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Sample records for inpatient treatment protocol

  1. Network coordination following discharge from psychiatric inpatient treatment: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Inadequate discharge planning following inpatient stays is a major issue in the provision of a high standard of care for patients who receive psychiatric treatment. Studies have shown that half of patients who had no pre-discharge contact with outpatient services do not keep their first outpatient appointment. Additionally, discharged patients who are not well linked to their outpatient care networks are at twice the risk of re-hospitalization. The aim of this study is to investigate if the Post-Discharge Network Coordination Program at ipw has a demonstrably significant impact on the frequency and duration of patient re-hospitalization. Subjects are randomly assigned to either the treatment group or to the control group. The treatment group participates in the Post-Discharge Network Coordination Program. The control group receives treatment as usual with no additional social support. Further outcome variables include: social support, change in psychiatric symptoms, quality of life, and independence in daily functioning. Methods/design The study is conducted as a randomized controlled trial. Subjects are randomly assigned to either the control group or to the treatment group. Computer generated block randomization is used to assure both groups have the same number of subjects. Stratified block randomization is used for the psychiatric diagnosis of ICD-10, F1. Approximately 160 patients are recruited in two care units at Psychiatrie-Zentrum Hard Embrach and two care units at Klinik Schlosstal Winterthur. Discussion The proposed post-discharge network coordination program intervenes during the critical post-discharge period. It focuses primarily on promoting the integration of the patients into their social networks, and additionally to coordinating outpatient care and addressing concerns of daily life. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN58280620 PMID:24007198

  2. Recent developments in alcoholism: inpatient treatment.

    PubMed

    Nace, E P

    1993-01-01

    The historical role of inpatient treatment for alcoholism is reviewed in terms of its advantages and disadvantages. The factors that have forced a change in the utilization of inpatient treatment include increasing recognition of the heterogeneity of alcoholic patients, negative outcome studies, and cost-containment efforts. The clinical domains that warrant inpatient treatment are outlined, and decisions of treatment placement are necessarily guided by the factors of acuteness, ability, safety, and stabilization. PMID:8234934

  3. Interpersonal Change Following Intensive Inpatient Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Clapp, Joshua D.; Grubaugh, Anouk L.; Allen, Jon G.; Oldham, John M.; Fowler, J. Christopher; Hardesty, Susan; Frueh, B. Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Persons admitted for inpatient psychiatric care often present with interpersonal difficulties that disrupt adaptive social relations and complicate the provision of treatment. Whereas domains of psychosocial functioning in this population demonstrate clear growth in response to intervention, the impact of treatment on more complex patterns of interpersonal behavior has been largely overlooked within the existing literature. Interpersonal profiles characteristic of psychiatric inpatients were identified in the current study to determine rates of transition to adaptive functioning following hospitalization. Methods: Personality disturbance was assessed in 513 psychiatric inpatients using the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems. Scores were analyzed within a series of latent profile models to isolate unique interpersonal profiles at admission and at discharge. Longitudinal modeling was then employed to determine rates of transition from dysfunctional to adaptive profiles. Relationships with background characteristics, clinical presentation, and treatment response were explored. Results: Normative, Submissive, and Hostile/Withdrawn profiles emerged at both admission and discharge. Patients in the Normative profile demonstrated relatively moderate symptoms. Submissive and Hostile/Withdrawn profiles were related to known risk factors and elevated psychopathology. Approximately half of patients identified as Submissive or Hostile/Withdrawn transitioned to the Normative profile by discharge. Transition status evidenced modest associations with background characteristics and clinical presentation. Treatment engagement and reduction of clinical symptoms were strongly associated with adaptive transition. Conclusion: Maladaptive interpersonal profiles characteristic of psychiatric inpatients demonstrated categorical change following inpatient hospitalization. Enhanced therapeutic engagement and overall reductions in psychiatric symptoms appear to increase potential for interpersonal change. PMID:25162133

  4. Goals of inpatient treatment for psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Sharfstein, Steven S

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the psychiatric hospital changed dramatically during the twentieth century. Formerly the primary location for psychiatric treatment, the hospital now plays a more circumscribed role within a community-based system of care. Crisis stabilization, safety, and a focus on rapid discharge are the critical components of the acute inpatient stay. Subspecialized units focus on geriatrics, children, adolescents, dual diagnosis (substance abuse and mental illness), trauma disorders, eating disorders, and forensics. When integrated with the general medical system and a comprehensive base of community-delivered day treatment, residential services, and outpatient services, psychiatric hospitalization is a humane alternative to long-term institutional care. PMID:18729730

  5. Therapeutic recreation treatment time during inpatient rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Gassaway, Julie; Dijkers, Marcel; Rider, Cecelia; Edens, Kelly; Cahow, Claire; Joyce, Joan

    2011-01-01

    Objective Following spinal cord injury (SCI), certified therapeutic recreation specialists (CTRSs) work with patients during rehabilitation to re-create leisure lifestyles. Although there is much literature available to describe the benefits of recreation, little has been written about the process of inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation therapeutic recreation (TR) programs or the effectiveness of such programs. To delineate how TR time is used during inpatient rehabilitation for SCI. Methods Six rehabilitation centers enrolled 600 patients with traumatic SCI for an observational study. CTRSs documented time spent on each of a set of specific TR activities during each patient encounter. Patterns of time use are described, for all patients and by neurologic category. Ordinary least-squares stepwise regression models are used to identify patient and injury characteristics predictive of total treatment time (overall and average per week) and time spent in TR activities. Results Ninety-four percent of patients enrolled in the SCIRehab study participated in TR. Patients received a mean total of 17.5 hours of TR; significant differences were seen in the amount of time spent in each activity among and within neurologic groups. The majority (76%) of patients participated in at least one structured therapeutic outing. Patient and injury characteristics explained little of the variation in time spent within activities. Conclusion The large amount of variability seen in TR treatment time within and among injury group categories, which is not explained well by patient and injury characteristics, sets the stage for future analyses to associate treatments with outcomes. PMID:21675356

  6. Managing processes of inpatient care and treatment.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Kerstin; Sandoff, Mette

    2015-11-16

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to establish a knowledge bank for the development of overall hospital processes. Description and analysis are used to show how process managers experience their situation and the various possibilities it offers for active management in the context of managing processes of inpatient care and treatment at Swedish hospitals. Design/methodology/approach - A qualitative and explorative design with open-ended interviews with 12 process managers at three Swedish hospitals was used. Transcribed interviews were analysed by means of latent content analysis. Findings - The two main categories emerging from the analysis were characteristics of process leadership and prerequisites of process management. Quality, relational and knowledge dimensions, and structure, time and information dimensions emerged as their respective sub-categories. The overall theme describes the interdependence between leadership characteristics and the prerequisites necessary for effective process management. Research limitations/implications - No generalizations could be made from the results of the qualitative interview studies but a deeper understanding of the phenomenon was reached, which in turn can be transferred to similar settings. Originality/value - This study contributes qualitative descriptions of leadership characteristics and the prerequisites necessary for active process management in the context of managing processes of inpatient care and treatment at Swedish hospitals, a subject that has not been investigated earlier. PMID:26556166

  7. Mortality in alcoholic patients given inpatient treatment.

    PubMed

    Feuerlein, W; Kfner, H; Flohrschtz, T

    1994-07-01

    Data on mortality during a 48-month follow-up period in a group of 1410 alcoholics who had received inpatient treatment were evaluated. In 1266 patients known to be either living or deceased the death rate was 7.6%. The percentage of deceased subjects was highest in the group over 50 years of age. The mortality rate was higher for men (9.8%) than for women (4.8%); for those with more than one divorce (16.8%); for those who were not fit for work (18.1%) or were retired at the start of the treatment (43.3%); who were employed in the alcohol business (21.7%); who had reduced their alcohol consumption before treatment (13.4%); who were unemployed 6 months after discharge (12.4%). The mortality rate was higher for those with high scores on a scale assessing calmness in a personality inventory (7.9%) and low scores on a questionnaire assessing motivation (10.9%) and insight into the need of change (12.4%). Alcohol-related illness before the index treatment played an important role: the mortality rate was higher for those who had had Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (40%), delirium tremens (15.3%), pancreatitis (13.9%) or cardiomyopathy (14.1%). The mortality rate was higher for treatment dropouts (12.9%) and for those who regularly or occasionally took sleeping pills (28.5%), psychoactive drugs (15.1%) or other drugs (11.5%) during treatment. In the follow-up periods substance use had a great effect on mortality. The mortality rate for those patients who still abstained from alcohol after 6 months (4.4%) was only a third of that for the patients who had relapsed (12.4%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8081182

  8. Cost Effectiveness of Alcoholism Treatment in Partial Hospital versus Inpatient Settings After Brief Inpatient Treatment: 12-Month Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrady, Barbara; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Alcoholics (N=174) were randomly assigned to partial hospital treatment (PHT) or extended inpatient (EIP) rehabilitation after inpatient evaluation and/or detoxification. There were few differences in clinical outcomes between the PHT and EIP groups. Subjects showed significant improvements in psychological well-being and social behavior.

  9. Cost Effectiveness of Alcoholism Treatment in Partial Hospital versus Inpatient Settings After Brief Inpatient Treatment: 12-Month Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrady, Barbara; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Alcoholics (N=174) were randomly assigned to partial hospital treatment (PHT) or extended inpatient (EIP) rehabilitation after inpatient evaluation and/or detoxification. There were few differences in clinical outcomes between the PHT and EIP groups. Subjects showed significant improvements in psychological well-being and social behavior.…

  10. [Inpatient care in the treatment of alcohol use disorders].

    PubMed

    Balester Mouret, Sylvain

    2011-12-01

    Inpatient treatment has long been considered the reference in the treatment of alcoholism. It may indeed have many conceptual advantages, but practically it is a method of treatment with high costs and long waiting period. Moreover, reviews of studies evaluating effectiveness of treatment settings for alcohol dependence suggest that no significant differences exist between inpatient and outpatient programs. Therefore, it seems useful to determine indications of inpatient detoxification programs. As we may see, the choice of inpatient detox should be primarily guided by the contra-indications of outpatient detox. However, it also depends very much on patients' preference, essential to success, since they are the lead actors. Some other situations require urgent residential care, regardless of readiness to change or type of alcohol disorder underlying. PMID:22288351

  11. Studying inpatient treatment practices in schizophrenia: an integrated methodology.

    PubMed

    Boyer, C A; Olfson, M; Kellermann, S L; Hansell, S; Walkup, J; Rosenfield, S; Mechanic, D

    1995-01-01

    A multi-phase research project examining current inpatient psychiatric practices and the relationships between different treatments and patient outcomes is described. The study sample includes Medicaid patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia who have been treated in inpatient units of general hospitals in New York State. The research is focused at the heart of the debate concerning the appropriate role of inpatient psychiatric care within a balanced system of mental health services. Addressed are the conceptual issues that guided the project, research strategies, instrument development, measures used and the preliminary findings that informed successive phases. Design issues are reviewed in light of the conceptual and pragmatic decisions made with a multiple site design. A compelling argument is made about the need for a long-term treatment orientation that prepares patients for what lies ahead and that assures communication and continuity between inpatient and outpatient care. PMID:8584587

  12. 42 CFR 412.101 - Special treatment: Inpatient hospital payment adjustment for low-volume hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special treatment: Inpatient hospital payment... INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Special Treatment of Certain Facilities Under the Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Operating Costs 412.101 Special treatment: Inpatient hospital payment adjustment for...

  13. Randomised controlled trial of day patient versus inpatient psychiatric treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Creed, F; Black, D; Anthony, P; Osborn, M; Thomas, P; Tomenson, B

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the proportion of acutely ill psychiatric patients who can be treated in a day hospital and compare the outcome of day patient and inpatient treatment. DESIGN--Prospective randomised controlled trial of day patient versus inpatient treatment after exclusion of patients precluded by severity of illness or other factors from being treated as day patients. All three groups assessed at three and 12 months. SETTING--Teaching hospital serving small socially deprived inner city area. Day hospital designed to take acute admissions because of few beds. PATIENTS--175 Patients were considered, of whom 73 could not be allocated. Of the remaining 102 patients, 51 were allocated to each treatment setting but only 89 became established in treatment--namely, 41 day patients and 48 inpatients. 73 Of these 89 patients were reassessed at three months and 70 at one year. INTERVENTIONS--Standard day patient and inpatient treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Discharge from hospital and return to previous level of social functioning; reduction of psychiatric symptoms, abnormal behaviour, and burden on relatives. RESULTS--33 Of 48 inpatients were discharged at three months compared with 17 of 41 day patients. But at one year 9 of 48 inpatients and three of 41 day patients were in hospital. 18 Of 35 day patients and 16 of 39 inpatients were at their previous level of social functioning at one year. The only significant difference at three months was a greater improvement in social role performance in the inpatients. At one year there was no significant difference between day patients and inpatients in present state examination summary scores and social role performance, burden, or behaviour. CONCLUSIONS--Roughly 40% of all acutely ill patients presenting for admission to a psychiatric unit may be treated satisfactorily in a well staffed day hospital. The outcome of treatment is similar to that of inpatient care but might possibly reduce readmissions. The hospital costs seem to be similar but further research is required to assess the costs in terms of extra demands on relatives, general practitioners, and other community resources. PMID:2188696

  14. Update of Inpatient Treatment for Refractory Chronic Daily Headache.

    PubMed

    Lai, Tzu-Hsien; Wang, Shuu-Jiun

    2016-01-01

    Chronic daily headache (CDH) is a group of headache disorders, in which headaches occur daily or near-daily (>15days per month) and last for more than 3months. Important CDH subtypes include chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, hemicrania continua, and new daily persistent headache. Other headaches with shorter durations (<4h/day) are usually not included in CDH. Common comorbidities of CDH are medication overuse headache and various psychiatric disorders, such as depression and anxiety. Indications of inpatient treatment for CDH patients include poor responses to outpatient management, need for detoxification for overuse of specific medications (particularly opioids and barbiturates), and severe psychiatric comorbidities. Inpatient treatment usually involves stopping acute pain, preventing future attacks, and detoxifying medication overuse if present. Multidisciplinary integrated care that includes medical staff from different disciplines (e.g., psychiatry, clinical psychology, and physical therapy) has been recommended. The outcomes of inpatient treatment are satisfactory in terms of decreasing headache intensity or frequency, withdrawal from medication overuse, reducing disability, and improving life quality, although long-term relapse is not uncommon. In conclusion, inpatient treatment may be useful for select patients with refractory CDH and should be incorporated in a holistic headache care program. PMID:26707496

  15. Correlates of Burnout in Inpatient Substance Abuse Treatment Therapists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elman, Barnett D.; Dowd, Edmund Thomas

    1997-01-01

    Identifies the occupational and personal characteristics and stressors that might be correlated with burnout among inpatient therapists (N=79) in substance abuse treatment facilities. Results show that recovering therapists had a higher sense of personal accomplishment than nonrecovering therapists. Therapists with more social support also enjoyed…

  16. Cost variation in child and adolescent psychiatric inpatient treatment.

    PubMed

    Beecham, Jennifer K; Green, Jonathan; Jacobs, Brian; Dunn, Graham

    2009-09-01

    Publicly available costs data for child and adolescent psychiatric inpatient services do not allow links to be made with patients' needs and outcomes. Without this information commissioners may reduce the role of inpatient services on the basis of budgetary impacts alone. This study estimates the support costs before, during and after an inpatient admission and explores the associations between costs, needs and outcomes. A detailed prospective cohort study of eight child and adolescent units was undertaken in which participants were assessed at referral, admission, decision to discharge and 1 year later. Mean admission costs were pound24,120, although the range was wide. Associations were found between costs and patients' global impairment, age and exclusion status. Support costs after admission were similar to pre-admission costs, but there was some evidence to suggest that services were better targeted. Moves in England to develop national tariffs for inpatient psychiatric episodes should be based on the likely cost of the episode of treatment rather than costs per day, and good commissioning requires more information on the predictors of such costs. PMID:19288167

  17. Outpatient versus inpatient uterine polyp treatment for abnormal uterine bleeding: randomised controlled non-inferiority study

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Natalie A M; Middleton, Lee; Diwakar, Lavanya; Smith, Paul; Denny, Elaine; Roberts, Tracy; Stobert, Lynda; Jowett, Susan; Daniels, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness and acceptability of outpatient polypectomy with inpatient polypectomy. Design Pragmatic multicentre randomised controlled non-inferiority study. Setting Outpatient hysteroscopy clinics in 31 UK National Health Service hospitals. Participants 507 women who attended as outpatients for diagnostic hysteroscopy because of abnormal uterine bleeding and were found to have uterine polyps. Interventions Participants were randomly assigned to either outpatient uterine polypectomy under local anaesthetic or inpatient uterine polypectomy under general anaesthesia. Data were collected on womens self reported bleeding symptoms at baseline and at 6, 12, and 24 months. Data were also collected on pain and acceptability of the procedure at the time of polypectomy. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was successful treatment, determined by the womens assessment of bleeding at six months, with a prespecified non-inferiority margin of 25%. Secondary outcomes included generic (EQ-5D) and disease specific (menorrhagia multi-attribute scale) quality of life, and feasibility and acceptability of the procedure. Results 73% (166/228) of women in the outpatient group and 80% (168/211) in the inpatient group reported successful treatment at six months (intention to treat relative risk 0.91, 95% confidence interval 0.82 to 1.02; per protocol relative risk 0.92, 0.82 to 1.02). Failure to remove polyps was higher (19% v 7%; relative risk 2.5, 1.5 to 4.1) and acceptability of the procedure was lower (83% v 92%; 0.90, 0.84 to 0.97) in the outpatient group Quality of life did not differ significantly between the groups. Four uterine perforations, one of which necessitated bowel resection, all occurred in the inpatient group. Conclusions Outpatient polypectomy was non-inferior to inpatient polypectomy. Failure to remove a uterine polyp was, however, more likely with outpatient polypectomy and acceptability of the procedure was slightly lower. Trial registration International Clinical Trials Registry 65868569. PMID:25801579

  18. Predictors for readmission into children's inpatient mental health treatment.

    PubMed

    Yampolskaya, Svetlana; Mowery, Debra; Dollard, Norn

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study was to examine factors associated with time to first and subsequent readmissions of youth (N = 1,432) to one of Florida's residential mental health treatment programs, known as State Inpatient Psychiatric Program (SIPP). Results of multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that greater maltreatment severity, shorter length of time spent in SIPP during the initial episode, and longer time to provision of targeted case management services were associated with earlier readmission. When time to subsequent readmission was examined, results of multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that shorter length of stay during the second hospitalization and having more than one mental health diagnosis increased the odds of experiencing subsequent readmission. One consistent finding across initial and subsequent readmissions was that the timing of service provision but not the amount of services was crucial for preventing readmissions to inpatient residential programs. PMID:23314826

  19. Reduction in mental distress among substance users receiving inpatient treatment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Substance users being admitted to inpatient treatment experience a high level of mental distress. In this study we explored changes in mental distress during treatment. Methods Mental distress, as measured by the HSCL-10, was registered at admission and at discharge among 164 substance users in inpatient treatment in Northern Norway. Predictors of reduction in mental distress were examined utilizing hierarchical regression analysis. Results We found a significant reduction in mental distress in the sample, but the number of patients scoring above cut-off on the HSCL-10 at discharge was still much higher than in the general population. A more severe use of substances as measured by the AUDIT and the DUDIT, and being female, predicted a higher level of mental distress at admission to treatment as well as greater reduction in mental distress during treatment. Holding no education beyond 10 year compulsory school only predicted a reduction in mental distress. Conclusions The toxic and withdrawal effects of substances, level of education as well as gender, contributed to the differences in change in mental distress during treatment. Regression to the mean may in part explain some of the findings. PMID:21122161

  20. Predicting Change in Emotional and Behavioural Problems during Inpatient Treatment in Clients with Mild Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenneij, Nienke; Didden, Robert; Koot, Hans M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Little is known about client characteristics that are related to outcome during inpatient treatment of adults with mild intellectual disability (ID) and severe behavioural problems. Method: We explored variables that were related to a change in behavioural problems in 87 individuals with mild ID during inpatient treatment in facilities

  1. Possible criteria for inpatient psychiatric admissions: which patients are transferred from emergency services to inpatient psychiatric treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Ziegenbein, Marc; Anreis, Christoph; Brggen, Bernhard; Ohlmeier, Martin; Kropp, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Background Patients with psychiatric problems often seek help and assistance in hospital emergency departments. An important task of emergency room staff is to decide whether such patients need to be admitted or whether they can be treated on an outpatient basis. Methods Psychiatric treatments given in the Central Interdisciplinary Emergency Department (CED) at the Medical University of Hannover (MHH) in 2002 were analysed. Results Of a total of 2632 patients seeking psychiatric help, 51.4% were admitted for inpatient treatment. Patients with dementia syndromes were admitted more frequently than patients with other psychiatric diseases. Suicidality was often the reason for admission. Accompanied patients were less likely to be hospitalised, unless a care-order was in force. Restraining measures and acute medication also had an impact on the rate of admissions. Conclusion The results may help psychiatrists in the emergency department to make a more effective decision regarding inpatient admission in the interest of the individual patient. PMID:17121672

  2. 42 CFR 412.101 - Special treatment: Inpatient hospital payment adjustment for low-volume hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... adjustment for low-volume hospitals. 412.101 Section 412.101 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... Inpatient Operating Costs § 412.101 Special treatment: Inpatient hospital payment adjustment for low-volume... payment to a qualifying hospital for the higher incremental costs associated with a low volume...

  3. 42 CFR 412.101 - Special treatment: Inpatient hospital payment adjustment for low-volume hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... adjustment for low-volume hospitals. 412.101 Section 412.101 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... Inpatient Operating Costs § 412.101 Special treatment: Inpatient hospital payment adjustment for low-volume... payment to a qualifying hospital for the higher incremental costs associated with a low volume...

  4. 42 CFR 412.101 - Special treatment: Inpatient hospital payment adjustment for low-volume hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... adjustment for low-volume hospitals. 412.101 Section 412.101 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... Inpatient Operating Costs § 412.101 Special treatment: Inpatient hospital payment adjustment for low-volume... payment to a qualifying hospital for the higher incremental costs associated with a low volume...

  5. 42 CFR 412.101 - Special treatment: Inpatient hospital payment adjustment for low-volume hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... adjustment for low-volume hospitals. 412.101 Section 412.101 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... Inpatient Operating Costs § 412.101 Special treatment: Inpatient hospital payment adjustment for low-volume... payment to a qualifying hospital for the higher incremental costs associated with a low volume...

  6. Markers for Aggression in Inpatient Treatment Facilities for Adults with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenneij, Nienke H.; Didden, Robert; Stolker, Joost Jan; Koot, Hans M.

    2009-01-01

    In high care settings for persons with intellectual disability (ID) aggressive incidents often occur. Still little is known about factors that are associated with an increased risk for aggressive behavior in clients who are admitted to an inpatient treatment facility. In four inpatient facilities, 108 adults with mild and borderline ID and

  7. The Involuntary Treatment of Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients--A Nation-Wide Survey from Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellila, Heikki Toivo; Sourander, Andre; Valimaki, Maritta; Warne, Tony; Kaivosoja, Matti

    2008-01-01

    This national cross-sectional study investigates the prevalence rates, regional differences and factors associated with the involuntary inpatient treatment of adolescents in Finland on a chosen day in 2000. The proportion of inpatients with involuntary legal status was 29.5% (n=82) giving a prevalence rate of 2.5 per 10,000/12-17 years old

  8. Inpatient management of migraine.

    PubMed

    Marmura, Michael J; Goldberg, Stephanie Wrobel

    2015-04-01

    Migraine is a frequently disabling disorder which may require inpatient treatment. Admission criteria for migraine include intractable migraine, nausea and/or vomiting, severe disability, and dependence on opioids or barbiturates. The inpatient treatment of migraine is based on observational studies and expert opinion rather than placebo-controlled trials. Well-established inpatient treatments for migraine include dihydroergotamine, neuroleptics/antiemetics, lidocaine, intravenous aspirin, and non-pharmacologic treatment such as cognitive-behavioral therapy. Short-acting treatments possibly associated with medication overuse, such as triptans, opioids, or barbiturate-containing compounds, are generally avoided. While the majority of persons with migraine are admitted on an emergency basis for only a few days, outcome studies and infusion protocols during elective admissions at tertiary headache centers suggest a longer length of stay may be needed for persons with intractable migraine. PMID:25704007

  9. Efficacy of an adjunctive brief psychodynamic psychotherapy to usual inpatient treatment of depression: rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A few recent studies have found indications of the effectiveness of inpatient psychotherapy for depression, usually of an extended duration. However, there is a lack of controlled studies in this area and to date no study of adequate quality on brief psychodynamic psychotherapy for depression during short inpatient stay exists. The present article describes the protocol of a study that will examine the relative efficacy, the cost-effectiveness and the cost-utility of adding an Inpatient Brief Psychodynamic Psychotherapy to pharmacotherapy and treatment-as-usual for inpatients with unipolar depression. Methods/Design The study is a one-month randomized controlled trial with a two parallel group design and a 12-month naturalistic follow-up. A sample of 130 consecutive adult inpatients with unipolar depression and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale score over 18 will be recruited. The study is carried out in the university hospital section for mood disorders in Lausanne, Switzerland. Patients are assessed upon admission, and at 1-, 3- and 12- month follow-ups. Inpatient therapy is a manualized brief intervention, combining the virtues of inpatient setting and of time-limited dynamic therapies (focal orientation, fixed duration, resource-oriented interventions). Treatment-as-usual represents the best level of practice for a minimal treatment condition usually proposed to inpatients. Final analyses will follow an intentionto-treat strategy. Depressive symptomatology is the primary outcome and secondary outcome includes measures of psychiatric symptomatology, psychosocial role functioning, and psychodynamic-emotional functioning. The mediating role of the therapeutic alliance is also examined. Allocation to treatment groups uses a stratified block randomization method with permuted block. To guarantee allocation concealment, randomization is done by an independent researcher. Discussion Despite the large number of studies on treatment of depression, there is a clear lack of controlled research in inpatient psychotherapy during the acute phase of a major depressive episode. Research on brief therapy is important to take into account current short lengths of stay in psychiatry. The current study has the potential to scientifically inform appropriate inpatient treatment. This study is the first to address the issue of the economic evaluation of inpatient psychotherapy. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry (ACTRN12612000909820) PMID:23110608

  10. Patterns of Utilization and Outcomes of Inpatient Psychiatric Treatment in Asian Americans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin E.; Saw, Anne; Zane, Nolan W.; Murphy, Beth L.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the knowledge of racial/ethnic disparities in mental health treatment utilization comes from studies examining outpatient services, and less is known about these disparities in inpatient services. This empirical gap may limit our understanding of these disparities since inpatient treatment is the most intensive form of specialty mental health care for patients with psychological disorders. We conducted a systematic chart review of 129 Asian American and 198 White American psychiatric inpatients to examine patterns of inpatient psychiatric treatment utilization. Demographic and clinical data were extracted from admission and discharge records during a two-year timeframe. Patterns of diagnoses revealed that Asian American patients utilized inpatient services for more severe psychiatric diagnoses compared to White American patients. Despite this, there were no racial/ethnic differences in levels of functional impairment at admission, and there were no racial/ethnic differences in length of treatment stay. For Asian American patients, level of psychosocial functioning at admission predicted length of stay. A better understanding of patterns of inpatient treatment use is needed to meet the clinical needs of Asian Americans with psychiatric disorders. PMID:25984267

  11. The INDDEP study: inpatient and day hospital treatment for depression symptom course and predictors of change

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression can be treated in an outpatient, inpatient or day hospital setting. In the German health care system, episodes of inpatient or day hospital treatment are common, but there is a lack of studies evaluating effectiveness in routine care and subgroups of patients with a good or insufficient treatment response. Our study aims at identifying prognostic and prescriptive outcome predictors as well as comparative effectiveness in psychosomatic inpatient and day hospital treatment in depression. Methods/Design In a naturalistic study, 300 consecutive inpatient and 300 day hospital treatment episodes in seven psychosomatic hospitals in Germany will be included. Patients are assessed at four time points of measurement (admission, discharge, 3-months follow-up, 12-months follow-up) including a broad range of variables (self-report and expert ratings). First, the whole sample will be analysed to identify prognostic and prescriptive predictors of outcome (primary outcome criterion: Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptoms QIDS-total score, expert rating). Secondly, for a comparison of inpatient and day hospital treatment, samples will be matched according to known predictors of outcome. Discussion Naturalistic studies with good external validity are needed to assess treatment outcome in depression in routine care and to identify subgroups of patients with different therapeutic needs. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN20317064 PMID:23531019

  12. Enhancing Treatment Team Process through Mindfulness-Based Mentoring in an Inpatient Psychiatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Nirbhay N.; Singh, Subhashni D.; Sabaawi, Mohamed; Myers, Rachel E.; Wahler, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    The authors investigated changes in treatment team functioning in an adult inpatient psychiatric hospital after the implementation of a mindfulness-based mentoring intervention. Using a multiple baseline across treatment teams design, the authors assessed levels of functioning of three treatment teams using a 50-item rating scale and then

  13. The experience of specialist inpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa: A qualitative study from adult patients' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Smith, Vivien; Chouliara, Zoe; Morris, Paul G; Collin, Paula; Power, Kevin; Yellowlees, Alex; Grierson, David; Papageorgiou, Elena; Cook, Moira

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to explore experiences of women currently undergoing specialist inpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa. Interviews were carried out with 21 women with a diagnosis of anorexia nervosa from a specialist adult inpatient eating disorder unit. Five master themes emerged using thematic analysis: (1) shifts in control, (2) experience of transition, (3) importance of supportive staff relationships, (4) sharing with peers and (5) process of recovery and self-discovery. Findings suggest that patients experience a process of change and adjustment in relation to levels of perceived personal control, attachment to the treatment environment and a sense of self-identity. PMID:24505059

  14. Perceived relapse risk and desire for medication assisted treatment among persons seeking inpatient opiate detoxification.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Genie L; Herman, Debra S; Stein, Michael D

    2013-09-01

    Most patients with opioid addiction do not receive medication at the time of discharge from brief inpatient detoxification programs despite the high risk of relapse and the availability of three FDA-approved medications. We surveyed 164 inpatient opioid detoxification patients to assess desire for pharmacotherapy following detoxification program discharge. Participants were predominantly male (71.3%) and 80% had detoxed in the past. Reporting on their most recent previous inpatient detoxification, 27% had relapsed the day they were discharged, 65% within a month of discharge, and 90% within a year of discharge. 63% reported they wanted medication-assisted treatment (MAT) after discharge from the current admission. The odds of desiring a treatment medication increased by a factor of 1.02 for every 1% increase in perceived relapse risk (p<.01). These data suggest patient preference discussions including relapse risk could increase post-detox abstinence. PMID:23786852

  15. Subjective Motives for Requesting In-Patient Treatment in Female with Anorexia Nervosa: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Gorse, Pauline; Nordon, Clementine; Rouillon, Frederic; Pham-Scottez, Alexandra; Revah-Levy, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Background Anorexia nervosa is a severe psychiatric disorder mainly affecting women. Its treatment is long and accepted with much difficulty, in particular in-patient treatment. Aims To describe the subjective motives of women with anorexia nervosa for requesting in-patient admission, from a qualitative analysis of application letters. Methods Participants were adult women (18 years and older) with anorexia nervosa who were admitted as in-patients in a referral hospital unit in France from January 2008 to December 2010. The application letters, prerequisites to admission, were studied by the interpretative phenomenological method of content analysis. Results 63 letters have been analysed, allowing the identification of six themes related to requests for in-patient care: loss of control of behaviour, and of thoughts, mental exhaustion, isolation, inner struggle and fear of recovery. Conclusions Requests for in-patient admission were motivated by very personal, subjective experiences, unrelated to medical reasons for admission. These results may help improve pre-admission motivational work with individuals, by basing it on their subjective experience. PMID:24204951

  16. Group trauma-informed treatment for adolescent psychiatric inpatients: a preliminary uncontrolled trial.

    PubMed

    Gudio, Omar G; Weis, J Rebecca; Havens, Jennifer F; Biggs, Emily A; Diamond, Ursula N; Marr, Mollie; Jackson, Christie; Cloitre, Marylene

    2014-08-01

    Despite high rates of trauma exposure (46%-96%) and significant posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; 21%-29%) symptoms in adolescent psychiatric inpatients, there is a dearth of research on effective interventions delivered in inpatient settings. The current report describes the development of Brief STAIR-A, a repeatable 3-module version of skills training in affective and interpersonal regulation (STAIR) developed for adolescents in inpatient care. An uncontrolled design was used to conduct a preliminary examination of the group intervention's effectiveness. Adolescent psychiatric inpatients (N = 38; ages 12 years-17 years) admitted to a public hospital participated in Brief STAIR-A and attended a median of 6 sessions (range 3-36). They completed measures of PTSD and depressive symptom severity, coping skill use, and coping efficacy upon admission and again prior to discharge. Participants reported significant reductions in symptom severity (d = 0.65-0.67), no change in the absolute level of coping skills used (d = 0.16), but greater coping efficacy when discharged from care (d = 0.75). Results from this pilot study suggest that this brief group treatment shows promise for treating adolescents' trauma-related difficulties in inpatient psychiatry settings, but additional research examining its effectiveness is essential. PMID:25070927

  17. [Inpatient psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Spitzer, C; Rullkötter, N; Dally, A

    2016-01-01

    In German-speaking countries inpatient psychotherapy plays a major role in the mental healthcare system. Due to its characteristic features, i. e. multiprofessionalism, multimodality and method integration, the inpatient approach represents a unique and independent type of psychotherapy. In order to be helpful, the manifold verbal and non-verbal methods need to be embedded into an overall treatment plan. Additionally, the therapeutic milieu of the hospital represents an important effective factor and its organization requires a more active construction. The indications for inpatient psychotherapy are not only based on the mental disorder but also on illness, setting and healthcare system-related criteria. In integrative concepts, the multiprofessional team is a key component with many functions. The effectiveness of psychotherapeutic hospital treatment has been proven by meta-analysis studies; however, 20-30 % of patients do not benefit from inpatient psychotherapy and almost 13 % drop-out prematurely. PMID:26628042

  18. Summary of combined treatment under endoscope on 70 esophagus cancer inpatients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Nong, Meilong; Li, Laisheng; Jia, Fang; Hao, Runchun

    1993-03-01

    We announce with satisfaction that combined treatment on 70 inpatients who suffered esophageal cancer in its middle or late course is perfectly successful. The combined methods include phototherapy, microwave therapy, and anticarcinogen local injection. The results are as follows: CR 3 cases, holds 4.3% of the total inpatients; PR 36 cases, 51.4%; MR 24 cases, 34.3%; NR 7 cases, 10%; the total effective rate 90%. Splendid results of treatment on enlarging the canal, improving dysphagia, and releasing obstruction have been obtained. The dysphagic grade increased from 66 to 148, the grade of esophagostenosis from 64 to 147, and the obstruction releasing rate is 69 out of 70 (that is 98.6%). The histological observation after treatment shows that 59/62 inpatients being reported as having cancer cells appear to have retrogression accompanied with a few or large quantities of necrotic cancer cells, and 3 inpatients were changed to negative reaction. No obvious poisoning or side effects arose. The combined treatment is more advantageous on those of old age or the physically weak and those who cannot stand for an operation, radiotherapy, or normal chemotherapy.

  19. [Methodic approaches to pharmaco-economic evaluation of vibration disease inpatient treatment in miners].

    PubMed

    Semenikhin, V A; Petrov, A G; Petro, G P

    2015-01-01

    The authors justify pharmaco-economic evaluation of vibration disease inpatient treatment in miners, as miners' health improvement necessitates effective use of available means and implementation of economic management methods. Qualitative medical and pharmaceutic care in miners with vibration disease requires considerable financial, material and manpower resources of medical organization. PMID:26336732

  20. Inpatient Treatment in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry--A Prospective Study of Health Gain and Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Jonathan; Jacobs, Brian; Beecham, Jennifer; Dunn, Graham; Kroll, Leo; Tobias, Catherine; Briskman, Jackie

    2007-01-01

    Background: Inpatient treatment is a complex intervention for the most serious mental health disorders in child and adolescent psychiatry. This is the first large-scale study into its effectiveness and costs. Previous studies have been criticised for methodological weaknesses. Methods: A prospective cohort study, including economic evaluation,

  1. Agitation in the inpatient psychiatric setting: a review of clinical presentation, burden, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hankin, Cheryl S; Bronstone, Amy; Koran, Lorrin M

    2011-05-01

    Agitation among psychiatric inpatients (particularly those diagnosed with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder) is common and, unless recognized early and managed effectively, can rapidly escalate to potentially dangerous behaviors, including physical violence. Inpatient aggression and violence have substantial adverse psychological and physical consequences for both patients and providers, and they are costly to the healthcare system. In contrast to the commonly held view that inpatient violence occurs without warning or can be predicted by "static" risk factors, such as patient demographics or clinical characteristics, research indicates that violence is usually preceded by observable behaviors, especially non-violent agitation. When agitation is recognized, staff should employ nonpharmacological de-escalation strategies and, if the behavior continues, offer pharmacological treatment to calm patients rapidly. Given the poor therapeutic efficacy and potential for adverse events associated with physical restraint and seclusion, and the potential adverse sequelae of involuntary drug treatment, these interventions should be considered last resorts. Pharmacological agents used to treat agitation include benzodiazepines and first- and second-generation antipsychotic drugs. Although no currently available agent is ideal, recommendations for selecting among them are provided. There remains an unmet need for a non-invasive and rapidly acting agent that effectively calms without excessively sedating patients, addresses the patient's underlying psychiatric symptoms, and is reasonably safe and tolerable. A treatment with these characteristics could substantially reduce the clinical and economic burden of agitation in the inpatient psychiatric setting. PMID:21586995

  2. Protocol Development Guidelines for Treatment Regimens

    Cancer.gov

    All protocols sponsored by the Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis (DCTD), National Cancer Institute (NCI), are reviewed for safety and scientific integrity. Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) staff have developed standardized guidelines to express chemotherapy regimens in a uniform, clear and consistent manner. The intention of the guidelines is to minimize undue risks to patients on DCTD sponsored investigational clinical trials. DCTD-sponsored protocols will not be approved unless they comply with the Guidelines for Treatment Regimen Expression and Nomenclature.

  3. The appropriateness of the treatment setting for the inpatient post-acute treatment of alcohol dependence disorders in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Rossegger, Astrid; Keller, Anne; Odenwald, Michael; Endrass, Jrme

    2009-01-01

    Background In Switzerland, a total of 1'000 patients a year are treated for alcohol-dependence in specialized institutions. Though the current literature suggests favoring outpatient treatment, whether outpatient or inpatient treatment is more efficient cannot be answered generally. For Germany, "AWMF"-treatment guidelines were formulated in order to treat patients with substance use disorders in the appropriate treatment settings. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the majority of patients treated in the largest specialized institution for alcohol abuse treatment in Switzerland were treated in the appropriate setting. Methods All completed treatments conducted in the Forel-Hospital the largest clinic of its kind in Switzerland between the 1st of January 2004 and the 20th of December 2006 were included in the investigation (n = 915). Patient and treatment characteristics were gathered using the information from the PSYREC and act-info questionnaire. The AWMF criteria were operationalized on the basis of the questionnaire. Results Applying the AWMF criteria resulted in the emergence of three groups: 73.7% of the study sample could clearly be assigned to the inpatient treatment group, and for 7.5% there was evidence supporting the allocation to an outpatient treatment setting. In 18.8% of the cases, however, the AWMF criteria did not allow an assignment to either of the treatment settings. Of the total sample, 18.5% of all patients apparently did not profit from the inpatient treatment setting, whereas for the vast majority (81.5%), a therapeutic progress was documented. In those patients who, according to the AWMF guidelines, did not need an inpatient setting, a larger proportion improved than in the group of the patients who needed an inpatient treatment in a specialized hospital. Furthermore, the logistic regression analyses revealed that the less severe the clinical state of a patient upon admittance, the higher the odds of improvement during the hospital stay. Conclusion The results serve as evidence that for at least three out of four patients treated in the investigated specialized institution, an inpatient treatment was appropriate. The principal reason for the necessity of an inpatient treatment setting was that this hospital population showed severe psychiatric, somatic or social irregularities. Only a very limited number of patients hospitalized in a specialized institution for the treatment of alcohol-related disorders can be treated in an outpatient setting. PMID:19570222

  4. Substance Abuse: A 12-Month Outcome Study Following Inpatient Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petiet, Carole A.

    A 12-month outcome study was conducted on 129 patients discharged from a hospital-based substance abuse treatment program in an effort to identify the progress of patients after treatment, evaluate the treatment program, and improve the program based on the evaluation. Subjects completed two demographic questionnaires and a 12-month post-discharge

  5. A randomised controlled trial of Outpatient versus inpatient Polyp Treatment (OPT) for abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, T Justin; Middleton, Lee J; Cooper, Natalie Am; Diwakar, Lavanya; Denny, Elaine; Smith, Paul; Gennard, Laura; Stobert, Lynda; Roberts, Tracy E; Cheed, Versha; Bingham, Tracey; Jowett, Sue; Brettell, Elizabeth; Connor, Mary; Jones, Sian E; Daniels, Jane P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Uterine polyps cause abnormal bleeding in women and conventional practice is to remove them in hospital under general anaesthetic. Advances in technology make it possible to perform polypectomy in an outpatient setting, yet evidence of effectiveness is limited. OBJECTIVES To test the hypothesis that in women with abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) associated with benign uterine polyp(s), outpatient polyp treatment achieved as good, or no more than 25% worse, alleviation of bleeding symptoms at 6 months compared with standard inpatient treatment. The hypothesis that response to uterine polyp treatment differed according to the pattern of AUB, menopausal status and longer-term follow-up was tested. The cost-effectiveness and acceptability of outpatient polypectomy was examined. DESIGN A multicentre, non-inferiority, randomised controlled trial, incorporating a cost-effectiveness analysis and supplemented by a parallel patient preference study. Patient acceptability was evaluated by interview in a qualitative study. SETTING Outpatient hysteroscopy clinics and inpatient gynaecology departments within UK NHS hospitals. PARTICIPANTS Women with AUB - defined as heavy menstrual bleeding (formerly known as menorrhagia) (HMB), intermenstrual bleeding or postmenopausal bleeding - and hysteroscopically diagnosed uterine polyps. INTERVENTIONS We randomly assigned 507 women, using a minimisation algorithm, to outpatient polypectomy compared with conventional inpatient polypectomy as a day case in hospital under general anaesthesia. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The primary outcome was successful treatment at 6 months, determined by the woman's assessment of her bleeding. Secondary outcomes included quality of life, procedure feasibility, acceptability and cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. RESULTS At 6 months, 73% (166/228) of women who underwent outpatient polypectomy were successfully treated compared with 80% (168/211) following inpatient polypectomy [relative risk (RR) 0.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.82 to 1.02]. The lower end of the CIs showed that outpatient polypectomy was at most 18% worse, in relative terms, than inpatient treatment, within the 25% margin of non-inferiority set at the outset of the study. By 1 and 2 years the corresponding proportions were similar producing RRs close to unity. There was no evidence that the treatment effect differed according to any of the predefined subgroups when treatments by variable interaction parameters were examined. Failure to completely remove polyps was higher (19% vs. 7%; RR 2.5, 95% CI 1.5 to 4.1) with outpatient polypectomy. Procedure acceptability was reduced with outpatient compared with inpatient polyp treatment (83% vs. 92%; RR 0.90, 95% CI 0.84 to 0.97). There were no significant differences in quality of life. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios at 6 and 12 months for inpatient treatment were £1,099,167 and £668,800 per additional QALY, respectively. CONCLUSIONS When treating women with AUB associated with uterine polyps, outpatient polypectomy was non-inferior to inpatient polypectomy at 6 and 12 months, and relatively cost-effective. However, patients need to be aware that failure to remove a polyp is more likely with outpatient polypectomy and procedure acceptability lower. TRIAL REGISTRATION Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN 65868569. FUNDING This project was funded by the NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme and will be published in full in Health Technology Assessment; Vol. 19, No. 61. See the NIHR Journals Library website for further project information. PMID:26240949

  6. Military inpatient residential treatment of substance abuse disorders: the Eisenhower Army Medical Center experience.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Scott R; Horton, Philip A; Trakowski, John H; Lenard, Janet H; Barron, Mark R; Nave, Peggy V; Gautreaux, Melissa S; Lott, Heather D

    2014-06-01

    Opened in 2009, the Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center Inpatient Residential Treatment Facility (RTF) is the largest and most well-established inpatient substance use disorder treatment facility in the Department of Defense. The RTF is a 28-day inpatient treatment program that employs evidence-based practices and is based on Alcoholics/Narcotics Anonymous principles that are incorporated with a hybrid of military daily structure regime including early morning physical training. Family involvement is encouraged. The RTF is staffed by a multidisciplinary team specializing in addictions and admits Active/Activated Service Members (SMs) from all Service branches, typically those who have failed other military/civilian substance use disorder programs. Eighty-seven percent of SMs referred to the program successfully commenced, with continuous sobriety observed in over half of SMs 6 months later, and 1 year relapse rates comparable to other alcohol treatment programs. Limitations of our program evaluation efforts, lessons learned, and recommendations for the way ahead are shared. PMID:24902136

  7. A Multivariate Process Model of Adolescent 12-Step Attendance and Substance Use Outcome Following Inpatient Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, John F.; Myers, Mark G.; Brown, Sandra A.

    2007-01-01

    A common recommendation for youth treated for substance abuse is to attend 12-step groups. However, little is known regarding the effects of this adult-derived prescription on substance use outcomes for teens. This study examined (a) the relation between 12-step attendance and substance use outcome in the 6 months postdischarge from inpatient care and (b) a process model of how 12-step attendance during the first 3 months postdischarge affects proximal outcomes of motivation, coping, and self-efficacy, measured at 3 months, and how these, in tum, affect ultimate substance use outcome in the following 3 months. Adolescent inpatients (N = 99) were assessed during treatment and 3 and 6 months postdischarge. Results revealed modest beneficial effects of 12-step attendance, which were mediated by motivation but not by coping or self-efficacy. Findings suggest that closer attention be paid to motivational factors in the treatment of adolescent substance abuse. PMID:11130156

  8. Between Difference and Belonging: Configuring Self and Others in Inpatient Treatment for Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Eli, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Dedicated inpatient care for eating disorders has profound impact on patients' embodied practices and lived realities. Analyses of inpatients' accounts have shown that participants endorse complex and conflicting attitudes toward their experiences in eating disorders wards, yet the apparent ambivalence that characterizes inpatient experiences has not been subject to critical examination. This paper examines the narrated experiences of 13 participants (12 women and one man; age 18–38 years at first interview) with past or present anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or eating disorder not otherwise specified, who had been hospitalized in an inpatient eating disorders ward for adults in central Israel. The interviews, which took place in 2005–2006, and again in 2011, were part of a larger longitudinal study exploring the subjective experiences of eating disorders and recovery among Israeli adults. Employing qualitative analysis, this study finds that the participants' accounts were concerned with dynamics of difference and belonging, as they played out in various aspects of inpatient care, including diagnosis, treatment, relationships with fellow patients and staff, and everyday life in hospital. Notably, participants simultaneously defined themselves as connected to, but also distinct from, the eating disordered others who formed their reference group at the ward. Through negotiating a protectively ambivalent positioning, participants recognized their eating disordered identities and connected with others on the ward, while also asserting their non-disordered individuality and distancing themselves from the potential dangers posed by ‘excessive’ belonging. The paper suggests that this ambivalent positioning can usefully be understood through the anthropological concept of liminality: being both a part of and apart from one's community. PMID:25210886

  9. 21 CFR 312.320 - Treatment IND or treatment protocol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Treatment IND or treatment protocol. 312.320 Section 312.320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE INVESTIGATIONAL NEW DRUG APPLICATION Expanded Access to Investigational Drugs for Treatment Use § 312.320 Treatment IND...

  10. 21 CFR 312.320 - Treatment IND or treatment protocol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Treatment IND or treatment protocol. 312.320 Section 312.320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE INVESTIGATIONAL NEW DRUG APPLICATION Expanded Access to Investigational Drugs for Treatment Use § 312.320 Treatment IND...

  11. 21 CFR 312.320 - Treatment IND or treatment protocol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Treatment IND or treatment protocol. 312.320 Section 312.320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE INVESTIGATIONAL NEW DRUG APPLICATION Expanded Access to Investigational Drugs for Treatment Use § 312.320 Treatment IND...

  12. Dental prosthetic treatment needs of inpatients with schizophrenia in Taiwan: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The need to obtain information on the dental prosthetic treatment needs (DPTNs) of inpatients with schizophrenia is unrecognized. This study aims to assess the DPTNs of this population and investigate the association between these needs and related factors. Methods The results of an oral health survey involving 1,103 schizophrenic adult inpatients in a long-term care institution in Taiwan were used. Chi-square tests and multiple logistic analyses were used to measure the independent effects of the characteristics of each subject on their DPTNs. Results Of the subjects, 805 (73.0%) were men and 298 (27.0%) were women. The mean age was 50.8 years. A total of 414 (37.5%) required fixed prosthesis, whereas 700 (63.5%) needed removable prosthesis. Multivariate analyses show that fixed prosthesis is associated with age only after adjusting for other potential independent variables. Older subjects who had a lower educational attainment or a longer length of stay required removable prosthesis. Conclusions The findings of this study show that the DPTNs of schizophrenic inpatients are not being met. Therefore, a special approach to the dental prosthetic treatment of these patients should be developed. PMID:23331491

  13. Protocol for audit of current Filipino practice in rehabilitation of stroke inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Suarez, Consuelo B; Dizon, Janine Margarita R; Grimmer, Karen; Estrada, Myrna S; Liao, Lauren Anne S; Malleta, Anne-Rochelle D; Tan, Ma Elena R; Marfil, Vero; Versales, Cristina S; Suarez, Jimah L; So, Kleon C; Uyehara, Edgardo D

    2015-01-01

    Background Stroke is one of the leading medical conditions in the Philippines. Over 500,000 Filipinos suffer from stroke annually. Provision of evidence-based medical and rehabilitation management for stroke patients has been a challenge due to existing environmental, social, and local health system issues. Thus, existing western guidelines on stroke rehabilitation were contextualized to draft recommendations relevant to the local Philippine setting. Prior to fully implementing the guidelines, an audit of current practice needs to be undertaken, thus the purpose of this audit protocol. Methods A clinical audit of current practices in stroke rehabilitation in the Philippines will be undertaken. A consensus list of data items to be captured was identified by the audit team during a 2-day meeting in 2012. These items, including patient demographics, type of stroke, time to referral for rehabilitation management, length of hospital stay, and other relevant descriptors of stroke management were included as part of the audit. Hospitals in the Philippines will be recruited to take part in the audit activity. Recruitment will be via the registry of the Philippine Academy of Rehabilitation Medicine, where 90% of physiatrists (medical doctors specialized in rehabilitation medicine) are active members and are affiliated with various hospitals in the Philippines. Data collectors will be identified and trained in the audit process. A pilot audit will be conducted to test the feasibility of the audit protocol, and refinements to the protocol will be undertaken as necessary. The comprehensive audit process will take place for a period of 3 months. Data will be encoded using MS Excel®. Data will be reported as means and percentages as appropriate. Subgroup analysis will be undertaken to look into differences and variability of stroke patient descriptors and rehabilitation activities. Conclusion This audit study is an ambitious project, but given the “need” to conduct the audit to identify “gaps” in current practice, and the value it can bring to serve as a platform for implementation of evidence-based stroke management in the Philippines to achieve best patient and health outcomes, the audit team is more than ready to take up the challenge. PMID:25784814

  14. 21 CFR 312.83 - Treatment protocols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Treatment protocols. 312.83 Section 312.83 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE INVESTIGATIONAL NEW DRUG APPLICATION Drugs Intended to Treat Life-threatening and Severely-debilitating Illnesses 312.83...

  15. 21 CFR 312.83 - Treatment protocols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Treatment protocols. 312.83 Section 312.83 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE INVESTIGATIONAL NEW DRUG APPLICATION Drugs Intended to Treat Life-threatening and...

  16. Treatment of avoidant personality traits in a German armed forces inpatient psychiatric setting.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Peter; Alliger-Horn, Christina; Kowalski, Jens T; Plate, Stefan; Wallner, Franziska; Wolff, Elisabeth; Strhle, Andreas

    2013-02-01

    Military duty places high demands on the soldiers' social adaptability and competences. Avoidant personality traits can lead to interpersonal conflicts and at least to mental disorders. 192 German Armed Forces soldiers were treated in a multimodal inpatient psychiatric treatment setting at a Bundeswehr hospital between 2007 and 2010. 129 of these patients received a social skills group training (group training of social competence [GSC]) as part of this setting. A comparison group (n=63) did not participate but got unspecific treatment elements instead. The Symptom Checklist 90-Revised (SCL-90-R) and the Inventory on Competence and Control Beliefs (Fragebogen zu Kompetenz- und Kontrollberzeugungen [FKK]) were applied. Symptom severity in the SCL-Global Severity Index, sum scale of the SCL-90-R and the four primary scales of the FKK showed significant improvements both immediately after treatment and at follow-up. No significant influence of the form of treatment (with/without GSC), age, gender, diagnosis, and deployments on the treatment result was established in the analysis of covariance. The data suggest that an inpatient psychiatric treatment setting focused on avoidant personality traits has a favorable effect on psychiatric symptom severity in military personnel. Social skills group training as a treatment component does not seem to be significantly superior to the standard setting. PMID:23495468

  17. Characteristics of middle-aged women in inpatient treatment for eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Forman, Maryelizabeth; Davis, William N

    2005-01-01

    The current study examined descriptive characteristics of women 35 years and older seeking inpatient treatment for an eating disorder. A second purpose was to compare characteristics and treatment experiences of midlife patients to young adult patients. Participants were 193 women admitted for treatment to a residential eating disorders facility. All of the women received the standard inpatient treatment package offered by the treatment facility. Participants completed measures of eating attitudes, depression, anxiety, body image, and media influence at admission and discharge and a program assessment measure at discharge. Results revealed comparable scores on measures of eating attitudes, anxiety, and depression at admission, although younger patients scored significantly higher on measures of body image and media influence at admission. With regard to treatment experience, midlife patients experienced greater change with regard to depression and body image dissatisfaction and described family therapy and grief and loss group therapy as being significantly more helpful than young adult patients. There appears to be a number of similarities across age cohorts in terms of clinical presentation, but underlying causal factors may differ between age groups. In general, midlife patients and young patients describe the standard treatment package as equally helpful, although midlife patients might also benefit from groups addressing grief and loss. PMID:16864530

  18. Predictors of dropout from inpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa: data from a large French sample.

    PubMed

    Huas, Caroline; Godart, Nathalie; Foulon, Christine; Pham-Scottez, Alexandra; Divac, Snezana; Fedorowicz, Valrie; Peyracque, Emilie; Dardennes, Roland; Falissard, Bruno; Rouillon, Frdric

    2011-02-28

    Dropout from anorexia nervosa inpatient treatment programs is frequent and is linked to a poorer outcome. This study aimed to identify predictive factors for dropout among anorexia nervosa inpatients. Between 1988 and 2004, 601 consecutive female inpatients with anorexia, restrictive (AN-R) or binge/purging (AN-B/P) subtype (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV)), were assessed at admission (clinical, socio-demographic, and psychological data). A stepwise logistic model was developed. Dropout rates were respectively 50.0% and 56.2% for AN-R and AN-B/P. Seven predictive factors were identified in multivariate analysis: having one or more children, low desired body mass index (BMI), a low minimum BMI, high scores on the SCL-90 paranoid ideation and the Morgan and Russell eating behavior subscales, and low educational status. Early dropouts had a particular profile: lower desired BMI, higher score on SCL90 paranoid subscale, and more impulsive behaviors (alcohol use, suicide attempts). Dropout appeared as a multifactorial event. In clinical practice, certain factors could serve as warning messages reflecting the severity of the illness (high EDI score and low minimum BMI); while others could be targeted before hospitalization (having at least one child and low desired BMI). PMID:20546922

  19. [Does a Turkish migration background influence treatment outcome? Results of a prospective inpatient healthcare study].

    PubMed

    Msko, Mike; Schneider, Jens; Koch, Uwe; Schulz, Holger

    2008-01-01

    Study results indicate a higher psycho-social burden for people with a Turkish migration background who live in Germany. The present study researches, if such a burden difference is detectable at the beginning of an inpatient treatment program for patients with psychological/psychosomatic disorders, if different treatment progressions occur and asks which influence the factor migration background plays in terms of the treatment results. At admission patients with a Turkish migration background (N = 99 vs. N = 753) showed a higher psychopathological burden. There was less treatment success for patients with a Turkish migration background und they didn't reach verifiable improvements in some scales. The regression analysis points out the importance of the factor migration background as an independent negative predictor of a positive treatment result. PMID:18421658

  20. Cost Analysis of Integrative Inpatient Treatment Based on DRG Data: The Example of Anthroposophic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Jrgen; Fiori, Wolfgang; Heusser, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background. Much work has been done to evaluate the outcome of integrative inpatient treatment but scarcely the costs. This paper evaluates the costs for inpatient treatment in three anthroposophic hospitals (AHs). Material and Methods. Cost and performance data from a total of 23,180 cases were analyzed and compared to national reference data. Subgroup analysis was performed between the cases with and without anthroposophic medical complex (AMC) treatment. Results. Costs and length of stay in the cases without AMC displayed no relevant differences compared to the national reference data. In contrast the inlier cases with AMC caused an average of 1,394 more costs. However costs per diem were not higher than those in the national reference data. Hence, the delivery of AMC was associated with a prolonged length of stay. 46.6% of the cases with AMC were high outliers. Only 10.6% of the inlier cases with AMC were discharged before reaching the mean length of stay of each DRG. Discussion. Treatment in an AH is not generally associated with an increased use of resources. However, the provision of AMC leads to a prolonged length of stay and cannot be adequately reimbursed by the current G-DRG system. Due to the heterogeneity of the patient population, an additional payment should be negotiated individually. PMID:23431346

  1. Perception of Problem Severity, Treatment Motivations, Experiences, and Long-Term Plans among Pregnant Women in a Detoxification Inpatient Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Afton; Shannon, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine pregnant women's substance use from initial use, to recognition of problem severity, motivations for treatment, and ultimately to treatment entry. The sample consisted of 114 pregnant women receiving inpatient detoxification treatment at the University of Kentucky Chandler Medical Center. Qualitative and

  2. Perception of Problem Severity, Treatment Motivations, Experiences, and Long-Term Plans among Pregnant Women in a Detoxification Inpatient Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Afton; Shannon, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine pregnant women's substance use from initial use, to recognition of problem severity, motivations for treatment, and ultimately to treatment entry. The sample consisted of 114 pregnant women receiving inpatient detoxification treatment at the University of Kentucky Chandler Medical Center. Qualitative and…

  3. Evaluation of an internet-based aftercare program to improve vocational reintegration after inpatient medical rehabilitation: study protocol for a cluster-randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mental disorders are the main reasons for rising proportions of premature pension in most high-income countries. Although inpatient medical rehabilitation has increasingly targeted work-related stress, there is still a lack of studies on the transfer of work-specific interventions into work contexts. Therefore, we plan to evaluate an online aftercare program aiming to improve vocational reintegration after medical rehabilitation. Methods Vocationally strained patients (n = 800) aged between 18 and 59 years with private internet access are recruited in psychosomatic, orthopedic and cardiovascular rehabilitation clinics in Germany. During inpatient rehabilitation, participants in stress management group training are cluster-randomized to the intervention or control group. The intervention group (n = 400) is offered an internet-based aftercare with weekly writing tasks and therapeutic feedback, a patient forum, a self-test and relaxation exercises. The control group (n = 400) obtains regular e-mail reminders with links to publicly accessible information about stress management and coping. Assessments are conducted at the beginning of inpatient rehabilitation, the end of inpatient rehabilitation, the end of aftercare, and 9 months later. The primary outcome is a risk score for premature pension, measured by a screening questionnaire at follow-up. Secondary outcome measures include level of vocational stress, physical and mental health, and work capacity at follow-up. Discussion We expect the intervention group to stabilize the improvements achieved during inpatient rehabilitation concerning stress management and coping, resulting in an improved vocational reintegration. The study protocol demonstrates the features of internet-based aftercare in rehabilitation. Trial registration International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Register (ISRCTN:ISRCTN33957202) PMID:23351836

  4. A randomized trial of one-day vs. three-day buprenorphine inpatient detoxification protocols for heroin dependence.

    PubMed

    Hopper, John A; Wu, Joanna; Martus, Wesley; Pierre, James D

    2005-01-01

    Detoxification from opioids remains an important first step in the treatment of many patients with opioid dependence. Several pharmacologic regimens have been used for opioid detoxification. In the United States, the partial mu-opioid agonist, buprenorphine (BUP) is the most recently approved pharmacotherapy for opioid detoxification and replacement. The literature in recent years has described detoxification protocols using a single high dose of BUP and a three-day BUP regimen. In many settings, such as drug-free programs, a single-dose detoxification protocol would be of significant benefit. There have been no prior studies comparing one-day and three-day BUP-assisted opioid withdrawal. In this pilot study, we conducted an open-label, randomized trial of one-day vs. three-day BUP/naloxone sublingual tablet-assisted opioid withdrawal. Twenty patients from a therapeutic community treatment program were randomly assigned to receive either 32 mg sublingual BUP over one hour (one-day group), or 32 mg sublingual BUP over three days (three-day group). Nine of 10 subjects (90 percent) in each group completed seven days in the detoxification protocol. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in all other outcome variables, including retention in the treatment program, intensity of withdrawal signs and symptoms, amounts of adjunct medications used, and ability to produce opiate-free urine. This study further validates the feasibility of the single high dose of BUP as a rapid detoxification method. PMID:17315409

  5. Psychotherapy of Borderline Personality Disorder: Can the Supply Meet the Demand? A German Nationwide Survey in DBT Inpatient and Day Clinic Treatment Facilities.

    PubMed

    Richter, Christoph; Steinacher, Bruno; Zum Eschenhoff, Anna; Bermpohl, Felix

    2016-02-01

    The present study aimed to assess (1) the amount of inpatient and day clinic DBT treatment places for patients with borderline personality disorder and (2) the relationship between supply and demand in a given study region. Survey of inpatient and day clinic facilities in the German DBT network. 42 inpatient units and day clinics responded, representing 75% of the DBT network members contacted. These institutions offer 527 DBT treatment places and treat about 2310 patients per year. The mean waiting period prior to treatment was 14.3weeks. 700 DBT inpatient or day clinic places exist in Germany in 2011. 3000 patients receive DBT inpatient or day clinic treatment per year. This approximates a ratio of 820 borderline patients for one existing DBT inpatient or day clinic place in Germany. The long waiting time reflects the great demand for this treatment and could be interpreted as an imbalance between supply and demand. PMID:26323785

  6. Group processes and process evaluations in a new treatment setting: inpatient group psychotherapy followed by internet-chat aftercare groups.

    PubMed

    Haug, Severin; Sedway, Jan; Kordy, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about processes characterizing therapeutic Internet-chat groups, which offer a novel way of providing group therapy over distances. In this study group processes and group evaluations were examined in a treatment setting where face-to-face inpatient groups are followed by chat aftercare groups. For a sample of 121 patients who participated in both treatment modalities, group processes and group evaluations were modeled using hierarchical linear modeling. The group evaluations followed a consistent upward course from the beginning of therapy until the end of chat aftercare. For the process measures Activity and Emotional Reactivity, the initial scores at the beginning of the chat groups were lower than at the end of the inpatient treatment, but higher than at admission. During chat aftercare, Activity and Emotional Reactivity scores increased less than during the inpatient phase, but on average Activity and Emotional Reactivity were higher during Internet-chat aftercare. The predictive value of the acquaintance of the therapist from inpatient treatment and the course of group evaluations during inpatient treatment on the course of group evaluations during chat aftercare were examined. PMID:18211213

  7. Inpatient cancer treatment: an analysis of financial and nonfinancial performance measures by hospital-ownership type.

    PubMed

    Newton, Ashley N; Ewer, Sid R

    2010-01-01

    This study uses longitudinal data of inpatient treatment from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's (AHRQ's) Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) to examine the differences in historical trends and build future projections of charges, costs, and lengths of stay (LOS) for inpatient treatment of four of the most prevalent cancer types: breast, colon, lung, and prostate. We stratify our data by hospital ownership type and for the aforementioned four major cancer types. We use the Kruskal Wallis (nonparametric ANOVA) Test and time series models to analyze variance and build projections, respectively, for mean charges per discharge, mean costs per discharge, mean LOS per discharge, mean charges per day, and mean costs per day. We find that significant differences exist in both the mean charges per discharge and mean charges per day for breast, colon, lung, and prostate cancers and in the mean LOS per discharge for breast cancer. Additionally, we find that both mean charges and mean costs are forecast to continue increasing while mean LOS are forecast to continue decreasing over the forecast period 2008 to 2012. The methodologies we employ may be used by individual hospital systems, and by health care policy-makers, for various financial planning purposes. Future studies could examine additional financial and nonfinancial variables for these and other cancer types, test for geographic disparities, or focus on procedural-level hospital measures. PMID:21294439

  8. Drop-out from adolescent and young adult inpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Tamara; Pioggiosi, Philippe; Huas, Caroline; Wallier, Jenny; Maria, Anne-Solne; Apfel, Alexandre; Curt, Florence; Falissard, Bruno; Godart, Nathalie

    2013-10-30

    We examined factors predictive of dropout from inpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa (AN) among adolescents in a prospective study of 359 consecutive hospitalizations for AN (DSM-IV). Patients were assessed at admission (clinical, socio-demographic, and psychological data). Multivariate analyses were performed. Drop-out (i.e. leaving hospital before the target weight is achieved) occurred in 24% (n=86) of hospitalizations; in 42.3% (n=30) of the cases, dropout was initiated by the treatment team and in 58.6% (n=41) by the patients and/or their parents. 18.6% (16/86) occurred during the first half of the inpatient program. Frequency of drop-out was significantly higher when the patient was living with only one parent, had been hospitalized previously, had a lower BMI at admission and was over 18 at admission. These elements should draw the attention of the clinician, so that he/she can prepare hospitalization with patients presenting lower admission BMI, particularly by motivational interventions for a better therapeutic alliance, and by the deployment of intensive accompaniment of single parents. Further studies aiming to replicate these results, and including the evaluation of other clinical dimensions such as impulsivity and other personality traits, are needed to elucidate this important topic. PMID:23639255

  9. [Treatment results from inpatient psychosomatic rehabilitation of Turkish migrants: a prospective study].

