the sensitivity of the cells to GE81112. PMID:27231947

  14. The Oligopeptide Permease Opp Mediates Illicit Transport of the Bacterial P-site Decoding Inhibitor GE81112.

    PubMed

    Maio, Alessandro; Brandi, Letizia; Donadio, Stefano; Gualerzi, Claudio O

    2016-01-01

    GE81112 is a tetrapeptide antibiotic that binds to the 30S ribosomal subunit and specifically inhibits P-site decoding of the mRNA initiation codon by the fMet-tRNA anticodon. GE81112 displays excellent microbiological activity against some Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in both minimal and complete, chemically defined, broth, but is essentially inactive in complete complex media. This is due to the presence of peptides that compete with the antibiotic for the oligopeptide permease system (Opp) responsible for its illicit transport into the bacterial cells as demonstrated in the cases of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. Mutations that inactivate the Opp system and confer GE81112 resistance arise spontaneously with a frequency of ca. 1 × 10(-6), similar to that of the mutants resistant to tri-l-ornithine, a known Opp substrate. On the contrary, cells expressing extrachromosomal copies of the opp genes are extremely sensitive to GE81112 in rich medium and GE81112-resistant mutations affecting the molecular target of the antibiotic were not detected upon examining >10⁸ cells of this type. However, some mutations introduced in the 16S rRNA to confer kasugamycin resistance were found to reduce the sensitivity of the cells to GE81112. PMID:27231947

  15. Inhibition of TNFα-induced iNOS expression in HSV-tk transduced 9L glioblastoma cell lines by Marasmius oreades substances through NF-κB- and MAPK-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ruimi, Nili; Petrova, Roumyana D; Agbaria, Riad; Sussan, Sherbel; Wasser, Solomon P; Reznick, Abraham Z; Mahajna, Jamal

    2010-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a gaseous, radical molecule that plays a role in various physiological processes. Previously, we reported that transduction of murine colon cancer cells (MC38) with herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene resulted in a significant over-expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and activation of NF-kB pathway. In this study we show that TNFα, but not LPS, was significantly able to stimulate the production of NO in HSV-tk transduced 9L glioblastoma cell lines, mediated by the up-regulation of iNOS transcript and iNOS protein. The TNFα-induced up-regulation of iNOS expression was mediated by MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways as revealed by using selective pharmaceutical inhibitors. A culture liquid extract of the edible and medicinal mushroom Marasmius oreades that was previously shown to inhibit iNOS expression in MCF-7 was utilized to prepare fractions and evaluate their ability to affect TNFα-induced iNOS expression in HSV tk transduced 9L cell lines. While most of the tested fractions were shown to inhibit TNFα-induced iNOS expression, they targeted different signaling pathways in a selective fashion. Here, we report that fraction SiSiF1 interfered with IKBα phosphorylation and consequently interfered with NF-κB activation pathway. SiSiF1 showed minimal interference with the phosphorylation of p38 and JNK proteins. In contrast, fraction SiSiF3 selectively inhibited the phosphorylation of p38 and fractions SiSiF4 and SiSiF5 selectively inhibited the phosphorylation of JNK with no observed effect against IKBα and p38 phosphorylation. Our data illustrate the complexity of iNOS regulation in HSV tk transduced 9L cell lines and also the richness of natural products with bioactive substances that may act synergistically through different signaling pathways to affect iNOS gene expression. PMID:20224909

  16. India-based neutrino observatory (INO): Physics reach and status report

    SciTech Connect

    Indumathi, D.

    2015-07-15

    We present a review of the physics reach and current status of the proposed India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). We briefly outline details of the INO location and the present status of detector development. We then present the physics goals and simulation studies of the main detector, the magnetised Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) detector, to be housed in INO. The ICAL detector would make precision measurements of neutrino oscillation parameters with atmospheric neutrinos including a measurement of the neutrino mass hierarchy. Additional synergies with other experiments due to the complete insensitivity of ICAL to the CP phase are also discussed.

  17. Galectin-9 Signaling through TIM-3 Is Involved in Neutrophil-Mediated Gram-Negative Bacterial Killing: An Effect Abrogated within the Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Carrascal, Isabel; Bergin, David A.; McElvaney, Oliver J.; McCarthy, Cormac; Banville, Nessa; Pohl, Kerstin; Hirashima, Mitsuomi; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Reeves, Emer P.; McElvaney, Noel G.

    2016-01-01

    The T cell Ig and mucin domain–containing molecule (TIM) family of receptors have emerged as potential therapeutic targets to correct abnormal immune function in chronic inflammatory conditions. TIM-3 serves as a functional receptor in structural cells of the airways and via the ligand galectin-9 (Gal-9) can modulate the inflammatory response. The aim of this study was to investigate TIM-3 expression and function in neutrophils, focusing on its potential role in cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Results revealed that TIM-3 mRNA and protein expression values of circulating neutrophils were equal between healthy controls (n = 20) and people with CF (n = 26). TIM-3 was detected on resting neutrophil membranes by FACS analysis, and expression levels significantly increased post IL-8 or TNF-α exposure (p < 0.05). Our data suggest a novel role for TIM-3/Gal-9 signaling involving modulation of cytosolic calcium levels. Via TIM-3 interaction, Gal-9 induced neutrophil degranulation and primed the cell for enhanced NADPH oxidase activity. Killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was significantly increased upon bacterial opsonization with Gal-9 (p < 0.05), an effect abrogated by blockade of TIM-3 receptors. This mechanism appeared to be Gram-negative bacteria specific and mediated via Gal-9/ LPS binding. Additionally, we have demonstrated that neutrophil TIM-3/Gal-9 signaling is perturbed in the CF airways due to proteolytic degradation of the receptor. In conclusion, results suggest a novel neutrophil defect potentially contributing to the defective bacterial clearance observed in the CF airways and suggest that manipulation of the TIM-3 signaling pathway may be of therapeutic value in CF, preferably in conjunction with antiprotease treatment. PMID:24477913

  18. An HD-domain phosphodiesterase mediates cooperative hydrolysis of c-di-AMP to affect bacterial growth and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, TuAnh Ngoc; Luo, Shukun; Pensinger, Daniel; Sauer, John-Demian; Tong, Liang; Woodward, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    The nucleotide cyclic di-3′,5′- adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) was recently identified as an essential and widespread second messenger in bacterial signaling. Among c-di-AMP–producing bacteria, altered nucleotide levels result in several physiological defects and attenuated virulence. Thus, a detailed molecular understanding of c-di-AMP metabolism is of both fundamental and practical interest. Currently, c-di-AMP degradation is recognized solely among DHH-DHHA1 domain-containing phosphodiesterases. Using chemical proteomics, we identified the Listeria monocytogenes protein PgpH as a molecular target of c-di-AMP. Biochemical and structural studies revealed that the PgpH His-Asp (HD) domain bound c-di-AMP with high affinity and specifically hydrolyzed this nucleotide to 5′-pApA. PgpH hydrolysis activity was inhibited by ppGpp, indicating a cross-talk between c-di-AMP signaling and the stringent response. Genetic analyses supported coordinated regulation of c-di-AMP levels in and out of the host. Intriguingly, a L. monocytogenes mutant that lacks c-di-AMP phosphodiesterases exhibited elevated c-di-AMP levels, hyperinduced a host type-I IFN response, and was significantly attenuated for infection. Furthermore, PgpH homologs, which belong to the 7TMR-HD family, are widespread among hundreds of c-di-AMP synthesizing microorganisms. Thus, PgpH represents a broadly conserved class of c-di-AMP phosphodiesterase with possibly other physiological functions in this crucial signaling network. PMID:25583510

  19. Bacterially-Mediated Formation of Rock Coatings in Karkevagge, Swedish Lapland: A Mineralogical and Micro-Environmental Analog for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marnocha, Cassandra L.

    The search for past or present life on Mars is, for now, limited to surface environments. An often neglected surface environment that could have served as an abode for life and could presently preserve evidence of that life is that of rock coatings. Rock coatings are mineral accretions on rock surfaces. On Earth, they are widespread and occur with considerable chemical diversity. There is growing evidence for a biotic role in their formation on Earth, particularly with respect to rock varnish. As a result, rock varnish has become a target of astrobiological interest on Mars, where varnish-like coatings have been observed. However, a number of coating types compatible with martian mineralogy exist but have yet to be investigated thoroughly. In this dissertation, I present a study of three principle rock coating types from a glacially eroded valley, Karkevagge, in northern Sweden. The coatings consist of iron films, sulfate crusts, and aluminum glazes, all with primary mineralogies that are compatible with those minerals that have been identified on Mars. To examine the role of microbiology in these terrestrial rock coatings and what the biotic formation of coatings might tell us about observed coatings on Mars, we asked three basic questions: 1) What microbes inhabit the coatings, 2) What are those microbes contributing to the geochemistry of the coatings, and 3) How are the microbes contributing to the overall formation of the rock coating? To answer these questions, we undertook two bacterial diversity surveys - Sanger sequencing and 454 pyrosequencing. Using the results of these surveys, we were able to assess diversity, richness, and metabolic potential of the communities. Microscopy and spectroscopy were used in order to visualize microbial communities inhabiting the coatings and to observe evidence of biomineralization. Using the answers to those questions - who, what, and how - a conceptual model of coating formation was developed to relate the terrestrial

  20. Triclosan Resistance in a Bacterial Fish Pathogen, Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, is Mediated by an Enoyl Reductase, FabV.

    PubMed

    Khan, Raees; Lee, Myung Hwan; Joo, Hae-Jin; Jung, Yong-Hoon; Ahmad, Shabir; Choi, Jin-Hee; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2015-04-01

    Triclosan, the widely used biocide, specifically targets enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR) in the bacterial fatty acid synthesis system. Although the fish pathogen Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida exhibits triclosan resistance, the nature of this resistance has not been elucidated. Here, we aimed to characterize the triclosan resistance of A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida causing furunculosis. The fosmid library of triclosan-resistant A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida was constructed to select a fosmid clone showing triclosan resistance. With the fosmid clone showing triclosan resistance, a subsequent secondary library search resulted in the selection of subclone pTSR-1. DNA sequence analysis of pTSR-1 revealed the presence of a chromosomal-borne fabV-encoding ENR homolog. The ENR of A. salmonicida (FabVas) exhibited significant homology with previously known FabV, including the catalytic domain YX(8)K. fabVas introduction into E. coli dramatically increased its resistance to triclosan. Heterologous expression of FabVas might functionally replace the triclosan-sensitive FabI in vivo to confer E. coli with triclosan resistance. A genome-wide search for fabVas homologs revealed the presence of an additional fabV gene (fabVas2) paralog in A. salmonicida strains and the fabVas orthologs from other gram-negative fish pathogens. Both of the potential FabV ENRs expressed similarly with or without triclosan supplement. This is the first report about the presence of two potential FabV ENRs in a single pathogenic bacterium. Our result suggests that triclosan-resistant ENRs are widely distributed in various bacteria in nature, and the wide use of this biocide can spread these triclosan-tolerant ENRs among fish pathogens and other pathogenic bacteria. PMID:25370725

  1. Green synthesis of bacterial mediated anti-proliferative gold nanoparticles: inducing mitotic arrest (G2/M phase) and apoptosis (intrinsic pathway)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh Kumar, C.; Poornachandra, Y.; Chandrasekhar, Cheemalamarri

    2015-11-01

    The physiochemical and biological properties of microbial derived gold nanoparticles have potential applications in various biomedical domains as well as in cancer therapy. We have fabricated anti-proliferative bacterial mediated gold nanoparticles (b-Au NPs) using a culture supernatant of Streptomyces clavuligerus and later characterized them by UV-visible, TEM, DLS, XRD and FT-IR spectroscopic techniques. The capping agent responsible for the nanoparticle formation was characterized based on SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF-MS analyses. They were tested for anticancer activity in A549, HeLa and DU145 cell lines. The biocompatibility and non-toxic nature of the nanoparticles were tested on normal human lung cell line (MRC-5). The b-Au NPs induced the cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase and also inhibited the microtubule assembly in DU145 cells. Mechanistic studies, such as ROS, MMP, Cyt-c, GSH, caspases 9, 8 and 3 activation and the Annexin V-FITC staining, along with the above parameters tested provided sufficient evidence that the b-Au NPs induced apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway. The results supported the use of b-Au NPs for future therapeutic application in cancer therapy and other biomedical applications.The physiochemical and biological properties of microbial derived gold nanoparticles have potential applications in various biomedical domains as well as in cancer therapy. We have fabricated anti-proliferative bacterial mediated gold nanoparticles (b-Au NPs) using a culture supernatant of Streptomyces clavuligerus and later characterized them by UV-visible, TEM, DLS, XRD and FT-IR spectroscopic techniques. The capping agent responsible for the nanoparticle formation was characterized based on SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF-MS analyses. They were tested for anticancer activity in A549, HeLa and DU145 cell lines. The biocompatibility and non-toxic nature of the nanoparticles were tested on normal human lung cell line (MRC-5). The b-Au NPs induced the cell cycle arrest in G2

  2. INO340 telescope control system: hardware design and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarzadeh, Asghar; Ravanmehr, Reza

    2014-07-01

    In order to meet high image quality requirements of the INO340 telescope, one of the significant issues is the design and development of the Telescope Control System (TCS) architecture. The architecture of TCS is designed based on distributed control system configuration, which consists of four major subsystems: Telescope Control System supervisor (TCSS), Dome Control System (DCS), Mount Control System (MCS), and Active Optic System (AOS). Another system which plays important role in the hardware architecture is Interlock System (ILS), which is responsible for safety of staff, telescope and data. ILS architecture is also designed, using distributed system method based on the fail-safe PLCs. All subsystems of TCS are designed with an adequate safety subsystem, which are responsible for the safety of the subsystem and communicates through reliable lines with the main controller, placed in control room. In this paper, we explain the innovative architecture of Telescope Control System together with Interlock System and in brief show the interface control issues between different subsystems.

  3. Neutrino physics with non-standard interactions at INO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Sandhya; Ghosh, Anushree; Ohlsson, Tommy; Tiwari, Deepak

    2015-12-01

    Non-standard neutrino interactions (NSI) involved in neutrino propagation inside Earth matter could potentially alter atmospheric neutrino fluxes. In this work, we look at the impact of these NSI on the signal at the ICAL detector to be built at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). We show how the sensitivity to the neutrino mass hierarchy of ICAL changes in the presence of NSI. The mass hierarchy sensitivity is shown to be rather sensitive to the NSI parameters ɛ eμ and ɛ eτ , while the dependence on ɛ μτ and ɛ τ τ is seen to be very mild, once the χ 2 is marginalised over oscillation and NSI parameters. If the NSI are large enough, the event spectrum at ICAL is expected to be altered and this can be used to discover new physics. We calculate the lower limit on NSI parameters above which ICAL could discover NSI at a given C.L. from 10 years of data. If NSI were too small, the null signal at ICAL can constrain the NSI parameters. We give upper limits on the NSI parameters at any given C.L. that one is expected to put from 10 years of running of ICAL. Finally, we give C.L. contours in the NSI parameter space that is expected to be still allowed from 10 years of running of the experiment.

  4. Rutin-Mediated Priming of Plant Resistance to Three Bacterial Pathogens Initiating the Early SA Signal Pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Xu, Xiaonan; Li, Yang; Wang, Yingzi; Li, Ming; Wang, Yong; Ding, Xinhua; Chu, Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids are ubiquitous in the plant kingdom and have many diverse functions, including UV protection, auxin transport inhibition, allelopathy, flower coloring and insect resistance. Here we show that rutin, a proud member of the flavonoid family, could be functional as an activator to improve plant disease resistances. Three plant species pretreated with 2 mM rutin were found to enhance resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, Ralstonia solanacearum, and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 in rice, tobacco and Arabidopsis thaliana respectively. While they were normally propagated on the cultural medium supplemented with 2 mM rutin for those pathogenic bacteria. The enhanced resistance was associated with primed expression of several pathogenesis-related genes. We also demonstrated that the rutin-mediated priming resistance was attenuated in npr1, eds1, eds5, pad4-1, ndr1 mutants, and NahG transgenic Arabidopsis plant, while not in either snc1-11, ein2-5 or jar1 mutants. We concluded that the rutin-priming defense signal was modulated by the salicylic acid (SA)-dependent pathway from an early stage upstream of NDR1 and EDS1. PMID:26751786

  5. Rutin-Mediated Priming of Plant Resistance to Three Bacterial Pathogens Initiating the Early SA Signal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Wang, Yingzi; Li, Ming; Wang, Yong; Ding, Xinhua; Chu, Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids are ubiquitous in the plant kingdom and have many diverse functions, including UV protection, auxin transport inhibition, allelopathy, flower coloring and insect resistance. Here we show that rutin, a proud member of the flavonoid family, could be functional as an activator to improve plant disease resistances. Three plant species pretreated with 2 mM rutin were found to enhance resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, Ralstonia solanacearum, and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 in rice, tobacco and Arabidopsis thaliana respectively. While they were normally propagated on the cultural medium supplemented with 2 mM rutin for those pathogenic bacteria. The enhanced resistance was associated with primed expression of several pathogenesis-related genes. We also demonstrated that the rutin-mediated priming resistance was attenuated in npr1, eds1, eds5, pad4-1, ndr1 mutants, and NahG transgenic Arabidopsis plant, while not in either snc1-11, ein2-5 or jar1 mutants. We concluded that the rutin-priming defense signal was modulated by the salicylic acid (SA)-dependent pathway from an early stage upstream of NDR1 and EDS1. PMID:26751786

  6. Bacterial kidney disease as a model for studies of cell mediated immunity in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Jansson, Eva; Hongslo, Thorbjörn; Johannisson, Anders; Pilström, Lars; Timmusk, Sirje; Norrgren, Leif

    2003-04-01

    A cell mediated immune (CMI) response was measured in vitro to heat-killed and to paraformaldehyde fixed Renibacterium salmoninarum (Rs) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) experimentally challenged with live Rs. The mitogenic response to the T lymphocyte mitogen Concanavalin A (Con A) was reduced during samplings 4 to 6 weeks after immersion, but no effect of the response to the B lymphocyte mitogen lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was detected. The subpopulation of lymphocytes, detected by the monoclonal antibody 1C2, was decreased from the 4th week to the 5th week of infection, and remained at the decreased level up to 10 weeks post immersion. The proportion of Immunoglobulin (Ig) bearing lymphocytes was not affected during the Rs infection period. The humoral antibody level to heat-stable Rs-antigens was increased up to 10 weeks after immersion but after 27 weeks was reduced to a level similar to that of the non-challenged fish. An anamnestic response was demonstrated in challenged fish, as intraperitoneal injection of heat-treated Rs bacteria into Rs challenged fish elicited a stronger humoral antibody response compared with injection into non-challenged fish. PMID:12657537

  7. A Methanol Extract of Adansonia digitata L. Leaves Inhibits Pro-Inflammatory iNOS Possibly via the Inhibition of NF-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ayele, Yihunie; Kim, Jung-Ah; Park, Eunhee; Kim, Ye-Jung; Retta, Negussie; Dessie, Gulelat; Rhee, Sang-Ki; Koh, Kwangoh; Nam, Kung-Woo; Kim, Hee Seon

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the total polyphenol content of eight wild edible plants from Ethiopia and their effect on NO production in Raw264.7 cells. Owing to its relatively high polyphenol concentration and inhibition of NO production, the methanol extract of Adansonia digitata L. leaf (MEAD) was subjected to detailed evaluation of its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Antioxidant effects were assessed by measuring free-radical-scavenging activity using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and oxygen-radical-absorbance capacity (ORAC) assays, while anti-inflammatory effects were assessed by measuring inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. In the ORAC assay, MEAD was 10.2 times more potent than vitamin C at eliminating peroxyl radicals. In DPPH assay, MEAD also showed a strong ROS scavenging effect. MEAD significantly inhibited iNOS activity (IC50=28.6 μg/ml) of LPS-stimulated Raw264.7 cells. We also investigated the relationship between iNOS expression and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation. MEAD inhibited IκBα degradation and NF-κB translocation from the cytosol to the nucleus in LPS-induced RAW264.7 cells without significant cytotoxic effects, as confirmed by MTT assay. These results suggest that MEAD inhibits anti-inflammatory iNOS expression, which might be related to the elimination of peroxyl radicals and thus the inhibition of IκBα-mediated NF-κB signal transduction. PMID:24009873

  8. Investigating the role of tumour cell derived iNOS on tumour growth and vasculature in vivo using a tetracycline regulated expression system.

    PubMed

    Papaevangelou, Efthymia; Whitley, Guy S; Johnstone, Alan P; Robinson, Simon P; Howe, Franklyn A

    2016-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical signalling molecule involved in various physiological and pathological processes, including cancer. Both tumouricidal and tumour promoting effects have been attributed to NO, making its role in cancer biology controversial and unclear. To investigate the specific role of tumour-derived NO in vascular development, C6 glioma cells were genetically modified to include a doxycycline regulated gene expression system that controls the expression of an antisense RNA to inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) to manipulate endogenous iNOS expression. Xenografts of these cells were propagated in the presence or absence of doxycycline. Susceptibility magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), initially with a carbogen (95% O2 /5% CO2 ) breathing challenge and subsequently an intravascular blood pool contrast agent, was used to assess haemodynamic vasculature (ΔR2 *) and fractional blood volume (fBV), and correlated with histopathological assessment of tumour vascular density, maturation and function. Inhibition of NO production in C6 gliomas led to significant growth delay and inhibition of vessel maturation. Parametric fBV maps were used to identify vascularised regions from which the carbogen-induced ΔR2 * was measured and found to be positively correlated with vessel maturation, quantified ex vivo using fluorescence microscopy for endothelial and perivascular cell staining. These data suggest that tumour-derived iNOS is an important mediator of tumour growth and vessel maturation, hence a promising target for anti-vascular cancer therapies. The combination of ΔR2 * response to carbogen and fBV MRI can provide a marker of tumour vessel maturation that could be applied to non-invasively monitor treatment response to iNOS inhibitors. PMID:26756734

  9. Clumping Factor A Interaction with Complement Factor I Increases C3b Cleavage on the Bacterial Surface of Staphylococcus aureus and Decreases Complement-Mediated Phagocytosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Hair, Pamela S.; Echague, Charlene G.; Sholl, Amber M.; Watkins, Justin A.; Geoghegan, Joan A.; Foster, Timothy J.; Cunnion, Kenji M.

    2010-01-01

    The human complement system is important in the immunological control of Staphylococcus aureus infection. We showed previously that S. aureus surface protein clumping factor A (ClfA), when expressed in recombinant form, bound complement control protein factor I and increased factor I cleavage of C3b to iC3b. In the present study, we show that, compared to the results for the wild type, when isogenic ClfA-deficient S. aureus mutants were incubated in serum, they bound less factor I, generated less iC3b on the bacterial surface, and bound fewer C3 fragments. It has been shown previously that two amino acids in ClfA (P336 and Y338) are essential for fibrinogen binding. However, S. aureus expressing ClfA(P336A Y338S) was less virulent than ClfA-deficient strains in animal models. This suggested that ClfA contributed to S. aureus virulence by a mechanism different than fibrinogen binding. In the present study, we showed that S. aureus expressing ClfA(P336A Y338S) was more susceptible to complement-mediated phagocytosis than a ClfA-null mutant or the wild type. Unlike ClfA, ClfA(P336A Y338S) did not enhance factor I cleavage of C3b to iC3b and inhibited the cofactor function of factor H. Fibrinogen enhanced factor I binding to ClfA and the S. aureus surface. Twenty clinical S. aureus strains all expressed ClfA and bound factor I. High levels of factor I binding by clinical strains correlated with poor phagocytosis. In summary, our results suggest that the interaction of ClfA with factor I contributes to S. aureus virulence by a complement-mediated mechanism. PMID:20100856

  10. Prevention of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis after adenovirus-mediated transfer of the bacterial bleomycin resistance gene.

    PubMed Central

    Tran, P L; Weinbach, J; Opolon, P; Linares-Cruz, G; Reynes, J P; Grégoire, A; Kremer, E; Durand, H; Perricaudet, M

    1997-01-01

    A serious limitation in the use of the DNA-cleaving, antitumoral-antibiotic, bleomycin during chemotherapy is pulmonary toxicity. Lung injury induced by bleomycin is characterized by an increased deposition of interstitial extracellular matrix proteins in the alveolar wall that compromises respiratory function. Several drugs have been tested in animal models to prevent the pulmonary toxicity of bleomycin, but have not led to a useful clinical treatment because of their adverse effects on other tissues. We have shown that transgenic mice expressing Streptoalloteichus hindustanus (Sh) ble bleomycin resistance protein in pulmonary epithelial cells in the lungs are protected against bleomycin-induced toxicity in lungs. In the present study, we used intranasal administration by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of the bleomycin resistance Sh ble gene to mouse lung for prevention of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. We constructed recombinant adenoviruses Ad.CMVble and Ad.RSVble harboring the bleomycin resistance Sh ble gene under the control of the cytomegalovirus early promoter and the Rous sarcoma virus early promoter, respectively. Transgene expression was detected in epithelia of conducting airways and alveolar septa by immunostaining with a rabbit polyclonal antibody directed against the bleomycin resistance protein and persisted for the duration of drug treatment; i.e., up to 17 d. No toxic effect was seen in adenovirus-treated mice. Pretreatment of mice with Ad.CMVble or Ad.RSVble completely prevented collagen deposition 42-133 d after bleomycin treatment, as measured by lung OH-proline content. Histologic studies indicated that there was little or no lung injury in the adenovirus/bleomycin-treated mice compared with the bleomycin-treated mice. These observations may lead to new approaches for the prevention of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:9045862

  11. Mulberry leaf extract mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles and its anti-bacterial activity against human pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adavallan, K.; Krishnakumar, N.

    2014-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) were synthesized at room temperature using Morus alba (mulberry) leaf extract as reducing and stabilizing agent. The development of plant mediated synthesis of nanoparticles is gaining importance due to its simplicity, low cost, non-toxicity, eco-friendliness, long term stability and reproducible aqueous synthesis method to obtain a self-assembly of nearly monodispersed Au-NPs. The formation and morphology of biosynthesized nanoparticles are investigated with the help of UV-Vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) techniques. Au-NPs formation was screened by UV-Vis spectroscopy through color conversion due to surface plasmon resonance band at 538 nm for Au-NPs. DLS studies revealed that the average size of Au-NPs was 50 nm. TEM studies showed the particles to be nearly spherical with few irregular shapes and particle size ranges 15-53 nm. The AFM image clearly shows the surface morphology of the well-dispersed Au-NPs with less than 50 nm. The high crystallinity of nanoparticles is evident from bright circular spots in the selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern. X-ray diffraction pattern showed high purity and face-centered cubic structure of Au-NPs. The FT-IR results indicate the presence of different functional groups present in the biomolecule capping the nanoparticles. Further, biosynthesized Au-NPs show strong zone of inhibition against Vibrio cholera (gram-negative) and Staphylococcus aureus (gram-positive) whereas, chemically synthesized Au-NPs and mulberry leaf extract exhibit a fair zone of inhibition.

  12. Computational Analyses of an Evolutionary Arms Race between Mammalian Immunity Mediated by Immunoglobulin A and Its Subversion by Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Ana; Woof, Jenny M.; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Parham, Peter; Esteves, Pedro J.

    2013-01-01

    IgA is the predominant immunoglobulin isotype in mucosal tissues and external secretions, playing important roles both in defense against pathogens and in maintenance of commensal microbiota. Considering the complexity of its interactions with the surrounding environment, IgA is a likely target for diversifying or positive selection. To investigate this possibility, the action of natural selection on IgA was examined in depth with six different methods: CODEML from the PAML package and the SLAC, FEL, REL, MEME and FUBAR methods implemented in the Datamonkey webserver. In considering just primate IgA, these analyses show that diversifying selection targeted five positions of the Cα1 and Cα2 domains of IgA. Extending the analysis to include other mammals identified 18 positively selected sites: ten in Cα1, five in Cα2 and three in Cα3. All but one of these positions display variation in polarity and charge. Their structural locations suggest they indirectly influence the conformation of sites on IgA that are critical for interaction with host IgA receptors and also with proteins produced by mucosal pathogens that prevent their elimination by IgA-mediated effector mechanisms. Demonstrating the plasticity of IgA in the evolution of different groups of mammals, only two of the eighteen selected positions in all mammals are included in the five selected positions in primates. That IgA residues subject to positive selection impact sites targeted both by host receptors and subversive pathogen ligands highlights the evolutionary arms race playing out between mammals and pathogens, and further emphasizes the importance of IgA in protection against mucosal pathogens. PMID:24019941

  13. Computational analyses of an evolutionary arms race between mammalian immunity mediated by immunoglobulin A and its subversion by bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Ana; Woof, Jenny M; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Parham, Peter; Esteves, Pedro J

    2013-01-01

    IgA is the predominant immunoglobulin isotype in mucosal tissues and external secretions, playing important roles both in defense against pathogens and in maintenance of commensal microbiota. Considering the complexity of its interactions with the surrounding environment, IgA is a likely target for diversifying or positive selection. To investigate this possibility, the action of natural selection on IgA was examined in depth with six different methods: CODEML from the PAML package and the SLAC, FEL, REL, MEME and FUBAR methods implemented in the Datamonkey webserver. In considering just primate IgA, these analyses show that diversifying selection targeted five positions of the Cα1 and Cα2 domains of IgA. Extending the analysis to include other mammals identified 18 positively selected sites: ten in Cα1, five in Cα2 and three in Cα3. All but one of these positions display variation in polarity and charge. Their structural locations suggest they indirectly influence the conformation of sites on IgA that are critical for interaction with host IgA receptors and also with proteins produced by mucosal pathogens that prevent their elimination by IgA-mediated effector mechanisms. Demonstrating the plasticity of IgA in the evolution of different groups of mammals, only two of the eighteen selected positions in all mammals are included in the five selected positions in primates. That IgA residues subject to positive selection impact sites targeted both by host receptors and subversive pathogen ligands highlights the evolutionary arms race playing out between mammals and pathogens, and further emphasizes the importance of IgA in protection against mucosal pathogens. PMID:24019941

  14. Card9 Mediates Intestinal Epithelial Cell Restitution, T-Helper 17 Responses, and Control of Bacterial Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    SOKOL, HARRY; CONWAY, KARA L.; ZHANG, MEI; CHOI, MYUNGHWAN; MORIN, BRET; CAO, ZHIFANG; VILLABLANCA, EDUARDO J.; LI, CHUN; WIJMENGA, CISCA; YUN, SEOK HYUN; SHI, HAI NING; XAVIER, RAMNIK J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Caspase recruitment domain 9 (CARD9) is an adaptor protein that integrates signals downstream of pattern recognition receptors. CARD9 has been associated with autoinflammatory disorders, and loss-of-function mutations have been associated with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, but the role of CARD9 in intestinal inflammation is unknown. We characterized the role of Card9 in mucosal immune responses to intestinal epithelial injury and infection. METHODS We induced intestinal inflammation in Card9-null mice by administration of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) or Citrobacter rodentium. We analyzed body weight, assessed inflammation by histology, and measured levels of cytokines and chemokines using quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Cell populations were compared between wild-type and Card9-null mice by flow cytometry analysis. RESULTS Colon tissues and mesenteric lymph nodes of Card9-null mice had reduced levels of interleukin (IL)-6, interferon-γ, and T-helper (Th)17 cytokines after administration of DSS, compared with wild-type mice. IL-17A and IL-22 expression were reduced in the recovery phase after DSS administration, coincident with decreased expression of antimicrobial peptides and the chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 20 (Ccl20). Although Card9-null mice had more intestinal fungi based on 18S analysis, their Th17 responses remained defective even when an antifungal agent was administered throughout DSS exposure. Moreover, Card9-null mice had impaired immune responses to C rodentium, characterized by decreased levels of colonic IL-6, IL-17A, IL-22, and regenerating islet-derived 3 gamma (RegIIIγ), as well as fewer IL-22—producing innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) in colon lamina propria. CONCLUSIONS The adaptor protein CARD9 coordinates Th17- and innate lymphoid cell-mediated intestinal immune responses after epithelial injury in mice. PMID:23732773

  15. The Bacterial Fermentation Product Butyrate Influences Epithelial Signaling via Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Changes in Cullin-1 Neddylation1

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amrita; Wu, Huixia; Collier-Hyams, Lauren S.; Kwon, Young-Man; Hanson, Jason M.; Neish, Andrew S.

    2010-01-01

    The human enteric flora plays a significant role in intestinal health and disease. Populations of enteric bacteria can inhibit the NF-κB pathway by blockade of IκB-α ubiquitination, a process catalyzed by the E3-SCFβ-TrCP ubiquitin ligase. The activity of this ubiquitin ligase is regulated via covalent modification of the Cullin-1 subunit by the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8. We previously reported that interaction of viable commensal bacteria with mammalian intestinal epithelial cells resulted in a rapid and reversible generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that modulated neddylation of Cullin-1 and resulted in suppressive effects on the NF-κB pathway. Herein, we demonstrate that butyrate and other short chain fatty acids supplemented to model human intestinal epithelia in vitro and human tissue ex vivo results in loss of neddylated Cul-1 and show that physiological concentrations of butyrate modulate the ubiquitination and degradation of a target of the E3-SCFβ-TrCP ubiquitin ligase, the NF-κB inhibitor IκB-α. Mechanistically, we show that physiological concentrations of butyrate induces reactive oxygen species that transiently alters the intracellular redox balance and results in inactivation of the NEDD8-conjugating enzyme Ubc12 in a manner similar to effects mediated by viable bacteria. Because the normal flora produces significant amounts of butyrate and other short chain fatty acids, these data provide a functional link between a natural product of the intestinal normal flora and important epithelial inflammatory and proliferative signaling pathways. PMID:19109186

  16. Mechanism for dynamic regulation of iNOS expression after UVB-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; Wu, Shiyong

    2013-08-01

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) induces an immediate activation of cNOSs, which contributes to the early release of nitric oxide after irradiation. UVB also induces the expression of iNOS, which peaks at both the mRNA and protein level near 24 h post-irradiation. The induced expression of iNOS contributes largely to the late elevation of nitric oxide after UVB irradiation. However, the regulation of iNOS expression in the early stages of UVB irradiation is not well studied. We previously reported that the UVB-induced early release of nitric oxide leads to the activation of PERK and GCN2, which phosphorylate the alpha-subunit of eIF2 and inhibit protein synthesis. In this report, we demonstrate that eIF2 phosphorylation plays a critical role in regulation of iNOS expression in the early-phase (with in 12 h) of UVB irradiation. Our data shows that with an increased phosphorylation of eIF2, the iNOS protein expression was reduced even though the iNOS mRNA expression was linearly increased in HaCaT and MEF cells after UVB irradiation. The UVB-induced dynamic up- and down-regulation of iNOS expression was almost completely lost in MEF(A/A) cells, which contain a nonphosphorylatable S51A mutation on eIF2. Our results suggest that the UVB-induced eIF2 phosphorylation does not only regulate iNOS expression at the translational level, but at the transcriptional level as well. PMID:22430947

  17. IL-27 and TGFβ mediated expansion of Th1 and adaptive regulatory T cells expressing IL-10 correlates with bacterial burden and disease severity in pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nathella P; Moideen, Kadar; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V; Nair, Dina; Sridhar, Rathinam; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T cell expression of IL-10 is an important mechanism controlling immunity to tuberculosis (TB). To identify the CD4+ T cell subsets producing IL-10 in human TB, we enumerated the frequencies of IL-10 expressing CD4+ T cell subsets following TB—antigen stimulation of cells from individuals with pulmonary (PTB) and latent TB (LTB). We first demonstrate that TB antigens induce an expansion of IL-10 expressing Th1 (IL-10+, IFNγ+, T-bet+), Th2 (IL-10+, IL-4+, GATA-3+), Th9 (IL-10+, IL-9+, IL-4−), Th17 (IL-10+, IL-17+, IFNγ−), and natural and adaptive regulatory T cells [nTregs; IL-10+, CD4+, CD25+, Foxp3+ and aTregs; IL-10 single+, CD4+, CD25−, Foxp3−] in PTB and LTB individuals, with frequencies being significantly higher in the former. However, only Th1 cells and adaptive Tregs expressing IL-10 exhibit a positive relationship with bacterial burdens and extent of disease in PTB. Finally, we show that IL-27 and TGFβ play an important role in the regulation of IL-10+ Th cell subsets. Thus, active PTB is characterized by an IL-27 and TGFβ mediated expansion of IL-10 expressing CD4+ T cell subsets, with IL-10+ Th1 and IL-10+ aTreg cells playing a potentially pivotal role in the pathogenesis of active disease. PMID:26417443

  18. Bacterial cell surface hydrophobicity properties in the mediation of in vitro adhesion by the rabbit enteric pathogen Escherichia coli strain RDEC-1.

    PubMed Central

    Drumm, B; Neumann, A W; Policova, Z; Sherman, P M

    1989-01-01

    The role of hydrophobicity in the attachment of enteropathogens to gastrointestinal mucosa is controversial. In vitro binding of Escherichia coli RDEC-1 to rabbit intestine is dependent on the expression of pili. We examined in vitro adherence of piliated RDEC-1 after altering either the hydrophobicity of the organisms, the hydrophobicity of the substrate for attachment, or the surface tension of the suspending liquid. Hydrophobicity of RDEC-1 was determined using four complementary methods. In each assay piliated RDEC-1 demonstrated relatively more hydrophobic properties compared with both organisms grown to suppress pilus expression and a mutant that cannot express mannose-resistant pili. When piliated RDEC-1 were pretreated with tetramethyl urea to disrupt hydrophobic bonds surface hydrophobicity decreased. Concurrently, bacterial adherence to rabbit ileal microvillus membranes, mucus and mucin was reduced. Binding of piliated organisms to hydrophobic surfaces was significantly higher compared to both nonpiliated bacteria and the adherence of piliated RDEC-1 to relatively hydrophilic surfaces. Addition of propanol reduced the surface tension of the suspending liquid, and decreased adhesion of piliated RDEC-1 to polystyrene by 80%. Conversely, adherence of piliated organisms to a hydrophilic surface increased 12-fold after lowering the surface tension of the suspending liquid. We conclude that hydrophobic properties have a role in mediating in vitro adherence of this E. coli enteric pathogen. Images PMID:2572606

  19. IL-27 and TGFβ mediated expansion of Th1 and adaptive regulatory T cells expressing IL-10 correlates with bacterial burden and disease severity in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nathella P; Moideen, Kadar; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V; Nair, Dina; Sridhar, Rathinam; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2015-09-01

    CD4(+) T cell expression of IL-10 is an important mechanism controlling immunity to tuberculosis (TB). To identify the CD4(+) T cell subsets producing IL-10 in human TB, we enumerated the frequencies of IL-10 expressing CD4(+) T cell subsets following TB-antigen stimulation of cells from individuals with pulmonary (PTB) and latent TB (LTB). We first demonstrate that TB antigens induce an expansion of IL-10 expressing Th1 (IL-10(+), IFNγ(+), T-bet(+)), Th2 (IL-10(+), IL-4(+), GATA-3(+)), Th9 (IL-10(+), IL-9(+), IL-4(-)), Th17 (IL-10(+), IL-17(+), IFNγ(-)), and natural and adaptive regulatory T cells [nTregs; IL-10(+), CD4(+), CD25(+), Foxp3(+) and aTregs; IL-10 single(+), CD4(+), CD25(-), Foxp3(-)] in PTB and LTB individuals, with frequencies being significantly higher in the former. However, only Th1 cells and adaptive Tregs expressing IL-10 exhibit a positive relationship with bacterial burdens and extent of disease in PTB. Finally, we show that IL-27 and TGFβ play an important role in the regulation of IL-10(+) Th cell subsets. Thus, active PTB is characterized by an IL-27 and TGFβ mediated expansion of IL-10 expressing CD4(+) T cell subsets, with IL-10(+) Th1 and IL-10(+) aTreg cells playing a potentially pivotal role in the pathogenesis of active disease. PMID:26417443

  20. Green synthesis of bacterial mediated anti-proliferative gold nanoparticles: inducing mitotic arrest (G2/M phase) and apoptosis (intrinsic pathway).

    PubMed

    Kumar, C Ganesh; Poornachandra, Y; Chandrasekhar, Cheemalamarri

    2015-11-28

    The physiochemical and biological properties of microbial derived gold nanoparticles have potential applications in various biomedical domains as well as in cancer therapy. We have fabricated anti-proliferative bacterial mediated gold nanoparticles (b-Au NPs) using a culture supernatant of Streptomyces clavuligerus and later characterized them by UV-visible, TEM, DLS, XRD and FT-IR spectroscopic techniques. The capping agent responsible for the nanoparticle formation was characterized based on SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF-MS analyses. They were tested for anticancer activity in A549, HeLa and DU145 cell lines. The biocompatibility and non-toxic nature of the nanoparticles were tested on normal human lung cell line (MRC-5). The b-Au NPs induced the cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase and also inhibited the microtubule assembly in DU145 cells. Mechanistic studies, such as ROS, MMP, Cyt-c, GSH, caspases 9, 8 and 3 activation and the Annexin V-FITC staining, along with the above parameters tested provided sufficient evidence that the b-Au NPs induced apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway. The results supported the use of b-Au NPs for future therapeutic application in cancer therapy and other biomedical applications. PMID:26503300

  1. Enzyme-mediated bacterial biodegradation of an azo dye (C.I. Acid blue 113): reuse of treated dye wastewater in post-tanning operations.

    PubMed

    Senthilvelan, T; Kanagaraj, J; Panda, R C

    2014-11-01

    "Dyeing" is a common practice used to color the hides during the post-tanning operations in leather processing generating plenty of wastewater. The waste stream containing dye as pollutant is severely harmful to living beings. An azo dye (C.I. Acid Blue 113) has been biodegraded effectively by bacterial culture mediated with azoreductase enzyme to reduce the pollution load in the present investigation. The maximum rate of dye degradation was found to be 96 ± 4 and 92 ± 4 % for the initial concentrations of 100 and 200 mg/l, respectively. The enzyme activity was measured using NADH as a substrate. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis was confirmed that the transformation of azo linkage could be transformed into N2 or NH3 or incorporated into complete biomass. Breaking down of dye molecules to various metabolites (such as aniline, naphthalene-1,4-diamine, 3-aminobenzenesulfonic acid, naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid, 8-aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid, 5,8-diaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid) was confirmed by gas chromatography and mass spectra (GC-MS) and mass (electrospray ionization (ESI)) spectra analysis. The treated wastewater could be reused for dyeing operation in the leather processing, and the properties of produced leather were evaluated by conventional methods that revealed to have improved dye penetration into the grain layer of experimental leather sample and resulted in high levelness of dyeing, which helps to obtain the desired smoothness and soft leather properties. PMID:25163883

  2. INO80-dependent regression of ecdysone-induced transcriptional responses regulates developmental timing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Sarah D; Ihry, Robert J; Gruetzmacher, Kelly M; Bashirullah, Arash

    2014-03-15

    Sequential pulses of the steroid hormone ecdysone regulate the major developmental transitions in Drosophila, and the duration of each developmental stage is determined by the length of time between ecdysone pulses. Ecdysone regulates biological responses by directly initiating target gene transcription. In turn, these transcriptional responses are known to be self-limiting, with mechanisms in place to ensure regression of hormone-dependent transcription. However, the biological significance of these transcriptional repression mechanisms remains unclear. Here we show that the chromatin remodeling protein INO80 facilitates transcriptional repression of ecdysone-regulated genes during prepupal development. In ino80 mutant animals, inefficient repression of transcriptional responses to the late larval ecdysone pulse delays the onset of the subsequent prepupal ecdysone pulse, resulting in a significantly longer prepupal stage. Conversely, increased expression of ino80 is sufficient to shorten the prepupal stage by increasing the rate of transcriptional repression. Furthermore, we demonstrate that enhancing the rate of regression of the mid-prepupal competence factor βFTZ-F1 is sufficient to determine the timing of head eversion and thus the duration of prepupal development. Although ino80 is conserved from yeast to humans, this study represents the first characterization of a bona fide ino80 mutation in any metazoan, raising the possibility that the functions of ino80 in transcriptional repression and developmental timing are evolutionarily conserved. PMID:24468295

  3. Lithium and valproate decrease inositol mass and increase expression of the yeast INO1 and INO2 genes for inositol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Vaden, D L; Ding, D; Peterson, B; Greenberg, M L

    2001-05-01

    Bipolar affective disorder (manic-depressive illness) is a chronic, severe, debilitating illness affecting 1-2% of the population. The Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs lithium and valproate are not completely effective in the treatment of this disorder, and the mechanisms underlying their therapeutic effects have not been established. We are employing genetic and molecular approaches to identify common targets of lithium and valproate in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that both drugs affect molecular targets in the inositol metabolic pathway. Lithium and valproate cause a decrease in intracellular myo-inositol mass and an increase in expression of both a structural (INO1) and a regulatory (INO2) gene required for inositol biosynthesis. The opi1 mutant, which exhibits constitutive expression of INO1, is more resistant to inhibition of growth by lithium but not by valproate, suggesting that valproate may inhibit the Ino1p-catalyzed synthesis of inositol 1-phosphate. Consistent with this possibility, growth in valproate leads to decreased synthesis of inositol monophosphate. Thus, both lithium and valproate perturb regulation of the inositol biosynthetic pathway, albeit via different mechanisms. This is the first demonstration of increased expression of genes in the inositol biosynthetic pathway by both lithium and valproate. Because inositol is a key regulator of many cellular processes, the effects of lithium and valproate on inositol synthesis have far-reaching implications for predicting genetic determinants of responsiveness and resistance to these agents. PMID:11278273

  4. NITRIC OXIDE PRODUCTION AND iNOS mRNA EXPRESSION IN IFN-8-STIMULATED CHICKEN MACROPHAGES TRANSFECTED WITH iNOS siRNAs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Utilizing RNA interference technology with siRNA in the HD-11 macrophage cell line, we determined how the knock-down of the iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) gene affected IFN-' induced macrophage production of nitric oxide (NO) and mRNA expression of genes involved in this biological pathway i...

