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Sample records for instabile arteriosklerotische plaque

  1. Vulnerable Plaque

    MedlinePlus

    ... plaque. Can vulnerable plaque be prevented? Patients can lower their C-reactive protein levels in the same ... lowering medicines called statins have been found to lower C-reactive protein levels, and doctors are now ...

  2. Fishbowl Plaques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Phyllis Gilchrist

    1998-01-01

    Presents an elementary art activity that successfully teaches the process of slabbing by having students create fishbowl plaques. Explains the process step-by-step beginning with a demonstration to the students along with showing previous examples. Endorses a type of clay that fires white because the glaze colors are much more vibrant. (CMK)

  3. Modern supragingival plaque control.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Iacono VJ; Aldredge WA; Lucks H; Schwartzstein S

    1998-06-01

    Supragingival plaque control is essential for the maintenance of oral health. Despite the many chemotherapeutic agents available as mouthrinses and toothpastes, mechanical plaque removal is still the best method to achieve effective plaque control. This is due, in part, to the lack of development of oral antimicrobials with the effectiveness and substantivity of chlorhexidine gluconate but without its adverse effects of dental staining and calculus formation. The use of the numerous mechanical (manual and electric) oral hygiene devices extant and their effectiveness, however, are dependent upon patient dexterity and compliance and concomitant active professional treatment for the monitoring of home care, oral hygiene instruction and patient motivation. This paper evaluates the current methods available to reduce plaque and gingivitis with emphasis on their effectiveness at both supragingival plaque control and disease prevention. In addition, recent studies on the newer oscillating/rotating electric plaque removers and interdental cleaning devices will be discussed as related to their efficacy and compliance.

  4. Inflammation and plaque vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Hansson, G K; Libby, P; Tabas, I

    2015-11-01

    Atherosclerosis is a maladaptive, nonresolving chronic inflammatory disease that occurs at sites of blood flow disturbance. The disease usually remains silent until a breakdown of integrity at the arterial surface triggers the formation of a thrombus. By occluding the lumen, the thrombus or emboli detaching from it elicits ischaemic symptoms that may be life-threatening. Two types of surface damage can cause atherothrombosis: plaque rupture and endothelial erosion. Plaque rupture is thought to be caused by loss of mechanical stability, often due to reduced tensile strength of the collagen cap surrounding the plaque. Therefore, plaques with reduced collagen content are thought to be more vulnerable than those with a thick collagen cap. Endothelial erosion, on the other hand, may occur after injurious insults to the endothelium instigated by metabolic disturbance or immune insults. This review discusses the molecular mechanisms involved in plaque vulnerability and the development of atherothrombosis. PMID:26260307

  5. Plaque regression and plaque stabilisation in cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Tarun; Ezhilan, J.; Vasnawala, Hardik; Somani, Vinod

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by formation of plaques on the inner walls of arteries that threatens to become the leading cause of death worldwide via its sequelae of myocardial infarction and stroke. Endothelial dysfunction leads to cholesterol uptake and accumulation of inflammatory markers within the plaque. The stability of a plaque eventually depends on the balance between vascular smooth muscle cells that stabilize it and the inflammatory cells like macrophages and T lymphocytes that make it prone to rupture. The current approach to manage atherosclerosis focuses on the treatment of a ruptured plaque and efforts have been made to reduce the risk of plaque rupture by identifying vulnerable plaques and treating them before they precipitate into clinical events. New diagnostic approaches such as IVUS and CIMT ultrasound are now being preferred over traditional coronary angiography because of their better accuracy in measuring plaque volume rather than the level of stenosis caused. The present review highlights the literature available on two prevalent approaches to manage a vulnerable plaque, namely, plaque stabilization and plaque regression, and their validation through various treatment modalities in recent plaque management studies. Plaque stabilization focuses on stabilizing the content of plaque and strengthening the overlying endothelium, while plaque regression focuses on the overall reduction in plaque volume and to reverse the arterial endothelium to its normal functional state. Although earlier studies contemplated the practicality of plaque regression and focused greatly on stabilization of a vulnerable plaque, our review indicated that, aided by the use of superior diagnostics tools, more intensive lipid modifying therapies have resulted in actual plaque regression. PMID:24381872

  6. Aetiology of pleural plaques

    PubMed Central

    Rous, V.; Studeny, J.

    1970-01-01

    Pleural plaques were found in 644 (6·6%) of 9,760 photofluorograms taken in 1965 in a region of Pelhřimov district; the incidence was highest in the age group 66-70 years. The advanced age of those affected may be explained by the greater frequency of the causative agent in the past. The disorder was known in Pelhřimov district as early as 1930; it was then thought to be posttuberculous. The past history of the cases was uninformative; as a rule, the only common previous disease was pleurisy with effusion, occurring in 9·7%. The general condition of those affected was excellent; only 8% were aware of the fact that pleural lesions were present. The disorder was found mainly in farmers, familial incidence was common, and if two generations of one family suffered from the condition, the older generation was affected in 100%. Pleural plaques consist morphologically of limited areas of hyalinized collagenous connective tissue with calcium salt deposits. Tubercle bacilli could not be cultivated from the lesions. Mineralological analysis showed no evidence of silicates in the pleural plaques and a normal content in the lungs. The aetiological factor responsible for the development of pleural plaques in Pelhřimov district is not known, but asbestos cannot be implicated. The unknown noxious agent is carried to the pleura by the lymph and blood stream. Pleural plaques are an endemic disorder. The traditional view that lesions are post-tuberculous appears, in the region submitted to this study, to be a possible explanation. Images PMID:5465601

  7. La pelade par plaques

    PubMed Central

    Spano, Frank; Donovan, Jeff C.

    2015-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Présenter aux médecins de famille des renseignements de base pour faire comprendre les schémas thérapeutiques et les résultats des traitements pour la pelade par plaques, de même que les aider à identifier les patients pour qui une demande de consultation en dermatologie pourrait s’imposer. Sources des données Une recension a été effectuée dans PubMed pour trouver des articles pertinents concernant le traitement de la pelade par plaques. Message principal La pelade par plaques est une forme auto-immune de perte pileuse qui touche à la fois les enfants et les adultes. Même s’il n’y a pas de mortalité associée à la maladie, la morbidité découlant des effets psychologiques de la perte des cheveux peut être dévastatrice. Lorsque la pelade par plaques et le sous-type de la maladie sont identifiés, un schéma thérapeutique approprié peut être amorcé pour aider à arrêter la chute des cheveux et possiblement faire commencer la repousse. Les traitements de première intention sont la triamcinolone intralésionnelle avec des corticostéroïdes topiques ou du minoxidil ou les 2. Les médecins de famille peuvent prescrire ces traitements en toute sécurité et amorcer ces thérapies. Les cas plus avancés ou réfractaires pourraient avoir besoin de diphénylcyclopropénone topique ou d’anthraline topique. On peut traiter la perte de cils avec des analogues de la prostaglandine. Les personnes ayant subi une perte de cheveux abondante peuvent recourir à des options de camouflage ou à des prothèses capillaires. Il est important de surveiller les troubles psychiatriques en raison des effets psychologiques profonds de la perte de cheveux. Conclusion Les médecins de famille verront de nombreux patients qui perdent leurs cheveux. La reconnaissance de la pelade par plaques et la compréhension du processus pathologique sous-jacent permettent d’amorcer un schéma thérapeutique approprié. Les cas plus graves ou réfractaires doivent être identifiés pour qu’une demande de consultation en dermatologie soit demandée au besoin.

  8. La pelade par plaques

    PubMed Central

    Spano, Frank; Donovan, Jeff C.

    2015-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Présenter aux médecins de famille des renseignements de base pour faire comprendre l’épidémiologie, la pathogenèse, l’histologie et l’approche clinique au diagnostic de la pelade par plaques. Sources des données Une recension a été effectuée dans PubMed pour trouver des articles pertinents concernant la pathogenèse, le diagnostic et le pronostic de la pelade par plaques. Message principal La pelade par plaques est une forme de perte pileuse auto-immune dont la prévalence durant une vie est d’environ 2 %. Des antécédents personnels ou familiaux de troubles auto-immuns concomitants, comme le vitiligo ou une maladie de la thyroïde, peuvent être observés dans un petit sous-groupe de patients. Le diagnostic peut souvent être posé de manière clinique en se fondant sur la perte de cheveux non cicatricielle et circulaire caractéristique, accompagnée de cheveux en « point d’exclamation » en périphérie chez ceux dont le problème en est aux premiers stades. Le diagnostic des cas plus complexes ou des présentations inhabituelles peut être facilité par une biopsie et un examen histologique. Le pronostic varie largement et de mauvais résultats sont associés à une apparition à un âge précoce, une perte importante, la variante ophiasis, des changements aux ongles, des antécédents familiaux ou des troubles auto-immuns concomitants. Conclusion La pelade par plaques est une forme auto-immune de perte de cheveux périodiquement observée en soins primaires. Les médecins de famille sont bien placés pour identifier la pelade par plaques, déterminer la gravité de la maladie et poser le diagnostic différentiel approprié. De plus, ils sont en mesure de renseigner leurs patients à propos de l’évolution clinique de la maladie ainsi que du pronostic général selon le sous-type de patients.

  9. Pioneer F Plaque Location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Pioneer F spacecraft, destined to be the first man made object to escape from the solar system into interstellar space, carries this pictorial plaque. It is designed to show scientifically educated inhabitants of some other star system, who might intercept it millions of years from now, when Pioneer was launched, from where, and by what kind of beings. (Hopefully, any aliens reading the plaque will not use this knowledge to immediately invade Earth.) The design is etched into a 6 inch by 9 inch gold-anodized aluminum plate, attached to the spacecraft's attenna support struts in a position to help shield it from erosion by interstellar dust. The radiating lines at left represents the positions of 14 pulsars, a cosmic source of radio energy, arranged to indicate our sun as the home star of our civilization. The '1-' symbols at the ends of the lines are binary numbers that represent the frequencies of these pulsars at the time of launch of Pioneer F relative of that to the hydrogen atom shown at the upper left with a '1' unity symbol. The hydrogen atom is thus used as a 'universal clock,' and the regular decrease in the frequencies of the pulsars will enable another civilization to determine the time that has elapsed since Pioneer F was launched. The hydrogen is also used as a 'universal yardstick' for sizing the human figures and outline of the spacecraft shown on the right. The hydrogen wavelength, about 8 inches, multiplied by the binary number representing '8' shown next to the woman gives her height, 64 inches. The figures represent the type of creature that created Pioneer. The man's hand is raised in a gesture of good will. Across the bottom are the planets, ranging outward from the Sun, with the spacecraft trajectory arching away from Earth, passing Mars, and swinging by Jupiter.

  10. Making a Lightweight Battery Plaque

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, M. A.; Post, R. E.; Soltis, D.

    1986-01-01

    Plaque formed in porous plastic by electroless plating. Lightweight plaque prepared by electroless plating of porous plastic contains embedded wire or expanded metal grid. Plastic may or may not be filled with soluble pore former. If it contains soluble pore former, treated to remove soluble pore former and increase porosity. Porous plastic then clamped into rig that allows plating solutions to flow through plastic. Lightweight nickel plaque used as electrode substrate for alkaline batteries, chiefly Ni and Cd electrodes, and for use as electrolyte-reservoir plates for fuel cells.

  11. Disappearance of La Caille Plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-04-01

    A bronze plaque erected to the memory of N.-L. de La Caille near the site of his observatory in Central Cape Town, has been stolen by metal thieves. It was designed by the famous architect Sir Herbert Baker.

  12. Dental plaque identification at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... special tablets that contain a red dye that stains the plaque. One tablet is chewed thoroughly, moving ... this method is that it leaves no pink stains in the mouth. In the office, dentists are ...

  13. Rationale of mechanical plaque control.

    PubMed

    Westfelt, E

    1996-03-01

    Patients who have received extensive periodontal treatment also demonstrate a high susceptibility to periodontal disease. Maintenance of periodontal health following therapy includes a lifelong supportive care consisting of daily removal of the microbial plaque by the patient, supplemented by professional care in an individually designed programme. Mechanical supragingival plaque control by self care is of utmost importance. The goal is to create a positive attitude by information and motivation to give the patient knowledge and confidence. The patient should be advised to use appropriate aids and technique. A soft brush, an interspace brush, interdental tooth brushes or tooth picks are recommended in periodontal patients. Professional tooth cleaning involves removal of supragingival plaque from all tooth surfaces using mechanically driven instruments and fluoride prophy paste and, when indicated, removal of calculus and subgingival plaque. Disclosing solution is used to visualize the plaque to the patient and to the clinician in order to reinforce instruction in oral hygiene. Oral hygiene measures alone seem to have limited effect on subgingival microflora in cases of severe disease. In shallow and moderately deep pockets a good plaque control can change the subgingival flora towards a more "healthy" composition. Subgingival plaque removal is performed with hand- and/or ultrasonic instruments. Cracks within the cementum, grooves, fissures, resorption lacunae, furcations may create difficulties in cleaning the root surface. Ultrasonic instrumentation has a beneficial effect in creating a smooth surface without extensive removal of cementum. Besides, the cavitational activity contributes to plaque removal which makes the instrument further suitable during maintenance therapy. The result of the debridement is assessed on the healing response in the tissues. The frequency of maintenance visits must be given on an individual basis according to the needs of every special patient. The visit includes plaque evaluation (disclosion), oral hygiene instruction, probing depth measurements, registration of bleeding on probing, scaling (plaque removal) if indicated, tooth polishing, fluoride application and radiographs if indicated. The goal is to identify and treat signs of recurrence of periodontal disease in order to prevent further loss of attachment. PMID:8707987

  14. Regulation of atherosclerotic plaque inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bck, M; Weber, C; Lutgens, E

    2015-11-01

    The immune reactions that regulate atherosclerotic plaque inflammation involve chemokines, lipid mediators and costimulatory molecules. Chemokines are a family of chemotactic cytokines that mediate immune cell recruitment and control cell homeostasis and activation of different immune cell types and subsets. Chemokine production and activation of chemokine receptors form a positive feedback mechanism to recruit monocytes, neutrophils and lymphocytes into the atherosclerotic plaque. In addition, chemokine signalling affects immune cell mobilization from the bone marrow. Targeting several of the chemokines and/or chemokine receptors reduces experimental atherosclerosis, whereas specific chemokine pathways appear to be involved in plaque regression. Leukotrienes are lipid mediators that are formed locally in atherosclerotic lesions from arachidonic acid. Leukotrienes mediate immune cell recruitment and activation within the plaque as well as smooth muscle cell proliferation and endothelial dysfunction. Antileukotrienes decrease experimental atherosclerosis, and recent observational data suggest beneficial clinical effects of leukotriene receptor antagonism in cardiovascular disease prevention. By contrast, other lipid mediators, such as lipoxins and metabolites of omega-3 fatty acids, have been associated with the resolution of inflammation. Costimulatory molecules play a central role in fine-tuning immunological reactions and mediate crosstalk between innate and adaptive immunity in atherosclerosis. Targeting these interactions is a promising approach for the treatment of atherosclerosis, but immunological side effects are still a concern. In summary, targeting chemokines, leukotriene receptors and costimulatory molecules could represent potential therapeutic strategies to control atherosclerotic plaque inflammation. PMID:25823439

  15. Progress in atherosclerotic plaque imaging

    PubMed Central

    Soloperto, Giulia; Casciaro, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the primary cause of mortality in the industrialized world, and arterial obstruction, triggered by rupture-prone atherosclerotic plaques, lead to myocardial infarction and cerebral stroke. Vulnerable plaques do not necessarily occur with flow-limiting stenosis, thus conventional luminographic assessment of the pathology fails to identify unstable lesions. In this review we discuss the currently available imaging modalities used to investigate morphological features and biological characteristics of the atherosclerotic plaque. The different imaging modalities such as ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, nuclear imaging and their intravascular applications are illustrated, highlighting their specific diagnostic potential. Clinically available and upcoming methodologies are also reviewed along with the related challenges in their clinical translation, concerning the specific invasiveness, accuracy and cost-effectiveness of these methods. PMID:22937215

  16. Imaging Atherosclerosis and Vulnerable Plaque

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Mehran M.; Glover, David K.; Lanza, Gregory M.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Johnson, Lynne L.

    2010-01-01

    Identifying patients at high risk for an acute cardiovascular event such as myocardial infarction or stroke and assessing the total atherosclerotic burden are clinically important. Currently available imaging modalities can delineate vascular wall anatomy and, with novel probes, target biologic processes important in plaque evolution and plaque stability. Expansion of the vessel wall involving remodeling of the extracellular matrix can be imaged, as can angiogenesis of the vasa vasorum, plaque inflammation, and fibrin deposits on early nonocclusive vascular thrombosis. Several imaging platforms are available for targeted vascular imaging to acquire information on both anatomy and pathobiology in the same imaging session using either hybrid technology (nuclear combined with CT) or MRI combined with novel probes targeting processes identified by molecular biology to be of importance. This article will discuss the current state of the art of these modalities and challenges to clinical translation. PMID:20395341

  17. Molecular Imaging of Plaque Vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Sina; Vashist, Aseem; Sadeghi, Mehran M.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade significant progress has been made in the development of novel imaging strategies focusing on the biology of the vessel wall for identification of vulnerable plaques. While the majority of these studies are still in the preclinical stage, few techniques (e.g., 18F-FDG and 18F-NaF PET imaging) have already been evaluated in clinical studies with promising results. Here, we will briefly review the pathobiology of atherosclerosis and discuss molecular imaging strategies that have been developed to target these events, with an emphasis on mechanisms that are associated with atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability. PMID:25124827

  18. Inhibiting macrophage proliferation suppresses atherosclerotic plaque inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jun; Lobatto, Mark E.; Hassing, Laurien; van der Staay, Susanne; van Rijs, Sarian M.; Calcagno, Claudia; Braza, Mounia S.; Baxter, Samantha; Fay, Francois; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L.; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Sager, Hendrik B.; Astudillo, Yaritzy M.; Leong, Wei; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Storm, Gert; Pérez-Medina, Carlos; Reiner, Thomas; Cormode, David P.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Swirski, Filip K.; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Fisher, Edward A.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation drives atherosclerotic plaque progression and rupture, and is a compelling therapeutic target. Consequently, attenuating inflammation by reducing local macrophage accumulation is an appealing approach. This can potentially be accomplished by either blocking blood monocyte recruitment to the plaque or increasing macrophage apoptosis and emigration. Because macrophage proliferation was recently shown to dominate macrophage accumulation in advanced plaques, locally inhibiting macrophage proliferation may reduce plaque inflammation and produce long-term therapeutic benefits. To test this hypothesis, we used nanoparticle-based delivery of simvastatin to inhibit plaque macrophage proliferation in apolipoprotein E–deficient mice (Apoe−/−) with advanced atherosclerotic plaques. This resulted in the rapid reduction of plaque inflammation and favorable phenotype remodeling. We then combined this short-term nanoparticle intervention with an 8-week oral statin treatment, and this regimen rapidly reduced and continuously suppressed plaque inflammation. Our results demonstrate that pharmacologically inhibiting local macrophage proliferation can effectively treat inflammation in atherosclerosis. PMID:26295063

  19. Ultrasound Tissue Characterization of Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaque

    PubMed Central

    Picano, Eugenio; Paterni, Marco

    2015-01-01

    A thrombotic occlusion of the vessel fed by ruptured coronary atherosclerotic plaque may result in unstable angina, myocardial infarction or death, whereas embolization from a plaque in carotid arteries may result in transient ischemic attack or stroke. The atherosclerotic plaque prone to such clinical events is termed high-risk or vulnerable plaque, and its identification in humans before it becomes symptomatic has been elusive to date. Ultrasonic tissue characterization of the atherosclerotic plaque is possible with different techniques—such as vascular, transesophageal, and intravascular ultrasound—on a variety of arterial segments, including carotid, aorta, and coronary districts. The image analysis can be based on visual, video-densitometric or radiofrequency methods and identifies three distinct textural patterns: hypo-echoic (corresponding to lipid- and hemorrhage-rich plaque), iso- or moderately hyper-echoic (fibrotic or fibro-fatty plaque), and markedly hyperechoic with shadowing (calcific plaque). Hypoechoic or dishomogeneous plaques, with spotty microcalcification and large plaque burden, with plaque neovascularization and surface irregularities by contrast-enhanced ultrasound, are more prone to clinical complications than hyperechoic, extensively calcified, homogeneous plaques with limited plaque burden, smooth luminal plaque surface and absence of neovascularization. Plaque ultrasound morphology is important, along with plaque geometry, in determining the atherosclerotic prognostic burden in the individual patient. New quantitative methods beyond backscatter (to include speed of sound, attenuation, strain, temperature, and high order statistics) are under development to evaluate vascular tissues. Although not yet ready for widespread clinical use, tissue characterization is listed by the American Society of Echocardiography roadmap to 2020 as one of the most promising fields of application in cardiovascular ultrasound imaging, offering unique opportunities for the early detection and treatment of atherosclerotic disease. PMID:25950760

  20. Imaging Atherosclerosis and Risk of Plaque Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, Eric A; Jaffer, Farouc A

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis imaging strategies can delineate characteristics of plaques at risk of rupture and thrombosis. Structural plaque imaging identifies high-risk plaque features including lipid pools, thin fibrous caps, and intraplaque hemorrhage, among others. New molecular imaging techniques complement structural imaging approaches by illuminating important features of plaque biology, with a prominent focus on detecting inflammation as a high-risk phenotype. As we unravel the molecular and structural characteristics underlying thrombosis-prone plaques, there is significant promise for eventual early identification and prediction of atherosclerotic plaque complications before they occur. Here we focus on recent imaging insights into high-risk arterial plaques, the etiologic agent of acute myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and sudden cardiac death. PMID:23982263

  1. The riddle of Randall's plaques.

    PubMed

    Prien, E L

    1975-10-01

    Randall described a pre-calculus lesion of the renal papilla in the 1930s and this was substantiated by others during the next decade and then largely ignored. This insignificant subepithelial calcification of the renal papilla. Randall's plaque type I, becomes the nucleus of at least 15% of calcium oxalate calculi, as demonstrated by apatite nuclei existing in papillary depression on the external stone surface. Cross section study of the stone demonstrates the peripheral nucleus with eccentric lamination postulating a mural origin. Contrariwise, study of the stone developing upon a nucleus originating in the papillary ducts (without producing obstruction) or out in the calix demonstrates a central nucleus surrounded by concentric laminations or lack of a mural origin, the more common type of calcium oxalate stone structure. Obstruction of the papillary ducts by hyperexcretion of stone salt may result in anemic infarction and sloughing of the apex of the papilla. Data concerning the prevalence of Randall's plaques in the population have been reviewed. Evidence of the incidence of calcium oxalate calculi that have developed upon Randall's plaques has been presented. A plea for further study of the pathology of the renal papilla has been voiced. PMID:1235369

  2. Bacterial sex in dental plaque

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ingar; Tribble, Gena D.; Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Wang, Bing-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Genes are transferred between bacteria in dental plaque by transduction, conjugation, and transformation. Membrane vesicles can also provide a mechanism for horizontal gene transfer. DNA transfer is considered bacterial sex, but the transfer is not parallel to processes that we associate with sex in higher organisms. Several examples of bacterial gene transfer in the oral cavity are given in this review. How frequently this occurs in dental plaque is not clear, but evidence suggests that it affects a number of the major genera present. It has been estimated that new sequences in genomes established through horizontal gene transfer can constitute up to 30% of bacterial genomes. Gene transfer can be both inter- and intrageneric, and it can also affect transient organisms. The transferred DNA can be integrated or recombined in the recipient's chromosome or remain as an extrachromosomal inheritable element. This can make dental plaque a reservoir for antimicrobial resistance genes. The ability to transfer DNA is important for bacteria, making them better adapted to the harsh environment of the human mouth, and promoting their survival, virulence, and pathogenicity. PMID:23741559

  3. Biomechanics and Inflammation in Atherosclerotic Plaque Erosion and Plaque Rupture: Implications for Cardiovascular Events in Women

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Ian C.; Suever, Jonathan D.; Timmins, Lucas H.; Veneziani, Alessandro; Vito, Raymond P.; Virmani, Renu; Oshinski, John N.; Taylor, W. Robert

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although plaque erosion causes approximately 40% of all coronary thrombi and disproportionally affects women more than men, its mechanism is not well understood. The role of tissue mechanics in plaque rupture and regulation of mechanosensitive inflammatory proteins is well established, but their role in plaque erosion is unknown. Given obvious differences in morphology between plaque erosion and rupture, we hypothesized that inflammation in general as well as the association between local mechanical strain and inflammation known to exist in plaque rupture may not occur in plaque erosion. Therefore, our objective was to determine if similar mechanisms underlie plaque rupture and plaque erosion. Methods and Results We studied a total of 74 human coronary plaque specimens obtained at autopsy. Using lesion-specific computer modeling of solid mechanics, we calculated the stress and strain distribution for each plaque and determined if there were any relationships with markers of inflammation. Consistent with previous studies, inflammatory markers were positively associated with increasing strain in specimens with rupture and thin-cap fibroatheromas. Conversely, overall staining for inflammatory markers and apoptosis were significantly lower in erosion, and there was no relationship with mechanical strain. Samples with plaque erosion most closely resembled those with the stable phenotype of thick-cap fibroatheromas. Conclusions In contrast to classic plaque rupture, plaque erosion was not associated with markers of inflammation and mechanical strain. These data suggest that plaque erosion is a distinct pathophysiological process with a different etiology and therefore raises the possibility that a different therapeutic approach may be required to prevent plaque erosion. PMID:25365517

  4. Advanced MRI for carotid plaque imaging.

    PubMed

    Singh, Navneet; Moody, Alan R; Roifman, Idan; Bluemke, David A; Zavodni, Anna E H

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the ubiquitous underling pathological process that manifests in heart attack and stroke, cumulating in the death of one in three North American adults. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is able to delineate atherosclerotic plaque components and total plaque burden within the carotid arteries. Using dedicated hardware, high resolution images can be obtained. Combining pre- and post-contrast T1, T2, proton-density, and magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo weighted fat-saturation imaging, plaque components can be defined. Post-processing software allows for semi- and fully automated quantitative analysis. Imaging correlation with surgical specimens suggests that this technique accurately differentiates plaque features. Total plaque burden and specific plaque components such as a thin fibrous cap, large fatty or necrotic core and intraplaque hemorrhage are accepted markers of neuroischemic events. Given the systemic nature of atherosclerosis, emerging science suggests that the presence of carotid plaque is also an indicator of coronary artery plaque burden, although the preliminary data primarily involves patients with stable coronary disease. While the availability and cost-effectiveness of MRI will ultimately be important determinants of whether carotid MRI is adopted clinically in cardiovascular risk assessment, the high accuracy and reliability of this technique suggests that it has potential as an imaging biomarker of future risk. PMID:26293362

  5. Acute coronary syndromes without coronary plaque rupture.

    PubMed

    Kanwar, Siddak S; Stone, Gregg W; Singh, Mandeep; Virmani, Renu; Olin, Jeffrey; Akasaka, Takashi; Narula, Jagat

    2016-05-01

    The latest advances in plaque imaging have provided clinicians with opportunities to treat acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and provide individualized treatment recommendations based not only on clinical manifestations, angiographic characteristics, and biomarker data, but also on the findings of plaque morphology. Although a substantial proportion of ACS events originate from plaques with an intact fibrous cap (IFC), clinicians predominantly equate ACS with plaque rupture arising from thin-cap fibroatheromas. In this Review, we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of plaque morphology in ACS with IFC, reviewing contemporary data from intravascular imaging. We also explore whether use of such imaging might provide a roadmap for more effective management of patients with ACS. PMID:26911330

  6. Fibrillar Amyloid Plaque Formation Precedes Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Steinbach, Sonja; Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Herms, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), hallmark β-amyloid deposits are characterized by the presence of activated microglia around them. Despite an extensive characterization of the relation of amyloid plaques with microglia, little is known about the initiation of this interaction. In this study, the detailed investigation of very small plaques in brain slices in AD transgenic mice of the line APP-PS1(dE9) revealed different levels of microglia recruitment. Analysing plaques with a diameter of up to 10 μm we find that only the half are associated with clear morphologically activated microglia. Utilizing in vivo imaging of new appearing amyloid plaques in double-transgenic APP-PS1(dE9)xCX3CR1+/- mice further characterized the dynamic of morphological microglia activation. We observed no correlation of morphological microglia activation and plaque volume or plaque lifetime. Taken together, our results demonstrate a very prominent variation in size as well as in lifetime of new plaques relative to the state of microglia reaction. These observations might question the existing view that amyloid deposits by themselves are sufficient to attract and activate microglia in vivo. PMID:25799372

  7. Multidetector row computed tomography may accurately estimate plaque vulnerability: does MDCT accurately estimate plaque vulnerability? (Pro).

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Sei; Imai, Atsuko; Kodama, Kazuhisa

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) has become the most reliable and established of the noninvasive examination techniques for detecting coronary heart disease. Now MDCT is chasing intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) in terms of spatial resolution. Among the components of vulnerable plaque, MDCT may detect lipid-rich plaque, the lipid pool, and calcified spots using computed tomography number. Plaque components are detected by MDCT with high accuracy compared with IVUS and angioscopy when assessing vulnerable plaque. The TWINS study and TOGETHAR trial demonstrated that angioscopic loss of yellow color occurred independently of volumetric plaque change by statin therapy. These 2 studies showed that plaque stabilization and regression reflect independent processes mediated by different mechanisms and time course. Noncalcified plaque and/or low-density plaque was found to be the strongest predictor of cardiac events, regardless of lesion severity, and act as a potential marker of plaque vulnerability. MDCT may be an effective tool for early triage of patients with chest pain who have a normal ECG and cardiac enzymes in the emergency department. MDCT has the potential ability to analyze coronary plaque quantitatively and qualitatively if some problems are resolved. MDCT may become an essential tool for detecting and preventing coronary artery disease in the future. PMID:21532180

  8. Symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid artery plaque

    PubMed Central

    Mughal, Majid M; Khan, Mohsin K; DeMarco, J Kevin; Majid, Arshad; Shamoun, Fadi; Abela, George S

    2011-01-01

    Carotid atherosclerotic plaques represent both stable and unstable atheromatous lesions. Atherosclerotic plaques that are prone to rupture owing to their intrinsic composition such as a large lipid core, thin fibrous cap and intraplaque hemorrhage are associated with subsequent thromboembolic ischemic events. At least 15–20% of all ischemic strokes are attributable to carotid artery atherosclerosis. Characterization of plaques may enhance the understanding of natural history and ultimately the treatment of atherosclerotic disease. MRI of carotid plaque and embolic signals during transcranial Doppler have identified features beyond luminal stenosis that are predictive of future transient ischemic attacks and stroke. The value of specific therapies to prevent stroke in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with severe carotid artery stenosis are the subject of current research and analysis of recently published clinical trials that are discussed in this article. PMID:21985544

  9. Vascular MR segmentation: wall and plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fuxing; Holzapfel, Gerhard; Schulze-Bauer, Christian; Stollberger, Rudolf; Thedens, Daniel; Bolinger, Lizann; Stolpen, Alan; Sonka, Milan

    2003-05-01

    Cardiovascular events frequently result from local rupture of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque. Non-invasive assessment of plaque vulnerability is needed to allow institution of preventive measures before heart attack or stroke occur. A computerized method for segmentation of arterial wall layers and plaque from high-resolution volumetric MR images is reported. The method uses dynamic programming to detect optimal borders in each MRI frame. The accuracy of the results was tested in 62 T1-weighted MR images from 6 vessel specimens in comparison to borders manually determined by an expert observer. The mean signed border positioning errors for the lumen, internal elastic lamina, and external elastic lamina borders were -0.12+/-0.14 mm, 0.04+/-0.12mm, and -0.15+/-0.13 mm, respectively. The presented wall layer segmentation approach is one of the first steps towards non-invasive assessment of plaque vulnerability in atherosclerotic subjects.

  10. A new inexpensive customized plaque for choroidal melanoma iodine-125 plaque therapy.

    PubMed

    Vine, A K; Tenhaken, R K; Diaz, R F; Maxson, B B; Lichter, A S

    1989-04-01

    The authors have developed a new inexpensive precious metal alloy plaque for use in customized iodine-125 plaque therapy. Each plaque is formed from two flat circular gold/palladium foils which are used in dental crown work. Using a simple manual mechanism, the two forms are stamped over a customized acrylic die shaped to the dimensions of the tumor base plus a 2-mm margin. Completed plaques consist of a back wall, a 2-mm side wall, and a 1.5-mm wide lip with holes for suture placement. Advantages include: simple construction from inexpensive components, customized shape, and iodine seeds that are readily visible on plane radiographs. PMID:2726186

  11. Detection of High-Risk Atherosclerotic Plaque

    PubMed Central

    Fleg, Jerome L.; Stone, Gregg W.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Granada, Juan F.; Hatsukami, Thomas S.; Kolodgie, Frank D.; Ohayon, Jacques; Pettigrew, Roderic; Sabatine, Marc S.; Tearney, Guillermo; Waxman, Sergio; Domanski, Michael J.; Srinivas, Pothur R.; Narula, Jagat

    2013-01-01

    The leading cause of major morbidity and mortality in most countries around the world is atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, most commonly caused by thrombotic occlusion of a high-risk coronary plaque resulting in myocardial infarction or cardiac death, or embolization from a high-risk carotid plaque resulting in stroke. The lesions prone to result in such clinical events are termed vulnerable or high-risk plaques, and their identification may lead to the development of pharmacological and mechanical intervention strategies to prevent such events. Autopsy studies from patients dying of acute myocardial infarction or sudden death have shown that such events typically arise from specific types of atherosclerotic plaques, most commonly the thin-cap fibroatheroma. However, the search in human beings for vulnerable plaques before their becoming symptomatic has been elusive. Recently, the PROSPECT (Providing Regional Observations to Study Predictors of Events in the Coronary Tree) study demonstrated that coronary plaques that are likely to cause future cardiac events, regardless of angiographic severity, are characterized by large plaque burden and small lumen area and/or are thin-cap fibroatheromas verified by radiofrequency intravascular ultrasound imaging. This study opened the door to identifying additional invasive and noninvasive imaging modalities that may improve detection of high-risk atherosclerotic lesions and patients. Beyond classic risk factors, novel biomarkers and genetic profiling may identify those patients in whom noninvasive imaging for vulnerable plaque screening, followed by invasive imaging for risk confirmation is warranted, and in whom future pharmacological and/or device-based focal or regional therapies may be applied to improve long-term prognosis. PMID:22974808

  12. Studies of the rickettsial plaque assay technique.

    PubMed

    Wike, D A; Tallent, G; Peacock, M G; Ormsbee, R A

    1972-05-01

    A plaque assay system for pathogenic rickettsiae, which utilizes primary chick embryo tissue cultures, is described. It proved to be a highly reproducible measure of infectiousness for Rickettsia rickettsi and R. typhi, which were employed in most studies; as well as for R. canada, R. prowazeki, R. sibirica, R. akari, R. conori, and Coxiella burneti. Plaque-forming units (PFU) were compared to direct rickettsial counts and to 50% infectious dose (ID(50)) values for embryonated eggs, mice, and guinea pigs. Plaque size, appearance, and number were influenced by diluent, incubation temperature after nutrient overlay, centrifugation of inoculated tissue cultures, and number of host cells planted initially in each flask. The most critical factors in plaque formation were diluent used in making rickettsial suspensions and incubation temperature (32 C) after nutrient overlay. Brain Heart Infusion was the only diluent capable of preventing significant delay in plaque formation and decreases in PFU and mouse ID(50). Plaque formation was unaffected by genetic background of host cells, volume of inoculum, temperature and length of incubation period before nutrient overlay, and rapid freezing and thawing of rickettsial seed. Centrifugation of inoculated cultures at 600 x g resulted in 100% irreversible absorption of rickettsiae to host cells within 5 min, whereas without centrifugation at least 4 hr was required to achieve the same effect. PMID:4629250

  13. Studies of the Rickettsial Plaque Assay Technique

    PubMed Central

    Wike, David A.; Tallent, George; Peacock, Marius G.; Ormsbee, Richard A.

    1972-01-01

    A plaque assay system for pathogenic rickettsiae, which utilizes primary chick embryo tissue cultures, is described. It proved to be a highly reproducible measure of infectiousness for Rickettsia rickettsi and R. typhi, which were employed in most studies; as well as for R. canada, R. prowazeki, R. sibirica, R. akari, R. conori, and Coxiella burneti. Plaque-forming units (PFU) were compared to direct rickettsial counts and to 50% infectious dose (ID50) values for embryonated eggs, mice, and guinea pigs. Plaque size, appearance, and number were influenced by diluent, incubation temperature after nutrient overlay, centrifugation of inoculated tissue cultures, and number of host cells planted initially in each flask. The most critical factors in plaque formation were diluent used in making rickettsial suspensions and incubation temperature (32 C) after nutrient overlay. Brain Heart Infusion was the only diluent capable of preventing significant delay in plaque formation and decreases in PFU and mouse ID50. Plaque formation was unaffected by genetic background of host cells, volume of inoculum, temperature and length of incubation period before nutrient overlay, and rapid freezing and thawing of rickettsial seed. Centrifugation of inoculated cultures at 600 × g resulted in 100% irreversible absorption of rickettsiae to host cells within 5 min, whereas without centrifugation at least 4 hr was required to achieve the same effect. Images PMID:4629250

  14. Improved treatment planning for COMS eye plaques

    SciTech Connect

    Astrahan, Melvin A. . E-mail: astrahan@usc.edu

    2005-03-15

    Purpose: A recent reanalysis of the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS) medium tumor trial concluded that incorporating factors to account for anisotropy, line source approximation, the gold plaque, and attenuation in the Silastic seed carrier into the dose calculations resulted in a significant and consistent reduction of calculated doses to structures of interest within the eye. The authors concluded that future eye plaque dosimetry should be 'performed using the most up-to-date parameters available.' The reason these factors are important is attributable to the low energy {sup 125}I radiation (approximately 28 keV) that is primarily absorbed by the photoelectric process. Photoelectric absorption is quite dependent on the atomic composition of the absorbing material. Being 40% silicon by weight, the effective atomic number of Silastic is significantly greater than that of water. Although the AAPM TG43 brachytherapy formalism inherently addresses the issues of source anisotropy and geometry, its parameter that accounts for scatter and attenuation, the radial dose function g(r), assumes that the source is immersed in infinite homogeneous water. In this work, factors are proposed for {sup 125}I that correct for attenuation in the Silastic carrier and scatter deficits resulting from the gold plaque and nearby air. The implications of using {sup 103}Pd seeds in COMS plaques are also discussed. Methods and materials: An existing TG43-based ophthalmic plaque planning system was modified to incorporate additional scatter and attenuation correction factors that better account for the path length of primary radiation in the Silastic seed carrier and the distance between the dose calculation point and the eye-air interface. Results: Compared with homogeneous water, the dose-modifying effects of the Silastic and gold are greatest near the plaque surface and immediately adjacent to the plaque, while being least near the center of the eye. The calculated dose distribution surrounding a single {sup 125}I seed centered in a COMS 20 mm plaque was found to be consistent with previously published examples that used thermoluminescent dosimetry measurements and Monte Carlo methods. For fully loaded 12 and 20 mm plaques, calculated dose to critical ocular structures ranged from 16%-50% less than would have been reported using the standard COMS dose calculation protocol. Conclusions: Treatment planning for COMS eye plaques that accurately accounts for the presence of the gold, Silastic and extraocular air is both possible and practical.

  15. Amyloid Plaques in PSAPP Mice Bind Less Metal than Plaques in Human Alzheimer's Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Leskovjan, A.; Lanzirotti, A; Miller, L

    2009-01-01

    Amyloid beta (A{Beta}) is the primary component of Alzheimer's disease (AD) plaques, a key pathological feature of the disease. Metal ions of zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), and calcium (Ca) are elevated in human amyloid plaques and are thought to be involved in neurodegeneration. Transgenic mouse models of AD also exhibit amyloid plaques, but fail to exhibit the high degree of neurodegeneration observed in humans. In this study, we imaged the Zn, Cu, Fe, and Ca ion distribution in the PSAPP transgenic mouse model representing end-stage AD (N = 6) using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobe. In order to account for differences in density in the plaques, the relative protein content was imaged with synchrotron Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM) on the same samples. FTIRM results revealed a 61% increase in protein content in the plaques compared to the surrounding tissue. After normalizing to protein density, we found that the PSAPP plaques contained only a 29% increase in Zn and there was actually less Cu, Fe, and Ca in the plaque compared to the surrounding tissue. Since metal binding to A{beta} is thought to induce redox chemistry that is toxic to neurons, the reduced metal binding in PSAPP mice is consistent with the lack of neurodegeneration in these animals. These findings were in stark contrast to the high metal ion content observed in human AD plaques, further implicating the role of metal ions in human AD pathology.

  16. Chemical agents for the control of plaque and plaque microflora: an overview.

    PubMed

    Gaffar, A; Afflitto, J; Nabi, N

    1997-10-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the technologies available for the chemical control of plaque. It is generally accepted that the formation of dental plaque at the interfaces of tooth/gingiva is one of the major causes of gingival inflammation and dental caries. Several therapeutic approaches have been used to control dental plaque and supragingival infections. These include fluoride preparations such as stannous fluoride, oxygenating agents, anti-attachment agents, and cationic and non-cationic antibacterial agents. Among the fluoride preparations, stable stannous fluoride pastes and gels have been shown to reduce supragingival plaque, gingivitis, hypersensitivity and caries. The effect of the oxygenating agents on the supragingival plaque has been equivocal, but recent data indicate that a stable agent which provides sustained active oxygen release is effective in controlling plaque. A polymer, PVPA, which reduced attachment of bacteria to teeth was shown to significantly reduce plaque formation in humans. A new generation of antibacterials includes non-ionics such as triclosan, which in combination with a special polymer delivery system, has been shown to reduce plaque, gingivitis, supragingival calculus and dental caries in long-term studies conducted around the world. Unlike the first generation of agents, the triclosan/copolymer/sodium fluoride system is effective in long-term clinicals and does not cause staining of teeth, increase in calculus, or disturbance in the oral microbial ecology. PMID:9395116

  17. DECT evaluation of noncalcified coronary artery plaque

    SciTech Connect

    Ravanfar Haghighi, Rezvan; Chatterjee, S.; Tabin, Milo; Singh, Rishi P.; Sharma, Munish; Krishna, Karthik; Sharma, Sanjiv; Jagia, Priya; Ray, Ruma; Arava, Sudhir; Yadav, Rakesh; Vani, V. C.; Lakshmi, R.; Kumar, Pratik; Mandal, Susama R.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Composition of the coronary artery plaque is known to have critical role in heart attack. While calcified plaque can easily be diagnosed by conventional CT, it fails to distinguish between fibrous and lipid rich plaques. In the present paper, the authors discuss the experimental techniques and obtain a numerical algorithm by which the electron density (ρ{sub e}) and the effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) can be obtained from the dual energy computed tomography (DECT) data. The idea is to use this inversion method to characterize and distinguish between the lipid and fibrous coronary artery plaques. Methods: For the purpose of calibration of the CT machine, the authors prepare aqueous samples whose calculated values of (ρ{sub e}, Z{sub eff}) lie in the range of (2.65 × 10{sup 23} ≤ ρ{sub e} ≤ 3.64 × 10{sup 23}/cm{sup 3}) and (6.80 ≤ Z{sub eff} ≤ 8.90). The authors fill the phantom with these known samples and experimentally determine HU(V{sub 1}) and HU(V{sub 2}), with V{sub 1},V{sub 2} = 100 and 140 kVp, for the same pixels and thus determine the coefficients of inversion that allow us to determine (ρ{sub e}, Z{sub eff}) from the DECT data. The HU(100) and HU(140) for the coronary artery plaque are obtained by filling the channel of the coronary artery with a viscous solution of methyl cellulose in water, containing 2% contrast. These (ρ{sub e}, Z{sub eff}) values of the coronary artery plaque are used for their characterization on the basis of theoretical models of atomic compositions of the plaque materials. These results are compared with histopathological report. Results: The authors find that the calibration gives ρ{sub e} with an accuracy of ±3.5% while Z{sub eff} is found within ±1% of the actual value, the confidence being 95%. The HU(100) and HU(140) are found to be considerably different for the same plaque at the same position and there is a linear trend between these two HU values. It is noted that pure lipid type plaques are practically nonexistent, and microcalcification, as observed in histopathology, has to be taken into account to explain the nature of the observed (ρ{sub e}, Z{sub eff}) data. This also enables us to judge the composition of the plaque in terms of basic model which considers the plaque to be composed of fibres, lipids, and microcalcification. Conclusions: This simple and reliable method has the potential as an effective modality to investigate the composition of noncalcified coronary artery plaques and thus help in their characterization. In this inversion method, (ρ{sub e}, Z{sub eff}) of the scanned sample can be found by eliminating the effects of the CT machine and also by ensuring that the determination of the two unknowns (ρ{sub e}, Z{sub eff}) does not interfere with each other and the nature of the plaque can be identified in terms of a three component model.

  18. Simulation of human atherosclerotic femoral plaque tissue: the influence of plaque material model on numerical results

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to the limited number of experimental studies that mechanically characterise human atherosclerotic plaque tissue from the femoral arteries, a recent trend has emerged in current literature whereby one set of material data based on aortic plaque tissue is employed to numerically represent diseased femoral artery tissue. This study aims to generate novel vessel-appropriate material models for femoral plaque tissue and assess the influence of using material models based on experimental data generated from aortic plaque testing to represent diseased femoral arterial tissue. Methods Novel material models based on experimental data generated from testing of atherosclerotic femoral artery tissue are developed and a computational analysis of the revascularisation of a quarter model idealised diseased femoral artery from a 90% diameter stenosis to a 10% diameter stenosis is performed using these novel material models. The simulation is also performed using material models based on experimental data obtained from aortic plaque testing in order to examine the effect of employing vessel appropriate material models versus those currently employed in literature to represent femoral plaque tissue. Results Simulations that employ material models based on atherosclerotic aortic tissue exhibit much higher maximum principal stresses within the plaque than simulations that employ material models based on atherosclerotic femoral tissue. Specifically, employing a material model based on calcified aortic tissue, instead of one based on heavily calcified femoral tissue, to represent diseased femoral arterial vessels results in a 487 fold increase in maximum principal stress within the plaque at a depth of 0.8 mm from the lumen. Conclusions Large differences are induced on numerical results as a consequence of employing material models based on aortic plaque, in place of material models based on femoral plaque, to represent a diseased femoral vessel. Due to these large discrepancies, future studies should seek to employ vessel-appropriate material models to simulate the response of diseased femoral tissue in order to obtain the most accurate numerical results. PMID:25602515

  19. Functional expression of dental plaque microbiota.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Scott N; Meissner, Tobias; Su, Andrew I; Snesrud, Erik; Ong, Ana C; Schork, Nicholas J; Bretz, Walter A

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries remains a significant public health problem and is considered pandemic worldwide. The prediction of dental caries based on profiling of microbial species involved in disease and equally important, the identification of species conferring dental health has proven more difficult than anticipated due to high interpersonal and geographical variability of dental plaque microbiota. We have used RNA-Seq to perform global gene expression analysis of dental plaque microbiota derived from 19 twin pairs that were either concordant (caries-active or caries-free) or discordant for dental caries. The transcription profiling allowed us to define a functional core microbiota consisting of nearly 60 species. Similarities in gene expression patterns allowed a preliminary assessment of the relative contribution of human genetics, environmental factors and caries phenotype on the microbiota's transcriptome. Correlation analysis of transcription allowed the identification of numerous functional networks, suggesting that inter-personal environmental variables may co-select for groups of genera and species. Analysis of functional role categories allowed the identification of dominant functions expressed by dental plaque biofilm communities, that highlight the biochemical priorities of dental plaque microbes to metabolize diverse sugars and cope with the acid and oxidative stress resulting from sugar fermentation. The wealth of data generated by deep sequencing of expressed transcripts enables a greatly expanded perspective concerning the functional expression of dental plaque microbiota. PMID:25177549

  20. Fatigue crack propagation analysis of plaque rupture.

    PubMed

    Pei, Xuan; Wu, Baijian; Li, Zhi-Yong

    2013-10-01

    Rupture of atheromatous plaque is the major cause of stroke or heart attack. Considering that the cardiovascular system is a classic fatigue environment, plaque rupture was treated as a chronic fatigue crack growth process in this study. Fracture mechanics theory was introduced to describe the stress status at the crack tip and Paris' law was used to calculate the crack growth rate. The effect of anatomical variation of an idealized plaque cross-section model was investigated. The crack initiation was considered to be either at the maximum circumferential stress location or at any other possible locations around the lumen. Although the crack automatically initialized at the maximum circumferential stress location usually propagated faster than others, it was not necessarily the most critical location where the fatigue life reached its minimum. We found that the fatigue life was minimum for cracks initialized in the following three regions: the midcap zone, the shoulder zone, and the backside zone. The anatomical variation has a significant influence on the fatigue life. Either a decrease in cap thickness or an increase in lipid pool size resulted in a significant decrease in fatigue life. Comparing to the previously used stress analysis, this fatigue model provides some possible explanations of plaque rupture at a low stress level in a pulsatile cardiovascular environment, and the method proposed here may be useful for further investigation of the mechanism of plaque rupture based on in vivo patient data. PMID:23897295

  1. Functional expression of dental plaque microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Scott N.; Meissner, Tobias; Su, Andrew I.; Snesrud, Erik; Ong, Ana C.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Bretz, Walter A.

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries remains a significant public health problem and is considered pandemic worldwide. The prediction of dental caries based on profiling of microbial species involved in disease and equally important, the identification of species conferring dental health has proven more difficult than anticipated due to high interpersonal and geographical variability of dental plaque microbiota. We have used RNA-Seq to perform global gene expression analysis of dental plaque microbiota derived from 19 twin pairs that were either concordant (caries-active or caries-free) or discordant for dental caries. The transcription profiling allowed us to define a functional core microbiota consisting of nearly 60 species. Similarities in gene expression patterns allowed a preliminary assessment of the relative contribution of human genetics, environmental factors and caries phenotype on the microbiota's transcriptome. Correlation analysis of transcription allowed the identification of numerous functional networks, suggesting that inter-personal environmental variables may co-select for groups of genera and species. Analysis of functional role categories allowed the identification of dominant functions expressed by dental plaque biofilm communities, that highlight the biochemical priorities of dental plaque microbes to metabolize diverse sugars and cope with the acid and oxidative stress resulting from sugar fermentation. The wealth of data generated by deep sequencing of expressed transcripts enables a greatly expanded perspective concerning the functional expression of dental plaque microbiota. PMID:25177549

  2. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound and detection of carotid plaque neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Kunte, Hagen; Schmidt, Charlotte; Harms, Lutz; Rückert, Ralph-Ingo; Grigoryev, Maria; Fischer, Thomas

    2012-11-13

    A 62-year-old man was admitted after recurrent transient left-sided weakness and sensory loss. Ultrasound (US) examination revealed a 70% narrowing of the right proximal internal carotid artery (ICA). Contrast-enhanced US suggested plaque neovascularization (figure, A). Carotid endarterectomy of the right ICA was performed. Immunohistochemistry of the specimen showed, corresponding to the US findings, extensive plaque neovascularization associated with dense macrophage infiltration (figure, B, C). Plaque neovascularization is associated with inflammation and plaque progression.(1) The detection of plaque neovascularization by contrast-enhanced US could give further evidence of plaque vulnerability, but further study is needed to determine its value. PMID:23150534

  3. Association between Randall's Plaque and Calcifying Nanoparticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciftcioglu, Neva; Vejdani, Kaveh; Lee, Olivia; Mathew, Grace; Aho, Katja M.; Kajander, Olavi; McKay, David S.; Jones, Jeff A.; Hayat, Matthew; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2007-01-01

    Randall's plaques, first described by Alexander Randall in the 1930s, are small subepithelial calcifications in the renal papillae (RP) that also extend deeply into the renal medulla. Despite the strong correlation between the presence of these plaques and the formation of renal stones, the precise origin and pathogenesis of Randall s plaque formation remain elusive. The discovery of calcifying nanoparticles (CNP) and their detection in many calcifying processes of human tissues has raised hypotheses about their possible involvement in renal stone formation. We collected RP and blood samples from 17 human patients who had undergone laparoscopic nephrectomy due to neoplasia. Homogenized RP tissues and serum samples were cultured for CNP. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis were performed on fixed RP samples. Immunohistochemical staining (IHS) was applied on the tissue samples using CNP-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb). Randall s plaques were visible on gross inspection in 11 out of 17 collected samples. Cultures of all serum samples and 13 tissue homogenates had CNP growth within 4 weeks. SEM revealed spherical apatite formations in 14 samples, with calcium and phosphate peaks detected by EDS analysis. IHS was positive in 9 out of 17 samples. A strong link was found between the presence of Randall s plaques and the detection of CNP, also referred to as nanobacteria. These results suggest new insights into the etiology of Randall's plaque formation, and will help us understand the pathogenesis of stone formation. Further studies on this topic may lead us to new approaches on early diagnosis and novel medical therapies of kidney stone formation.

  4. Statistical segmentation of carotid plaque neovascularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkus, Zeynettin; Bosch, Johan G.; Sánchez-Ferrero, Gonzalo V.; Carvalho, Diego D. B.; Renaud, Guillaume; van den Oord, Stijn C. H.; ten Kate, Gerrit L.; Schinkel, Arend F. L.; de Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.

    2013-03-01

    In several studies, intraplaque neovascularization (IPN) has been linked with plaque vulnerability. The recent development of contrast enhanced ultrasound enables IPN detection, but an accurate quantification of IPN is a big challenge due to noise, motion, subtle contrast response, blooming of contrast and artifacts. We present an algorithm that automatically estimates the location and amount of contrast within the plaque over time. Plaque pixels are initially labeled through an iterative expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. The used algorithm avoids several drawbacks of standard EM. It is capable of selecting the best number of components in an unsupervised way, based on a minimum message length criterion. Next, neighborhood information using a 5×5 kernel and spatiotemporal behavior are combined with the known characteristics of contrast spots in order to group components, identify artifacts and finalize the classification. Image sequences are divided into 3-seconds subgroups. A pixel is relabeled as an artifact if it is labeled as contrast for more than 1.5 seconds in at least two subgroups. For 10 plaques, automated segmentation results were validated with manual segmentation of contrast in 10 frames per clip. Average Dice index and area ratio were 0.73+/-0.1 (mean+/-SD) and 98.5+/-29.6 (%) respectively. Next, 45 atherosclerotic plaques were analyzed. Time integrated IPN surface area was calculated. Average area of IPN was 3.73+/-3.51 mm2. Average area of 45 plaques was 11.6+/-8.6 mm2. This method based on EM contrast segmentation provides a new way of IPN quantification.