    PubMed

    Nickel, C; Lojewski, N; Muehlbacher, M; Cangoez, B; Müller-Rabe, T; Buschmann, W; Mitterlehner, F O; Lahmann, C; Egger, C; Kettler, C; Rother, N; Tritt, K; Bachler, E; Fartacek, R; Leiberich, P; Pedrosa Gil, F; Rother, W K; Loew, T H; Nickel, M

    2006-03-01

    Psychosomatic rehabilitation and the concluding social-medical assessment constitute a particular challenge. The aim of this study was to examine whether inpatient psychosomatic rehabilitation in the context of an integrated treatment concept, conducted in Turkish and German, is effective in the rehabilitation of Turkish migrant laborers, and what concluding socio-medical assessment results from this treatment. 195 Turkish patients--44 male and 151 female--received inpatient psychosomatic treatment for approximately 40 days. Sociodemographic, psychiatric and social-medical data were recorded, as well as Symptom Checklist (SCL-90-R) testing upon admission and discharge. A predominant number of patients were laborers, with a low level of primary education, who were afflicted with psychosocial problems and dissatisfaction with their workplace and who first came into psychosomatic treatment many years following the onset of their illness. Many of them had a clearly defined desire to retire. At the end of their admission, a significant improvement in almost all the scales of the SCL-R-90 was ascertained on the one hand, but on the other, adequate socio-medical results were hardly observed. The symptoms' improvement would confirm that the combination of service offerings in Turkish and German proved themselves. A portion of the patients (approx. 40 %) were classified subsequent to treatment as capable of working for 6 hours or more. Nevertheless, approximately approx. 75 % still sought to retire. Timely psychosomatic treatment could counteract chronification of the illness and the establishment of a steadfast desire to enter retirement, and consequently represent an improvement in the prognosis. Likewise, consistent psychosomatic training of physicians, as well as systematic prophylactic measures with the migrant laborers, should be considered. PMID:16575693

  10. Course of health care costs before and after psychiatric inpatient treatment: patient-reported vs. administrative records

    PubMed Central

    Zentner, Nadja; Baumgartner, Ildiko; Becker, Thomas; Puschner, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is limited evidence on the course of health service costs before and after psychiatric inpatient treatment, which might also be affected by source of cost data. Thus, this study examines: i) differences in health care costs before and after psychiatric inpatient treatment, ii) whether these differences vary by source of cost-data (self-report vs. administrative), and iii) predictors of cost differences over time. Methods: Sixty-one psychiatric inpatients gave informed consent to their statutory health insurance company to provide insurance records and completed assessments at admission and 6-month follow-up. These were compared to the self‐reported treatment costs derived from the "Client Socio-demographic and Service Use Inventory" (CSSRI‐EU) for two 6‐month observation periods before and after admission to inpatient treatment to a large psychiatric hospital in rural Bavaria. Costs were divided into subtypes including costs for inpatient and outpatient treatment as well as for medication. Results: Sixty-one participants completed both assessments. Over one year, the average patient‐reported total monthly treatment costs increased from € 276.91 to € 517.88 (paired Wilcoxon Z = ‐2.27; P = 0.023). Also all subtypes of treatment costs increased according to both data sources. Predictors of changes in costs were duration of the index admission and marital status. Conclusion: Self-reported costs of people with severe mental illness adequately reflect actual service use as recorded in administrative data. The increase in health service use after inpatient treatment can be seen as positive, while the pre-inpatient level of care is a potential problem, raising the question whether more or better outpatient care might have prevented hospital admission. Findings may serve as a basis for future studies aiming at furthering the understanding of what to expect regarding appropriate levels of post-hospital care, and what factors may help or inhibit post-discharge treatment engagement. Future research is also needed to examine long-term effects of inpatient psychiatric treatment on outcome and costs. PMID:25774372

  11. Early traumatized inpatients high in psychoform and somatoform dissociation: characteristics and treatment response.

    PubMed

    Jepsen, Ellen K K; Langeland, Willie; Heir, Trond

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the clinical relevance of differences in psychoform and somatoform dissociative symptoms in 55 early traumatized inpatients. The high psychoform and somatoform dissociative group (n = 18), somatoform dissociative group (n = 22), and nondissociative group (n = 15) did not differ on abuse severity, depressive symptoms, interpersonal problems, Axis I or II comorbidity, or deterioration rates. Compared to the other 2 groups, the highly dissociative group was characterized by younger age, living alone, higher levels of posttraumatic and general distress, more frequent reports of suicidality, self-mutilation, eating problems, and less favorable treatment response. The results highlight the clinical relevance of using dissociation measures for identifying subgroups of patients with severe psychopathology who may be more treatment resistant. PMID:24983399

  12. The inpatient evaluation and treatment of a self-professed budding serial killer.

    PubMed

    Reisner, Andrew D; McGee, Mark; Noffsinger, Stephen G

    2003-02-01

    The authors present the case of a man who was hospitalized after claiming that he was about to become a serial killer. The patient presented with extensive written homicidal fantasies and homicidal intentions without evidence of actual homicidal acts. In addition to routine assessments, hospital staff members used case conferences, psychological testing, outside forensic consultation, and a forensic review process to make decisions regarding diagnosis, treatment planning, and discharge. The patient was discharged after 8 months of inpatient treatment and was apparently free of homicidal impulses or symptoms of severe mental illness. A 2-year court commitment allowed for the enactment and potential enforcement of a discharge plan that was endorsed by the patient, the hospital, and community care providers. The authors review diagnostic and risk management issues. Comparisons with known features of typical serial killers are made. PMID:12613432

  13. Cost analysis of inpatient treatment of anorexia nervosa in adolescents: hospital and caregiver perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Matthew; Katzman, Debra K.; Akseer, Nadia; Steinegger, Cathleen; Hancock-Howard, Rebecca L.; Coyte, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Admission to hospital is the treatment of choice for anorexia nervosa in adolescent patients who are medically unstable; however, stays are often prolonged and frequently disrupt normal adolescent development, family functioning, school and work productivity. We sought to determine the costs of inpatient treatment in this population from a hospital and caregiver perspective, and to identify determinants of such costs. Methods We used micro-costing methods for this cohort study involving all adolescent patients (age 1218 yr) admitted for treatment of anorexia nervosa at a tertiary care child and adolescent eating disorder program in Toronto, between Sept. 1, 2011, and Mar. 31, 2013. We used hospital administrative data and Canadian census data to calculate hospital and caregiver costs. Results We included 73 adolescents in our cohort for cost-analysis. We determined a mean total hospital cost in 2013 Canadian dollars of $51 349 (standard deviation [SD] $26 598) and a mean total societal cost of $54 932 (SD $27 864) per admission, based on a mean length of stay of 37.9 days (SD 19.7 d). We found patient body mass index (BMI) to be the only significant negative predictor of hospital cost (p < 0.001). For every unit increase in BMI, we saw a 15.7% decrease in hospital cost. In addition, we found higher BMI (p < 0.001) and younger age (p < 0.05) to be significant negative predictors of caregiver costs. Interpretation The economic burden of inpatient treatment for adolescents with anorexia nervosa on hospitals and caregivers is substantial, especially among younger patients and those with lower BMI. Recognizing the symptoms of eating disorders early may preclude the need for admission to hospital altogether or result in admissions at higher BMIs, thereby potentially reducing these costs. PMID:26389097

  14. TOXICITY REDUCTION EVALUATION PROTOCOL FOR MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document presents a generalized protocol for conducting a Toxicity Reduction evaluation (TRE) at a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). This protocol is designed to provide guidance to municipalities in preparing TRE plans, evaluating the information generated durin...

  15. The effect of prospective payment on admission and treatment policy: evidence from inpatient rehabilitation facilities.

    PubMed

    Sood, Neeraj; Huckfeldt, Peter J; Grabowski, David C; Newhouse, Joseph P; Escarce, Jos J

    2013-09-01

    We examine provider responses to the Medicare inpatient rehabilitation facility (IRF) prospective payment system (PPS), which simultaneously reduced marginal reimbursement and increased average reimbursement. IRFs could respond to the PPS by changing the number of patients admitted, admitting different types of patients, or changing the intensity of care. We use Medicare claims data to separately estimate each type of provider response. We also examine changes in patient outcomes and spillover effects on other post-acute care providers. We find that costs of care initially fell following the PPS, which we attribute to changes in treatment decisions rather than the characteristics of patients admitted to IRFs within the diagnostic categories we examine. However, the probability of admission to IRFs increased after the PPS due to the expanded admission policies of providers. We find modest spillover effects in other post-acute settings and negative health impacts for only one of three diagnostic groups studied. PMID:23994598

  16. Characteristics of urinary retention in female inpatients managed with medical treatments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang Yong; Kim, Chul Sung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to analyze the characteristics of urinary retention (UR) in female inpatients managed with medical treatments. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of female inpatients referred to the department of urology for UR at our institution from January 2009, to December 2014. UR was defined as a difficulty in self-voiding despite a sufficient urine volume or >300-mL postvoid residual. The data included patients' age, body mass index (BMI), ambulatory status, medical and surgical history, classes of taking drugs, and urinary tract infection. Results A total of 182 women were included as retention group, mean age of 72.64±12.94 years and BMI of 22.94±3.10 kg/m2. In the chi-square analysis, cardiovascular disorders (p=0.000), diabetes mellitus (p=0.008), metastatic malignancy (p=0.008), chronic renal disorders (p=0.028) were found significantly. In the multiple logistic regression analysis, cardiovascular disorders (p=0.002; odds ratio [OR], 0.491), metastatic malignancy (p=0.013; OR, 2.616) were found to increase the risk of UR. The most common surgical history was anti-incontinence surgery (7.2%). In term of medication use, the most prescribed agents were nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (53.8%). The patients taking multiple drugs with antimuscarinic effects except of NSAIDs, narcotics and diuretics were 48 (26.4%). Urinary tract infection was identified in 43 patients (23.6%). Conclusions UR in females managed with medical treatments could be occurred occasionally. We think that thorough attentions are needed for UR to patients with cardiovascular disorders including diabetes mellitus, metastatic malignancy, chronic renal disorders urinary tract infection, and more careful interests when managing with drugs with antimuscarinic effects. PMID:26682022

  17. Placement and Permanency Outcomes for Children in Out-of-Home Care by Prior Inpatient Mental Health Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Jung Min; Ryan, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This longitudinal study followed 5,978 children in out-of-home care to examine whether placement and permanency outcomes differ between children with and without a history of inpatient mental health treatment. Method: Data were drawn from child welfare and Medicaid records from the state of Illinois. Logistic regression and survival

  18. Social Recovery Model: An 8-Year Investigation of Adolescent 12-step Group Involvement following Inpatient Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, John F.; Brown, Sandra A.; Abrantes, Ana; Kahler, Christopher; Myers, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite widespread use of 12-step treatment approaches and referrals to Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Narcotics Anonymous (NA) by youth providers, little is known about the significance of these organizations in youth addiction recovery. Furthermore, existing evidence is based mostly on short-term follow-up and is limited methodologically. Methods Adolescent inpatients (N = 160; M age = 16, 40% female) were followed at 6-months, and at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 years post-treatment. Time-lagged, generalized estimating equations (GEE) modeled treatment outcome in relation to AA/NA attendance controlling for static and time-varying covariates. Robust regression (LOWESS) explored dose-response thresholds of AA/NA attendance on outcome. Results AA/NA attendance was common and intensive early post-treatment, but declined sharply and steadily over the 8-year period. Patients with greater addiction severity and those who believed they could not use substances in moderation were more likely to attend. Despite declining attendance, the effects related to AA/NA remained significant and consistent. Greater early participation was associated with better long-term outcomes. Conclusions Even though many youth discontinue AA/NA over time, attendees appear to benefit, and more severely substance-involved youth attend most. Successful early post-treatment engagement of youth in abstinence-supportive social contexts, such as AA/NA, may have long-term implications for alcohol and drug involvement into young adulthood. PMID:18557829

  19. Risky Decision-Making but Not Delay Discounting Improves during Inpatient Treatment of Polysubstance Dependent Alcoholics

    PubMed Central

    De Wilde, Bieke; Bechara, Antoine; Sabbe, Bernard; Hulstijn, Wouter; Dom, Geert

    2013-01-01

    Background: High levels of impulsivity, characteristics of addicted patients, are known to be important predictors of relapse. However, so far, little is known about the stability or variability of two main components of impulsivity (delay discounting and decision-making). The present study examined the changes in impulsivity during the first week of an abstinence based, behavioral orientated inpatient treatment program. Method: Thirty-seven polysubstance dependent alcoholics completed the Delay Discounting Task (DDT), and the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) using the original version with decks A?B?C?D?, and an alternative version with decks K?L?M?N?, for measuring decision-making, after 2 and 6?weeks of active treatment. Results: It was found that performances on the IGT changed during treatment while performances on the DDT did not (test-retest period: 4?weeks). Conclusion: The results provide preliminary evidence that improvements in decision-making might be related to treatment effects. All patients followed a highly structured cognitive-behavioral treatment program, which might have enhanced their executive functioning (coping skills training). PMID:24027538

  20. Determinants of readmission following inpatient substance abuse treatment: a national study of VA programs.

    PubMed

    Peterson, K A; Swindle, R W; Phibbs, C S; Recine, B; Moos, R H

    1994-06-01

    This study examines program determinants of one aspect of VA inpatient substance abuse treatment program performance. Performance was measured by the ratio of a program's readmission rate to the expected rate for programs with similar patients. Six-month readmission rates in 101 VA treatment programs were analyzed. Preliminary analyses indicated that patient differences across programs accounted for 36% of the variance in readmission rates. Program differences accounted for 47% of the variance in case-mix-adjusted readmission rate. Among program factors selected through a literature review, better than expected readmission performance was associated with having fewer early discharges, a longer intended treatment duration, more patient participation in aftercare, more family or friend assessment interviews, and treating more patients on a compulsory basis. Performance was not related to stress management training, patient attendance at more self-help meetings during treatment, staff characteristics, or average staff costs per patient day. The findings indicate that treatment retention, duration, and increased aftercare may be targeted to reduce high readmission rates. Last, there were only small differences in the model over 30, 60, 90, and 365 day follow-up intervals, suggesting substantial stability of the findings. PMID:8189773

  1. Efficacy of Initiating Tobacco Dependence Treatment in Inpatient Psychiatry: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Stephen E.; Delucchi, Kevin; Hall, Sharon M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the efficacy of a motivational tobacco cessation treatment combined with nicotine replacement relative to usual care initiated in inpatient psychiatry. Methods. We randomized participants (n?=?224; 79% recruitment rate) recruited from a locked acute psychiatry unit with a 100% smoking ban to intervention or usual care. Prior to hospitalization, participants averaged 19 (SD?=?12) cigarettes per day; only 16% intended to quit smoking in the next 30 days. Results. Verified smoking 7-day point prevalence abstinence was significantly higher for intervention than usual care at month 3 (13.9% vs 3.2%), 6 (14.4% vs 6.5%), 12 (19.4% vs 10.9%), and 18 (20.0% vs 7.7%; odds ratio [OR]?=?3.15; 95% confidence interval [CI]?=?1.22, 8.14; P?=?.018; retention?>?80%). Psychiatric measures did not predict abstinence; measures of motivation and tobacco dependence did. The usual care group had a significantly greater likelihood than the intervention group of psychiatric rehospitalization (adjusted OR?=?1.92; 95% CI?=?1.06, 3.49). Conclusions. The findings support initiation of motivationally tailored tobacco cessation treatment during acute psychiatric hospitalization. Psychiatric severity did not moderate treatment efficacy, and cessation treatment appeared to decrease rehospitalization risk, perhaps by providing broader therapeutic benefit. PMID:23948001

  2. Efficacy of yoga as an add-on treatment for in-patients with functional psychotic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Manjunath, R. B.; Varambally, S.; Thirthalli, J.; Basavaraddi, I. V.; Gangadhar, B. N.

    2013-01-01

    Context: The efficacy of yoga as an intervention for in-patients with psychosis is as yet unknown; although, previous studies have shown efficacy in stabilized out-patients with schizophrenia. Aim: This study aimed to compare the effect of add-on yoga therapy or physical exercise along with standard pharmacotherapy in the treatment of in-patients with psychosis. Settings and Design: This study was performed in an in-patient setting using a randomized controlled single blind design. Materials and Methods: A total of 88 consenting in-patients with psychosis were randomized into yoga therapy group (n=44) and physical exercise group (n=44). Sixty patients completed the study period of 1½ months. Patients who completed in the yoga group (n=35) and in the exercise group (n=25) were similar on the demographic profile, illness parameters and psychopathology scores at baseline. Results: The two treatment groups were not different on the clinical syndrome scores at the end of 2 weeks. At the end of 6 weeks, patients in the yoga group however had lower mean scores on Clinical Global Impression Severity (CGIS), Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (total and general psychopathology subscale) and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) (P<0.05). Repeated measure analysis of variance detected an advantage for yoga over exercise in reducing the clinical CGIS and HDRS scores. Conclusion: Adding yoga intervention to standard pharmacological treatment is feasible and may be beneficial even in the early and acute stage of psychosis. PMID:24049202

  3. [Effectiveness of a systematic treatment model in an inpatient department of child and adolescent psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Zander, B; Balck, F; Rotthaus, W; Strack, M

    2001-01-01

    This is a report on the findings of the effectiveness of the "Viersener Modell", a inpatient systemic child psychiatry model. The therapy effects were recorded, by means of self and therapists assessment, in several relevant areas of change. The index clients (ic) show typical characteristics of a child psychiatry population. The ic (n = 43) and also their parents (37 mothers and 22 fathers) showed significant improvement on the level of psychiatric symptoms, individual problems and in general experience and behavior. The psychiatric symptoms that were conspicuous by both ic and parents at the beginning of therapy, were mainly inconspicuous at the end of the treatment (effectsize (es): icfemale, n = 28 = .82, icmale, n = 15 = .22, motherswithout partner(accompanying) = .20, motherswith partner(accompanying) = .44, fathers = .44). There was no essential improvement in the quality of the couples relationship, on the other hand the relationships were not clinically conspicuous at the beginning of therapy. Family members and therapists assessed quality of the treatment results and process mainly in accordance with our hypothesis. While the therapists noticed a significant improvement in the functioning of the family relationships (es = .87) at the end of the therapy, the parents (reported no difficulties in family functioning at the beginning of therapy) reported no essential improvement of family relationships in the follow-up questionnaire (n = 32). The improvement of the problems and the assessment of the quality of the treatment results remained stable over an eight month period. PMID:11471421

  4. Racial-ethnic differences in access, diagnosis, and outcomes in public-sector inpatient mental health treatment.

    PubMed

    Delphin-Rittmon, Miriam E; Flanagan, Elizabeth H; Andres-Hyman, Raquel; Ortiz, Jose; Amer, Mona M; Davidson, Larry

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated inequities in access, diagnosis, and treatment for African Americans and Hispanic Americans receiving treatment in northeast, public sector, inpatient mental health settings as part of a Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services Health Disparities Initiative. Data from 1,484 adults were obtained through a random extract of patients admitted to state inpatient facilities between 2002 and 2005. After controlling for demographic variables and symptom severity, logistic and linear regression showed that Hispanic Americans were significantly more likely to enter inpatient care through crisis/emergency sources and were significantly less likely to self-refer or come to inpatient care through other sources (e.g., family, outpatient). After admission, Hispanic Americans were more likely to be diagnosed with other psychotic disorders (e.g., schizoaffective disorder, delusional disorder), were less likely to receive an Axis II diagnosis at discharge, and had a shorter length of stay than non-Hispanic White Americans. African Americans were more likely than other groups to be diagnosed with schizophrenia, drug-related, and Cluster B diagnoses (discharge only), and they were less likely to be diagnosed with mood disorders and other nonpsychotic disorders. Although African Americans were more likely than other groups to come to inpatient units from numerous routes, including self-referral and referral from other sources (e.g., family, outpatient), they were more likely to terminate treatment against medical advice and displayed shorter length of stay despite receiving ratings of greater symptom severity at discharge. These findings highlight the need for policies, programs, and system interventions designed to eliminate disparities and improve the quality and cultural responsiveness of behavioral health services. PMID:25961650

  5. [The mortality rate of alcoholic patients 4 years after inpatient treatment].

    PubMed

    Feuerlein, W; Kfner, H; Flohrschtz, T

    1995-02-01

    Data on mortality during a 48-month follow-up period in a group of 1410 alcoholics who had received inpatient treatment were evaluated. In 1266 patients known to be either living or deceased the death rate was 7.6%. The percentage of deceased subjects was highest in the group over 50 years of age. The mortality rate was higher for men (9.8%) than for women (4.8%); for those with more than one divorce (16.8%); for those who were not fit for work (18.1%) or were retired at the start of the treatment (43.3%); who were employed in the alcohol business (21.7%); who had reduced their alcohol consumption before treatment (13.4%); who were unemployed 6 months after discharge (12.4%). The mortality rate was higher for those with high scores on a scale assessing calmness in a personality inventory (7.9%) and low scores on a questionnaire assessing motivation (10.9%) and insight into the need of change (12.4%). Alcohol-related illness before the index treatment played an important role: the mortality rate was higher for those who had had Wernicke-Korsakoff-syndrome (40%), delirium tremens (15.3%), pancreatitis (13.9%) or cardiomyopathy (14.1%). The mortality rate was higher for treatment dropouts (12.9%) and for those who regularly or occasionally took sleeping pills (28.5%), psychoactive drugs (15.1%) or other drugs (11.5%) during treatment. In the follow-up periods substance use had a great effect on mortality. The mortality rate for those patients who still abstained from alcohol for after 6 months (4.4%) was only a third of that the patients who had relapsed (12.4%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7709499

  6. Evaluation of a self-management patient education program for patients with chronic heart failure undergoing inpatient cardiac rehabilitation: study protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic heart failure requires a complex treatment regimen on a life-long basis. Therefore, self-care/self-management is an essential part of successful treatment and comprehensive patient education is warranted. However, specific information on program features and educational strategies enhancing treatment success is lacking. This trial aims to evaluate a patient-oriented and theory-based self-management educational group program as compared to usual care education during inpatient cardiac rehabilitation in Germany. Methods/Design The study is a multicenter cluster randomized controlled trial in four cardiac rehabilitation clinics. Clusters are patient education groups that comprise HF patients recruited within 2 weeks after commencement of inpatient cardiac rehabilitation. Cluster randomization was chosen for pragmatic reasons, i.e. to ensure a sufficient number of eligible patients to build large-enough educational groups and to prevent contamination by interaction of patients from different treatment allocations during rehabilitation. Rehabilitants with chronic systolic heart failure (n = 540) will be consecutively recruited for the study at the beginning of inpatient rehabilitation. Data will be assessed at admission, at discharge and after 6 and 12 months using patient questionnaires. In the intervention condition, patients receive the new patient-oriented self-management educational program, whereas in the control condition, patients receive a short lecture-based educational program (usual care). The primary outcome is patients’ self-reported self-management competence. Secondary outcomes include behavioral determinants and self-management health behavior (symptom monitoring, physical activity, medication adherence), health-related quality of life, and treatment satisfaction. Treatment effects will be evaluated separately for each follow-up time point using multilevel regression analysis, and adjusting for baseline values. Discussion This study evaluates the effectiveness of a comprehensive self-management educational program by a cluster randomized trial within inpatient cardiac rehabilitation in Germany. Furthermore, subgroup-related treatment effects will be explored. Study results will contribute to a better understanding of both the effectiveness and mechanisms of a self-management group program as part of cardiac rehabilitation. Trial registration German Clinical Trials Register: DRKS00004841; WHO International Clinical Trials: = DRKS00004841 PMID:23968340

  7. [Quality assurance by routine data (QAR)--a new dimension in quality management of inpatient treatment?].

    PubMed

    Slany, E; Reuter, W

    2009-06-01

    Patients, admitting doctors and payers want to have more and more valid information about the medical results in hospitals really are. The quality of medical care in hospitals is demonstrated in the quality reports through structure and process data, data of volume about the most common main diagnoses and procedures and, in the current version, also through data of external quality assurance. For patients and payers, this means that it may be difficult to obtain sufficient information on relevant quality criteria for different therapies in hospital departments. It may also mean that it is difficult to choose between hospitals. The project "Quality assurance of inpatient treatment by routine data" (QAR) is a new and extended attempt in quality management. By changing the reimbursement procedures of hospitals to DRG, one receives data from which one can easily deduce marks of quality. For special treatment the QAR marks of quality provide patients, insurance companies and the internal quality management of hospitals with information on the quality of the hospitals and their departments. In this paper, the opportunities and prospects of quality assurance by using routine date will be discussed. PMID:19544719

  8. [Framework for qualified inpatient withdrawal treatment of alcoholics in North Rhine-Westphalia].

    PubMed

    Reymann, G; Preising, M

    2003-03-01

    The programme against addiction, set up by the Ministry for Women, Family, Youth and Health of North Rhine Westphalia, Germany and with broad participation from all groups concerned (MfjFG 1999), seeks the improvement of qualified in-patient withdrawal-treatment for alcoholics. Under the leadership of a district administration, a congress comprising seven one-day workshops was held for representatives of the Ministry, health insurance funds, pension insurance carriers and physicians. They agreed on the basic concept outlined below. Low-threshold access, diversity of essential treatment goals, financial obligation on the part of the regular health insurances, nursing staff, physicians, social workers, and non-verbal therapists according to the decree for psychiatric hospitals in Germany (Bundesregierung 1990), a regular in-patient-period for uncomplicated detoxification and motivation of up to 21 days, prolonged in justified cases up to six weeks, and the integration in the regional help-system for persons with substance-use related problems are essential features of this concept. PMID:12652929

  9. Reinvigorating Inpatient Group Psychotherapy: Integrating Clients' Off-Unit Experiences in Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxman, Elaine B.; Chambliss, Catherine

    Publicly funded psychiatric inpatient institutions focus increasingly on stabilization and relapse prevention, readying patients for rapid community reentry. Growing emphasis on consumer satisfaction and professionals' accountability for efficient outcomes has coincided with increasing cost concerns. Since staffing limitations mandate innovative

  10. Efficacy and cost-effectiveness of an experimental short-term inpatient Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) program: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is a serious psychiatric condition associated with substantial mortality, burden and public health costs. DBT is the treatment model with the largest number of published research articles showing effectiveness. However, some patients are not sufficiently engaged in outpatient treatment while presenting severe parasuicidal behavior, making hospitalization necessary. The Center for Personality Disorders Jelgersma developed an intensive 12-week inpatient DBT program that (i) rapidly reduces core borderline symptoms like suicidal behavior, (ii) minimizes the negative effects of an inpatient setting, and (iii) enhances compliance with outpatient treatment. We evaluate the (cost-) effectiveness of this experimental program. Methods/design Seventy patients, aged 18 to 45 years with a primary diagnosis of BPD, showing a chronic pattern of parasuicidal gestures and/or reporting high degrees of severity of other borderline symptoms, are randomly allocated to the control and intervention groups. Subjects in the control group receive standard outpatient DBT, provided in one of three regular mental health settings in GGZ Rivierduinen. Subjects in the intervention group receive 12 weeks of intensified inpatient DBT plus six months of standard DBT, provided in the Center for Personality Disorders Jelgersma. The primary outcome is the number of suicide attempts/self-harming acts. Secondary outcomes are severity of other borderline complaints, quality of life, general psychopathological symptoms and health care utilization and productivity costs. Data are gathered using a prospective, two (group: intervention and control) by five (time of measurement) repeated measures factorial design. Participants will complete three-monthly outcome assessments in the course of therapy: at baseline, and 12, 24, 36 and 52 weeks after the start of the treatment. The period of recruitment started in March 2012 and the study will end in December 2014. Discussion Highly suicidal outpatient patients can pose a dilemma for mental health care professionals. Although hospitalization seems inevitable under some circumstances, it has proven to be harmful in its own right. This paper outlines the background and methods of a randomized trial evaluating the possible surplus value of a short-term inpatient DBT program. PMID:24885551

  11. Specialised teams or personal continuity across inpatient and outpatient mental healthcare? Study protocol for a natural experiment

    PubMed Central

    Giacco, Domenico; Bird, Victoria Jane; McCrone, Paul; Lorant, Vincent; Nicaise, Pablo; Pfennig, Andrea; Bauer, Michael; Ruggeri, Mirella; Lasalvia, Antonio; Moskalewicz, Jacek; Welbel, Marta; Priebe, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mental healthcare organisation can either pursue specialisation, that is, distinct clinicians and teams for inpatient and outpatient care or personal continuity of care, that is, the same primary clinician for a patient across the two settings. Little systematic research has compared these approaches. Existing studies subject have serious methodological shortcomings. Yet, costly reorganisations of services have been carried out in different European countries, inconsistently aiming to achieve specialisation or personal continuity of care. More reliable evidence is required on whether specialisation or continuity of care is more effective and cost-effective, and whether this varies for different patient groups and contexts. Design and methods In a natural experiment, we aim to recruit at least 6000 patients consecutively admitted to inpatient psychiatric care in Belgium, Germany, Italy, Poland, and the UK. In each country, care approaches supporting specialisation and personal continuity coexist. Patients will be followed up at 1 year to compare outcomes, costs and experiences. Inclusion criteria are: 18 years of age or older; clinical diagnosis of psychosis, affective disorder or anxiety/somatisation disorder; sufficient command of the language of the host country; absence of cognitive deterioration and/or organic brain disorders; and capacity to provide informed consent. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval was obtained in all countries: (1) England: NRES Committee North East—Newcastle & North Tyneside (ref: 14/NE/1017); (2) Belgium: Comité d'Ethique hospitalo-facultaire des Cliniques St-Luc; (3) Germany: Ethical Board, Technische Universität Dresden; (4) Italy: Comitati Etici per la sperimentazione clinica (CESC) delle provincie di Verona, Rovigo, Vicenza, Treviso, Padova; (5) Poland: Komisja Bioetyczna przy Instytucie Psychiatrii i Neurologii w Warszawie. We will disseminate the findings through scientific publications and a study-specific website. At the end of the study, we will develop recommendations for policy decision-making, and organise national and international workshops with stakeholders. Trial registration number ISRCTN registry: ISRCTN40256812. PMID:26608634

  12. Axis I comorbidity in adolescent inpatients referred for treatment of substance use disorders

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To assess comorbid DSM-IV-TR Axis I disorders in adolescent inpatients referred for treatment of substance use disorders. Methods 151 patients (mean age 16.95 years, SD = 1.76; range 13 - 22) were consecutively assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) and standardized clinical questionnaires to assess mental disorders, symptom distress, psychosocial variables and detailed aspects of drug use. A consecutively referred subgroup of these 151 patients consisting of 65 underage patients (mean age 16.12, SD = 1.10; range 13 - 17) was additionally assessed with the modules for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and conduct disorder (CD) using The Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for school-aged children (K-SADS-PL). Results 128 (84.8%) of the 151 patients were dependent on at least one substance, the remaining patients fulfilled diagnostic criteria for abuse only. 40.5% of the participants fulfilled criteria for at least one comorbid present Axis I disorder other than substance use disorders (67.7% in the subgroup additionally interviewed with the K-SADS-PL). High prevalences of present mood disorder (19.2%), somatoform disorders (9.3%), and anxiety disorders (22.5%) were found. The 37 female participants showed a significantly higher risk for lifetime comorbid disorders; the gender difference was significantly pronounced for anxiety and somatoform disorders. Data from the underage subgroup revealed a high prevalence for present CD (41.5%). 33% of the 106 patients (total group) who were within the mandatory school age had not attended school for at least a two-month period prior to admission. In addition, 51.4% had been temporarily expelled from school at least once. Conclusions The present data validates previous findings of high psychiatric comorbidity in adolescent patients with substance use disorders. The high rates of school refusal and conduct disorder indicate the severity of psychosocial impairment. PMID:20920182

  13. Long Sick Leave after Orthopaedic Inpatient Rehabilitation: Treatment Failure or Relapse?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangels, Marija; Schwarz, Susanne; Worringen, Ulrike; Holme, Martin; Rief, Winfried

    2011-01-01

    We investigated whether short-term versus long-term sick leave after orthopaedic inpatient rehabilitation can be predicted by initial assessment information, the clinical status at discharge, or whether the follow-up interval is crucial for later sick leave. We examined 214 patients from an orthopaedic rehabilitation hospital at admission,

  14. Increased Physical Activity Not Decreased Energy Intake Is Associated with Inpatient Medical Treatment for Anorexia Nervosa in Adolescent Females

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Janine; Hagman, Jennifer; Pan, Zhaoxing; MacLean, Paul

    2013-01-01

    There is a dearth of data regarding changes in dietary intake and physical activity over time that lead to inpatient medical treatment for anorexia nervosa (AN). Without such data, more effective nutritional therapies for patients cannot be devised. This study was undertaken to describe changes in diet and physical activity that precede inpatient medical hospitalization for AN in female adolescents. This data can be used to understand factors contributing to medical instability in AN, and may advance rodent models of AN to investigate novel weight restoration strategies. It was hypothesized that hospitalization for AN would be associated with progressive energy restriction and increased physical activity over time. 20 females, 1119 years (14.31.8 years), with restricting type AN, completed retrospective, self-report questionnaires to assess dietary intake and physical activity over the 6 month period prior to inpatient admission (food frequency questionnaire, Pediatric physical activity recall) and 1 week prior (24 hour food recall, modifiable activity questionnaire). Physical activity increased acutely prior to inpatient admission without any change in energy or macronutrient intake. However, there were significant changes in reported micronutrient intake causing inadequate intake of Vitamin A, Vitamin D, and pantothenic acid at 1 week versus high, potentially harmful, intake of Vitamin A over 6 months prior to admission. Subject report of significantly increased physical activity, not decreased energy intake, were associated with medical hospitalization for AN. Physical activity and Vitamin A and D intake should be carefully monitored following initial AN diagnosis, as markers of disease progression as to potentially minimize the risk of medical instability. PMID:23637854

  15. Evaluation of a pilot training program in alcohol screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment for nurses in inpatient settings.

    PubMed

    Broyles, Lauren M; Gordon, Adam J; Rodriguez, Keri L; Hanusa, Barbara H; Kengor, Caroline; Kraemer, Kevin L

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) is a set of clinical strategies for reducing the burden of alcohol-related injury, disease, and disability. SBIRT is typically considered a physician responsibility but calls for interdisciplinary involvement requiring basic SBIRT knowledge and skills training for all healthcare disciplines. The purpose of this pilot study was to design, implement, and evaluate a theory-driven SBIRT training program for nurses in inpatient settings (RN-SBIRT) that was developed through an interdisciplinary collaboration of nursing, medical, and public health professionals and tailored for registered nurses in the inpatient setting. In this three-phase study, we evaluated (1) RN-SBIRT's effectiveness for changing nurses' alcohol-related knowledge, clinical practice, and attitudes and (2) the feasibility of implementing the inpatient curriculum. In a quasi-experimental design, two general medical units at our facility were randomized to receive RN-SBIRT or a self-directed Web site on alcohol-related care. We performed a formative evaluation of RN-SBIRT, guided by the RE-AIM implementation framework. After training, nurses in the experimental condition had significant increases in Role Adequacy for working with drinkers and reported increased performance and increased competence for a greater number of SBIRT care tasks. Despite some scheduling challenges for the nurses to attend RN-SBIRT, nurse stakeholders were highly satisfied with RN-SBIRT. Results suggest that with adequate training and ongoing role support, nurses in inpatient settings could play active roles in interdisciplinary initiatives to address unhealthy alcohol use among hospitalized patients. PMID:24622525

  16. Evaluation of a pilot training program in alcohol screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment for nurses in inpatient settings.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Broyles LM; Gordon AJ; Rodriguez KL; Hanusa BH; Kengor C; Kraemer KL

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) is a set of clinical strategies for reducing the burden of alcohol-related injury, disease, and disability. SBIRT is typically considered a physician responsibility but calls for interdisciplinary involvement requiring basic SBIRT knowledge and skills training for all healthcare disciplines. The purpose of this pilot study was to design, implement, and evaluate a theory-driven SBIRT training program for nurses in inpatient settings (RN-SBIRT) that was developed through an interdisciplinary collaboration of nursing, medical, and public health professionals and tailored for registered nurses in the inpatient setting. In this three-phase study, we evaluated (1) RN-SBIRT's effectiveness for changing nurses' alcohol-related knowledge, clinical practice, and attitudes and (2) the feasibility of implementing the inpatient curriculum. In a quasi-experimental design, two general medical units at our facility were randomized to receive RN-SBIRT or a self-directed Web site on alcohol-related care. We performed a formative evaluation of RN-SBIRT, guided by the RE-AIM implementation framework. After training, nurses in the experimental condition had significant increases in Role Adequacy for working with drinkers and reported increased performance and increased competence for a greater number of SBIRT care tasks. Despite some scheduling challenges for the nurses to attend RN-SBIRT, nurse stakeholders were highly satisfied with RN-SBIRT. Results suggest that with adequate training and ongoing role support, nurses in inpatient settings could play active roles in interdisciplinary initiatives to address unhealthy alcohol use among hospitalized patients.

  17. Decline in in-patient treatments of genital warts among young Australians following the national HPV vaccination program

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There has been a rapid decline in the number of young heterosexuals diagnosed with genital warts at outpatient sexual health services since the national human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program started in Australia in 2007. We assessed the impact of the vaccination program on the number of in-patient treatments for genital warts. Methods Data on in-patient treatments of genital warts in all private hospitals were extracted from the Medicare website. Medicare is the universal health insurance scheme of Australia. In the vaccine period (20072011) and pre-vaccine period (20002007) we calculated the percentage change in treatment numbers and trends in annual treatment rates in private hospitals. Australian population data were used to calculate rates. Summary rate ratios of average annual trends were determined. Results Between 2000 and 2011, 6,014 women and 936 men aged 1544?years underwent in-patient treatment for genital warts in private hospitals. In 1524?year old women, there was a significant decreasing trend in annual treatment rates of vulval/vaginal warts in the vaccine period (overall decrease of 85.3% in treatment numbers from 2007 to 2011) compared to no significant trend in the pre-vaccine period (summary rate ratio (SRR)?=?0.33, p?treatment rates of penile warts in the vaccine period (decrease of 70.6%) compared to an increasing trend in the pre-vaccine period (SRR?=?0.76, p?=?0.02). In 2534?year old men there was a significant decreasing trend in the vaccine period compared to no change in the pre-vaccine period (SRR?=?0.81, p?=?0.04) and in 3544?year old men there was no significant change in rates of penile warts both periods, but the rate of change was greater in the vaccine period (SRR?=?0.70, p?=?0.02). Conclusions The marked decline in in-patient treatment of vulval/vaginal warts in the youngest women is probably attributable to the HPV vaccine program. The moderate decline in in-patient treatments for penile warts in men probably reflects herd immunity. PMID:23506489

  18. Protocol for the treatment of radiation injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, D.; Weiss, J. F.; Macvittie, T. J.; Pillai, M. V.

    Despite adequate precautionary measures and high-quality safeguard devices, many accidental radiation exposures continue to occur and may pose greater risks in the future, including radiation exposure in the space environment. The medical management of radiation casualties is of major concern to health care providers. Such medical management was addressed at The First Consensus Development Conference on the Treatment of Radiation Injuries, Washington, DC, 1989. The conference addressed the most appropriate treatment for the hematopoietic and infectious complications that accompany radiation injuries and for combined radiation and traumatic/burn injuries. Based on the evidence presented at the conference, a consensus statement was formulated by expert physicians and scientists. The recommended therapies, including a suggested algorithm incorporating these recommendations for the treatment of radiation injuries, will be discussed.

  19. Cellulitis: Home Or Inpatient in Children from the Emergency Department (CHOICE): protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Laila F; Babl, Franz E; Orsini, Francesca; Hopper, Sandy M; Bryant, Penelope A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Children needing intravenous antibiotics for cellulitis are usually admitted to hospital, whereas adults commonly receive intravenous treatment at home. This is a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of intravenous antibiotic treatment of cellulitis in children comparing administration of ceftriaxone at home with standard care of flucloxacillin in hospital. The study aims to compare (1) the rate of treatment failure at home versus hospital (2) the safety of treatment at home versus hospital; and (3) the effect of exposure to short course ceftriaxone versus flucloxacillin on nasal and gut micro-organism resistance patterns and the clinical implications. Methods and analysis Inclusion criteria: children aged 6 months to <18 years with uncomplicated moderate/severe cellulitis, requiring intravenous antibiotics. Exclusions: complicated cellulitis (eg, orbital, foreign body) and immunosuppressed or toxic patients. The study is a single-centre, open-label, non-inferiority RCT. It is set in the emergency department (ED) at the Royal Children's Hospital (RCH) in Melbourne, Australia and the Hospital-in-the-Home (HITH) programme; a home-care programme, which provides outreach from RCH. Recruitment will occur in ED from January 2015 to December 2016. Participants will be randomised to either treatment in hospital, or transfer home under the HITH programme. The calculated sample size is 188 patients (94 per group) and data will be analysed by intention-to-treat. Primary outcome: treatment failure defined as a change in treatment due to lack of clinical improvement according to the treating physician or adverse events, within 48 h Secondary outcomes: readmission to hospital, representation, adverse events, length of stay, microbiological results, development of resistance, cost-effectiveness, patient/parent satisfaction. This study has started recruitment. Ethics and dissemination This study has been approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee of the RCH Melbourne (34254C) and registered with the ClinicalTrials.gov registry (NCT02334124). We aim to disseminate the findings through international peer-reviewed journals and conferences. Clinical trial Pre-results. PMID:26754176

  20. [Subjective estimations of the treatment programmes offered in inpatient and outpatient orthopaedic rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Morfeld, M; Bürger, W; Dietsche, S; Koch, U

    2002-01-01

    The survey of psychosocial, somatic and economic outcomes is regarded as standard in establishing the effectiveness of various rehabilitative forms of medical care. Another important part is the patient's perspective for the subjective valuation of the entire measure or different facets of the rehabilitation measure. During a comparison of the effectiveness of different forms of care of orthopaedic rehabilitation (inpatient, outpatient in the hospital, outpatient) 1176 patients were questioned in writing at 4 different time points. The results concerning the general measurement of the satisfaction with the rehabilitation measure showed a high level and a high acceptance in all forms of medical care at the end of and after the measure. The result relating to the selection of the correct hospital for the specific troubles of the patient was positive as well. This can also be stated for the patients' estimation of the contacts between the doctors and the physiotherapists. At the end of measure, all the patients in every form of care viewed these contacts as being helpful. The outpatient offers were viewed a bit better by the patients concerning the contacts to doctors and physiotherapists. The extent of the care specific to the different occupational groups was estimated by almost all patients of all forms as being just about right. Additionally, the course organization and the work of the administration had a good evaluation - with slight advantages for the inpatient forms. PMID:12007035

  1. The Effects of Integrative In-Patient Treatment on Patients' Quality of Life: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Langhorst, Jost; Beer, Andre-Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background. In the last decades, several hospitals have adopted this concept of integrative medicine for the treatment of chronic and acute states of illnesses in in-patient treatment. The aim of this paper was to summarize the current evidence for a possible effectiveness of integrative on-patient treatment in patients' quality of life by means of a meta-analysis. Material and Methods. The databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, PsycInfo, PsycLit CCMED, and CAMbase were screened to find articles. We also screened publisher databases to find relevant information. Articles were included if patients were treated in a hospital. To guarantee comparability SF-36 was the predefined outcome measure for patients' quality of life. Data of pre/posteffects on the mental and physical scores of the SF-36 were extracted and effect sizes were calculated and entered into a random effect meta-analysis. Results. Eight articles published between 2003 and 2010 were included in the final meta-analysis. Random effect meta-analysis of the eight studies revealed an overall effect size of 0.37 (95% CI: [0.28; 0.45]) in the physical score and 0.38 (95% CI: [0.30; 0.45]) in the mental score of the SF-36. I2 statistics indicate a high heterogeneity in the effects in both the physical and mental scores of the SF-36 (I2 = 91.8%, P < 0.001, resp.; I2 = 86.7%, P < 0.001). Discussion. This meta-analysis might help to rediscover the importance of integrative in-patient treatment for patients, physicians, and stakeholders. PMID:23431339

  2. Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma Survival Improved With Treatment on Multimodality Protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Naamit Kurshan; Wexler, Leonard H.; Singer, Samuel; Alektiar, Kaled M.; Keohan, Mary Louise; Shi, Weiji; Zhang, Zhigang; Wolden, Suzanne

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a pediatric sarcoma rarely occurring in adults. For unknown reasons, adults with RMS have worse outcomes than do children. Methods and Materials: We analyzed data from all patients who presented to Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 1990 and 2011 with RMS diagnosed at age 16 or older. One hundred forty-eight patients met the study criteria. Ten were excluded for lack of adequate data. Results: The median age was 28 years. The histologic diagnoses were as follows: embryonal 54%, alveolar 33%, pleomorphic 12%, and not otherwise specified 2%. The tumor site was unfavorable in 67% of patients. Thirty-three patients (24%) were at low risk, 61 (44%) at intermediate risk, and 44 (32%) at high risk. Forty-six percent were treated on or according to a prospective RMS protocol. The 5-year rate of overall survival (OS) was 45% for patients with nonmetastatic disease. The failure rates at 5 years for patients with nonmetastatic disease were 34% for local failure and 42% for distant failure. Among patients with nonmetastatic disease (n=94), significant factors associated with OS were histologic diagnosis, site, risk group, age, and protocol treatment. On multivariate analysis, risk group and protocol treatment were significant after adjustment for age. The 5-year OS was 54% for protocol patients versus 36% for nonprotocol patients. Conclusions: Survival in adult patients with nonmetastatic disease was significantly improved for those treated on RMS protocols, most of which are now open to adults.

  3. Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) therapy in the treatment of depression: a matched pairs study in an inpatient setting

    PubMed Central

    Hase, Michael; Balmaceda, Ute Mirian; Hase, Adrian; Lehnung, Maria; Tumani, Visal; Huchzermeier, Christian; Hofmann, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Background Depression is a severe mental disorder that challenges mental health systems worldwide as the success rates of all established treatments are limited. Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy is a scientifically acknowledged psychotherapeutic treatment for PTSD. Given the recent research indicating that trauma and other adverse life experiences can be the basis of depression, the aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of EMDR therapy with this disorder. Method In this study, we recruited a group of 16 patients with depressive episodes in an inpatient setting. These 16 patients were treated with EMDR therapy by reprocessing of memories related to stressful life events in addition to treatment as usual (TAU). They were compared to a group of 16 controls matched regarding diagnosis, degree of depression, sex, age and time of admission to hospital, which were receiving TAU only. Results Sixty-eight percent of the patients in the EMDR group showed full remission at end of treatment. The EMDR group showed a greater reduction in depressive symptoms as measured by the SCL-90-R depression subscale. This difference was significant even when adjusted for duration of treatment. In a follow-up period of more than 1year the EMDR group reported less problems related to depression and less relapses than the control group. Conclusions EMDR therapy shows promise as an effective treatment for depressive disorders. Larger controlled studies are necessary to replicate our findings. PMID:26085967

  4. Decision-making capacity for treatment in psychiatric and medical in-patients: cross-sectional, comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Gareth S.; Szmukler, George; Richardson, Genevra; David, Anthony S.; Raymont, Vanessa; Freyenhagen, Fabian; Martin, Wayne; Hotopf, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Background Is the nature of decision-making capacity (DMC) for treatment significantly different in medical and psychiatric patients? Aims To compare the abilities relevant to DMC for treatment in medical and psychiatric patients who are able to communicate a treatment choice. Method A secondary analysis of two cross-sectional studies of consecutive admissions: 125 to a psychiatric hospital and 164 to a medical hospital. The MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool - Treatment and a clinical interview were used to assess decision-making abilities (understanding, appreciating and reasoning) and judgements of DMC. We limited analysis to patients able to express a choice about treatment and stratified the analysis by low and high understanding ability. Results Most people scoring low on understanding were judged to lack DMC and there was no difference by hospital (P = 0.14). In both hospitals there were patients who were able to understand yet lacked DMC (39% psychiatric v. 13% medical in-patients, P<0.001). Appreciation was a better test of DMC in the psychiatric hospital (where psychotic and severe affective disorders predominated) (P<0.001), whereas reasoning was a better test of DMC in the medical hospital (where cognitive impairment was common) (P = 0.02). Conclusions Among those with good understanding, the appreciation ability had more salience to DMC for treatment in a psychiatric setting and the reasoning ability had more salience in a medical setting. PMID:23969482

  5. Variations in Risk and Treatment Factors among Adolescents Engaging in Different Types of Deliberate Self-Harm in an Inpatient Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boxer, Paul

    2010-01-01

    This study employs a framework adopted in 2008 by Jacobson, Muehlenkamp, Miller, and Turner to explore differences in risk and treatment factors in a sample of 476 adolescent inpatients grouped with relation to their involvement in deliberately self-harmful (DSH) behavior. Participants were assigned to groups indicating no DSH, nonsuicidal…

  6. Evaluation of the Computerized Assessment System for Psychotherapy Evaluation and Research (CASPER) as a Measure of Treatment Effectiveness with Psychiatric Inpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnaman, Joanna E. Strong; Farrell, Albert D.; Bisconer, Sarah W.

    2006-01-01

    Assessment procedures to evaluate inpatient treatment effectiveness can provide information to inform clinical practice. The Computerized Assessment System for Psychotherapy Evaluation and Research (CASPER) represents a standardized approach to assess patients' target problems that combines elements of individualized and nomothetic approaches.

  7. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Adjunctive Family Therapy and Treatment as Usual Following Inpatient Treatment for Anorexia Nervosa Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Godart, Nathalie; Berthoz, Sylvie; Curt, Florence; Perdereau, Fabienne; Rein, Zo; Wallier, Jenny; Horreard, Anne-Sophie; Kaganski, Irne; Lucet, Rjane; Atger, Frdric; Corcos, Maurice; Fermanian, Jacques; Falissard, Bruno; Flament, Martine; Eisler, Ivan; Jeammet, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Research on treatments in anorexia nervosa (AN) is scarce. Although most of the therapeutic programs used in real world practice in AN treatment resort to multidisciplinary approaches, they have rarely been evaluated. Objective To compare two multidimensional post-hospitalization outpatients treatment programs for adolescents with severe AN: Treatment as Usual (TAU) versus this treatment plus family therapy (TAU+FT). Method Sixty female AN adolescents, aged 13 to 19 years, were included in a randomized parallel controlled trial conducted from 1999 to 2002 for the recruitment, and until 2004 for the 18 months follow-up. Allocation to one of the two treatment groups (30 in each arm) was randomised. The TAU program included sessions for the patient alone as well as sessions with a psychiatrist for the patient and her parents. The TAU+FT program was identical to the usual one but also included family therapy sessions targeting intra-familial dynamics, but not eating disorder symptoms. The main Outcome Measure was the Morgan and Russell outcome category (Good or Intermediate versus Poor outcome). Secondary outcome indicators included AN symptoms or their consequences (eating symptoms, body mass index, amenorrhea, number of hospitalizations in the course of follow-up, social adjustment). The evaluators, but not participants, were blind to randomization. Results At 18 months follow-up, we found a significant group effect for the Morgan and Russell outcome category in favor of the program with family therapy (Intention-to-treat: TAU+FT :12/30 (40%); TAU : 5/29 (17.2%) p?=?0.05; Per Protocol analysis: respectively 12/26 (46.2%); 4/27 (14.8%), p?=?0.01). Similar group effects were observed in terms of achievement of a healthy weight (i.e., BMI?10th percentile) and menstrual status. Conclusions Adding family therapy sessions, focusing on intra-familial dynamics rather than eating symptomatology, to a multidimensional program improves treatment effectiveness in girls with severe AN. Trial Registration Controlled-trials.com ISRCTN71142875 PMID:22238574

  8. Substance Abuse Treatment: Group Therapy. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 41

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Jonathan Max; Hills, Susan; Rife, Mary Lou

    2005-01-01

    This Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) presents an overview of the role and efficacy of group therapy in substance abuse treatment. TIPs are best-practice guidelines for the treatment of substance use disorders that make the latest research in substance abuse treatment available to counselors and educators. The content was generated by a panel…

  9. Substance Abuse Treatment And Family Therapy. A Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 39

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Jonathan Max; Oliff, Helen; Sutton, David; Bartlett, Catalina; Henderson, Randi

    2004-01-01

    This Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) addresses substance abuse treatment in the context of family therapy. TIPs are best-practice guidelines for the treatment of substance use disorders that make the latest research in substance abuse treatment available to counselors and educators. The content was generated by a panel of experts in the…

  10. Use of identification wristbands among patients receiving inpatient treatment in a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmeister, Louse Viecili; de Moura, Gisela Maria Schebella Souto

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the use of identification wristbands among patients hospitalized in inpatient units. METHOD: quantitative, descriptive and transversal research, with a sample of 385 patients. Data collection occurred through the observational method through the filling out of a structured questionnaire which aimed to check the presence of the identification wristband and the identifiers used. Descriptive statistics with absolute and relative frequencies was used for analysis. RESULTS: it was obtained that 83.9% of the patients were found to have the correctly identified wristband, 11.9% had a wristband with errors, and 4.2% of the patients were without a wristband. The main nonconformities found on the identification wristbands were incomplete name, different registration numbers, illegibility of the data and problems with the physical integrity of the wristbands. CONCLUSION: the study demonstrated the professionals' engagement in the process of patient identification, evidencing a high rate of conformity of the wristbands. Furthermore, it contributed to identify elements in the use of wristbands which may be improved for a safe identification process. PMID:25806629

  11. In-Patient Treatment of Fibromyalgia: A Controlled Nonrandomized Comparison of Conventional Medicine versus Integrative Medicine including Fasting Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Michalsen, Andreas; Li, Chenying; Kaiser, Katharina; Ldtke, Rainer; Meier, Larissa; Stange, Rainer; Kessler, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Fibromyalgia poses a challenge for therapy. Recent guidelines suggest that fibromyalgia should be treated within a multidisciplinary therapy approach. No data are available that evaluated multimodal treatment strategies of Integrative Medicine (IM). We conducted a controlled, nonrandomized pilot study that compared two inpatient treatment strategies, an IM approach that included fasting therapy and a conventional rheumatology (CM) approach. IM used fasting cure and Mind-Body-Medicine as specific methods. Of 48 included consecutive patients, 28 were treated with IM, 20 with CM. Primary outcome was change in the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) score after the 2-week hospital stay. Secondary outcomes included scores of pain, depression, anxiety, and well being. Assessments were repeated after 12 weeks. At 2 weeks, there were significant improvements in the FIQ (P < 0.014) and for most of secondary outcomes for the IM group compared to the CM group. The beneficial effects for the IM approach were reduced after 12 weeks and no longer statistically significant with the exception of anxiety. Findings indicate that a multimodal IM treatment with fasting therapy might be superior to CM in the short term and not inferior in the mid term. Longer-term studies are warranted to assess the clinical impact of integrative multimodal treatment in fibromyalgia. PMID:23431352

  12. A tailored curriculum of alcohol screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) for nurses in inpatient settings.

    PubMed

    Broyles, Lauren M; Kraemer, Kevin L; Kengor, Caroline; Gordon, Adam J

    2013-01-01

    A package of clinical strategies known as alcohol screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) is increasingly recommended for reducing unhealthy alcohol use, the spectrum of alcohol consumption from at-risk drinking (defined as consumption above recommended guidelines) to alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence. The United States' Joint Commission issued new SBIRT-related hospital accreditation measures for alcohol. Ongoing initiatives aim to promote, support, and sustain SBIRT implementation in hospital settings. In hospital settings, nurse-delivered SBIRT may be a particularly viable and efficient model for SBIRT implementation. However, like physicians, most nurses have not been trained in how to perform SBIRT, and few authors have described alcohol-related curricula specifically for nurses. In addition, historical differences in nurse and physician professional scopes of practice, role perceptions, and patterns of care delivery suggest the need for effective SBIRT initial and continuing education and training that are tailored to the nursing profession and inpatient environments. In this article, we provide an in-depth description of the registered nurse SBIRT curriculum and describe its development and contents as well as various nurse- and setting-specific adaptations. In addition, we describe how we engaged nursing stakeholders in the development and implementation of the curriculum and discuss potential implications for future SBIRT training and delivery by nurses. SBIRT continuing education and training for nurses represents one of the first steps in expanded SBIRT implementation. Comprehensive workforce and organizational development of inpatient and nurse-delivered SBIRT may provide the means to address the entire spectrum of unhealthy alcohol use across healthcare settings. PMID:24621542

  13. Scalp Acupuncture Treatment Protocol for Anxiety Disorders: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia; Pan, Zimei; Ying, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most common psychiatric illnesses, and acupuncture treatment is widely accepted in the clinic without the side effects seen from various medications. We designed a scalp acupuncture treatment protocol by locating two new stimulation areas. The area one is between Yintang (M-HN-3) and Shangxing (DU-23) and Shenting (DU-24), and the area two is between Taiyang (M-HN-9) and Tianchong (GB-9) and Shuaigu (GB-8). By stimulating these two areas with high-frequency continuous electric waves, remarkable immediate and long-term effects for anxiety disorders have been observed in our practice. The first case was a 70-year-old male with general anxiety disorder (GAD) and panic attacks at night. The scalp acupuncture treatment protocol was applied with electric stimulation for 45 minutes once every week. After four sessions of acupuncture treatments, the patient reported that he did not have panic attacks at night and he had no feelings of anxiety during the day. Follow-up 4 weeks later confirmed that he did not have any episodes of panic attacks and he had no anxiety during the day since his last acupuncture treatment. The second case was a 35-year-old male who was diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with a history of providing frontline trauma care as a Combat Medics from the Iraq combat field. He also had 21 broken bones and multiple concussions from his time in the battlefield. He had symptoms of severe anxiety, insomnia, nightmares with flashbacks, irritability, and bad temper. He also had chest pain, back pain, and joint pain due to injuries. The above treatment protocol was performed with 30 minutes of electric stimulation each time in combination with body acupuncture for pain management. After weekly acupuncture treatment for the first two visits, the patient reported that he felt less anxious and that his sleep was getting better with fewer nightmares. After six sessions of acupuncture treatments, the patient completely recovered from PTSD, went back to work, and now lives a healthy and happy family life. The above cases and clinical observation show that the scalp acupuncture treatment protocol with electric stimulation has a significant clinic outcome for GAD, panic disorder and PTSD. The possible mechanism of action of scalp acupuncture on anxiety disorder may be related to overlapping modulatory effects on the cortical structures (orbitofrontal cortex [OFC]) and medial prefrontal cortex [mPFC]) and subcortical/limbic regions (amygdala and hippocampus), and biochemical effect of acupuncture through immunohistochemistry (norepinephrine, serotonin) performed directly to the brain tissue for anxiety disorders. PMID:25105075

  14. The feasibility of a holistic wellness program for HIV/AIDS patients residing in a voluntary inpatient treatment program.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Vanessa

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this project was to examine the feasibility of an ongoing holistic wellness program in a residential facility treating persons with HIV/AIDS. The goal was to create a voluntary, four week holistic wellness intensive within the established inpatient behavioral health treatment program. Participants were given practicable holistic self care tools to effectively manage HIV related symptoms, general medical issues, addiction, depression, stress and anxiety. The program incorporated evidence-based holistic activities including yoga, therapeutic dance, meditation, Reiki, and reflective journaling. Narrative survey results and post-program evaluation support that an ongoing holistic wellness program within the existing treatment model is feasible and could have numerous potential beneficial effects. This project clearly exemplified the ideal opportunity for holistic nurses to implement innovative holistic interventions within the current healthcare delivery system. It is the author's observation that future studies with a larger participant group to further examine measurable benefits can lend valuable information and insight into the future development of holistic wellness programs for residential treatment facilities. PMID:23686463

  15. Substance Abuse Treatment for Persons with Co-Occurring Disorders. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 42

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Treatment Improvement Protocols (TIPs), developed by the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT), part of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), are best-practice guidelines for the treatment of substance use disorders. CSAT draws on the experience…

  16. Substance Abuse Treatment for Persons With Co-Occurring Disorders. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 42

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacks, Stanley; Ries, Richard K.

    2005-01-01

    This Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) provides guidelines for counselors and others working in the field of co-occurring substance use and mental disorders. TIPs are best-practice guidelines for the treatment of substance use disorders that make the latest research in substance abuse treatment available to counselors and educators. The content…

  17. A protocol for systematic reviews of Ayurveda treatments

    PubMed Central

    Narahari, Saravu R; Aggithaya, Madhur Guruprasad; Suraj, Kumbla R.

    2010-01-01

    This protocol is intended primarily for Ayurveda doctors who wish to take up systematic reviews along with an expert who has experience in doing such reviews. We have structured this protocol by incorporating the principles of patient treatment in Ayurveda, within the Cochrane framework, using Vitiligo as a model. The treatment section provides a comprehensive list of classical medicines used in the treatment of the disease. This will help in increasing the search terms. Such a list also helps to determine the needs of individualized treatment principles used in the trial and to assess the confounding factors. The search strategy includes an extensive listing of eastern data bases and hand searching. In Ayurveda, the titles of articles are not in the Population, Intervention, Control, and Outcome (PICO) pattern and sometimes the title and methodology do not tally. Therefore, a search of all types of studies is necessary to pool all the relevant publications. A data extraction form is proposed for use in assessing the quality of Ayurvedic studies. The form provides a template for performing evidence reviews of Ayurvedic interventions. PMID:21455455

  18. Preventing Suicide Among Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Sakinofsky, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    Objective Inpatient suicide comprises a proportionately small but clinically important fraction of suicide. This study is intended as a qualitative analysis of the comprehensive English literature, highlighting what is known and what can be done to prevent inpatient suicide. Method: A systematic search was conducted on the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, Web of Knowledge, and a personal database for articles on cohort series, preferably controlled, of inpatient suicide (not deliberate self-harm or attempted suicide, unless they also dealt specifically with suicide data). Results: A qualitative discussion is presented, based on the findings of the literature searched. Conclusions: The bulk of inpatient suicides actually occur not on the ward but off premises, when the patient was on leave or had absconded. Peaks occur shortly after admission and discharge. It is possible to reduce suicide risk on the ward by having a safe environment, optimizing patient visibility, supervising patients appropriately, careful assessment, awareness of and respect for suicide risk, good teamwork and communication, and adequate clinical treatment. PMID:24881161

  19. Biomechanics and orthodontic treatment protocol in maxillofacial distraction osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Sandhya; Verma, Sanjeev K.; Tariq, Mohd.; Prabhat, K. C.; Kumar, Shailendra

    2011-01-01

    As in the traditional combined surgical and orthodontic procedures, an Orthodontist can plays vital role in treatment planning and the orthodontic treatment of patient undergoing distraction osteogenesis. This role includes predistraction assessment of the craniofacial skeleton and occlusal function, pre-distraction, and post-distraction orthodontic care. Based on clinical evaluation, dental study models, photographic analysis, cephalometric evaluation, and three-dimensional computed tomographic analysis, the Orthodontist, in collaboration with the Surgeon, plans distraction device placement and the predicted vectors of distraction. Finally, as in other forms of orthognathic surgery, the practice of distraction osteogenesis depends on the cooperation and planning between orthodontist and surgeon as a team. Purpose of this paper is to review biomechanics and orthodontic treatment protocol of distraction osteogenesis in the maxillofacial region. PMID:22639497

  20. Coping strategies, hope, and treatment efficacy in pharmacoresistant inpatients with neurotic spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ociskova, Marie; Prasko, Jan; Kamaradova, Dana; Grambal, Ales; Kasalova, Petra; Sigmundova, Zuzana; Latalova, Klara; Vrbova, Kristyna

    2015-01-01

    Background Approximately 30%–60% of patients with neurotic spectrum disorders remain symptomatic despite treatment. Identifying the predictors of good response to psychiatric and psychotherapeutic treatment may be useful for increasing treatment efficacy in neurotic patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of hope, coping strategies, and dissociation on the treatment response of this group of patients. Methods Pharmacoresistant patients, who underwent a 6-week psychotherapeutic program, were enrolled in the study. All patients completed the Clinical Global Impression (CGI) – both objective and subjective forms, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)-II at baseline and after 6 weeks. The COPE Inventory, the Adult Dispositional Hope Scale (ADHS), and the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) were completed at the start of the treatment. Results Seventy-six patients completed the study. The mean scores for all scales measuring the severity of the disorders (BAI, BDI-II, subjective and objective CGI) significantly decreased during the treatment. Several subscores of the COPE Inventory, the overall score of ADHS, and the overall score of DES significantly correlated with the treatment outcome. Multiple regression was used to find out which factors were the most significant predictors of the therapeutic outcomes. The most important predictors of the treatment response were the overall levels of hope and dissociation. Conclusion According to our results, a group of patients with a primary neurotic disorder, who prefer the use of maladaptive coping strategies, feel hopelessness, and have tendencies to dissociate, showed poor response to treatment. PMID:26028972

  1. Adolescents in Residential and Inpatient Treatment: A Review of the Outcome Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bettmann, Joanna E.; Jasperson, Rachael A.

    2009-01-01

    Operationalizing treatment efficacy has become essential in the field of psychotherapy. Managed health care now requires psychotherapy to produce measurable outcomes and define success concretely. This requirement has resulted in research attempting to identify empirically supported and evidence-based treatments. This article presents a review of

  2. Adolescents in Residential and Inpatient Treatment: A Review of the Outcome Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bettmann, Joanna E.; Jasperson, Rachael A.

    2009-01-01

    Operationalizing treatment efficacy has become essential in the field of psychotherapy. Managed health care now requires psychotherapy to produce measurable outcomes and define success concretely. This requirement has resulted in research attempting to identify empirically supported and evidence-based treatments. This article presents a review of…

  3. [Clinico-economic evaluation of cost effectiveness of treatment of inpatients with ulcers].