  5. Nitrotyrosinylation, Remodeling and Endothelial-Myocyte Uncoupling in iNOS, Cystathionine Beta Synthase (CBS) Knockouts and iNOS/CBS Double Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Soumi; Kumar, Munish; Sen, Utpal; Mishra, Paras K.; Tyagi, Neetu; Metreveli, Naira; Lominadze, David; Rodriguez, Walter; Tyagi, Suresh C.

    2009-01-01

    Increased levels of homocysteine (Hcy), recognized as hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), were associated with cardiovascular diseases. There was controversy regarding the detrimental versus cardio protective role of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in ischemic heart disease. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the Hcy generated nitrotyrosine by inducing the endothelial nitric oxide synthase, causing endothelial-myocyte (E–M) coupling. To differentiate the role of iNOS versus constitutive nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and nNOS) in Hcy-mediated nitrotyrosine generation and matrix remodeling in cardiac dysfunction, left ventricular (LV) tissue was analyzed from cystathionine beta synthase (CBS) heterozygote knockout, iNOS homozygote knockout, CBS−/+/iNOS−/− double knockout, and wild-type (WT) mice. The levels of nitrotyrosine, MMP-2 and -9 (zymographic analysis), and fibrosis (by trichrome stain) were measured. The endothelial-myocyte function was determined in cardiac rings. In CBS−/+ mice, homocysteine was elevated and in iNOS−/− mice, nitric oxide was significantly reduced. The nitrotyrosine and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) levels were elevated in double knockout and CBS−/+ as compared to WT mice. Although MMP-2 levels were similar in CBS−/+, iNOS−/−, and CBS−/+/iNOS−/−, the levels were three- to fourfold higher than WT. The levels of collagen were similar in CBS−/+ and iNOS−/−, but they were threefold higher than WT. Interesting, the levels of collagen increased sixfold in double knockouts, compared to WT, suggesting synergism between high Hcy and lack of iNOS. Left ventricular hypertrophy was exaggerated in the iNOS−/− and double knockout, and mildly increased in the CBS−/+, compared to WT mice. The endothelial-dependent relaxation was attenuated to the same extent in the CBS−/+ and iNOS−/−, compared to WT, but it was robustly blunted in double knockouts. The results concluded that homocysteine

  6. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Eucalyptus globulus using explants with shoot apex with introduction of bacterial choline oxidase gene to enhance salt tolerance.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Etsuko; Nanto, Kazuya; Oishi, Masatoshi; Ebinuma, Hiroyasu; Morishita, Yoshihiko; Sakurai, Nozomu; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Shibata, Daisuke; Shimada, Teruhisa

    2012-01-01

    Eucalyptus globulus is one of the most economically important plantation hardwoods for paper making. However, its low transformation frequency has prevented genetic engineering of this species with useful genes. We found the hypocotyl section with a shoot apex has the highest regeneration ability among another hypocotyl sections, and have developed an efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method using these materials. We then introduced a salt tolerance gene, namely a bacterial choline oxidase gene (codA) with a GUS reporter gene, into E. globulus. The highest frequency of transgenic shoot regeneration from hypocotyls with shoot apex was 7.4% and the average frequency in four experiments was 4.0%, 12-fold higher than that from hypocotyls without shoot apex. Using about 10,000 explants, over 250 regenerated buds were confirmed as transformants by GUS analysis. Southern blot analysis of 100 elongated shoots confirmed successful generation of stable transformants. Accumulation of glycinebetaine was investigated in 44 selected transgenic lines, which showed 1- to 12-fold higher glycinebetaine levels than non-transgenic controls. Rooting of 16 transgenic lines was successful using a photoautotrophic method under enrichment with 1,000 ppm CO(2). The transgenic whole plantlets were transplanted into potting soil and grown normally in a growth room. They showed salt tolerance to 300 mM NaCl. The points of our system are using explants with shoot apex as materials, inhibiting the elongation of the apex on the selection medium, and regenerating transgenic buds from the side opposite to the apex. This approach may also solve transformation problems in other important plants. PMID:22009051

  7. Effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitor pretreatment on nitric oxide production, nNOS and iNOS expression in rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Di Girolamo, G; Farina, M; Riberio, M L; Ogando, D; Aisemberg, J; de los Santos, A R; Martí, M L; Franchi, A M

    2003-07-01

    1. The therapeutic effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is thought to be due mainly to its inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes, but there is a growing body of research that now demonstrates a variety of NSAIDs effects on cellular signal transduction pathways other than those involving prostaglandins. 2. Nitric oxide (NO) as a free radical and an agent that gives rise to highly toxic oxidants (peroxynitrile, nitric dioxide, nitron ion), becomes a cause of neuronal damage and death in some brain lesions such as Parkinson and Alzheimer disease, and Huntington's chorea. 3. In the present study, the in vivo effect of three NSAIDs (lysine clonixinate (LC), indomethacine (INDO) and meloxicam (MELO)) on NO production and nitric oxide synthase expression in rat cerebellar slices was analysed. Rats were treated with (a) saline, (b) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (5 mg kg(-1), i.p.), (c) saline in combination with different doses of NSAIDs and (d) LPS in combination with different doses of NSAIDs and then killed 6 h after treatment. 4. NO synthesis, evaluated by Bred and Snyder technique, was increased by LPS. This augmentation was inhibited by coadministration of the three NSAIDs assayed. None of the NSAIDs tested was able to modify control NO synthesis. 5. Expression of iNOS and neural NOS (nNOS) was detected by Western blotting in control and LPS-treated rats. LC and INDO, but not MELO, were able to inhibit the expression of these enzymes. 6. Therefore, reduction of iNOS and nNOS levels in cerebellum may explain, in part, the anti-inflammatory effect of these NSAIDs and may also have importance in the prevention of NO-mediated neuronal injury. PMID:12871835

  8. Effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitor pretreatment on nitric oxide production, nNOS and iNOS expression in rat cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    DiGirolamo, G; Farina, M; Riberio, M L; Ogando, D; Aisemberg, J; de los Santos, A R; Martí, M L; Franchi, A M

    2003-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is thought to be due mainly to its inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes, but there is a growing body of research that now demonstrates a variety of NSAIDs effects on cellular signal transduction pathways other than those involving prostaglandins. Nitric oxide (NO) as a free radical and an agent that gives rise to highly toxic oxidants (peroxynitrile, nitric dioxide, nitron ion), becomes a cause of neuronal damage and death in some brain lesions such as Parkinson and Alzheimer disease, and Huntington's chorea. In the present study, the in vivo effect of three NSAIDs (lysine clonixinate (LC), indomethacine (INDO) and meloxicam (MELO)) on NO production and nitric oxide synthase expression in rat cerebellar slices was analysed. Rats were treated with (a) saline, (b) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (5 mg kg−1, i.p.), (c) saline in combination with different doses of NSAIDs and (d) LPS in combination with different doses of NSAIDs and then killed 6 h after treatment. NO synthesis, evaluated by Bred and Snyder technique, was increased by LPS. This augmentation was inhibited by coadministration of the three NSAIDs assayed. None of the NSAIDs tested was able to modify control NO synthesis. Expression of iNOS and neural NOS (nNOS) was detected by Western blotting in control and LPS-treated rats. LC and INDO, but not MELO, were able to inhibit the expression of these enzymes. Therefore, reduction of iNOS and nNOS levels in cerebellum may explain, in part, the anti-inflammatory effect of these NSAIDs and may also have importance in the prevention of NO-mediated neuronal injury. PMID:12871835

  9. Control of TMEM16A by INO-4995 and other inositolphosphates

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yuemin; Schreiber, Rainer; Wanitchakool, Podchanart; Kongsuphol, Patthara; Sousa, Marisa; Uliyakina, Inna; Palma, Marta; Faria, Diana; Traynor-Kaplan, Alexis E; Fragata, José I; Amaral, Margarida D; Kunzelmann, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Background And Purpose Ca2+-dependent Cl− secretion (CaCC) in airways and other tissues is due to activation of the Cl− channel TMEM16A (anoctamin 1). Earlier studies suggested that Ca2+-activated Cl− channels are regulated by membrane lipid inositol phosphates, and that 1-O-octyl-2-O-butyryl-myo-inositol 3,4,5,6-tetrakisphosphate octakis(propionoxymethyl) ester (INO-4995) augments CaCC. Here we examined whether TMEM16A is the target for INO-4995 and if the channel is regulated by inositol phosphates. Experimental Approach The effects of INO-4995 on CaCC were examined in overexpressing HEK293, colonic and primary airway epithelial cells as well as Xenopus oocytes. We used patch clamping, double electrode voltage clamp and Ussing chamber techniques. Key Results We found that INO-4995 directly activates a TMEM16A whole cell conductance of 6.1 ± 0.9 nS pF–1 in overexpressing cells. The tetrakisphosphates Ins(3,4,5,6)P4 or Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 and enzymes controlling levels of InsP4 or PIP2 and PIP3 had no effects on the magnitude or kinetics of TMEM16A currents. In contrast in Xenopus oocytes, human airways and colonic cells, which all express TMEM16A endogenously, Cl− currents were not acutely activated by INO-4995. However incubation with INO-4995 augmented 1.6- to 4-fold TMEM16A-dependent Cl− currents activated by ionomycin or ATP, while intracellular Ca2+ signals were not affected. The potentiating effect of INO-4995 on transient ATP-activated TMEM16A-currents in cystic fibrosis (CF) airways was twice of that observed in non-CF airways. Conclusions And Implications These data indicate that TMEM16A is the target for INO-4995, although the mode of action appears different for overexpressed and endogenous channels. INO-4995 may be useful for the treatment of CF lung disease. PMID:22946960

  10. iNOS Activity Modulates Inflammation, Angiogenesis, and Tissue Fibrosis in Polyether-Polyurethane Synthetic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Cassini-Vieira, Puebla; Araújo, Fernanda Assis; da Costa Dias, Filipi Leles; Russo, Remo Castro; Andrade, Silvia Passos; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Barcelos, Luciola Silva

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable interest in implantation techniques and scaffolds for tissue engineering and, for safety and biocompatibility reasons, inflammation, angiogenesis, and fibrosis need to be determined. The contribution of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the regulation of the foreign body reaction induced by subcutaneous implantation of a synthetic matrix was never investigated. Here, we examined the role of iNOS in angiogenesis, inflammation, and collagen deposition induced by polyether-polyurethane synthetic implants, using mice with targeted disruption of the iNOS gene (iNOS−/−) and wild-type (WT) mice. The hemoglobin content and number of vessels were decreased in the implants of iNOS−/− mice compared to WT mice 14 days after implantation. VEGF levels were also reduced in the implants of iNOS−/− mice. In contrast, the iNOS−/− implants exhibited an increased neutrophil and macrophage infiltration. However, no alterations were observed in levels of CXCL1 and CCL2, chemokines related to neutrophil and macrophage migration, respectively. Furthermore, the implants of iNOS−/− mice showed boosted collagen deposition. These data suggest that iNOS activity controls inflammation, angiogenesis, and fibrogenesis in polyether-polyurethane synthetic implants and that lack of iNOS expression increases foreign body reaction to implants in mice. PMID:26106257

  11. The Mouse INO80 Chromatin-Remodeling Complex Is an Essential Meiotic Factor for Spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Serber, Daniel W; Runge, John S; Menon, Debashish U; Magnuson, Terry

    2016-01-01

    The ability to faithfully transmit genetic information across generations via the germ cells is a critical aspect of mammalian reproduction. The process of germ cell development requires a number of large-scale modulations of chromatin within the nucleus. One such occasion arises during meiotic recombination, when hundreds of DNA double-strand breaks are induced and subsequently repaired, enabling the transfer of genetic information between homologous chromosomes. The inability to properly repair DNA damage is known to lead to an arrest in the developing germ cells and sterility within the animal. Chromatin-remodeling activity, and in particular the BRG1 subunit of the SWI/SNF complex, has been shown to be required for successful completion of meiosis. In contrast, remodeling complexes of the ISWI and CHD families are required for postmeiotic processes. Little is known regarding the contribution of the INO80 family of chromatin-remodeling complexes, which is a particularly interesting candidate due to its well described functions during DNA double-strand break repair. Here we show that INO80 is expressed in developing spermatocytes during the early stages of meiotic prophase I. Based on this information, we used a conditional allele to delete the INO80 core ATPase subunit, thereby eliminating INO80 chromatin-remodeling activity in this lineage. The loss of INO80 resulted in an arrest during meiosis associated with a failure to repair DNA damage during meiotic recombination. PMID:26607718

  12. The Complex Role of iNOS in Acutely-Rejecting Cardiac Transplants

    PubMed Central

    Pieper, Galen M.; Roza, Allan M.

    2008-01-01

    This review summarizes the evidence for a detrimental role of nitric oxide (NO) derived from inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and/or reactive nitrogen species such as peroxynitrite in acutely-rejecting cardiac transplants. In chronic cardiac transplant rejection, iNOS may have an opposing beneficial component. The purpose of this review is primarily to address issues related to acute rejection which is a recognized risk factor for chronic rejection. The evidence for a detrimental role is based upon strategies involving non-selective NOS inhibitors, NO neutralizers, selective iNOS inhibitors and iNOS gene deletion in rodent models of cardiac rejection. The review is discussed in the context of the impact on various components including graft survival, histological rejection and cardiac function which may contribute in toto to the process of graft rejection. Possible limitations of each strategy are discussed in order to understand better the variance in published findings including issues related to the potential importance of cell localization of iNOS expression. Finally, the concept of a dual role of NO and its down-stream product, peroxynitrite, in rejection vs. immune regulation is discussed. PMID:18291116

  13. Association of INOS, TRAIL, TGF-β2, TGF-β3, and IgL genes with response to Salmonella enteritidis in poultry

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Several candidate genes were selected, based on their critical roles in the host's response to intracellular bacteria, to study the genetic control of the chicken response to Salmonella enteritidis (SE). The candidate genes were: inducible nitric oxide synthase (INOS), tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), transforming growth factor β2 (TGF-β2), transforming growth factor β3 (TGF-β3), and immunoglobulin G light chain (IgL). Responses to pathogenic SE colonization or to SE vaccination were measured in the Iowa Salmonella response resource population (ISRRP). Outbred broiler sires and three diverse, highly inbred dam lines produced 508 F1 progeny, which were evaluated as young chicks for either bacterial load isolated from spleen or cecum contents after pathogenic SE inoculation, or the circulating antibody level after SE vaccination. Fragments of each gene were sequenced from the founder lines of the resource population to identify genomic sequence variation. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were identified, then PCR-RFLP techniques were developed to genotype the F1 resource population. Linear mixed models were used for statistical analyses. Because the inbred dam lines always contributed one copy of the same allele, the heterozygous sire allele effects could be assessed in the F1 generation. Association analyses revealed significant effects of the sire allele of TRAIL-StyI on the spleen (P < 0.07) and cecum (P < 0.0002) SE bacterial load. Significant effects (P < 0.04) were found on the cecum bacterial load for TGF-β3-BsrI. Varied and moderate association was found for SE vaccine antibody response for all genes. This is the first reported study on the association of SNP in INOS, TRAIL, TGF-β2, TGF-β3, and IgL with the chicken response to SE. Identification of candidate genes to improve the immune response may be useful for marker-assisted selection to enhance disease resistance. PMID:12927083

  14. DELETION OF iNOS PROVIDES CARDIOPROTECTION IN MICE WITH 2-KIDNEY, 1-CLIP HYPERTENSION

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ying; Carretero, Oscar A.; Xu, Jiang; Rhaleb, Nour-Eddine; Yang, James J.; Pagano, Patrick J.; Yang, Xiao-Ping

    2009-01-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension and target organ damage. We hypothesized that induction of iNOS contributes to left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and dysfunction in mice with 2-kidney, 1-clip hypertension (2K1C). Deletion of iNOS diminishes oxidative stress, thereby attenuating LV hypertrophy and enhancing cardiac performance. 2K1C was induced in mice lacking iNOS (iNOS−/−) and wild-type controls (WT, C57BL/6J). Sham-clipped mice served as controls. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured weekly by tail cuff. Left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF, by echocardiography) and cardiac response (dP/dtmax, dP/dt/ip and dP/dtmin) to isoproterenol (ISO: 50 ng/mouse, i.v.) were studied at the end of the experiment. 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE, a byproduct of lipid peroxidation and an indicator of oxidative stress) was measured by immunohistochemical staining. Nox2, eNOS and iNOS protein expression were determined by Western blot. We found that SBP, LV weight (LVW), myocyte cross-sectional area (MCSA), interstitial collagen fraction (ICF), EF and cardiac response to ISO did not differ between strains with sham clipping. 2K1C increased SBP, LVW, MCSA and ICF similarly in both strains. However, in iNOS−/− dP/dtmax, dP/dt/ip and dP/dtmin markedly increased in response to ISO, associated with decreased cardiac 4-HNE expression and urinary nitrate/nitrite. We concluded that deletion of iNOS does not seem to play a significant role in preventing 2K1C-induced hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy; however, it does enhance preservation of cardiac function, probably due to reduction of iNOS-induced oxidative stress. PMID:19001185

  15. Upregulation of B1 receptor mediating des-Arg9-BK-induced rat paw oedema by systemic treatment with bacterial endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Campos, M M; Souza, G E; Calixto, J B

    1996-03-01

    1. The effect of pretreatment with bacterial endotoxin (LPS, 10 micrograms, i.v., 24 h) on the bradykinin B1 and B2 receptor-induced oedema in the rat paw, and the interaction of B1-mediated responses with other inflammatory mediators, was investigated. 2. Intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of the selective B1 agonist, des-Arg9-BK (DABK, 100 nmol) in naive animals pretreated with the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, captopril caused a small increase in paw volume (0.04 +/- 0.003 ml, mean +/- s.e. mean, n = 6), while the B2-selective agonist, tyrosine8-bradykinin (T-BK, 3 nmol) induced marked oedema (0.36 +/- 0.02 ml). However, i.pl. injection of DABK (3-300 nmol) in rats pretreated with LPS (24 h beforehand) resulted in a marked dose- and time-related increase in paw volume, with mean ED50 of 24.1 nmol. In contrast, oedema caused by T-BK (3 nmol) was reduced by 79 +/- 4% in animals treated with LPS when compared with naive animals. 3. Oedema caused by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, 10 nmol) was unaffected by LPS treatment, while oedema induced by histamine (100 nmol), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, 10 nmol) and substance P (SP, 3 nmol) was reduced (P < 0.05). 4. The selective B1 antagonist, des-Arg9[Leu8]-BK (100-300 nmol), produced dose-dependent inhibition of DABK (100 nmol)-induced paw oedema in LPS-treated animals with mean IC50 of 134 nmol, while the selective B2 antagonists, Hoe 140 and NPC 17731 (each 10 nmol), had no effect. 5. Treatment of animals with dexamethasone (0.5 mg kg-1, s.c.) 24 or 48 h prior to LPS injection resulted in a graded inhibition of DABK (100 nmol)-induced oedema formation (58 +/- 3 and 82 +/- 2%, respectively), and almost reversed to control value oedema formation induced by T-BK (3 nmol) in LPS-pretreated rats. Cycloheximide (1 mg kg-1, s.c.) or indomethacin (2 mg kg-1, i.p.) pretreatment 24 and 1 h prior to LPS injection, respectively, markedly inhibited DABK (100 nmol)-induced paw oedema (98 +/- 2 and 50 +/- 4%, respectively). 6

  16. I. Development of Metal-Mediated SPOT-Synthesis Methods for the Efficient Construction of Small-Molecule Macroarrays. II. Design and Synthesis of Novel Bacterial Biofilm Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, Reto

    I. The use of small molecule probes to explore biological phenomena has become a valuable tool in chemical biology. As a result, methods that permit the rapid synthesis and biological evaluation of such compounds are highly sought-after. The small molecule macroarray represents one such approach for the synthesis and identification of novel bioactive agents. Macroarrays are readily constructed via the SPOT-synthesis technique on planar cellulose membranes, yielding spatially addressed libraries of ˜10-1000 unique compounds. We sought to expand the arsenal of chemical reactions compatible with this solid-phase platform, and developed highly efficient SPOT-synthesis protocols for the Mizoroki-Heck, Suzuki-Miyaura, and copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction. We demonstrated that these metal-mediated reactions can be implemented, either individually or sequentially, for the efficient construction of small molecules in high purity on rapid time scales. Utilizing these powerful C-C and C-N bond forming coupling reactions, we constructed a series of macroarrays based on novel stilbene, phenyl-naphthalene, and triazole scaliblds. Subsequent biological testing of the stilbene and phenyl-naphthalene libraries revealed several potent antagonists and agonists, respectively, of the quorum sensing (QS) receptor LuxR in Vibrio fischeri. II. Bacteria living within biofilms are notorious for their resistance to known antibiotic agents, and constitute a major human health threat. Methods to attenuate biofilm growth would have a significant impact on the management of bacterial infections. Despite intense research efforts, small molecules capable of either inhibiting or dispersing biolilms remain scarce. We utilized natural products with purported anti-biofilm or QS inhibitory activity as sources of structural insight to guide the synthesis of novel biofilm modulators with improved activities. These studies revealed 2-aminobenzimidazole derivatives as highly potent

  17. Development of Antisense Therapeutic and Imaging Agents to Detect and Suppress Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS) Expression in Acute Lung Injury (ALI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuefei

    This dissertation focuses on the development and investigation of antisense imaging and therapeutic agents, combined with nanotechnology, to detect and suppress inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression for the diagnosis and treatment of acute lung injury (ALI). To achieve this goal, several efforts were made. The first effort was the identification and characterization of high binding affinity antisense peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) and shell-crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticle (SCK)-PNA conjugates to the iNOS mRNA. Antisense binding sites on the iNOS mRNA were first mapped by a procedure for rapidly generating a library of antisense accessible sites on native mRNAs (MASL) which involves reverse transcription of whole cell mRNA extracts with a random oligodeoxynucleotide primer followed by mRNA-specific PCR. Antisense PNAs against the antisense accessible sites were accordingly synthesized and characterized. The second effort was the investigation of cationic shell crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticle (cSCK)-mediated siRNA delivery to suppress iNOS expression for the treatment of ALI. siRNA with its unique gene-specific properties could serve as a promising therapeutic agent, however success in this area has been challenged by a lack of efficient biocompatible transfection agents. cSCK with its nanometer size and positive charge previously showed efficient cellular delivery of phosphorothioate ODNs (oligodeoxynucleotides), plasmid DNA and PNA. Herein, cSCK showed good siRNA binding and facilitated efficient siRNA transfection in HeLa, a mouse macrophage cell line and other human cell lines. cSCK led to greater silencing efficiency than Lipofectamine 2000 in HeLa cells as determined by the viability following transfection with cytotoxic and non-cytotoxic siRNAs, as well in 293T and HEK cells, and was comparable in BEAS-2B and MCF10a cells. The third effort was the preparation of an iNOS imaging probe through electrostatic complexation between a radiolabeled

  18. Glutathione S-transferase P1 suppresses iNOS protein stability in RAW264.7 macrophage-like cells after LPS stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiang; Kong, Xiuqin; Zhou, Yi; Lan, Lei; Luo, Lan; Yin, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) is a ubiquitous expressed protein which plays an important role in the detoxification and xenobiotics metabolism. Previous studies showed that GSTP1 was upregulated by the LPS stimulation in RAW264.7 macrophage-like cells and GSTP1 overexpression downregulated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression. Here we show that GSTP1 physically associates with the oxygenase domain of iNOS by the G-site domain and decreases the protein level of iNOS dimer. Both overexpression and RNA interference (RNAi) experiments indicate that GSTP1 downregulates iNOS protein level and increases S-nitrosylation and ubiquitination of iNOS. The Y7F mutant type of GSTP1 physically associates with iNOS, but shows no effect on iNOS protein content, iNOS S-nitrosylation, and changes in iNOS from dimer to monomer, suggesting the importance of enzyme activity of GSTP1 in regulating iNOS S-nitrosylation and stability. GSTM1, another member of GSTs shows no significant effect on regulation of iNOS. In conclusion, our study reveals the novel role of GSTP1 in regulation of iNOS by affecting S-nitrosylation, dimerization, and stability, which provides a new insight for analyzing the regulation of iNOS and the anti-inflammatory effects of GSTP1. PMID:26361746

  19. Antioxidative effects of cinnamomi cortex: A potential role of iNOS and COX-II

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jin-Won; Kim, Jeong-Jun; Kim, Sung-Jin

    2011-01-01

    Background: Cinnamomi cortex has wide varieties of pharmacological actions such as anti-inflammatory action, anti-platelet aggregation, and improving blood circulation. In this study, we tested to determine whether the Cinnamomi cortex extract has antioxidant activities. Materials and Methods: Antioxidative actions were explored by measuring free radical scavenging activity, NO levels, and reducing power. The mechanism of antioxidative action of Cinnamomi cortex was determined by measuring iNOS and COX-II expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated Raw cells. Results: Seventy percent methanolic extract of Cinnamomi cortex exerted significant 1,1-diphenyl--2--picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radicals and NO scavenging activities in a dose-dependent manner. More strikingly, the Cinnamomi cortex extract exerted dramatic reducing power activity (13-fold over control). Production of iNOS induced by LPS was significantly inhibited by the Cinnamomi cortex extract, suggesting that it inhibits NO production by suppressing iNOS expression. Additionally, COX-2 induced by LPS was dramatically inhibited by the Cinnamomi cortex extract. Conclusion: These results suggest that 70% methanolic extract of Cinnamomi cortex exerts significant antioxidant activity via inhibiting iNOS and COX-II induction. PMID:22262934

  20. Gene Recruitment of the Activated INO1 Locus to the Nuclear Membrane

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The spatial arrangement of chromatin within the nucleus can affect reactions that occur on the DNA and is likely to be regulated. Here we show that activation of INO1 occurs at the nuclear membrane and requires the integral membrane protein Scs2. Scs2 antagonizes the action of the transcriptional repressor Opi1 under conditions that induce the unfolded protein response (UPR) and, in turn, activate INO1. Whereas repressed INO1 localizes throughout the nucleoplasm, the gene is recruited to the nuclear periphery upon transcriptional activation. Recruitment requires the transcriptional activator Hac1, which is produced upon induction of the UPR, and is constitutive in a strain lacking Opi1. Artificial recruitment of INO1 to the nuclear membrane permits activation in the absence of Scs2, indicating that the intranuclear localization of a gene can profoundly influence its mechanism of activation. Gene recruitment to the nuclear periphery, therefore, is a dynamic process and appears to play an important regulatory role. PMID:15455074

  1. Upregulated iNOS and oxidative damage to the cochlear stria vascularis due to noise stress.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaorui; Nuttall, Alfred L

    2003-03-28

    Our previous work has revealed increased nitric oxide (NO) production in the cochlear perilymph following noise stress. However, it is not clear if the increase of NO is related to iNOS and whether NO-related oxidative stress can cause vascular tissue damage. In this study, iNOS immunoreactivity, NO production, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the lateral wall were examined in normal mice and compared with similar animals exposed to 120 dBA broadband noise, 3 h/day, for 2 consecutive days. In the normal animals, iNOS expression was not observed in the vascular endothelium of the stria vascularis and only weak iNOS immunoactivity was detected in the marginal cells. However, expression of iNOS in the wall of the blood vessels of stria vascularis and marginal cells was observed after loud sound stress (LSS). Relatively low levels of NO production and low ROS activity were detected in the stria vascularis in the unstimulated condition. In contrast, NO production was increased and ROS activity was elevated in the stria vascularis after LSS. These changes were attenuated by the iNOS inhibitor, GW 274150. To explore whether noise induces apoptotic processes in the stria vascularis, we examined morphological changes in endothelial- and marginal-cells. In vitro, annexin-V phosphatidylserine (PS) (to label and detect early evidence of apoptosis) was combined with propidium iodide (PI) (to probe plasma membrane integrity). PI alone was used in fixed tissues to detect later stage apoptotic cells by morphology of the nuclei. Following LSS, PS was expressed on cell surfaces of endothelial cells of blood vessels and marginal cells of the stria vascularis. Later stage apoptosis, characterized by irregular nuclei and condensation of nuclei, was also observed in these cells. The data indicate that increased iNOS expression and production of both NO and ROS following noise stress may lead to marginal cell pathology, and the dysfunction of cochlear microcirculation by inducing

  2. Sterile-α- and armadillo motif-containing protein inhibits the TRIF-dependent downregulation of signal regulatory protein α to interfere with intracellular bacterial elimination in Burkholderia pseudomallei-infected mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Baral, Pankaj; Utaisincharoen, Pongsak

    2013-09-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, evades macrophage killing by suppressing the TRIF-dependent pathway, leading to inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. We previously demonstrated that virulent wild-type B. pseudomallei inhibits the TRIF-dependent pathway by upregulating sterile-α- and armadillo motif-containing protein (SARM) and by inhibiting downregulation of signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα); both molecules are negative regulators of Toll-like receptor signaling. In contrast, the less virulent lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mutant of B. pseudomallei is unable to exhibit these features and is susceptible to macrophage killing. However, the functional relationship of these two negative regulators in the evasion of macrophage defense has not been elucidated. We demonstrated here that SIRPα downregulation was observed after inhibition of SARM expression by small interfering RNA in wild-type-infected macrophages, indicating that SIRPα downregulation is regulated by SARM. Furthermore, this downregulation requires activation of the TRIF signaling pathway, as we observed abrogation of SIRPα downregulation as well as restricted bacterial growth in LPS mutant-infected TRIF-depleted macrophages. Although inhibition of SARM expression is correlated to SIRPα downregulation and iNOS upregulation in gamma interferon-activated wild-type-infected macrophages, these phenomena appear to bypass the TRIF-dependent pathway. Similar to live bacteria, the wild-type LPS is able to upregulate SARM and to prevent SIRPα downregulation, implying that the LPS of B. pseudomallei may play a crucial role in regulating the expression of these two negative regulators. Altogether, our findings show a previously unrecognized role of B. pseudomallei-induced SARM in inhibiting SIRPα downregulation-mediated iNOS upregulation, facilitating the ability of the bacterium to multiply in macrophages. PMID:23836818

  3. Nitrosyl Iodide, Ino: Millimeter-Wave Spectroscopy Guided by AB Initio Quantum Chemical Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailleux, Stephane; Duflot, Denis; Aiba, Shohei; Ozeki, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    In the series of the nitrosyl halides, XNO (where X = {F, Cl, Br, I}), the millimeter-wave spectrum of INO remains so far unknown. We report our investigation on the first high-resolution rotational spectroscopy of nitrosyl iodide, INO. One of the motivation for this work comes from the growing need in developing a more complete understanding of atmospheric chemistry, especially halogen and nitrogen oxides chemistry that adversely impacts ozone levels. In the family of the nitrogen oxyhalides such as nitrosyl (XNO), nitryl (XNO), nitrite (XONO), and nitrate (XON0_2) halides, those with X = {F, Cl, Br} have been well studied, both theoretically and experimentally. However, relatively little is known about the iodine-containing analogues, although they also are of potential importance in tropospheric chemistry. In 1991, the Fourier-transform IR spectroscopic detection of INO, INO_2 and IONO_2 in the gas phase has been reported The INO molecule was generated by in situ mixing continuously I_2 and NO in a 50-cm long reaction glass tube whose outlet was connected to the absorption cell using a teflon tube. At the time of writing this abstract, 68 μ_a-type transitions (K_a = 0-10), all weak, have been successfully assigned. The hyperfine structures due to both I and N nuclei will also be presented. S.B. and D.D. acknowledge support from the Laboratoire d'Excellence CaPPA (Chemical and Physical Properties of the Atmosphere) through contract ANR-10-LABX-005 of the Programme d'Investissement d'Avenir. I. Barnes, K. H. Becker and J. Starcke, J. Phys. Chem. 1991, 95, 9736-9740.

  4. Prodigiosin inhibits gp91{sup phox} and iNOS expression to protect mice against the oxidative/nitrosative brain injury induced by hypoxia-ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chia-Che; Wang, Yea-Hwey; Chern, Chang-Ming; Liou, Kuo-Tong; Hou, Yu-Chang; Peng, Yu-Ta; Shen, Yuh-Chiang

    2011-11-15

    This study aimed to explore the mechanisms by which prodigiosin protects against hypoxia-induced oxidative/nitrosative brain injury induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion (MCAo/r) injury in mice. Hypoxia in vitro was modeled using oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) followed by reoxygenation of BV-2 microglial cells. Our results showed that treatment of mice that have undergone MCAo/r injury with prodigiosin (10 and 100 {mu}g/kg, i.v.) at 1 h after hypoxia ameliorated MCAo/r-induced oxidative/nitrosative stress, brain infarction, and neurological deficits in the mice, and enhanced their survival rate. MCAo/r induced a remarkable production in the mouse brains of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a significant increase in protein nitrosylation; this primarily resulted from enhanced expression of NADPH oxidase 2 (gp91{sup phox}), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and the infiltration of CD11b leukocytes due to breakdown of blood-brain barrier (BBB) by activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). All these changes were significantly diminished by prodigiosin. In BV-2 cells, OGD induced ROS and nitric oxide production by up-regulating gp91{sup phox} and iNOS via activation of the NF-{kappa}B pathway, and these changes were suppressed by prodigiosin. In conclusion, our results indicate that prodigiosin reduces gp91{sup phox} and iNOS expression possibly by impairing NF-{kappa}B activation. This compromises the activation of microglial and/or inflammatory cells, which then, in turn, mediates prodigiosin's protective effect in the MCAo/r mice. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prodigiosin ameliorated brain infarction and deficits. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prodigiosin protected against hypoxia/reperfusion-induced brain injury. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prodigiosin diminished oxidative/nitrosativestress and leukocytes infiltration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prodigiosin reduced BBB breakdown. Black

  5. Protection of Tong-Sai-Mai Decoction against Apoptosis Induced by H2O2 in PC12 Cells: Mechanisms via Bcl-2-Mitochondria-ROS-INOS Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Maxwell Kim Kit; Lu, Yin; Di, Liu-qing; Xu, Hui-qin

    2014-01-01

    Tong-Sai-Mai decoction (TSM) is a Chinese materia medica polyherbal formulation that has been applied in treating brain ischemia for hundreds of years. Because it could repress the oxidative stress in in vivo studies, now we focus on the in vitro studies to investigate the mechanism by targeting the oxidative stress dependent signaling. The relation between the neurogenesis and the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production remains largely unexamined. PC12 cells are excitable cell types widely used as in vitro model for neuronal cells. Most marker genes that are related to neurotoxicity, apoptosis, and cell cycles are expressed at high levels in these cells. The aim of the present study is to explore the cytoprotection of TSM against hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2-) induced apoptosis and the molecular mechanisms underlying PC12 cells. Our findings revealed that TSM cotreatment with H2O2 restores the expression of bcl-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (INOS), and mitochondria membrane potential. Meanwhile, it reduces intracellular [Ca2+] concentration, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, and the expression of caspase-3 and bax. The results of the present study suggested that the cytoprotective effects of the TSM might be mediated, at least in part, by the bcl-2-mitochondria-ROS-INOS pathway. Due to its nontoxic characteristics, TSM could be further developed to treat the neurodegenerative diseases which are closely associated with the oxidative stress. PMID:25404948

  6. Do calcium-mediated cellular signalling pathways, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), estrogen or progesterone receptor antagonists, or bacterial endotoxins affect bovine placental function in vitro?

    PubMed

    Weems, Y S; Randel, R D; Carstens, G E; Welsh, T H; Weems, C W

    2004-04-01

    media treated with RU-486 increased (P < or = 0.05) at 4 and 8 h compared to vehicle controls and was not affected by other treatments (P > or = 0.05). Concentrations of PGE2 in media at 4 and 8 h were lower (P < or = 0.05) when compared to controls except treatment with PGE2 at 4 and 8h and RU-486 at 8h (P > or = 0.05). PGF2alpha was increased (P < or = 0.05) by RU-486 at 8h and no other treatment affected PGF2alpha at 4 or 8 h (P < or = 0.05). In conclusion, modulators of cellular calcium signalling pathways given alone do not affect bovine placental progesterone secretion at the days studied and progesterone receptor-mediated events appear to suppress placental progesterone, PGF2alpha, and PGE2 secretion in cattle. In addition, PGE2 does not appear to regulate bovine placental progesterone secretion when the corpus luteum is functional and bacterial endotoxin does not appear to affect bovine placental secretion of PGF2alpha or PGE2. PMID:15287156

  7. Chromatin Remodeling Factors Isw2 and Ino80 Regulate Checkpoint Activity and Chromatin Structure in S Phase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Laura; Rodriguez, Jairo; Tsukiyama, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    When cells undergo replication stress, proper checkpoint activation and deactivation are critical for genomic stability and cell survival and therefore must be highly regulated. Although mechanisms of checkpoint activation are well studied, mechanisms of checkpoint deactivation are far less understood. Previously, we reported that chromatin remodeling factors Isw2 and Ino80 attenuate the S-phase checkpoint activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, especially during recovery from hydroxyurea. In this study, we found that Isw2 and Ino80 have a more pronounced role in attenuating checkpoint activity during late S phase in the presence of methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). We therefore screened for checkpoint factors required for Isw2 and Ino80 checkpoint attenuation in the presence of MMS. Here we demonstrate that Isw2 and Ino80 antagonize checkpoint activators and attenuate checkpoint activity in S phase in MMS either through a currently unknown pathway or through RPA. Unexpectedly, we found that Isw2 and Ino80 increase chromatin accessibility around replicating regions in the presence of MMS through a novel mechanism. Furthermore, through growth assays, we provide additional evidence that Isw2 and Ino80 partially counteract checkpoint activators specifically in the presence of MMS. Based on these results, we propose that Isw2 and Ino80 attenuate S-phase checkpoint activity through a novel mechanism. PMID:25701287

  8. Terlipressin inhibits in vivo aortic iNOS expression induced by lipopolysaccharide in rats with biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Richard; Barrière, Eric; Tazi, Khalid A; Lardeux, Bernard; Dargère, Delphine; Urbanowicz, Waldemar; Poirel, Odile; Chauvelot-Moachon, Laurence; Guimont, Marie-Christine; Bernuau, Dominique; Lebrec, Didier

    2002-11-01

    In cirrhosis, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, a product of Gram-negative bacteria) in the blood may cause septic shock. LPS-elicited induction of arterial inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) results in nitric oxide (NO)-induced vasodilation, which causes arterial hypotension and hyporeactivity to alpha(1)-adrenergic constrictors. In vitro studies have suggested that vasopressin inhibits iNOS expression in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells exposed to LPS. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of terlipressin administration (a vasopressin analog) on in vivo LPS-induced aortic iNOS in rats with cirrhosis. LPS (1 mg/kg, intravenously) was administered followed by the intravenous administration of terlipressin (0.05 mg/kg, intravenously) or placebo 1 hour later. Arterial pressure was measured, and contractions to phenylephrine (an alpha(1)-adrenoceptor agonist), iNOS activity, and iNOS expressions (mRNA and protein) were investigated in isolated aortas. LPS-induced arterial hypotension and aortic hyporeactivity to phenylephrine were abolished in rats that received terlipressin. LPS-induced aortic iNOS activity and expression were suppressed in terlipressin-treated rats. In conclusion, in LPS-challenged rats with cirrhosis, terlipressin administration inhibits in vivo LPS-induced aortic iNOS expression. Terlipressin administration may be a novel approach for the treatment of arterial hypotension and hyporeactivity to alpha(1)-adrenergic constrictors in patients with cirrhosis and septic shock. PMID:12395316

  9. Bacterial Sialidase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Data shows that elevated sialidase in bacterial vaginosis patients correlates to premature births in women. Bacterial sialidase also plays a significant role in the unusual colonization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients. Crystals of Salmonella sialidase have been reproduced and are used for studying the inhibitor-enzyme complexes. These inhibitors may also be used to inhibit a trans-sialidase of Trypanosome cruzi, a very similar enzyme to bacterial sialidase, therefore preventing T. cruzi infection, the causitive agent of Chagas' disease. The Center for Macromolecular Crystallography suggests that inhibitors of bacterial sialidases can be used as prophylactic drugs to prevent bacterial infections in these critical cases.