  5. Aterofisiol® in carotid plaque evolution

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Bruno; Compagna, Rita; Amato, Maurizio; Gallelli, Luca; de Franciscis, Stefano; Serra, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Background In patients with carotid stenosis, the risk of plaque rupture is related to the composition of the atherosclerotic plaque rather than to its magnitude. In this regard, we evaluated the effects of a supplement, Aterofisiol,® containing omega-3 (EPA [eicosapen acid] DHA [docosahexaenoic acid]), vitamin K2, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPC) and resveratrol on the composition of atherosclerotic plaque and on neurological symptoms in patients with carotid stenosis undergoing carotid endarterectomy. Methods The study was randomized, prospective, and double-blinded. Eligible patients were of both sexes, with carotid stenosis >70% who underwent endarterectomy. Enrolled patients were randomly allocated to receive either one tablet of acetylsalicylic acid 100 mg (Cardioaspirin®) + one tablet of Aterofisiol every 24 hours or one tablet of Cardioaspirin + one tablet of placebo every 24 hours. Each treatment was started 30 days before the surgery and was stopped 5 days before the surgery. The plaques were removed “en bloc” using standard surgical technique. Results During the study period, 214 patients (135 men and 79 women) were enrolled for intent-to-treat and randomized in two groups: Group A: 107 patients (68 men and 39 women) were treated with Cardioaspirin + Aterofisiol. Group B: 107 patients (67 men and 40 women) were treated with Cardioaspirin + placebo. At the end of the study, 202 patients participated fully (103 patients in Group A and 99 patients in Group B), making up the protocol evaluation population (94.4%). The mean lipid content of removed plaques was significantly lower (P<0.05) in Group A. We recorded a significantly lower incidence of neurological symptoms in Group A in comparison with Group B (P<0.05). Conclusion In the study, Aterofisiol showed to be effective in reducing the amounts of cholesterol and lipids in the plaques and in reducing adverse neurological events in the study group with respect to controls. PMID:26229448

  6. Cobalt60 plaques in recurrent retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fass, D.; McCormick, B.; Abramson, D.; Ellsworth, R. )

    1991-08-01

    Cobalt60 plaque irradiation is one treatment option for patients with recurrent retinoblastoma following conventional external beam irradiation (ERT). Tumorocidal doses can be delivered without excessive risk of normal tissue injury. In patients not considered candidates for xenon arc or cryotherapy, 60Co is an alternative to enucleation. Between 1968 and 1987, 85 patients were treated with 60Co plaques, 72 of whom had failed prior ERT. Age at diagnosis ranged from 1 week to 4 years. There are 37 males and 35 females. Seventy-one patients had bilateral disease and one had unilateral. Three patients had both eyes plaqued. Prior ERT ranged from 30 to 70 Gy (mean 4200 Gy). Time from initial therapy to failure ranged from 13 to 60 months. Cobalt plaques of 10 mm, 15 mm, or 10 {times} 15 mm were used depending on tumor size and location. Dose prescribed to the apex of the tumor ranged from 30 to 50 Gy (median 40 Gy) given over 3 to 8 days. Twelve patients had two plaque applications; three patients had three plaque applications. All patients were followed with routine ophthalmoscopic examinations. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 22 years (mean 8.7). Seven patients died of metastatic disease; 10 patients developed non-ocular second tumors. Thirty patients required enucleation. Twenty-two patients had clear tumor progression, two patients had radiation complications, and six patients had a combination of tumor growth and complications. Cobalt60 can salvage eyes in retinoblastoma patients failing ERT. Currently, the authors are using I125 in an attempt to spare normal ocular tissue and reduce subsequent complications.

  7. Pigmented epidermal plaques in three dogs.

    PubMed

    Stokking, Laura B; Ehrhart, Eugene J; Lichtensteiger, Carol A; Campbell, Karen L

    2004-01-01

    Papillomavirus was identified in pigmented epidermal plaques (PEP) from three dogs: a miniature schnauzer with hyperadrenocorticism and hypoglobulinemia, an American Staffordshire terrier with hypoglobulinemia, and a Pomeranian with unconfirmed hypothyroidism. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arose within several plaques in the Pomeranian. Clinical improvement coincided in the first two cases with treatment of the concurrent disease and the administration of low-dose oral interferon-alpha. This is the first report of PEP in an American Staffordshire terrier and a Pomeranian. The potential for malignant transformation of PEP to SCC emphasizes the need for recognition and clinical management of PEP. PMID:15347622

  8. MR Imaging of Coronary Arteries and Plaques.

    PubMed

    Dweck, Marc R; Puntman, Valentina; Vesey, Alex T; Fayad, Zahi A; Nagel, Eike

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance offers the promise of radiation-free imaging of the coronary arteries, providing information with respect to luminal stenosis, plaque burden, high-risk plaque characteristics, and disease activity. In combination, this would provide a comprehensive, individualized assessment of coronary atherosclerosis that could be used to improve patient risk stratification and to guide treatment. However, the technical challenges involved with delivering upon this promise are considerable, requiring sophisticated approaches to both data acquisition and post-processing. In this review, we describe the current status of this technology, its capabilities, its limitations, and what will be required in the future to translate this technology into routine clinical practice. PMID:26965732

  9. Digitate dermatosis (small-plaque parapsoriasis).

    PubMed

    Lewin, Jesse; Latkowski, Jo-Ann

    2012-12-01

    We report a 79-year-old man with a 15-year history of elongated, finger-like, erythematous patches that are symmetrically distributed on his flanks and of small, <5 cm, erythematous, slightly scaly, round-oval patches on the upper and lower extremities. The lesions were occasionally pruritic and waxed and waned over the years. His clinical and histopathologic data indicated small-plaque parapsoriasis, which is a benign entity that has been the center of controversy over the years, owing to its similarities to large-plaque parapsoriasis, which is on a spectrum with mycosis fungoides. PMID:23286793

  10. Cobalt plaque therapy of posterior uveal melanomas

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, J.A.; Augsburger, J.J.; Brady, L.W.; Day, J.L.

    1982-10-01

    One hundred patients with choroidal melanomas who were treated by the authors with cobalt plaque radiotherapy were analyzed with regard to tumor regression, visual results, complications, and mortality rate. The follow-up period at the time of this writing ranged from one to five years. These preliminary observations indicate that cobalt plaque radiotherapy induces tumor regression in 96% of cases, preserves useful vision in many cases and has fewer complications during the one- to five-year follow-up period than previously believed.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of juxtapapillary plaques in cadaver eyes.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, D F; Mieler, W F; Jaffe, G J; Robertson, D M; Hendrix, L

    1990-01-01

    Adequate treatment of juxtapapillary melanomas with episcleral plaque brachytherapy using lower energy radiation sources may be difficult because of uncertainties regarding the relationship of the plaque to the optic nerve and tumour base. We obtained magnetic resonance images of a dummy plaque placed in a juxtapapillary location in cadaver specimens. Although it is possible to place a plaque in close association with the optic nerve sheath, a tissue barrier exists which may prevent actual contact between the plaque and nerve. Posterior tilting of the plaque may also occur. Because of these uncertainties regarding plaque placement, juxtapapillary melanomas should be considered a distinct subgroup when evaluating the efficacy of radioactive plaque brachytherapy in the treatment of choroidal melanoma. Images PMID:2306444

  12. Treating cardiovascular atherosclerotic plaques with Tongmaijiangzhi (TMJZ) capsule.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hong-Qiang; Zhao, Li; Zhang, Zhong Shuang; Wang, Zhong; Wang, Li; Duan, Jun Cang; Li, Li; Zhai, Zhi Hong; Qu, De Tao; Huang, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerotic plaques can cause serious syndromes and mortality. Cholesterol accumulation in the plaques can disrupt the arterial flow, with lumen narrowing and stenosis, which contributes to heart attack and sudden cardiac death. The pharmacological treatment to atherosclerotic plaques can be anti-hypertensives, anti-cholesterol, and cleaning of the existed plaques. This work examined the effects of pharmacological Tongmaijiangzhi (TMJZ) capsule on atherosclerotic plaques. The radiological findings of the atherosclerotic plaques of 107 patients receiving TMJZ treatment were analyzed. We found that the TMJZ administration decreases plaque volume and alters the composition in a relatively short period, showing highly promising effects. TMJZ treatment is able to remove the existed atherosclerotic plaques with no side effects observed. PMID:24311866

  13. 18. Photocopy of drawing of bronze dedication plaque, circa 1903 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of drawing of bronze dedication plaque, circa 1903 (original drawing in possession of City Engineer's Office Grand Rapids, Michigan) DEDICATION PLAQUE. - Bridge Street Bridge, Spanning Grand River, Michigan & Bridge Streets, Grand Rapids, Kent County, MI

  14. Association between Randall's Plaque and Calcifying Nanoparticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Citfcioglu, Neva; Vejdani, Kaveh; Lee, Olivia; Mathew, Grace; Aho, Katja M.; Kajander, Olavi; McKay, David S.; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2007-01-01

    Randall initially described calcified subepithelial papillary plaques, which he hypothesized as nidi for kidney stone formation. The discovery of calcifying nanoparticles (CNP) in many calcifying processes of human tissues has raised another hypothesis about their possible involvement in urinary stone formation. This research is the first attempt to investigate the potential association of these two hypotheses. We collected renal papilla and blood samples from 17 human patients who had undergone laparoscopic nephrectomy due to neoplasia. Immunohistochemical staining (IHS) was applied on the tissue samples using monoclonal antibody 8D10 (mAb) against CNP. Homogenized papillary tissues and serum samples were cultured for CNP. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis were performed on fixed papillary samples. Randall's plaques were visible on gross inspection in 11 out of 17 collected samples. IHS was positive for CNP antigen in 8 of these 11 visually positive samples, but in only 1 of the remaining 6 samples. SEM revealed spherical apatite formations in 14 samples, all of which had calcium and phosphate peaks detected by EDS analysis. From this study, there was some evidence of a link between the presence of Randall's plaques and the detection of CNP, also referred to as nanobacteria. Although causality was not demonstrated, these results suggest that further studies with negative control samples should be made to explore the etiology of Randall's plaque formation, thus leading to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of stone formation.

  15. Potential pathogenic aspects of denture plaque.

    PubMed

    Coulthwaite, L; Verran, J

    2007-01-01

    Oral health status declines with age and as a result the need for removable prostheses increases. Oral health is a reflection of one's general health, affecting the ability of an individual to eat and speak, and contributes significantly to a sense of confidence and well-being. Currently, there are 15 million denture wearers in the UK, representing a significant consumer base and a special healthcare consideration. The microbiology of denture plaque has received little attention in comparison with dental plaque, yet it differs in location and composition. Denture plaque and poor denture hygiene is associated with stomatitis (Candida infection), may also serve as a reservoir of potentially infectious pathogens, and may contribute to oral malodour and to caries and periodontitis in people who have remaining natural teeth. Oral bacteria have been implicated in bacterial endocarditis, aspiration pneumonia, gastrointestinal infection and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, among others, and dentures offer a reservoir for microorganisms associated with these infections. An effective oral hygiene regimen is important to control denture plaque biofilm and contributes to the control of associated oral and systemic diseases. PMID:18236742

  16. Microtissue Culture Plaque Assay for Herpesvirus saimiri

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Emerson W.; Dunkel, Virginia C.

    1973-01-01

    A microtissue culture method for the plaque assay of Herpesvirus saimiri has been developed. Virus titrations carried out in Microtest II tissue culture plates (Falcon) yielded reproducible results that agreed well with those obtained by employing macrocultures. The described method is quantitative, reproducible, economical, and suitable for routine assay of large numbers of virus samples. Images PMID:4201642

  17. Artery buckling affects the mechanical stress in atherosclerotic plaques

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Tortuous arteries are often seen in patients with hypertension and atherosclerosis. While the mechanical stress in atherosclerotic plaque under lumen pressure has been studied extensively, the mechanical stability of atherosclerotic arteries and subsequent effect on the plaque stress remain unknown. To this end, we investigated the buckling and post-buckling behavior of model stenotic coronary arteries with symmetric and asymmetric plaque. Methods Buckling analysis for a model coronary artery with symmetric and asymmetric plaque was conducted using finite element analysis based on the dimensions and nonlinear anisotropic materials properties reported in the literature. Results Artery with asymmetric plaque had lower critical buckling pressure compared to the artery with symmetric plaque and control artery. Buckling increased the peak stress in the plaque and led to the development of a high stress concentration in artery with asymmetric plaque. Stiffer calcified tissue and severe stenosis increased the critical buckling pressure of the artery with asymmetric plaque. Conclusions Arteries with atherosclerotic plaques are prone to mechanical buckling which leads to a high stress concentration in the plaques that can possibly make the plaques prone to rupture. PMID:25603490

  18. A Modified Dummy Plaque for the Accurate Placement of Ruthenium-106 Plaques in Brachytherapy of Intraocular Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Krohn, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To present a new technique to ensure the correct positioning of ruthenium plaques in episcleral brachytherapy. Materials and Methods An acrylic dummy plaque is made opaque by sanding both sides with sandpaper, and its edge is covered by a black marking tape. This modified plaque is temporarily sutured to the sclera overlying the choroidal tumour site. The tip of an endoillumination probe is placed at the anterior edge of the plaque, yielding a strong light scattering within the opaque acrylic material. Due to the light-absorbing tape around the plaque border, the scattered light is confined within the plaque, and its perimeter can be observed by indirect ophthalmoscopy as a circle of transilluminated light surrounding the tumour. When the correct position has been found, the dummy plaque is replaced by a ruthenium-106 plaque. Results The technique was successfully applied in 5 patients with posterior choroidal melanoma. Compared to standard focal transillumination, its main advantage is that the position of the entire plaque and tumour can be observed simultaneously in one field without any movement or manipulation of the light probe or plaque. Conclusion The described transillumination technique and modified dummy plaque facilitate the correct positioning of ruthenium plaques in brachytherapy of choroidal melanoma. PMID:27172165

  19. Carotid artery plaque assessment using quantitative expansive remodeling evaluation and MRI plaque signal intensity.

    PubMed

    Kurosaki, Yoshitaka; Yoshida, Kazumichi; Fukumitsu, Ryu; Sadamasa, Nobutake; Handa, Akira; Chin, Masaki; Yamagata, Sen

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Plaque characteristics and morphology are important indicators of plaque vulnerability. MRI-detected intraplaque hemorrhage has a great effect on plaque vulnerability. Expansive remodeling, which has been considered compensatory enlargement of the arterial wall in the progression of atherosclerosis, is one of the criteria of vulnerable plaque in the coronary circulation. The purpose of this study was risk stratification of carotid artery plaque through the evaluation of quantitative expansive remodeling and MRI plaque signal intensity. METHODS Both preoperative carotid artery T1-weighted axial and long-axis MR images of 70 patients who underwent carotid endarterectomy (CEA) or carotid artery stenting (CAS) were studied. The expansive remodeling ratio (ERR) was calculated from the ratio of the linear diameter of the artery at the thickest segment of the plaque to the diameter of the artery on the long-axis image. Relative plaque signal intensity (rSI) was also calculated from the axial image, and the patients were grouped as follows: Group A = rSI ≥ 1.40 and ERR ≥ 1.66; Group B = rSI< 1.40 and ERR ≥ 1.66; Group C = rSI ≥ 1.40 and ERR < 1.66; and Group D = rSI < 1.40 and ERR < 1.66. Ischemic events within 6 months were retrospectively evaluated in each group. RESULTS Of the 70 patients, 17 (74%) in Group A, 6 (43%) in Group B, 7 (44%) in Group C, and 6 (35%) in Group D had ischemic events. Ischemic events were significantly more common in Group A than in Group D (p = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS In the present series of patients with carotid artery stenosis scheduled for CEA or CAS, patients with plaque with a high degree of expansion of the vessel and T1 high signal intensity were at higher risk of ischemic events. The combined assessment of plaque characterization with MRI and morphological evaluation using ERR might be useful in risk stratification for carotid lesions, which should be validated by a prospective, randomized study of asymptomatic patients. PMID:26361279

  20. Animal models for plaque rupture: a biomechanical assessment.

    PubMed

    van der Heiden, Kim; Hoogendoorn, Ayla; Daemen, Mat J; Gijsen, Frank J H

    2016-02-29

    Rupture of atherosclerotic plaques is the main cause of acute cardiovascular events. Animal models of plaque rupture are rare but essential for testing new imaging modalities to enable diagnosis of the patient at risk. Moreover, they enable the design of new treatment strategies to prevent plaque rupture. Several animal models for the study of atherosclerosis are available. Plaque rupture in these models only occurs following severe surgical or pharmaceutical intervention. In the process of plaque rupture, composition, biology and mechanics each play a role, but the latter has been disregarded in many animal studies. The biomechanical environment for atherosclerotic plaques is comprised of two parts, the pressure-induced stress distribution, mainly - but not exclusively - influenced by plaque composition, and the strength distribution throughout the plaque, largely determined by the inflammatory state. This environment differs considerably between humans and most animals, resulting in suboptimal conditions for plaque rupture. In this review we describe the role of the biomechanical environment in plaque rupture and assess this environment in animal models that present with plaque rupture. PMID:26607378

  1. Plaque Production by Arboviruses in Singh's Aedes albopictus Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yunker, C. E.; Cory, J.

    1975-01-01

    We report plaquing tests of 124 virus strains, mostly arboviruses of 21 serological groups, in Singh's line of Aedes albopictus cells. Thirty of these plaqued; all were arboviruses of six groups and were known or presumed to be mosquito borne. Failing to plaque were 86 strains of arboviruses, mostly tick borne, two strains of insect pathogens, and six animal viruses not classified as arboviruses. Among mosquito-borne agents, plaquing ability appeared related to serological classification. California group and most A-group viruses failed to plaque, but nearly all members of B and Bunyamwera groups readily plaqued. Within serological group B, 14 of 16 mosquito-borne agents plaqued, but none of 13 tick-borne or vector-unassociated viruses did so. Some implications of these results for recognition and classification of arboviruses are discussed. Images PMID:234160

  2. Imaging of coronary atherosclerosis and identification of the vulnerable plaque

    PubMed Central

    de Feyter, P.J.; Serruys, P. W.; Nieman, K.; Mollet, N.; Cademartiri, F.; van Geuns, R. J.; Slager, C.; van der Steen, A.F.W.; Krams, R.; Schaar, J.A.; Wielopolski, P.; Pattynama, P.M.T.; Arampatzis, A.; van der Lugt, A.; Regar, E.; Ligthart, J.; Smits, P.

    2003-01-01

    Identification of the vulnerable plaque responsible for the occurrence of acute coronary syndromes and acute coronary death is a prerequisite for the stabilisation of this vulnerable plaque. Comprehensive coronary atherosclerosis imaging in clinical practice should involve visualisation of the entire coronary artery tree and characterisation of the plaque, including the three-dimensional morphology of the plaque, encroachment of the plaque on the vessel lumen, the major tissue components of the plaque, remodelling of the vessel and presence of inflammation. Obviously, no single diagnostic modality is available that provides such comprehensive imaging and unfortunately no diagnostic tool is available that unequivocally identifies the vulnerable plaque. The objective of this article is to discuss experience with currently available diagnostic modalities for coronary atherosclerosis imaging. In addition, a number of evolving techniques will be briefly discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7 PMID:25696244

  3. Macrophage iron, hepcidin, and atherosclerotic plaque stability.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Jerome L

    2007-09-01

    Hepcidin has emerged as the key hormone in the regulation of iron balance and recycling. Elevated levels increase iron in macrophages and inhibit gastrointestinal iron uptake. The physiology of hepcidin suggests an additional mechanism by which iron depletion could protect against atherosclerotic lesion progression. Without hepcidin, macrophages retain less iron. Very low hepcidin levels occur in iron deficiency anemia and also in homozygous hemochromatosis. There is defective retention of iron in macrophages in hemochromatosis and also evidently no increase in atherosclerosis in this disorder. In normal subjects with intact hepcidin responses, atherosclerotic plaque has been reported to have roughly an order of magnitude higher iron concentration than that in healthy arterial wall. Hepcidin may promote plaque destabilization by preventing iron mobilization from macrophages within atherosclerotic lesions; the absence of this mobilization may result in increased cellular iron loads, lipid peroxidation, and progression to foam cells. Marked downregulation of hepcidin (e.g., by induction of iron deficiency anemia) could accelerate iron loss from intralesional macrophages. It is proposed that the minimally proatherogenic level of hepcidin is near the low levels associated with iron deficiency anemia or homozygous hemochromatosis. Induced iron deficiency anemia intensely mobilizes macrophage iron throughout the body to support erythropoiesis. Macrophage iron in the interior of atherosclerotic plaques is not exempt from this process. Decreases in both intralesional iron and lesion size by systemic iron reduction have been shown in animal studies. It remains to be confirmed in humans that a period of systemic iron depletion can decrease lesion size and increase lesion stability as demonstrated in animal studies. The proposed effects of hepcidin and iron in plaque progression offer an explanation of the paradox of no increase in atherosclerosis in patients with hemochromatosis despite a key role of iron in atherogenesis in normal subjects. PMID:17720947

  4. Angiogenesis in human coronary atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, E. R.; Garvin, M. R.; Dev, R.; Stewart, D. K.; Hinohara, T.; Simpson, J. B.; Schwartz, S. M.

    1994-01-01

    Neovascularization in the walls of coronary arteries is associated with the presence of atherosclerotic plaque. The mechanisms responsible for the formation of these intraplaque microvessels are not understood. The purpose of this study is to examine the prevalence of endothelial cell replication in plaque microvessels. Two hundred and one primary and restenotic coronary atherectomy specimens were analyzed for the presence of microvessels and proliferation as reflected by positive immunolabeling for Ulex agglutinin and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen, respectively. In primary but not restenotic specimens, proliferation of any cell type was associated with the detection of microvessels on the same slide. However, intraplaque microvessels were more commonly found in restenotic compared to primary specimens (P = 0.004). Twelve highly vascularized specimens with evidence of replication were subjected to detailed histomorphological and quantitative image analyses. At 200 x, the most vascular optical field of each slide was identified and consistently included plaque macrophages. Total slide endothelial cell replication indices for these specimens varied, but in some instances were remarkably elevated (eg, 43.5%). The role of intraplaque angiogenesis may be analogous to that of tumor or wound angiogenesis and be important in development and progression of coronary artery lesions and restenosis. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7524331

  5. Cataractogenesis after Cobalt-60 eye plaque radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kleineidam, M.; Augsburger, J.J. ); Hernandez, C.; Glennon, P.; Brady, L.W. )

    1993-07-15

    This study was designed to estimate the actuarial incidence of typical postirradiation cataracts and to identify prognostic factors related to their development in melanoma-containing eyes treated by Cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy. A special interest was the impact of calculated radiation dose and dose-rate to the lens. The authors evaluated the actuarial occurrence of post-irradiation cataract in 365 patients with primary posterior uveal melanoma treated by Cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy between 1976 and 1986. Only 22% (S.E. = 4.6%) of the patients who received a total dose of 6 to 20 Gy at the center of the lens developed a visually significant cataract attributable to the radiation within 5 years after treatment. Using multivariate Cox proportional hazards modeling, the authors identified thickness of the tumor, location of the tumor's anterior margin relative to the equatorward and the ora serrata, and diameter of the eye plaque used as the best combination of covariables for predicting length of time until development of cataract. Surprisingly, the dose of radiation delivered to the lens, which was strongly correlated to all of these covariables, was not a significant predictive factor in multivariate analysis. The results suggest that success of efforts to decrease the occurrence rate of post-irradiation cataracts by better treatment planning might be limited in patients with posterior uveal melanoma. 21 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Microwave plaque thermoradiotherapy for choroidal melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Finger, P. T.

    1992-01-01

    Microwave thermoradiotherapy was used as a primary treatment for 44 patients with choroidal melanoma. An episcleral dish-shaped microwave antenna was placed beneath the tumour at the time of plaque brachytherapy. While temperatures were measured at the sclera, the tumour's apex was targeted to receive a minimum of 42 degrees C for 45 minutes. In addition, the patients received full or reduced doses of plaque radiotherapy. No patients have been lost to follow-up. Two eyes have been enucleated: one for rubeotic glaucoma, and one for uveitic glaucoma. Though six patients have died, only one death was due to metastatic choroidal melanoma (39 months after treatment). Clinical observations suggest that the addition of microwave heating to plaque radiation therapy of choroidal melanoma has been well tolerated. There has been a 97.7% local control rate (with a mean follow-up of 22.2 months). We have reduced the minimum tumour radiation dose (apex dose) to levels used for thermoradiotherapy of cutaneous melanomas (50 Gy/5000 rad). Within the range of this follow-up period no adverse effects which might preclude the use of this microwave heat delivery system for treatment of choroidal melanoma have been noted. Images PMID:1622949

  7. Intravascular probe for detection of vulnerable plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patt, Bradley E.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; MacDonald, Lawrence R.; Yamaguchi, Yuko; Tull, Carolyn R.; Janecek, Martin; Hoffman, Edward J.; Strauss, H. William; Tsugita, Ross; Ghazarossian, Vartan

    2001-12-01

    Coronary angiography is unable to define the status of the atheroma, and only measures the luminal dimensions of the blood vessel, without providing information about plaque content. Up to 70% of heart attacks are caused by minimally obstructive vulnerable plaques, which are too small to be detected adequately by angiography. We have developed an intravascular imaging detector to identify vulnerable coronary artery plaques. The detector works by sensing beta or conversion electron radiotracer emissions from plaque-binding radiotracers. The device overcomes the technical constraints of size, sensitivity and conformance to the intravascular environment. The detector at the distal end of the catheter uses six 7mm long by 0.5mm diameter scintillation fibers coupled to 1.5m long plastic fibers. The fibers are offset from each other longitudinally by 6mm and arranged spirally around a guide wire in the catheter. At the proximal end of the catheter the optical fibers are coupled to an interface box with a snap on connector. The interface box contains a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT) to decode the individual fibers. The whole detector assembly fits into an 8-French (2.7 mm in diameter) catheter. The PSPMT image is further decoded with software to give a linear image, the total instantaneous count rate and an audio output whose tone corresponds to the count rate. The device was tested with F-18 and Tl-204 sources. Spectrometric response, spatial resolution, sensitivity and beta to background ratio were measured. System resolution is 6 mm and the sensitivity is >500 cps / micrometers Ci when the source is 1 mm from the detector. The beta to background ratio was 11.2 for F-18 measured on a single fiber. The current device will lead to a system allowing imaging of labeled vulnerable plaque in coronary arteries. This type of signature is expected to enable targeted and cost effective therapies to prevent acute coronary artery diseases such as: unstable angina, acute myocardial infarction, and sudden cardiac death.

  8. The microscopic network structure of mussel (Mytilus) adhesive plaques.

    PubMed

    Filippidi, Emmanouela; DeMartini, Daniel G; Malo de Molina, Paula; Danner, Eric W; Kim, Juntae; Helgeson, Matthew E; Waite, J Herbert; Valentine, Megan T

    2015-12-01

    Marine mussels of the genus Mytilus live in the hostile intertidal zone, attached to rocks, bio-fouled surfaces and each other via collagen-rich threads ending in adhesive pads, the plaques. Plaques adhere in salty, alkaline seawater, withstanding waves and tidal currents. Each plaque requires a force of several newtons to detach. Although the molecular composition of the plaques has been well studied, a complete understanding of supra-molecular plaque architecture and its role in maintaining adhesive strength remains elusive. Here, electron microscopy and neutron scattering studies of plaques harvested from Mytilus californianus and Mytilus galloprovincialis reveal a complex network structure reminiscent of structural foams. Two characteristic length scales are observed characterizing a dense meshwork (approx. 100 nm) with large interpenetrating pores (approx. 1 µm). The network withstands chemical denaturation, indicating significant cross-linking. Plaques formed at lower temperatures have finer network struts, from which we hypothesize a kinetically controlled formation mechanism. When mussels are induced to create plaques, the resulting structure lacks a well-defined network architecture, showcasing the importance of processing over self-assembly. Together, these new data provide essential insight into plaque structure and formation and set the foundation to understand the role of plaque structure in stress distribution and toughening in natural and biomimetic materials. PMID:26631333

  9. Atherosclerotic Aortic Arch Plaques in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Deif, Randa; El-Sayed, Mohamed; allah, Foad Abd; Baligh, Essam; El-Fayomy, Nervana M.; EzzAt, Loai; Gamal, Heba

    2011-01-01

    Background: Atherosclerotic aortic arch plaques (AAP) have been linked to an increased risk of thrombo-embolic events as a cause of acute ischemic stroke of undetermined etiology. Objectives: To find out the presence of atherosclerotic plaques in aortic arch and their potential role as a source of embolism in cerebral infarction of undetermined etiology. Methods: We performed trans-esophageal echocardiography (TEE) and multislice computerized tomography (MSCT) of the aortic arch on 30 patients with acute ischemic stroke of undetermined cause from a total series of 150 non-selected patients with acute ischemic stroke studied prospectively by clinical evaluation, laboratory investigations, cranial computed tomography, color coded duplex ultrasonography of the carotid arteries and transcranial Doppler (TCD). Results: Using trans-esophageal echocardiography eight patients (29.6%) had atherosclerotic aortic arch plaques, while using multislice computerized tomography atherosclerotic aortic arch plaques were revealed in twelve patients (40%). Atherosclerotic aortic arch plaques were significantly related to older age, male gender, hypertension, ischemic heart disease and low-grade atherosclerotic carotid lesions. Multislice computerized tomography of the aortic arch was more sensitive than trans-esophageal echocardiography in detecting the site, size and characters of atherosclerotic aortic arch plaques. Conclusion: Atherosclerotic aortic arch plaques are a frequent finding in patients with acute ischemic stroke of undetermined cause supporting the hypothesis that aortic plaques have embolic potential. In addition, multislice computerized tomography is more sensitive than trans-esophageal echocardiography in detecting atherosclerotic aortic arch plaques and better characterization of these plaques especially relevant one. PMID:22518260

  10. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI to Study Atherosclerotic Plaque Microvasculature.

    PubMed

    van Hoof, Raf H M; Heeneman, Sylvia; Wildberger, Joachim E; Kooi, M Eline

    2016-06-01

    Rupture of a vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque of the carotid artery is an important underlying cause of clinical ischemic events, such as stroke. Abundant microvasculature has been identified as an important aspect contributing to plaque vulnerability. Plaque microvasculature can be studied non-invasively with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-)MRI in animals and patients. In recent years, several DCE-MRI studies have been published evaluating the association between microvasculature and other key features of plaque vulnerability (e.g., inflammation and intraplaque hemorrhage), as well as the effects of novel therapeutic interventions. The present paper reviews this literature, focusing on DCE-MRI methods of acquisition and analysis of atherosclerotic plaques, the current state and future potential of DCE-MRI in the evaluation of plaque microvasculature in clinical and preclinical settings. PMID:27115144

  11. Computer Simulations of Atherosclerotic Plaque Growth in Coronary Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Biyue; Tang, Dalin

    2011-01-01

    A three dimensional mathematical model with a linear plaque growth function was developed to investigate the geometrical adaptation of atherosclerotic plaques in coronary arteries and study the influences of flow wall shear stress (WSS), blood viscosity and the inlet flow rate on the growth of atherosclerotic plaques using computational plaque growth simulations. The simulation results indicated that the plaque wall thickness at the neck of the stenosis increased at a decreasing rate in the atherosclerosis progression. The simulation results also showed a strong dependence of the plaque wall thickness increase on the blood viscosity and the inlet flow rate. The progression rate in a coronary artery was lower with a higher inlet velocity flow rate and higher with a smaller value of the blood viscosity. PMID:21141673

  12. Dental plaque, platelets, and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Herzberg, M C; Weyer, M W

    1998-07-01

    Cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis and myocardial ischemia, occur as a result of a complex set of genetic and environmental factors. During periodontitis, dental plaque microorganisms may disseminate through the blood to infect the vascular endothelium and contribute to the occurrence of atherosclerosis and risk of myocardial ischemia and infarction. Myocardial ischemia and infarction are often preceded by acute thromboembolic events. In an in vitro model of thrombosis, certain dental plaque bacteria induce platelets to aggregate. Aggregation of platelets is induced by the platelet aggregation-associated protein [PAAPJ expressed on plaque bacteria, including Streptococcus sanguis and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Intravenous infusion of S. sanguis into rabbits has been shown previously to cause changes in the electrocardiogram (ECG), heart rate, blood pressure, and cardiac contractility. These changes are consistent with the occurrence of myocardial infarction. The ECG changes are now shown to begin within 30 seconds after infusion of PAAP+ S. sanguis, followed by alterations in blood pressure and respiratory rate. These changes occurred intermittently over a 30-minute period and changed within one heartbeat to a normal pattern and suddenly back to abnormal. Intermittent ECG abnormalities were seen in 13 of 15 rabbits, including left axis deviation, ST-segment depression, preventricular contractions, alternans, and bigemnia. Dose-dependent thrombocytopenia, accumulation of 111Indium-labeled platelets in the lungs, and tachypnea also occurred. No changes occurred with the PAAp- strain. The data indicated that PAPP+ S. sanguis interacts with circulating platelets, inducing thromboemboli to cause the pulmonary and cardiac abnormalities. During periodontitis, therefore, PAAP+ S. sanguis and P. gingivalis bacteremia may contribute to the chance of acute thromboembolic events. PMID:9722699

  13. Stability Analysis of a Model of Atherosclerotic Plaque Growth

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Sushruth; Seshaiyer, Padmanabhan

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the formation of life-threatening plaques in blood vessels, is a form of cardiovascular disease. In this paper, we analyze a simplified model of plaque growth to derive physically meaningful results about the growth of plaques. In particular, the main results of this paper are two conditions, which express that the immune response increases as LDL cholesterol levels increase and that diffusion prevails over inflammation in a healthy artery. PMID:25883675

  14. Dosimetric Benefit of a New Ophthalmic Radiation Plaque

    SciTech Connect

    Marwaha, Gaurav; Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio ; Wilkinson, Allan; Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio ; Bena, James; Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio ; Macklis, Roger; Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio ; Singh, Arun D.; Department of Ophthalmic Oncology, Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio; Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the computed dosimetry of a new ophthalmic plaque, EP917, when compared with the standard Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS) plaques, could reduce radiation exposure to vision critical structures of the eye. Methods and Materials: One hundred consecutive patients with uveal melanoma treated with COMS radiation plaques between 2007 and 2010 were included in this study. These treatment plans were generated with the use of Bebig Plaque Simulator treatment-planning software, both for COMS plaques and for EP917 plaques using I-125. Dose distributions were calculated for a prescription of 85 Gy to the tumor apex. Doses to the optic disc, opposite retina, lens, and macula were obtained, and differences between the 2 groups were analyzed by standard parametric methods. Results: When compared with the COMS plaques, the EP917 plaques used fewer radiation seeds by an average difference of 1.94 (P<.001; 95% confidence interval [CI], -2.8 to -1.06) and required less total strength of radiation sources by an average of 17.74 U (air kerma units) (P<.001; 95% CI, -20.16 to -15.32). The total radiation doses delivered to the optic disc, opposite retina, and macula were significantly less by 4.57 Gy, 0.50 Gy, and 11.18 Gy, respectively, with the EP917 plaques vs the COMS plaques. Conclusion: EP917 plaques deliver less overall radiation exposure to critical vision structures than COMS treatment plaques while still delivering the same total therapeutic dose to the tumor.

  15. Congenital Milia En Plaque on Scalp

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sangita; Sangal, Shikha

    2015-01-01

    Milia en plaque is a rare disease entity characterized by confluence of multiple keratin-filled cysts resulting from the obstruction of hair follicle without any preceding primary dermatosis. Fewer than 40 cases have been reported so far in dermatological literature, and most cases are described to occur in adults and in the peri-auricular area. We describe a case of congenital MEP on scalp of a five-year-old boy with a blaschkoid extension into posterior nuchal area. This case report claims its uniqueness because of the unusual site and congenital presentation. PMID:25657433

  16. 14. DETAIL VIEW OF COMMEMORATIVE PLAQUE AND FINIAL, NORTH END ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAIL VIEW OF COMMEMORATIVE PLAQUE AND FINIAL, NORTH END SPAN - East Bloomsburg Bridge, Spanning Susquehanna River at Pennsylvania Route 487 (Legislative Route 283), Bloomsburg, Columbia County, PA

  17. 17. DETAIL OF BUILDER'S PLAQUE, LOOKING NORTH. Philadelphia & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. DETAIL OF BUILDER'S PLAQUE, LOOKING NORTH. - Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, Wissahickon Creek Viaduct, Spanning Wissahickon Creek, north of Ridge Avenue Bridge, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  18. DETAIL OF PLAQUE DESCRIBING LION SCULPTURES BY ROLAND HINTON PERRY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF PLAQUE DESCRIBING LION SCULPTURES BY ROLAND HINTON PERRY, NORTHWEST ABUTMENT - Connecticut Avenue Bridge, Spans Rock Creek & Potomac Parkway at Connecticut Avenue, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  19. Dental plaque - associated infections and antibacterial oral hygiene products.

    PubMed

    Verran, J

    1991-02-01

    Synopsis Dental plaque accumulates on hard non-shedding surfaces such as teeth, dentures and orthodontic appliances. This accumulation is facilitated by the absence of adequate oral hygiene procedures. The term 'plaque' describes a mass of microorganisms embedded in an organic matrix of host and microbial origin. In addition to the aesthetic desirability of 'clean teeth, healthy gums and fresh breath' associated with the absence of plaque, obvious consequences of the presence of plaque include tooth decay (dental caries), gingivitis and periodontal (gum) disease and denture associated problems. Thus the prevention of plaque formation, the reduction of plaque accumulation and the effective removal of plaque are considerations of the cosmetic and health professions alike. There are many oral hygiene products available to the general public - toothpastes, mouthwashes, denture cleaners, and, more recently, chewing gums and novel mouthwashes. Several of these products have antimicrobial components. This paper reviews the microbiology of plaque and plaque associated problems, and surveys the type of products currently available for maintenance of good oral hygiene. Potential areas for future development are also explored. PMID:19291039

  20. Nature or The Natural Evolution of Plaque: What Matters?

    PubMed Central

    AURSULESEI, Viviana

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Progression to major acute cardiovascular events often is triggered by an atherosclerotic plaque complicated by rupture or erosion, namely the vulnerable plaque. Early and secure identification of these plaques would allow the development of individualized therapeutic and pharmacological strategies, applied in a timely manner. Imaging methods have a huge potential in detecting and monitoring the evolution of vulnerable plaque. Even though there are multiple invasive and noninvasive techniques, clinical application is for now a matter of choosing the relevant imaging feature for the prognosis, the methodology of study and the target population. PMID:24790659

  1. Urothelial Plaque Formation in Post-Golgi Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Hudoklin, Samo; Jezernik, Kristijan; Neumüller, Josef; Pavelka, Margit; Romih, Rok

    2011-01-01

    Urothelial plaques are specialized membrane domains in urothelial superficial (umbrella) cells, composed of highly ordered uroplakin particles. We investigated membrane compartments involved in the formation of urothelial plaques in mouse umbrella cells. The Golgi apparatus did not contain uroplakins organized into plaques. In the post-Golgi region, three distinct membrane compartments containing uroplakins were characterized: i) Small rounded vesicles, located close to the Golgi apparatus, were labelled weakly with anti-uroplakin antibodies and they possessed no plaques; we termed them “uroplakin-positive transporting vesicles” (UPTVs). ii) Spherical-to-flattened vesicles, termed “immature fusiform vesicles” (iFVs), were uroplakin-positive in their central regions and contained small urothelial plaques. iii) Flattened “mature fusiform vesicles” (mFVs) contained large plaques, which were densely labelled with anti-uroplakin antibodies. Endoytotic marker horseradish peroxidase was not found in these post-Golgi compartments. We propose a detailed model of de novo urothelial plaque formation in post-Golgi compartments: UPTVs carrying individual 16-nm particles detach from the Golgi apparatus and subsequently fuse into iFV. Concentration of 16-nm particles into plaques and removal of uroplakin-negative membranes takes place in iFVs. With additional fusions and buddings, iFVs mature into mFVs, each carrying two urothelial plaques toward the apical surface of the umbrella cell. PMID:21887288

  2. DETAIL OF PLAQUE WITH ADDITIONAL DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION INFORMATION, SOUTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF PLAQUE WITH ADDITIONAL DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION INFORMATION, SOUTHEAST ABUTMENT - Connecticut Avenue Bridge, Spans Rock Creek & Potomac Parkway at Connecticut Avenue, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  3. Subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B.; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-01-01

    We perform subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast pulses. Excised mouse aortas containing atherosclerotic plaque were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to observe the ablation result, while the physical damage was inspected in histological sections. We characterize the effects of incident pulse energy on surface damage, ablation hole size, and filament propagation. We find that it is possible to ablate plaque just below the surface without causing surface damage, which motivates further investigation of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal. PMID:26203381

  4. Ultrafast laser ablation for targeted atherosclerotic plaque removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B.; Descloux, Laurent; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-07-01

    Coronary artery disease, the main cause of heart disease, develops as immune cells and lipids accumulate into plaques within the coronary arterial wall. As a plaque grows, the tissue layer (fibrous cap) separating it from the blood flow becomes thinner and increasingly susceptible to rupturing and causing a potentially lethal thrombosis. The stabilization and/or treatment of atherosclerotic plaque is required to prevent rupturing and remains an unsolved medical problem. Here we show for the first time targeted, subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses. Excised atherosclerotic mouse aortas were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. The physical damage was characterized with histological sections of the ablated atherosclerotic arteries from six different mice. The ultrafast ablation system was integrated with optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging for plaque-specific targeting and monitoring of the resulting ablation volume. We find that ultrafast ablation of plaque just below the surface is possible without causing damage to the fibrous cap, which indicates the potential use of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal. We further demonstrate ex vivo subsurface ablation of a plaque volume through a catheter device with the high-energy ultrafast pulse delivered via hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

  5. 19. View of dedication plaque on the north tower facing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. View of dedication plaque on the north tower facing south. The view is oblique because that portion of the approach trestles immediately in front of the plaque was removed in 1979. - Henry Ford Bridge, Spanning Cerritos Channel, Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. Nanoparticle uptake by macrophages in vulnerable plaques for atherosclerosis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Melzer, Susanne; Ankri, Rinat; Fixler, Dror; Tarnok, Attila

    2015-11-01

    The composition of atherosclerotic (AS) plaques is crucial concerning rupture, thrombosis and clinical events. Two plaque types are distinguished: stable and vulnerable plaques. Vulnerable plaques are rich in inflammatory cells, mostly only M1 macrophages, and are highly susceptible to rupture. These plaques represent a high risk particularly with the standard invasive diagnosis by coronary angiography. So far there are no non-invasive low-risk clinical approaches available to detect and distinguish AS plaque types in vivo. The perspective review introduces a whole work-flow for a novel approach for non-invasive detection and classification of AS plaques using the diffusion reflection method with gold nanoparticle loaded macrophages in combination with flow and image cytometric analysis for quality assurance. Classical biophotonic methods for AS diagnosis are summarized. Phenotyping of monocytes and macrophages are discussed for specific subset labelling by nanomaterials, as well as existing studies and first experimental proofs of concept for the novel approach are shown. In vitro and in vivo detection of NP loaded macrophages (MΦ). Different ways of MΦ labelling include (1) in vitro labelling in suspension (whole blood or buffy coat) or (2) labelling of short-term MΦ cultures with re-injection of MΦ-NP into the animal to detect migration of the cells in the plaques and (3) in vivo injection of NP into the organism. PMID:26110589

  7. VIEW OF A BRONZE PLAQUE LOCATED AT THE FRONT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF A BRONZE PLAQUE LOCATED AT THE FRONT OF BUILDING 708. PLAQUE IS MOUNTED ON THE WALL JUST TO THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE CHAPEL'S ENTRANCE. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Chapel, Corner of Oakley & Nimitz Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. 24. View of one of the plaques from Clark Fork ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. View of one of the plaques from Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge. Presently located at the Bonner County Historical Museum in Sandpoint, Idaho. A plaque was attached at each end of the bridge. Only one remains. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  9. Characterization of bacteriophage communities and CRISPR profiles from dental plaque

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dental plaque is home to a diverse and complex community of bacteria, but has generally been believed to be inhabited by relatively few viruses. We sampled the saliva and dental plaque from 4 healthy human subjects to determine whether plaque was populated by viral communities, and whether there were differences in viral communities specific to subject or sample type. Results We found that the plaque was inhabited by a community of bacteriophage whose membership was mostly subject-specific. There was a significant proportion of viral homologues shared between plaque and salivary viromes within each subject, suggesting that some oral viruses were present in both sites. We also characterized Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) in oral streptococci, as their profiles provide clues to the viruses that oral bacteria may be able to counteract. While there were some CRISPR spacers specific to each sample type, many more were shared across sites and were highly subject specific. Many CRISPR spacers matched viruses present in plaque, suggesting that the evolution of CRISPR loci may have been specific to plaque-derived viruses. Conclusions Our findings of subject specificity to both plaque-derived viruses and CRISPR profiles suggest that human viral ecology may be highly personalized. PMID:24981669

  10. New low-viscosity overlay medium for viral plaque assays

    PubMed Central

    Matrosovich, Mikhail; Matrosovich, Tatyana; Garten, Wolfgang; Klenk, Hans-Dieter

    2006-01-01

    Background Plaque assays in cell culture monolayers under solid or semisolid overlay media are commonly used for quantification of viruses and antiviral substances. To overcome the pitfalls of known overlays, we tested suspensions of microcrystalline cellulose Avicel RC/CL™ as overlay media in the plaque and plaque-inhibition assay of influenza viruses. Results Significantly larger plaques were formed under Avicel-containing media, as compared to agar and methylcellulose (MC) overlay media. The plaque size increased with decreasing Avicel concentration, but even very diluted Avicel overlays (0.3%) ensured formation of localized plaques. Due to their low viscosity, Avicel overlays were easier to use than methylcellulose overlays, especially in the 96-well culture plates. Furthermore, Avicel overlay could be applied without prior removal of the virus inoculum thus facilitating the assay and reducing chances of cross-contamination. Using neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir carboxylate, we demonstrated applicability of the Avicel-based plaque reduction assay for testing of antiviral substances. Conclusion Plaque assay under Avicel-containing overlay media is easier, faster and more sensitive than assays under agar- and methylcellulose overlays. The assay can be readily performed in a 96-well plate format and seems particularly suitable for high-throughput virus titrations, serological studies and experiments on viral drug sensitivity. It may also facilitate work with highly pathogenic agents performed under hampered conditions of bio-safety labs. PMID:16945126

  11. [Effect of Root Iron Plaque on Norfloxacin Uptake by Rice].

    PubMed

    Ma, Wei; Bao, Yan-yu

    2015-06-01

    In anaerobic condition, release of oxygen by roots to rhyzosphere caused the formation of red plaque of iron oxides or hydroxides on the root surface of rice. The effect of iron plaque on norfloxacin uptake was investigated with solution culture in greenhouse, and the results are showed in the following. The content of iron plaque increased with the increase of Fe2+ concentration in medium. After the addition of norfloxacin in nutrient solution, the content of iron plaques on the root surface decreased to different degree, and the reduction of iron plaques was increasing with the increase of norfloxacin mass concentration. Significant relationships were found between the iron plaques and norfloxacin on the root surface, and the correlation coefficients were 0.959 (norfloxacin mass concentration was 10 mg x L(-1)) and 0.987 (norfloxacin mass concentration was 50 mg x L(-1)), respectively, however, the norfloxacin contents in roots and shoots had no significant correlation with the iron plaques. After addition of different mass concentrations of norfloxacin, the quality distribution percentages of norfloxacin on the root surface and in roots and shoots were 87.7%-97.6%, 0.8%-4.8%, 1.5%-7.5%, respectively, the norfloxacin content on the root surface was far greater than those in roots and shoots. It was therefore concluded that iron plaque on roots was a norfloxacin reservoir for rice plant but had no significant effect on the transfer of norfloxacin to roots and shoots of the rice plant. PMID:26387334

  12. Application of infrared fiber optic imaging in atherosclerotic plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bujin; Casscells, S. W.; Bearman, Gregory H.; McNatt, Janice; Naghevi, Morteza; Malik, Basit A.; Gul, Khawar; Willerson, James T.

    1999-07-01

    Rupture of atherosclerotic plaques - the main cause of heart attach and stokes - is not predictable. Hence even treadmill stress tests fail to detect many persons at risk. Fatal plaques are found at autopsies to be associated with active inflammatory cells. Classically, inflammation is detected by its swelling, red color, pain and heat. We have found that heat accurately locates the dangerous plaques that are significantly warmer then atherosclerotic plaques without the same inflammation. In order to develop a non-surgical method of locating these plaques, an IR fiber optic imaging system has been developed in our laboratory to evalute the causes and effect of heat in atherosclerotic plaques. The fiber optical imagin bundle consists of 900 individual As2S3 chalcogenide glass fibers which transmit IR radiation from 0.7 micrometers 7 micrometers with little energy loss. By combining that with a highly sensitive Indium Antimonide IR focal plane array detector, we are able to obtain thermal graphic images in situ. The temperature heterogeneity of atherosclerotic plaques developed in the arteral of the experimental animal models is under study with the new device. The preliminary experimental results from the animal model are encouraging. The potential of using this new technology in diagnostic evaluation of the vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques is considerable.

  13. Biological plaque control: novel therapeutic approach to periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Naoyuki

    2012-03-01

    Despite its important role in the control of periodontal disease, mechanical plaque control is not properly practiced by most individuals. Therefore, adjunctive chemical plaque control using chlorhexidine and antibiotics has also been suggested as an additional therapeutic strategy to augment mechanical plaque control. However, the additional effects of adjunctive antibiotic therapy are small, and topical chlorhexidine therapy is not without side effects. Given current limitations, new approaches for the control of biofilm are required. The new therapeutic approaches discussed in this review are divided into two categories: probiotics and vaccines. Probiotics is an interesting new field of periodontology research that aims to achieve biological plaque control by eliminating pathogenic bacteria. In addition, passive immunization using egg yolk antibody raised against periodontal pathogens may be an effective approach for the treatment of periodontitis. Further study to evaluate the possible effects of these biological plaque control methods against periodontal disease is warranted. PMID:22466880

  14. Imaging Modalities to Identity Inflammation in an Atherosclerotic Plaque

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Sunny; Miller, Avraham; Agarwal, Chirag; Zakin, Elina; Acholonu, Michael; Gidwani, Umesh; Sharma, Abhishek; Kulbak, Guy; Shani, Jacob; Chen, On

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, multifocal arterial wall disease caused by local and systemic inflammation responsible for major cardiovascular complications such as myocardial infarction and stroke. With the recent understanding that vulnerable plaque erosion and rupture, with subsequent thrombosis, rather than luminal stenosis, is the underlying cause of acute ischemic events, there has been a shift of focus to understand the mechanisms that make an atherosclerotic plaque unstable or vulnerable to rupture. The presence of inflammation in the atherosclerotic plaque has been considered as one of the initial events which convert a stable plaque into an unstable and vulnerable plaque. This paper systemically reviews the noninvasive and invasive imaging modalities that are currently available to detect this inflammatory process, at least in the intermediate stages, and discusses the ongoing studies that will help us to better understand and identify it at the molecular level. PMID:26798515

  15. Are herbal mouthwash efficacious over chlorhexidine on the dental plaque?

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Devanand; Nayan, Swapna; Tippanawar, Harshad K.; Patil, Gaurav I.; Jain, Ankita; Momin, Rizwan K.; Gupta, Rajendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To compare the effect of herbal extract mouthwash and chlorhexidine mouthwash on the dental plaque level. Materials and Methods: The subjects (60 healthy medical students aged ranges between 20 and 25 years) were randomly divided into two groups, that is, the herbal group and the chlorhexidine gluconate mouthwash group. The data were collected at the baseline and 3 days. The plaque was disclosed using erythrosine disclosing agent and their scores were recorded using the Quigley and Hein plaque index modified by Turesky-Gilmore-Glickman. Statistical analysis was carried out later to compare the effect of all the two groups. Results: Our result showed that the chlorhexidine group shows a greater decrease in plaque score followed by herbal extract, but the result was statistically insignificant. Conclusion: The results indicate that herbal mouthwash may prove to be an effective agent owing to its ability to reduce plaque level, especially in low socioeconomic strata. PMID:26130940

  16. Comparative study of bovine rotavirus isolates by plaque assay.

    PubMed Central

    Archambault, D; Roy, R S; Dea, S; Elazhary, M A

    1984-01-01

    Rotaviruses were isolated on BSC-1 cells from counterimmunoelectrophoresis and/or electron microscopy positive intestinal contents from two asymptomatic and six diarrheic calves from Quebec. The plaque assay was performed using these lines and agar overlay medium containing trypsin and DEAE-dextran. This assay was used to compare the Quebec isolates to an attenuated American strain (NCDV) and another strain (TH) obtained from France. The NCDV strain produced plaques that were significantly larger than those produced by the TH strain. Three Quebec isolates produced plaques similar in size to TH strain, one isolate was similar to NCDV strain and another isolate produced larger plaques than those of both NCDV and TH strains. The other isolates induced the production of plaques that were not significantly different from those of NCDV or TH strains. PMID:6089982

  17. Characterization of Atherosclerotic Plaques by Laser Speckle Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nadkarni, Seemantini K.; Bouma, Brett E.; Helg, Tina; Chan, Raymond; Halpern, Elkan; Chau, Alexandra; Minsky, Milan Singh; Motz, Jason T.; Houser, Stuart L.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2010-01-01

    Background A method capable of determining atherosclerotic plaque composition and measuring plaque viscoelasticity can provide valuable insight into intrinsic features associated with plaque rupture and can enable the identification of high-risk lesions. In this article, we describe a new optical technique, laser speckle imaging (LSI), that measures an index of plaque viscoelasticity. We evaluate the potential of LSI for characterizing atherosclerotic plaque. Methods and Results Time-varying helium-neon laser speckle images were acquired from 118 aortic plaque specimens from 14 human cadavers under static and deforming conditions (0 to 200 μm/s). Temporal fluctuations in the speckle patterns were quantified by exponential fitting of the normalized cross-correlation of sequential frames in each image series of speckle patterns to obtain the exponential decay time constant, τ. The decorrelation time constants of thin-cap fibroatheromas (TCFA) (τ=47.5±19.2 ms) were significantly lower than those of other atherosclerotic lesions (P<0.001), and the sensitivity and specificity of the LSI technique for identifying TCFAs were >90%. Speckle decorrelation time constants demonstrated strong correlation with histological measurements of plaque collagen (R=0.73, P<0.0001), fibrous cap thickness (R=0.87, P<0.0001), and necrotic core area (R=−0.81, P<0.0001). Under deforming conditions (10 to 200 μm/s), τ correlated well with cap thickness in necrotic core fibroatheromas (P>0.05). Conclusions The measurement of speckle decorrelation time constant from laser speckle images provides an index of plaque viscoelasticity and facilitates the characterization of plaque type. Our results demonstrate that LSI is a highly sensitive technique for characterizing plaque and identifying thin-cap fibroatheromas. PMID:16061738

  18. Aortic Arch Plaques and Risk of Recurrent Stroke and Death

    PubMed Central

    Di Tullio, Marco R.; Russo, Cesare; Jin, Zhezhen; Sacco, Ralph L.; Mohr, J.P.; Homma, Shunichi

    2010-01-01

    Background Aortic arch plaques are a risk factor for ischemic stroke. Although the stroke mechanism is conceivably thromboembolic, no randomized studies have evaluated the efficacy of antithrombotic therapies in preventing recurrent events. Methods and Results The relationship between arch plaques and recurrent events was studied in 516 patients with ischemic stroke, double–blindly randomized to treatment with warfarin or aspirin as part of the Patent Foramen Ovale in Cryptogenic Stroke Study (PICSS), based on the Warfarin-Aspirin Recurrent Stroke Study (WARSS). Plaque thickness and morphology was evaluated by transesophageal echocardiography. End-points were recurrent ischemic stroke or death over a 2-year follow-up. Large plaques (≥4mm) were present in 19.6% of patients, large complex plaques (those with ulcerations or mobile components) in 8.5 %. During follow-up, large plaques were associated with a significantly increased risk of events (adjusted Hazard Ratio 2.12, 95% Confidence Interval 1.04-4.32), especially those with complex morphology (HR 2.55, CI 1.10-5.89). The risk was highest among cryptogenic stroke patients, both for large plaques (HR 6.42, CI 1.62-25.46) and large-complex plaques (HR 9.50, CI 1.92-47.10). Event rates were similar in the warfarin and aspirin groups in the overall study population (16.4% vs. 15.8%; p=0.43). Conclusions In patients with stroke, and especially cryptogenic stroke, large aortic plaques remain associated with an increased risk of recurrent stroke and death at two years despite treatment with warfarin or aspirin. Complex plaque morphology confers a slight additional increase in risk. PMID:19380621

  19. Microglial response to amyloid plaques in APPsw transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Frautschy, S. A.; Yang, F.; Irrizarry, M.; Hyman, B.; Saido, T. C.; Hsiao, K.; Cole, G. M.