    PubMed

    Vakhrushev, Ia M; Kudrina, E A; Molchanova, L F

    2001-01-01

    The treatment efficiency was estimated in 128 patients with peptic ulcer (65 patients were treated in policlinic in daily hospital and 63 patients were treated in usual hospital). It was demonstrated that the duration of treatment in daily hospital was average reduced on 4.8 days and treatment value in daily hospital was lowered on 49%. So, the introduction and development of the hospital-replacing forms of the medical help had allowed rationally and economically use the resources of public health. PMID:11681192

  4. Oral health status and treatment needs among psychiatric inpatients in Rennes, France: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Severe mental disorders have a chronic course associated with a high risk for co-morbid somatic illnesses and premature mortality and oral health is critical for overall systemic health. But general health care needs in this population are often neglected. Some studies have aimed at determining the oral health status of psychiatric in-patients but to date, no emphasis has been placed on oral health of psychiatric patients in France. The goal of this study was to assess the oral health and treatment needs of institutionalized patients in a large psychiatric hospital, where a dental service was available and free, to compare it with the average population, with psychiatric in-patients in other countries and to provide recommendations for psychiatrists and care-giving staff. Methods The dental status (DMFT), the oral hygiene (OHIS: Simplified Oral Hygiene Index), the saliva flow rate were recorded on a randomized patient sample. Demographic and medical data were retrieved from the institutional clinical files. Results Among the 161 examined patients, 95 (59.0%) were men and 66 (41.0%) were women. The mean age was 46.9 17.5years. The majority was diagnosed schizophrenia (36.6%) or mood disorders (21.1%). The mean OHIS was 1.7 1.1. Among the 147 patients who agreed to carry out the salivary examination, the average saliva flow rate was 0.3g 0.3g/min. Saliva flow under the average rest saliva flow (0.52mg/min) was found for 80.3% of the patient. The mean DMFT was 15.8 8.8 (D = 3.7 4.4, M = 7.3 9.4, F = 4.7 4.9) and significantly increased with age (p < 0.001) and degree of disability (p = 0.003) (stepwise linear regression). Eighteen patients (11.2%) were edentulous. Conclusions The DMFT was similar to low income French population but psychiatric patients had almost 4 times more decayed teeth, slightly less missing teeth and 1.5 times less filled teeth. Oral health appeared to be better than in most other countries. But compared to general population, the still unmet dental and prosthetic needs indicated the major need of enhanced access to dental care and specific preventive programs. PMID:24053587

  5. Substance Abuse Treatment For Adults in the Criminal Justice System. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 44

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Catalina; Dinsmore, Janet; Gilbert, J. Max; Kornblum, Annette; Latham, Joyce; Oliff, Helen; Paisner, Susan; Sutton, David

    2005-01-01

    This Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) provides guidelines for counselors and criminal justice personnel who treat offenders with substance use disorders. TIPs are best-practice guidelines that make the latest research in substance abuse treatment available to counselors and educators. The content was generated by a panel of experts in the…

  6. Which values are important for patients during involuntary treatment? A qualitative study with psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Emanuele; Giacco, Domenico; Katasakou, Christina; Priebe, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Involuntary hospital treatment is practised throughout the world. Providing appropriate treatment in this context is particularly challenging for mental health professionals, who frequently face ethical issues as they have to administer treatments in the absence of patient consent. We have explored the views of 59 psychiatric patients who had been involuntarily admitted to hospital treatment across England. Moral deliberation theory, developed in the field of clinical bioethics, was used to assess ethical issues. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim, and analysed through thematic content analysis. We have detected a number of circumstances in the hospital that were perceived as potentially conflictual by patients. We have established which patient values should be considered by staff when deliberating on ethically controversial issues in these circumstances. Patients regarded as important having freedom of choice and the feeling of being safe during their stay in the hospital. Patients also valued non-paternalistic and respectful behaviour from staff. Consideration of patient values in moral deliberation is important to manage ethical conflicts. Even in the ethically challenging context of involuntary treatment, there are possibilities to increase patient freedoms, enhance their sense of safety and convey respect. PMID:24129367

  7. A prospective, modernized treatment protocol for periprosthetic femur fractures.

    PubMed

    Duwelius, Paul J; Schmidt, Andrew H; Kyle, Richard F; Talbott, Vanessa; Ellis, Thomas J; Butler, Jay B V

    2004-10-01

    This article reports a prospective series of periprosthetic femur fractures in 33 patients treated with a modernized fracture treatment protocol. Some form of operative treatment was selected prospectively based on the categorization of the fracture by the Duncan-Vancouver and Beals-Tower Oregon classification systems. Fractures in which the prosthesis-bone interface was stable were treated with open reduction and internal fixation of the fracture around the stable implant. Unstable prosthesis-bone interfaces required removal of the primary prosthesis and revision to an uncemented long-stem prosthesis after stabilization of the femoral fracture with plates or allograft struts. Complications were minimal over an average follow-up period of 28.3 months; restoration of function was predictable. PMID:15363923

  8. Nonsurgical Korean Integrative Treatments for Symptomatic Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Three-Armed Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial Protocol.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kiok; Shin, Kyung-Min; Lee, Jun-Hwan; Seo, Bok-Nam; Jung, So-Young; Youn, Yousuk; Lee, Sang Ho; Kim, Jaehong; Qu, Wenchun; Kim, Tae-Hun

    2016-01-01

    This is a study protocol for a pilot three-armed randomized controlled trial on nonsurgical integrative Korean medicinal treatment for symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Thirty-six participants who have been diagnosed with (LSS) and recommended for spinal surgery by neurosurgeons or orthopedics and have had spinal symptoms such as severe low back pain and neurological claudication regardless of at least three months of conservative treatments will be recruited. Participants will be randomly assigned to be one of the three intervention groups, including the Mokhuri treatment program group 1 or 2 or usual care group. All treatments will be administered in inpatient units over a period of 4 weeks. The primary outcomes are 0 to 100 Visual Analogue Scales for low back pain and leg pain and the secondary outcomes are Oswestry Disability Index; EQ-5D; Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire; Oxford Claudication Score; physical function test, including treadmill test, walking duration, and distance assessment for free leg pain; radiologic testing; and adverse events which will be assessed during the 4-week treatment period as well as after 3 and 6 months of follow-up. Then, we will assess the feasibility of the clinical trial design as well as a nonsurgical integrative treatment program. This trial is registered with CRIS registration number: KCT0001218. PMID:26941823

  9. Nonsurgical Korean Integrative Treatments for Symptomatic Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Three-Armed Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kiok; Shin, Kyung-Min; Lee, Jun-Hwan; Seo, Bok-Nam; Jung, So-Young; Youn, Yousuk; Lee, Sang Ho; Kim, Jaehong; Qu, Wenchun

    2016-01-01

    This is a study protocol for a pilot three-armed randomized controlled trial on nonsurgical integrative Korean medicinal treatment for symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Thirty-six participants who have been diagnosed with (LSS) and recommended for spinal surgery by neurosurgeons or orthopedics and have had spinal symptoms such as severe low back pain and neurological claudication regardless of at least three months of conservative treatments will be recruited. Participants will be randomly assigned to be one of the three intervention groups, including the Mokhuri treatment program group 1 or 2 or usual care group. All treatments will be administered in inpatient units over a period of 4 weeks. The primary outcomes are 0 to 100 Visual Analogue Scales for low back pain and leg pain and the secondary outcomes are Oswestry Disability Index; EQ-5D; Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire; Oxford Claudication Score; physical function test, including treadmill test, walking duration, and distance assessment for free leg pain; radiologic testing; and adverse events which will be assessed during the 4-week treatment period as well as after 3 and 6 months of follow-up. Then, we will assess the feasibility of the clinical trial design as well as a nonsurgical integrative treatment program. This trial is registered with CRIS registration number: KCT0001218. PMID:26941823

  10. The association between psychopathology and substance use: adolescent and young adult substance users in inpatient treatment in Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Saban, Amina; Flisher, Alan; Laubscher, Ria; London, Leslie; Morojele, Neo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Evidence suggests that comorbid psychopathology can negatively affect treatment outcomes in substance users. In South Africa, limited information exists regarding the prevalence, nature and role of psychiatric comorbidity in substance users. This study examined psychiatric comorbidity and its association with specific substance use, and young adult substance users in treatment for substance use. Methods Male and female inpatient substance users (n=95; ages 17-30 years) were sampled consecutively in order of admission from three clinics in Cape Town. An interview schedule was administered to elicit patients sociodemographic and substance use history details. The computer-assisted Diagnostic Interview Schedule DSM IV (C-DIS IV) was administered to screen patients for current psychiatric disorders. Resuls The sample was largely male, Coloured, Muslim and single. Cannabis (51.6%) and crystal methamphetamine (17.9%) were the most common first substances of use. Heroin (53.7%) and crystal methamphetamine (33.7%) were the most common substances for which treatment was sought (primary substances). The most common comorbid psychopathologies were anti-social personality disorder (ASPD 87.4%) and conduct disorder (CD 67.4%). Regression analyses showed a marginally significant association between specific phobia and first use of cannabis, but indicated no statistically significant associations between psychopathology and substance use. Conclusion The results demonstrated a high proportion of previously unidentified comorbid psychopathology in inpatient substance users. Further research is needed to investigate psychiatric comorbidity in inpatient substance users. PMID:24643118

  11. Acute treatment of pediatric headache in the emergency department and inpatient settings.

    PubMed

    Kabbouche, Marielle A; Linder, Steven L

    2005-06-01

    Migraine headache can be debilitating. If initiated early, aggressive management may prevent severe disability and failure at school. It must be noted that treatments available for use for acute migraine headache in children and adolescents are off-label. Their use is widespread, but double-blind, placebo-controlled studies are still unavailable for this age group. PMID:16018229

  12. Evaluating the Appropriateness and Effectiveness of Long Term Inpatient Psychiatric Treatment for Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickert, Jeff; Sotinsky, Ted

    This paper describes the outcomes of a study that explored the significance of the Severity of Illness Rating Scale (SIRS) as a tool for utilization review and program evaluation. The SIRS was first introduced in March 1993 and soon became the centerpiece for the Arthur Brisbane Child Treatment Center's Utilization Review Plan. Since its

  13. Are you Sleeping? Pilot Comparison of Self-Reported and Objective Measures of Sleep Quality and Duration in an Inpatient Alcoholism Treatment Program.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Alyssa T; Krumlauf, Michael C; Whiting, Barbara P; Clark, Rosa J; Wallen, Gwenyth R

    2012-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are common among alcohol-dependent individuals and can increase risk of relapse. The current study compares subjective and objective measures of sleep quality and duration and describes the prevalence of baseline sleep disturbances in an inpatient population of alcoholics undergoing their first week of detoxification. At baseline, the PSQI revealed that 79% of participants were above the cutoff score (?5) for clinically meaningful sleep disturbances (mean = 12.57, SD = 4.38). Actigraphy results revealed that average sleep efficiency was 75.89%. Sleep efficiency scores were significantly correlated with self-reported sleep efficiency (P = 0.04, r = 0.47). Sleep duration measured by the actigraphy watches was not significantly correlated with self-reported sleep duration (P = 0.65, r = 0.10). Ongoing assessment of sleep disturbances may be a valuable tool for informing the development of customized sleep interventions in a similar inpatient alcohol treatment sample. PMID:23115479

  14. Decertification outcomes for bipolar disorder in an inpatient community mental health treatment center: impact on subsequent service use over two years.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Glen L; Iosif, Ana-Maria; Iosiff, Ana-Maria; Brooks, Michael; Scott, Charles L; Hilty, Donald M

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated differences in usage of inpatient and outpatient mental health services over a 2-year period following the index hospitalization between 50 decertified and 48 certified subjects with bipolar manic or mixed episode from an inpatient mental health treatment center. The decertified group had higher number of rehospitalization over the 2-year period compared to certified group (mean=2.26, SE=0.41 vs. mean=1.19, SE=0.24; Wald ? (2)=5.50, p=0.02). Median time to first rehospitalization was 40weeks in the certified and 17weeks in the decertified group, but the difference in time to rehospitalization failed to achieve statistical significance (p=0.18). History of prior hospitalization was associated with higher numbers of rehospitalizations and crisis room visits (both p<0.01) and with shorter time before first rehospitalization (p<0.001). PMID:22271342

  15. Self-harm history predicts resistance to inpatient treatment of body shape aversion in women with eating disorders: The role of negative affect.

    PubMed

    Olatunji, Bunmi O; Cox, Rebecca; Ebesutani, Chad; Wall, David

    2015-06-01

    Although self-harm has been observed among patients with eating disorders, the effects of such tendencies on treatment outcomes are unclear. The current study employed structural equation modeling to (a) evaluate the relationship between self-harm and changes in body dissatisfaction and drive for thinness in a large sample of patients (n=2061) who underwent inpatient treatment, and (b) to examine whether the relationship between self-harm and changes in body dissatisfaction and drive for thinness during inpatient treatment remains significant when controlling for change in negative affect during treatment. Results revealed that patients with a history of self-harm reported significantly less reduction in body dissatisfaction and drive for thinness following treatment. Patients experiencing less change in negative affect also reported significantly less reduction in body dissatisfaction and drive for thinness after discharge from treatment. However, the association between history of self-harm and reduction in body dissatisfaction and drive for thinness after treatment became non-significant when controlling for change in negative affect. This pattern of findings was also replicated among patients with a primary diagnosis of anorexia nervosa (n=845), bulimia nervosa (n=565), and eating disorder not otherwise specified (n=651). The implications of these findings for delineating the specific role of self-harm in the nature and treatment of eating disorders are discussed. PMID:25868550

  16. Covariation of self- and other-directed aggression among inpatient youth: Continuity in the transition to treatment and shared risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Boxer, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Although other-directed and self-directed aggression covary in very high risk youth, these forms of aggression infrequently are studied simultaneously. Understanding better their covariation is an important task for improving services to high risk youth. In this study, data from the clinical records of 476 youth admitted to secure inpatient treatment were analyzed to examine relations among self- and other-directed aggression exhibit prior to and during inpatient treatment. Analyses tested the hypotheses that self- and other-directed aggression would tend to covary and display continuity from pre-treatment to in-treatment. Also tested were the hypotheses that youth with histories of co-occurring self- and other-directed aggression would show the highest levels of aggression during treatment and the greatest degree of personal and contextual risk upon entering treatment. These hypotheses were largely supported. Exploratory analyses revealed interesting discontinuities in aggression (aggression emitted only before or during treatment) with critical implications for research and practice with youth receiving clinical care, especially those in institutional placements. PMID:20309848

  17. Personality Disorders in Substance Abusers: A Comparison of Patients Treated in a Prison Unit and Patients Treated in Inpatient Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefansson, Ragnar; Hesse, Morten

    2008-01-01

    A large body of literature has shown a high prevalence of personality disorders in substance abusers. We compared a sample of substance abusers treated in a prison setting with substance abusers treated in a non-prison inpatient setting rated with the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III. Base-rate scores indicated a prevalence of 95% of

  18. A Novel Protocol for Model Calibration in Biological Wastewater Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ao; Guo, Jianhua; Ni, Bing-Jie; Wang, Shuying; Yang, Qing; Peng, Yongzhen

    2015-01-01

    Activated sludge models (ASMs) have been widely used for process design, operation and optimization in wastewater treatment plants. However, it is still a challenge to achieve an efficient calibration for reliable application by using the conventional approaches. Hereby, we propose a novel calibration protocol, i.e. Numerical Optimal Approaching Procedure (NOAP), for the systematic calibration of ASMs. The NOAP consists of three key steps in an iterative scheme flow: i) global factors sensitivity analysis for factors fixing; ii) pseudo-global parameter correlation analysis for non-identifiable factors detection; and iii) formation of a parameter subset through an estimation by using genetic algorithm. The validity and applicability are confirmed using experimental data obtained from two independent wastewater treatment systems, including a sequencing batch reactor and a continuous stirred-tank reactor. The results indicate that the NOAP can effectively determine the optimal parameter subset and successfully perform model calibration and validation for these two different systems. The proposed NOAP is expected to use for automatic calibration of ASMs and be applied potentially to other ordinary differential equations models. PMID:25682959

  19. A Novel Protocol for Model Calibration in Biological Wastewater Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ao; Guo, Jianhua; Ni, Bing-Jie; Wang, Shuying; Yang, Qing; Peng, Yongzhen

    2015-02-01

    Activated sludge models (ASMs) have been widely used for process design, operation and optimization in wastewater treatment plants. However, it is still a challenge to achieve an efficient calibration for reliable application by using the conventional approaches. Hereby, we propose a novel calibration protocol, i.e. Numerical Optimal Approaching Procedure (NOAP), for the systematic calibration of ASMs. The NOAP consists of three key steps in an iterative scheme flow: i) global factors sensitivity analysis for factors fixing; ii) pseudo-global parameter correlation analysis for non-identifiable factors detection; and iii) formation of a parameter subset through an estimation by using genetic algorithm. The validity and applicability are confirmed using experimental data obtained from two independent wastewater treatment systems, including a sequencing batch reactor and a continuous stirred-tank reactor. The results indicate that the NOAP can effectively determine the optimal parameter subset and successfully perform model calibration and validation for these two different systems. The proposed NOAP is expected to use for automatic calibration of ASMs and be applied potentially to other ordinary differential equations models.

  20. Burden of blood transmitted infections in substance users admitted for inpatient treatment in Singapore and the associated factors

    PubMed Central

    Kinson, Rochelle Melina; Guo, Song; Wan, Yi Min; Manning, Victoria; Teoh, Hui Chin; Wong, Kim Eng

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION There is a paucity of local data on the prevalence of blood transmitted infections (BTIs), such as hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections, among illicit drug users. This study aimed to examine the prevalence of BTIs among substance-dependent inpatients and identify the factors associated with BTIs. METHODS We conducted a retrospective case note analysis of 170 inpatients who had a history of substance dependence and were seen at the National Addictions Management Service, Singapore, between 1 June 2009 and 31 May 2010. RESULTS The majority of the 170 inpatients were male (88.2%) and Chinese (58.2%). The mean age of the patients was 43.1 years, and the main drug of abuse was opioids (86.5%). BTIs were found in 70 (41.2%) inpatients; the prevalence of hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV infections was 3.7%, 39.6% and 0%, respectively. Lifetime intravenous drug use, but not needle-sharing, was more common among inpatients who were positive for BTIs (p < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis showed that lifetime intravenous drug use (OR 4.3, 95% CI 1.7–10.8, p < 0.01) was the only significant predictor of BTI. CONCLUSION 41.2% of the substance users seeking help were positive for at least one BTI. Lifetime intravenous drug users were found to be more than four times more likely to have a BTI. Early detection and prevention is essential to improve prognosis. PMID:25588571

  1. Inpatient Treatment Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Alan L., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    Presents case study of 44-year-old male admitted to acute psychiatric unit and diagnosed as having chemical dependency, posttraumatic stress disorder, schizoaffective disorder, and major depression. Following description of the case, comments are given by Candace Coggins, clinical specialist, and Jane Zibelin, Director of Nursing, and by Lois

  2. Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome: Influence of a Combined Inpatient/Outpatient Methadone Treatment Regimen on the Average Length of Stay of a Medicaid NICU Population

    PubMed Central

    Hulman, Sonia; Musci, Michael; Stang, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Prescription opioid and heroin abuse have been increasing steadily year after year, and continue to be a serious national problem. A sequela of the increase in opioid abuse has been an increase in the number of infants born with opioid dependence. These infants often require costly, prolonged stays in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) for drug withdrawal treatment. The authors studied a population of infants from a large Medicaid health plan who were born with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) secondary to in utero opioid exposure to assess the average length of stay in the NICU, and to determine the variables that may account for differences in interinstitutional lengths of stay. The overall average length of stay for NAS was 21.1 days for the 139 infants included in the study. Analysis of the medication used for treatment revealed that infants who were treated with a combined inpatient/outpatient regimen with methadone had an average length of stay of 11.4 days versus 25.1 days for infants who were treated entirely as inpatients (P<0.001), a 55% reduction in average length of stay. In 2009 there were an estimated 13,600 cases of NAS in the United States at a cost of $53,000 per case. A 55% reduction in length of stay corresponds to $396 million in annual savings for the treatment of NAS. Development of successful combined inpatient/outpatient management programs for NAS warrants further consideration. (Population Health Management 2015;18:392–397) PMID:25803316

  3. Medium-term cost-effectiveness of an automated non-invasive ventilation outpatient set-up versus a standard fixed level non-invasive ventilation inpatient set-up in obese patients with chronic respiratory failure: a protocol description

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, S; Arbane, G; Murphy, P; Elliott, M W; Janssens, J P; Pepin, J L; Muir, J F; Cuvelier, A; Polkey, M; Parkin, D; Douiri, A; Hart, N

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is an escalating issue, with an accompanying increase in referrals of patients with obesity-related respiratory failure. Currently, these patients are electively admitted to hospital for initiation of non-invasive ventilation (NIV), but it is unknown whether outpatient initiation is as effective as inpatient set-up. We hypothesise that outpatient set-up using an autotitrating NIV device will be more cost-effective than a nurse-led inpatient titration and set-up. Methods and analysis We will undertake a multinational, multicentre randomised controlled trial. Participants will be randomised to receive the usual inpatient set-up, which will include nurse-led initiation of NIV or outpatient set-up with an automated NIV device. They will be stratified according to the trial site, gender and previous use of NIV or continuous positive airway pressure. Assuming a 10% dropout rate, a total sample of 82 patients will be required. Cost-effectiveness will be evaluated using standard treatment costs and health service utilisation as well as health-related quality of life measures (severe respiratory insufficiency (SRI) and EuroQol-5 dimensions (EQ-5D)). A change in the SRI questionnaire will be based on the analysis of covariance adjusting for the baseline measurements between the two arms of patients. Ethics and dissemination This study has been approved by the Westminster National Research Ethics Committee (11/LO/0414) and is the trial registered on the UKCRN portfolio. The trial is planned to start in January 2015 with publication of the trial results in 2017. Trial registration number ISRCTN 51420481. PMID:25908673

  4. Task-shifting an inpatient triage, assessment, and treatment program improves the quality of care for hospitalized Malawian children

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Dan; Preidis, Geoffrey A.; Milazi, Robert; Spinler, Jennifer K.; Lufesi, Norman; Mwansambo, Charles; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; McCollum, Eric D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We aimed to improve pediatric inpatient surveillance at a busy referral hospital in Malawi with 2 new programs: (1) the provision of vital sign equipment and implementation of an inpatient triage program (ITAT) that includes a simplified pediatric severity-of-illness score; (2) task-shifting ITAT to a new cadre of health care workers called Vital Sign Assistants (VSAs). Methods This study, conducted on the pediatric inpatient ward of a large referral hospital in Malawi, was divided into 3 phases, each lasting 4 weeks. In Phase A, we collected baseline data. In Phase B, we provided 3 new automated vital sign poles and implemented ITAT with current hospital staff. In Phase C, VSAs were introduced and performed ITAT. Our primary outcome measures were the number of vital sign assessments performed and clinician notifications to reassess patients with high ITAT scores. Results We enrolled 3,994 patients who received 5,155 vital sign assessments. Assessment frequency was equal between Phases A (0.67 assessments/patient) and B (0.61 assessments/patient), but increased 3.6-fold in Phase C (2.44 assessments/patient, p<0.001). Clinician notifications increased from Phases A (84) and B (113) to Phase C (161, p=0.002). Inpatient mortality fell from Phase A (9.3%) to Phases B (5.7) and C (6.9%). Conclusions ITAT with VSAs improved vital sign assessments and nearly doubled clinician notifications of patients needing further assessment due to high ITAT scores, while equipment alone made no difference. Task-shifting ITAT to VSAs may improve outcomes in pediatric hospitals in the developing world. PMID:23600592

  5. Inpatient diabetology. The new frontier.

    PubMed

    Abourizk, Nicolas N; Vora, Chaula K; Verma, Parveen K

    2004-05-01

    Tight glycemic control is now an imperative of outpatient diabetes care. The inpatient arena remains under the influence of an ineffective paradigm characterized by tolerance for hyperglycemia and a reluctance to use insulin intensively. This article is a call to action against the lip service paid to inpatient diabetes care. The compelling in vitro and in vivo evidence for the benefit of intensive insulin-mediated glycemic control is summarized. The linchpin of current inpatient care is a commonly used insulin sliding scale. This autopilot approach as the sole mode of treatment for inpatient hyperglycemia has been strongly condemned. Nevertheless, it continues to survive. The evidence supports the compelling argument that the adverse effect of hyperglycemia on hospital length of stay, morbidity, and mortality is substantial. Clinicians, nurses, administrators, and insurers ought to look critically at the prevailing paradigm and spearhead the much-needed revolution in inpatient diabetology. The issue of glycemic targets, the need for noninvasive blood glucose monitoring, and the role of nursing staff in this revolution are raised. We call for the banning of the insulin sliding scale use as the sole diabetes order. Also, the use of basal insulin via continuous intravenous insulin infusion or subcutaneous insulin analogs should be embraced. Educating nurses, house staff, and other frontline professionals in the adverse consequences of the current paradigm is essential. Inpatient glycemic control matters; clinical and financial outcomes are at stake. It behooves the health care system and the diabetic public to address the contemporary state of inpatient diabetology as soon as possible. PMID:15109346

  6. An Inpatient Vocational Rehabilitation Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bielefeld, Martin

    This paper describes the Cleveland Veterans Administration inpatient Vocational Rehabilitation Unit (VRU), an intensive vocational assessment and counseling program designed to maximize the self-reliance and productivity of patients. The VRU is presented as a minimal care, 3-month maximum treatment program in which patients work on incentive pay

  7. Inpatient hospital costs and length of stay for the treatment of affective and somatoform disorders – evidence from Germany

    PubMed Central

    Romeyke, Tobias; Scheuer, Hans Christoph; Stummer, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Diagnosis related costs analyses are the subject of science and research and are of great relevance and importance for decision makers in the hospital and for funding bodies, but also for international health policy. Up to now, standardized costs analyses with valid costs data have not been available for inpatient care of patients with affective and somatoform disorders. Background This clinical picture presents a major challenge for the provision of outpatient and inpatient care. An interdisciplinary approach in an inpatient setting can be beneficial for already “chronified” patients with severe forms of progression. Because of its structural and procedural demands, this type of care is associated with a greater expenditure of resources. Methods Costs data from the years 2008 to 2012 were analyzed for a total of 17,424 hospitalized patients in more than 200 different hospitals in Germany. The study compared the costs of treating patients with the main diagnosis affective and somatoform disorders using standardized interdisciplinary therapy, with the costs of conventional therapy. Results Interdisciplinary patient care is characterized by a high proportion of the costs derived from the structural and procedural implementation and the medical and nursing care. For interdisciplinary therapy with a mean period of hospitalization of 15.2 days, over 60% of the total costs were incurred by the personnel and material costs of the medical and non-medical infrastructure. The outlay is considerably greater than would be incurred by a conventional therapeutic approach without interdisciplinary therapy. Discussion and conclusion For the first time, detailed diagnosis-related costs data are published which were generated by consistent, standardized cost unit accounting. An interdisciplinary, holistic approach to the clinical picture results in a significant increase in costs for the hospitals. PMID:25506252

  8. Changes in Physical Fitness, Bone Mineral Density and Body Composition During Inpatient Treatment of Underweight and Normal Weight Females with Longstanding Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bratland-Sanda, Solfrid; Martinsen, Egil W.; Sundgot-Borgen, Jorunn

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine changes in aerobic fitness, muscular strength, bone mineral density (BMD) and body composition during inpatient treatment of underweight and normal weight patients with longstanding eating disorders (ED). Twenty-nine underweight (BMI < 18.5, n = 7) and normal weight (BMI ? 18.5, n = 22) inpatients (mean (SD) age: 31.0 (9.0) years, ED duration: 14.9 (8.8) years, duration of treatment: 16.6 (5.5) weeks) completed this prospective naturalistic study. The treatment consisted of nutritional counseling, and 2 60 min weekly moderate intensive physical activity in addition to psychotherapy and milieu therapy. Underweight patients aimed to increase body weight with 0.5 kg/week until the weight gain goal was reached. Aerobic fitness, muscular strength, BMD and body composition were measured at admission and discharge. Results showed an increase in mean muscular strength, total body mass, fat mass, and body fat percentage, but not aerobic capacity, among both underweight and normal weight patients. Lumbar spine BMD increased among the underweight patients, no changes were observed in BMD among the normal weight patients. Three out of seven underweight patients were still underweight at discharge, and only three out of nine patients with excessive body fat (i.e., >33%) managed to reduce body fat to normal values during treatment. These results calls for a more individualized treatment approach to achieve a more optimal body composition among both underweight and normal to overweight patients with longstanding ED. PMID:22470294

  9. Changes in physical fitness, bone mineral density and body composition during inpatient treatment of underweight and normal weight females with longstanding eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Bratland-Sanda, Solfrid; Martinsen, Egil W; Sundgot-Borgen, Jorunn

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine changes in aerobic fitness, muscular strength, bone mineral density (BMD) and body composition during inpatient treatment of underweight and normal weight patients with longstanding eating disorders (ED). Twenty-nine underweight (BMI < 18.5, n = 7) and normal weight (BMI ? 18.5, n = 22) inpatients (mean (SD) age: 31.0 (9.0) years, ED duration: 14.9 (8.8) years, duration of treatment: 16.6 (5.5) weeks) completed this prospective naturalistic study. The treatment consisted of nutritional counseling, and 2 60 min weekly moderate intensive physical activity in addition to psychotherapy and milieu therapy. Underweight patients aimed to increase body weight with 0.5 kg/week until the weight gain goal was reached. Aerobic fitness, muscular strength, BMD and body composition were measured at admission and discharge. Results showed an increase in mean muscular strength, total body mass, fat mass, and body fat percentage, but not aerobic capacity, among both underweight and normal weight patients. Lumbar spine BMD increased among the underweight patients, no changes were observed in BMD among the normal weight patients. Three out of seven underweight patients were still underweight at discharge, and only three out of nine patients with excessive body fat (i.e., >33%) managed to reduce body fat to normal values during treatment. These results calls for a more individualized treatment approach to achieve a more optimal body composition among both underweight and normal to overweight patients with longstanding ED. PMID:22470294

  10. A pilot study of heart rate variability biofeedback therapy in the treatment of perinatal depression on a specialized perinatal psychiatry inpatient unit.

    PubMed

    Beckham, A Jenna; Greene, Tammy B; Meltzer-Brody, Samantha

    2013-02-01

    Heart rate variability biofeedback (HRVB) therapy may be useful in treating the prominent anxiety features of perinatal depression. We investigated the use of this non-pharmacologic therapy among women hospitalized with severe perinatal depression. Three questionnaires, the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale, and Linear Analog Self Assessment, were administered to 15 women in a specialized inpatient perinatal psychiatry unit. Participants were also contacted by telephone after discharge to assess continued use of HRVB techniques. The use of HRVB was associated with an improvement in all three scales. The greatest improvement (-13.867, p < 0.001 and -11.533, p < 0.001) was among STAI scores. A majority (81.9 %, n = 9) of women surveyed by telephone also reported continued frequent use at least once per week, and over half (54.6 %, n = 6) described the use of HRVB techniques as very or extremely beneficial. The use of HRVB was associated with statistically significant improvement on all instrument scores, the greatest of which was STAI scores, and most women reported frequent continued use of HRVB techniques after discharge. These results suggest that HRVB may be particularly beneficial in the treatment of the prominent anxiety features of perinatal depression, both in inpatient and outpatient settings. PMID:23179141

  11. Study protocol: cluster randomised controlled trial to assess the clinical and cost effectiveness of a staff training intervention in inpatient mental health rehabilitation units in increasing service users engagement in activities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study focuses on people with complex and severe mental health problems who require inpatient rehabilitation. The majority have a diagnosis of schizophrenia whose recovery has been delayed due to non-response to first-line treatments, cognitive impairment, negative symptoms and co-existing problems such as substance misuse. These problems contribute to major impairments in social and everyday functioning necessitating lengthy admissions and high support needs on discharge to the community. Engagement in structured activities reduces negative symptoms of psychosis and may lead to improvement in function, but no trials have been conducted to test the efficacy of interventions that aim to achieve this. Methods/design This study aims to investigate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a staff training intervention to increase service users engagement in activities. This is a single-blind, two-arm cluster randomised controlled trial involving 40 inpatient mental health rehabilitation units across England. Units are randomised on an equal basis to receive either standard care or a hands-on, manualised staff training programme comprising three distinct phases (predisposing, enabling and reinforcing) delivered by a small team of psychiatrists, occupational therapists, service users and activity workers. The primary outcome is service user engagement in activities 12months after randomisation, assessed using a standardised measure. Secondary outcomes include social functioning and costs and cost-effectiveness of care. Discussion The study will provide much needed evidence for a practical staff training intervention that has potential to improve service user functioning, reducing the need for hospital treatment and supporting successful community discharge. The trial is registered with Current Controlled Trials (Ref ISRCTN25898179). PMID:23981710

  12. Clinical Guidelines for the Use of Buprenorphine in the Treatment of Opioid Addiction. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 40

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boone, Margaret; Brown, Nancy J.; Moon, Mary A.; Schuman, Deborah J.; Thomas, Josephine; Wright, Denise L.

    2004-01-01

    This Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) addresses the clinical use of buprenorphine in the treatment of opioid addiction. TIPs are best-practice guidelines for the treatment of substance use disorders that make the latest research in substance abuse treatment available to counselors and educators. The content was generated by a panel of experts…

  13. [An update of the obstetrics hemorrhage treatment protocol].

    PubMed

    Morillas-Ramírez, F; Ortiz-Gómez, J R; Palacio-Abizanda, F J; Fornet-Ruiz, I; Pérez-Lucas, R; Bermejo-Albares, L

    2014-04-01

    Obstetric hemorrhage is still a major cause of maternal and fetal morbimortality in developed countries. This is an underestimated problem, which usually appears unpredictably. A high proportion of the morbidity of obstetric hemorrhage is considered to be preventable if adequately managed. The major international clinical guidelines recommend producing consensus management protocols, adapted to local characteristics and keep them updated in the light of experience and new scientific publications. We present a protocol updated, according to the latest recommendations, and our own experience, in order to be used as a basis for those anesthesiologists who wish to use and adapt it locally to their daily work. This last aspect is very important to be effective, and is a task to be performed at each center, according to the availability of resources, personnel and architectural features. PMID:24560060

  14. Psychopharmacological treatment of 2195 in-patients with borderline personality disorder: A comparison with other psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Bridler, René; Häberle, Anne; Müller, Sabrina T; Cattapan, Katja; Grohmann, Renate; Toto, Sermin; Kasper, Siegfried; Greil, Waldemar

    2015-06-01

    Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) are usually prescribed a variety of psychotropic drugs; however, none is recommended in the guidelines nor has any been approved for this indication. As data on drug prescriptions for BPD are sparse, cross-sectional data from the European Drug Safety Project AMSP were used to analyse drug prescriptions of 2195 in-patients with BPD between 2001 and 2011, and the mean values, confidence intervals and regression analyses were calculated. 70% of all BPD patients were medicated with antipsychotics and/or antidepressants, 33% with anticonvulsants, 30% with benzodiazepines, and 4% with lithium; 90% received at least one, 80%≥2, and 54%≥3 psychotropic drugs concomitantly (mean: 2.8). Prescription rates for quetiapine, the single drug most often used in BPD (22%), increased significantly over time. In view of the high percentage of young females with BPD, 18-40 year-old female patients with BPD were compared with patients of the same age but with depression (unipolar and bipolar) and schizophrenia. Typical sedative antipsychotics and anticonvulsants were prescribed more often in BPD than in the other diagnostic groups, with the exception of bipolar depression; this was true for the single substances quetiapine, levomepromazine, chlorprothixene, carbamazepine, and valproate. A limitation of the study was the use of clinical data without verifying the diagnoses by structured interviews. Contrary to the guidelines, about 90% of in-patients with BPD received psychotropic drugs. Polypharmacy was common, and antipsychotics with sedative profiles such as quetiapine and mood-stabilizing anticonvulsants such as valproate appear to be preferred. PMID:25907249

  15. A Pilot Study of Brief Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback to Reduce Craving in Young Adult Men Receiving Inpatient Treatment for Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Eddie, D.; Kim, C.; Lehrer, P.; Deneke, E.; Bates, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    The present pilot study investigated the implementation feasibility, and efficacy for reducing alcohol and drug craving, of a brief, 3-session heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV BFB) intervention added to a traditional 28-day substance abuse disorder (SUD) inpatient treatment program. Forty-eight young adult men received either treatment as usual (TAU) plus three sessions of HRV BFB training over three weeks, or TAU only. Participants receiving HRV BFB training were instructed to practice daily using a handheld HRV BFB device. HRV BFB training was well tolerated by participants and supported by treatment staff. Men receiving TAU + HRV BFB demonstrated a greater, medium effect size reduction in alcohol and drug craving compared to those receiving TAU only, although this difference did not reach statistical significance. In addition, an interaction effect was observed in analyses that accounted for baseline craving levels, wherein heart rate variability (HRV) levels at treatment entry were predictive of changes in craving in the TAU group only. Low baseline levels of HRV were associated with increases in craving, whereas higher baseline HRV levels were associated with greater decreases in craving from start to end of treatment. In the TAU + HRV BFB group, however, there was no such association. That is, HRV BFB appeared to dissociate individual differences in baseline HRV levels from changes in craving. Given that alcohol and drug craving often precipitates relapse, HRV BFB merits further study as an adjunct treatment to ameliorate craving experienced by persons with substance use disorders. PMID:25179673

  16. [Cerebral insufficiency--treatment with Ginkgo-biloba extract. Time of onset of effect in a double-blind study with 60 inpatients].

    PubMed

    Eckmann, F

    1990-10-10

    Sixty inpatients with cerebral insufficiency and the leading symptom depressive mood, were treated in a double-blind study for 6 weeks with a daily dose of 160 mg Ginkgo biloba extract or placebo. After 2, 4 and 6 weeks, changes in 12 typical symptoms in comparison with the last examination, were evaluated. In the group receiving placebo, small, but progressive improvements were observed. In the Ginkgo-biloba group, the overall number of improvements was significantly larger. After 2 weeks the differences were marked for only a few of the symptoms; after 4 and 6 weeks in contrast, in 11 of the 12 symptoms. The largest number of improvements in the Ginkgo-biloba group was observed between the 2nd and 4th weeks of treatment. In this period, about two-thirds of the patients on Ginkgo-biloba, and about one-fifth of the patients on placebo showed improvements. PMID:2242846

  17. A Protocol-Based Decision for Choosing a Proper Surgical Treatment Option for Carotid Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Jang, E-Wook; Chung, Joonho; Seo, Kwon-Duk; Suh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Yong Bae

    2015-01-01

    Objective There are two established surgical treatment options for carotid artery stenosis. Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) has been accepted as a gold standard for surgical treatment while carotid artery stenting (CAS) has recently become an alternative option. Each treatment option has advantages and disadvantages for the treatment outcomes. We propose a protocol for selection of a proper surgical treatment option for carotid artery stenosis. Materials and Methods A total of 192 published articles on management of carotid artery stenosis were reviewed. Preoperatively considerable factors which had been repeatedly noted in those articles for the risk/benefits of CEA or CAS were selected. According to those factors, a protocol with four categories was established. Results CEA or CAS is indicated when the patient has a symptomatic stenosis ? 50%, or when the patient has an asymptomatic stenosis ? 80%. Each treatment option has absolute indications and favorable indications. Each absolute indication is scored with three points, and each favorable indication, one point. Based on the highest scores, a proper treatment option (CEA or CAS) is selected. Conclusion We have been treating patients according to this protocol and evaluating the outcomes of our protocol-based decision because this protocol might be helpful in assessment of risk/benefit for selection of a proper surgical treatment option in patients with carotid artery stenosis. PMID:26157689

  18. Methylphenidate in mania project (MEMAP): study protocol of an international randomised double-blind placebo-controlled study on the initial treatment of acute mania with methylphenidate

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Treatment of patients with acute mania remains a considerable medical challenge since onset of action of antimanic medication is delayed for several days. Psychostimulants could have an earlier onset of action. This assumption is based on the vigilance regulation model of mania which postulates that vigilance is unstable in manic patients. Accordingly, vigilance-stabilising psychostimulants could be more useful than conventional treatment in acute mania. We present here the study protocol of a trial intended to study the efficacy and safety of methylphenidate in the initial treatment of acute mania. Methods/design A multi-centre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial will be conducted in 88 bipolar inpatients with acute mania. Male and female patients older than 18?years will be randomised to treatment with either methylphenidate (20 to 40?mg/day) or placebo for 2.5?days, given once or twice daily. The main outcome measure is the reduction in the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) after 2.5?days of treatment. Other outcome measures include the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale-Excited Component (PANSS-EC) the Clinical Global ImpressionBipolar Scale (CGI-BP), the Screen for Cognitive Impairment in Psychiatry (SCIP), actigraphy and the EEG-Vigilance Algorithm Leipzig (VIGALL). Discussion A positive study outcome of the proposed study could substantially impact our understanding of the etiopathogenesis of mania and open new treatment perspectives. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT 01541605 PMID:23446109

  19. Treatment protocol development for disinfesting legumes using radio frequency energy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is an urgent need to develop technically effective and environmentally sound phytosanitary and quarantine treatments for the legume industry to replace chemical fumigation. The goal of this study was to develop practical non-chemical treatments for postharvest disinfestations of legumes using ...

  20. Hispanic Inpatient Pain Intensity.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Deborah Dillon; Ambrose, Margaret; Morey, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    Hispanic adults experience significant pain, but little is known about their pain during hospitalization. The purpose of this research was to describe Hispanic inpatients' pain intensity and compare their pain intensity with that of non-Hispanic patients. A post hoc descriptive design was used to examine 1,466 Hispanic inpatients' medical records (63.2% English speakers) and 12,977 non-Hispanic inpatients' medical records from one hospital for 2012. Mean documented pain intensity was mild for both Hispanic and non-Hispanic inpatients. Pain intensity was greater for English-speaking Hispanic patients than Spanish speakers. The odds of being documented with moderate or greater pain intensity decreased 30% for Spanish-speaking patients. Greater pain intensity documented for English-speaking Hispanic inpatients suggests underreporting of pain intensity by Spanish-speaking patients. Practitioners should use interpreter services when assessing and treating pain with patients who speak languages different from the practitioners' language(s). PMID:24958761

  1. Generic Protocol for the Verification of Ballast Water Treatment Technology

    EPA Science Inventory

    In anticipation of the need to address performance verification and subsequent approval of new and innovative ballast water treatment technologies for shipboard installation, the U.S Coast Guard and the Environmental Protection Agency‘s Environmental Technology Verification Progr...

  2. Generic Protocol for the Verification of Ballast Water Treatment Technology

    EPA Science Inventory

    In anticipation of the need to address performance verification and subsequent approval of new and innovative ballast water treatment technologies for shipboard installation, the U.S Coast Guard and the Environmental Protection Agencys Environmental Technology Verification Progr...

  3. Protocols in Cleft Lip and Palate Treatment: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    de Ladeira, Pedro Ribeiro Soares; Alonso, Nivaldo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To find clinical decisions on cleft treatment based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Method. Searches were made in PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library on cleft lip and/or palate. From the 170 articles found in the searches, 28 were considered adequate to guide clinical practice. Results. A scarce number of RCTs were found approaching cleft treatment. The experimental clinical approaches analyzed in the 28 articles were infant orthopedics, rectal acetaminophen, palatal block with bupivacaine, infraorbital nerve block with bupivacaine, osteogenesis distraction, intravenous dexamethasone sodium phosphate, and alveoloplasty with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). Conclusions. Few randomized controlled trials were found approaching cleft treatment, and fewer related to surgical repair of this deformity. So there is a need for more multicenter collaborations, mainly on surgical area, to reduce the variety of treatment modalities and to ensure that the cleft patient receives an evidence-based clinical practice. PMID:23213503

  4. Brief Strategic Therapy vs Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for the Inpatient and Telephone-Based Outpatient Treatment of Binge Eating Disorder: The STRATOB Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Manzoni, Gian Mauro; Villa, Valentina; Cesa, Gian Luca; Molinari, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the results of the STRATOB (Systemic and STRATegic psychotherapy for OBesity) study, a two-arm randomized controlled clinical trial (RCT) comparing Brief Strategic Therapy (BST, Nardone or Arezzo model) with the gold standard CBT (Cognitive Behavioral Therapy) for the inpatient and telephone-based outpatient treatment of obese people with Binge Eating Disorder (BED) seeking treatment for weight reduction. Primary outcome measure of the randomized trial was change in the Global Index of the Outcome Questionnaire (OQ 45.2). Secondary outcome measures were BED remission (weekly binge episodes < 2) and weight loss. Data were collected at baseline, at discharge from the hospital (c.a. 1 month after) and after 6 months from discharge.. No significant difference between groups (BST vs CBT) was found in the primary outcome at discharge. However, a greater improvement was seen in the BST vs the CBT group (P<.01) in the primary outcome at 6 months. About secondary outcomes, no significant difference between groups were found in weight change both at discharge and at 6 months. Notably, a significant association emerged between treatment groups and BED remission at 6 months in favor of BST (only 20% of patients in BST group reported a number of weekly binge episodes > 2 vs 63.3% in CBT group). PMID:21559234

  5. Development and Use of an Eating Disorder Assessment and Treatment Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huebner, Lois A.; Weitzman, Lauren M.; Mountain, Lisa M.; Nelson, Kris L.; Oakley, Danielle R.; Smith, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    Counseling centers have been challenged to effectively treat the growing number of college students who struggle with disordered eating. In response to this critical issue, an Eating Disorder Assessment and Treatment Protocol (EDATP) was developed to assist clinical disposition in the counseling center setting and identify treatment guidelines

  6. Addressing Viral Hepatitis in People with Substance Use Disorders. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 53

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Treatment Improvement Protocols (TIPs) are developed by the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT), part of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Each TIP involves the development of topic-specific best-practice guidelines for the prevention and…

  7. [Vaginal candidiasis--treatment protocols using miconazole and fluconazole].

    PubMed

    Mazne?kova, V

    2003-01-01

    The incidence of fungal infections is growing in the last 20 years. The epidemiological studies show that 45% of all vaginal infections are caused by Candida albicans or other Candida species. 7 out of 10 women suffer from yeast infection at least once in a lifetime and 4 out of 10 have multiple recurrences. 20-55% of women have asyptomatic vaginal colonization with Candida species. It is strongly believed that fungal infection is not sexually transmitted disease. The route of transmission is oral and it is estrogene dependant. The diagnosis is based on macroscopic, microscopic examination (KOH preparation), culture and rarely Pap test. Treatment of vaginal candidiosis is based on two principles: elimination of predisposing factors antifungal treatment Local treatment is the first line of choice in cases of acute vaginal yeast infection with 84-90% success rate. There are a variety of local preparations on our market including Nizoral, Clotrimazole, Canesten, Gyno-Daktarine, Gyno-Pevaryl, Miconazole. Different groups of broad spectrum oral antimycotics are also used including Nystatine, Ketoconazole (Nizoral), Fluconazole (Diflucan, Fungolon, Mycosyst), itraconazole (Orungal). The treatment of chronic, recurrent and resistant forms of vaginal candidosis is carried out with prolonged local and/or systemic therapy for a period of at least 6 months. Different regimes of therapy are proposed. Fluconazole is an oral drug of choice for continuous treatment of vaginal yeast infection with the least toxicity. PMID:14619753

  8. A Protocol for the Assessment and Treatment of School Phobia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doll, Beth

    This paper addresses the problem of school phobia, one of the most common childhood anxiety disorders. It presents four case studies of preadolescent school phobia involving two girls and two boys in grades four through seven. Several features of effective strategies for the assessment and treatment of school phobia which have emerged from the…

  9. Managing symptoms during cancer treatments: evaluating the implementation of evidence-informed remote support protocols

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Management of cancer treatment-related symptoms is an important safety issue given that symptoms can become life-threatening and often occur when patients are at home. With funding from the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, a pan-Canadian steering committee was established with representation from eight provinces to develop symptom protocols using a rigorous methodology (CAN-IMPLEMENT). Each protocol is based on a systematic review of the literature to identify relevant clinical practice guidelines. Protocols were validated by cancer nurses from across Canada. The aim of this study is to build an effective and sustainable approach for implementing evidence-informed protocols for nurses to use when providing remote symptom assessment, triage, and guidance in self-management for patients experiencing symptoms while undergoing cancer treatments. Methods A prospective mixed-methods study design will be used. Guided by the Knowledge to Action Framework, the study will involve (a) establishing an advisory knowledge user team in each of three targeted settings; (b) assessing factors influencing nurses use of protocols using interviews/focus groups and a standardized survey instrument; (c) adapting protocols for local use, ensuring fidelity of the content; (d) selecting intervention strategies to overcome known barriers and implementing the protocols; (e) conducting think-aloud usability testing; (f) evaluating protocol use and outcomes by conducting an audit of 100 randomly selected charts at each of the three settings; and (g) assessing satisfaction with remote support using symptom protocols and change in nurses barriers to use using survey instruments. The primary outcome is sustained use of the protocols, defined as use in 75% of the calls. Descriptive analysis will be conducted for the barriers, use of protocols, and chart audit outcomes. Content analysis will be conducted on interviews/focus groups and usability testing with comparisons across settings. Discussion Given the importance of patient safety, patient-centered care, and delivery of quality services, learning how to effectively implement evidence-informed symptom protocols in oncology healthcare services is essential for ensuring safe, consistent, and effective care for individuals with cancer. This study is likely to have a significant contribution to the delivery of remote oncology services, as well as influence symptom management by patients at home. PMID:23164244

  10. Carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma: Diagnostic dilemma and treatment protocol.

    PubMed

    Keerthi, R; Raut, Rohan P; Vaibhav, N; Ghosh, Abhishek

    2014-07-01

    Carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma (CXPA) is a carcinoma arising from a primary or recurrent benign pleomorphic adenoma. It often poses a diagnostic challenge to clinicians and pathologists. The entity is difficult to diagnose preoperatively. Pathological assessment is the gold standard for making the diagnosis. Treatment for CXPA often involves an ablative surgical procedure, which may be followed by radiotherapy. We report a case of a 65-year-old lady with a history of recurrent swelling in the left preauricular region and a history of surgery 10 years back, in the same region. Preoperatively, a diagnosis of pleomorphic adenoma of the parotid gland metastasizing to the cervical lymph node was made, but postoperatively it was reported as CXPA adenoma of the parotid gland. A radical parotidectomy involving en bloc resection of the facial nerve along with deep and superficial lobes of the parotid was performed followed by radiotherapy. The fact that pleomorphic adenomas are classified as benign tumors should not overshadow the wide range of biological behaviors associated with these tumors. On account of the potential for malignant transformation, surgical treatment must be properly performed. Surgery followed by radiotherapy should be considered as the standard care for a patient with carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma. PMID:25565746

  11. Coronal shear fractures of distal humerus: Diagnostic and treatment protocols

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajay Pal; Singh, Arun Pal

    2015-01-01

    Coronal shear fractures of distal humerus involving the capitellum and the trochlea are rare injuries with articular complexity, and are technically challenging for management. With better understanding of the anatomy and imaging advancements, the complex nature of these fractures is well appreciated now. These fractures involve metaphysealcomminution of lateral column and associated intraarticular injuries are common. Previously, closed reduction and excision were the accepted treatment but now preference is for open reduction and internal fixation with an aim to provide stable and congruent joint with early range of motion of joint. Various approaches including extensile lateral, anterolateral and posterior approaches have been described depending on the fracture pattern and complexity. Good to excellent outcome have been reported with internal fixations and poor results are noted in articular comminution with associated articular injuries. Various implants including headleass compression screws, minifragment screws, bioabsorbable implants and column plating are advocated for reconstruction of these complex fractures. Inspite of articular fragments being free of soft tissue attachments the rate of osteonecrosis and osteoarthritis is reported very less after internal fixation. This article summarizes the diagnostic and treatment strategies for these rare fractures and recommendations for management. PMID:26716083

  12. Mental Health and Substance Use Characteristics of Flight Attendants Enrolled in an In-Patient Substance Abuse Treatment Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Gail; Diaz, Naelys; McIlveen, John; Weiner, Michael; Mullaney, Donald

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the prevalence rates of co-occurring mental health problems among 70 flight attendants in substance abuse treatment. Results indicated that flight attendants in treatment were more likely to experience alcohol dependency than drug dependency. A high proportion of participants reported clinical levels of…

  13. [Normative definition of staff requirement for a guideline-adherent inpatient qualified detoxification treatment in alcohol dependence].

    PubMed

    Kiefer, F; Koopmann, A; Godemann, F; Wolff, J; Batra, A; Mann, K

    2016-03-01

    The central element of the "qualified withdrawal treatment" of alcohol dependence is - in addition to physical withdrawal treatment - psychotherapy. The treatment of the underlying addictive disorder that is displayed by intoxication, harmful behaviour and withdrawal symptoms is only possible with a combination of somatic and psychotherapeutic treatment elements. The successfully established multimodal therapy of the "qualified alcohol withdrawal treatment", postulated in the current S3-Treatment Guidelines, requires a multi-disciplinary treatment team with psychotherapeutic competence. The aim of the present work is to calculate the normative staff requirement of a guideline-based 21-day qualified withdrawal treatment and to compare the result with the staffing regulations of the German Institute for Hospital Reimbursement. The present data support the hypothesis that even in the case of a hundred per cent implementation of these data, adequate therapy of alcohol-related disorders, according to the guidelines, is not feasible. This has to be considered when further developing the finance compensation system based on the described superseded elements of the German Institute for Hospital Reimbursement. PMID:26842899

  14. Mental Health and Substance Use Characteristics of Flight Attendants Enrolled in an In-Patient Substance Abuse Treatment Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Gail; Diaz, Naelys; McIlveen, John; Weiner, Michael; Mullaney, Donald

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the prevalence rates of co-occurring mental health problems among 70 flight attendants in substance abuse treatment. Results indicated that flight attendants in treatment were more likely to experience alcohol dependency than drug dependency. A high proportion of participants reported clinical levels of

  15. Rules of engagement: qualitative experiences of therapeutic alliance when receiving in-patient treatment for anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Sly, Richard; Morgan, John F; Mountford, Victoria A; Sawer, Francesca; Evans, Charlotte; Lacey, J Hubert

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has emphasised the importance of therapeutic alliance to treatment outcomes for anorexia nervosa. This study aimed to examine the experiences of service users in developing therapeutic alliance whilst in treatment for their eating disorders. This qualitative study, using purposive sampling, recruited a sample of service users receiving treatment at a national eating disorders service. In-depth interviews were audiotaped and transcribed, with transcriptions being subject to interpretative phenomenological analysis. Participants were eight adult women receiving tertiary level eating disorder treatment in a specialist setting. The text analysis produced four dominant categories: alliance as a key experience; being active, not passive; taboo talking; and first impressions count. The development of therapeutic alliance is a core component of treatment. This study identifies important areas that contribute to the successful cultivation of positive therapeutic alliance. PMID:24392991

  16. Hemophilia treatment in developing countries: products and protocols.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Alok; You, Steve K; Ayob, Yasmin; Chuansumrit, Ampaiwan; de Bosch, Norma; Perez Bianco, Raul; Ala, Fereydoun

    2005-11-01

    The most important aspect of management of hemophilia is to provide adequate replacement of safe clotting factor concentrates to prevent or treat bleeding episodes. There has been considerable progress in many countries in the developing world with regard to this aspect of care. However, very little data are available in the literature on the types of products being used for factor replacement and the doses being administered for control or treatment of bleeding in different countries. These data are important to document because only then can data from different centers be compared. This article provides data from seven countries: Korea, Malaysia, Thailand, Venezuela, Argentina, Iran, and India. It shows that there is wide variability not only in the types of products used (plasma to recombinant factor concentrates) but also in the doses administered (minimal to very high) for similar indications. Prospective documentation of data on musculoskeletal outcome at these centers and correlation with dose of factor replacement could help identify different models of care. Comparing such data and collating the experience in different countries could be useful for optimizing care and establishing cost-effective models. The combined experience in the developing world in providing hemophilia services should be used to define standards of care that are practical and to set achievable goals. PMID:16276456

  17. National Trends in the Surgical Treatment of Ovarian Torsion in Children: An Analysis of 2041 Pediatric Patients Utilizing the Nationwide Inpatient Sample.

    PubMed

    Sola, Richard; Wormer, Blair A; Walters, Amanada L; Heniford, B Todd; Schulman, Andrew M

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the national trends in surgical management of ovarian torsion (OT) in children. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was queried from 1998 to 2011 for females less than 18 years of age with OT. Patients were stratified into three treatment groups: oophorectomy (OO), oophoropexy, or release of torsion (RT) alone. There were 2041 patients with OT, of which 1598 (78%) underwent OO, 126 (6%) oophoropexy, and 317 (15%) RT. RT significantly increased from 1998 to 2011 (9% vs 25%; P < 0.05). At nonteaching hospitals, there were higher rates of OO (89.3% vs 79.5%; P < 0.05) and lower rates of RT (10.7% vs 20.5%; P < 0.05) compared with teaching hospitals. RT was performed at a higher rate in Northeast United States compared with the South (22.7% vs 14.2%; P < 0.05). Girls presenting at nonteaching hospitals and the South had increased odds of undergoing OO compared with those presenting at teaching hospitals and the Northeast (P < 0.05). Although ovarian conservation for OT in children is more often performed in the Northeast United States and at teaching hospitals, this large population-based study demonstrates OO remains the most common surgical management for OT in the United States. PMID:26350658

  18. The mediating role of non-suicidal self-injury in the relationship between impulsivity and suicidal behavior among inpatients receiving treatment for substance use disorders.

    PubMed

    Anestis, Michael D; Tull, Matthew T; Lavender, Jason M; Gratz, Kim L

    2014-08-15

    Several theories posit a direct role of impulsivity in suicidal behavior. The interpersonal-psychological theory of suicidal behavior (IPTS) argues that the relationship between impulsivity and suicidal behavior is explained by the painful and/or provocative experiences (PPEs) often encountered by impulsive individuals. It thus seems plausible that nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), itself associated with impulsivity, might account for the relationship between impulsivity and suicidal behavior. We examined data from 93 adult inpatients (54.8% male) seeking treatment for substance use disorders. Patients completed a structured interview assessing prior suicidal behavior and a series of self-report questionnaires examining impulsivity, NSSI, and psychopathology. Four impulsivity dimensions (negative urgency, positive urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance) were associated with lifetime number of suicide attempts and/or suicide potential. Furthermore, results supported our hypotheses, as all but one relation was better accounted for by NSSI and, in the one exception, the direct effect was non-significant. Findings are consistent with the IPTS and suggest that suicidal behavior may not be a direct manifestation of impulsivity, but facilitated through exposure to PPEs capable of altering an individual׳s relationship to pain and fear of death. PMID:24768248

  19. Psychological Symptoms Before and After a 14-Day Initial Inpatient Treatment in Tuberculosis Patients Compared with Their Primary Caregivers and Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Emami, Habib; Modarressi, Taher; Najmi, Kosar; Radmand, Golnar; Tabarsi, Payam; Richter, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most challenging public health burdens in the world. Recent research demonstrated high prevalence of mental disorders in TB patients and their caregivers. The purpose of this study was to assess mental health of TB patients and their caregivers in Iran before and after a two-week inpatient treatment and to determine the prevalence of psychological problems in these groups. Materials and Methods: A standardized questionnaire (SCL-90) was used to assess psychological symptoms in 146 hospitalized TB patients and their caregivers (n=89). Furthermore, the scores of both target groups were compared with those of a group of healthy individuals (n=85). Results: The mean scores before the start of the initial treatment of the patients were significantly lower for paranoid ideation (P=0.038) and hostility (P= 0.046), and the scores of depression (P=0.046) and somatization (P=0.001) were significantly higher than those of the healthy individuals. The patients scored significantly higher than the caregivers on depression (0.047) and somatization (P< 0.001), whereas the caregivers scored higher than the healthy individuals on paranoid ideation (P= 0.044) and hostility (P= 0.034). Multiple linear regression showed that age, educational level and marital status were factors affecting the mental health of TB patients and their caregivers. The variance in psychological symptoms of the patients was between 10% (paranoid ideation) and 27% (hostility) of the variance in the symptoms of their caregivers. Conclusion: Tuberculosis control and treatment programs should not only address issues like continued respiratory symptoms, but should also focus on mental health in TB patients and their caregivers. PMID:26858764

  20. An Evaluation of the Italian Version of the Yale Food Addiction Scale in Obese Adult Inpatients Engaged in a 1-Month-Weight-Loss Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ceccarini, Martina; Manzoni, Gian Mauro; Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Molinari, Enrico

    2015-11-01

    Addiction is a compulsive need for and use of a specific substance leading to a habit, tolerance, and psychophysiological symptoms. Excessive food consumption is similar to that of substance addiction. Some individuals who have trouble losing weight display addictive eating symptoms. To investigate food addiction in a sample of obese adults referred to hospital for a 1-month-weight-loss treatment. The Italian version of the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS-16) was used as a screening tool in 88 obese inpatients. The construct validity of the YFAS-16 was assessed by testing its correlations with measures of binge eating (Binge Eating Scale), impulsiveness (Barratt Impulsiveness Scale), and emotional dysregulation (Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale). 34.1% of our sample was diagnosed with YFAS food addiction. Such diagnosis was also supported by strong associations between FA and psychological and behavioral features, typically descriptive of classic addiction. Patients who endorsed the YFAS-16 criteria for food addiction (FA) had significantly higher binge eating levels, greater emotional dysregulation, and nonacceptance of negative feelings; they lacked goal-oriented behavior, had little impulse control, had difficulty in emotion recognition, and attentional impulsivity; and they were unable to concentrate and lacked inhibitory control behavior, unlike participants who did not meet the FA criteria. Further research is needed to support the reliability of the YFAS-16. This measure has the potential to be applied in epidemiological research, estimating the prevalence of FA within the Italian population and to assess new treatments' efficacy for obese patients with food addiction symptoms seeking weight-loss treatments. PMID:26267366

  1. The Cost-Effectiveness of an Intensive Treatment Protocol for Severe Dyslexia in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakkaart-van Roijen, Leona; Goettsch, Wim G.; Ekkebus, Michel; Gerretsen, Patty; Stolk, Elly A.

    2011-01-01

    Studies of interventions for dyslexia have focused entirely on outcomes related to literacy. In this study, we considered a broader picture assessing improved quality of life compared with costs. A model served as a tool to compare costs and effects of treatment according to a new protocol and care as usual. Quality of life was measured and valued

  2. Confusion ahead as CMS changes inpatient criteria.

    PubMed

    2013-10-01

    In the Inpatient Prospective Payment System final rule for 2014, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services established a benchmark of two midnights for an inpatient admission and issued robust requirements for documentation. Case managers must work closely with physicians to ensure that the documentation includes the expected length of stay, the rationale for hospital treatment, the treatment plan, and a written order for admission. Case managers must review every admission within 24 hours to make sure the hospital doesn't lose reimbursement. Auditors will be looking for incidents where hospitals keep patients over two midnights when it's not medically necessary in order to get inpatient reimbursement. CMS continues to emphasize quality in care. PMID:24195133

  3. Doses delivered to normal brain under different treatment protocols at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Capala, J.; Coderre, J.A.; Liu, H.B.

    1996-12-31

    As of October 31, 1996, 23 glioblastoma multiforme patients underwent BNCT under several treatment protocols at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor. For treatment planning and dosimetry purposes, these protocols may be divided into four groups. The first group comprises protocols that used an 8-cm collimator and allowed a peak normal brain dose of 10.5 Gy-Eq to avolume of 1 cm{sup 3} were the thermal neutron flux was maximal (even if it happened to be in the tumor volume). The second group differs from the first in that it allowed a peak normal brain dose of 12.6 Gy-Eq. The protocols of the third and fourth groups allowed the prescribed peak normal brain dose of 12.6 Gy-Eq to be outside of the tumor volume, used a 12-cm collimator and, respectively, uni- or bilateral irradiations. We describe the treatment planning procedures and report the doses delivered to various structures of the brain.

  4. Therapeutic doll play in the treatment of a severely impaired psychiatric inpatient: dramatic clinical improvements with a nontraditional nursing intervention.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Shira; Hanchuk, Hilary; Nelson, Marjorie

    2015-05-01

    Interest has grown in the use of doll therapy, particularly in geropsychiatric and dementia care settings. In a long-term state psychiatric hospital, a dollhouse-play activity was implemented in an effort to engage an acutely disturbed, middle-aged woman undergoing medication trials and whose symptoms had been refractory to conventional treatments. A schedule of nondirective dollhouse-play activities was implemented over an 8-week period. Measures of behavioral change were tracked. Dramatic clinical improvements were seen, including significant reductions in verbal and physical aggression, use of as-needed medications, and need for close one-to-one monitoring. Improvements were seen prior to achievement of therapeutic drug levels. The patient was successfully discharged from the hospital. Doll play has recently been associated with clinical benefits in the care of patients with dementia and has long been deployed in childhood mental health treatment. The current findings suggest doll play may have applications as a time-limited intervention in the treatment of major psychiatric disorders in adults and warrants consideration when achieving therapeutic alliance has proven particularly challenging. PMID:25974922

  5. Treatment Protocol for High Velocity/High Energy Gunshot Injuries to the Face

    PubMed Central

    Peled, Micha; Leiser, Yoav; Emodi, Omri; Krausz, Amir

    2011-01-01

    Major causes of facial combat injuries include blasts, high-velocity/high-energy missiles, and low-velocity missiles. High-velocity bullets fired from assault rifles encompass special ballistic properties, creating a transient cavitation space with a small entrance wound and a much larger exit wound. There is no dispute regarding the fact that primary emergency treatment of ballistic injuries to the face commences in accordance with the current advanced trauma life support (ATLS) recommendations; the main areas in which disputes do exist concern the question of the timing, sequence, and modes of surgical treatment. The aim of the present study is to present the treatment outcome of high-velocity/high-energy gunshot injuries to the face, using a protocol based on the experience of a single level I trauma center. A group of 23 injured combat soldiers who sustained bullet and shrapnel injuries to the maxillofacial region during a 3-week regional military conflict were evaluated in this study. Nine patients met the inclusion criteria (high-velocity/high-energy injuries) and were included in the study. According to our protocol, upon arrival patients underwent endotracheal intubation and were hemodynamically stabilized in the shock-trauma unit and underwent total-body computed tomography with 3-D reconstruction of the head and neck and computed tomography angiography. All patients underwent maxillofacial surgery upon the day of arrival according to the protocol we present. In view of our treatment outcomes, results, and low complication rates, we conclude that strict adherence to a well-founded and structured treatment protocol based on clinical experience is mandatory in providing efficient, appropriate, and successful treatment to a relatively large group of patients who sustain various degrees of maxillofacial injuries during a short period of time. PMID:23449809

  6. Conservative Treatment Protocol for Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumour: a Follow-up Study of 3 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Glsn; Ataoglu, Hanife; Kalayci, Abdullah; Kucuk, Korhan; Esen, Alparslan

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The keratocystic odontogenic tumour is classified as a developmental cyst derived from the enamel organ or from the dental lamina. The treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumour of the jaw remains controversial. The aim of this study was to report the outcome of our conservative treatment protocol for keratocystic odontogenic tumour. Methods Three patients with different complaints referred to Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinic, Faculty of Dentistry, Seluk University. Initial biopsy was carried out in all patients and keratocystic odontogenic tumours was diagnosed subsequent to histopathological examination. The patients with keratocystic odontogenic tumours were treated by enucleation followed by open packing. This conservative treatment protocol was selected because of existing young aged patients. The average follow-up duration of the cases was 2 years. Results Out of 3 cases, 2 lesions were present in mandible and 1 lesion in maxilla. There was no evidence of recurrence during follow-up. All the cases were monitored continuously with panoramic radiographs, computed tomography and clinical evaluations. Conclusions This conservative treatment protocol for keratocystic odontogenic tumours, based on enucleation followed by open packing would be a possible choice with a view of offering low recurrence rate and low morbidity rate particularly in young patients. PMID:24421977

  7. Inpatient Therapeutic Assessment With Narcissistic Personality Disorder.

    PubMed

    Hinrichs, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence supporting the effectiveness of Collaborative/Therapeutic Assessment (C/TA) has led clinicians and researchers to apply C/TA to a variety of clinical populations and treatment settings. This case example presents a C/TA inpatient adaptation illustrated with narcissistic personality disorder. After a brief overview of salient concepts, I provide a detailed account of the clinical interview, test interpretation paired with diagnostic considerations specific to narcissism, planned intervention, and discussion of assessment results. Throughout the case study, I attempt to demonstrate defining features of C/TA, inpatient adaptations, and clinical techniques that encourage meaningful engagement with a "hard to reach" personality. PMID:26408333

  8. Collagenase Dupuytren Contracture: Achieving Single Treatment Success with a Hand Therapist-Based Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Malafa, Menyoli M.; Lehrman, Craig; Criley, Jerry W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgery remains the gold standard in the treatment of Dupuytren contracture but is technically demanding, carries significant risk of complications, and requires prolonged recovery time. Collagenase injection is an efficacious alternative to surgery; however, contracture release often requires multiple treatments spaced a month apart. We report our experience with a new collagenase treatment protocol aimed to minimize the total treatment time per joint contracture. Methods: We performed a single institution retrospective review of patients with Dupuytren contracture treated with collagenase using our protocol from 2011 to 2013. Patients returned 24 hours after collagenase injection for cord manipulation by a certified hand therapist while under digital block. Treatment success was defined as reduction in contracture to 5 degrees or less. Successfully treated joints were evaluated for recurrence (>10 degrees contracture) at 30-day and 6-month follow-up appointments. Serious adverse events, including skin tears, were recorded. Results: Success was achieved in 36 of 47 treated joints (76.6%) after a single injection. There were 2 recurrences in 32 joints at 30-day follow-up (6.2%) and no recurrences in 17 joints available at 6-month follow-up. Skin tears were the only serious adverse event occurring in 18 of 47 cord ruptures (38.3%). All healed secondarily without complication. Conclusions: Our protocol preserves treatment efficacy while maximizing efficiency. Achieving successful cord rupture with a single injection allows earlier return of function, reduced cost of treatment, and increased convenience for the patient. Patients, particularly those with greater contractures, should be counseled regarding the risk of skin tear during cord manipulation. PMID:27014558

  9. Optimized Protocol To Analyze Changes in the Lipidome of Xenografts after Treatment with 2-Hydroxyoleic Acid.

    PubMed

    Fernndez, Roberto; Garate, Jone; Lage, Sergio; Ters, Silvia; Higuera, Mnica; Bestard-Escalas, Joan; Martin, M Laura; Lpez, Daniel H; Guardiola-Serrano, Francisca; Escrib, Pablo V; Barcel-Coblijn, Gwendolyn; Fernndez, Jos A

    2016-01-01

    Xenografts are a popular model for the study of the action of new antitumor drugs. However, xenografts are highly heterogeneous structures, and therefore it is sometimes difficult to evaluate the effects of the compounds on tumor metabolism. In this context, imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) may yield the required information, due to its inherent characteristics of sensitivity and spatial resolution. To the best of our knowledge, there is still no clear analysis protocol to properly evaluate the changes between samples due to the treatment. Here we present a protocol for the evaluation of the effect of 2-hydroxyoleic acid (2-OHOA), an antitumor compound, on xenografts lipidome based on IMS. Direct treated/control comparison did not show conclusive results. As we will demonstrate, a more sophisticated protocol was required to evaluate these changes including the following: (1) identification of different areas in the xenograft, (2) classification of these areas (necrotic/viable) to compare similar types of tissues, (3) suppression of the effect of the variation of adduct formation between samples, and (4) normalization of the variables using the standard deviation to eliminate the excessive impact of the stronger peaks in the statistical analysis. In this way, the 36 lipid species that experienced the largest changes between treated and control were identified. Furthermore, incorporation of 2-hydroxyoleic acid to a sphinganine base was also confirmed by MS/MS. Comparison of the changes observed here with previous results obtained with different techniques demonstrates the validity of the protocol. PMID:26607740

  10. A protocol proposition of cell therapy for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Paes, J T; Stessuk, T; Marcelino, M; Faria, C; Marinelli, T; Ribeiro-Paes, M J

    2014-01-01

    The main feature of pulmonary emphysema is airflow obstruction resulting from the destruction of the alveolar walls distal to the terminal bronchioles. Existing clinical approaches have improved and extended the quality of life of emphysema patients. However, no treatment currently exists that can change the disease course and cure the patient. The different therapeutic approaches that are available aim to increase survival and/or enhance the quality of life of emphysema patients. In this context, cell therapy is a promising therapeutic approach with great potential for degenerative pulmonary diseases. In this protocol proposition, all patients will be submitted to laboratory tests, such as evaluation of heart and lung function and routine examinations. Stem cells will be harvested by means of 10 punctures on each anterior iliac crest, collecting a total volume of 200mL bone marrow. After preparation, separation, counting and labeling (optional) of the mononuclear cells, the patients will receive an intravenous infusion from the pool of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells (BMMC). This article proposes a rational and safe clinical cellular therapy protocol which has the potential for developing new projects and can serve as a methodological reference for formulating clinical application protocols related to the use of cellular therapy in COPD. This study protocol was submitted and approved by the Brazilian National Committee of Ethics in Research (CONEP - Brazil) registration number 14764. It is also registered in ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01110252). PMID:24287082

  11. Electrophysiological differences between high and low frequency rTMS protocols in depression treatment.

    PubMed

    Valiulis, Vladas; Gerulskis, Giedrius; Dapšys, Kastytis; Vištartaite, Giedre; Šiurkute, Aldona; Mačiulis, Valentinas

    2012-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a rapidly expanding mean in drug resistant depression treatment. Yet, despite vast research in this field, exact neurophysiological mechanism of rTMS therapy still remains unclear. This results in difficulties choosing suitable rTMS parameters in advance and compromises thorough evaluation of efficacy after the treatment. In order to obtain more explicit assessment of rTMS therapy in the psychiatric field, we evaluated and compared the influence of two most widely used antidepressive rTMS protocols on EEG band power spectrum and relation to clinical test scores (MADRS, BDI, HAM-D17). Forty-five patients (12 male, 33 female, mean age 52.16 years) participated in the study. Twenty-three patients received high frequency (10 Hz) stimulation, the rest 22 were stimulated using low frequency (1 Hz) protocol. Both groups received 10 to 15 daily rTMS sessions. EEG recordings and clinical tests were obtained the day before rTMS course and same day after the last session. Majority (57.78%) of patients showed considerable improvement after the treatment. There were no notable differences in clinical test score drop between the two rTMS protocols. However, we found that different protocols resulted in significantly different electrophysiological changes. High frequency (10 Hz) rTMS resulted in widespread changes off EEG band power, including delta power increase on the left hemisphere and alpha power growth on the right. Theta power increase was also obtained in parietal-occipital areas. Low frequency (1 Hz) rTMS showed to have no major effect on basic EEG band power, however, we found a notable shift of frontal alpha power asymmetry towards the right hemisphere, which correlated with the clinical outcome. Our study results suggest that two widely used rTMS protocols strongly differ in their electrophysiological mechanisms. Low frequency stimulation finesse on frontal alpha power asymmetry shift, whereas high frequency protocol acts on wider electrophysiological changes in the brain. PMID:23093015

  12. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Model To Evaluate Intramuscular Tetracycline Treatment Protocols To Prevent Antimicrobial Resistance in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Amais; Grsbll, Kaare; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Toft, Nils; Matthews, Louise

    2014-01-01

    High instances of antimicrobial resistance are linked to both routine and excessive antimicrobial use, but excessive or inappropriate use represents an unnecessary risk. The competitive growth advantages of resistant bacteria may be amplified by the strain dynamics; in particular, the extent to which resistant strains outcompete susceptible strains under antimicrobial pressure may depend not only on the antimicrobial treatment strategies but also on the epidemiological parameters, such as the composition of the bacterial strains in a pig. This study evaluated how variation in the dosing protocol for intramuscular administration of tetracycline and the composition of bacterial strains in a pig affect the level of resistance in the intestine of a pig. Predictions were generated by a mathematical model of competitive growth of Escherichia coli strains in pigs under specified plasma concentration profiles of tetracycline. All dosing regimens result in a clear growth advantage for resistant strains. Short treatment duration was found to be preferable, since it allowed less time for resistant strains to outcompete the susceptible ones. Dosing frequency appeared to be ineffective at reducing the resistance levels. The number of competing strains had no apparent effect on the resistance level during treatment, but possession of fewer strains reduced the time to reach equilibrium after the end of treatment. To sum up, epidemiological parameters may have more profound influence on growth dynamics than dosing regimens and should be considered when designing improved treatment protocols. PMID:25547361

  13. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model to evaluate intramuscular tetracycline treatment protocols to prevent antimicrobial resistance in pigs.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Amais; Grsbll, Kaare; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Toft, Nils; Matthews, Louise; Nielsen, Sren Saxmose

    2015-03-01

    High instances of antimicrobial resistance are linked to both routine and excessive antimicrobial use, but excessive or inappropriate use represents an unnecessary risk. The competitive growth advantages of resistant bacteria may be amplified by the strain dynamics; in particular, the extent to which resistant strains outcompete susceptible strains under antimicrobial pressure may depend not only on the antimicrobial treatment strategies but also on the epidemiological parameters, such as the composition of the bacterial strains in a pig. This study evaluated how variation in the dosing protocol for intramuscular administration of tetracycline and the composition of bacterial strains in a pig affect the level of resistance in the intestine of a pig. Predictions were generated by a mathematical model of competitive growth of Escherichia coli strains in pigs under specified plasma concentration profiles of tetracycline. All dosing regimens result in a clear growth advantage for resistant strains. Short treatment duration was found to be preferable, since it allowed less time for resistant strains to outcompete the susceptible ones. Dosing frequency appeared to be ineffective at reducing the resistance levels. The number of competing strains had no apparent effect on the resistance level during treatment, but possession of fewer strains reduced the time to reach equilibrium after the end of treatment. To sum up, epidemiological parameters may have more profound influence on growth dynamics than dosing regimens and should be considered when designing improved treatment protocols. PMID:25547361

  14. Radioimmunotherapy: A Specific Treatment Protocol for Cancer by Cytotoxic Radioisotopes Conjugated to Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Hidekazu

    2014-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) represents a selective internal radiation therapy, that is, the use of radionuclides conjugated to tumor-directed monoclonal antibodies (including those fragments) or peptides. In a clinical field, two successful examples of this treatment protocol are currently extended by 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin) and 131I-tositumomab (Bexxar), both of which are anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies coupled to cytotoxic radioisotopes and are approved for the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients. In addition, some beneficial observations are obtained in preclinical studies targeting solid tumors. To date, in order to reduce the unnecessary exposure and to enhance the therapeutic efficacy, various biological, chemical, and treatment procedural improvements have been investigated in RIT. This review outlines the fundamentals of RIT and current knowledge of the preclinical/clinical trials for cancer treatment. PMID:25379535

  15. Protocol Directed Patient Care using a Computer

    PubMed Central

    Blum, B.; Lenhard, R.; McColligan, E.