  10. Myeloid-related protein 8 induces self-tolerance and cross-tolerance to bacterial infection via TLR4- and TLR2-mediated signal pathways

    PubMed Central

    Coveney, Andrew P.; Wang, Wei; Kelly, Justin; Hua Liu, Jing; Blankson, Siobhan; Di Wu, Qiong; Paul Redmond, H.; Huai Wang, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-related protein 8 (Mrp8) is the active component of Mrp8/14 protein complex released by phagocytes at the site of infection and stimulates inflammatory responses. However, it is unclear whether Mrp8 could induce self-tolerance and cross-tolerance to bacterial infection. Here we report that Mrp8 triggered TNF-α and IL-6 release via a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-dependent manner. Pre-stimulation of murine macrophages and human monocytes with Mrp8 induced self-tolerance to Mrp8 re-stimulation and cross-tolerance to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), bacterial lipoprotein (BLP), gram-negative and gram-positive bacterial challenges, with substantially attenuated TNF-α and IL-6 release. Moreover, Mrp8 tolerisation significantly reduced serum TNF-α and IL-6, increased polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) recruitment and accelerated bacterial clearance, thus protecting mice against LPS-induced lethality and cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced polymicrobial sepsis. In addition to TLR4, TLR2 also contributed to Mrp8-induced inflammatory response and tolerance. Down-regulation of phosphorylated p38 by Mrp8 pre-stimulation was predominantly responsible for the intracellular mechanism of Mrp8-induced tolerance. Thus, our findings of Mrp8-induced self-tolerance and cross-tolerance may provide a potential strategy for attenuating an overwhelming proinflammatory cascade and enhancing antimicrobial responses during microbial sepsis. PMID:26329314

  11. The effect of aspirin nanoemulsion on TNFα and iNOS in gastric tissue in comparison with conventional aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Fatma Abd Elhalim; Hashem, Khalid S; Hussein Elkelawy, Asmaa Mohammed M

    2015-01-01

    aspirin, indicated by significant decreases in TNFα, iNOS, prostaglandin E2, and malondialdehyde levels, and also significant increases in glutathione, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase. The biochemical results were confirmed by histopathological studies. Conclusion Aspirin nanoemulsion has less toxic effect on the gastric mucosa compared to ordinary aspirin. This can be indicated by the increase of the antioxidant activity and the decrease of the inflammatory mediators in the gastric tissue. PMID:26345150

  12. THE ROLE OF MIR-212 AND INOS IN ALCOHOL-INDUCED INTESTINAL BARRIER DYSFUNCTION AND STEATOHEPATITIS

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yueming; Zhang, Lijuan; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Shaikh, Maliha; Song, Shiwen; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is commonly associated with intestinal barrier dysfunction. Alcohol-induced dysregulation of intestinal tight junction (TJ) proteins, such as Zonula Occludens-1 (ZO-1), plays an important role in alcohol-induced gut leakiness. However, the mechanism of alcohol-induced disruption of TJ proteins is not well established. The goal of this study was to elucidate this mechanism by studying the role of MicroRNA 212 (miR-212) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in alcohol-induced gut leakiness. Methods The permeability of the Caco-2 monolayer was assessed by transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and flux of fluorescein sulfonic acid (FSA). miR-212 was measured by real time PCR. The wild type, iNOS knockout, and miR-212 knockdown mice were fed with alcohol diet (29% of total calories, 4.5% v/v) for 8 weeks. The LNA-anti-miR-212 was used to inhibit miR-212 expression in mice. The alcohol-induced intestinal permeability, miR-212 expression and liver injuries in mice were measured. Results Our in vitro monolayer and in vivo mice studies showed that: (1) alcohol-induced over-expression of the intestinal miR-212 and intestinal hyperpermeability is prevented by using miR-212 knock-down techniques; and (2). iNOS is upregulated in the intestine by alcohol and that iNOS signaling is required for alcohol-induced miR-212 over-expression, ZO-1 disruption, gut leakiness and steatohepatis. Conclusions These studies thus support a novel miR-212 mechanism for alcohol-induced gut leakiness and a potential target that could be exploited for therapeutic intervention to prevent leaky gut and liver injury in alcoholics. PMID:26207424

  13. Expression of NRAMP1 and iNOS in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis naturally infected cattle.

    PubMed

    Delgado, F; Estrada-Chávez, C; Romano, M; Paolicchi, F; Blanco-Viera, F; Capellino, F; Chavez-Gris, G; Pereira-Suárez, A L

    2010-09-01

    Paratuberculosis (PTB) is a chronic disease caused by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) that affects several animal species, and some studies have suggested that there may be a relationship between Crohn's disease and PTB. Significant aspects of PTB pathogenesis are not yet completely understood, such as the role of macrophages. Natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (NRAMP1) and the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) molecules have shown nonspecific effects against several intracellular pathogens residing within macrophages. However, these molecules have been scarcely studied during natural infection with MAP. In this work, changes in NRAMP1 and iNOS expression were surveyed by immunohistochemistry in tissue samples from MAP-infected cattle and healthy controls. Our findings show strong specific immunolabeling against both NRAMP1 and iNOS molecules, throughout granulomatous PTB-compatible lesions in ileum and ileocaecal lymph nodes from paratuberculous cattle compared with uninfected controls, suggesting a relationship between the expression of these molecules and the pathogenesis of PTB disease. PMID:19345998

  14. Bacterial Proteasomes

    PubMed Central

    Jastrab, Jordan B.; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-01-01

    Interest in bacterial proteasomes was sparked by the discovery that proteasomal degradation is required for the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, one of the world's deadliest pathogens. Although bacterial proteasomes are structurally similar to their eukaryotic and archaeal homologs, there are key differences in their mechanisms of assembly, activation, and substrate targeting for degradation. In this article, we compare and contrast bacterial proteasomes with their archaeal and eukaryotic counterparts, and we discuss recent advances in our understanding of how bacterial proteasomes function to influence microbial physiology. PMID:26488274

  15. Induction of L-arginine transport and nitric oxide synthase in vascular smooth muscle cells: synergistic actions of pro-inflammatory cytokines and bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Wileman, S. M.; Mann, G. E.; Baydoun, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    1. The interactions between pro-inflammatory cytokines and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on L-arginine transporter and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activities were examined in rat cultured aortic smooth muscle cells. 2. LPS induced a concentration (0.01-100 micrograms ml-1) and time (8-24 h)-dependent stimulation of nitrite production which was accompanied by a parallel increase in L-arginine transport. 3. Unlike LPS, activation of smooth muscle cells with either interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma, 100 u ml-1), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha, 300 u ml-1) or interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha, 100 u ml-1) failed to stimulate L-arginine transport or increase nitrite accumulation. 4. When applied in combination with LPS (100 micrograms ml-1) both IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha, but not IL-1 alpha, enhanced the effects observed with LPS alone. Furthermore, activation of cells with LPS and IFN-gamma had no effect on uptake of the neutral amino acid L-citrulline but selectively increased the Vmax for L-arginine transport 2.8 fold and nitrite levels from 24 +/- 7 to 188 +/- 14 pmol micrograms-1 protein 24 h-1. 5. The substrate specificity, Na- and pH-independence of saturable L-arginine transport in both unactivated (K(m) = 44 microM, Vmax = 3 pmol micrograms-1 protein min-1) and activated (K(m) = 75 microM, Vmax = 8.3 pmol micrograms-1 protein min-1) smooth muscle cells were characteristic of the cationic amino acid transport system y+. 6. Cycloheximide (1 microM) abolished induction of L-arginine transport and nitrite accumulation in response to LPS and IFN-gamma. In contrast, the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (10 microM, 24 h) selectively inhibited nitrite production. 7. Our results demonstrate that pro-inflammatory mediators selectively enhance transport of L-arginine under conditions of sustained NO synthesis by vascular smooth muscle cells. In addition, the differential inhibition of iNOS and L-arginine transporter activity by dexamethasone suggests that

  16. Evaluation of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification method for rapid detection of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus important bacterial pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus infected with Edwardsiella ictaluri results in $40 - 50 million annual losses in profits to catfish producers. Early detection of this pathogen is necessary for disease control and reduction of economic loss. In this communication, the loop-mediated isothermal a...

  17. Soil water availability and microsite mediate fungal and bacterial phospholipid fatty acid biomarker abundances in Mojave Desert soils exposed to elevated atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, V. L.; Schaeffer, S. M.; Ziegler, S. E.; Evans, R. D.

    2011-06-01

    Changes in the rates of nitrogen (N) cycling, microbial carbon (C) substrate use, and extracellular enzyme activities in a Mojave Desert ecosystem exposed to elevated atmospheric CO2 suggest shifts in the size and/or functional characteristics of microbial assemblages in two dominant soil microsites: plant interspaces and under the dominant shrub Larrea tridentata. We used ester-linked phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) biomarkers as a proxy for microbial biomass to quantify spatial and temporal differences in soil microbial communities from February 2003 to May 2005. Further, we used the 13C signature of the fossil CO2 source for elevated CO2 plots to trace recent plant C inputs into soil organic matter (SOM) and broad microbial groups using δ13C (‰). Differences between individual δ13CPLFA and δ13CSOM for fungal biomarkers indicated active metabolism of newer C in elevated CO2 soils. Total PLFA-C was greater in shrub microsites compared to plant interspaces, and CO2 treatment differences within microsites increased under higher soil water availability. Total, fungal, and bacterial PLFA-C increased with decreasing soil volumetric water content (VWC) in both microsites, suggesting general adaptations to xeric desert conditions. Increases in fungal-to-bacterial PLFA-C ratio with decreasing VWC reflected functional group-specific responses to changing soil water availability. While temporal and spatial extremes in resource availability in desert ecosystems contribute to the difficulty in identifying common trends or mechanisms driving microbial responses in less extreme environments, we found that soil water availability and soil microsite interacted with elevated CO2 to shift fungal and bacterial biomarker abundances in Mojave Desert soils.

  18. Temperature-mediated differences in bacterial kidney disease expression and survival in Renibacterium salmoninarum-challenged bull trout and other salmonids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, D.T.; Moffitt, C.M.; Peters, K.K.

    2007-01-01

    Resource managers considering restoration and reconnection of watersheds to protect and enhance threatened populations of bull trout Salvelinus confluentus have little information about the consequences of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum. To better understand the response of bull trout to R. salmoninarum challenge, we conducted several laboratory experiments at two water temperatures. The extent, severity, and lethality of BKD in bull trout were compared with those of similarly challenged lake trout S. namaycush, Arctic char S. alpinus, Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, and rainbow trout O. mykiss. The lethal dose of bacterial cells necessary to induce 50% mortality (LD50) was 10-fold lower at the 15??C challenge than at the 9??C challenge. Of the species tested, bull trout were relatively resistant to BKD, Arctic char were the most susceptible among Salvelinus species, and Chinook salmon were the most susceptible among Oncorhynchus species tested. Mean time to death was more rapid for all fish tested at 15??C than for fish challenged at 9??C. These results suggest that infection of bull trout with BKD likely poses a low risk to successful restoration of threatened populations. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  19. Resilience of the intestinal microbiota following pathogenic bacterial infection is independent of innate immunity mediated by NOD1 or NOD2.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Susan J; Geddes, Kaoru; Maisonneuve, Charles; Streutker, Catherine J; Philpott, Dana J

    2016-01-01

    The innate immune receptors, NOD1 and NOD2, are key regulators of intestinal homeostasis. NOD2 deficiency is linked to increased risk for Crohn's disease, a type of inflammatory bowel disease characterized by chronic inflammatory pathology and dysbiosis within resident microbial communities. However, the relationship between NOD protein-regulated immune functions and dysbiosis remains unclear. We hypothesized that the relationship between NOD1 or NOD2 deficiency and altered community structure during chronic disease may arise via NOD-dependent impairment of community resilience over time. Using the Salmonella ΔaroA model of chronic colitis with littermate mice to control for environmental influences on the microbiota, we show that NOD proteins exert a relatively minor impact on the chronic inflammatory environment and do not significantly contribute to bacterial abundance or community resilience following infection. Rather, temporal shifts in relative abundance of targeted bacterial groups correlated with inflammatory phenotype driven by presence of the pathogen and the ensuing complex immune response. PMID:27083475

  20. Intestinal expression of Fas and Fas ligand is upregulated by bacterial signaling through TLR4 and TLR5, with activation of Fas modulating intestinal TLR-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Philana; O'Donnell, Charlotte; Lyons, Caitriona; Keane, Jonathan; Regan, Tim; O'Brien, Stephen; Fallon, Padraic; Brint, Elizabeth; Houston, Aileen

    2014-12-15

    TLRs play an important role in mediating intestinal inflammation and homeostasis. Fas is best studied in terms of its function in apoptosis, but recent studies demonstrate that Fas signaling may mediate additional functions such as inflammation. The role of Fas, and the Fas ligand (FasL), in the intestine is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate potential cross-talk between TLRs and Fas/FasL system in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). IECs were stimulated with TLR ligands, and expression of Fas and FasL was investigated. Treatment with TLR4 and TLR5 ligands, but not TLR2 and 9 ligands, increased expression of Fas and FasL in IECs in vitro. Consistent with this finding, expression of intestinal Fas and FasL was reduced in vivo in the epithelium of TLR4 knockout (KO), 5KO, and germ-free mice, but not in TLR2KO mice. Modulating Fas signaling using agonistic anti-Fas augmented TLR4- and TLR5-mediated TNF-α and IL-8 production by IECs. In addition, suppression of Fas in IECs reduced the ability of TLR4 and TLR5 ligands and the intestinal pathogens Salmonella typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes to induce the expression of IL-8. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that extensive cross-talk in IECs occurs between the Fas and TLR signaling pathways, with the FasL/Fas system playing a role in TLR-mediated inflammatory responses in the intestine. PMID:25378591

  1. Bacterial Keratitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... very quickly, and if left untreated, can cause blindness. The bacteria usually responsible for this type of ... to intense ultraviolet radiation exposure, e.g. snow blindness or welder's arc eye). Next Bacterial Keratitis Symptoms ...

  2. Inducible nitric oxide synthase mediates early epithelial repair of porcine ileum.

    PubMed

    Gookin, Jody L; Rhoads, J Marc; Argenzio, Robert A

    2002-07-01

    Reports conflict regarding the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on intestinal epithelium. In chronic injury, NO appears detrimental by combining with reactive oxygen to form potent-free radicals. In contrast, inhibition of NO synthesis after acute injury exacerbates damage and inflammation. Recent studies have disclosed constitutive expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) by normal intestinal epithelia, yet little attention has been given to the role of iNOS in acute epithelial repair. We studied the local effects of iNOS on early epithelial repair of porcine ileal mucosa injured by deoxycholate within Ussing chambers. iNOS was constitutively expressed by the villous epithelium, and after deoxycholate injury, iNOS was expressed by injured and detaching enterocytes. Selective inhibition of iNOS abolished increases in NO synthesis and villous reepithelialization after injury. Exogenous L-arginine rescued baseline reepithelialization from NOS inhibitors but was only capable of stimulating additional repair in the presence of serum. These results demonstrate that iNOS-derived NO is a key mediator of early villous reepithelialization following acute mucosal injury. PMID:12065303

  3. Bioactive diterpenoids from Trigonostemon chinensis: Structures, NO inhibitory activities, and interactions with iNOS.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Peng, Maoqin; Sun, Xiaocong; Liu, Xingyu; Tong, Ling; Su, Guochen; Ohizumi, Yasushi; Lee, Dongho; Guo, Yuanqiang

    2016-10-01

    A phytochemical investigation to obtain new NO inhibitors led to the isolation of two new (1 and 2) and four known (3-6) diterpenoids from Trigonostemon chinensis. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic data analyses, and the absolute configurations of new compounds were established by experimental and calculated ECD spectra. The inhibitory activities on lipopolysaccharide-induced NO production in murine microglial BV-2 cells of these diterpenoids were evaluated, and all of the compounds showed inhibitory effects. The interactions of bioactive compounds with iNOS protein were also studied by molecular docking. PMID:27570243

  4. Numerical studies on electrostatic field configuration of Resistive Plate Chambers for the INO-ICAL experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jash, A.; Majumdar, N.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2015-11-01

    As a part of detailed optimization studies on Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) to be used in INO-ICAL experiment, the effect of geometrical artifacts like edge, corner, spacers on the device response should be investigated thoroughly. In this context, the electrostatic field within an RPC has been computed following Finite Element Method and Boundary Element Method to study the effect of these artifacts on the field map. The weighting field distribution for the given geometry has also been evaluated which is necessary for simulating the device signal. A unified model to calculate both physical and weighting field within RPC has been proposed and tested for its validity.

  5. Melatonin Enhances the Anti-Tumor Effect of Fisetin by Inhibiting COX-2/iNOS and NF-κB/p300 Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhenlong; Xiao, Yao; Wang, Jingshu; Qiu, Huijuan; Yu, Wendan; Tang, Ranran; Yuan, Yuhui; Guo, Wei; Deng, Wuguo

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin is a hormone identified in plants and pineal glands of mammals and possesses diverse physiological functions. Fisetin is a bio-flavonoid widely found in plants and exerts antitumor activity in several types of human cancers. However, the combinational effect of melatonin and fisetin on antitumor activity, especially in melanoma treatment, remains unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that melatonin could enhance the antitumor activity of fisetin in melanoma cells and identified the underlying molecular mechanisms. The combinational treatment of melanoma cells with fisetin and melatonin significantly enhanced the inhibitions of cell viability, cell migration and clone formation, and the induction of apoptosis when compared with the treatment of fisetin alone. Moreover, such enhancement of antitumor effect by melatonin was found to be mediated through the modulation of the multiply signaling pathways in melanoma cells. The combinational treatment of fisetin with melatonin increased the cleavage of PARP proteins, triggered more release of cytochrome-c from the mitochondrial inter-membrane, enhanced the inhibition of COX-2 and iNOS expression, repressed the nuclear localization of p300 and NF-κB proteins, and abrogated the binding of NF-κB on COX-2 promoter. Thus, these results demonstrated that melatonin potentiated the anti-tumor effect of fisetin in melanoma cells by activating cytochrome-c-dependent apoptotic pathway and inhibiting COX-2/iNOS and NF-κB/p300 signaling pathways, and our study suggests the potential of such a combinational treatment of natural products in melanoma therapy. PMID:25000190

  6. Distinct roles for SWR1 and INO80 chromatin remodeling complexes at chromosomal double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    van Attikum, Haico; Fritsch, Olivier; Gasser, Susan M

    2007-01-01

    INO80 and SWR1 are two closely related ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes that share several subunits. Ino80 was reported to be recruited to the HO endonuclease-induced double-strand break (DSB) at the budding yeast mating-type locus, MAT. We find Swr1 similarly recruited in a manner dependent on the phosphorylation of H2A (γH2AX). This is not unique to cleavage at MAT; both Swr1 and Ino80 bind near an induced DSB on chromosome XV. Whereas Swr1 incorporates the histone variant H2A.Z into chromatin at promoters, H2A.Z levels do not increase at DSBs. Instead, H2A.Z, γH2AX and core histones are coordinately removed near the break in an INO80-dependent, but SWR1-independent, manner. Mutations in INO80-specific subunits Arp8 or Nhp10 impair the binding of Mre11 nuclease, yKu80 and ATR-related Mec1 kinase at the DSB, resulting in defective end-processing and checkpoint activation. In contrast, Mre11 binding, end-resection and checkpoint activation were normal in the swr1 strain, but yKu80 loading and error-free end-joining were impaired. Thus, these two related chromatin remodelers have distinct roles in DSB repair and checkpoint activation. PMID:17762868

  7. Robust neuroprotective effects of intranasally delivered iNOS siRNA encapsulated in gelatin nanoparticles in the postischemic brain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il-Doo; Sawicki, Elizabeth; Lee, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Eun-Hwa; Park, Heon Joo; Han, Pyung-Lim; Kim, Kyekyoon Kevin; Choi, Hyungsoo; Lee, Ja-Kyeong

    2016-07-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of intranasal iNOS siRNA delivery was investigated in the postischemic rat brain after encapsulating on in gelatin nanoparticles (GNPs; diameter 188.0 ± 60.9 nm) cross-linked with 0.0667% glutaraldehyde (GA). Intranasally delivered GNPs were found in extracellular and intracellular compartments of many brain regions, including the olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, and striatum at 1 hour after infusion and continued to be detected for days. Infarct volumes were markedly suppressed (maximal reduction to 42.1 ± 2.6%) at 2 days after 60 minutes of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) when iNOS siRNA/GNPs were delivered at 6 hours post-MCAO. In addition, this protective effect was manifested by reductions in neurological and behavioral deficits that were sustained for 2 weeks. Therapeutic potency of iNOS siRNA/GNPs was significantly greater and sustained longer than that of bare siRNA and prolonged and efficient iNOS by iNOS siRNA/GNP is responsible for the robust neuroprotective effect. PMID:26945975

  8. Campylobacter jejuni outer membrane vesicle-associated proteolytic activity promotes bacterial invasion by mediating cleavage of intestinal epithelial cell E-cadherin and occludin.

    PubMed

    Elmi, Abdi; Nasher, Fauzy; Jagatia, Heena; Gundogdu, Ozan; Bajaj-Elliott, Mona; Wren, Brendan; Dorrell, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) play an important role in the pathogenicity of Gram-negative bacteria. Campylobacter jejuni produces OMVs that trigger IL-8, IL-6, hBD-3 and TNF-α responses from T84 intestinal epithelial cells and are cytotoxic to Caco-2 IECs and Galleria mellonella larvae. Proteomic analysis of 11168H OMVs identified the presence of three proteases, HtrA, Cj0511 and Cj1365c. In this study, 11168H OMVs were shown to possess proteolytic activity that was reduced by pretreatment with specific serine protease inhibitors. OMVs isolated from 11168H htrA, Cj0511 or Cj1365c mutants possess significantly reduced proteolytic activity. 11168H OMVs are able to cleave both E-cadherin and occludin, but this cleavage is reduced with OMVs pretreated with serine protease inhibitors and also with OMVs isolated from htrA or Cj1365c mutants. Co-incubation of T84 monolayers with 11168H OMVs results in a visible reduction in both E-cadherin and occludin. The addition of 11168H OMVs to the co-culture of live 11168H bacteria with T84 cells results in enhanced levels of bacterial adhesion and invasion in a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. Further investigation of the cleavage of host cell structural proteins by C. jejuni OMVs should enhance our understanding of the interactions of this important pathogen with intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:26451973

  9. Spatiotemporally Resolved Tracking of Bacterial Responses to ROS-Mediated Damage at the Single-Cell Level with Quantitative Functional Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Álvaro; Grüner, Malte; Forbes, Taylor; Denz, Cornelia; Strassert, Cristian A

    2016-06-22

    Herein we report on the implementation of photofunctional microparticles in combination with optical tweezers for the investigation of bacterial responses to oxidative stress by means of quantitative functional microscopy. A combination of a strongly hydrophobic axially substituted Si(IV) phthalocyanine adsorbed onto silica microparticles was developed, and the structural and photophysical characterization was carried out. The microparticles are able to produce reactive oxygen species under the fluorescence microscope upon irradiation with red light, and the behavior of individual bacteria can be consequently investigated in situ and in real time at the single cell level. For this purpose, a methodology was introduced to monitor phototriggered changes with spatiotemporal resolution. The defined distance between the photoactive particles and individual bacteria can be fixed under the microscope before the photosensitization process is started, and the photoinduced damage can be monitored by tracing the time-dependent fluorescence turn-on of a suitable marker. The results showed a distance-dependent photoinduced death time, defined as the onset of the incorporation of propidium iodide. Our methodology constitutes a new tool for the in vitro design and evaluation of photosensitizers for the treatment of cancer and infectious diseases with the aid of functional optical microscopy, as it enables a quantitative response evaluation of living systems toward oxidative stress. More generally, it provides a way to understand the response of an ensemble of living entities to reactive oxygen species by analyzing the behavior of a set of individual organisms. PMID:27227509

  10. Flavonoids inhibit iNOS production via mitogen activated proteins in lipoteichoic acid stimulated cardiomyoblasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Ventura-Arroyo, Jairo Agustín; Arreguín-Cano, Juan Antonio; Ostoa-Pérez, María Fernanda

    2014-08-01

    Infective endocarditis is caused by oral commensal bacteria which are important etiologic agents in this disease and can induce release of nitric oxide (NO), promoting an inflammatory response in the endocardium. In this study, we investigated the properties of kaempherol, epigallocatechin, apigenin, and naringin in embryonic mouse heart cells (H9c2) treated with lipoteichoic acid (LTA) obtained from Streptococcus sanguinis. NO production was measured with the Griess method. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In addition, western blot assays and immunofluorescence staining were used to assess translocation of nuclear factor kappa beta (NF-κB), degradation of IκB, and activity of the mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinases extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2), p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). And the effects of these flavonoids on cell viability were also assessed. Our results showed that flavonoids blocked activation of ERK, JNK, and p38 in cardiomyocytes treated with LTA. Moreover, the flavonoids showed no cytotoxic effects and blocked NF-κB translocation and IκB degradation and inhibited LTA-induced NF-κB promoter activity, iNOS expression and NO production. In conclusion these effects are consistent with some of the observed anti-inflammatory properties of other flavonoids. PMID:24768712

  11. Selective iNOS inhibition is superior to norepinephrine in the treatment of rat endotoxic shock.

    PubMed

    Rosselet, A; Feihl, F; Markert, M; Gnaegi, A; Perret, C; Liaudet, L

    1998-01-01

    S-methyl-isothiourea (SMT) is a potent inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS) with relative selectivity towards the inducible isoform (iNOS). We compared SMT and norepinephrine for the treatment of experimental endotoxic shock. Anesthetized rats challenged intravenously with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), 10 mg/kg, were treated after 1 h with a 4-h infusion of norepinephrine (titrated to maintain blood pressure within baseline values), SMT at low dose (0.1 mg x kg-1 x h-1), or at high dose (1 mg x kg-1 x h-1), or an equivalent volume of saline (2 ml x kg-1 x h-1). In saline-treated animals, LPS increased plasma nitrate and produced hypotension, low cardiac output (CO), lactic acidosis, and signs of liver and kidney dysfunction. Norepinephrine maintained blood pressure (BP) and reduced the fall in CO, without affecting lactic acidosis, organ dysfunction, and nitrate accumulation. The latter was dose-dependently blunted by SMT. Treatment with this agent prevented hypotension, through systemic vasoconstriction with the high dose and a maintained CO with the low dose. Low, but not high, dose SMT blunted lactic acidosis. Both doses reduced the signs of renal, but not liver, dysfunction. In additional studies, we obtained evidence that, in contrast with the high dose, SMT at low dose did not interfere with the function of constitutive NOS. These findings suggest a potential advantage of selective iNOS inhibition over standard adrenergic support in the therapy of septic shock. PMID:9445295

  12. Bacterial Genome Instability

    PubMed Central

    Darmon, Elise

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial genomes are remarkably stable from one generation to the next but are plastic on an evolutionary time scale, substantially shaped by horizontal gene transfer, genome rearrangement, and the activities of mobile DNA elements. This implies the existence of a delicate balance between the maintenance of genome stability and the tolerance of genome instability. In this review, we describe the specialized genetic elements and the endogenous processes that contribute to genome instability. We then discuss the consequences of genome instability at the physiological level, where cells have harnessed instability to mediate phase and antigenic variation, and at the evolutionary level, where horizontal gene transfer has played an important role. Indeed, this ability to share DNA sequences has played a major part in the evolution of life on Earth. The evolutionary plasticity of bacterial genomes, coupled with the vast numbers of bacteria on the planet, substantially limits our ability to control disease. PMID:24600039

  13. Bacterial multidrug efflux transporters.

    PubMed

    Delmar, Jared A; Su, Chih-Chia; Yu, Edward W

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by bacteria are a leading cause of death worldwide. Although antibiotics remain a key clinical therapy, their effectiveness has been severely compromised by the development of drug resistance in bacterial pathogens. Multidrug efflux transporters--a common and powerful resistance mechanism--are capable of extruding a number of structurally unrelated antimicrobials from the bacterial cell, including antibiotics and toxic heavy metal ions, facilitating their survival in noxious environments. Transporters of the resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) superfamily typically assemble as tripartite efflux complexes spanning the inner and outer membranes of the cell envelope. In Escherichia coli, the CusCFBA complex, which mediates resistance to copper(I) and silver(I) ions, is the only known RND transporter specific to heavy metals. Here, we describe the current knowledge of individual pump components of the Cus system, a paradigm for efflux machinery, and speculate on how RND pumps assemble to fight diverse antimicrobials. PMID:24702006

  14. Bacterial Cell Wall Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsberg, Cynthia; Brown, Stephanie; Walker, Suzanne

    Bacterial cell-surface polysaccharides cells are surrounded by a variety of cell-surface structures that allow them to thrive in extreme environments. Components of the cell envelope and extracellular matrix are responsible for providing the cells with structural support, mediating intercellular communication, allowing the cells to move or to adhere to surfaces, protecting the cells from attack by antibiotics or the immune system, and facilitating the uptake of nutrients. Some of the most important cell wall components are polysaccharide structures. This review discusses the occurrence, structure, function, and biosynthesis of the most prevalent bacterial cell surface polysaccharides: peptidoglycan, lipopolysaccharide, arabinogalactan, and lipoarabinomannan, and capsular and extracellular polysaccharides. The roles of these polysaccharides in medicine, both as drug targets and as therapeutic agents, are also described.

  15. Bacterial toxin HigB associates with ribosomes and mediates translation-dependent mRNA cleavage at A-rich sites.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Jennifer M; Woychik, Nancy A

    2009-07-10

    Most pathogenic Proteus species are primarily associated with urinary tract infections, especially in persons with indwelling catheters or functional/anatomic abnormalities of the urinary tract. Urinary tract infections caused by Proteus vulgaris typically form biofilms and are resistant to commonly used antibiotics. The Rts1 conjugative plasmid from a clinical isolate of P. vulgaris carries over 300 predicted open reading frames, including antibiotic resistance genes. The maintenance of the Rts1 plasmid is ensured in part by the HigBA toxin-antitoxin system. We determined the precise mechanism of action of the HigB toxin in vivo, which is distinct from other known toxins. We demonstrate that HigB is an endoribonuclease whose enzymatic activity is dependent on association with ribosomes through the 50 S subunit. Using primer extension analysis of several test mRNAs, we showed that HigB cleaved extensively across the entire length of coding regions only at specific recognition sequences. HigB mediated cleavage of 100% of both in-frame and out-of-frame AAA sequences. In addition, HigB cleaved approximately 20% of AA sequences in coding regions and occasionally cut single As. Remarkably, the cleavage specificity of HigB coincided with one of the most frequently used codons in the AT-rich Proteus spp., AAA (lysine). Therefore, the HigB-mediated plasmid maintenance system for the Rts1 plasmid highlights the intimate relationship between host cells and extrachromosomal DNA that enables the dynamic acquisition of genes that impart a spectrum of survival advantages, including those encoding multidrug resistance and virulence factors. PMID:19423702

  16. Supernatural supersymmetry: Phenomenological implications of anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jonathan L.; Moroi, Takeo

    2000-05-01

    We discuss the phenomenology of supersymmetric models in which supersymmetry breaking terms are induced by the super-Weyl anomaly. Such a scenario is envisioned to arise when supersymmetry breaking takes place in another world, i.e., on another brane. We review the anomaly-mediated framework and study in detail the minimal anomaly-mediated model parametrized by only 3+1 parameters: Maux, m0, tan β, and sgn(μ). The renormalization group equations exhibit a novel ``focus point'' (as opposed to fixed point) behavior, which allows squark and slepton masses far above their usual naturalness bounds. We present the superparticle spectrum and highlight several implications for high energy colliders. Three lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) candidates exist: the W-ino, the stau, and the tau sneutrino. For the W-ino LSP scenario, light W-ino triplets with the smallest possible mass splittings are preferred; such W-inos are within reach of run II Fermilab Tevatron searches. Finally, we study a variety of sensitive low energy probes, including b-->sγ, the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, and the electric dipole moments of the electron and neutron.

  17. Supernatural supersymmetry: Phenomenological implications of anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Jonathan L.; Moroi, Takeo

    2000-05-01

    We discuss the phenomenology of supersymmetric models in which supersymmetry breaking terms are induced by the super-Weyl anomaly. Such a scenario is envisioned to arise when supersymmetry breaking takes place in another world, i.e., on another brane. We review the anomaly-mediated framework and study in detail the minimal anomaly-mediated model parametrized by only 3+1 parameters: M{sub aux}, m{sub 0}, tan {beta}, and sgn({mu}). The renormalization group equations exhibit a novel ''focus point'' (as opposed to fixed point) behavior, which allows squark and slepton masses far above their usual naturalness bounds. We present the superparticle spectrum and highlight several implications for high energy colliders. Three lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) candidates exist: the W-ino, the stau, and the tau sneutrino. For the W-ino LSP scenario, light W-ino triplets with the smallest possible mass splittings are preferred; such W-inos are within reach of run II Fermilab Tevatron searches. Finally, we study a variety of sensitive low energy probes, including b{yields}s{gamma}, the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, and the electric dipole moments of the electron and neutron. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  18. Bacterial Fucose-Rich Polysaccharide Stabilizes MAPK-Mediated Nrf2/Keap1 Signaling by Directly Scavenging Reactive Oxygen Species during Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis of Human Lung Fibroblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roy Chowdhury, Sougata; Sinha, Tridib Kumar; Sen, Ramkrishna; Basak, Ratan Kumar; Adhikari, Basudam; Bhattacharyya, Arindam

    2014-01-01

    Continuous free radical assault upsets cellular homeostasis and dysregulates associated signaling pathways to promote stress-induced cell death. In spite of the continuous development and implementation of effective therapeutic strategies, limitations in treatments for stress-induced toxicities remain. The purpose of the present study was to determine the potential therapeutic efficacy of bacterial fucose polysaccharides against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced stress in human lung fibroblast (WI38) cells and to understand the associated molecular mechanisms. In two different fermentation processes, Bacillus megaterium RB-05 biosynthesized two non-identical fucose polysaccharides; of these, the polysaccharide having a high-fucose content (∼42%) conferred the maximum free radical scavenging efficiency in vitro. Structural characterizations of the purified polysaccharides were performed using HPLC, GC-MS, and 1H/13C/2D-COSY NMR. H2O2 (300 µM) insult to WI38 cells showed anti-proliferative effects by inducing intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and by disrupting mitochondrial membrane permeability, followed by apoptosis. The polysaccharide (250 µg/mL) attenuated the cell death process by directly scavenging intracellular ROS rather than activating endogenous antioxidant enzymes. This process encompasses inhibition of caspase-9/3/7, a decrease in the ratio of Bax/Bcl2, relocalization of translocated Bax and cytochrome c, upregulation of anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl2 family and a decrease in the phosphorylation of MAPKs (mitogen activated protein kinases). Furthermore, cellular homeostasis was re-established via stabilization of MAPK-mediated Nrf2/Keap1 signaling and transcription of downstream cytoprotective genes. This molecular study uniquely introduces a fucose-rich bacterial polysaccharide as a potential inhibitor of H2O2-induced stress and toxicities. PMID:25412177

  19. Bacterial fucose-rich polysaccharide stabilizes MAPK-mediated Nrf2/Keap1 signaling by directly scavenging reactive oxygen species during hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of human lung fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Roy Chowdhury, Sougata; Sengupta, Suman; Biswas, Subir; Sinha, Tridib Kumar; Sen, Ramkrishna; Basak, Ratan Kumar; Adhikari, Basudam; Bhattacharyya, Arindam

    2014-01-01

    Continuous free radical assault upsets cellular homeostasis and dysregulates associated signaling pathways to promote stress-induced cell death. In spite of the continuous development and implementation of effective therapeutic strategies, limitations in treatments for stress-induced toxicities remain. The purpose of the present study was to determine the potential therapeutic efficacy of bacterial fucose polysaccharides against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced stress in human lung fibroblast (WI38) cells and to understand the associated molecular mechanisms. In two different fermentation processes, Bacillus megaterium RB-05 biosynthesized two non-identical fucose polysaccharides; of these, the polysaccharide having a high-fucose content (∼ 42%) conferred the maximum free radical scavenging efficiency in vitro. Structural characterizations of the purified polysaccharides were performed using HPLC, GC-MS, and (1)H/(13)C/2D-COSY NMR. H2O2 (300 µM) insult to WI38 cells showed anti-proliferative effects by inducing intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and by disrupting mitochondrial membrane permeability, followed by apoptosis. The polysaccharide (250 µg/mL) attenuated the cell death process by directly scavenging intracellular ROS rather than activating endogenous antioxidant enzymes. This process encompasses inhibition of caspase-9/3/7, a decrease in the ratio of Bax/Bcl2, relocalization of translocated Bax and cytochrome c, upregulation of anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl2 family and a decrease in the phosphorylation of MAPKs (mitogen activated protein kinases). Furthermore, cellular homeostasis was re-established via stabilization of MAPK-mediated Nrf2/Keap1 signaling and transcription of downstream cytoprotective genes. This molecular study uniquely introduces a fucose-rich bacterial polysaccharide as a potential inhibitor of H2O2-induced stress and toxicities. PMID:25412177

  20. Bioactive products of arginine in sepsis: tissue and plasma composition after LPS and iNOS blockade.

    PubMed

    Lortie, M J; Ishizuka, S; Schwartz, D; Blantz, R C

    2000-06-01

    Blockade or gene deletion of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) fails to fully abrogate all the sequelae leading to the high morbidity of septicemia. An increase in substrate uptake may be necessary for the increased production of nitric oxide (NO), but arginine is also a precursor for other bioactive products. Herein, we demonstrate an increase in alternate arginine products via arginine and ornithine decarboxylase in rats given lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The expression of iNOS mRNA in renal tissue was evident 60 but not 30 min post-LPS, yet a rapid decrease in blood pressure was obtained within 30 min that was completely inhibited by selective iNOS blockade. Plasma levels of arginine and ornithine decreased by at least 30% within 60 min of LPS administration, an effect not inhibited by the iNOS blocker L-N(6)(1-iminoethyl)lysine (L-NIL). Significant increases in plasma nitrates and citrulline occurred only 3-4 h post-LPS, an effect blocked by L-NIL pretreatment. The intracellular composition of organs harvested 6 h post-LPS reflected tissue-specific profiles of arginine and related metabolites. Tissue arginine concentration, normally an order of magnitude higher than in plasma, did not decrease after LPS. Pretreatment with L-NIL had a significant impact on the disposition of tissue arginine that was organ specific. These data demonstrate changes in arginine metabolism before and after de novo iNOS activity. Selective blockade of iNOS did not prevent uptake and can deregulate the production of other bioactive arginine metabolites. PMID:10837347

  1. Bacterial-Mediated Induced Resistance in Cucumber: Beneficial Effect of the Endophytic Bacterium Serratia plymuthica on the Protection Against Infection by Pythium ultimum.

    PubMed

    Benhamou, N; Gagné, S; Le Quéré, D; Dehbi, L

    2000-01-01

    ABSTRACT The potential of the endophytic bacterium Serratia plymuthica strain R1GC4 in stimulating defense reactions in cucumber (Cucumis sativus) seedlings inoculated with the soilborne pathogen Pythium ultimum was explored at the cellular level. Bacterial treatment prior to Pythium inoculation resulted in less seedling disease development as compared with that in nontreated control plants, in which typical root symptoms were visible by 3 days after inoculation with the pathogen. Histological investigations of root samples revealed striking differences in the extent of plant defense reactions between bacterized and nonbacterized plants. These observations were further confirmed at the ultrastructural level with the demonstration that restriction of fungal colonization to the outermost root tissues of bacterized seedlings correlated with the deposition of enlarged callose-enriched wall appositions at sites of potential pathogen penetration and the accumulation of an osmiophilic material in the colonized areas. Hyphae of the pathogen, surrounded by this electron-opaque material, exhibited considerable changes including cytoplasm disorganization and, in many cases, loss of the protoplasm. However, labeling with the beta-1,4-exoglucanase resulted in a regular labeling of Pythium cell walls, even at a time when these walls were entirely coated by the osmiophilic material. This material was also found to infiltrate into the invading hyphae to form either an internal coating of the cell wall or a network of polymorphic droplets in the area previously occupied by the cytoplasm. Cytochemical investigations revealed that callose, pectin, and cellulose appeared in the wall appositions. In addition, glucosides, lipids, and phenolics were detected in the electron-dense aggregates forming the core of most wall appositions. Finally, galactose residues were among the minor polysaccharidic compounds detected in the wall appositions. Evidence is provided in this study showing that

  2. Bacterial Immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variety of bacterial agents reside in and around the environment that can cause illness and death in a poultry flock. Many cause disseminated disease while others exert more local effects such as the respiratory or gastrointestinal tract. The host, for our current purposes the laying hen, has de...

  3. Study of the directionality of cosmic muons using the INO-ICAL prototype detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, G.; Mondal, N. K.; Pal, S.; Samuel, D.; Satyanarayana, B.

    2014-01-01

    The India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) collaboration is planning to build a magnetised Iron-CALorimeter detector (ICAL) to study atmospheric neutrino oscillations with high precision. The ICAL adopts a 50 kton iron target and about 28 800 Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) of 2×2 m2 in area as active detector elements. As part of its R&D programme, a prototype detector stack composed of 12 layers of glass RPCs of 1×1 m2 in area has been set up at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) to study the detector parameters using cosmic muons. We present here a study of the capability of this prototype detector to distinguish between up-going and down-going muons.

  4. Effects of dietary menadione on the activity of antioxidant enzymes in abalone, Haliotis discus hannai Ino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jinghua; Xu, Wei; Mai, Kangsen; Zhang, Wenbing; Feng, Xiuni; Liufu, Zhiguo

    2012-01-01

    A 240-day growth experiment in a re-circulating water system was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary menadione on the growth and antioxidant responses of abalone Haliotis discus hannai Ino. Triplicate groups of juvenile abalone (initial weight: 1.19 ± 0.01 g; shell length: 19.23 ± 0.01 mm) were fed to satiation with 3 semi-purified diets containing 0, 10, and 1 000 mg menadione sodium bisulfite (MSB)/kg, respectively. Results show that there were no significant differences in the rate of weight gain or in the daily increment in shell length of abalone among different treatments. Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glutathione reductase (GR) in viscera were significantly decreased with dietary menadione. However, activities of these enzymes except for GPX in muscle were increased. Therefore, antioxidant responses of abalone were increased in muscle and decreased in viscera by dietary menadione.

  5. Development of 2 m×2 m size glass RPCs for INO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuyan, M.; Datar, V. M.; Kalmani, S. D.; Lahamge, S. M.; Mohammed, S.; Mondal, N. K.; Nagaraj, P.; Redij, A.; Samuel, D.; Saraf, M. N.; Satyanarayana, B.; Shinde, R. R.; Verma, P.

    2012-01-01

    The India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) collaboration is planning to build a massive 50 kt magnetised iron calorimeter (ICAL) detector to study atmospheric neutrinos and to precisely determine the neutrino oscillation parameters. About 30,000 2 m×2 m size glass Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) will be used as active detector elements in ICAL. Starting with a small 30 cm ×30 cm size RPCs, we have now succeeded in developing full size 2 m ×2 m RPCs. The fabrication procedures used for these large size RPCs as well as their performance will be discussed in this paper. We will also present some preliminary results from our studies on SF6 based gas mixtures on the RPC operation and characteristics.

  6. Luteolin, a bioflavonoid inhibits azoxymethane-induced colon carcinogenesis: Involvement of iNOS and COX-2

    PubMed Central

    Pandurangan, Ashok Kumar; Kumar, Suresh Ananda Sadagopan; Dharmalingam, Prakash; Ganapasam, Sudhandiran

    2014-01-01

    Colon cancer (CRC) is a serious health problem through worldwide. Development of novel drug without side effect for this cancer was crucial. Luteolin (LUT), a bioflavonoid has many beneficial effects such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative properties. Azoxymethane (AOM), a derivative of 1, 2-Dimethyl hydrazine (DMH) was used for the induction of CRC in Balb/C mice. CRC was induced by intraperitoneal injection of AOM to mice at the dose of 15 mg/body kg weight for 3 weeks. Mouse was treated with LUT at the dose of 1.2 mg/body kg weight orally until end of the experiment. The expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygense (COX)-2 were analyzed by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The expressions of iNOS and COX-2 were increased in the case of AOM induction. Administration of LUT effectively reduced the expressions of iNOS and COX-2. The present study revealed that, LUT suppresses both iNOS and COX-2 expressions and act as an anti-inflammatory role against CRC. PMID:24991108

  7. Quantitative measurement of iNOS expression in melanoma, nasopharyngeal, colorectal, and breast tumors of Tunisian patients: comparative study and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Dabbeche-Bouricha, Emna; Hadiji-Abbes, Nadia; Abdelmaksoud-Damak, Rania; Alaya, Nesrine; Ayadi, Wajdi; Charfi, Slim; Khabir, Abdelmajid; Sellami-Boudawara, Tahia; Mokdad-Gargouri, Raja

    2016-04-01

    Chronic inflammation increases the risk of development of human malignancies. iNOS is an enzyme dominantly expressed during inflammatory reactions and seems to play a critical role in tumorigenesis. Our aim was to assess the iNOS expression in four types of human tumors: breast, colorectal, nasopharyngeal, and melanoma, of Tunisian patients. The level of iNOS was measured by RT-QPCR in tumor specimens. We showed that the expression of iNOS was higher in breast compared to colorectal and nasopharyngeal tumors, whereas in melanoma, the level of iNOS expression was low. Significant associations were found when comparing the iNOS expression in cancers pairs such as melanoma versus colorectal (p < 0.0001), colorectal versus nasopharyngeal (p = 0.0072), and melanoma versus breast (p < 0.0001). Furthermore, iNOS expression correlated with the Breslow thickness, Clark level, and histological subtype in melanoma, while in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, significant association was seen with age at diagnosis, TNM, metastasis, response to treatment, and expression of COX-2. Furthermore, the expression of iNOS correlated with tumor size, TNM, tumor location, and histological type in colorectal cancer, and with tumor size, tumor stage, SBR grade, and triple negative cases in breast cancer. On the other hand, immunohistochemistry analysis shows that the expression of iNOS is observed in the stroma and tumor cells as well. Overall, our results highlight that iNOS is a reliable marker for advanced stage and aggressive behavior for the four types of cancer and might be a potential promising therapeutic target. PMID:26547585

  8. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    PubMed

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists. PMID:27474242

  9. Differential roles of iNOS and nNOS at rostral ventrolateral medulla during experimental endotoxemia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Chan, J Y; Wang, S H; Chan, S H

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the differential contribution of inducible and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and nNOS) at the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) to endotoxemia induced by E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In Sprague-Dawley rats maintained under propofol anesthesia, i.v. administration of LPS (15, 30, or 45 mg/kg) induced a reduction (phase I), followed by an augmentation (phase II) and a secondary decrease (phase III) in the power density of the vasomotor components (0-0.8 Hz) in systemic arterial pressure (SAP) signals. LPS also induced an immediate hypotension, followed by a rebound increase and a secondary decrease in SAP. In addition, the level of iNOS mRNA exhibited a significant surge that began with phase I endotoxemia, reaching progressively its peak at phase III. Discernible down-regulation of nNOS mRNA was not detected until the last phase of endotoxemia. Pretreatment with microinjection of the selective iNOS inhibitor, aminoguanidine (250 pmol), into the bilateral RVLM significantly prolonged phases II and III endotoxemia, blunted the initial and secondary hypotension, and antagonized the upregulation of iNOS mRNA. Similar pretreatment with the selective nNOS inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole (1 pmol), on the other hand, discernibly shortened phase II and prolonged phase III endotoxemia, and induced progressive hypotension by antagonizing the rebound increase in SAP. We conclude that the relative prevalence of functional expression and molecular synthesis of iNOS over nNOS in the RVLM may be a crucial determinant for the reduction or loss in power density of the vasomotor components of SAP signals during experimental endotoxemia. PMID:11198360

  10. Aloe vera toxic effects: expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in testis of Wistar rat

    PubMed Central

    Asgharzade, Samira; Rafieian-kopaei, Mahmoud; Mirzaeian, Amin; Reiisi, Somaye; Salimzadeh, Loghman

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Nitric oxide (NO), a product of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), contributes in germ cell apoptosis. This study was aimed to evaluate the effects of Aloe vera gel (AVG) on male Wistar rat reproductive organ, serum NO level, and expression of iNOS gene in leydig cells. Materials and Methods: Adult male Wistar rats (n=36) were used for experiments in three groups. The experimental groups were orally administered with the AVG extract solution once-daily as follow: 150 mg.kg-1; group A, 300 mg.kg-1; group B, and only normal saline; group C (control group). They were mated with untreated females and the reproductive and chemical parameters were assessed for each group, including semen quality, serum testosterone, sperm fertility, gonad and body weight, serum NO concentration (by the Griess method), and iNOS gene expression (using RT-PCR). Results: The testes weight, serum testosterone, as well as sperm count and fertility of the AVG treated groups were significantly reduced when compared to the control (P<0.001). Concentration of serum NO was significantly increased (37.1±4.63 µM) in the administrated group with higher AVG concentration, compared to the control group (P<0.001; 10.19±0.87 µM); however, iNOS mRNA expression was increased in the treated animals (P<0.001). Conclusion: iNOS may play a functional role in spermatogenesis via apoptosis, reducing sperm count, but further studies are needed to illustrate the mechanisms by which AVG exerts its negative effects on spermatogenesis and sperm quality. PMID:26730330

  11. Bacterial Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Erwin; Reichenbach, Tobias

    Microbial laboratory communities have become model systems for studying the complex interplay between nonlinear dynamics of evolutionary selection forces, stochastic fluctuations arising from the probabilistic nature of interactions, and spatial organization. Major research goals are to identify and understand mechanisms that ensure viability of microbial colonies by allowing for species diversity, cooperative behavior and other kinds of "social" behavior. A synthesis of evolutionary game theory, nonlinear dynamics, and the theory of stochastic processes provides the mathematical tools and conceptual framework for a deeper understanding of these ecological systems. We give an introduction to the modern formulation of these theories and illustrate their effectiveness, focusing on selected examples of microbial systems. Intrinsic fluctuations, stemming from the discreteness of individuals, are ubiquitous, and can have important impact on the stability of ecosystems. In the absence of speciation, extinction of species is unavoidable, may, however, take very long times. We provide a general concept for defining survival and extinction on ecological time scales. Spatial degrees of freedom come with a certain mobility of individuals. When the latter is sufficiently high, bacterial community structures can be understood through mapping individual-based models, in a continuum approach, onto stochastic partial differential equations. These allow progress using methods of nonlinear dynamics such as bifurcation analysis and invariant manifolds. We conclude with a perspective on the current challenges in quantifying bacterial pattern formation, and how this might have an impact on fundamental research in nonequilibrium physics .