    1998-01-01

    Microglial activation is central to the inflammatory response in Alzheimer's Disease (AD). A recently described mouse line, Tg(HuAPP695.K670N/M671L)2576, expressing human amyloid precursor protein with a familial AD gene mutation, age-related amyloid deposits, and memory deficits, was found to develop a significant microglial response using Griffonia simplicifolia lectin or phosphotyrosine probe to identify microglia Both Griffonia simplicifolia lectin and phosphotyrosine staining showed increased numbers of intensely labeled, often enlarged microglia clustered in and around plaques, consistent with microglial activation related to beta-amyloid formation. Using quantitative image analysis of coronal phosphotyrosine-immunostained sections, transgene-positive 10- to 16-month-old, hemizygous, hybrid Tg2576 (APPsw) animals showed significantly increased microglial density and size in plaque-forming areas of hippocampus and frontal, entorhinal, and occipital cortex. Quantitative analysis of microglia as a function of distance from the center of plaques (double labeled for A beta peptide and microglia) revealed highly significant, two- to fivefold elevations in microglial number and area within plaques compared with neighboring regions. Tg2576 beta-amyloid-plaque-forming mice should be a useful system for assessing the consequences of the microglial-mediated inflammatory response to beta-amyloid and developing anti-inflammatory therapeutic strategies for Alzheimer's disease. These results provide the first quantitative link between beta-amyloid plaque formation and microglial activation in an animal model with neuritic plaques and memory deficits. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9422548

  20. The Vulnerable Plaque: the Real Villain in Acute Coronary Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Michael; Puri, Aniket; Devlin, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    The term "vulnerable plaque" refers to a vascular lesion that is prone to rupture and may result in life-threatening events which include myocardial infarction. It consists of thin-cap fibroatheroma and a large lipid core which is highly thrombogenic. Acute coronary syndromes often result from rupture of vulnerable plaques which frequently are only moderately stenosed and not visible by conventional angiography. Several invasive and non-invasive strategies have been developed to assess the burden of vulnerable plaques. Intravascular ultrasound provides a two-dimensional cross-sectional image of the arterial wall and can help assess the plaque burden and composition. Optical coherent tomography offers superior resolution over intravascular ultrasound. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging provides non-invasive imaging for visualizing fibrous cap thickness and rupture in plaques. In addition, it may be of value in assessing the effects of treatments, such as lipid-lowering therapy. Technical issues however limit its clinical applicability. The role of multi-slice computed tomography, a well established screening tool for coronary artery disease, remains to be determined. Fractional flow reserve (FFR) may provide physiological functional assessment of plaque vulnerability; however, its role in the management of vulnerable plaque requires further studies. Treatment of the vulnerable patient may involve systemic therapy which currently include statins, ACE inhibitors, beta-blockers, aspirin, and calcium-channel blockers and in the future local therapeutic options such as drug-eluting stents or photodynamic therapy. PMID:21673834

  1. Systematic review of pleural plaques and lung function

    PubMed Central

    Kerper, Laura E.; Lynch, Heather N.; Zu, Ke; Tao, Ge; Utell, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Context US EPA proposed a Reference Concentration for Libby amphibole asbestos based on the premise that pleural plaques are adverse and cause lung function deficits. Objective We conducted a systematic review to evaluate whether there is an association between pleural plaques and lung function and ascertain whether results were dependent on the method used to identify plaques. Methods Using the PubMed database, we identified studies that evaluated pleural plaques and lung function. We assessed each study for quality, then integrated evidence and assessed associations based on the Bradford Hill guidelines. We also compared the results of HRCT studies to those of X-ray studies. Results We identified 16 HRCT and 36 X-ray studies. We rated six HRCT and 16 X-ray studies as higher quality based on a risk-of-bias analysis. Half of the higher quality studies reported small but statistically significant mean lung function decrements associated with plaques. None of the differences were clinically significant. Many studies had limitations, such as inappropriate controls and/or insufficient adjustment for confounders. There was little consistency in the direction of effect for the most commonly reported measurements. X-ray results were more variable than HRCT results. Pleural plaques were not associated with changes in lung function over time in longitudinal studies. Conclusion The weight of evidence indicates that pleural plaques do not impact lung function. Observed associations are most likely due to unidentified abnormalities or other factors. PMID:25518994

  2. The bacteria responsible for ureolysis in artificial dental plaque.

    PubMed

    Sissons, C H; Hancock, E M; Perinpanayagam, H E; Cutress, T W

    1988-01-01

    The origin of ureolytic activity in artificial-mouth plaques was established by assessing the contribution to plaque ureolytic activity of the isolated bacteria. To overcome losses of ureolytic activity caused by the unstable presence of urease in oral bacteria, ureolytic bacteria were isolated from an exceptionally active plaque (1 mumol NH3/min per mg protein) in which 63 per cent of the flora was ureolytic. After their ability to metabolize urea was stabilized, 13 ureolytic bacteria remained: seven strains of Streptococcus salivarius, one Streptococcus bovis, two Staphylococcus epidermidis and three Staphylococcus haemolyticus. Their urease activity, measured after growth into stationary phase, was reproducible and strain specific with a 20-fold range within each genus. The mean ureolytic activity of each species, when weighted by its calculated incidence in the original plaque, accounted for 40 per cent of the total plaque ureolytic activity. However, these values for urease levels were only a small fraction of the bacterial ureolytic potential. Urease per mg cell protein measured during the growth cycle of a selected Strep. salivarius, and Staph. epidermidis, varied 10-fold, and reached much higher activities (i.e. 6-8 mumol NH3/min per mg of cell protein) than under the growth conditions that were used to assess the contribution of these species to total plaque ureolysis. Thus urea metabolism in artificial plaque was due mainly to Strep. salivarius, with a small contribution from Staph. epidermidis. The presence of further unidentified species of ureolytic oral bacteria need not be invoked. PMID:3075450

  3. Cell surface hydrophobicity of dental plaque microorganisms in situ.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, M; Judes, H; Weiss, E

    1983-01-01

    The cell surface hydrophobicity of bacteria obtained directly from human tooth surfaces was assayed by measuring their adherence to liquid hydrocarbons. Fresh samples of supragingival dental plaque were washed and dispersed in buffer. Adherence of the plaque microorganisms to hexadecane, octane, and xylene was tested turbidimetrically and by direct microscopic observation. The results clearly show that the vast majority of bacteria comprising dental plaque exhibit pronounced cell surface hydrophobicity. These data support the hypothesis that hydrophobic interactions play a major role in mediating bacterial adherence on tooth surfaces. Images PMID:6642654

  4. Multimodality imaging of carotid atherosclerotic plaque: Going beyond stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Hingwala, Divyata; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan; Sylaja, Padmavathy N; Thomas, Bejoy; Kapilamoorthy, Tirur Raman

    2013-01-01

    Apart from the degree of stenosis, the morphology of carotid atherosclerotic plaques and presence of neovascularization are important factors that may help to evaluate the risk and ‘vulnerability’ of plaques and may also influence the choice of treatment. In this article, we aim to describe the techniques and imaging findings on CTA, high resolution MRI and contrast enhanced ultrasound in the evaluation of carotid atherosclerotic plaques. We also discuss a few representative cases from our institute with the related clinical implications. PMID:23986615

  5. Atherosclerotic plaque detection by confocal Brillouin and Raman microscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Basagaoglu, Berkay; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2015-02-01

    Atherosclerosis, the development of intraluminal plaque, is a fundamental pathology of cardiovascular system and remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Biomechanical in nature, plaque rupture occurs when the mechanical properties of the plaque, related to the morphology and viscoelastic properties, are compromised, resulting in intraluminal thrombosis and reduction of coronary blood flow. In this report, we describe the first simultaneous application of confocal Brillouin and Raman microscopies to ex-vivo aortic wall samples. Such a non-invasive, high specific approach allows revealing a direct relationship between the biochemical and mechanical properties of atherosclerotic tissue.

  6. Non-pulsed electrochemical impregnation of flexible metallic battery plaques

    DOEpatents

    Maskalick, Nicholas J.

    1982-01-01

    A method of loading active battery material into porous, flexible, metallic battery plaques, comprises the following steps: precipitating nickel hydroxide active material within the plaque, by making the plaque cathodic, at a high current density, in an electro-precipitation cell also containing a consumable nickel anode and a solution comprising nickel nitrate, having a pH of between 2.0 and 2.8; electrochemically oxidizing the precipitate in caustic formation solution; and repeating the electro-precipitation step at a low current density.

  7. Hydrogen sulfide production from subgingival plaque samples.

    PubMed

    Basic, A; Dahlén, G

    2015-10-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial anaerobe infection. Little is known about the dysbiotic microbiota and the role of bacterial metabolites in the disease process. It is suggested that the production of certain waste products in the proteolytic metabolism may work as markers for disease severity. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a gas produced by degradation of proteins in the subgingival pocket. It is highly toxic and believed to have pro-inflammatory properties. We aimed to study H2S production from subgingival plaque samples in relation to disease severity in subjects with natural development of the disease, using a colorimetric method based on bismuth precipitation. In remote areas of northern Thailand, adults with poor oral hygiene habits and a natural development of periodontal disease were examined for their oral health status. H2S production was measured with the bismuth method and subgingival plaque samples were analyzed for the presence of 20 bacterial species with the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique. In total, 43 subjects were examined (age 40-60 years, mean PI 95 ± 6.6%). Fifty-six percent had moderate periodontal breakdown (CAL > 3 < 7 mm) and 35% had severe periodontal breakdown (CAL > 7 mm) on at least one site. Parvimonas micra, Filifactor alocis, Porphyromonas endodontalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum were frequently detected. H2S production could not be correlated to periodontal disease severity (PPD or CAL at sampled sites) or to a specific bacterial composition. Site 21 had statistically lower production of H2S (p = 0.02) compared to 16 and 46. Betel nut chewers had statistically significant lower H2S production (p = 0.01) than non-chewers. Rapid detection and estimation of subgingival H2S production capacity was easily and reliably tested by the colorimetric bismuth sulfide precipitation method. H2S may be a valuable clinical marker for degradation of proteins in the subgingival pocket. PMID:25280920

  8. Bacterial interactions in pathogenic subgingival plaque.

    PubMed

    Ng, Hong Min; Kin, Lin Xin; Dashper, Stuart G; Slakeski, Nada; Butler, Catherine A; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-05-01

    Chronic periodontitis has a polymicrobial biofilm aetiology. Polymicrobial biofilms are complex, dynamic microbial communities formed by two or more bacterial species that are important for the persistence and proliferation of participating microbes in the environment. Interspecies adherence, which often involves bacterial surface-associated molecules, and communications are essential in the spatial and temporal development of a polymicrobial biofilm, which in turn is necessary for the overall fitness of a well-organized multispecies biofilm community. In the oral cavity, interactions between key oral bacterial species, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia, are essential for the progression of chronic periodontitis. In vivo, P. gingivalis and T. denticola are frequently found to co-exist in deep periodontal pockets and have been co-localized to the superficial layers of subgingival plaque as microcolony blooms adjacent to the pocket epithelium, suggesting possible interbacterial interactions that contribute towards disease. The motility and chemotactic ability of T. denticola, although not considered as classic virulence factors, are likely to be important in the synergistic biofilm formation with P. gingivalis. In vitro, P. gingivalis and T. denticola display a symbiotic relationship in nutrient utilization and growth promotion. Together these data suggest there is an intimate relationship between these two species that has evolved to enhance their survival and virulence. PMID:26541672

  9. Vulnerable plaque intervention: State of the art.

    PubMed

    Young, John J; Phillips, Harry R; Marso, Steven P; Granada, Juan F; McPherson, John A; Waksman, Ron; Steinhubl, Steven R; Schwartz, Robert S; Stone, Gregg W

    2008-02-15

    Progressive atherosclerotic disease is responsible for many of the late adverse clinical events that detract from the high procedural and clinical success of percutaneous coronary intervention. Despite recent advances in catheter based technology for the treatment of obstructive coronary artery disease, the greater risk to the patient over time may in fact come from the significant rate of acute coronary events triggered by nonculprit and/or nonobstructive coronary artery lesions. These areas of vulnerability within the epicardial coronary tree have generated a great deal of interest surrounding the concepts of vulnerable plaque (VP), vulnerable blood and the vulnerable patient. This 'state of the art' review discusses the limitations of coronary angiography alone in providing risk assessment; reviews the underlying biological concepts of VP; discusses evolving noninvasive and invasive imaging technologies for the detection of VP; and finally provides a futuristic look at how the field of interventional cardiology may transcend the traditional angiogram and move toward a more comprehensive treatment approach that benefits the patients' overall coronary health. PMID:18288729

  10. Prolidase activity in chronic plaque psoriasis patients

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Nurten; Ozgöztas, Orhan; Sezen, Hatice; Yesilova, Yavuz; Turan, Enver

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory, T-cell-mediated and hyperproliferative skin disease characterized by erythematous, squamous, sharply circumscribed and infiltrated plaques. The metabolisms of the collagen proteins undergo considerable changes due to the acceleration of their turnovers as a result of increased prolidase activity in psoriasis patients. Aim To determine the level of prolidase activity in psoriasis patients and evaluate its relationship with the oxidative system. Material and methods The serum prolidase enzyme activity, total antioxidant levels and total oxidant levels of 40 psoriasis patients and a control group including 47 healthy individuals were analyzed by using their serum samples, and their oxidative stress indices were calculated. Results The prolidase levels (p < 0.01), total oxidant levels (p < 0.01) and oxidative stress index levels (p < 0.001) of the patient group were higher than the corresponding parameters in the control group. The total antioxidant level was low (p < 0.01). Although a positive correlation was found between the prolidase and total antioxidant levels and the total oxidant level, no correlation was found between prolidase and the oxidative stress index. Conclusions It has been determined that the activity of the prolidase enzyme increases due to the increased collage turnover in psoriasis patients. Increased serum oxidant levels and oxidative stress indices values may play a role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. PMID:26015776

  11. 8. DETAIL OF EAST FRONT, SHOWING COMPANY NAME PLAQUE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. DETAIL OF EAST FRONT, SHOWING COMPANY NAME PLAQUE AND PARAPET. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Commercial & Industrial Buildings, Carr, Ryder & Adams Company, Powerhouse, Tenth & Jackson Streets, Dubuque, Dubuque County, IA

  12. 6. WEST FRONT DETAIL, SHOWING COMPANY NAME PLAQUE AND UPPER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. WEST FRONT DETAIL, SHOWING COMPANY NAME PLAQUE AND UPPER FLOOR FENESTRATION. VIEW TO EAST. - Commercial & Industrial Buildings, Becker-Hazelton Company Warehouse, 280 Iowa Street, Dubuque, Dubuque County, IA

  13. Clathrin and Cx43 gap junction plaque endoexocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nickel, Beth M.; DeFranco, B. Hewa; Gay, Vernon L.; Murray, Sandra A.

    2008-10-03

    In earlier transmission electron microscopic studies, we have described pentilaminar gap junctional membrane invaginations and annular gap junction vesicles coated with short, electron-dense bristles. The similarity between these electron-dense bristles and the material surrounding clathrin-coated pits led us to suggest that the dense bristles associated with gap junction structures might be clathrin. To confirm that clathrin is indeed associated with annular gap junction vesicles and gap junction plaques, quantum dot immuno-electron microscopic techniques were used. We report here that clathrin associates with both connexin 43 (Cx43) gap junction plaques and pentilaminar gap junction vesicles. An important finding was the preferential localization of clathrin to the cytoplasmic surface of the annular or of the gap junction plaque membrane of one of the two contacting cells. This is consistent with the possibility that the direction of gap junction plaque internalization into one of two contacting cells is regulated by clathrin.

  14. A helical microwave antenna for welding plaque during balloon angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, P.; Rappaport, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    A catheter-based microwave helix antenna has been developed in an attempt to improve the long-term success of balloon angioplasty treatment of arteriosclerosis. When the balloon is inflated to widen vessels obstructed with plaque, microwave power is deposited in the plaque, heating it, and thereby fixing it in place. By optimizing the helix pitch angle and excitation frequency, the antenna radiation pattern can be adjusted to deposit microwave power preferentially in the plaque while avoiding overheating the healthy artery. The optimal power deposition patterns of helical antennas are analytically computed for four-layered concentric and four-layered nonconcentric cylindrical geometries, which model symmetric and asymmetric occluded arteries. Experiments were performed on occluded artery phantom models with a prototype antenna for both symmetric and asymmetric models, which matched the theoretical predictions well, indicating almost complete power absorption in the low-water-content simulated plaque.

  15. Detail of aluminum plaque attached to the top of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of aluminum plaque attached to the top of the northwest pilaster, facing west. - Oakland Avenue Viaduct, Oakland Avenue spanning U.S. Route 62 (State Route 2302) & Pine Run, Sharon, Mercer County, PA

  16. Elevation view of dedication plaque on east wall of south ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation view of dedication plaque on east wall of south lobby - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Pacific Branch, Main Mental Health Building, 11301 Wilshire Boulevard, West Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. 16. RETAIL VIEW, LOOKING NORTHWEST, OF DUNDEE DAM DEDICATION PLAQUE: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. RETAIL VIEW, LOOKING NORTHWEST, OF DUNDEE DAM DEDICATION PLAQUE: - Dundee Canal, Headgates, Guardlock & Uppermost Section, 250 feet northeast of Randolph Avenue, opposite & in line with East Clifton Avenue, Clifton, Passaic County, NJ

  18. 156. 1932 UNITED DAUGHTERS OF CONFEDERACY, DISTRICT CHAPTERS MEMORIAL PLAQUE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    156. 1932 UNITED DAUGHTERS OF CONFEDERACY, DISTRICT CHAPTERS MEMORIAL PLAQUE AND REPLACEMENT RED OAK MEMORIAL PLANTING. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  19. 30. Bronze plaque located on southern inner wall at east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Bronze plaque located on southern inner wall at east end of south pier taken looking southeast - Duluth Ship Canal, South Pier, North end of Minnesota Point & Canal Park, Duluth, St. Louis County, MN

  20. VIEW TO THE SOUTHEAST. MEMORIAL WITH BRONZE PLAQUE IN HONOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW TO THE SOUTHEAST. MEMORIAL WITH BRONZE PLAQUE IN HONOR OF KELLER, MARKS THE CENTER OF THE BRIDGE. - Keller Memorial Bridge, Spanning Tennessee River at U.S. Highway 31, Decatur, Morgan County, AL

  1. Limestone and bronze "Mississippi River Crossing" Bridge plaque located at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Limestone and bronze "Mississippi River Crossing" Bridge plaque located at North corner of Administration Building site - Huey P. Long Bridge, Administration Building, 5100 Jefferson Highway, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  2. PORT HUDSON NATIONAL CEMETERY PLAQUE, FORMERLY MOUNTED AT BASE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PORT HUDSON NATIONAL CEMETERY PLAQUE, FORMERLY MOUNTED AT BASE OF FLAGPOLE, PRESENTLY STORED IN SERVICE BUILDING. VIEW TO WEST. - Port Hudson National Cemetery, 20978 Port Hickey Road, Zachary, East Baton Rouge Parish, LA

  3. HISTORIC IMAGE: VIEW OF FLAGPOLE AND ARTILLERY MONUMENTS WITH PLAQUE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HISTORIC IMAGE: VIEW OF FLAGPOLE AND ARTILLERY MONUMENTS WITH PLAQUE IN FOREGROUND. PHOTOGRAPH CA. 1920S-30S. CEMETERY MAINTENANCE LEDGER, NCA HISTORY COLLECTION. - Alexandria National Cemetery, 1450 Wilkes Street, Alexandria, Independent City, VA

  4. Scientists Reduce Alzheimer's-Linked Brain Plaques in Mice

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Scientists Reduce Alzheimer's-Linked Brain Plaques in Mice Team used gene therapy, but there's no guarantee ... March 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists working with mice report preliminary progress in efforts to eliminate brain- ...

  5. 6. VIEW OF COMMEMORATIVE PLAQUE, EAST APPROACH GUARDRAIL, WHICH STATES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF COMMEMORATIVE PLAQUE, EAST APPROACH GUARDRAIL, WHICH STATES 'SALINE RIVER; ARK. GENERAL CONST. CO.; CONTRACTOR; ARKANSAS; STATE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT; 1928, BRIDGE NO. __.' - Saline River Bridge, County Highway 365 across Saline River, Benton, Saline County, AR

  6. HISTORIC IMAGE: VIEW OF MEIGS LODGE, WITH PLAQUE IN FOREGROUND. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HISTORIC IMAGE: VIEW OF MEIGS LODGE, WITH PLAQUE IN FOREGROUND. PHOTOGRAPH CA. 1930S. CEMETERY MAINTENANCE LEDGER, NCA HISTORY COLLECTION. - Alexandria National Cemetery, 1450 Wilkes Street, Alexandria, Independent City, VA

  7. 32. STUDIO VIEW OF PLAQUE PLACED ON MILL HOUSE AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. STUDIO VIEW OF PLAQUE PLACED ON MILL HOUSE AT TIME OF COMPLETION, COMMEMORATING EDWARD J. LUKE (SEE TEXT) - Sperry Corn Elevator Complex, Weber Avenue (North side), West of Edison Street, Stockton, San Joaquin County, CA

  8. 38. 100 foot through truss bridge original identification plaque ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. 100 foot through truss - bridge original identification plaque located on the top of the north portal entrance. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  9. Intracoronary Imaging in the Detection of Vulnerable Plaques.

    PubMed

    Batty, Jonathan A; Subba, Shristy; Luke, Peter; Gigi, Li Wing Chi; Sinclair, Hannah; Kunadian, Vijay

    2016-03-01

    Coronary artery disease is the result of atherosclerotic changes to the coronary arterial wall, comprising endothelial dysfunction, vascular inflammation and deposition of lipid-rich macrophage foam cells. Certain high-risk atherosclerotic plaques are vulnerable to disruption, leading to rupture, thrombosis and the clinical sequelae of acute coronary syndrome. Though recognised as the gold standard for evaluating the presence, distribution and severity of atherosclerotic lesions, invasive coronary angiography is incapable of identifying non-stenotic, vulnerable plaques that are responsible for adverse cardiovascular events. The recognition of such limitations has impelled the development of intracoronary imaging technologies, including intravascular ultrasound, optical coherence tomography and near-infrared spectroscopy, which enable the detailed evaluation of the coronary wall and atherosclerotic plaques in clinical practice. This review discusses the present status of invasive imaging technologies; summarises up-to-date, evidence-based clinical guidelines; and addresses questions that remain unanswered with regard to the future of intracoronary plaque imaging. PMID:26879196

  10. 26. BOLLING MEMORIAL GROVE PLAQUE, AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, OLD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. BOLLING MEMORIAL GROVE PLAQUE, AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, OLD HIGHWAY 101. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING E. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  11. 33. HISTORIC PLAQUE MARKING WHERE JOHNSTON DIED, ADJACENT TO PATHWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. HISTORIC PLAQUE MARKING WHERE JOHNSTON DIED, ADJACENT TO PATHWAY WITH CONCRETE CULVERT LEADING NORTH OUT OF RAVINE TOWARD JOHNSTON MEMORIAL SITE. VIEW NW. - Shiloh National Military Park Tour Roads, Shiloh, Hardin County, TN

  12. Contemporary carotid imaging: from degree of stenosis to plaque vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Brinjikji, Waleed; Huston, John; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Kim, Gyeong-Moon; Lerman, Amir; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Carotid artery stenosis is a well-established risk factor of ischemic stroke, contributing to up to 10%-20% of strokes or transient ischemic attacks. Many clinical trials over the last 20 years have used measurements of carotid artery stenosis as a means to risk stratify patients. However, with improvements in vascular imaging techniques such as CT angiography and MR angiography, ultrasonography, and PET/CT, it is now possible to risk stratify patients, not just on the degree of carotid artery stenosis but also on how vulnerable the plaque is to rupture, resulting in ischemic stroke. These imaging techniques are ushering in an emerging paradigm shift that allows for risk stratifications based on the presence of imaging features such as intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH), plaque ulceration, plaque neovascularity, fibrous cap thickness, and presence of a lipid-rich necrotic core (LRNC). It is important for the neurosurgeon to be aware of these new imaging techniques that allow for improved patient risk stratification and outcomes. For example, a patient with a low-grade stenosis but an ulcerated plaque may benefit more from a revascularization procedure than a patient with a stable 70% asymptomatic stenosis with a thick fibrous cap. This review summarizes the current state-of-the-art advances in carotid plaque imaging. Currently, MRI is the gold standard in carotid plaque imaging, with its high resolution and high sensitivity for identifying IPH, ulceration, LRNC, and inflammation. However, MRI is limited due to time constraints. CT also allows for high-resolution imaging and can accurately detect ulceration and calcification, but cannot reliably differentiate LRNC from IPH. PET/CT is an effective technique to identify active inflammation within the plaque, but it does not allow for assessment of anatomy, ulceration, IPH, or LRNC. Ultrasonography, with the aid of contrast enhancement, is a cost-effective technique to assess plaque morphology and characteristics, but it is limited in sensitivity and specificity for detecting LRNC, plaque hemorrhage, and ulceration compared with MRI. Also summarized is how these advanced imaging techniques are being used in clinical practice to risk stratify patients with low- and high-grade carotid artery stenosis. For example, identification of IPH on MRI in patients with low-grade carotid artery stenosis is a risk factor for failure of medical therapy, and studies have shown that such patients may fair better with carotid endarterectomy (CEA). MR plaque imaging has also been found to be useful in identifying revascularization candidates who would be better candidates for CEA than carotid artery stenting (CAS), as high intraplaque signal on time of flight imaging is associated with vulnerable plaque and increased rates of adverse events in patients undergoing CAS but not CEA. PMID:26230478

  13. Detail of plaque beneath column on the south parapet at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of plaque beneath column on the south parapet at the west end of the bridge. The plaque reads “1914; Mayor E.J. Drussel; Councilmen E.S. Henry, E.F. Hogan, R.P. Lamdin, C.F. Ross, J.H. Shuppert; Leonard & Day, Engineers; C.H. Gildersleeve, Builder.” - First Street Bridge, Spanning Napa River at First Street between Soscol Avenue & Juarez Street, Napa, Napa County, CA

  14. An interactive treatment planning system for ophthalmic plaque radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Astrahan, M A; Luxton, G; Jozsef, G; Kampp, T D; Liggett, P E; Sapozink, M D; Petrovich, Z

    1990-03-01

    Brachytherapy using removable episcleral plaques containing sealed radioisotope sources is being studied as an alternative to enucleation in the treatment of choroidal melanoma and other tumors of the eye. Encouraging early results have been reported, but late complications which lead to loss of vision continue to be a problem. A randomized national study, the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS) is currently in progress to evaluate the procedure. The COMS specified isotope is 125I. Precise dosimetric calculations near the plaque may correlate strongly with complications and could also be used to optimize isotope loading patterns in the plaques. A microcomputer based treatment planning system has been developed for ophthalmic plaque brachytherapy. The program incorporates an interactive, 3-dimensional, solid-surface, color-graphic interface. The program currently supports 125I and 192Ir seeds which are treated as anisotropic line sources. Collimation effects related to plaque structure are accounted for, permitting detailed study of shielding effectiveness near the lip of a plaque. A dose distribution matrix may be calculated in any subregion of a transverse, sagittal, or coronal planar cross section of the eye, in any plane transecting the plaque and crossing the eye diametrically, or on a spherical surface within or surrounding the eye. Spherical surfaces may be displayed as 3-dimensional perspective projections or as funduscopic diagrams. Isodose contours are interpolated from the dose matrix. A pointer is also available to explicitly calculate and display dose at any location on the dosimetry surface. An interactive editing capability allows new plaque designs to be rapidly added to the system. PMID:2318702

  15. Urease and Dental Plaque Microbial Profiles in Children

    PubMed Central

    Morou-Bermudez, Evangelia; Rodriguez, Selena; Bello, Angel S.; Dominguez-Bello, Maria G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Urease enzymes produced by oral bacteria generate ammonia, which can have a significant impact on the oral ecology and, consequently, on oral health. To evaluate the relationship of urease with dental plaque microbial profiles in children as it relates to dental caries, and to identify the main contributors to this activity. Methods 82 supragingival plaque samples were collected from 44 children at baseline and one year later, as part of a longitudinal study on urease and caries in children. DNA was extracted; the V3–V5 region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced using 454 pyrosequencing. Urease activity was measured using a spectrophotometric assay. Data were analyzed with Qiime. Results Plaque urease activity was significantly associated with the composition of the microbial communities of the dental plaque (Baseline P = 0.027, One Year P = 0.012). The bacterial taxa whose proportion in dental plaque exhibited significant variation by plaque urease levels in both visits were the family Pasteurellaceae (Baseline P<0.001; One Year P = 0.0148), especially Haemophilus parainfluenzae. No association was observed between these bacteria and dental caries. Bacteria in the genus Leptotrichia were negatively associated with urease and positively associated with dental caries (Bonferroni P<0.001). Conclusions Alkali production by urease enzymes primarily from species in the family Pasteurellaceae can be an important ecological determinant in children’s dental plaque. Further studies are needed to establish the role of urease-associated bacteria in the acid/base homeostasis of the dental plaque, and in the development and prediction of dental caries in children. PMID:26418220

  16. Effect of rinse with calcium enriched milk on plaque fluid.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M; Matsunaga, K; Kadoma, Y

    1999-09-01

    Previous research has shown that rinsing the mouth with milk significantly diminished the pH in dental plaque fluid; however, the degree of saturation with respect to the dental enamel (DS) was not significantly decreased because of an increase in the calcium ion concentration in plaque fluid. The aim of this study was to investigate the cariostatic effect of adding calcium to milk on the DS value of the plaque fluid after rinsing. Plaque samples were collected from 8 Japanese male dental students. Prior to plaque collection, all subjects refrained from practicing oral hygiene for 48 hr and fasted overnight. Supragingival plaque samples were collected from one side of the mouth of each subject, and then collected from the other side, following a 30-second rinse with 15 mL of calcium-enriched milk, which was prepared by adding calcium carbonate to ordinary milk, and a 10-minute waiting period. The samples were cleared by centrifugation, and the plaque fluid was analyzed for inorganic ions and pH, using an ion chromatograph and pH microelectrode, respectively. The calcium ion concentration of the milk was 6.4 mM, which was about 36% higher than that of ordinary milk. The pH decreased significantly (p<5%) from 6.4 to 6.1 following the rinse with calcium enriched milk, as tested by the paired t-test. The decrease in pH might have caused a reduction of the DS value; however, it was compensated for by a significant (p<0.5%) increase in the calcium ion concentration of plaque fluid. PMID:12160258

  17. Fully automatic plaque segmentation in 3-D carotid ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jieyu; Li, He; Xiao, Feng; Fenster, Aaron; Zhang, Xuming; He, Xiaoling; Li, Ling; Ding, Mingyue

    2013-12-01

    Automatic segmentation of the carotid plaques from ultrasound images has been shown to be an important task for monitoring progression and regression of carotid atherosclerosis. Considering the complex structure and heterogeneity of plaques, a fully automatic segmentation method based on media-adventitia and lumen-intima boundary priors is proposed. This method combines image intensity with structure information in both initialization and a level-set evolution process. Algorithm accuracy was examined on the common carotid artery part of 26 3-D carotid ultrasound images (34 plaques ranging in volume from 2.5 to 456 mm(3)) by comparing the results of our algorithm with manual segmentations of two experts. Evaluation results indicated that the algorithm yielded total plaque volume (TPV) differences of -5.3 ± 12.7 and -8.5 ± 13.8 mm(3) and absolute TPV differences of 9.9 ± 9.5 and 11.8 ± 11.1 mm(3). Moreover, high correlation coefficients in generating TPV (0.993 and 0.992) between algorithm results and both sets of manual results were obtained. The automatic method provides a reliable way to segment carotid plaque in 3-D ultrasound images and can be used in clinical practice to estimate plaque measurements for management of carotid atherosclerosis. PMID:24063959

  18. Visfatin Destabilizes Atherosclerotic Plaques in Apolipoprotein E–Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Bin; Wang, Jitao; Qi, Tianjun; Zhang, Hui; Li, Tao; Zhao, Peiqing; Sun, Hui; Xu, Jia; Song, Haibo; Dong, Zhe; An, Fengshuang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Although there is evidence that visfatin is associated with atherogenesis, the effect of visfatin on plaque stability has not yet been explored. Methods In vivo, vulnerable plaques were established by carotid collar placement in apolipoprotein E–deficient (ApoE−/−) mice, and lentivirus expressing visfatin (lenti-visfatin) was locally infused in the carotid artery. The lipid, macrophage, smooth muscle cell (SMC) and collagen levels were evaluated, and the vulnerability index was calculated. In vitro, RAW264.7 cells were stimulated with visfatin, and the MMPs expressions were assessed by western blot and immunofluorescence. And the mechanism that involved in visfatin-induced MMP-8 production was investigated. Results Transfection with lenti-visfatin significantly promoted the expression of visfatin which mainly expressed in macrophages in the plaque. Lenti-visfatin transfection significantly promoted the accumulation of lipids and macrophages, modulated the phenotypes of smooth muscle cells and decreased the collagen levels in the plaques, which significantly decreased the plaque stability. Simultaneously, transfection with lenti-visfatin significantly up-regulated the expression of MMP-8 in vivo, as well as MMP-1, MMP-2 and MMP-9. Recombinant visfatin dose- and time-dependently up-regulated the in vitro expression of MMP-8 in macrophages. Visfatin promoted the translocation of NF-κB, and inhibition of NF-κB significantly reduced visfatin-induced MMP-8 production. Conclusions Visfatin increased MMP-8 expression, promoted collagen degradation and increased the plaques vulnerability index. PMID:26848572

  19. Preliminary study of the detectability of coronary plaque with PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delso, G.; Martinez-Möller, A.; Bundschuh, R. A.; Nekolla, S. G.; Ziegler, S. I.; Schwaiger, M.

    2011-04-01

    The evaluation of coronary plaque vulnerability could be of great diagnostic value in cardiology. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a good candidate due to its ability to quantify micromolar concentrations of targeted drugs. However, the detectability of sub-voxel targets such as coronary plaque is limited by partial volume effects and by cardiorespiratory motion. The goal of this paper is to investigate the impact of these factors in the detectability of plaque uptake. Radioactive markers were implanted on the epicardium of a pig and in vivo scans were performed. This was complemented with phantom measurements to determine the minimum detectable uptake as a function of background activity. Simulations were used to evaluate the effect of cardiorespiratory motion on the reconstructed lesions. Despite cardiorespiratory motion of up to 7 mm, the markers were detectable in the in vivo scans even after the injection of background. A lower limit of 250 Bq was found for a target to be detectable. Motion reduced the contrast of the reconstructed lesions to 23% of their static counterpart. Respiratory gating improved this to 49% of the static value. The results suggest that coronary plaque evaluation with PET is possible, provided that sufficient plaque-to-myocardium uptake contrast (50 to 100) can be achieved. This requirement increases exponentially for lesions with uptake below 250 Bq. The described experiments provide a means of estimating the minimum uptake and contrast required to ensure the detectability of plaque lesions.

  20. Effects of dietary flaxseed on atherosclerotic plaque regression.

    PubMed

    Francis, Andrew A; Deniset, Justin F; Austria, Jose A; LaValleé, Renee K; Maddaford, Graham G; Hedley, Thomas E; Dibrov, Elena; Pierce, Grant N

    2013-06-15

    Dietary flaxseed can retard the progression of atherosclerotic plaques. However, it remains unclear whether these antiatherogenic effects extend to plaque regression. In the present study, the therapeutic potential of dietary flaxseed on atherosclerotic plaque regression and vascular contractile function was evaluated using a novel rabbit model. Rabbits were randomly assigned to receive either a regular diet for 12 wk (group I) or a 1% cholesterol-supplemented diet for 4 wk followed by a regular diet for 8 wk (group II). The remaining experimental animals were treated as in group II but were fed for an additional 14 wk with either a regular diet (group III) or a 10% flaxseed-supplemented diet (group IV). Animals in group II showed clear evidence of plaque growth stabilization. Their vessels also exhibited significantly lower norepinephrine-induced contraction and an impaired relaxation response to acetylcholine compared with animals in group I. Dietary flaxseed supplementation resulted in a significant ≈40% reduction in plaque formation (P = 0.033). Animals in both groups II and III displayed improved contraction and endothelium-dependent vessel relaxation. Dietary flaxseed is a valuable strategy to accelerate the regression of atherosclerotic plaques; however, flaxseed intervention did not demonstrate a clear beneficial effect on the vessel contractile response and endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. PMID:23585134

  1. Immunological responses to bacterial plaque in the mouth.

    PubMed

    Lehner, T

    A heavy load of bacteria, referred to as dental plaque, accumulates at the junction between the teeth and gum. Bacterial plaque may be considered to have three functional components: (a) cariogenic organisms, (b) organisms inducing gingival inflammation and periodontal disease, and (c) adjuvant and tolerizing agents, such as lipopolysaccharides, dextrans and levans. Sequential investigation of plaque accumulation in man has shown a correlation between gingival inflammation and both lymphocyte transformation and macrophage migration inhibition. An adjuvant effect of in vivo plaque accumulation was manifested by the enhancement of T lymphocytes in the mixed leucocyte culture reaction and of B lymphocytes, as shown by the increased response to lipopolysaccharide. It may be significant that a substantial component of bacterial plaque consists of dextrans and levans, produced by certain streptococci and actinomyces, and lipopolysaccharides from Gram-negative bacteria. These bacterial products are B cell mitogens which may have an adjuvant or tolerizing effect on immune responses. The relationships between immunogenicity, mitogenicity, adjuvanticity and tolerogenicity of lipopolysaccharides, levan and dextran have not been clearly defined. However, important variables of the polyglycans are the molecular weight, type of branching, negative charge, epitope density, degradability, dosage and the sequence between mitogen and antigen. Dental plaque in man is a focus of B cell mitogens and T cell antigens which may modulate the immune responses in such a way as to induce a protective response in the development of caries and a damaging response in periodontal disease. PMID:346320

  2. Dosimetry for 125I seed (model 6711) in eye plaques.

    PubMed

    Chiu-Tsao, S T; Anderson, L L; O'Brien, K; Stabile, L; Liu, J C

    1993-01-01

    The effect of eye plaque materials (gold backing and silastic seed-carrier insert) on the dose distribution around a single 125I seed has been measured, using cubic lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) 1 mm on an edge, in a solid water eye phantom embedded in a solid water head phantom. With an 125I seed (model 6711) positioned in the center slot of the silastic insert for a 20-mm plaque of the design used in the collaborative ocular melanoma study (COMS), dose was measured at 2-mm intervals along the plaque central axis (the seed's transverse axis) and at various off-axis points, both with and without the COMS gold backing placed over the insert. Monte Carlo calculations (MORSE code) were performed, as well, for these configurations and closely the same geometry but assuming a large natural water phantom. Additional Monte Carlo calculations treated the case, both for 20- and 12-mm gold plaques, where the silastic insert is replaced by natural water. Relative to previous measurements taken in homogeneous medium of the same material (without the eye plaque), the dose reduction found by both Monte Carlo and TLD methods was greater at points farther from the seed along the central axis and, for a given central-axis depth, at larger off-axis distances. Removal of the gold backing from the plaque did not make measurable difference in the dose reduction results (10% at 1 cm). PMID:8497229

  3. Replica study of plaque formation on human tooth surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lie, T; Gusberti, F

    1979-01-01

    Plaque formation on buccal tooth surfaces was studied by replica technique, consisting of impressions using low viscosity silicone impression materials and positive models produced in epoxy resins. Bacterial accumulation occurred near the cemento-enamel junction in 6-hr specimens, and subsequently expanded in a coronal direction. This development took place partly by extensions of single layers of bacteria, and partly by a pattern where the colonization was mostly restricted to vertical enamel cracks. Plaque accumulations were also frequently located in abrasion grooves and surface pits in the enamel, and prolific plaque areas were consistently surrounded by a monolayer of bacterial cells. Globular and hemispheric structures which occurred, especially on root surfaces immediately after cleaning, were probably artefacts caused by air bubbles or remaining moisture. In separate series of experiments it was demonstrated that improved reproduction of details from the plaque could be achieved by repeating the replicating procedure. The findings indicate that plaque formation starts by adsorption and proliferation of individual bacteria on tooth surfaces, and not by adsorption of aggregates of cells. Special attention should be directed against the problem of artefacts and moisture in replica studies of dental plaque. PMID:375661

  4. MRI-based biomechanical parameters for carotid artery plaque vulnerability assessment.

    PubMed

    Speelman, Lambert; Teng, Zhongzhao; Nederveen, Aart J; van der Lugt, Aad; Gillard, Jonathan H

    2016-02-29

    Carotid atherosclerotic plaques are a major cause of ischaemic stroke. The biomechanical environment to which the arterial wall and plaque is subjected to plays an important role in the initiation, progression and rupture of carotid plaques. MRI is frequently used to characterize the morphology of a carotid plaque, but new developments in MRI enable more functional assessment of carotid plaques. In this review, MRI based biomechanical parameters are evaluated on their current status, clinical applicability, and future developments. Blood flow related biomechanical parameters, including endothelial wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index, have been shown to be related to plaque formation. Deriving these parameters directly from MRI flow measurements is feasible and has great potential for future carotid plaque development prediction. Blood pressure induced stresses in a plaque may exceed the tissue strength, potentially leading to plaque rupture. Multi-contrast MRI based stress calculations in combination with tissue strength assessment based on MRI inflammation imaging may provide a plaque stress-strength balance that can be used to assess the plaque rupture risk potential. Direct plaque strain analysis based on dynamic MRI is already able to identify local plaque displacement during the cardiac cycle. However, clinical evidence linking MRI strain to plaque vulnerability is still lacking. MRI based biomechanical parameters may lead to improved assessment of carotid plaque development and rupture risk. However, better MRI systems and faster sequences are required to improve the spatial and temporal resolution, as well as increase the image contrast and signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:26791734

  5. Can anti-erosion dentifrices also provide effective plaque control?

    PubMed Central

    Bellamy, PG; Prendergast, M; Strand, R; Yu, Z; Day, TN; Barker, ML; Mussett, AJ

    2011-01-01

    Objective: While gingivitis and caries continue to be prevalent issues, there is growing concern about dental erosion induced by dietary acids. An oral hygiene product that protects against all these conditions would be beneficial. This study investigated the potential of two anti-erosion dentifrices to inhibit plaque. Methods: This was a randomized, three-period, two-treatment, double-blind, crossover study evaluating a stannous chloride/sodium fluoride dentifrice (SnCl2/NaF, blend-a-med® Pro Expert) and a popular anti-erosion dentifrice (NaF, Sensodyne® ProNamel™). During Period 3, subjects were randomized to repeat one treatment to evaluate any product carryover effects. Each treatment period was 17 days. Test dentifrices were used with a standard manual toothbrush. Digital plaque image analysis (DPIA) was employed at the end of each period to evaluate plaque levels (i) overnight (am prebrush); (ii) post-brushing with the test product (am post-brush); and (iii) mid-afternoon (pm). Analysis was conducted via an objective computer algorithm, which calculated total area of visible plaque. Results: Twenty-seven subjects completed the study. At all time points, subjects had statistically significantly (P ≤ 0.0001) lower plaque levels after using the SnCl2/NaF dentifrice than the NaF dentifrice. The antiplaque benefit for the SnCl2/NaF dentifrice versus the NaF dentifrice was: am prebrush = 26.0%; am post-brushing = 27.9%; pm = 25.7%. Conclusions: The SnCl2/NaF dentifrice provided significantly greater daytime and overnight plaque inhibition than the NaF toothpaste. When recommending dentifrice to patients susceptible to dental erosion, clinicians can consider one that also inhibits plaque. PMID:21356021

  6. Macrophage-targeted photodynamic detection of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, Michael R.; Tawakol, Ahmed; Castano, Ana P.; Gad, Faten; Zahra, Touqir; Ahmadi, Atosa; Stern, Jeremy; Ortel, Bernhard; Chirico, Stephanie; Shirazi, Azadeh; Syed, Sakeena; Muller, James E.

    2003-06-01

    Rupture of a vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque (VP) leading to coronary thrombosis is the chief cause of sudden cardiac death. VPs are angiographically insignificant lesions, which are excessively inflamed and characterized by dense macrophage infiltration, large necrotic lipid cores, thin fibrous caps, and paucity of smooth muscle cells. We have recently shown that chlorin(e6) conjugated with maleylated albumin can target macrophages with high selectivity via the scavenger receptor. We report the potential of this macrophage-targeted fluorescent probe to localize in VPs in a rabbit model of atherosclerosis, and allow detection and/or diagnosis by fluorescence spectroscopy or imaging. Atherosclerotic lesions were induced in New Zealand White rabbit aortas by balloon injury followed by administration of a high-fat diet. 24-hours after IV injection of the conjugate into atherosclerotic or normal rabbits, the animals were sacrificed, and aortas were removed, dissected and examined for fluorescence localization in plaques by fiber-based spectrofluorimetry and confocal microscopy. Dye uptake within the aortas was also quantified by fluorescence extraction of samples from aorta segments. Biodistribution of the dye was studied in many organs of the rabbits. Surface spectrofluorimetry after conjugate injection was able to distinguish between plaque and adjacent aorta, between atherosclerotic and normal aorta, and balloon-injured and normal iliac arteries with high significance. Discrete areas of high fluorescence (up to 20 times control were detected in the balloon-injured segments, presumably corresponding to macrophage-rich plaques. Confocal microscopy showed red ce6 fluorescence localized in plaques that showed abundant foam cells and macrophages by histology. Extraction data on aortic tissue corroborated the selectivity of the conjugate for plaques. These data support the strategy of employing macrophage-targeted fluorescent dyes to detect VP by intravascular spectrofluorimetry. It may also be possible to use macrophage-targeted PDT to therapeutically modify inflammatory cell-laden VPs leading to plaque stabilization and reduction of sudden cardiovascular death.

  7. Survival of human dental plaque flora in various transport media.

    PubMed

    Syed, S A; Loesche, W J

    1972-10-01

    Dental plaque samples from (i) subjects with no apparent oral disease, (ii) mentally retarded subjects with periodontal disease, and (iii) subjects with active caries were collected in three transport media viz. a dithiothreitol poised balanced mineral salt solution designated as reduced transport fluid (RTF), VMG II, and modified Stuart medium (SBL). The samples were dispersed by sonic treatment, diluted in the respective medium in which they were collected, and cultured on MM10 sucrose agar. The efficiency of the transport media in the survival of dental plaque flora was determined by comparing the quantitative recovery (expressed as percentage of the initial viable count) from the specimens stored for various lengths of time. The data showed a great variation in the recovery of the oral bacterial flora from the plaque samples. VMG II and SBL served better than RTF as storage media for non-disease-associated dental plaque cultured under strict anaerobic conditions. Recoveries of bacteria from periodontal plaque specimens stored in RTF were higher than SBL and VMG II under identical conditions. The organisms present in the carious plaque samples appeared to survive much better in RTF and VMG II than in SBL as determined by conventional anaerobic culturing technique. However, VMG II showed a higher recovery of organisms from these specimens with an increase in the storage period, suggesting multiplication of the plaque flora. RTF did not allow the growth of oral bacterial flora under all experimental conditions. On the basis of the relative performance of these media it is suggested that RTF is a satisfactory medium for the transport of oral bacteria present in the samples. PMID:4628799

  8. Fluorescence immunoassay for detecting periodontal bacterial pathogens in plaque.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, L F; Anderson, L; Sandberg, G P; Aeppli, D M; Shelburne, C E

    1991-01-01

    A particle concentration fluorescence immunoassay has been modified into a bacterial concentration fluorescence immunoassay (BCFIA) to rapidly detect periodontopathic bacteria in human plaque samples. The BCFIA utilizes fluorescently tagged monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against the lipopolysaccharide of selected gram-negative plaque bacteria. Microorganisms closely associated with periodontal disease that can be identified in plaque with the BCFIA include Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bacteroides intermedius, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Eikenella corrodens. Briefly, the procedure involved mixing a patient's plaque sample or other bacterial preparation with a species-specific fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled MAb in a specialized microtiter plate. This mixture was incubated to allow binding of the MAb to its homologous bacteria. The bound and unbound fluorescent tagged MAbs were separated by filtration in the modified microtiter plate, and the total bacterial bound fluorescence was determined with a fluorimeter. The number of a specific bacterial species in a given plaque sample or other bacterial suspension was estimated by reference to a primary standard carried through the BCFIA. The lower detection limit of the BCFIA was 10(3) to 10(4) bacterial cells from single cultures of bacteria or 10(4) bacterial cells in mixed cultures. The coefficient of variation within and between plates for each of the five bacterium-specific MAbs in screening plaque for the periodontal pathogens was less than 10%. These results demonstrate that microbes in plaque can be used as the solid phase in the BCFIA to detect and quantitate MAbs associated with specific bacteria quickly and reliably. PMID:1761686

  9. Individuality, Stability, and Variability of the Plaque Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Utter, Daniel R; Mark Welch, Jessica L; Borisy, Gary G

    2016-01-01

    Dental plaque is a bacterial biofilm composed of a characteristic set of organisms. Relatively little information from cultivation-independent, high-throughput analyses has been published on the temporal dynamics of the dental plaque microbiome. We used Minimum Entropy Decomposition, an information theory-based approach similar to oligotyping that provides single-nucleotide resolution, to analyze a previously published time series data set and investigate the dynamics of the plaque microbiome at various analytic and taxonomic levels. At both the genus and 97% Operational Taxonomic Unit (OTU) levels of resolution, the range of variation within each individual overlapped that of other individuals in the data set. When analyzed at the oligotype level, however, the overlap largely disappeared, showing that single-nucleotide resolution enables differentiation of individuals from one another without ambiguity. The overwhelming majority of the plaque community in all samples was made up of bacteria from a moderate number of plaque-typical genera, indicating that the overall community framework is shared among individuals. Each of these genera fluctuated in abundance around a stable mean that varied between individuals, with some genera having higher inter-individual variability than others. Thus, at the genus level, differences between individuals lay not in the identity of the major genera but in consistently differing proportions of these genera from mouth to mouth. However, at the oligotype level, we detected oligotype "fingerprints," a highly individual-specific set of persistently abundant oligotypes fluctuating around a stable mean over time. For example, within the genus Corynebacterium, more than a dozen oligotypes were detectable in each individual, of which a different subset reached high abundance in any given person. This pattern suggests that each mouth contains a subtly different community of organisms. We also compared the Chinese plaque community characterized here to previously characterized Western plaque communities, as represented by analyses of data emerging from the Human Microbiome Project, and found no major differences between Chinese and Western supragingival plaque. In conclusion, we found the plaque microbiome to be highly individualized at the oligotype level and characterized by stability of community membership, with variability in the relative abundance of community members between individuals and over time. PMID:27148241

  10. Identifying Vulnerable Plaques with Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Joshua Ryan

    The rupture of arterial plaques is the most common cause of ischemic complications including stroke, the fourth leading cause of death and number one cause of long term disability in the United States. Unfortunately, because conventional diagnostic tools fail to identify plaques that confer the highest risk, often a disabling stroke and/or sudden death is the first sign of disease. A diagnostic method capable of characterizing plaque vulnerability would likely enhance the predictive ability and ultimately the treatment of stroke before the onset of clinical events. This dissertation evaluates the hypothesis that Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging can noninvasively identify lipid regions, that have been shown to increase a plaque's propensity to rupture, within carotid artery plaques in vivo. The work detailed herein describes development efforts and results from simulations and experiments that were performed to evaluate this hypothesis. To first demonstrate feasibility and evaluate potential safety concerns, finite- element method simulations are used to model the response of carotid artery plaques to an acoustic radiation force excitation. Lipid pool visualization is shown to vary as a function of lipid pool geometry and stiffness. A comparison of the resulting Von Mises stresses indicates that stresses induced by an ARFI excitation are three orders of magnitude lower than those induced by blood pressure. This thesis also presents the development of a novel pulse inversion harmonic tracking method to reduce clutter-imposed errors in ultrasound-based tissue displacement estimates. This method is validated in phantoms and was found to reduce bias and jitter displacement errors for a marked improvement in image quality in vivo. Lastly, this dissertation presents results from a preliminary in vivo study that compares ARFI imaging derived plaque stiffness with spatially registered composition determined by a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) gold standard in human carotid artery plaques. It is shown in this capstone experiment that lipid filled regions in MRI correspond to areas of increased displacement in ARFI imaging while calcium and loose matrix components in MRI correspond to uniformly low displacements in ARFI imaging. This dissertation provides evidence to support that ARFI imaging may provide important prognostic and diagnostic information regarding stroke risk via measurements of plaque stiffness. More generally, the results have important implications for all acoustic radiation force based imaging methods used clinically.