    1980-01-01

    The Johns Hopkins Oncology Center has developed a clinical information system which assists in the care of the 2,000 patients currently under treatment at the Center. The system maintains a data base containing a summary diagnostic and treatment history plus complete tabulations of laboratory results, therapies, and other clinical findings. These data are organized and displayed in formats which aid decision-making. For the past year the Center has been working with an extension to the data system which produces daily care plans for each inpatient and outpatient treated at the Center. These plans are a function of the disease, treatment protocol, and current clinical status of each patient. This paper describes the objectives, organization, and experience to date with the use of computer generated plans for protocol directed patient care.

  16. Medical Inpatient Journey Modeling and Clustering: A Bayesian Hidden Markov Model Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhengxing; Dong, Wei; Wang, Fei; Duan, Huilong

    2015-01-01

    Modeling and clustering medical inpatient journeys is useful to healthcare organizations for a number of reasons including inpatient journey reorganization in a more convenient way for understanding and browsing, etc. In this study, we present a probabilistic model-based approach to model and cluster medical inpatient journeys. Specifically, we exploit a Bayesian Hidden Markov Model based approach to transform medical inpatient journeys into a probabilistic space, which can be seen as a richer representation of inpatient journeys to be clustered. Then, using hierarchical clustering on the matrix of similarities, inpatient journeys can be clustered into different categories w.r.t their clinical and temporal characteristics. We evaluated the proposed approach on a real clinical data set pertaining to the unstable angina treatment process. The experimental results reveal that our method can identify and model latent treatment topics underlying in personalized inpatient journeys, and yield impressive clustering quality.

  17. 42 CFR 412.405 - Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. 412.405 Section 412.405 Public... PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital... under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. The prospective payment...

  18. [Betadine in the care of friction blisters. Treatment protocol in primary health care].

    PubMed

    Gonzalez de la Guerra, Jos Manuel; Gonzlez Campo, Myrian

    2013-06-01

    First prize in the VII edition of the award winning work Betadine for nursing 2012. The dermatitis caused by repeated friction or trauma to the skin are very common in the population, mainly in athletes. The action of shear forces on the skin makes intradermal blisters very painful; being foot the areas more prone to its occurrence and local infection, one of the most common complications during its evolution. The proposed treatment protocol, presents a new technique of cost-effective cure for these injuries from the nursing consultation in Primary Health Care. Currently, there are many techniques in the treatment of these skin changes, but none has established itself as the "gold standard" in its approach. This technique of treatment accelerates regeneration of the injured area, reduces pain, prevents infection and epithelialization time is estimated between four and five days. PMID:23909219

  19. European protocols for the diagnosis and initial treatment of interstitial lung disease in children.

    PubMed

    Bush, Andrew; Cunningham, Steve; de Blic, Jacques; Barbato, Angelo; Clement, Annick; Epaud, Ralph; Hengst, Meike; Kiper, Nural; Nicholson, Andrew G; Wetzke, Martin; Snijders, Deborah; Schwerk, Nicolaus; Griese, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Interstitial lung disease in children (chILD) is rare, and most centres will only see a few cases/year. There are numerous possible underlying diagnoses, with specific and non-specific treatment possibilities. The chILD-EU collaboration has brought together centres from across Europe to advance understanding of these considerations, and as part of this process, has created standard operating procedures and protocols for the investigation of chILD. Where established consensus documents exist already, for example, for the performance of bronchoalveolar lavage and processing of lung biopsies, these have been adopted. This manuscript reports our proposals for a staged investigation of chILD, starting from when the condition is suspected to defining the diagnosis, using pathways dependent on the clinical condition and the degree of illness of the child. These include the performance of genetic testing, echocardiography, high-resolution CT, bronchoscopy when appropriate and the definitive investigation of lung biopsy, in order to establish a precise diagnosis. Since no randomised controlled trials of treatment have ever been performed, we also report a Delphi consensus process to try to harmonise treatment protocols such as the use of intravenous and oral corticosteroids, and add-on therapies such as hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin. The aim is not to dictate to clinicians when a therapeutic trial should be performed, but to offer the possibility to collaborators of having a unified approach when a decision to treat has been made. PMID:26135832

  20. GHOST Protocol: Greatest Healing Opportunity for Soft Tissue, a Treatment Paradigm for Complex Sarcoma Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kobraei, Edward M; Eberlin, Kyle R; Ricci, Joseph A; Reish, Richard G; Winograd, Jonathan M; Cetrulo, Curtis L

    2015-06-01

    Modern sarcoma treatment has created new challenges for plastic surgeons. This study was designed to review the recent experience and practice patterns following complex sarcoma resection at a large sarcoma center. All cases from October 2013 to October 2014 involving rare nonepithelial tumors, a multidisciplinary surgical team, radiation and/or chemotherapy treatments, and plastic surgical reconstruction were included in the analysis. In addition to evaluating clinical outcomes, cases were reviewed to identify factors associated with excellent or poor patient care. Review of these cases formed the basis of the greatest healing opportunity for soft tissue (GHOST) protocol. Our patient population included seven males (64%) and four females (36%). All except one patient was exposed to radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or some combination. Diverse procedures were used for reconstruction. Early complications occurred in two patients (18%), and late complications in four patients (36%). Sarcoma resection was found to be highly morbid in our series. Patients with poor preoperative nutritional status were more likely to experience complications postoperatively. The decision to stage a reconstruction was complex and influenced by several factors. Multimodal sarcoma treatments may involve highly morbid procedures and create complex wounds. The GHOST protocol is a useful reference for plastic surgeons. PMID:26031266

  1. Treatment Protocols to Reduce Injury and Improve Stone Breakage in SWL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAteer, James A.; Evan, Andrew P.; Connors, Bret A.; Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; Williams, James C.; Lingeman, James E.

    2008-09-01

    Here we provide a capsule summary of key observations showing that adverse effects can be reduced and stone breakage outcomes can be improved by the choice of the treatment protocol used in SWL. The take home message istechnique in lithotripsy can be used to significant advantage. SW-rate is key, and so is the sequence of SW delivery. Patient studies have shown that stone breakage is significantly improved at 60SW/min compared to a rate of 120SW/min, and laboratory experiments with pigs show that acute SWL injury to the kidney can be reduced dramatically by further slowing the SW firing rate to 30SW/min. The sequence of SW administration has a profound effect on the kidney, and renal injury is significantly reduced when the treatment protocol incorporates a priming dose of SW's followed by a brief pause before treatment is resumed. Continued developments in lithotripsy technology are welcome and will hopefully lead to improved SWL systems. Current experience suggests, however, that technology is not a substitute for expert technique, and attention to the fundamentals of SW delivery is essential to achieve the best possible outcomes regardless of the lithotripter at hand.

  2. Comprehensive Case Management for Substance Abuse Treatment. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 27.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Paddy; Dogoloff, Mary Lou; Harteker, Linda; Nelson, Anne E.; Paul, Michelle M.; Shuman, Deborah J.; Mjoseth, Marcia; Vitzthum, Virginia; Hayes, Elizabeth; Gilbert, Max; Smith, Cara; Nguyen, Y-Lang

    This TIP contains information on the best practice guidelines on case management for substance abuse treatment providers. It serves to educate program coordinators and facilitators about the factors to consider as they decide to modify or implement case management activities. Many substance abuse clients arrive for treatment with a number of other

  3. Treatment for Stimulant Use Disorders. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 33.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Center for Substance Abuse Treatment.

    This TIP on the best practice guidelines for treatment of substance abuse provides basic knowledge for practitioners, educators, and paraprofessionals about the nature and treatment of stimulant use disorders. More specifically, it reviews what is currently known about treating the medical, psychiatric, and substance abuse/dependence problems…

  4. Clinical Strategies for Integrating Medication Interventions Into Behavioral Treatment for Adolescent ADHD: The Medication Integration Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Hogue, Aaron; Bobek, Molly; Tau, Gregory Z.; Levin, Frances R.

    2014-01-01

    Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is highly prevalent among adolescents enrolled in behavioral health services but remains undertreated in this age group. Also the first-line treatment for adolescent ADHD, stimulant medication, is underutilized in routine practice. This article briefly describes three behavioral interventions designed to promote stronger integration of medication interventions into treatment planning for adolescent ADHD: family ADHD psychoeducation, family-based medication decision-making, and behavior therapist leadership in coordinating medication integration. It then introduces the Medication Integration Protocol (MIP), which incorporates all three interventions into a five-task protocol: ADHD Assessment and Medication Consult; ADHD Psychoeducation and Client Acceptance; ADHD Symptoms and Family Relations; ADHD Medication and Family Decision-Making; and Medication Management and Integration Planning. The article concludes by highlighting what behavior therapists should know about best practices for medication integration across diverse settings and populations: integrating medication interventions into primary care, managing medication priorities and polypharmacy issues for adolescents with multiple diagnoses, providing ADHD medications to adolescent substance users, and the compatibility of MIP intervention strategies with everyday practice conditions. PMID:25505817

  5. Treatment of a patient with cleidocranial dysplasia using a single-stage implant protocol.

    PubMed

    Petropoulos, Vicki C; Balshi, Thomas J; Wolfinger, Glenn J; Balshi, Stephen F

    2011-10-01

    This patient report describes the treatment of a 45-year-old Caucasian woman with cleidocranial dysplasia who had significant dental problems that greatly affected her quality of life. The patient had orthodontic treatment in her earlier years along with surgical removal of supernumerary teeth. Using implants, the maxillary and mandibular arches were restored with fixed screw-retained prostheses. Eight implants and six implants were placed in the maxilla and mandible, respectively. Both arches were immediately loaded following the Teeth in a Day protocol using an all-acrylic resin provisional prosthesis. Five months later, definitive maxillary and mandibular prostheses were fabricated. The patient has been followed for a period of 5 years, and all postoperative evaluations have been uneventful. PMID:22003879

  6. Transdiagnostic Treatment of Bipolar Disorder and Comorbid Anxiety with the Unified Protocol: A Clinical Replication Series

    PubMed Central

    Ellard, Kristen K.; Deckersbach, Thilo; Sylvia, Louisa G.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Barlow, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic, debilitating disorder with recurrent manic and depressive episodes. Over 75% of bipolar patients have a current or lifetime diagnosis of a comorbid anxiety disorder. Comorbid anxiety in BD is associated with greater illness severity, greater functional impairment, and poorer illness-related outcomes. Effectively treating comorbid anxiety in individuals with BD has been recognized as one of the biggest unmet needs in the field of bipolar disorder. Recently, the Unified Protocol for Transdiagnostic Treatment of Emotional Disorders (UP) was developed to be applicable to the full range of anxiety and mood disorders, based upon converging evidence from genetics, cognitive and affective neuroscience, and behavioral research suggesting common, core emotion-related pathology. Here, we present a preliminary evaluation of the efficacy of the UP for the treatment of BD with comorbid anxiety, in a clinical replication series consisting of three cases. PMID:22822175

  7. Substance Abuse Treatment and Domestic Violence. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Paddy; Gartner, Constance Grant; Markl, Lise; Henderson, Randi; Brooks, Margaret K.; Wesson, Donald; Dogoloff, Mary Lou; Vitzthum, Virginia; Hayes, Elizabeth

    The major goal of this TIP, on the best practice guidelines to improve the treatment of substance abuse, is to provide clinicians, educators, and paraprofessionals with the latest findings concerning domestic violence. The information is intended to educate providers about the needs and behaviors of batterers and survivors, and how to tailor

  8. The inpatient fracture neck of femur: an important subgroup of patients.

    PubMed

    Green, Carl M; Zeiton, Moez; Foulkes, Katherine; Barrie, Jim

    2014-12-01

    Fractured neck of femur (FNOF) is an increasing problem for the National Health Service (NHS) with 61,508 recorded on the National Hip Fracture Database (NHFD) in 20122013 and treatment of such patients is estimated to cost the NHS 1.5 billion per year. Inpatients falling in hospital and sustain a FNOF have rarely been studied as a separate group of patients to assess standards of patient care, time to operative management, and patient mortality. Of 694 patients sustaining an acute FNOF at a single trust between January 2012 and June 2013, 40 patients (5.8%) sustained an inpatient FNOF. 19 patients (47.5%) were male and 15 patients (37.5%) had an ASA grade of 4 or 5, compared to 153 patients (23.4%) and 127 patients (19.4%) respectively of community FNOF. 39 of 40 patients received operative management. Patients with an inpatient FNOF were less likely to be admitted to an orthopaedic ward within 4 h (30%) and receive operative management within 48 h (65%) according to Blue Book standards. Results according to best practice tariff (BPT) were also significantly reduced for the inpatient FNOF group, with 23 patients (57.5%) receiving operative management within 36 h and only 19 patients (47.5%) achieving BPT compared to 76.5% and 72.5% respectively for community FNOF patients. Mortality among inpatients reached 40% at 120 days and 50% at 1 year, significantly higher than community FNOF patients after multivariate analysis. Patients sustaining an inpatient FNOF are more likely to have significant medical co-morbidity and require aggressive medical and surgical management, especially due to their increased risk of mortality post-operatively. Such injuries have direct and indirect financial implications to a health care trust, which can be minimised by prompt management of these patients. This study highlights the need for a standardised protocol of management of this important subgroup of patients and for further work on falls prevention strategies within the National Health Service. PMID:25458059

  9. Integrating addiction treatment into primary care using mobile health technology: protocol for an implementation research study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Healthcare reform in the United States is encouraging Federally Qualified Health Centers and other primary-care practices to integrate treatment for addiction and other behavioral health conditions into their practices. The potential of mobile health technologies to manage addiction and comorbidities such as HIV in these settings is substantial but largely untested. This paper describes a protocol to evaluate the implementation of an E-Health integrated communication technology delivered via mobile phones, called Seva, into primary-care settings. Seva is an evidence-based system of addiction treatment and recovery support for patients and real-time caseload monitoring for clinicians. Methods/Design Our implementation strategy uses three models of organizational change: the Program Planning Model to promote acceptance and sustainability, the NIATx quality improvement model to create a welcoming environment for change, and Rogers’s diffusion of innovations research, which facilitates adaptations of innovations to maximize their adoption potential. We will implement Seva and conduct an intensive, mixed-methods assessment at three diverse Federally Qualified Healthcare Centers in the United States. Our non-concurrent multiple-baseline design includes three periods — pretest (ending in four months of implementation preparation), active Seva implementation, and maintenance — with implementation staggered at six-month intervals across sites. The first site will serve as a pilot clinic. We will track the timing of intervention elements and assess study outcomes within each dimension of the Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance framework, including effects on clinicians, patients, and practices. Our mixed-methods approach will include quantitative (e.g., interrupted time-series analysis of treatment attendance, with clinics as the unit of analysis) and qualitative (e.g., staff interviews regarding adaptations to implementation protocol) methods, and assessment of implementation costs. Discussion If implementation is successful, the field will have a proven technology that helps Federally Qualified Health Centers and affiliated organizations provide addiction treatment and recovery support, as well as a proven strategy for implementing the technology. Seva also has the potential to improve core elements of addiction treatment, such as referral and treatment processes. A mobile technology for addiction treatment and accompanying implementation model could provide a cost-effective means to improve the lives of patients with drug and alcohol problems. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01963234). PMID:24884976

  10. Comparing Voice-Therapy and Vocal-Hygiene Treatments in Dysphonia Using a Limited Multidimensional Evaluation Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Parra, Maria J.; Adrian, Jose A.; Casado, Juan C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluates the effectiveness of two different programs of voice-treatment on a heterogeneous group of dysphonic speakers and the stability of therapeutic progress for longterm follow-up post-treatment period, using a limited multidimensional protocol of evaluation. Method: Forty-two participants with voice disorders were

  11. Comparing Voice-Therapy and Vocal-Hygiene Treatments in Dysphonia Using a Limited Multidimensional Evaluation Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Parra, Maria J.; Adrian, Jose A.; Casado, Juan C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluates the effectiveness of two different programs of voice-treatment on a heterogeneous group of dysphonic speakers and the stability of therapeutic progress for longterm follow-up post-treatment period, using a limited multidimensional protocol of evaluation. Method: Forty-two participants with voice disorders were…

  12. Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) for offenders: protocol for a pragmatic randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) is an evidence-based technique that, in some health-care settings, has been shown to cost-effectively reduce alcohol and drug use, research on the efficacy of SBIRT among criminal offender populations is limited. Such populations have a high prevalence of drug and alcohol use but limited access to intervention, and many are at risk for post-release relapse and recidivism. Thus, there exists a need for treatment options for drug-involved offenders of varying risk levels to reduce risky behaviors or enter treatment. Methods/design This protocol describes an assessment of SBIRT feasibility and effectiveness in a criminal justice environment. Eight-hundred persons will be recruited from a large metropolitan jail, with the experimental group receiving an intervention depending on risk level and the control group receiving minimal intervention. The intervention will assess the risk level for drug and alcohol misuse by inmates, providing those at low or medium risk a brief intervention in the jail and referring those at high risk to community treatment following release. In addition, a brief treatment (eight-session) option will be available. Using data from a 12-month follow-up interview, the primary study outcomes are a reduction in drug and alcohol use, while secondary outcomes include participation in treatment, rearrest, quality of life, reduction in HIV risk behaviors, and costs of SBIRT. Expected value Individual reductions in alcohol and drug use can have significant effects on public health and safety when observed over a large population at risk for substance-use problems. With wider dissemination statewide or nationwide, a relatively low-cost intervention such as SBIRT could offer demonstrated benefits in this population. Trial registration Clinical Trials Government Identifier, NCT01683643. PMID:24499609

  13. Shrinking inpatient psychiatric capacity: cause for celebration or concern?

    PubMed

    Salinsky, Eileen; Loftis, Christopher

    2007-08-01

    This issue brief examines reported capacity constraints in inpatient psychiatric services and describes how these services fit within the continuum of care for mental health treatment. The paper summarizes the type and range of acute care services used to intervene in mental health crises, including both traditional hospital-based services and alternative crisis interventions, such as mobile response teams. It reviews historical trends in the supply of inpatient psychiatric beds and explores the anticipated influence of prospective payment for inpatient psychiatric services under Medicare. The paper also considers other forces that may affect the need for and supply of acute mental health services, including key factors that could improve the quality and efficiency of inpatient psychiatric care. PMID:17679175

  14. Medication-Assisted Treatment For Opioid Addiction in Opioid Treatment Programs. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 43

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinkler, Emily; Vallejos Bartlett, Catalina; Brooks, Margaret; Gilbert, Johnatnan Max; Henderson, Randi; Shuman, Deborah, J.

    2005-01-01

    TIP 43 provides best-practice guidelines for medication-assisted treatment of opioid addiction in opioid treatment programs (OTPs). The primary intended audience for this volume is substance abuse treatment providers and administrators who work in OTPs. Recommendations in the TIP are based on both an analysis of current research and determinations…

  15. Developing a safe antifungal treatment protocol to eliminate Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis from amphibians.

    PubMed

    Martel, A; Van Rooij, P; Vercauteren, G; Baert, K; Van Waeyenberghe, L; Debacker, P; Garner, T W J; Woeltjes, T; Ducatelle, R; Haesebrouck, F; Pasmans, F

    2011-02-01

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is one of the most pathogenic microorganisms affecting amphibians in both captivity and in nature. The establishment of B. dendrobatidis free, stable, amphibian captive breeding colonies is one of the emergency measures that is being taken to save threatened amphibian species from extinction. For this purpose, in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing and the development of efficient and safe treatment protocols are required. In this study, we evaluated the use of amphotericin B and voriconazole to treat chytridiomycosis in amphibians. The concentration at which the growth of five tested B. dendrobatidis strains was inhibited was 0.8 ?g/ml for amphotericin B and 0.0125 ?g/ml for voriconazole. To completely eliminate a mixture of sporangia and zoospores of strain IA042 required 48 h of exposure to 8 ?g/ml of amphotericin B or 10 days to 1.25 ?g/ml of voriconazole. Zoospores were killed within 0.5 h by 0.8 ?g/ml of amphotericin B, but even after 24 h exposure to 1.25 ?g/ml of voriconazole they remained viable. Amphotericin B was acutely toxic for Alytes muletensis tadpoles at 8 ?g/ml, whereas toxic side effects were not noticed during a seven-day exposure to voriconazole at concentrations as high as 12.5 ?g/ml. The voriconazole concentrations remained stable in water during this exposure period. On the basis of this data, experimentally inoculated postmetamorphic Alytes cisternasii were sprayed once daily for 7 days with a 1.25 ?g/ml solution of voriconazole in water which eliminated the B. dendrobatidis infection from all treated animals. Finally, treatment of a naturally infected colony of poison dart frogs (Dendrobatidae) using this protocol, combined with environmental disinfection, cleared the infection from the colony. PMID:20718611

  16. A 10-year analysis of the "Amsterdam" protocol in the treatment of zygomatic complex fractures.

    PubMed

    Forouzanfar, Tymour; Salentijn, Erik; Peng, Gina; van den Bergh, Bart

    2013-10-01

    Despite many publications on the epidemiology, incidence and aetiology of zygomatic complex (ZC) fractures there is still a lack of information about a consensus in its treatment. The aim of the present study is to investigate retrospectively the Amsterdam protocol for surgical treatment of ZC fractures. The 10 years results and complications are presented. The study population consisted of 236 patients (170 males, 66 females, 210 ZC fractures, 26 solitary zygomatic arch fractures) with a mean age of 39.3 (SD: ±15.6) years (range 4-87 years). The mean cause of injury was traffic accident followed by violence and fall. A total of 225 plates and 943 screws were used. Twenty-eight patients presented with complications, including wound infection (9 patients) and transient paralysis of the facial nerve (one patient). Seven patients (2.8%) needed surgical retreatment of whom four patients needed secondary orbital floor reconstruction as these patients developed enophthalmos and diplopia. In conclusion this report provides important data for reaching a consensus for the treatment of these types of fractures. PMID:23375533

  17. The Effect of Inpatient Care on Measured Health Needs in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Brian; Green, Jonathan; Kroll, Leopold; Tobias, Catherine; Dunn, Graham; Briskman, Jacqueline

    2009-01-01

    Background: The concept of "health need" relates patient problems in symptom and psychosocial domains to available appropriate treatments. We studied the effectiveness of inpatient treatment in modifying measured "Health Needs" in children and adolescents admitted to UK inpatient units. Methods: A prospective cohort study of 150 children and

  18. A stepwise protocol for the treatment of refractory gastroesophageal reflux-induced chronic cough

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xianghuai; Lv, Hanjing; Yu, Li; Chen, Qiang; Liang, Siwei

    2016-01-01

    Background Refractory gastroesophageal reflux-induced chronic cough (GERC) is difficult to manage. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of a novel stepwise protocol for treating this condition. Methods A total of 103 consecutive patients with suspected refractory reflux-induced chronic cough failing to a standard anti-reflux therapy were treated with a stepwise therapy. Treatment commences with high-dose omeprazole and, if necessary, is escalated to subsequent sequential treatment with ranitidine and finally baclofen. The primary end-point was overall cough resolution, and the secondary end-point was cough resolution after each treatment step. Results High-dose omeprazole eliminated or improved cough in 28.1% of patients (n=29). Further stepwise of treatment with the addition of ranitide yielded a favorable response in an additional 12.6% (n=13) of patients, and subsequent escalation to baclofen provoked response in another 36.9% (n=38) of patients. Overall, this stepwise protocol was successful in 77.6% (n=80) of patients. The diurnal cough symptom score fell from 3 [1] to 1 [0] (Z=6.316, P=0.000), and the nocturnal cough symptom score decreased from 1 [1] to 0 [1] (Z=–4.511, P=0.000), with a corresponding reduction in the Gastroesophageal Reflux Diagnostic Questionnaire score from 8.6±1.7 to 6.8±0.7 (t=3.612, P=0.000). Conversely, the cough threshold C2 to capsaicin was increased from 0.49 (0.49) µmol/L to 1.95 (2.92) µmol/L (Z=–5.892, P=0.000), and the cough threshold C5 was increased from 1.95 (2.92) µmol/L to 7.8 (5.85) µmol/L (Z=–5.171, P=0.000). Conclusions Sequential stepwise anti-reflux therapy is a useful therapeutic strategy for refractory reflux-induced chronic cough. PMID:26904227

  19. Evaluation of a Modified Pamidronate Protocol for the Treatment of Osteogenesis Imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Palomo, Telma; Andrade, Maria C; Peters, Barbara S E; Reis, Fernanda A; Carvalhaes, João Tomás A; Glorieux, Francis H; Rauch, Frank; Lazaretti-Castro, Marise

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous pamidronate is widely used to treat children with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). In a well-studied protocol ('standard protocol'), pamidronate is given at a daily dose of 1 mg per kg body weight over 4 h on 3 successive days; infusion cycles are repeated every 4 months. Here, we evaluated renal safety of a simpler protocol for intravenous pamidronate infusions (2 mg per kg body weight given in a single infusion over 2 h, repeated every 4 months; 'modified protocol'). Results of 18 patients with OI types I, III, or IV treated with the modified protocol for 12 months were compared to 18 historic controls, treated with standard protocol. In the modified protocol, mild transient post-infusion increases in serum creatinine were found during each infusion but after 12 months serum creatinine remained similar from baseline [0.40 mg/dl (SD: 0.13)] to the end of the study [0.41 mg/dl (SD: 0.11)] (P = 0.79). The two protocols led to similar changes in serum creatinine during the first pamidronate infusion [modified protocol: +2 % (SD: 21 %); standard protocol: -3 % (SD: 8 %); P = 0.32]. Areal lumbar spine bone mineral density Z-scores increased from -2.7 (SD: 1.5) to -1.8 (SD: 1.4) with the modified protocol, and from -4.1 (SD: 1.4) to -3.1 (SD: 1.1) with standard protocol (P = 0.68 for group differences in bone density Z-score changes). The modified pamidronate protocol is safe and may have similar effects on bone density as the standard pamidronate protocol. More studies are needed with longer follow-up to prove anti-fracture efficacy. PMID:26387692

  20. Efficacy of treatments and pain management for trapeziometacarpal (thumb base) osteoarthritis: protocol for a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki, Tokiko; Lalonde, Lyne; Harris, Patrick; Bureau, Nathalie J; Gaudreault, Nathaly; Ziegler, Daniela; Choinière, Manon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The thumb is essential for daily activities. Unfortunately, this digit is commonly affected by trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis (TMO), handicapping a large number of individuals. TMO constitutes an increasing human and economic burden for our society whose population is ageing. Limited access to adequate treatment is among the most important obstacles to optimal TMO management. Poor understanding of TMO characteristics, lack of knowledge about evidence-based treatments, simplistic pain management plans based solely on the patient's physical condition, absence of interprofessional communication and lack of multidisciplinary treatment guidelines contribute to inadequate TMO management. On the long term, our research project aims at improving the quality of care and services offered to patients with TMO by developing a patient-centred, evidence-based multidisciplinary management clinical pathway coordinated across the healthcare system. This proposed systematic review is a prerequisite to ensuring evidence-based practices and aims to document the efficacy of all the existing modalities for TMO management. Methods and analysis The protocol of the systematic review is registered with PROSPERO and will be conducted using the guidelines Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. We will identify studies in English and French concerning TMO treatments through searches in Cochrane Central, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsychINFO, CINHAL, PubMed, OT Seekers, PEDRO and the grey literature. 2 reviewers will independently screen study eligibility, extract data and appraise studies using published assessment tools. Meta-analyses will be undertaken where feasible; otherwise, narrative syntheses will be carried out. The robustness of evidence will be assessed using the GRADE system. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval is not required for this study. A comprehensive knowledge exchange and transfer plan incorporating effective strategies will be used to disseminate the findings of this review and utilise them to optimise TMO management. Trial registration number PROSPERO CRD42015015623. PMID:26463223

  1. Clinical implementation of an objective computer-aided protocol for intervention in intra-treatment correction using electronic portal imaging.

    PubMed

    Van den Heuvel, F; De Neve, W; Verellen, D; Coghe, M; Coen, V; Storme, G

    1995-06-01

    In order to test the feasibility of a protocol for intra-fractional adjustment of the patient position, during radiation therapy treatment in the pelvic region, a two-fold study is carried out. The protocol involves an objective quantitative measurement of the error in positioning starting from the comparison of a portal image with a reference image. The first part of the study applies the protocol to determine the efficacy of adjustment using subjective determination of the positioning errors by a clinician by measuring the residual errors after adjustment. A group of 13 patients was followed extensively throughout their treatment, analyzing 240 fields. In the second part the measurement itself determines the extent of readjustment of the position. Throughout the procedure elapsed time is measured to determine the extra time involved in using this procedure. For this part a group of 21 patients was followed yielding statistics on 218 fields. Using this computer aided protocol it is shown that systematic as well as random errors can be reduced to standard deviations of the order of 1 mm. The price to pay however is additional treatment time up to 58% of the treatment time without the protocol. Time analysis shows that the largest part of the added time is spent on the readjustment of the patients' position adding a mean of 37% of time to the treatment of one field. This is despite the fact that the readjustment was performed using a remote couch controller. Finally a statistical analysis shows that it is possible to select patients benefiting from the use of such a protocol after a limited number of fractions. PMID:7480827

  2. Multidisciplinary management of ankyloglossia in childhood. Treatment of 101 cases. A protocol

    PubMed Central

    Pastor-Vera, Tomasa; Ferrés-Amat, Eduard; Mareque-Bueno, Javier; Prats-Armengol, Jordi; Ferrés-Padró, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Background Partial ankyloglossia is a limitation which restricts the possibility of protrusion and elevation of the tip of the tongue due to the shortness of either the lingual frenulum or the genioglossus muscles or both. The principal objective of this paper is to present our protocol of action for the treatment of ankyloglossia. The specific objectives are to study patients with ankyloglossia treated by the Service of Maxillofacial Surgery and the Service of Speech Therapy of our pediatric Hospital, describe the diagnostic procedures, the pre-surgical intervention, the surgical technique undertaken and the post-surgical rehabilitation taking into account the level of collaboration of the patients, and finally, describe the surgical complications and the referral of patients. Material and Methods This is a descriptive study of healthy patients, without any diagnosis of syndrome, ranging between 4 and 14 years that have been surgically treated and rehabilitated post-surgery within a period of 2 years. Results 101 frenectomies and lingual plasties have been performed and patients have been treated following the protocol of action that we hereby present. After the surgical intervention, the degree of ankyloglossia has been improved, considering correction in 29 (28%) of the patients (95% CI: 20%, 38%), reaching, with the post-surgical orofacial rehabilitation, a correction of 97 (96%) of the participants (95% CI: 90%, 98%). Conclusions The chosen surgical technique for moderate-severe ankyloglossia in our centre is the frenectomy and lingual plasty. The myofunctional training begins one week before the surgical intervention so that the patients learn the exercises without pain. Key words:Ankyloglossia, tongue-tie, lingual frenum. PMID:26595832

  3. Terrible triad of the elbow: treatment protocol and outcome in a series of eighteen cases.

    PubMed

    Pierrart, Jérôme; Bégué, Thierry; Mansat, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The terrible triad is an uncommon injury, which includes an elbow posterior dislocation with fractures of the radial head and coronoid process of the ulna. In addition there is rupture of the lateral and medial collateral ligaments. The short-term and long term results are historically poor, with a high rate of complications. The main objective of this study is to report the results of a multicentre study of patients who sustained the terrible triad injury focusing on surgical treatment in order to offer a standardized surgical protocol. We retrospectively review the results of surgical treatment of eighteen terrible triads from a multicentre study of 226 elbow dislocations. At an average follow up of 31.5 months postoperatively, all eighteen patients returned for clinical examination, functional evaluation, and radiographs. The mean MEPS score value was 78 (25-100), which correspond to three excellent results, ten good results, three fair results, and two poor results. Five early and three late complications were reported. This particular case of elbow dislocation is very unstable and leads to many complications. The surgeon should attempt to restore stability by preserving the radial head whenever possible or replacing it with prosthesis otherwise, by repairing the lateral collateral ligament and performing fixation of the coronoid fracture. If after anatomical restoration of stability elements, the elbow remains unstable, options include repair of the medial collateral ligament or stabilization assumed by hinged external fixator. PMID:26528938

  4. Measuring family satisfaction with inpatient rehabilitation care.

    PubMed

    Angelino, Elisabetta; Gragnano, Andrea; Miglioretti, Massimo

    2016-02-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to investigate the psychometric characteristics of the Questionnaire of Family members' Satisfaction about the Rehabilitation (QFSR), a new questionnaire assessing the satisfaction of patients' families with the in-hospital rehabilitation service, i.e., the organizational procedure, medical treatment, relationship with nurses/other health workers, and outcome. Design/methodology/approach - The QFSR (13 items) was administered to 1,226 (F=60.4 percent; mean age=57.4, SD 15 years) family members of patients admitted to two units for inpatient rehabilitation, i.e., cardiovascular and neuromotor. Findings - Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) confirmed the theoretical four-factor structure of the questionnaire in a subsample of 308 respondents randomly selected from the sample (SB χ² (61)=57.4, p=0.61; RMSEA=0.0; 90 percent CI [0.0, 0.031], CFI=1.00). The remaining 708 respondents (393 relatives of cardiovascular unit inpatients and 315 relatives of neuromotor unit inpatients) were used to test measurement invariance between the groups of family members with patients in the two units. The configurial, scalar, and strict factorial invariance provided a good fit to the data. Originality/value - The QFSR, specifically developed to measure the satisfaction of family members of patients undergoing rehabilitation, appears to be a promising brief questionnaire that can provide important indications for continuous improvement in the delivery of healthcare. PMID:26771060

  5. Inpatient care in Kazakhstan: A comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ainur B.; Izekenova, Aigulsum; Abikulova, Akmaral

    2013-01-01

    Background: Reforms in inpatient care are critical for the enhancement of the efficiency of health systems. It still remains the main costly sector of the health system, accounting for more than 60% of all expenditures. Inappropriate and ineffective use of the hospital infrastructure is also a big issue. We aimed to analyze statistical data on health indices and dynamics of the hospital stock in Kazakhstan in comparison with those of developed countries. Materials and Methods: Study design is comparative quantitative analysis of inpatient care indicators. We used information and analytical methods, content analysis, mathematical treatment, and comparative analysis of statistical data on health system and dynamics of hospital stock in Kazakhstan and some other countries of the world [Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), USA, Canada, Russia, China, Japan, and Korea] over the period 2001-2011. Results: Despite substantial and continuous reductions over the past 10 years, hospitalization rates in Kazakhstan still remain high compared to some developed countries, including those of the OECD. In fact, the hospital stay length for all patients in Kazakhstan in 2011 is around 9.9 days, hospitalization ratio per 100 people is 16.3, and hospital beds capacity is 100 per 10,000 inhabitants. Conclusion: The decreased level of beds may adversely affect both medical organization and health system operations. Alternatives to the existing inpatient care are now being explored. The introduction of the unified national healthcare system allows shifting the primary focus on primary care organizations, which can decrease the demand on inpatient care as a result of improving the health status of people at the primary care level. PMID:24516484

  6. Frequency, Characteristics and Management of Adolescent Inpatient Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Baeza, Immaculada; Saito, Ema; Amanbekova, Dinara; Ramani, Meena; Kapoor, Sandeep; Chekuri, Raja; De Hert, Marc; Carbon, Maren

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Inpatient aggression is a serious challenge in pediatric psychiatry. Methods A chart review study in adolescent psychiatric inpatients consecutively admitted over 24 months was conducted, to describe aggressive events requiring an intervention (AERI) and to characterize their management. AERIs were identified based on specific institutional event forms and/or documentation of as-needed (STAT/PRN) medication administration for aggression, both recorded by nursing staff. Results Among 408 adolescent inpatients (age: 15.2±1.6 years, 43.9% male), 1349 AERIs were recorded, with ≥1 AERI occurring in 28.4% (n=116; AERI+). However, the frequency of AERIs was highly skewed (median 4, range: 1–258). In a logistical regression model, the primary diagnosis at discharge of disruptive behavior disorders and bipolar disorders, history of previous inpatient treatment, length of hospitalization, and absence of a specific precipitant prior to admission were significantly associated with AERIs (R2=0.32; p<0.0001). The first line treatment of patients with AERIs (AERI+) was pharmacological in nature (95.6%). Seclusion or restraint (SRU) was used at least once in 59.4% of the AERI+ subgroup (i.e., in 16.9% of all patients; median within-group SRU frequency: 3). Treatment and discharge characteristics indicated a poorer prognosis in the AERI+ (discharge to residential care AERI+: 22.8%, AERI−: 5.6%, p<0.001) and a greater need for psychotropic polypharmacy (median number of psychotropic medications AERI+: 2; AERI−: 1, p<0.001). Conclusions Despite high rates of pharmacological interventions, SRU continue to be used in adolescent inpatient care. As both of these approaches lack a clear evidence base, and as adolescents with clinically significant inpatient aggression have increased illness acuity/severity and service needs, structured research into the most appropriate inpatient aggression management is sorely needed. PMID:23647136

  7. Interleukin 2 Topical Cream for Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcer: Experiment Protocol

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background It is estimated there are 2.9 million diabetic patients in the United Kingdom, and around 5%-7% of patients have diabetic ulcers. This number will continue to increase globally. Diabetic ulcers are a major economic burden on the healthcare system. More than £650 million is spent on foot ulcers or amputations each year, and up to 100 people a week have a limb amputated due to diabetes. In T1DM, the level of IL-2 is reduced, and hence, wound healing is in a prolonged inflammatory phase. It is not known if IL-2 topical cream can shorten the healing process in T1DM patients. Objective The objective of this study is to understand the pathophysiology in type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and investigate possible future treatment based on its clinical features. The hypothesis is that IL-2 cream can speed up wound healing in NOD mice and that this can be demonstrated in a ten-week study. An experiment protocol is designed in a mouse model for others to conduct the experiment. The discussion is purely based on diabetic conditions; lifestyle influences like smoking and drinking are not considered. Methods Skin incisions will be created on 20 nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, and IL-2 topical cream will be applied in a 10-week study to prove the hypothesis. Mice will be randomly and equally divide into two groups with one being the control group. Results T1DM patients have a decreased number of T regulatory (Treg) cells and interleukin 2 (IL-2). These are the keys to the disease progression and delay in wound healing. Diabetic ulcer is a chronic wound and characterized by a prolonged inflammatory phase. Conclusions If the experiment is successful, T1DM patients will have an alternative, noninvasive treatment of foot ulcers. In theory, patients with other autoimmune diseases could also use IL-2 topical cream for treatment. PMID:26276522

  8. Patient experience and satisfaction with inpatient service: development of short form survey instrument measuring the core aspect of inpatient experience.

    PubMed

    Wong, Eliza L Y; Coulter, Angela; Hewitson, Paul; Cheung, Annie W L; Yam, Carrie H K; Lui, Siu Fai; Tam, Wilson W S; Yeoh, Eng-Kiong

    2015-01-01

    Patient experience reflects quality of care from the patients' perspective; therefore, patients' experiences are important data in the evaluation of the quality of health services. The development of an abbreviated, reliable and valid instrument for measuring inpatients' experience would reflect the key aspect of inpatient care from patients' perspective as well as facilitate quality improvement by cultivating patient engagement and allow the trends in patient satisfaction and experience to be measured regularly. The study developed a short-form inpatient instrument and tested its ability to capture a core set of inpatients' experiences. The Hong Kong Inpatient Experience Questionnaire (HKIEQ) was established in 2010; it is an adaptation of the General Inpatient Questionnaire of the Care Quality Commission created by the Picker Institute in United Kingdom. This study used a consensus conference and a cross-sectional validation survey to create and validate a short-form of the Hong Kong Inpatient Experience Questionnaire (SF-HKIEQ). The short-form, the SF-HKIEQ, consisted of 18 items derived from the HKIEQ. The 18 items mainly covered relational aspects of care under four dimensions of the patient's journey: hospital staff, patient care and treatment, information on leaving the hospital, and overall impression. The SF-HKIEQ had a high degree of face validity, construct validity and internal reliability. The validated SF-HKIEQ reflects the relevant core aspects of inpatients' experience in a hospital setting. It provides a quick reference tool for quality improvement purposes and a platform that allows both healthcare staff and patients to monitor the quality of hospital care over time. PMID:25860775

  9. The experience of adolescent inpatient care and the anticipated transition to the community: Young people's perspectives.

    PubMed

    Gill, Freya; Butler, Stephen; Pistrang, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    This study explored adolescents' perspectives of inpatient mental health care, focussing on aspects of the inpatient environment they anticipated would help or hinder their transition back home. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 adolescent inpatients; transcripts were analysed thematically. Participants experienced inpatient treatment as offering a mix of benefits (e.g., supportive relationships) and drawbacks (e.g., living in a "fake world"). They anticipated the transition home as providing opportunities for personal growth and consolidation of new coping skills, but also posing challenges concerning re-entering the "real world" after the experience of being "wrapped in cotton wool". Self-determination theory and attachment theory offer two potential frameworks for understanding these opportunities and challenges. Inpatient care has the potential to foster key mechanisms for adaptive development, creating a platform for developing positive future behaviours. Community teams should work closely with inpatient units to support the generalisation of the young person's newly acquired coping skills. PMID:26599528

  10. The use of antiepileptic drugs in learning disabled people with epilepsy: an audit of adult in-patients in a treatment and continuing care service.

    PubMed

    Tiffin, P A; Perini, A F

    2001-10-01

    The primary aim of the audit described was to examine antiepileptic drug use among adult in-patients with learning disability. A secondary aim was to examine investigation in those patients. For the purposes of this paper "Learning disability" is synonymous with ICD-10 "Mental Retardation", "Mental Handicap" or "Intellectual Impairment" and should not be confused with the North American use of the term which refers to discrete, specific problems in mental abilities such as reading. A total of 75 adult patients on both the Northgate and Prudhoe sites (managed by Northgate and Prudhoe NHS Trust) were identified as being treated with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) for postulated epilepsy. Only 12 (16%) patients were being treated with three AEDs or more, the remainder being on either one or two AEDs. All patients with a history of status epilepticus were prescribed rectal diazepam or, more rarely, intranasal midazolam. The number and type of investigations performed on patients varied widely and was sometimes limited by the patient's ability to co-operate with procedures. Overall, 28 patients were identified who might benefit from a reduction in the number of AEDs prescribed. In 15 of these patients antiepileptic drug regime was currently being reduced. The increased utilization of sleep/sedated electroencephalogram (EEG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI--for partial seizures), where practical, may also increase diagnostic accuracy in identifying epilepsy and its aetiology. Audit will be repeated in 12 months. PMID:11749106

  11. A stepped-wedge cluster randomised controlled trial for evaluating rates of falls among inpatients in aged care rehabilitation units receiving tailored multimedia education in addition to usual care: a trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Anne-Marie; Waldron, Nicholas; Etherton-Beer, Christopher; McPhail, Steven M; Ingram, Katharine; Flicker, Leon; Haines, Terry P

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Falls are the most frequent adverse event reported in hospitals. Approximately 30% of in-hospital falls lead to an injury and up to 2% result in a fracture. A large randomised trial found that a trained health professional providing individualised falls prevention education to older inpatients reduced falls in a cognitively intact subgroup. This study aims to investigate whether this efficacious intervention can reduce falls and be clinically useful and cost-effective when delivered in the real-life clinical environment. Methods A stepped-wedge cluster randomised trial will be used across eight subacute units (clusters) which will be randomised to one of four dates to start the intervention. Usual care on these units includes patient's screening, assessment and implementation of individualised falls prevention strategies, ongoing staff training and environmental strategies. Patients with better levels of cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination >23/30) will receive the individualised education from a trained health professional in addition to usual care while patient's feedback received during education sessions will be provided to unit staff. Unit staff will receive training to assist in intervention delivery and to enhance uptake of strategies by patients. Falls data will be collected by two methods: case note audit by research assistants and the hospital falls reporting system. Cluster-level data including patient's admissions, length of stay and diagnosis will be collected from hospital systems. Data will be analysed allowing for correlation of outcomes (clustering) within units. An economic analysis will be undertaken which includes an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by The University of Notre Dame Australia Human Research Ethics Committee and local hospital ethics committees. Results The results will be disseminated through local site networks, and future funding and delivery of falls prevention programmes within WA Health will be informed. Results will also be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and medical conferences. Trial registration The study is registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials registry (ACTRN12612000877886). PMID:24430881

  12. Cryptographically supported NFC tags in medication for better inpatient safety.

    PubMed

    Özcanhan, Mehmet Hilal; Dalkılıç, Gökhan; Utku, Semih

    2014-08-01

    Reliable sources report that errors in drug administration are increasing the number of harmed or killed inpatients, during healthcare. This development is in contradiction to patient safety norms. A correctly designed hospital-wide ubiquitous system, using advanced inpatient identification and matching techniques, should provide correct medicine and dosage at the right time. Researchers are still making grouping proof protocol proposals based on the EPC Global Class 1 Generation 2 ver. 1.2 standard tags, for drug administration. Analyses show that such protocols make medication unsecure and hence fail to guarantee inpatient safety. Thus, the original goal of patient safety still remains. In this paper, a very recent proposal (EKATE) upgraded by a cryptographic function is shown to fall short of expectations. Then, an alternative proposal IMS-NFC which uses a more suitable and newer technology; namely Near Field Communication (NFC), is described. The proposed protocol has the additional support of stronger security primitives and it is compliant to ISO communication and security standards. Unlike previous works, the proposal is a complete ubiquitous system that guarantees full patient safety; and it is based on off-the-shelf, new technology products available in every corner of the world. To prove the claims the performance, cost, security and scope of IMS-NFC are compared with previous proposals. Evaluation shows that the proposed system has stronger security, increased patient safety and equal efficiency, at little extra cost. PMID:24957387

  13. Standardized Patient Walkthroughs in the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network: Common Challenges to Protocol Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Fussell, Holly; Kunkel, Lynn E.; McCarty, Dennis; Lewy, Colleen S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Training research staff to implement clinical trials occurring in community-based addiction treatment programs presents unique challenges. Standardized patient walkthroughs of study procedures may enhance training and protocol implementation. Objectives Examine and discuss cross-site and cross-study challenges of participant screening and data collection procedures identified during standardized patient walkthroughs of multi-site clinical trials. Method Actors portrayed clients and “walked through” study procedures with protocol research staff. The study completed 57 walkthroughs during implementation of 4 clinical trials. Results Observers and walkthrough participants identified three areas of concern (consent procedures, screening and assessment processes, and protocol implementation) and made suggestions for resolving the concerns. Conclusions and Scientific Significance Standardized patient walkthroughs capture issues with study procedures previously unidentified with didactic training or unscripted rehearsals. Clinical trials within the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network are conducted in addiction treatment centers that vary on multiple dimensions. Based on walkthrough observations, the national protocol team and local site leadership modify standardized operating procedures and resolve cross-site problems prior to recruiting study participants. The standardized patient walkthrough improves consistency across study sites and reduces potential site variation in study outcomes. PMID:21854287

  14. Effectiveness of two intensive treatment methods for smoking cessation and relapse prevention in patients with coronary heart disease: study protocol and baseline description

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is no more effective intervention for secondary prevention of coronary heart disease than smoking cessation. Yet, evidence about the (cost-)effectiveness of smoking cessation treatment methods for cardiac inpatients that also suit nursing practice is scarce. This protocol describes the design of a study on the (cost-)effectiveness of two intensive smoking cessation interventions for hospitalised cardiac patients as well as first results on the inclusion rates and the characteristics of the study population. Methods/design An experimental study design is used in eight cardiac wards of hospitals throughout the Netherlands to assess the (cost-)effectiveness of two intensive smoking cessation counselling methods both combined with nicotine replacement therapy. Randomization is conducted at the ward level (cross-over). Baseline and follow-up measurements after six and 12 months are obtained. Upon admission to the cardiac ward, nurses assess patients smoking behaviour, ensure a quit advice and subsequently refer patients for either telephone counselling or face-to-face counselling. The counselling interventions have a comparable structure and content but differ in provider and delivery method, and in duration. Both counselling interventions are compared with a control group receiving no additional treatment beyond the usual care. Between December 2009 and June 2011, 245 cardiac patients who smoked prior to hospitalisation were included in the usual care group, 223 in the telephone counselling group and 157 in the face-to-face counselling group. Patients are predominantly male and have a mean age of 57?years. Acute coronary syndrome is the most frequently reported admission diagnosis. The ultimate goal of the study is to assess the effects of the interventions on smoking abstinence and their cost-effectiveness. Telephone counselling is expected to be more (cost-)effective in highly motivated patients and patients with high SES, whereas face-to-face counselling is expected to be more (cost-)effective in less motivated patients and patients with low SES. Discussion This study examines two intensive smoking cessation interventions for cardiac patients using a multi-centre trial with eight cardiac wards. Although not all eligible patients could be included and the distribution of patients is skewed in the different groups, the results will be able to provide valuable insight into effects and costs of counselling interventions varying in delivery mode and intensity, also concerning subgroups. Trial registration Dutch Trial Register NTR2144 PMID:22587684

  15. Neurofeedback Treatment and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Effectiveness of Neurofeedback on Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and the Optimal Choice of Protocol.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Karen; Andersen, Sren Bo; Carlsson, Jessica

    2016-02-01

    Neurofeedback is an alternative, noninvasive approach used in the treatment of a wide range of neuropsychiatric disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Many different neurofeedback protocols and methods exist. Likewise, PTSD is a heterogeneous disorder. To review the evidence on effectiveness and preferred protocol when using neurofeedback treatment on PTSD, a systematic search of PubMed, PsychInfo, Embase, and Cochrane databases was undertaken. Five studies were included in this review. Neurofeedback had a statistically significant effect in three studies. Neurobiological changes were reported in three studies. Interpretation of results is, however, limited by differences between the studies and several issues regarding design. The optimistic results presented here qualify neurofeedback as probably efficacious for PTSD treatment. PMID:26825263

  16. Treatment of Co-Occurring Substance Abuse and Suicidality among Adolescents: A Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Spirito, Anthony; Kahler, Christopher W.; Hunt, Jeffrey; Monti, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study tested a cognitive-behavioral treatment protocol for adolescents with a co-occurring alcohol or other drug use disorder (AOD) and suicidality in a randomized clinical trial. Method: Forty adolescents (M[subscript age] = 15 years; 68% female, 89% White) and their families recruited from an inpatient psychiatric hospital were

  17. Educational opportunities and inpatient psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Crowder, M K; Jack, R A

    1986-01-01

    Despite inpatient psychiatry's longstanding role as a mainstay of psychiatric training, very little attention has been directed toward the educational opportunities of inpatient work. Experience rather than research has been our guide. Together with a brief history of inpatient psychiatry, the educational aspects of this setting have been discussed. The results of an informal survey supplement the text. We conclude with several educational concerns currently developing as a natural result of the ever-changing face of our profession. Our aim has been to provide a serious consideration of the issues and we invite our readers to expand upon or disagree with any or all of our contentions. We trust our ultimate goals are the same: to provide our profession with a steady supply of competent teachers, researchers and clinicians. Our patients can only benefit from this endeavor. PMID:3432584

  18. Evolving Prehospital, Emergency Department, and Inpatient Management Models for Geriatric Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Christopher R.; Platts-Mills, Timothy F.

    2013-01-01

    Alternative management methods are essential to ensure high quality and efficient emergency care for the growing number of geriatric adults worldwide. Protocols for case-finding and rapid diagnosis to support early condition-specific treatment for older adults with acute severe illness and injury are needed. Improved emergency department care for older adults will require providers to look beyond the diagnosis to address the influence of other factors on the patient's health: isolation and depression; finances and transportation; and chronic medical conditions and polypharmacy. This review article describes recent and ongoing efforts to enhance the quality of emergency care for older adults using alternative management approaches spanning the spectrum from prehospital care, through the emergency department, and into evolving inpatient or outpatient processes of care. PMID:23177599

  19. The NeuroAiD Safe Treatment (NeST) Registry: a protocol

    PubMed Central

    Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Kumar, Ramesh; Soertidewi, Lyna; Abu Bakar, Azizi; Laik, Carine; Gan, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction NeuroAiD (MLC601, MLC901), a combination of natural products, has been shown to be safe and to aid neurological recovery after brain injuries. The NeuroAiD Safe Treatment (NeST) Registry aims to assess its use and safety in the real-world setting. Methods and analysis The NeST Registry is designed as a product registry that would provide information on the use and safety of NeuroAiD in clinical practice. An online NeST Registry was set up to allow easy entry and retrieval of essential information including demographics, medical conditions, clinical assessments of neurological, functional and cognitive state, compliance, concomitant medications, and side effects, if any, among patients on NeuroAiD. Patients who are taking or have been prescribed NeuroAiD may be included. Participation is voluntary. Data collected are similar to information obtained during standard care and are prospectively entered by the participating physicians at baseline (before initialisation of NeuroAiD) and during subsequent visits. The primary outcome assessed is safety (ie, non-serious and serious adverse event), while compliance and neurological status over time are secondary outcomes. The in-person follow-up assessments are timed with clinical appointments. Anonymised data will be extracted and collectively analysed. Initial target sample size for the registry is 2000. Analysis will be performed after every 500 participants entered with completed follow-up information. Ethics and dissemination Doctors who prescribe NeuroAiD will be introduced to the registry by local partners. The central coordinator of the registry will discuss the protocol and requirements for implementation with doctors who show interest. Currently, the registry has been approved by the Ethics Committees of Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (Malaysia) and National Brain Center (Indonesia). In addition, for other countries, Ethics Committee approval will be obtained in accordance with local requirements. Trial registration number NCT02536079. PMID:26567259

  20. Prevalence of undiagnosed diabetic retinopathy among inpatients with diabetes: the diabetic retinopathy inpatient study (DRIPS)

    PubMed Central

    Kovarik, Jessica J; Eller, Andrew W; Willard, Lauren A; Ding, Jiaxi; Johnston, Jann M; Waxman, Evan L

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence and risk factors of diabetic retinopathy in the inpatient diabetic population in the USA and to determine the barriers to ophthalmic examinations and treatment among this population. Research design and methods A cross-sectional analysis of 113 inpatients with diabetes mellitus admitted to an inner city community teaching hospital in Pittsburgh. Digital fundus photographs of the posterior pole were taken of each eye after pharmacological dilation. Presence, absence and severity of diabetic retinopathy and macular edema were graded on the basis of internationally accepted criteria. An investigator-administered questionnaire and review of the medical record were used to obtain data about patient demographics, clinical characteristics and barriers to ophthalmic care. The association between these data and the presence of diabetic retinopathy was tested. Results The estimated prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in the inpatient population was 44% (95% CI 34% to 53%). The prevalence of previously undiagnosed diabetic retinopathy and sight-threatening retinopathy was 25% (95% CI 17% to 33%) and 19% (95% CI 11% to 26%), respectively. Renal disease was independently associated with the presence of diabetic retinopathy (OR, 3.86; 95% CI 1.22 to 12.27), as well as a longer duration of diabetes (OR, 1.08 per year; 95% CI 1.014 to 1.147). Diabetic retinopathy was seen in 15 of 17 patients admitted with diabetic foot ulcers or osteomyelitis. Frequently reported barriers to ophthalmic examinations included lack of transportation and physical disability. Conclusions The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy and sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy in the inpatient population is likely significantly higher than in the general diabetic population in the USA. These patients have barriers to care that need to be addressed to make standard of care ophthalmic examinations and treatment possible in this population. PMID:26925238

  1. The effects of an 8-week multicomponent inpatient treatment program on body composition and anaerobic fitness in overweight and obese children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Karner-Rezek, Klaus; Knechtle, Beat; Fenzl, Matthias; Schlegel, Christian; Konrad, Manuela; Rosemann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background High intensity exercise is considered as an effective means for reducing body fat. The aims of the present study were to investigate (1) whether body mass would be lost and body composition would change and (2) whether variables of anaerobic fitness prior to the intervention period would be related to loss of body mass and changes in body composition in overweight and obese children and adolescents. Methods A total of 28 children and adolescents (19 boys, 9 girls) attended an 8-week multicomponent inpatient program. Caloric intake was based on the subjects weight and a daily energy deficit of ~500 kcal was targeted. At the beginning and at the end of the program, variables of anaerobic fitness were assessed using Wingate tests. Body composition was measured before and after the program using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results Body mass decreased by 11.4% 1.6% in boys and by 11.0% 2.8% in girls (P < 0.001). Fat mass decreased by 23.8% 6.1% in boys and by 21.5% 5.2% in girls (P < 0.001). The decrease in fat mass was associated with the decrease in body mass in boys (r = 0.54, P = 0.017) but not in girls (P > 0.05). The decrease in body mass and the decrease in fat mass were neither associated with overall energy expenditure nor with the energy deficit in both genders (P > 0.05). Mean power in W/kg increased in the Wingate tests by 95.4% 109.1% in boys and by 100.0% 119.9% in girls (P < 0.001). Conclusions Adjustments of the chronically positive imbalance of energy intake and energy expenditure of obese children and adolescents living in obesogenic environments should be addressed in a multisectoral approach. Future research in multicomponent childhood and adolescent weight loss programs should be directed towards a better understanding of the underlying complex dynamics in energy homeostasis which promote weight loss and changes in body composition due to high intensity exercise interventions. PMID:23525602

  2. 42 CFR 412.405 - Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. 412.405 Section 412.405 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities 412.405 Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. The prospective payment...

  3. 42 CFR 412.405 - Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. 412.405 Section 412.405 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities 412.405 Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. The prospective payment...

  4. 42 CFR 412.405 - Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. 412.405 Section 412.405 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities 412.405 Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. The prospective payment...

  5. 42 CFR 412.405 - Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. 412.405 Section 412.405 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities 412.405 Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. The prospective payment...

  6. Cost-of-Illness in Psoriasis: Comparing Inpatient and Outpatient Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Steinke, Sabine I. B.; Peitsch, Wiebke K.; Ludwig, Alexander; Goebeler, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Treatment modalities of chronic plaque psoriasis have dramatically changed over the past ten years with a still continuing shift from inpatient to outpatient treatment. This development is mainly caused by outpatient availability of highly efficient and relatively well-tolerated systemic treatments, in particular BioLogicals. In addition, inpatient treatment is time- and cost-intense, conflicting with the actual burst of health expenses and with patient preferences. Nevertheless, inpatient treatment with dithranol and UV light still is a major mainstay of psoriasis treatment in Germany. The current study aims at comparing the total costs of inpatient treatment and outpatient follow-up to mere outpatient therapy with different modalities (topical treatment, phototherapy, classic systemic therapy or BioLogicals) over a period of 12 months. To this end, a retrospective cost-of-illness study was conducted on 120 patients treated at the University Medical Centre Mannheim between 2005 and 2006. Inpatient therapy caused significantly higher direct medical, indirect and total annual costs than outpatient treatment (13,042 € versus 2,984 €). Its strong influence on cost levels was confirmed by regression analysis, with total costs rising by 104.3% in case of inpatient treatment. Patients receiving BioLogicals produced the overall highest costs, whereas outpatient treatment with classic systemic antipsoriatic medications was less cost-intense than other alternatives. PMID:24194911

  7. Boron neutron capture therapy applied to advanced breast cancers: Engineering simulation and feasibility study of the radiation treatment protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sztejnberg Goncalves-Carralves, Manuel Leonardo

    This dissertation describes a novel Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) application for the treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 positive (HER2+) breast cancers. The original contribution of the dissertation is the development of the engineering simulation and the feasibility study of the radiation treatment protocol for this novel combination of BNCT and HER2+ breast cancer treatment. This new concept of BNCT, representing a radiation binary targeted treatment, consists of the combination of two approaches never used in a synergism before. This combination may offer realistic hope for relapsed and/or metastasized breast cancers. This treatment assumes that the boronated anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies (MABs) are administrated to the patient and accumulate preferentially in the tumor. Then the tumor is destroyed when is exposed to neutron irradiation. Since the use of anti-HER2 MABs yields good and promising results, the proposed concept is expected to amplify the known effect and be considered as a possible additional treatment approach to the most severe breast cancers for patients with metastasized cancer for which the current protocol is not successful and for patients refusing to have the standard treatment protocol. This dissertation makes an original contribution with an integral numerical approach and proves feasible the combination of the aforementioned therapy and disease. With these goals, the dissertation describes the theoretical analysis of the proposed concept providing an integral engineering simulation study of the treatment protocol. An extensive analysis of the potential limitations, capabilities and optimization factors are well studied using simplified models, models based on real CT patients' images, cellular models, and Monte Carlo (MCNP5/X) transport codes. One of the outcomes of the integral dosimetry assessment originally developed for the proposed treatment of advanced breast cancers is the implementation of BNCT for HER2+ breast cancers for deep seated tumors using MITRII-FCB facility with an 8 cm diameter beam (port closest-to-tumor position), with boron concentrations in the tumor higher than 32 mug/g, and for a tumor-to-healthy tissue boron concentration ratio of 8:1. The therapeutic ratios for the proposed treatment would be higher than five for skin and adipose tissue and higher than three for tumor surrounding fibroglandular tissue. The microdosimetry study shows potential improvements in the therapeutic ratios based on the expected sub-cellular boron biodistributions. The engineering simulation study of clinical cases shows the advantages of using BNCT for HER+ breast cancers. Assuming an assured high efficiency of the boron agent delivery, the proposed concept can be considered for stage IV HER2+ breast cancers in treating the metastasized tumors in brain, head and neck, and lungs.

  8. Do total smoking bans affect the recruitment and retention of adolescents in inpatient substance abuse treatment programs? A 5-year medical chart review, 2001-2005.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, Russell C; Brewster, Joan M; Johnson, Joy; Taylor, Lawren; Beach, Glenn; Lentz, Tim

    2007-10-01

    Adolescents engaged in substance abuse treatment manifest a rate of cigarette smoking approximately four times higher than that of youth in the general population ( approximately 80% vs. 20%) and a high rate of smoking persistence into adulthood. Although there has been a shift toward the implementation of no-smoking policies in substance abuse treatment programs, few studies have examined the relation between cigarette-smoking bans and key clinical outcomes. The current study examined the medical charts of all adolescents (N = 520) admitted to the only adolescent hospital-based substance abuse treatment program in the northern two thirds of the province of British Columbia, Canada. During the span of the study period (March 2001-December 2005), the treatment site moved from a partial smoking ban to a total smoking ban, and then retreated to partial smoking ban. The total smoking ban was not associated with a lower proportion of adolescent smokers seeking treatment at the facility or a lower treatment completion rate among smokers. Total smoking bans do not appear to be an obstacle for adolescent smokers seeking residential substance abuse treatment, nor do total smoking bans appear to compromise the treatment completion rates of smokers in comparison to nonsmokers. Despite these null findings, the effective implementation of smoke-free policies in adolescent substance abuse treatment programs requires not only large-scale organizational change but also the transformation of current commonly held beliefs about tobacco dependence in addictions treatment and recovery communities. PMID:17376637

  9. Modifying the ECC-based grouping-proof RFID system to increase inpatient medication safety.

    PubMed

    Ko, Wen-Tsai; Chiou, Shin-Yan; Lu, Erl-Huei; Chang, Henry Ker-Chang

    2014-09-01

    RFID technology is increasingly used in applications that require tracking, identification, and authentication. It attaches RFID-readable tags to objects for identification and execution of specific RFID-enabled applications. Recently, research has focused on the use of grouping-proofs for preserving privacy in RFID applications, wherein a proof of two or more tags must be simultaneously scanned. In 2010, a privacy-preserving grouping proof protocol for RFID based on ECC in public-key cryptosystem was proposed but was shown to be vulnerable to tracking attacks. A proposed enhancement protocol was also shown to have defects which prevented proper execution. In 2012, Lin et al. proposed a more efficient RFID ECC-based grouping proof protocol to promote inpatient medication safety. However, we found this protocol is also vulnerable to tracking and impersonation attacks. We then propose a secure privacy-preserving RFID grouping proof protocol for inpatient medication safety and demonstrate its resistance to such attacks. PMID:24997856

  10. 29 CFR 825.114 - Inpatient care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.114 Inpatient care. Inpatient care means an overnight stay in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility, including... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inpatient care. 825.114 Section 825.114 Labor...

  11. 29 CFR 825.114 - Inpatient care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.114 Inpatient care. Inpatient care means an overnight stay in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility, including... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inpatient care. 825.114 Section 825.114 Labor...

  12. 29 CFR 825.114 - Inpatient care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.114 Inpatient care. Inpatient care means an overnight stay in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility, including... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inpatient care. 825.114 Section 825.114 Labor...

  13. 29 CFR 825.114 - Inpatient care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.114 Inpatient care. Inpatient care means an overnight stay in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility, including... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inpatient care. 825.114 Section 825.114 Labor...

  14. 29 CFR 825.114 - Inpatient care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.114 Inpatient care. Inpatient care means an overnight stay in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility, including... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inpatient care. 825.114 Section 825.114 Labor...

  15. Prosecuting Assaultive Forensic and Psychiatric Inpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angus, Kerri C.; Reddon, John R.; Chudleigh, Michele D.

    2008-01-01

    Inpatient assault of forensic and psychiatric staff is a complex and multifaceted issue. Hence, the consequences reported in the literature regarding prosecuting assaultive inpatients are quite variable. In this article, issues pertaining to the prosecution of violent inpatients are reviewed. Illustrative cases, challenges of prosecution,

  16. Inpatient Suicide in a Chinese Psychiatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jie; Ran, Mao-Sheng; Hao, Yuantao; Zhao, Zhenhuan; Guo, Yangbo; Su, Jinghua; Lu, Huixian

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the risk factors for suicide among psychiatric inpatients in China. In this study we identified the risk factors of suicide among psychiatric inpatients at Guangzhou Psychiatric Hospital. All psychiatric inpatients who died by suicide during the 1956-2005 period were included in this study. Using a case-control design, 64

  17. Prosecuting Assaultive Forensic and Psychiatric Inpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angus, Kerri C.; Reddon, John R.; Chudleigh, Michele D.