  12. Lifestyles of the effector-rich: genome-enabled characterization of bacterial plant pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome sequencing of bacterial plant pathogens is providing transformative insights into the complex network of molecular plant-microbe interactions mediated by extracellular effectors during pathogenesis. Bacterial pathogens sequenced to completion are phylogenetically diverse and vary significant...

  13. Anticoagulant Activity and Structural Characterization of Polysaccharide from Abalone (Haliotis discus hannai Ino) Gonad.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun; Yang, Jingfeng; Song, Shuang; Zhou, Dayong; Qiao, Weizhou; Zhu, Ce; Liu, Shuyin; Zhu, Beiwei

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aimed at characterizing the structure and the anticoagulant activity of a polysaccharide fraction (AGP33) isolated from the gonads of Haliotis discus hannai Ino. AGP33 was extracted by enzymatic hydrolysis and purified by ion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatography. The backbone fraction of AGP33 (BAGP33), which appeared to contain of mannose, glucose and galactose, was prepared by partial acid hydrolysis. According to methylation and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, the backbone of AGP33 was identified as mainly consisting of 1→3-linked, 1→4-linked, and 1→6-linked monosaccharides. AGP33 is a sulfated polysaccharide with sulfates occur at 3-O- and 4-O-positions. It prolonged thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT) and prothrombin time (PT) compared to a saline control solution in a dosage-dependent manner. AGP33 exhibited an extension (p < 0.01) of APTT compared to the saline group at concentrations higher than 5 μg/mL. AGP33 exhibited higher anticoagulant activity than its desulfated product (AGP33-des) and BAGP33. The results showed that polysaccharide with higher molecular weight and sulfate content demonstrated greater anticoagulant activity. PMID:27338320

  14. Bacterial Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells, yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micrometer scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, I review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  15. Airborne Bacterial Interactions: Functions Out of Thin Air?

    PubMed Central

    Audrain, Bianca; Létoffé, Sylvie; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria produce and release a large diversity of small molecules including organic and inorganic volatile compounds, hereafter referred to as bacterial volatile compounds (BVCs). Whereas BVCs were often only considered as wasted metabolic by-product sometimes perceived by animal olfactory systems, it is increasingly clear that they can also mediate cross-kingdom interactions with fungi, plants and animals. Recently, in vitro studies also reported the impact of BVCs on bacterial biology through modulation of antibiotic resistance, biofilm formation and virulence. Here, we review BVCs influence on bacterial adaptation to their environment and discuss the biological relevance of recently reported inter- and intra-species bacterial interactions mediated by BVCs. PMID:26733998

  16. The effect of high protein diet and exercise on irisin, eNOS, and iNOS expressions in kidney.

    PubMed

    Tastekin, Ebru; Palabiyik, Orkide; Ulucam, Enis; Uzgur, Selda; Karaca, Aziz; Vardar, Selma Arzu; Yilmaz, Ali; Aydogdu, Nurettin

    2016-08-01

    Long-term effects of high protein diets (HPDs) on kidneys are still not sufficiently studied. Irisin which increases oxygen consumption and thermogenesis in white fat cells was shown in skeletal muscles and many tissues. Nitric oxide synthases (NOS) are a family of enzymes catalyzing the production of nitric oxide (NO) from L-arginine. We aimed to investigate the effects of HPD, irisin and NO expression in kidney and relation of them with exercise and among themselves. Animals were grouped as control, exercise, HPD and exercise combined with HPD (exercise-HPD). Rats were kept on a HPD for 5 weeks and an exercise program was given them as 5 exercise and 2 rest days per week exercising on a treadmill with increasing speed and angle. In our study, while HPD group had similar total antioxidant capacity (TAC) levels with control group, exercise and exercise-HPD groups had lower levels (p < 0.05). Kidneys of exercising rats had no change in irisin or eNOS expression but their iNOS expression had increased (p < 0.001). HPD-E group has not been observed to cause kidney damage and not have a significant effect on rat kidney irisin, eNOS, or iNOS expression. Localization of irisin, eNOS, and iNOS staining in kidney is highly selective and quite clear in this study. Effects of exercise and HPD on kidney should be evaluated with different exercise protocols and contents of the diet. İrisin, eNOS, and iNOS staining localizations should be supported with various research studies. PMID:27277302

  17. Rutin improves endotoxin-induced acute lung injury via inhibition of iNOS and VCAM-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Chun; Horng, Chi-Ting; Chen, Shyan-Tarng; Lee, Shiuan-Shinn; Yang, Ming-Ling; Lee, Chien-Ying; Kuo, Wu-Hsien; Yeh, Chung-Hsin; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang

    2016-02-01

    Endotoxins exist anywhere including in water pools, dust, humidifier systems, and machining fluids. The major causal factor is endotoxins in many serious diseases, such as fever, sepsis, multi-organ failure, meningococcemia, and severe morbidities like neurologic disability, or hearing loss. Endotoxins are also called lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and are important pathogens of acute lung injury (ALI). Rutin has potential beneficial effects including anti-inflammation, antioxidation, anti-hyperlipidemia, and anti-platelet aggregation. Pre-treatment with rutin inhibited LPS-induced neutrophil infiltration in the lungs. LPS-induced expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was suppressed by rutin, but there was no influence on expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and cyclooxygenase-2. In addition, activation of the nuclear factor (NF)κB was reduced by rutin. Furthermore, we found that the inhibitory concentration of rutin on expression of VCAM-1 and iNOS was similar to NFκB activation. In conclusion, rutin is a potential protective agent for ALI via inhibition of neutrophil infiltration, expression of VCAM-1 and iNOS, and NFκB activation. PMID:25080890

  18. Diverse Bacterial Microcompartment Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Chiranjit; Sinha, Sharmistha; Chun, Sunny; Yeates, Todd O.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial microcompartments (MCPs) are sophisticated protein-based organelles used to optimize metabolic pathways. They consist of metabolic enzymes encapsulated within a protein shell, which creates an ideal environment for catalysis and facilitates the channeling of toxic/volatile intermediates to downstream enzymes. The metabolic processes that require MCPs are diverse and widely distributed and play important roles in global carbon fixation and bacterial pathogenesis. The protein shells of MCPs are thought to selectively control the movement of enzyme cofactors, substrates, and products (including toxic or volatile intermediates) between the MCP interior and the cytoplasm of the cell using both passive electrostatic/steric and dynamic gated mechanisms. Evidence suggests that specialized shell proteins conduct electrons between the cytoplasm and the lumen of the MCP and/or help rebuild damaged iron-sulfur centers in the encapsulated enzymes. The MCP shell is elaborated through a family of small proteins whose structural core is known as a bacterial microcompartment (BMC) domain. BMC domain proteins oligomerize into flat, hexagonally shaped tiles, which assemble into extended protein sheets that form the facets of the shell. Shape complementarity along the edges allows different types of BMC domain proteins to form mixed sheets, while sequence variation provides functional diversification. Recent studies have also revealed targeting sequences that mediate protein encapsulation within MCPs, scaffolding proteins that organize lumen enzymes and the use of private cofactor pools (NAD/H and coenzyme A [HS-CoA]) to facilitate cofactor homeostasis. Although much remains to be learned, our growing understanding of MCPs is providing a basis for bioengineering of protein-based containers for the production of chemicals/pharmaceuticals and for use as molecular delivery vehicles. PMID:25184561

  19. A study on the inhibition of VEGF expression in salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma cells via iNOS gene RNAi in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ou Yang, Ke-Xiong; Liang, Jun; Yang, Zi-Nan; Zhao, Jian-Jiang

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we aimed to explore the effect of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma (SACC). Using RNAi, we transfected chemically synthesised iNOS siRNA into ACC-M cells (a highly metastatic adenoid cystic carcinoma cell line) and detected the change in the gene and protein expression levels of iNOS and VEGF by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. A transwell invasiveness assay was used to examine the changes in invasive ability of ACC-M cells. Cell growth was determined using a CCK-8 assay. Apoptosis and cell-cycle phases were detected by flow cytometry. We found that silencing iNOS down-regulated the expression of VEGF and then inhibited cell growth and invasiveness of SACC cells, while it increased apoptosis. Therefore, we concluded that iNOS can regulate VEGF expression and iNOS may be a therapeutic target. PMID:25065562

  20. Bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, C A

    1991-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common of the vaginitides affecting women of reproductive age. It appears to be due to an alteration in the vaginal ecology by which Lactobacillus spp., the predominant organisms in the healthy vagina, are replaced by a mixed flora including Prevotella bivia, Prevotella disiens, Porphyromonas spp., Mobiluncus spp., and Peptostreptococcus spp. All of these organisms except Mobiluncus spp. are also members of the endogenous vaginal flora. While evidence from treatment trials does not support the notion that BV is sexually transmitted, recent studies have shown an increased risk associated with multiple sexual partners. It has also been suggested that the pathogenesis of BV may be similar to that of urinary tract infections, with the rectum serving as a reservoir for some BV-associated flora. The organisms associated with BV have also been recognized as agents of female upper genital tract infection, including pelvic inflammatory disease, and the syndrome BV has been associated with adverse outcome of pregnancy, including premature rupture of membranes, chorioamnionitis, and fetal loss; postpartum endometritis; cuff cellulitis; and urinary tract infections. The mechanisms by which the BV-associated flora causes the signs of BV are not well understood, but a role for H2O2-producing Lactobacillus spp. in protecting against colonization by catalase-negative anaerobic bacteria has been recognized. These and other aspects of BV are reviewed. PMID:1747864

  1. Atorvastatin-induced cardioprotection is mediated by increasing inducible nitric oxide synthase and consequent S-nitrosylation of cyclooxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Atar, Shaul; Ye, Yumei; Lin, Yu; Freeberg, Sheldon Y; Nishi, Shawn P; Rosanio, Salvatore; Huang, Ming-He; Uretsky, Barry F; Perez-Polo, Jose R; Birnbaum, Yochai

    2006-05-01

    We determined the effects of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1; SC-560), COX-2 (SC-58125), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS; 1400W) inhibitors on atorvastatin (ATV)-induced myocardial protection and whether iNOS mediates the ATV-induced increases in COX-2. Sprague-Dawley rats received 10 mg ATV.kg(-1).day(-1) added to drinking water or water alone for 3 days and received intravenous SC-58125, SC-560, 1400W, or vehicle alone. Anesthesia was induced with ketamine and xylazine and maintained with isoflurane. Fifteen minutes after intravenous injection rats underwent 30-min myocardial ischemia followed by 4-h reperfusion [infarct size (IS) protocol], or the hearts were explanted for biochemical analysis and immunoblotting. Left ventricular weight and area at risk (AR) were comparable among groups. ATV reduced IS to 12.7% (SD 3.1) of AR, a reduction of 64% vs. 35.1% (SD 7.6) in the sham-treated group (P < 0.001). SC-58125 and 1400W attenuated the protective effect without affecting IS in the non-ATV-treated rats. ATV increased calcium-independent NOS (iNOS) [11.9 (SD 0.8) vs. 3.9 (SD 0.1) x 1,000 counts/min; P < 0.001] and COX-2 [46.7 (SD 1.1) vs. 6.5 (SD 1.4) pg/ml of 6-keto-PGF(1alpha); P < 0.001] activity. Both SC-58125 and 1400W attenuated this increase. SC-58125 did not affect iNOS activity, whereas 1400W blocked iNOS activity. COX-2 was S-nitrosylated in ATV-treated but not sham-treated rats or rats pretreated with 1400W. COX-2 immunoprecipitated with iNOS but not with endothelial nitric oxide synthase. We conclude that ATV reduced IS by increasing the activity of iNOS and COX-2, iNOS is upstream to COX-2, and iNOS activates COX-2 by S-nitrosylation. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that preconditioning effects are mediated via PG. PMID:16339820

  2. Effect of ambient pressure variation on closed loop gas system for India based Neutrino Observatory (INO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyanarayana, B.; Majumder, G.; Mondal, N. K.; Kalmani, S. D.; Shinde, R. R.; Joshi, A.

    2014-10-01

    Pilot unit of a closed loop gas mixing and distribution system for the INO project was designed and is being operated with 1.8meters × 1.9meters RPCs for about two years. A number of studies on controlling the flow and optimisation of the gas mixture through the RPC stack were carried out during this period. The gas system essentially measures and attempts to maintain absolute pressure inside the RPC gas volume. During typical Mumbai monsoon seasons, the barometric pressure changes rather rapidly, due to which the gas system fails to maintain the set differential pressure between the ambience and the RPC gas volume. As the safety bubblers on the RPC gas input lines are set to work on fixed pressure differentials, the ambient pressure changes lead to either venting out and thus wasting gas through safety bubblers or over pressuring the RPCs gas volume and thus degrading its performance. The above problem also leads to gas mixture contamination through minute leaks in gas gap. The problem stated above was solved by including the ambient barometric pressure as an input parameter in the closed loop. Using this, it is now possible to maintain any set differential pressure between the ambience and RPC gas volumes between 0 to 20mm of water column, thus always ensuring a positive pressure inside the RPC gas volume with respect to the ambience. This has resulted in improved performance of the gas system by maintaining the constant gas flow and reducing the gas toping up frequency. In this paper, we will highlight the design features and improvements of the closed loop gas system. We will present some of the performance studies and considerations for scaling up the system to be used with the engineering module and then followed by Iron Calorimeter detector (ICAL), which is designed to deploy about 30,000 RPCs of 1.8meters × 1.9 meters in area.

  3. Loss of inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in the mouse renal cell carcinoma cell line RENCA is mediated by microRNA miR-146a.

    PubMed

    Perske, Christina; Lahat, Nitza; Sheffy Levin, Sharon; Bitterman, Haim; Hemmerlein, Bernhard; Rahat, Michal Amit

    2010-10-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages can potentially kill tumor cells via the high concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) produced by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS); however, tumor-associated macrophages actually support tumor growth, as they are skewed toward M2 activation, which is characterized by low amounts of NO production and is proangiogenic. We show that the mouse renal cell carcinoma cell line, RENCA, which, on stimulation, expresses high levels of iNOS mRNA, loses its ability to express the iNOS protein. This effect is mediated by the microRNA miR-146a, as inhibition of RENCA cells with anti-miR- 146a restores iNOS expression and NO production (4.8 ± 0.4 versus 0.3 ± 0.1 μmol/L in uninhibited cells, P < 0.001). In vivo, RENCA tumor cells do not stain for iNOS, while infiltrating tumor-associated macrophages showed intense staining, and both cell types expressed iNOS mRNA. Restoring iNOS protein expression in RENCA cells using anti-miR-146a increases macrophage-induced death of RENCA cells by 73% (P < 0.01) in vitro and prevents tumor growth in vivo. These results suggest that, in addition to NO production by macrophages, tumor cells must produce NO to induce their own deaths, and some tumor cells may use miR-146a to reduce or abolish endogenous NO production to escape macrophage-mediated cell death. Thus, inhibiting miR-146a may render these tumor cells susceptible to therapeutic strategies, such as adoptive transfer of M1-activated macrophages. PMID:20709800

  4. Bacterial tyrosinases.

    PubMed

    Claus, Harald; Decker, Heinz

    2006-01-01

    Tyrosinases are nearly ubiquitously distributed in all domains of life. They are essential for pigmentation and are important factors in wound healing and primary immune response. Their active site is characterized by a pair of antiferromagnetically coupled copper ions, CuA and CuB, which are coordinated by six histidine residues. Such a "type 3 copper centre" is the common feature of tyrosinases, catecholoxidases and haemocycanins. It is also one of several other copper types found in the multi-copper oxidases (ascorbate oxidase, laccase). The copper pair of tyrosinases binds one molecule of atmospheric oxygen to catalyse two different kinds of enzymatic reactions: (1) the ortho-hydroxylation of monophenols (cresolase activity) and (2) the oxidation of o-diphenols to o-diquinones (catecholase activity). The best-known function is the formation of melanins from L-tyrosine via L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa). The complicated hydroxylation mechanism at the active centre is still not completely understood, because nothing is known about their tertiary structure. One main reason for this deficit is that hitherto tyrosinases from eukaryotic sources could not be isolated in sufficient quantities and purities for detailed structural studies. This is not the case for prokaryotic tyrosinases from different Streptomyces species, having been intensively characterized genetically and spectroscopically for decades. The Streptomyces tyrosinases are non-modified monomeric proteins with a low molecular mass of ca. 30kDa. They are secreted to the surrounding medium, where they are involved in extracellular melanin production. In the species Streptomyces, the tyrosinase gene is part of the melC operon. Next to the tyrosinase gene (melC2), this operon contains an additional ORF called melC1, which is essential for the correct expression of the enzyme. This review summarizes the present knowledge of bacterial tyrosinases, which are promising models in order to get more insights in

  5. Activation of toll-like receptor signaling pathways leading to nitric oxide-mediated antiviral responses.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Cader, Mohamed Sarjoon; Amarasinghe, Aruna; Abdul-Careem, Mohamed Faizal

    2016-08-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs), well-characterized pattern-recognizing receptors of the innate arm of the immune system, are vital in detecting pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). The TLR-PAMP interaction initiates an intracellular signaling cascade, predominantly culminating in upregulation of antiviral components, including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). After activation, various TLR pathways can promote iNOS production via the myeloid differentiation primary response-88 (MyD-88) adapter protein. Subsequently, iNOS facilitates production of nitric oxide (NO), a highly reactive and potent antiviral molecule that can inhibit replication of RNA and DNA viruses. Furthermore, NO can diffuse freely across cell membranes and elicit antiviral mechanisms in various ways, including direct and indirect damage to viral genomes. This review emphasizes current knowledge of NO-mediated antiviral responses elicited after activation of TLR signaling pathways. PMID:27233799

  6. Activated Macrophages as a Novel Determinant of Tumor Cell Radioresponse: The Role of Nitric Oxide-Mediated Inhibition of Cellular Respiration and Oxygen Sparing

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Heng; De Ridder, Mark; Verovski, Valeri N.; Sonveaux, Pierre; Jordan, Benedicte F.; Law, Kalun; Monsaert, Christinne; Van den Berge, Dirk L.; Verellen, Dirk; Feron, Olivier; Gallez, Bernard; Storme, Guy A.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Nitric oxide (NO), synthesized by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), is known to inhibit metabolic oxygen consumption because of interference with mitochondrial respiratory activity. This study examined whether activation of iNOS (a) directly in tumor cells or (b) in bystander macrophages may improve radioresponse through sparing of oxygen. Methods and Materials: EMT-6 tumor cells and RAW 264.7 macrophages were exposed to bacterial lipopolysaccharide plus interferon-gamma, and examined for iNOS expression by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting and enzymatic activity. Tumor cells alone, or combined with macrophages were subjected to metabolic hypoxia and analyzed for radiosensitivity by clonogenic assay, and for oxygen consumption by electron paramagnetic resonance and a Clark-type electrode. Results: Both tumor cells and macrophages displayed a coherent picture of iNOS induction at transcriptional/translational levels and NO/nitrite production, whereas macrophages showed also co-induction of the inducible heme oxygenase-1, which is associated with carbon monoxide (CO) and bilirubin production. Activation of iNOS in tumor cells resulted in a profound oxygen sparing and a 2.3-fold radiosensitization. Bystander NO-producing, but not CO-producing, macrophages were able to block oxygen consumption by 1.9-fold and to radiosensitize tumor cells by 2.2-fold. Both effects could be neutralized by aminoguanidine, a metabolic iNOS inhibitor. An improved radioresponse was clearly observed at macrophages to tumor cells ratios ranging between 1:16 to 1:1. Conclusions: Our study is the first, as far as we are aware, to provide evidence that iNOS may induce radiosensitization through oxygen sparing, and illuminates NO-producing macrophages as a novel determinant of tumor cell radioresponse within the hypoxic tumor microenvironment.

  7. Investigating the Role of TNF-α and IFN-γ Activation on the Dynamics of iNOS Gene Expression in LPS Stimulated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Salim, Taha; Sershen, Cheryl L.; May, Elebeoba E.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage produced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is known to play a critical role in the proinflammatory response against intracellular pathogens by promoting the generation of bactericidal reactive nitrogen species. Robust and timely production of nitric oxide (NO) by iNOS and analogous production of reactive oxygen species are critical components of an effective immune response. In addition to pathogen associated lipopolysaccharides (LPS), iNOS gene expression is dependent on numerous proinflammatory cytokines in the cellular microenvironment of the macrophage, two of which include interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). To understand the synergistic effect of IFN-γ and TNF-α activation, and LPS stimulation on iNOS expression dynamics and NO production, we developed a systems biology based mathematical model. Using our model, we investigated the impact of pre-infection cytokine exposure, or priming, on the system. We explored the essentiality of IFN-γ priming to the robustness of initial proinflammatory response with respect to the ability of macrophages to produce reactive species needed for pathogen clearance. Results from our theoretical studies indicated that IFN-γ and subsequent activation of IRF1 are essential in consequential production of iNOS upon LPS stimulation. We showed that IFN-γ priming at low concentrations greatly increases the effector response of macrophages against intracellular pathogens. Ultimately the model demonstrated that although TNF-α contributed towards a more rapid response time, measured as time to reach maximum iNOS production, IFN-γ stimulation was significantly more significant in terms of the maximum expression of iNOS and the concentration of NO produced. PMID:27276061

  8. Adhesion molecules in antibacterial defenses: effects of bacterial extracts.

    PubMed

    Marchant, A; Duchow, J; Goldman, M

    1992-01-01

    Adhesion of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) to vascular endothelium is one of the first events in their response against local bacterial infection. Different adhesion molecules sequentially mediate PMN adherence to endothelium and extravasation into inflamed tissues. We show that bacterial extracts OM-85 BV and OM-89 increase the expression of adhesion molecules at the surface of PMN and we suggest that this upregulation could be linked to the beneficial effect of bacterial extracts in the prevention of respiratory tract infections. PMID:1439236

  9. Involvement of nitric oxide synthase in matrix metalloproteinase-9- and/or urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-mediated glioma cell migration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Src tyrosine kinase activates inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and, in turn, nitric oxide production as a means to transduce cell migration. Src tyrosine kinase plays a key proximal role to control α9β1 signaling. Our recent studies have clearly demonstrated the role of α9β1 integrin in matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and/or urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR)-mediated glioma cell migration. In the present study, we evaluated the involvement of α9β1 integrin-iNOS pathway in MMP-9- and/or uPAR-mediated glioma cell migration. Methods MMP-9 and uPAR shRNAs and overexpressing plasmids were used to downregulate and upregulate these molecules, respectively in U251 glioma cells and 5310 glioma xenograft cells. The effect of treatments on migration and invasion potential of these glioma cells were assessed by spheroid migration, wound healing, and Matrigel invasion assays. In order to attain the other objectives we also performed immunocytochemical, immunohistochemical, RT-PCR, Western blot and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis. Results Immunohistochemical analysis revealed the prominent association of iNOS with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Immunofluorescence analysis showed prominent expression of iNOS in glioma cells. MMP-9 and/or uPAR knockdown by respective shRNAs reduced iNOS expression in these glioma cells. RT-PCR analysis revealed elevated iNOS mRNA expression in either MMP-9 or uPAR overexpressed glioma cells. The migration potential of MMP-9- and/or uPAR-overexpressed U251 glioma cells was significantly inhibited after treatment with L-NAME, an inhibitor of iNOS. Similarly, a significant inhibition of the invasion potential of the control or MMP-9/uPAR-overexpressed glioma cells was noticed after L-NAME treatment. A prominent reduction of iNOS expression was observed in the tumor regions of nude mice brains, which were injected with 5310 glioma cells, after MMP-9 and/or uPAR knockdown. Protein expressions

  10. Development of a pyramidal wavefront sensor test-bench at INO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turbide, Simon; Wang, Min; Gauvin, Jonny; Martin, Olivier; Savard, Maxime; Bourqui, Pascal; Veran, Jean-Pierre; Deschenes, William; Anctil, Genevieve; Chateauneuf, François

    2013-12-01

    The key technical element of the adaptive optics in astronomy is the wavefront sensing (WFS). One of the advantages of the pyramid wavefront sensor (P-WFS) over the widely used Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor seems to be the increased sensitivity in closed-loop applications. A high-sensitivity and large dynamic-range WFS, such as P-WFS technology, still needs to be further investigated for proper justification in future Extremely Large Telescopes application. At INO, we have recently carried out the optical design, testing and performance evaluation of a P-WFS bench setup. The optical design of the bench setup mainly consists of the super-LED fiber source, source collimator, spatial light modulator (SLM), relay lenses, tip-tilt mirror, Fourier-transforming lens, and a four-faceted glass pyramid with a large vertex angle as well as pupil re-imaged optics. The phase-only SLM has been introduced in the bench setup to generate atmospheric turbulence with a maximum phase shift of more than 2π at each pixel (256 grey levels). Like a modified Foucault knife-edge test, the refractive pyramid element is used to produce four images of the entrance pupil on a CCD camera. The Fourier-transforming lens, which is used before the pyramid prism, is designed for telecentric output to allow dynamic modulation (rotation of the beam around the pyramid-prism center) from a tip-tilt mirror. Furthermore, a P-WFS diffraction-based model has been developed. This model includes most of the system limitations such as the SLM discrete voltage steps and the CCD pixel pitch. The pyramid effects (edges and tip) are considered as well. The modal wavefront reconstruction algorithm relies on the construction of an interaction matrix (one for each modulation's amplitude). Each column of the interaction matrix represents the combination of the four pupil images for a given wavefront aberration. The nice agreement between the data and the model suggest that the limitation of the system is not the P

  11. Baicalin ameliorates isoproterenol-induced acute myocardial infarction through iNOS, inflammation and oxidative stress in rat

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huaguo; Xu, Yongfu; Wang, Jianzhong; Zhao, Wei; Ruan, Huihui

    2015-01-01

    Baicalin belongs to glucuronic acid glycosides and after hydrolysisbaicalein and glucuronic acid come into being. It has such effects as clearing heat and removing toxicity, anti-inflammation, choleresis, bringing high blood pressure down, diuresis, anti-allergic reaction and so on. In this study, we investigated whether baicalin ameliorates isoproterenol-induced acute myocardial infarction and its mechanism. Rat model of acute myocardial infarction was induced by isoproterenol. Casein kinase (CK), the MB isoenzyme of creatine kinase (CK-MB), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), cardiac troponin T (cTnT) and infarct size measurement were used to measure the protective effect of baicalin on isoproterenol-induced acute myocardial infarction. iNOS protein expression in rat was analyzed using western blot analysis. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6), malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and caspase-3 activation levels were explored using commercial ELISA kits. In the acute myocardial infarction experiment, baicalin effectively ameliorates the level of CK, CK-MB, LDH and cTnT, reduced infarct size in acute myocardial infarction rat model. Meanwhile, treatment with baicalin effectively decreased the iNOS protein expression, inflammatory factors and oxidative stresses in a rat model of acute myocardial infarction. However, baicalin emerged that anti-apoptosis activity and suppressed the activation of caspase-3 in a rat model of acute myocardial infarction. The data suggest that the protective effect of baicalin ameliorates isoproterenol-induced acute myocardial infarction through iNOS, inflammation and oxidative stress in rat. PMID:26617721

  12. Immobilization of plasmid DNA in bacterial ghosts.

    PubMed

    Mayrhofer, Peter; Tabrizi, Chakameh Azimpour; Walcher, Petra; Haidinger, Wolfgang; Jechlinger, Wolfgang; Lubitz, Werner

    2005-02-16

    The development of novel delivery vehicles is crucial for the improvement of DNA vaccine efficiency. In this report, we describe a new platform technology, which is based on the immobilization of plasmid DNA in the cytoplasmic membrane of a bacterial carrier. This technology retains plasmid DNA (Self-Immobilizing Plasmid, pSIP) in the host envelope complex due to a specific protein/DNA interaction during and after protein E-mediated lysis. The resulting bacterial ghosts (empty bacterial envelopes) loaded with pDNA were analyzed in detail by real time PCR assays. We could verify that pSIP plasmids were retained in the pellets of lysed Escherichia coli cultures indicating that they are efficiently anchored in the inner membrane of bacterial ghosts. In contrast, a high percentage of control plasmids that lack essential features of the self-immobilization system were expelled in the culture broth during the lysis process. We believe that the combination of this plasmid immobilization procedure and the protein E-mediated lysis technology represents an efficient in vivo technique for the production of non-living DNA carrier vehicles. In conclusion, we present a "self-loading", non-living bacterial DNA delivery vector for vaccination endowed with intrinsic adjuvant properties of the Gram-negative bacterial cell envelope. PMID:15681093

  13. Bacterial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, L; Agabian-Keshishian, N; Bendis, I

    1971-09-01

    technique can be used to select for mutants blocked in the various stages of morphogenesis. 3) Temperature-sensitive mutants of Caulobacter that are restricted in macromolecular synthesis and development at elevated temperatures have been isolated. 4) Genetic exchange in the Calflobacter genus has been demonstrated and is now being defined. Two questions related to control processes can now readily be approached experimentally. (i) Is the temporal progression of events occurring during bacterial differentiation controlled by regulator gene products? (ii) Is the differentiation cycle like a biosynthetic pathway where one event must follow another? The availability of temperature-sensitive mutants blocked at various stages of development permits access to both questions. An interesting feature of the differentiation cycle is that the polar organelle may represent a special segregated unit which is operative in the control of the differentiation process. Perhaps the sequential morphogenic changes exhibited by Caulobacter are dependent on the initial synthesis of this organelle. Because the ultimate expression of cell changes are dependent on selective protein synthesis, specific messenger RNA production-either from DNA present in an organelle or from the chromosome-may prove to be a controlling factor in cell differentiation. We have begun studies with RNA polymerase purified from Caulobacter crescentus to determine whether cell factors or alterations in the enzyme structure serve to change the specificity of transcription during the cell cycle. Control of sequential cell changes at the level of transcription has long been postulated and has recently been substantiated in the case of Bacillus sporulation (6). The Caulobacter bacteria now present another system in which direct analysis of these control mechanisms is feasible. PMID:5572165

  14. Mechanical properties and structure of Haliotis discus hannai Ino and Hemifusus tuba conch shells: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jie; Chen, Chen; Liang, Yan; Wang, Jian

    2010-03-01

    Haliotis discus hannai Ino (abalone shell) and Hemifusus tuba conch shell have been studied for the purpose to comparatively investigate the mechanisms by which nature designs composites. It is shown that both shells are composed of aragonite and a small amount of proteins while the conch shell shows finer microstructure but lower strength than abalone shell. It is also shown that the fresh shells exhibits better property than those after heat-treatments. It is therefore supposed that the size of inorganic substance is not a dominant factor to improve strength, while both proteins in shells and the microstructure of inorganic matter also play important roles.

  15. The Heme Oxygenase-1 Inducer THI-56 Negatively Regulates iNOS Expression and HMGB1 Release in LPS-Activated RAW 264.7 Cells and CLP-Induced Septic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Min; Park, Sang Won; Kim, Hye Jung; Lee, Jae Heun; Chang, Ki Churl

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear DNA binding protein high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) has recently been suggested to act as a late mediator of septic shock. The effect of ((S)-6,7-dihydroxy-1-(4-hydroxynaphthylmethyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloid, also known as THI-56, in an experimental model of sepsis was investigated. THI-56 exhibited potent anti-inflammatory properties in response to LPS in RAW 264.7 cells. In particular, THI-56 significantly inhibited the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the release of HMGB1 in activated macrophages. THI-56 activated NE-F2-regulated factor 2 (Nrf-2)/heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1). The specific knockdown of the HO-1 gene by HO-1 siRNA significantly reversed the inhibitory effects of THI-56 on iNOS expression and HMGB1 release in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Importantly, THI-56 administration protected animals from death induced by either a lethal dose of LPS or cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Furthermore, the ALT, AST, BUN, creatinine, and HMGB1 levels in the blood were significantly increased in CLP-induced septic mice, and the administration of THI-56 reduced these levels in a concentration-dependent and zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX)-sensitive manner. In addition, the administration of THI-56 significantly ameliorated not only lung damage but also macrophage infiltration in the livers of CLP-induced septic mice, and these effects were also abrogated in the presence of ZnPPIX. Thus, we conclude that THI-56 significantly attenuates the proinflammatory response induced by LPS and reduces organ damage in a CLP-induced sepsis model through the upregulation of Nrf-2/HO-1. PMID:24098466

  16. Effect of Progesterone Therapy on TNF-α and iNOS Gene Expression in Spinal Cord Injury Model.

    PubMed

    Farahabadi, Akram; Akbari, Mohammad; Amini Pishva, Akram; Zendedel, Adib; Arabkheradmand, Ali; Beyer, Cordian; Dashti, Nasrin; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza

    2016-06-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) as a destructive crash result in neurons degeneration. The SCI lead to the onset of biochemical and molecular cascades such as inflammation that in turn has a key role in neurodegeneration development. The previous studies demonstrated the role of TNF-α and iNOS genes in intensifying the process after SCI. As a consequence, these genes overexpression intensify the inflammation and neuron degeneration process. In the present study, 32 male Wistar rats were chased and divided into four groups of eight. The SCI were induced in three groups and another group used as a sham. The progesterone hormone used as a therapeutic agent in rats with SCI. The results showed that injection of 10 μg/kg/12h progesterone hormone reduced the TNF-α and iNOS gene expression significantly and confirmed the role of progesterone in the reduction of inflammation. Also, the numbers of intact neurons in progesterone group were higher than other groups that demonstrated the protective effects of progesterone on neuron death. The BBB test was performed and demonstrated that progesterone is an effective factor to the improvement of locomotor response. These results of the study confirmed the anti-inflammatory activity of progesterone hormone and suggested that it can be used as a therapeutic factor for SCI. PMID:27306339

  17. Echinocystic Acid Inhibits IL-1β-Induced COX-2 and iNOS Expression in Human Osteoarthritis Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiqiang; Wang, Yanlong; Piao, Taikui; Liu, Jianyu

    2016-04-01

    Echinocystic acid (EA), a pentacyclic triterpene isolated from the fruits of Gleditsia sinensis Lam, displays a range of pharmacological activities including anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. However, the effect of EA on IL-1β-stimulated osteoarthritis chondrocyte has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of EA on IL-1β-stimulated human osteoarthritis chondrocyte. Chondrocytes were stimulated with IL-1β in the absence or presence of EA. NO and PGE2 production were measured by Griess reagent and ELISA. The expression of COX-2, iNOS, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), inhibitory kappa B (IκBα), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) were detected by Western blot analysis. The results showed that EA suppressed IL-1β-induced collagenase-3 (MMP-13), NO, and PGE2 production in a dose-dependent manner. IL-1β up-regulated the expression of COX-2 and iNOS, and the increase was inhibited by EA. Furthermore, IL-1β-induced NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation were inhibited by EA. In conclusion, EA effectively attenuated IL-1β-induced inflammatory response in osteoarthritis chondrocyte which suggesting that EA may be a potential agent in the treatment of osteoarthritis. PMID:26499345

  18. Deletion of UCP2 in iNOS Deficient Mice Reduces the Severity of the Disease during Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Aheng, Caroline; Ly, Nathalie; Kelly, Mairead; Ibrahim, Saleh; Ricquier, Daniel; Alves-Guerra, Marie-Clotilde; Miroux, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Uncoupling protein 2 is a member of the mitochondrial anion carrier family that is widely expressed in neurons and the immune cells of humans. Deletion of Ucp2 gene in mice pre-activates the immune system leading to higher resistance toward infection and to an increased susceptibility to develop chronic inflammatory diseases as previously exemplified with the Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model for multiple sclerosis. Given that oxidative stress is enhanced in Ucp2−/− mice and that nitric oxide (NO) also plays a critical function in redox balance and in chronic inflammation, we generated mice deficient for both Ucp2 and iNos genes and submitted them to EAE. Mice lacking iNos gene exhibited the highest clinical score (3.4+/−0.5 p<0.05). Surprisingly, mice deficient for both genes developed milder disease with reduced immune cell infiltration, cytokines and ROS production as compared to iNos−/− mice. PMID:21857957

  19. Sildenafil Ameliorates Gentamicin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Rats: Role of iNOS and eNOS

    PubMed Central

    Morsy, Mohamed A.; Ibrahim, Salwa A.; Amin, Entesar F.; Kamel, Maha Y.; Rifaai, Rehab A.; Hassan, Magdy K.

    2014-01-01

    Gentamicin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic, is used for the treatment of serious Gram-negative infections. However, its usefulness is limited by its nephrotoxicity. Sildenafil, a selective phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor, was reported to prevent or decrease tissue injury. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential protective effects of sildenafil on gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. Male Wistar rats were injected with gentamicin (100 mg/kg/day, i.p.) for 6 days with and without sildenafil. Sildenafil administration resulted in nephroprotective effect in gentamicin-intoxicated rats as it significantly decreased serum creatinine and urea, urinary albumin, and renal malondialdehyde and nitrite/nitrate levels, with a concomitant increase in renal catalase and superoxide dismutase activities compared to gentamicin-treated rats. Moreover, immunohistochemical examination revealed that sildenafil treatment markedly reduced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, while expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was markedly enhanced. The protective effects of sildenafil were verified histopathologically. In conclusion, sildenafil protects rats against gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity possibly, in part, through its antioxidant activity, inhibition of iNOS expression, and induction of eNOS production. PMID:25120567

  20. Pathogenesis and pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Tunkel, A R; Scheld, W M

    1993-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis remains a disease with associated unacceptable morbidity and mortality rates despite the availability of effective bactericidal antimicrobial therapy. Through the use of experimental animal models of infection, a great deal of information has been gleaned concerning the pathogenic and pathophysiologic mechanisms operable in bacterial meningitis. Most cases of bacterial meningitis begin with host acquisition of a new organism by nasopharyngeal colonization followed by systemic invasion and development of a high-grade bacteremia. Bacterial encapsulation contributes to this bacteremia by inhibiting neutrophil phagocytosis and resisting classic complement-mediated bactericidal activity. Central nervous system invasion then occurs, although the exact site of bacterial traversal into the central nervous system is unknown. By production and/or release of virulence factors into and stimulation of formation of inflammatory cytokines within the central nervous system, meningeal pathogens increase permeability of the blood-brain barrier, thus allowing protein and neutrophils to move into the subarachnoid space. There is then an intense subarachnoid space inflammatory response, which leads to many of the pathophysiologic consequences of bacterial meningitis, including cerebral edema and increased intracranial pressure. Attenuation of this inflammatory response with adjunctive dexamethasone therapy is associated with reduced concentrations of tumor necrosis factor in the cerebrospinal fluid, with diminished cerebrospinal fluid leukocytosis, and perhaps with improvement of morbidity, as demonstrated in recent clinical trials. Further information on the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis should lead to the development of more innovative treatment and/or preventive strategies for this disorder. Images PMID:8472245

  1. Unexpected versatility in bacterial riboswitches.

    PubMed

    Mellin, J R; Cossart, Pascale

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial riboswitches are elements present in the 5'-untranslated regions (UTRs) of mRNA molecules that bind to ligands and regulate the expression of downstream genes. Riboswitches typically regulate the expression of protein-coding genes. However, mechanisms of riboswitch-mediated regulation have recently been shown to be more diverse than originally thought, with reports showing that riboswitches can regulate the expression of noncoding RNAs and control the access of proteins, such as transcription termination factor Rho and RNase E, to a nascent RNA. Riboswitches are also increasingly used in biotechnology, with advances in the engineering of synthetic riboswitches and the development of riboswitch-based sensors. In this review we address the emerging roles and mechanisms of riboswitch-mediated regulation in natura and recent progress in the development of riboswitch-based technology. PMID:25708284

  2. Controlled bile acid exposure to oesophageal mucosa causes up-regulation of nuclear γ-H2AX possibly via iNOS induction

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bo; Zhao, Shengqian; Tao, Zhen; Wen, Jin; Yang, Yancheng; Zheng, Yin; Yan, Hongling; Sheng, Ying; Gao, Aimin

    2016-01-01

    Using an in vitro model in which flatmounts of oesophagus was periodically exposed to bile acids, we demonstrate, using multiple methods, that the bile acid receptor TGR5, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and γ-histone family 2A variant (γ-H2AX) are up-regulated. This indicates that bile acids cause up-regulation of iNOS, which further causes genotoxic stress as evidenced by increase of the highly sensitive marker, phosphorylated histone. In vitro nitric oxide (NO) assays showed increased production of nitric acid in the oesophageal epithelium exposed to the bile acids. This increase was inhibited in the presence of the nonspecific iNOS inhibitor aminoguanidine (AG). Cumulatively, the results of the present study provide suggestion that not only acid reflux, but also non-acid reflux of bile may cause genotoxic stress. These aspects merit to be tested in wide spectrum of Barrett epithelial tissues. PMID:27247425

  3. Controlled bile acid exposure to oesophageal mucosa causes up-regulation of nuclear γ-H2AX possibly via iNOS induction.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Zhao, Shengqian; Tao, Zhen; Wen, Jin; Yang, Yancheng; Zheng, Yin; Yan, Hongling; Sheng, Ying; Gao, Aimin

    2016-08-01

    Using an in vitro model in which flatmounts of oesophagus was periodically exposed to bile acids, we demonstrate, using multiple methods, that the bile acid receptor TGR5, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and γ-histone family 2A variant (γ-H2AX) are up-regulated. This indicates that bile acids cause up-regulation of iNOS, which further causes genotoxic stress as evidenced by increase of the highly sensitive marker, phosphorylated histone. In vitro nitric oxide (NO) assays showed increased production of nitric acid in the oesophageal epithelium exposed to the bile acids. This increase was inhibited in the presence of the nonspecific iNOS inhibitor aminoguanidine (AG). Cumulatively, the results of the present study provide suggestion that not only acid reflux, but also non-acid reflux of bile may cause genotoxic stress. These aspects merit to be tested in wide spectrum of Barrett epithelial tissues. PMID:27247425

  4. JAK2-STAT3 signaling pathway mediates thrombin-induced proinflammatory actions of microglia in vitro.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chengfang; Ma, Rong; Sun, Shenggang; Wei, Guirong; Fang, Yuan; Liu, Rengang; Li, Gang

    2008-11-15

    The present study shows that JAK2-STAT3 inflammatory signaling mediates thrombin-stimulated microglia activation. In rat primary microglia, thrombin rapidly activated JAK2 and induced phosphorylation of STAT3. In addition, thrombin increased transcription of the inflammation-associated genes tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), production of TNF-alpha, NO and induced neurodegeneration of dopaminergic neurons in mesencephalic cultures. AG490, a JAK inhibitor, markedly reduced activation of JAK2 and STAT3 in thrombin-treated microglia. AG490 also inhibited thrombin-induced transcription and expression of TNF-alpha, iNOS and/or NO release, moreover rescued dopaminergic neurons. These results suggest that JAK2-STAT3 signaling pathway plays a critical role in mediating thrombin-induced activation of microglia and degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. PMID:18710787

  5. Specific oligopeptides in fermented soybean extract inhibit NF-κB-dependent iNOS and cytokine induction by toll-like receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo Hyung; Wu, Hong Min; Lee, Chan Gyu; Sung, Dae Il; Song, Hye Jung; Matsui, Toshiro; Kim, Han Bok; Kim, Sang Geon

    2014-11-01

    The ethanol extract of fermented soybean from Glycine max (chungkookjang, CHU) has been claimed to have chemopreventive and cytoprotective effects. In the present study, we examined the inhibitory effect of CHU on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cytokine induction by toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands treatment and attempted to identify the responsible active components. Nitric oxide (NO) content and iNOS levels in the media or RAW264.7 cells were measured using the Griess reagent and real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. CHU treatment inhibited NO production and iNOS induction elicited by lipopolysaccharide (LPS, TLR4L) in a concentration-dependent manner. Tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 productions were also diminished. Peptidoglycans (TLR2/6L) and CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides (TLR9L) from CHU inhibited iNOS induction, but not poly I:C (TLR3L) or loxoribine (TLF7L). The anti-inflammatory effect resulted from the inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) through the inhibition of inhibitory-κB degradation. Of the representative components in CHU, specific oligopeptides (AFPG and GVAWWMY) had the ability to inhibit iNOS induction by LPS, whereas others failed to do so. Daidzein, an isoflavone used for comparative purposes, was active at a relatively higher concentration. In an animal model, oral administration of CHU to rats significantly diminished carrageenan-induced paw edema and iNOS induction. Our results demonstrate that CHU has anti-inflammatory effects against TLR ligands by inhibiting NF-κB activation, which may result from specific oligopeptide components in CHU. Since CHU is orally effective, dietary applications of CHU and/or the identified oligopeptides may be of use in the prevention of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25184943

  6. Tristetraprolin: a novel mediator of the anticancer properties of resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Tang, C; He, G

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is a natural compound that exhibits anticancer properties. Previous studies have proved that it can inhibit the proliferation of breast cancer cell lines and upregulate some cytokines such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The initiation and progression of cancer are associated with the abnormal expression of multiple cytokines. Tristetraprolin (TTP), an mRNA-binding protein, is one of the key proteins that participate in regulating cytokine expression. Two different proliferation assays on MCF-7 cells showed that the cell proliferation rate significantly reduced following treatment with resveratrol. Most importantly, we found that resveratrol promoted TTP expression at both the mRNA and protein level in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, the expression of COX-2 and VEGF were significantly suppressed by resveratrol while that of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was upregulated. Lastly, the effects of resveratrol on both MCF-7 proliferation and expression of COX-2, VEGF, and iNOS were significantly inhibited by TTP knockdown, indicating that TTP mediates the anticancer properties of resveratrol. In summary, we conclude that resveratrol inhibits the proliferation of MCF-7 cells by TTP upregulation, which is associated with downregulation of COX-2 and VEGF and upregulation of iNOS. PMID:27323060

  7. Mediation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    MacKinnon, David P.; Fairchild, Amanda J.; Fritz, Matthew S.