  11. Individuality, Stability, and Variability of the Plaque Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Utter, Daniel R.; Mark Welch, Jessica L.; Borisy, Gary G.

    2016-01-01

    Dental plaque is a bacterial biofilm composed of a characteristic set of organisms. Relatively little information from cultivation-independent, high-throughput analyses has been published on the temporal dynamics of the dental plaque microbiome. We used Minimum Entropy Decomposition, an information theory-based approach similar to oligotyping that provides single-nucleotide resolution, to analyze a previously published time series data set and investigate the dynamics of the plaque microbiome at various analytic and taxonomic levels. At both the genus and 97% Operational Taxonomic Unit (OTU) levels of resolution, the range of variation within each individual overlapped that of other individuals in the data set. When analyzed at the oligotype level, however, the overlap largely disappeared, showing that single-nucleotide resolution enables differentiation of individuals from one another without ambiguity. The overwhelming majority of the plaque community in all samples was made up of bacteria from a moderate number of plaque-typical genera, indicating that the overall community framework is shared among individuals. Each of these genera fluctuated in abundance around a stable mean that varied between individuals, with some genera having higher inter-individual variability than others. Thus, at the genus level, differences between individuals lay not in the identity of the major genera but in consistently differing proportions of these genera from mouth to mouth. However, at the oligotype level, we detected oligotype “fingerprints,” a highly individual-specific set of persistently abundant oligotypes fluctuating around a stable mean over time. For example, within the genus Corynebacterium, more than a dozen oligotypes were detectable in each individual, of which a different subset reached high abundance in any given person. This pattern suggests that each mouth contains a subtly different community of organisms. We also compared the Chinese plaque community characterized here to previously characterized Western plaque communities, as represented by analyses of data emerging from the Human Microbiome Project, and found no major differences between Chinese and Western supragingival plaque. In conclusion, we found the plaque microbiome to be highly individualized at the oligotype level and characterized by stability of community membership, with variability in the relative abundance of community members between individuals and over time. PMID:27148241

  12. Gamma mixture classifier for plaque detection in intravascular ultrasonic images.

    PubMed

    Vegas-Sánchez-Ferrero, Gonzalo; Seabra, José; Rodriguez-Leor, Oriol; Serrano-Vida, Angel; Aja-Fernández, Santiago; Palencia, César; Martín-Fernández, Marcos; Sanches, Joao

    2014-01-01

    Carotid and coronary vascular incidents are mostly caused by vulnerable plaques. Detection and characterization of vulnerable plaques are important for early disease diagnosis and treatment. For this purpose, the echomorphology and composition have been studied. Several distributions have been used to describe ultrasonic data depending on tissues, acquisition conditions, and equipment. Among them, the Rayleigh distribution is a one-parameter model used to describe the raw envelope RF ultrasound signal for its simplicity, whereas the Nakagami distribution (a generalization of the Rayleigh distribution) is the two-parameter model which is commonly accepted. However, it fails to describe B-mode images or Cartesian interpolated or subsampled RF images because linear filtering changes the statistics of the signal. In this work, a gamma mixture model (GMM) is proposed to describe the subsampled/interpolated RF images and it is shown that the parameters and coefficients of the mixture are useful descriptors of speckle pattern for different types of plaque tissues. This new model outperforms recently proposed probabilistic and textural methods with respect to plaque description and characterization of echogenic contents. Classification results provide an overall accuracy of 86.56% for four classes and 95.16% for three classes. These results evidence the classifier usefulness for plaque characterization. Additionally, the classifier provides probability maps according to each tissue type, which can be displayed for inspecting local tissue composition, or used for automatic filtering and segmentation. PMID:24402895

  13. Radionuclide imaging - A molecular key to the atherosclerotic plaque

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Harald Franz; Haubner, Roland; Pichler, Bernd Juergen; Gawaz, Meinrad

    2008-01-01

    Despite primary and secondary prevention, serious cardiovascular events like unstable angina or myocardial infarction still account for one third of all deaths worldwide. Therefore, identifying individual patients with vulnerable plaques at high risk for plaque rupture is a central challenge in cardiovascular medicine. Several non-invasive techniques, such as MRI, multislice computed tomography and electron beam tomography are currently being tested for their ability to identify such patients by morphological criteria. In contrast, molecular imaging techniques use radiolabeled molecules to detect functional aspects in atherosclerotic plaques by visualizing its biological activity. Based upon the knowledge about the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, various studies in vitro, in vivo and the first clinical trials have used different tracers for plaque imaging studies, including radioactive labelled lipoproteins, components of the coagulation system, cytokines, mediators of the metalloproteinase system, cell adhesion receptors and even whole cells. This review gives an update on the relevant non-invasive plaque imaging approaches using nuclear imaging techniques to detect atherosclerotic vascular lesions. PMID:18582628

  14. Low copper and high manganese levels in prion protein plaques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Gilbert, P.U.P.A.; Abrecth, Mike; Baldwin, Katherine L.; Russell, Robin E.; Pedersen, Joel A.; McKenzie, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of aggregates rich in an abnormally folded form of the prion protein characterize the neurodegeneration caused by transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). The molecular triggers of plaque formation and neurodegeneration remain unknown, but analyses of TSE-infected brain homogenates and preparations enriched for abnormal prion protein suggest that reduced levels of copper and increased levels of manganese are associated with disease. The objectives of this study were to: (1) assess copper and manganese levels in healthy and TSE-infected Syrian hamster brain homogenates; (2) determine if the distribution of these metals can be mapped in TSE-infected brain tissue using X-ray photoelectron emission microscopy (X-PEEM) with synchrotron radiation; and (3) use X-PEEM to assess the relative amounts of copper and manganese in prion plaques in situ. In agreement with studies of other TSEs and species, we found reduced brain levels of copper and increased levels of manganese associated with disease in our hamster model. We also found that the in situ levels of these metals in brainstem were sufficient to image by X-PEEM. Using immunolabeled prion plaques in directly adjacent tissue sections to identify regions to image by X-PEEM, we found a statistically significant relationship of copper-manganese dysregulation in prion plaques: copper was depleted whereas manganese was enriched. These data provide evidence for prion plaques altering local transition metal distribution in the TSE-infected central nervous system.

  15. Carotid Plaques Correlates in Patients With Familial Hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Waluś-Miarka, Małgorzata; Czarnecka, D; Wojciechowska, W; Kloch-Badełek, M; Kapusta, M; Sanak, M; Wójcik, M; Małecki, M T; Starzyk, J; Idzior-Waluś, B

    2016-05-01

    Patients with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) are at increased risk of premature cardiovascular disease. We compared factors associated with the presence of carotid plaques and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), markers of subclinical atherosclerosis, in 241 patients with FH (98, 40.7% men; mean age 41 ± 18.4 years). Patients with FH having carotid plaques (36.5%) had mean age, apolipoprotein (apo) B, glucose, apoA1, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic BP, waist/hip ratio (WHR), and body mass index higher than patients without plaques. Logistic regression revealed that apoB (odds ratio [OR] per 1 unit change 1.03,P= .005), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C; OR per 1 standard deviation [SD] change 0.59,P= .015), and non-HDL-C (OR per 1SD change 1.53,P= .04) were significantly associated with the presence of plaques. The cIMT correlated with obesity parameters, BP, apoB, glucose, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, creatinine, γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, and alanine transaminase (P< .001). Regression analysis revealed that cIMT was significantly associated with apoB, SBP, and WHR. These results confirm the role of apoB-containing lipoproteins and low HDL-C with the presence of carotid plaques and apoB, BP, and WHR with cIMT. PMID:26198473

  16. Multimodal spectroscopy detects features of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque

    PubMed Central

    Šćepanović, Obrad R.; Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Miller, Arnold; Kong, Chae-Ryon; Volynskaya, Zoya; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Kramer, John R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Early detection and treatment of rupture-prone vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques is critical to reducing patient mortality associated with cardiovascular disease. The combination of reflectance, fluorescence, and Raman spectroscopy—termed multimodal spectroscopy (MMS)—provides detailed biochemical information about tissue and can detect vulnerable plaque features: thin fibrous cap (TFC), necrotic core (NC), superficial foam cells (SFC), and thrombus. Ex vivo MMS spectra are collected from 12 patients that underwent carotid endarterectomy or femoral bypass surgery. Data are collected by means of a unitary MMS optical fiber probe and a portable clinical instrument. Blinded histopathological analysis is used to assess the vulnerability of each spectrally evaluated artery lesion. Modeling of the ex vivo MMS spectra produce objective parameters that correlate with the presence of vulnerable plaque features: TFC with fluorescence parameters indicative of collagen presence; NC∕SFC with a combination of diffuse reflectance β-carotene∕ceroid absorption and the Raman spectral signature of lipids; and thrombus with its Raman signature. Using these parameters, suspected vulnerable plaques can be detected with a sensitivity of 96% and specificity of 72%. These encouraging results warrant the continued development of MMS as a catheter-based clinical diagnostic technique for early detection of vulnerable plaques. PMID:21280896

  17. Multimodal spectroscopy detects features of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šćepanović, Obrad R.; Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Miller, Arnold; Kong, Chae-Ryon; Volynskaya, Zoya; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Kramer, John R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Early detection and treatment of rupture-prone vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques is critical to reducing patient mortality associated with cardiovascular disease. The combination of reflectance, fluorescence, and Raman spectroscopy-termed multimodal spectroscopy (MMS)-provides detailed biochemical information about tissue and can detect vulnerable plaque features: thin fibrous cap (TFC), necrotic core (NC), superficial foam cells (SFC), and thrombus. Ex vivo MMS spectra are collected from 12 patients that underwent carotid endarterectomy or femoral bypass surgery. Data are collected by means of a unitary MMS optical fiber probe and a portable clinical instrument. Blinded histopathological analysis is used to assess the vulnerability of each spectrally evaluated artery lesion. Modeling of the ex vivo MMS spectra produce objective parameters that correlate with the presence of vulnerable plaque features: TFC with fluorescence parameters indicative of collagen presence; NC/SFC with a combination of diffuse reflectance β-carotene/ceroid absorption and the Raman spectral signature of lipids; and thrombus with its Raman signature. Using these parameters, suspected vulnerable plaques can be detected with a sensitivity of 96% and specificity of 72%. These encouraging results warrant the continued development of MMS as a catheter-based clinical diagnostic technique for early detection of vulnerable plaques.

  18. ROPES eye plaque dosimetry: commissioning and verification of an ophthalmic brachytherapy treatment planning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poder, J.; Annabell, N.; Geso, M.; Alqathami, M.; Corde, S.

    2013-06-01

    In this study, the Plaque SimulatorTM eye plaque brachytherapy planning system was commissioned for ROPES eye plaques and Amersham Health model 6711 Iodine 125 seeds, using TG43-UI data. The brachytherapy module of the RADCALC® independent checking program was configured to allow verification of the accuracy of the dose calculated by Plaque SimulatorTM. Central axis depth dose distributions were compared and observed to agree to within 2% for all ROPES plaque models and depths of interest. Experimental measurements were performed with a customized PRESAGEm 3-D type dosimeter to validate the calculated depth dose distributions. Preliminary results have shown the effect of the stainless steel plaque backing decreases the measured fluorescence intensity by up to 25%, and 40% for the 15 mm and 10 mm diameter ROPES plaques respectively. This effect, once fully quantified should be accounted for in the Plaque SimulatorTM eye plaque brachytherapy planning system.

  19. The association of hemoglobin A1c and high risk plaque and plaque extent assessed by coronary computed tomography angiography.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Nobuo; Inoh, Shinichi; Nojo, Takeshi; Nakamura, Sunao

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship of Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and plaque characteristics including high risk plaque and plaque extent. We retrospectively examined 1079 consecutive coronary computed tomography(CT) angiography scans and the HbA1c results. We divided the patients into four groups by the HbA1c status: non-diabetic, ?6.0; borderline, 6.1-6.4; diabetic low, 6.5-7.1; diabetic high, >7.1. We determined segment involvement score >4 as extensive disease. High risk plaque was defined as two feature positive (FP) plaque which consists of positive remodeling (remodeling index >1.1) and low attenuation (<30 HU). Univariate and multivariate analysis including conventional cardiovascular risk factors, symptoms and medication was performed. Univariate analysis showed that diabetic patients as well as borderline patients were significantly related with 2FP plaque and extensive disease. Although the relationship of borderline patients and 2FP plaque was marginal in multivariate analysis [odds ratio (OR) 1.53, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.95-2.40, p=0.07], the elevation of HbA1c was strongly associated with 2FP plaque (diabetic low, OR 2.19, 95% CI 1.37-3.45, p<0.005; diabetic high, OR 4.14, 95% CI 2.57-6.67, p<0.0005). The association of HbA1c elevation and extensive disease was quite similar between borderline and diabetic patients (borderline, OR 1.96, 95% CI 1.29-2.95, p<0.005; diabetic low, OR 1.94, 95% CI 1.25-3.01, p<0.005; diabetic high, OR 2.19, 95% CI 1.39-3.43, p<0.005). Patients with elevated HbA1c of >6.0 are potentially at risk for future cardiovascular events due to increased high risk plaque and extensive disease, even below the diabetic level of 6.5. Coronary CT could be used for risk stratification of these patients. PMID:26463885

  20. Micro-CT imaging of Randall’s plaques

    PubMed Central

    Lingeman, James E.; Coe, Fredric L.; Worcester, Elaine M.; Evan, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Micro-computed tomographic imaging (micro-CT) provides unprecedented information on stone structure and mineral composition. High-resolution micro-CT even allows visualization of the lumens of tubule and/or vessels within Randall’s plaque, on stones or in papillary biopsies, thus giving a non-destructive way to study these sites of stone adhesion. This paper also shows an example of a stone growing on a different anchoring mechanism: a mineral plug within the lumen of a Bellini duct (BD plug). Micro-CT shows striking structural differences between stones that have grown on Randall’s plaque and those that have grown on BD plugs. Thus, Randall’s plaque can be distinguished by micro-CT, and this non-destructive method shows great promise in helping to elucidate the different mechanisms by which small stones are retained in the kidney during the development of nephrolithiasis. PMID:25096802

  1. Proton MR spectroscopy of gadolinium-enhanced multiple sclerosis plaques.

    PubMed

    Narayana, P A; Wolinsky, J S; Jackson, E F; McCarthy, M

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and proton MR spectroscopy were performed in 14 patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis (MS). Prominent resonances in the 0.5-2.0-ppm region were seen in the spectra of six of nine gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced plaques in seven patients. These resonances were presumed to originate in lipids and other myelin breakdown products. Similar resonances were detected in only seven of 21 unenhancing plaques. The more frequent presence of such signals in the gadolinium-enhanced regions indicates that myelin breakdown is often associated with the inflammation that occurs in early stages of MS plaque evolution. It remains uncertain, however, whether active inflammation as indicated by gadolinium enhancement is a necessary precursor of myelin breakdown as detected at MR spectroscopy. Quantitative spectral analysis did not indicate statistically significant differences in N-acetyl aspartate and choline levels relative to creatine plus phosphocreatine between healthy volunteers and MS patients. PMID:1627860

  2. Radiation regression patterns after cobalt plaque insertion for retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Buys, R.J.; Abramson, D.H.; Ellsworth, R.M.; Haik, B.

    1983-08-01

    An analysis of 31 eyes of 30 patients who had been treated with cobalt plaques for retinoblastoma disclosed that a type I radiation regression pattern developed in 15 patients; type II, in one patient, and type III, in five patients. Nine patients had a regression pattern characterized by complete destruction of the tumor, the surrounding choroid, and all of the vessels in the area into which the plaque was inserted. This resulting white scar, corresponding to the sclerae only, was classified as a type IV radiation regression pattern. There was no evidence of tumor recurrence in patients with type IV regression patterns, with an average follow-up of 6.5 years, after receiving cobalt plaque therapy. Twenty-nine of these 30 patients had been unsuccessfully treated with at least one other modality (ie, light coagulation, cryotherapy, external beam radiation, or chemotherapy).

  3. Desmocollin-2 alone forms functional desmosomal plaques, with the plaque formation requiring the juxtamembrane region and plakophilins.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Miwako; Nagatomo, Azusa; Tsuda, Megumi; Obata, Shuichi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Shintaro T

    2015-10-01

    The role of the juxtamembrane region of the desmocollin-2 cytoplasmic domain in desmosome formation was investigated by using gene knockout and reconstitution experiments. When a deletion construct of the desmocollin-2 juxtamembrane region was expressed in HaCaT cells, the mutant protein became localized linearly at the cell-cell boundary, suggesting the involvement of this region in desmosomal plaque formation. Then, desmocollin-2 and desmoglein-2 genes of epithelial DLD-1 cells were ablated by using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. The resultant knockout cells did not form desmosomes, but re-expression of desmocollin-2 in the cells formed desmosomal plaques in the absence of desmoglein-2 and the transfectants showed significant cell adhesion activity. Intriguingly, expression of desmocollin-2 lacking its juxtamembrane region did not form the plaques. The results of an immunoprecipitation and GST-fusion protein pull-down assay suggested the binding of plakophilin-2 and -3 to the region. Ablation of plakophilin-2 and -3 genes resulted in disruption of the plaque-like accumulation and linear localization of desmocollin-2 at intercellular contact sites. These results suggest that the juxtamembrane region of desmocollin-2 and plakophilins are involved in the desmosomal plaque formation, possibly through the interaction between this region and plakophilins. PMID:25972099

  4. The apical border plaque in severe periodontitis. An ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Vrahopoulos, T P; Barber, P M; Newman, H N

    1995-02-01

    This study concerns the apical border (AB) plaque in relation to severe forms of periodontitis (SP), including juvenile, post-juvenile, and rapidly progressing periodontitis. Twenty-four (24) teeth from 16 patients with SP were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The AB was not discrete, with islands of bacteria in the so-called plaque-free zone (PFZ). Coronal to the AB the established plaque consisted of a layer of Gram-positive cocci and ghost cells and a superficial layer mainly of Gram-negative morphotypes, including cocci, rods, filaments, fusiforms, and spirochetes. The most apical apparently intact organisms in the PFZ were in bacterial islands or in isolation and were predominantly Gram-negative cocci and rods, with ghost cells in abundance. Ruthenium red, alcian blue-lanthanum nitrate, and safranin O were used to label matrix polyanionic macromolecules, and periodic acid (thiosemicarbazide) silver proteinate for intracellular polysaccharide (IPS). The matrix components were mainly fibrillar. Many intact bacteria exhibited extracellular polysaccharides or glycocalyces associated with their cell wall, and cytoplasmic IPS granules. The latter varied in distribution and were evident even in the most apically advanced intact microorganisms. The results indicate that IPS and some matrix features of the apical border plaque in severe periodontitis in certain aspects resemble those of sub-contact area plaque on children's teeth, in health or associated with early chronic gingivitis, and with those in chronic adult periodontitis. They also suggest the establishment of acidic regions in the microniche at the bottom of the periodontal pocket in the various forms of periodontitis differing in rate of progression. It was concluded that there was a limited range of intact bacterial morphotypes in the apical border plaque in severe periodontitis, similar to those in chronic adult periodontitis. PMID:7537328

  5. Effects of plaque lengths on stent surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Syaifudin, Achmad; Takeda, Ryo; Sasaki, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of the stent surface influence the effectiveness of vascular disease treatment after stent deployment. During the expanding process, the stent acquires high-level deformation that could alter either its microstructure or the magnitude of surface roughness. This paper constructed a finite element simulation to observe the changes in surface roughness during the stenting process. Structural transient dynamic analysis was performed using ANSYS, to identify the deformation after the stent is placed in a blood vessel. Two types of bare metal stents are studied: a Palmaz type and a Sinusoidal type. The relationship between plaque length and the changes in surface roughness was investigated by utilizing three different length of plaque; plaque length longer than the stent, shorter than the stent and the same length as the stent. In order to reduce computational time, 3D cyclical and translational symmetry was implemented into the FE model. The material models used was defined as a multilinear isotropic for stent and hyperelastic for the balloon, plaque and vessel wall. The correlation between the plastic deformation and the changes in surface roughness was obtained by intermittent pure tensile test using specimen whose chemical composition was similar to that of actual stent material. As the plastic strain is achieved from FE simulation, the surface roughness can be assessed thoroughly. The study found that the plaque size relative to stent length significantly influenced the critical changes in surface roughness. It was found that the length of stent which is equal to the plaque length was preferable due to the fact that it generated only moderate change in surface roughness. This effect was less influential to the Sinusoidal stent. PMID:25813957

  6. Bifurcation analysis of a model for atherosclerotic plaque evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulelzai, M. A. K.; Dubbeldam, J. L. A.; Meijer, H. G. E.

    2014-06-01

    We analyze two ordinary differential equation (ODE) models for atherosclerosis. The ODE models describe long time evolution of plaques in arteries. We show how the dynamics of the first atherosclerosis model (model A) can be understood using codimension-two bifurcation analysis. The Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) intake parameter (d) is the first control parameter and the second control parameter is either taken to be the conversion rate of macrophages (b) or the wall shear stress (σ). Our analysis reveals that in both cases a Bogdanov-Takens (BT) point acts as an organizing center. The bifurcation diagrams are calculated partly analytically and to a large extent numerically using AUTO07 and MATCONT. The bifurcation curves show that the concentration of LDL in the plaque as well as the monocyte and the macrophage concentrations exhibit oscillations for a certain range of values of the control parameters. Moreover, we find that there are threshold values for both the cholesterol intake rate dcrit and the conversion rate of the macrophages bcrit, which depend on the values of other parameters, above which the plaque volume increases with time. It is found that larger conversion rates of macrophages lower the threshold value of cholesterol intake and vice versa. We further argue that the dynamics for model A can still be discerned in the second model (model B) in which the slow evolution of the radius of the artery is coupled self-consistently to changes in the plaque volume. The very slow evolution of the radius of the artery compared to the other processes makes it possible to use a slow manifold approximation to study the dynamics in this case. We find that in this case the model predicts that the concentrations of the plaque constituents may go through a period of oscillations before the radius of the artery will start to decrease. These oscillations hence act as a precursor for the reduction of the artery radius by plaque growth.

  7. Method of making a light weight battery plaque

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, M. A.; Post, R. E.; Soltis, D. G. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A nickel plaque which may be coated with a suitable metal or compound to make an electrode for a fuel cell or battery is fabricated by directing nickel sensitizer, catalyst and plating solutions through a porous plastic substrate in the order named and at prescribed temperatures and flow rates. A boride compound dissolved in the plating solution decreases the electrical resistance of the plaque. Certain substrates may require treatment in an alkali solution to dissolve filler materials thereby increasing porosity to a required 65%.

  8. Dosimetric study of the 15 mm ROPES eye plaque

    SciTech Connect

    Granero, D.; Perez-Calatayud, J.; Ballester, F.; Casal, E.; Frutos, J.M. de

    2004-12-01

    The main aim of this paper is to make a study of dose-rate distributions obtained around the 15 mm, radiation oncology physics and engineering services, Australia (ROPES) eye plaque loaded with {sup 125}I model 6711 radioactive seeds. In this study, we have carried out a comparison of the dose-rate distributions obtained by the algorithm used by the Plaque Simulator (PS) (BEBIG GmbH, Berlin, Germany) treatment planning system with those obtained by means of the Monte Carlo method for the ROPES eye plaque. A simple method to obtain the dose-rate distributions in a treatment planning system via the superposition of the dose-rate distributions of a seed placed in the eye plaque has been developed. The method uses eye plaque located in a simplified geometry of the head anatomy and distributions obtained by means of the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The favorable results obtained in the development of this method suggest that it could be implemented on a treatment planning system to improve dose-rate calculations. We have also found that the dose-rate falls sharply along the eye and that outside the eye the dose-rate is very low. Furthermore, the lack of backscatter photons from the air located outside the eye-head phantom produces a dose reduction negligible for distances from the eye-plaque r<1 cm but reaches up to 20% near the air-eye interface. Results showed that the treatment planning system lacks accuracy around the border of the eye (in the sclera and the surrounding area) due to the simplicity of the algorithm used. The BEBIG treatment planning system uses a global attenuation factor that takes into account the effect of the eye plaque seed carrier and the lack of backscatter photons caused by the metallic cover, which in the case of a ROPES eye plaque has a default value of T=1 (no correction). In the present study, a global attenuation factor T=0.96 and an air-interface correction factor which improve on treatment planning system calculations were obtained.

  9. DETAIL OF PLAQUE COMMEMORATING THE JULY/ AUGUST 1958 VOYAGE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF PLAQUE COMMEMORATING THE JULY/ AUGUST 1958 VOYAGE OF THE USS NAUTILUS (SSN-571) TO THE NORTH POLE. NOTE: THIS PLAQUE IS NOT LOCATED AT WHARFS S13-S19; IT IS AT THE SUBMARINE MEMORIAL PARK, ABOUT 1,000' SOUTH OF THE WHARFS. THE LOCATION AND ORIENTATION OF THIS PHOTO IS NOT SHOWN ON THE PHOTO KEY MAP - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Additional Piers and Quay Walls, S13 to S19, Northeast end of Magazine Loch, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. The nature of iron deposits differs between symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid atherosclerotic plaques

    SciTech Connect

    Kopriva, David; Kisheev, Anastasye; Meena, Deiter; Pelle, Shaneen; Karnitsky, Max; Lavoie, Andrea; Buttigieg, Josef; Hagemeyer, Christoph E.

    2015-11-25

    Iron within atherosclerotic plaque has been implicated as a catalyst of oxidative stress that causes progression of plaque, and plaque rupture. Iron is believed to accumulate within plaque by incorporation of erythrocytes following plaque rupture and hemorrhage. There is only indirect evidence to support this hypothesis. Plaque specimens were obtained from ten symptomatic and fifteen asymptomatic patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy at a single institution. Plaques were sectioned for study using synchrotron radiation induced X-ray fluorescence the study the distribution of zinc, calcium and iron. Histologic staining was carried out with Prussian Blue, and immunohistochemical staining was done to localize macrophages with CD68. Data were compared against patient clinical variables. Ten symptomatic (15 ± 10 days between index symptoms and surgery) and fifteen asymptomatic carotid plaques were studied. Zinc and calcium co-localized in mineralized areas of symptomatic and asymptomatic plaque. Iron was identified away from zinc and calcium in both symptomatic and asymptomatic plaques. Within the symptomatic plaques, iron was found within the thrombus associated with plaque rupture and hemorrhage. It did not stain with Prussian Blue, but was found in association with CD68 positive macrophages. In symptomatic plaques, the abundance of iron showed an association with the source patient’s LDL cholesterol (R2 = 0.39, Significance F = 0.05). Iron in asymptomatic plaque was present as hemosiderin/ferritin that stained positive with Prussian Blue, and was observed in association with CD68 positive macrophages. Iron in acutely symptomatic plaques is found within thrombus, in the presence of macrophages. Moreover, the abundance of iron in symptomatic plaques is associated with the source patient’s LDL cholesterol. Within asymptomatic plaques, iron is found in association with macrophages, as hemosiderin/ferritin.

  11. The nature of iron deposits differs between symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid atherosclerotic plaques

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kopriva, David; Kisheev, Anastasye; Meena, Deiter; Pelle, Shaneen; Karnitsky, Max; Lavoie, Andrea; Buttigieg, Josef; Hagemeyer, Christoph E.

    2015-11-25

    Iron within atherosclerotic plaque has been implicated as a catalyst of oxidative stress that causes progression of plaque, and plaque rupture. Iron is believed to accumulate within plaque by incorporation of erythrocytes following plaque rupture and hemorrhage. There is only indirect evidence to support this hypothesis. Plaque specimens were obtained from ten symptomatic and fifteen asymptomatic patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy at a single institution. Plaques were sectioned for study using synchrotron radiation induced X-ray fluorescence the study the distribution of zinc, calcium and iron. Histologic staining was carried out with Prussian Blue, and immunohistochemical staining was done to localize macrophagesmore » with CD68. Data were compared against patient clinical variables. Ten symptomatic (15 ± 10 days between index symptoms and surgery) and fifteen asymptomatic carotid plaques were studied. Zinc and calcium co-localized in mineralized areas of symptomatic and asymptomatic plaque. Iron was identified away from zinc and calcium in both symptomatic and asymptomatic plaques. Within the symptomatic plaques, iron was found within the thrombus associated with plaque rupture and hemorrhage. It did not stain with Prussian Blue, but was found in association with CD68 positive macrophages. In symptomatic plaques, the abundance of iron showed an association with the source patient’s LDL cholesterol (R2 = 0.39, Significance F = 0.05). Iron in asymptomatic plaque was present as hemosiderin/ferritin that stained positive with Prussian Blue, and was observed in association with CD68 positive macrophages. Iron in acutely symptomatic plaques is found within thrombus, in the presence of macrophages. Moreover, the abundance of iron in symptomatic plaques is associated with the source patient’s LDL cholesterol. Within asymptomatic plaques, iron is found in association with macrophages, as hemosiderin/ferritin.« less

  12. The Nature of Iron Deposits Differs between Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Kopriva, David; Kisheev, Anastasye; Meena, Deiter; Pelle, Shaneen; Karnitsky, Max; Lavoie, Andrea; Buttigieg, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Iron within atherosclerotic plaque has been implicated as a catalyst of oxidative stress that causes progression of plaque, and plaque rupture. Iron is believed to accumulate within plaque by incorporation of erythrocytes following plaque rupture and hemorrhage. There is only indirect evidence to support this hypothesis. Plaque specimens were obtained from ten symptomatic and fifteen asymptomatic patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy at a single institution. Plaques were sectioned for study using synchrotron radiation induced X-ray fluorescence the study the distribution of zinc, calcium and iron. Histologic staining was carried out with Prussian Blue, and immunohistochemical staining was done to localize macrophages with CD68. Data were compared against patient clinical variables. Ten symptomatic (15 ± 10 days between index symptoms and surgery) and fifteen asymptomatic carotid plaques were studied. Zinc and calcium co-localized in mineralized areas of symptomatic and asymptomatic plaque. Iron was identified away from zinc and calcium in both symptomatic and asymptomatic plaques. Within the symptomatic plaques, iron was found within the thrombus associated with plaque rupture and hemorrhage. It did not stain with Prussian Blue, but was found in association with CD68 positive macrophages. In symptomatic plaques, the abundance of iron showed an association with the source patient’s LDL cholesterol (R2 = 0.39, Significance F = 0.05). Iron in asymptomatic plaque was present as hemosiderin/ferritin that stained positive with Prussian Blue, and was observed in association with CD68 positive macrophages. Iron in acutely symptomatic plaques is found within thrombus, in the presence of macrophages. The abundance of iron in symptomatic plaques is associated with the source patient’s LDL cholesterol. Within asymptomatic plaques, iron is found in association with macrophages, as hemosiderin/ferritin. PMID:26606178

  13. Feasibility of diagnosing unstable plaque in patients with acute coronary syndrome using iMap-IVUS*

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Jian; WANG, Zhao; WANG, Wei-min; LI, Qi; MA, Yu-liang; LIU, Chuan-fen; LU, Ming-yu; ZHAO, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the plaque composition between stable and unstable plaques, characterize unstable plaque by using iMap-intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), and quantify the diagnostic criteria for unstable plaque. Methods: Thirty-three acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients who had undergone coronary angiography and IVUS from February 19, 2014 to December 19, 2014 at Peking University People’s Hospital were enrolled in the study. Baseline data were collected. The patients were divided into two groups according to their gray-scale IVUS imaging, stable plaque and unstable plaque. A difference-in-difference evaluation was performed using the baseline data and off-line iMap imaging results between the two groups. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was constructed to obtain the optimal cut-off value to diagnose unstable plaque. Results: Percentages of fibrotic and necrotic tissues, absolute values of lipidic, necrotic, and calcified tissues, and plaque burden were independent predictors for unstable plaque. Absolute necrotic area was the best predictor and exhibited the highest diagnostic value for plaque vulnerability (area under the curve (AUC)=0.806, P=0.000, 95% CI (0.718, 0.894)). The cut-off score for predicting unstable plaque was 4.0 mm2. Conclusions: This study attempted to propose a cut-off value based on absolute necrotic area using iMap-IVUS to predict plaque vulnerability in patients with ACS. This score might provide a valuable reference for diagnosing unstable plaque. PMID:26537210

  14. Effects of extracellular plaque components on the chlorhexidine sensitivity of strains of Streptococcus mutans and human dental plaque

    SciTech Connect

    Wolinsky, L.E.; Hume, W.R.

    1985-08-01

    An in vitro study was undertaken to determine the effects of sucrose-derived extracellular plaque components on the sensitivity of selected oral bacteria to chlorhexidine (CX). Cultures of Streptococcus mutans HS-6, OMZ-176, Ingbritt C, 6715-wt13, and pooled human plaque were grown in trypticase soy media with or without 1% sucrose. The sensitivity to CX of bacteria grown in each medium was determined by fixed-time exposure to CX and subsequent measurement of /sup 3/H-thymidine uptake. One-hour exposure to CX at concentrations of 10(-4) M (0.01% w/v) or greater substantially inhibited subsequent cellular division among all the S. mutans strains and human plaque samples tested. An IC50 (the CX concentration which depressed /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation to 50% of control level) of close to 10(-4) M was noted for S. mutans strains HS-6, OMZ-176, and 6715-wt13 when grown in the presence of sucrose. The same strains grown in cultures without added sucrose showed about a ten-fold greater sensitivity to CX (IC50 close to 10(-5) M). A three-fold difference was noted for S. mutans Ingbritt C. Only a slight increase in the IC50 was noted for the plaque samples cultured in sucrose-containing media, but their threshold for depression of /sup 3/H-thymidine uptake by CX was lower than that for the sucrose-free plaque samples. The study showed that extracellular products confer some protection against CX to the bacteria examined, and provided an explanation for the disparity between clinically-recommended concentrations for plaque suppression and data on in vitro susceptibility.

  15. Plaque: What It Is and How to Get Rid of It

    MedlinePlus

    ... for a fresh feeling! Rinse again. Remember: Food residues, especially sweets, provide nutrients for the germs that ... why it is important to remove all food residues, as well as plaque, from teeth. Remove plaque ...

  16. Head Injuries Tied to Buildup of Alzheimer's Plaques, Small Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... 157055.html Head Injuries Tied to Buildup of Alzheimer's Plaques, Small Study Finds But it's too soon ... brain injury may lead to a buildup of Alzheimer's-type plaques in the brain, including in regions ...

  17. Identification of Amyloid Plaques in Retinas from Alzheimer’s Patients and Noninvasive In Vivo Optical Imaging of Retinal Plaques in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Koronyo-Hamaoui, Maya; Koronyo, Yosef; Ljubimov, Alexander V.; Miller, Carol A.; Ko, MinHee K.; Black, Keith L.; Schwartz, Michal; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2010-01-01

    Noninvasive monitoring of β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques, the neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is critical for AD diagnosis and prognosis. Current visualization of Aβ plaques in brains of live patients and animal models is limited in specificity and resolution. The retina as an extension of the brain portrays an appealing target for a live, noninvasive optical imaging of AD if disease pathology is manifested there. We identified retinal Aβ plaques in postmortem eyes from AD patients (n=8) and in suspected early stage cases (n=5), consistent with brain pathology and clinical reports; plaques were undetectable in age-matched non-AD individuals (n=5). In APPSWE/PS1ΔE9 transgenic mice (AD-Tg; n=18) and not in non-Tg wt mice (n=10), retinal Aβ plaques were detected following systemic administration of curcumin, a safe plaque-labeling fluorochrome. Moreover, retinal plaques were detectable earlier than in the brain and accumulated with disease progression. An immune-based therapy effective in reducing brain plaques, significantly reduced retinal Aβ plaque burden in immunized versus non-immunized AD mice (n=4 mice per group). In live AD-Tg mice (n=24), systemic administration of curcumin allowed noninvasive optical imaging of retinal Aβ plaques in vivo with high resolution and specificity; plaques were undetectable in non-Tg wt mice (n=11). Our discovery of Aβ specific plaques in retinas from AD patients, and the ability to noninvasively detect individual retinal plaques in live AD mice establish the basis for developing high resolution optical imaging for early AD diagnosis, prognosis assessment and response to therapies. PMID:20550967

  18. 4. VISTA POINT AND INTERPRETIVE PLAQUE AT LEE VINING CANYON. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VISTA POINT AND INTERPRETIVE PLAQUE AT LEE VINING CANYON. NOTE ROAD CUT ON CANYON WALL. LOOKING NNE. GIS: N-37 56 30.3 / 119 13 44.8 - Tioga Road, Between Crane Flat & Tioga Pass, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  19. Imaging of the Fibrous Cap in Atherosclerotic Carotid Plaque

    SciTech Connect

    Saba, Luca; Potters, Fons; Lugt, Aad van der; Mallarini, Giorgio

    2010-08-15

    In the last two decades, a substantial number of articles have been published to provide diagnostic solutions for patients with carotid atherosclerotic disease. These articles have resulted in a shift of opinion regarding the identification of stroke risk in patients with carotid atherosclerotic disease. In the recent past, the degree of carotid artery stenosis was the sole determinant for performing carotid intervention (carotid endarterectomy or carotid stenting) in these patients. We now know that the degree of stenosis is only one marker for future cerebrovascular events. If one wants to determine the risk of these events more accurately, other parameters must be taken into account; among these parameters are plaque composition, presence and state of the fibrous cap (FC), intraplaque haemorrhage, plaque ulceration, and plaque location. In particular, the FC is an important structure for the stability of the plaque, and its rupture is highly associated with a recent history of transient ischaemic attack or stroke. The subject of this review is imaging of the FC.

  20. 6. VIEW OF BRIDGE COMMEMORATIVE PLAQUE WHICH STATES '1908, J. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF BRIDGE COMMEMORATIVE PLAQUE WHICH STATES '1908, J. H. CROOKS, ED. ELLIS, A. S. LELAND, COMMISSIONERS. L. E. BRELSFORD, AUDITOR. L. WEST, SURVEYOR. - B. C. GERWICK, DESIGNER. F. E. WITHCOTT, ENG. ON CONST. C. A. WARNER, CONTRACTOR.' - First Street Reinforced Concrete Bridge, Spanning Moxahala Creek at First Street (CR 7), Roseville, Muskingum County, OH

  1. Development of Tc-99m Imaging Agents for Abeta Plaques

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi-Ping, Zhuang; Mei-Ping Kung; Catherihne Hou; Hank F. Kung

    2008-09-26

    Development of SPECT imaging agents based on Tc-99m targeting Aβ plaques is useful for diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A stilbene derivative, [11C]SB-13, showing promise in detecting senile plaques present in AD patients has been reported previously1,2. Based on the 4’-amino-stilbene core structure we have added substituted groups through which a chelating group, N2S2, was conjugated. We report herein a series of Tc-99m labeled stilbene derivative conjugated with a TcO[N2S2] core. The syntheses of stilbenes containing a N2S2 chelating ligand are achieved by a scheme shown. Lipophilic 99mTc stilbene complexes were successfully prepared and purified through HPLC. Preliminary results of in vitro labeling of brain sections from transgenic mice showed very promising plaque labeling. These 99mTc stilbene derivatives are warranted for further evaluations as potential imaging agents targeting amyloid plaques.

  2. Manufacturer's plaque located on north side of south parapet wall, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Manufacturer's plaque located on north side of south parapet wall, bridge over little Pince Creek (S.R. 1026, section 002), looking south - Bridge over Little Pine Creek, State Route 1026 over Little Pine Creek, 2.01 kilometers (1.25 miles) East of Bendertown, Jonestown, Columbia County, PA

  3. Interstellar Message Plaques: Application of White-Light Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matloff, G. L.

    2002-01-01

    During Spring / Summer 2001, a prototype white-light holographic interstellar-probe message plaque was created under Contract H-29712D of NASA Marshall Spaceflight Center (MSFC), and commercial white-light holograms were tested for space-radiation tolerance at the MSFC Space Environment Facility (SEF) in Huntsville, AL, USA. Artist C Bangs' message plaque was created at the Center for Holographic Arts in Long Island City, NY. The 57.5 X 47.5 cm rainbow hologram was delivered to MSFC after framing by Simon Liu Inc., Brooklyn, NY, USA. The prototype message plaque, which is in the collection of the MSFC Space Transportation Directorate, has six multiplexed 2-D and 3-D images representing humans, the hypothetical interstellar spacecraft, and our position in the galaxy. Consultation with John Caulfield of Fisk University, an expert in holography, revealed that micron-thick holograms not much larger than a sheet of paper could contain hundreds of thousands of images, which opens the me ssage-plaque field considerably so that work of many artists could be included. Tests of commercial holograms at up to 100 MRad of simulated solar-wind radiation were performed at MSFC / SEF. Image-quality deterioriation was monitored using the image-color- histogram of the (trademarked) Adobe Photoshop software package. No significant deterioration occurred, which is in agreement with the literature. Holographic solar sails may be a propulsive application of this technology.

  4. A modified plaque pH telemetry method.

    PubMed

    Maiwald, H J; Fröhlich, S

    1992-01-01

    Previous plaque-pH telemetry studies reported the acidogenicity of various foods and dietary patterns to estimate potential cariogenicity. To avoid patient discomfort, improve compliance, and minimize electrode malfunctions, we have simplified our telemetry method and compared it to our previously published model. A removable partial prosthesis with a glass electrode set in the approximal space left by a missing first molar was used in 2 subjects. In the modified method, subjects suspended oral hygiene for 3 days, the prosthesis was then installed on the 3rd day, and accumulated plaque was spread on the electrode and covered with gauze for retention. In comparative tests, the same subjects wore the prosthesis in the mouth during plaque accumulation. Test sessions compared the plaque pH response to 4 treatments: a 10% sucrose rinse, a 10% sorbitol rinse, a snack roll with marmalade and coffee, and the snack followed by gum chewing. Overall, pH curves were similar (mean baselines and minimas) and no significant differences in mean pH response were noted between the 2 methods. The modified method improved subject participation, demonstrated greater reliability, and showed Stephan curves comparable to conventional methods. PMID:1449616

  5. Reporting Casting Bronze Plaque Becomes Advisers Class Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Charlie

    1977-01-01

    Describes an advisers' class project (at the University of Oklahoma) which consisted of reporting on the casting of a bronze plaque bearing the names of the first school newspaper, "The Students Gazette," and its editor, Samuel M. Fox, for presentation in Philadelphia to commemorate scholastic journalism's Bicentennial. (MB)

  6. Verruca vulgaris in a plaque of acanthosis nigricans.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Atif; Matthews, Mark; Browning, John C

    2011-01-01

    Warts are common cutaneous tumors, induced by different strains of the human papilloma virus. Many people develop one or more warts in their lifetime, most of which resolve spontaneously. We present a case of multiple warts within a plaque of acanthosis nigricans probably related to autoinoculation. PMID:21696689

  7. SEQUENTIAL INOCULATION AS AN ADJUNCT IN ENTERIC VIRUS PLAQUE ENUMERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential utility of sequentially inoculating a virus sample onto two different cultures of similar dissimilar cell lines was evaluated in conjunction with IDU (5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine) treatment of the cells as a potential adjunct in viral plaque formation assays. his evaluat...

  8. Ultrasound imaging versus morphopathology in cardiovascular diseases. Coronary atherosclerotic plaque

    PubMed Central

    Baroldi, Giorgio; Bigi, Riccardo; Cortigiani, Lauro

    2004-01-01

    This review article is aimed at comparing the results of histopathological and clinical imaging studies to assess coronary atherosclerotic plaques in humans. In particular, the gap between the two techniques and its effect on the understanding of the pathophysiological basis of coronary artery disease is critically discussed. PMID:15598352

  9. 10. DETAIL VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING COMMEMORATIVE PLAQUE ON EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING COMMEMORATIVE PLAQUE ON EAST SIDE OF SOUTH APPROACH WHICH STATES 'EIGHT MILE CREEK; MILLERS GARAGE & CONT. CO.; CONTRACTOR.; ARKANSAS; STATE HIGHWAY COMMISSION.; DWIGHT H. BLACKWOOD, CHAIRMAN.; C.S. CHRISTIAN, ENGINEER.; 1929.; BRIDGE NO.__' - Eight Mile Creek Bridge, Spanning Eight Mile Creek at U.S. Highway 49, Paragould, Greene County, AR

  10. Optical coherence tomography for imaging the vulnerable plaque

    PubMed Central

    Tearney, Guillermo J.; Jang, Ik-Kyung; Bouma, Brett E.

    2009-01-01

    While our understanding of vulnerable coronary plaque is still at an early stage, the concept that certain types of plaques predispose patients to developing an acute myocardial infarction continues to be at the forefront of cardiology research. Intracoronary optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been developed to both identify and study these lesions due to its distinct resolution advantage over other imaging modalities. We review clinical research conducted at the Massachusetts General Hospital over the past five years to develop, validate, and utilize this technology to improve our understanding of vulnerable plaque. Our results show that intracoronary OCT may be safely conducted in patients and that it provides abundant information regarding plaque microscopic morphology, which is essential to the identification and study of high-risk lesions. Even though many basic biological, clinical, and technological challenges must be addressed prior to widespread use of this technology, the unique capabilities of OCT ensure that it will have a prominent role in shaping the future of cardiology. PMID:16674177

  11. Intracellular amyloid and the neuronal origin of Alzheimer neuritic plaques

    PubMed Central

    Pensalfini, Anna; Albay, Ricardo; Rasool, Suhail; Wu, Jessica; Hatami, Asa; Arai, Hiromi; Margol, Lawrence; Milton, Saskia; Poon, Wayne; Corrada, Maria; Kawas, Claudia; Glabe, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Genetic analysis of familial forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) causally links the proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and AD. However, the specific type of amyloid and mechanisms of amyloid pathogenesis remain unclear. We conducted a detailed analysis of intracellular amyloid with an aggregation specific conformation dependent monoclonal antibody, M78, raised against fibrillar Aß42. M78 immunoreactivity colocalizes with Aß and the carboxyl terminus of APP (APP-CTF) immunoreactivities in perinuclear compartments at intermediate times in 10 mo 3XTg-AD mice, indicating that this represents misfolded and aggregated protein rather than normally folded APP. At 12 mo, M78 immunoreactivity also accumulates in the nucleus. Neuritic plaques at 12 mo display the same spatial organization of centrally colocalized M78, diffuse chromatin and neuronal nuclear NeuN staining surrounded by peripheral M78 and APP-CTF immunoreactivity as observed in neurons, indicating that neuritic plaques arise from degenerating neurons with intracellular amyloid immunoreactivity. The same staining pattern was observed in neuritic plaques in human AD brains, showing elevated intracellular M78 immunoreactivity at intermediate stages of amyloid pathology (Braak A and B) compared to no amyloid pathology and late stage amyloid pathology (Braak 0 and C, respectively). These results indicate that intraneuronal protein aggregation and amyloid accumulation is an early event in AD and that neuritic plaques are initiated by the degeneration and death of neurons by a mechanism that may be related to the formation of extracellular traps by neutrophils. PMID:25092575

  12. Optical coherence tomography for imaging the vulnerable plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tearney, Guillermo J.; Jang, Ik-Kyung; Bouma, Brett E.

    2006-03-01

    While our understanding of vulnerable coronary plaque is still at an early stage, the concept that certain types of plaques predispose patients to developing an acute myocardial infarction continues to be at the forefront of cardiology research. Intracoronary optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been developed to both identify and study these lesions due to its distinct resolution advantage over other imaging modalities. We review clinical research conducted at the Massachusetts General Hospital over the past five years to develop, validate, and utilize this technology to improve our understanding of vulnerable plaque. Our results show that intracoronary OCT may be safely conducted in patients and that it provides abundant information regarding plaque microscopic morphology, which is essential to the identification and study of high-risk lesions. Even though many basic biological, clinical, and technological challenges must be addressed prior to widespread use of this technology, the unique capabilities of OCT ensure that it will have a prominent role in shaping the future of cardiology.

  13. Is Cadmium Exposure Associated with the Burden, Vulnerability and Rupture of Human Atherosclerotic Plaques?

    PubMed Central

    Sallsten, Gerd; Lundh, Thomas; Barregard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The general population is exposed to cadmium from food and smoking. Cadmium is a widely spread toxic pollutant that seems to be associated with cardiovascular diseases, although little is known if it contributes to the occurrence of atherosclerotic plaques and the process whereby plaques become vulnerable and are prone to rupture. We tested the hypotheses that cadmium exposure is associated not only with an increased subclinical burden of atherosclerotic plaques in different vascular territories and early signs of plaque vulnerability, but also with cadmium content and plaque-rupture in the clinical phase of the disease. Ultrasound technique was used to measure plaque prevalence and echogenicity in the carotid and femoral arteries in a population sample of women (n = 599) in whom blood cadmium was measured. In addition cadmium was measured in snap-frozen endarterectomies and whole blood obtained from patients who were referred to surgery because of symptomatic carotid plaques (n = 37). Sixteen endarterectomies were divided into three parts corresponding to different flow conditions and plaque vulnerability. In the population sample blood cadmium was associated with the number of vascular territories with plaques (p = 0.003 after adjustment for potential confounders). The cadmium concentrations in symptomatic plaques were 50-fold higher in plaque tissue than in blood. Cadmium levels in blood and plaque correlated, also after adjustment for smoking and other cardiovascular risk factors (p<0.001). Compared with the other parts of the plaque, the cadmium content was double as high in the part where plaque rupture usually occurs. In conclusion, the results show that cadmium exposure is associated with the burden of subclinical atherosclerosis in middle-aged women with different degrees of glucose tolerance, and that the content of cadmium in symptomatic plaques in patients is related to that in blood, but much higher, and preferentially located in the part of plaque where rupture often occurs. PMID:25816093

  14. Three-dimensional dosimetry imaging of I-125 plaque for eye cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, M.; Green, J.; Petasecca, M.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Cutajar, D.; Franklin, D.; Jakubek, J.; Carolan, M. G.; Conway, M.; Pospisil, S.; Kron, T.; Metcalfe, P.; Zaider, M.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2011-05-01

    Treatment of ocular cancers using eye plaque brachytherapy is now an established medical procedure. However, current QA for these eye plaques is quite rudimentary, limiting the opportunities for precise pre-tumour plaque customisation. This paper proposes and experimentally validates a new technique for imaging of eye plaque dose distributions using a high-resolution pixelated silicon detector. Results are presented demonstrating the 2D and 3D isodose surfaces produced using experimental data collected using this method.

  15. An in vitro biofilm model of subgingival plaque

    PubMed Central

    Walker, C.; Sedlacek, M. J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Numerous biofilm models have been described for the study of bacteria associated with the supragingival plaque. However, there are fewer models available for the study of subgingival plaque. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a model that closely mimicked the composition of the subgingival flora. Methods: The model was developed as follows: calcium hydroxyapatite disks were coated overnight with 10% sterile saliva, placed in flat-bottomed tissue culture plates containing trypticase-soy broth, directly inoculated with a small aliquot of dispersed subgingival plaque, incubated anaerobically, and transferred to fresh medium at 48-h intervals until climax (steady-state) biofilms were formed (?10 days). Results: The model, based on samples from eight periodontitis patients and eight healthy subjects, yielded a multi-species, heterogeneous biofilm, consisting of both gram-positive and gram-negative species, and comprising 15?20 cultivable species associated with the subgingival flora. The species present and their proportions were reflective of the initial cultivable subgingival flora. Comparisons of the initial plaque samples from healthy subjects and the mature biofilms showed 81% similarity in species and 70% similarity in the proportions present. Biofilms formed from samples obtained from periodontally diseased subjects were 69% similar in species and 57% similar in the proportions present. Conclusions: The biofilm model described here closely reproduces the composition of the cultivable subgingival plaque both in the species present and in their relative proportions. Differences existed between biofilms grown from diseased and non-diseased sites with the former being characterized by the presence of periodontal pathogens at microbially significant levels. PMID:17488440

  16. Stable size distribution of amyloid plaques over the course of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Mielke, Matthew L; Muzitansky, Alona; Gómez-Isla, Teresa; Growdon, John H; Bacskai, Brian J; Betensky, Rebecca A; Frosch, Matthew P; Hyman, Bradley T

    2012-08-01

    Amyloid β plaques are a key pathologic feature of Alzheimer disease (AD), but whether plaque sizes increase or stabilize over the course of AD is unknown. We measured the size distribution of total immunoreactive (10D5-positive) and dense-core (Thioflavin S-positive) plaques in the temporal neocortex of a large group of subjects with AD and age-matched plaque-bearing subjects without dementia to test the hypothesis that amyloid plaques continue to grow along with the progression of the disease. The size of amyloid β (10D5)-positive plaques did not differ between groups, whereas dense-core plaques from the group with AD were slightly larger than those from the group without dementia (∼25%-30%, p = 0.01). Within the group with AD, dense-core plaque size did not independently correlate with duration of clinical disease (from 4 to 21 years, p = 0.68), whereas 10D5-positive plaque size correlated negatively with disease duration (p = 0.01). By contrast, an earlier age of symptom onset strongly predicted a larger postmortem plaque size; this effect was independent of disease duration and the presence of the APOE[Latin Small Letter Open E]4 allele (p = 0.0001). We conclude that plaques vary in size among patients, with larger size distributions correlating with an earlier age of onset, but plaques do not substantially increase in size over the clinical course of the disease. PMID:22805771

  17. Direct association between diet and the stability of human atherosclerotic plaque.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Isabel; Andersson Georgiadou, Elisavet; Mattsson, Sören; Skog, Göran; Pedro, Luís; Fernandes E Fernandes, José; Dias, Nuno; Engström, Gunnar; Nilsson, Jan; Stenström, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Mediterranean diet has been suggested to explain why coronary heart disease mortality is lower in southern than northern Europe. Dietary habits can be revealed by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) measurement of carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) in biological tissues. To study if diet is associated with human plaque stability, atherosclerotic plaques from carotid endarterectomy on 56 patients (21 Portuguese and 35 Swedish) were analysed by IRMS and histology. Plaque components affecting rupture risk were measured. Swedish plaques had more apoptosis, lipids and larger cores, as well as fewer proliferating cells and SMC than the Portuguese, conferring the Swedish a more rupture-prone phenotype. Portuguese plaques contained higher δ(13)C and δ(15)N than the Swedish, indicating that Portuguese plaques were more often derived from marine food. Plaque δ(13)C correlated with SMC and proliferating cells, and inversely with lipids, core size, apoptosis. Plaque δ(15)N correlated with SMC and inversely with lipids, core size and apoptosis. This is the first observational study showing that diet is reflected in plaque components associated with its vulnerability. The Portuguese plaques composition is consistent with an increased marine food intake and those plaques are more stable than those from Swedish patients. Marine-derived food is associated with plaque stability. PMID:26490319

  18. 21 CFR 872.5580 - Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque... adhesion of dental plaque. (a) Identification. The device is assigned the generic name oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque and is identified as a device intended to reduce the presence...