    2008-01-01

    Inpatient assault of forensic and psychiatric staff is a complex and multifaceted issue. Hence, the consequences reported in the literature regarding prosecuting assaultive inpatients are quite variable. In this article, issues pertaining to the prosecution of violent inpatients are reviewed. Illustrative cases, challenges of prosecution,…

  18. Negotiating Time: The Significance of Timing in Ending Inpatient Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Sarah Gustavus

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses work with young people during their stay on an NHS psychiatric inpatient unit, especially focusing on the end of treatment and the appropriate timing of discharge into the community. When approaching the end of an admission, various factors are considered that seem particularly relevant to the decision of when a young person…

  19. Feasibility of Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Suicidal Adolescent Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Laurence Y.; Cox, Brian J.; Gunasekara, Shiny; Miller, Alec L.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) implementation in a general child and adolescent psychiatric inpatient unit and to provide preliminary effectiveness data on DBT versus treatment as usual (TAU). Method: Sixty-two adolescents with suicide attempts or suicidal ideation were admitted to one of two

  20. Negotiating Time: The Significance of Timing in Ending Inpatient Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Sarah Gustavus

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses work with young people during their stay on an NHS psychiatric inpatient unit, especially focusing on the end of treatment and the appropriate timing of discharge into the community. When approaching the end of an admission, various factors are considered that seem particularly relevant to the decision of when a young person

  1. A Preliminary Investigation of the Long-Term Outcome of the Unified Protocol for Transdiagnostic Treatment of Emotional Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bullis, Jacqueline R.; Fortune, Meghan R.; Farchione, Todd J.; Barlow, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To conduct a preliminary examination of long-term outcomes on a broad range of affective disorder symptoms treated with a newly developed intervention: The Unified Protocol for Transdiagnostic Treatment of Emotional Disorders (UP). Method Maintenance of treatment gains at long-term follow-up (LTFU) were explored in patients (n = 15, mean age = 32.27; 60% female) who completed a clinical trial of the UP. Results Treatment gains observed at 6-month follow-up (6MFU) on measures of clinical severity, general symptoms of depression and anxiety, and a measure of symptom interference in daily functioning were largely maintained 12 months later (at an average of 18 months posttreatment), and any significant changes from 6MFU to LTFU reflected small increases in symptoms that remained, on average, in the subclinical range. Conclusions These findings provide the first initial support for the durability of broad treatment gains following transdiagnostic treatment. PMID:25113056

  2. Inpatient charges and mental illness: Findings from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample 1999-2007.

    PubMed

    Banta, Jim E; Belk, Ivorie; Newton, Kedon; Sherzai, Abdullah

    2010-01-01

    Inpatient costs related to mental illness are substantial, though declining as a percentage of overall mental health treatment costs. The public sector has become increasingly involved in funding and providing mental health services. Nationwide Inpatient Sample data for the years 1999-2007 were used to: 1) examine Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurance charges related to mental illness hospitalizations, including trends over time; and 2) examine trends in mental comorbidity with physical illness and its effect on charges. There were an estimated 12.4 million mental illness discharges during the 9-year period, with Medicare being the primary payer for 4.3 million discharges, Medicaid for 3.3 million, private insurance for 3.2 million, and 1.6 million for all other payers. Mean inflation-adjusted charges per hospitalization were US$17,528, US$15,651, US$10,539, and US$11,663, respectively. Charges to public sources increased for schizophrenia and dementia-related discharges, with little private/public change noted for mood disorders. Comorbid mood disorders increased dramatically from 1.5 million discharges in 1999 to 3.4 million discharges in 2007. Comorbid illness was noted in 14.0% of the 342 million inpatient discharges during the study period and was associated with increased charges for some medical conditions and decreased charges for other medical conditions. PMID:21935325

  3. Inpatient charges and mental illness: Findings from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample 19992007

    PubMed Central

    Banta, Jim E; Belk, Ivorie; Newton, Kedon; Sherzai, Abdullah

    2010-01-01

    Inpatient costs related to mental illness are substantial, though declining as a percentage of overall mental health treatment costs. The public sector has become increasingly involved in funding and providing mental health services. Nationwide Inpatient Sample data for the years 19992007 were used to: 1) examine Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurance charges related to mental illness hospitalizations, including trends over time; and 2) examine trends in mental comorbidity with physical illness and its effect on charges. There were an estimated 12.4 million mental illness discharges during the 9-year period, with Medicare being the primary payer for 4.3 million discharges, Medicaid for 3.3 million, private insurance for 3.2 million, and 1.6 million for all other payers. Mean inflation-adjusted charges per hospitalization were US$17,528, US$15,651, US$10,539, and US$11,663, respectively. Charges to public sources increased for schizophrenia and dementia-related discharges, with little private/public change noted for mood disorders. Comorbid mood disorders increased dramatically from 1.5 million discharges in 1999 to 3.4 million discharges in 2007. Comorbid illness was noted in 14.0% of the 342 million inpatient discharges during the study period and was associated with increased charges for some medical conditions and decreased charges for other medical conditions. PMID:21935325

  4. Outcome of a heartworm treatment protocol in dogs presenting to Louisiana State University from 2008 to 2011: 50 cases.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Elizabeth; Ryan, Kirk; Reynolds, Caryn; Pariaut, Romain

    2014-11-15

    Since 2008, the American Heartworm Society has recommended using a three-dose melarsomine protocol (a single intramuscular injection of melarsomine dihydrochloride at 2.5mg/kg, followed approximately 1 month later with two doses administered 24h apart) for all heartworm-positive dogs, with doxycycline given at 10mg/kg twice daily for 4 weeks prior to administration of melarsomine. To report the efficacy and side effects of this standard heartworm treatment protocol in 50 dogs presenting to our hospital from 2008 to 2011, information on the history, clinical, laboratory, and diagnostic imaging findings and treatment was obtained from medical records. When possible, additional follow-up information was obtained through telephone interviews with referring veterinarians and owners. Twenty-six dogs (52%) experienced minor complications, such as injection site reactions, gastrointestinal signs (vomiting, diarrhea, inappetance), and behavioral changes (lethargy, depression) during or after heartworm treatment. Twenty-seven dogs (54%) experienced respiratory signs (coughing, dyspnea) and heart failure attributed to progressive heartworm disease and worm death. Seven dogs (14%) died within the treatment period. Owners frequently reported behavioral changes, such as depression and lethargy, suspected to be secondary to pain. Fifty percent of owners surveyed indicated that, prior to the diagnosis, they either were not currently administering heartworm preventative, or they had recently adopted the dog from a shelter that did not administer preventatives. After treatment, 100% were administering heartworm preventatives to their pet. Eighteen dogs (36%) received a heartworm antigen test 6 months after adulticide therapy, 12 of which tested negative and six tested positive. Four of the dogs with a positive test at 6 months had negative tests 1 month later with no additional treatment. Adverse effects were common with the recommended protocol, but the majority of these were mild. Dogs in Class 1 (i.e., heartworm positive but otherwise largely lacking clinical evidence of disease) did not experience any major adverse effects or death. PMID:24953753

  5. Benefit of using muscle relaxants in the routine treatment protocol of oral submucosal fibrosis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nichlani, Sunil Srichand; Jagade, Mohan V; Ganeshan, Arunprabhu

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this present work is to describe the nature and extent of fibrosis within muscle and to correlate this with the mouth opening (MO) in OSE patients and to prove our results in improvement of mouth opening in patients with OSMF with use of "muscle relaxants" along with other modalities of treatment . The study was conducted on 40 patients who visited our outpatient department with grade 3 (<19mm) mouth opening. 20 of these patients underwent the routine treatment protocol of weekly injection of hyaluronidase with hydrocortisone and antioxidant capsules with added lycopene for 1month. The remaining test subjects in addition to the routine injections and antioxidants were given skeletal muscle relaxants like thiocolchicoside or chlorzoxazone. The mouth opening (interincisal distance of maxillary and mandibular incisors at maximum possible mouth opening) was measured and graded as follows: grade 1 (>40mm), grade 2 (20-39mm) and grade 3 (<19mm) with the help of vernier callipers after the study period of 1month. 17 out of the 20 test patients who received muscle relaxants in addition to the routine protocol showed marked improvement with shift from grade 3 (<19mm) to grade 1 (>40mm) i.e. a greater than 20mm improvement in mouth opening. Using muscle relaxants as a adjuvant therapy in the routine protocol of treatment of oral submucosal fibrosis will not only cater and halt the problem of fibrosis but also will take care of the muscle spasm and inflammation which also inadvertently contribute to the restricted mouth opening. We found excellent improvement on adding muscle relaxants to the routine protocol which was not just an objective but also a subjective success. PMID:23024934

  6. Evaluation of cardiopulmonary biomarkers during classic adulticide treatment versus the American Heartworm Society recommended treatment protocol in dogs infected by Dirofilaria immitis.

    PubMed

    Carretn, E; Morchn, R; Simn, F; Juste, M C; Gonzlez-Miguel, J; Montoya-Alonso, J A

    2014-11-15

    Adulticide treatment of dogs with canine heartworm disease causes the death of the adult Dirofilaria immitis lodged in the vascular system of the host. During the death of the worms, pulmonary thromboembolisms (PTE), pulmonary inflammation, congestive heart failure, or renal disease are possible consequences. The aim of this study was to evaluate cardiopulmonary biomarkers and renal parameters during adulticide treatment of canine heartworm to compare the classic two-injection treatment protocol versus the American Heartworm Society (AHS) recommended protocol. Fourteen heartworm-infected dogs with high parasite burdens were divided in three groups and allocated to adulticide protocols as follows: Group A (n=5) was treated with the classic two-injection protocol; group B (n=5) was treated using the AHS recommended protocol, and group C (n=4) was treated as for group B but received diminishing anti-inflammatory doses of prednisone. To assess cardiorespiratory status, cardiac troponin I (cTnI), myoglobin, and D-dimer were measured. Renal function was evaluated by measuring urea, creatinine, and urine protein:creatinine (UP:C). Serum and urine samples were collected day 0 (day of diagnosis), 7 and 14 days after the first dose of adulticide, and 1 month after the last adulticide injection. Dogs that received classic treatment presented pathologic concentrations of D-dimer more frequently and showed higher average D-dimer levels, which may indicate the presence of more severe PTE. Group C showed the highest levels of D-dimer during treatment, which may be due to an exacerbation of PTE caused by the administration of prednisone. CTnI and myoglobin values remained above reference values in all groups during the study but reached the lowest values 1 month after the last injection. Levels of urea and creatinine were within normal ranges in all groups, and 28.5% of the dogs were proteinuric on day 0, progressing to better UP:C values at the end of the treatment, except in group A. The results of this study justify the treatment of canine heartworm disease using the AHS recommended adulticide guidelines and recommends re-evaluation of the role of glucocorticosteroids in the prevention and treatment of PTE. PMID:25224786

  7. Effects of placebos without deception compared with no treatment: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Petkovic, Grace; Charlesworth, James E G; Kelley, John; Miller, Franklin; Roberts, Nia; Howick, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Placebos have long provided a robust control for evaluating active pharmacological preparations, but frequently demonstrate a variable therapeutic effect when delivered in double-blinded placebo-controlled trials. Delivery of placebos as treatment alone has been considered unethical, as it has been thought that deception is essential for their effect. However, recent evidence suggests that clinical benefit can be derived from placebos delivered without deception (unblinded/open-label) manner. Here, we present a protocol for the first systematic review and meta-analysis of studies of the effects of non-deceptive placebos compared with no treatment. Methods and analysis This protocol will compare the effect of placebos delivered non-deceptively to no treatment. It will also assess the methods of delivery used for non-deceptive placebos. Studies will be sought through relevant database searches and will include those within disease settings and those among healthy controls. To be included, trials must include both non-deceptive (open-label) placebo and no treatment groups. All data extraction and analysis will be conducted by two independent reviewers. The analysis will evaluate any differences in outcome measures between the non-deceptive placebo and no treatment groups. Outcome measures will be the clinically-relevant outcomes detailed in the primary papers. The delivery methods, such as verbal instructions, which may provide positive expectations and outcomes, of non-deceptive placebos will also be assessed. Each study will be comprehensively assessed for bias. Subgroup analyses will identify any discrepancies among heterogeneous data. Ethics and dissemination This review does not require ethical approval. The completed review will be widely disseminated by publication and social media where appropriate. This protocol has been registered on PROSPERO (2015:CRD42015023347). PMID:26610763

  8. Effect of a second treatment with prostaglandin F2? during the Ovsynch protocol on luteolysis and pregnancy in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Wiltbank, Milo C; Baez, Giovanni M; Cochrane, Fenella; Barletta, Rafael V; Trayford, Cheryl R; Joseph, Robert T

    2015-12-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of a second treatment with prostaglandin F2? (PGF) during Ovsynch on regression of the corpus luteum (CL) and on fertility to the timed artificial insemination. Two experiments were performed. In both experiments, cows were randomized to receive (1) no additional treatments with PGF=1 PGF, or (2) a second PGF treatment at 24h after the first PGF treatment=2 PGF. The first experiment (n=344 synchronized lactating dairy cows that received artificial insemination at 813d in milk) used the Double-Ovsynch protocol for synchronizing ovulation. Blood samples were collected at the PGF and final GnRH treatments (72 and 16h before timed artificial insemination) during the breeding Ovsynch protocol, to determine CL regression in response to the protocol. Treatment with 2 PGF increased CL regression from 83.0% with 1 PGF to 97.0% with 2 PGF. The effect of 2 PGF on CL regression was observed in both primiparous and multiparous cows. Cows with lower (2.0 to 4.8ng/mL) versus greater (4.9 to 12.0ng/mL) circulating progesterone at the time of PGF had lower percentage of cows with complete CL regression after 1 PGF (66.7 vs. 88.1%) but not after 2 PGF (95.1 vs. 97.6%). Experiment 2 used 2,148 lactating dairy cows on 11 dairy farms in 4 different regions of the United States. Cows were synchronized with Ovsynch and received timed artificial insemination at 603d in milk. Cows that received 2 PGF had a tendency for increased pregnancies per artificial insemination (P/AI) compared with cows with 1 PGF (36.1 vs. 33.3%). This tendency for improvement in P/AI was observed in multiparous but not in primiparous cows. Combining data from the 2 experiments indicated a 9.45% relative increase in P/AI for cows receiving 2 compared with 1 PGF (37.6 vs. 34.4%) with the increase in P/AI observed in multiparous but not in primiparous cows. Thus, a second PGF treatment in Ovsynch-type protocols can increase pregnancy success by about 10%, primarily due to enhanced fertility in multiparous cows. PMID:26433418

  9. Bee venom acupuncture, NSAIDs or combined treatment for chronic neck pain: study protocol for a randomized, assessor-blind trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic neck pain (CNP) is a common painful medical condition with a significant socioeconomic impact. In spite of widespread usage, the effectiveness and safety of combined treatments between conventional and complementary alternative medical treatment modalities has not been fully established in a rigorous randomized clinical trial (RCT). This pilot study will provide the clinical evidence to evaluate the feasibility and refine the protocol for a full-scale RCT on combined treatment of bee venom acupuncture (BVA) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in patients with CNP. Methods/Design This is a randomized, single-blind clinical trial with three parallel arms. Sixty patients between 18 and 65 years of age with non-specific, uncomplicated neck pain lasting for at least three months will be enrolled. Participants will be randomly allocated into the BVA, NSAIDs or combined treatment group. Assessors and statisticians will be blinded to the random allocation. All researchers will receive training to ensure their strict adherence to the study protocol. Patients from the BVA and combined treatment group will be treated with a bee venom increment protocol into predefined acupoints for six sessions over a three week period. BVA intervention is developed through a comprehensive discussion among interdisciplinary spine disorder experts, according to the guidelines of Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA). Patients from the NSAIDs and combined treatment groups will be prescribed loxoprofen (one tablet to be taken orally, three times a day for three weeks). Bothersomeness from CNP measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS) will be the primary outcome assessed at screening, visit two (baseline), four, six, eight (4th week assessment) and nine (8th week assessment) follow-up session. VAS for pain intensity, neck disability index (NDI), quality of life, depressive status and adverse experiences will also be analyzed. Discussion Our study results will contribute to feasibility evaluation and to relevant RCT protocol development for a full-scale RCT on combined treatment of BVA and NSAIDs for CNP patients. Trial registration This study is registered with the United States (US) National Institutes of Health Clinical Trials Registry: NCT01922466. PMID:24746224

  10. Evaluation of sputum culture conversion as a prognostic marker for end-of-treatment outcome inpatients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kurbatova, Ekaterina V.; Cegielski, J. Peter; Lienhardt, Christian; Akksilp, Rattanawadee; Bayona, Jaime; Becerra, Mercedes C.; Caoili, Janice; Contreras, Carmen; Dalton, Tracy; Danilovits, Manfred; Demikhova, Olga V.; Ershova, Julia; Gammino, Victoria M.; Gelmanova, Irina; Heilig, Charles M.; Jou, Ruwen; Kazennyy, Boris; Keshavjee, Salmaan; Kim, Hee Jin; Kliiman, Kai; Kvasnovsky, Charlotte; Leimane, Vaira; Mitnick, Carole D.; Quelapio, Imelda; Riekstina, Vija; Smith, Sarah E.; Tupasi, Thelma; van der Walt, Martie; Vasilyeva, Irina A.; Via, Laura E.; Viiklepp, Piret; Volchenkov, Grigory; Walker, Allison Taylor; Wolfgang, Melanie; Yagui, Martin; Zignol, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Background To assess the validity of sputum culture conversion (SCC) on solid media at varying time points and the time to SCC as prognostic markers for end-of-treatment outcome in multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) patients. Methods Data on1,712 MDR-TB patients from two large cohort studies were analyzed. Measures of association were determined using random effects multivariable logistic regression. Predictive values were calculated using bivariate random-effects generalized linear mixed model. Findings Times to SCC and SCC status at 6 months were significantly associated with treatment success compared to failure or death. SCC status at 2 months was significantly associated with treatment success among patients without known HIV infection only. The overall association of SCC with a successful outcome was substantially stronger at 6 months (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=14.07, 95% CI 10.0519.71) than at 2 months (HIV-negative patients: aOR=4.12 [2.257.54]; HIV unknown: aOR=3.59 [1.966.58], HIV-positive: aOR=0.38 [0.121.18]). The 2-month SCC had low sensitivity (27%) and high specificity (90%) for predicting treatment success. Conversely, 6-month SCC status had high sensitivity (92%), but moderate specificity (58%). The maximum combined sensitivity and specificity for SCC was reached between the 6th and 10th month of treatment. Interpretation Time to SCC, SCC status at 6 months, and SCC status at 2 months among patients without known HIV infection can be considered proxy markers of end-of-treatment outcome in MDR-TB patients, but the overall association with treatment success is substantially stronger for 6-month compared to 2-month SCC. Funding USAID, the US CDC, the Division of Intramural Research of NIAID/NIH, and the Republic of Koreas CDC. PMID:25726085

  11. Treatment Protocols for Eating Disorders: Clinicians' Attitudes, Concerns, Adherence and Difficulties Delivering Evidence-Based Psychological Interventions.

    PubMed

    Waller, Glenn

    2016-04-01

    There are several protocols in existence that guide clinicians in the implementation of effective, evidence-based psychological interventions for eating disorders. These have been made accessible in the form of treatment manuals. However, relatively few clinicians use those protocols, preferring to offer more eclectic or integrative approaches. Following a summary of the research that shows that these evidence-based approaches can be used successfully in routine clinical settings, this review considers why there is such poor uptake of these therapies in such settings. This review focuses on the role of service culture and on clinicians' own attitudes, beliefs and emotions. Possible means of enhancing uptake are considered, but these cannot be considered to be ideal solutions at present. PMID:26893234

  12. Addressing Inpatient Glycaemic Control with an Inpatient Glucometry Alert System

    PubMed Central

    Seheult, J. N.; Pazderska, A.; Gaffney, P.; Fogarty, J.; Sherlock, M.; Gibney, J.; Boran, G.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Poor inpatient glycaemic control has a prevalence exceeding 30% and results in increased length of stay and higher rates of hospital complications and inpatient mortality. The aim of this study was to improve inpatient glycaemic control by developing an alert system to process point-of-care blood glucose (POC-BG) results. Methods. Microsoft Excel Macros were developed for the processing of daily glucometry data downloaded from the Cobas IT database. Alerts were generated according to ward location for any value less than 4?mmol/L (hypoglycaemia) or greater than 15?mmol/L (moderate-severe hyperglycaemia). The Diabetes Team provided a weekday consult service for patients flagged on the daily reports. This system was implemented for a 60-day period. Results. There was a statistically significant 20% reduction in the percentage of hyperglycaemic patient-day weighted values >15?mmol/L compared to the preimplementation period without a significant change in the percentage of hypoglycaemic values. The time-to-next-reading after a dysglycaemic POC-BG result was reduced by 14% and the time-to-normalization of a dysglycaemic result was reduced from 10.2 hours to 8.4 hours. Conclusion. The alert system reduced the percentage of hyperglycaemic patient-day weighted glucose values and the time-to-normalization of blood glucose. PMID:26290664

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION: DEVELOPMENT OF A PROTOCOL FOR TESTING COMMERCIALLY PRODUCED STORMWATER TREATMENT DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past decade, there has been an increasing array of commercially available products for the treatment of nonpoint source pollution from urban stormwater. These products incorporate various approaches to stormwater treatment such as: in-line subsurface treatment chambers...

  14. Automation in an Addiction Treatment Research Clinic: Computerized Contingency Management, Ecological Momentary Assessment, and a Protocol Workflow System

    PubMed Central

    Vahabzadeh, Massoud; Lin, Jia-Ling; Mezghanni, Mustapha; Epstein, David H.; Preston, Kenzie L.

    2009-01-01

    Issues A challenge in treatment research is the necessity of adhering to protocol and regulatory strictures while maintaining flexibility to meet patients treatment needs and accommodate variations among protocols. Another challenge is the acquisition of large amounts of data in an occasionally hectic environment, along with provision of seamless methods for exporting, mining, and querying the data. Approach We have automated several major functions of our outpatient treatment research clinic for studies in drug abuse and dependence. Here we describe three such specialized applications: the Automated Contingency Management (ACM) system for delivery of behavioral interventions, the Transactional Electronic Diary (TED) system for management of behavioral assessments, and the Protocol Workflow System (PWS) for computerized workflow automation and guidance of each participants daily clinic activities. These modules are integrated into our larger information system to enable data sharing in real time among authorized staff. Key Findings ACM and TED have each permitted us to conduct research that was not previously possible. In addition, the time to data analysis at the end of each study is substantially shorter. With the implementation of the PWS, we have been able to manage a research clinic with an 80-patient capacity having an annual average of 18,000 patient-visits and 7,300 urine collections with a research staff of five. Finally, automated data management has considerably enhanced our ability to monitor and summarize participant-safety data for research oversight. Implications and conclusion When developed in consultation with end users, automation in treatment-research clinics can enable more efficient operations, better communication among staff, and expansions in research methods. PMID:19320669

  15. ABM Clinical Protocol #1: Guidelines for Blood Glucose Monitoring and Treatment of Hypoglycemia in Term and Late-Preterm Neonates, Revised 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wight, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    A central goal of The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine is the development of clinical protocols for managing common medical problems that may impact breastfeeding success. These protocols serve only as guidelines for the care of breastfeeding mothers and infants and do not delineate an exclusive course of treatment or serve as standards of medical care. Variations in treatment may be appropriate according to the needs of an individual patient. PMID:24823918

  16. Heparin-based treatment to prevent symptomatic deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism or death in general medical inpatients is not supported by best evidence.

    PubMed

    Spencer, A; Cawood, T; Frampton, C; Jardine, D

    2014-11-01

    Prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in medical patients is controversial. In contrast to surgical patients, the evidence supporting the use of heparin-based treatment for prevention of VTE (HVTEp) may not justify current guidelines. This study aims to determine whether current clinical guidelines for HVTEp are appropriate for medical patients. We searched medical databases for original randomised placebo-controlled studies of HVTEp in medical patients, excluding those with stroke and in intensive care. From 401 potentially relevant studies, we selected eight, which included over 16?000 patients. HVTEp decreased the incidence of all deep venous thromboses (DVT): 4.3% in the placebo group versus 2.3% in the treatment group, P = 0.002, number needed to treat, 50. However, this treatment effect was not seen for symptomatic DVT: 1.2% versus 0.9%, P = 0.18, odds ratio (OR) 0.72 (0.45-1.16). Similarly, HVTEp did not decrease the incidence of pulmonary embolism (PE): 0.54% versus 0.27%, P = 0.3, OR 0.57 (0.21-1.53), or fatal PE: 0.1% versus 0.0%, P = 0.3, OR 0.2 (0.01-4.11). Furthermore, HVTEp did not decrease total mortality: 5.63% versus 5.39%, P = 0.92, OR 0.96 (0.78-1.18). The use of HVTEp in hospitalised general medical patients does not result in a significant reduction in symptomatic DVT, PE, fatal PE or total mortality. The best evidence does not support the recommendations of the current clinical guidelines. PMID:25367724

  17. Outcomes of Inpatient Treatment for Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia in Alzheimers Disease Versus Dementia With Lewy Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Tatsuru; Tochimoto, Shinnichi; Madachi, Shuhei; Hino, Shoryoku

    2015-01-01

    Objective Most community-based studies have shown a more malignant clinical course for patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) than Alzheimers disease (AD). We examined differences in outcomes between patients with DLB and AD hospitalized for the treatment of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. Method A chart review was conducted of patients with either AD or DLB hospitalized in the acute psychogeriatric ward between January 2008 and December 2011 in Kahoku-City, Ishikawa, Japan. Outcome measures were discharge destinations and time to death. A diagnosis of AD was made according to DSM-5 criteria, whereas a diagnosis of DLB was made according to the Consortium on DLB International Workshop criteria for probable DLB. Pharmacologic treatment was optimized under constant monitoring of patients. Cholinesterase inhibitors and yi-gan san were tried prior to antipsychotics in DLB patients. Results The study cohort consisted of 224 patients with AD and 106 with DLB. After matching for sociodemographic factors and cognitive and physical function, it was found that antipsychotics were less frequently used during hospitalization in patients with DLB than AD (63% vs 82%, respectively, P < .01), whereas cholinesterase inhibitors (88% vs 43%, P < .001) and yi-gan san (35% vs 20%, P < .05) were more frequently used in patients with DLB. There were no significant differences in discharge destinations between the 2 groups. The 5-year cumulative survival rates were similar in the AD and DLB groups (46.4% vs 45.7%, respectively, P = .6225). Conclusions Optimization of pharmacologic treatment during hospitalization could reduce the use of antipsychotics and improve the subsequent clinical course in DLB. PMID:26835172

  18. INtegration of DEPression Treatment into HIV Care in Uganda (INDEPTH-Uganda): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite 10 to% of persons living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa having clinical depression, and the consequences of depression for key public health outcomes (HIV treatment adherence and condom use), depression treatment is rarely integrated into HIV care programs. Task-shifting, protocolized approaches to depression care have been used to overcome severe shortages of mental health specialists in developing countries, but not in sub-Saharan Africa and not with HIV clients. The aims of this trial are to evaluate the implementation outcomes and cost-effectiveness of a task-shifting, protocolized model of antidepressant care for HIV clinics in Uganda. Methods/Design INDEPTH-Uganda is a cluster randomized controlled trial that compares two task-shifting models of depression care - a protocolized model versus a model that relies on the clinical acumen of trained providers to provide depression care in ten public health HIV clinics in Uganda. In addition to data abstracted from routine data collection mechanisms and supervision logs, survey data will be collected from patient and provider longitudinal cohorts; at each site, a random sample of 150 medically stable patients who are depressed according to the PHQ-2 screening will be followed for 12months, and providers involved in depression care implementation will be followed over 24months. These data will be used to assess whether the two models differ on implementation outcomes (proportion screened, diagnosed, treated; provider fidelity to model of care), provider adoption of treatment care knowledge and practices, and depression alleviation. A cost-effectiveness analysis will be conducted to compare the relative use of resources by each model. Discussion If effective and resource-efficient, the task-shifting, protocolized model will provide an approach to building the capacity for sustainable integration of depression treatment in HIV care settings across sub-Saharan Africa and improving key public health outcomes. Trial registration INDEPTH-Uganda has been registered with the National Institutes of Health sponsored clinical trials registry (3 February 2013) and has been assigned the identifier NCT02056106. PMID:24962086

  19. Continuity of Offender Treatment for Substance Use Disorders from Institution to Community. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 30.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Center for Substance Abuse Treatment.

    This TIP, on the best practice recommendations for the treatment of substance abuse, presents guidelines for ensuring continuity of care as offenders with substance use disorders move from incarceration to the community. Research indicates that treatment gains may be lost if treatment is not continued after the offender is released from…

  20. Effects of an in-patient treatment program based on regular exercise and a balanced diet on high molecular weight adiponectin, resistin levels, and insulin resistance in adolescents with severe obesity.

    PubMed

    Gueugnon, Carine; Mougin, Fabienne; Simon-Rigaud, Marie-Laure; Regnard, Jacques; Ngre, Vronique; Dumoulin, Gilles

    2012-08-01

    Adiponectin, the most abundant hormone produced by adipose tissue, circulates in 3 isoforms, including high molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin. The latter has been suggested to be a better predictor of metabolic disturbances and insulin resistance associated with obesity. This study investigated changes in total and HMW adiponectin, resistin, and homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) during a 9-month in-patient treatment program based on physical exercise and a balanced diet in 32 severely obese adolescents. Total and HMW adiponectin, resistin, and HOMA were measured at baseline (month 0) and during the program (months 3, 6, 9). In addition, a control group of 15 teenagers served as a reference for the baseline assessments. At baseline, HMW adiponectin was more markedly decreased in obese adolescents than total adiponectin, and both were lower than in controls. Conversely, resistin and HOMA were higher in obese adolescents. During the program, there was a significant change in body composition and improved insulin sensitivity among obese teenagers. In addition, HMW adiponectin and the ratio of HMW-to-total adiponectin increased throughout the study, whereas total adiponectin only increased up until the sixth month. On the contrary, resistin did not show any significant change. In obese adolescents, a long-term combination of aerobic exercise and a balanced diet, inducing change in body composition and improved insulin sensitivity, markedly increased HMW adiponectin compared with total adiponectin, without any change in resistin concentrations. Our results thus suggest that the determination of HMW adiponectin could be more useful than measurement of total adiponectin in clinical settings. PMID:22574715

  1. Developing an Inpatient Group Psychotherapy Program: Challenges and Lessons Learnt

    PubMed Central

    Razaghi, Emran Mohammad; Tabatabaee, Maryam; Pourramzani, Ali; Shirali Mohammadpour, Reza; Mousazade Moghaddam, Arezou; Yahyavi, Seyyed Taha

    2015-01-01

    In Iran, inpatient group psychotherapy has been limited to transient practices for research purposes or fulfilling personal interest of therapists. The goal of this paper is to share and explain the experience of developing an inpatient group psychotherapy program in Roozbeh Psychiatric Hospital, Tehran, Iran. After theoretical delineation and preparation of a draft of the program guideline, two pilot sessions were held. Based on this initial experience a final treatment guideline was prepared. Afterwards, the program was continued for more than 1 year in a female ward at Roozbeh Psychiatric Hospital. The output of this exercise was a guideline that covers important topics in development of inpatient group psychotherapy. It is concluded that inpatient group psychotherapy has its unique challenges. Of the most important challenges that can be mentioned in this regard are the participation of patients with significant differences in levels of psychopathology and psychiatric signs and symptoms, and high comorbidity with specific personality traits or disorders. Other challenges relevant to the structure of the group include items such as very limited time for working through and inevitable out-of-group contacts. PMID:26576176

  2. Developing an Inpatient Group Psychotherapy Program: Challenges and Lessons Learnt.

    PubMed

    Razaghi, Emran Mohammad; Tabatabaee, Maryam; Pourramzani, Ali; Shirali Mohammadpour, Reza; Mousazade Moghaddam, Arezou; Yahyavi, Seyyed Taha

    2015-09-01

    In Iran, inpatient group psychotherapy has been limited to transient practices for research purposes or fulfilling personal interest of therapists. The goal of this paper is to share and explain the experience of developing an inpatient group psychotherapy program in Roozbeh Psychiatric Hospital, Tehran, Iran. After theoretical delineation and preparation of a draft of the program guideline, two pilot sessions were held. Based on this initial experience a final treatment guideline was prepared. Afterwards, the program was continued for more than 1 year in a female ward at Roozbeh Psychiatric Hospital. The output of this exercise was a guideline that covers important topics in development of inpatient group psychotherapy. It is concluded that inpatient group psychotherapy has its unique challenges. Of the most important challenges that can be mentioned in this regard are the participation of patients with significant differences in levels of psychopathology and psychiatric signs and symptoms, and high comorbidity with specific personality traits or disorders. Other challenges relevant to the structure of the group include items such as very limited time for working through and inevitable out-of-group contacts. PMID:26576176

  3. Internal Medicine Training in the Inpatient Setting

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Di Francesco; Pistoria, Michael J; Auerbach, Andrew D; Nardino, Robert J; Holmboe, Eric S

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE Although the inpatient setting has served as the predominant educational site of internal medicine training programs, many changes and factors are currently affecting education in this setting. As a result, many educational organizations are calling for reforms in inpatient training. This report reviews the available literature on specific internal medicine inpatient educational interventions and proposes recommendations for improving internal medicine training in this setting. METHOD We searched Medline for articles published between 1966 and August 2004 which focused on internal medicine training interventions in the inpatient setting; bibliographies of Medline-identified articles, as well as articles suggested by experts in the field provided additional citations. We then reviewed, classified, and abstracted only articles where an assessment of learner outcomes was included. RESULTS Thirteen studies of inpatient internal medicine educational interventions were found that included an outcome assessment. All were single institution studies. The majority of these studies was of poor methodological quality and focused on specific content areas of internal medicine. None assessed the effectiveness or impact of internal medicine core inpatient experiences or curriculum. CONCLUSION This review identifies significant gaps in our understanding of what constitutes effective inpatient education. The paucity of high quality research in the internal medicine inpatient setting highlights the urgent need to formally define and study what constitutes an effective core inpatient curriculum. PMID:16423111

  4. International Study to Predict Optimized Treatment for Depression (iSPOT-D), a randomized clinical trial: rationale and protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Clinically useful treatment moderators of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) have not yet been identified, though some baseline predictors of treatment outcome have been proposed. The aim of iSPOT-D is to identify pretreatment measures that predict or moderate MDD treatment response or remission to escitalopram, sertraline or venlafaxine; and develop a model that incorporates multiple predictors and moderators. Methods/Design The International Study to Predict Optimized Treatment - in Depression (iSPOT-D) is a multi-centre, international, randomized, prospective, open-label trial. It is enrolling 2016 MDD outpatients (ages 18-65) from primary or specialty care practices (672 per treatment arm; 672 age-, sex- and education-matched healthy controls). Study-eligible patients are antidepressant medication (ADM) naïve or willing to undergo a one-week wash-out of any non-protocol ADM, and cannot have had an inadequate response to protocol ADM. Baseline assessments include symptoms; distress; daily function; cognitive performance; electroencephalogram and event-related potentials; heart rate and genetic measures. A subset of these baseline assessments are repeated after eight weeks of treatment. Outcomes include the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (primary) and self-reported depressive symptoms, social functioning, quality of life, emotional regulation, and side-effect burden (secondary). Participants may then enter a naturalistic telephone follow-up at weeks 12, 16, 24 and 52. The first half of the sample will be used to identify potential predictors and moderators, and the second half to replicate and confirm. Discussion First enrolment was in December 2008, and is ongoing. iSPOT-D evaluates clinical and biological predictors of treatment response in the largest known sample of MDD collected worldwide. Trial registration International Study to Predict Optimised Treatment - in Depression (iSPOT-D) ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00693849 URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00693849?term=International+Study+to+Predict+Optimized+Treatment+for+Depression&rank=1 PMID:21208417

  5. Cost analysis of the Kozak protocol as used in an Ontario hospital in the treatment of children with epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed Central

    Wodinsky, H. B.

    1984-01-01

    Conventional treatment of epidermolysis bullosa is often unsuccessful. The Kozak protocol is an alternative that has been given considerable public support in Ontario. The incremental cost of this treatment program at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, was examined. The departments of nursing, pharmacy and food services each kept records of salaries and supply costs applicable to the care of nine patients with epidermolysis bullosa who were treated in the fiscal year 1982-83. The selected direct costs to the hospital were compared with the projected costs if these patients had been treated in Dr. Kozak's clinic in West Germany or under the financial arrangements offered to Dr. Kozak by the Ontario minister of health. At a total incremental cost of +255.92 per patient-day, care at the Hospital for Sick Children may not currently be the least expensive means of offering the Kozak protocol to Ontario children. However, the major expense of the program, the nurses' salaries, could be reduced if the patients' parents were to assume many of the nursing tasks; this would make the hospital's program the most cost-effective method of treating children with epidermolysis bullosa. PMID:6697279

  6. 42 CFR 424.13 - Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... other than inpatient psychiatric facilities. 424.13 Section 424.13 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... services of hospitals other than inpatient psychiatric facilities. (a) Content of certification and... hospital services (other than inpatient psychiatric facility services) only if a physician certifies...

  7. Effectiveness of a Nurse-Managed Protocol to Prevent Hypoglycemia in Hospitalized Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Marelli, Giuseppe; Avanzini, Fausto; Iacuitti, Giuseppe; Planca, Enrico; Frigerio, Ilaria; Busi, Giovanna; Carlino, Liliana; Cortesi, Laura; Roncaglioni, Maria Carla; Riva, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Background. Hypoglycemia due to inadequate carbohydrate intake is a frequent complication of insulin treatment of diabetic in-patients. Objective. To assess the effectiveness of a nurse-managed protocol to prevent hypoglycemia during subcutaneous insulin treatment. Design. Prospective pre-post-intervention study. Methods. In 350 consecutive diabetic in-patients the incidence of hypoglycemia (blood glucose < 70?mg/dL) during subcutaneous insulin treatment was assessed before (phase A) and after (phase B) the protocol was adopted to permit (1) the patient to opt for substitutive food to integrate incomplete carbohydrate intake in the meal; (2) in case of lack of appetite or repeatedly partial intake of the planned food, prandial insulin administered at the end of the meal to be related to the actual amount of carbohydrates eaten; (3) intravenous infusion of glucose during prolonged fasting. Results. Eighty-four patients in phase A and 266 in phase B received subcutaneous insulin for median periods of, respectively, 7 (Q1Q3 612) and 6 days (Q1Q3 49). Hypoglycemic events declined significantly from 0.34 0.33 per day in phase A to 0.19 0.30 in phase B (P > 0.001). Conclusions. A nurse-managed protocol focusing on carbohydrate intake reduced the incidence of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes receiving subcutaneous insulin in hospital. PMID:25961051

  8. Outpatient Myelography: A Prospective Trial Comparing Complications after Myelography between Outpatients and Inpatients in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Inoue, Hidenori; Aoki, Takaaki; Ishiguro, Naoki; Osawa, Yoshimitsu

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective comparative study. Purpose To compare the incidence and severity of adverse reactions associated with myelography performed in outpatients vs. in inpatients and report the safety and usefulness of outpatient myelography in Japanese patients. Overview of Literature Myelography is normally performed as an inpatient procedure in most hospitals in Japan. No studies have reported the usefulness and adverse effects of outpatient myelography in Japanese patients. Methods We performed 221 myelography procedures. Eighty-five of the 221 patients underwent outpatient myelography using our new protocol. The incidence and severity of adverse reactions were compared with the other 136 patients, who underwent conventional inpatient myelography. We further compared the cost of outpatient and inpatient myelography. Results The overall rate of adverse effects was 9.4% in outpatients, as compared with 7.4% in inpatients. Overall, 1.2% of outpatients and 0.74% inpatients experienced "severe" adverse effects (requiring hospitalization). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in either the overall rate of adverse effects or the rate of "severe" adverse effects. Moreover, the average outpatient procedure cost was only one-third to one-half that of the inpatient procedure. Conclusions This was the first study to address the safety and usefulness of outpatient myelography in Japanese patients. If selected according to proper inclusion criteria for outpatient procedure, no significant differences were observed in the adverse effects between inpatients and outpatients. The outpatient procedure is more economical and has the added benefit of being more convenient and time-efficient for the patient. PMID:26713127

  9. Albumin (BSA) Adsorption over Graphene in Aqueous Environment: Influence of Orientation, Adsorption Protocol, and Solvent Treatment.

    PubMed

    Vilhena, J G; Rubio-Pereda, Pamela; Vellosillo, Perceval; Serena, P A; Pérez, Rubén

    2016-02-23

    We report 150 ns explicit solvent MD simulations of the adsorption on graphene of albumin (BSA) in two orientations and using two different adsorption protocols, i.e., free and forced adsorption. Our results show that free adsorption occurs with little structural rearrangements. Even taking adsorption to an extreme, by forcing it with a 5 nN downward force applied during the initial 20 ns, we show that along a particular orientation BSA is able to preserve the structural properties of the majority of its binding sites. Furthermore, in all the cases considered in this work, the ibuprofen binding site has shown a strong resilience to structural changes. Finally, we compare these results with implicit solvent simulations and find that the latter predicts an extreme protein unfolding upon adsorption. The origin of this discrepancy is attributed to a poor description of the water entropic forces at interfaces in the implicit solvent methods. PMID:26799950

  10. Substance Abuse among Older Adults. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 26.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Paddy; Davis, Carolyn; Howard, Deborah L.; Kimbrough, Phyllis; Nelson, Anne; Paul, Michelle; Shuman, Deborah; Brooks, Margaret K.; Dogoloff, Mary Lou; Vitzthum, Virginia; Hayws, Elizabeth

    As alcohol and other drug disorders become acknowledged as major problems, the need increases for current information on the scope of the problem and appropriate treatment. This TIP serves to educate treatment providers with information about older adults who, in general, are more likely to hide their substance abuse, less likely to seek

  11. Implementation of an Intensive Treatment Protocol for Adolescents with Panic Disorder and Agoraphobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angelosante, Aleta G.; Pincus, Donna B.; Whitton, Sarah W.; Cheron, Daniel; Pian, Jessica

    2009-01-01

    New and innovative ways of implementing cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) are required to address the varied needs of youth with anxiety disorders. Brief treatment formats may be useful in assisting teens to return to healthy functioning quickly and can make treatment more accessible for those who may not have local access to providers of CBT.

  12. Models of Inpatient Neurologic Care.

    PubMed

    Likosky, David J; Aragon, Juan M

    2015-12-01

    The rapid ascension of the neurohospitalist model has been a response to national pressures implemented around local practicalities. As such, there is no uniform or ideal neurohospitalist model; there remains tremendous variation nationally. Over time, several dominant models have emerged, each of which raises distinct issues, both clinical and financial. As the field continues to grow, neurohospitalists in both hospital-owned and private practices are developing models that are reshaping the practice of inpatient neurology. A thoughtful approach to developing and maintaining programs is critical to success. PMID:26595873

  13. A comprehensive inpatient discharge system.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, E. M.; Teich, J. M.; Pedraza, L. A.; Thomas, D.

    1996-01-01

    Our group has developed a computer system that supports all phases of the inpatient discharge process. The system fills in most of the physician's discharge order form and the nurse's discharge abstract, using information available from sign-out, order entry, scheduling, and other databases. It supplies information for referrals to outside institutions, and provides a variety of instruction materials for patients. Discharge forms can be completed in advance, so that the patient is not waiting for final paperwork. Physicians and nurses can work on their components independently, rather than in series. Response to the system has been very favorable. PMID:8947755

  14. Chinese Herbal Medicine in the Treatment of Chronic Heart Failure: Three-Stage Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Liangtao; Chen, Jianxin; Guo, Shuzhen; Wang, Juan; Gao, Kuo; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Chan; Zhao, Huihui; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background. Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) has been used in the treatment of chronic heart failure (CHF) for a long time. Treatment based on syndrome differentiation and the main characteristic of TCM is the fundamental principle of TCM practice. In this study protocol, we have designed a trial to assess the efficacy and safety of CHM on CHF based on syndrome differentiation. Methods/Design. This is a three-stage trial of CHM in the treatment of CHF. The first stage is a literature review aiming to explore the common syndromes of CHF. The second is a multicentral, randomized, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CHM for the treatment of CHF. The third is a multicentral, randomized controlled clinical trial aiming to make cost-effectiveness analysis and evaluate the feasibility, compliance, and universality of CHM on CHF. Discussion. This trial will evaluate the efficacy, safety, feasibility, compliance, and universality of CHM on CHF. The expected outcome is to provide evidence-based recommendations for CHM on CHF and develop a prescription of CHM in the treatment of CHF. This trial is registered with NCT01939236 (Stage Two of the whole trial). PMID:26089951

  15. SU-E-J-113: The Influence of Optimizing Pediatric CT Simulator Protocols On the Treatment Dose Calculation in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Zhang, J; Hu, Q; Tie, J; Wu, H; Deng, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the possibility of applying optimized scanning protocols for pediatric CT simulation by quantifying the dosimetric inaccuracy introduced by using a fixed HU to density conversion. Methods: The images of a CIRS electron density reference phantom (Model 062) were acquired by a Siemens CT simulator (Sensation Open) using the following settings of tube voltage and beam current: 120 kV/190mA (the reference protocol used to calibrate CT for our treatment planning system (TPS)); Fixed 190mA combined with all available kV: 80, 100, and 140; fixed 120 kV and various current from 37 to 444 mA (scanner extremes) with interval of 30 mA. To avoid the HU uncertainty of point sampling in the various inserts of known electron densities, the mean CT numbers of the central cylindrical volume were calculated using DICOMan software. The doses per 100 MU to the reference point (SAD=100cm, Depth=10cm, Field=10X10cm, 6MV photon beam) in a virtual cubic phantom (30X30X30cm) were calculated using Eclipse TPS (calculation model: AcurosXB-11031) by assigning the CT numbers to HU of typical materials acquired by various protocols. Results: For the inserts of densities less than muscle, CT number fluctuations of all protocols were within the tolerance of 10 HU as accepted by AAPM-TG66. For more condensed materials, fixed kV yielded stable HU with any mA combination where largest disparities were found in 1750mg/cc insert: HU{sub reference}=1801(106.6cGy), HU{sub minimum}=1799 (106.6cGy, error{sub dose}=0.00%), HU{sub maximum}=1815 (106.8cGy, error{sub dose}=0.19%). Yet greater disagreements were observed with increasing density when kV was modified: HU{sub minimum}=1646 (104.5cGy, error{sub dose}=- 1.97%), HU{sub maximum}=2487 (116.4cGy, error{sub dose}=9.19%) in 1750mg/cc insert. Conclusion: Without affecting treatment dose calculation, personalized mA optimization of CT simulator can be conducted by fixing kV for a better cost-effectiveness of imaging dose and quality especially for children. Unless recalibrated, kV should be constant for all anatomical sites if diagnostic CT scanner is used as a simulator. This work was partially supported by Capital Medical Development Scientific Research Fund of China.

  16. Internet treatment for social anxiety disorder in Romania: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is one of the most common anxiety disorders and is associated with marked impairments. However, a small proportion of individuals with SAD seek and receive treatment. Internet-administrated cognitive behavior therapy (iCBT) has been found to be an effective treatment for SAD. This trial will be the first Internet-delivered guided self-help intervention for SAD in Romania. Methods Participants with social anxiety disorder (N = 96) will be recruited via newspapers, online banners and Facebook. Participants will be randomized to either: a) an active treatment, or b) a waiting list control group. The treatment will have a guided iCBT format and will last for nine weeks. Self-report questionnaires on social phobia, anxiety, depression, treatment credibility and irrational thinking will be used. All assessments will be collected pre, post and at follow-up (six months after intervention). Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale Self-Report version (LSAS-SR) will be the primary outcome measure and will be administrated on a weekly basis in both conditions. Discussion The present randomized controlled trial investigates the efficacy of an Internet-administered intervention in reducing social anxiety symptoms in a culture where this form of treatment has not been tested. This trial will add to the body of knowledge on the efficacy of iCBT, and the results might lead to an increase of the accessibility of evidence-based psychological treatment in Romania. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01557894 PMID:23111108

  17. Approach bias modification in inpatient psychiatric smokers.

    PubMed

    Machulska, Alla; Zlomuzica, Armin; Rinck, Mike; Assion, Hans-Jörg; Margraf, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Drug-related automatic approach tendencies contribute to the development and maintenance of addictive behavior. The present study investigated whether a nicotine-related approach bias can be modified in smokers undergoing inpatient psychiatric treatment by using a novel training variant of the nicotine Approach-Avoidance-Task (AAT). Additionally, we assessed whether the AAT-training would affect smoking behavior. Inpatient smokers were randomly assigned to either an AAT-training or a sham-training condition. In the AAT-training condition, smokers were indirectly instructed to make avoidance movements in response to nicotine-related pictures and to make approach movements in response to tooth-cleaning pictures. In the sham-training condition, no contingency between picture content und arm movements existed. Trainings were administered in four sessions, accompanied by a brief smoking-cessation intervention. Smoking-related self-report measures and automatic approach biases toward smoking cues were measured before and after training. Three months after training, daily nicotine consumption was obtained. A total of 205 participants were recruited, and data from 139 participants were considered in the final analysis. Prior to the trainings, smokers in both conditions exhibited a stronger approach bias for nicotine-related pictures than for tooth-cleaning pictures. After both trainings, this difference was no longer evident. Although reduced smoking behavior at posttest was observed after both trainings, only the AAT-training led to a larger reduction of nicotine consumption at a three-month follow-up. Our preliminary data partially support the conclusion that the AAT might be a feasible tool to reduce smoking in the long-term in psychiatric patients, albeit its effect on other smoking-related measures remains to be explored. PMID:26874269

  18. Uptake of a web-based oncology protocol system: how do cancer clinicians use eviQ cancer treatments online?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The use of computerized systems to support evidence-based practice is commonplace in contemporary medicine. Despite the prolific use of electronic support systems there has been relatively little research on the uptake of web-based systems in the oncology setting. Our objective was to examine the uptake of a web-based oncology protocol system (http://www.eviq.org.au) by Australian cancer clinicians. Methods We used web-logfiles and Google Analytics to examine the characteristics of eviQ registrants from October 2009-December 2011 and patterns of use by cancer clinicians during a typical month. Results As of December 2011, there were 16,037 registrants; 85% of whom were Australian health care professionals. During a typical month 87% of webhits occurred in standard clinical hours (08:00 to 18:00 weekdays). Raw webhits were proportional to the size of clinician groups: nurses (47% of Australian registrants), followed by doctors (20%), and pharmacists (14%). However, pharmacists had up to three times the webhit rate of other clinical groups. Clinicians spent five times longer viewing chemotherapy protocol pages than other content and the protocols viewed reflect the most common cancers: lung, breast and colorectal. Conclusions Our results demonstrate eviQ is used by a range of health professionals involved in cancer treatment at the point-of-care. Continued monitoring of electronic decision support systems is vital to understanding how they are used in clinical practice and their impact on processes of care and patient outcomes. PMID:23497080

  19. Three Years of a Nonsurgical Periodontal Treatment Protocol to Observe Clinical Outcomes in ? 6-mm Pockets: A Retrospective Case Series.

    PubMed

    Roncati, Marisa; Gariffo, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    A total of 25 patients were treated with a nonsurgical periodontal treatment protocol (NSPTP) consisting of four appointments (three within 1 week and one approximately 30 days later). Nonsurgical periodontal instrumentation was implemented, with the adjunctive use of thermal diode lasers (wavelength of 808 or 980 nm). The patients were scheduled for recall visits every 3 months and reevaluated 1 year post-NSPTP. They were subsequently monitored at 4-month intervals for the remaining 2-year follow-up maintenance period. In total, 698 teeth (210 multirooted and 488 single-rooted) were included in the study. The mean bleeding on probing was 43% at baseline and decreased to 12% at 12 months and to 8% at 3 years. The initial ? 6-mm probing pocket depth (PPD) in single-rooted teeth decreased from 6.2 mm at baseline to a mean of 1.8 mm at 12 months and remained at 1.8 mm at 3 years, with a mean clinical attachment level (CAL) gain of 4.4 mm. In multirooted teeth, the PPD decreased from 6.7 mm to a mean of 3.9 mm at 12 months and 3.6 mm at 3 years, with a mean CAL gain of 2.9 mm. The mean overall recession was 0.3 mm at baseline, 0.1 mm at 1 year, and 0.3 mm at the 3-year follow-up. In the short-term followup period, uniform and consistent implementation of the NSPTP used here with adjunctive use of thermal diode lasers seemed to convey therapeutic benefits, stable periodontal soft tissue levels, and satisfactory esthetics in patients with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis. The present protocol is relevant as a treatment option for medically compromised patients, those who refuse or delay surgical treatment, or those who present with other limitations. PMID:26901297

  20. A comparison of two treatments for childhood apraxia of speech: methods and treatment protocol for a parallel group randomised control trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Childhood Apraxia of Speech is an impairment of speech motor planning that manifests as difficulty producing the sounds (articulation) and melody (prosody) of speech. These difficulties may persist through life and are detrimental to academic, social, and vocational development. A number of published single subject and case series studies of speech treatments are available. There are currently no randomised control trials or other well designed group trials available to guide clinical practice. Methods/Design A parallel group, fixed size randomised control trial will be conducted in Sydney, Australia to determine the efficacy of two treatments for Childhood Apraxia of Speech: 1) Rapid Syllable Transition Treatment and the 2) Nuffield Dyspraxia Programme Third edition. Eligible children will be English speaking, aged 412?years with a diagnosis of suspected CAS, normal or adjusted hearing and vision, and no comprehension difficulties or other developmental diagnoses. At least 20 children will be randomised to receive one of the two treatments in parallel. Treatments will be delivered by trained and supervised speech pathology clinicians using operationalised manuals. Treatment will be administered in 1-hour sessions, 4 times per week for 3?weeks. The primary outcomes are speech sound and prosodic accuracy on a customised 292 item probe and the Diagnostic Evaluation of Articulation and Phonology inconsistency subtest administered prior to treatment and 1?week, 1?month and 4?months post-treatment. All post assessments will be completed by blinded assessors. Our hypotheses are: 1) treatment effects at 1?week post will be similar for both treatments, 2) maintenance of treatment effects at 1 and 4?months post will be greater for Rapid Syllable Transition Treatment than Nuffield Dyspraxia Programme treatment, and 3) generalisation of treatment effects to untrained related speech behaviours will be greater for Rapid Syllable Transition Treatment than Nuffield Dyspraxia Programme treatment. This protocol was approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee, University of Sydney (#12924). Discussion This will be the first randomised control trial to test treatment for CAS. It will be valuable for clinical decision-making and providing evidence-based services for children with CAS. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12612000744853 PMID:22863021

  1. Hepatocellular carcinoma: From clinical practice to evidence-based treatment protocols

    PubMed Central

    Galun, Danijel; Basaric, Dragan; Zuvela, Marinko; Bulajic, Predrag; Bogdanovic, Aleksandar; Bidzic, Nemanja; Milicevic, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the major malignant diseases in many healthcare systems. The growing number of new cases diagnosed each year is nearly equal to the number of deaths from this cancer. Worldwide, HCC is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths, as it is the fifth most common cancer and the third most important cause of cancer related death in men. Among various risk factors the two are prevailing: viral hepatitis, namely chronic hepatitis C virus is a well-established risk factor contributing to the rising incidence of HCC. The epidemic of obesity and the metabolic syndrome, not only in the United States but also in Asia, tend to become the leading cause of the long-term rise in the HCC incidence. Today, the diagnosis of HCC is established within the national surveillance programs in developed countries while the diagnosis of symptomatic, advanced stage disease still remains the characteristic of underdeveloped countries. Although many different staging systems have been developed and evaluated the Barcelona-Clinic Liver Cancer staging system has emerged as the most useful to guide HCC treatment. Treatment allocation should be decided by a multidisciplinary board involving hepatologists, pathologists, radiologists, liver surgeons and oncologists guided by personalized -based medicine. This approach is important not only to balance between different oncologic treatments strategies but also due to the complexity of the disease (chronic liver disease and the cancer) and due to the large number of potentially efficient therapies. Careful patient selection and a tailored treatment modality for every patient, either potentially curative (surgical treatment and tumor ablation) or palliative (transarterial therapy, radioembolization and medical treatment, i.e., sorafenib) is mandatory to achieve the best treatment outcome. PMID:26380652

  2. Does recruitment method make a difference? Effects on protocol retention and treatment outcome in elderly depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Stack, J A; Paradis, C F; Reynolds, C F; Houck, P R; Frank, E; Anderson, B; Mayo, A L; Miller, M D; Rifai, A H; Perel, J M

    1995-01-31

    The specific aim of this study was to contrast effects of recruitment method (solicited, referred) on demographic, psychosocial, medical, and treatment outcome measures in an ongoing clinical trial of maintenance therapies in late-life depression. Data from 125 elderly patients (56 solicited via media campaign, 69 clinically referred) with recurrent, unipolar major depression were available for analysis. Several statistical contrast procedures, including group t tests, chi 2 tests, survival analysis, and logistic regression, were used to assess differences in patient profiles related to method of recruitment. Referred patients included a higher proportion of African Americans and had a lower level of education, fewer economic resources, and higher chronic medical burden. Solicited patients had been in the index episode longer than the referred patients at the time of protocol entry and were 3.4 times more likely to have experienced a "provoking agent" (severe life event or chronic difficulty) during the 6 months that preceded the onset of depressive symptoms. In contrast to these demographic and illness history differences, there were no differences in treatment response rates or time to response related to recruitment method. Solicited patients had an overall treatment response rate of 71% versus 62% in the referred group. Median time to response was 14.3 weeks in the solicited group and 13.6 weeks in the referred group. These results suggest that the inclusion of solicited patients in geriatric depression clinical trials does not bias short-term treatment outcome. PMID:7792338

  3. Effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy augmentation in major depression treatment (ECAM study): study protocol for a randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Atsuo; Sado, Mitsuhiro; Mitsuda, Dai; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Kikuchi, Toshiaki; Abe, Takayuki; Sato, Yuji; Iwashita, Satoru; Mimura, Masaru; Ono, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Major depression is a serious mental disorder that causes substantial distress and impairment in individuals and places an enormous burden on society. Although antidepressant treatment is the most common therapy provided in routine practice, there is little evidence to guide second-line therapy for patients who have failed to respond to antidepressants. The aim of this paper is to describe the study protocol for a randomised controlled trial that measures the clinical effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) as an augmentation strategy to treat patients with non-psychotic major depression identified as suboptimal responders to usual depression care. Methods and analysis The current study is a 16-week assessor-blinded randomised, parallel-groups superiority trial with 12-month follow-up at an outpatient clinic as part of usual depression care. Patients aged 2065?years with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) Major Depressive Disorder who have experienced at least one failed trial of antidepressants as part of usual depression care, will be randomly assigned to receive CBT plus treatment as usual, or treatment as usual alone. The primary outcome is the change in clinician-rated 17-item GRID-Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (GRID-HAMD) score at 16?weeks, and secondary outcomes include severity and change in scores of subjective depression symptoms, proportion of responders and remitters, safety and quality of life. The primary population will be the intention-to-treat patients. Ethics and dissemination All protocols and the informed consent form comply with the Ethics Guideline for Clinical Research (Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare). Ethics review committees at the Keio University School of Medicine and the Sakuragaoka Memorial Hospital approved the study protocol. The results of the study will be disseminated at several research conferences and as published articles in peer-reviewed journals. The study will be implemented and reported in line with the CONSORT statement. Trial registration number UMIN Clinical Trials Registry: UMIN000001218. PMID:25335963

  4. A Qualitative Study of the Treatment Improvement Protocols (TIPs): An Assessment of the Use of TIPs by Individuals Affiliated with the Addiction Technology Transfer Centers (ATTCs).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayashi, Susan W.; Suzuki, Marcia; Hubbard, Susan M.; Huang, Judy Y.; Cobb, Anita M.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluated the Addiction Technology Transfer Centers (ATTCs) of the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT) as a means of diffusion of innovations, focusing on use of the Treatment Improvement Protocols (TIPs). Qualitative studies at 6 ATTCs that included 57 interviews show that the CSAT is at the forefront of providing resources to the

  5. Folate Augmentation of Treatment Evaluation for Depression (FolATED): protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Seren Haf; Bedson, Emma; Hughes, Dyfrig; Lloyd, Keith; Moat, Stuart; Pirmohamed, Munir; Slegg, Gary; Tranter, Richard; Whitaker, Rhiannon; Wilkinson, Clare; Russell, Ian

    2007-01-01

    Background Clinical depression is common, debilitating and treatable; one in four people experience it during their lives. The majority of sufferers are treated in primary care and only half respond well to active treatment. Evidence suggests that folate may be a useful adjunct to antidepressant treatment: 1) patients with depression often have a functional folate deficiency; 2) the severity of such deficiency, indicated by elevated homocysteine, correlates with depression severity, 3) low folate is associated with poor antidepressant response, and 4) folate is required for the synthesis of neurotransmitters implicated in the pathogenesis and treatment of depression. Methods/Design The primary objective of this trial is to estimate the effect of folate augmentation in new or continuing treatment of depressive disorder in primary and secondary care. Secondary objectives are to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of folate augmentation of antidepressant treatment, investigate how the response to antidepressant treatment depends on genetic polymorphisms relevant to folate metabolism and antidepressant response, and explore whether baseline folate status can predict response to antidepressant treatment. Seven hundred and thirty patients will be recruited from North East Wales, North West Wales and Swansea. Patients with moderate to severe depression will be referred to the trial by their GP or Psychiatrist. If patients consent they will be assessed for eligibility and baseline measures will be undertaken. Blood samples will be taken to exclude patients with folate and B12 deficiency. Some of the blood taken will be used to measure homocysteine levels and for genetic analysis (with additional consent). Eligible participants will be randomised to receive 5 mg of folic acid or placebo. Patients with B12 deficiency or folate deficiency will be given appropriate treatment and will be monitored in the 'comprehensive cohort study'. Assessments will be at screening, randomisation and 3 subsequent follow-ups. Discussion If folic acid is shown to improve the efficacy of antidepressants, then it will provide a safe, simple and cheap way of improving the treatment of depression in primary and secondary care. Trial registration Current controlled trials ISRCTN37558856 PMID:18005429

  6. The effectiveness of opioid substitution treatments for patients with opioid dependence: a systematic review and multiple treatment comparison protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Opioids are psychoactive analgesic drugs prescribed for pain relief and palliative care. Due to their addictive potential, effort and vigilance in controlling prescriptions is needed to avoid misuse and dependence. Despite the effort, the prevalence of opioid use disorder continues to rise. Opioid substitution therapies are commonly used to treat opioid dependence; however, there is minimal consensus as to which therapy is most effective. Available treatments include methadone, heroin, buprenorphine, as well as naltrexone. This systematic review aims to assess and compare the effect of all available opioid substitution therapies on the treatment of opioid dependence. Methods/Design The authors will search Medline, EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, Cochrane Clinical Trials Registry, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform Search Portal, and the National Institutes for Health Clinical Trials Registry. The title, abstract, and full-text screening will be completed in duplicate. When appropriate, multiple treatment comparison Bayesian meta-analytic methods will be performed to deduce summary statistics estimating the effectiveness of all opioid substitution therapies in terms of retention and response to treatment (as measured through continued opioid abuse). Discussion Using evidence gained from this systematic review, we anticipate disseminating an objective review of the current available literature on the effectiveness of all opioid substitution therapies for the treatment of opioid use disorder. The results of this systematic review are imperative to the further enhancement of clinical practice in addiction medicine. Systematic review registration PROSPERO CRD42013006507. PMID:25239213

  7. An Inpatient Child Passenger Safety program.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Lindsey Nichole; DiGirolamo, Barbara; McMahon, Maria; Damian, Frances; Brostoff, Marcie; Shermont, Herminia; Mooney, David Patrick; Lee, Lois Kaye

    2013-11-01

    Background. Our institution implemented an Inpatient Child Passenger Safety (CPS) program for hospitalized children to improve knowledge and compliance with the Massachusetts CPS law, requiring children less than 8 years old or 57 inches tall to be secured in a car seat when in a motor vehicle. Methods. After the Inpatient CPS Program was piloted on 3 units in 2009, the program was expanded to all inpatient units in 2010. A computerized nursing assessment tool identifies children in need of a CPS consult for education and/or car seat. Results. With the expanded Inpatient CPS Program, 3650 children have been assessed, 598 consults initiated, and 325 families have received CPS education. Car seats were distributed to 419 children; specialty car seats were loaned to 134 families. Conclusions. With a multidisciplinary approach, we implemented an Inpatient CPS Program for hospitalized children providing CPS education and car seats to families in need. PMID:24137036

  8. Altrenogest treatment associated with a farrowing induction protocol to avoid early parturition in sows.

    PubMed

    Gaggini, T S; Perin, J; Arend, L S; Bernardi, M L; Wentz, I; Bortolozzo, F P

    2013-06-01

    This study investigated the effect of altrenogest treatment on the farrowing development of sows, and birth weight (BW) and piglet survival until the third day of life. Three control groups were used: (i) sows that farrowed spontaneously before 114day of gestation (CONT <114); (ii) sows that spontaneously farrowed at ?114day of gestation (CONT ?114); (iii) sows that farrowed at ?114day with cloprostenol treatment (CONTCLOPR). Other sows were treated with altrenogest (Regumate() ) for 3days (days 111, 112 and 113 of gestation): one group gave birth spontaneously (ALT) and the other group received altrenogest until day 113 and cloprostenol on day 114 (ALTCLOPR). There were no differences (p>0.05) in farrowing duration, BW, coefficient of variation (CV) of BW, stillborn piglets, mummified foetuses, percentage of light piglets and survival until Day 3 between sows with and without cloprostenol treatment, in both control (CONT ?114 vs CONTCLOPR) and altrenogest-treated sows (ALT vs ALTCLOPR). Further comparisons were performed taking into account three groups: sows with early delivery (CONT <114 - farrowing before 114days of gestation; n=56), sows with longer gestation (CONT ?114 - with and without cloprostenol treatment sows; n=103) and ALT sows (with and without cloprostenol treatment; n=105). Gestation length of CONT ?114 and ALT sows was similar (p>0.05), but higher than in CONT <114 sows. There were no differences (p>0.05) between groups in farrowing duration, CV of BW, and percentages of stillborn piglets and mummified foetuses. Sows of CONT <114 group had a larger litter size and a lower BW than sows of the other two groups (p<0.05). Sows of CONT <114 group had a higher percentage of lighter piglets and a lower piglet survival rate (p<0.05) than ALT sows. In conclusion, altrenogest treatment proved to be an efficient method to avoid early parturition in 3-5 parity sows resulting in heavier piglets at birth. PMID:22994857

  9. Patients who discontinued statin treatment: a protocol for cohort study using primary care data

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradova, Yana; Coupland, Carol; Brindle, Peter; Hippisley-Cox, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Risk thresholds for using statins to prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD) have recently been lowered, so an increasing number of patients are now prescribed these drugs. Although the safety of long-term statin use has been generally established, concerns about the balance of risks and benefits of statins still exist for some medical professionals and patients, and issues concerning their side effects are occasionally widely publicised. This study will report the rates of stopping for statins and also identify any patient groups more likely to stop using statins, so possibly increasing their risk of cardiovascular events. Methods and analysis A prospective open cohort study between 1 January 2002 and 30 September 2014 will be based on the general population of people prescribed statins, using records from UK general practices contributing to the Clinical Practice Research Database (CPRD). Participants aged 2584?years will enter the cohort on the date of their first prescription for a statin and leave on the earliest date of: a cardiovascular event; death; leaving the practice; the last practice upload date or the study end date. If there are no prescriptions within 90?days after the expected finishing date of a prescription, a patient will be defined as a stopper with the discontinuation outcome date as the expected finishing date. Rates of statin discontinuation will be calculated by calendar year, type and dose of statin, age, and morbidities. Cox proportional regression analyses will be run to identify the most important factors associated with discontinuation. Analyses will be run separately for patients without CVD (primary prevention) and with diagnosed CVD (secondary prevention). Ethics and dissemination The protocol has been reviewed and approved by Independent Scientific Advisory Committee for MHRA Database Research. The results will be published in a peer-reviewed journal. PMID:26493458

  10. Bath additives for the treatment of childhood eczema (BATHE): protocol for multicentre parallel group randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Santer, Miriam; Rumsby, Kate; Ridd, Matthew J; Francis, Nick A; Stuart, Beth; Chorozoglou, Maria; Wood, Wendy; Roberts, Amanda; Thomas, Kim S; Williams, Hywel C; Little, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Bath emollients are widely prescribed for childhood eczema, yet evidence of their benefits over direct application of emollients is lacking. Objectives To determine the clinical and cost-effectiveness of adding bath emollient to the standard management of eczema in children Methods and analysis Design: Pragmatic open 2-armed parallel group randomised controlled trial. Setting: General practitioner (GP) practices in England and Wales. Participants: Children aged over 12 months and less than 12 years with eczema, excluding inactive or very mild eczema (5 or less on Nottingham Eczema Severity Scale). Interventions: Children will be randomised to either bath emollients plus standard eczema care or standard eczema care only. Outcome measures: Primary outcome is long-term eczema severity, measured by the Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure (POEM) repeated weekly for 16 weeks. Secondary outcomes include: number of eczema exacerbations resulting in healthcare consultations over 1 year; eczema severity over 1 year; disease-specific and generic quality of life; medication use and healthcare resource use; cost-effectiveness. Aiming to detect a mean difference between groups of 2.0 (SD 7.0) in weekly POEM scores over 16 weeks (significance 0.05, power 0.9), allowing for 20% loss to follow-up, gives a total sample size of 423 children. We will use repeated measures analysis of covariance, or a mixed model, to analyse weekly POEM scores. We will control for possible confounders, including baseline eczema severity and child's age. Cost-effectiveness analysis will be carried out from a National Health Service (NHS) perspective. Ethics and dissemination This protocol was approved by Newcastle and North Tyneside 1 NRES committee 14/NE/0098. Follow-up will be completed in 2017. Findings will be disseminated to participants and carers, the public, dermatology and primary care journals, guideline developers and decision-makers. Trial registration number ISRCTN84102309. PMID:26525422

  11. Ultrasound guided injection of dexamethasone versus placebo for treatment of plantar fasciitis: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plantar fasciitis is the most commonly reported cause of chronic pain beneath the heel. Management of this condition commonly involves the use of corticosteroid injection in cases where less invasive treatments have failed. However, despite widespread use, only two randomised trials have tested the effect of this treatment in comparison to placebo. These trials currently offer the best available evidence by which to guide clinical practice, though both were limited by methodological issues such as insufficient statistical power. Therefore, the aim of this randomised trial is to compare the effect of ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection versus placebo for treatment of plantar fasciitis. Methods The trial will be conducted at the La Trobe University Podiatry Clinic and will recruit 80 community-dwelling participants. Diagnostic ultrasound will be used to diagnose plantar fasciitis and participants will be required to meet a range of selection criteria. Participants will be randomly allocated to one of two treatment arms: (i) ultrasound-guided injection of the plantar fascia with 1 mL of 4 mg/mL dexamethasone sodium phosphate (experimental group), or (ii) ultrasound-guided injection of the plantar fascia with 1 mL normal saline (control group). Blinding will be applied to participants and the investigator performing procedures, measuring outcomes and analysing data. Primary outcomes will be pain measured by the Foot Health Status Questionnaire and plantar fascia thickness measured by ultrasound at 4, 8 and 12 weeks. All data analyses will be conducted on an intention-to-treat basis. Conclusion This will be a randomised trial investigating the effect of dexamethasone injection on pre-specified treatment outcomes in people with plantar fasciitis. Within the parameters of this protocol, the trial findings will be used to make evidence-based recommendations regarding the use of corticosteroid injection for treatment of this condition. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry. ACTRN12610000239066. PMID:20633300

  12. Implementing drug abuse treatment services in criminal justice settings: Introduction to the CJ-DATS study protocol series

    PubMed Central

    Ducharme, Lori J.; Chandler, Redonna K.; Wiley, Tisha R. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite a growing pipeline of effective clinical treatments, there remains a persistent research-to-practice gap in drug abuse services. Delivery of effective treatment services is especially lacking in the U.S. criminal justice system, where half of all incarcerated persons meet the need for drug abuse or dependence, yet few receive needed care. Structural, financial, philosophical and other barriers slow the pace of adoption of available evidence-based practices. These challenges led to the development of a multi-site cooperative research endeavor known as the Criminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies (CJ-DATS), funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). CJ-DATS engages university-based research teams, criminal justice agencies, and community-based treatment providers in implementation research studies to test strategies for enhancing treatment service delivery to offender populations. Methods This Introduction reviews the mission of NIDA, the structure and goals of the CJ-DATS cooperative, and the implementation studies being conducted by the participating organizations. The component Study Protocols in this article collection are then described. Discussion CJ-DATS applies implementation science perspectives and methods to address a vexing problem – the need to link offender populations with effective treatment for drug abuse, HIV, and other related conditions for which they are at high risk. Applying these principles to the U.S. criminal justice system is an innovative extension of lessons that have been learned in mainstream healthcare settings. This collection is offered as both an introduction to NIDA's work in this area, as well as a window onto the challenges of conducting health services research in settings in which improving public health is not the organization's core mission. PMID:24707454

  13. A PROTOCOL FOR DETERMINING WWF SETTLING VELOCITIES FOR TREATMENT PROCESS DESIGN ENHANCEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urban wet weather flows (WWF) contain a high proportion of suspended solids (SS) which must be rapidly reduced before release to receiving waters. Site specific, storm-event data evaluations for designing WWF-treatment facilities differs from dry-weather flow design. WWF-sett...