    2010-01-01

    Mediating variables are prominent in psychological theory and research. A mediating variable transmits the effect of an independent variable on a dependent variable. Differences between mediating variables and confounders, moderators, and covariates are outlined. Statistical methods to assess mediation and modern comprehensive approaches are described. Future directions for mediation analysis are discussed. PMID:16968208

  8. Endotoxemia-mediated induction of cardiac inducible nitric-oxide synthase expression accounts for the hypotensive effect of ethanol in female rats.

    PubMed

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M; Fan, Ming; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A

    2008-01-01

    We have recently shown that intragastric (i.g.) ethanol lowers blood pressure (BP) in conscious female rats via a reduction in cardiac output (CO). However, the mechanisms implicated in these hemodynamic effects of ethanol are not known. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that ethanol-evoked endotoxemia mediates the reduction in CO via enhanced myocardial inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. Immunoblot (myocardial iNOS), biochemical (plasma endotoxin and nitrite/nitrate), and integrative [BP, heart rate, CO, stroke volume (SV), and total peripheral resistance (TPR)] studies were conducted in conscious female rats that received i.g. ethanol (1 g/kg) in the absence or presence of 1400W (N-(3-[aminomethyl]benzyl) acetamidine) or ampicillin to selectively inhibit iNOS and to eliminate endogenous endotoxin, respectively. Ethanol-evoked hypotension coincided with reductions in CO and SV and increases in: 1) TPR, 2) plasma endotoxin and nitrite/nitrate, and 3) myocardial iNOS expression. These effects of ethanol were virtually abolished in rats pretreated with ampicillin (200 mg/kg/day for 2 days by gavage) or with 1400W (5 mg/kg i.p.) except for the increase in plasma endotoxin, which persisted in 1400W-pretreated rats. These findings yield insight into the mechanistic role of endotoxin-myocardial iNOS signaling in the cardiodepressant action of ethanol, which accounts for its hypotensive effect in conscious female rats. PMID:17925480

  9. Set1/COMPASS and Mediator are repurposed to promote epigenetic transcriptional memory

    PubMed Central

    D'Urso, Agustina; Takahashi, Yoh-hei; Xiong, Bin; Marone, Jessica; Coukos, Robert; Randise-Hinchliff, Carlo; Wang, Ji-Ping; Shilatifard, Ali; Brickner, Jason H

    2016-01-01

    In yeast and humans, previous experiences can lead to epigenetic transcriptional memory: repressed genes that exhibit mitotically heritable changes in chromatin structure and promoter recruitment of poised RNA polymerase II preinitiation complex (RNAPII PIC), which enhances future reactivation. Here, we show that INO1 memory in yeast is initiated by binding of the Sfl1 transcription factor to the cis-acting Memory Recruitment Sequence, targeting INO1 to the nuclear periphery. Memory requires a remodeled form of the Set1/COMPASS methyltransferase lacking Spp1, which dimethylates histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4me2). H3K4me2 recruits the SET3C complex, which plays an essential role in maintaining this mark. Finally, while active INO1 is associated with Cdk8- Mediator, during memory, Cdk8+ Mediator recruits poised RNAPII PIC lacking the Kin28 CTD kinase. Aspects of this mechanism are generalizable to yeast and conserved in human cells. Thus, COMPASS and Mediator are repurposed to promote epigenetic transcriptional poising by a highly conserved mechanism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16691.001 PMID:27336723

  10. Set1/COMPASS and Mediator are repurposed to promote epigenetic transcriptional memory.

    PubMed

    D'Urso, Agustina; Takahashi, Yoh-Hei; Xiong, Bin; Marone, Jessica; Coukos, Robert; Randise-Hinchliff, Carlo; Wang, Ji-Ping; Shilatifard, Ali; Brickner, Jason H

    2016-01-01

    In yeast and humans, previous experiences can lead to epigenetic transcriptional memory: repressed genes that exhibit mitotically heritable changes in chromatin structure and promoter recruitment of poised RNA polymerase II preinitiation complex (RNAPII PIC), which enhances future reactivation. Here, we show that INO1 memory in yeast is initiated by binding of the Sfl1 transcription factor to the cis-acting Memory Recruitment Sequence, targeting INO1 to the nuclear periphery. Memory requires a remodeled form of the Set1/COMPASS methyltransferase lacking Spp1, which dimethylates histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4me2). H3K4me2 recruits the SET3C complex, which plays an essential role in maintaining this mark. Finally, while active INO1 is associated with Cdk8(-) Mediator, during memory, Cdk8(+) Mediator recruits poised RNAPII PIC lacking the Kin28 CTD kinase. Aspects of this mechanism are generalizable to yeast and conserved in human cells. Thus, COMPASS and Mediator are repurposed to promote epigenetic transcriptional poising by a highly conserved mechanism. PMID:27336723

  11. Nitric oxide mediates intestinal pathology but not immune expulsion during Trichinella spiralis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, C E; Paterson, J C; Wei, X Q; Liew, F Y; Garside, P; Kennedy, M W

    2000-04-15

    The relationship between intestinal pathology and immune expulsion of gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes remains controversial. Although immune expulsion of GI helminth parasites is usually associated with Th2 responses, the effector mechanisms directly responsible for parasite loss have not been identified. We have previously shown that while the intestinal pathology accompanying the expulsion of the GI parasite Trichinella spiralis may be dependent on IL-4 and mediated by TNF, parasite loss is independent of TNF. In contrast, intestinal pathology in other disease models has been attributed to Th1 cytokines, although it closely resembles that seen in helminth infections. Whereas production of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in the gut is important for both homeostasis of the epithelial layer and in protection against pathogenic microorganisms, overproduction of NO has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of inflammatory conditions. We therefore investigated the role of NO in T. spiralis infection using iNOS-deficient mice. iNOS-/- and iNOS-/+ mice were infected with T. spiralis, and parasite expulsion and intestinal pathology were followed. Parasite expulsion proceeded similarly in both groups of animals, but significant intestinal pathology was only observed in the heterozygous mice. Thus it appears that, although the protective effects of Th2 responses in GI helminth infection do not require NO, this mediator contributes substantially to the associated enteropathy. NO may therefore be an important mediator of enteropathy in both Th1- and Th2-inducing conditions. PMID:10754319

  12. Small molecule control of bacterial biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Worthington, Roberta J.; Richards, Justin J.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are defined as a surface attached community of bacteria embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances that they have produced. When in the biofilm state, bacteria are more resistant to antibiotics and the host immune response than are their planktonic counterparts. Biofilms are increasingly recognized as being significant in human disease, accounting for 80% of bacterial infections in the body and diseases associated with bacterial biofilms include: lung infections of cystic fibrosis, colitis, urethritis, conjunctivitis, otitis, endocarditis and periodontitis. Additionally, biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices are of particular concern, as once the device is colonized infection is virtually impossible to eradicate. Given the prominence of biofilms in infectious diseases, there has been an increased effort toward the development of small molecules that will modulate bacterial biofilm development and maintenance. In this review, we highlight the development of small molecules that inhibit and/or disperse bacterial biofilms through non-microbicidal mechanisms. The review discuses the numerous approaches that have been applied to the discovery of lead small molecules that mediate biofilm development. These approaches are grouped into: 1) the identification and development of small molecules that target one of the bacterial signaling pathways involved in biofilm regulation, 2) chemical library screening for compounds with anti-biofilm activity, and 3) the identification of natural products that possess anti-biofilm activity, and the chemical manipulation of these natural products to obtain analogues with increased activity. PMID:22733439

  13. Measurement of integrated flux of cosmic ray muons at sea level using the INO-ICAL prototype detector

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, S.; Acharya, B.S.; Majumder, G.; Mondal, N.K.; Samuel, D.; Satyanarayana, B. E-mail: acharya@tifr.res.in E-mail: nkm@tifr.res.in E-mail: bsn@tifr.res.in

    2012-07-01

    The India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) collaboration is planning to set-up a magnetized Iron-CALorimeter (ICAL) to study atmospheric neutrino oscillations with precise measurements of oscillations parameters. The ICAL uses 50 kton iron as target mass and about 28800 Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) of 2 m × 2 m in area as active detector elements. As part of its R and D program, a prototype detector stack comprising 12 layers of RPCs of 1 m × 1 m in area has been set-up at Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) to study the detector parameters using cosmic ray muons. We present here a study of muon flux measurement at sea level and lower latitude. (Site latitude: 18°54'N, longitude: 72°48'E.)

  14. Measurement of integrated flux of cosmic ray muons at sea level using the INO-ICAL prototype detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, S.; Acharya, B. S.; Majumder, G.; Mondal, N. K.; Samuel, D.; Satyanarayana, B.

    2012-07-01

    The India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) collaboration is planning to set-up a magnetized Iron-CALorimeter (ICAL) to study atmospheric neutrino oscillations with precise measurements of oscillations parameters. The ICAL uses 50 kton iron as target mass and about 28800 Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) of 2 m × 2 m in area as active detector elements. As part of its R&D program, a prototype detector stack comprising 12 layers of RPCs of 1 m × 1 m in area has been set-up at Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) to study the detector parameters using cosmic ray muons. We present here a study of muon flux measurement at sea level and lower latitude. (Site latitude: 18°54'N, longitude: 72°48'E.)

  15. Ginsenoside Rg3 regulates S-nitrosylation of the NLRP3 inflammasome via suppression of iNOS

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sung-Jin; Park, Jun-Young; Choi, Song; Lee, Jin-Bong; Jung, Haiyoung; Kim, Tae-Don; Yoon, Suk Ran; Choi, Inpyo; Shim, Sungbo; Park, Young-Jun

    2015-08-07

    Ginsenoside Rg3, a specific biological effector, is well-known as a major bioactive ingredient of Panax ginseng. However, its role in the inflammasome activation process remains unclear. In this report, we demonstrate that ginsenosides 20(R)-Rg3 and 20(S)-Rg3 are capable of suppressing both lethal endotoxic shock and the S-nitrosylation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by inhibiting nitric oxide (NO) production through the regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. In response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the reducing effect of 20(S)-Rg3 and 20(R)-Rg3 on nitric oxide led to an increase in the survival time of mice after lethal endotoxin-induced shock, and excess levels of NO inhibited IL-1β production via the S-nitrosylation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. In addition, ginsenosides 20(R)-Rg3 and 20(S)-Rg3 had suppressive effects on the LPS- or UV-irradiation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in macrophage and HaCaT cells and thereby prevented apoptosis of spleen cells in mice. Altogether, these results demonstrate that ginsenoside 20(R)-Rg3 and 20(S)-Rg3, a naturally occurring compound, might act as a dual therapeutic regulator for the treatment of inflammatory and oxidative stress-related diseases. - Highlights: • Ginsenosides Rg3 inhibits NO production through the regulation of iNOS expression. • Ginsenosides Rg3 inhibits the S-nitrosylation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. • Ginsenosides Rg3 suppress on the LPS- or UV-irradiation-induced ROS levels in cells.

  16. Effects of Selective iNOS Inhibitor on Spatial Memory in Recovered and Non-Recovered Ketamine Induced Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Tabrizian, Kaveh; Najafi, Sheyda; Belaran, Maryam; Hosseini-Sharifabad, Ali; Azami, Kian; Soodi, Maliheh; Kazemi, Ali; Kebriaeezadeh, Abbas; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is thought to be involved in spatial learning and memory in several brain areas such as hippocampus. This study examined the effects of post-training intrahippocampal microinjections of 1400W as a selective iNOS inhibitor on spatial memory, in anesthetized and non-anesthetized situations in rats. In the present work, 4-day training trials of animals were conducted. Spatial memory was tested 48 hours after the drug infusions. For microinjection of 1400W into CA1 region of the hippocampus in conscious animals, guide cannula was implanted into the CA1 area and 1400W was infused after recovery from surgical anesthesia. In anesthetized animals, 1400W was microinjected directly into CA1 region by Hamilton syringe during anesthesia. After completion of training, 1400W (10, 50 and 100 μM/side) were microinjected bilaterally (1 μL/side) and testing trials were performed 48 h after drug infusions in both groups of cannulated and non-cannulated rats. Significant reduction was observed in escape latency and traveled distance in animals that received 1400W (100 μM/side, *p < 0.05) via cannula after recovery in comparison with control group. Also, microinjection of 1400W (100 μM/side) in post recovery phase caused a significant (***p < 0.001) reduction in time and distance of finding the hidden platform in comparison with anesthetized situation. These findings suggest that 1400W has a significant improvement on spatial memory and memory enhancement induced by iNOS inhibitor can be affected by anesthesia in a period of time. PMID:24250424

  17. Effect of sildenafil citrate on interleukin-1β-induced nitric oxide synthesis and iNOS expression in SW982 cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung-Ok; Park, Shin-Young; Han, Chang-Woo; Chung, Hyun Kee; Ryu, Dae-Hyun

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the effect of sildenafil citrate on IL-1β-induced nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and iNOS expression in human synovial sarcoma SW982 cells. IL-1β stimulated the cells to generate NO in both dose- and time-dependent manners. The IL-1β-induced NO synthesis was inhibited by guanylate cyclase (GC) inhibitor, LY83583. When the cells were treated with 8-bromo-cGMP, a hydrolyzable analog of cGMP, NO synthesis was increased upto 5-fold without IL-1β treatment suggesting that cGMP is an essential component for increasing the NO synthesis. Synoviocytes and chondrocytes contain strong cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity, which has biochemical features of PDE5. When SW982 cells were pretreated with sildenafil citrate (Viagra), a PDE5 specific inhibitor, sildenafil citrate significantly inhibited IL-1β-induced NO synthesis and iNOS expressions. From this result, we noticed that PDE5 activity is required for IL-1β-induced NO synthesis and iNOS expressions in human synovial sarcoma cells, and sildenafil citrate may be able to suppress an inflammatory reaction of synovium through inhibition of NO synthesis and iNOS expression by cytokines. PMID:18587266

  18. INO-4885 [5,10,15,20-tetra[N-(benzyl-4'-carboxylate)-2-pyridinium]-21H,23H-porphine iron(III) chloride], a peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst, protects the heart against reperfusion injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xiang-Ying; Gao, Erhe; Yuan, Yuexin; Wang, Yajing; Lau, Wayne Bond; Koch, Walter; Ma, Xin-Liang; Tao, Ling

    2009-03-01

    Oxidative/nitrative stress caused by peroxynitrite, the reaction product of superoxide (O2(.-)) and nitric oxide (NO), is the primary cause of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. The present study determined whether INO-4885 [5,10,15,20-tetra[N-(benzyl-4'-carboxylate)-2-pyridinium]-21H,23H-porphine iron(III) chloride], a new peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst, may provide cellular protection and protect heart from myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. Adult male mice were subjected to 30 min of ischemia and 3 or 24 h of reperfusion. Mice were randomized to receive vehicle, INO-4885 without catalytic moiety, or INO-4885 (3-300 microg/kg i.p.) 10 min before reperfusion. Infarct size, apoptosis, nitrotyrosine content, NO/O2(.-) production, and inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS)/NADPH oxidase expression were determined. INO-4885 treatment reduced ischemia/reperfusion-induced protein nitration and caspase 3 activation in a dose-dependent fashion in the range of 3 to 100 microg/kg. However, doses exceeding 100 microg/kg produced nonspecific effects and attenuated its protective ability. At the optimal dose (30 microg/kg), INO-4885 significantly reduced infarct size (p < 0.01), decreased apoptosis (p < 0.01), and reduced tissue nitrotyrosine content (p < 0.01). As expected, INO-4885 had no effect on ischemia/reperfusion-induced iNOS expression and NO overproduction. To our surprise, this compound significantly reduced superoxide production and partially blocked NADPH oxidase overexpression in the ischemic/reperfused cardiac tissue. Additional experiments demonstrated that INO-4885 provided better cardioprotection than N-(3-(aminomethyl)benzyl)acetamidine (1400W, a selective iNOS inhibitor), apocynin (an NADPH oxidase inhibitor), or Tiron (a cell-permeable superoxide scavenger). Taken together, our data demonstrated that INO-4885 is a cardioprotective molecule that attenuates myocardial reperfusion injury by facilitating peroxynitrite decomposition and

  19. Impact of the Tumor Microenvironment on the Expression of Inflammatory Mediators in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Riemann, A; Ihling, A; Reime, S; Gekle, M; Thews, O

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia and extracellular acidosis are common features of solid malignant tumors. The aim of the study was to analyze whether these pathophysiological parameters affect the expression of inflammatory mediators in tumor cells. Therefore the mRNA expression of MCP-1 (monocyte chemotactic protein 1), iNOS and osteopontin was measured under hypoxic (pO2 1 mmHg) and acidotic (pH 6.6) conditions by qPCR in AT1 R-3327 prostate cancer cells. In addition, the underlying signaling cascades were analyzed by using inhibitors of the p38 and ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathways.Hypoxia led to a significant decrease of the expression of MCP-1 and osteopontin over the complete observation period of 24 h, whereas the iNOS expression after an initial reduction slightly increased. Acidotic conditions for up to 6 h increased the iNOS expression significantly which was functional as indicated by an elevated level of nitrate/nitrite formation by 30 %. Acidosis had almost no impact on the MCP-1 expression of tumor cells, whereas the osteopontin level tended to increase leading to a significantly elevated level after 24 h at pH 6.6. Inhibiting the p38 and ERK1/2 under control conditions revealed that the MAPKs play a significant role for the regulation of the expression of inflammatory mediators. MCP-1 expression could be lowered by inhibiting ERK1/2 whereas iNOS expression was dependent on both p38 and ERK1/2 MAPK. These results indicate that the adverse tumor microenvironment affects the expression of inflammatory mediators by tumors cells and may therefore modulate the immune response within the tumor tissue. PMID:27526131

  20. Facial bacterial infections: folliculitis.

    PubMed

    Laureano, Ana Cristina; Schwartz, Robert A; Cohen, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    Facial bacterial infections are most commonly caused by infections of the hair follicles. Wherever pilosebaceous units are found folliculitis can occur, with the most frequent bacterial culprit being Staphylococcus aureus. We review different origins of facial folliculitis, distinguishing bacterial forms from other infectious and non-infectious mimickers. We distinguish folliculitis from pseudofolliculitis and perifolliculitis. Clinical features, etiology, pathology, and management options are also discussed. PMID:25441463

  1. Gene transfer as a strategy to achieve permanent cardioprotection I: rAAV-mediated gene therapy with inducible nitric oxide synthase limits infarct size 1 year later without adverse functional consequences

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qianhong; Guo, Yiru; Wu, Wen-Jian; Ou, Qinghui; Zhu, Xiaoping; Tan, Wei; Yuan, Fangping; Chen, Ning; Dawn, Buddhadeb; Luo, Li; O’Brien, Erin

    2013-01-01

    The ultimate goal of prophylactic gene therapy is to confer permanent protection against ischemia. Although gene therapy with inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is known to protect against myocardial infarction at 3 days and up to 2 months, the long-term effects on myocardial ischemic injury and function are unknown. To address this issue, we created a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector carrying the iNOS gene (rAAV/iNOS), which enables long-lasting transgene expression. The ability of rAAV/iNOS to direct the expression of functional iNOS protein was confirmed in COS-7 cells before in vivo gene transfer. Mice received injections in the anterior LV wall of rAAV/LacZ or rAAV/iNOS; 1 year later, they underwent a 30-min coronary occlusion (O) and 4 h of reperfusion (R). iNOS gene transfer resulted in elevated iNOS protein expression (+3-fold vs. the LacZ group, n = 6; P < 0.05) and iNOS activity (+4.4-fold vs. the LacZ group, n = 6; P < 0.05) 1 year later. Infarct size (% of risk region) was dramatically reduced at 1 year after iNOS gene transfer (13.5 ± 2.2%, n = 12, vs. 41.7 ± 2.9%, n = 10, in the LacZ group; P < 0.05). The infarct-sparing effect of iNOS gene therapy at 1 year was as powerful as that observed 24 h after ischemic preconditioning (six 4-min O/4-min R cycles) (19.3 ± 2.3%, n = 11; P < 0.05). Importantly, compared with the LacZ group (n = 11), iNOS gene transfer (n = 10) had no effect on LV dimensions or function for up to 1 year (at 1 year: FS 34.5 ± 2.0 vs. 34.6 ± 2.6%, EF 57.0 ± 2.0 vs. 59.7 ± 2.9%, LVEDD 4.3 ± 0.1 vs. 4.2 ± 0.2 mm, LVESD 2.8 ± 0.1 vs. 2.9 ± 0.2 mm) (echocardiography). These data demonstrate, for the first time, that rAAV-mediated iNOS gene transfer affords long-term, probably permanent (1 year), cardioprotection without adverse functional consequences, providing a strong rationale for further preclinical testing of prophylactic gene therapy. PMID:21779912

  2. Demonstrating Bacterial Flagella.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, John R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes an effective laboratory method for demonstrating bacterial flagella that utilizes the Proteus mirabilis organism and a special harvesting technique. Includes safety considerations for the laboratory exercise. (MDH)

  3. Contribution of bacterial outer membrane vesicles to innate bacterial defense

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are constitutively produced by Gram-negative bacteria throughout growth and have proposed roles in virulence, inflammation, and the response to envelope stress. Here we investigate outer membrane vesiculation as a bacterial mechanism for immediate short-term protection against outer membrane acting stressors. Antimicrobial peptides as well as bacteriophage were used to examine the effectiveness of OMV protection. Results We found that a hyper-vesiculating mutant of Escherichia coli survived treatment by antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) polymyxin B and colistin better than the wild-type. Supplementation of E. coli cultures with purified outer membrane vesicles provided substantial protection against AMPs, and AMPs significantly induced vesiculation. Vesicle-mediated protection and induction of vesiculation were also observed for a human pathogen, enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), challenged with polymyxin B. When ETEC with was incubated with low concentrations of vesicles concomitant with polymyxin B treatment, bacterial survival increased immediately, and the culture gained resistance to polymyxin B. By contrast, high levels of vesicles also provided immediate protection but prevented acquisition of resistance. Co-incubation of T4 bacteriophage and OMVs showed fast, irreversible binding. The efficiency of T4 infection was significantly reduced by the formation of complexes with the OMVs. Conclusions These data reveal a role for OMVs in contributing to innate bacterial defense by adsorption of antimicrobial peptides and bacteriophage. Given the increase in vesiculation in response to the antimicrobial peptides, and loss in efficiency of infection with the T4-OMV complex, we conclude that OMV production may be an important factor in neutralizing environmental agents that target the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:22133164

  4. The role of macrophage mediators in respirable quartz-elicited inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Berlo, D.; Albrecht, C.; Knaapen, A. M.; van Schooten, F. J.; Schins, R. P. F.

    2009-02-01

    The instigation and persistence of an inflammatory response is widely considered to be critically important in quartz-induced lung cancer and fibrosis. Macrophages have been long recognised as a crucial player in pulmonary inflammation, but evidence for the role of type II epithelial cells is accumulating. Investigations were performed in the rat lung type II cell line RLE and the rat alveolar macrophage cell line NR8383 using Western blotting, NF-κB immunohistochemistry and qRT-PCR of the pro-inflammatory genes iNOS and COX-2, as well as the cellular stress gene HO-1. The direct effect of quartz on pro-inflammatory signalling cascades and gene expression in RLE cells was compared to the effect of conditioned media derived from quartz-treated NR8383 cells. Conditioned media activated the NF-κB signalling pathway and induced a far stronger upregulation of iNOS mRNA than quartz itself. Quartz elicited a stronger, progressive induction of COX-2 and HO-1 mRNA. Our results suggest a differentially mediated inflammatory response, in which reactive particles themselves induce oxidative stress and activation of COX-2, while mediators released from particle-activated macrophages trigger NF-κB activation and iNOS expression in type II cells.

  5. NADPH Oxidase-Mediated Superoxide Production by Intermediary Bacterial Metabolites of Dibenzofuran: A Potential Cause for Trans-Mitochondrial Membrane Potential (ΔΨm) Collapse in Human Hepatoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Prashant Kumar; Gupta, Jyotsana; Shahni, Shweta; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2015-09-01

    Dibenzofuran is a direct precursor of extremely toxic compounds such as dioxins. It is widely distributed persistent organic pollutant in environment that potentiate oxidative stress, apoptosis, and necrosis through bioactivation in HepG2 cells. An alkalotolerent Pseudomonas strain ISTDF1 can metabolize dibenzofuran as a sole source of carbon and energy through diverse dioxygenation. However, there is a paucity of information about the potential toxic effects of the intermediary metabolites that are formed during treatment with dibenzofuran. We have assessed and discovered the potential mechanism of toxicity induced by metabolites of dibenzofuran that were formed at 18 and 36 h. Cell viability, CYP1A2 induction, ROS activity, Superoxide production, mitochondrial NADPH oxidase activity, and mitochondrial trans-membrane potential were studied using different assays such as 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), confocal laser scanning microscopy, and flow cytometry. Analysis revealed formation of 2-(1-carbonyl methylidine)-2,3-dihydrobenzofuranlidene after 18 h of bacterial treatment due to oxygenation at carbon (C3-C4). This compound induces higher mitochondrial NADPH oxidase-dependent superoxide production that makes it more toxic than the parent compound. It was evident that after 36 h of bacterial treatment, toxicity induced by dibenzofuran and its metabolites was completely removed. This study highlights the fact that despite of efficient biodegradation of toxicants, bioactive toxic intermediates can be formed. Therefore, it is necessary to assess the toxicity of each intermediary for complete mitigation of associated risk. PMID:26032510

  6. Bacterial IgA protease-mediated degradation of agIgA1 and agIgA1 immune complexes as a potential therapy for IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Li, Xueying; Shen, Hongchun; Mao, Nan; Wang, Honglian; Cui, Luke; Cheng, Yuan; Fan, Junming

    2016-01-01

    Mesangial deposition of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 (agIgA1) and its immune complexes is a key pathogenic mechanism of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). However, treatment of IgAN remains ineffective. We report here that bacteria-derived IgA proteases are capable of degrading these pathogenic agIgA1 and derived immune complexes in vitro and in vivo. By screening 14 different bacterial strains (6 species), we found that 4 bacterial IgA proteases from H. influenzae, N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis exhibited high cleaving activities on serum agIgA1 and artificial galactose-depleted IgA1 in vitro and the deposited agIgA1-containing immune complexes in the mesangium of renal biopsy from IgAN patients and in a passive mouse model of IgAN in vitro. In the modified mouse model of passive IgAN with abundant in situ mesangial deposition of the agIgA-IgG immune complexes, a single intravenous delivery of IgA protease from H. influenzae was able to effectively degrade the deposited agIgA-IgG immune complexes within the glomerulus, demonstrating a therapeutic potential for IgAN. In conclusion, the bacteria-derived IgA proteases are biologically active enzymes capable of cleaving the circulating agIgA and the deposited agIgA-IgG immune complexes within the kidney of IgAN. Thus, the use of such IgA proteases may represent a novel therapy for IgAN. PMID:27485391

  7. Bacterial IgA protease-mediated degradation of agIgA1 and agIgA1 immune complexes as a potential therapy for IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Li, Xueying; Shen, Hongchun; Mao, Nan; Wang, Honglian; Cui, Luke; Cheng, Yuan; Fan, Junming

    2016-01-01

    Mesangial deposition of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 (agIgA1) and its immune complexes is a key pathogenic mechanism of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). However, treatment of IgAN remains ineffective. We report here that bacteria-derived IgA proteases are capable of degrading these pathogenic agIgA1 and derived immune complexes in vitro and in vivo. By screening 14 different bacterial strains (6 species), we found that 4 bacterial IgA proteases from H. influenzae, N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis exhibited high cleaving activities on serum agIgA1 and artificial galactose-depleted IgA1 in vitro and the deposited agIgA1-containing immune complexes in the mesangium of renal biopsy from IgAN patients and in a passive mouse model of IgAN in vitro. In the modified mouse model of passive IgAN with abundant in situ mesangial deposition of the agIgA-IgG immune complexes, a single intravenous delivery of IgA protease from H. influenzae was able to effectively degrade the deposited agIgA-IgG immune complexes within the glomerulus, demonstrating a therapeutic potential for IgAN. In conclusion, the bacteria-derived IgA proteases are biologically active enzymes capable of cleaving the circulating agIgA and the deposited agIgA-IgG immune complexes within the kidney of IgAN. Thus, the use of such IgA proteases may represent a novel therapy for IgAN. PMID:27485391

  8. Oleifolioside A, a New Active Compound, Attenuates LPS-Stimulated iNOS and COX-2 Expression through the Downregulation of NF-κB and MAPK Activities in RAW 264.7 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hai Yang; Kim, Kyoung-Sook; Lee, Young-Choon; Moon, Hyung-In; Lee, Jai-Heon

    2012-01-01

    Oleifolioside A, a new triterpenoid compound isolated from Dendropanax morbifera Leveille (D. morbifera), was shown in this study to have potent inhibitory effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS-)stimulated nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Consistent with these findings, oleifolioside A was further shown to suppress the expression of LPS-stimulated inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxigenase-2 (COX-2) in a dose-dependent manner at both the protein and mRNA levels and to significantly inhibit the DNA-binding activity and transcriptional activity of NF-κB in response to LPS. These results were found to be associated with the inhibition of the degradation and phosphorylation of IκB-α and subsequent translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunit to the nucleus. Inhibition of NF-κB activation by oleifolioside A was also shown to be mediated through the prevention of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Taken together, our results suggest that oleifolioside A has the potential to be a novel anti-inflammatory agent capable of targeting both the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:22911495

  9. Mediation Analysis with Multiple Mediators

    PubMed Central

    VanderWeele, T.J.; Vansteelandt, S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the causal inference literature on mediation have extended traditional approaches to direct and indirect effects to settings that allow for interactions and non-linearities. In this paper, these approaches from causal inference are further extended to settings in which multiple mediators may be of interest. Two analytic approaches, one based on regression and one based on weighting are proposed to estimate the effect mediated through multiple mediators and the effects through other pathways. The approaches proposed here accommodate exposure-mediator interactions and, to a certain extent, mediator-mediator interactions as well. The methods handle binary or continuous mediators and binary, continuous or count outcomes. When the mediators affect one another, the strategy of trying to assess direct and indirect effects one mediator at a time will in general fail; the approach given in this paper can still be used. A characterization is moreover given as to when the sum of the mediated effects for multiple mediators considered separately will be equal to the mediated effect of all of the mediators considered jointly. The approach proposed in this paper is robust to unmeasured common causes of two or more mediators. PMID:25580377

  10. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Tim N.; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection. PMID:27096872

  11. Bacterial Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Compton, Emma L R; Mindell, Joseph A

    2010-09-01

    Bacterial ion channels were known, but only in special cases, such as outer membrane porins in Escherichia coli and bacterial toxins that form pores in their target (bacterial or mammalian) membranes. The exhaustive coverage provided by a decade of bacterial genome sequencing has revealed that ion channels are actually widespread in bacteria, with homologs of a broad range of mammalian channel proteins coded throughout the bacterial and archaeal kingdoms. This review discusses four groups of bacterial channels: porins, mechano-sensitive (MS) channels, channel-forming toxins, and bacterial homologs of mammalian channels. The outer membrane (OM) of gram-negative bacteria blocks access of essential nutrients; to survive, the cell needs to provide a mechanism for nutrients to penetrate the OM. Porin channels provide this access by forming large, nonspecific aqueous pores in the OM that allow ions and vital nutrients to cross it and enter the periplasm. MS channels act as emergency release valves, allowing solutes to rapidly exit the cytoplasm and to dissipate the large osmotic disparity between the internal and external environments. MS channels are remarkable in that they do this by responding to forces exerted by the membrane itself. Some bacteria produce toxic proteins that form pores in trans, attacking and killing other organisms by virtue of their pore formation. The review focuses on those bacterial toxins that kill other bacteria, specifically the class of proteins called colicins. Colicins reveal the dangers of channel formation in the plasma membrane, since they kill their targets with exactly that approach. PMID:26443789

  12. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections.

    PubMed

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection. PMID:27096872

  13. Fungal and Bacterial Diseases.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungal and bacterial diseases are important constraints to production. Recognition of diseases and information on their biology is important in disease management. This chapter is aimed at providing diagnostic information on fungal and bacterial diseases of sugar beet and their biology, epidemiolo...

  14. Bacterial volatiles promote growth in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Choong-Min; Farag, Mohamed A.; Hu, Chia-Hui; Reddy, Munagala S.; Wei, Han-Xun; Paré, Paul W.; Kloepper, Joseph W.

    2003-01-01

    Several chemical changes in soil are associated with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). Some bacterial strains directly regulate plant physiology by mimicking synthesis of plant hormones, whereas others increase mineral and nitrogen availability in the soil as a way to augment growth. Identification of bacterial chemical messengers that trigger growth promotion has been limited in part by the understanding of how plants respond to external stimuli. With an increasing appreciation of how volatile organic compounds signal plants and serve in plant defense, investigations into the role of volatile components in plant–bacterial systems now can follow. Here, we present chemical and plant-growth data showing that some PGPR release a blend of volatile components that promote growth of Arabidopsis thaliana. In particular, the volatile components 2,3-butanediol and acetoin were released exclusively from two bacterial strains that trigger the greatest level of growth promotion. Furthermore, pharmacological applications of 2,3-butanediol enhanced plant growth whereas bacterial mutants blocked in 2,3-butanediol and acetoin synthesis were devoid in this growth-promotion capacity. The demonstration that PGPR strains release different volatile blends and that plant growth is stimulated by differences in these volatile blends establishes an additional function for volatile organic compounds as signaling molecules mediating plant–microbe interactions. PMID:12684534

  15. Cyclosporine A regulate oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes: mechanisms via ROS generation, iNOS and Hsp70

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huei-Wen; Chien, Chiang-Ting; Yu, Sung-Liang; Lee, Yuan-Teh; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2002-01-01

    Previous study suggested that cyclosporine A (CsA) could partially reduce ischaemia/reperfusion-induced injury in isolated heart, but the mechanism was still unclear. In this study, the possible mechanisms of cyclosporine A in regulating oxidative stress-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis were examined. Morphological (cell shrinkage, apoptotic body formation, and DNA fragmentation) and biochemical (annexin-V staining for exposed phosphatidylserine residues) evidences showed that both hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hypoxia/reoxygenation could induce apoptotic change in the embryonal rat heart myoblast-derived cells (H9c2). These effects were inhibited by pre-treatment with CsA at concentration of 0.01–1.0 μM for 24 h, but were increased with 10.0 μM CsA. While examining the mechanisms of CsA in protecting cardiomyocyte apoptosis, we found that the collapse of mitochondria membrane potential (ΔΨm) induced by oxidative stress was partially reversed by CsA (0.01–1.0 μM). Compared to the control, CSA at the concentration of 0.1 and 10.0 μM significantly increased the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) to 117.2±12.4% and 234.4±9.3%, respectively. Co-incubating with the antioxidant, ascorbic acid (10.0 μM), could partially reduce the protective effect of CsA (0.01–1.0 μM) and the toxic effect of 10.0 μM CsA. Pre-treatment with CsA at concentration of 0.01–1.0 μM for 24 h produced up-regulation of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp 70), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and also induced NO production, indicating that these factors might be associated with the cell protective effects of CsA. These results suggest that CsA could protect the oxidative stress-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis not only by preventing the loss of ΔΨm in mitochondria, but also through ROS generation, Hsp70, and iNOS up-regulation. PMID:12411407

  16. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase mediates expression of arginase II but not inducible nitric-oxide synthase in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yi; Liu, Yusen; Nelin, Leif D

    2015-01-23

    The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) have been shown to participate in iNOS induction following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation, while the role of MAPKs in the regulation of arginase remains unclear. We hypothesized that different MAPK family members are involved in iNOS and arginase expression following LPS stimulation. LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells exhibited increased protein and mRNA levels for iNOS, arginase I, and arginase II; although the induction of arginase II was more robust than that for arginase I. A p38 inhibitor completely prevented iNOS expression while it only attenuated arginase II induction. In contrast, a MEK1/2 inhibitor (ERK pathway) completely abolished arginase II expression while actually enhancing iNOS induction in LPS-stimulated cells. Arginase II promoter activity was increased by ∼4-fold following LPS-stimulation, which was prevented by the ERK pathway inhibitor. Arginase II promoter activity was unaffected by a p38 inhibitor or JNK pathway interference. Transfection with a construct expressing a constitutively active RAS mutant increased LPS-induced arginase II promoter activity, while transfection with a vector expressing a dominant negative ERK2 mutant or a vector expressing MKP-3 inhibited the arginase II promoter activity. LPS-stimulated nitric oxide (NO) production was increased following siRNA-mediated knockdown of arginase II and decreased when arginase II was overexpressed. Our results demonstrate that while both the ERK and p38 pathways regulate arginase II induction in LPS-stimulated macrophages, iNOS induction by LPS is dependent on p38 activation. These results suggest that differential inhibition of the MAPK pathway may be a potential therapeutic strategy to regulate macrophage phenotype. PMID:25451938

  17. The bacterial lipopeptide iturins induce Verticillium dahliae cell death by affecting fungal signalling pathways and mediate plant defence responses involved in pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity.

    PubMed

    Han, Qin; Wu, Fengli; Wang, Xiaonan; Qi, Hong; Shi, Liang; Ren, Ang; Liu, Qinghai; Zhao, Mingwen; Tang, Canming

    2015-04-01

    Verticillium wilt in cotton caused by Verticillium dahliae is one of the most serious plant diseases worldwide. Because no known fungicides or cotton cultivars provide sufficient protection against this pathogen, V. dahliae causes major crop yield losses. Here, an isolated cotton endophytic bacterium, designated Bacillus amyloliquefaciens 41B-1, exhibited greater than 50% biocontrol efficacy against V. dahliae in cotton plants under greenhouse conditions. Through high-performance liquid chromatography and mass analysis of the filtrate, we found that the antifungal compounds present in the strain 41B-1 culture filtrate were a series of isoforms of iturins. The purified iturins suppressed V. dahliae microsclerotial germination in the absence or presence of cotton. Treatment with the iturins induced reactive oxygen species bursts, Hog1 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation and defects in cell wall integrity. The oxidative stress response and high-osmolarity glycerol pathway contribute to iturins resistance in V. dahliae. In contrast, the Slt2 MAPK pathway may be involved in iturins sensitivity in this fungus. In addition to antagonism, iturins could induce plant defence responses as activators and mediate pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity. These findings suggest that iturins may affect fungal signalling pathways and mediate plant defence responses against V. dahliae. PMID:24934960

  18. Betulinic acid regulates generation of neuroinflammatory mediators responsible for tissue destruction in multiple sclerosis in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Blaževski, Jana; Petković, Filip; Momčilović, Miljana; Paschke, Reinhard; Kaluđerović, Goran N; Mostarica Stojković, Marija; Miljković, Djordje

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the influences of betulinic acid (BA), a triterpenoid isolated from birch bark, on neuroinflammatory mediators involved in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in vitro. Methods: Encephalitogenic T cells were prepared from draining lymph nodes and spinal cords of Dark Agouti rats 8 to 10 d after immunization with myelin basic protein (MBP) and complete Freund's adjuvant. Macrophages were isolated from the peritoneal cavity of adult untreated rats. Astrocytes were isolated from neonatal rat brains. The cells were cultured and then treated with different agents. IFN-γ, IL-17, iNOS and CXCL12 mRNA levels in the cells were analyzed with RT-PCR. iNOS and CXCL12 protein levels were detected using immunoblot. NO and ROS generation was measured using Griess reaction and flow cytometry, respectively. Results: In encephalitogenic T cells stimulated with MBP (10 μg/mL), addition of BA inhibited IL-17 and IFN-γ production in a dose-dependent manner. The estimated IC50 values for IL-17 and IFN γ were 11.2 and 63.8 μmol/L, respectively. When the macrophages were stimulated with LPS (10 ng/mL), addition of BA (50 μmol/L) significantly increased ROS generation, and suppressed NO generation. The astrocytes were stimulated with ConASn containing numerous inflammatory mediators, which mimicked the inflammatory milieu within CNS; addition of BA (50 μmol/L) significantly increased ROS generation, and blocked ConASn-induced increases in iNOS and CXCL12 mRNA levels, but did not affect iNOS and CXCL12 protein levels. Importantly, in both the macrophages and astrocytes, addition of BA (50 μmol/L) inhibited lipid peroxidation. Conclusion: Besides inhibiting encephalitogenic T cell cytokines and reducing NO generation, BA induces tissue-damaging ROS generation within CNS. PMID:23377550

  19. ABC transporters: bacterial exporters.

    PubMed Central

    Fath, M J; Kolter, R

    1993-01-01

    The ABC transporters (also called traffic ATPases) make up a large superfamily of proteins which share a common function and a common ATP-binding domain. ABC transporters are classified into three major groups: bacterial importers (the periplasmic permeases), eukaryotic transporters, and bacterial exporters. We present a comprehensive review of the bacterial ABC exporter group, which currently includes over 40 systems. The bacterial ABC exporter systems are functionally subdivided on the basis of the type of substrate that each translocates. We describe three main groups: protein exporters, peptide exporters, and systems that transport nonprotein substrates. Prototype exporters from each group are described in detail to illustrate our current understanding of this protein family. The prototype systems include the alpha-hemolysin, colicin V, and capsular polysaccharide exporters from Escherichia coli, the protease exporter from Erwinia chrysanthemi, and the glucan exporters from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium meliloti. Phylogenetic analysis of the ATP-binding domains from 29 bacterial ABC exporters indicates that the bacterial ABC exporters can be divided into two primary branches. One branch contains the transport systems where the ATP-binding domain and the membrane-spanning domain are present on the same polypeptide, and the other branch contains the systems where these domains are found on separate polypeptides. Differences in substrate specificity do not correlate with evolutionary relatedness. A complete survey of the known and putative bacterial ABC exporters is included at the end of the review. PMID:8302219

  20. Gamma-decanolactone inhibits iNOS and TNF-alpha production by lipopolysaccharide-activated microglia in N9 cells.

    PubMed

    Pflüger, Pricila; Viau, Cassiana Macagnan; Coelho, Vanessa Rodrigues; Berwig, Natália Alice; Staub, Renata Bartolomeu; Pereira, Patrícia; Saffi, Jenifer

    2016-06-01

    Activated microglia that produce reactive nitrogen species (RNS), inflammatory factors, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and other neurovirulent factors may lead to the development of neurodegenerative diseases. Certain compounds can inhibit the activation of microglia. However, these mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of Gamma-decanolactone (GD) on the production of reactive oxygen species and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) - stimulated N9 murine microglial cells through the p38 MAPK signaling pathway. The results showed that GD attenuated the activation of N9 cells and inhibited intracellular reactive oxygen species and the expression of iNOS and TNF-α induced by LPS in the cells. In addition, GD blocked the phosphorylation of p38 and inhibited cleaved caspase-9 and DNA damage. These data indicate that GD has therapeutic potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, and that it exerts its effects by inhibiting inflammation. PMID:27012990

  1. Dogs with patent Dirofilaria immitis infection have higher expression of circulating IL-4, IL-10 and iNOS mRNA than those with occult infection.