  19. 21 CFR 872.5580 - Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque... adhesion of dental plaque. (a) Identification. The device is assigned the generic name oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque and is identified as a device intended to reduce the presence...

  20. 21 CFR 872.5580 - Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque... adhesion of dental plaque. (a) Identification. The device is assigned the generic name oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque and is identified as a device intended to reduce the presence...

  1. Direct association between diet and the stability of human atherosclerotic plaque

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Isabel; Andersson Georgiadou, Elisavet; Mattsson, Sören; Skog, Göran; Pedro, Luís; Fernandes e Fernandes, José; Dias, Nuno; Engström, Gunnar; Nilsson, Jan; Stenström, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Mediterranean diet has been suggested to explain why coronary heart disease mortality is lower in southern than northern Europe. Dietary habits can be revealed by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) measurement of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) in biological tissues. To study if diet is associated with human plaque stability, atherosclerotic plaques from carotid endarterectomy on 56 patients (21 Portuguese and 35 Swedish) were analysed by IRMS and histology. Plaque components affecting rupture risk were measured. Swedish plaques had more apoptosis, lipids and larger cores, as well as fewer proliferating cells and SMC than the Portuguese, conferring the Swedish a more rupture-prone phenotype. Portuguese plaques contained higher δ13C and δ15N than the Swedish, indicating that Portuguese plaques were more often derived from marine food. Plaque δ13C correlated with SMC and proliferating cells, and inversely with lipids, core size, apoptosis. Plaque δ15N correlated with SMC and inversely with lipids, core size and apoptosis. This is the first observational study showing that diet is reflected in plaque components associated with its vulnerability. The Portuguese plaques composition is consistent with an increased marine food intake and those plaques are more stable than those from Swedish patients. Marine-derived food is associated with plaque stability. PMID:26490319

  2. How do we prevent the vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque from rupturing? Insights from in vivo assessments of plaque, vascular remodeling, and local endothelial shear stress.

    PubMed

    Andreou, Ioannis; Antoniadis, Antonios P; Shishido, Koki; Papafaklis, Michail I; Koskinas, Konstantinos C; Chatzizisis, Yiannis S; Coskun, Ahmet U; Edelman, Elazer R; Feldman, Charles L; Stone, Peter H

    2015-05-01

    Coronary atherosclerosis progresses both as slow, gradual enlargement of focal plaque and also as a more dynamic process with periodic abrupt changes in plaque geometry, size, and morphology. Systemic vasculoprotective therapies such as statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and antiplatelet agents are the cornerstone of prevention of plaque rupture and new adverse clinical outcomes, but such systemic therapies are insufficient to prevent the majority of new cardiac events. Invasive imaging methods have been able to identify both the anatomic features of high-risk plaque and the ongoing pathobiological stimuli responsible for progressive plaque inflammation and instability and may provide sufficient information to formulate preventive local mechanical strategies (eg, preemptive percutaneous coronary interventions) to avert cardiac events. Local endothelial shear stress (ESS) triggers vascular phenomena that synergistically exacerbate atherosclerosis toward an unstable phenotype. Specifically, low ESS augments lipid uptake and catabolism, induces plaque inflammation and oxidation, downregulates the production, upregulates the degradation of extracellular matrix, and increases cellular apoptosis ultimately leading to thin-cap fibroatheromas and/or endothelial erosions. Increases in blood thrombogenicity that result from either high or low ESS also contribute to plaque destabilization. An understanding of the actively evolving vascular phenomena, as well as the development of in vivo imaging methodologies to identify the presence and severity of the different processes, may enable early identification of a coronary plaque destined to acquire a high-risk state and allow for highly selective, focal preventive interventions to avert the adverse natural history of that particular plaque. In this review, we focus on the role of ESS in the pathobiologic processes responsible for plaque destabilization, leading either to accelerated plaque growth or to acute coronary events, and emphasize the potential to utilize in vivo risk stratification of individual coronary plaques to optimize prevention strategies to preclude new cardiac events. PMID:25336461

  3. Patient-specific prediction of coronary plaque growth from CTA angiography: a multiscale model for plaque formation and progression.

    PubMed

    Parodi, Oberdan; Exarchos, Themis P; Marraccini, Paolo; Vozzi, Federico; Milosevic, Zarko; Nikolic, Dalibor; Sakellarios, Antonis; Siogkas, Panagiotis K; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I; Filipovic, Nenad

    2012-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamics methods based on in vivo 3-D vessel reconstructions have recently been identified the influence of wall shear stress on endothelial cells as well as on vascular smooth muscle cells, resulting in different events such as flow mediated vasodilatation, atherosclerosis, and vascular remodeling. Development of image-based modeling technologies for simulating patient-specific local blood flows is introducing a novel approach to risk prediction for coronary plaque growth and progression. In this study, we developed 3-D model of plaque formation and progression that was tested in a set of patients who underwent coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) for anginal symptoms. The 3-D blood flow is described by the Navier-Stokes equations, together with the continuity equation. Mass transfer within the blood lumen and through the arterial wall is coupled with the blood flow and is modeled by a convection-diffusion equation. The low density lipoprotein (LDL) transports in lumen of the vessel and through the vessel tissue (which has a mass consumption term) are coupled by Kedem-Katchalsky equations. The inflammatory process is modeled using three additional reaction-diffusion partial differential equations. A full 3-D model was created. It includes blood flow and LDL concentration, as well as plaque formation and progression. Furthermore, features potentially affecting plaque growth, such as patient risk score, circulating biomarkers, localization and composition of the initial plaque, and coronary vasodilating capability were also investigated. The proof of concept of the model effectiveness was assessed by repetition of CTA, six months after. PMID:22665513

  4. 125I eye plaque dose distribution including penumbra characteristics.

    PubMed

    de la Zerda, A; Chiu-Tsao, S T; Lin, J; Boulay, L L; Kanna, I; Kim, J H; Tsao, H S

    1996-03-01

    The two main purposes of this work are (1) to determine the penumbra characteristics for 125I eye plaque and the relative influence of the plaque and eye-air interface on the dose distribution, and (2) to initiate development of a treatment planning algorithm for clinical dose calculations. Dose was measured in a newly designed solid water eye phantom for an 125I (6711) seed at the center of a 20 mm COMS eye plaque using thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) "cubes" and "minichips" inside and outside the eye, in the longitudinal and transverse central planes. TLD cubes were used in most locations, except for short distances from the seed and in the penumbra region. In the presence of both the plaque and the eye-air interface, the dose along the central axis was found to be reduced by 10% at 1 cm and up to 20% at 2.5 cm, relative to the bulk homogeneous phantom case. In addition, the overall dose reduction was greater for larger off-axis coordinates at a given depth. The penumbra characteristics due to the lip collimation were quantified, particularly the dependence of penumbra center and width on depth. Only small differences were observed between the profiles in the transverse and longitudinal planes. In the bulk geometry (without the eye-air interface), the dose reduction due to the presence of the plaque alone was found to be 7% at a depth of 2.5 cm. The additional reduction of 13% observed, with the presence of eye-air interface (20% combined), can be attributed to the lack of backscattering from the air in front of the eye. The dose-reduction effect due to the anterior air interface alone became unnoticeable at a depth of 1.1 cm (1.5 cm from the eye-air interface). An analytic fit to measured data was developed for clinical dose calculations for a centrally loaded seed. The central axis values of the dose rates multiplied by distance squared, Dr2, were fitted with a double exponential function of depth. The off-axis profile of Dr2, at a given depth, was parametrized by a modified Fermi-Dirac function to model both the penumbra characteristics due the plaque lip collimation and the effect of oblique filtration by silastic. PMID:8815384

  5. A free boundary problem for steady small plaques in the artery and their stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Avner; Hao, Wenrui; Hu, Bei

    2015-08-01

    Atherosclerosis is a leading cause of death in the United States and worldwide; it originates from a plaque which builds up in the artery. In this paper, we consider a simplified model of plaque growth involving LDL and HDL cholesterols, macrophages and foam cells, which satisfy a coupled system of PDEs with a free boundary, the interface between the plaque and the blood flow. We prove that there exist small radially symmetric stationary plaques and establish a sharp condition that ensures their stability. We also determine necessary and sufficient conditions under which a small initial plaque will shrink and disappear, or persist for all times.

  6. Immunostained plaque assay for detection and titration of rabies virus infectivity.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun-Sun; Um, Jihye; Choi, Young-Ki; Lee, Yeong Seon; Ju, Young Ran; Kim, Su Yeon

    2016-02-01

    The fluorescent antibody test (FAT) is the most commonly used method for detection of the rabies virus (RV). The plaque assay can only be applied to fixed RVs, and cannot be used for street RVs. In this study, plaque formation allowing the determination of both fixed and street RVs was achieved using the immune plaque assay. The immune plaque assay carried out using both fixed and street RVs showed the formation of clear and countable plaques after immunostaining with anti-RV P monoclonal antibody and HRP-conjugated anti-mouse IgG. Plaque size increased with incubation time, and the plaque morphology differed according to viral strain. Fixed RVs had the dot-shaped regular plaque morphology and street RVs had the small irregular-shape plaque morphology. In addition, no significant differences were observed between the growth kinetics of the KGH strain when the virus was titrated using the FAT and the immune plaque assay. It allowed the successful detection and quantification of both street and fixed RVs through the production of clear, countable plaques, making it easy to obtain objective results. The assay is an applicable tool for the detection of RVs in various investigations, including virus neutralizing antibody testing, cell-to-cell spread, and viral drug sensitivity testing. PMID:26569350

  7. Texture based segmentation method to detect atherosclerotic plaque from optical tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Ammu; Hewko, Mark; Sowa, Michael; Sherif, Sherif

    2013-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging has been widely employed in assessing cardiovascular disease. Atherosclerosis is one of the major cause cardio vascular diseases. However visual detection of atherosclerotic plaque from OCT images is often limited and further complicated by high frame rates. We developed a texture based segmentation method to automatically detect plaque and non plaque regions from OCT images. To verify our results we compared them to photographs of the vascular tissue with atherosclerotic plaque that we used to generate the OCT images. Our results show a close match with photographs of vascular tissue with atherosclerotic plaque. Our texture based segmentation method for plaque detection could be potentially used in clinical cardiovascular OCT imaging for plaque detection.

  8. Inflammation, plaque progression and vulnerability: evidence from intravascular ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Yu; Puri, Rishi

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to a critical role of inflammation in the development and propagation of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Pathological studies in human and animal models have elucidated specific inflammatory mediators contributing to the progression and rupture of atherosclerotic plaque in the artery wall. These observations not only outline the importance of inflammation in atheroma progression but also the potential of anti-inflammatory therapeutic approaches to prevent and stabilize atherosclerotic disease. Intravascular ultrasonography enables direct atheroma visualization in vivo. Additionally, refinements in ultrasound technology permitting radiofrequency backscatter analysis enhance plaque characterization associated with disease instability. These imaging modalities will continue to provide opportunities for evaluating novel inflammatory mechanisms and anti-inflammatory therapies. PMID:26331112

  9. Episcleral eye plaque dosimetry comparison for the Eye Physics EP917 using Plaque Simulator and Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Leonard W; Amoush, Ahmad; Wilkinson, Douglas A

    2015-01-01

    This work is a comparative study of the dosimetry calculated by Plaque Simulator, a treatment planning system for eye plaque brachytherapy, to the dosimetry calculated using Monte Carlo simulation for an Eye Physics model EP917 eye plaque. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation using MCNPX 2.7 was used to calculate the central axis dose in water for an EP917 eye plaque fully loaded with 17 IsoAid Advantage 125I seeds. In addition, the dosimetry parameters ?, gL(r), and F(r,?) were calculated for the IsoAid Advantage model IAI-125 125I seed and benchmarked against published data. Bebig Plaque Simulator (PS) v5.74 was used to calculate the central axis dose based on the AAPM Updated Task Group 43 (TG-43U1) dose formalism. The calculated central axis dose from MC and PS was then compared. When the MC dosimetry parameters for the IsoAid Advantage 125I seed were compared with the consensus values, ? agreed with the consensus value to within 2.3%. However, much larger differences were found between MC calculated gL(r) and F(r,?) and the consensus values. The differences between MC-calculated dosimetry parameters are much smaller when compared with recently published data. The differences between the calculated central axis absolute dose from MC and PS ranged from 5% to 10% for distances between 1 and 12 mm from the outer scleral surface. When the dosimetry parameters for the 125I seed from this study were used in PS, the calculated absolute central axis dose differences were reduced by 2.3% from depths of 4 to 12 mm from the outer scleral surface. We conclude that PS adequately models the central dose profile of this plaque using its defaults for the IsoAid model IAI-125 at distances of 1 to 7 mm from the outer scleral surface. However, improved dose accuracy can be obtained by using updated dosimetry parameters for the IsoAid model IAI-125 125I seed. PMID:26699577

  10. Assessment of vulnerable and unstable carotid atherosclerotic plaques on endarterectomy specimens

    PubMed Central

    BUTCOVAN, DOINA; MOCANU, VERONICA; BARAN, DANA; CIURESCU, DIANA; TINICA, GRIGORE

    2016-01-01

    The types of lesion instability responsible for the majority of acute coronary events frequently include plaque disruption and plaque erosion with superimposed thrombosis. The term ‘vulnerable plaque is used to describe atherosclerotic (ATS) plaques that are particularly prone to rupture and susceptible to thrombus formation, such as the thin-cap fibroatheroma (TCFA). The aim of the present study was to assess the morphological and histological differences between plaques that are unstable and those that are vulnerable to instability. Carotid artery endarterectomy specimens were obtained from 26 patients with carotid artery stenosis, consisting of 20 men and 6 women (age range, 35–80 years). Histological and morphometric methods were used to visualize and characterize the ATS plaques. Among the 26 carotid ATS plaques, 23% were stable, 23% were unstable and 54% were vulnerable. With regard to morphometric characteristics, the following mean values were obtained for the TCFA and unstable plaques, respectively: Fibrous cap thickness, 21.91 and 11.66 µM; proportion of necrotic core area in the total plaque area, 25.90 and 22.03%; and the proportion of inflammatory area in the total plaque area, 8.41 and 3.04%. No plaque calcification was observed in any of them. Since ATS coronary artery disease is considerably widespread and fatal, it is crucial to further study ATS lesions to obtain an improved understanding of the nature of vulnerable and unstable plaques. The methods used to detect plaque size, necrotic core area and fibrous cap thickness are considered to be particularly useful for identifying vulnerable and unstable plaques.

  11. The source of variation in ureolysis in artificial plaques cultured from human salivary bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sissons, C H; Hancock, E M; Cutress, T W

    1988-01-01

    Artificial-mouth plaques were cultured for 7 days from the saliva of two individuals, one with high and one with low salivary ureolytic activity. There was a 7.5-fold range in the resulting plaque ureolysis rates (per mg of protein), and the composition of the flora varied widely. The average rate of ureolysis of artificial plaque was similar to that in natural plaques but higher than in salivary sediment (after correction of sediment rates for the presence of 50 per cent non-bacterial protein). The average rate of ureolysis per ureolytic bacterium was 2.5 times higher in the artificial plaques than in saliva. Although the saliva inocula were from subjects with a 3-fold difference in salivary ureolysis rate, this difference was not reflected in the ureolytic activity of the artificial plaques. Neither was this difference evident in the ureolytic activity of the corresponding natural plaques. The established hypothesis that plaque ureolysis is derived mainly from an unidentified active segment of the total ureolytic flora was tested in the artificial plaques by analysis of variance to determine the contribution of the known ureolytic bacteria. Plaque ureolysis rates were almost entirely explained (r2 = 86 per cent) by the percentage of total detectable ureolytic bacteria in the plaque flora. The plaque bacteria giving strong ureolytic reactions on agar plates were all Gram-positive cocci and in 6 of the 9 plaques were streptococci only. Therefore, in artificial plaques the physiologically significant bacteria comprise a high proportion of the total ureolytic flora and are Gram-positive cocci, mainly streptococci. PMID:3075449

  12. Optical detection of structural changes in human carotid atherosclerotic plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korol, R. M.; Canham, P. B.; Finlay, H. M.; Hammond, R. R.; Quantz, M.; Ferguson, G. G.; Liu, L. Y.; Lucas, A. R.

    2005-08-01

    Background: Arterial bifurcations are commonly the sites of developing atherosclerotic plaque that lead to arterial occlusions and plaque rupture (myocardial infarctions and strokes). Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy provides an effective nondestructive method supplying spectral information on extracellular matrix (ECM) protein composition, specifically collagen and elastin. Purpose: To investigate regional differences in the ECM proteins -- collagen I, III and elastin in unstable plaque by analyzing data from laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of human carotid endarterectomy specimens. Methods: Gels of ECM protein extracts (elastin, collagen types I & III) were measured as reference spectra and internal thoracic artery segments (extra tissue from bypass surgery) were used as tissue controls. Arterial segments and the endarterectomy specimens (n=21) were cut into 5mm cross-sectional rings. Ten fluorescence spectra per sampling area were then recorded at 5 sites per ring with argon laser excitation (357nm) with a penetration depth of 200 μm. Spectra were normalized to maximum intensity and analyzed using multiple regression analysis. Tissue rings were fixed in formalin (within 3 hours of surgery), sectioned and stained with H&E or Movat's Pentachrome for histological analysis. Spectroscopy data were correlated with immunohistology (staining for elastin, collagen types I, III and IV). Results: Quantitative fluorescence for the thoracic arteries revealed a dominant elastin component on the luminal side -- confirmed with immunohistology and known artery structure. Carotid endarterectomy specimens by comparison had a significant decrease in elastin signature and increased collagen type I and III. Arterial spectra were markedly different between the thoracic and carotid specimens. There was also a significant elevation (p<0.05) of collagen type I distal to the bifurcation compared to proximal tissue in the carotid specimens. Conclusion: Fluorescence spectroscopy is an effective method for evaluating ECM (collagen and elastin) associated with vascular remodeling despite the considerable variability in the plaque structure. Consistent regional differences were detected in the carotid specimens.

  13. Hydrocortisone supresses inflammatory activity of metalloproteinase - 8 in carotid plaque

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Sthefano Atique; Antonangelo, Leila; Capelozzi, Vera Luiza; Beteli, Camila Baumann; de Camargo Júnior, Otacílio; de Aquino, José Luis Braga; Caffaro, Roberto Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Objective Matrix metalloproteinases are inflammatory biomarkers involved in carotid plaque instability. Our objective was to analyze the inflammatory activity of plasma and carotid plaque MMP-8 and MMP-9 after intravenous administration of hydrocortisone. Methods The study included 22 patients with stenosis ≥ 70% in the carotid artery (11 symptomatic and 11 asymptomatic) who underwent carotid endarterectomy. The patients were divided into two groups: Control Group - hydrocortisone was not administered, and Group 1 - 500 mg intravenous hydrocortisone was administered during anesthetic induction. Plasma levels of MMP-8 and MMP-9 were measured preoperatively (24 hours before carotid endarterectomy) and at 1 hour, 6 hours and 24 hours after carotid endarterectomy. In carotid plaque, tissue levels of MMP-8 and MMP-9 were measured. Results Group 1 showed increased serum levels of MMP- 8 (994.28 pg/ml and 408.54 pg/ml, respectively; P=0.045) and MMP-9 (106,656.34 and 42,807.69 respectively; P=0.014) at 1 hour after carotid endarterectomy compared to the control group. Symptomatic patients in Group 1 exhibited lower tissue concentration of MMP-8 in comparison to the control group (143.89 pg/ml and 1317.36 respectively; P=0.003). There was a correlation between preoperative MMP-9 levels and tissue concentrations of MMP-8 (P=0.042) and MMP-9 (P=0.019) between symptomatic patients in the control group. Conclusion Hydrocortisone reduces the concentration of MMP- 8 in carotid plaque, especially in symptomatic patients. There was an association between systemic and tissue inflammation. PMID:26313719

  14. A rotational ablation tool for calcified atherosclerotic plaque removal.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Hyeng; Kim, Hyung-Jung; Kim, Nicholas N; Yoon, Hae-Sung; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2011-12-01

    Atherosclerosis is a major cardiovascular disease involving accumulations of lipids, white blood cells, and other materials on the inside of artery walls. Since the calcification found in the advanced stage of atherosclerosis dramatically enhances the mechanical properties of the plaque, restoring the original lumen of the artery remains a challenge. High-speed rotational atherectomy, when performed with an ablating grinder to remove the plaque, produces much better results in the treatment of calcified plaque compared to other methods. However, the high-speed rotation of the Rotablator commercial rotational atherectomy device produces microcavitation, which should be avoided because of the serious complications it can cause. This research involves the development of a high-speed rotational ablation tool that does not generate microcavitation. It relies on surface modification to achieve the required surface roughness. The surface roughness of the tool for differential cutting was designed based on lubrication theory, and the surface of the tool was modified using Nd:YAG laser beam engraving. Electron microscope images and profiles indicated that the engraved surface of the tool had approximately 1 μm of root mean square surface roughness. The ablation experiment was performed on hydroxyapatite/polylactide composite with an elastic modulus similar to that of calcified plaque. In addition, differential cutting was verified on silicone rubber with an elastic modulus similar to that of a normal artery. The tool performance and reliability were evaluated by measuring the ablation force exerted, the size of the debris generated during ablation, and through visual inspection of the silicone rubber surface. PMID:21792606

  15. Modeling plaque fissuring and dissection during balloon angioplasty intervention.

    PubMed

    Gasser, T Christian; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2007-05-01

    Balloon angioplasty intervention is traumatic to arterial tissue. Fracture mechanisms such as plaque fissuring and/or dissection occur and constitute major contributions to the lumen enlargement. However, these types of mechanically-based traumatization of arterial tissue are also contributing factors to both acute procedural complications and chronic restenosis of the treatment site. We propose physical and finite element models, which are generally useable to trace fissuring and/or dissection in atherosclerotic plaques during balloon angioplasty interventions. The arterial wall is described as an anisotropic, heterogeneous, highly deformable, nearly incompressible body, whereas tissue failure is captured by a strong discontinuity kinematics and a novel cohesive zone model. The numerical implementation is based on the partition of unity finite element method and the interface element method. The later is used to link together meshes of the different tissue components. The balloon angioplasty-based failure mechanisms are numerically studied in 3D by means of an atherosclerotic-prone human external iliac artery, with a type V lesion. Image-based 3D geometry is generated and tissue-specific material properties are considered. Numerical results show that in a primary phase the plaque fissures at both shoulders of the fibrous cap and stops at the lamina elastica interna. In a secondary phase, local dissections between the intima and the media develop at the fibrous cap location with the smallest thickness. The predicted results indicate that plaque fissuring and dissection cause localized mechanical trauma, but prevent the main portion of the stenosis from high stress, and hence from continuous tissue damage. PMID:17385047

  16. Association of Chlamydia Pneumoniae Infection With Atherosclerotic Plaque Formation

    PubMed Central

    Assar, Omid; Nejatizadeh, Azim; Dehghan, Farzaneh; Kargar, Mohammad; Zolghadri, Nader

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a complex multifactorial disorder. Studies show that infectious microbial agents may play an important role in the development of atherosclerosis; however, these findings are conflicting. This study investigated the presence of Chlamydia pneumoniae DNA in atherosclerotic plaques of patients suffering from coronary artery disease. In a cross-sectional study, 85 patients (43 females and 42 males with mean age of 61±9.5, range 42-82 years) referred for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and thoracic biopsy as the control groups were enrolled for this study. Standard questionnaires, including demographic and clinical evaluation were administered. Obtained specimens were processed and then nested polymerase chain reaction with primers for Pst1 fragment was carried out to detect Chlamydia pneumoniae DNA. Statistical analysis was done using the SPSS software. Of note, in 25 out of the 85 patients (29.4%), C. pneumoniae was detected within atherosclerotic plaques, whereas, 5 out of the 85 thoracic biopsy (5.9%) were positive for the presence of the mentioned bacteria in internal thoracic artery. There was a statistically significant association between atherosclerotic plaque (study group) and thoracic biopsy (control group) in terms of C. pneumoniae positivity (P=0.0001). The findings of this study support the hypothesis that C. pneumoniae is associated with atherosclerosis.

  17. Supragingival plaque microbial analysis in reflection to caries experience

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dental caries develops as a result of the metabolism of carbohydrates by cariogenic bacteria present in a complex biofilm. The present study aimed to examine if bacteria in pooled supragingival plaque samples quantified using a “checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization” based panel of caries-related bacteria, could reflect the caries experience in a manner similar to saliva samples analysed using a chair-side method in a previous investigation. Methods A total of 86 mothers and their children aged 4–6 years and 12–16 years old participated. Caries experience (DMFT/dmft; Decayed, Missing and Filled Teeth for permanent and primary teeth) was registered clinically and radiographically. Caries was recorded at the D3 level (caries into dentine). The D/d component was divided into three categories. A pooled supragingival plaque sample per participant was obtained from posterior approximal sites. Analyses of 15 bacterial species were performed using the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridisation technique. Results No significant relationships were found between the bacterial scores and DMFT/dmft nor D/d groups. Conclusions Unlike the saliva samples and the chair-side method, interproximal pooled plaque samples analysed using the “checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique” did not reveal any significant relations between the bacterial counts and the caries experience. PMID:23298235

  18. HDL-mimetic PLGA nanoparticle to target atherosclerosis plaque macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L; Fay, Francois; Lobatto, Mark E; Tang, Jun; Ouimet, Mireille; Kim, YongTae; van der Staay, Susanne E M; van Rijs, Sarian M; Priem, Bram; Zhang, Liangfang; Fisher, Edward A; Moore, Kathryn J; Langer, Robert; Fayad, Zahi A; Mulder, Willem J M

    2015-03-18

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a natural nanoparticle that exhibits an intrinsic affinity for atherosclerotic plaque macrophages. Its natural targeting capability as well as the option to incorporate lipophilic payloads, e.g., imaging or therapeutic components, in both the hydrophobic core and the phospholipid corona make the HDL platform an attractive nanocarrier. To realize controlled release properties, we developed a hybrid polymer/HDL nanoparticle composed of a lipid/apolipoprotein coating that encapsulates a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) core. This novel HDL-like nanoparticle (PLGA-HDL) displayed natural HDL characteristics, including preferential uptake by macrophages and a good cholesterol efflux capacity, combined with a typical PLGA nanoparticle slow release profile. In vivo studies carried out with an ApoE knockout mouse model of atherosclerosis showed clear accumulation of PLGA-HDL nanoparticles in atherosclerotic plaques, which colocalized with plaque macrophages. This biomimetic platform integrates the targeting capacity of HDL biomimetic nanoparticles with the characteristic versatility of PLGA-based nanocarriers. PMID:25650634

  19. HDL-Mimetic PLGA Nanoparticle To Target Atherosclerosis Plaque Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L.; Fay, Francois; Lobatto, Mark E.; Tang, Jun; Ouimet, Mireille; Kim, YongTae; van der Staay, Susanne E. M.; van Rijs, Sarian M.; Priem, Bram; Zhang, Liangfang; Fisher, Edward A; Moore, Kathryn J.; Langer, Robert; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J M

    2015-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a natural nanoparticle that exhibits an intrinsic affinity for atherosclerotic plaque macrophages. Its natural targeting capability as well as the option to incorporate lipophilic payloads, e.g., imaging or therapeutic components, in both the hydrophobic core and the phospholipid corona make the HDL platform an attractive nanocarrier. To realize controlled release properties, we developed a hybrid polymer/HDL nanoparticle composed of a lipid/apolipoprotein coating that encapsulates a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) core. This novel HDL-like nanoparticle (PLGA–HDL) displayed natural HDL characteristics, including preferential uptake by macrophages and a good cholesterol efflux capacity, combined with a typical PLGA nanoparticle slow release profile. In vivo studies carried out with an ApoE knockout mouse model of atherosclerosis showed clear accumulation of PLGA–HDL nanoparticles in atherosclerotic plaques, which colocalized with plaque macrophages. This biomimetic platform integrates the targeting capacity of HDL biomimetic nanoparticles with the characteristic versatility of PLGA-based nanocarriers. PMID:25650634

  20. Patient specific multiscale modelling for plaque formation and progression.

    PubMed

    Exarchos, T P; Sakellarios, A; Siogkas, P K; Fotiadis, D I; Milosevic, Z; Nikolic, D; Filipovic, N; Marraccini, P; Vozzi, F; Parodi, O

    2012-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional model of plaque formation and progression that was tested in a set of patients who underwent coronary Computed Tomography angiography (CTA) for anginal symptoms. The 3D blood flow is described by the Navier-Stokes equations, together with the continuity equation. Mass transfer within the blood lumen and through the arterial wall is coupled with the blood flow and is modeled by a convection-diffusion equation. The Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) transports in lumen of the vessel and through the vessel tissue (which has a mass consumption term) are coupled by Kedem-Katchalsky equations. The inflammatory process is modeled using three additional reaction-diffusion partial differential equations. A full three-dimensional model was created. Furthermore, features potentially affecting plaque growth, such as patient risk score, circulating biomarkers, localization and composition of the initial plaque, and coronary vasodilating capability were also investigated. The proof of concept of the model effectiveness was assessed 6 months after the baseline evaluation. PMID:23366529

  1. Optimization of sup 125 I ophthalmic plaque brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Astrahan, M.A.; Luxton, G.; Jozsef, G.; Liggett, P.E.; Petrovich, Z. )

    1990-11-01

    Episcleral plaques containing {sup 125}I sources are often used in the treatment of ocular melanoma. Within four years post-treatment, however, the majority of patients experience some visual loss due to radiation retinopathy. The high incidence of late complications suggests that careful treatment optimization may lead to improved outcome. The goal of optimization would be to reduce the magnitude of vision-limiting complications without compromising tumor control. We have developed a three-dimensional computer model for ophthalmic plaque therapy which permits us to explore the potential of various optimization strategies. One simple strategy which shows promise is to maximize the ratio of dose to the tumor apex (T) compared to dose to the macula (M). By modifying the parameters of source location, activity distribution, source orientation, and shielding we find that the calculated T:M ratio can be varied by a factor of 2 for a common plaque design and posterior tumor location. Margins and dose to the tumor volume remain essentially unchanged.

  2. Adherence of plaque components to different restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Kawai, K; Urano, M

    2001-01-01

    This study compared the amount of artificial plaque synthesized in vitro by Streptococcus sobrinus on various dental materials using radioisotopes. In particular, plaque-retaining capacities of new types of ceramics were the focus of this study. Specimens were fabricated from the following materials (one amalgam alloy [Spherical-D], one casting gold alloy [Casting Gold TYPE I], one resin composite [Herculite XR] and three ceramics [Vita Celay Blanks, IPS Empress and Dicor MGC]). The amount of bacteria and glucans adhered on the specimens was measured after incubation for 24 hours at 37 degrees C with radio-labeled cariogenic bacteria and sucrose. This adhesion test was performed using two different surfaces with 600-grit roughness and clinical smoothness. Irrespective of the surface roughness, the least amount of plaque adhered to the ceramics. However, in the case of the resin composite and amalgam, the amount of bacteria and glucan adhesion decreased dramatically by polishing, though there were no statistically different changes in the amount of bacteria and glucans that adhered to the ceramics even after polishing. In general, the amount of adhered bacteria showed almost the same tendency as that of glucans. Although no statistical differences in the amount of bacteria and glucan adhesion were detected among the three ceramics investigated in this study, a lesser amount of bacteria and glucans adhered to them compared to the other materials. PMID:11504440

  3. Endothelial erosion of plaques as a substrate for coronary thrombosis.

    PubMed

    White, Stephen J; Newby, Andrew C; Johnson, Thomas W

    2016-02-29

    Myocardial infarction is a prevalent, life-threatening consequence of athero-thrombosis. Post-mortem histology and intravascular imaging in live patients have shown that approximately one third of myocardial infarctions are caused by a thrombus overlying an intact, non-ruptured atherosclerotic plaque. Histology identifies erosion of luminal endothelial cells from smooth muscle and proteoglycan-rich, thick fibrous cap atheromas as the underlying pathology. Unlike plaque ruptures, endothelial erosions tend to occur on thick-capped atherosclerotic plaques and may or may not be associated with inflammation. Smoking and female gender are strong risk factors for erosion. Multiple mechanisms may contribute to endothelial erosion, including endothelial dysfunction, TLR signalling, leukocyte activation and modification of sub-endothelial matrix by endothelial or smooth muscle cells, which may trigger loss of adhesion to the extracellular matrix or endothelial apoptosis. Diagnosis of endothelial erosion by intravascular imaging, especially high resolution optical coherence tomography, may influence treatment strategies, offering prognostic value and utility as an endpoint in trials of agents designed to preserve an intact coronary endothelium. PMID:26791872

  4. Rhenium and technetium complexes that bind to amyloid-? plaques.

    PubMed

    Hayne, David J; North, Andrea J; Fodero-Tavoletti, Michelle; White, Jonathan M; Hung, Lin W; Rigopoulos, Angela; McLean, Catriona A; Adlard, Paul A; Ackermann, Uwe; Tochon-Danguy, Henri; Villemagne, Victor L; Barnham, Kevin J; Donnelly, Paul S

    2015-03-21

    Alzheimer's disease is associated with the presence of insoluble protein deposits in the brain called amyloid plaques. The major constituent of these deposits is aggregated amyloid-? peptide. Technetium-99m complexes that bind to amyloid-? plaques could provide important diagnostic information on amyloid-? plaque burden using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT). Tridentate ligands with a stilbene functional group were used to form complexes with the fac-[M(I)(CO)3](+) (M = Re or (99m)Tc) core. The rhenium carbonyl complexes with tridentate co-ligands that included a stilbene functional group and a dimethylamino substituent bound to amyloid-? present in human frontal cortex brain tissue from subjects with Alzheimer's disease. This chemistry was extended to make the analogous [(99m)Tc(I)(CO)3](+) complexes and the complexes were sufficiently stable in human serum. Whilst the lipophilicity (log?D7.4) of the technetium complexes appeared ideally suited for penetration of the blood-brain barrier, preliminary biodistribution studies in an AD mouse model (APP/PS1) revealed relatively low brain uptake (0.24% ID g(-1) at 2 min post injection). PMID:25515141

  5. Spectral CT imaging of vulnerable plaque with two independent biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baturin, Pavlo; Alivov, Yahya; Molloi, Sabee

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the feasibility of a novel four-material decomposition technique for assessing the vulnerability of plaque with two contrast materials spectral computer tomography (CT) using two independent markers: plaque's inflammation and spotty calcification. A simulation study was conducted using an energy-sensitive photon-counting detector for k-edge imaging of the coronary arteries. In addition to detecting the inflammation status, which is known as a biological marker of a plaque's vulnerability, we use spotty calcium concentration as an independent marker to test a plaque's vulnerability. We have introduced a new method for detecting and quantifying calcium concentrations in the presence of two contrast materials (iodine and gold), calcium and soft tissue background. In this method, four-material decomposition was performed on a pixel-by-pixel basis, assuming there was an arbitrary mixture of materials in the voxel. The concentrations of iodine and gold were determined by the k-edge material decomposition based on the maximum likelihood method. The calibration curves of the attenuation coefficients, with respect to the concentrations of different materials, were used to separate the calcium signal from both contrast materials and different soft tissues in the mixtures. Three different materials (muscle, blood and lipid) were independently used as soft tissue. The simulations included both ideal and more realistic energy resolving detectors to measure the polychromatic photon spectrum in single slice parallel beam geometry. The ideal detector was used together with a 3 cm diameter digital phantom to demonstrate the decomposition method while a more realistic detector and a 33 × 24 cm2 digital chest phantom were simulated to validate the vulnerability assessment technique. A 120 kVp spectrum was generated to produce photon flux sufficient for detecting contrast materials above the k-edges of iodine (33.2 keV) and gold (80.7 keV). By performing simulations on a 3 cm diameter digital phantom, we successfully identified four materials that were simultaneously present in the mixture at different proportions and in multiple locations on the phantom. Quantitative analysis with a chest digital phantom showed that the results for iodine, gold and calcium were highly correlated with the known concentrations. The analysis revealed a potentially powerful technique for assessing a plaque's vulnerability with two independent markers. High correlation and low relative errors between calculated and known materials’ concentrations showed that the method is feasible. This technique can potentially have a high clinical impact.

  6. Spectral CT imaging of vulnerable plaque with two independent biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Baturin, Pavlo; Alivov, Yahya; Molloi, Sabee

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the feasibility of a novel four-material decomposition technique for assessing the vulnerability of plaque with two contrast materials spectral computer tomography (CT) using two independent markers: plaque's inflammation and spotty calcification. A simulation study was conducted using an energy-sensitive photon-counting detector for k-edge imaging of the coronary arteries. In addition to detecting the inflammation status, which is known as a biological marker of a plaque's vulnerability, we use spotty calcium concentration as an independent marker to test a plaque's vulnerability. We have introduced a new method for detecting and quantifying calcium concentrations in the presence of two contrast materials (iodine and gold), calcium and soft tissue background. In this method, four-material decomposition was performed on a pixel-by-pixel basis, assuming there was an arbitrary mixture of materials in the voxel. The concentrations of iodine and gold were determined by the k-edge material decomposition based on the maximum likelihood method. The calibration curves of the attenuation coefficients, with respect to the concentrations of different materials, were used to separate the calcium signal from both contrast materials and different soft tissues in the mixtures. Three different materials (muscle, blood and lipid) were independently used as soft tissue. The simulations included both ideal and more realistic energy resolving detectors to measure the polychromatic photon spectrum in single slice parallel beam geometry. The ideal detector was used together with a 3 cm diameter digital phantom to demonstrate the decomposition method while a more realistic detector and a 33 × 24 cm(2) digital chest phantom were simulated to validate the vulnerability assessment technique. A 120 kVp spectrum was generated to produce photon flux sufficient for detecting contrast materials above the k-edges of iodine (33.2 keV) and gold (80.7 keV). By performing simulations on a 3 cm diameter digital phantom, we successfully identified four materials that were simultaneously present in the mixture at different proportions and in multiple locations on the phantom. Quantitative analysis with a chest digital phantom showed that the results for iodine, gold and calcium were highly correlated with the known concentrations. The analysis revealed a potentially powerful technique for assessing a plaque's vulnerability with two independent markers. High correlation and low relative errors between calculated and known materials' concentrations showed that the method is feasible. This technique can potentially have a high clinical impact. PMID:22683885

  7. Antibacterial agents in the control of supragingival plaque--a review.

    PubMed

    Eley, B M

    1999-03-27

    This review considers the main agents which have been used as antibacterial agents in mouthwashes and other vehicles to inhibit the growth of supragingival plaque. The agents discussed are bisguanide antiseptics, quaternary ammonium compounds, phenolic antiseptics, hexetidine, povidone iodine, triclosan, delmopinol, salifluor, metal ions, sanguinarine, propolis and oxygenating agents. The plaque inhibitory, anti-plaque and anti-gingivitis properties of these agents are considered along with their substantivity, safety and possible clinical usefulness. Clinical trials of these agents that have been published are also reported. The possible clinical uses of antiseptic mouthwashes are finally considered along with some advice about assessing manufacturers claims. Throughout this review the terms plaque inhibitory, anti-plaque and anti-gingivitis have been used according to the clarification of terminology suggested by the European Federation of Periodontology at its second workshop. This defines a plaque inhibitory effect as one reducing plaque to levels insufficient to prevent the development of gingivitis; an anti-plaque effect as one which produces a prolonged and profound reduction in plaque sufficient to prevent the development of gingivitis; and anti-gingivitis as an anti-inflammatory effect on the gingival health not necessarily mediated through an effect on plaque. PMID:10230103

  8. Primary Stenting for Complex Atherosclerotic Plaques in Aortic and Iliac Stenoses

    SciTech Connect

    Onal, Baran; Ilgit, Erhan T.; Yuecel, Cem; Ozbek, Erdal; Vural, Murat; Akpek, Sergin

    1998-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of primary stenting for complex atherosclerotic plaques in aortic and iliac stenoses that are not amenable to balloon angioplasty alone. Methods: Nineteen patients with complex atherosclerotic plaques were treated with a Palmaz stent (n= 19), Wallstent (n= 1), Strecker stent (n= 1), or Memotherm stent (n= 1). A total of 22 stenoses presenting with complex plaque morphology including ulcerated plaques, ulcerated plaques with focal aneurysms, plaques with heavy calcification, severely eccentric plaques, plaques with overhanging edge, and plaques with spontaneous dissection were stented. The lesions were in the aorta (n= 1), common iliac artery (n= 19), or external iliac artery (n= 2). Results: Immediate angiography after stent placement revealed restoration of patency of the stented segment. Focal aneurysms and ulcerated areas were occluded in the follow-up angiographies obtained 4-12 weeks after the procedure. In one case with poor distal runoff and multiple complex lesions of the iliac artery, subacute occlusion occurred. Clinical and angiographic follow-up (3-46 months) revealed patency of all other stented segments. Conclusion: Primary stenting is an effective and reliable approach for complex plaques in stenoses. Patency of the arterial segment with a smooth lumen can be created without the risk of acute complications such as distal embolization, dissection, or occlusion.

  9. Molecular imaging of apolipoprotein B-100 in human coronary plaques by color fluorescent angioscopy and microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hiruta, Nobuyuki; Uchida, Yasuto; Maezawa, Yuko; Shimoyama, Ei; Uchida, Yasumi

    2013-01-01

    Apolipoprotein B-100 (ApoB-100) is an important risk factor for coronary artery disease. However, its localization in human coronary plaques is not well understood. The present study was performed to visualize ApoB-100 in human coronary artery wall. Deposition of native ApoB-100 in excised human coronary plaques and normal segments classified by conventional angioscopy was investigated by color fluorescent angioscopy (CFA) and microscopy (CFM) using Nile blue dye (NB) which elicits a golden fluorescence characteristic of ApoB-100 as a biomarker. By CFA, the % incidence of ApoB-100 was 20 in 40 normal segments, 38 in 42 white, and 11 in 35 yellow plaques (P < 0.05 versus white plaques). There was no significant difference in detection sensitivity between CFA and luminal surface scan by CFM. By CFM transected surface scan, ApoB-100 deposited in superficial, deep, and/or in both layers. Deposition in both layers was frequently observed in white plaques and yellow plaques without necrotic core (NC), less frequently in normal segments, and rarely in yellow plaques with NC. (1) Taking into consideration the well known process of plaque growth, the results suggest that ApoB-100 begins to deposit before plaque formation, increasingly deposits with plaque growth, and disappears after necrotic core formation. (2) CFA is feasible for imaging of ApoB-100 in human coronary artery wall. PMID:23676365

  10. Characterising human atherosclerotic carotid plaque tissue composition and morphology using combined spectroscopic and imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Calcification is a marked pathological component in carotid artery plaque. Studies have suggested that calcification may induce regions of high stress concentrations therefore increasing the potential for rupture. However, the mechanical behaviour of the plaque under the influence of calcification is not fully understood. A method of accurately characterising the calcification coupled with the associated mechanical plaque properties is needed to better understand the impact of calcification on the mechanical behaviour of the plaque during minimally invasive treatments. This study proposes a comparison of biochemical and structural characterisation methods of the calcification in carotid plaque specimens to identify plaque mechanical behaviour. Biochemical analysis, by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, was used to identify the key components, including calcification, in each plaque sample. However, FTIR has a finite penetration depth which may limit the accuracy of the calcification measurement. Therefore, this FTIR analysis was coupled with the identification of the calcification inclusions located internally in the plaque specimen using micro x-ray computed tomography (μX-CT) which measures the calcification volume fraction (CVF) to total tissue content. The tissue characterisation processes were then applied to the mechanical material plaque properties acquired from experimental circumferential loading of human carotid plaque specimen for comparison of the methods. FTIR characterised the degree of plaque progression by identifying the functional groups associated with lipid, collagen and calcification in each specimen. This identified a negative relationship between stiffness and 'lipid to collagen' and 'calcification to collagen' ratios. However, μX-CT results suggest that CVF measurements relate to overall mechanical stiffness, while peak circumferential strength values may be dependent on specific calcification geometries. This study demonstrates the need to fully characterise the calcification structure of the plaque tissue and that a combination of FTIR and μX-CT provides the necessary information to fully understand the mechanical behaviour of the plaque tissue. PMID:25602176

  11. Characterizing the appearance and growth of amyloid plaques in APP/PS1 mice

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ping; Bero, Adam W.; Cirrito, John R.; Xiao, Qingli; Hu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yan; Gonzales, Ernesto; Holtzman, David M.; Lee, Jin-Moo

    2009-01-01

    Amyloid plaques are primarily composed of extracellular aggregates of amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide and are a pathological signature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the factors that influence the dynamics of amyloid plaque formation and growth in vivo are largely unknown. Using serial intravital multiphoton microscopy through a thinned-skull cranial window in APP/PS1 transgenic mice, we have found that amyloid plaques appear and grow over a period of weeks before reaching a mature size. Growth was more prominent early after initial plaque formation: plaques grew faster in 6 month-old compared to 10 month-old mice. Plaque growth rate was also size-related, as smaller plaques exhibited more rapid growth relative to larger plaques. Alterations in interstitial Aβ concentrations were associated with changes in plaque growth. Parallel studies using multiphoton microscopy and in vivo microdialysis revealed that pharmacological reduction of soluble extracellular Aβ by as little as 20-25% was associated with a dramatic decrease in plaque formation and growth. Furthermore, this small reduction in Aβ synthesis was sufficient to reduce amyloid plaque load in 6 month-old but not 10 month-old mice, suggesting that treatment early in disease pathogenesis may be more effective than later treatment. In contrast to thinned-skull windows, no significant plaque growth was observed under open-skull windows, which demonstrated extensive microglial and astrocytic activation. Together, these findings indicate that individual amyloid plaque growth in vivo occurs over a period of weeks and may be influenced by interstitial Aβ concentration as well as reactive gliosis. PMID:19710322

  12. Characterising human atherosclerotic carotid plaque tissue composition and morphology using combined spectroscopic and imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Hilary E; Mulvihill, John J; Cunnane, Eoghan M; Walsh, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    Calcification is a marked pathological component in carotid artery plaque. Studies have suggested that calcification may induce regions of high stress concentrations therefore increasing the potential for rupture. However, the mechanical behaviour of the plaque under the influence of calcification is not fully understood. A method of accurately characterising the calcification coupled with the associated mechanical plaque properties is needed to better understand the impact of calcification on the mechanical behaviour of the plaque during minimally invasive treatments. This study proposes a comparison of biochemical and structural characterisation methods of the calcification in carotid plaque specimens to identify plaque mechanical behaviour. Biochemical analysis, by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, was used to identify the key components, including calcification, in each plaque sample. However, FTIR has a finite penetration depth which may limit the accuracy of the calcification measurement. Therefore, this FTIR analysis was coupled with the identification of the calcification inclusions located internally in the plaque specimen using micro x-ray computed tomography (μX-CT) which measures the calcification volume fraction (CVF) to total tissue content. The tissue characterisation processes were then applied to the mechanical material plaque properties acquired from experimental circumferential loading of human carotid plaque specimen for comparison of the methods. FTIR characterised the degree of plaque progression by identifying the functional groups associated with lipid, collagen and calcification in each specimen. This identified a negative relationship between stiffness and 'lipid to collagen' and 'calcification to collagen' ratios. However, μX-CT results suggest that CVF measurements relate to overall mechanical stiffness, while peak circumferential strength values may be dependent on specific calcification geometries. This study demonstrates the need to fully characterise the calcification structure of the plaque tissue and that a combination of FTIR and μX-CT provides the necessary information to fully understand the mechanical behaviour of the plaque tissue. PMID:25602176

  13. Manual planimetric measurement of carotid plaque volume using three-dimensional ultrasound imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Anthony; Ainsworth, Craig; Blake, Chris; Spence, J. David; Fenster, Aaron

    2007-04-15

    We investigated the utility of three manual planimetric methods to quantify carotid plaque volume. A single observer measured 15 individual plaques from 15 three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound (3D US) images of patients ten times each using three different planimetric approaches. Individual plaque volumes were measured (range: 32.6-597.1 mm{sup 3}) using a standard planimetric approach (M1) whereby a plaque end was identified and sequential contours were measured. The same plaques were measured using a second approach (M2), whereby plaque ends were first identified and the 3D US image of the plaque was then subdivided into equal intervals. A third method (M3) was used to measure total plaque burden (range: 165.1-1080.0 mm{sup 3}) in a region ({+-}1.5 cm) relative to the carotid bifurcation. M1 systematically underestimated individual plaque volume compared to M2 (V{sub 2}=V{sub 1}+14.0 mm{sup 3}, r=0.99, p=0.006) due to a difference in the mean plaque length measured. Coefficients of variance (CV) for M1 and M2 decrease with increasing plaque volume, with M2 results less than M1. Root mean square difference between experimental and theoretical CV for M2 was 3.2%. The standard deviation in the identification of the transverse location of the carotid bifurcation was 0.56 mm. CVs for plaque burden measured using M3 ranged from 1.2% to 7.6% and were less than CVs determined for individual plaque volumes of the same volume. The utility of M3 was demonstrated by measuring carotid plaque burden and volume change over a period of 3 months in three patients. In conclusion, M2 was determined to be a more superior measurement technique than M1 to measure individual plaque volume. Furthermore, we demonstrated the utility of M3 to quantify regional plaque burden and to quantify change in plaque volume.

  14. Numbers and types of asbestos fibers in subjects with pleural plaques.

    PubMed Central

    Warnock, M. L.; Prescott, B. T.; Kuwahara, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    The authors analyzed asbestos fibers in lung samples from 20 subjects with pleural plaques discovered on autopsy and compared the findings to their previous analyses of lungs from subjects with little or no asbestos exposure and no plaques. Sixteen of the subjects with plaques had a history of exposure to asbestos. The authors used electron-optical methods and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy to investigate the structure, diffraction patterns, and chemical composition of the asbestos fibers. The subjects with plaques had significantly higher median concentrations than the control subjects for amosite and crocidolite fibers (P less than 0.01) but not for the other fiber types. Minimal microscopic asbestosis was present in the 3 subjects who had the highest amosite concentrations. In the subjects with typical plaques, a history of asbestos exposure, and more fibers than in the control population, the relation of the plaques to asbestos was confirmed; for others, it was uncertain. PMID:7124907

  15. Characterization of atherosclerotic plaque-depositions by infrared, Raman and CARS microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthäus, Christian; Bergner, Gero; Krafft, Christoph; Dietzek, Benjamin; Romeike, Bernd F. M.; Brehm, Bernhard R.; Popp, Jürgen

    2011-07-01

    Atherosclerotic plaques are mainly composed of proteoglycans, triglycerides, cholesterol, cholesterolester and crystalline calcium. From histopathological characterizations it is known that the composition of these atherosclerotic plaques can vary to a great extent, due to different risk factors as smoking, hyperlipedemia, or genetic background ect. The individual plaque components can be spectroscopically easily identified. Furthermore, spectroscopic imaging technologies offer the possibility to study the plaque compositions in a more quantitative manner than traditional staining techniques. Here, we compare the potential of IR, Raman and CARS microscopy to characterize the constitution of atherosclerotic plaques as well as the structure of the surrounding tissue. For data analysis and image reconstruction spectral decomposition algorithms such as vertex component analysis (VCA) were introduced. The results are in good agreement with the histopathology. Aim of the study is to correlate the compositional characteristics of atherosclerotic plaques with individual disease patterns.