  14. Preovulatory uterine flushing with saline as a treatment for unexplained infertility: a randomised controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Dodin, Sylvie; Moore, Lynne; Bujold, Emmanuel; Lefebvre, Jessica; Bergeron, Marie-Ève

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In vitro fertilisation (IVF) is the treatment of choice for unexplained infertility. Preovulatory uterine flushing could reduce intrauterine debris and inflammatory factors preventing pregnancy and constitute an alternative to IVF. Our objective is to assess the efficacy of preovulatory uterine flushing with physiological saline for the treatment of unexplained infertility. Methods and analysis We will perform a randomised controlled trial based on consecutive women aged between 18 and 37 years consulting for unexplained infertility for at least 1 year. On the day of their luteinising hormone surge, 192 participants will be randomised in two equal groups to either receive 20 mL of physiological saline by an intrauterine catheter or 10 mL of saline intravaginally. We will assess relative risk of live birth (primary outcome), as well as pregnancy (secondary outcome) over one cycle of treatment. We will report the side effects, complications and acceptability of the intervention. Ethics and dissemination This project was approved by the Ethics committee of the Centre Hospitatlier Universitaire de Quebec (no 2015–1146). Uterine flushing is usually well tolerated by women and would constitute a simple, affordable and minimally invasive treatment for unexplained infertility. We plan to communicate the results of the review by presenting research abstracts at conferences and by publishing the results in a peer-reviewed journal. Trial registration number NCT02539290; Pre-results. PMID:26739737

  15. Effects of Different Infrared Beak Treatment Protocols on Chicken Welfare and Physiology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infrared beak treatment (IR) provides an alternative to the conventional hot blade beak trimming (HB), which purports to be more welfare friendly. To improve the efficiency of the IR system, different interface plates (25/23C and 27/23C) and lamp power settings (44, 48 and 52) were tested in this st...

  16. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Anxiety Disorders: Three Case Studies Exemplifying a Unified Treatment Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eifert, Georg H.; Forsyth, John P.; Arch, Joanna; Espejo, Emmanuel; Keller, Melody; Langer, David

    2009-01-01

    Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is an innovative acceptance-based behavior therapy that has been applied broadly and successfully to treat a variety of clinical problems, including the anxiety disorders. Throughout treatment ACT balances acceptance and mindfulness processes with commitment and behavior change processes. As applied to

  17. MODEL PROTOCOL FOR THE COMPREHENSIVE EVALUATION OF PUBLICLY OWNED TREATMENT WORKS PERFORMANCE AND OPERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual presents a systematic approach to conducting a comprehensive performance evaluation of municipal wastewater treatment plants. The objective of the evaluation is to identify and rank the causes of poor plant performance. Five major problem areas are addressed. They are...

  18. Screening and Assessing Adolescents for Substance Use Disorders. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 31.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Center for Substance Abuse Treatment.

    This TIP is designed to teach juvenile justice, health services, education, and substance abuse treatment personnel about how to identify, screen, and assess people 11-to-21 years old who may be experiencing substance-related problems. It details warning signs of substance use disorders, when to screen, when to assess, what domains besides

  19. A protocol for the use of computational fluid dynamics as a supportive tool for wastewater treatment plant modelling.

    PubMed

    Laurent, J; Samstag, R W; Ducoste, J M; Griborio, A; Nopens, I; Batstone, D J; Wicks, J D; Saunders, S; Potier, O

    2014-01-01

    To date, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models have been primarily used for evaluation of hydraulic problems at wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). A potentially more powerful use, however, is to simulate integrated physical, chemical and/or biological processes involved in WWTP unit processes on a spatial scale and to use the gathered knowledge to accelerate improvement in plant models for everyday use, that is, design and optimized operation. Evolving improvements in computer speed and memory and improved software for implementing CFD, as well as for integrated processes, has allowed for broader usage of this tool for understanding, troubleshooting, and optimal design of WWTP unit processes. This paper proposes a protocol for an alternative use of CFD in process modelling, as a way to gain insight into complex systems leading to improved modelling approaches used in combination with the IWA activated sludge models and other kinetic models. PMID:25429444

  20. Moxibustion for the treatment of pressure ulcers: study protocol for a pilot, multicentre, randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qin-hong; Yue, Jin-huan; Li, Chao-ran; Sun, Zhong-ren

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pressure ulcers are common in the elderly and immobile. Currently, there are few proven effective treatments for pressure ulcers. This trial aims to evaluate the feasibility, efficacy and safety of moxibustion for pressure ulcers. Methods/analysis This is a multicentre, two-armed, parallel-design randomised controlled trial (RCT). 30 eligible patients with pressure ulcers will be randomised in a ratio of 1:1 to the treatment group and control group. The participants in the treatment group will undergo indirect moxibustion for 30?min before application of a dressing, one session daily, five sessions weekly for 4?weeks. The patients in the control group will only receive a dressing, applied in the same way as in the treatment group. Both groups will be followed up for 3?months. The primary outcome measures will be wound surface area (WSA) and proportion of ulcers healed within trial period (PUHTP). The secondary outcomes will be the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH Tool), visual analogue scale (VAS) and adverse events. All outcomes will be evaluated at the beginning of the study, at the end of the second week, at 4?weeks after randomisation and at 1 and 3?months after treatment cessation. Ethics/dissemination This trial has undergone ethical scrutiny and been approved by the ethics review boards of First Affiliated Hospital of Heilongjiang University of Chinese Medicine and Second Affiliated Hospital of Heilongjiang University of Chinese Medicine (Permission number: HZYEYLP2014). The results of this study will provide clinical evidence for the feasibility, efficacy and safety of moxibustion for pressure ulcers. Trial registration number ChiCTR-TRC-13003959. PMID:25550296

  1. Nonemergency Involuntary Antipsychotic Medication in Prison: Effects on Prison Inpatient Days and Disciplinary Charges.

    PubMed

    Salem, Anasuya; Kushnier, Alexander; Dorio, Nicole; Reeves, Rusty

    2015-06-01

    We hypothesized that treating mentally ill inmates involuntarily with antipsychotic medication would reduce the number of prison inpatient days and the number of inmates who receive disciplinary charges. The subjects were 133 mentally ill inmates who were placed on the New Jersey Department of Corrections (NJ DOC) nonemergency involuntary medication protocol and received antipsychotic medication for at least one year. No difference was noted in an inmate's mean number of prison inpatient days in the year before versus the year during involuntary medication. Fewer inmates received serious disciplinary charges during the year of involuntary medication relative to the year before, when they were not medicated. In addition, there were decreases in mean instances and mean total number of charges during involuntary medication versus before. Neither an increased number of inpatient days nor depot medication accounted for the inmates who incurred no charges while receiving involuntary medication. PMID:26071504

  2. Kidney preservation protocol for management of emphysematous pyelonephritis: Treatment modalities and follow-up

    PubMed Central

    El-Nahas, Ahmed R.; Shokeir, Ahmed A.; Eziyi, Amogu Kalu; Barakat, Tamer S.; Tijani, Kehinde Habeeb; El-Diasty, Tarek; Abol-Enein, Hassan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To present treatments for kidney preservation in the management of emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN), and to evaluate the functional outcome of preserved kidneys during the follow-up. Patients and methods The computerized files of patients with EPN from 2000 to 2010 were reviewed. After initial resuscitation, ultrasonography-guided percutaneous tubes were placed for drainage of infected fluid and gas. A radio-isotopic renal scan was done after stabilization of the patients condition. Preservation of the affected kidney was attempted when the differential function was >10%. A renal isotopic scan was taken during the follow-up to evaluate renographic changes in preserved kidneys. Results The study included 33 kidneys in 30 consecutive patients (mean age 51.7years, SD 10.9). Kidney preservation was applicable for 23 kidneys (20 patients). Preservation methods included percutaneous nephrostomy for 12, percutaneous tube drain for two and conservative treatment for nine kidneys (six patients). Nephrectomy was performed for 10 kidneys (emergency in three and delayed in seven). The frequency of post-treatment septic shock after kidney preservation (10%) was significantly lower than after nephrectomy (20%, P=0.005). The overall mortality rate was 7% (two patients). The follow-up was completed for 13 patients with 15 preserved kidneys for a mean duration of 21months. During the follow-up, differential renographic clearance of the affected kidney was stable in 13 of 15 while two kidneys showed improvement. Conclusions Kidney preservation should be the primary goal in the treatment of EPN when the differential renal clearance is >10%. It was associated with fewer complications than nephrectomy and the follow-up showed a favourable functional outcome of the preserved kidneys. PMID:26579294

  3. The evaluation of different treatment protocols for trauma-induced lung injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gzel, Aygl; Kat?, Celal; Duran, Latif; Alaam, Hasan; Gacar, Ayhan; Gven, Tolga; Murat, Naci; ?i?man, Blent

    2014-01-01

    Background Lung contusion is an important factor that affects mortality and morbidity of lung injury after blunt chest trauma (BCT). The present study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of different treatment regimens on BCT-induced lung injury. Methods A total of 35 Sprague Dawley rats were divided into five experimental groups (n=7): sham, control; BCT; BCT + MP, BCT group treated with methylprednisolone (MP; 30 mg/kg on first day and 3 mg/kg/d on the following days); BCT + Q, BCT group treated with quercetin (Q; 50 mg/kg/d for seven days); and BCT + MP + Q, BCT group treated with the same doses of MP and Q. Serum Clara Cell Protein-16 (CC-16), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels were analyzed to determine histopathological changes in the lung tissues. Results Elevated serum CC-16 and TBARS levels and reduced serum SOD levels were found in the BCT group compared to the Sham group. There was a significant change in the serum CC-16 levels in the BCT + MP group compared to the Sham group. Serum TBARS levels were significantly lower in the BCT + MP and BCT + Q group compared to the BCT group. The combined therapy regimen yielded significantly decreased CC-16 levels and increased serum SOD levels compared to the individual treatment groups. Serum TBARS levels did not significantly differ between the BCT + MP + Q group and the other treatment groups. Compared to the BCT + MP + Q group, the BCT + MP group showed significantly lower alveolar edema (AED) and alveolar exudate (AEX) scores, while the BCT + Q group showed significantly lower peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration (PICI) and AED scores. Conclusions The combined usage of quercetin and low dose MP treatment after initial high dose MP at the early stage of lung injury after BCT is more effective. PMID:24605218

  4. Protocol for the nonoperative treatment of obstructing intramural duodenal hematoma during childhood.

    PubMed

    Touloukian, R J

    1983-03-01

    A prospective plan for the nonoperative treatment of obstructing intramural duodenal hematoma was developed to (1) promptly establish the diagnosis and rule out transmural leaks by obtaining a contrast roentgenogram on admission and to subsequently study evolution of the obstructing intramural duodenal hematoma with sequential roentgenograms at 5 to 7 day intervals; (2) identify associated pancreatic injury with ultrasonography and serum amylase and lipase determinations; and (3) to determine effectiveness of nasogastric suction and total parenteral nutrition. Twelve children, who ranged in age from 2 to 15 years, with obstructing intramural duodenal hematoma following blunt injury were admitted over the past 9 years. The two youngest were battered children and two others had subsequently diagnosed clotting disorders (idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and von Willebrand's disease). Significant resolution of the obstruction allowed resumption of oral intake by the end of the first week of treatment in eight patients, whereas the remaining four required 13, 14, 22, and 38 days of nasogastric suction and total parenteral nutrition. Residual deformity seen on roentgenograms did not interfere with achieving adequate oral nutrition. Excellent results in this series substantiate the conclusion that a management plan that assesses the evolution of an obstructing intramural duodenal hematoma and provides adequate nutrition is a successful alternative to surgical treatment. The presence of underlying hematologic disorders and child abuse must be suspected. PMID:6837855

  5. Efficacy and safety of pharmacological treatments for neuroborreliosis—protocol for a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuroborreliosis is a tick-borne infectious disease of the nervous system caused by Borrelia burgdorferi. Common clinical manifestations of neuroborreliosis are cranial nerve dysfunctions, polyradiculoneuritis, and meningitis. Diagnosis is usually based on clinical presentation, serologic testing, and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid. Many aspects of pharmacological treatment, such as choice of drug, dosage, and duration are subject of intense debate, leading to uncertainties in patients and healthcare providers alike. To approach the questions regarding pharmacological treatment of neuroborreliosis, we will perform a systematic review. Methods We will perform a comprehensive systematic literature search for potentially eligible studies that report outcomes after pharmacological interventions. To adequately consider the wealth of research that has been conducted so far, this review will evaluate randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-randomized studies on treatment of neuroborreliosis. We will assess potential risk of bias for each RCT meeting our selection criteria using the Cochrane risk of bias tool for RCTs. For non-randomized studies, we will use the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale and the recently piloted Cochrane risk of bias tool for non-randomized studies. Our primary outcome of interest will be neurological symptoms and the secondary outcomes will be disability, patient-reported outcomes (quality of life, and, if reported separately from other neurological symptoms, pain, fatigue, depression, cognition, and sleep), adverse events, and cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis. Pooling of data and meta-analysis will only be deemed justified between studies with similar design (e.g., RCTs are only combined with other RCTs), characteristics (e.g., similar populations), and of acceptable heterogeneity (I2 < 80%). Pooled estimates will be calculated using RevMan software. Prespecified subgroup analyses will evaluate groups of antibiotics, length of antibiotic treatment, and different doses of doxycycline. We will assess the quality of evidence using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Discussion This systematic review will summarize the available evidence from RCTs and non-randomized studies regarding pharmacological treatment of neuroborreliosis. The available evidence will be summarized and discussed to provide a basis for decision-making for patients and healthcare professionals. Systematic review registration PROSPERO registration number: CRD42014008839 PMID:25336085

  6. Economic aspects of nursing in inpatient naturopathy: vidence from Germany.

    PubMed

    Romeyke, Tobias; Stummer, Harald

    2013-01-01

    The costs of nursing in Germany are defined in terms of "nursing-relevant secondary diagnoses." However, the further development of the German-DRG system reveals nursing diagnoses play a constantly declining role with regard to increasing severity and revenue assurance. In particular, additional therapeutic nursing services performed, for example, by specially trained, certified nurses in acute hospitals focusing on naturopathy are not adequately defined. In this study, researchers analyzed naturopathic care, especially the nursing costs for inpatient care of multi-morbid cardiac patients, with a particular focus on a holistic, comprehensive treatment. Results indicated the nursing costs in an inpatient acute hospital with a naturopathic focus are significantly higher than nursing costs in hospitals operating exclusively according to conventional medicine. Questions about adequate determination of the costs of DRGs for professional groups such as the nursing service need to be addressed. PMID:23923242

  7. Group CBT for psychosis: a longitudinal, controlled trial with inpatients.

    PubMed

    Owen, Mary; Sellwood, William; Kan, Stephen; Murray, John; Sarsam, May

    2015-02-01

    Individual cognitive behaviour therapy for psychosis (CBTp) is a recommended treatment in the acute phase and beyond. However, less is known about the effectiveness of group CBTp in acute care. This mixed methods study explored the implementation and effectiveness of brief group CBTp with inpatients. This prospective trial compared inpatients who received either a four week group CBTp program or treatment as usual (TAU). Participants (n=113at baseline) completed self-report measures of distress, confidence and symptoms of psychosis at baseline, post-intervention and one month follow up. CBTp group participants also completed a brief open-ended satisfaction questionnaire. Using complete case analysis participants who received CBTp showed significantly reduced distress at follow up compared to TAU and significantly increased confidence across the study and follow up period. However, these effects were not demonstrated using a more conservative intention-to-treat analysis. Qualitative analysis of the satisfaction data revealed positive feedback with a number of specific themes. The study suggests that brief group CBTp with inpatients may improve confidence and reduce distress in the longer term. Participants report that the groups are acceptable and helpful. However, given the methodological limitations involved in this 'real world' study more robust evidence is needed. PMID:25577190

  8. Adult Hip Flexion Contracture due to Neurological Disease: A New Treatment ProtocolSurgical Treatment of Neurological Hip Flexion Contracture

    PubMed Central

    Nicodemo, Alberto; Arrigoni, Chiara; Bersano, Andrea; Mass, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Congenital, traumatic, or extrinsic causes can lead people to paraplegia; some of these are potentially; reversible and others are not. Paraplegia can couse hip flexion contracture and, consequently, pressure sores, scoliosis, and hyperlordosis; lumbar and groin pain are strictly correlated. Scientific literature contains many studies about children hip flexion related to neurological diseases, mainly caused by cerebral palsy; only few papers focus on this complication in adults. In this study we report our experience on surgical treatment of adult hip flexion contracture due to neurological diseases; we have tried to outline an algorithm to choose the best treatment avoiding useless or too aggressive therapies. We present 5 cases of adult hips flexion due to neurological conditions treated following our algorithm. At 1-year-follow-up all patients had a good clinical outcome in terms of hip range of motion, pain and recovery of walking if possible. In conclusion we think that this algorithm could be a good guideline to treat these complex cases even if we need to treat more patients to confirm this theory. We believe also that postoperation physiotherapy it is useful in hip motility preservation, improvement of muscular function, and walking ability recovery when possible. PMID:24707293

  9. Effects of lifestyle modification after breast cancer treatment: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is no consensus in the literature regarding the effectiveness of lifestyle modification interventions, including recommendations about specific diet or exercise program for patients with breast cancer. Diet interventions and regular physical activity may reduce the risk of breast cancer and its recurrence. The primary aim of our study is to evaluate the effects of different lifestyle modification interventions (diet and physical activity) in the survival of patients with stages I to III breast cancer after treatment. Methods/design This review will be conducted according to the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Intervention and will be reported following the PRISMA statement recommendations. CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE databases will be searched for peer-reviewed literature. Randomized controlled trials of diet, exercise, or both, compared with usual care, after treatment of breast cancer stage I to III will be included in the systematic review. Two authors will independently screen titles and abstracts of studies for potential eligibility. Data will be combined using random-effect meta-analysis models with restricted maximum-likelihood as variance estimator, and will be presented as relative risk or standardized mean difference with 95% CI. The quality of evidence will be assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) framework and summary of findings tables will be presented for patient important outcomes. Discussion Our study may improve the current understanding of the role that lifestyle-modifiable factors can play in saving or prolonging the lives of women who have been treated for breast cancer, and also on modifying their quality of life. Systematic review registration The review has been registered with PROSPERO (registration number CRD42014008743). PMID:24997590

  10. Intralesional cryotherapy versus excision and corticosteroids or brachytherapy for keloid treatment: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Keloids are a burden for patients due to physical, aesthetic and social complaints and treatment remains a challenge because of therapy resistance and high recurrence rates. The main goal of treatment is to improve the quality of life (QoL); this implies that, apart from surgical outcomes, patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) need to be taken into account. Decision making in keloid treatment is difficult due to heterogeneity of the condition and the lack of comparative studies. Methods/Design This is a multicentre, randomised controlled open trial that compares 1) intralesional cryotherapy versus excision and corticosteroids for primary keloids, and 2) intralesional cryotherapy versus excision and brachytherapy for therapy-resistant keloids. The primary outcome is the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS), a 12-item scale (with score 12 indicating the best and 120 indicating the worst scar imaginable). A difference of six points on the total score is considered to be of clinical importance. Secondary outcomes are recurrence rates, volume reduction, Skindex-29 scores, SF-36 scores and complication rates. Primary and secondary outcome measurements are taken at baseline, and at 2, 12, 26 and 52 weeks postoperatively. For analysis, a linear mixed model is used. A total of 176 patients will be included over a period of 2.5 years. The protocol is approved by the Medical Ethics Committee of the Erasmus University Medical Centre Rotterdam and follows good clinical practice guidelines. Discussion The outcomes of this study will improve evidence-based decision making for the treatment of keloids, as well as patient education. Trial registration Dutch Trial Register NTR4151. PMID:24354714

  11. 42 CFR 424.15 - Requirements for inpatient CAH services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Requirements for inpatient CAH services. 424.15... Requirements 424.15 Requirements for inpatient CAH services. (a) Medicare Part A pays for inpatient CAH... accordance with 412.3 of this chapter. (b) Certification begins with the order for inpatient admission....

  12. 42 CFR 424.15 - Requirements for inpatient CAH services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Requirements for inpatient CAH services. 424.15... Requirements 424.15 Requirements for inpatient CAH services. (a) Medicare Part A pays for inpatient CAH... accordance with 412.3 of this chapter. (b) Certification begins with the order for inpatient admission....

  13. Cohort protocol paper: The Pain and Opioids In Treatment (POINT) study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Internationally, there is concern about the increased prescribing of pharmaceutical opioids for chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP). In part, this is related to limited knowledge about the long-term benefits and outcomes of opioid use for CNCP. There has also been increased injection of some pharmaceutical opioids by people who inject drugs, and for some patients, the development of problematic and/or dependent use. To date, much of the research on the use of pharmaceutical opioids among people with CNCP, have been clinical trials that have excluded patients with complex needs, and have been of limited duration (i.e. fewer than 12weeks). The Pain and Opioids In Treatment (POINT) study is unique study that aims to: 1) examine patterns of opioid use in a cohort of patients prescribed opioids for CNCP; 2) examine demographic and clinical predictors of adverse events, including opioid abuse or dependence, medication diversion, other drug use, and overdose; and 3) identify factors predicting poor pain relief and other outcomes. Methods/Design The POINT cohort comprises around 1,500 people across Australia prescribed pharmaceutical opioids for CNCP. Participants will be followed-up at four time points over a two year period. POINT will collect information on demographics, physical and medication use history, pain, mental health, drug and alcohol use, non-adherence, medication diversion, sleep, and quality of life. Data linkage will provide information on medications and services from Medicare (Australias national health care scheme). Data on those who receive opioid substitution therapy, and on mortality, will be linked. Discussion This study will rigorously examine prescription opioid use among CNCP patients, and examine its relationship to important health outcomes. The extent to which opioids for chronic pain is associated with pain reduction, quality of life, mental and physical health, aberrant medication behavior and substance use disorders will be extensively examined. Improved understanding of the longer-term outcomes of chronic opioid therapy will direct community-based interventions and health policy in Australia and internationally. The results of this study will assist clinicians to better identify those patients who are at risk of adverse outcomes and who therefore require alternative treatment strategies. PMID:24646721

  14. Biofeedback for treatment of awake and sleep bruxism in adults: systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bruxism is a disorder of jaw-muscle activity characterised by repetitive clenching or grinding of the teeth which results in discomfort and damage to dentition. The two clinical manifestations of the condition (sleep and awake bruxism) are thought to have unrelated aetiologies but are palliated using similar techniques. The lack of a definitive treatment has prompted renewed interest in biofeedback, a behaviour change method that uses electronic detection to provide a stimulus whenever bruxism occurs. This systematic review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the state of research into biofeedback for bruxism; to assess the efficacy and acceptability of biofeedback therapy in management of awake bruxism and, separately, sleep bruxism in adults; and to compare findings between the two variants. Methods A systematic review of published literature examining biofeedback as an intervention directed at controlling primary bruxism in adults. We will search electronic databases and the grey literature using a predefined search strategy to identify randomised and non-randomised studies, technical reports and patents. Searches will not be restricted by language or date and will be expanded through contact with authors and experts, and by following up reference lists and citations. Two authors, working independently, will conduct screening of search results, study selection, data extraction and quality assessment and a third will resolve any disagreements. The primary outcomes of acceptability and effectiveness will be assessed using only randomised studies, segregated by bruxism subtype. A meta-analysis of these data will be conducted only if pre-defined conditions for quality and heterogeneity are met, otherwise the data will be summarized in narrative form. Data from non-randomised studies will be used to augment a narrative synthesis of the state of technical developments and any safety-related issues. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42013006880. Discussion Biofeedback is not new, but its place in the clinical management of bruxism remains unclear. New research, and the availability of miniaturized consumer-grade devices, makes a systematic review timely to guide treatment decisions and inform future research. PMID:24886985

  15. How do surgeons decide to refer patients for adjuvant cancer treatment? Protocol for a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-small cell lung cancer, breast cancer, and colorectal cancer are commonly diagnosed cancers in Canada. Patients diagnosed with early-stage non-small cell lung, breast, or colorectal cancer represent potentially curable populations. For these patients, surgery is the primary mode of treatment, with (neo)adjuvant therapies (e.g., chemotherapy, radiotherapy) recommended according to disease stage. Data from our research in Nova Scotia, as well as others, demonstrate that a substantial proportion of non-small cell lung cancer and colorectal cancer patients, for whom practice guidelines recommend (neo)adjuvant therapy, are not referred for an oncologist consultation. Conversely, surveillance data and clinical experience suggest that breast cancer patients have much higher referral rates. Since surgery is the primary treatment, the surgeon plays a major role in referring patients to oncologists. Thus, an improved understanding of how surgeons make decisions related to oncology services is important to developing strategies to optimize referral rates. Few studies have examined decision making for (neo)adjuvant therapy from the perspective of the cancer surgeon. This study will use qualitative methods to examine decision-making processes related to referral to oncology services for individuals diagnosed with potentially curable non-small cell lung, breast, or colorectal cancer. Methods A qualitative study will be conducted, guided by the principles of grounded theory. The study design is informed by our ongoing research, as well as a model of access to health services. The method of data collection will be in-depth, semi structured interviews. We will attempt to recruit all lung, breast, and/or colorectal cancer surgeons in Nova Scotia (n???42), with the aim of interviewing a minimum of 34 surgeons. Interviews will be audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Data will be collected and analyzed concurrently, with two investigators independently coding and analyzing the data. Analysis will involve an inductive, grounded approach using constant comparative analysis. Discussion The primary outcomes will be (1) identification of the patient, surgeon, institutional, and health-system factors that influence surgeons decisions to refer non-small cell lung, breast, and colorectal cancer patients to oncology services when consideration for (neo)adjuvant therapy is recommended and (2) identification of potential strategies that could optimize referral to oncology for appropriate individuals. PMID:23098262

  16. Protocol Development

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Content Home | Investigator Resources | Protocol Development | Initiatives/Programs/Collaborations | Links to More Resources | Funding Opportunities | About CTEP Home | Sitemap | Contact CTEP Search this site Protocol Development Protocol

  17. A combination of radiotherapy, nitric oxide and a hyperoxygenation sensitizing protocol for brain malignant tumor treatment.

    PubMed

    Al-Waili, Noori S; Butler, Glenn J

    2007-01-01

    Brain malignant tumor such as glioblastoma is a challenging medical and surgical problem. In spite of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the prognosis is still very poor. The limitations of currently available treatment modalities to cure or significantly prolong and improve the quality of life should stimulate rigorous research and studies to combat brain malignant tumors. While precision radiotherapy to reduce tumor size and ameliorate symptoms is still the standard of care, tumor sensitivity to radiation is compromised by low oxygen tensions and a necrotic tumor center. We propose to take advantage of the fact that elevated oxygen increases sensitivity of tumor cells to radiation. A specific application of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO(2)), using nitric oxide (NO) donors and inducers (such as L-arginine, dinitrite or tocopheryl succinate) and ascorbic acid to dilate blood vessels, should permit oxygen tensions in the range of 1000 mmHg to diffuse into the cells and thus increase sensitivity to radiation. This should permit doses that are low enough to cause the death of tumors cells yet minimize injury to brain tissue near the tumor and induced neurological sequelae. PMID:17069987

  18. Hygienic-dietary recommendations for major depression treatment: Study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Depression is a highly prevalent and disabling mental disorder with an incidence rate which appears to be increasing in the developed world. This fact seems to be at least partially related to lifestyle factors. Some hygienic-dietary measures have shown their efficacy as a coadjuvant of standard treatment. However, their effectiveness has not yet been proved enough in usual clinical practice. Methods Multicenter, randomized, controlled, two arm-parallel, clinical trial involving 300 patients over 18 years old with a diagnosis of Major Depression. Major depression will be diagnosed by means of the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. The Beck Depression Inventory total score at the end of the study will constitute the main efficacy outcome. Quality of Life and Social and Health Care Services Consumption Scales will be also administered. Patients will be assessed at three different occasions: baseline, 6-month follow-up and 12-month follow-up. Discussion We expect the patients in the active lifestyle recommendations group to experience a greater improvement in their depressive symptoms and quality of life with lower socio-sanitary costs. Trial registration ISRCTN73931675 PMID:23158080

  19. Predictors of Dropout from Inpatient Opioid Detoxification with Buprenorphine: A Chart Review

    PubMed Central

    Halln, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Inpatient withdrawal treatment (detoxification) is common in opioid dependence, although dropout against medical advice often limits its outcome. This study aimed to assess baseline predictors of dropout from inpatient opioid detoxification with buprenorphine, including age, gender, current substance use, and type of postdetoxification planning. A retrospective hospital chart review was carried out for inpatient standard opioid detoxifications using buprenorphine taper, in a detoxification ward in Malm, Sweden (N = 122). Thirty-four percent of patients (n = 42) dropped out against medical advice. In multivariate logistic regression, dropout was significantly associated with younger age (OR 0.93 [0.890.97]) and negatively predicted by inpatient postdetoxification plan (OR 0.41 [0.180.94]), thus favouring an inpatient plan as opposed to outpatient treatment while residing at home. Dropout was unrelated to baseline urine toxicology. In opioid detoxification, patients may benefit from a higher degree of postdetoxification planning, including transition to residential treatment, in order to increase the likelihood of a successful detoxification and treatment entry. Young opioid-dependent patients may need particular attention in the planning of detoxification. PMID:25530903

  20. Reasons for inpatients not to seek clarity at Dr George Mukhari Academic Hospital, Pretoria

    PubMed Central

    Omole, Olufemi B.; Govender, Indiran; Ndimande, John V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Healthcare practitioners should provide patients with information regarding their clinical conditions. Patients should also feel free to seek clarity on information provided. However, not all patients seek this clarity. Objectives To explore the reasons inpatients gave for not seeking clarity on information that was received but not understood. Methods This was a qualitative arm of a larger study, titled Are inpatients aware of the admission reasons and management plans of their clinical conditions? A survey at a tertiary hospital in South Africa, conducted in 2010. Of the 264 inpatients who participated in the larger study, we extracted the unstructured responses from those participants (n = 152) who had indicated in the questionnaire that there was information they had not understood during their encounter with healthcare practitioners, but that they had nonetheless not sought clarity. Data were analysed thematically. Results Themes that emerged were that inpatients did not ask for clarity as they perceived healthcare practitioners to be too busy, aloof, non-communicators and sometimes uncertain about patients conditions. Some inpatients had unquestioning trust in healthcare practitioners, whilst others had experiences of bad treatment. Inpatients had poor self-esteem, incapacitating clinical conditions, fear of bad news and prior knowledge of their clinical conditions. Some inpatients stated that they had no reason for not seeking clarity. Conclusion The reasons for not seeking clarity were based on patients experiences with the healthcare practitioners and their perceptions of the latter and of themselves. A programme should be developed in order to educate inpatients on effective communication with their healthcare practitioners. PMID:26245394

  1. Difference in prevalence of metabolic syndrome between Japanese outpatients and inpatients with schizophrenia: A nationwide survey.

    PubMed

    Sugai, Takuro; Suzuki, Yutaro; Yamazaki, Manabu; Shimoda, Kazutaka; Mori, Takao; Ozeki, Yuji; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Sugawara, Norio; Yasui-Furukori, Norio; Minami, Yoshitake; Okamoto, Kurefu; Sagae, Toyoaki; Someya, Toshiyuki

    2016-03-01

    Patients with schizophrenia have a higher risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS). MetS prevalence varies with ethnicity. Although environmental factors, such as lack of physical activity and unbalanced diet, can lead to MetS, these may differ between outpatients and inpatients with schizophrenia. The Japanese mental health care system differs from that in other countries. However, few studies have investigated the prevalence of MetS in Japanese patients with schizophrenia. Therefore, we conducted a nationwide survey to clarify the prevalence of MetS in Japanese outpatients and inpatients with schizophrenia. We investigated the risk of MetS by questionnaire in 520 facilities for outpatients and 247 facilities for inpatients. There were 7655 outpatients and 15,461 inpatients with schizophrenia. MetS prevalence was based on the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III-A) and the Japan Society for the Study of Obesity (JASSO). The overall MetS prevalence in outpatients using the ATP III-A definition was 34.2%, with 37.8% in men and 29.4% in women, compared with 13.0% in inpatients, with 12.3% in men and 13.9% in women. MetS prevalence in outpatients was approximately 2- to 3-fold higher than in inpatients. In conclusion, MetS prevalence in Japanese outpatients was approximately 3-fold higher than in inpatients. Therefore, we should pay more attention to the risk of physical disease in Japanese patients with schizophrenia, considering the difference in health characteristics between outpatients and inpatients. PMID:26811231

  2. Inpatient management of diabetic foot disorders: a clinical guide.

    PubMed

    Wukich, Dane K; Armstrong, David G; Attinger, Christopher E; Boulton, Andrew J M; Burns, Patrick R; Frykberg, Robert G; Hellman, Richard; Kim, Paul J; Lipsky, Benjamin A; Pile, James C; Pinzur, Michael S; Siminerio, Linda

    2013-09-01

    The implementation of an inpatient diabetic foot service should be the goal of all institutions that care for patients with diabetes. The objectives of this team are to prevent problems in patients while hospitalized, provide curative measures for patients admitted with diabetic foot disorders, and optimize the transition from inpatient to outpatient care. Essential skills that are required for an inpatient team include the ability to stage a foot wound, assess for peripheral vascular disease, neuropathy, wound infection, and the need for debridement; appropriately culture a wound and select antibiotic therapy; provide, directly or indirectly, for optimal metabolic control; and implement effective discharge planning to prevent a recurrence. Diabetic foot ulcers may be present in patients who are admitted for nonfoot problems, and these ulcers should be evaluated by the diabetic foot team during the hospitalization. Pathways should be in place for urgent or emergent treatment of diabetic foot infections and neuropathic fractures/dislocations. Surgeons involved with these patients should have knowledge and interest in limb preservation techniques. Prevention of iatrogenic foot complications, such as pressure sores of the heel, should be a priority in patients with diabetes who are admitted for any reason: all hospitalized diabetic patients require a clinical foot exam on admission to identify risk factors such as loss of sensation or ischemia. Appropriate posthospitalization monitoring to reduce the risk of reulceration and infection should be available, which should include optimal glycemic control and correction of any fluid and electrolyte disturbances. PMID:23970716

  3. Substance abuse in an inpatient psychiatric sample.

    PubMed

    Brady, K; Casto, S; Lydiard, R B; Malcolm, R; Arana, G

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between psychoactive drug abuse and psychopathology is complex. There have been few systematic explorations of substance abuse in psychiatric populations since the recent epidemic of cocaine abuse. To update and further explore the relationship between psychiatric illness and substance abuse, 100 consecutively admitted patients to an inpatient psychiatry unit were administered a drug and alcohol use/abuse questionnaire. Sixty-four percent endorsed current or past problems with substance abuse and 29% met DSM-III-R criteria for substance abuse in the 30 days prior to admission. For the major diagnostic categories, there were no significant differences between groups in percentages of patients with substance abuse disorders. There was a trend (p less than or equal to .2) toward an increased number of lifetime psychiatric hospitalizations in the substance-abusing group. Alcohol was the most common drug of choice followed by stimulants, cannabis, and sedative hypnotics. Differences in drug choices between diagnostic categories are discussed. Forty-three percent of urine drug screens obtained were positive, and of those with positive urine drug screens, 42% denied drug use upon admission. Only 40% of patients with current or past substance abuse problems had received treatment for their chemical dependency. In our sample, while substance abuse was very prevalent, it was underreported and undertreated. PMID:1746501

  4. Assessing overall functioning with adolescent inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, Greg; Forlenza, Nicholas; Poland, Charlotte; Ray, Sagarika; Zodan, Jennifer; Mehra, Ashwin; Goyal, Ajay; Baity, Matthew R.; Siefert, Caleb J.; Sobin, Sean; Leite, David; Sinclair, Samuel J.

    2014-01-01

    The current study looks to evaluate the validity and reliability of a brief measure of overall functioning for adolescents. Clinicians were asked to complete the Overall Functioning Scale for 72 adolescents consecutively admitted to the adolescent psychiatric inpatient service of a community safety net medical center. The results revealed that this new measure is related to the patients length of stay, clinician-rated measures of social cognition and object relations, Global Assessment of Functioning score at admission, and global rating of engagement in individual psychotherapy. Results also showed that the OFS was related to patients history of non-suicidal self-harm as well as treatment outcome as assessed by measures of psychological health and well-being and symtomatology. Hierarchical regressions reveal that the OFS shows incremental validity above the admission GAF score in predicting length of stay. The results also showed that the OFS demonstrates inter-rater reliability in the excellent range (ICC 1,2) of .88. Clinical implications of the use of this tool as well as areas of future research are discussed. PMID:25259948

  5. A Prospective Multi-Centre Study of Admissions to Adolescent Inpatient Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrate, R. M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes study examining admissions to adolescent psychiatry inpatient units. Seven diagnostic groups accounted for 90% of admissions. Treatment programs included external resources and agencies. 67 percent of admissions led to "completed treatment." Suggests type of diagnosis, not reliance upon elective admissions, reduced likelihood of

  6. Locus of Control and Outcome in an Operantly-Based Inpatient Multimodal Chronic Pain Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goloff, Marc; And Others

    During the past 10 years, a number of inpatient programs have been designed for the treatment of chronic pain. To investigate the utility of the Rotter Internal-External Locus of Control Scale (I-E) and Wallston's and Wallston's Health Locus of Control Scale (HLC) in predicting outcome in an operantly-based, multi-modal program for the treatment

  7. Efficacy and safety of gelatine tannate for the treatment of acute gastroenteritis in children: protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Michałek, Dorota; Kołodziej, Maciej; Konarska, Zofia; Szajewska, Hania

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Worldwide, acute gastroenteritis in children, usually caused by viruses, leads to considerable morbidity and mortality. The treatment is aimed at preventing and treating dehydration, promoting weight gain after rehydration, and reducing the duration and severity of diarrhoea. Effective and inexpensive interventions that could add to the effect of oral rehydration therapy are of interest. Recently, in many European countries, gelatine tannate is being widely marketed for treating acute gastroenteritis. Gelatine tannate is a complex of tannic acid, which possesses astringent and anti-inflammatory properties, and a protective gelatine. Currently, there is no evidence to support the use of gelatine tannate for treating acute gastroenteritis in children and only scant evidence to support the use of gelatine tannate in adults. We aim to assess the efficacy of gelatine tannate for the treatment of acute gastroenteritis in children. Methods and analysis This will be a blind, placebo-controlled, randomised trial. Children younger than 5 years of age with acute gastroenteritis defined as a change in stool consistency to loose or liquid form (according to the Bristol Stool Form scale or Amsterdam Stool Form scale) and/or an increase in the frequency of evacuations (typically ≥3 in 24 h), lasting for no longer than 5 days, will be recruited. A total of 158 children will be randomised to receive either gelatine tannate (children younger than 3 years of age will receive 250 mg, 4 times/day, and those older than 3 years of age will receive 500 mg, 4 times/day) or matching placebo for 5 days. The primary outcome measure is the duration of diarrhoea. Ethics and dissemination The Bioethics Committee approved the study protocol. The findings of this trial will be submitted to a peer-reviewed paediatric journal. Abstracts will be submitted to relevant national and international conferences. Trial registration number NCT02280759; Pre-results. PMID:26895988

  8. Acupuncture treatment for ischaemic stroke in young adults: protocol for a randomised, sham-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lifang; Fang, Jianqiao; Jin, Xiaoming; Keeler, Crystal Lynn; Gao, Hong; Fang, Zhen; Chen, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Stroke in young adults is not uncommon. Although the overall incidence of stroke has been recently declining, the incidence of stroke in young adults is increasing. Traditional vascular risk factors are the main cause of young ischaemic stroke. Acupuncture has been shown to benefit stroke rehabilitation and ameliorate the risk factors for stroke. The aims of this study were to determine whether acupuncture treatment will be effective in improving the activities of daily living (ADL), motor function and quality of life (QOL) in patients of young ischaemic stroke, and in preventing stroke recurrence by controlling blood pressure, lipids and body weight. Methods and analysis In this randomised, sham-controlled, participant-blinded and assessor-blinded clinical trial, 120 patients between 18 and 45 years of age with a recent (within 1 month) ischaemic stroke will be randomised for an 8-week acupuncture or sham acupuncture treatment. The primary outcome will be the Barthel Index for ADL. The secondary outcomes will include the Fugl-Meyer Assessment for motor function; the World Health Organization Quality of Life BREF (WHOQOL-BREF) for QOL; and risk factors that are measured by ambulatory blood pressure, the fasting serum lipid, body mass index and waist circumference. Incidence of adverse events and long-term mortality and recurrence rate during a 10-year and 30-year follow-up will also be investigated. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval was obtained from the Ethics Committee of The Third Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang Chinese Medical University. Protocol V.3 was approved in June 2013. The results will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at international congresses. The results will also be disseminated to patients by telephone during follow-up calls enquiring on the patient's post-study health status. Trial registration number ChiCTR-TRC- 13003317; Pre-results. PMID:26739742

  9. 42 CFR 424.14 - Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... psychiatric facilities. 424.14 Section 424.14 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Certification and Plan Requirements 424.14 Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric... requirements differ from those for other hospitals because the care furnished in psychiatric hospitals is...

  10. 42 CFR 424.14 - Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... psychiatric facilities. 424.14 Section 424.14 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Certification and Plan Requirements 424.14 Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric... requirements differ from those for other hospitals because the care furnished in psychiatric hospitals is...

  11. A multicenter open-label treatment protocol (HGT-GCB-058) of velaglucerase alfa enzyme replacement therapy in patients with Gaucher disease type 1: safety and tolerability

    PubMed Central

    Pastores, Gregory M.; Rosenbloom, Barry; Weinreb, Neal; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Grabowski, Gregory; Cohn, Gabriel M.; Zahrieh, David

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety of velaglucerase alfa in patients with type 1 Gaucher disease who received velaglucerase alfa in the US treatment protocol HGT-GCB-058 (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00954460) during a global supply shortage of imiglucerase. Methods: This multicenter open-label treatment protocol enrolled patients who were either treatment nave or had been receiving imiglucerase. Patients received intravenous velaglucerase alfa every other week at a dose of 60?U/kg (treatment nave) or 1560?U/kg (previously treated). Results: A total of 211 (including six treatment-nave) patients were enrolled. Among the 205 previously treated patients, 35 (17.1%) experienced an adverse event considered related to study drug. Among the six treatment-nave patients, one had an adverse event considered related to study drug. Infusion-related adverse events occurred in 28 (13.3%) of the 211 patients and usually occurred during the first three infusions. De novo, nonneutralizing, antivelaglucerase alfa antibodies developed during treatment in one (<1.0%) previously treated patient and none of the treatment-nave patients. Conclusion: The currently observed safety profile was consistent with those previously reported for imiglucerase and velaglucerase alfa phase III clinical trials. These results support the safety of initiating treatment with velaglucerase alfa or transitioning patients from imiglucerase therapy to velaglucerase alfa therapy. PMID:24263462

  12. Evaluating the Clinical Effectiveness of a Specialized Perinatal Psychiatry Inpatient Unit

    PubMed Central

    Meltzer-Brody, Samantha; Brandon, Anna R.; Pearson, Brenda; Burns, Lynne; Raines, Christena; Bullard, Elizabeth; Rubinow, David

    2013-01-01

    Women experiencing severe perinatal mental illness during pregnancy or postpartum have unique needs when psychiatric hospitalization is indicated. Although many countries have established mother-baby psychiatric units, similar facilities have not been available in the US. In 2011, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill inaugurated the first Perinatal Psychiatry Inpatient Unit (PPIU) in the US. We describe the unique characteristics of the patient population and report clinical outcomes guiding development and refinement of treatment protocols. Ninety-two perinatal patients were admitted between September 2011 and September 2012, and 91 completed self-report measures at admission and discharge. Perinatal unipolar mood disorder was the most frequent primary diagnosis (60.43%), and eleven patients (12%) were admitted with psychosis. The data document clinically and statistically significant improvements in symptoms of depression, anxiety and active suicidal ideation between admission and discharge (p < .0001), as assessed by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, Patient Health Questionnaire, and Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale. Overall functioning was also improved, demonstrated by a significant mean difference of −10.96 in total scores of the Work and Social Adjustment Scale (p < 0.0001). Data suggest that delivering specialized and targeted interventions for severe maternal mental illness in a safe and supportive setting produces positive patient outcomes. PMID:24201978

  13. Association of Family Structure to Later Criminality: A Population-Based Follow-Up Study of Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients in Northern Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikaheimo, Olli; Laukkanen, Matti; Hakko, Helina; Rasanen, Pirkko

    2013-01-01

    The influence of family structure on criminality in adolescents is well acknowledged in population based studies of delinquents, but not regarding adolescent psychiatric inpatients. The association of family structure to criminality was examined among 508 adolescents receiving psychiatric inpatient treatment between 2001 and 2006. Family structure

  14. Association of Family Structure to Later Criminality: A Population-Based Follow-Up Study of Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients in Northern Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikaheimo, Olli; Laukkanen, Matti; Hakko, Helina; Rasanen, Pirkko

    2013-01-01

    The influence of family structure on criminality in adolescents is well acknowledged in population based studies of delinquents, but not regarding adolescent psychiatric inpatients. The association of family structure to criminality was examined among 508 adolescents receiving psychiatric inpatient treatment between 2001 and 2006. Family structure…

  15. Eccentric treatment for patellar tendinopathy: a prospective randomised short‐term pilot study of two rehabilitation protocols

    PubMed Central

    Frohm, Anna; Saartok, Tönu; Halvorsen, Kjartan; Renström, Per

    2007-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy and safety of two eccentric rehabilitation protocols for patients with symptomatic patellar tendinopathy. A new eccentric overload training device was compared with the present standard eccentric rehabilitation programme on a decline board. Design Prospective, randomised clinical trial. Setting Sports rehabilitation clinic, university sports laboratory, supplemented with home exercises. Patients 20 competitive and recreational athletes, all with clinical diagnosis of patellar tendinopathy, verified by MRI or ultrasound imaging. Interventions A 12‐week rehabilitation period, either with bilateral eccentric overload strength training using the Bromsman device twice a week or with unilateral eccentric body load training using a decline board twice a week, supplemented with daily home exercises. Outcome measures The primary outcome was pain and function, assessed by the Swedish Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment for Patella (VISA‐P) score. Secondary outcome measures were isokinetic muscle torque, dynamic function and muscle flexibility, as well as pain level estimations using visual analogue scale (VAS). Side effects were registered. Results Both treatment groups improved in the short term according to the VISA‐P scores during the 12‐week rehabilitation period. However, there were no significant differences between the groups in terms of pain and function. After a 3‐month rehabilitation period, most patients could be regarded as improved enough to be able to return to training and sports. No serious side effects were detected in either group. Conclusion In patients with patellar tendinopathy pain, two‐legged eccentric overload training twice per week, using the new device (Bromsman), was as efficient and safe as the present standard daily eccentric one‐legged rehabilitation‐training regimen using a decline board. PMID:17289855

  16. Smoking cessation for hospital inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Bickerstaffe, Gary

    2014-01-01

    People who smoke make up a significant number of those admitted to hospital (NICE 2014). Being admitted to hospital can present a unique opportunity to attempt to stop smoking. Many smokers find quitting very difficult (Rigotti et al 2007), in large part due to them living and working in environments that contain many cues and triggers associated with nicotine consumption and smoking behaviours. Hospitals generally do not contain such environmental prompts to smoke. In the community, smokers have access to numerous types of support including GP's, pharmacies and Stop Smoking Services (SSS). Once admitted to hospital access to such support is significantly diminished. Given that many patients may be highly motivated to attempt to stop smoking due to heightened concerns about their health and being in an environment not associated with their smoking habits, it seems prudent to ensure there is access to all the levels of smoking cessation support available outside of the hospital. Not providing such support neglects implementing an evidence based, cost-effective health intervention in a major health setting (NICE 2014). A SSS pathway was designed that enabled existing hospital healthcare staff to be trained to identify patients that smoke, ask if the patient is considering quitting or abstaining whilst in hospital. If motivated to quit or abstain, to complete an assessment. This being based around dependence to nicotine and motivation to quit. Access to all available stop smoking medications should be included. Medication should only be provided alongside some level of motivational support up to discharge. Training core staff was felt to be the best option. They are available outside of office hours and access hospital systems such as pharmacy more readily than satellite staff. On discharge the patient is handed over to SSS for continued contact and support once at home. Over 200 staff are trained to complete the assessment and support inpatients to stop or abstain. Approximately 30-35 referrals are made to the local SSS each month, the quit rate at 4 weeks averaging around 4045%. Most referrals are seen from cardiology and respiratory. All hospital departments should identify staff to be trained to offer cessation support to their patients . PMID:26732425

  17. An Update on Inpatient Hypertension Management.

    PubMed

    Axon, R Neal; Turner, Mason; Buckley, Ryan

    2015-11-01

    Hypertension is highly prevalent affecting nearly one third of the US adult population. Though generally approached as an outpatient disorder, elevated blood pressure is observed in a majority of hospitalized patients. The spectrum of hypertensive disease ranges from patients with hypertensive emergency including markedly elevated blood pressure and associated end-organ damage to asymptomatic patients with minimally elevated pressures of unclear significance. It is important to note that current evidence-based hypertension guidelines do not specifically address inpatient hypertension. This narrative review focuses primarily on best practices for diagnosing and managing nonemergent hypertension in the inpatient setting. We describe examples of common hypertensive syndromes, provide suggestions for optimal post-acute management, and point to evidence-based or consensus guidelines where available. In addition, we describe a practical approach to managing asymptomatic elevated blood pressure observed in the inpatient setting. Finally, arranging effective care transitions to ensure optimal ongoing hypertension management is appropriate in all cases. PMID:26362300

  18. Violent psychiatric inpatients in a public hospital.

    PubMed

    Morrison, E F

    1990-01-01

    Violence in inpatient psychiatric settings is a clinically significant and relevant problem requiring attention by the psychiatric community. Despite the prevalence of research on violent behavior, few nursing studies have been conducted that explore the components of nursing care that may influence the amount of violence occurring in inpatient psychiatric settings. The purpose of the study was to identify the characteristics of violent patients and the components of nursing care that are related to violent patient behavior. A qualitative study was conducted using participant observation and grounded theory methodology. Data were collected in a metropolitan public hospital over a 9-month period. Six categories of violent patients were identified during data analysis: (1) the user, (b) the outlaw, (c) the rebel without a cause, (d) the little big man, (e) the child, and (6) the vamp. Implications of the study for clinicians working in inpatient psychiatric settings are discussed. PMID:2326569

  19. Inpatients hypospadias care: Trends and outcomes from the American nationwide inpatient sample

    PubMed Central

    Sukumar, Shyam; Sood, Akshay; Hanske, Julian; Vetterlein, Malte; Elder, Jack S.; Fisch, Margit; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Friedman, Ariella A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Hypospadias is the most common congenital penile anomaly. Information about current utilization patterns of inpatient hypospadias repair as well as complication rates remain poorly evaluated. Materials and Methods The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was used to identify all patients undergoing inpatient hypospadias repair between 1998 and 2010. Patient and hospital characteristics were attained and outcomes of interest included intra- and immediate postoperative complications. Utilization was evaluated temporally and also according to patient and hospital characteristics. Predictors of complications and excess length of stay were evaluated by logistic regression models. Results A weighted 10,201 patients underwent inpatient hypospadias repair between 1998 and 2010. Half were infants (52.2%), and were operated in urban and teaching hospitals. Trend analyses demonstrated a decline in incidence of inpatient hypospadias repair (estimated annual percentage change, -6.80%; range, -0.51% to -12.69%; p=0.037). Postoperative complication rate was 4.9% and most commonly wound-related. Hospital volume was inversely related to complication rates. Specifically, higher hospital volume (>31 cases annually) was the only variable associated with decreased postoperative complications. Conclusions Inpatient hypospadias repair have substantially decreased since the late 1990's. Older age groups and presumably more complex procedures constitute most of the inpatient procedures nowadays. PMID:26279829

  20. A short-term psychiatric inpatient program for adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gold, I M; Heller, C; Ritorto, B

    1992-01-01

    Third-party payers have become increasingly unwilling to fund long-term hospitalizations for adolescents. Inpatient adolescent programs have had to develop strategies to treat this difficult patient population much more rapidly. In late 1989 a short-term adolescent treatment program, known as the STAT program, was developed and implemented at a private psychiatric hospital in Massachusetts. The program aimed for a two- to three-week length of stay, a reduction of 30 to 50 percent. To accomplish this goal, the program shifted from a treatment-based approach to a focus on crisis management, patient evaluation and stabilization, and transition to outpatient services. Many staff concerns were allayed during the program's implementation. Short-term treatment for adolescents can be viable if appropriate exclusion criteria are developed for admissions and an adequate range of outpatient treatment services are available. PMID:1544650

  1. Factors affecting staff morale on inpatient mental health wards in England: a qualitative investigation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Good morale among staff on inpatient psychiatric wards is an important requirement for the maintenance of strong therapeutic alliances and positive patient experiences, and for the successful implementation of initiatives to improve care. More understanding is needed of mechanisms underlying good and poor morale. Method We conducted individual and group interviews with staff of a full range of disciplines and levels of seniority on seven NHS in-patient wards of varying types in England. Results Inpatient staff feel sustained in their potentially stressful roles by mutual loyalty and trust within cohesive ward teams. Clear roles, supportive ward managers and well designed organisational procedures and structures maintain good morale. Perceived threats to good morale include staffing levels that are insufficient for staff to feel safe and able to spend time with patients, the high risk of violence, and lack of voice in the wider organisation. Conclusions Increasing employee voice, designing jobs so as to maximise autonomy within clear and well-structured operational protocols, promoting greater staff-patient contact and improving responses to violence may contribute more to inpatient staff morale than formal support mechanisms. PMID:21510852

  2. Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis on a Cardiology In-Patient Unit: A Surprising Result?

    PubMed

    Golian, Mehrdad; Moussa, Motaz; White, Charlene; Aletta, Giuseppe; Koley, Lillian; Seifer, Colette

    2016-02-01

    To determine whether a guideline-based protocol improves compliance with venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis guidelines, 10 single-day audits of a cardiology inpatient unit were performed. All patients at high risk for VTE were included (n= 420; male/female= 282/138; median age, 66 14 years). Before the protocol, 36% of patients were not receiving VTE prophylaxis; after the protocol, 26% did not receive prophylaxis (P= 0.024). In conclusion, there is a high rate of noncompliance with accepted guidelines for the prevention of VTE. The introduction of a guideline-based protocol significantly increased compliance, but a substantial proportion of patients still did not receive VTE prophylaxis despite meriting such therapy. PMID:26268047

  3. Day Hospital Mentalization-Based Treatment (MBT-DH) versus treatment as usual in the treatment of severe borderline personality disorder: protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Severe borderline personality disorder is associated with a very high psychosocial and economic burden. Current treatment guidelines suggest that several manualized treatments, including day hospital Mentalization-Based Treatment (MBT-DH), are effective in these patients. However, only two randomized controlled trials have compared manualized MBT-DH with treatment as usual. Given the relative paucity of data supporting the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of MBT-DH, the possible influence of researcher allegiance in one of the trials, and potential problems with the generalization of findings to mental health systems in other countries, this multi-site randomized trial aims to investigate the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of manualized MBT-DH compared to manualized specialist treatment as usual in The Netherlands. Methods/design The trial is being conducted at two sites in The Netherlands. Patients with a DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of borderline personality disorder and a score of ≥ 20 on the Borderline Personality Disorder Severity Index were randomly allocated to MBT-DH or treatment as usual. The MBT-DH program consists of a maximum of 18 months’ intensive treatment, followed by a maximum of 18 months of maintenance therapy. Specialist treatment as usual is provided by the City Crisis Service in Amsterdam, a service that specializes in treating patients with personality disorders, offering manualized, non-MBT interventions including family interventions, Linehan training, social skills training, and pharmacotherapy, without a maximum time limit. Patients are assessed at baseline and subsequently every 6 months up to 36 months after the start of treatment. The primary outcome measure is the frequency and severity of manifestations of borderline personality disorder as assessed by the Borderline Personality Disorder Severity Index. Secondary outcome measures include parasuicidal behaviour, symptomatic distress, social and interpersonal functioning, personality functioning, attachment, capacity for mentalizing and quality of life. Cost-effectiveness is assessed in terms of the cost per quality-adjusted life year. Outcomes will be analyzed using multilevel analyses based on intention-to-treat principles. Discussion Severe borderline personality disorder is a serious psychological disorder that is associated with high burden. This multi-site randomized trial will provide further data concerning the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of MBT-DH for these patients. Trial registration NTR2175 PMID:24886402

  4. Roadmap to inpatient heart failure management.

    PubMed

    Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) accounts for over 1 million primary hospitalizations in the USA each year and carries a tremendous burden on costs and patient outcomes. The clinical syndrome of HF is not a single disease, but represents the complex interplay between various cardiac and non-cardiac processes, each of which need to be individually addressed. This review provides an updated, contemporary roadmap for inpatient worsening chronic HF management with a focus on identifying and addressing initiating mechanisms, amplifying factors, and cardiac structural abnormalities. Inpatient risk stratification should guide patient education, team structuring, disposition, and post-discharge monitoring. PMID:25238886

  5. Low-dose RUTF protocol and improved service delivery lead to good programme outcomes in the treatment of uncomplicated SAM: a programme report from Myanmar.

    PubMed

    James, Philip T; Van den Briel, Natalie; Rozet, Aurélie; Israël, Anne-Dominique; Fenn, Bridget; Navarro-Colorado, Carlos

    2015-10-01

    The treatment of uncomplicated severe acute malnutrition (SAM) requires substantial amounts of ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF). In 2009, Action Contre la Faim anticipated a shortfall of RUTF for their nutrition programme in Myanmar. A low-dose RUTF protocol to treat children with uncomplicated SAM was adopted. In this protocol, RUTF was dosed according to beneficiary's body weight, until the child reached a Weight-for-Height z-score of ≥-3 and mid-upper arm circumference ≥110 mm. From this point, the child received a fixed quantity of RUTF per day, independent of body weight until discharge. Specific measures were implemented as part of this low-dose RUTF protocol in order to improve service quality and beneficiary support. We analysed individual records of 3083 children treated from July 2009 to January 2010. Up to 90.2% of children recovered, 2.0% defaulted and 0.9% were classified as non-responders. No deaths were recorded. Among children who recovered, median [IQR] length of stay and weight gain were 42 days [28; 56] and 4.0 g kg(-1) day(-1) [3.0; 5.7], respectively. Multivariable logistic regression showed that children older than 48 months had higher odds of non-response to treatment than younger children (adjusted odds ratio: 3.51, 95% CI: 1.67-7.42). Our results indicate that a low-dose RUTF protocol, combined with specific measures to ensure good service quality and beneficiary support, was successful in treating uncomplicated SAM in this setting. This programmatic experience should be validated by randomised studies aiming to test, quantify and attribute the effect of the protocol adaptation and programme improvements presented here. PMID:25850698

  6. Low–dose RUTF protocol and improved service delivery lead to good programme outcomes in the treatment of uncomplicated SAM: a programme report from Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    James, Philip T; Van den Briel, Natalie; Rozet, Aurélie; Israël, Anne-Dominique; Fenn, Bridget; Navarro-Colorado, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of uncomplicated severe acute malnutrition (SAM) requires substantial amounts of ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF). In 2009, Action Contre la Faim anticipated a shortfall of RUTF for their nutrition programme in Myanmar. A low-dose RUTF protocol to treat children with uncomplicated SAM was adopted. In this protocol, RUTF was dosed according to beneficiary's body weight, until the child reached a Weight-for-Height z-score of ≥−3 and mid-upper arm circumference ≥110 mm. From this point, the child received a fixed quantity of RUTF per day, independent of body weight until discharge. Specific measures were implemented as part of this low-dose RUTF protocol in order to improve service quality and beneficiary support. We analysed individual records of 3083 children treated from July 2009 to January 2010. Up to 90.2% of children recovered, 2.0% defaulted and 0.9% were classified as non-responders. No deaths were recorded. Among children who recovered, median [IQR] length of stay and weight gain were 42 days [28; 56] and 4.0 g kg–1 day–1 [3.0; 5.7], respectively. Multivariable logistic regression showed that children older than 48 months had higher odds of non-response to treatment than younger children (adjusted odds ratio: 3.51, 95% CI: 1.67–7.42). Our results indicate that a low-dose RUTF protocol, combined with specific measures to ensure good service quality and beneficiary support, was successful in treating uncomplicated SAM in this setting. This programmatic experience should be validated by randomised studies aiming to test, quantify and attribute the effect of the protocol adaptation and programme improvements presented here. PMID:25850698

  7. 42 CFR 441.154 - Active treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 in Psychiatric Facilities or Programs 441.154 Active treatment. Inpatient psychiatric services must involve active treatment, which means implementation of...

  8. 42 CFR 441.154 - Active treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 in Psychiatric Facilities or Programs 441.154 Active treatment. Inpatient psychiatric services must involve active treatment, which means implementation of...

  9. 42 CFR 441.154 - Active treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 in Psychiatric Facilities or Programs 441.154 Active treatment. Inpatient psychiatric services must involve active treatment, which means implementation of...

  10. 42 CFR 441.154 - Active treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 in Psychiatric Facilities or Programs 441.154 Active treatment. Inpatient psychiatric services must involve active treatment, which means implementation of...

  11. 42 CFR 441.154 - Active treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 in Psychiatric Facilities or Programs 441.154 Active treatment. Inpatient psychiatric services must involve active treatment, which means implementation of...

  12. [Reactions to infliximab infusions in dermatologic patients: consensus statement and treatment protocol. Working Group of the Grupo Espaol de Psoriasis de la Academia Espaola de Dermatologa y Venereologa ].

    PubMed

    Puig Sanz, Llus; Sez, E; Lozano, M J; Bordas, X; Carrascosa, J M; Gallardo, F; Luelmo, J; Snchez-Regaa, M; Alsina, M; Garca-Patos, V

    2009-03-01

    Infliximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to and blocks tumor necrosis factor alpha and is the most effective biologic agent approved for the treatment of moderate-to-severe psoriasis. It is administered by intravenous infusion, usually in day hospitals on an outpatient basis. The main problem with the administration of infliximab is the possibility of infusion reactions, which may be immediate or delayed; these reactions are related to the immunogenicity of this monoclonal antibody, leading to the production of anti-infliximab antibodies. Infusion reactions to infliximab are not usually anaphylactic (ie, they are not mediated by immunoglobulin E), and re-exposure of the patient using specific protocols to prevent and treat these reactions is therefore possible. The extensive experience in the use of infliximab for the treatment of rheumatic conditions and chronic inflammatory bowel disease has made it possible to develop infusion reaction management protocols; these can be applied to dermatologic patients, who constitute a growing proportion of patients treated with intravenous biological agents. The aim of this review is to draw up a consensus protocol for the treatment of infusion reactions in dermatologic patients treated with infliximab. PMID:19445874

  13. Hospital Costs and Inpatient Mortality among Children Undergoing Surgery for Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Romley, John A; Chen, Alex Y; Goldman, Dana P; Williams, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the association between hospital costs and risk-adjusted inpatient mortality among children undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease (CHD) in U.S. acute-care hospitals. Data Sources/Study Settings Retrospective cohort study of 35,446 children in 2003, 2006, and 2009 Kids' Inpatient Database (KID). Study Design Cross-sectional logistic regression of risk-adjusted inpatient mortality and hospital costs, adjusting for a variety of patient-, hospital-, and community-level confounders. Data Collection/Extraction Methods We identified relevant discharges in the KID using the AHRQ Pediatric Quality Indicator for pediatric heart surgery mortality, and linked these records to hospital characteristics from American Hospital Association Surveys and community characteristics from the Census. Principal Findings Children undergoing CHD surgery in higher cost hospitals had lower risk-adjusted inpatient mortality (p=.002). An increase from the 25th percentile of treatment costs to the 75th percentile was associated with a 13.6 percent reduction in risk-adjusted mortality. Conclusions Greater hospital costs are associated with lower risk-adjusted inpatient mortality for children undergoing CHD surgery. The specific mechanisms by which greater costs improve mortality merit further exploration. PMID:24138064

  14. 42 CFR 424.15 - Requirements for inpatient CAH services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for inpatient CAH services. 424.15... 424.15 Requirements for inpatient CAH services. (a) Content of certification. Medicare Part A pays for inpatient CAH services only if a physician certifies that the individual may reasonably be expected to...