    PubMed

    Morchón, R; López-Belmonte, J; Bazzocchi, C; Grandi, G; Kramer, L; Simón, F

    2007-01-15

    Dirofilaria immitis is the agent of canine heartworm disease, in which adult worms reside in the pulmonary arteries, producing first stage larvae (microfilariae) that are released into the bloodstream. The present work describes the cytokine and iNOS mRNA expression in the peripheral blood of naturally infected dogs classified as either microfilariemic or amicrofilariemic. Results show that microfilariemic dogs had higher expression of IL-4 and iNOS mRNA than amicrofilariemic dogs. Furthermore, IL-10 mRNA expression was strongly expressed in dogs with circulating microfilariae, compared to only negligible expression in amicrofilariemic dogs. Finally, mf+ status was associated with a predominance in IgG1 production against worm antigens. These results would suggest that circulating mf may stimulate, like in other filarial infections, an immune bias towards unresponsiveness in D. immitis-infected dogs, consenting long-term adult worm survival. PMID:17112598

  2. Ginsenoside Rg3 regulates S-nitrosylation of the NLRP3 inflammasome via suppression of iNOS.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sung-Jin; Park, Jun-Young; Choi, Song; Lee, Jin-Bong; Jung, Haiyoung; Kim, Tae-Don; Yoon, Suk Ran; Choi, Inpyo; Shim, Sungbo; Park, Young-Jun

    2015-08-01

    Ginsenoside Rg3, a specific biological effector, is well-known as a major bioactive ingredient of Panax ginseng. However, its role in the inflammasome activation process remains unclear. In this report, we demonstrate that ginsenosides 20(R)-Rg3 and 20(S)-Rg3 are capable of suppressing both lethal endotoxic shock and the S-nitrosylation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by inhibiting nitric oxide (NO) production through the regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. In response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the reducing effect of 20(S)-Rg3 and 20(R)-Rg3 on nitric oxide led to an increase in the survival time of mice after lethal endotoxin-induced shock, and excess levels of NO inhibited IL-1β production via the S-nitrosylation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. In addition, ginsenosides 20(R)-Rg3 and 20(S)-Rg3 had suppressive effects on the LPS- or UV-irradiation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in macrophage and HaCaT cells and thereby prevented apoptosis of spleen cells in mice. Altogether, these results demonstrate that ginsenoside 20(R)-Rg3 and 20(S)-Rg3, a naturally occurring compound, might act as a dual therapeutic regulator for the treatment of inflammatory and oxidative stress-related diseases. PMID:26086107

  3. Bacterial challenges in food

    PubMed Central

    Collee, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative aspects of bacterial challenges that might be encountered in food are discussed with reference to recognized and relatively unrecognized hazards. Mechanisms of pathogenicity are reviewed and the populations at risk are noted. The bacterial content of food as it is served at table merits more study. The challenge of prevention by education is discussed. Indirect bacterial challenges in our food are considered. The real challenge of diagnosis depends upon an awareness of a complex range of conditions; the importance of effective communication with efficient laboratory and epidemiological services is stressed. There is an increasing need for care in the preparation and distribution of food. PMID:4467860

  4. Macrophage-mediated inflammatory response decreases mycobacterial survival in mouse MSCs by augmenting NO production

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kun; Wu, Yongjian; Xie, Heping; Li, Miao; Ming, Siqi; Li, Liyan; Li, Meiyu; Wu, Minhao; Gong, Sitang; Huang, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a hard-to-eradicate intracellular microbe, which escapes host immune attack during latent infection. Recent studies reveal that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) provide a protective niche for MTB to maintain latency. However, the regulation of mycobacterial residency in MSCs in the infectious microenvironment remains largely unknown. Here, we found that macrophage-mediated inflammatory response during MTB infection facilitated the clearance of bacilli residing in mouse MSCs. Higher inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) production were observed in mouse MSCs under macrophage-mediated inflammatory circumstance. Blocking NO production in MSCs increased the survival of intracellular mycobacteria, indicating NO-mediated antimycobacterial activity. Moreover, both nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathways were involved in iNOS expression and NO production in inflammatory microenvironment. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β could trigger NO production in MSCs and exert anti-mycobacterial activity via NF-κB signaling pathway. Neutralization of interleukin-1β in macrophage-mediated inflammatory microenvironment dampened the ability of mouse MSCs to produce NO. Together, our findings demonstrated that macrophage-mediated inflammatory response during mycobacterial infection promotes the clearance of bacilli in mouse MSCs by increasing NO production, which may provide a better understanding of latent MTB infection. PMID:27251437

  5. Macrophage-mediated inflammatory response decreases mycobacterial survival in mouse MSCs by augmenting NO production.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kun; Wu, Yongjian; Xie, Heping; Li, Miao; Ming, Siqi; Li, Liyan; Li, Meiyu; Wu, Minhao; Gong, Sitang; Huang, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a hard-to-eradicate intracellular microbe, which escapes host immune attack during latent infection. Recent studies reveal that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) provide a protective niche for MTB to maintain latency. However, the regulation of mycobacterial residency in MSCs in the infectious microenvironment remains largely unknown. Here, we found that macrophage-mediated inflammatory response during MTB infection facilitated the clearance of bacilli residing in mouse MSCs. Higher inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) production were observed in mouse MSCs under macrophage-mediated inflammatory circumstance. Blocking NO production in MSCs increased the survival of intracellular mycobacteria, indicating NO-mediated antimycobacterial activity. Moreover, both nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathways were involved in iNOS expression and NO production in inflammatory microenvironment. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β could trigger NO production in MSCs and exert anti-mycobacterial activity via NF-κB signaling pathway. Neutralization of interleukin-1β in macrophage-mediated inflammatory microenvironment dampened the ability of mouse MSCs to produce NO. Together, our findings demonstrated that macrophage-mediated inflammatory response during mycobacterial infection promotes the clearance of bacilli in mouse MSCs by increasing NO production, which may provide a better understanding of latent MTB infection. PMID:27251437

  6. Macrophages From Irradiated Tumors Express Higher Levels of iNOS, Arginase-I and COX-2, and Promote Tumor Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.-S.; Chen, F.-H.; Wang, C.-C.; Huang, H.-L.; Jung, Shih-Ming; Wu, C.-J.; Lee, C.-C.; McBride, William H.; Chiang, C.-S.; Hong, J.-H. . E-mail: jihong@adm.cgmh.org.tw

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of single and fractionated doses of radiation on tumors and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), and to elucidate the potential of TAMs to influence tumor growth. Methods and Materials: A murine prostate cell line, TRAMP-C1, was grown in C57Bl/6J mice to 4-mm tumor diameter and irradiated with either 25 Gy in a single dose, or 60 Gy in 15 fractions. The tumors were removed at the indicated times and assessed for a variety of markers related to TAM content, activation status, and function. Results: In tumors receiving a single radiation dose, arginase (Arg-I), and cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA expression increased as a small transient wave within 24 h and a larger persistent wave starting after 3 days. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA was elevated only after 3 days and continued to increase up to 3 weeks. After fractionated irradiation, Arg-1 and COX-2 mRNA levels increased within 5 days, whereas iNOS was increased only after 10 fractions of irradiation had been given. Increased levels of Arg-I, COX-2, and, to a lesser extent, iNOS protein were found to associate with TAMs 1-2 weeks after tumor irradiation. Function of TAMs were compared by mixing them with TRAMP-C1 cells and injecting them into mice; TRAMP-C1 cells mixed with TAMs from irradiated tumors appeared earlier and grew significantly faster than those mixed with TAMs from unirradiated tumors or TRAMP-C1 alone. Conclusions: Tumor-associated macrophages in the postirradiated tumor microenvironment express higher levels of Arg-1, COX-2, and iNOS, and promote early tumor growth in vivo.

  7. LPS-induced iNOS expression in N9 microglial cells is suppressed by geniposide via ERK, p38 and nuclear factor-κB signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gu; He, Jun-Lin; Xie, Xiao-Yan; Yu, Chao

    2012-09-01

    Activated microglia producing reactive nitrogen species, inflammatory factors, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other neurovirulent factors, can lead to the development of neurodegenerative diseases. Certain compounds can inhibit the activation of microglia. However, the mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of geniposide on the production of ROS and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated N9 murine microglial cells through the p38, ERK1/2 and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathways. After the N9 cells were pre-treated with the vehicle or geniposide and exposed to LPS for the time indicated, the MTT conversion test was used to assess cell viability. Suitable concentrations were chosen and adjusted according to the experiments. Extracellular nitric oxide (NO) release was measured by Griess reaction. The formation of ROS and intracellular NO was evaluated by fluorescence imaging. NOS activities were determined using commercially available kits. The morphology of the N9 cells was examined by hematoxylin and eosin staining. The expression of iNOS mRNA was examined by RT-PCR. The protein levels of iNOS, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), ERK1/2 and NF-κB, inhibitory factor-κB-α (IκB-α) were determined by western blot analysis. The results showed that geniposide attenuated the activation of N9 cells and inhibited the overproduction of NO, intracellular ROS and the expression of iNOS induced by LPS in the cells. In addition, geniposide blocked the phosphorylation of p38, ERK1/2 and inhibited the drop-off of IκB induced by LPS in the cells. These data indicate that geniposide has therapeutic potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, and that it exerts its effects by inhibiting inflammation. PMID:22710392

  8. Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory action of curcumin analog (DM1): Effect on iNOS and COX-2 gene expression and autophagy pathways.

    PubMed

    Paulino, Niraldo; Paulino, Amarilis Scremin; Diniz, Susana N; de Mendonça, Sergio; Gonçalves, Ivair D; Faião Flores, Fernanda; Santos, Reginaldo Pereira; Rodrigues, Carina; Pardi, Paulo Celso; Quincoces Suarez, José Agustin

    2016-04-15

    This work describes the anti-inflammatory effect of the curcumin-analog compound, sodium 4-[5-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-oxo-penta-1,4-dienyl]-2-methoxy-phenolate (DM1), and shows that DM1 modulates iNOS and COX-2 gene expression in cultured RAW 264.7 cells and induces autophagy on human melanoma cell line A375. PMID:27010501

  9. Baicalin ameliorates isoproterenol-induced acute myocardial infarction through iNOS, inflammation, oxidative stress and P38MAPK pathway in rat

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shen-Jie; Wu, Xiao-Peng; Song, Heng-Liang; Li, Gui-Qi

    2015-01-01

    Baicalin is one of the active ingredients in the skullcap, with a variety of pharmacological effects, such as blood pressure reduction, sedation, liver-protection, gallbladder-protection, anti-bacteria, anti-inflammation, etc. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential cardioprotective effects of baicalin ameliorates isoproterenol-induced acute myocardial infarction (AMI) through inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), inflammation, oxidative stress and P38MAPK passageway in rat. Rat model of AMI was induced by isoproterenol (100 mg/kg) and then treated baicalin (various does of baicalin: 1 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg, respectively) for 24 h. Infarct size, the heart weight to body weight ratio and creatine kinase (CK), the MB isoenzyme of creatine kinase (CK-MB), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and cardiac troponin T (cTnT) of rats with AMI induced by isoproterenol were used to evaluate curative effect of baicalin on AMI. Meanwhile, iNOS and phosphorylation-p38 MAPK (p-p38) protein expressions, inflammatory factor and oxidative stress were inspected using western blot and commercial kits, respectively. In the present study, pre-treatment with baicalin (10 or 100 mg/kg) significantly ameliorated infarct size, the heart weight to body weight ratio and CK, CK-MB, LDH and cTnT levels in rats with AMI induced by isoproterenol. iNOS protein expression, the serum TNF-α, IL-6, MDA and SOD levels and p-38 protein expressions were significantly suppressed by treatment with baicalin (10 or 100 mg/kg). These results suggest that acute treatment with baicalin ameliorates AMI, iNOS, inflammation, oxidative stress and P38MAPK pathway in rat with AMI induced by isoproterenol. PMID:26885181

  10. Protection by taurine against INOS-dependent DNA damage in heavily exercised skeletal muscle by inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Hiromichi; Okita, Shinya; Kato, Toshihiro; Naka, Toru; Kawanishi, Shosuke; Ohnishi, Shiho; Oshida, Yoshiharu; Ma, Ning

    2013-01-01

    Taurine protects against tissue damage in a variety of models involving inflammation, especially the muscle. We set up a heavy exercise bout protocol for rats consisting of climbing ran on a treadmill to examine the effect of an intraabdominal dose of taurine (300 mg/kg/day) administered 1 h before heavy exercise for ten consecutive days. Each group ran on the treadmill at 20 m/min, 25% grade, for 20 min or until exhaustion within 20 min once each 10 days. Exhaustion was the point when an animal was unable to right itself when placed on its side. The muscle damage was associated with an increased accumulation of 8-nitroguanine and 8-OHdG in the nuclei of skeletal muscle cells. The immunoreactivities for NF-κB and iNOS were also increased in the exercise group. Taurine ameliorated heavy exercise-induced muscle DNA damage to a significant extent since it reduced the accumulation of 8-nitroguanine and 8-OHdG, possibly by down-regulating the expression of iNOS through a modulatory action on NF-κB signaling pathway. This study demonstrates for the first time that taurine can protect against intense exercise-induced nitrosative inflammation and ensuing DNA damage in the skeletal muscle of rats by preventing iNOS expression and the nitrosative stress generated by heavy exercise. PMID:23392939

  11. Bacterial Wound Culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  12. Bacterial Nail Infection (Paronychia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in people who work in the health care industry. Chronic paronychia is most common in adult women and those who work in places where their hands are kept moist, such as food handlers. Signs and Symptoms Bacterial nail infection most ...

  13. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    MedlinePlus

    Overgrowth - intestinal bacteria; Bacterial overgrowth - intestine ... Unlike the large intestine, the small intestine does not have a high number of bacteria. When there are too many bacteria in the ...

  14. Bacterial surface adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utada, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Biofilms are structured multi-cellular communities that are fundamental to the biology and ecology of bacteria. Parasitic bacterial biofilms can cause lethal infections and biofouling, but commensal bacterial biofilms, such as those found in the gut, can break down otherwise indigestible plant polysaccharides and allow us to enjoy vegetables. The first step in biofilm formation, adaptation to life on a surface, requires a working knowledge of low Reynolds number fluid physics, and the coordination of biochemical signaling, polysaccharide production, and molecular motility motors. These crucial early stages of biofilm formation are at present poorly understood. By adapting methods from soft matter physics, we dissect bacterial social behavior at the single cell level for several prototypical bacterial species, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Vibrio cholerae.

  15. The fate of bacterial cocaine esterase (CocE): an in vivo study of CocE-mediated cocaine hydrolysis, CocE pharmacokinetics, and CocE elimination.

    PubMed

    Brim, Remy L; Noon, Kathleen R; Collins, Gregory T; Stein, Aron; Nichols, Joseph; Narasimhan, Diwa; Ko, Mei-Chuan; Woods, James H; Sunahara, Roger K

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine abuse and toxicity remain widespread problems in the United States. Currently cocaine toxicity is treated only symptomatically, because there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved pharmacotherapy for this indication. To address the unmet need, a stabilized mutant of bacterial cocaine esterase [T172R/G173Q-CocE (DM-CocE)], which hydrolyzes cocaine into inactive metabolites and has low immunogenic potential, has been developed and previously tested in animal models of cocaine toxicity. Here, we document the rapid cocaine hydrolysis by low doses of DM-CocE in vitro and in vivo, as well as the pharmacokinetics and distribution of the DM-CocE protein in rats. DM-CocE at 50.5 μg/kg effectively eliminated 4 mg/kg cocaine within 2 min in both male and female rats as measured by mass spectrometry. We expanded on these findings by using a pharmacologically relevant dose of DM-CocE (0.32 mg/kg) in rats and monkeys to hydrolyze convulsant doses of cocaine. DM-CocE reduced cocaine to below detection limits rapidly after injection; however, elimination of DM-CocE resulted in peripheral cocaine redistribution by 30 to 60 min. Elimination of DM-CocE was quantified by using [³⁵S] labeling of the enzyme and was found to have a half-life of 2.1 h in rats. Minor urinary output of DM-CocE was also observed. Immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and radiography all were used to elucidate the mechanism of DM-CocE elimination, rapid proteolysis, and recycling of amino acids into all tissues. This rapid elimination of DM-CocE is a desirable property of a therapeutic for cocaine toxicity and should reduce the likelihood of immunogenic or adverse reactions as DM-CocE moves toward clinical use. PMID:21990608

  16. Deciphering the bacterial glycocode: recent advances in bacterial glycoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Longwell, Scott A.; Dube, Danielle H.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial glycoproteins represent an attractive target for new antibacterial treatments, as they are frequently linked to pathogenesis and contain distinctive glycans that are absent in humans. Despite their potential therapeutic importance, many bacterial glycoproteins remain uncharacterized. This review focuses on recent advances in deciphering the bacterial glycocode, including metabolic glycan labeling to discover and characterize bacterial glycoproteins, lectin-based microarrays to monitor bacterial glycoprotein dynamics, crosslinking sugars to assess the roles of bacterial glycoproteins, and harnessing bacterial glycosylation systems for the efficient production of industrially important glycoproteins. PMID:23276734

  17. Bistability and Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Malka, Roy; Shochat, Eliezer; Rom-Kedar, Vered

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial infections occur when the natural host defenses are overwhelmed by invading bacteria. The main component of the host defense is impaired when neutrophil count or function is too low, putting the host at great risk of developing an acute infection. In people with intact immune systems, neutrophil count increases during bacterial infection. However, there are two important clinical cases in which they remain constant: a) in patients with neutropenic-associated conditions, such as those undergoing chemotherapy at the nadir (the minimum clinically observable neutrophil level); b) in ex vivo examination of the patient's neutrophil bactericidal activity. Here we study bacterial population dynamics under fixed neutrophil levels by mathematical modelling. We show that under reasonable biological assumptions, there are only two possible scenarios: 1) Bacterial behavior is monostable: it always converges to a stable equilibrium of bacterial concentration which only depends, in a gradual manner, on the neutrophil level (and not on the initial bacterial level). We call such a behavior type I dynamics. 2) The bacterial dynamics is bistable for some range of neutrophil levels. We call such a behavior type II dynamics. In the bistable case (type II), one equilibrium corresponds to a healthy state whereas the other corresponds to a fulminant bacterial infection. We demonstrate that published data of in vitro Staphylococcus epidermidis bactericidal experiments are inconsistent with both the type I dynamics and the commonly used linear model and are consistent with type II dynamics. We argue that type II dynamics is a plausible mechanism for the development of a fulminant infection. PMID:20463954

  18. L-arginine stimulates CAT-1-mediated arginine uptake and regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase for the growth of chick intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chao; Zhang, Xiaoyun; He, Qiang; Li, Junming; Lu, Jianjun; Zou, Xiaoting

    2015-01-01

    L-arginine (L-Arg) uptake is mediated by members of cationic amino acid transporter (CAT) family and may coincide with the induction of nitric oxide synthases (NOS). The present study was conducted to investigate the extracellular concentrations of L-Arg regulating the CAT-1, CAT-4 and inducible NOS (iNOS) in chick intestinal epithelial cells. The cells were cultured for 4 days in Arg-free Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium containing 10, 100, 200, 400, or 600 μM L-Arg. Cell viability, nitric oxide (NO) concentrations, uptake and metabolism of L-[3H]-Arg as well as expression of CAT-1, CAT-4, and iNOS were determined. Our results showed that L-Arg enhances cell growth with a maximal response at 10-400 μM. Addition of 100, 200, or 400 μM L-Arg increased the L-[3H]-Arg uptake, which was associated with greater conversion of L-[3H]-citrulline and NO production in comparison with 10 μM L-Arg group. Increasing extracellular concentrations of L-Arg from 10 to 400 μM dose dependently increased the levels of CAT-1 mRNA and protein, while no effect on CAT-4 mRNA abundance was found. Furthermore, supplementation of 100, 200, or 400 μM L-Arg upregulated the expression of iNOS mRNA, and the relative protein levels for iNOS in 200 and 400 μM L-Arg groups were higher than those in 10 and 100 μM L-Arg groups. Collectively, we conclude that the CAT-1 isoform plays a role in L-Arg uptake, and L-Arg-mediated elevation of NO via iNOS promotes the growth of chick intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:25336270

  19. Supplementation with Angelica keiskei inhibits expression of inflammatory mediators in the gastric mucosa of Helicobacter pylori-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Aryoung; Lim, Joo Weon; Kim, Hoguen; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2016-05-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric ulceration and carcinogenesis. The oxidant-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), regulates expression of inflammatory mediators such as interferon γ (IFN-γ), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). These inflammatory mediators increased in gastric mucosal tissues from patients infected with H pylori. Angelica keiskei (AK), a green leafy vegetable, is rich in carotenoids and flavonoids and shows antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Therefore, we hypothesized that AK may protect the gastric mucosa of H pylori-infected mice against inflammation. We determined lipid peroxide abundance, myeloperoxidase activity, expression levels of inflammatory mediators (IFN-γ, COX-2, and iNOS), NF-κB-DNA binding activity, and histologic changes in gastric mucosal tissues. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine served as the positive control treatment. Supplementation with AK suppressed increases in lipid peroxide abundance, myeloperoxidase activity, induction of inflammatory mediators (IFN-γ, COX-2, and iNOS), activation of NF-κB, and degradation of nuclear factor of κ light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor α in gastric mucosal tissue from H pylori-infected mice. Inhibition of H pylori-induced alterations by AK was similar to that by N-acetylcysteine. Taken together, these results suggest that supplementation with AK may prevent H pylori-induced gastric inflammation by inhibiting NF-κB-mediated induction of inflammatory mediators in the gastric mucosa of patients infected with H pylori. PMID:27101766

  20. A GPCR Handles Bacterial Sensing in Chemotaxis and Phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Senoo, Hiroshi; Sesaki, Hiromi; Iijima, Miho

    2016-02-22

    In this issue of Developmental Cell, Pan et al. (2016) identified in cells of the social amoeba Dictyostelium a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that recognizes a chemoattractant secreted by bacteria. This work uncovers a mechanism by which a single GPCR mediates pseudopod extension during cell migration and bacterial engulfment. PMID:26906729

  1. Integrons: natural tools for bacterial genome evolution.

    PubMed

    Rowe-Magnus, D A; Mazel, D

    2001-10-01

    Integrons were first identified as the primary mechanism for antibiotic resistance gene capture and dissemination among Gram-negative bacteria. More recently, their role in genome evolution has been extended with the discovery of larger integron structures, the super-integrons, as genuine components of the genomes of many species throughout the gamma-proteobacterial radiation. The functional platforms of these integrons appear to be sedentary, whereas their gene cassette contents are highly variable. Nevertheless, the gene cassettes for which an activity has been experimentally demonstrated encode proteins related to simple adaptive functions and their recruitment is seen as providing the bacterial host with a selective advantage. The widespread occurrence of the integron system among Gram-negative bacteria is discussed, with special focus on the super-integrons. Some of the adaptive functions encoded by these genes are also reviewed, and implications of integron-mediated genome evolution in the emergence of novel bacterial species are highlighted. PMID:11587934

  2. (Non-)translational medicine: targeting bacterial RNA.

    PubMed

    Dinan, Adam M; Loftus, Brendan J

    2013-01-01

    The rise and spread of antibiotic resistance is among the most severe challenges facing modern medicine. Despite this fact, attempts to develop novel classes of antibiotic have been largely unsuccessful. The traditional mechanisms by which antibiotics work are subject to relatively rapid bacterial resistance via mutation, and hence have a limited period of efficacy. One promising strategy to ameliorate this problem is to shift from the use of chemical compounds targeting protein structures and processes to a new era of RNA-based therapeutics. RNA-mediated regulation (riboregulation) has evolved naturally in bacteria and is therefore a highly efficient means by which gene expression can be manipulated. Here, we describe recent advances toward the development of effective anti-bacterial therapies, which operate through various strategies centered on RNA. PMID:24265632

  3. Bacterial start site prediction.

    PubMed

    Hannenhalli, S S; Hayes, W S; Hatzigeorgiou, A G; Fickett, J W

    1999-09-01

    With the growing number of completely sequenced bacterial genes, accurate gene prediction in bacterial genomes remains an important problem. Although the existing tools predict genes in bacterial genomes with high overall accuracy, their ability to pinpoint the translation start site remains unsatisfactory. In this paper, we present a novel approach to bacterial start site prediction that takes into account multiple features of a potential start site, viz., ribosome binding site (RBS) binding energy, distance of the RBS from the start codon, distance from the beginning of the maximal ORF to the start codon, the start codon itself and the coding/non-coding potential around the start site. Mixed integer programing was used to optimize the discriminatory system. The accuracy of this approach is up to 90%, compared to 70%, using the most common tools in fully automated mode (that is, without expert human post-processing of results). The approach is evaluated using Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli and Pyrococcus furiosus. These three genomes cover a broad spectrum of bacterial genomes, since B.subtilis is a Gram-positive bacterium, E.coli is a Gram-negative bacterium and P. furiosus is an archaebacterium. A significant problem is generating a set of 'true' start sites for algorithm training, in the absence of experimental work. We found that sequence conservation between P. furiosus and the related Pyrococcus horikoshii clearly delimited the gene start in many cases, providing a sufficient training set. PMID:10446249

  4. Specialized Mediation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Carol; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Six articles discuss librarians as mediators in special circumstances. Highlights include the reference librarian and the information paraprofessional; effective reference mediation for nontraditional public library users, including mentally impaired patrons and illiterate adults; the academic librarian's role in the education process; and…

  5. Lipoproteins of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kovacs-Simon, A; Titball, R W; Michell, S L

    2011-02-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are a set of membrane proteins with many different functions. Due to this broad-ranging functionality, these proteins have a considerable significance in many phenomena, from cellular physiology through cell division and virulence. Here we give a general overview of lipoprotein biogenesis and highlight examples of the roles of lipoproteins in bacterial disease caused by a selection of medically relevant Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens: Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Neisseria meningitidis. Lipoproteins have been shown to play key roles in adhesion to host cells, modulation of inflammatory processes, and translocation of virulence factors into host cells. As such, a number of lipoproteins have been shown to be potential vaccines. This review provides a summary of some of the reported roles of lipoproteins and of how this knowledge has been exploited in some cases for the generation of novel countermeasures to bacterial diseases. PMID:20974828

  6. Bacterial transfer RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Jennifer; Ibba, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Transfer RNA is an essential adapter molecule that is found across all three domains of life. The primary role of transfer RNA resides in its critical involvement in the accurate translation of messenger RNA codons during protein synthesis and, therefore, ultimately in the determination of cellular gene expression. This review aims to bring together the results of intensive investigations into the synthesis, maturation, modification, aminoacylation, editing and recycling of bacterial transfer RNAs. Codon recognition at the ribosome as well as the ever-increasing number of alternative roles for transfer RNA outside of translation will be discussed in the specific context of bacterial cells. PMID:25796611

  7. Molecular mechanism of bacterial type 1 and P pili assembly.

    PubMed

    Busch, Andreas; Phan, Gilles; Waksman, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    The formation of adhesive surface structures called pili or fimbriae ('bacterial hair') is an important contributor towards bacterial pathogenicity and persistence. To fight often chronic or recurrent bacterial infections such as urinary tract infections, it is necessary to understand the molecular mechanism of the nanomachines assembling such pili. Here, we focus on the so far best-known pilus assembly machinery: the chaperone-usher pathway producing the type 1 and P pili, and highlight the most recently acquired structural knowledge. First, we describe the subunits' structure and the molecular role of the periplasmic chaperone. Second, we focus on the outer-membrane usher structure and the catalytic mechanism of usher-mediated pilus biogenesis. Finally, we describe how the detailed understanding of the chaperone-usher pathway at a molecular level has paved the way for the design of a new generation of bacterial inhibitors called 'pilicides'. PMID:25624519

  8. Bacterial Catabolism of Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP)

    PubMed Central

    Reisch, Chris R.; Moran, Mary Ann; Whitman, William B.

    2011-01-01

    Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) is a metabolite produced primarily by marine phytoplankton and is the main precursor to the climatically important gas dimethylsulfide (DMS). DMS is released upon bacterial catabolism of DMSP, but it is not the only possible fate of DMSP sulfur. An alternative demethylation/demethiolation pathway results in the eventual release of methanethiol, a highly reactive volatile sulfur compound that contributes little to the atmospheric sulfur flux. The activity of these pathways control the natural flux of sulfur released to the atmosphere. Although these biochemical pathways and the factors that regulate them are of great interest, they are poorly understood. Only recently have some of the genes and pathways responsible for DMSP catabolism been elucidated. Thus far, six different enzymes have been identified that catalyze the cleavage of DMSP, resulting in the release of DMS. In addition, five of these enzymes appear to produce acrylate, while one produces 3-hydroxypropionate. In contrast, only one enzyme, designated DmdA, has been identified that catalyzes the demethylation reaction producing methylmercaptopropionate (MMPA). The metabolism of MMPA is performed by a series of three coenzyme-A mediated reactions catalyzed by DmdB, DmdC, and DmdD. Interestingly, Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique, a member of the SAR11 clade of Alphaproteobacteria that is highly abundant in marine surface waters, possessed functional DmdA, DmdB, and DmdC enzymes. Microbially mediated transformations of both DMS and methanethiol are also possible, although many of the biochemical and molecular genetic details are still unknown. This review will focus on the recent discoveries in the biochemical pathways that mineralize and assimilate DMSP carbon and sulfur, as well as the areas for which a comprehensive understanding is still lacking. PMID:21886640

  9. Bacterial carbon utilization in vertical subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Tietz, Alexandra; Langergraber, Günter; Watzinger, Andrea; Haberl, Raimund; Kirschner, Alexander K T

    2008-03-01

    Subsurface vertical flow constructed wetlands with intermittent loading are considered as state of the art and can comply with stringent effluent requirements. It is usually assumed that microbial activity in the filter body of constructed wetlands, responsible for the removal of carbon and nitrogen, relies mainly on bacterially mediated transformations. However, little quantitative information is available on the distribution of bacterial biomass and production in the "black-box" constructed wetland. The spatial distribution of bacterial carbon utilization, based on bacterial (14)C-leucine incorporation measurements, was investigated for the filter body of planted and unplanted indoor pilot-scale constructed wetlands, as well as for a planted outdoor constructed wetland. A simple mass-balance approach was applied to explain the bacterially catalysed organic matter degradation in this system by comparing estimated bacterial carbon utilization rates with simultaneously measured carbon reduction values. The pilot-scale constructed wetlands proved to be a suitable model system for investigating microbial carbon utilization in constructed wetlands. Under an ideal operating mode, the bulk of bacterial productivity occurred within the first 10cm of the filter body. Plants seemed to have no significant influence on productivity and biomass of bacteria, as well as on wastewater total organic carbon removal. PMID:17991505

  10. Modeling intraocular bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Astley, Roger A; Coburn, Phillip S; Parkunan, Salai Madhumathi; Callegan, Michelle C

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial endophthalmitis is an infection and inflammation of the posterior segment of the eye which can result in significant loss of visual acuity. Even with prompt antibiotic, anti-inflammatory and surgical intervention, vision and even the eye itself may be lost. For the past century, experimental animal models have been used to examine various aspects of the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of bacterial endophthalmitis, to further the development of anti-inflammatory treatment strategies, and to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and efficacies of antibiotics. Experimental models allow independent control of many parameters of infection and facilitate systematic examination of infection outcomes. While no single animal model perfectly reproduces the human pathology of bacterial endophthalmitis, investigators have successfully used these models to understand the infectious process and the host response, and have provided new information regarding therapeutic options for the treatment of bacterial endophthalmitis. This review highlights experimental animal models of endophthalmitis and correlates this information with the clinical setting. The goal is to identify knowledge gaps that may be addressed in future experimental and clinical studies focused on improvements in the therapeutic preservation of vision during and after this disease. PMID:27154427

  11. Phagocytosis of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yoon-Suk Alexander; Kocks, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Phagocytosis is an evolutionarily ancient, receptor-driven process, by which phagocytic cells recognize invading microbes and destroy them after internalization. The phagocytosis receptor Eater is expressed exclusively on Drosophila phagocytes and is required for the survival of bacterial infections. In a recent study, we explored how Eater can defend fruit flies against different kinds of bacteria. We discovered that Eater bound to certain types of bacteria directly, while for others bacterial binding was dependent on prior disruption of the bacterial envelope. Similar to phagocytes, antimicrobial peptides and lysozymes are ancient components of animal immune systems. Our results suggest that cationic antimicrobial peptides, as well as lysozymes, can facilitate Eater binding to live Gram-negative bacteria. Both types of molecules promote surface-exposure of bacterial ligands that otherwise would remain buried and hidden under an outer membrane. We propose that unmasking ligands for phagocytic receptors may be a conserved mechanism operating in many animals, including humans. Thus, studying a Drosophila phagocytosis receptor may advance our understanding of innate immunity in general. PMID:22223092

  12. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Donald L.; Ramachandra, Muralidhara

    1993-01-01

    A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

  13. BACTERIAL WATERBORNE PATHOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterial pathogens are examples of classical etiological agents of waterborne disease. While these agents no longer serve as major threats to U.S. water supplies, they are still important pathogens in areas with substandard sanitation and poor water treatment facilities. In th...

  14. Bacterial microflora of nectarines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microflora of fruit surfaces has been the best source of antagonists against fungi causing postharvest decays of fruit. However, there is little information on microflora colonizing surfaces of fruits other than grapes, apples, and citrus fruit. We characterized bacterial microflora on nectarine f...

  15. Bacterial leaf spot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial leaf spot has been reported in Australia (Queensland), Egypt, El Salvador, India, Japan, Nicaragua, Sudan, and the United States (Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, and Wisconsin). It occasionally causes locally severe defoliation and post-emergence damping-off and stunting. The disease is...

  16. The Bacterial Growth Curve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulton, Richard J. L.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure that allows students to view an entire bacterial growth curve during a two- to three-hour student laboratory period is described. Observations of the lag phase, logarithmic phase, maximum stationary phase, and phase of decline are possible. A nonpathogenic, marine bacterium is used in the investigation. (KR)

  17. Curcumin, a Curcuma longa constituent, acts on MAPK p38 pathway modulating COX-2 and iNOS expression in chronic experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Barquero, Laura; Villegas, Isabel; Sánchez-Calvo, Juan Manuel; Talero, Elena; Sánchez-Fidalgo, Susana; Motilva, Virginia; Alarcón de la Lastra, Catalina

    2007-03-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a nonspecific inflammatory disorder characterized by oxidative and nitrosative stress, leucocyte infiltration and up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), such as the p38 and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) modulate the transcription of many genes involved in the inflammatory process. Curcumin is a polyphenol derived from Curcuma longa, which is known to have anti-inflammatory activity. The aim of this study was to study the effects and mechanisms of action of curcumin, on chronic colitis in rats. Inflammation response was assessed by histology and myeloperoxidase activity (MPO). We determined the production of Th1 and Th2 cytokines and nitrites in colon mucosa, as well as the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclo-oxygenase(COX)-1 and-2 by western blotting and inmmunohistochemistry. Finally, we studied the involvement of MAPKs signaling in the protective effect of curcumin in chronic colonic inflammation. Curcumin (50-100 mg/kg/day) were administered by oral gavage 24 h after trinitrobenzensulfonic acid (TNBS) instillation, and daily during 2 weeks before sacrifice. Curcumin significantly attenuated the damage and caused substantial reductions of the rise in MPO activity and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF)-alpha. Also curcumine was able to reduce nitrites colonic levels and induced down-regulation of COX-2 and iNOS expression, and a reduction in the activation of p38 MAPK; however, no changes in the activation of JNK could be observed. In conclusion, we suggest that inhibition of p38 MAPK signaling by curcumin could explain the reduced COX-2 and iNOS immunosignals and the nitrite production in colonic mucosa reducing the development of chronic experimental colitis. PMID:17276891

  18. Corticosteroids for Bacterial Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Muthiah; Mascarenhas, Jeena; Rajaraman, Revathi; Ravindran, Meenakshi; Lalitha, Prajna; Glidden, David V.; Ray, Kathryn J.; Hong, Kevin C.; Oldenburg, Catherine E.; Lee, Salena M.; Zegans, Michael E.; McLeod, Stephen D.; Lietman, Thomas M.; Acharya, Nisha R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether there is a benefit in clinical outcomes with the use of topical corticosteroids as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of bacterial corneal ulcers. Methods Randomized, placebo-controlled, double-masked, multicenter clinical trial comparing prednisolone sodium phosphate, 1.0%, to placebo as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of bacterial corneal ulcers. Eligible patients had a culture-positive bacterial corneal ulcer and received topical moxifloxacin for at least 48 hours before randomization. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA) at 3 months from enrollment. Secondary outcomes included infiltrate/scar size, reepithelialization, and corneal perforation. Results Between September 1, 2006, and February 22, 2010, 1769 patients were screened for the trial and 500 patients were enrolled. No significant difference was observed in the 3-month BSCVA (−0.009 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution [logMAR]; 95% CI, −0.085 to 0.068; P = .82), infiltrate/scar size (P = .40), time to reepithelialization (P = .44), or corneal perforation (P > .99). A significant effect of corticosteroids was observed in subgroups of baseline BSCVA (P = .03) and ulcer location (P = .04). At 3 months, patients with vision of counting fingers or worse at baseline had 0.17 logMAR better visual acuity with corticosteroids (95% CI, −0.31 to −0.02; P = .03) compared with placebo, and patients with ulcers that were completely central at baseline had 0.20 logMAR better visual acuity with corticosteroids (−0.37 to −0.04; P = .02). Conclusions We found no overall difference in 3-month BSCVA and no safety concerns with adjunctive corticosteroid therapy for bacterial corneal ulcers. Application to Clinical Practice Adjunctive topical corticosteroid use does not improve 3-month vision in patients with bacterial corneal ulcers. PMID:21987582

  19. Phenotypic plasticity in bacterial plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Paul E

    2004-01-01

    Plasmid pB15 was previously shown to evolve increased horizontal (infectious) transfer at the expense of reduced vertical (intergenerational) transfer and vice versa, a key trade-off assumed in theories of parasite virulence. Whereas the models predict that susceptible host abundance should determine which mode of transfer is selectively favored, host density failed to mediate the trade-off in pB15. One possibility is that the plasmid's transfer deviates from the assumption that horizontal spread (conjugation) occurs in direct proportion to cell density. I tested this hypothesis using Escherichia coli/pB15 associations in laboratory serial culture. Contrary to most models of plasmid transfer kinetics, my data show that pB15 invades static (nonshaking) bacterial cultures only at intermediate densities. The results can be explained by phenotypic plasticity in traits governing plasmid transfer. As cells become more numerous, the plasmid's conjugative transfer unexpectedly declines, while the trade-off between transmission routes causes vertical transfer to increase. Thus, at intermediate densities the plasmid's horizontal transfer can offset selection against plasmid-bearing cells, but at high densities pB15 conjugates so poorly that it cannot invade. I discuss adaptive vs. nonadaptive causes for the phenotypic plasticity, as well as potential mechanisms that may lead to complex transfer dynamics of plasmids in liquid environments. PMID:15166133

  20. Identification of a novel compound that inhibits iNOS and COX-2 expression in LPS-stimulated macrophages from Schisandra chinensis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, You Jin; Park, Sun Young; Kim, Sun Gun; Park, Da Jung; Kang, Jum Soon; Lee, Sang Joon; Yoon, Sik; Kim, Young Hun; Bae, Yoe-Sik; Choi, Young-Whan

    2010-01-22

    A novel {alpha}-iso-cubebenol, which has anti-inflammatory effects in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages, was isolated from the fruits of Schisandra chinensis. {alpha}-iso-cubebenol inhibited LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) production. Consistent with these findings, {alpha}-iso-cubebenol also reduced the LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 at the protein and mRNA levels in a concentration-dependent manner. {alpha}-iso-cubebenol also inhibited LPS-induced nuclear translocation of the NF-{kappa}B p65 subunit. Furthermore, {alpha}-iso-cubebenol suppressed the phosphorylation of ERK, JNK, and p38 kinase induced by LPS. Since the novel {alpha}-iso-cubebenol blocked the production of several pro-inflammatory mediators induced by LPS in macrophages, the molecule can be useful material for the development of anti-inflammatory agents against bacterial infections or endotoxin.

  1. Carbohydrate Receptors of Bacterial Adhesins: Implications and Reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlsen, K.; Oelschlaeger, T. A.; Hacker, J.; Khan, A. S.

    Bacteria entering a host depend on adhesins to achieve colonization. Adhesins are bacterial surface structures mediating binding to host surficial areas. Most adhesins are composed of one or several proteins. Usually a single bacterial strain is able to express various adhesins. The adhesion type expressed may influence host-, tissue or even cell tropism of Gram-negative and of Gram-positive bacteria. The binding of fimbrial as well as of afimbrial adhesins of Gram-negative bacteria to host carbohydrate structures (=receptors) has been elucidated in great detail. In contrast, in Gram-positives, most well studied adhesins bind to proteinaceous partners. Nevertheless, for both bacterial groups the binding of bacterial adhesins to eukaryotic carbohydrate receptors is essential for establishing colonization or infection. The characterization of this interaction down to the submolecular level provides the basis for strategies to interfere with this early step of infection which should lead to the prevention of subsequent disease. However, this goal will not be achieved easily because bacterial adherence is not a monocausal event but rather mediated by a variety of adhesins.

  2. Bacterial ghosts as multifunctional vaccine particles.

    PubMed

    Szostak, M P; Mader, H; Truppe, M; Kamal, M; Eko, F O; Huter, V; Marchart, J; Jechlinger, W; Haidinger, W; Brand, E; Denner, E; Resch, S; Dehlin, E; Katinger, A; Kuen, B; Haslberger, A; Hensel, A; Lubitz, W

    1997-02-01

    Expression of cloned PhiX174 gene E in Gram-negative bacteria results in lysis of the bacteria by formation of an E-specific transmembrane tunnel structure built through the cell envelope complex. Bacterial ghosts have been produced from a variety of bacteria including Escherichia coli. Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella enteritidis, Vibrio cholerae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Pasteurella haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Helicobacter pylori. Such ghosts are used as non-living candidate vaccines and represent an alternative to heat or chemically inactivated bacteria. In recombinant ghosts, foreign proteins can be inserted into the inner membrane prior to E-mediated lysis via specific N-, or C-, or N- and C-terminal anchor sequences. The export of proteins into the periplasmic space or the expression of recombinant S-layer proteins vastly extents the capacity of ghosts or recombinant ghosts as carriers of foreign epitopes or proteins. Oral, aerogenic or parenteral applications of (recombinant) ghosts in experimental animals induced specific humoral and cellular immune responses against bacterial and target components including protective mucosal immunity. The most relevant advantage of ghosts and recombinant bacterial ghosts as immunogens is that no inactivation procedures that denature relevant immunogenic determinants are employed in the production of ghosts used as vaccines or as carriers of relevant antigens. The inserted target antigens into the inner membrane or into S-layer proteins are not limited in size. PMID:9382740

  3. Bacterial, Fungal, Parasitic, and Viral Myositis

    PubMed Central

    Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F.