  16. Effect of iron plaque on antimony uptake by rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiao-Dan; Wang, Yu-Jun; Hockmann, Kerstin; Zhou, Dong-Mei

    2015-09-01

    Although iron (Fe) plaque has been shown to significantly affect the uptake of toxic antimony (Sb) by rice, knowledge about the influence of iron plaque on antimony (Sb) (amount, mechanisms, etc) is, however, limited. Here, the effect of Fe plaque on Sb(III) and Sb(V) (nominal oxidation states) uptake by rice (Oryza sativa L.) was investigated using hydroponic experiments and synchrotron-based techniques. The results showed that iron plaque immobilized Sb on the surface of rice roots. Although the binding capacity of iron plaque for Sb(III) was markedly greater than that for Sb(V), significantly more Sb(III) was taken up by roots and transported to shoots. In the presence of Fe plaque, Sb uptake into rice roots was significantly reduced, especially for Sb(III). However, this did not translate into decreasing Sb concentrations in rice shoots and even increased shoot Sb concentrations during high Fe-Sb(III) treatment. PMID:25947970

  17. The effect of 3 mouthrinses on plaque and gingivitis development.

    PubMed

    Maruniak, J; Clark, W B; Walker, C B; Magnusson, I; Marks, R G; Taylor, M; Clouser, B

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of 3 mouthrinses, Listerine Antiseptic (thymol), Peridex (chlorhexidine), Perimed (povidone iodine and hydrogen peroxide), and a placebo (water) on the development of dental plaque and gingivitis, when used as the only oral hygiene procedure for 14 days. 71 subjects were entered into a randomized, double-blind study. At the baseline examination, papillary bleeding score (PBS), and plaque index (PI) were registered, after which subjects received supragingival prophylaxis and were assigned to 1 of 4 study cells. Subjects were asked to refrain from all oral hygiene procedures except for the supervised 14-day 2 x daily rinsing with the assigned preparation. At day 14, the same clinical parameters were again registered. Statistical analysis was performed by a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) to compare the 4 groups, followed by Duncan's multiple range test to determine specific group differences. At baseline, average PBS and PI scores were similar for all 4 groups. After 14 days, the average PBS for Peridex and Perimed was significantly lower than for Listerine Antiseptic and water. The frequency of interdental units with a PBS greater than 2 was significantly lower for Peridex and Perimed than for Listerine Antiseptic and water. We concluded that both Peridex and Perimed were effective in reducing plaque and gingivitis when used as a 2 x daily mouthrinse by subjects refraining from other oral hygiene procedures. In vitro, a synergistic effect was assumed when inhibition was achieved with Perimed at the same or greater dilution than was achieved with povidone-iodine alone. PMID:1310096

  18. Thiocyanate supplementation decreases atherosclerotic plaque in mice expressing human myeloperoxidase

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, P. E.; Laura, R. P.; Maki, R. A.; Reynolds, W. F.; Davies, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of the heme enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO) are associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. MPO predominantly catalyzes formation of the oxidants hypochlorous acid (HOCl) from Cl−, and hypothiocyanous acid (HOSCN) from SCN−, with these anions acting as competitive substrates. HOSCN is a less powerful and more specific oxidant than HOCl, and selectively targets thiols; such damage is largely reversible, unlike much HOCl-induced damage. We hypothesized that increased plasma SCN−, and hence HOSCN formation instead of HOCl, may decrease artery wall damage. This was examined using high-fat fed atherosclerosis-prone LDLR−/− mice transgenic for human MPO, with and without SCN− (10 mM) added to drinking water. Serum samples, collected fortnightly, were analyzed for cholesterol, triglycerides, thiols, MPO and SCN−; study-long exposure was calculated by area under the curve (AUC). Mean serum SCN− concentrations were elevated in the supplemented mice (200-320 μM) relative to controls (<120 μM). Normalized aortic root plaque areas at sacrifice were 26% lower in the SCN−-supplemented mice compared to controls (P=0.0417), but plaque morphology was not appreciably altered. Serum MPO levels steadily increased in mice on the high-fat diet, however, comparison of SCN−- supplemented vs. control mice showed no significant changes in MPO protein, cholesterol or triglyceride levels; thiol levels were decreased in supplemented mice at one time-point. Plaque areas increased with higher cholesterol AUC (r=0.4742; P=0.0468), and decreased with increasing SCN− AUC (r=−0.5693; P=0.0134). These data suggest that increased serum SCN− levels, which can be achieved in humans by dietary manipulation, may decrease atherosclerosis burden. PMID:25812586

  19. In vitro method for prediction of plaque reduction by dentifrice.

    PubMed

    Tepper, Bruce; Howard, Brian; Schnell, Daniel; Mills, Lisa; Xu, Jian

    2015-11-01

    An in vitro Particle Based Biofilm (PBB) model was developed to enable high throughput screening tests to predict clinical plaque reduction. Multi-species oral biofilms were cultured from pooled stimulated human saliva on continuously-colliding hydroxyapatite particles. After three days PBBs were saline washed prior to use in screening tests. Testing involved dosing PBBs for 1min followed by neutralization of test materials and rinsing. PBBs were then assayed for intact biofilm activity measured as ATP. The ranking of commercial dentifrices from most to least reduction of intact biofilm activity was Crest ProHealth Clinical Gum Protection, Crest ProHealth, Colgate Total and Crest Cavity Protection. We demonstrated five advantages of the PBB model: 1) the ATP metric had a linear response over ≥1000-fold dynamic range, 2) potential interference with the ATP assay by treatments was easily eliminated by rinsing PBBs with saline, 3) discriminating power was statistically excellent between all treatment comparisons with the negative controls, 4) screening test results were reproducible across four tests, and 5) the screening test produced the same rank order for dentifrices as clinical studies that measured plaque reduction. In addition, 454 pyrosequencing of the PBBs indicated an oral microbial consortium was present. The most prevalent genera were Neisseria, Rothia, Streptococcus, Porphyromonas, Prevotella, Actinomyces, Fusobacterium, Veillonella and Haemophilus. We conclude these in vitro methods offer an efficient, effective and relevant screening tool for reduction of intact biofilm activity by dentifrices. Moreover, dentifrice rankings by the in vitro test method are expected to predict clinical results for plaque reduction. PMID:26151407

  20. Thiocyanate supplementation decreases atherosclerotic plaque in mice expressing human myeloperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Morgan, P E; Laura, R P; Maki, R A; Reynolds, W F; Davies, M J

    2015-06-01

    Elevated levels of the heme enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO) are associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. MPO predominantly catalyzes formation of the oxidants hypochlorous acid (HOCl) from Cl(-), and hypothiocyanous acid (HOSCN) from SCN(-), with these anions acting as competitive substrates. HOSCN is a less powerful and more specific oxidant than HOCl, and selectively targets thiols; such damage is largely reversible, unlike much HOCl-induced damage. We hypothesized that increased plasma SCN(-), and hence HOSCN formation instead of HOCl, may decrease artery wall damage. This was examined using high-fat fed atherosclerosis-prone LDLR(-/-) mice transgenic for human MPO, with and without SCN(-) (10 mM) added to drinking water. Serum samples, collected fortnightly, were analyzed for cholesterol, triglycerides, thiols, MPO, and SCN(-); study-long exposure was calculated by area under the curve (AUC). Mean serum SCN(-) concentrations were elevated in the supplemented mice (200-320 ?M) relative to controls (< 120 ?M). Normalized aortic root plaque areas at sacrifice were 26% lower in the SCN(-)-supplemented mice compared with controls (P = 0.0417), but plaque morphology was not appreciably altered. Serum MPO levels steadily increased in mice on the high-fat diet, however, comparison of SCN(-)-supplemented versus control mice showed no significant changes in MPO protein, cholesterol, or triglyceride levels; thiol levels were decreased in supplemented mice at one time-point. Plaque areas increased with higher cholesterol AUC (r = 0.4742; P = 0.0468), and decreased with increasing SCN(-) AUC (r = - 0.5693; P = 0.0134). These data suggest that increased serum SCN(-) levels, which can be achieved in humans by dietary manipulation, may decrease atherosclerosis burden. PMID:25812586

  1. View of Commemorative plaque left on moon at Hadley-Apennine landing site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A close-up view of a commemorative plaque left on the Moon at the Hadley-Apennine landing site in memory of 14 NASA astronauts and USSR cosmonauts, now deceased. Their names are inscribed in alphabetical order on the plaque. The plaque was stuck in the lunar soil by Astronauts David R. Scott and James B. Irwin during their Apollo 15 lunar surface extravehicular activity. The tin, man-like object represents the figure of a fallen astronaut/cosmonaut.

  2. Micro-FTIR imaging spectroscopy of calcified atheromatous carotid plaques. Part IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alò, Francesco; Conti, Carla; Ferraris, Paolo; Giorgini, Elisabetta; Rubini, Corrado; Sabbatini, Simona; Tosi, Giorgio

    2009-03-01

    Micro-imaging infrared spectroscopy has been performed on atheromatous plaques in order to localize and characterize substances responsible for the cytotoxic effects that prevent macrophages clearance of lipidic and calcified materials. In plaques with different graded atherosclerotic lesions, infrared determinations allowed to visualize gruel and ceroid toxic components and variously calcified zones. Compare correlations let to visualize the progression of the lesion on going from the lumen to the outer media of the plaque.

  3. A computational fluid-structure interaction model for plaque vulnerability assessment in atherosclerotic human coronary arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Razaghi, Reza; Haghpanahi, Mohammad

    2014-04-01

    Coronary artery disease is responsible for a third of global deaths worldwide. Computational simulations of blood flow can be used to understand the interactions of artery/plaque and blood in coronary artery disease and to better predict the rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. So far, the mechanical properties of animals' coronary artery have been mostly used for hemodynamic simulation of atherosclerotic arteries. The mechanical properties of animals' coronary arteries are often not accurate enough and can be only used for an approximate estimation and comparative assessment of the cognate parameters in human. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid-structure interactions model with three different plaque types is presented to perform a more accurate plaque vulnerability assessment for human atherosclerotic plaques. The coronary arteries of twenty-two male individuals were removed during autopsy and subjected to uniaxial tensile loading. The hyperelastic material coefficients of coronary arteries were calculated and implemented to the computational model. The fully coupled fluid and structure models were solved using the explicit dynamics finite element code LS-DYNA. The normal and shear stresses induced within the plaques were significantly affected by different plaque types. The highest von Mises (153 KPa) and shear (57 KPa) stresses were observed for hypocellular plaques, while the lowest von Mises (70 KPa) and shear (39 KPa) stresses were observed on the stiffer calcified plaques. The results suggest that the risk of plaque rupture due to blood flow is lower for cellular and hypocellular plaques, while higher for calcified plaques with low fracture stresses.

  4. Investigation of atherosclerotic plaque by high-frequency EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biktagirov, T. B.; Chelyshev, Yu A.; Gafurov, M. R.; Mamin, G. V.; Orlinskii, S. B.; Osin, Yu N.; Salakhov, M. Kh

    2013-12-01

    We present a comparative study of samples of aorta walls from male patients with atherosclerosis and hydroxyapatite powders with the average size of crystallites of 30 nm synthesized by the wet precipitation technique by using 94 GHz pulsed EPR. Origin of the observed paramagnetic centers is discussed. Supported by the electron microscopy and microanalysis, it is shown that EPR spectra from the calcified biological tissues correlates with those obtained in inorganic hydroxyapatites. The hypothesis about the important role of (nano)hydroxyapatite in formation of the mineral deposits and atherosclerotic plaque instability is further sustained.

  5. Plaque pH modulations of children's favourite snacks.

    PubMed

    Gauba, K; Goyal, A; Tewari, A

    1991-03-01

    Cariogenic potential of a few children's favourite snacks, assessed by evaluation of pH modulations on their respective consumption after 2,5,10,20,30 and 40 minutes compared to 10 percent sucrose control using pooled plaque method, in 8-12 years old children revealed lollipop (hard sucking candy) to be the most cariogenic and samosa without chutney to be the least cariogenic. The cariogenic potential of ice creams were similar, however, low as compared to sucrose solution of 10 percent. PMID:2056343

  6. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia during adalimumab treatment for plaque psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Harada, Yukinori; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Sato, Midori; Kodaira, Mutsuki; Kono, Tsunesuke

    2015-01-01

    Adalimumab is commonly used to treat autoimmune diseases with few reported hematological adverse reactions. We herein describe the case of an 85-year-old Japanese man with plaque psoriasis who developed autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) after 3 years of adalimumab treatment. The patient suddenly developed hematuria and dyspnea on exertion while receiving adalimumab treatment. Laboratory data showed low hemoglobin levels and slightly increased reticulocyte counts, while direct and indirect antiglobulin tests were positive. The patient was diagnosed with AIHA which resolved after replacing the adalimumab treatment with prednisolone therapy. The findings from this case indicate that AIHA may be caused by long-term adalimumab treatment. PMID:25948357

  7. Staining and calculus formation after 0.12% chlorhexidine rinses in plaque-free and plaque covered surfaces: a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    ZANATTA, Fabrício Batistin; ANTONIAZZI, Raquel Pippi; RÖSING, Cassiano Kuchenbecker

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Studies concerning side effects of chlorhexidine as related to the presence of plaque are scarce. The purpose of this study was to compare the side effects of 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) on previously plaque-free (control group) and plaque-covered surfaces (test group). Methods This study had a single-blind, randomized, split-mouth, 21 days-experimental gingivitis design, including 20 individuals who abandoned all mechanical plaque control methods during 25 days. After 4 days of plaque accumulation, the individuals had 2 randomized quadrants cleaned, remaining 2 quadrants with plaque-covered dental surfaces. On the fourth day, the individuals started with 0.12% CHX rinsing lasting for 21 days. Stain index intensity and extent as well as calculus formation were evaluated during the experimental period. Results Intergroup comparisons showed statistically higher (p<0.05) stain intensity and extent index as well as calculus formation over the study in test surfaces as compared to control surfaces. Thus, 26.19% of test surfaces presented calculus, whereas calculus was observed in 4.52% in control surfaces. Conclusion The presence of plaque increased 0.12% CHX side effects. These results strengthen the necessity of biofilm disruption prior to the start of CHX mouthrinses in order to reduce side effects. PMID:21085810

  8. F-18 Fluoride Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography for Detecting Atherosclerotic Plaques.

    PubMed

    Kang, Won Jun

    2015-01-01

    A large number of major cardiovascular events occur in patients due to minimal or some lumen narrowing of the coronary artery. Recent biological studies have shown that the biological composition or vulnerability of the plaque is more critical for plaque rupture compared to the degree of stenosis. To overcome the limitations of anatomical images, molecular imaging techniques have been suggested as promising imaging tools in various fields. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), which is widely used in the field of oncology, is an example of molecular probes used in atherosclerotic plaque evaluation. FDG is a marker of plaque macrophage glucose utilization and inflammation, which is a prominent characteristic of vulnerable plaque. Recently, F-18 fluoride has been used to visualize vulnerable plaque in clinical studies. F-18 fluoride accumulates in regions of active microcalcification, which is normally observed during the early stages of plaque formation. More studies are warranted on the accumulation of F-18 fluoride and plaque formation/vulnerability; however, due to high specific accumulation, low background activity, and easy accessibility, F-18 fluoride is emerging as a promising non-invasive imaging probe to detect vulnerable plaque. PMID:26576114

  9. Ultrasound-Based Carotid Elastography for Detection of Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaques Validated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chengwu; Pan, Xiaochang; He, Qiong; Huang, Manwei; Huang, Lingyun; Zhao, Xihai; Yuan, Chun; Bai, Jing; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound-based carotid elastography has been developed to estimate the mechanical properties of atherosclerotic plaques. The objective of this study was to evaluate the in vivo capability of carotid elastography in vulnerable plaque detection using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging as reference. Ultrasound radiofrequency data of 46 carotid plaques from 29 patients (74 ± 5 y old) were acquired and inter-frame axial strain was estimated with an optical flow method. The maximum value of absolute strain rate for each plaque was derived as an indicator for plaque classification. Magnetic resonance imaging of carotid arteries was performed on the same patients to classify the plaques into stable and vulnerable groups for carotid elastography validation. The maximum value of absolute strain rate was found to be significantly higher in vulnerable plaques (2.15 ± 0.79 s(-1), n = 27) than in stable plaques (1.21 ± 0.37 s(-1), n = 19) (p < 0.0001). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed, and the area under the curve was 0.848. Therefore, the in vivo capability of carotid elastography to detect vulnerable plaques, validated by magnetic resonance imaging, was proven, revealing the potential of carotid elastography as an important tool in atherosclerosis assessment and stroke prevention. PMID:26553205

  10. A simple and highly repeatable viral plaque assay for enterovirus 71.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yingxian; Xu, Yi; Ou, Zhiying; Su, Ling; Xia, Huimin

    2015-04-01

    The classic plaque assay is a method for counting infectious viral particles, however its complexity limits its use in a variety of virological experiments. To simplify the operation and to improve the repeatability, we employed an improved plaque assay procedure based on Avicel to make the whole experiment easier and optimize the results on a model of Vero cells infection with Enterovirus 71(EV71). Clear plaques visible to the naked eyes can be formed on a 24-well plate or a 96-well plate without immunostaining. Following further improvement, this plaque assay procedure could be applied to other viruses, being both simple and repeatable. PMID:25515071

  11. Ex vivo differential phase contrast and magnetic resonance imaging for characterization of human carotid atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Meletta, Romana; Borel, Nicole; Stolzmann, Paul; Astolfo, Alberto; Klohs, Jan; Stampanoni, Marco; Rudin, Markus; Schibli, Roger; Krämer, Stefanie D; Herde, Adrienne Müller

    2015-10-01

    Non-invasive detection of specific atherosclerotic plaque components related to vulnerability is of high clinical relevance to prevent cerebrovascular events. The feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for characterization of plaque components was already demonstrated. We aimed to evaluate the potential of ex vivo differential phase contrast X-ray tomography (DPC) to accurately characterize human carotid plaque components in comparison to high field multicontrast MRI and histopathology. Two human plaque segments, obtained from carotid endarterectomy, classified according to criteria of the American Heart Association as stable and unstable plaque, were examined by ex vivo DPC tomography and multicontrast MRI (T1-, T2-, and proton density-weighted imaging, magnetization transfer contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging). To identify specific plaque components, the plaques were subsequently sectioned and stained for fibrous and cellular components, smooth muscle cells, hemosiderin, and fibrin. Histological data were then matched with DPC and MR images to define signal criteria for atherosclerotic plaque components. Characteristic structures, such as the lipid and necrotic core covered by a fibrous cap, calcification and hemosiderin deposits were delineated by histology and found with excellent sensitivity, resolution and accuracy in both imaging modalities. DPC tomography was superior to MRI regarding resolution and soft tissue contrast. Ex vivo DPC tomography allowed accurate identification of structures and components of atherosclerotic plaques at different lesion stages, in good correlation with histopathological findings. PMID:26179860

  12. Comparison of strain rates of dart impacted plaques and pendulum impacted bumpers

    SciTech Connect

    Scammell, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    The difference in strain rates prevailing during pendulum impact of bumpers versus high speed dart impact of plaques was investigated. Uni-axial strain gages were applied to the tension side of the plaques and bumpers directly opposite the point of impact. The plaques were impacted with an instrumented high rate dart impact tester and the bumpers impacted with a full scale bumper pendulum impact tester. Theoretical calculations and actual strain rate data support the conclusion that the strain rate of a plaque during dart impact significantly exceeds that of bumper strain rate during pendulum impact.

  13. F-18 Fluoride Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography for Detecting Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A large number of major cardiovascular events occur in patients due to minimal or some lumen narrowing of the coronary artery. Recent biological studies have shown that the biological composition or vulnerability of the plaque is more critical for plaque rupture compared to the degree of stenosis. To overcome the limitations of anatomical images, molecular imaging techniques have been suggested as promising imaging tools in various fields. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), which is widely used in the field of oncology, is an example of molecular probes used in atherosclerotic plaque evaluation. FDG is a marker of plaque macrophage glucose utilization and inflammation, which is a prominent characteristic of vulnerable plaque. Recently, F-18 fluoride has been used to visualize vulnerable plaque in clinical studies. F-18 fluoride accumulates in regions of active microcalcification, which is normally observed during the early stages of plaque formation. More studies are warranted on the accumulation of F-18 fluoride and plaque formation/vulnerability; however, due to high specific accumulation, low background activity, and easy accessibility, F-18 fluoride is emerging as a promising non-invasive imaging probe to detect vulnerable plaque. PMID:26576114

  14. Investigation of the composition of arterial plaques based on arterial waveforms and material properties.

    PubMed

    Feng, J; Rajeswaran, T; He, S; Wilkinson, F L; Serracino-Inglott, F; Azzawi, M; Parikh, V; Miraftab, M; Alexander, M Y

    2015-08-01

    Stroke is mainly caused by a narrowing of the carotid artery from a build-up of plaque. The risk of plaque rupture and subsequent stroke is dependent on plaque composition. Advances in imaging modalities offer a non-invasive means to assess the health of blood vessels and detect damage. However, the current diagnosis fails to identify patients with soft lipid plaque that are more susceptible to fissure, resulting in stroke. The aim of this study was to use waveform analysis to identify plaque composition and the risk of rupture. We have investigated pressure and flow by combining an artificial blood flow circuit with tubing containing different materials, to simulate plaques in a blood vessel. We used fat and bone to model lipid and calcification respectively to determine if the composition of plaques can be identified by arterial waveforms. We demonstrate that the arterial plaque models with different percentages of calcification and fat, results in significantly different arterial waveforms. These findings imply that arterial waveform analysis has the potential for further development to identify the vulnerable plaques prone to rupture. These findings could have implications for improved patient prognosis by speed of detection and a more appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:26736431

  15. Molecular imaging of plaques in coronary arteries with PET and SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhong-Hua; Rashmizal, Hairil; Xu, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease remains a major cause of mortality. Presence of atherosclerotic plaques in the coronary artery is responsible for lumen stenosis which is often used as an indicator for determining the severity of coronary artery disease. However, the degree of coronary lumen stenosis is not often related to compromising myocardial blood flow, as most of the cardiac events that are caused by atherosclerotic plaques are the result of vulnerable plaques which are prone to rupture. Thus, identification of vulnerable plaques in coronary arteries has become increasingly important to assist identify patients with high cardiovascular risks. Molecular imaging with use of positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has fulfilled this goal by providing functional information about plaque activity which enables accurate assessment of plaque stability. This review article provides an overview of diagnostic applications of molecular imaging techniques in the detection of plaques in coronary arteries with PET and SPECT. New radiopharmaceuticals used in the molecular imaging of coronary plaques and diagnostic applications of integrated PET/CT and PET/MRI in coronary plaques are also discussed. PMID:25278976

  16. Bacteria Present in Carotid Arterial Plaques Are Found as Biofilm Deposits Which May Contribute to Enhanced Risk of Plaque Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Lanter, Bernard B.; Sauer, Karin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Atherosclerosis, a disease condition resulting from the buildup of fatty plaque deposits within arterial walls, is the major underlying cause of ischemia (restriction of the blood), leading to obstruction of peripheral arteries, congestive heart failure, heart attack, and stroke in humans. Emerging research indicates that factors including inflammation and infection may play a key role in the progression of atherosclerosis. In the current work, atherosclerotic carotid artery explants from 15 patients were all shown to test positive for the presence of eubacterial 16S rRNA genes. Density gradient gel electrophoresis of 5 of these samples revealed that each contained 10 or more distinct 16S rRNA gene sequences. Direct microscopic observation of transverse sections from 5 diseased carotid arteries analyzed with a eubacterium-specific peptide nucleic acid probe revealed these to have formed biofilm deposits, with from 1 to 6 deposits per thin section of plaque analyzed. A majority, 93%, of deposits was located proximal to the internal elastic lamina and associated with fibrous tissue. In 6 of the 15 plaques analyzed, 16S rRNA genes from Pseudomonas spp. were detected. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms have been shown in our lab to undergo a dispersion response when challenged with free iron in vitro. Iron is known to be released into the blood by transferrin following interaction with catecholamine hormones, such as norepinephrine. Experiments performed in vitro showed that addition of physiologically relevant levels of norepinephrine induced dispersion of P. aeruginosa biofilms when grown under low iron conditions in the presence but not in the absence of physiological levels of transferrin. PMID:24917599

  17. An automated approach to seed assignment for eye plaque brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Koh, Tong; Yeung, Ivan; Tong, Shidong

    2000-07-01

    Episcleral plaques are commonly used for the treatment of ocular tumours such as choroidal melanoma. Treatment planning involves the assignment of seeds to slots on the plaque to achieve a desired dose rate distribution. Seed assignment is rather straightforward if seeds are ordered on demand. However, the assignment task becomes tedious and laborious if the seeds have to be chosen from an existing stock of seeds with different activities. To date, this task has usually been performed by a human planner through trial and error. An algorithm has been developed to automate the task of seed assignment using a mixed-integer programming method. We also explore ways to simplify the problem such that the method becomes practical in most facilities. We have tested the method on three randomly chosen clinical cases from our past records, to show that the algorithm could yield solutions within a shorter time frame and with less deviation from the desired dose rate distributions, as compared with the solutions from a human counterpart.

  18. Plaque neovascularization: defense mechanisms, betrayal, or a war in progress.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Pedro R; Purushothaman, Meeranani; Purushothaman, K-Raman

    2012-04-01

    Angiogenesis is induced from sprouting of preexisting endothelial cells leading to neovascularization. Imbalance in the angiogenic and antiangiogenic mediators triggers angiogenesis, which may be physiological in the normal state or pathological in malignancy and atherosclerosis. Physiologic angiogenesis is instrumental for restoration of vessel wall normoxia and resolution inflammation, leading to atherosclerosis regression. However, pathological angiogenesis enhances disease progression, increasing macrophage infiltration and vessel wall thickness, perpetuating hypoxia and necrosis. In addition, thin-walled fragile neovessels may rupture, leading to intraplaque hemorrhage. Lipid-rich red blood cell membranes and free hemoglobin are detrimental to plaque composition, increasing inflammation, lipid core expansion, and oxidative stress. In addition, associated risk factors that include polymorphysms in the haptoglobin genotype and diabetes mellitus may modulate the features of plaque vulnerability. This review will focus on physiological and pathological angiogenesis in atherosclerosis and summarizes the current status of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy, microvascular rarefaction, and possible statin-mediated effects in atherosclerosis neovascularization. PMID:22548565

  19. Performance of digital RGB reflectance color extraction for plaque lesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, Hadzli; Taib, Mohd Nasir; Jailani, Rozita; Sulaiman, Saadiah; Baba, Roshidah

    2005-01-01

    Several clinical psoriasis lesion groups are been studied for digital RGB color features extraction. Previous works have used samples size that included all the outliers lying beyond the standard deviation factors from the peak histograms. This paper described the statistical performances of the RGB model with and without removing these outliers. Plaque lesion is experimented with other types of psoriasis. The statistical tests are compared with respect to three samples size; the original 90 samples, the first size reduction by removing outliers from 2 standard deviation distances (2SD) and the second size reduction by removing outliers from 1 standard deviation distance (1SD). Quantification of data images through the normal/direct and differential of the conventional reflectance method is considered. Results performances are concluded by observing the error plots with 95% confidence interval and findings of the inference T-tests applied. The statistical tests outcomes have shown that B component for conventional differential method can be used to distinctively classify plaque from the other psoriasis groups in consistent with the error plots finding with an improvement in p-value greater than 0.5.

  20. Characterization of atherosclerotic plaque depositions by Raman and FTIR imaging.

    PubMed

    Lattermann, Annika; Matthus, Christian; Bergner, Norbert; Beleites, Claudia; Romeike, Bernd F; Krafft, Christoph; Brehm, Bernhard R; Popp, Jrgen

    2013-01-01

    Spectroscopy-based imaging techniques can provide useful biochemical information about tissue samples. Here, we employ Raman and Fourier transform infrared (IR) imaging to characterize composition and constitution of atherosclerotic plaques of rabbits, fed with a high cholesterol diet. The results were compared with conventional light microscopy after staining with hematoxylin eosin, and elastica van Gieson. The spectral unmixing algorithm vertex component analysis was applied for data analysis and image reconstruction. IR microscopy allowed for differentiation between lipids and proteins in plaques of full aortic cross sections. Raman microscopy further discriminated cholesterol esters, cholesterol and triglycerides. FTIR and Raman images were recorded at a resolution near 20 micrometer per pixel for a large field of view. High resolution Raman images at 1 micrometer per pixel revealed structural details at selected regions of interest. The intima-media and the lipid-protein ratio were determined in five specimens for quantitation. These results correlate well with histopathology. The described method is a promising tool for easy and fast molecular imaging of atherosclerosis. PMID:23139154

  1. Improved Correlation of Strain Indices with Cognitive Dysfunction with Inclusion of Adventitial Layer with Carotid Plaque.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Mitchell, C C; Varghese, T; Jackson, D C; Rocque, B G; Hermann, B P; Dempsey, R J

    2016-05-01

    Plaque instability may lead to chronic embolization, which in turn may contribute to progressive cognitive decline. Accumulated strain tensor indices over a cardiac cycle within a pulsating carotid plaque may be viable biomarkers for the diagnosis of plaque instability. Using plaque-only carotid artery segmentations, we recently demonstrated that impaired cognitive function correlated significantly with maximum axial and lateral strain indices within a localized region of interest in plaque. Inclusion of the adventitial layer focuses our strain or instability measures on the vessel wall-plaque interface hypothesized to be a region with increased shearing forces and measureable instability. A hierarchical block-matching motion tracking algorithm developed in our laboratory was used to estimate accumulated axial, lateral, and shear strain distribution in plaques identified with the plaque-with-adventitia segmentation. Correlations of strain indices to the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status Total score were performed and compared with previous results. Overall, correlation coefficients (r) and significance (p) values improved for axial, lateral, and shear strain indices. Shear strain indices, however, demonstrated the largest improvement. The Pearson correlation coefficients for maximum shear strain and cognition improved from the previous plaque-only analyses of -0.432 and -0.345 to -0.795 and -0.717 with the plaque-with-adventitia segmentation for the symptomatic group and for all patients combined, respectively. Our results demonstrate the advantage of including adventitia for ultrasound carotid strain imaging providing improved association to parameters assessing cognitive impairment in patients. This supports theories of the importance of the vessel wall plaque interface in the pathophysiology of embolic disease. PMID:26025578

  2. Autophagy in Atherosclerosis: A Phenomenon Found in Human Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huihui; Cao, Yongjun; Tong, Tong; Shi, Jijun; Zhang, Yanlin; Yang, Yaping; Liu, Chunfeng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Autophagy has been found to be involved in animal and cell models of atherosclerosis, but to date, it lacks general observation in human atherosclerotic plaques. Here, we investigated autophagy in smooth muscle cells (SMCs), endothelial cells (ECs), and macrophages in human atherosclerotic plaques via transmission electron microscopy (TEM), western blotting, and immunohistochemistry analysis. Methods: The histopathologic morphology of these plaques was observed via hematoxylin and eosin staining. The ultrastructural morphology of the SMCs, ECs, and macrophages in these plaques was observed via TEM. The localization of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (MAP1-LC3), a relatively special maker of autophagy, in plaques was observed by double fluorescent immunochemistry and western blotting. Results: All of these human atherosclerotic plaques were considered advanced and unstable in histologically observation. By double fluorescent immunochemistry, the expression of LC3-II increased in the SMCs of the fibrous cap, the macrophages, and the microvascular ECs of the plaque shoulders. The protein level of LC3-II by western blotting significantly increased in plaques compared with normal controls. In addition, TEM observation of plaques revealed certain features of autophagy in SMCs, ECs, and macrophages including the formation of myelin figures, vacuolization, and the accumulation of inclusions in the cytosol. These results indicate that autophagy is activated in SMCs, ECs, and macrophages in human advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Conclusions: Our study is to demonstrate the existence of autophagy in human atherosclerotic plaques by different methods, which may contribute to the development of pharmacological approaches to stabilize vulnerable and rupture-prone lesions. PMID:25563316

  3. Modified COMS Plaques for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd Iris Melanoma Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Rowan M.; Furutani, Keith M.; Pulido, Jose S.; Stafford, Scott L.; Rogers, D.W.O.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Novel plaques are used to treat iris melanoma at the Mayo Clinic Rochester. The plaques are a modification of the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS) 22 mm plaque design with a gold alloy backing, outer lip, and silicone polymer insert. An inner lip surrounds a 10 mm diameter cutout region at the plaque center. Plaques span 360{sup o}, 270{sup o}, and 180{sup o} arcs. This article describes dosimetry for these plaques and others used in the treatment of anterior eye melanomas. Methods and Materials: The EGSnrc user-code BrachyDose is used to perform Monte Carlo simulations. Plaques and seeds are fully modeled. Three-dimensional dose distributions for different plaque models, TG-43 calculations, and {sup 125}I (model 6711) and {sup 103}Pd (model 200) seeds are compared via depth-dose curves, tabulation of doses at points of interest, and isodose contours. Results: Doses at points of interest differ by up to 70% from TG-43 calculations. The inner lip reduces corneal doses. Matching plaque arc length to tumor extent reduces doses to eye regions outside the treatment area. Maintaining the same prescription dose, {sup 103}Pd offers lower doses to critical structures than {sup 125}I, with the exception of the sclera adjacent to the plaque. Conclusion: The Mayo Clinic plaques offer several advantages for anterior eye tumor treatments. Doses to regions outside the treatment area are significantly reduced. Doses differ considerably from TG-43 predictions, illustrating the importance of complete Monte Carlo simulations. Calculations take a few minutes on a single CPU, making BrachyDose sufficiently fast for routine clinical treatment planning.

  4. 21 CFR 872.5580 - Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 872.5580 Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque. (a) Identification. The device is assigned the generic name oral rinse to...

  5. 21 CFR 872.5580 - Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 872.5580 Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque. (a) Identification. The device is assigned the generic name oral rinse to...

  6. Fluorescent activated cell sorting: an effective approach to study dendritic cell subsets in human atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Van Brussel, Ilse; Ammi, Rachid; Rombouts, Miche; Cools, Nathalie; Vercauteren, Sven R; De Roover, Dominique; Hendriks, Jeroen M H; Lauwers, Patrick; Van Schil, Paul E; Schrijvers, Dorien M

    2015-02-01

    Different immune cell types are present within atherosclerotic plaques. Dendritic cells (DC) are of special interest, since they are considered as the 'center of the immuniverse'. Identifying inflammatory DC subtypes within plaques is important for a better understanding of the lesion pathogenesis and pinpoints their contribution to the atherosclerotic process. We have developed a flow cytometry-based method to characterize and isolate different DC subsets (i.e. CD11b(+), Clec9A(+) and CD16(+) conventional (c)DC and CD123(+) plasmacytoid (p)DC) in human atherosclerotic plaques. We revealed a predominance of pro-inflammatory CD11b(+) DC in advanced human lesions, whereas atheroprotective Clec9A(+) DC were almost absent. CD123(+) pDC and CD16(+) DC were also detectable in plaques. Remarkably, plaques from distinct anatomical locations exhibited different cellular compositions: femoral plaques contained less CD11b(+) and Clec9A(+) DC than carotid plaques. Twice as many monocytes/macrophages were observed compared to DC. Moreover, relative amounts of T cells/B cells/NK cells were 6 times as high as DC numbers. For the first time, fluorescent activated cell sorting analysis of DC subsets in human plaques indicated a predominance of CD11b(+) cDC, in comparison with other DC subsets. Isolation of the different subsets will facilitate detailed functional analysis and may have significant implications for tailoring appropriate therapy. PMID:25527343

  7. Laser-induced fluorescence detection of atherosclerotic plaque with hematoporphyrin derivative used as an exogenous probe.

    PubMed

    Prevosti, L G; Wynne, J J; Becker, C G; Linsker, R; Shires, G T

    1988-04-01

    Clinical use of laser angioplasty is limited by the lack of an adequate guidance system. As a first step toward developing a reliable guidance system, laser-induced surface fluorescence and a fluorescent probe were used to differentiate plaque from normal arterial wall. The aortas from four normal New Zealand white rabbits and six atherosclerotic rabbits were studied in vitro. Rabbits from each group received 2.5 mg/kg of hematoporphyrin derivative intravenously 24 hours before death. Segments of the aortas were irradiated with a helium-cadmium laser, and the tissue surface fluorescence spectra were recorded with an optical multichannel analyzer. A plaque index, based on the resulting spectra, was calculated for each specimen of aorta. The spectra from normal aorta without hematoporphyrin derivative, normal aorta with hematoporphyrin derivative, and from plaque of atherosclerotic rabbits without hematoporphyrin derivative showed the same wavelength dependence. The plaque index values were not significantly different from one another. However, in plaque from atherosclerotic rabbits given hematoporphyrin derivative, the spectrum was markedly different, showing a broad spectral peak at 632 nm. This spectral peak corresponds to the spectral peak of hematoporphyrin derivative and was only seen in the plaque of atherosclerotic rabbits given hematoporphyrin derivative. The plaque index for these specimens was significantly different from all other specimens (p less than 0.001). This difference in fluorescence spectra and plaque index could be incorporated into a guidance system for laser angioplasty. PMID:2965255

  8. Lentigines in resolving psoriatic plaques: rarely reported sequelae in pediatric cases.

    PubMed

    LaRosa, Caroline L; Foulke, Galen T; Feigenbaum, Dana F; Cordoro, Kelly M; Zaenglein, Andrea L

    2015-01-01

    Lentigo formation has been described in adults after the resolution of psoriatic plaques treated with various standard psoriasis treatments. We describe three cases of lentigines developing in areas of resolving psoriatic plaques: two in patients treated with etanercept and one before starting etanercept. A possible pathomechanism is proposed. PMID:25727728

  9. Elevated Levels of Serum Fibrin and Fibrinogen Degradation Products Are Independent Predictors of Larger Coronary Plaques and Greater Plaque Necrotic Core

    PubMed Central

    Corban, Michel T; Hung, Olivia Y; Mekonnen, Girum; Eshtehardi, Parham; Eapen, Danny J; Rasoul-Arzrumly, Emad; Kassem, Hatem Al; Manocha, Pankaj; Ko, Yi-An; Sperling, Laurence S; Quyyumi, Arshed A; Samady, Habib

    2016-01-01

    Background Co-existence of vulnerable plaque and pro-thrombotic state may provoke acute coronary events. It was hypothesized that elevated serum levels of fibrin and fibrinogen degradation products (FDP) are associated with larger total plaque and necrotic core (NC) areas. Methods and Results Seventy-five patients presenting with stable anginal symptoms (69%) or stabilized acute coronary syndrome (ACS; 31%), and found to have non-obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) with a fractional flow reserve >0.8, were studied. Invasive virtual histology intravascular ultrasound (VH-IVUS) was performed in 68 LAD arteries, 6 circumflex arteries, and 1 right coronary artery. Serum FDP levels were measured using ELISA technique. Plaque volumetrics and composition were assessed in each VH-IVUS frame and averaged. The median age of patients was 56 (47–63) years; 52% were men and 23% had diabetes. The average length of coronary artery studied was 62 mm. After adjustment for systemic risk factors, medications, CRP levels and ACS, male gender (P<0.001) and serum FDP levels (P=0.02) were independent predictors of a larger NC area. Older age (P<0.001), male gender (P<0.0001) and increased serum FDP level (P=0.03) were associated with a larger plaque area. Conclusions In patients with CAD, a higher serum level of FDP is independently associated with larger plaques and greater plaque NC. PMID:26911453

  10. Design and analysis of plaque and gingivitis clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Chilton, N W; Fleiss, J L

    1986-05-01

    It is most important that the proper design of a clinical trial be developed prior to the start of the study. Such a design is one that will not tend to find a treatment to be effective when it really is ineffective, and will not tend to miss a good treatment when it really is effective. The questions to be answered by a clinical trial must be decided in advance and will help determine the design. Trials should take into consideration how the agent is to be used: carefully controlled, ordinary use, subject or professionally applied, etc. The double-blind parallel randomized trial is preferred to the double blind cross-over design, except possibly for a professionally applied treatment which does not leach into the saliva or affect the oral microflora. Blocking or stratification tends to increase the efficiency of a clinical trial, and also may produce more information on the agent's effectiveness. Stratification is preferred to blocking, particularly when subjects enter the trial serially over time. Subjects should be stratified by age, sex and baseline level of plaque or gingivitis. Stratification permits a check on whether the effect of treatment is atypically strong or weak for certain types of patients. Where possible, the same examiner should examine the same patients throughout the study. Examiners should be self-calibrated to reduce intra-examiner error. Plaque and gingivitis trials should be at least of 6 months duration and may be preventive or therapeutic in nature. The preferred statistical analysis when 2 treatments are being compared is a comparison of mean changes in plaque or gingivitis scores by the independent sample t-test. An analysis of covariance using the baseline scores as the covariate may improve power somewhat. When pairwise t-tests are performed in comparing several treatments, multiple comparison criteria are indicated. Parametric rather than nonparametric tests are preferred since they usually have more power. The square root of whole mouth means in gingivitis clinical trials is the preferred transformation to obtain greater power and to produce approximately normal distributions. PMID:3522648

  11. Genesis and growth of extracellular-vesicle-derived microcalcification in atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Hutcheson, Joshua D; Goettsch, Claudia; Bertazzo, Sergio; Maldonado, Natalia; Ruiz, Jessica L; Goh, Wilson; Yabusaki, Katsumi; Faits, Tyler; Bouten, Carlijn; Franck, Gregory; Quillard, Thibaut; Libby, Peter; Aikawa, Masanori; Weinbaum, Sheldon; Aikawa, Elena

    2016-03-01

    Clinical evidence links arterial calcification and cardiovascular risk. Finite-element modelling of the stress distribution within atherosclerotic plaques has suggested that subcellular microcalcifications in the fibrous cap may promote material failure of the plaque, but that large calcifications can stabilize it. Yet the physicochemical mechanisms underlying such mineral formation and growth in atheromata remain unknown. Here, by using three-dimensional collagen hydrogels that mimic structural features of the atherosclerotic fibrous cap, and high-resolution microscopic and spectroscopic analyses of both the hydrogels and of calcified human plaques, we demonstrate that calcific mineral formation and maturation results from a series of events involving the aggregation of calcifying extracellular vesicles, and the formation of microcalcifications and ultimately large calcification areas. We also show that calcification morphology and the plaque's collagen content-two determinants of atherosclerotic plaque stability-are interlinked. PMID:26752654

  12. Coronary Plaque Boundary Enhancement in IVUS Image by Using a Modified Perona-Malik Diffusion Filter.

    PubMed

    Anam, S; Uchino, E; Suetake, N

    2014-01-01

    We propose a modified Perona-Malik diffusion (PMD) filter to enhance a coronary plaque boundary by considering the conditions peculiar to an intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) image. The IVUS image is commonly used for a diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The IVUS image is however very grainy due to heavy speckle noise. When the normal PMD filter is applied for speckle noise reduction in the IVUS image, the coronary plaque boundary becomes vague. For this problem, we propose a modified PMD filter which is designed in special reference to the coronary plaque boundary detection. It can then not only reduce the speckle noise but also enhance clearly the coronary plaque boundary. After applying the modified PMD filter to the IVUS image, the coronary plaque boundaries are successfully detected further by applying the Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy model. The accuracy of the proposed method has been confirmed numerically by the experiments. PMID:25506357

  13. Coronary Plaque Boundary Enhancement in IVUS Image by Using a Modified Perona-Malik Diffusion Filter

    PubMed Central

    Anam, S.; Uchino, E.; Suetake, N.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a modified Perona-Malik diffusion (PMD) filter to enhance a coronary plaque boundary by considering the conditions peculiar to an intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) image. The IVUS image is commonly used for a diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The IVUS image is however very grainy due to heavy speckle noise. When the normal PMD filter is applied for speckle noise reduction in the IVUS image, the coronary plaque boundary becomes vague. For this problem, we propose a modified PMD filter which is designed in special reference to the coronary plaque boundary detection. It can then not only reduce the speckle noise but also enhance clearly the coronary plaque boundary. After applying the modified PMD filter to the IVUS image, the coronary plaque boundaries are successfully detected further by applying the Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy model. The accuracy of the proposed method has been confirmed numerically by the experiments. PMID:25506357

  14. The relationship among extent of lipid-rich plaque, lesion characteristics, and plaque progression/regression in patients with coronary artery disease: a serial near-infrared spectroscopy and intravascular ultrasound study

    PubMed Central

    Dohi, Tomotaka; Maehara, Akiko; Moreno, Pedro R.; Baber, Usman; Kovacic, Jason C.; Limaye, Atul M.; Ali, Ziad A.; Sweeny, Joseph M.; Mehran, Roxana; Dangas, George D.; Xu, Ke; Sharma, Samin K.; Mintz, Gary S.; Kini, Annapoorna S.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the relationship between lipid content and plaque morphometry as well as the process of lesion progression and regression in patients with significant coronary artery disease. Methods and results The present study, using data from the YELLOW trial, was conducted in patients having significant coronary lesions (fractional flow reserve <0.8) who underwent serial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) at baseline and after 7 weeks. For each coronary plaque (≥50% plaque burden that was ≥5 mm in length), we evaluated plaque characteristics and the extent of lipid-rich plaque [LRP, defined as the 4 mm long segment with the maximum lipid-core burden index (maxLCBI4 mm)] on NIRS. Among 66 patients (age 63.0 ± 10.1 years; 82% statin use at baseline), 94 plaques were identified. The extent of LRP at baseline was positively correlated with IVUS plaque burden (r = 0.317, P = 0.002). A large LRP (maxLCBI4 mm ≥500) was present only in plaques with a large plaque burden (≥70%). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that plaque burden was the best predictor of the extent of LRP (P < 0.001). In lesions with a large plaque burden and a large amount of LRP at baseline, a reduction in LRP was seen in all lesions in patients receiving intensive statin therapy (P = 0.004) without a significant change in plaque burden. Conclusions Coronary lesions containing a large amount of LRP also had a large plaque burden. Short-term regression of LRP (without a change in plaque burden) was observed mainly in plaques with a large plaque burden and a large amount of LRP at baseline. Clinical Trial Registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01567826. PMID:25190072

  15. miRNAs in atherosclerotic plaque initiation, progression, and rupture

    PubMed Central

    Andreou, Ioannis; Sun, Xinghui; Stone, Peter H.; Edelman, Elazer R.; Feinberg, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic immune-inflammatory disorder that integrates multiple cell types and a diverse set of inflammatory mediators. miRNAs are emerging as important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression in most, if not all, vertebrate cells and constitute central players in many physiological and pathological processes. Rapidly accumulating experimental studies reveal their key role in cellular and molecular processes related to the development of atherosclerosis. Here, we review the current evidence for the involvement of miRNAs in early atherosclerotic lesion formation to plaque rupture and erosion. We conclude with a perspective on the clinical relevance, therapeutic opportunities, and future challenges of miRNA biology in the pathogenesis of this complex disease. PMID:25771097

  16. Calcium Oxalate Stones Are Frequently Found Attached to Randall's Plaque

    SciTech Connect

    Matlaga, Brian R.

    2007-04-05

    The exact mechanisms of the crystallization processes that occur during the formation of calcium oxalate calculi are controversial. Over six decades ago, Alexander Randall reported on a series of cadaveric renal units in which he observed calcium salt deposits on the tips of the renal papilla. Randall hypothesized that these deposits, eponymously termed Randall's plaque, would be the ideal site for stone formation, and indeed in a number of specimens he noted small stones attached to the papillae. With the recent advent of digital endoscopic imaging and micro computerized tomography (CT) technology, it is now possible to inspect the renal papilla of living, human stone formers and to study the attached stone with greater scrutiny.

  17. miRNAs in atherosclerotic plaque initiation, progression, and rupture.

    PubMed

    Andreou, Ioannis; Sun, Xinghui; Stone, Peter H; Edelman, Elazer R; Feinberg, Mark W

    2015-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic immune-inflammatory disorder that integrates multiple cell types and a diverse set of inflammatory mediators. miRNAs are emerging as important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression in most, if not all, vertebrate cells, and constitute central players in many physiological and pathological processes. Rapidly accumulating experimental studies reveal their key role in cellular and molecular processes related to the development of atherosclerosis. We review current evidence for the involvement of miRNAs in early atherosclerotic lesion formation and in plaque rupture and erosion. We conclude with a perspective on the clinical relevance, therapeutic opportunities, and future challenges of miRNA biology in understanding the pathogenesis of this complex disease. PMID:25771097

  18. Calcium Oxalate Stones Are Frequently Found Attached to Randall's Plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlaga, Brian R.; Williams, James C.; Evan, Andrew P.; Lingeman, James E.

    2007-04-01

    The exact mechanisms of the crystallization processes that occur during the formation of calcium oxalate calculi are controversial. Over six decades ago, Alexander Randall reported on a series of cadaveric renal units in which he observed calcium salt deposits on the tips of the renal papilla. Randall hypothesized that these deposits, eponymously termed Randall's plaque, would be the ideal site for stone formation, and indeed in a number of specimens he noted small stones attached to the papillae. With the recent advent of digital endoscopic imaging and micro computerized tomography (CT) technology, it is now possible to inspect the renal papilla of living, human stone formers and to study the attached stone with greater scrutiny.

  19. In vitro hydrolysis of monofluorophosphate by dental plaque microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Jackson, L R

    1982-07-01

    Enzymic hydrolysis of sodium monofluorophosphate by suspensions of dental microorganisms has been demonstrated at pH 5.1, pH 7.0, and pH 8.4, using a fluoride-selective electrode. The extracellular medium from viable Streptococcus mutans K1R cells contained low MFPase and paranitrophenyl phosphatase activity. It is hypothesized that the enzymes responsible for MFP hydrolysis by S. mutans K1R are intracellular, and that cell disruption is necessary for hydrolysis to be manifested; this question requires further study. In vitro MFPase activity was of a magnitude consistent with the hypothesis that it may significantly raise the fluoride ion concentration of plaque within the several minutes MFP would be in the mouth during toothbrushing. PMID:6282948

  20. Pleural vasculitides of microscopic polyangiitis with asbestos-related plaques.

    PubMed

    Hara, Ayako; Kinoshita, Yoshinori; Hosoi, Keita; Okumura, Yoshitomo; Song, Misa; Min, Kyongyob

    2015-12-01

    A 69-year-old man who had been exposed to asbestos for approximately 40 years presented with the complaint of fever and pleuritic chest pain on the right side on deep inspiration. Chest X-ray films showed pleural effusion in the right side. Initial antibiotic treatment was ineffective. The hyaluronic acid level was high in the pleural effusion but no malignant mesotheliomal cells were seen with blind pleural biopsy. Blood chemistry showed a remarkable high titer of myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA) and open renal biopsy suggested crescentic glomerulonephritis. The precise pathological examination on the pleura obtained by the open pleural biopsy showed vasculitides and plaque leading to diagnosis of microscopic polyangiitis (MPA). This is a rare case of MPA seen in the pleural arteries. PMID:26740883

  1. Sensitive plaque neutralization assay for parainfluenza virus types 1, 2, and 3 and respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed Central

    Hawthorne, J D; Albrecht, P

    1981-01-01

    A sensitive plaque neutralization assay for parainfluenza virus types 1, 2, and 3 and respiratory syncytial virus was developed in Vero and MA 104 cell cultures. The tests were performed in semimicrotoiter trays containing 24 wells, 16 mm in diameter. Parainfluenza virus type 1 formed plaques in Vero and MA 104 cells only when trypsin was added to the overlay medium. Plaquing of parainfluenza virus type 1 was more sensitive and technically reproducible in MA 104 cells than in Vero cells. Parainfluenza virus types 2 and 3 and respiratory syncytial virus readily formed plaques in Vero cells. Plaques with all viruses were necrotic in character, except for plaques produced by parainfluenza virus type 3, which appeared red due to an increased uptake of neutral red by infected cells. Different conditions for plaquing of the four viruses had to be used to obtain plaques of suitable size. Antibody titers of commercially prepared guinea pig typing sera were 5- to 50-fold higher by the plaque neutralization test than by complement fixation. The addition of guinea pig immunoglobulin G antiglobulin to the serum-virus mixtures enhanced the conventional neutralization test 5- to 10-fold. The sensitivity and specificity of the plaque neutralization test was also determined with sera of marmosets experimentally infected with parainfluenza virus types 1 and 3. The generally low postinfection titers could be enhanced, on the average, 40-fold by using human immunoglobulin G antiglobulin in the neutralization test. A low degree of cross-reactivity was shown between parainfluenza virus types 1 and 3 both in the conventional neutralization test and in the anti-immunoglobulin enhanced neutralization test. Images PMID:6262372

  2. The tar fraction of cigarette smoke does not promote arteriosclerotic plaque development.

    PubMed Central

    Penn, A; Keller, K; Snyder, C; Nadas, A; Chen, L C

    1996-01-01

    In addition to being the single greatest known environmental cause of cancer, cigarette smoke (CS) is also a major contributor to heart disease. We reported previously that 1) inhalation of either mainstream or sidestream CS promotes aortic arteriosclerotic plaque development; 2) 1,3 butadiene, a vapor-phase component of CS, promotes plaque development at 20 ppm, which at the time was only 2 times higher than the threshold limit value; and 3) individual tar fraction carcinogens in CS, including polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitrosamines, either do not promote plaque development or do so only at high concentrations. These results suggested that the tar fraction is not the primary source of plaque-promoting agents in CS. We asked whether repeated exposure to the tar fraction of CS, collected in a cold trap (TAR), promotes plaque development in an avian model of arteriosclerosis. Acetone extracts of mainstream CS tar from burning, unfiltered reference cigarettes were solubilized in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and injected weekly into cockerels for 16 weeks (25 mg/kg/week). Positive controls were injected weekly with the synthetic PAH carcinogen, 7,12 dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) dissolved in DMSO and negative controls were injected with DMSO. Plaque location and prevalence did not differ from group to group. Morphometric analysis of plaque cross-sectional areas showed that plaque sizes, which are log-normally distributed, were significantly larger in the DMBA cockerels compared to both the TAR and DMSO groups. There were no significant differences in plaque size between DMSO and TAR cockerels. The results reported here, combined with other recent findings, support the conclusion that the primary arteriosclerotic plaque-promoting components of CS are in the vapor phase. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:8930554

  3. A finite element study of balloon expandable stent for plaque and arterial wall vulnerability assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Razaghi, Reza

    2014-07-01

    The stresses induced within plaque tissues and arterial layers during stent expansion inside an atherosclerotic artery can be exceeded from the yield stresses of those tissues and, consequently, lead to plaque or arterial layer rupture. The distribution and magnitude of the stresses in each component involved in stenting might be clearly different for different plaque types and different arterial layers. In this study, a nonlinear finite element simulation was employed to investigate the effect of plaque composition (calcified, cellular, and hypocellular) on the stresses induced in the arterial layers (intima, media, and adventitia) during implantation of a balloon expandable coronary stent into a stenosed artery. The atherosclerotic artery was assumed to consist of a plaque and normal/healthy arterial tissues on its outer side. The results indicated a significant influence of plaque types on the maximum stresses induced within the plaque wall and arterial layers during stenting but not when computing maximum stress on the stent. The stress on the stiffest calcified plaque wall was in the fracture level (2.38 MPa), whereas cellular and hypocellular plaques remain stable owing to less stress on their walls. Regardless of plaque types, the highest von Mises stresses were observed on the stiffest intima layer, whereas the lowest stresses were seen to be located in less stiff media layer. The computed stresses on the intima layer were found to be high enough to initiate a rupture in this stiff layer. These findings suggest a higher risk of arterial vascular injury for the intima layer, while a lower risk of arterial injury for the media and adventitia layers.