  15. 42 CFR 424.15 - Requirements for inpatient CAH services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Requirements for inpatient CAH services. 424.15... 424.15 Requirements for inpatient CAH services. (a) Content of certification. Medicare Part A pays for inpatient CAH services only if a physician certifies that the individual may reasonably be expected to...

  16. Psychiatric Information Systems: An Analysis of Inpatient and Outpatient Unit Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Wisdom, Jennifer; Bielavitz, Sarann; French, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes how a sample of inpatient and out-patient psychiatric treatment units use technology to aid in patient care through scheduling, tracking, billing, and documenting clinical services. We conducted semi-structured interviews (n = 68) at four inpatient and four outpatient psychiatric facilities in Oregon. Results indicate psychiatric facilities are assembling systems for managing information that include a combination of electronic linked clinical records, paper records, and unit-specific, unlinked databases. Barriers remain in (1) improving the sophistication of psychiatric information systems, (2) improving linkages of behavioral health with other medical information systems, and (3) increasing information technology support. PMID:21603591

  17. C4-3: Implementation of a Screening Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) Protocol in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Rahm, Alanna Kulchak; Martin, Carmen; Boggs, Jennifer; Price, David; Beck, Arne; Dearing, James; Backer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Substance abuse in the United States is a serious public health concern; however, routine screening is inconsistent in primary care. In partnership with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Kaiser Permanente Colorado (KPCO) implemented the Screening Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) protocol in one primary care clinic over a 3-month period in order to determine staff perceptions, barriers, and solutions for wide-scale implementation. Methods Based on prior feasibility studies, clinic staff were engaged in order to anticipate barriers and solutions to improve implementation success. A quantitative survey of team functioning and clinic priority for implementing SBIRT was also conducted prior to implementation. Screening was conducted by front desk staff of all adult Health Maintenance Visits (ages 1964 years) using a 3-question paper questionnaire, followed by Brief Intervention delivered by the behavioral medicine specialist (BMS) in the case of positive screening result. This workflow was determined by the clinic despite prior feasibility results indicating optimal workflow consisting of screening by Medical Assistants and Nurses during the rooming process due to multiple competing demands from the organization during the implementation period. Results A total of 1097 eligible patients were seen during the 3-month implementation, 321 (29%) were screened for alcohol use, and 15 (5%) required additional Brief Intervention with the BMS. Positive results of implementation included improved awareness by physicians of alcohol use, better communication among members of the care team, and integration of the BMS as a resource for the care team. Barriers included patient resistance, competing demands on the clinic, and lack of information on screening recorded in the medical record. Post-study debriefing with primary care and BMS staff led to a commitment by clinic leadership and staff to revise workflow and explore regional implementation strategies. Solutions include additional training regarding clinical utility of screening and options for normalizing screening for patients and solutions for recording screening in the EMR. Conclusions Through continued use of SBIRT, this clinic will also demonstrate the value of screening for drug and alcohol use to the region in order to promote wider dissemination.

  18. The Hjelp24 NIMI Ringerike obesity clinic: an inpatient programme to address morbid obesity in adults.

    PubMed

    Mhlum, Sverre; Danielsen, Kjersti Karoline; Heggeb, Lena Klasson; Schill, Janne

    2012-02-01

    An inpatient programme for the treatment of morbidly obese patients is described. The programme targets physical training, nutrition and coping strategies for behaviour change management. The patients spend 14 weeks at the clinic followed by two 1-week visits 16 and 32 weeks postdischarge. Preliminary data from the 166 patients treated during 2006 are given. PMID:20460258

  19. Treating Inpatients with Comorbid Depression and Alcohol Use Disorders: A Comparison of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Connie L.; Zettle, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    Inpatients involuntarily committed to a chemical dependency unit and exhibiting a co-occurring depressive disorder received either individual sessions of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) or treatment as usual (TAU) within the context of an ongoing 12-step program. Results indicated significant, but equivalent, reductions in levels of…

  20. Treating Inpatients with Comorbid Depression and Alcohol Use Disorders: A Comparison of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Connie L.; Zettle, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    Inpatients involuntarily committed to a chemical dependency unit and exhibiting a co-occurring depressive disorder received either individual sessions of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) or treatment as usual (TAU) within the context of an ongoing 12-step program. Results indicated significant, but equivalent, reductions in levels of

  1. Differing Levels of Superstitious Beliefs among Three Groups: Psychiatric Inpatients, Churchgoers, and Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Sheryl L.

    This study investigated the level of superstitious belief among 175 persons in three categories: persons undergoing inpatient psychiatric treatment, churchgoers, and college students. A 50-item inventory consisting of positive and negative common superstitions, including a 5-item invalidity subscale, was administered. Using a 2 (male, female) x 3…

  2. Inpatient Family Intervention: A Preliminary Report on Six-Month Outcome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Gretchen L.; And Others

    Recent research suggests that family attitudes may be significant determinants of relapse and hospital readmission among both schizophrenics and hospitalized depressives. To assess the incremental effectiveness of inpatient family intervention within the context of treatment for schizophrenic disorder and major affective disorder patients, a

  3. Weight Gain and Its Correlates Among Forensic Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, N Zoe; Ham, Elke; Lang, Carol; Harris, Grant T

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We investigated changes in weight, body mass index (BMI), and other indices of the metabolic syndrome in forensic inpatients. Weight gain associated with newer antipsychotics (APs) is well established in the general psychiatric population. Methods: We examined the medical records of 291 men admitted to a forensic hospital at admission and again at discharge or 365 days later if still in hospital. We also recorded diagnosis and smoker status on admission and quantified psychotropic treatment and adherence, physical activity, and daytime occupation during the hospitalization. Results: On admission, 33% were obese and 22% of the 106 patients for whom sufficient data were available met criteria for metabolic syndrome. Among patients staying at least 30 days, 60% were weighed again before discharge but repeated blood pressure and waist circumference measures were uncommon, even among those at greatest risk. The 122 forensic inpatients with sufficient information gained an average of 12% of their body weight and 40% increased by at least 1 BMI category, gaining an average of 3.67 kg per month. Weight gain was associated with duration of time and was not attributable to being underweight on admission, diagnosis of schizophrenia, atypical AP treatment, medication adherence, or having been a smoker. Conclusions: Patients gained weight during forensic hospitalization independent of medication use. We recommend further research using consistent measurement and wider sampling of both metabolic syndrome indicators and its individual and systemic causes in forensic populations. PMID:26174527

  4. 42 CFR 424.14 - Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... psychiatric facilities. 424.14 Section 424.14 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... psychiatric facilities. (a) Requirements for certification and recertification: General considerations... other hospitals because the care furnished in inpatient psychiatric facilities is often purely...

  5. 42 CFR 424.14 - Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... psychiatric facilities. 424.14 Section 424.14 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... psychiatric facilities. (a) Requirements for certification and recertification: General considerations... other hospitals because the care furnished in inpatient psychiatric facilities is often purely...

  6. Treatment of pediatric non-Hodgkin lymphomas in a country with limited resources: results of the first national protocol in Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Baez, F; Pillon, M; Manfredini, L; Ocampo, E; Mendez, G; Ortiz, R; Palacios, R; Gutierrez, T; Tridello, G; Conter, V; Valsecchi, Mg; Fossati Bellani, F; Cavalli, F; Masera, G; Rosolen, A

    2008-01-01

    We report the results of a protocol for the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) conducted in Nicaragua in the context of an international collaborative program. Fifty-three children with NHL treated between 1996 and 2003 were retrospectively evaluated. Therapy was designed based on local drug availability and affordability with dose and schedule adaptations for Burkitt and lymphoblastic lymphomas. With a median follow-up of 3 years, the projected 9-year overall survival was 63% and event-free survival 53%. The treatment was efficacious, feasible, and well tolerated in spite of the local socio-economical conditions. PMID:16972240

  7. Impulse control disorders in psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Müller, Astrid; Rein, Katharina; Kollei, Ines; Jacobi, Andrea; Rotter, Andrea; Schütz, Patricia; Hillemacher, Thomas; de Zwaan, Martina

    2011-08-15

    The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of impulse control disorders (ICDs) in a European psychiatric inpatient sample. Two hundred thirty four consecutive psychiatric inpatients (62% female) were examined using a module of the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders fourth edition (DSM-IV) that has been developed for ICDs (SCID-ICD). In addition to intermittent explosive disorder, pyromania, kleptomania, pathological gambling, and trichotillomania, the proposed ICDs not otherwise specified were assessed, including compulsive buying, nonparaphilic compulsive sexual behavior, pathological internet use, and pathological skin picking. Based on the SCID-ICD, a lifetime ICD rate of 23.5% and a current ICD rate of 18.8% were found. The most frequent ICDs were pathological skin picking (lifetime 7.3%, current 6.8%), compulsive buying (lifetime 6.8%, current 6.0%), and intermittent explosive disorder (lifetime 5.6%, current 3.4%). In contrast, referring to admission diagnoses taken from patients' charts only 3.8% of the inpatients were diagnosed with any current ICD. Individuals with comorbid ICD were significantly younger and had more admission diagnoses other than ICD. The results suggest high rates of ICDs among psychiatric inpatients that remain to be under-diagnosed in clinical routine. PMID:21546096

  8. Depression in Geriatric and Adult Medical Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magni, Guido; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Administered two scales for the evaluation of depression to two groups of medical inpatients: adults (N=201) and geriatric subjects (N=178). Results confirmed a high presence of depressive symptoms among patients with medical problems, particularly among geriatric subjects. Factors most predictive of depressive symptoms are identified. (JAC)

  9. Computer-Assisted Psychoeducation of Psychiatric Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burda, Philip C.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Assesses the impact of computer-assisted psychoeducation of psychiatric inpatients as a complement to traditional classroom lectures. Subjects who received computer-assisted psychoeducation were found to have higher test-passing rates and lower rates of absenteeism than subjects who received cognitive training on the computers. (Author/AEF)

  10. Determinants of geropsychiatric inpatient length of stay.

    PubMed

    Blank, Karen; Hixon, Laurel; Gruman, Cindy; Robison, Julie; Hickey, Gene; Schwartz, Harold I

    2005-01-01

    Despite efforts to decrease lengths of acute psychiatric hospital stays, some geriatric inpatients continue to have extended stays. This research examined factors related to length of stay (LOS), including legal and administrative factors not traditionally included in prior studies. The charts of 384 patients, representing all 464 discharges from an inpatient geropsychiatric unit over a one-year period, were evaluated retrospectively and analyzed using logistic regression and logarithmic transformation. The LOS of over 12% of the inpatients was 26 days or more (average LOS 14.1). Factors significantly associated with longer LOS were: receiving electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), higher Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) positive symptoms scores, falling, pharmacology complications, multiple prior psychiatric hospitalizations, requiring court proceedings to continue hospitalization or medicate against will, consultation delays and not performing ECT on weekends. Neither demographics nor diagnoses alone had influence on length of stay. Incorporation of LOS predictors into Medicare Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS) would more accurately account for the complexity in the cost of caring for geropsychiatry patients. PMID:15884745

  11. Detecting Depression in Elderly Medical Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapp, Stephen R.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Used Research Diagnostic Criteria to assess base rate of detection of depression in 150 elderly medical inpatients by nonpsychiatric physicians, and evaluated psychometric properties of screening instruments to assess depression. Found detection of depression by house staff extremely low (8.7 percent). Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), BDI…

  12. Reducing treatments in cattle superovulation protocols by combining a pituitary extract with a 5% hyaluronan solution: Is it able to diminish activation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis compared to the traditional protocol?

    PubMed

    Biancucci, Andrea; Sbaragli, Tatiana; Comin, Antonella; Sylla, Lakamy; Monaci, Maurizio; Peric, Tanja; Stradaioli, Giuseppe

    2016-03-15

    Traditional superovulation protocols that include multiple gonadotropin treatments are time-consuming and labor intensive. These protocols require multiple handling and restraining of embryo donors. This will likely increase the risks of injuries in both animals and humans and induce stress that may lead to a reduced superovulatory response. These are more evident when working with cattle that are rarely handled or raised on extensive grazing. The objectives of this experiment were to compare the efficacy of a split-injection protocol of porcine pituitary-derived porcine FSH (pFSH) preparation (slow release [SR] group) to the traditional 4-day treatment with pFSH administered twice daily (C group) and to determine the concentrations of cortisol in the hair as a marker of activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis during the two superovulatory treatments. Thirty-two heifers were stimulated twice in a 2 × 2 crossover design and compared for ovarian response and numbers and characteristics of recovered ova-embryo among treatments. No differences between SR and C groups were found in terms of percentage of responsive animals (100% vs. 93.8%) and ovulation rate (83.7 ± 1.1 vs. 79.5 ± 1.0%). A positive correlation was found between the number of follicles responsive to pFSH (2-8 mm) at the beginning of treatments and the superovulatory response, and no differences were found in these follicular populations between the two treatment groups. The numbers of CLs, ova-embryos, fertilized ova, transferable and freezable embryos recovered per cow were found to be significantly higher in SR compared with C group (14.0 ± 1.6 vs. 10.6 ± 1.0, 12.1 ± 1.6 vs. 7.6 ± 1.0, 11.1 ± 1.1 vs. 7.3 ± 1.0, 9.6 ± 1.4 vs. 6.6 ± 1.0, and 9.4 ± 1.4 vs. 6.0 ± 1.0 for SR and C group, respectively). The SR group produced also a significantly greater number of excellent- and/or good-quality embryos compared with the C group. The concentrations of cortisol in the hair at Days 14 and 21 were significantly greater in the C compared with the SR group (P < 0.05). In conclusion, these results indicate that the dilution of gonadotropin in a 5% hyaluronan solution, reducing the administration frequency, improves the quantitative and qualitative superovulatory response of Marchigiana heifers. Further studies using other breeds of cattle are needed to verify the results herein obtained and to confirm the lower activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis caused in the donor by the split-injection protocol. PMID:26691606

  13. Development and validation of a simple protocol to rapidly determine the performance of biofilters for VOC treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Deshusses, M.A.; Johnson, C.T.

    2000-02-01

    A protocol has been developed for the rapid determination of complete elimination characteristics of target pollutants in waste air biofilters. The protocol involves the determination of two pollutant concentration profiles along the height of a three-segment biofilter under carefully chosen conditions. The combination of the data results in 12 points on the elimination capacity vs load curve which is sufficient to fully characterize a system. The protocol conditions were chosen to enable characterization of biofiltration systems with VOC elimination capacities ranging from 20 to 120 g m{sup {minus}3} h{sup {minus}1}. The protocol was then applied to 18 different VOCs, and the results compared well with previously published data, when available. Maximum removal performance of classes of compounds in the biofilter followed the sequence alcohols > esters > ketones >aromatics alkanes. An attempt was made to correlate the pollutant elimination with Henry's coefficient, and the octanol/water partition coefficient and trends were obtained. The results suggest that biodegradation of VOCs in biofilters is influenced both by the pollutant availability and to a lesser extent by the hydrophobicity of the treated compounds.

  14. Predictors of Readmission after Inpatient Plastic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Umang; Salgado, Christopher; Mioton, Lauren; Rambachan, Aksharananda

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding risk factors that increase readmission rates may help enhance patient education and set system-wide expectations. We aimed to provide benchmark data on causes and predictors of readmission following inpatient plastic surgery. Methods The 2011 National Surgical Quality Improvement Program dataset was reviewed for patients with both "Plastics" as their recorded surgical specialty and inpatient status. Readmission was tracked through the "Unplanned Readmission" variable. Patient characteristics and outcomes were compared using chi-squared analysis and Student's t-tests for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. Multivariate regression analysis was used for identifying predictors of readmission. Results A total of 3,671 inpatient plastic surgery patients were included. The unplanned readmission rate was 7.11%. Multivariate regression analysis revealed a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (odds ratio [OR], 2.01; confidence interval [CI], 1.12-3.60; P=0.020), previous percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) (OR, 2.69; CI, 1.21-5.97; P=0.015), hypertension requiring medication (OR, 1.65; CI, 1.22-2.24; P<0.001), bleeding disorders (OR, 1.70; CI, 1.01-2.87; P=0.046), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class 3 or 4 (OR, 1.57; CI, 1.15-2.15; P=0.004), and obesity (body mass index ?30) (OR, 1.43; CI, 1.09-1.88, P=0.011) to be significant predictors of readmission. Conclusions Inpatient plastic surgery has an associated 7.11% unplanned readmission rate. History of COPD, previous PCI, hypertension, ASA class 3 or 4, bleeding disorders, and obesity all proved to be significant risk factors for readmission. These findings will help to benchmark inpatient readmission rates and manage patient and hospital system expectations. PMID:24665418

  15. Investigating the efficacy of integrated cognitive behavioral therapy for adult treatment seeking substance use disorder patients with comorbid ADHD: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) frequently co-occurs with substance use disorders (SUD). The combination of ADHD and SUD is associated with a negative prognosis of both SUD and ADHD. Pharmacological treatments of comorbid ADHD in adult patients with SUD have not been very successful. Recent studies show positive effects of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in ADHD patients without SUD, but CBT has not been studied in ADHD patients with comorbid SUD. Methods/design This paper presents the protocol of a randomized controlled trial to test the efficacy of an integrated CBT protocol aimed at reducing SUD as well as ADHD symptoms in SUD patients with a comorbid diagnosis of ADHD. The experimental group receives 15 CBT sessions directed at symptom reduction of SUD as well as ADHD. The control group receives treatment as usual, i.e. 10 CBT sessions directed at symptom reduction of SUD only. The primary outcome is the level of self-reported ADHD symptoms. Secondary outcomes include measures of substance use, depression and anxiety, quality of life, health care consumption and neuropsychological functions. Discussion This is the first randomized controlled trial to test the efficacy of an integrated CBT protocol for adult SUD patients with a comorbid diagnosis of ADHD. The rationale for the trial, the design, and the strengths and limitations of the study are discussed. Trial registration This trial is registered in http://www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01431235. PMID:23663651

  16. Manipulation of progesterone to increase ovulatory response to the first GnRH treatment of an Ovsynch protocol in lactating dairy cows receiving first timed artificial insemination.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, P D; Wiltbank, M C; Fricke, P M

    2015-12-01

    Ovulation to the first GnRH (G1) treatment of the Ovsynch protocol improves synchronization rate and pregnancies per AI (P/AI). Elevated progesterone (P4) concentrations at G1 decrease the ovulatory response by decreasing the magnitude of the GnRH-induced LH surge. Therefore, our objective was to evaluate the effect of temporarily decreasing P4 concentrations before initiation of an Ovsynch protocol on ovulatory response to G1 and P/AI. Lactating Holstein cows (n=800) at 533 (herd A) or 513 (herd B) d in milk (DIM) were synchronized using a modified Double-Ovsynch protocol [pre-Ovsynch protocol (d 0, GnRH; d 7, PGF2?; d 10, GnRH) followed 7 d later by an Ovsynch-56 protocol (d 0, G1; d 7, PGF2?; d 8, PGF2?; d 9.5, GnRH)] to receive first timed artificial insemination (TAI; 803 DIM) 16h after the last GnRH treatment. Cows were randomly assigned to receive 12.5mg of PGF2? (a half-dose of dinoprost tromethamine) 2 d before G1 (low-P4) or serve as untreated controls (high-P4). Overall, high-P4 cows had greater P4 concentrations at G1 compared with low-P4 cows (3.0 vs. 1.3ng/mL, respectively). Ovulatory response to G1 was greater for low-P4 than high-P4 cows [81.1 vs. 60.3%, respectively]. Premature luteal regression during the second Ovsynch protocol did not differ between treatments [15.0% vs. 10.7%; for low-P4 vs. high-P4 cows, respectively]. Overall, P/AI did not differ between treatments 32 d after TAI [56.3 vs. 52.9%, for low-P4 vs. high-P4 cows, respectively] or 67 d after AI [50.5 vs. 47.6%, for low-P4 vs. high-P4 cows, respectively]. Pregnancy loss from 32 to 67 d after TAI did not differ between treatments [9.9 vs. 9.3%, for low-P4 vs. high-P4 cows, respectively]. Overall, cows that ovulated to G1 had more P/AI than cows that did not ovulate [58.2 vs. 41.8%, respectively]. The increase in P/AI for cows that ovulated to G1 (16.4%) combined with the observed increase in ovulation to G1 due to treatment (20.8%; low-P4 - high-P4) resulted in the expected numerical increase in P/AI of 3.4% in low-P4 versus high-P4 cows observed in this experiment. We conclude that administration of a half-dose of PGF2? 2 d before G1 during a Double-Ovsynch protocol decreased P4 at G1 and increased ovulatory response to G1. PMID:26454293

  17. Annual Hospital Volume of High Dose Interleukin-2 and Inpatient Mortality in Melanoma and Renal Cell Carcinoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Kathan; Appleman, Leonard; Wang, Hong; Tarhini, Ahmad A.; Parikh, Rahul A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Immunotherapy using high dose interleukin-2 (HD IL2) in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and melanoma is associated with severe toxicities. The association between annual hospital volume of HD IL2 and inpatient mortality is not well studied. In this study we aim to quantify the impact of annual hospital volume of HD IL2 on inpatient mortality using National Inpatient Sample (NIS) data. Methods We did a cross-sectional study using NIS, one of the largest inpatient datasets in United States, from 2003 to 2011. Patients with melanoma and RCC receiving HD IL2 were identified by ICD9 procedure code 00.15. The primary outcome was inpatient mortality. Using Joinpoint regression, which detects change in trend of inpatient mortality with change in annual volume, the hospitals were classified in three volume categories (low: 1–40, medium: 41–120, high: >120). Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify predictors of inpatient mortality controlling for confounders. Results From 2003 to 2011, 29,532 patients with RCC or melanoma who received HD IL2 were identified, and 124 died during the hospitalization (0.4%). The hospitals with low, medium and high annual volume had significant difference in inpatient mortality (0.83%, 0.29% and 0.13% respectively, p = 0.0003). On multivariate analysis, low volume hospitals were associated with significantly higher odds of inpatient mortality (OR 6.1, 95% CI 1.6–23.2, p = 0.003) as compared to high volume hospitals. Additionally, the hospitals with annual volume of 1–20 had even higher rates (1.31% vs. 0.13%, p<0.0001) and multivariate odds (OR 8.9, 95% CI 2.4–33.2, p = 0.0006) of inpatient mortality as compared to high volume hospitals. Conclusions Lower annual hospital volume of HD IL2 is associated with worse outcomes. Annual hospital volume of 1–40 and 1–20 treatments per year is associated with 6 and 9 times higher odds of inpatient mortality respectively as compared to high volume hospitals. Our findings provide preliminary evidence for a volume-outcome relationship for RCC and melanoma patients undergoing HD IL2 treatment. They support future volume-outcome analyses in relation to other anti-cancer therapies that require special training and expertise. PMID:26799322

  18. A clinical trial protocol for second line treatment of malignant brain tumors with BNCT at University of Tsukuba.

    PubMed

    Aiyama, H; Nakai, K; Yamamoto, T; Nariai, T; Kumada, H; Ishikawa, E; Isobe, T; Endo, K; Takada, T; Yoshida, F; Shibata, Y; Matsumura, A

    2011-12-01

    We have evaluated the efficacy and safety of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for recurrent glioma and malignant brain tumor using a new protocol. One of the two patients enrolled in this trial is a man with recurrent glioblastoma and the other is a woman with anaplastic meningioma. Both are still alive and no severe adverse events have been observed. Our findings suggest that NCT will be safe as a palliative therapy for malignant brain tumors. PMID:21778066

  19. [A protocol for the diagnosis and treatment of metabolic osteopathy in patients with home-based parenteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    Enterría, P Gómez; González, L Laborda; Faedo, C Martínez

    2007-01-01

    Patients presenting severe intestinal failure submitted to a home-based parenteral nutrition program have increased risk for bone metabolism impairments. This decrease in bone quality has a multifactorial origin and may be already present when implementing nutritional support. There is the need for having available protocols allowing early diagnosis of osteo-metabolic disease and implementing adequate therapy to prevent fractures and improving the quality of life of these patients. PMID:17612377

  20. An in-patient behavioural psychotherapy unit. Description and audit.

    PubMed

    Thornicroft, G; Colson, L; Marks, I

    1991-03-01

    An in-patient behavioural psychotherapy unit is described that emphasises self-treatment, teaching relatives to become cotherapists while resident in the unit, routine collection of outcome data, minimising use of medication, and absence of night nurses. Patients are referred from all over the UK, mostly with chronic disabling OCD. Treatment includes self-exposure and self-imposed response prevention. A year's cohort (52 patients) showed substantial improvement that consolidated during six-month follow-up (83% decrease in total ritual time per day, 58% fall in target ritual scores, better social adjustment), and families noted relief of burden; eight patients dropped out. Further such units are needed in the UK, perhaps on a regional basis; they could be run as specialist hostels. PMID:2036535

  1. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Puncturing and Bloodletting at Twelve Hand Jing Points to Treat Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning as Adjunct to First Aid Treatment: A Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Ying; Pan, Xingfang; Zhang, Sai; Jin, Jun; Wang, Wei; Wang, Dongqiang; Han, Dexin; Wang, Guirong; Hu, Qunliang; Kang, Jingqing; Ding, Shasha; Yang, Yi; Bu, Huaien; Guo, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background. Acute carbon monoxide poisoning (ACOP) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in many countries. Twelve Hand Jing Points (THJP) have been believed to be effective to treat all kinds of emergency calls in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for more than 3000 years. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) is designed to evaluate the effectiveness of THJP in curing acute carbon monoxide poisoning in first aid treatment. This paper reports the protocol of the trial. Methods/Design. This RCT is a multicenter, randomized, controlled study undergoing in China. The compliant patients are divided into the bloodletting group and standard of care group. With first aid treatments given to both of the groups, the bloodletting group is bleeding at THJP upon being hospitalized. Primary outcomes and secondary outcomes will be measured and compared between these two groups. Before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 30 minutes, 1 hour, and 4 hours after treatment, patients' basic vital signs and state of consciousness were observed. Before treatment and 1 and 4 hours after treatment, carboxyhemoglobin concentration in venous blood samples was detected. Discussion. The objective of this study is to provide convincing evidence to clarify the efficacy and safety of THJP for early treatment of acute carbon monoxide poisoning. PMID:26339271

  2. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Puncturing and Bloodletting at Twelve Hand Jing Points to Treat Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning as Adjunct to First Aid Treatment: A Study Protocol.

    PubMed

    Yue, Ying; Pan, Xingfang; Zhang, Sai; Jin, Jun; Wang, Wei; Wang, Dongqiang; Han, Dexin; Wang, Guirong; Hu, Qunliang; Kang, Jingqing; Ding, Shasha; Yang, Yi; Bu, Huaien; Guo, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background. Acute carbon monoxide poisoning (ACOP) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in many countries. Twelve Hand Jing Points (THJP) have been believed to be effective to treat all kinds of emergency calls in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for more than 3000 years. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) is designed to evaluate the effectiveness of THJP in curing acute carbon monoxide poisoning in first aid treatment. This paper reports the protocol of the trial. Methods/Design. This RCT is a multicenter, randomized, controlled study undergoing in China. The compliant patients are divided into the bloodletting group and standard of care group. With first aid treatments given to both of the groups, the bloodletting group is bleeding at THJP upon being hospitalized. Primary outcomes and secondary outcomes will be measured and compared between these two groups. Before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 30 minutes, 1 hour, and 4 hours after treatment, patients' basic vital signs and state of consciousness were observed. Before treatment and 1 and 4 hours after treatment, carboxyhemoglobin concentration in venous blood samples was detected. Discussion. The objective of this study is to provide convincing evidence to clarify the efficacy and safety of THJP for early treatment of acute carbon monoxide poisoning. PMID:26339271

  3. Suicide amongst psychiatric in-patients who abscond from the ward: a national clinical survey

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Suicide prevention by mental health services requires an awareness of the antecedents of suicide amongst high risk groups such as psychiatric in-patients. The goal of this study was to describe the social and clinical characteristics of people who had absconded from an in-patient psychiatric ward prior to suicide, including aspects of the clinical care they received. Methods We carried out a national clinical survey based on a 10-year (1997-2006) sample of people in England and Wales who had died by suicide. Detailed data were collected on those who had been in contact with mental health services in the year before death. Results There were 1,851 cases of suicide by current psychiatric in-patients, 14% of all patient suicides. 1,292 (70%) occurred off the ward. Four hundred and sixty-nine of these patients died after absconding from the ward, representing 25% of all in-patient suicides and 38% of those that occurred off the ward. Absconding suicides were characterised by being young, unemployed and homeless compared to those who were off the ward with staff agreement. Schizophrenia was the most common diagnosis, and rates of previous violence and substance misuse were high. Absconders were proportionally more likely than in-patients on agreed leave to have been legally detained for treatment, non-compliant with medication, and to have died in the first week of admission. Whilst absconding patients were significantly more likely to have been under a high level of observation, clinicians reported more problems in observation due to either the ward design or other patients on the ward. Conclusion Measures that may prevent absconding and subsequent suicide amongst in-patients might include tighter control of ward exits, and more intensive observation of patients, particularly in the early days of admission. Improving the ward environment to provide a supportive and less intimidating experience may contribute to reduced risk. PMID:20128891

  4. An in-patient model for positive airway pressure desensitization: a report of 2 pediatric cases.

    PubMed

    Harford, Kelli-Lee; Jambhekar, Supriya; Com, Gulnur; Bylander, Lisa; Pruss, Kristi; Teagle, Jana; Ward, Wendy

    2012-05-01

    Application of positive airway pressure is frequently indicated in pediatric patients with a diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea. Adherence to equipment use is often less than optimal and can be more challenging when working with children with special needs. An in-patient protocol was designed utilizing various techniques and strategies from the medical adherence literature and applied to 2 cases. This protocol utilizes specialists from various disciplines, including respiratory therapists, psychologists, physicians, nurses, and child life therapists, as well as parental involvement. This paper outlines this protocol using 2 case studies. Both patients successfully used their equipment for greater than 4 hours at night by the end of their hospital stay of 4 days and maintained or advanced these gains at follow-up. These 2 cases suggest that more research should be conducted to further evaluate the effectiveness of similar programs. PMID:22152821

  5. Communications protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Xiaoming (Inventor); Baras, John S. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to an improved communications protocol which increases the efficiency of transmission in return channels on a multi-channel slotted Alohas system by incorporating advanced error correction algorithms, selective retransmission protocols and the use of reserved channels to satisfy the retransmission requests.

  6. Virtual reality exposure-based therapy for the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder: a review of its efficacy, the adequacy of the treatment protocol, and its acceptability

    PubMed Central

    Botella, Cristina; Serrano, Berenice; Baños, Rosa M; Garcia-Palacios, Azucena

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The essential feature of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is the development of characteristic symptoms following exposure to one or more traumatic events. According to evidence-based intervention guidelines and empirical evidence, one of the most extensively researched and validated treatments for PTSD is prolonged exposure to traumatic events; however, exposure therapy can present some limitations. Virtual reality (VR) can help to improve prolonged exposure because it creates fictitious, safe, and controllable situations that can enhance emotional engagement and acceptance. Objective In addition to carrying out a review to evaluate the efficacy of VR exposure-based therapy (VR-EBT) for the treatment of PTSD, the aim of this study was to contribute to analyzing the use of VR-EBT by: first, evaluating the adequacy of psychological treatment protocols that use VR-EBT to treat PTSD; and second, analyzing the acceptability of VR-EBT. Method We performed a replica search with descriptors and databases used in two previous reviews and updated to April 2015. Next, we carried out an evaluation of the efficacy, adequacy, and acceptability of VR-EBT protocols. Results Results showed that VR-EBT was effective in the treatment of PTSD. The findings related to adequacy showed that not all studies using VR-EBT reported having followed the clinical guidelines for evidence-based interventions in the treatment of PTSD. Regarding acceptability, few studies evaluated this subject. However, the findings are very promising, and patients reported high acceptability and satisfaction with the inclusion of VR in the treatment of PTSD. Conclusion The main weaknesses identified in this review focus on the need for more controlled studies, the need to standardize treatment protocols using VR-EBT, and the need to include assessments of acceptability and related variables. Finally, this paper highlights some directions and future perspectives for using VR-EBT in PTSD treatment. PMID:26491332

  7. Inpatient falls in freestanding children's hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jamerson, Patricia A; Graf, Elaine; Messmer, Patricia R; Fields, Heidi W; Barton, Sharon; Berger, Anne; Daraiseh, Nancy M; Fix, Michele; Huth, Myra; Latta, Linda; Smith, Andrea B; Lunbeck, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Patient falls are considered a significant safety risk, but little evidence regarding the significance of falls in children is available. A multisite, observational study of fall events occurring in pediatric inpatients (younger than 18 years of age) from Child Health Corporation of America member hospitals was conducted to determine the prevalence and significance of falls. Fall prevalence was 0.84 per 1,000 patient days with 48% classified as preventable. Injuries occurred in 32%, but only two falls resulted in an increased length of stay; none resulted in permanent disability or death. Only 47% of the children who fell were identified to be at risk for fall. Alert mechanisms were used in 60% and preventive measures in 23%. These findings suggest that while inpatient pediatric fall rates are lower than those of adults, greater diligence in identification and risk reduction may further reduce the prevalence of falls and the proportion of fall-related injuries. PMID:25134226

  8. The effect of animal-assisted activity on inpatients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chu, Cheng-I; Liu, Chao-Yin; Sun, Chi-Tzu; Lin, Jung

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of animal-assisted activity on self-esteem, control over activities of daily living, and other psycho-physiological aspects among Taiwanese inpatients with schizophrenia. Thirty participants were randomly assigned to either the treatment or control group. A weekly animal-assisted activity program was arranged for patients in the treatment group for 2 months. A questionnaire assessing self-esteem, self-determination, social support, and psychiatric symptoms was completed the week before and the week after the animal-assisted activity. Compared with the control group, the treatment group showed significant improvement on all measures except for social support and negative psychiatric symptoms. The results of this study showed that animal-assisted activity can promote significant improvements in many clinical aspects among inpatients with schizophrenia. Therefore, animal-assisted activity should be integrated into the treatment of institutionalized patients with schizophrenia. PMID:20000282

  9. Inpatient psychiatric adolescents function better than expected after discharge. A follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Pelkonen, M

    1990-04-01

    In order to evaluate and develop an inpatient program for adolescents, a follow-up study was carried out based on interviews with 58 adolescents discharged from the inpatient unit on average 7 years before. The mental status of these patients had been poor on admission. At the time of follow-up interviews, approximately 30% of patients appeared to have normal, socially varied lives. The results were better for patients whose treatment at the unit had lasted for more than 3 months and had included psychotherapy. Roughly 10% of the patients at the time of follow-up interviews had severe problems. The prognosis was worst for the patients who needed to be transferred from the adolescent unit to adult psychiatric treatment units because of suicidal and violent behavior. Young patients with severe disturbances need an individualized, multidisciplinary treatment approach, including individual psychotherapy and vocational training. The treatment should continue uninterrupted on an outpatient basis. PMID:2343757

  10. The State of Inpatient Psychiatry for Youth in Ontario: Results of the ONCAIPS Benchmarking Survey

    PubMed Central

    Greenham, Stephanie L.; Persi, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about inpatient psychiatry settings and the services they provide for children and adolescents in Ontario. This paper provides the first broad description of unit characteristics, services provided, and patient characteristics in these settings. Method: Nominated representatives from Ontario hospitals with generic mental health beds (i.e., providing inpatient care across diagnostic groups) for children and adolescents were surveyed regarding data from April 2009 to March 2010. Response rate was 93%. Additional data were extracted from the Ontario Network of Child and Adolescent Inpatient Psychiatry Services (ONCAIPS) Directory and Ministry of Health and Long Term Care (MOHLTC) website. Results: Settings provided primarily crisis services with some planned elective admissions. Higher rates of involuntary admissions, briefer stays, lower interdisciplinary diversity, and lower occupancy were typical of settings with higher proportions of crisis admissions. Services most commonly provided included stabilization, assessment, pharmacotherapy, and mental health education. Bed numbers provincially, beds per staff, and prominence of suicide risk, mood disorders, and utilization of cognitive and behavioural approaches were comparable to trends internationally. Inter-setting disparities were observed in access to inpatient services for different age and diagnostic groups, and availability of psychiatry and different professions. Conclusions: Lack of consistent performance and outcome evaluation, common measures, availability of psychiatry and interdisciplinary supports, and dissimilar treatments provincially, suggest the need to consider potential improvements through systematic monitoring of setting performance and outcomes, and development of provincial best practice standards for staffing and treatment. PMID:24516475

  11. Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality in an Inpatient Setting: Results of a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Thomas E.; Green, Kelly L.; Allen, Jon G.; Jobes, David A.; Nadorff, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Patients hospitalized for psychiatric reasons exhibit significantly elevated risk of suicide, yet the research literature contains very few outcome studies of interventions designed for suicidal inpatients. This pilot study examined the inpatient feasibility and effectiveness of The Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality (CAMS), a structured evidence-based method for risk assessment and treatment planning (Jobes, 2006). The study used an open-trial, case-focused design to assess an inpatient adaptation of CAMS, spread over a period averaging 51 days. The intervention was provided via individual therapy to a convenience sample of 20 patients (16 females and four males, average age 36.9) who were hospitalized with recent histories of suicidal ideation and behavior. Results showed statistically and clinically significant reductions in depression, hopelessness, suicide cognitions, and suicidal ideation, as well as improvement on factors considered “drivers” of suicidality. Treatment effect sizes were in the large range (Cohen’s d > .80) across several outcome measures, including suicidal ideation. Although these findings must be considered preliminary due to the lack of a randomized control group, they merit attention from clinicians working with patients at risk for suicide. This study also supports the feasibility of implementing a structured, suicide-specific intervention for at-risk patients in inpatient settings. PMID:22369081

  12. Influence of irrigation protocols on the bond strength of fiber posts cemented with a self-adhesive luting agent 24 hours after endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Lima, Jessica Ferraz Carvalho; Lima, Adriano Fonseca; Humel, Maria Malerba Colombi; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Marchi, Giselle Maria; Ferraz, Caio Cezar Randi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of different irrigation protocols on the bond strength, at different root depths, of fiber posts cemented with a self-adhesive cement 24 hours after endodontic treatment. Fifty-six bovine incisor roots were endodontically prepared and separated into 7 groups (n = 8) according to irrigation protocols: group 1, sterile saline (control); group 2, chlorhexidine (CHX) gel 2% and saline; group 3, sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) 5.25% and saline; group 4, CHX and saline (final irrigation with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid [EDTA] 17%); group 5, NaOCl and saline (final irrigation with EDTA); group 6, CHX and saline (final irrigation with NaOCl and EDTA); and group 7, NaOCl (final irrigation with CHX and EDTA). No statistically significant difference was found among the groups. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the different irrigation protocols did not influence the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement, which presented similar behaviors at the 3 root depths studied. PMID:26147163

  13. Developing patient-centered treatment protocols in brain stimulation: a rationale for combining quantitative and qualitative approaches in persons with HIV.

    PubMed

    Rosedale, Mary; Malaspina, Dolores; Malamud, Daniel; Strauss, Shiela M; Horne, Jaclyn D; Abouzied, Salman; Cruciani, Ricardo A; Knotkova, Helena

    2012-01-01

    This article reports and discusses how quantitative (physiological and behavioral) and qualitative methods are being combined in an open-label pilot feasibility study. The study evaluates safety, tolerability, and acceptability of a protocol to treat depression in HIV-infected individuals, using a 2-week block of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Major depressive disorder (MDD) is the second most prevalent psychiatric disorder after substance abuse among HIV-positive adults, and novel antidepressant treatments are needed for this vulnerable population. The authors describe the challenges and contributions derived from different research perspectives and methodological approaches and provide a philosophical framework for combining quantitative and qualitative measurements for a fuller examination of the disorder. Four methodological points are presented: (1) the value of combining quantitative and qualitative approaches; (2) the need for context-specific measures when studying patients with medical and psychiatric comorbidities; (3) the importance of research designs that integrate physiological, behavioral, and qualitative approaches when evaluating novel treatments; and (4) the need to explore the relationships between biomarkers, clinical symptom assessments, patient self-evaluations, and patient experiences when developing new, patient-centered protocols. The authors conclude that the complexity of studying novel treatments in complex and new patient populations requires complex research designs to capture the richness of data that inform translational research. PMID:22412085

  14. Opportunistic hearing screening in elderly inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Jordan; Dale, Oliver T; Corbridge, Rogan; Chatterjee, Apurba; Gosney, Margot A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of occult hearing loss in elderly inpatients, to evaluate feasibility of opportunistic hearing screening and to determine subsequent provision of hearing aids. Materials and methods: Subjects (>65?years) were recruited from five elderly care wards. Hearing loss was detected by a ward-based hearing screen comprising patient-reported assessment of hearing disability and a whisper test. Subjects failing the whisper test or reporting hearing difficulties were offered formal audiological assessment. Results: Screening was performed on 51 patients aged between 70 and 95?years. Of the patients, 21 (41%) reported hearing loss and 16 (31%) failed the whisper test. A total of 37 patients (73%) were referred for audiological assessment with 17 (33%) found to have aidable hearing loss and 11 were fitted with hearing aids (22%). Discussion: This study highlights the high prevalence of occult hearing loss in elderly inpatients. Easy two-step screening can accurately identify patients with undiagnosed deafness resulting in significant proportions receiving hearing aids. Key sentences Approximately 14% of the elderly population use hearing aids despite a reported prevalence of deafness in up to 55%. The use of hearing aids is associated with an improvement in physical, emotional, mental and social well-being. An easy screening test for hearing loss consists of patient-reported hearing loss and a whisper test. Opportunistic screening of elderly inpatients resulted in referral of 73% of screened patients for formal audiology. Of the screened patients, 22% were provided with hearing aids.

  15. A managed protocol for treatment of deceased potential donors reduces the incidence of cardiac arrest before organ explant

    PubMed Central

    Westphal, Glauco Adrieno; Zaclikevis, Viviane Renata; Vieira, Kalinca Daberkow; Cordeiro, Rodrigo de Brito; Horner, Marina Borges W.; de Oliveira, Thamy Pellizzaro; Duarte, Robson; Sperotto, Geonice; da Silveira, Georgiana; Caldeira, Milton; Coll, Elisabeth; Yus-Teruel, Santiago

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of the application of a managed protocol for the maintenance care of deceased potential multiple organ donors at two hospitals. Methods A before (Phase 1)/after (Phase 2) study conducted at two general hospitals, which included consecutively potential donors admitted to two intensive care units. In Phase 1 (16 months), the data were collected retrospectively, and the maintenance care measures of the potential donors were instituted by the intensivists. In Phase 2 (12 months), the data collection was prospective, and a managed protocol was used for maintenance care. The two phases were compared in terms of their demographic variables, physiological variables at diagnosis of brain death and the end of the process, time to performance of brain death confirmatory test and end of the process, adherence to bundles of maintenance care essential measures, losses due to cardiac arrest, family refusal, contraindications, and the conversion rate of potential into actual donors. Student's t- and chi-square tests were used, and p-value < 0.05 was considered to be significant. Results A total of 42 potential donors were identified (18 in Phase 1 and 24 in Phase 2). The time interval between the first clinical assessment and the recovery decreased in Phase 2 (Phase 1: 35.015.5 hours versus Phase 2: 24.66.2 hours; p = 0.023). Adherence increased to 10 out of the 19 essential items of maintenance care, and losses due to cardiac arrest also decreased in Phase 2 (Phase 1: 27.8 versus 0% in Phase 2; p = 0.006), while the convertion rate increased (Phase 1: 44.4 versus 75% in Phase 2; p = 0.044). The losses due to family refusal and medical contraindication did not vary. Conclusion The adoption of a managed protocol focused on the application of essential measures for the care of potential deceased donors might reduce the loss of potential donors due to cardiac arrest. PMID:23917929

  16. Use of McKenzie cervical protocol in the treatment of radicular neck pain in a machine operator

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, Sundeep

    2003-01-01

    A case of mechanical neck pain with radiation into the upper extremity in a 53-year-old man is presented. The use of standard chiropractic manipulative therapy was not an option due to patient apprehension. A reduction of symptoms was reported with certain spinal movements. This made the patient a candidate for the use of spinal loading strategies as described by McKenzie. The application of McKenzie cervical therapy resulted in improved symptoms and function in this individual. The McKenzie protocol, and its use in the management of neck pain, is discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3

  17. Two years experience with quality assurance protocol for patient related Rapid Arc treatment plan verification using a two dimensional ionization chamber array

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To verify the dose distribution and number of monitor units (MU) for dynamic treatment techniques like volumetric modulated single arc radiation therapy - Rapid Arc - each patient treatment plan has to be verified prior to the first treatment. The purpose of this study was to develop a patient related treatment plan verification protocol using a two dimensional ionization chamber array (MatriXX, IBA, Schwarzenbruck, Germany). Method Measurements were done to determine the dependence between response of 2D ionization chamber array, beam direction, and field size. Also the reproducibility of the measurements was checked. For the patient related verifications the original patient Rapid Arc treatment plan was projected on CT dataset of the MatriXX and the dose distribution was calculated. After irradiation of the Rapid Arc verification plans measured and calculated 2D dose distributions were compared using the gamma evaluation method implemented in the measuring software OmniPro (version 1.5, IBA, Schwarzenbruck, Germany). Results The dependence between response of 2D ionization chamber array, field size and beam direction has shown a passing rate of 99% for field sizes between 7 cm 7 cm and 24 cm 24 cm for measurements of single arc. For smaller and larger field sizes than 7 cm 7 cm and 24 cm 24 cm the passing rate was less than 99%. The reproducibility was within a passing rate of 99% and 100%. The accuracy of the whole process including the uncertainty of the measuring system, treatment planning system, linear accelerator and isocentric laser system in the treatment room was acceptable for treatment plan verification using gamma criteria of 3% and 3 mm, 2D global gamma index. Conclusion It was possible to verify the 2D dose distribution and MU of Rapid Arc treatment plans using the MatriXX. The use of the MatriXX for Rapid Arc treatment plan verification in clinical routine is reasonable. The passing rate should be 99% than the verification protocol is able to detect clinically significant errors. PMID:21342509

  18. Predictors of remission in depression to individual and combined treatments (PReDICT): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Limited controlled data exist to guide treatment choices for clinicians caring for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Although many putative predictors of treatment response have been reported, most were identified through retrospective analyses of existing datasets and very few have been replicated in a manner that can impact clinical practice. One major confound in previous studies examining predictors of treatment response is the patient’s treatment history, which may affect both the predictor of interest and treatment outcomes. Moreover, prior treatment history provides an important source of selection bias, thereby limiting generalizability. Consequently, we initiated a randomized clinical trial designed to identify factors that moderate response to three treatments for MDD among patients never treated previously for the condition. Methods/design Treatment-naïve adults aged 18 to 65 years with moderate-to-severe, non-psychotic MDD are randomized equally to one of three 12-week treatment arms: (1) cognitive behavior therapy (CBT, 16 sessions); (2) duloxetine (30–60 mg/d); or (3) escitalopram (10–20 mg/d). Prior to randomization, patients undergo multiple assessments, including resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), immune markers, DNA and gene expression products, and dexamethasone-corticotropin-releasing hormone (Dex/CRH) testing. Prior to or shortly after randomization, patients also complete a comprehensive personality assessment. Repeat assessment of the biological measures (fMRI, immune markers, and gene expression products) occurs at an early time-point in treatment, and upon completion of 12-week treatment, when a second Dex/CRH test is also conducted. Patients remitting by the end of this acute treatment phase are then eligible to enter a 21-month follow-up phase, with quarterly visits to monitor for recurrence. Non-remitters are offered augmentation treatment for a second 12-week course of treatment, during which they receive a combination of CBT and antidepressant medication. Predictors of the primary outcome, remission, will be identified for overall and treatment-specific effects, and a statistical model incorporating multiple predictors will be developed to predict outcomes. Discussion The PReDICT study’s evaluation of biological, psychological, and clinical factors that may differentially impact treatment outcomes represents a sizeable step toward developing personalized treatments for MDD. Identified predictors should help guide the selection of initial treatments, and identify those patients most vulnerable to recurrence, who thus warrant maintenance or combination treatments to achieve and maintain wellness. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00360399. Registered 02 AUG 2006. First patient randomized 09 FEB 2007. PMID:22776534

  19. Large-sized hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC): a neoadjuvant treatment protocol with repetitive transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) before percutaneous MR-guided laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT).

    PubMed

    Zangos, Stephan; Eichler, Katrin; Balzer, Jrn O; Straub, Ralf; Hammerstingl, Renate; Herzog, Christopher; Lehnert, Thomas; Heller, Mathias; Thalhammer, Axel; Mack, Martin G; Vogl, Thomas J

    2007-02-01

    This study aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a neoadjuvant treatment protocol with repeated transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) before MR-guided laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) for large-sized hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). Repeated TACE (mean, 3.5 treatments per patient) was performed in 48 patients with neoadjuvant intention (the largest lesion was between 50 and 80 mm in diameter, and there were no more than five lesions). For the TACE treatment, we used 10 mg/m(2) mitomycin, 10 ml/m(2) Lipiodol and microspheres. The tumor volume was measured by MRI. Lipiodol retention of the tumors was evaluated with CT. After the diameter of the tumors had decreased to less than 50 mm, the patients were treated with MR-guided LITT 4 to 6 weeks after embolization. Repeated TACE reduced the tumor size in 32 patients (66.7%), forming the basis for performing MR-guided LITT procedures. These patients received one to four laser treatments (mean, 1.9 per patient) for tumor ablation, resulting in a median survival of 36.0 months after the first treatment. For the remaining patients, no reduction in tumor size was achieved in 12 patients and disease progression in 4 patients. Neoadjuvant TACE appears to be an effective treatment of large-sized HCC, which extends the indication for MR-guided LITT. PMID:16896704

  20. Inpatient psychiatric care in the 21st century: the need for reform.

    PubMed

    Glick, Ira D; Sharfstein, Steven S; Schwartz, Harold I

    2011-02-01

    Driven by financial pressures, the sole focus of psychiatric inpatient treatment has become safety and crisis stabilization. Data are lacking on outcomes of ultrashort-stay hospitalizations; however, such stays may diminish opportunities for a sustained recovery. In the absence of an evidence base to guide clinicians and policy makers, mental health professionals have an ethical obligation to promote what they consider to be best practice. This Open Forum focuses on the need to reconsider the current model of inpatient hospitalization in order to maximize positive outcomes and emphasize appropriate transition to the community and less intensive levels of care. A model of care is presented based on rapid formulation of diagnosis, goals, and treatment modalities before treatment begins. Three phases are described--assessment, implementation, and resolution--with specific principles to guide length-of-stay decisions and requirements for staffing. PMID:21285100

  1. A Multicenter Cohort Study of Treatments and Hospital Outcomes in Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wexelblatt, Scott L.; Crowley, Moira; Grow, Jennifer L.; Jasin, Lisa R.; Klebanoff, Mark A.; McClead, Richard E.; Meinzen-Derr, Jareen; Mohan, Vedagiri K.; Stein, Howard; Walsh, Michele C.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare pharmacologic treatment strategies for neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) with respect to total duration of opioid treatment and length of inpatient hospital stay. METHODS: We conducted a cohort analysis of late preterm and term neonates who received inpatient pharmacologic treatment of NAS at one of 20 hospitals throughout 6 Ohio regions from January 2012 through July 2013. Physicians managed NAS using 1 of 6 regionally based strategies. RESULTS: Among 547 pharmacologically treated infants, we documented 417 infants managed using an established NAS weaning protocol and 130 patients managed without protocol-driven weaning. Regardless of the treatment opioid chosen, when we accounted for hospital variation, infants receiving protocol-based weans experienced a significantly shorter duration of opioid treatment (17.7 vs 32.1 days, P < .0001) and shorter hospital stay (22.7 vs 32.1 days, P = .004). Among infants receiving protocol-based weaning, there was no difference in the duration of opioid treatment or length of stay when we compared those treated with morphine with those treated with methadone. Additionally, infants treated with phenobarbital were treated with the drug for a longer duration among those following a morphine-based compared with methadone-based weaning protocol. (P ≤ .002). CONCLUSIONS: Use of a stringent protocol to treat NAS, regardless of the initial opioid chosen, reduces the duration of opioid exposure and length of hospital stay. Because the major driver of cost is length of hospitalization, the implications for a reduction in cost of care for NAS management could be substantial. PMID:25070317

  2. Interleukin-1beta, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist levels in patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and the effects of different treatment protocols.

    PubMed

    Haspolat, S; Anlar, B; Köse, G; Coskun, M; Yegin, O

    2001-06-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a rare progressive inflammatory disease of the central nervous system caused by a persistent aberrant measles virus infection. Cytokines are polypeptides that regulate immune responses and inflammatory reactions. Interleukin-1beta has been implicated as a central mediator of tissue damage and destruction in a number of central nervous system diseases. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist could function as an important anti-inflammatory cytokine. We studied interleukin-1beta and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist levels in the cerebrospinal fluids of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and evaluated the effects of different treatment protocols on these cytokines. Interleukin-1beta and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist levels were measured in 15 patients who had a recent diagnosis of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (group 1), 6 patients who had been treated with isoprinosine (group 2), 5 patients with intraventricular interferon-alpha (group 3), and 6 patients with interferon-beta (group 4). The results were compared within the groups and also with the results of 10 patients with other neurologic disease (group 5). The interleukin-1beta concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid and sera were all below the detection limits (3.9 pg/mL). Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist levels were not statistically different, except for the group treated with intraventricular interferon-alpha. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist levels were 170 +/- 52, 175 +/- 58, 1605 +/- 518, 77.5 +/- 24, and 108 +/- 18 pg/mL in groups 1 to 5, respectively. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist levels and cerebrospinal fluid serum ratios were significantly increased during interferon-alpha treatment. In conclusion, interleukin-1 and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist levels were not elevated in the patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. The only treatment protocol that affects interleukin-1 receptor antagonist levels in cerebrospinal fluid was intraventricular interferon-alpha. Further studies on higher numbers of patients may better document the immunologic status of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and the effects of different treatment modes. PMID:11417607

  3. Early management after self-poisoning with an organophosphorus or carbamate pesticide a treatment protocol for junior doctors

    PubMed Central

    Eddleston, Michael; Dawson, Andrew; Karalliedde, Lakshman; Dissanayake, Wasantha; Hittarage, Ariyasena; Azher, Shifa; Buckley, Nick A

    2004-01-01

    Severe organophosphorus or carbamate pesticide poisoning is an important clinical problem in many countries of the world. Unfortunately, little clinical research has been performed and little evidence exists with which to determine best therapy. A cohort study of acute pesticide poisoned patients was established in Sri Lanka during 2002; so far, more than 2000 pesticide poisoned patients have been treated. A protocol for the early management of severely ill, unconscious organophosphorus/carbamate-poisoned patients was developed for use by newly qualified doctors. It concentrates on the early stabilisation of patients and the individualised administration of atropine. We present it here as a guide for junior doctors in rural parts of the developing world who see the majority of such patients and as a working model around which to base research to improve patient outcome. Improved management of pesticide poisoning will result in a reduced number of suicides globally. PMID:15566582

  4. Changing trends in inpatient care for psychiatrically hospitalized youth: 1991-2008.

    PubMed

    Meagher, Susan M; Rajan, Anjana; Wyshak, Grace; Goldstein, Joel

    2013-06-01

    Research has focused on changes in the psychiatric treatment of youth in outpatient settings, but less is known about trends in inpatient care. This study documents changes in the lengths of stay (LOS), clinical profiles of youth, and medication use within an inpatient setting in Massachusetts between 1991 and 2008. A chart review of 233 medical records of psychiatrically hospitalized youth was conducted at three points in time (1991, 1998, and 2008). Sample includes youth between ages 4 and 18. Clinical data, including LOS, diagnoses and other clinical variables, and number and type of medications prescribed were compared across sample years. Findings indicate a significant decrease in the LOS coupled with a concurrent increase in psychotropic medication use between each successive sample year. The prescription of anti-psychotic medications, in particular, increased significantly. On clinical indices, findings show that there was an increase in the diagnosis of bipolar spectrum disorders and a concurrent decrease in unipolar diagnoses in the 2008 sample. Attention-deficit and developmental disorders showed little change. Trauma-related disorders were significantly less frequently diagnosed in 2008. Children hospitalized in 1998 and 2008 had more prior hospitalizations and presented with greater acuity than those in the 1991 sample. Results highlight important changes that have occurred in child/adolescent inpatient settings over the past two decades. Data suggest that these changes have not resulted in decreased rates of inpatient hospitalization for youth with more severe psychiatric disorders. PMID:22855261

  5. Effect of a steam foot spa on geriatric inpatients with cognitive impairment: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Yoshihisa; Kondo, Hideki; Kondo, Satoshi; Takagi, Masayuki; Kano, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether a steam foot spa improves cognitive impairment in geriatric inpatients. Methods Geriatric inpatients with cognitive impairment were given a steam foot spa treatment at 42C for 20 minutes for 2 weeks (5 days/week). Physiological indicators such as blood pressure, percutaneous oxygen saturation, pulse, tympanic temperature, and sleep time and efficiency were assessed. Cognitive function and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia were assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination, Dementia Mood Assessment Scale, and Dementia Behavior Disturbance scale. Results Significant decreases in systolic (P < 0.01) and diastolic blood pressure (P < 0.05) along with a significant increase in tympanic temperature (P < 0.01) were observed after the steam foot spas. A significant improvement was seen in the Mini-Mental State Examination score (P < 0.01) and the overall dementia severity items in Dementia Mood Assessment Scale (P < 0.05). Limitations Japanese people are very fond of foot baths. However, it is difficult to understand why inpatients cannot receive steam foot baths. In this study, a control group was not used. Raters and enforcers were not blinded. Conclusion The results of this pilot study suggest that steam foot spas mitigate cognitive impairment in geriatric inpatients. PMID:23717038

  6. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Clinical Trial of a Dual-Processing Treatment Protocol for Substance-Dependent Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matto, Holly C.; Hadjiyane, Maria C.; Kost, Michelle; Marshall, Jennifer; Wiley, Joseph; Strolin-Goltzman, Jessica; Khatiwada, Manish; VanMeter, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Empirical evidence suggests substance dependence creates stress system dysregulation which, in turn, may limit the efficacy of verbal-based treatment interventions, as the recovering brain may not be functionally capable of executive level processing. Treatment models that target implicit functioning are necessary. Methods: An RCT was

  7. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Clinical Trial of a Dual-Processing Treatment Protocol for Substance-Dependent Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matto, Holly C.; Hadjiyane, Maria C.; Kost, Michelle; Marshall, Jennifer; Wiley, Joseph; Strolin-Goltzman, Jessica; Khatiwada, Manish; VanMeter, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Empirical evidence suggests substance dependence creates stress system dysregulation which, in turn, may limit the efficacy of verbal-based treatment interventions, as the recovering brain may not be functionally capable of executive level processing. Treatment models that target implicit functioning are necessary. Methods: An RCT was…

  8. The study protocol of the Norwegian randomized controlled trial of electroconvulsive therapy in treatment resistant depression in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The treatment of depressive phases of bipolar disorder is challenging. The effects of the commonly used antidepressants in bipolar depression are questionable. Electroconvulsive therapy is generally considered to be the most effective treatment even if there are no randomized controlled trials of electroconvulsive therapy in bipolar depression. The safety of electroconvulsive therapy is well documented, but there are some controversies as to the cognitive side effects. The aim of this study is to compare the effects and side effects of electroconvulsive therapy to pharmacological treatment in treatment resistant bipolar depression. Cognitive changes and quality of life during the treatment will be assessed. Methods/Design A prospective, randomised controlled, multi-centre six- week acute treatment trial with seven clinical assessments. Follow up visit at 26 weeks or until remission (max 52 weeks). A neuropsychological test battery designed to be sensitive to changes in cognitive function will be used. Setting: Nine study centres across Norway, all acute psychiatric departments. Sample: n = 132 patients, aged 18 and over, who fulfil criteria for treatment resistant depression in bipolar disorder, Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale Score of at least 25 at baseline. Intervention: Intervention group: 3 sessions per week for up to 6 weeks, total up to 18 sessions. Control group: algorithm-based pharmacological treatment as usual. Discussion This study is the first randomized controlled trial that aims to investigate whether electroconvulsive therapy is better than pharmacological treatment as usual in treatment resistant bipolar depression. Possible long lasting cognitive side effects will be evaluated. The study is investigator initiated, without support from industry. Trial registration NCT00664976 PMID:20178636

  9. Enhancing the patient involvement in outcomes: a study protocol of personalised outcome measurement in the treatment of substance misuse

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Involving patients in treatment is becoming increasingly popular in mental health [Sales & Alves: Personalized evaluation of psychological treatments: A review of tools and research designs, submitted]. However, in substance misuse treatment settings, the patient perspective about treatment tends to be overlooked. This has been cited as a key priority by Orford et al. [Addiction, 103: 875-885, 2008] who included patient feedback about treatment as one of ten areas requiring an urgent paradigm shift in addiction research and practice. This project will apply an innovative method to involve substance misuse patients in psychological therapies, by asking them to suggest topics to evaluate their treatment. These topics suggested by patients can be written as a list of personalised items, so-called as patient-generated outcome measures (PGOM). Despite its patient-friendly features, PGOMs have never been used in this population, which is what this project aims to overcome. Methods/design This project is part of an International Exchange Platform on Personalising Addiction Treatment. Data will be collected in two phases (pre-post study and focus groups with patients) to explore the following: 1). How reliable and sensitive to change are PGOMs and standardised measures in substance misuse treatment? 2). Do PGOMs add relevant information to standardised measures? 3). What are the views of substance misuse patients about personalised outcome assessment? 4). Development of guidelines on using PGOMs in this population Discussion This research will potentially demonstrate the diversity of personal problems among patients seeking substance misuse treatment, suggesting the relevance of PGOM as a method to personalise outcome measurement and, ultimately, guiding treatment provision. It is expected that, as in previous studies, PGOMs will be perceived as helpful and patient-friendly tools, where patients may express their own concerns in a semi-structured setting. Similarly to other populations, we also expect PGOMs to be reliable, valid and sensitive to clinical changes in substance misuse treatment, as well as more content informative than their standardised counterparts. If these results are achieved, we might hypothesize that PGOMs are a potentially valid supplement to traditional standardised scales, by providing a closer insight to what motivates patients to participate in substance misuse treatment programmes. PMID:24341378

  10. Vitamin D Deficiency Among Psychiatric Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Richard A.; Orendain, Geraldine C. M.; Joseph, Michel D.; Abanishe, James O.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Previous studies in northern Europe and Australia have indicated that vitamin D deficiency is common in psychiatric patients. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among psychiatric inpatients in a large North American city. The association of vitamin D status with clinical characteristics was also explored, and subgroups of patients that are more vulnerable to vitamin D deficiency were identified. Method: This descriptive study looked at 107 unselected consecutive admissions to a psychiatric inpatient service in New York City between September and early December 2010. All patients were aged 18 years and older. Psychiatric diagnoses were established by attending psychiatrists as part of the routine assessment using criteria from the DSM-IV. Serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, tandem mass spectrometry. A vitamin Ddeficient state was defined as serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level ? 20 ng/mL. Results: Fifty-six (52.3%) patients were classified as deficient in vitamin D. Age and 25-hydroxyvitamin D level were significantly correlated (P = .001). Seventy-one percent of patients from age 18 to 34 years were deficient in vitamin D; this rate was significantly higher than the rate of deficiency in older patients (P = .017). No significant relationships were found between 25-hydroxyvitamin D level and gender, race/ethnicity, glycosylated hemoglobin, body mass index, and major psychiatric diagnostic categories. Conclusions: A high percentage of psychiatric inpatients are deficient in vitamin D. Younger patients were more at risk for deficiency. Screening for vitamin D deficiency should be part of the health assessment of patients with major psychiatric illnesses. PMID:22943031

  11. AMA discharge from a psychiatric inpatient unit.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, S; Helfrich, J; Mestayer, R F

    1981-01-01

    This study examines AMA discharges from a psychiatric inpatient unit. Such discharges are found to occur with greater frequency (p .005) among individuals with alcoholism and character disorders. The AMA patients do not, however, seem to form a homogeneous group in themselves. This study identifies two subgroups of AMA patients: the "early" AMA and the "late" AMA, depending upon their length of stay in the hospital prior to AMA discharge. The demographic, clinical and psychodynamic differences between the two sub-groups are discussed. Some practical recommendations are made in regard to the prevention and management of AMA discharge requests. PMID:7228530

  12. The ETTAA study protocol: a UK-wide observational study of Effective Treatments for Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Sastry, Priya; Hughes, Victoria; Hayes, Paul; Vallabhaneni, Srinivasa; Sharples, Linda; Thompson, Matt; Catarino, Pedro; Moorjani, Narain; Vale, Luke; Gray, Joanne; Cook, Andrew; Elefteriades, John A; Large, Stephen R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Chronic thoracic aortic aneurysm (CTAA) affecting the arch or descending aorta is an indolent but life-threatening condition with a rising prevalence as the UK population ages. Treatment may be in the form of open surgical repair (OSR) surgery, endovascular stent grafting (ESG) or best medical therapy (BMT). Currently, there is no consensus on the best management strategy, and no UK-specific economic studies that assess outcomes beyond the chosen procedure, but this is required in the context of greater demand for treatment and limited National Health Service (NHS) resources. Methods and analysis This is a prospective, multicentre observational study with statistical and economic modelling of patients with CTAA affecting the arch or descending aorta. We aim to gain an understanding of how treatments are currently chosen, and to determine the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the three available treatment strategies (BMT, ESG and OSR). This will be achieved by: (1) following consecutive patients who are referred to the teams collaborating in this proposal and collecting data regarding quality of life (QoL), medical events and hospital stays over a maximum of 5?years; (2) statistical analysis of the comparative effectiveness of the three treatments; and (3) economic modelling of the comparative cost-effectiveness of the three treatments. Primary study outcomes are: aneurysm growth, QoL, freedom from reintervention, freedom from death or permanent neurological injury, incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year gained. Ethics and dissemination The study will generate an evidence base to guide patients and clinicians to determine the indications and timing of treatment, as well as informing healthcare decision-makers about which treatments the NHS should provide. The study has achieved ethical approval and will be disseminated primarily in the form of a Health Technology Assessment monograph at its completion. Trial registration number ISRCTN04044627. PMID:26038360

  13. Brain imaging predictors and the international study to predict optimized treatment for depression: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Approximately 50% of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) do not respond optimally to antidepressant treatments. Given this is a large proportion of the patient population, pretreatment tests that predict which patients will respond to which types of treatment could save time, money and patient burden. Brain imaging offers a means to identify treatment predictors that are grounded in the neurobiology of the treatment and the pathophysiology of MDD. Methods/Design The international Study to Predict Optimized Treatment in Depression is a multi-center, parallel model, randomized clinical trial with an embedded imaging sub-study to identify such predictors. We focus on brain circuits implicated in major depressive disorder and its treatment. In the full trial, depressed participants are randomized to receive escitalopram, sertraline or venlafaxine-XR (open-label). They are assessed using standardized multiple clinical, cognitive-emotional behavioral, electroencephalographic and genetic measures at baseline and at eight weeks post-treatment. Overall, 2,016 depressed participants (18 to 65 years old) will enter the study, of whom a target of 10% will be recruited into the brain imaging sub-study (approximately 67 participants in each treatment arm) and 67 controls. The imaging sub-study is conducted at the University of Sydney and at Stanford University. Structural studies include high-resolution three-dimensional T1-weighted, diffusion tensor and T2/Proton Density scans. Functional studies include standardized functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with three cognitive tasks (auditory oddball, a continuous performance task, and Go-NoGo) and two emotion tasks (unmasked conscious and masked non-conscious emotion processing tasks). After eight weeks of treatment, the functional MRI is repeated with the above tasks. We will establish the methods in the first 30 patients. Then we will identify predictors in the first half (n = 102), test the findings in the second half, and then extend the analyses to the total sample. Trial registration International Study to Predict Optimized Treatment - in Depression (iSPOT-D). ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00693849. PMID:23866851

  14. Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells and Strategies for Treatment of Nervous System Disorders: Many Protocols, and Many Results.