    2008-01-01

    Infectious myositis may be caused by a broad range of bacterial, fungal, parasitic, and viral agents. Infectious myositis is overall uncommon given the relative resistance of the musculature to infection. For example, inciting events, including trauma, surgery, or the presence of foreign bodies or devitalized tissue, are often present in cases of bacterial myositis. Bacterial causes are categorized by clinical presentation, anatomic location, and causative organisms into the categories of pyomyositis, psoas abscess, Staphylococcus aureus myositis, group A streptococcal necrotizing myositis, group B streptococcal myositis, clostridial gas gangrene, and nonclostridial myositis. Fungal myositis is rare and usually occurs among immunocompromised hosts. Parasitic myositis is most commonly a result of trichinosis or cystericercosis, but other protozoa or helminths may be involved. A parasitic cause of myositis is suggested by the travel history and presence of eosinophilia. Viruses may cause diffuse muscle involvement with clinical manifestations, such as benign acute myositis (most commonly due to influenza virus), pleurodynia (coxsackievirus B), acute rhabdomyolysis, or an immune-mediated polymyositis. The diagnosis of myositis is suggested by the clinical picture and radiologic imaging, and the etiologic agent is confirmed by microbiologic or serologic testing. Therapy is based on the clinical presentation and the underlying pathogen. PMID:18625683

  4. 3D printing of microscopic bacterial communities

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Jodi L.; Ritschdorff, Eric T.; Whiteley, Marvin; Shear, Jason B.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria communicate via short-range physical and chemical signals, interactions known to mediate quorum sensing, sporulation, and other adaptive phenotypes. Although most in vitro studies examine bacterial properties averaged over large populations, the levels of key molecular determinants of bacterial fitness and pathogenicity (e.g., oxygen, quorum-sensing signals) may vary over micrometer scales within small, dense cellular aggregates believed to play key roles in disease transmission. A detailed understanding of how cell–cell interactions contribute to pathogenicity in natural, complex environments will require a new level of control in constructing more relevant cellular models for assessing bacterial phenotypes. Here, we describe a microscopic three-dimensional (3D) printing strategy that enables multiple populations of bacteria to be organized within essentially any 3D geometry, including adjacent, nested, and free-floating colonies. In this laser-based lithographic technique, microscopic containers are formed around selected bacteria suspended in gelatin via focal cross-linking of polypeptide molecules. After excess reagent is removed, trapped bacteria are localized within sealed cavities formed by the cross-linked gelatin, a highly porous material that supports rapid growth of fully enclosed cellular populations and readily transmits numerous biologically active species, including polypeptides, antibiotics, and quorum-sensing signals. Using this approach, we show that a picoliter-volume aggregate of Staphylococcus aureus can display substantial resistance to β-lactam antibiotics by enclosure within a shell composed of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:24101503

  5. Bacterial ratchet motors

    PubMed Central

    Di Leonardo, R.; Angelani, L.; Dell’Arciprete, D.; Ruocco, G.; Iebba, V.; Schippa, S.; Conte, M. P.; Mecarini, F.; De Angelis, F.; Di Fabrizio, E.

    2010-01-01

    Self-propelling bacteria are a nanotechnology dream. These unicellular organisms are not just capable of living and reproducing, but they can swim very efficiently, sense the environment, and look for food, all packaged in a body measuring a few microns. Before such perfect machines can be artificially assembled, researchers are beginning to explore new ways to harness bacteria as propelling units for microdevices. Proposed strategies require the careful task of aligning and binding bacterial cells on synthetic surfaces in order to have them work cooperatively. Here we show that asymmetric environments can produce a spontaneous and unidirectional rotation of nanofabricated objects immersed in an active bacterial bath. The propulsion mechanism is provided by the self-assembly of motile Escherichia coli cells along the rotor boundaries. Our results highlight the technological implications of active matter’s ability to overcome the restrictions imposed by the second law of thermodynamics on equilibrium passive fluids. PMID:20457936

  6. Physics of Bacterial Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Sean X.; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Bacterial cells utilize three-dimensional (3D) protein assemblies to perform important cellular functions such as growth, division, chemoreception, and motility. These assemblies are composed of mechanoproteins that can mechanically deform and exert force. Sometimes, small-nucleotide hydrolysis is coupled to mechanical deformations. In this review, we describe the general principle for an understanding of the coupling of mechanics with chemistry in mechanochemical systems. We apply this principle to understand bacterial cell shape and morphogenesis and how mechanical forces can influence peptidoglycan cell wall growth. We review a model that can potentially reconcile the growth dynamics of the cell wall with the role of cytoskeletal proteins such as MreB and crescentin. We also review the application of mechanochemical principles to understand the assembly and constriction of the FtsZ ring. A number of potential mechanisms are proposed, and important questions are discussed. PMID:22126993

  7. Formation of bacterial nanocells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainshtein, Mikhail; Kudryashova, Ekaterina; Suzina, Natalia; Ariskina, Elena; Voronkov, Vadim

    1998-07-01

    Existence of nanobacteria received increasing attention both in environmental microbiology/geomicro-biology and in medical microbiology. In order to study a production of nanoforms by typical bacterial cells. Effects of different physical factors were investigated. Treatment of bacterial cultures with microwave radiation, or culturing in field of electric current resulted in formation a few types of nanocells. The number and type of nanoforms were determined with type and dose of the treatment. The produced nanoforms were: i) globules, ii) clusters of the globules--probably produced by liaison, iii) nanocells coated with membrane. The viability of the globules is an object opened for doubts. The nanocells discovered multiplication and growth on solidified nutrient media. The authors suggest that formation of nanocells is a common response of bacteria to stress-actions produced by different agents.

  8. [Bacterial diseases of rape].

    PubMed

    Zakharova, O M; Mel'nychuk, M D; Dankevych, L A; Patyka, V P

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial destruction of the culture was described and its agents identified in the spring and winter rape crops. Typical symptoms are the following: browning of stem tissue and its mucilagization, chlorosis of leaves, yellowing and beginning of soft rot in the place of leaf stalks affixion to stems, loss of pigmentation (violet). Pathogenic properties of the collection strains and morphological, cultural, physiological, and biochemical properties of the agents of rape's bacterial diseases isolated by the authors have been investigated. It was found that all the isolates selected by the authors are highly or moderately aggressive towards different varieties of rape. According to the complex of phenotypic properties 44% of the total number of isolates selected by the authors are related to representatives of the genus Pseudomonas, 37% - to Xanthomonas and 19% - to Pectobacterium. PMID:23293826

  9. Arctigenin Protects against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Pulmonary Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in a Mouse Model via Suppression of MAPK, HO-1, and iNOS Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-zhou; Jiang, Zheng-kui; He, Bao-xia; Liu, Xian-ben

    2015-08-01

    Arctigenin, a bioactive component of Arctium lappa (Nubang), has anti-inflammatory activity. Here, we investigated the effects of arctigenin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury. Mice were divided into four groups: control, LPS, LPS + DMSO, and LPS + Arctigenin. Mice in the LPS + Arctigenin group were injected intraperitoneally with 50 mg/kg of arctigenin 1 h before an intratracheal administration of LPS (5 mg/kg). Lung tissues and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALFs) were collected. Histological changes of the lung were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Arctigenin decreased LPS-induced acute lung inflammation, infiltration of inflammatory cells into BALF, and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, arctigenin pretreatment reduced the malondialdehyde level and increased superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and glutathione peroxidase/glutathione disulfide ratio in the lung. Mechanically, arctigenin significantly reduced the production of nitric oxygen and inducible nitric oxygen synthase (iNOS) expression, enhanced the expression of heme oxygenase-1, and decreased the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Arctigenin has anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects on LPS-induced acute lung injury, which are associated with modulation of MAPK, HO-1, and iNOS signaling. PMID:25616905

  10. Scabraside D Derived from Sea Cucumber Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Metastasis via iNOS and STAT-3 Expression in Human Cholangiocarcinoma Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Assawasuparerk, Kanjana; Rawangchue, Thanakorn; Phonarknguen, Rassameepen

    2016-01-01

    Scabraside D, a sulfated triterpene glycoside, was extracted from the sea cucumber Holothuria scabra. It shows anti-proliferation in many of cancer cell lines, but the function and mechanisms of action of scabraside D in human cholangiocarcinoma (HuCCA) have not previously determined. In this study, we investigated the activity of scabraside D on HuCCA cell apoptosis, lymphangiogenesis and metastasis in a nude mouse model. Scabraside D induced signs of apoptosis, such as cell shrinkage, nuclear condensation, nuclear fragmentation and DNA fragmentation on TUNEL assays, while effectively decreasing expression of BCl-2 but increasing caspase-3 gene level expression. Immunohistochemistry revealed that scabraside D significantly reduced lymphatic vessel density (LVD). Moreover, scabraside D treatment significantly decreased VEGF-C, MMP-9 and uPA gene expression, which play important roles in the lymphangiogenesis and invasion of cancer cells in metastasis processes. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that scabraside D significantly decreased iNOS and STAT-3 gene expression. This study demonstrated that scabraside D plays a role in activation of HuCCA tumor apoptosis and inhibition of lymphangiogenesis, invasion and metastasis through decreasing BCl-2, MMP-9, uPA and VEGF-C and increasing caspase-3 expression by suppression of iNOS and STAT-3 expression. Therefore, scabraside D could be a promising candidate for cholangiocarcinoma treatment. PMID:27221911

  11. eNOS and iNOS trigger apoptosis in the brains of sheep and goats naturally infected with the border disease virus.

    PubMed

    Dincel, Gungor Cagdas; Kul, Oguz

    2015-10-01

    In this study, apoptotic and anti-apoptotic mechanisms and if present, which pathway to trigger the apoptosis in the brains of Border Disease Virus (BDV) infected lambs (n=10) and goat kids (n=5) were investigated. Briefly, apoptotic (caspase 3, caspase 9) and anti-apoptotic markers (Bcl-2), cytokine response (TNF-α, INF-γ), reactive gliosis and myelin loss were examined. eNOS, iNOS, caspase 9, caspase 3 and GFAP expressions were higher in BDV infected tissues compared to control animals (6 kids and 6 lambs) (p<0.05). Double immunoperoxidase test revealed that TUNEL positive apoptotic cells showed significant association with increased eNOS-iNOS and iNOS-BDV expressions. However, no significant differences were found for TNFR1, TNF-α and INF-γ expressions in BD (p>0.05). There was a positive correlation between the intensity of myelin loss, GFAP activity and severity of infection. Inconclusion, as a novel finding, it is established that eNOS and iNOS overexpressions are co-associated with apoptosis in BDV infected neurons and neuroglia. The results also strongly suggested that BDV infected apoptotic cells mainly prefer the intrinsic pathway that might be most likely related to increased nitric oxide levels. PMID:25882134

  12. Dental pulp in mature replanted human teeth: morphological alterations and metalloproteineses-2 and -9, Annexin-5, BCL-2 and iNOS modulation.

    PubMed

    Leone, A; Angelova Volponi, A; Uzzo, M L; Spatola, G F; Jurjus, A; Vandevska-Radunovic, V

    2015-01-01

    Tooth replantation, as a treatment concept, has been subject to controversies regarding the mechanism as well as the various parameters underlying this process. This work aimed to study time-related changes in the pulp of replanted mature human premolars through the changes in the levels of certain factors involved in the underlying mechanisms of pulpal tissue healing after replantation. Eleven experimental mature teeth were extracted, immediately replanted in the original socket and left without any other intervention for 1, 2, 3 and 12 weeks before re-extraction. Three premolars served as control. All specimens were subject to histological analysis and the levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, Annexin V, iNOS and BCL-2 (anti-apoptotic family) were analyzed employing immunohistochemistry. The results showed degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM), inflammatory cell infiltrate, loss in pulpo-dentine interface and loss of odontoblasts in the dental pulp tissue. This was accompanied by increase over time of MMP-9, Annexin V, iNOS and a decrease of BCL-2 and MMP-2, suggesting that apoptosis increased throughout the experimental period. PMID:26753662

  13. Transition from two to one integument in Prunus species: expression pattern of INNER NO OUTER (INO), ABERRANT TESTA SHAPE (ATS) and ETTIN (ETT).

    PubMed

    Lora, Jorge; Hormaza, José I; Herrero, Maria

    2015-10-01

    While gymnosperm ovules have one integument, in most angiosperms two integuments surround the ovules. Unitegmic ovules have arisen independently several times during the evolution of angiosperms, but the ultimate genetic cause of the presence of a single integument remains elusive. We compared species of the genus Prunus that have different numbers of integuments: bitegmic species, such as Prunus armeniaca (apricot) and Prunus persica (peach), and unitegmic species, such as Prunus incisa, analyzing the expression pattern of genes that are involved in integument development in Arabidopsis thaliana: INNER NO OUTER (INO), ABERRANT TESTA SHAPE (ATS) and ETTIN (ETT). Bitegmic and unitegmic species showed similar INO expression patterns, indicative of the conservation of an outer integument. However, expression of ETT, which occurs in the boundary of the outer and inner integuments, was altered in unitegmic ovules, which showed lack of ETT expression. These results strongly suggest that the presence of a single integument could be attributable to the amalgamation of two integuments and support the role of ETT in the fusion of the outer and inner integuments in unitegmic ovules, a situation that could be widespread in other unitegmic species of angiosperms. PMID:25991552

  14. Bacterial transformation of terpenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishko, V. V.; Nogovitsina, Y. M.; Ivshina, I. B.

    2014-04-01

    Data on the bacterial transformation of terpenoids published in the literature in the past decade are analyzed. Possible pathways for chemo-, regio- and stereoselective modifications of terpenoids are discussed. Considerable attention is given to new technological approaches to the synthesis of terpenoid derivatives suitable for the use in the perfume and food industry and promising as drugs and chiral intermediates for fine organic synthesis. The bibliography includes 246 references.

  15. Hydrangenol inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide production in BV2 microglial cells by suppressing the NF-κB pathway and activating the Nrf2-mediated HO-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Ju; Kang, Chang-Hee; Jayasooriya, Rajapaksha Gedara Prasad Tharanga; Dilshara, Matharage Gayani; Lee, Seungheon; Choi, Yung Hyun; Seo, Yong Taek; Kim, Gi-Young

    2016-06-01

    We previously demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effect of water extract of Hydrangea macrophylla in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophage cells. Here, we investigated whether hydrangenol, a bioactive component of H. macrophylla, attenuates the expression of nitric oxide (NO) and its associated gene, inducible NO synthase (iNOS), in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglial cells. Our data showed that low dosages of hydrangenol inhibited LPS-stimulated NO release and iNOS expression without any accompanying cytotoxicity. Hydrangenol also suppressed LPS-induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) subunits, consequently inhibiting DNA-binding activity of NF-κB. Additionally, the NF-κB inhibitors, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) and PS-1145, significantly attenuated LPS-induced iNOS expression, indicating that hydrangenol-induced NF-κB inhibition might be a key regulator of iNOS expression. Furthermore, our data showed that hydrangenol suppresses NO production by inducing heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). The presence of cobalt protoporphyrin, a specific HO-1 inducer, potently suppressed LPS-induced NO production. Hydrangenol also promoted nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and subsequently increased its binding activity at the specific antioxidant response element sites. Additionally, transient knockdown of Nrf2 significantly downregulated hydrangenol-induced HO-1 expression, indicating that hydrangenol-induced Nrf2 is an upstream regulator of HO-1. Taken together, these data suggest that hydrangenol attenuates NO production and iNOS expression in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglial cells by inhibiting NF-κB activation and by stimulating the Nrf2-mediated HO-1 signaling pathway. Therefore, hydrangenol is a promising therapeutic agent for treatment of LPS-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:27032067

  16. Neglected Bacterial Zoonoses

    PubMed Central

    Chikeka, Ijeuru; Dumler, J. Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial zoonoses comprise a group of diseases in humans or animals acquired by direct contact with or by oral consumption of contaminated animal materials, or via arthropod vectors. Among neglected infections, bacterial zoonoses are among the most neglected given emerging data on incidence and prevalence as causes of acute febrile illness, even in areas where recognized neglected tropical diseases occur frequently. While many other bacterial infections could also be considered in this neglected category, five distinct infections stand out because they are globally distributed, are acute febrile diseases, have high rates of morbidity and case fatality, and are reported as commonly as malaria, typhoid or dengue virus infections in carefully designed studies in which a broad spectrum diagnoses are actively sought. Thus, this review will focus attention on leptospirosis, relapsing fever borreliosis, and rickettsioses, including scrub typhus, murine typhus and spotted fever group rickettsiosis. Of greatest interest is the lack of distinguishing clinical features among these infections when in humans, which confounds diagnosis where laboratory confirmation is lacking, and in regions where clinical diagnosis is often attributed to one of several perceived more common threats. As diseases such as malaria come under improved control, the real impact of these common and under-recognized infections will become evident, as will the requirement for the strategies and allocation of resources for their control. PMID:25964152

  17. Acute Bacterial Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Vincent; Lammert, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute bacterial cholangitis for the most part owing to common bile duct stones is common in gastroenterology practice and represents a potentially life-threatening condition often characterized by fever, abdominal pain, and jaundice (Charcot's triad) as well as confusion and septic shock (Reynolds' pentad). Methods This review is based on a systematic literature review in PubMed with the search items ‘cholangitis’, ‘choledocholithiasis’, ‘gallstone disease’, ‘biliary infection’, and ‘biliary sepsis’. Results Although most patients respond to empiric broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment, timely endoscopic biliary drainage depending on the severity of the disease is required to eliminate the underlying obstruction. Specific recommendations have been derived from the Tokyo guideline working group consensus 2006 and its update in 2013, albeit poorly evidence-based, providing a comprehensive overview of diagnosis, classification, risk stratification, and treatment algorithms in acute bacterial cholangitis. Conclusion Prompt clinical recognition and accurate diagnostic workup including adequate laboratory assessment and (aetiology-oriented) imaging are critical steps in the management of cholangitis. Treatment is directed at the two major interrelated pathophysiologic components, i.e. bacterial infection (immediate antimicrobial therapy) and bile duct obstruction (biliary drainage). As for the latter, transpapillary endoscopic drainage by stent or nasobiliary drain and/or same-session bile duct clearance, depending on individual disease severity, represent first-line treatment approaches. PMID:26468310

  18. Function, structure, and mechanism in bacterial photosensory LOV proteins

    PubMed Central

    Herrou, Julien; Crosson, Sean

    2012-01-01

    LOV domains are protein photosensors conserved in bacteria, archaea, plants and fungi that detect blue light via a flavin cofactor. In the bacterial kingdom, LOV domains are present in both chemotrophic and phototrophic species, where they are found N-terminally of signaling and regulatory domains such as sensor histidine kinases, diguanylate cyclases/phosphodiesterases, DNA-binding domains, and σ factor regulators. In this review, we describe the current state of knowledge on the function of bacterial LOV proteins, the structural basis of LOV domain-mediated signal transduction, and the use of LOV domains as genetically-encoded photoswitches in synthetic biology. PMID:21822294

  19. Diverse mechanisms for inflammasome sensing of cytosolic bacteria and bacterial virulence.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Shao, Feng

    2016-02-01

    The inflammasomes are emerging cytosolic defenses against bacterial infections. The inflammasomes converge on inflammatory caspases activation that triggers pyroptosis, and interleukin-1β/18 maturation in the case of caspase-1 activation. The inflammasomes not only detect major bacterial molecules but also sense bacterial virulence activity. Among the canonical caspase-1-activating inflammasomes, the NAIP subfamily of NLR proteins serves as the receptors for bacterial flagellin and type III secretion apparatus; Pyrin indirectly senses Rho modification/inactivation by various bacterial agents; NLRP1 in mice/rats detects the protease activity of anthrax lethal toxin by serving as its substrate. Caspase-11 and caspase-4/5 directly recognize bacterial LPS and then become activated. Inflammasome sensing of cytosolic bacteria employs much more diversified biochemical mechanisms, compared with Toll-like receptors-mediated recognition on the membrane. PMID:26562791

  20. Study of bacterial adhesion on biomimetic temperature responsive glycopolymer surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinan; Kotsuchibashi, Yohei; Liu, Yang; Narain, Ravin

    2015-01-28

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen responsible for diseases such as bacteremia, chronic lung infection, and acute ulcerative keratitis. P. aeruginosa induced diseases can be fatal as the exotoxins and endotoxins released by the bacterium continue to damage host tissues even after the administration of antibiotics. As bacterial adhesion on cell surfaces is the first step in bacterial based pathogen infections, the control of bacteria-cell interactions is a worthwhile research target. In this work, thermally responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) [P(NIPAAm)] based biomimetic surfaces were developed to study the two major bacterial infection mechanisms, which is believed to be mediated by hydrophobic or lectin-carbohydrate interactions, using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation. Although, a greater number of P. aeruginosa adhered to the NIPAAm homopolymer modified surfaces at temperatures higher than the lower critical solution temperature (LCST), the bacterium-substratum bond stiffness was stronger between P. aeruginosa and a galactose based P(NIPAAm) surface. The high bacterial adhesion bond stiffness observed on the galactose based thermally responsive surface at 37 °C might suggest that both hydrophobic and lectin-carbohydrate interactions contribute to bacterial adhesion on cell surfaces. Our investigation also suggests that the lectin-carbohydrate interaction play a significant role in bacterial infections. PMID:25548940

  1. Metamorphosis of a Butterfly-Associated Bacterial Community

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Tobin J.; McMillan, W. Owen; Fierer, Noah

    2014-01-01

    Butterflies are charismatic insects that have long been a focus of biological research. They are also habitats for microorganisms, yet these microbial symbionts are little-studied, despite their likely importance to butterfly ecology and evolution. In particular, the diversity and composition of the microbial communities inhabiting adult butterflies remain uncharacterized, and it is unknown how the larval (caterpillar) and adult microbiota compare. To address these knowledge gaps, we used Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from internal bacterial communities associated with multiple life stages of the neotropical butterfly Heliconius erato. We found that the leaf-chewing larvae and nectar- and pollen-feeding adults of H. erato contain markedly distinct bacterial communities, a pattern presumably rooted in their distinct diets. Larvae and adult butterflies host relatively small and similar numbers of bacterial phylotypes, but few are common to both stages. The larval microbiota clearly simplifies and reorganizes during metamorphosis; thus, structural changes in a butterfly's bacterial community parallel those in its own morphology. We furthermore identify specific bacterial taxa that may mediate larval and adult feeding biology in Heliconius and other butterflies. Although male and female Heliconius adults differ in reproductive physiology and degree of pollen feeding, bacterial communities associated with H. erato are not sexually dimorphic. Lastly, we show that captive and wild individuals host different microbiota, a finding that may have important implications for the relevance of experimental studies using captive butterflies. PMID:24466308

  2. Brood size modifications affect plumage bacterial assemblages of European starlings.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Françoise S; Moureau, Benoit; Jourdie, Violaine; Heeb, Philipp

    2005-02-01

    During reproduction, birds face trade-offs between time and energy devoted to parental effort and traits associated with self-maintenance. We manipulated brood sizes to investigate the effects of such trade-offs on feather bacterial densities and the structure of bacterial assemblages on feathers in adult European starlings, Sturnus vulgaris, and in vitro feather degradation. As predicted by a trade-off between parental effort and self-maintenance, we found that birds with enlarged broods had more free-living bacteria on their feathers than birds with reduced broods. Furthermore, we found a significant interaction between brood manipulation and original brood size on free-living bacterial densities suggesting that the trade-off is mediated by the adults' initial reproductive investment. In contrast, brood size manipulations had no significant effect on densities of attached bacteria. Using ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA), we demonstrated that brood manipulations significantly modified the structure (band pattern) of feather-degrading bacterial assemblages, but had no significant effect on their richness (number of bands) or the in vitro feather degradation. In vitro feather degradation varied in relation to the premanipulation brood size and positively with the richness of the feather degrading bacterial community. Besides brood manipulation effect, we found that ecological factors and individual traits, such as the age, the nest location or the capture date, shaped bacterial assemblages and feather degradation capacities. PMID:15660952

  3. BACTERIALLY-MEDIATED DEGRADATION OF A CHIRAL DISINFECTION BYPRODUCT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection of drinking and waste waters, through chlorination, can result in the production of chlorinated organic compounds, many of which are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Among these regulated compounds are the haloacetic acids, which exhibit toxic e...

  4. Dentigerumycin: a bacterial mediator of an ant-fungus symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dong-Chan; Poulsen, Michael; Currie, Cameron R.; Clardy, Jon

    2009-01-01

    Fungus-growing ants engage in mutualistic associations with both the fungus they cultivate for food and actinobacteria (Pseudonocardia spp.) that produce selective antibiotics to defend that fungus from specialized fungal parasites. In the first system to be analyzed at the molecular level, the bacterium associated with the ant Apterostigma dentigerum produces dentigerumycin, a cyclic depsipeptide with highly modified amino acids, to selectively inhibit the parasitic fungus (Escovopsis sp.). PMID:19330011

  5. Second messenger-mediated adjustment of bacterial swimming velocity.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Alex; Kaiser, Matthias; Li, Hui; Spangler, Christian; Kasper, Christoph Alexander; Ackermann, Martin; Kaever, Volkhard; Sourjik, Victor; Roth, Volker; Jenal, Urs

    2010-04-01

    Bacteria swim by means of rotating flagella that are powered by ion influx through membrane-spanning motor complexes. Escherichia coli and related species harness a chemosensory and signal transduction machinery that governs the direction of flagellar rotation and allows them to navigate in chemical gradients. Here, we show that Escherichia coli can also fine-tune its swimming speed with the help of a molecular brake (YcgR) that, upon binding of the nucleotide second messenger cyclic di-GMP, interacts with the motor protein MotA to curb flagellar motor output. Swimming velocity is controlled by the synergistic action of at least five signaling proteins that adjust the cellular concentration of cyclic di-GMP. Activation of this network and the resulting deceleration coincide with nutrient depletion and might represent an adaptation to starvation. These experiments demonstrate that bacteria can modulate flagellar motor output and thus swimming velocity in response to environmental cues. PMID:20303158

  6. INCREASED PULMONARY DISEASE MEDIATED THROUGH ALTERED BACTERIAL DEFENSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The process of infection has been defined as an interaction of a host, a microbe, and the environment. In the natural environment, healthy individuals exist in equilibrium with potentially pathogenic microorganisms. Using this concept, an animal-model system was developed to stud...

  7. Role of iNOS gene expression in the anti-inflammatory and tissue protective mechanisms of continuous wave at 630-905nm and 905nm superpulsed laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandel, Arkady; Moriyama, Yumi; Fong, Jamie; Dumoulin-White, Roger; Lilge, Lothar

    2012-03-01

    Up regulation of iNOS gene expression is playing a role in the initiation of the anti-inflammatory and tissue protective mechanisms related to nitric oxide (NO) for continuous wave red and infrared as well as 905nm superpulsed laser therapy (SPLT). The iNOS expression before and after laser therapy was evaluated in a zymosan-induced acute arthritis model, in knee joints of young (<15 weeks), middle aged (>15 weeks and < 35 weeks) and old (> 35 weeks) FVB/N-Tg (iNOS-luc) mice by bioluminescence imaging.

  8. Piperine inhibits IL-β induced expression of inflammatory mediators in human osteoarthritis chondrocyte.

    PubMed

    Ying, Xiaozhou; Chen, Xiaowei; Cheng, Shaowen; Shen, Yue; Peng, Lei; Xu, Hua Zi

    2013-10-01

    Black pepper (Piper nigrum) is a common remedy in Traditional Chinese Medicine and possesses diverse biological activities including anti-inflammatory properties. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease with an inflammatory component that drives the degradation of cartilage extracellular matrix. The present study aimed to assess the effects of piperine, the active phenolic component in black pepper extract, on human OA chondrocytes. In this study, human OA chondrocytes were pretreated with piperine at 10, 50 or 100μg/ml and subsequently stimulated with IL-1β (5ng/ml) for 24h. Production of PGE2 and NO was evaluated by the Griess reaction and an ELISA. Gene expression of MMP-3, MMP-13, iNOS and COX-2 was measured by real-time PCR. MMP-3 and MMP-13 proteins in culture medium were determined using cytokine-specific ELISA. Western immunoblotting was used to analyze the iNOS and COX-2 protein production in the culture medium. The regulation of NF-kB activity and the degradation of IkB were explored using luciferase and Western immunoblotting, respectively. We found that piperine inhibited the production of PGE2 and NO induced by IL-1β. Piperine significantly decreased the IL-1β-stimulated gene expression and production of MMP-3, MMP-13, iNOS and COX-2 in human OA chondrocytes. Piperine inhibited the IL-1β-mediated activation of NF-κB by suppressing the degradation of its inhibitory protein IκBα in the cytoplasm. The present report is first to demonstrate the anti-inflammatory activity of piperine in human OA chondrocytes. Piperine can effectively abrogate the IL-1β-induced over-expression of inflammatory mediators; suggesting that piperine may be a potential agent in the treatment of OA. PMID:23838114

  9. Nitric oxide-mediated apoptosis of neutrophils through caspase-8 and caspase-3-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Megha; Nagarkoti, Sheela; Awasthi, Deepika; Singh, Abhishek K; Chandra, Tulika; Kumaravelu, J; Barthwal, Manoj K; Dikshit, Madhu

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils play an indispensable role in killing of invading pathogens by enhancing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and NO generation, and subsequently undergoing apoptosis. Unlike ROS/NOX2, role of NO/NOS still remains undefined in the apoptosis of neutrophils (PMNs) and the present study attempts to decipher the importance of NO/NOS in the neutrophil apoptosis. Prolonged treatment of human PMNs or mice bone marrow derived neutrophils (BMDN) with NO led to enhanced ROS generation, caspase-8/caspase-3 cleavage, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and finally cellular apoptosis. NO-induced ROS generation led to caspase-8 deglutathionylation and activation, which subsequently activated mitochondrial death pathway via BID (Bcl-2 family protein) cleavage. NO-mediated augmentation of caspase-8 and BID cleavage was significantly prevented in BMDN from neutrophil cytosolic factor-1 (NCF-1) knockout (KO) mice, implying the involvement of NOX2 in NO-induced apoptosis of PMNs. Furthermore, ROS, NO generation and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression were enhanced in a time-dependent manner in human PMNs and mice BMDN undergoing spontaneous apoptosis. Pharmacological and genetic ablation of iNOS in human PMNs and mice BMDN significantly reduced the levels of apoptosis. Impaired apoptosis of BMDN from iNOS KO mice was due to reduced caspase-8 activity which subsequently prevented caspase-3 and -9 activation. Altogether, our results suggest a crucial role of NO/iNOS in neutrophil apoptosis via enhanced ROS generation and caspase-8 mediated activation of mitochondrial death pathway. PMID:27584786

  10. Mediator Deathwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Tony

    2005-01-01

    The most discussed and analyzed form of deathwork is the dyadic "therapist" [double arrow] "client" relationship, but this far from exhausts the various types of professional work involving the dead. Mediator deathwork is where the professional gleans or constructs information about the dead, edits and polishes it, and publicly presents the edited…

  11. Bacterial infections in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Botwin, Gregory J; Morgan, Timothy R

    2014-09-01

    Bacterial infections occur in 25-35 % of cirrhotics admitted to hospital. Health-care associated and hospital acquired (nosocomial) infections are the most common epidemiology, with community acquired infections less common (15-30 %). Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and urinary infections are the most common sites, with spontaneous bacteremia, pneumonia, cellulitis and other sites being less common. The risk of infection is increased among subjects with more severe liver disease and an infection in the past 6 months. Bacteria are isolated from approximately half of patients with a clinical diagnosis of infection. Gram-negative enterobacteriaceae are the most common organisms among community acquired infections; Gram-positive cocci are the most common organisms isolated among subjects with nosocomial infections. Up to 30 % of hospital associated infections are with multidrug resistant bacteria. Consequently, empiric antibiotic therapy that is recommended for community acquired infections is often inadequate for nosocomial infections. Infections worsen liver function. In-hospital and 1-year mortality of cirrhotics with infections is significantly higher than among cirrhotics without infection. In-hospital complications of infections, such as severe sepsis and septic shock, and mortality, are increased among subjects with multidrug-resistant infections as compared with cirrhotics with susceptible bacteria. Short-term antibiotic prophylaxis of cirrhotics with upper gastrointestinal bleeding and long-term antibiotic prophylaxis of selected cirrhotics with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis reduces infections and improves survival. Albumin administration to cirrhotics with SBP and evidence of advanced liver disease improves survival. The benefit of albumin administration to cirrhotics with infections other than SBP is under investigation. PMID:26201326

  12. Bacterial Skin Infections.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Fadi; Khan, Tariq; Pujalte, George G A

    2015-12-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections account for 0.5% of outpatient visits to primary care. Skin and soft tissue infections can usually be managed in an outpatient setting. However, there are certain circumstances as discussed in this article that require more urgent care or inpatient management. Primary care providers should be able to diagnose, manage, and provide appropriate follow-up care for these frequently seen skin infections. This article provides family physicians with a comprehensive review of the assessment and management of common bacterial skin infections. PMID:26612370

  13. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Dukowicz, Andrew C.; Levine, Gary M.

    2007-01-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), defined as excessive bacteria in the small intestine, remains a poorly understood disease. Initially thought to occur in only a small number of patients, it is now apparent that this disorder is more prevalent than previously thought. Patients with SIBO vary in presentation, from being only mildly symptomatic to suffering from chronic diarrhea, weight loss, and malabsorption. A number of diagnostic tests are currently available, although the optimal treatment regimen remains elusive. Recently there has been renewed interest in SIBO and its putative association with irritable bowel syndrome. In this comprehensive review, we will discuss the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of SIBO. PMID:21960820

  14. Bacterial terpene cyclases.

    PubMed

    Dickschat, Jeroen S

    2016-01-01

    Covering: up to 2015. This review summarises the accumulated knowledge about characterised bacterial terpene cyclases. The structures of identified products and of crystallised enzymes are included, and the obtained insights into enzyme mechanisms are discussed. After a summary of mono-, sesqui- and diterpene cyclases the special cases of the geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol synthases that are both particularly widespread in bacteria will be presented. A total number of 63 enzymes that have been characterised so far is presented, with 132 cited references. PMID:26563452

  15. Bacterial porins stimulate bone resorption.

    PubMed Central

    Meghji, S; Henderson, B; Nair, S P; Tufano, M A

    1997-01-01

    Porins are abundant outer membrane proteins of gram-negative bacteria involved in transport of low-molecular-mass molecules. During the past decade, porins from a number of bacteria have also been shown to have proinflammatory activities including inducing the synthesis of proinflammatory mediators (cytokines, platelet-activating factor, and nitric oxide) in cultured cells and inducing inflammation in vivo. With this range of actions, it was possible that porins could also interact with bone cells to cause aberrant bone remodeling and that this could contribute to the bone destruction seen in gram-negative bone infections. By using purified preparations of Salmonella typhimurium and Pseudomonas aeruginosa porins, in the presence of polymyxin B, it was possible to induce concentration-dependent loss of calcium from cultured murine calvaria at porin concentrations in the range of 1 to 10 nM. The mechanism of action of the porins was determined by the inclusion of inhibitors of cyclooxygenase or inflammatory cytokines in the culture media. The bone-resorbing activity of both porins was not inhibited by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin or by neutralizing the activity of tumor necrosis factor. Indeed, relatively high concentrations of these agents produced an unexpected increase in the bone resorption induced by the porins. In contrast, porin-induced bone resorption could be inhibited by relatively high concentrations of the natural inhibitor of interleukin-1 (IL-1 receptor antagonist). It appears that these porins stimulate bone resorption by a mechanism distinct from that of lipopolysaccharide, and the possibility therefore exists that porins play a role in bone destruction in gram-negative bacterial infections of bone. PMID:9119467

  16. Zinc protoporphyrin inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-, lipoteichoic acid-, and peptidoglycan-induced nitric oxide production through stimulating iNOS protein ubiquitination

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, J.-M.; Lin, H.-Y.; Shen, S.-C.; Wu, M.-S.; Lin, C.-W.; Chiu, W.-T.; Lin, C.-H. Chen, Y.-C.

    2009-06-15

    In the present study, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), but not ferric protoporphyrin (FePP), tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), or zinc chloride (ZnCl{sub 2}), at the doses of 0.5, 1, and 2 {mu}M, dose-dependently inhibited lipopolysaccharide- (LPS), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), and peptidoglycan (PGN)-induced inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) and nitric oxide (NO) production with an increase in heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) protein in RAW264.7 macrophages in a serum-free condition. NO inhibition and HO-1 induction by ZnPP were blocked by the separate addition of fetal bovine serum (FBS) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). A decrease in the iNOS/NO ratio and an increase in HO-1 protein by ZnPP were identified in three different conditions including ZnPP pretreatment, ZnPP co-treatment, and ZnPP post-treatment with LPS and LTA. Activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) and extracellular regulated kinases (ERKs) were detected in LPS-, LTA-, and PGN-treated RAW264.7 cells, and iNOS/NO production was blocked by adding the JNK inhibitor, SP600125, but not the ERK inhibitor, PD98059. However, ZnPP addition potentiated ERK and JNK protein phosphorylation stimulated by LPS, LTA, and PGN. Increases in total protein ubiquitination and ubiquitinated iNOS proteins were detected in ZnPP-treated macrophages elicited by LPS according to Western and immunoprecipitation/Western blotting assays, respectively. The decrease in LPS-induced iNOS protein by ZnPP was reversed by adding the proteasome inhibitors MG132 and lactacystin. The reduction in HO-1 protein induced by ZnPP via transfection of HO-1 small interfering RNA did not affect the inhibitory effect of ZnPP against LPS-induced iNOS/NO production and protein ubiquitination induced by ZnPP in macrophages. Data of the present study provide the first evidence to support ZnPP effectively inhibiting inflammatory iNOS/NO production through activation of protein ubiquitination in a HO-1-independent manner in macrophages.

  17. Immune modulation of the pulmonary hypertensive response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin) in broilers.

    PubMed

    Wideman, R F; Chapman, M E; Wang, W; Erf, G F

    2004-04-01

    The lungs of broilers are constantly challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) that can activate leukocytes and trigger thromboxane A2 (TxA2)- and serotonin (5HT)-mediated pulmonary vasoconstriction leading to pulmonary hypertension. Among broilers from a single genetic line, some individuals respond to LPS with large increases in pulmonary arterial pressure, whereas others fail to exhibit any response to the same supramaximal dose of LPS. This extreme variability in the pulmonary hypertensive response to LPS appears to reflect variability in the types or proportions of chemical mediators released by leukocytes. Our research has confirmed that TxA2 and 5HT are potent pulmonary vasoconstrictors in broilers and that broilers hatched and reared together consistently exhibit pulmonary hypertension after i.v. injections of TxA2 or 5HT. Previous in vitro studies conducted using macrophages from different lines of chickens demonstrated innate variability in the LPS-stimulated induction of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) followed by the onset of an LPS-refractory state. The NOS enzyme converts arginine to citrulline and nitric oxide (NO). It is known that NO produced by endothelial NOS serves as a key modulator of flow-dependent pulmonary vasodilation, and it is likely that NO generated by iNOS also contributes to the pulmonary vasodilator response. Accordingly, it is our hypothesis that the pulmonary hypertensive response to LPS in broilers is minimal when more vasodilators (NO, prostacyclin) than vasoconstrictors (TxA2, 5HT) are generated during an LPS challenge. Indeed, inhibiting NO production through pharmacological blockade of NOS with the inhibitor Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester modestly increased the baseline pulmonary arterial pressure and dramatically increased the pulmonary hypertensive response to LPS in all broilers evaluated. Innate differences in the effect of LPS on the pulmonary vasculature may contribute to differences in susceptibility of

  18. Proteomic evidence of bacterial peptide translocation in afebrile patients with cirrhosis and ascites.

    PubMed

    Caño, Rocío; Llanos, Lucía; Zapater, Pedro; Pascual, Sonia; Bellot, Pablo; Barquero, Claudia; Pérez-Mateo, Miguel; Such, José; Francés, Rubén

    2010-05-01

    Bacterial translocation in patients with cirrhosis induces a marked proinflammatory activity that may be different against viable bacteria or bacterial products. The aim of this study is to identify new markers of bacterial translocation by investigating bacterial-driven peptides and correlate their presence with the inflammatory response. Patients with cirrhosis and ascites were included. An analysis by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of ascitic fluid total protein from patients (n = 47) and from frequently detected bacterial strains was performed. Two-dimensional maps were digitally compared. The identification of possible markers was performed by mass spectrometry. TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, IL-12, nitric oxide, and proteins of the complement and lipopolysaccharide-binding protein levels were measured in ascitic fluid samples of patients by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Patients were distributed according to the presence (group I, n = 16) and absence (group II, n = 31) of serum and ascitic fluid bacterial DNA. Among clinical and analytical differences between groups, only mean arterial pressure was significantly higher in patients from group II. Identified bacterial peptides were associated with bacterial protection against immune defenses and included glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase A, Porin OmpC, and HSP60. Eight patients from group I also showed bacterial peptides, whereas none from group II did. All studied mediators of immune activation were significantly higher in patients with bacterial DNA than in patients without bacterial DNA. TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, and proteins of the complement were significantly increased in patients with bacterial peptides versus those without bacterial peptides. Bacterial peptide translocation is present in the ascitic fluid of a subgroup of patients with advanced cirrhosis and is associated with an increased immune response. PMID:20087563

  19. Animal Models of Bacterial Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Marquart, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial keratitis is a disease of the cornea characterized by pain, redness, inflammation, and opacity. Common causes of this disease are Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Animal models of keratitis have been used to elucidate both the bacterial factors and the host inflammatory response involved in the disease. Reviewed herein are animal models of bacterial keratitis and some of the key findings in the last several decades. PMID:21274270

  20. Mechanism of Bacterial Oligosaccharyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Sabina; Lizak, Christian; Michaud, Gaëlle; Bucher, Monika; Darbre, Tamis; Aebi, Markus; Reymond, Jean-Louis; Locher, Kaspar P.

    2013-01-01

    N-Linked glycosylation is an essential post-translational protein modification in the eukaryotic cell. The initial transfer of an oligosaccharide from a lipid carrier onto asparagine residues within a consensus sequon is catalyzed by oligosaccharyltransferase (OST). The first X-ray structure of a complete bacterial OST enzyme, Campylobacter lari PglB, was recently determined. To understand the mechanism of PglB, we have quantified sequon binding and glycosylation turnover in vitro using purified enzyme and fluorescently labeled, synthetic peptide substrates. Using fluorescence anisotropy, we determined a dissociation constant of 1.0 μm and a strict requirement for divalent metal ions for consensus (DQNAT) sequon binding. Using in-gel fluorescence detection, we quantified exceedingly low glycosylation rates that remained undetected using in vivo assays. We found that an alanine in the −2 sequon position, converting the bacterial sequon to a eukaryotic one, resulted in strongly lowered sequon binding, with in vitro turnover reduced 50,000-fold. A threonine is preferred over serine in the +2 sequon position, reflected by a 4-fold higher affinity and a 1.2-fold higher glycosylation rate. The interaction of the +2 sequon position with PglB is modulated by isoleucine 572. Our study demonstrates an intricate interplay of peptide and metal binding as the first step of protein N-glycosylation. PMID:23382388

  1. The bacterial gliding machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Abhishek

    Cells of Flavobacterium johnsoniae, a rod-shaped bacterium, glide over surfaces with speeds reaching up to 2 micrometer's. Gliding is powered by a protonmotive force. The adhesin SprB forms filaments about 160 nm long that move on the cell-surface along a looped track. Interaction of SprB filaments with a surface produces gliding. We tethered F. johnsoniae cells to glass by adding anti-SprB antibody. Tethered cells spun about fixed points, rotating at speeds of about 1 Hz. The torques required to sustain such speeds were large, comparable to those generated by the flagellar rotary motor. Using a flow cell apparatus, we changed load on the gliding motor by adding the viscous agent Ficoll to tethered cells. We found that a gliding motor runs at constant speed rather than constant torque. We attached gold nanoparticles to the SprB filament and tracked its motion. We fluorescently tagged a bacterial Type IX secretion system (T9SS) protein and imaged its dynamics. Fluorescently tagged T9SS protein localized near the point of tether, indicating that T9SS localizes with the gliding motor. Based on our results, we propose a model to explain bacterial gliding.

  2. [Endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis].