  4. Rapid stabilisation of atherosclerotic plaque with 5-aminolevulinic acid-mediated sonodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhitao; Sun, Xin; Guo, Shuyuan; Wang, Liping; Wang, Tengyu; Peng, Chenghai; Wang, Wei; Tian, Zhen; Zhao, Ruibo; Cao, Wenwu; Tian, Ye

    2015-10-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid-mediated sonodynamic therapy (ALA-SDT) effectively induces the apoptosis of atherogenic macrophages, but whether it can stabilise atherosclerotic plaque in vivo is unclear. Here, we used an animal model to evaluate the effects of ALA-SDT on plaque stabilisation. Sixty rabbits were induced atherosclerotic plaques in the femoral artery with a combination of silastic tube placement with atherogenic diet, and randomly assigned into control (n = 12) and SDT (n = 48) groups. In the SDT group, after intravenous injected with ALA (60 mg/kg) animals underwent the treatment of ultrasound with intensities of 0.75, 1.00, 1.50 and 2.00 W/cm(²) (n = 12 for each intensity). Seven days after the treatment, the plaque disruption assay was performed to test plaque stability. We found that ALA-SDT with ultrasound intensity of 1.5 W/cm(²) showed the strongest efficacy to stabilise plaques. Under this condition, the frequency of plaque disruption decreased by 88% (p<0.01), positive area of macrophages reduced by 94% (p<0.001) and percentage content of lipids dropped by 60% (p < 0.001), while percentage content of collagens increased by 127% (p<0.001). We also found that the plaque stabilisation by ALA-SDT was associated with increased macrophage apoptosis and apoptotic cell clearance. Moreover, ALA-SDT decreased the contents and activities of matrix metalloproteinase-2,9 and increased the levels of tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase-1,2 in plaques. Our studies demonstrate that ALA-SDT promotes plaque stabilisation by inducing macrophage elimination and inhibiting matrix degradation. This method might be a promising regimen for atherosclerosis therapy. PMID:26179778

  5. Angioscopic Evaluation of Stabilizing Effects of Bezafibrate on Coronary Plaques in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fujimori, Yoshiharu; Ohsawa, Hidefumi; Hirose, Jyunichi; Noike, Hirofumi; Tokuhiro, Keiichi; Kanai, Masahito; Yoshinuma, Masaki; Mineoka, Kazuhito; Hitsumoto, Takashi; Aoyagi, Kaneyuki; Sakurai, Takeshi; Sato, Shin; Yoshinaga, Kokushi; Ozegawa, Masaaki; Morio, Hiroshi; Yamada, Katsumi; Terasawa, Kimiko; Uchida, Yuuko; Oshima, Tomomitsu

    2000-01-01

    Background Since long-term administrations of anti-hyperlipidemic agents result in reduction in % stenosis or increase in minimum lumen diameter (MLD) of stenotic coronary segments, it is generally believed that anti-hyperlipidemic agents stabilize vulnerable coronary plaques. However, recent pathologic and angioscopic studies revealed that vulnerability of coronary plaques is not related to severity of stenosis and the rims rather than top of the plaques disrupt, and therefore, angiography is not adequate for evaluation of vulnerability. Angioscopy enables macroscopic pathological evaluation of the coronary plaques. Therefore, we carried out a prospective angioscopic open trial for evaluation of the stabilizing effects of bezafibrate on coronary plaques. Methods From April, 1997 to December, 1998, 24 patients underwent coronary angioscopy of the plaques in the non-targeted vessels during coronary interventions and 6 months later. The patients were divided into control (10 patients, 14 plaques) and bezafibrat (14 patients, 21 plaques) groups. Oral administration of bezafibrate (Bezatol SR, 400mg/day) was started immediately after the interventions and was continued for 6 months. The vulnerability score was determined based on angioscopic characteristics of plaques and it was compared before and 6 months later. Results Six months later, vulnerability score was reduced (from 1.6 to 0.8;p < 0.05) in bezafibrate group and unchanged (from 1.4 to 1.3; NS) in control group. In bezafibrate group, the changes in vulnerability score was not correlated with those in % stenosis or MLD. Conclusion The results indicate that bezafibrate can stabilize coronary plaques. PMID:18493543

  6. The Spatial Distribution of Plaque Vulnerabilities in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guian; Li, Yuxin; Takayama, Tadateru; Nishida, Toshihiko; Sudo, Mitsumasa; Haruta, Hironori; Fukamachi, Daisuke; Okubo, Kimie; Higuchi, Yoshiharu; Hiro, Takafumi; Saito, Satoshi; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although the plaque characteristics have been recognized in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), the plaque spatial distribution is not well clarified. Using color-mapping intravascular ultrasound (iMAP-IVUS), we examined culprit lesions to clarify plaque morphology, composition and spatial distribution of the sites of potential vulnerability. Methods Sixty-eight culprit lesions in 64 consecutive AMI patients who underwent angiography and IVUS examinations before intervention were analyzed. Plaque morphology and composition were quantified with iMAP-IVUS. The spatial distribution of the sites of potential vulnerability was assessed with longitudinal reconstruction of the consecutive IVUS images. The plaque characteristics were also compared between ruptured and non-ruptured lesions, and between totally occlusive (TO) and non-TO lesions. Results The sites with maximum necrotic area (maxNA), maximum plaque burden (maxPB) and most severely narrowed (minimal luminal area, MLA) were recognized vulnerability. In the majority of cases, maxNA sites were proximal to the maxPB sites, and MLA sites were distal to the maxNA and maxPB sites. Ruptures usually occurred close to maxNA sites and proximal to maxPB and MLA sites. The average distance from the site of rupture to the maxNA site was 0.33 ± 4.04 mm. Ruptured lesions showed significant vessel remodeling, greater plaque volume, and greater lipidic volume compared to those of non-ruptured lesions. Both the length and plaque burden (PB) of TO lesions were greater than those of non-TO lesions. Conclusions Instead of overlapping on maxPB sites, most maxNA sites are proximal to the maxPB sites and are the sites most likely to rupture. Plaque morphology and composition play critical roles in plaque rupture and coronary occlusion. PMID:27031514

  7. Evaluating intensity normalization for multispectral classification of carotid atherosclerotic plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan; van't Klooster, Ronald; van Wijk, Diederik F.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; van der Geest, Rob J.

    2015-03-01

    Intensity normalization is an important preprocessing step for automatic plaque analysis in MR images as most segmentation algorithms require the images to have a standardized intensity range. In this study, we derived several intensity normalization approaches with inspiration from expert manual analysis protocols, for classification of carotid vessel wall plaque from in vivo multispectral MRI. We investigated intensity normalization based on a circular region centered at lumen (nCircle); based on sternocleidomastoid muscle (nSCM); based on intensity scaling (nScaling); based on manually classified fibrous tissue (nManuFibrous) and based on automatic classified fibrous tissue (nAutoFibrous). The proposed normalization methods were evaluated using three metrics: (1) Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) between manual and automatic segmentation obtained by classifiers using different normalizations; (2) correlation between proposed normalizations and normalization used by expert; (3) Mahalanobis Distance between pairs of components. In the performed classification experiments, features of normalized image, smoothed, gradient magnitude and Laplacian images at multi-scales, distance to lumen, distance to outer wall, wall thickness were calculated for each vessel wall (VW) pixel. A supervised pattern recognition system, based on a linear discriminate classifier, was trained using the manual segmentation result to classify each VW pixel to be one of the four classes: fibrous tissue, lipid, calcification, and loose matrix according to the highest posterior probability. We evaluated our method on image data of 23 patients. Compared to the result of conventional square region based intensity normalizatio n, nScaling resulted in significant increase in DSC for lipid (p = 0.006) and nAutoFibrous resulted in significant increase in DSC for calcification (p = 0.004). In conclusion, it was demonstrated that the conventional region based normalization approach is not optimal and nAutoFibrous and nScaling are promising approaches deserving further studies.

  8. Identification of Atherosclerotic Plaques in Carotid Artery by Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Rick; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin; Silveira, Landulfo; Costa, Maricília Silva; Alves, Leandro Procópio; Pasqualucci, Carlos Augusto; Brugnera, Aldo

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this work was to identify the presence of atherosclerotic plaques in carotid artery using the Fluorescence Spectroscopy. The most important pathogeny in the cardiovascular disorders is the atherosclerosis, which may affect even younger individuals. With approximately 1.2 million heart attacks and 750,000 strokes afflicting an aging American population each year, cardiovascular disease remains the number one cause of death. Carotid artery samples were obtained from the Autopsy Service at the University of São Paulo (São Paulo, SP, Brazil) taken from cadavers. After a histopathological analysis the 60 carotid artery samples were divided into two groups: normal (26) and atherosclerotic plaques (34). Samples were irradiated with the wavelength of 488 nm from an Argon laser. A 600 μm core optical fiber, coupled to the Argon laser, was used for excitation of the sample, whereas another 600 optical fiber, coupled to the spectrograph entrance slit, was used for collecting the fluorescence from the sample. Measurements were taken at different points on each sample and then averaged. Fluorescence spectra showed a single broad line centered at 549 nm. The fluorescence intensity for each sample was calculated by subtracting the intensity at the peak (550 nm) and at the bottom (510 nm) and then data were statistically analyzed, looking for differences between both groups of samples. ANOVA statistical test showed a significant difference (p<0,05) between both types of tissues, with regard to the fluorescence peak intensities. Our results indicate that this technique could be used to detect the presence of the atherosclerotic in carotid tissue.

  9. Fluorescence characteristics of atherosclerotic plaque and malignant tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Baert, Luc; Berg, Roger; D'Hallewin, Marie-Ange; Johansson, Jonas; Stenram, Unne; Svanberg, Katarina; Svanberg, Sune

    1991-06-01

    Two series of investigations utilizing laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) in characterizing diseased tissue are presented. In one in vitro investigation the fluorescence from normal and atherosclerotically diseased arteries are studied. In another clinical study the fluorescence in vivo from superficial urinary bladder malignancies in patients who had received a low-dose injection of Hematoporphyrin Derivative (HpD) is investigated. Additionally, the fluorescence properties of L-tryptophan, collagen-I powder, elastin powder, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and (beta) -carothene were investigated and compared with the spectra from the tissue samples. A nitrogen laser (337 nm) alone or in connection with a dye laser (405 nm) was used together with an optical multichannel analyzer (OMA) to study the fluorescence spectra. The fluorescence decay characteristics of atherosclerotic plaque were examined utilizing a mode locked argon ion laser, synchronously pumping a picosecond dye laser. A fast detection system based on photon counting was employed. The fluorescence decay curves were evaluated on a PC computer allowing up to three lifetime components to be determined. A fluorescence peak at 390 nm in fibrotic plaque was identified as due to collagen fibers, while a fluorescence peak at 520 nm was connected to (beta) -carotene. The in vivo measurements of urinary bladder malignancies were performed with the optical fiber of the OMA system inserted through the biopsy channel of a cystoscope during the diagnostical procedure. The spectral recordings from urinary bladders, obtained at 337 nm and 405 nm excitation, revealed fluorescence features which can be used to demarcate tumor areas from normal mucosa. The fluorescence emission might also be useful to characterize different degrees of dysplasia.

  10. Association between Randalls plaque and calcifying nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    iftio?lu, Neva; Vejdani, Kaveh; Lee, Olivia; Mathew, Grace; Aho, Katja M; Kajander, E Olavi; McKay, David S; Jones, Jeffrey A; Stoller, Marshall L

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Randall initially described calcified subepithelial papillary plaques, which he hypothesized as nidi for urinary calculi. The discovery of calcifying nanoparticles (CNP), also referred to as nanobacteria, in calcified soft tissues has raised another hypothesis about their possible involvement in urinary stone formation. This research is the first attempt to investigate the potential association of these two hypotheses. Methods We collected renal papilla and blood samples from 17 human patients who had undergone laparoscopic nephrectomy. Immunohistochemical staining (IHS) was applied using monoclonal antibody (mAb) against CNP. Homogenized papillary tissues and serum samples were cultured for CNP. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were performed on papillary samples. Serum samples were tested for CNP antigen and antibody with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results Randalls plaques (RP) were visible on gross inspection in 11 out of 17 samples. IHS was positive for CNP antigen in 8 of the visually positive samples, but in only 1 of the remaining samples. SEM revealed spherical apatite-formations in 14 samples confirmed by EDS analysis. In cultures, all serum samples and 13 tissue homogenates grew CNP. In ELISA, 14 samples were positive for CNP-antigen and 11 samples were positive for CNP-antibody. Conclusion There was evidence of a link between detection of CNP and presence of RP. Although causality was not demonstrated, these results suggest that further studies with negative control samples should be made to explore the etiology of RP formation, thus leading to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of stone formation. PMID:18488421

  11. Evaluation of holy basil mouthwash as an adjunctive plaque control agent in a four day plaque regrowth model

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Anirudh B.; Vij, Chhavi; Trivedi, Dhiraj; Setty, Swati B.; Thakur, Srinath L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Various antibacterial and antiplaque agents are used in chemical plaque control but none are without their shortcomings. Chlorhexidine considered a gold standard, also has an array of side effects. To overcome these, numerous herbal extracts have been tried and tested and one among them is holy basil. The present study evaluated the antibacterial efficacy of holy basil in vitro against some periodontopathogens and its antiplaque effect in vivo. Study Design: Thirty periodontally healthy volunteers were randomly divided into three groups and refrained from all mechanical oral hygiene measures for 4 days and used one of the randomly assigned mouthwash (1- chlorhexidine; 2- holy basil; and 3- sterile water [placebo]) twice daily. The Plaque Index (PI) was assessed at days 0 and 5. Aqueous extract of holy basil was tested against Prevotella intermedia (P. intermedia) and Fusobacterium nucleatum (F.nucleatum). Results: Holy basil extract showed inhibition of both the tested periodontopathogens (P.intermedia and F.nucleatum) at various concentrations. In all groups, the PI increased from baseline to day 5. There was a statistically significant difference (p < .05) between the chlorhexidine and placebo rinse and the holy basil and placebo rinse, but no statistically significant difference was found between the chlorhexidine and holy basil rinse with respect to PI. Conclusions: These results indicate that the holy basil mouthwash has an antiplaque effect and is efficacious against P. intermedia and F. nucleatum strains in vitro. Hence holy basil mouthwash may have potential as an antiplaque mouthwash with prophylactic benefits. Key words:Antibacterial agent, basil, Fusobacterium nucleatum, mouthwashes, Prevotella intermedia. PMID:25674314

  12. Detection of Symptomatic Carotid Plaque Using Source Data from MR and CT Angiography: A Correlative Study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ajay; Baradaran, Hediyeh; Mtui, Edward E.; Kamel, Hooman; Pandya, Ankur; Giambrone, Ashley; Iadecola, Costantino; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Carotid plaque MRI has been a useful method to characterize vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque elements. Recent investigations have suggested that source images from CT angiography (CTA) and MR angiography (MRA) can identify the simple high-risk features of symptom-producing carotid artery plaque. We studied the correlation and relative diagnostic accuracies of CTA and MRA source images in detecting symptomatic carotid artery plaque. Methods Subjects were eligible if they had carotid stenosis between 50 and 99% and had MRA and CTA exams performed within 10 days of one another. We measured the soft (non-calcified) plaque and hard (calcified) plaque thickness on CTA axial source images and intraplaque high-intensity signal (IHIS) on 3D-time-of-flight MRA source images in subjects. We assessed whether a correlation existed between increasing CTA soft plaque thicknesses and the presence of MRA IHIS using the Student's t-test. We calculated the differences in sensitivity and specificity measures of CTA and MRA source-imaging data with the occurrence of recent ipsilateral stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) as the reference standard. We also performed logistic regression analyses to evaluate the predictive strength of plaque showing both IHIS and increased CTA soft plaque thickness in predicting symptomatic disease status. Results Of 1994 screened patients, 48 arteries met the final inclusion criteria with MRA and CTA performed within 10 days of one another. The mean and median time between CTA and MRA exams were 2.0 days and 1 day, respectively. A total of 34 of 48 stenotic vessels (70.8%) were responsible for giving rise to ipsilateral stroke or TIA. CTA mean soft plaque thickness was significantly greater (4.47 vs. 2.30 mm, p < 0.0001) in patients with MRA-defined IHIS, while CTA hard plaque thickness was significantly greater (2.09 vs. 1.16 mm, p = 0.0134) in patients without MRA evidence of IHIS. CTA soft plaque thickness measurements were more sensitive than MRA IHIS (91.2 vs. 67.6%, p=0.011) in detecting symptomatic plaque, while differences in specificity were not significantly different (p = 0.1573). In the subset of patients with both IHIS on MRA and plaque thickness >2.4 mm on CTA, the odds ratio of detecting symptomatic plaque, corrected for stenosis severity, was 45.3 (p < 0.0005). Conclusions Unprocessed source images from CTA and MRA, which are routinely evaluated for clinical studies demonstrate the highly correlated presence of IHIS and increasing soft plaque thickness. In particular, plaque that shows high-risk features on both MRA and CTA are very strongly associated with symptom-producing carotid plaque. With further validation, such techniques are promising practical methods of extracting risk information from routine neck angiographic imaging. PMID:25721945

  13. Non-calcified coronary atherosclerotic plaque characterization by dual energy computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Yamak, Didem; Panse, Prasad; Pavlicek, William; Boltz, Thomas; Akay, Metin

    2014-05-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most prevalent cause of death worldwide. Atherosclerosis which is the condition of plaque buildup on the inside of the coronary artery wall is the main cause of CHD. Rupture of unstable atherosclerotic coronary plaque is known to be the cause of acute coronary syndrome. Vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaque has been related to a large lipid core covered by a fibrous cap. Non-invasive assessment of plaque characterization is necessary due to prognostic importance of early stage identification. The purpose of this study is to use the additional attenuation data provided by dual energy computed tomography (DECT) for plaque characterization. We propose to train supervised learners on pixel values recorded from DECT monochromatic X-ray and material basis pairs images, for more precise classification of fibrous and lipid plaques. The interaction of the pixel values from different image types is taken into consideration, as single pixel value might not be informative enough to separate fibrous from lipid. Organic phantom plaques scanned in a fabricated beating heart phantom were used as ground truth to train the learners. Our results show that support vector machines, artificial neural networks and random forests provide accurate results both on phantom and patient data. PMID:24808227

  14. Viral concentration determination through plaque assays: using traditional and novel overlay systems.

    PubMed

    Baer, Alan; Kehn-Hall, Kylene

    2014-01-01

    Plaque assays remain one of the most accurate methods for the direct quantification of infectious virons and antiviral substances through the counting of discrete plaques (infectious units and cellular dead zones) in cell culture. Here we demonstrate how to perform a basic plaque assay, and how differing overlays and techniques can affect plaque formation and production. Typically solid or semisolid overlay substrates, such as agarose or carboxymethyl cellulose, have been used to restrict viral spread, preventing indiscriminate infection through the liquid growth medium. Immobilized overlays restrict cellular infection to the immediately surrounding monolayer, allowing the formation of discrete countable foci and subsequent plaque formation. To overcome the difficulties inherent in using traditional overlays, a novel liquid overlay utilizing microcrystalline cellulose and carboxymethyl cellulose sodium has been increasingly used as a replacement in the standard plaque assay. Liquid overlay plaque assays can be readily performed in either standard 6 or 12 well plate formats as per traditional techniques and require no special equipment. Due to its liquid state and subsequent ease of application and removal, microculture plate formats may alternatively be utilized as a rapid, accurate and high throughput alternative to larger scale viral titrations. Use of a non heated viscous liquid polymer offers the opportunity to streamline work, conserves reagents, incubator space, and increases operational safety when used in traditional or high containment labs as no reagent heating or glassware are required. Liquid overlays may also prove more sensitive than traditional overlays for certain heat labile viruses. PMID:25407402

  15. Molecular determinants of plaque size as an indicator of dengue virus attenuation.

    PubMed

    Goh, Kenneth Choon Meng; Tang, Choon Kit; Norton, Diana Catherine; Gan, Esther Shuyi; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Sun, Bo; Syenina, Ayesa; Yousuf, Amjad; Ong, Xin Mei; Kamaraj, Uma Sangumathi; Cheung, Yin Bun; Gubler, Duane J; Davidson, Andrew; St John, Ashley Lauren; Sessions, October Michael; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2016-01-01

    The development of live viral vaccines relies on empirically derived phenotypic criteria, especially small plaque sizes, to indicate attenuation. However, while some candidate vaccines successfully translated into licensed applications, others have failed safety trials, placing vaccine development on a hit-or-miss trajectory. We examined the determinants of small plaque phenotype in two dengue virus (DENV) vaccine candidates, DENV-3 PGMK30FRhL3, which produced acute febrile illness in vaccine recipients, and DENV-2 PDK53, which has a good clinical safety profile. The reasons behind the failure of PGMK30FRhL3 during phase 1 clinical trial, despite meeting the empirically derived criteria of attenuation, have never been systematically investigated. Using in vitro, in vivo and functional genomics approaches, we examined infections by the vaccine and wild-type DENVs, in order to ascertain the different determinants of plaque size. We show that PGMK30FRhL3 produces small plaques on BHK-21 cells due to its slow in vitro growth rate. In contrast, PDK53 replicates rapidly, but is unable to evade antiviral responses that constrain its spread hence also giving rise to small plaques. Therefore, at least two different molecular mechanisms govern the plaque phenotype; determining which mechanism operates to constrain plaque size may be more informative on the safety of live-attenuated vaccines. PMID:27185466

  16. Semi-automated segmentation of carotid artery total plaque volume from three dimensional ultrasound carotid imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, D.; Gyacskov, I.; Ukwatta, E.; Lindenmaier, T.; Fenster, A.; Parraga, G.

    2012-03-01

    Carotid artery total plaque volume (TPV) is a three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US) imaging measurement of carotid atherosclerosis, providing a direct non-invasive and regional estimation of atherosclerotic plaque volume - the direct determinant of carotid stenosis and ischemic stroke. While 3DUS measurements of TPV provide the potential to monitor plaque in individual patients and in populations enrolled in clinical trials, until now, such measurements have been performed manually which is laborious, time-consuming and prone to intra-observer and inter-observer variability. To address this critical translational limitation, here we describe the development and application of a semi-automated 3DUS plaque volume measurement. This semi-automated TPV measurement incorporates three user-selected boundaries in two views of the 3DUS volume to generate a geometric approximation of TPV for each plaque measured. We compared semi-automated repeated measurements to manual segmentation of 22 individual plaques ranging in volume from 2mm3 to 151mm3. Mean plaque volume was 43+/-40mm3 for semi-automated and 48+/-46mm3 for manual measurements and these were not significantly different (p=0.60). Mean coefficient of variation (CV) was 12.0+/-5.1% for the semi-automated measurements.

  17. Macrophage apoptosis in atherosclerosis: consequences on plaque progression and the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Tabas, Ira

    2009-09-01

    Atherothrombotic vascular diseases, such as myocardial infarction and stroke, are the leading causes of death in the industrialized world. The immediate cause of these diseases is acute occlusive thrombosis in medium-sized arteries feeding critical organs. Thrombosis is triggered by the rupture or erosion of a minority of atherosclerotic plaques that have advanced to a particular stage of "vulnerability." Vulnerable plaques are characterized by certain key features, such as inflammation, thinning of a protective collagenous cap, and a lipid-rich necrotic core consisting of macrophage debris. A number of cellular events contribute to vulnerable plaque formation, including secretion of pro-inflammatory, procoagulant, and proteolytic molecules by macrophages as well as the death of macrophages, intimal smooth muscles cells, and possibly endothelial cells. The necrotic core in particular is a key factor in plaque vulnerability, because macrophage debris promotes inflammation, plaque instability, and thrombosis. Plaque necrosis arises from a combination of lesional macrophage apoptosis and defective clearance of these dead cells, a process called efferocytosis. This review focuses on how macrophage apoptosis, in the setting of defective efferocytosis, contributes to necrotic core formation and how a process known to be prominent in advanced lesions--activation of ER stress signal-transduction pathways--contributes to macrophage apoptosis in these plaques. PMID:19243235

  18. Ni-Co alloy plaque for cathode of Ni-Cd battery

    SciTech Connect

    Lander, J.J.

    1986-03-27

    This invention relates generally to Ni-Cd batteries and, in particular, relates to the plaque material attached to the cathode. Because of the wide use of nickel-cadmium batteries, the corrosion rates of nickel and nickel-cobalt alloys are of interest to nickel-cadmium battery electrochemical theory and its technology. The plaque material of the cathode consists of a Ni-Co alloy in solid solution wherein the cobalt is by weight percent 1-10% of the alloy. Conventional methods of applying the plaque material to the nickel core may be used. It is therefore an object of the invention to provide an improved cathode for a nickel-cadmium battery wherein the nickel corrosion is substantially lessened in the plaque material. One process of making the plaque uses a nickel-powder slurry applied to a nickel-plated steel core. This is then sintered at a high temperature which, results in a very porous structure and welding of the nickel grains to the core. This plaque is then soaked in appropriate salts to make either a positive or a negative plate; nickel salts make a positive plate and a cadmium salts a negative plate, for example. After impregnation, the plaque is placed in an electrolyte and an electric current is passed therethrough to convert the salts to their final form. In the nickel-cadmium cell, nickel hydroxide is the active material in the positive plate.

  19. Estimation of Ultrasound Strain Indices in Carotid Plaque and Correlation to Cognitive Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X; Jackson, D.C.; Mitchell, C.C.; Varghese, T.; Hermann, B.P.; Kliewer, M.A.; Dempsey, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    Carotid plaque prone to release emboli may be predicted by increased strain variations within plaque due to arterial pulsation over a cardiac cycle. Non-invasive ultrasound strain imaging may therefore be a viable surrogate to determine the risk of embolic stroke and possible cognitive impairment. Ultrasound strain imaging was performed on 24 human subjects with significant plaque, who also underwent standardized cognitive assessment (Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS)) prior to a carotid endarterectomy (CEA) procedure. Radiofrequency signals were acquired using a Siemens Antares with a VFX 13-5 linear array transducer. Plaque regions were segmented by a radiologist at end-diastole using the Medical Imaging Interaction Toolkit. A hierarchical block-matching motion tracking algorithm was utilized to estimate the cumulated axial, lateral, and shear strains within the imaging plane. The maximum strain indices of the plaque, defined as mean accumulated strain over a small region of interest in the plaque with large deformations, were obtained. All the strain indices were then correlated with RBANS Total score. Overall cognitive performance was negatively associated with maximum axial and lateral strains respectively. The results demonstrate a direct relationship between the maximum axial and lateral strain indices in carotid plaque and cognitive impairment. PMID:25571271

  20. On the effect of calcification volume and configuration on the mechanical behaviour of carotid plaque tissue.

    PubMed

    Barrett, H E; Cunnane, E M; Kavanagh, E G; Walsh, M T

    2016-03-01

    Vascular calcification is a complex molecular process that exhibits a number of relatively characteristic morphology patterns in atherosclerotic plaques. Treatment of arterial stenosis by endovascular intervention, involving forceful circumferential expansion of the plaque, can be unpredictable in calcified lesions. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanical stretching mechanisms and define the mechanical limits for circumferentially expanding carotid plaque lesions under the influence of distinct calcification patterns. Mechanical and structural characterisation was performed on 17 human carotid plaques acquired from patients undergoing endarterectomy procedures. The mechanical properties were determined using uniaxial extension tests that stretch the lesions to complete failure along their circumferential axis. Calcification morphology of mechanically ruptured plaque lesions was characterised using high resolution micro computed tomography imaging. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the mechanically induced failure sites and to identify the interface boundary conditions between calcified and non-calcified tissue. The mechanical tests produced four distinct trends in mechanical behaviour which corresponded to the calcification patterns that structurally defined each mechanical group. Each calcification pattern produced unique mechanical restraining effects on the plaque tissue stretching properties evidenced by the variation in degree of stretch to failure. Resistance to failure appears to rely on interactions between calcification and non-calcified tissue. Scanning electron microscopy examination revealed structural gradations at interface boundary conditions to facilitate the transfer of stress. This study emphasises the mechanical influence of distinct calcification configurations on plaque expansion properties and highlights the importance of pre-operative lesion characterisation to optimise treatment outcomes. PMID:26655460

  1. Effects of herbal and non-herbal toothpastes on plaque and gingivitis: A clinical comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Tatikonda, Aravind; Debnath, Surangama; Chauhan, Vivek Singh; Chaurasia, Vishwajit Rampratap; Taranath, M; Sharma, Akanksha Manmohan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Presence of plaque may be the culprit for dental caries, gingivitis, periodontal problems, and halitosis. Many mechanical aids are practiced worldwide to remove or control plaque, including tooth brushes, dental floss, mouth rinses, and dentifrices. The objective of this clinical study was to investigate the effectiveness of herbal toothpaste (Dabur Red) in controlling plaque and gingivitis, as compared to conventional (non-herbal) dentifrice (Pepsodent). Materials and Methods: In this study, 30 subjects aged 35–43 years with established gingivitis and at least 20 natural teeth, and having a probing depth <3 mm were investigated. After the washout period, plaque and gingival index (PI and GI, respectively) scores were assessed at days 0 and 30. Differences between groups were compared with Mann–Whitney U test and the mean scores of PI and GI by Wilcoxon test. Statistical difference between the weights of dentifrices tubes on days 0 and 30 was evaluated by Student's t-test. Results: At the end of 30 days of the study, there was statistically significant difference between both the groups for plaque and gingival scores. Conclusion: After 30 days of trial, both test and control groups showed effective reduction of plaque and gingivitis, which was statistically significant. No adverse reactions to dentifrices products were observed during the trial. It was concluded that herbal dentifrice was as effective as non-herbal dentifrices in the control of plaque and gingivitis. PMID:25558453

  2. Viral Concentration Determination Through Plaque Assays: Using Traditional and Novel Overlay Systems

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Alan; Kehn-Hall, Kylene

    2015-01-01

    Plaque assays remain one of the most accurate methods for the direct quantification of infectious virons and antiviral substances through the counting of discrete plaques (infectious units and cellular dead zones) in cell culture. Here we demonstrate how to perform a basic plaque assay, and how differing overlays and techniques can affect plaque formation and production. Typically solid or semisolid overlay substrates, such as agarose or carboxymethyl cellulose, have been used to restrict viral spread, preventing indiscriminate infection through the liquid growth medium. Immobilized overlays restrict cellular infection to the immediately surrounding monolayer, allowing the formation of discrete countable foci and subsequent plaque formation. To overcome the difficulties inherent in using traditional overlays, a novel liquid overlay utilizing microcrystalline cellulose and carboxymethyl cellulose sodium has been increasingly used as a replacement in the standard plaque assay. Liquid overlay plaque assays can be readily performed in either standard 6 or 12 well plate formats as per traditional techniques and require no special equipment. Due to its liquid state and subsequent ease of application and removal, microculture plate formats may alternatively be utilized as a rapid, accurate and high throughput alternative to larger scale viral titrations. Use of a non heated viscous liquid polymer offers the opportunity to streamline work, conserves reagents, incubator space, and increases operational safety when used in traditional or high containment labs as no reagent heating or glassware are required. Liquid overlays may also prove more sensitive than traditional overlays for certain heat labile viruses. PMID:25407402

  3. Saliva as the Sole Nutritional Source in the Development of Multispecies Communities in Dental Plaque.

    PubMed

    Jakubovics, Nicholas S

    2015-06-01

    Dental plaque is a polymicrobial biofilm that forms on the surfaces of teeth and, if inadequately controlled, can lead to dental caries or periodontitis. Nutrient availability is the fundamental limiting factor for the formation of dental plaque, and for its ability to generate acid and erode dental enamel. Nutrient availability is also critical for bacteria to grow in subgingival biofilms and to initiate periodontitis. Over the early stages of dental plaque formation, micro-organisms acquire nutrients by breaking down complex salivary substrates such as mucins and other glycoproteins. Once dental plaque matures, dietary carbohydrates become more important for supragingival dental plaque, and gingival crevicular fluid forms the major nutrient source for subgingival microorganisms. Many species of oral bacteria do not grow in laboratory monocultures when saliva is the sole nutrient source, and it is now clear that intermicrobial interactions are critical for the development of dental plaque. This chapter aims to provide an overview of the key metabolic requirements of some well-characterized oral bacteria, and the nutrient webs that promote the growth of multispecies communities and underpin the pathogenicity of dental plaque for both dental caries and periodontitis. PMID:26185065

  4. Quantitative evaluation of atherosclerotic plaque phantom by near-infrared multispectral imaging with three wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Ryo; Ishii, Katsunori; Awazu, Kunio

    2014-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is a primary cause of critical ischemic disease. The risk of critical event is involved the content of lipid in unstable plaque. Near-infrared (NIR) range is effective for diagnosis of atherosclerotic plaque because of the absorption peaks of lipid. NIR multispectral imaging (NIR-MSI) is suitable for the evaluation of plaque because it can provide spectroscopic information and spatial image quickly with a simple measurement system. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the lipid concentrations in plaque phantoms quantitatively with a NIR-MSI system. A NIR-MSI system was constructed with a supercontinuum light, a grating spectrometer and a MCT camera. Plaque phantoms with different concentrations of lipid were prepared by mixing bovine fat and a biological soft tissue model to mimic the different stages of unstable plaque. We evaluated the phantoms by the NIR-MSI system with three wavelengths in the band at 1200 nm. Multispectral images were processed by spectral angle mapper method. As a result, the lipid areas of phantoms were effectively highlighted by using three wavelengths. In addition, the concentrations of lipid areas were classified according to the similarity between measured spectra and a reference spectrum. These results suggested the possibility of image enhancement and quantitative evaluation of lipid in unstable plaque with a NIR-MSI.

  5. Colonization resistance of defined bacterial plaques to Streptococcus mutans implantation on teeth in a model mouth.

    PubMed

    Perrons, C J; Donoghue, H D

    1990-02-01

    We investigated the ability of Streptococcus mutans C67-1 to colonize simple bacterial plaques and the effects of age and stability of the pre-formed plaque on colonization resistance. Mixed-plaques of Actinomyces viscosus WVU627, 'Streptococcus mitior' LPA-1, and Veillonella dispar OMZ193 were grown on tooth segments, mounted back to back for simulation of approximal sites in a model mouth for 66 h. S. mutans C67-1 was either included in the original inoculum or super-inoculated onto the developing plaque. Inclusion of S. mutans C67-1 did not alter the total viable counts, but the proportional composition changed due to inter-species interactions. Colonization resistance of the mixed-plaque samples developed within 24 h, although S. mutans C67-1 was always able to colonize these stagnation sites. Colonization resistance of 24-hour plaque against a fresh isolate, S. mutans CP3, was also studied. There was greater colonization resistance by the basic plaque to this organism, compared with S. mutans C67-1, although the reasons for this were not clear. These initial experiments demonstrate the way in which the factors involved in bacterial colonization resistance in microbial films on teeth can be studied under controlled conditions. PMID:2307751

  6. Ultrafast optical-ultrasonic system and miniaturized catheter for imaging and characterizing atherosclerotic plaques in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiawen; Ma, Teng; Mohar, Dilbahar; Steward, Earl; Yu, Mingyue; Piao, Zhonglie; He, Youmin; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Patel, Pranav M.; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD) is the number one cause of death worldwide. The majority of CAD-induced deaths are due to the rupture of vulnerable plaques. Accurate assessment of plaques is crucial to optimize treatment and prevent death in patients with CAD. Current diagnostic techniques are often limited by either spatial resolution or penetration depth. Several studies have proved that the combined use of optical and ultrasonic imaging techniques increase diagnostic accuracy of vulnerable plaques. Here, we introduce an ultrafast optical-ultrasonic dual-modality imaging system and flexible miniaturized catheter, which enables the translation of this technology into clinical practice. This system can perform simultaneous optical coherence tomography (OCT)-intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging at 72 frames per second safely in vivo, i.e., visualizing a 72 mm-long artery in 4 seconds. Results obtained in atherosclerotic rabbits in vivo and human coronary artery segments show that this ultrafast technique can rapidly provide volumetric mapping of plaques and clearly identify vulnerable plaques. By providing ultrafast imaging of arteries with high resolution and deep penetration depth simultaneously, this hybrid IVUS-OCT technology opens new and safe opportunities to evaluate in real-time the risk posed by plaques, detect vulnerable plaques, and optimize treatment decisions. PMID:26678300

  7. Effects of supervised daily dental plaque removal by children after 3 years.

    PubMed

    Suomi, J D; Peterson, J K; Matthews, B L; Voglesong, R H; Lyman, B A

    1980-08-01

    The benefits of a school-based plaque removal program are presented. Children in grades 5-8 were inclined in a study which was designed to determine the effect on oral hygiene, gingival inflammation and dental caries of removing dental plaque through supervised daily flossing and toothbrushing in school. A fluoride-free dentifrice was used. Controls did not receive instruction in plaque removal procedures nor did they engage in plaque removal activities at school. For three school years the students in the treatment group practiced daily plaque removal, supervised by trained personnel. All participants were examined initially for plaque (PHP), gingival inflammation (DHC) and dental caries (DMFS). Girls in the treatment group showed a significant reduction (28%) in mean plaque scores and, for girls and boys, the mean changes in gingivitis scores were significantly reduced (40% and 17%, respectively). Adjusted mean incremental DMF surface scores were 13% lower in the treatment group than in the control group. The difference between groups was not statistically significant and was accounted for entirely by the findings in mesial and distal surfaces (26%). This difference approached statistical significance (P=0.07). PMID:6936116

  8. Improving visualization of intracranial arteries at the skull base for CT angiography with calcified plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Adam; Lee, Chung-Wei; Yang, Chung-Yi; Liu, Hon-Man

    2010-03-01

    Bony structures at the skull base were the main obstacle to detection and estimation of arterial stenoses and aneurysms for CT angiography in the brain. Direct subtraction and the matched mask bone elimination (MMBE) have become two standard methods for removing bony structures. However, clinicians regularly find that calcified plaques at or near the carotid canal cannot be removed satisfactorily by existing methods. The blood-plaque boundary tends to be blurred by subtraction operation while plaque size is constantly overestimated by the bone mask dilation operation in the MMBE approach. In this study, we propose using the level of enhancement to adjust the MMBE bone mask more intelligently on the artery- and tissue-bone/plaque boundaries. The original MMBE method is only applied to the tissue-bone boundary voxels; while the artery-bone/blood-plaque boundary voxels, identified by a higher enhancement level, are processed by direct subtraction instead. A dataset of 6 patients (3 scanned with a regular dose and 3 scanned with a reduced dose) with calcified plaques at or near the skull base is used to examine our new method. Preliminary results indicate that the visualization of intracranial arteries with calcified plaques at the skull base can be improved effectively and efficiently.

  9. A framework for the co-registration of hemodynamic forces and atherosclerotic plaque components

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Bernard; Chen, Huijun; Chen, Yimin; Hatsukami, Thomas S.; Kerwin, William S.; Yuan, Chun

    2013-01-01

    Local hemodynamic forces, such as wall shear stress, are thought to trigger cellular and molecular mechanisms that determine atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability to rupture. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a powerful tool to characterize human carotid atherosclerotic plaque composition and morphology, and to identify plaque features shown to be key determinants of plaque vulnerability. Image-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has allowed researchers to obtain time-resolved wall shear stress (WSS) information of atherosclerotic carotid arteries. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms of initiation and progression of atherosclerosis can be obtained through the comparison of WSS and plaque composition and morphology. To date, however, advance in knowledge has been limited greatly due to the lack of a reliable infrastructure to perform such analysis. The aim of this study is to establish a framework that will allow for the co-registration and analysis of the three-dimensional (3D) distribution ofWSS and plaque components and morphology. The use of this framework will lead to future studies targeted to determining the role of WSS in atherosclerotic plaque progression and vulnerability. PMID:23945133

  10. Network structure of the mussel plaque and its significance for load bearing and adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippidi, Emmanouela; Kim, Juntae; Waite, J. Herbert; Helgeson, Matthew; Valentine, Megan T.

    2015-03-01

    Marine mussels attach to rocks, each other, and a variety of surfaces via a flat, wide plaque that is interpenetrated by the collagen fibers of a thin, long thread that connects the plaque to the mussel body. The unusually strong adhesion of the plaque has long been attributed to the molecular design of its adhesive proteins that can form a variety of strong chemical bonds. However, the molecular energies for de-adhesion are orders of magnitude smaller than the macroscopic energies measured. We propose that the mesoscopic design of the plaque is critical in enhancing load bearing and eventually adhesion. We present new results on the structure of the plaque studied via electron microscopy and neutron scattering that exhibit a plaque geometry reminiscent of structural foams. Our studies reveal a collection of pores with an inner network, further connected with an outer network. The final structure can be described by two length scales. A synthetic soft system is constructed in an effort to mimic the two-lengthscale structure of the natural plaques. The structure of the native and synthetic systems is compared with the ultimate goal of evaluating the importance of the mesoscopic structure to mechanics and adhesion. NSF MRSEC IRG-I.

  11. The effects of plaque morphology and material properties on peak cap stress in human coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Akyildiz, Ali C; Speelman, Lambert; Nieuwstadt, Harm A; van Brummelen, Harald; Virmani, Renu; van der Lugt, Aad; van der Steen, Anton F W; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Gijsen, Frank J H

    2016-05-01

    Heart attacks are often caused by rupture of caps of atherosclerotic plaques in coronary arteries. Cap rupture occurs when cap stress exceeds cap strength. We investigated the effects of plaque morphology and material properties on cap stress. Histological data from 77 coronary lesions were obtained and segmented. In these patient-specific cross sections, peak cap stresses were computed by using finite element analyses. The finite element analyses were 2D, assumed isotropic material behavior, and ignored residual stresses. To represent the wide spread in material properties, we applied soft and stiff material models for the intima. Measures of geometric plaque features for all lesions were determined and their relations to peak cap stress were examined using regression analyses. Patient-specific geometrical plaque features greatly influence peak cap stresses. Especially, local irregularities in lumen and necrotic core shape as well as a thin intima layer near the shoulder of the plaque induce local stress maxima. For stiff models, cap stress increased with decreasing cap thickness and increasing lumen radius (R = 0.79). For soft models, this relationship changed: increasing lumen radius and increasing lumen curvature were associated with increased cap stress (R = 0.66). The results of this study imply that not only accurate assessment of plaque geometry, but also of intima properties is essential for cap stress analyses in atherosclerotic plaques in human coronary arteries. PMID:26237279

  12. Molecular Imaging of Low-density Lipoprotein in Human Coronary Plaques by Color Fluorescent Angioscopy and Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Yasumi; Maezawa, Yuko; Uchida, Yasuto; Hiruta, Nobuyuki; Shimoyama, Ei

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is an important risk factor for coronary artery disease. However, its localization in human coronary plaques is not well understood. The present study was performed to visualize LDL in human coronary artery wall. Methods (1) The fluorescence characteristic of LDL was investigated by color fluorescent microscopy (CFM) with excitation at 470-nm and emission at 515-nm using Nile blue dye (NB) as a biomarker. (2) Native LDL in 40 normal segments, 42 white plaques and 35 yellow plaques (20 with necrotic core) of human coronary arteries was investigated by color fluorescent angioscopy (CFA) and CFM. Results (1) NB elicited a brown, golden and red fluorescence characteristic of LDL, apolipoprotein B-100, and lysophosphatidylcholine/triglyceride, respectively. (2) The % incidence of LDL in normal segments, white, and yellow plaques was 25, 38 and 14 by CFA and 42, 42 and 14 by CFM scan of their luminal surface, respectively, indicating lower incidence (p<0.05) of LDL in yellow plaques than white plaques, and no significant differences in detection sensitivity between CFA and CFM. By CFM transected surface scan, LDL deposited more frequently and more diffusely in white plaques and yellow plaques without necrotic core (NC) than normal segments and yellow plaques with NC. LDL was localized to fibrous cap in yellow plaques with NC. Co-deposition of LDL with other lipid components was observed frequently in white plaques and yellow plaques without NC. Conclusions (1) Taken into consideration of the well-known process of coronary plaque growth, the results of the present study suggest that LDL begins to deposit before plaque formation; increasingly deposits with plaque growth, often co-depositing with other lipid components; and disappears after necrotic core formation. (2) CFA is feasible for visualization of LDL in human coronary artery wall. PMID:23209809

  13. An Update of Animal Models of Alzheimer Disease with a Reevaluation of Plaque Depositions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Eun

    2013-01-01

    Animal models of Alzheimer disease (AD) are used to study the mechanisms underlying AD pathogenesis, genetic interactions with genes of interest, and environmental risk factors that cause sporadic AD as well as to test the therapeutic effects of AD drug-candidates on neuropathology and cognitive function. To attain a comparative view on the AD models developed, representative AD lines were selected and summarized with respect to transgenic constructs and AD-related pathology. In addition, age-dependent plaque deposition data available in the literature for six representative AD models such as Tg2576, PDAPP, TgAPP23, Tg-APPswe/PS1dE9, 3xTg-AD, and 5XFAD mice were reevaluated using a photographic plaque reference scale method that was introduced recently. Tg2576, PDAPP, and TgAPP23 mice, which carry the amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgene, produced initially slow, but progressively accelerated plaque deposition as they aged, resulting in logistic plaque deposition. In contrast, Tg-APPswe/PS1dE9 and 3xTg-AD mice, which carry both APP and PS1 transgenes, developed abruptly accelerated plaque formation from the beginning, resulting in logarithmic plaque deposition. 5XFAD mice, which also carry both the APP and PS1 transgenes, developed a logarithmic deposition beginning at 2 months. This comparative analysis suggests that AD models may be classified into two distinct plaque deposition groups, and that early plaque models such as APPswe/PS1dE9, 3xTg-AD and 5XFAD might be useful to study the biochemical aspects of APP metabolism, whereas late plaque models such as Tg2576, PDAPP, and TgAPP23 might be useful to study more physiological and environmental aspects of AD pathogenesis, which occur on a longer time scale. PMID:23833557

  14. Early Canine Plaque Biofilms: Characterization of Key Bacterial Interactions Involved in Initial Colonization of Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Holcombe, Lucy J.; Patel, Niran; Colyer, Alison; Deusch, Oliver; O’Flynn, Ciaran; Harris, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is a significant problem in dogs affecting between 44% and 63.6% of the population. The main etiological agent for PD is plaque, a microbial biofilm that colonizes teeth and causes inflammation of the gingiva. Understanding how this biofilm initiates on the tooth surface is of central importance in developing interventions against PD. Although the stages of plaque development on human teeth have been well characterized little is known about how canine plaque develops. Recent studies of the canine oral microbiome have revealed distinct differences between the canine and human oral environments and the bacterial communities they support, particularly with respect to healthy plaque. These differences mean knowledge about the nature of plaque formation in humans may not be directly translatable to dogs. The aim of this study was to identify the bacterial species important in the early stages of canine plaque formation in vivo and then use isolates of these species in a laboratory biofilm model to develop an understanding of the sequential processes which take place during the initial colonization of enamel. Supra-gingival plaque samples were collected from 12 dogs at 24 and 48 hour time points following a full mouth descale and polish. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rDNA identified 134 operational taxonomic units after statistical analysis. The species with the highest relative abundance were Bergeyella zoohelcum, Neisseria shayeganii and a Moraxella species. Streptococcal species, which tend to dominate early human plaque biofilms, had very low relative abundance. In vitro testing of biofilm formation identified five primary colonizer species, three of which belonged to the genus Neisseria. Using these pioneer bacteria as a starting point, viable two and three species communities were developed. Combining in vivo and in vitro data has led us to construct novel models of how the early canine plaque biofilm develops. PMID:25463050

  15. Ex vivo comparison of angioscopy and histopathology for the evaluation of coronary plaque characteristics.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Masahiko; Fujii, Kenichi; Hao, Hiroyuki; Imanaka, Takahiro; Fukunaga, Masashi; Miki, Kojiro; Tamaru, Hiroto; Nakata, Tsuyoshi; Sawada, Hisashi; Naito, Yoshiro; Hirota, Seiichi; Masuyama, Tohru

    2016-06-01

    The yellow plaque has been considered to be a vulnerable and high risk for acute coronary syndrome events but not fully evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between angioscopic color grade and histological features in coronary autopsy specimens. We longitudinally sectioned 110 coronary arteries from 40 autopsy hearts with non-cardiovascular death. Harvested arteries were imaged with intravascular ultrasound to identify the focal plaque (plaque burden >50 %). An angioscopic examination of each focal plaque evaluated its color intensity as follows: 0 (white), 1 (light yellow), 2 (yellow), or 3 (dark yellow). The corresponding histological assessment was classified according to a modified version of the American Heart Association classification of atherosclerosis. Two hundred six plaques were matched to the histological analysis. Of these, 82 (40 %) were categorized as yellow (≥grade 1). Although, yellow plaque often includes thin-cap fibroatheroma (TCFA), the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and overall diagnostic accuracy for histological TCFA were 83, 91, 22, 99 and 91 %, respectively. The false-positive coronary angioscopic diagnoses for TCFA that contributed to the low positive predictive value consisted of the following plaques: thick FA (>65 μm), accumulations of large quantities of foam cells on the luminal surface, or dense calcified plates at the surface of the intima. Vulnerable coronary plaques were detected with high sensitivity and low positive predictive value from their yellow color on angioscopy. Not only fibroatheroma but also various types of plaques and their components, such as immature lipidic components and superficial calcium plates, appeared yellow on coronary angioscopy. PMID:26873010

  16. Impact of Coronary Plaque Characteristics on Late Stent Malapposition after Drug-Eluting Stent Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sung-Jin; Kim, Byeong-Keuk; Shin, Dong-Ho; Kim, Jung-Sun; Ko, Young-Guk; Choi, Donghoon; Jang, Yangsoo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the impact of pre-procedural coronary plaque composition assessed by virtual histology intravascular ultrasound (VH-IVUS) on late stent malapposition assessed by optical coherence tomography (OCT) following drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation. Materials and Methods The study population consisted of 121 patients (121 lesions) who underwent both pre-procedural VH-IVUS and follow-up OCT after DES implantation. The association between pre-procedural plaque composition [necrotic core (NC), dense calcium (DC), fibrotic (FT), and fibro-fatty (FF) volumes] assessed by VH-IVUS and late stent malapposition (percent malapposed struts) or strut coverage (percent uncovered struts) assessed by follow-up OCT was evaluated. Results Pre-procedural absolute total NC, DC, FT, and FF plaque volumes were 22.9±19.0, 7.9±9.6, 63.8±33.8, and 16.5±12.4 mm3, respectively. At 6.3±3.1 months post-intervention, percent malapposed and uncovered struts were 0.8±2.5% and 15.3±16.7%, respectively. Pre-procedural absolute total NC and DC plaque volumes were positively correlated with percent malapposed struts (r=0.44, p<0.001 and r=0.45, p<0.001, respectively), while pre-procedural absolute total FT plaque volume was weakly associated with percent malapposed struts (r=0.220, p=0.015). Pre-procedural absolute total DC plaque volume was the only independent predictor of late stent malapposition on multivariate analysis (β=1.12, p=0.002). There were no significant correlations between pre-intervention plaque composition and percent uncovered struts. Conclusion Pre-procedural plaque composition was associated with late stent malapposition but not strut coverage after DES implantation. Larger pre-procedural absolute total DC plaque volumes were associated with greater late stent malapposition. PMID:26446634

  17. Early canine plaque biofilms: characterization of key bacterial interactions involved in initial colonization of enamel.

    PubMed

    Holcombe, Lucy J; Patel, Niran; Colyer, Alison; Deusch, Oliver; O'Flynn, Ciaran; Harris, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is a significant problem in dogs affecting between 44% and 63.6% of the population. The main etiological agent for PD is plaque, a microbial biofilm that colonizes teeth and causes inflammation of the gingiva. Understanding how this biofilm initiates on the tooth surface is of central importance in developing interventions against PD. Although the stages of plaque development on human teeth have been well characterized little is known about how canine plaque develops. Recent studies of the canine oral microbiome have revealed distinct differences between the canine and human oral environments and the bacterial communities they support, particularly with respect to healthy plaque. These differences mean knowledge about the nature of plaque formation in humans may not be directly translatable to dogs. The aim of this study was to identify the bacterial species important in the early stages of canine plaque formation in vivo and then use isolates of these species in a laboratory biofilm model to develop an understanding of the sequential processes which take place during the initial colonization of enamel. Supra-gingival plaque samples were collected from 12 dogs at 24 and 48 hour time points following a full mouth descale and polish. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rDNA identified 134 operational taxonomic units after statistical analysis. The species with the highest relative abundance were Bergeyella zoohelcum, Neisseria shayeganii and a Moraxella species. Streptococcal species, which tend to dominate early human plaque biofilms, had very low relative abundance. In vitro testing of biofilm formation identified five primary colonizer species, three of which belonged to the genus Neisseria. Using these pioneer bacteria as a starting point, viable two and three species communities were developed. Combining in vivo and in vitro data has led us to construct novel models of how the early canine plaque biofilm develops. PMID:25463050

  18. IVUS-Based FSI Models for Human Coronary Plaque Progression Study: Components, Correlation and Predictive Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liang; Wu, Zheyang; Yang, Chun; Zheng, Jie; Bach, Richard; Muccigrosso, David; Billiar, Kristen; Maehara, Akiko; Mintz, Gary S.; Tang, Dalin

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic plaque progression is believed to be associated with mechanical stress conditions. Patient follow-up in vivo intravascular ultrasound coronary plaque data were acquired to construct fluid-structure interaction (FSI) models with cyclic bending to obtain flow wall shear stress (WSS), plaque wall stress (PWS) and strain (PWSn) data and investigate correlations between plaque progression measured by wall thickness increase (WTI), cap thickness increase (CTI), lipid depth increase (LDI) and risk factors including wall thickness (WT), WSS, PWS, and PWSn. Quarter average values (n=178–1016) of morphological and mechanical factors from all slices were obtained for analysis. A predictive method was introduced to assess prediction accuracy of risk factors and identify the optimal predictor(s) for plaque progression. A combination of wall thickness and plaque wall stress was identified as the best predictor for plaque progression measured by WTI. Plaque wall thickness had best overall correlation with WTI (r=−0.7363, p<1e-10), cap thickness (r=0.4541, p<1e-10), CTI (r = − 0.4217, p<1e-8), LD (r=0.4160, p<1e-10), and LDI (r= −0.4491, p<1e-10), followed by plaque wall stress (with WTI: (r = − 0.3208, p<1e-10); cap thickness: (r=0.4541, p<1e-10); CTI: (r = − 0.1719, p=0.0190); LD: (r= − 0.2206, p<1e-10); LDI: r=0.1775, p<0.0001). Wall shear stress had mixed correlation results. PMID:25245219

  19. Effect of coconut oil in plaque related gingivitis — A preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Peedikayil, Faizal C.; Sreenivasan, Prathima; Narayanan, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oil pulling or oil swishing therapy is a traditional procedure in which the practitioners rinse or swish oil in their mouth. It is supposed to cure oral and systemic diseases but the evidence is minimal. Oil pulling with sesame oil and sunflower oil was found to reduce plaque related gingivitis. Coconut oil is an easily available edible oil. It is unique because it contains predominantly medium chain fatty acids of which 45-50 percent is lauric acid. Lauric acid has proven anti inflammatory and antimicrobial effects. No studies have been done on the benefits of oil pulling using coconut oil to date. So a pilot study was planned to assess the effect of coconut oil pulling on plaque induced gingivitis. Materials and Methods: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of coconut oil pulling/oil swishing on plaque formation and plaque induced gingivitis. A prospective interventional study was carried out. 60 age matched adolescent boys and girls in the age-group of 16-18 years with plaque induced gingivitis were included in the study and oil pulling was included in their oral hygiene routine. The study period was 30 days. Plaque and gingival indices of the subjects were assessed at baseline days 1,7,15 and 30. The data was analyzed using paired t test. Results: A statistically significant decrease in the plaque and gingival indices was noticed from day 7 and the scores continued to decrease during the period of study. Conclusion: Oil pulling using coconut oil could be an effective adjuvant procedure in decreasing plaque formation and plaque induced gingivitis. PMID:25838632

  20. Improving quality assurance for assembled COMS eye plaques using a pinhole gamma camera

    SciTech Connect

    Beiki-Ardakani, Akbar; Jezioranski, John; Jaffray, David A.; Yeung, Ivan

    2008-10-15

    A quality assurance system has been designed to verify the location and strength of seeds loaded in a brachytherapy eye plaque. This system consists of (1) a pinhole camera in conjunction with a Lumisys ACR-2000i computed radiography (CR) unit to image the location and measure the relative strength of the seeds with autoradiography, and (2) a source strength jig with a survey meter to estimate the total activity of the seeds in the plaque. Five holders of different sizes were made for fixation of the COMS (Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study) plaques (12, 14, 16, 18, and 20 mm) in the camera. The plaque-to-pinhole distance (d{sub pp}) has been optimized to be 30 mm to give approximately uniform intensity on the CR image for uniformly loaded COMS plaques. The pinhole-to-detector distance (d{sub pd}) can be kept at either 30 mm for 1:1 scale, or at larger distances for higher magnification. For a 1:1 scaling and pinhole diameter of 0.345 mm, useful images are obtained with time-activity product (mCi sec) ranging from 5 to 250 mCi sec. Within this range, the pinhole system is able to differentiate seed activities of >10%. The resulting pinhole autoradiograph is able to (1) confirm the correct number of seeds loaded in the plaque, (2) verify the proper sitting of the seeds in the silastic carrier and the plaque, (3) verify the relative activity distribution of the seeds loaded in the plaque, and (4) potentially evaluate the integrity of the seed. The source strength measurement system is able to measure the total strength of seeds in the plaque ranging from 10 to 80 mCi with an uncertainty of 5%.