    PubMed

    Daz, David; Muoz-Castaeda, Rodrigo; Alonso, Jos Ramn; Weruaga, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    Bone marrow stem cells are the best known stem cell type and have been employed for more than 50 years, especially in pathologies of the hematopoietic and immune systems. However, their therapeutic potential is much broader, and they can also be employed to palliate neural diseases. Apart from their plastic properties, these cells lack the legal or ethical constraints of other stem cell populations, that is, embryonic stem cells. Current research addressing the integration of bone marrow-derived cells into the neural circuits of the central nervous system, their features, and applications is a hotspot in neurobiology. Nevertheless, as in other leading research lines the efficacy and possibilities of their application depend on technical procedures, which are still far from being standardized. Accordingly, for efficient research this large range of variants should be taken into account as they could lead to unexpected results. Rather than focusing on clinical aspects, this review offers a compendium of the methodologies aimed at providing a guide for researchers who are working in the field of bone marrow transplantation in the central nervous system. It seeks to be useful for both introductory and trouble-shooting purposes, and in particular for dealing with the large array of bone marrow transplantation protocols available. PMID:25171812

  15. Corticosteroid treatment for community-acquired pneumonia - the STEP trial: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the third-leading infectious cause of death worldwide. The standard treatment of CAP has not changed for the past fifty years and its mortality and morbidity remain high despite adequate antimicrobial treatment. Systemic corticosteroids have anti-inflammatory effects and are therefore discussed as adjunct treatment for CAP. Available studies show controversial results, and the question about benefits and harms of adjunct corticosteroid therapy has not been conclusively resolved, particularly in the non-critical care setting. Methods/Design This randomized multicenter study compares a treatment with 7days of prednisone 50mg with placebo in adult patients hospitalized with CAP independent of severity. Patients are screened and enrolled within the first 36hours of presentation after written informed consent is obtained. The primary endpoint will be time to clinical stability, which is assessed every 12hours during hospitalization. Secondary endpoints will be, among others, all-cause mortality within 30 and 180days, ICU stay, duration of antibiotic treatment, disease activity scores, side effects and complications, value of adrenal function testing and prognostic hormonal and inflammatory biomarkers to predict outcome and treatment response to corticosteroids. Eight hundred included patients will provide an 85% power for the intention-to-treat analysis of the primary endpoint. Discussion This largest to date double-blind placebo-controlled multicenter trial investigates the effect of adjunct glucocorticoids in 800 patients with CAP requiring hospitalization. It aims to give conclusive answers about benefits and risks of corticosteroid treatment in CAP. The inclusion of less severe CAP patients will be expected to lead to a relatively low mortality rate and survival benefit might not be shown. However, our study has adequate power for the clinically relevant endpoint of clinical stability. Due to discontinuing glucocorticoids without tapering after seven days, we limit duration of glucocorticoid exposition, which may reduce possible side effects. Trial registration 7 September 2009 on ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00973154. PMID:24974155

  16. The Ethical Analysis Protocol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Raul G.

    1992-01-01

    The Ethical Analysis Protocol is a set of questions on treatment of participants, research practices, and sociopolitical dimensions of research that can be used to elicit information about ethical assumptions, constraints, and implications of institutional research studies. They provide a framework for ethical analysis of an institutional research

  17. Comparing Mindfulness-Based Group Therapy With Treatment as Usual for Opioid Dependents: A Pilot Randomized Clinical Trial Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Imani, Saeed; Atef Vahid, Mohammad Kazem; Gharraee, Banafsheh; Habibi, Mojtaba; Bowen, Sarah; Noroozi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: In response to high burden of opioid abuse in Iran, Ministry of Health has launched a large-scale opioid maintenance treatment program, delivered through a network of certified drug treatment centers. To promote opioid pharmacotherapies, there is an urgent need to develop and introduce evidence-based psychosocial interventions into the network. Patients and Methods: This is a randomized clinical trial (RCT) to investigate feasibility and effectiveness of adding mindfulness-based group therapy to opioid pharmacotherapies as compared to opioid pharmacotherapies alone. The primary outcomes were treatment retention and percentage of weekly morphine, methamphetamine, and benzodiazepine negative tests. Discussion: This is the first RCT that explores the effectiveness of mindfulness-based relapse prevention group therapy among opioid dependent clients in Iran. The feasibility of group therapy and comparison of outcomes in intervention and control groups should be discussed in the outcome article. PMID:26251659

  18. Cannabis Use and Dependence among French Schizophrenic Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Lejoyeux, Michel; Basquin, Anne; Koch, Marie; Embouazza, Houcine; Chalvin, Florence; Ilongo, Michaelle

    2014-01-01

    Background: To assess the prevalence of cannabis use and dependence in a population of schizophrenic inpatients and to compare schizophrenics with and without cannabis consumption. Methods: One hundred one schizophrenic patients were examined during their first week of hospitalization. They answered the PANNS scale of schizophrenia, the CAGE and the Fagerstrm questionnaire, and the DSM-IV-TR criteria for cannabis, alcohol, opiates, and nicotine use dependence were checked. We also assessed socio-demographic characteristics, the motive of cannabis consumption, and the number of cannabis joints and alcoholic drinks taken. Results: The prevalence of cannabis consumption was 33.6% among schizophrenic inpatients. Schizophrenics consuming cannabis were younger than non-schizophrenics (33.3 vs. 44.7?years p?treatment. PMID:25076916

  19. Can virtual nature improve patient experiences and memories of dental treatment? A study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dental anxiety and anxiety-related avoidance of dental care create significant problems for patients and the dental profession. Distraction interventions are used in daily medical practice to help patients cope with unpleasant procedures. There is evidence that exposure to natural scenery is beneficial for patients and that the use of virtual reality (VR) distraction is more effective than other distraction interventions, such as watching television. The main aim of this randomized controlled trial is to determine whether the use of VR during dental treatment can improve the overall dental experience and recollections of treatment for patients, breaking the negative cycle of memories of anxiety leading to further anxiety, and avoidance of future dental appointments. Additionally, the aim is to test whether VR benefits dental patients with all levels of dental anxiety or whether it could be especially beneficial for patients suffering from higher levels of dental anxiety. The third aim is to test whether the content of the VR distraction can make a difference for its effectiveness by comparing two types of virtual environments, a natural environment and an urban environment. Methods/design The effectiveness of VR distraction will be examined in patients 18years or older who are scheduled to undergo dental treatment for fillings and/or extractions, with a maximum length of 30minutes. Patients will be randomly allocated into one of three groups. The first group will be exposed to a VR of a natural environment. The second group will be exposed to a VR of an urban environment. A third group consists of patients who receive standard care (control group). Primary outcomes relate to patients memories of the dental treatment one week after treatment: (a) remembered pain, (b) intrusive thoughts and (c) vividness of memories. Other measures of interest are the dental experience, the treatment experience and the VR experience. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN41442806 PMID:24655569

  20. Adapted motivational interviewing to improve the uptake of treatment for glaucoma in Nigeria: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Glaucoma is a chronic eye disease associated with irreversible visual loss. In Africa, glaucoma patients often present late, with very advanced disease. One-off procedures, such as laser or surgery, are recommended in Africa because of lack of or poor adherence to medical treatment. However, acceptance of surgery is usually extremely low. To prevent blindness, adherence to treatment needs to improve, using acceptable, replicable and cost-effective interventions. After reviewing the literature and interviewing patients in Bauchi (Nigeria) motivational interviewing (MI) was selected as the intervention for this trial, with adaptation for glaucoma (MIG). MI is designed to strengthen personal motivation for, and commitment to a specific goal by eliciting and exploring a person’s reasons for change within an atmosphere of acceptance and compassion. The aim of this study is to assess whether MIG increases the uptake of laser or surgery amongst glaucoma patients where this is the recommended treatment. The hypothesis is that MIG increases the uptake of treatment. This will be the first trial of MI in Africa. Methods This is a hospital based, single centre, randomized controlled trial of MIG plus an information sheet on glaucoma and its treatment (the latter being “standard care”) compared with standard care alone for glaucoma patients where the treatment recommended is surgery or laser. Those eligible for the trial are adults aged 17 years and above who live within 200 km of Bauchi with advanced glaucoma where the examining ophthalmologist recommends surgery or laser. After obtaining written informed consent, participants will be randomly allocated to MIG plus standard care, or standard care alone. Motivational interviewing will be delivered in Hausa or English by one of two MIG trained personnel. One hundred and fifty participants will be recruited to each arm. The primary outcome is the proportion of participants undergoing laser or surgery within two months of the date given to re attend for the procedure. MIG quality will be assessed using the validated MI treatment integrity scale. Discussion Motivational interviewing may be an important tool to increase the acceptance of treatment for glaucoma. The approach is potentially scalable and may be useful for other chronic conditions in Africa. Trial registration ISRCTN79330571 (Controlled-Trials.com). PMID:24773760

  1. Characteristics of Inpatient Care and Rehabilitation for Acute First-Ever Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Won Hyuk; Shin, Yong-Il; Lee, Sam-Gyu; Oh, Gyung-Jae; Lim, Young Shil

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to analyze the status of inpatient care for acute first-ever stroke at three general hospitals in Korea to provide basic data and useful information on the development of comprehensive and systematic rehabilitation care for stroke patients. Materials and Methods This study conducted a retrospective complete enumeration survey of all acute first-ever stroke patients admitted to three distinct general hospitals for 2 years by reviewing medical records. Both ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes were included. Survey items included demographic data, risk factors, stroke type, state of rehabilitation treatment, discharge destination, and functional status at discharge. Results A total of 2159 patients were reviewed. The mean age was 61.514.4 years and the ratio of males to females was 1.23:1. Proportion of ischemic stroke comprised 54.9% and hemorrhagic stroke 45.1%. Early hospital mortality rate was 8.1%. Among these patients, 27.9% received rehabilitation consultation and 22.9% underwent inpatient rehabilitation treatment. The mean period from admission to rehabilitation consultation was 14.5 days. Only 12.9% of patients were transferred to a rehabilitation department and the mean period from onset to transfer was 23.4 days. Improvements in functional status were observed in the patients who had received inpatient rehabilitation treatment after acute stroke management. Conclusion Our analysis revealed that a relatively small portion of patients who suffered from an acute first-ever stroke received rehabilitation consultation and inpatient rehabilitation treatment. Thus, applying standardized clinical practice guidelines for post-acute rehabilitation care is needed to provide more effective and efficient rehabilitation services to patients with stroke. PMID:25510773

  2. Prediction of Psychiatric Inpatient Utilization: A Markov Chain Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweillam, Attia; Tardiff, Kenneth

    1978-01-01

    This study sought to develop and test a method for predicting inpatient utilization in the New York State Department of Mental Hygiene. A Markov chain mathematical model was developed and tested ex post facto for its accuracy in prediction of inpatient workload by age groups for two successive fiscal years. (Author)

  3. Inpatient Mental Health Services in Metropolitan and Nonmetropolitan Counties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagenfeld, Morton O.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Analyzes the 1983 distribution of inpatient mental health facilities and estimated inpatient beds for all 3,137 U.S. counties categorized on an 18-position urbanization scale. Finds services available in only 13 percent of all nonmetro counties and in virtually none of the most rural, nonadjacent, nonmetro counties. Contains 30 references. (SV)

  4. Multifaceted Inpatient Psychiatry Approach to Reducing Readmissions: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Timothy P.; Rohrer, James E.; Rioux, Pierre A.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Access to psychiatric services, particularly inpatient psychiatric care, is limited and lacks comprehensiveness in rural areas. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact on readmission rates of a multifaceted inpatient psychiatry approach (MIPA) offered in a rural hospital. Methods: Readmissions within 30 days of

  5. Design of a randomized trial to evaluate the influence of mobile phone reminders on adherence to first line antiretroviral treatment in South India - the HIVIND study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Poor adherence to antiretroviral treatment has been a public health challenge associated with the treatment of HIV. Although different adherence-supporting interventions have been reported, their long term feasibility in low income settings remains uncertain. Thus, there is a need to explore sustainable contextual adherence aids in such settings, and to test these using rigorous scientific designs. The current ubiquity of mobile phones in many resource-constrained settings, make it a contextually appropriate and relatively low cost means of supporting adherence. In India, mobile phones have wide usage and acceptability and are potentially feasible tools for enhancing adherence to medications. This paper presents the study protocol for a trial, to evaluate the influence of mobile phone reminders on adherence to first-line antiretroviral treatment in South India. Methods/Design 600 treatment nave patients eligible for first-line treatment as per the national antiretroviral treatment guidelines will be recruited into the trial at two clinics in South India. Patients will be randomized into control and intervention arms. The control arm will receive the standard of care; the intervention arm will receive the standard of care plus mobile phone reminders. Each reminder will take the form of an automated call and a picture message. Reminders will be delivered once a week, at a time chosen by the patient. Patients will be followed up for 24 months or till the primary outcome i.e. virological failure, is reached, whichever is earlier. Self-reported adherence is a secondary outcome. Analysis is by intention-to-treat. A cost-effectiveness study of the intervention will also be carried out. Discussion Stepping up telecommunications technology in resource-limited healthcare settings is a priority of the World Health Organization. The trial will evaluate if the use of mobile phone reminders can influence adherence to first-line antiretrovirals in an Indian context. Trial Registration Trial registration: ISRCTN79261738. PMID:20346136

  6. 75 FR 23851 - Medicare Program; Proposed Changes to the Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ... inpatient prospective payment system ] IRF Inpatient rehabilitation facility LAMCs Large area metropolitan... additional payment as an outlier case. This additional payment is designed to protect the hospital from...

  7. Tailored internet-administered treatment of anxiety disorders for primary care patients: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Internet-administered cognitive behavioural therapy (ICBT) has been found to be effective for a range of anxiety disorders. However, most studies have focused on one specific primary diagnosis and co-morbidity has not been considered. In primary care settings, patients with anxiety often suffer from more than one psychiatric condition, making it difficult to disseminate ICBT for specific conditions. The aim of this study will be to investigate if ICBT tailored according to symptom profile can be a feasible treatment for primary care patients with anxiety disorders. It is a randomised controlled trial aimed to evaluate the treatment against an active control group. Methods Participants with anxiety disorders and co-morbid conditions (N = 128), will be recruited from a primary care population. The Clinical Outcome in Routine Evaluation (CORE-OM) will serve as the primary outcome measure. Secondary measures include self-reported depression, anxiety, quality of life and loss of production and the use of health care. All assessments will be collected via the Internet and measure points will be baseline, post treatment and 12 months post treatment. Discussion This trial will add to the body of knowledge on the effectiveness of ICBT for anxiety disorders in primary care. The trial will also add knowledge on the long term effects of ICBT when delivered for regular clinic patients Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01390168 PMID:22321916

  8. Treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in countries with limited resources; lessons from use of a single protocol in India over a twenty year period [corrected].

    PubMed

    Magrath, I; Shanta, V; Advani, S; Adde, M; Arya, L S; Banavali, S; Bhargava, M; Bhatia, K; Gutirrez, M; Liewehr, D; Pai, S; Sagar, T G; Venzon, D; Raina, V

    2005-07-01

    In the 1970s, survival rates after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in children and young adults (less than 25 years) in India were poor, even in specialised cancer centres. The introduction of a standard treatment protocol (MCP841) and improvements in supportive care in three major cancer centres in India led to an increase in the event-free survival rate (EFS) from less than 20% to 45-60% at 4 years. Results of treatment with protocol MCP841 between 1984 and 1990 have been published and are briefly reviewed here. In addition, previously unpublished data from 1048 patients treated between 1990 and 1997 are reported. Significant differences in both patient populations and treatment outcome were noted among the centres. In one centre, a sufficiently large number of patients were treated each year to perform an analysis of patient characteristics and outcome over time. Although steady improvement in outcome was observed, differences in the patient populations in the time periods examined were also noted. Remarkably, prognostic factors common to all three centres could not be defined. Total white blood cell count (WBC) was the only statistically significant risk factor identified in multivariate analyses in two of the centres. Age is strongly associated with outcome in Western series, but was not a risk factor for EFS in any of the centres. Comparison of patient characteristics with published series from Western nations indicated that patients from all three Indian centres had more extensive disease at presentation, as measured by WBC, lymphadenopathy and organomegaly. The proportions of ALLs with precursor T-cell immunophenotypes, particularly in Chennai, were also increased, even when differences in the age distribution were taken into consideration (in <18-year olds, the range was 21.1-42.7%), and in molecular analyses performed on leukaemic cells from over 250 patients less than 21-years-old with precursor B-cell ALL, a lower frequency of TEL-AML1-positive ALL cases than reported in Western series was observed. The worse outcome of treatment in Indian patients compared with recent Western series was probably due to the higher rate of toxic deaths in the Indian patients, and possibly also due to their more extensive disease - which is, at least partly, a consequence of delay in diagnosis. Differences in the spectrum of molecular subtypes may also have played a role. The higher toxic death rates observed are likely to have arisen from a combination of more extensive disease at diagnosis, co-morbidities (e.g., intercurrent infections), differences in the level of hygiene achievable in the average home, poor access to acute care, and more limited supportive care facilities in Indian hospitals. Toxic death was not associated with WBC at presentation, and hence would tend to obscure the importance of this, and, potentially, other risk factors, as prognostic indicators. Since the prevalence of individual risk factors varies in different populations and over time, their relative importance would also be expected to vary in different centres and in different time periods. This was, in fact, observed. These findings have important implications for the treatment of ALL in countries of low socioeconomic status; it cannot be assumed that risk factors defined in Western populations are equally appropriate for patient assignment to risk-adapted therapy groups in less affluent countries. They also demonstrate that heterogeneity in patient populations and resources can result in significant differences in outcome, even when the same treatment protocol is used. This is often overlooked when comparing published patient series. PMID:16026693

  9. Treatment of skeletal class III malocclusion using face mask therapy with alternate rapid maxillary expansion and constriction (Alt-RAMEC) protocol.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Anand Ramchandra; Kumari, N Retna; Vadakkepuriyal, Kannan; Santhkumar, Madhu

    2015-01-01

    Class III malocclusion is very common malocclusion and can be due to maxillary retrusion, mandibular prognathism, or combination. Ellis and McNamara found a combination of maxillary retrusion and mandibular protrusion to be the most common skeletal relationship (30%). The treatment should be carried out as early as possible for permitting normal growth of the skeletal bases. Reverse pull head gear combined with maxillary expansion can effectively correct skeletal Class III malocclusion due to maxillary deficiency in growing patient. An eight-year-old female patient with chief complaint of prognathic mandible and anterior crossbite was successfully treated in duration of 5 months with facemask and expansion therapy based on Alternate Rapid Maxillary Expansion and Constriction (Alt-RAMEC) protocol. PMID:26381639

  10. Clinical course, costs and predictive factors for response to treatment in carpal tunnel syndrome: the PALMS study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common neuropathy of the upper limb and a significant contributor to hand functional impairment and disability. Effective treatment options include conservative and surgical interventions, however it is not possible at present to predict the outcome of treatment. The primary aim of this study is to identify which baseline clinical factors predict a good outcome from conservative treatment (by injection) or surgery in patients diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. Secondary aims are to describe the clinical course and progression of CTS, and to describe and predict the UK cost of CTS to the individual, National Health Service (NHS) and society over a two year period. Methods/Design In this prospective observational cohort study patients presenting with clinical signs and symptoms typical of CTS and in whom the diagnosis is confirmed by nerve conduction studies are invited to participate. Data on putative predictive factors are collected at baseline and follow-up through patient questionnaires and include standardised measures of symptom severity, hand function, psychological and physical health, comorbidity and quality of life. Resource use and cost over the 2year period such as prescribed medications, NHS and private healthcare contacts are also collected through patient self-report at 6, 12, 18 and 24months. The primary outcome used to classify treatment success or failures will be a 5-point global assessment of change. Secondary outcomes include changes in clinical symptoms, functioning, psychological health, quality of life and resource use. A multivariable model of factors which predict outcome and cost will be developed. Discussion This prospective cohort study will provide important data on the clinical course and UK costs of CTS over a two-year period and begin to identify predictive factors for treatment success from conservative and surgical interventions. PMID:24507749

  11. Treatment of atrial fibrillation with a dual defibrillator in heart failure patients (TRADE HF): protocol for a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Heart failure(HF) and atrial fibrillation(AF) frequently coexist in the same patient and are associated with increased mortality and frequent hospitalizations. As the concomitance of AF and HF is often associated with a poor prognosis, the prompt treatment of AF in HF patients may significantly improve outcome. Methods/design Recent implantable cardiac resynchronization (CRT) devices allow electrical therapies to treat AF automatically. TRADE-HF (trial registration: NCT00345592; http://www.clinicaltrials.gov) is a prospective, randomized, double arm study aimed at demonstrating the efficacy of an automatic, device-based therapy for treatment of atrial tachycardia and fibrillation(AT/AF) in patients indicated for CRT. The study compares automatic electrical therapy to a traditional more usual treatment of AT/AF: the goal is to demonstrate a reduction in a combined endpoint of unplanned hospitalizations for cardiac reasons, death from cardiovascular causes or permanent AF when using automatic atrial therapy as compared to the traditional approach involving hospitalization for symptoms and in-hospital treatment of AT/AF. Discussion CRT pacemaker with the additional ability to convert AF as well as ventricular arrhythmias may play a simultaneous role in rhythm control and HF treatment. The value of the systematic implantation of CRT ICDs with the capacity to deliver atrial therapy in HF patients at risk of AF has not yet been explored. The TRADE-HF study will assess in CRT patients whether a strategy based on automatic management of atrial arrhythmias might be a valuable option to reduce the number of hospital admission and to reduce the progression the arrhythmia to a permanent form. Trial registration NCT00345592 PMID:21324118

  12. Adjustment of inpatient care reimbursement for nursing intensity.

    PubMed

    Welton, John M; Zone-Smith, Laurie; Fischer, Mary H

    2006-11-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has begun an ambitious recalibration of the inpatient prospective payment system, the first since its introduction in 1983. Unfortunately, inpatient nursing care has been overlooked in the new payment system and continues to be treated as a fixed cost and billed at a set per-diem "room and board" fee despite the known variability of nursing intensity across different care settings and diagnoses. This article outlines the historical influences regarding costing, billing, and reimbursement of inpatient nursing care and provides contemporary evidence about the variability of nursing intensity and costs at acute care hospitals in the United States. A remedy is proposed to overcome the existing limitations of the Inpatient Prospective Payment System by creating a new nursing cost center and nursing intensity adjustment by DRG for each routine-and intensive-care day of stay to allow independent costing, billing, and reimbursement of inpatient nursing care. PMID:17242392

  13. Ondansetron and simvastatin added to treatment as usual in patients with schizophrenia: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Negative symptoms and cognitive deficits are two partially-related features of schizophrenia which have a major negative impact on social function and objective quality of life. Standard drug treatments have little impact on either. There is some evidence that anti-inflammatory treatment may have beneficial effects in schizophrenia and major depression. Statins are cholesterol-lowering agents that have been found to be anti-inflammatory agents and are also known to decrease C-reactive protein (CRP). Ondansetron is a serotonin (5-HT3) receptor antagonist widely used to prevent nausea and vomiting in patients receiving chemotherapy for cancer. Small studies have suggested that ondansetron is effective as an adjunct drug in improving the symptoms of schizophrenia. Methods/design This is a two center, six-month, double-blind placebo controlled, factorial design study of ondansetron and/or simvastatin added to treatment as usual for patients suffering from schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, psychosis not otherwise specified or schizophreniform disorder. This will be a 2 2 design, with 54 patients in each cell, giving a total of 216 patients over three years. There will be a screening, a randomization and seven follow-up visits. Full clinical and neurocognitive assessments will be carried out at baseline (randomization), 14 weeks and at 26 weeks, while the positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS), pill count and side effects checklist will be carried out at every visit. Simvastatin will be started at 20 mg once daily (OD), this will be increased to 40 mg after four weeks. Ondansetron will be administered in an 8 mg dose. Discussion Anti-inflammatory treatments have been shown to have some beneficial effects in schizophrenia. Both simvastatin and ondansetron provide some evidence of a reduction in symptoms compared to treatment as usual. The aim of this study is to establish the degree of improvement in negative symptoms with the addition of ondansetron and/or simvastatin to treatment as usual. Trail registration ClinicalTrails.gov NCT01602029 PMID:23782463

  14. Efficacy of customised foot orthoses in the treatment of Achilles tendinopathy: study protocol for a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Munteanu, Shannon E; Landorf, Karl B; Menz, Hylton B; Cook, Jill L; Pizzari, Tania; Scott, Lisa A

    2009-01-01

    Background Achilles tendinopathy is a common condition that can cause marked pain and disability. Numerous non-surgical treatments have been proposed for the treatment of this condition, but many of these treatments have a poor or non-existent evidence base. The exception to this is eccentric calf muscle exercises, which have become a standard non-surgical intervention for Achilles tendinopathy. Foot orthoses have also been advocated as a treatment for Achilles tendinopathy, but the long-term efficacy of foot orthoses for this condition is unknown. This manuscript describes the design of a randomised trial to evaluate the efficacy of customised foot orthoses to reduce pain and improve function in people with Achilles tendinopathy. Methods One hundred and forty community-dwelling men and women aged 18 to 55 years with Achilles tendinopathy (who satisfy inclusion and exclusion criteria) will be recruited. Participants will be randomised, using a computer-generated random number sequence, to either a control group (sham foot orthoses made from compressible ethylene vinyl acetate foam) or an experimental group (customised foot orthoses made from semi-rigid polypropylene). Both groups will be prescribed a calf muscle eccentric exercise program, however, the primary difference between the groups will be that the experimental group receive customised foot orthoses, while the control group receive sham foot orthoses. The participants will be instructed to perform eccentric exercises 2 times per day, 7 days per week, for 12 weeks. The primary outcome measure will be the total score of the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment - Achilles (VISA-A) questionnaire. The secondary outcome measures will be participant perception of treatment effect, comfort of the foot orthoses, use of co-interventions, frequency and severity of adverse events, level of physical activity and health-related quality of life (assessed using the Short-Form-36 questionnaire - Version two). Data will be collected at baseline, then at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months. Data will be analysed using the intention to treat principle. Discussion This study is the first randomised trial to evaluate the long-term efficacy of customised foot orthoses for the treatment of Achilles tendinopathy. The study has been pragmatically designed to ensure that the study findings are generalisable to clinical practice. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry Number: ACTRN12609000829213. PMID:19852853

  15. Low-intensity internet-delivered treatment for generalized anxiety symptoms in routine care: protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Worldwide prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is considered high; in Europe lifetime prevalence has been estimated at 4.3 to 5.9%. High levels of anxiety disorders have been reported in university students, affecting 25 to 30% of the population. Young adults are some of the most vulnerable for the onset of mental health disorders and any stressors may act as a catalyst for their onset. The absence of resources can often mean that many do not seek treatment. Other factors that impede access to resources include such things as a lack of trained professionals, personal stigma, and waiting lists. Anxiety disorders can be treated successfully; indeed brief forms of cognitive-behavior therapy have been recommended. One potential avenue for research and development is that of delivering low-intensity interventions online for students with GAD. Therefore, the current study seeks to investigate the potential effectiveness for a low-intensity online CBT-based treatment for GAD in a service-based setting; implemented as one step in a stepped-care model. Methods/Design The research is a service-based effectiveness study utilizing a randomized waiting-list controlled design. The active intervention consists of six weekly modules of online CBT. Participants are assigned a supporter who provides weekly post-session feedback on progress and exercises. Participants will complete the GAD-7 as the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcomes include pathological worry, depression and measures of well-being. At three-months follow-up data will be collected using the GAD-7, BDI-II, PSWQ, ED-Q5 and WSAS. Post-session data will be collected on significant in-session events in treatment (HAT). A satisfaction with treatment measure will be administered post-treatment (SAT). Discussion The study will be a contribution to the potential for a low-intensity internet-delivered program implemented in a service-based setting; implemented as one step in a stepped-care model. The study will be a contribution to the already established work in online treatments for anxiety worldwide. The study will assess the utility of an innovative digital health solution (SilverCloud) to deliver such interventions. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN16303842. PMID:24767603

  16. Costs and process of in-patient tuberculosis management at a central academic hospital, Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Marais, F.; Mehtar, S.; Baltussen, R. M. P. M.

    2012-01-01

    Setting: South Africa reports more cases of tuberculosis (TB) than any other country, but an up-to-date, precise estimate of the costs associated with diagnosing, treating and preventing TB at the in-patient level is not available. Objective: To determine the costs associated with TB management among in-patients and to study the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) at a central academic hospital in Cape Town. Design: Retrospective and partly prospective cost analysis of TB cases diagnosed between May 2008 and October 2009. Results: The average daily in-patient costs were US$238; the average length of stay was 9.7 days. Mean laboratory and medication costs per stay were respectively US$26.82 and US$8.68. PPE use per day cost US$0.99. The average total TB management costs were US$2373 per patient. PPE was not always properly used. Discussion: The costs of in-patient TB management are high compared to community-based treatment; the main reason for the high costs is the high number of in-patient days. An efficiency assessment is needed to reduce costs. Cost reduction per TB case prevented was approximately US$2373 per case. PPE use accounted for the lowest costs. Training is needed to improve PPE use. PMID:26392953

  17. The 'Expanded HIV care in opioid substitution treatment' (EHOST) cluster-randomized, stepped-wedge trial: A study protocol.

    PubMed

    Nosyk, B; Krebs, E; Min, J E; Ahamad, K; Buxton, J; Goldsmith, C; Hull, M; Joe, R; Krajden, M; Lima, V D; Olding, M; Wood, E; Montaner, J S G

    2015-11-01

    The public health response to HIV/AIDS has turned its focus onto optimizing health care system delivery to maximize case identification, access and sustained engagement in antiretroviral treatment (ART). Opioid Agonist Treatment (OAT) provides a critical opportunity for HIV testing and linkage to ART. The EHOST study is a cluster-randomized, stepped-wedge trial to evaluate a prescriber-focused intervention to increase HIV testing rates, and optimize ART engagement and retention outcomes among individuals engaged in OAT. The study will encompass all drug treatment clinics currently admitting patients for the treatment of opioid use disorder across the province of British Columbia, encompassing an estimated 90% of the OAT caseload. The trial will be executed over a 24-month period, with groups of clinics receiving the intervention in 6-month intervals. Evaluation of the proposed intervention's effectiveness will focus on three primary outcomes: (i) the HIV testing rate among those not known to be HIV positive; (ii) the rate of ART initiation among those not on ART; and (iii) the rate of ART continuation among those on ART. A difference-in-differences analytical framework will be applied to estimate the intervention's effect. This approach will assess site-specific changes in primary outcomes across clusters while adjusting for potential residual heterogeneity in patient case mix, volume, and quality of care across clinics. Statistical analysis of outcomes will be conducted entirely with linked population-level administrative health datasets. Facilitated by established collaborations between key stakeholders across the province, the EHOST intervention promises to optimize HIV testing and care within a marginalized and hard-to-reach population. PMID:26342295

  18. Short message service (SMS) interventions for the prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted infections: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Globally, the incidence of sexually transmitted infections (STI) is rising, posing a challenge to its control and appropriate management. Text messaging has become the most common mode of communication among almost six billion mobile phone users worldwide. Text messaging can be used to remind patients about clinic appointments, to notify patients that it is time for STI re-testing, and to facilitate patient communication with their health professionals with any questions and concerns they may have about their sexual health. While there are a handful of systematic reviews published on short message service (SMS) interventions in a variety of health settings and issues, none are related to sexual health. We plan to conduct a systematic review to examine the impact text messaging might have on interventions for the prevention and care of patients with STIs. Methods/Design Eligible studies will include both quantitative and qualitative studies published after 1995 that discuss the efficacy and effectiveness of SMS interventions for STI prevention and management using text messaging. Data will be abstracted independently by two reviewers using a standardized pre-tested data abstraction form. Inter-rater reliability scores will be obtained to ensure consistency in the inclusion and data extraction of studies. Heterogeneity will be assessed using the I2 test and subgroup analyses. A nonhypothesis driven inductive reasoning approach as well as a coding framework will be applied to analyze qualitative studies. A meta-analysis may be conducted if sufficient quantitative studies are found using similar outcomes. Discussion For this protocol, we identified ten related systematic reviews. The reviews were limited to a particular disease or setting, were not exclusive to SMS interventions, or were out of date. This systematic review will be the first comprehensive examination of studies that discuss the effectiveness of SMS on multiple outcomes that relate to STI prevention and management, covering diverse settings and populations. Findings of the systematic review and any additional meta-analyses will be published and presented to our key knowledge users. This information will provide the evidence that is required to appropriately adopt text messaging into standard practice in STI care. PMID:24433348

  19. The DOMUS study protocol: a randomized clinical trial of accelerated transition from oncological treatment to specialized palliative care at home

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The focus of Specialized Palliative Care (SPC) is to improve care for patients with incurable diseases and their families, which includes the opportunity to make their own choice of place of care and ultimately place of death. The Danish Palliative Care Trial (DOMUS) aims to investigate whether an accelerated transition process from oncological treatment to continuing SPC at home for patients with incurable cancer results in more patients reaching their preferred place of care and death. The SPC in this trial is enriched with a manualized psychological intervention. Methods/Design DOMUS is a controlled randomized clinical trial with a balanced parallel-group randomization (1:1). The planned sample size is 340 in- and outpatients treated at the Department of Oncology at Copenhagen University Hospital. Patients are randomly assigned either to: a) standard care plus SPC enriched with a standardized psychological intervention for patients and caregivers at home or b) standard care alone. Inclusion criteria are incurable cancer with no or limited antineoplastic treatment options. Discussion Programs that facilitate transition from hospital treatment to SPC at home for patients with incurable cancer can be a powerful tool to improve patients’ quality of life and support family/caregivers during the disease trajectory. The present study offers a model for achieving optimal delivery of palliative care in the patient’s preferred place of care and attempt to clarify challenges. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01885637 PMID:25242890

  20. Anger Self-Management in Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury: Protocol for a Psycho-educational Treatment With a Structurally Equivalent Control and an Evaluation of Treatment Enactment

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Tessa; Brockway, Jo Ann; Fann, Jesse R.; Maiuro, Roland D.; Vaccaro, Monica J.

    2014-01-01

    Anger and irritability are important and persistent clinical problems following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Treatment options include medications, behavioral modification, and psychotherapies, but some are impractical and none have proven efficacy with this population. We describe a randomized multi-center clinical trial testing a novel, one-on-one, 8-session psychoeducational treatment program, Anger Self-Management Training (ASMT), designed specifically for people with TBI who have significant cognitive impairment. The trial is notable for its use of a structurally equivalent comparison treatment, called Personal Readjustment and Education (PRE), which was created for the study and is intended to maximize equipoise for both participants and treaters. Fidelity assessment is conducted in real time and used in therapist supervision sessions. The primary outcome is change in self-reported anger on validated measures from pre-treatment to 1 week after the final session. Secondary outcomes include participant anger as reported by a significant other; emotional distress in domains other than anger/ irritability; behavioral functioning; and quality of life. An interim assessment after the 4th session will allow examination of the trajectory of any observed treatment effects, and a follow-up assessment 2 months after the end of intervention will allow examination of persistence of effects. A treatment enactment phase, in which participants are interviewed several months after the last therapy session, is designed to provide qualitative data on whether and to what extent the principles and techniques learned in treatment are still carried out in daily life. PMID:25530306

  1. Assessing an enoxaparin dosing protocol in morbidly obese patients.

    PubMed

    Lalama, Jeffrey T; Feeney, Megan E; Vandiver, Jeremy W; Beavers, K Diane; Walter, Leah N; McClintic, Jacqueline R

    2015-05-01

    The effect of obesity on the pharmacokinetics of enoxaparin is not clearly understood and traditional treatment doses in morbidly obese patients (body mass index [BMI]>40kg/m(2)) can lead to over anticoagulation. Our institution developed an inpatient protocol with reduced enoxaparin doses (0.75mg/kg/dose based on actual body weight) for patients with a weight >200kg or BMI>40kg/m(2). The primary objective was to determine if modified enoxaparin treatment doses would achieve therapeutic anti-Xa levels (goal range 0.6-1.0IU/mL) in morbidly obese patients. Thirty-one patients were included in our study and had a median body weight of 138kg (range 105-197) and a median BMI of 46.2kg/m(2) (range 40.1-62). The initial peak anti-Xa levels were in therapeutic range in 15 of 31 patients (48%) with an initial mean anti-Xa level of 0.92IU/mL. Twenty-four patients (77%) achieved therapeutic anti-Xa levels in goal range during their hospitalization, with a mean enoxaparin dose of 0.71mg/kg. Bleeding and thrombotic events were minimal and all patients that achieved an anti-Xa level in goal range did so with a dose less than 1mg/kg of enoxaparin. PMID:25087072

  2. Clonidine versus captopril for treatment of postpartum very high blood pressure: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial (CLONCAP)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The behavior of arterial blood pressure in postpartum of women with hypertension and pregnancy and the best treatment for very high blood pressure in this period still need evidence. The Cochrane systematic review assessing prevention and treatment of postpartum hypertension found only two trials (120 patients) comparing hydralazine with nifedipine and labetalol for the treatment of severe hypertension and did not find enough evidence to know how best to treat women with hypertension after birth. Although studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of treatment with captopril, side effects were reported. Because of these findings, new classes of antihypertensive drugs began to be administered as an alternative therapy. Data on the role of clonidine in this particular group of patients, its effects in the short and long term are still scarce in the literature. Objectives To determine the effectiveness of clonidine, compared to captopril, for the treatment of postpartum very high blood pressure in women with hypertension in pregnancy. Methods/design The study is a triple blind randomized controlled trial including postpartum women with diagnosis of hypertension in pregnancy presenting very high blood pressure, and exclusion criteria will be presence of heart disease, smoking, use of illicit drugs, any contraindication to the use of captopril or clonidine and inability to receive oral medications. Eligible patients will be invited to participate and those who agree will be included in the study and receive captopril or clonidine according to a random list of numbers. The subjects will receive the study medication every 20 minutes until blood pressure is over 170 mmHg of systolic blood pressure and 110 mmHg diastolic blood pressure. A maximum of six pills a day for very high blood pressure will be administered. In case of persistent high blood pressure levels, other antihypertensive agents will be used. During the study the women will be subject to strict control of blood pressure and urine output. This proposal has already obtained approval of the local Institutional Review Board of the coordinating center (IMIP, Recife, Brazil) and of the National Council for Ethics in Research (CONEP) of the Brazilian Ministry of Health. Trial registration Clinical Trials Register under the number NCT01761916. PMID:23899372

  3. Comparison of non-surgical treatment methods for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis: protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lumbar spinal stenosis is the most common reason for spinal surgery in older adults. Previous studies have shown that surgery is effective for severe cases of stenosis, but many patients with mild to moderate symptoms are not surgical candidates. These patients and their providers are seeking effective non-surgical treatment methods to manage their symptoms; yet there is a paucity of comparative effectiveness research in this area. This knowledge gap has hindered the development of clinical practice guidelines for non-surgical treatment approaches for lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods/design This study is a prospective randomized controlled clinical trial that will be conducted from November 2013 through October 2016. The sample will consist of 180 older adults (>60years) who have both an anatomic diagnosis of stenosis confirmed by diagnostic imaging, and signs/symptoms consistent with a clinical diagnosis of lumbar spinal stenosis confirmed by clinical examination. Eligible subjects will be randomized into one of three pragmatic treatment groups: 1) usual medical care; 2) individualized manual therapy and rehabilitative exercise; or 3) community-based group exercise. All subjects will be treated for a 6-week course of care. The primary subjective outcome is the Swiss Spinal Stenosis Questionnaire, a self-reported measure of pain/function. The primary objective outcome is the Self-Paced Walking Test, a measure of walking capacity. The secondary objective outcome will be a measurement of physical activity during activities of daily living, using the SenseWear Armband, a portable device to be worn on the upper arm for one week. The primary analysis will use linear mixed models to compare the main effects of each treatment group on the changes in each outcome measure. Secondary analyses will include a responder analysis by group and an exploratory analysis of potential baseline predictors of treatment outcome. Discussion Our study should provide evidence that helps to inform patients and providers about the clinical benefits of three non-surgical approaches to the management of lumbar spinal stenosis symptoms. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01943435 PMID:24872875

  4. A randomized controlled trial comparing Circle of Security Intervention and treatment as usual as interventions to increase attachment security in infants of mentally ill mothers: Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Psychopathology in women after childbirth represents a significant risk factor for parenting and infant mental health. Regarding child development, these infants are at increased risk for developing unfavorable attachment strategies to their mothers and for subsequent behavioral, emotional and cognitive impairments throughout childhood. To date, the specific efficacy of an early attachment-based parenting group intervention under standard clinical outpatient conditions, and the moderators and mediators that promote attachment security in infants of mentally ill mothers, have been poorly evaluated. Methods/Design This randomized controlled clinical trial tests whether promoting attachment security in infancy with the Circle of Security (COS) Intervention will result in a higher rate of securely attached children compared to treatment as usual (TAU). Furthermore, we will determine whether the distributions of securely attached children are moderated or mediated by variations in maternal sensitivity, mentalizing, attachment representations, and psychopathology obtained at baseline and at follow-up. We plan to recruit 80 mother-infant dyads when infants are aged 4-9months with 40 dyads being randomized to each treatment arm. Infants and mothers will be reassessed when the children are 16-18months of age. Methodological aspects of the study are systematic recruitment and randomization, explicit inclusion and exclusion criteria, research assessors and coders blinded to treatment allocation, advanced statistical analysis, manualized treatment protocols and assessments of treatment adherence and integrity. Discussion The aim of this clinical trial is to determine whether there are specific effects of an attachment-based intervention that promotes attachment security in infants. Additionally, we anticipate being able to utilize data on maternal and child outcome measures to obtain preliminary indications about potential moderators of the intervention and inform hypotheses about which intervention may be most suitable when offered in a clinical psychiatric outpatient context. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN88988596 PMID:24476106

  5. 42 CFR 440.10 - Inpatient hospital services, other than services in an institution for mental diseases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... an institution for mental diseases. 440.10 Section 440.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... for mental diseases. (a) Inpatient hospital services means services that— (1) Are ordinarily furnished... and treatment of patients with disorders other than mental diseases; (ii) Is licensed or...

  6. 42 CFR 440.10 - Inpatient hospital services, other than services in an institution for mental diseases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... an institution for mental diseases. 440.10 Section 440.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... for mental diseases. (a) Inpatient hospital services means services that— (1) Are ordinarily furnished... and treatment of patients with disorders other than mental diseases; (ii) Is licensed or...

  7. 42 CFR 440.10 - Inpatient hospital services, other than services in an institution for mental diseases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... an institution for mental diseases. 440.10 Section 440.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... for mental diseases. (a) Inpatient hospital services means services that— (1) Are ordinarily furnished... and treatment of patients with disorders other than mental diseases; (ii) Is licensed or...

  8. 42 CFR 440.10 - Inpatient hospital services, other than services in an institution for mental diseases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... an institution for mental diseases. 440.10 Section 440.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... for mental diseases. (a) Inpatient hospital services means services that— (1) Are ordinarily furnished... and treatment of patients with disorders other than mental diseases; (ii) Is licensed or...

  9. 42 CFR 440.10 - Inpatient hospital services, other than services in an institution for mental diseases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... an institution for mental diseases. 440.10 Section 440.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... for mental diseases. (a) Inpatient hospital services means services that— (1) Are ordinarily furnished... and treatment of patients with disorders other than mental diseases; (ii) Is licensed or...

  10. Clinical Outcomes of a Specialised Inpatient Unit for Adults with Mild to Severe Intellectual Disability and Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsky, Y.; White, S. E.; Palucka, A. M.; Weiss, J.; Bockus, S.; Gofine, T.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Limitations of general psychiatric services have led to the development of specialised psychiatric programmes for patients with intellectual disability (ID) and mental health needs. Few studies have examined treatment outcomes of specialised inpatient units, and no studies have explored how the effects of intervention may differ for

  11. Mitochondrionopathy Phenotype in Doxorubicin-Treated Wistar Rats Depends on Treatment Protocol and Is Cardiac-Specific

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Gonçalo C.; Pereira, Susana P.; Pereira, Claudia V.; Lumini, José A.; Magalhães, José; Ascensão, António; Santos, Maria S.; Moreno, António J.; Oliveira, Paulo J.

    2012-01-01

    Although doxorubicin (DOX) is a very effective antineoplastic agent, its clinical use is limited by a dose-dependent, persistent and cumulative cardiotoxicity, whose mechanism remains to be elucidated. Previous works in animal models have failed to use a multi-organ approach to demonstrate that DOX-associated toxicity is selective to the cardiac tissue. In this context, the present work aims to investigate in vivo DOX cardiac, hepatic and renal toxicity in the same animal model, with special relevance on alterations of mitochondrial bioenergetics. To this end, male Wistar rats were sub-chronically (7 wks, 2 mg/Kg) or acutely (20 mg/Kg) treated with DOX and sacrificed one week or 24 hours after the last injection, respectively. Alterations of mitochondrial bioenergetics showed treatment-dependent differences between tissues. No alterations were observed for cardiac mitochondria in the acute model but decreased ADP-stimulated respiration was detected in the sub-chronic treatment. In the acute treatment model, ADP-stimulated respiration was increased in liver and decreased in kidney mitochondria. Aconitase activity, a marker of oxidative stress, was decreased in renal mitochondria in the acute and in heart in the sub-chronic model. Interestingly, alterations of cardiac mitochondrial bioenergetics co-existed with an absence of echocardiograph, histopathological or ultra-structural alterations. Besides, no plasma markers of cardiac injury were found in any of the time points studied. The results confirm that alterations of mitochondrial function, which are more evident in the heart, are an early marker of DOX-induced toxicity, existing even in the absence of cardiac functional alterations. PMID:22745682

  12. Treatment of optic neuritis with erythropoietin (TONE): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial—study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Diem, Ricarda; Molnar, Fanni; Beisse, Flemming; Gross, Nikolai; Drüschler, Katharina; Heinrich, Sven P; Joachimsen, Lutz; Rauer, Sebastian; Pielen, Amelie; Sühs, Kurt-Wolfram; Linker, Ralf Andreas; Huchzermeyer, Cord; Albrecht, Philipp; Hassenstein, Andrea; Aktas, Orhan; Guthoff, Tanja; Tonagel, Felix; Kernstock, Christoph; Hartmann, Kathrin; Kümpfel, Tania; Hein, Katharina; van Oterendorp, Christian; Grotejohann, Birgit; Ihorst, Gabriele; Maurer, Julia; Müller, Matthias; Volkmann, Martin; Wildemann, Brigitte; Platten, Michael; Wick, Wolfgang; Heesen, Christoph; Schiefer, Ulrich; Wolf, Sebastian; Lagrèze, Wolf A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Optic neuritis leads to degeneration of retinal ganglion cells whose axons form the optic nerve. The standard treatment is a methylprednisolone pulse therapy. This treatment slightly shortens the time of recovery but does not prevent neurodegeneration and persistent visual impairment. In a phase II trial performed in preparation of this study, we have shown that erythropoietin protects global retinal nerve fibre layer thickness (RNFLT-G) in acute optic neuritis; however, the preparatory trial was not powered to show effects on visual function. Methods and analysis Treatment of Optic Neuritis with Erythropoietin (TONE) is a national, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre trial with two parallel arms. The primary objective is to determine the efficacy of erythropoietin compared to placebo given add-on to methylprednisolone as assessed by measurements of RNFLT-G and low-contrast visual acuity in the affected eye 6 months after randomisation. Inclusion criteria are a first episode of optic neuritis with decreased visual acuity to ≤0.5 (decimal system) and an onset of symptoms within 10 days prior to inclusion. The most important exclusion criteria are history of optic neuritis or multiple sclerosis or any ocular disease (affected or non-affected eye), significant hyperopia, myopia or astigmatism, elevated blood pressure, thrombotic events or malignancy. After randomisation, patients either receive 33 000 international units human recombinant erythropoietin intravenously for 3 consecutive days or placebo (0.9% saline) administered intravenously. With an estimated power of 80%, the calculated sample size is 100 patients. The trial started in September 2014 with a planned recruitment period of 30 months. Ethics and dissemination TONE has been approved by the Central Ethics Commission in Freiburg (194/14) and the German Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (61-3910-4039831). It complies with the Declaration of Helsinki, local laws and ICH-GCP. Trial registration number NCT01962571. PMID:26932144

  13. Virtual reality exposure therapy as treatment for pain catastrophizing in fibromyalgia patients: proof-of-concept study (Study Protocol)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Albeit exercise is currently advocated as one of the most effective management strategies for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS); the implementation of exercise as a FMS treatment in reality is significantly hampered by patients' poor compliance. The inference that pain catastrophizing is a key predictor of poor compliance in FMS patients, justifies considering the alteration of pain catastrophizing in improving compliance towards exercises in FMS patients. The aim of this study is to provide proof-of-concept for the development and testing of a novel virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) program as treatment for exercise-related pain catastrophizing in FMS patients. Methods Two interlinked experimental studies will be conducted. Study 1 aims to objectively ascertain if neurophysiological changes occur in the functional brain areas associated with pain catastrophizing, when catastrophizing FMS subjects are exposed to visuals of exercise activities. Study 2 aims to ascertain the preliminary efficacy and feasibility of exposure to visuals of exercise activities as a treatment for exercise-related pain catastrophizing in FMS subjects. Twenty subjects will be selected from a group of FMS patients attending the Tygerberg Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa and randomly allocated to either the VRET (intervention) group or waiting list (control) group. Baseline neurophysiological activity for subjects will be collected in study 1 using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In study 2, clinical improvement in pain catastrophizing will be measured using fMRI (objective) and the pain catastrophizing scale (subjective). Discussion The premise is if exposing FMS patients to visuals of various exercise activities trigger the functional brain areas associated with pain catastrophizing; then as a treatment, repeated exposure to visuals of the exercise activities using a VRET program could possibly decrease exercise-related pain catastrophizing in FMS patients. Proof-of-concept will either be established or negated. The results of this project are envisaged to revolutionize FMS and pain catastrophizing research and in the future, assist health professionals and FMS patients in reducing despondency regarding FMS management. Trial registration PACTR201011000264179 PMID:21529375

  14. Recommendations for Pharmacological Management of Inpatient Aggression in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Guarav; Barzman, Drew

    2010-01-01

    Objective. While there has been a great deal of speculation by clinical researchers over the last three decades on effective and safe methods for the pharmacological management of aggression in children and adolescents, it is only in the last decade that there have been well-designed studies available to address this issue. Medication is commonly used to control aggression in children and adolescents in inpatient units. Also, there exists a need for evidence-based guidelines for the use of these different pharmacological agents for managing pediatric aggression on inpatient units. The aims of this article are to provide a systemic review and to provide treatment guidelines based on these limited but currently available studies. Methods. The articles reviewed in this study were obtained through a PubMed search using the key words ‘children,’ ‘adolescents,’ ‘aggression,’ ‘inpatient,’ ‘ziprasidone,’ ‘lithium,’ and ‘risperidone.’ A total of 499 studies were generated. Only studies focusing on pharmacological management of inpatient pediatric aggression with mean duration less than six weeks and published during January 1980 to August 2009 were included. Only English articles were considered. A total of 13 studies met these criteria, which were included in the review without any further statistical analysis. Recommendations are made on this available evidenced-based literature. Results. There is some evidence for the standing use of oral lithium, haloperidol, olanzapine, and risperidone for aggression related to specific psychiatric diagnoses. Intramuscular ziprasidone and olanzapine administered as needed were found to be effective for the rapid management of moderate to severe aggression. Oral or intramuscular diphenhydramine administered as needed was found to be useful for managing mild aggression due to a placebo effect. Conclusions. Studies are available on managing aggression in children and adolescents in inpatient treatment settings but are limited. Further studies on the use of various psychotropic medications are needed in order to develop comprehensive guidelines for the safe and effective pharmacological management of child and adolescent inpatient aggression. PMID:20376274

  15. Preparing for the inpatient rehabilitation PPS.

    PubMed

    Rielinger, J A

    2001-12-01

    To assess the financial impact of the inpatient rehabilitation prospective payment system (PPS) on its future revenues, the MetroHealth Center for Rehabilitation (MHCR), Cleveland, Ohio, undertook a three-phase process using data from calendar year 2000 to estimate its potential profit or loss for each case-mix group (CMG) identified in the final rule. This process entailed developing a database to facilitate the combination and comparison of patient-charge and clinical data by CMG, using the combined data to estimate costs by cost center, and using payment information included in the final rule to estimate revenues by CMG. Following the assessment, the MHCR decided to expand the database to assist clinicians in making informed decisions in their patient-assessment and care-delivery processes that would account for cost and revenue considerations under the PPS. PMID:11765633

  16. Can "patient keeper" help in-patients?

    PubMed

    Al-Hinnawi, M F

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to present our "Patient Keeper" application, which is a client-server medical application. "Patient Keeper" is designed to run on a mobile phone for the client application and on a PC for the server application using J2ME and JAVA2, respectively. This application can help doctors during visits to their patients in hospitals. The client application allows doctors to store on their mobile phones the results of their diagnoses and findings such as temperature, blood pressure, medications, analysis, etc., and send this information to the server via short message service (SMS) for storage in a database. The server can also respond to any request from the client and send the result via Bluetooth, infrared, or over the air. Experimental results showed a significant improvement of the healthcare delivery and reduction for in-patient stay. PMID:19548829

  17. Routine CT screening of psychiatry inpatients.

    PubMed

    McClellan, R L; Eisenberg, R L; Giyanani, V L

    1988-10-01

    During a 3-year period, all inpatients in the psychiatry unit underwent routine screening computed tomography (CT) in an effort to detect clinically unsuspected intracranial abnormalities. Of 261 patients examined who had no focal neurologic deficits, 103 had schizophrenia, 71 had depression, 48 had bipolar disorders, and 39 had paranoid delusions. Findings on 230 (88.1%) of the CT scans were within normal limits, and 27 (10.4%) showed only cortical atrophy. The remaining four cases (1.5%) demonstrated basal ganglia calcification (n = 2), old lacunar infarction (n = 1), or osteoma arising from the inner table of the skull (n = 1), all of which were considered to be clinically unrelated to the patients' psychiatric conditions. In the absence of focal neurologic deficits or other findings suggesting an intracranial abnormality (eg, papilledema, seizures, persistent or increasing headaches), there is no justification for routine CT scanning in patients admitted to the hospital for psychiatric disorders. PMID:3420286

  18. Diagnostic and treatment delay, quality of life and satisfaction with care in colorectal cancer patients: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to recent improvements in colorectal cancer survival, patient-reported outcomes, including health-related quality of life and satisfaction with care, have become well-established endpoints to determine the impact of the disease on the lives of patients. The aim of this study is to determine prospectively, in a cohort of colorectal cancer incident cases: a) health-related quality of life, b) satisfaction with hospital-based care, and c) functional status. A secondary objective is to determine whether diagnostic/therapeutic delay influence quality of life or patients satisfaction levels. Methods/design Single-centre prospective follow-up study of colorectal cancer patients diagnosed during the period 20112012 (n?=?375). This project was approved by the corresponding ethics review board, and informed consent is obtained from each patient. After diagnosis, patients are interviewed by a trained nurse, obtaining information on sociodemographic characteristics, family history of cancer, first symptoms, symptom perception and reaction to early symptoms. Quality of life is assessed with the EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-CR29 questionnaires, and patients satisfaction with care is determined using the EORTC IN-PATSAT32. Functional status is measured with the Karnofsky Performance Status Scale. Clinical records are also reviewed to collect information on comorbidity, tumour characteristics, treatment, hospital consultations and exploratory procedures. Symptoms-to-diagnosis interval is defined as the time from the date of first symptoms until the cytohistological confirmation of cancer. Treatment delay is defined as the time between diagnosis and surgical treatment. All the patients will be followed-up for a maximum of 2 years. For survivors, assessments will be re-evaluated at one and two years after the diagnosis. Multiple linear/logistic regression models will be used to identify variables associated with the patients functional status, quality of life and satisfaction with care score. Changes in quality of life over time will be analysed with linear mixed-effects regression models. Discussion The results will provide a deeper understanding of the impact of colorectal cancer from a more patient-centred approach, allowing us to identify groups of patients in need of additional attention, as well as areas for improvement. Special attention will be given to the relationship between diagnostic/therapeutic delay and patients quality of life and satisfaction with the care received. PMID:23845102

  19. Treatment of neonatal jaundice with filtered sunlight in Nigerian neonates: study protocol of a non-inferiority, randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Severe neonatal jaundice and its progression to kernicterus is a leading cause of death and disability among newborns in poorly-resourced countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. The standard treatment for jaundice using conventional phototherapy (CPT) with electric artificial blue light sources is often hampered by the lack of (functional) CPT devices due either to financial constraints or erratic electrical power. In an attempt to make phototherapy (PT) more readily available for the treatment of pathologic jaundice in underserved tropical regions, we set out to test the hypothesis that filtered sunlight phototherapy (FS-PT), in which potentially harmful ultraviolet and infrared rays are appropriately screened, will be as efficacious as CPT. Methods/design This prospective, non-blinded randomized controlled non-inferiority trial seeks to enroll infants with elevated total serum/plasma bilirubin (TSB, defined as 3mg/dl below the level recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics for high-risk infants requiring PT) who will be randomly and equally assigned to receive FS-PT or CPT for a total of 616 days at an inner-city maternity hospital in Lagos, Nigeria. Two FS-PT canopies with pre-tested films will be used. One canopy with a film that transmits roughly 33% blue light (wavelength range: 400 to 520nm) will be used during sunny periods of a day. Another canopy with a film that transmits about 79% blue light will be used during overcast periods of the day. The infants will be moved from one canopy to the other as needed during the day with the goal of keeping the blue light irradiance level above 8?W/cm2/nm. Primary outcome: FS-PT will be as efficacious as CPT in reducing the rate of rise in bilirubin levels. Secondary outcome: The number of infants requiring exchange transfusion under FS-PT will not be more than those under CPT. Conclusion This novel study offers the prospect of an effective treatment for infants at risk of severe neonatal jaundice and avoidable exchange transfusion in poorly-resourced settings without access to (reliable) CPT in the tropics. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01434810 PMID:24373547

  20. Collaborative care for the treatment of comorbid depression and coronary heart disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression and coronary heart disease (CHD) are frequently comorbid and portend higher morbidity, mortality and poorer quality of life. Prior systematic reviews of depression treatment randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in the population with CHD have not assessed the efficacy of collaborative care. This systematic review aims to bring together the contemporary research on the effectiveness of collaborative care interventions for depression in comorbid CHD populations. Methods/Design Electronic databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL) will be searched using a sensitive search strategy exploding the topics CHD, depression and RCT. Full text inspection and bibliography searching will be conducted, and authors of included studies will be contacted to identify unpublished studies. Eligibility criteria are: population, depression comorbid with CHD; intervention, RCT of collaborative care defined as a coordinated model of care involving multidisciplinary health care providers, including: (a) primary physician and at least one other health professional (e.g. nurse, psychiatrist, psychologist), (b) a structured patient management plan that delivers either pharmacological or non-pharmacological intervention, (c) scheduled patient follow-up and (d) enhanced inter-professional communication between the multiprofessional team; comparison, either usual care, enhanced usual care, wait-list control group or no further treatment; and outcome, major adverse cardiac events (MACE), standardized measure of depression, anxiety, quality of life, cost-effectiveness. Screening, data extraction and risk of bias assessment will be undertaken by two reviewers with disagreements resolved through discussion. Meta-analytic methods will be used to synthesize the data collected relating to the outcomes. Discussion This review will evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of collaborative care for depression in populations primarily with CHD. The results will facilitate integration of evidence-based practice for this precarious population. Systematic review registration PROSPERO CRD42014013653. PMID:25351999

  1. Promising link between selenium and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma in the treatment protocols of obesity as well as depression.

    PubMed

    Donma, M M; Donma, O

    2016-04-01

    Considerable interest has been given to the significance of peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) in macronutrient metabolism, however, there is not sufficient data concerning the interactions between PPARs and micronutrients. Investigations performed on PPARγ and one of the essential micronutrients selenium (Se) have shown that both parameters may lead to alterations in obesity-related or mood disorders. Therefore, it is plausible to consider PPARγ and Se together as a powerful combination during the treatment of two associated diseases; obesity and depression. PPARγ has been shown to be involved in the antidepressant-like activity. It is also an important parameter to be considered in obesity as the master regulator of adipogenesis. The mechanism of action of PPARγ is initiated by ligand binding which induces a conformational change in the receptor. Se is capable of alleviating inflammatory signaling pathways. Obesity is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation. Depression is also defined as an inflammatory disorder. Inflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) participate in the progression of depression. They are also obesity-associated parameters. Due to TNFα induced depressive-like behaviors and the positive association between this proinflammatory cytokine and obesity, TNFα-activated signaling pathways and those inhibiting them have recently gained importance as potential targets and therapeutic tools, respectively. More studies are necessary to develop compounds with therapeutic nature against depressive disorders and obesity. PPARγ is an important signaling pathway that occurs at the crossroads of depression and obesity. Se, aside from its anti-inflammatory, anticarcinogenic and antioxidative nature, affects also the way of PPARγ action. Se supplementation or fortification as well as the development of the partial agonists of PPARγ in which lipophilic Se compounds are used as ligand followed by experimental trials and human studies using the newly developed compounds will be promising approaches for future hope during the treatment of these diseases. PMID:26968915

  2. Treatment of primary glioblastoma multiforme with cetuximab, radiotherapy and temozolomide (GERT) phase I/II trial: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Combs, Stephanie E; Heeger, Steffen; Haselmann, Renate; Edler, Lutz; Debus, Jrgen; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    2006-01-01

    Background The implementation of combined radiochemotherapy (RCHT) with temozolomide (TMZ) has lead to a significant increase in overall survival times in patients with Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), however, outcome still remains unsatisfactory. The majority of GBMs show an overexpression and/or amplification of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Therefore, addition of EGFR-inhibition with cetuximab to the current standard treatment approach with radiotherapy and TMZ seems promising. Methods/design GERT is a one-armed single-center phase I/II trial. In a first step, dose-escalation of TMZ from 50 mg/m2 to 75 mg/m2 together with radiotherapy and cetuximab will be performed. Should safety be proven, the phase II trial will be initiated with the standard dose of 75 mg/m2 of TMZ. Cetuximab will be applied in the standard application dose of 400 mg/m2 in week 1, thereafter at a dose of 250 mg/m2 weekly. A total of 46 patients will be included into this phase I/II trial. Primary endpoints are feasibility and toxicity, secondary endpoints are overall and progression-free survival. An interim analysis will be performed after inclusion of 15 patients into the main study. Patients' enrolment will be performed over a period of 2 years. The observation time will end 2 years after inclusion of the last patient. Discussion The goal of this study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of combined RCHT-immunotherapy with TMZ and cetuximab as first-line treatment for patients with primary GBM. PMID:16709245

  3. Is activity against "atypical" pathogens necessary in the treatment protocols for community-acquired pneumonia? Issues with combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, John G

    2008-12-01

    The "atypical pathogens" reviewed include Legionella pneumophila, Chlamydophilia pneumoniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Urinary antigen tests are the most frequently used tests for Legionella species and show good specificity and reasonable sensitivity. For M. pneumoniae, detection of immunoglobulin M, used for the past decade, has substantially improved diagnostic specificity and has simplified testing. For C. pneumoniae, there is no consensus on a simplified test that can be commonly used, and the reported results, with the use of tests that have not been well validated for diagnostic accuracy, show great variation in prevalence. With regard to therapeutic trials, 3 meta-analyses have recently addressed the issue of clinical outcome with or without antibiotics directed against atypical pathogens (macrolides or fluoroquinolones vs. beta-lactam agents). These analyses have not been able to demonstrate any clinical benefit, except in a subset analysis of infections caused by L. pneumophila. Nevertheless, multiple studies from the 1950s and 1960s supported a clinical benefit of tetracycline or erythromycin treatment for infections caused by M. pneumoniae. The largest uncontrolled review of antibiotic treatment for hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia demonstrated a clear benefit from the use of macrolides plus cephalosporins or fluoroquinolones, compared with the use of beta-lactams alone, although these data support a potential role for atypical agents, because other potential explanations make drawing conclusions difficult. With regard to future studies, it is noted that the standard of care in the United States, Canada, and some other countries is routine use of agents to treat infection with atypical pathogens, which makes the conduct of controlled trials to address these issues ethically difficult and practically impossible. Additional limitations are the difficulty in diagnostic testing for C. pneumoniae and the importance of rapid institution of therapy for patients severely ill enough to require hospitalization. These observations introduce substantial ethical and logistical barriers to studies of specific agents, except by retrospective analyses. PMID:18986295

  4. Interrupting transmission of soil-transmitted helminths: a study protocol for cluster randomised trials evaluating alternative treatment strategies and delivery systems in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Brooker, Simon J; Mwandawiro, Charles S; Halliday, Katherine E; Njenga, Sammy M; Mcharo, Carlos; Gichuki, Paul M; Wasunna, Beatrice; Kihara, Jimmy H; Njomo, Doris; Alusala, Dorcas; Chiguzo, Athuman; Turner, Hugo C; Teti, Caroline; Gwayi-Chore, Claire; Nikolay, Birgit; Truscott, James E; Hollingsworth, T Déirdre; Balabanova, Dina; Griffiths, Ulla K; Freeman, Matthew C; Allen, Elizabeth; Pullan, Rachel L; Anderson, Roy M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In recent years, an unprecedented emphasis has been given to the control of neglected tropical diseases, including soil-transmitted helminths (STHs). The mainstay of STH control is school-based deworming (SBD), but mathematical modelling has shown that in all but very low transmission settings, SBD is unlikely to interrupt transmission, and that new treatment strategies are required. This study seeks to answer the question: is it possible to interrupt the transmission of STH, and, if so, what is the most cost-effective treatment strategy and delivery system to achieve this goal? Methods and analysis Two cluster randomised trials are being implemented in contrasting settings in Kenya. The interventions are annual mass anthelmintic treatment delivered to preschool- and school-aged children, as part of a national SBD programme, or to entire communities, delivered by community health workers. Allocation to study group is by cluster, using predefined units used in public health provision—termed community units (CUs). CUs are randomised to one of three groups: receiving either (1) annual SBD; (2) annual community-based deworming (CBD); or (3) biannual CBD. The primary outcome measure is the prevalence of hookworm infection, assessed by four cross-sectional surveys. Secondary outcomes are prevalence of Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura, intensity of species infections and treatment coverage. Costs and cost-effectiveness will be evaluated. Among a random subsample of participants, worm burden and proportion of unfertilised eggs will be assessed longitudinally. A nested process evaluation, using semistructured interviews, focus group discussions and a stakeholder analysis, will investigate the community acceptability, feasibility and scale-up of each delivery system. Ethics and dissemination Study protocols have been reviewed and approved by the ethics committees of the Kenya Medical Research Institute and National Ethics Review Committee, and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. The study has a dedicated web site. Trial registration number NCT02397772. PMID:26482774

  5. Perceptions of Yoga Therapy Embedded in Two Inpatient Rehabilitation Hospitals: Agency Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Van Puymbroeck, Marieke; Miller, Kristine K; Dickes, Lori A; Schmid, Arlene A

    2015-01-01

    Inpatient medical rehabilitation has maintained a typical medical-model focus and structure for many years. However, as integrative therapies, such as yoga therapy, emerge as treatments which can enhance the physical and mental health of its participants, it is important to determine if they can be easily implemented into the traditional rehabilitation structure and milieu. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of key agency personnel on the feasibility and utility of yoga therapy implemented in inpatient rehabilitation. This study reports the results of focus groups and an individual interview with key stakeholders (administrators and rehabilitation therapists) from two rehabilitation hospitals following the implementation of yoga therapy. Results focused on several key themes: feasibility from the therapist and administrator perspectives, challenges to implementation, and utility and benefit. Overall, the implementation and integration of yoga therapy were positive; however, some programmatic and policy and organizational considerations remain. Implications for practice and future research are provided. PMID:26491457

  6. Perceptions of Yoga Therapy Embedded in Two Inpatient Rehabilitation Hospitals: Agency Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Van Puymbroeck, Marieke; Miller, Kristine K.; Dickes, Lori A.; Schmid, Arlene A.

    2015-01-01

    Inpatient medical rehabilitation has maintained a typical medical-model focus and structure for many years. However, as integrative therapies, such as yoga therapy, emerge as treatments which can enhance the physical and mental health of its participants, it is important to determine if they can be easily implemented into the traditional rehabilitation structure and milieu. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of key agency personnel on the feasibility and utility of yoga therapy implemented in inpatient rehabilitation. This study reports the results of focus groups and an individual interview with key stakeholders (administrators and rehabilitation therapists) from two rehabilitation hospitals following the implementation of yoga therapy. Results focused on several key themes: feasibility from the therapist and administrator perspectives, challenges to implementation, and utility and benefit. Overall, the implementation and integration of yoga therapy were positive; however, some programmatic and policy and organizational considerations remain. Implications for practice and future research are provided. PMID:26491457

  7. SU-F-BRD-05: Dosimetric Comparison of Protocol-Based SBRT Lung Treatment Modalities: Statistically Significant VMAT Advantages Over Fixed- Beam IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Best, R; Harrell, A; Geesey, C; Libby, B; Wijesooriya, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to inter-compare and find statistically significant differences between flattened field fixed-beam (FB) IMRT with flattening-filter free (FFF) volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for stereotactic body radiation therapy SBRT. Methods: SBRT plans using FB IMRT and FFF VMAT were generated for fifteen SBRT lung patients using 6 MV beams. For each patient, both IMRT and VMAT plans were created for comparison. Plans were generated utilizing RTOG 0915 (peripheral, 10 patients) and RTOG 0813 (medial, 5 patients) lung protocols. Target dose, critical structure dose, and treatment time were compared and tested for statistical significance. Parameters of interest included prescription isodose surface coverage, target dose heterogeneity, high dose spillage (location and volume), low dose spillage (location and volume), lung dose spillage, and critical structure maximum- and volumetric-dose limits. Results: For all criteria, we found equivalent or higher conformality with VMAT plans as well as reduced critical structure doses. Several differences passed a S