    PubMed

    Cornut, P-L; Chiquet, C

    2011-01-01

    Endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis, also called metastatic bacterial endophthalmitis, remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. It is a rare and potentially sight-threatening ocular infection that occurs when bacteria reach the eye via the bloodstream, cross the blood-ocular barrier, and multiply within the eye. It usually affects immunocompromised patients and those suffering from diabetes mellitus, malignancy, or cardiac disease, but has also been reported after invasive procedures or in previously healthy people. In most cases, the ocular symptoms occur after the diagnosis of septicemia or systemic infection. Ocular symptoms include decreased vision, redness, discharge, pain, and floaters. The ocular inflammatory signs may be anterior and/or posterior. Bilateral involvement occurs in nearly 25% of cases. A wide range of microorganisms are involved, with differences in their frequency according to geography as well as the patient's age and past medical history, because of variations in the predisposing conditions and the source of the sepsis. The majority of patients are initially misdiagnosed, and ophthalmologists should be aware of this because prompt local and general management is required to save the eye and/or the patient's life. PMID:21145128

  3. virB-Mediated Survival of Brucella abortus in Mice and Macrophages Is Independent of a Functional Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase or NADPH Oxidase in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yao-Hui; den Hartigh, Andreas B.; de Lima Santos, Renato; Adams, L. Garry; Tsolis, Renée M.

    2002-01-01

    The Brucella abortus virB locus is required for establishing chronic infection in the mouse. Using in vitro and in vivo models, we investigated whether virB is involved in evasion of the bactericidal activity of NADPH oxidase and the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in macrophages. Elimination of NADPH oxidase or iNOS activity in macrophages in vitro increased recovery of wild-type B. abortus but not recovery of a virB mutant. In mice lacking either NADPH oxidase or iNOS, however, B. abortus infected and persisted to the same extent as it did in congenic C57BL/6 mice up until 60 days postinfection, suggesting that these host defense mechanisms are not critical for limiting bacterial growth in the mouse. A virB mutant did not exhibit increased survival in either of the knockout mouse strains, indicating that this locus does not contribute to evasion of nitrosative or oxidative killing mechanisms in vivo. PMID:12183526

  4. Nanoparticle Approaches against Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Weiwei; Thamphiwatana, Soracha; Angsantikul, Pavimol; Zhang, Liangfang

    2014-01-01

    Despite the wide success of antibiotics, the treatment of bacterial infection still faces significant challenges, particularly the emergence of antibiotic resistance. As a result, nanoparticle drug delivery platforms including liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, dendrimers, and various inorganic nanoparticles have been increasingly exploited to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of existing antibiotics. This review focuses on areas where nanoparticle approaches hold significant potential to advance the treatment of bacterial infection. These areas include targeted antibiotic delivery, environmentally responsive antibiotic delivery, combinatorial antibiotic delivery, nanoparticle-enabled antibacterial vaccination, and nanoparticle-based bacterial detection. In each area we highlight the innovative antimicrobial nanoparticle platforms and review their progress made against bacterial infections. PMID:25044325

  5. Languages and dialects: bacterial communication beyond homoserine lactones.

    PubMed

    Brameyer, Sophie; Bode, Helge B; Heermann, Ralf

    2015-09-01

    Gram-negative bacteria use N-acyl homoserine lactones (acyl-HSLs) for communication, predominantly mediated by LuxR-type receptors. Recent studies uncovered aryl-HSLs, α-pyrones and dialkylresorcinols as further chemical languages of Gram-negative bacteria. These findings extend the number of bacterial signaling molecules and suggest that cell-cell communication goes far beyond acyl-HSL signaling in nature. PMID:26231578

  6. Resveratrol ameliorates benzo(a)pyrene-induced testicular dysfunction and apoptosis: involvement of p38 MAPK/ATF2/iNOS signaling.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Bhaswati; Nandi, Pinki; Chakraborty, Supriya; Raha, Sanghamitra; Sen, Parimal C; Jana, Kuladip

    2016-08-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] is an environmental toxicant that alters the steroidogenic profile of testis and induces testicular dysfunction. In the present study, we have investigated the molecular signaling of B(a)P and the ameliorative potential of the natural aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) antagonist and antioxidant, resveratrol, on B(a)P-induced male reproductive toxicity. Studies showed that B(a)P treatment resulted in p38 MAPK activation and increased inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) production along with testicular apoptosis and steroidogenic dysfunction. Resveratrol cotreatment maintained testicular redox potential, increased serum testosterone level and enhanced expression of major testicular steroidogenic proteins (CYPIIA1, StAR, 3βHSD, 17βHSD) and prevented subsequent onset of apoptosis. Resveratrol cotreatment resulted inhibition of testicular cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) expression, which is the major B(a)P metabolizing agent for BPDE-DNA adduct formation. Resveratrol also significantly decreased the B(a)P-induced AhR protein level, its nuclear translocation and subsequent promoter activation, thereby decreased the expression of CYP1A1. Resveratrol also down-regulated B(a)P-induced testicular iNOS production through suppressing the activation of p38 MAPK and ATF2, thus improved the oxidative status of the testis and prevented apoptosis. Our findings cumulatively suggest that resveratrol inhibits conversion of B(a)P into BPDE by modulating the transcriptional regulation of CYP1A1 and acting as an antioxidant thus prevents B(a)P-induced oxidative stress and testicular apoptosis. PMID:27162022

  7. Rutin inhibits UVB radiation-induced expression of COX-2 and iNOS in hairless mouse skin: p38 MAP kinase and JNK as potential targets.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ki-Seok; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Chun, Kyung-Soo; Na, Hye-Kyung; Surh, Young-Joon

    2014-10-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation, a complete environmental carcinogen, induces oxidative and inflammatory skin damage, thereby increasing the risk of skin carcinogenesis. The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of a wide variety of plant polyphenols have been reported. Rutin (3-rhamnosyl-glucosylquercetin), a polyphenol present in many edible plants, possesses diverse pharmacological properties including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimutagenic and anticancer activities. The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of rutin on UVB-induced inflammation in mouse skin in vivo. Topical application of rutin onto the dorsal skin of female HR-1 hairless mice 30 min prior to UVB irradiation diminished epidermal hyperplasia and the levels of proteins modified by 4-hydroxynonenal, which is a biochemical hallmark of lipid peroxidation. Topical application of rutin also significantly inhibited UVB-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), two representative inflammatory enzymes, in hairless mouse skin. Rutin inhibited the DNA binding of activator protein-1 (AP-1) and phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) in mouse skin exposed to UVB. Moreover, rutin attenuated UVB-induced phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK). Pharmacological inhibition of p38 MAP kinase and JNK decreased UVB-induced expression of COX-2 in mouse skin. Taken together, these findings suggest that rutin exerts anti-inflammatory effects in UVB-irradiated mouse skin by inhibiting expression of COX-2 and iNOS, which is attributable to its suppression of p38 MAP kinase and JNK signaling responsible for AP-1 activation. PMID:24875145

  8. Effects of Selective iNOS Inhibitor on Spatial Memory in Recovered and Non-recovered Ketamine Induced-anesthesia in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tabrizian, Kaveh; Najafi, Sheyda; Belaran, Maryam; Hosseini-Sharifabad, Ali; Azami, Kian; Hosseini, Asieh; Soodi, Maliheh; Kazemi, Ali; Abbas, Abbas; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is thought to be involved in spatial learning and memory in several brain areas such as hippocampus. This study examined the effects of post-training intrahippocampal microinjections of 1400W as a selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor on spatial memory, in both anesthetized and non-anesthetized situations in rats. In the present work, 4-day training trials of animals were conducted. Spatial memory was tested 48 h after the drug infusions. For microinjection of 1400W into CA1 region of the hippocampus in conscious animals, guide cannula was implanted into the CA1 area and 1400W was infused after recovery from surgical anesthesia. In anesthetized animals, 1400W was microinjected directly into CA1 region by Hamilton syringe during anesthesia. After completion of training, 1400W (10, 50 and 100 μM/side) were microinjected bilaterally (1 μL/side) and testing trials were performed 48 h after drug infusions in both groups of cannulated and non-cannulated rats. Significant reduction was observed in escape latency and traveled distance in animals that received 1400W (100 μM/side, * P < 0.05) via cannula after recovery in comparison with control group. Moreover, microinjection of 1400W (100 μM/side) in post recovery phase also caused a significant (*** P < 0.001) reduction in time and distance of finding the hidden platform in comparison with anesthetized situation. These results suggest that 1400W has a significant improvement on spatial memory, and memory enhancement induced by iNOS inhibitor can be affected by anesthesia in a period of time. PMID:24363743

  9. Selenomethionine Inhibits IL-1β Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS) and Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) Expression in Primary Human Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Anthony Wai Ming; Stabler, Thomas V.; Bolognesi, Michael; Kraus, Virginia Byers

    2010-01-01

    Objective Several lines of evidence show that selenium has potential protective effects in osteoarthritis (OA), however the exact mechanism is still unclear. As IL-1β is one of the key proinflammatory cytokines contributing to the progression in OA, we investigated the effect of selenium in neutralizing the inflammatory effects of IL-1β on nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E (PGE2) production, and the signaling pathways involved. Methods Isolated primary human chondrocytes were pretreated with selenomethionine (0.5 μM SeMet) for 24 hours then co-treated without or with IL-1β (10 pg/ml or 50 pg/ml) for another 24 hours followed by RNA isolation. Gene expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) was determined by quantitative Real Time-Polymerase Chain Reaction. Culture media concentrations of NO and PGE2 were determined by nitrite assay and immunoassay respectively. For analysis of cell signaling pathways, chondrocytes were pretreated with SeMet then stimulated with IL-1β for 0 – 45 minutes. The activity of IL-1β signaling pathways was determined by Western blot screening of phosphorylation states of signal transduction proteins. Results SeMet inhibited chondrocyte gene expression of IL-1β induced iNOS (31–54%, p=0.031) and COX2 (50–65%, p=0.031) with corresponding reductions in both NO (19–47%, p=0.031) and PGE2 (24–32%, p=0.031) production. Pretreatment with SeMet attenuated IL-1β induced activation of p38 MAPK (39%, p=0.039) but not the ERK, JNK or NFkB pathways. Conclusions This study elucidates one potential protective mechanism of selenium, namely through the alteration of cell signaling and downstream transcription of pro-inflammatory effects of IL-1β. PMID:21035557

  10. Correlation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibition with TNF-α, caspase-1, FasL and TLR-3 in pathogenesis of rabies in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Madhu, B P; Singh, K P; Saminathan, M; Singh, R; Tiwari, A K; Manjunatha, V; Harish, C; Manjunathareddy, G B

    2016-02-01

    The role of inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1α/β (IL-1α/β), IL-6, IL-10, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interferons, nitric oxide (NO) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in pathogenesis of rabies is being actively pursued. Presently, levels of certain immune molecules in pathogenesis of rabies in mice have been investigated. CVS strain of rabies infection resulted in early increase in iNOS, TNF-α, caspase-1, Fas ligand (FasL) and toll-like receptor-3 (TLR-3) mRNA levels in brain, and nitric oxide levels in serum. The severity of clinical signs and microscopic lesions largely correlated with NO levels. Aminoguanidine (AG; iNOS inhibitor) decreased NO production with delay in development of clinical signs and increase in survival time. Prolonged survival time correlated with reduced viral load evident by real-time PCR, reduced fluorescent signals of rabies antigen in brain and reduced immunohistochemistry signals in neuronal cytoplasm. These parameters suggested that nitric oxide did influence the rabies virus replication. Inhibition of iNOS by AG administration led to decreased expression of TNF-α, caspase-1, FasL and TLR-3 mRNA levels suggesting that increase in NO levels in rabies virus infection possibly contributed to development of disease through inflammation, apoptosis and immune-evasive mechanisms. PMID:26690069

  11. Bacterial cellulose membranes used as artificial substitutes for dural defection in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Ma, Xia; Chen, Shiwen; Tao, Meifeng; Yuan, Lutao; Jing, Yao

    2014-01-01

    To improve the efficacy and safety of dural repair in neurosurgical procedures, a new dural material derived from bacterial cellulose (BC) was evaluated in a rabbit model with dural defects. We prepared artificial dura mater using bacterial cellulose which was incubated and fermented from Acetobacter xylinum. The dural defects of the rabbit model were repaired with BC membranes. All surgeries were performed under sodium pentobarbital anesthesia, and all efforts were made to minimize suffering. All animals were humanely euthanized by intravenous injection of phenobarbitone, at each time point, after the operation. Then, the histocompatibility and inflammatory effects of BC were examined by histological examination, real-time fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western Blot. BC membranes evenly covered the surface of brain without adhesion. There were seldom inflammatory cells surrounding the membrane during the early postoperative period. The expression of inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α as well as iNOS and COX-2 were lower in the BC group compared to the control group at 7, 14 and 21 days after implantation. BC can repair dural defects in rabbit and has a decreased inflammatory response compared to traditional materials. However, the long-term effects need to be validated in larger animals. PMID:24937688

  12. Bacterial Cellulose Membranes Used as Artificial Substitutes for Dural Defection in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chen; Ma, Xia; Chen, Shiwen; Tao, Meifeng; Yuan, Lutao; Jing, Yao

    2014-01-01

    To improve the efficacy and safety of dural repair in neurosurgical procedures, a new dural material derived from bacterial cellulose (BC) was evaluated in a rabbit model with dural defects. We prepared artificial dura mater using bacterial cellulose which was incubated and fermented from Acetobacter xylinum. The dural defects of the rabbit model were repaired with BC membranes. All surgeries were performed under sodium pentobarbital anesthesia, and all efforts were made to minimize suffering. All animals were humanely euthanized by intravenous injection of phenobarbitone, at each time point, after the operation. Then, the histocompatibility and inflammatory effects of BC were examined by histological examination, real-time fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western Blot. BC membranes evenly covered the surface of brain without adhesion. There were seldom inflammatory cells surrounding the membrane during the early postoperative period. The expression of inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α as well as iNOS and COX-2 were lower in the BC group compared to the control group at 7, 14 and 21 days after implantation. BC can repair dural defects in rabbit and has a decreased inflammatory response compared to traditional materials. However, the long-term effects need to be validated in larger animals. PMID:24937688

  13. Exploring bacterial lignin degradation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Margaret E; Chang, Michelle C Y

    2014-04-01

    Plant biomass represents a renewable carbon feedstock that could potentially be used to replace a significant level of petroleum-derived chemicals. One major challenge in its utilization is that the majority of this carbon is trapped in the recalcitrant structural polymers of the plant cell wall. Deconstruction of lignin is a key step in the processing of biomass to useful monomers but remains challenging. Microbial systems can provide molecular information on lignin depolymerization as they have evolved to break lignin down using metalloenzyme-dependent radical pathways. Both fungi and bacteria have been observed to metabolize lignin; however, their differential reactivity with this substrate indicates that they may utilize different chemical strategies for its breakdown. This review will discuss recent advances in studying bacterial lignin degradation as an approach to exploring greater diversity in the environment. PMID:24780273

  14. Ribonucleotides in Bacterial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Jeremy W.; Randall, Justin R.; Matthews, Lindsay A.; Simmons, Lyle A.

    2014-01-01

    In all living cells, DNA is the storage medium for genetic information. Being quite stable, DNA is well-suited for its role in storage and propagation of information, but RNA is also covalently included in DNA through various mechanisms. Recent studies also demonstrate useful aspects of including ribonucleotides in the genome during repair. Therefore, our understanding of the consequences of RNA inclusion into bacterial genomic DNA is just beginning, but with its high frequency of occurrence the consequences and potential benefits are likely to be numerous and diverse. In this review, we discuss the processes that cause ribonucleotide inclusion in genomic DNA, the pathways important for ribonucleotide removal and the consequences that arise should ribonucleotides remain nested in genomic DNA. PMID:25387798

  15. [Small intestine bacterial overgrowth].

    PubMed

    Leung Ki, E L; Roduit, J; Delarive, J; Guyot, J; Michetti, P; Dorta, G

    2010-01-27

    Small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition characterised by nutrient malabsorption and excessive bacteria in the small intestine. It typically presents with diarrhea, flatulence and a syndrome of malabsorption (steatorrhea, macrocytic anemia). However, it may be asymptomatic in the eldery. A high index of suspicion is necessary in order to differentiate SIBO from other similar presenting disorders such as coeliac disease, lactose intolerance or the irritable bowel syndrome. A search for predisposing factor is thus necessary. These factors may be anatomical (stenosis, blind loop), or functional (intestinal hypomotility, achlorydria). The hydrogen breath test is the most frequently used diagnostic test although it lacks standardisation. The treatment of SIBO consists of eliminating predisposing factors and broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. PMID:20214190

  16. The bacterial proteogenomic pipeline

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Proteogenomics combines the cutting-edge methods from genomics and proteomics. While it has become cheap to sequence whole genomes, the correct annotation of protein coding regions in the genome is still tedious and error prone. Mass spectrometry on the other hand relies on good characterizations of proteins derived from the genome, but can also be used to help improving the annotation of genomes or find species specific peptides. Additionally, proteomics is widely used to find evidence for differential expression of proteins under different conditions, e.g. growth conditions for bacteria. The concept of proteogenomics is not altogether new, in-house scripts are used by different labs and some special tools for eukaryotic and human analyses are available. Results The Bacterial Proteogenomic Pipeline, which is completely written in Java, alleviates the conducting of proteogenomic analyses of bacteria. From a given genome sequence, a naïve six frame translation is performed and, if desired, a decoy database generated. This database is used to identify MS/MS spectra by common peptide identification algorithms. After combination of the search results and optional flagging for different experimental conditions, the results can be browsed and further inspected. In particular, for each peptide the number of identifications for each condition and the positions in the corresponding protein sequences are shown. Intermediate and final results can be exported into GFF3 format for visualization in common genome browsers. Conclusions To facilitate proteogenomics analyses the Bacterial Proteogenomic Pipeline is a set of comprehensive tools running on common desktop computers, written in Java and thus platform independent. The pipeline allows integrating peptide identifications from various algorithms and emphasizes the visualization of spectral counts from different experimental conditions. PMID:25521444

  17. Bacterial haptotaxis: Effect of auto-attraction and bacterial motility on microcolony formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckerman, Bernard; Zhao, Kun; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Luijten, Erik

    Recent work has demonstrated that surface-adhered Pseudomonas aeruginosa tend to self-organize into microcolonies using a positive-feedback mechanism mediated by the exopolysaccharide Psl, which the bacteria secrete as they traverse the surface. We elucidate this colony-nucleation process and explore how it is influenced by the deposition rate of Psl and by bacterial motility. A detailed analysis of the data presented in our earlier study, in combination with additional simulations, provides further insight into the exploratory strategy of P. aeruginosa. Specifically, the isogenic bacterial population is found to exhibit polyphenic motility. As a result, the bacterial population splits into two distinct subpopulations when depositing Psl, those that become trapped in their self-deposited Psl and those that move sufficiently quickly to escape their Psl beds and explore the surface. We perform computer simulations in which we adjust the relative prevalence of these subpopulations by varying the Psl deposition rate and find that there is a trade-off between surface exploration, microcolony diversity and microcolony fortification.

  18. Uncovering common bacterial skin infections.

    PubMed

    Napierkowski, Daria

    2013-03-10

    The four most common bacterial skin infections are impetigo, erysipelas, cellulitis, and folliculitis. This article summarizes current information about the etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and implications for primary care practice needed to effectively diagnose and treat common bacterial skin infections. PMID:23361375

  19. The human parasite Leishmania amazonensis downregulates iNOS expression via NF-κB p50/p50 homodimer: role of the PI3K/Akt pathway

    PubMed Central

    Calegari-Silva, Teresa C.; Vivarini, Áislan C.; Miqueline, Marina; Dos Santos, Guilherme R. R. M.; Teixeira, Karina Luiza; Saliba, Alessandra Mattos; Nunes de Carvalho, Simone; de Carvalho, Laís; Lopes, Ulisses G.

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania amazonensis activates the NF-κB transcriptional repressor homodimer (p50/p50) and promotes nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) downregulation. We investigated the role of PI3K/Akt in p50/p50 NF-κB activation and the effect on iNOS expression in L. amazonensis infection. The increased occupancy of p50/p50 on the iNOS promoter of infected macrophages was observed and we demonstrated that both p50/p50 NF-κB induction and iNOS downregulation in infected macrophages depended on PI3K/Akt activation. Importantly, the intracellular growth of the parasite was also impaired during PI3K/Akt signalling inhibition and in macrophages knocked-down for Akt 1 expression. It was also observed that the increased nuclear levels of p50/p50 in L. amazonensis-infected macrophages were associated with reduced phosphorylation of 907 Ser p105, the precursor of p50. Corroborating these data, we demonstrated the increased levels of phospho-9 Ser GSK3β in infected macrophages, which is associated with GSK3β inhibition and, consequently, its inability to phosphorylate p105. Remarkably, we found that the levels of pPTEN 370 Ser, a negative regulator of PI3K, increased due to L. amazonensis infection. Our data support the notion that PI3K/Akt activity is sustained during the parasite infection, leading to NF-κB 105 phosphorylation and further processing to originate p50/p50 homodimers and the consequent downregulation of iNOS expression. PMID:26400473

  20. The human parasite Leishmania amazonensis downregulates iNOS expression via NF-κB p50/p50 homodimer: role of the PI3K/Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Calegari-Silva, Teresa C; Vivarini, Áislan C; Miqueline, Marina; Dos Santos, Guilherme R R M; Teixeira, Karina Luiza; Saliba, Alessandra Mattos; Nunes de Carvalho, Simone; de Carvalho, Laís; Lopes, Ulisses G

    2015-09-01

    Leishmania amazonensis activates the NF-κB transcriptional repressor homodimer (p50/p50) and promotes nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) downregulation. We investigated the role of PI3K/Akt in p50/p50 NF-κB activation and the effect on iNOS expression in L. amazonensis infection. The increased occupancy of p50/p50 on the iNOS promoter of infected macrophages was observed and we demonstrated that both p50/p50 NF-κB induction and iNOS downregulation in infected macrophages depended on PI3K/Akt activation. Importantly, the intracellular growth of the parasite was also impaired during PI3K/Akt signalling inhibition and in macrophages knocked-down for Akt 1 expression. It was also observed that the increased nuclear levels of p50/p50 in L. amazonensis-infected macrophages were associated with reduced phosphorylation of 907 Ser p105, the precursor of p50. Corroborating these data, we demonstrated the increased levels of phospho-9 Ser GSK3β in infected macrophages, which is associated with GSK3β inhibition and, consequently, its inability to phosphorylate p105. Remarkably, we found that the levels of pPTEN 370 Ser, a negative regulator of PI3K, increased due to L. amazonensis infection. Our data support the notion that PI3K/Akt activity is sustained during the parasite infection, leading to NF-κB 105 phosphorylation and further processing to originate p50/p50 homodimers and the consequent downregulation of iNOS expression. PMID:26400473

  1. Bacterial multi-drug efflux transporters

    PubMed Central

    Delmar, Jared A.; Su, Chih-Chia; Yu, Edward W.

    2016-01-01

    Infections caused by bacteria remain a leading cause of death worldwide. While antibiotics remain a key clinical therapy, their effectiveness has been severely compromised by the development of drug resistance in these pathogens. A common and powerful resistance mechanism, multi-drug efflux transporters are capable of extruding a number of structurally unrelated antimicrobials from the bacterial cell, including antibiotics and toxic heavy metal ions, facilitating their survival in noxious environments. Those transporters belonging to the resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) superfamily typically assemble as tripartite efflux complexes, spanning the inner and outer membranes of the cell envelope. In Escherichia coli, the CusCFBA complex, which mediates resistance to copper(I) and silver(I) ions, is the only known RND transporter with a specificity for heavy metals. Herein, we describe the current knowledge of individual pump components of the Cus system, a paradigm for efflux machinery, and speculate on how RND pumps assemble to fight diverse antimicrobials. PMID:24702006

  2. Unraveling a bacterial hexose transport pathway.

    PubMed

    Herzberg, O; Klevit, R

    1994-12-01

    Structural information about proteins involved in bacterial hexose transport mediated by the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system is rapidly accumulating. Within the past year, two crystal structures and two solution NMR structures of the histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein have been reported, adding structural details to previous NMR and crystallographic work on this protein and on enzyme IIA. The crystal structure of the regulatory complex between the glucose enzyme IIA and glycerol kinase has been determined, and the association of the histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein and either the glucose enzyme IIA or the mannitol enzyme IIA have been studied by NMR. Proposals concerning the mechanism of phosphoryl transfer and the protein-protein interactions involved may now be tested more rigorously using these data. PMID:7712285

  3. Architecture and Characteristics of Bacterial Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Gyanendra P; Malli Mohan, Ganesh Babu; Dubrovsky, Anna; Amen, Triana; Tsipshtein, Shai; Rouvinski, Alex; Rosenberg, Alex; Kaganovich, Daniel; Sherman, Eilon; Medalia, Ohad; Ben-Yehuda, Sigal

    2016-02-22

    Bacteria display an array of contact-dependent interaction systems that have evolved to facilitate direct cell-to-cell communication. We have previously identified a mode of bacterial communication mediated by nanotubes bridging neighboring cells. Here, we elucidate nanotube architecture, dynamics, and molecular components. Utilizing Bacillus subtilis as a model organism, we found that at low cell density, nanotubes exhibit remarkable complexity, existing as both intercellular tubes and extending tubes, with the latter frequently surrounding the cells in a "root-like" fashion. Observing nanotube formation in real time showed that these structures are formed in the course of minutes, displaying rapid movements. Utilizing a combination of super-resolution, light, and electron microscopy, we revealed that nanotubes are composed of chains of membranous segments harboring a continuous lumen. Furthermore, we discovered that a conserved calcineurin-like protein, YmdB, presents in nanotubes and is required for both nanotube production and intercellular molecular trade. PMID:26906740

  4. Emerging Roles of Toxin-Antitoxin Modules in Bacterial Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kędzierska, Barbara; Hayes, Finbarr

    2016-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) cassettes are encoded widely by bacteria. The modules typically comprise a protein toxin and protein or RNA antitoxin that sequesters the toxin factor. Toxin activation in response to environmental cues or other stresses promotes a dampening of metabolism, most notably protein translation, which permits survival until conditions improve. Emerging evidence also implicates TAs in bacterial pathogenicity. Bacterial persistence involves entry into a transient semi-dormant state in which cells survive unfavorable conditions including killing by antibiotics, which is a significant clinical problem. TA complexes play a fundamental role in inducing persistence by downregulating cellular metabolism. Bacterial biofilms are important in numerous chronic inflammatory and infectious diseases and cause serious therapeutic problems due to their multidrug tolerance and resistance to host immune system actions. Multiple TAs influence biofilm formation through a network of interactions with other factors that mediate biofilm production and maintenance. Moreover, in view of their emerging contributions to bacterial virulence, TAs are potential targets for novel prophylactic and therapeutic approaches that are required urgently in an era of expanding antibiotic resistance. This review summarizes the emerging evidence that implicates TAs in the virulence profiles of a diverse range of key bacterial pathogens that trigger serious human disease. PMID:27322231

  5. Bacterial Origin of a Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Protein Translocase

    PubMed Central

    Harsman, Anke; Niemann, Moritz; Pusnik, Mascha; Schmidt, Oliver; Burmann, Björn M.; Hiller, Sebastian; Meisinger, Chris; Schneider, André; Wagner, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are of bacterial ancestry and have to import most of their proteins from the cytosol. This process is mediated by Tom40, an essential protein that forms the protein-translocating pore in the outer mitochondrial membrane. Tom40 is conserved in virtually all eukaryotes, but its evolutionary origin is unclear because bacterial orthologues have not been identified so far. Recently, it was shown that the parasitic protozoon Trypanosoma brucei lacks a conventional Tom40 and instead employs the archaic translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (ATOM), a protein that shows similarities to both eukaryotic Tom40 and bacterial protein translocases of the Omp85 family. Here we present electrophysiological single channel data showing that ATOM forms a hydrophilic pore of large conductance and high open probability. Moreover, ATOM channels exhibit a preference for the passage of cationic molecules consistent with the idea that it may translocate unfolded proteins targeted by positively charged N-terminal presequences. This is further supported by the fact that the addition of a presequence peptide induces transient pore closure. An in-depth comparison of these single channel properties with those of other protein translocases reveals that ATOM closely resembles bacterial-type protein export channels rather than eukaryotic Tom40. Our results support the idea that ATOM represents an evolutionary intermediate between a bacterial Omp85-like protein export machinery and the conventional Tom40 that is found in mitochondria of other eukaryotes. PMID:22778261

  6. Anti-Nociceptive Effect of Resveratrol During Inflammatory Hyperalgesia via Differential Regulation of pro-Inflammatory Mediators.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajeet Kumar; Vinayak, Manjula

    2016-07-01

    Sensitization of nociceptive neurons by inflammatory mediators leads to hypersensitivity for normal painful stimuli which is termed hyperalgesia. Oxidative stress is an essential factor in pathological pain; therefore, antioxidants qualify as potential anti-hyperalgesic agents. The present study examines the efficacy of the natural antioxidant resveratrol in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) induced hyperalgesic rats. Thermal hyperalgesia was measured at different time points by paw withdrawal latency test and confirmed by c-Fos expression in spinal dorsal horn. The impact of resveratrol treatment on inflammatory mediators at peripheral (paw skin) and central (spinal cord) sites was determined during early (6 h) as well as late phase (48 h) of hyperalgesia. Intraplanter injection of CFA increased the level of cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 as well as inflammatory enzymes COX-2 and iNOS in paw skin in both phases. In case of spinal cord, the level of COX-2 was found to be elevated in both phases, whereas iNOS could not be detected. The cytokines were found to be elevated only in late phase in spinal cord. Administration of resveratrol (20 mg/kg) shifted the level of all inflammatory mediators towards normal, except cytokines in paw skin. The present study suggests that the anti-nociceptive effect of resveratrol is implicated at both peripheral and central sites in a tissue specific manner. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27060370

  7. Bacterial peptidoglycan stimulates adipocyte lipolysis via NOD1.

    PubMed

    Chi, Wendy; Dao, Dyda; Lau, Trevor C; Henriksbo, Brandyn D; Cavallari, Joseph F; Foley, Kevin P; Schertzer, Jonathan D

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is associated with inflammation that can drive metabolic defects such as hyperlipidemia and insulin resistance. Specific metabolites can contribute to inflammation, but nutrient intake and obesity are also associated with altered bacterial load in metabolic tissues (i.e. metabolic endotoxemia). These bacterial cues can contribute to obesity-induced inflammation. The specific bacterial components and host receptors that underpin altered metabolic responses are emerging. We previously showed that Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 (NOD1) activation with bacterial peptidoglycan (PGN) caused insulin resistance in mice. We now show that PGN induces cell-autonomous lipolysis in adipocytes via NOD1. Specific bacterial PGN motifs stimulated lipolysis in white adipose tissue (WAT) explants from WT, but not NOD1⁻/⁻mice. NOD1-activating PGN stimulated mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK),protein kinase A (PKA), and NF-κB in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The NOD1-mediated lipolysis response was partially reduced by inhibition of ERK1/2 or PKA alone, but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). NOD1-stimulated lipolysis was partially dependent on NF-κB and was completely suppressed by inhibiting ERK1/2 and PKA simultaneously or hormone sensitive lipase (HSL). Our results demonstrate that bacterial PGN stimulates lipolysis in adipocytes by engaging a stress kinase, PKA, NF-κB-dependent lipolytic program. Bacterial NOD1 activation is positioned as a component of metabolic endotoxemia that can contribute to hyperlipidemia, systemic inflammation and insulin resistance by acting directly on adipocytes. PMID:24828250

  8. Comparative Genomic Analyses of the Bacterial Phosphotransferase System

    PubMed Central

    Barabote, Ravi D.; Saier, Milton H.

    2005-01-01

    We report analyses of 202 fully sequenced genomes for homologues of known protein constituents of the bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS). These included 174 bacterial, 19 archaeal, and 9 eukaryotic genomes. Homologues of PTS proteins were not identified in archaea or eukaryotes, showing that the horizontal transfer of genes encoding PTS proteins has not occurred between the three domains of life. Of the 174 bacterial genomes (136 bacterial species) analyzed, 30 diverse species have no PTS homologues, and 29 species have cytoplasmic PTS phosphoryl transfer protein homologues but lack recognizable PTS permeases. These soluble homologues presumably function in regulation. The remaining 77 species possess all PTS proteins required for the transport and phosphorylation of at least one sugar via the PTS. Up to 3.2% of the genes in a bacterium encode PTS proteins. These homologues were analyzed for family association, range of protein types, domain organization, and organismal distribution. Different strains of a single bacterial species often possess strikingly different complements of PTS proteins. Types of PTS protein domain fusions were analyzed, showing that certain types of domain fusions are common, while others are rare or prohibited. Select PTS proteins were analyzed from different phylogenetic standpoints, showing that PTS protein phylogeny often differs from organismal phylogeny. The results document the frequent gain and loss of PTS protein-encoding genes and suggest that the lateral transfer of these genes within the bacterial domain has played an important role in bacterial evolution. Our studies provide insight into the development of complex multicomponent enzyme systems and lead to predictions regarding the types of protein-protein interactions that promote efficient PTS-mediated phosphoryl transfer. PMID:16339738

  9. Bacterial Respiratory Infections Complicating Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Charles; Anderson, Ronald

    2016-04-01

    Opportunistic bacterial and fungal infections of the lower respiratory tract, most commonly those caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Pneumocystis jirovecii, remain the major causes of mortality in those infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Bacterial respiratory pathogens most prevalent in those infected with HIV, other than M. tuberculosis, represent the primary focus of the current review with particular emphasis on the pneumococcus, the leading cause of mortality due to HIV infection in the developed world. Additional themes include (1) risk factors; (2) the predisposing effects of HIV-mediated suppression on pulmonary host defenses, possibly intensified by smoking; (3) clinical and laboratory diagnosis, encompassing assessment of disease severity and outcome; and (4) antibiotic therapy. The final section addresses current recommendations with respect to pneumococcal immunization in the context of HIV infection, including an overview of the rationale underpinning the current "prime-boost" immunization strategy based on sequential administration of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine 13 and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine 23. PMID:26974299

  10. Control of bacterial adhesion and growth on honeycomb-like patterned surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng; Ding, Yonghui; Ge, Xiang; Leng, Yang

    2015-11-01

    It is a great challenge to construct a persistent bacteria-resistant surface even though it has been demonstrated that several surface features might be used to control bacterial behavior, including surface topography. In this study, we develop micro-scale honeycomb-like patterns of different sizes (0.5-10 μm) as well as a flat area as the control on a single platform to evaluate the bacterial adhesion and growth. Bacteria strains, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus with two distinct shapes (rod and sphere) are cultured on the platforms, with the patterned surface-up and surface-down in the culture medium. The results demonstrate that the 1 μm patterns remarkably reduce bacterial adhesion and growth while suppressing bacterial colonization when compared to the flat surface. The selective adhesion of the bacterial cells on the patterns reveals that the bacterial adhesion is cooperatively mediated by maximizing the cell-substrate contact area and minimizing the cell deformation, from a thermodynamic point of view. Moreover, study of bacterial behaviors on the surface-up vs. surface-down samples shows that gravity does not apparently affect the spatial distribution of the adherent cells although it indeed facilitates bacterial adhesion. Furthermore, the experimental results suggest that two major factors, i.e. the availability of energetically favorable adhesion sites and the physical confinements, contribute to the anti-bacterial nature of the honeycomb-like patterns. PMID:26302067

  11. Symbiont-mediated functions in insect hosts

    PubMed Central

    Su, Qi; Zhou, Xiaomao; Zhang, Youjun

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial endosymbionts occur in a diverse array of insect species and are usually rely within the vertical transmission from mothers to offspring. In addition to primary symbionts, plant sap-sucking insects may also harbor several diverse secondary symbionts. Bacterial symbionts play a prominent role in insect nutritional ecology by aiding in digestion of food or supplementing nutrients that insect hosts can’t obtain sufficient amounts from a restricted diet of plant phloem. Currently, several other ecologically relevant traits mediated by endosymbionts are being investigated, including defense toward pathogens and parasites, adaption to environment, influences on insect-plant interactions, and impact of population dynamics. Here, we review recent theoretical predictions and experimental observations of these traits mediated by endosymbionts and suggest that clarifying the roles of symbiotic microbes may be important to offer insights for ameliorating pest invasiveness or impact. PMID:23710278

  12. Multiple pilus motors cooperate for persistent bacterial movement in two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Holz, Claudia; Opitz, Dirk; Greune, Lilo; Kurre, Rainer; Koomey, Michael; Schmidt, M Alexander; Maier, Berenike

    2010-04-30

    In various bacterial species surface motility is mediated by cycles of type IV pilus motor elongation, adhesion, and retraction, but it is unclear whether bacterial movement follows a random walk. Here we show that the correlation time of persistent movement in Neisseria gonorrhoeae increases with the number of pili. The unbinding force of individual pili from the surface F=10 pN was considerably lower than the stalling force F>100 pN, suggesting that density, force, and adhesive properties of the pilus motor enable a tug-of-war mechanism for bacterial movement. PMID:20482147

  13. Multiple Pilus Motors Cooperate for Persistent Bacterial Movement in Two Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holz, Claudia; Opitz, Dirk; Greune, Lilo; Kurre, Rainer; Koomey, Michael; Schmidt, M. Alexander; Maier, Berenike

    2010-04-01

    In various bacterial species surface motility is mediated by cycles of type IV pilus motor elongation, adhesion, and retraction, but it is unclear whether bacterial movement follows a random walk. Here we show that the correlation time of persistent movement in Neisseria gonorrhoeae increases with the number of pili. The unbinding force of individual pili from the surface F=10pN was considerably lower than the stalling force F>100pN, suggesting that density, force, and adhesive properties of the pilus motor enable a tug-of-war mechanism for bacterial movement.

  14. Laboratory Diagnosis of Bacterial Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Romney M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial gastroenteritis is a disease that is pervasive in both the developing and developed worlds. While for the most part bacterial gastroenteritis is self-limiting, identification of an etiological agent by bacterial stool culture is required for the management of patients with severe or prolonged diarrhea, symptoms consistent with invasive disease, or a history that may predict a complicated course of disease. Importantly, characterization of bacterial enteropathogens from stool cultures in clinical laboratories is one of the primary means by which public health officials identify and track outbreaks of bacterial gastroenteritis. This article provides guidance for clinical microbiology laboratories that perform stool cultures. The general characteristics, epidemiology, and clinical manifestations of key bacterial enteropathogens are summarized. Information regarding optimal specimen collection, transport, and processing and current diagnostic tests and testing algorithms is provided. This article is an update of Cumitech 12A (P. H. Gilligan, J. M. Janda, M. A. Karmali, and J. M. Miller, Cumitech 12A, Laboratory diagnosis of bacterial diarrhea, 1992). PMID:25567220

  15. Reactive oxygen species- and nitric oxide-mediated lung inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction in wild-type and iNOS-deficient mice exposed to diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongwen; Ma, Joseph K; Barger, Mark W; Mercer, Robert R; Millecchia, Lyndell; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Castranova, Vince; Ma, Jane Y

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary responses to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) exposure are mediated through enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) by alveolar macrophages (AM). The current study examined the differential roles of ROS and NO in DEP-induced lung injury using C57B/6J wild-type (WT) and inducible NO synthase knockout (iNOS KO) mice. Mice exposed by pharyngeal aspiration to DEP or carbon black particles (CB) (35 mg/kg) showed an inflammatory profile that included neutrophil infiltration, increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, and elevated albumin content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) at 1, 3, and 7 d postexposure. The organic extract of DEP (DEPE) did not induce an inflammatory response. Comparing WT to iNOS KO mice, the results show that NO enhanced DEP-induced neutrophils infiltration and plasma albumin content in BALF and upregulated the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 12 (IL-12) by AM. DEP-exposed AM from iNOS KO mice displayed diminished production of IL-12 and, in response to ex vivo lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge, decreased production of IL-12 but increased production of IL-10 when compared to cells from WT mice. DEP, CB, but not DEPE, induced DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction in AM, however, that is independent of cellular production of NO. These results demonstrate that DEP-induced immune/inflammatory responses in mice are regulated by both ROS- and NO-mediated pathways. NO did not affect ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and DNA damage but upregulated IL-12 and provided a counterbalance to the ROS-mediated adaptive stress response that downregulates IL-12 and upregulates IL-10. PMID:19267316

  16. The rare bacterial biosphere.

    PubMed

    Pedrós-Alió, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    All communities are dominated by a few species that account for most of the biomass and carbon cycling. On the other hand, a large number of species are represented by only a few individuals. In the case of bacteria, these rare species were until recently invisible. Owing to their low numbers, conventional molecular techniques could not retrieve them. Isolation in pure culture was the only way to identify some of them, but current culturing techniques are unable to isolate most of the bacteria in nature. The recent development of fast and cheap high-throughput sequencing has begun to allow access to the rare species. In the case of bacteria, the exploration of this rare biosphere has several points of interest. First, it will eventually produce a reasonable estimate of the total number of bacterial taxa in the oceans; right now, we do not even know the right order of magnitude. Second, it will answer the question of whether "everything is everywhere." Third, it will require hypothesizing and testing the ecological mechanisms that allow subsistence of many species in low numbers. And fourth, it will open an avenue of research into the immense reserve of genes with potential applications hidden in the rare biosphere. PMID:22457983

  17. Bacterial Brain Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Significant advances in the diagnosis and management of bacterial brain abscess over the past several decades have improved the expected outcome of a disease once regarded as invariably fatal. Despite this, intraparenchymal abscess continues to present a serious and potentially life-threatening condition. Brain abscess may result from traumatic brain injury, prior neurosurgical procedure, contiguous spread from a local source, or hematogenous spread of a systemic infection. In a significant proportion of cases, an etiology cannot be identified. Clinical presentation is highly variable and routine laboratory testing lacks sensitivity. As such, a high degree of clinical suspicion is necessary for prompt diagnosis and intervention. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging offer a timely and sensitive method of assessing for abscess. Appearance of abscess on routine imaging lacks specificity and will not spare biopsy in cases where the clinical context does not unequivocally indicate infectious etiology. Current work with advanced imaging modalities may yield more accurate methods of differentiation of mass lesions in the brain. Management of abscess demands a multimodal approach. Surgical intervention and medical therapy are necessary in most cases. Prognosis of brain abscess has improved significantly in the recent decades although close follow-up is required, given the potential for long-term sequelae and a risk of recurrence. PMID:25360205

  18. Electromagnetism of Bacterial Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainiwaer, Ailiyasi

    2011-10-01

    There has been increasing concern from the public about personal health due to the significant rise in the daily use of electrical devices such as cell phones, radios, computers, GPS, video games and television. All of these devices create electromagnetic (EM) fields, which are simply magnetic and electric fields surrounding the appliances that simultaneously affect the human bio-system. Although these can affect the human system, obstacles can easily shield or weaken the electrical fields; however, magnetic fields cannot be weakened and can pass through walls, human bodies and most other objects. The present study was conducted to examine the possible effects of bacteria when exposed to magnetic fields. The results indicate that a strong causal relationship is not clear, since different magnetic fields affect the bacteria differently, with some causing an increase in bacterial cells, and others causing a decrease in the same cells. This phenomenon has yet to be explained, but the current study attempts to offer a mathematical explanation for this occurrence. The researchers added cultures to the magnetic fields to examine any effects to ion transportation. Researchers discovered ions such as potassium and sodium are affected by the magnetic field. A formula is presented in the analysis section to explain this effect.

  19. Bacterial genotoxicity bioreporters

    PubMed Central

    Biran, Alva; Yagur‐Kroll, Sharon; Pedahzur, Rami; Buchinger, Sebastian; Reifferscheid, Georg; Ben‐Yoav, Hadar; Shacham‐Diamand, Yosi; Belkin, Shimshon

    2010-01-01

    Summary Ever since the introduction of the Salmonella typhimurium mammalian microsome mutagenicity assay (the ‘Ames test’) over three decades ago, there has been a constant development of additional genotoxicity assays based upon the use of genetically engineered microorganisms. Such assays rely either on reversion principles similar to those of the Ames test, or on promoter–reporter fusions that generate a quantifiable dose‐dependent signal in the presence of potential DNA damaging compounds and the induction of repair mechanisms; the latter group is the subject of the present review. Some of these assays were only briefly described in the scientific literature, whereas others have been developed all the way to commercial products. Out of these, only one, the umu‐test, has been fully validated and ISO‐ and OECD standardized. Here we review the main directions undertaken in the construction and testing of bacterial‐based genotoxicity bioassays, including the attempts to incorporate at least a partial metabolic activation capacity into the molecular design. We list the genetic modifications introduced into the tester strains, compare the performance of the different assays, and briefly describe the first attempts to incorporate such bacterial reporters into actual genotoxicity testing devices. PMID:21255340