  1. Leukotriene B4 Levels in Human Atherosclerotic Plaques and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    van den Borne, Pleunie; van der Laan, Sander W.; Bovens, Sandra M.; Koole, Dave; Kowala, Mark C.; Michael, Laura F.; Schoneveld, Arjan H.; van de Weg, Sander M.; Velema, Evelyn; de Vries, Jean-Paul; de Borst, Gert J.; Moll, Frans L.; de Kleijn, Dominique P. V.; Quax, Paul H. A.; Hoefer, Imo E.; Pasterkamp, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Background Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) has been associated with the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation. However, associations of LTB4 levels with tissue characteristics and adverse clinical outcome of advanced atherosclerosis and AAA are scarcely studied. We hypothesized that LTB4 levels are associated with a vulnerable plaque phenotype and adverse clinical outcome. Furthermore, that LTB4 levels are associated with inflammatory AAA and adverse clinical outcome. Methods Atherosclerotic plaques and AAA specimens were selected from two independent databases for LTB4 measurements. Plaques were isolated during carotid endarterectomy from asymptomatic (n?=?58) or symptomatic (n?=?317) patients, classified prior to surgery. LTB4 levels were measured without prior lipid extraction and levels were corrected for protein content. LTB4 levels were related to plaque phenotype, baseline patient characteristics and clinical outcome within three years following surgery. Seven non-diseased mammary artery specimens served as controls. AAA specimens were isolated during open repair, classified as elective (n?=?189), symptomatic (n?=?29) or ruptured (n?=?23). LTB4 levels were measured similar to the plaque measurements and were related to tissue characteristics, baseline patient characteristics and clinical outcome. Twenty-six non-diseased aortic specimens served as controls. Results LTB4 levels corrected for protein content were not significantly associated with histological characteristics specific for vulnerable plaques or inflammatory AAA as well as clinical presentation. Moreover, it could not predict secondary manifestations independently investigated in both databases. However, LTB4 levels were significantly lower in controls compared to plaque (p?=?0.025) or AAA (p?=?0.017). Conclusions LTB4 levels were not associated with a vulnerable plaque phenotype or inflammatory AAA or clinical presentation. This study does not provide supportive evidence for a role of LTB4 in atherosclerotic plaque destabilization or AAA expansion. However, these data should be interpreted with care, since LTB4 measurements were performed without prior lipid extractions. PMID:24475136

  2. Prevalence and factors associated with scleral hyaline plaque: clinical study of older adults in southeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Soraya; Damasceno, Nadyr; Damasceno, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the prevalence of scleral hyaline plaque among older adults in the city of Niterói in southeastern Brazil. A second goal was to assess the correlation between scleral hyaline plaque and several age-related diseases, including eye diseases and systemic diseases. Methods The study sample comprised 667 participants who were followed for 15 months. The study had a prospective, longitudinal, observational design that established inclusion and exclusion criteria. The following variables were selected for correlation with scleral hyaline plaque: sex, age, age range, iris color, ethnicity, presence of cataract, moderate to high myopia, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetes mellitus, systemic arterial hypertension, degenerative arthritis, and osteoporosis. These correlations were assessed by means of the χ2 test and Student’s t-test. Multivariate analysis was performed to exclude factors that were potentially associated with aging exclusively but that did not have a direct relationship with hyaline plaque. Binary logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios, significance, and confidence intervals. Results Scleral hyaline plaques were found in 177 patients (17.54%). There was a statistically significant association between the presence of hyaline plaques and sex (female), age range (≥70 years old), ethnicity (Caucasian), cataract, moderate to high myopia, systemic arterial hypertension, degenerative arthritis, and osteoporosis (P<0.05). On multivariate binary logistic regression analysis, only female sex, age range (≥70 years), moderate to high myopia, and degenerative arthritis exhibited significant correlation. Conclusion The prevalence of scleral hyaline plaque in the present study was higher than in previous reports in the medical literature. Several age-related diseases exhibited a correlation with scleral hyaline plaque. The most significant factors associated with scleral hyaline plaque were advanced age, female sex, moderate to high myopia, and degenerative arthritis. PMID:26170612

  3. Meshless Generalized Finite Difference Method and Human Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaque Progression Simulation Using Multi-Year MRI Patient-Tracking Data.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Tang, Dalin; Yuan, Chun; Kerwin, William; Liu, Fei; Canton, Gador; Hatsukami, Thomas S; Atluri, Satya

    2008-01-01

    Atherosclerotic plaque rupture and progression have been the focus of intensive investigations in recent years. Plaque rupture is closely related to most severe cardiovascular syndromes such as heart attack and stroke. A computational procedure based on meshless generalized finite difference (MGFD) method and serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data was introduced to quantify patient-specific carotid atherosclerotic plaque growth functions and simulate plaque progression. Participating patients were scanned three times (T(1), T(2), and T(3), at intervals of about 18 months) to obtain plaque progression data. Vessel wall thickness (WT) changes were used as the measure for plaque progression. Since there was insufficient data with the current technology to quantify individual plaque component growth, the whole plaque was assumed to be uniform, homogeneous, hyperelastic, isotropic and nearly incompressible. The linear elastic model was used. The 2D plaque model was discretized and solved using a meshless generalized finite difference (GFD) method. Starting from the T(2) plaque geometry, plaque progression was simulated by solving the solid model and adjusting wall thickness using plaque growth functions iteratively until T(3) is reached. Numerically simulated plaque progression agreed very well with actual plaque geometry at T(3) given by MRI data. We believe this is the first time plaque progression simulation based on multi-year patient-tracking data was reported. Serial MRI-based progression simulation adds time dimension to plaque vulnerability assessment and will improve prediction accuracy for potential plaque rupture risk. PMID:19774222

  4. Pleural plaques and risk of cancer in Turin, northwestern Italy. An autopsy study

    SciTech Connect

    Mollo, F.; Andrion, A.; Colombo, A.; Segnan, N.; Pira, E.

    1984-10-01

    The relationship between the occurrence of neoplastic diseases and the presence of pleural plaques was studied in a series of 1097 autopsies performed in Turin from the adult general population. In men, pleural plaques showed an association with the presence of laryngeal, pulmonary, esophageal, and colorectal cancer. Only cancer of the larynx was strongly related to the occurrence of such pleural changes. This autopsy investigation confirms previous observations by others based on x-ray findings, and suggests that pleural plaques may be regarded as risk indicators of possibly asbestos-related tumors in the general population.

  5. Low Adiponectin Levels Are an Independent Predictor of Mixed and Non-Calcified Coronary Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Lehrke, Michael; Stark, Renee; Greif, Martin; Becker, Alexander; von Ziegler, Franz; Tittus, Janine; Reiser, Maximilian; Becker, Christoph; Göke, Burkhard; Parhofer, Klaus G.; Leber, Alexander W.

    2009-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis is the primary cause of coronary artery disease (CAD). There is increasing recognition that lesion composition rather than size determines the acute complications of atherosclerotic disease. Low serum adiponectin levels were reported to be associated with coronary artery disease and future incidence of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The impact of adiponectin on lesion composition still remains to be determined. Methodology/Principal Findings We measured serum adiponectin levels in 303 patients with stable typical or atypical chest pain, who underwent dual-source multi-slice CT-angiography to exclude coronary artery stenosis. Atherosclerotic plaques were classified as calcified, mixed or non-calcified. In bivariate analysis adiponectin levels were inversely correlated with total coronary plaque burden (r = −0.21, p = 0.0004), mixed (r = −0.20, p = 0.0007) and non-calcified plaques (r = −0.18, p = 0.003). No correlation was seen with calcified plaques (r = −0.05, p = 0.39). In a fully adjusted multivariate model adiponectin levels remained predictive of total plaque burden (estimate: −0.036, 95%CI: −0.052 to −0.020, p<0.0001), mixed (estimate: −0.087, 95%CI: −0.132 to −0.042, p = 0.0001) and non-calcified plaques (estimate: −0.076, 95%CI: −0.115 to −0.038, p = 0.0001). Adiponectin levels were not associated with calcified plaques (estimate: −0.021, 95% CI: −0.043 to −0.001, p = 0.06). Since the majority of coronary plaques was calcified, adiponectin levels account for only 3% of the variability in total plaque number. In contrast, adiponectin accounts for approximately 20% of the variability in mixed and non-calcified plaque burden. Conclusions/Significance Adiponectin levels predict mixed and non-calcified coronary atherosclerotic plaque burden. Low adiponectin levels may contribute to coronary plaque vulnerability and may thus play a role in the pathophysiology of ACS. PMID:19266101

  6. Specific imaging of atherosclerotic plaque lipids with two-wavelength intravascular photoacoustics

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Jansen, Krista; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; van Soest, Gijs

    2015-01-01

    The lipid content in plaques is an important marker for identifying atherosclerotic lesions and disease states. Intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging can be used to visualize lipids in the artery. In this study, we further investigated lipid detection in the 1.7-µm spectral range. By exploiting the relative difference between the IVPA signal strengths at 1718 and 1734 nm, we could successfully detect and differentiate between the plaque lipids and peri-adventitial fat in human coronary arteries ex vivo. Our study demonstrates that IVPA imaging can positively identify atherosclerotic plaques using only two wavelengths, which could enable rapid data acquisition in vivo. PMID:26417500

  7. Migration of blood cells to β-amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hohsfield, Lindsay A; Humpel, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease that leads to the progressive deterioration of cognitive and memory functions. The deposition of extracellular beta-amyloid (Aβ) senile plaques and intracellular tau neurofibrillary tangles are considered the cardinal pathological hallmarks of AD, however, accumulating evidence indicates that immune cells may also play an important role in disease pathogenesis. Among these immune cells, blood-derived cells and their infiltration into the CNS towards Aβ plaques have been implicated in therapeutic strategies against AD. Here, we review the current literature on blood cell migration into the AD brain and the important players involved in this selective migration towards Aβ plaques. PMID:25752742

  8. Plaque Brachytherapy for Uveal Melanoma: A Vision Prognostication Model

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Niloufer; Khan, Mohammad K.; Bena, James; Macklis, Roger; Singh, Arun D.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To generate a vision prognostication model after plaque brachytherapy for uveal melanoma. Methods and Materials: All patients with primary single ciliary body or choroidal melanoma treated with iodine-125 or ruthenium-106 plaque brachytherapy between January 1, 2005, and June 30, 2010, were included. The primary endpoint was loss of visual acuity. Only patients with initial visual acuity better than or equal to 20/50 were used to evaluate visual acuity worse than 20/50 at the end of the study, and only patients with initial visual acuity better than or equal to 20/200 were used to evaluate visual acuity worse than 20/200 at the end of the study. Factors analyzed were sex, age, cataracts, diabetes, tumor size (basal dimension and apical height), tumor location, and radiation dose to the tumor apex, fovea, and optic disc. Univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards were used to determine the influence of baseline patient factors on vision loss. Kaplan-Meier curves (log rank analysis) were used to estimate freedom from vision loss. Results: Of 189 patients, 92% (174) were alive as of February 1, 2011. At presentation, visual acuity was better than or equal to 20/50 and better than or equal to 20/200 in 108 and 173 patients, respectively. Of these patients, 44.4% (48) had post-treatment visual acuity of worse than 20/50 and 25.4% (44) had post-treatment visual acuity worse than 20/200. By multivariable analysis, increased age (hazard ratio [HR] of 1.01 [1.00-1.03], P=.05), increase in tumor height (HR of 1.35 [1.22-1.48], P<.001), and a greater total dose to the fovea (HR of 1.01 [1.00-1.01], P<.001) were predictive of vision loss. This information was used to develop a nomogram predictive of vision loss. Conclusions: By providing a means to predict vision loss at 3 years after treatment, our vision prognostication model can be an important tool for patient selection and treatment counseling.

  9. Episcleral radioactive plaque therapy: Initial clinical experience with 56 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lean, E.K.; Cohen, D.M.; Liggett, P.E.; Luxton, G.; Langholz, B.; Lau, R.; Astrahan, M.A.; Hyden, E.C.; Petrovich, Z. )

    1990-06-01

    Between 1983 and 1987, 56 patients with choroidal melanoma were treated at the University of Southern California with episcleral plaque (RPT). There were 29 female and 27 male patients, with a mean age of 59 years. Tumor stage at diagnosis was T2 in 18 (32%) and T3 in 38 (68%) patients. The tumor height ranged from 2.9 to 15 mm (mean 6.8 mm). Radial dimensions ranged from 5 to 25 mm (mean 13.2 mm), and circumference ranged from 7 to 23 mm (mean 12.3 mm). Most (77%) patients had posteriorly located tumors, including 18% that were juxtapapillary. Custom-designed gold plaques were utilized in this study. Radioactive isotopes used were 125I for 26 procedures or 192Ir for 31 procedures. A total of 56 patients were treated, with one patient having two procedures. Radiation doses at the tumor apex ranged from 29.8 to 165.4 Gy (mean 94.5 Gy), with the dose at 5-mm depth ranging from 70.5 to 430 Gy (mean 161.5 Gy). Follow-up ranged from 29 to 57 months (mean 39 months). The overall 4-year survival was 96%, with a 91% incidence of free-of-disease progression at 4 years. The majority (84%) of patients experienced a decrease in tumor height, with 27 (48%) patients having greater than 50% decrease. Increase in tumor height was noted in 5 (9%) and no change in 4 (7%) patients. Useful vision was observed in 59% of patients, including 21% who had improved vision. Metastatic tumor occurred in 5 (9%) patients, with a mean time to metastases of 14 months. There was a good correlation between radial tumor dimension and metastatic disease, p less than 0.001. Treatment complications were observed in 34 (61%) patients, with cataract and retinopathy being the most common. Enucleation was performed in 11 (20%) patients, with a mean time to enucleation of 14.5 months. Causative factors for enucleation were treatment complications in 6 and tumor progression in 5 patients.

  10. Quantification of cholesteryl esters in human and rabbit atherosclerotic plaques by magic-angle spinning (13)C-NMR.

    PubMed

    Peng, S; Guo, W; Morrisett, J D; Johnstone, M T; Hamilton, J A

    2000-12-01

    Accumulation of cholesteryl esters (CEs) is a key event in the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. More recent work suggests a role for CEs in plaque rupture leading to thrombosis, which can result in an acute event such as myocardial infarction or stroke. In this study, we present nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) protocols for quantification of CEs in plaques in situ. Total CEs quantified by (13)C magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR in excised plaques from human carotid arteries and rabbit aortic arteries were in good agreement with the amounts determined by subsequent standard chemical assays. The latter analysis is disadvantageous because it requires that plaque lipids be extracted from the tissue, resulting in the loss of all phase information of CEs as well as other major plaque components. With our MAS-NMR protocol, the plaque components are preserved in their native phases. Combining MAS and off-MAS NMR, we were able to quantitatively distinguish isotropic (liquid) CEs from anisotropic (liquid-crystalline) CEs in plaque tissues. In a recent study, we applied a different (13)C MAS-NMR protocol to quantify crystalline cholesterol monohydrate in plaques. Together, these 2 studies describe a new, noninvasive MAS-NMR strategy for the identification and quantification of the major lipid components in plaques in situ. This approach will be useful for investigation of the relationship between plaque rupture and specific lipids in their biologically relevant phases. PMID:11116072

  11. Infectious agents in coronary atheromas: a possible role in the pathogenesis of plaque rupture and acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Maria de Lourdes; Ramires, Jose A F

    2002-01-01

    In this review we report our recent findings of histopathological features of plaque instability and the association with Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) and Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP) infection, studying thrombosed coronary artery segments (CAS) of patients who died due to acute myocardial infarction. Vulnerable plaques are known to be associated with fat atheromas and inflammation of the plaque. Here we demonstrated that vulnerability is also related with focal positive vessel remodeling that maintains relatively well preserved lumen even in the presence of large atheromatous plaques. This phenomena may explain why the cinecoronariography may not detect large and dangerous vulnerable plaques. Greater amount of these bacteria in vulnerable plaques is associated with adventitial inflammation and positive vessel remodeling: the mean numbers of lymphocytes were significantly higher in adventitia than in the plaque, good direct correlation was obtained between numbers of CD20 B cells and numbers of CP infected cells in adventitia, and between % area of MP-DNA in the plaque and cross sectional area of the vessel, suggesting a cause-effect relationship. Mycoplasma is a bacterium that needs cholesterol for proliferation and may increase virulence of other infectious agents. In conclusion, co-infection by Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae may represent an important co-factor for plaque instability, leading to coronary plaque thrombosis and acute myocardial infarction, since larger amount of these bacteria strongly correlated with histological signs of more vulnerability of the plaque. The search of CMV and Helicobacter pilori in these tissues resulted negative. PMID:12219114

  12. Biomechanical modeling and morphology analysis indicates plaque rupture due to mechanical failure unlikely in atherosclerosis-prone mice.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Ian C; Weiss, Daiana; Suever, Jonathan D; Virmani, Renu; Veneziani, Alessandro; Vito, Raymond P; Oshinski, John N; Taylor, W Robert

    2013-02-01

    Spontaneous plaque rupture in mouse models of atherosclerosis is controversial, although numerous studies have discussed so-called "vulnerable plaque" phenotypes in mice. We compared the morphology and biomechanics of two acute and one chronic murine model of atherosclerosis to human coronaries of the thin-cap fibroatheroma (TCFA) phenotype. Our acute models were apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) and LDL receptor-deficient (LDLr(-/-)) mice, both fed a high-fat diet for 8 wk with simultaneous infusion of angiotensin II (ANG II), and our chronic mouse model was the apolipoprotein E-deficient strain fed a regular chow diet for 1 yr. We found that the mouse plaques from all three models exhibited significant morphological differences from human TCFA plaques, including the plaque burden, plaque thickness, eccentricity, and amount of the vessel wall covered by lesion as well as significant differences in the relative composition of plaques. These morphological differences suggested that the distribution of solid mechanical stresses in the walls may differ as well. Using a finite-element analysis computational solid mechanics model, we computed the relative distribution of stresses in the walls of murine and human plaques and found that although human TCFA plaques have the highest stresses in the thin fibrous cap, murine lesions do not have such stress distributions. Instead, local maxima of stresses were on the media and adventitia, away from the plaque. Our results suggest that if plaque rupture is possible in mice, it may be driven by a different mechanism than mechanics. PMID:23203971

  13. Ultraviolet Phototherapy Management of Moderate-to-Severe Plaque Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The purpose of this evidence based analysis was to determine the effectiveness and safety of ultraviolet phototherapy for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. Research Questions The specific research questions for the evidence review were as follows: What is the safety of ultraviolet phototherapy for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis? What is the effectiveness of ultraviolet phototherapy for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis? Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition Psoriasis is a common chronic, systemic inflammatory disease affecting the skin, nails and occasionally the joints and has a lifelong waning and waxing course. It has a worldwide occurrence with a prevalence of at least 2% of the general population, making it one of the most common systemic inflammatory diseases. The immune-mediated disease has several clinical presentations with the most common (85% - 90%) being plaque psoriasis. Characteristic features of psoriasis include scaling, redness, and elevation of the skin. Patients with psoriasis may also present with a range of disabling symptoms such as pruritus (itching), pain, bleeding, or burning associated with plaque lesions and up to 30% are classified as having moderate-to-severe disease. Further, some psoriasis patients can be complex medical cases in which diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, and hypertension are more likely to be present than in control populations and 10% also suffer from arthritis (psoriatic arthritis). The etiology of psoriasis is unknown but is thought to result from complex interactions between the environment and predisposing genes. Management of psoriasis is related to the extent of the skin involvement, although its presence on the hands, feet, face or genitalia can present challenges. Moderate-to-severe psoriasis is managed by phototherapy and a range of systemic agents including traditional immunosuppressants such as methotrexate and cyclospsorin. Treatment with modern immunosuppressant agents known as biologicals, which more specifically target the immune defects of the disease, is usually reserved for patients with contraindications and those failing or unresponsive to treatments with traditional immunosuppressants or phototherapy. Treatment plans are based on a long-term approach to managing the disease, patient’s expectations, individual responses and risk of complications. The treatment goals are several fold but primarily to: 1) improve physical signs and secondary psychological effects, 2) reduce inflammation and control skin shedding, 3) control physical signs as long as possible, and to 4) avoid factors that can aggravate the condition. Approaches are generally individualized because of the variable presentation, quality of life implications, co-existent medical conditions, and triggering factors (e.g. stress, infections and medications). Individual responses and commitments to therapy also present possible limitations. Phototherapy Ultraviolet phototherapy units have been licensed since February 1993 as a class 2 device in Canada. Units are available as hand held devices, hand and foot devices, full-body panel, and booth styles for institutional and home use. Units are also available with a range of ultraviolet A, broad and narrow band ultraviolet B (BB-UVB and NB-UVB) lamps. After establishing appropriate ultraviolet doses, three-times weekly treatment schedules for 20 to 25 treatments are generally needed to control symptoms. Evidence-Based Analysis Methods The literature search strategy employed keywords and subject headings to capture the concepts of 1) phototherapy and 2) psoriasis. The search involved runs in the following databases: Ovid MEDLINE (1996 to March Week 3 2009), OVID MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE (1980 to 2009 Week 13), the Wiley Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination/International Agency for Health Technology Assessment. Parallel search strategies were developed for the remaining databases. Search results were limited to human and English-language published between January 1999 and March 31, 2009. Search alerts were generated and reviewed for relevant literature up until May 31, 2009. Inclusion Criteria Exclusion Criteria English language reports and human studies Ultraviolet phototherapy interventions for plaque-type psoriasis Reports involving efficacy and/or safety outcome studies Original reports with defined study methodology Standardized measurements on outcome events such as technical success, safety, effectiveness, durability, quality of life or patient satisfaction Non-systematic reviews, letters, comments and editorials Randomized trials involving side-to-side or half body comparisons Randomized trials not involving ultraviolet phototherapy intervention for plaque-type psoriasis Trials involving dosing studies, pilot feasibility studies or lacking control groups Summary of Findings A 2000 health technology evidence report on the overall management of psoriasis by The National Institute Health Research (NIHR) Health Technology Assessment Program of the UK was identified in the MAS evidence-based review. The report included 109 RCT studies published between 1966 and June 1999 involving four major treatment approaches – 51 on phototherapy, 32 on oral retinoids, 18 on cyclosporin and five on fumarates.. The absence of RCTs on methotrexate was noted as original studies with this agent had been performed prior to 1966. Of the 51 RCT studies involving phototherapy, 22 involved UVA, 21 involved UVB, five involved both UVA and UVB and three involved natural light as a source of UV. The RCT studies included comparisons of treatment schedules, ultraviolet source, addition of adjuvant therapies, and comparisons between phototherapy and topical treatment schedules. Because of heterogeneity, no synthesis or meta-analysis could be performed. Overall, the reviewers concluded that the efficacy of only five therapies could be supported from the RCT-based evidence review: photochemotherapy or phototherapy, cyclosporin, systemic retinoids, combination topical vitamin D3 analogues (calcipotriol) and corticosteroids in combination with phototherapy and fumarates. Although there was no RCT evidence supporting methotrexate, it’s efficacy for psoriasis is well known and it continues to be a treatment mainstay. The conclusion of the NIHR evidence review was that both photochemotherapy and phototherapy were effective treatments for clearing psoriasis, although their comparative effectiveness was unknown. Despite the conclusions on efficacy, a number of issues were identified in the evidence review and several areas for future research were discussed to address these limitations. Trials focusing on comparative effectiveness, either between ultraviolet sources or between classes of treatment such as methotrexate versus phototherapy, were recommended to refine treatment algorithms. The need for better assessment of cost-effectiveness of therapies to consider systemic drug costs and costs of surveillance, as well as drug efficacy, were also noted. Overall, the authors concluded that phototherapy and photochemotherapy had important roles in psoriasis management and were standard therapeutic options for psoriasis offered in dermatology practices. The MAS evidence-based review focusing on the RCT trial evidence for ultraviolet phototherapy management of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis was performed as an update to the NIHR 2000 systemic review on treatments for severe psoriasis. In this review, an additional 26 RCT reports examining phototherapy or photochemotherapy for psoriasis were identified. Among the studies were two RCTs comparing ultraviolet wavelength sources, five RCTs comparing different forms of phototherapy, four RCTs combining phototherapy with prior spa saline bathing, nine RCTs combining phototherapy with topical agents, two RCTs combining phototherapy with the systemic immunosuppressive agents methotrexate or alefacept, one RCT comparing phototherapy with an additional light source (the excimer laser), and one comparing a combination therapy with phototherapy and psychological intervention involving simultaneous audiotape sessions on mindfulness and stress reduction. Two trials also examined the effect of treatment setting on effectiveness of phototherapy, one on inpatient versus outpatient therapy and one on outpatient clinic versus home-based phototherapy. Conclusions The conclusions of the MAS evidence-based review are outlined in Table ES1. In summary, phototherapy provides good control of clinical symptoms in the short term for patients with moderate-to-severe plaque-type psoriasis that have failed or are unresponsive to management with topical agents. However, many of the evidence gaps identified in the NIHR 2000 evidence review on psoriasis management persisted. In particular, the lack of evidence on the comparative effectiveness and/or cost-effectiveness between the major treatment options for moderate-to-severe psoriasis remained. The evidence on effectiveness and safety of longer term strategies for disease management has also not been addressed. Evidence for the safety, effectiveness, or cost-effectiveness of phototherapy delivered in various settings is emerging but is limited. In addition, because all available treatments for psoriasis – a disease with a high prevalence, chronicity, and cost – are palliative rather than curative, strategies for disease control and improvements in self-efficacy employed in other chronic disease management strategies should be investigated. Table ES1: RCT Evidence for Ultraviolet Phototherapy Treatment of Moderate-To-Severe Plaque Psoriasis Conclusion Evidence Level Phototherapy is an effective treatment for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis Moderate quality and adequate study evidence Narrow band PT is more effective than broad band PT for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis High quality but limited study evidence Oral-PUVA has a greater clinical response, requires less treatments and has a greater cumulative UV irradiation dose than UVB to achieve treatment effects for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis High quality and adequate study evidence Spa salt water baths prior to phototherapy did increase short term clinical response of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis but did not decrease cumulative UV irradiation dose High quality and adequate study evidence Addition of topical agents (vitamin D3 calcipotriol) to NB-UVB did not increase mean clinical response or decrease treatments or cumulative UV irradiation dose High quality and adequate study evidence Methotrexate prior to NB-UVB in high need psoriasis patients did significantly increase clinical response, decrease number of treatment sessions and decrease cumulative UV irradiation dose High quality study but limited study evidence Phototherapy following alefacept did increase early clinical response in moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis Inadequate study evidence Effectiveness and safety of home NB-UVB phototherapy was not inferior to NB-UVB phototherapy provided in a clinic to patients with psoriasis referred for phototherapy. Treatment burden was lower and patient satisfaction was higher with home therapy and patients in both groups preferred future phototherapy treatments at home High quality study but limited study evidence Ontario Health System Considerations A 2006 survey of ultraviolet phototherapy services in Canada identified 26 phototherapy clinics in Ontario for a population of over 12 million. At that time, there were 177 dermatologists and 50 geographic regions in which 28% (14/50) provided phototherapy services. The majority of the phototherapy services were reported to be located in densely populated areas; relatively few patients living in rural communities had access to these services. The inconvenience of multiple weekly visits for optimal phototherapy treatment effects poses additional burdens to those with travel difficulties related to health, job, or family-related responsibilities. Physician OHIP billing for phototherapy services totaled 117,216 billings in 2007, representing approximately 1,800 patients in the province treated in private clinics. The number of patients treated in hospitals is difficult to estimate as physician costs are not billed directly to OHIP in this setting. Instead, phototherapy units and services provided in hospitals are funded by hospitals’ global budgets. Some hospitals in the province, however, have divested their phototherapy services, so the number of phototherapy clinics and their total capacity is currently unknown. Technological advances have enabled changes in phototherapy treatment regimens from lengthy hospital inpatient stays to outpatient clinic visits and, more recently, to an at-home basis. When combined with a telemedicine follow-up, home phototherapy may provide an alternative strategy for improved access to service and follow-up care, particularly for those with geographic or mobility barriers. Safety and effectiveness have, however, so far been evaluated for only one phototherapy home-based delivery model. Alternate care models and settings could potentially increase service options and access, but the broader consequences of the varying cost structures and incentives that either increase or decrease phototherapy services are unknown. Economic Analyses The focus of the current economic analysis was to characterize the costs associated with the provision of NB-UVB phototherapy for plaque-type, moderate-to-severe psoriasis in different clinical settings, including home therapy. A literature review was conducted and no cost-effectiveness (cost-utility) economic analyses were published in this area. Hospital, Clinic, and Home Costs of Phototherapy Costs for NB-UVB phototherapy were based on consultations with equipment manufacturers and dermatologists. Device costs applicable to the provision of NB-UVB phototherapy in hospitals, private clinics and at a patient’s home were estimated. These costs included capital costs of purchasing NB-UVB devices (amortized over 15-20 years), maintenance costs of replacing equipment bulbs, physician costs of phototherapy treatment in private clinics ($7.85 per phototherapy treatment), and medication and laboratory costs associated with treatment of moderate-to-severe psoriasis. NB-UVB phototherapy services provided in a hospital setting were paid for by hospitals directly. Phototherapy services in private clinic and home settings were paid for by the clinic and patient, respectively, except for physician services covered by OHIP. Indirect funding was provided to hospitals as part of global budgeting and resource allocation. Home therapy services for NB-UVB phototherapy were not covered by the MOHLTC. Coverage for home-based phototherapy however, was in some cases provided by third party insurers. Device costs for NB-UVB phototherapy were estimated for two types of phototherapy units: a “booth unit” consisting of 48 bulbs used in hospitals and clinics, and a “panel unit” consisting of 10 bulbs for home use. The device costs of the booth and panel units were estimated at approximately $18,600 and $2,900, respectively; simple amortization over 15 and 20 years implied yearly costs of approximately $2,500 and $150, respectively. Replacement cost for individual bulbs was about $120 resulting in total annual cost of maintenance of about $8,640 and $120 for booth and panel units, respectively. Estimated Total Costs for Ontario Average annual cost per patient for NB-UVB phototherapy provided in the hospital, private clinic or at home was estimated to be $292, $810 and $365 respectively. For comparison purposes, treatment of moderate-to-severe psoriasis with methotrexate and cyclosporin amounted to $712 and $3,407 annually per patient respectively; yearly costs for biological drugs were estimated to be $18,700 for alefacept and $20,300 for etanercept-based treatments. Total annual costs of NB-UVB phototherapy were estimated by applying average costs to an estimated proportion of the population (age 18 or older) eligible for phototherapy treatment. The prevalence of psoriasis was estimated to be approximately 2% of the population, of which about 85% was of plaque-type psoriasis and approximately 20% to 30% was considered moderate-to-severe in disease severity. An estimate of 25% for moderate-to-severe psoriasis cases was used in the current economic analysis resulting in a range of 29,400 to 44,200 cases. Approximately 21% of these patients were estimated to be using NB-UVB phototherapy for treatment resulting in a number of cases in the range between 6,200 and 9,300 cases. The average (7,700) number of cases was used to calculate associated costs for Ontario by treatment setting. Total annual costs were as follows: $2.3 million in a hospital setting, $6.3 million in a private clinic setting, and $2.8 million for home phototherapy. Costs for phototherapy services provided in private clinics were greater ($810 per patient annually; total of $6.3 million annually) and differed from the same services provided in the hospital setting only in terms of additional physician costs associated with phototherapy OHIP fees. Keywords Psoriasis, ultraviolet radiation, phototherapy, photochemotherapy, NB-UVB, BB-UVB PUVA PMID:23074532

  14. Topological analyses in APP/PS1 mice reveal that astrocytes do not migrate to amyloid-β plaques.

    PubMed

    Galea, Elena; Morrison, Will; Hudry, Eloise; Arbel-Ornath, Michal; Bacskai, Brian J; Gómez-Isla, Teresa; Stanley, H Eugene; Hyman, Bradley T

    2015-12-22

    Although the clustering of GFAP immunopositive astrocytes around amyloid-β plaques in Alzheimer's disease has led to the widespread assumption that plaques attract astrocytes, recent studies suggest that astrocytes stay put in injury. Here we reexamine astrocyte migration to plaques, using quantitative spatial analysis and computer modeling to investigate the topology of astrocytes in 3D images obtained by two-photon microscopy of living APP/PS1 mice and WT littermates. In WT mice, cortical astrocyte topology fits a model in which a liquid of hard spheres exclude each other in a confined space. Plaques do not disturb this arrangement except at very large plaque loads, but, locally, cause subtle outward shifts of the astrocytes located in three tiers around plaques. These data suggest that astrocytes respond to plaque-induced neuropil injury primarily by changing phenotype, and hence function, rather than location. PMID:26644572

  15. A proof-of-concept study for predicting the region of atherosclerotic plaque development based on plaque growth modeling in carotid arteries.

    PubMed

    Sakellarios, Antonis I; Bizopoulos, Paschalis; Stefanou, Kostas; Athanasiou, Lambros S; Papafaklis, Michail I; Bourantas, Christos V; Naka, Katerina K; Michalis, Lampros K; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we present a computational model for plaque growth utilizing magnetic resonance data of a patient's carotid artery. More specifically, we model blood flow utilizing the Navier-Stokes equations, as well as LDL and HDL transport using the convection-diffusion equation in the arterial lumen. The accumulated LDL in the arterial wall is oxidized considering the protective effect of HDL. Macrophages recruitment and foam cells formation are the final step of the proposed multi-level modeling approach of the plaque growth. The simulated results of our model are compared with the follow-up MRI findings in 12 months regarding the change to the arterial wall thickness. WSS and LDL may indicate potential regions of plaque growth (R(2)=0.35), but the contribution of foam cells formation, macrophages and oxidized LDL increased the prediction significantly (R(2)=0.75). PMID:26737794

  16. Imaging Coronary Atherosclerosis and Vulnerable Plaques with Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tearney, Guillermo J.; Jang, Ik-Kyung; Kashiwagi, Manubu; Bouma, Brett E.

    Intracoronary optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an invasive microscopic imaging technology that has been developed for the identification of vulnerable plaque. OCT acquires cross-sectional images of tissue reflectance and, since it may be implemented through an optical fiber probe, it is readily adaptable to coronary catheters for insertion into coronary arteries and circumferential imaging of arterial pathology. The first investigation of vascular optical coherence tomography ex vivo demonstrated the potential of this technique to identify arterial microstructure. Subsequent development of OCT technology enabled image acquisition at rates sufficient for intracoronary imaging in human patients. In this chapter, we review studies conducted with this technology at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Results from these studies show that a wide variety of microscopic features, including those associated with TCFAs, can be identified by OCT imaging both ex vivo and in living human patients. These findings suggest that this technology will play an important role in improving our understanding of coronary artery disease, guiding local therapy, and decreasing themortality of AMI.

  17. Predominant cultivable microflora of human dental fissure plaque.

    PubMed Central

    Theilade, E; Fejerskov, O; Karring, T; Theilade, J

    1982-01-01

    Plaque developed in 10 occlusal fissures from unerupted third molars during implantation for 200 to 270 days in lower molars of dental students was studied. To characterize the predominant cultivable flora, 592 isolates (51 to 67 from each fissure) were subcultured from anaerobic roll tubes. Twenty-eight of the isolates were lost. Streptococci constituted 8 to 86% (median, 45%) of the isolates, Streptococcus mutans constituted 0 to 86% (median, 25%) and S. sanguis constituted 0 to 15% (median, 1%). A few isolates of "S. mitior" and "S. milleri" were found, but no S. salivarius. Staphylococci made up 0 to 23% (median, 9%). Gram-positive rods constituted 6 to 59% (median, 35%). Of these, 0 to 46% (median, 18%) were Actinomyces naeslundii and A. viscosus, but no anaerobic actinomyces were isolated. Arachnia and propionibacteria made up small proportions, lactobacilli were isolated from two fissures, constituting 10 and 29%, and eubacteria were isolated from one fissure (27%). Gram-negative cocci made up 0 to 46% (media, 4%). Only two isolates of gram-negative rods were found, both facultative anaerobes. Although 8 of the 10 fissures had large proportions of S. mutans, lactobacilli, or both, no caries was found even with microradiography. The large individual variation probably reflects differences in initial colonization from saliva and in growth conditions in each fissure. PMID:7095858

  18. Intravital imaging of amyloid plaques in a transgenic mouse model using optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Song; Yan, Ping; Maslov, Konstantin; Lee, Jin-Moo; Wang, Lihong V

    2009-12-15

    We report optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) for in vivo imaging of amyloid plaques in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model. Validation using conventional fluorescence microscopy and multiphoton microscopy shows that OR-PAM has sufficient sensitivity and spatial resolution to identify amyloid plaques in living brains. In addition, with dual-wavelength OR-PAM, the three-dimensional morphology of amyloid plaques and the surrounding microvasculature are imaged simultaneously through a cranial window without angiographic contrast agents. OR-PAM, capable of providing both exogenous molecular contrast and endogenous hemoglobin contrast, has the potential to serve as a new technology for in vivo microscopic observations of cerebral plaque deposits. PMID:20016651

  19. Chlamydia Pneumoniae and Immunoinflammatory Reactions in an Unstable Atherosclerotic Plaque in Humans.

    PubMed

    Pigarevskii, P V; Mal'tseva, S V; Snegova, V A; Davydova, N G; Guseva, V A

    2015-06-01

    Comparative study of the walls of the aorta, coronary artery, and a. basilaris detected for the first time intra- and extracellular depositions of Chlamydia pneumoniae in unstable atherosclerotic plaques. No chlamydia were detected in the intima of normal sites of the vascular wall and just negligible levels thereof in stable atherosclerotic plaques. An unstable plaque with intra- and extracellular colonies was characterized by infiltration of the cap and intima adjacent to the atheromatous core with mononuclear cells, primarily T cells. These data suggested that Chlamydia pneumoniae could play an important role in the development of immunoinflammatory processes in the vascular wall and promote destabilization and progressive development of atherosclerotic plaques in humans. PMID:26085364

  20. DETAIL OF “BIVOUAC OF THE DEAD” PLAQUES, SOUTH OF CHAPEL/ADMINISTRATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF “BIVOUAC OF THE DEAD” PLAQUES, SOUTH OF CHAPEL/ADMINISTRATION BUILDING. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Los Angeles National Cemetery, 950 South Sepulveda Boulevard, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. The effect of hexetidine spray on dental plaque following periodontal surgery.

    PubMed

    Bokor, M

    1996-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of a 0.2% hexetidine spray, used as a supplement to regular oral hygiene measures, on dental plaque and gingival condition following periodontal surgery. This study was carried out on 38 patients who required 2 episodes of periodontal surgery. Examinations regarding dental plaque were performed at 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days, while the condition of the gingiva were examined at 0 and 28 days. Dental plaque was assessed by the Turesky modification of Quigley-Hein index; the gingival condition was evaluated using the gingival index of Löe-Silness and the papilla bleeding index. In a double-blind cross-over study of 28 days duration, significant reduction in plaque accumulation and an improvement in wound healing were demonstrated for the test spray compared to the placebo. PMID:8997651

  2. (68)Ga-Bivalent Polypegylated Styrylpyridine Conjugates for Imaging Aβ Plaques in Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Zha, Zhihao; Song, Jin; Choi, Seok Rye; Wu, Zehui; Ploessl, Karl; Smith, Megan; Kung, Hank

    2016-05-18

    plaques deposited on blood vessels are associated with cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). In an effort to selectively map these Aβ plaques, we are reporting a new series of (68)Ga labeled styrylpyridine derivatives with high molecular weights. In vitro binding to Aβ plaques in post-mortem Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain tissue showed that these (68)Ga labeled bivalent styrylpyridines displayed good affinities and specificity (Ki < 30 nM). In vitro autoradiography using post-mortem AD brain sections showed specific binding of these (68)Ga complexes to Aβ plaques. Biodistribution studies in normal mice showed very low initial brain uptakes (<0.3% dose/g) indicating a low blood-brain barrier (BBB) penetration. The preliminary results suggest that (68)Ga labeled bivalent styrylpyridines may be promising candidates as PET imaging radiotracers for detecting CAA. PMID:27045547

  3. Shape-based segmentation and visualization techniques for evaluation of atherosclerotic plaques in coronary artery disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinck, Daniel; Krüger, Sebastian; Reimann, Anja; Scheuering, Michael

    2006-03-01

    Multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) has developed strongly in the emerging field of cardiovascular imaging. The manual analysis of atherosclerotic plaques in coronary arteries is a very time consuming and labor intensive process and today only qualitative analysis is possible. In this paper we present a new shape-based segmentation and visualization technique for quantitative analysis of atherosclerotic plaques in coronary artery disease. The new technique takes into account several aspects of the vascular anatomy. It uses two surface representations, one for the contrast filled vessel lumen and also one for the vascular wall. The deviation between these two surfaces is defined as plaque volume. These surface representations can be edited by the user manually. With this kind of representation it is possible to calculate sub plaque volumes (such as: lipid rich core, fibrous tissue, calcified tissue) inside this suspicious area. Also a high quality 3D visualization, using Open Inventor is possible.

  4. Painting blood vessels and atherosclerotic plaques with an adhesive drug depot

    PubMed Central

    Kastrup, Christian J.; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Figueiredo, Jose Luiz; Lee, Haeshin; Kambhampati, Swetha; Lee, Timothy; Cho, Seung-Woo; Gorbatov, Rostic; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Dang, Tram T.; Dutta, Partha; Yeon, Ju Hun; Cheng, Hao; Pritchard, Christopher D.; Vegas, Arturo J.; Siegel, Cory D.; MacDougall, Samantha; Okonkwo, Michael; Thai, Anh; Stone, James R.; Coury, Arthur J.; Weissleder, Ralph; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of diseased vasculature remains challenging, in part because of the difficulty in implanting drug-eluting devices without subjecting vessels to damaging mechanical forces. Implanting materials using adhesive forces could overcome this challenge, but materials have previously not been shown to durably adhere to intact endothelium under blood flow. Marine mussels secrete strong underwater adhesives that have been mimicked in synthetic systems. Here we develop a drug-eluting bioadhesive gel that can be locally and durably glued onto the inside surface of blood vessels. In a mouse model of atherosclerosis, inflamed plaques treated with steroid-eluting adhesive gels had reduced macrophage content and developed protective fibrous caps covering the plaque core. Treatment also lowered plasma cytokine levels and biomarkers of inflammation in the plaque. The drug-eluting devices developed here provide a general strategy for implanting therapeutics in the vasculature using adhesive forces and could potentially be used to stabilize rupture-prone plaques. PMID:23236189

  5. Atheromatous plaque in the distal aortic arch creating the potential for cerebral embolism during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Hamano, K; Ikeda, Y; Mikamo, A; Okada, H; Gohra, H; Zempo, N; Ueda, K; Kimura, K; Murata, K; Matsuzaki, M; Esato, K

    2001-03-01

    The present study evaluated the risk in cardiac patients of rupture of a plaque by a jet stream from the arch cannula. The entire thoracic aorta and cardiac function were routinely monitored by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in 88 adult patients who underwent coronary artery bypass surgery. The changes in the atheromatous plaque in the distal aortic arch were observed before and after cardiopulmonary bypass. Of the 88 patients, 13 were found to have preoperative atheromatous plaque at the distal aortic arch and 8 (61.5%) of them suffered plaque rupture caused by jet stream from the arch cannula. Only 1 patient experienced apparent embolic episodes manifesting as cerebral and left leg embolisms; the remaining 7 had no clinical embolic symptoms. In order to prevent atheroembolic events, attention should be paid not only to the ascending aorta, but also to the distal arch and in this regard TEE is useful for detecting atheromatous changes of the aorta. PMID:11266188

  6. 46. VIEW OF BRONZE ENGINEERS/INSPECTORS PLAQUE LOCATED ON SOUTH SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. VIEW OF BRONZE ENGINEERS/INSPECTORS PLAQUE LOCATED ON SOUTH SIDE OF WESTERN APPROACH WALL - Tomlinson Bridge, Spanning Quinnipiac River at Forbes Street (U.S. Route 1), New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  7. [Noninvasive Methods of Detection of Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaques in Coronary Arteries].

    PubMed

    Tagieva, N R; Shakhnovich, R M; Veselova, T N

    2015-01-01

    In most cases direct cause of acute coronary syndrome and sudden death is an intracoronary thrombus formed on a surface of unstable atherosclerotic plaque (UAP). The following are main characteristics of UAP: active inflammation; large lipid rich nucleus occupying a40% of plaque volume; thin (< 65 mm) fibrous cap; erosions of intima over plaque; tear of plaque cap; superficially located calcium nodules; intraplaque hemorrhage. Visualization of UAP in coronary arteries is a very important direction in diagnostics. During recent years both invasive and noninvasive methods of detection of UAP have been actively developed. In this review we present main noninvasive techniques used for detection of UAP: multislice computed tomography, magnetic resonance tomography, positron emission tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography. In the review we have covered main advantages and limitations of each invasive method of UAP detection and delineated perspectives of development of this direction. PMID:26615630

  8. [Invasive methods of detection of unstable atherosclerotic plaques in coronary arteries].

    PubMed

    Tagieva, N P; Shakhnovich, R M; Mironov, V M; Ruda, M Ia

    2014-01-01

    In most cases direct cause of acute coronary syndrome and sudden death is an intracoronary thrombus formed on a surface of unstable atherosclerotic plaque (UAP). The following are main characteristics of UAP: active inflammation; large lipid rich nucleus occupying a 40% of plaque volume; thin (< 65 mm) fibrous cap; erosions of intima over plaque; tear of plaque cap; superficially located calcium nodules; intraplaque hemorrhage. Visualization of UAP in coronary arteries is a very important direction in diagnostics. During recent years both invasive and noninvasive methods of detection of UAP have been actively developed. In this review we present main invasive techniques used for detection of UAP: intravascular ultrasound study with virtual histology; optical coherent tomography; near-infrared spectroscopy; thermography; intravascular magnetic resonance imaging; direct visualization by angioscopy. In the review we have covered main advantages and limitations of each invasive method of UAP detection and delineated perspectives of development of this direction. PMID:25902659

  9. Selective absorption of ultraviolet laser energy by human atherosclerotic plaque treated with tetracycline

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy-Chutorian, D.; Kosek, J.; Mok, W.; Quay, S.; Huestis, W.; Mehigan, J.; Profitt, D.; Ginsburg, R.

    1985-05-01

    Tetracycline is an antibiotic that absorbs ultraviolet light at 355 nm and preferentially binds to atherosclerotic plaque both in vitro and in vivo. Tetracycline-treated human cadaveric aorta was compared with untreated aorta using several techniques: absorptive spectrophotometry; and tissue uptake of radiolabeled tetracycline, which showed 4-fold greater uptake by atheroma than by normal vessel. In addition, intravenous tetracycline administered to patients undergoing vascular surgery demonstrated characteristic fluorescence in surgically excised diseased arteries. Because of tetracycline's unique properties, the authors exposed tetracycline-treated and untreated aorta to ultraviolet laser radiation at a wavelength of 355 nm. They found enhanced ablation of tetracycline-treated atheroma compared with untreated atheroma. The plaque ablation caused by ultraviolet laser radiation was twice as extensive in tetracycline-treated vs nontreated plaque. This study demonstrates the potential of tetracycline plaque enhancement for the selective destruction of atheroma by ultraviolet laser radiation.

  10. Genesis and growth of extracellular-vesicle-derived microcalcification in atherosclerotic plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheson, Joshua D.; Goettsch, Claudia; Bertazzo, Sergio; Maldonado, Natalia; Ruiz, Jessica L.; Goh, Wilson; Yabusaki, Katsumi; Faits, Tyler; Bouten, Carlijn; Franck, Gregory; Quillard, Thibaut; Libby, Peter; Aikawa, Masanori; Weinbaum, Sheldon; Aikawa, Elena

    2016-03-01

    Clinical evidence links arterial calcification and cardiovascular risk. Finite-element modelling of the stress distribution within atherosclerotic plaques has suggested that subcellular microcalcifications in the fibrous cap may promote material failure of the plaque, but that large calcifications can stabilize it. Yet the physicochemical mechanisms underlying such mineral formation and growth in atheromata remain unknown. Here, by using three-dimensional collagen hydrogels that mimic structural features of the atherosclerotic fibrous cap, and high-resolution microscopic and spectroscopic analyses of both the hydrogels and of calcified human plaques, we demonstrate that calcific mineral formation and maturation results from a series of events involving the aggregation of calcifying extracellular vesicles, and the formation of microcalcifications and ultimately large calcification areas. We also show that calcification morphology and the plaque’s collagen content--two determinants of atherosclerotic plaque stability--are interlinked.

  11. Plaque hemorrhage in carotid artery disease: Pathogenesis, clinical and biomechanical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Zhongzhao; Sadat, Umar; Brown, Adam J.; Gillard, Jonathan H.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke remains the most prevalent disabling illness today, with internal carotid artery luminal stenosis due to atheroma formation responsible for the majority of ischemic cerebrovascular events. Severity of luminal stenosis continues to dictate both patient risk stratification and the likelihood of surgical intervention. But there is growing evidence to suggest that plaque morphology may help improve pre-existing risk stratification criteria. Plaque components such a fibrous tissue, lipid rich necrotic core and calcium have been well investigated but plaque hemorrhage (PH) has been somewhat overlooked. In this review we discuss the pathogenesis of PH, its role in dictating plaque vulnerability, PH imaging techniques, marterial properties of atherosclerotic tissues, in particular, those obtained based on in vivo measurements and effect of PH in modulating local biomechanics. PMID:24485514

  12. [Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae are associated to inflammation and rupture of the atherosclerotic coronary plaques].

    PubMed

    Ramires, José Antonio F; Higuchi, Maria de Lourdes

    2002-01-01

    In this review we report recent findings of our lab showing that Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae are present in higher amount, associated with adventitial inflammation and positive vessel remodeling, in thrombosed coronary artery segments (CAS) of patients who died due to acute myocardial infarction. CD8T cell was the predominant lymphocytes in the plaque and CD24(B) cell in the adventitia. The mean numbers of lymphocytes were significantly higher in adventitia than in the plaque. Vulnerable plaques were usually associated with focal positive vessel remodeling and large lipidic atheromas. Mycoplasma is the only bacterium that needs cholesterol for proliferation. We hypothesized that the association of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae increases virulence of both bacteria, inducing inflammation and rupture of the plaque. The search of CMV and Helicobacter pylori resulted negative. PMID:15626350

  13. Using multimodal femtosecond CARS imaging to determine plaque burden in luminal atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Alex C.-T.; Mostaço-Guidolin, Leila B.; Ridsdale, Andrew; Pegoraro, Adrian F.; Smith, Michael S. D.; Slepkov, Aaron; Hewko, Mark D.; Kohlenberg, Elicia K.; Schattka, Bernie; Stolow, Albert; Sowa, Michael G.

    2011-03-01

    Luminal atherosclerosis imaging was demonstrated by multimodal femtosecond CARS microscopy (MM-CARS). Using a myocardial infarction-prone rabbit model of atherosclerosis, this study demonstrated the utility of multimodal CARS imaging in determining atherosclerotic plaque burden through two types of image analysis procedures. Firstly, multimodal CARS images were evaluated using a signal-intensity parameter based on intensity changes derived from the multi-channel data (e.g. TPEF, SHG and CARS) to classify plaque burden within the vessel. Secondly, the SHG images that mainly correspond to collagen fibrils were evaluated using a texture analysis model based on the first-order statistical (FOS) parameters of the image histogram. Correlation between FOS parameters of collagen images with atherosclerosis plaque burden was established. A preliminary study of using spectroscopic CARS in identifying the different lipid components within the plaque was also discussed.

  14. Lesional T cells and dermal dendrocytes in psoriasis plaque express increased levels of granulysin.

    PubMed

    Raychaudhuri, Siba P; Jiang, W-Y; Raychaudhuri, Smriti K; Krensky, Alan M

    2004-12-01

    Granulysin is a broad-spectrum potent antimicrobial peptide produced by the immunocytes. We determined granulysin levels in certain cutaneous inflammatory diseases and correlated expression of granulysin with the relative risks of secondary infections in these conditions. In immunohistochemistry stains a monoclonal antigranulysin antibody was used at 1:150 dilutions. Compared with atopic dermatitis and nummular eczema lesions where secondary infection with Staphylococcus aureus is very common, we found that a significantly increased number of granulysin-positive T cells (P < .01) were present in psoriatic plaques. Psoriasis plaques are heavily colonized with S aureus . It is a well-known observation that despite open cracks and fissures these plaques do not get infected. Increased levels of granulysin provide an explanation for relative immunity of psoriatic plaques against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial infections. PMID:15583601

  15. Dietary supplementation with resveratrol reduces plaque pathology in a transgenic model of Alzheimers Disease

    PubMed Central

    Karuppagounder, Saravanan S.; Pinto, John T.; Xu, Hui; Chen, Lian H.; Beal, M. Flint; Gibson, Gary E.

    2010-01-01

    Resveratrol, a polyphenol found in red wine, peanuts, soy beans, and pomegranates, possesses a wide range of biological effects. Since resveratrols properties seem ideal for treating neurodegenerative diseases, its ability to diminish amyloid plaques was tested. Mice were fed clinically feasible dosages of resveratrol for forty-five days. Neither resveratrol nor its conjugated metabolites were detectable in brain. Nevertheless, resveratrol diminished plaque formation in a region specific manner. The largest reductions in the percent area occupied by plaques were observed in medial cortex (?48%), striatum (?89%) and hypothalamus (?90%). The changes occurred without detectable activation of SIRT-1 or alterations in APP processing. However, brain glutathione declined 21% and brain cysteine increased 54%. The increased cysteine and decreased glutathione may be linked to the diminished plaque formation. This study supports the concept that onset of neurodegenerative disease may be delayed or mitigated with use of dietary chemo-preventive agents that protect against ?-amyloid induced neuronal damage. PMID:19041676

  16. Drinking Habits Are Associated with Changes in the Dental Plaque Microbial Community▿

    PubMed Central

    Signoretto, Caterina; Bianchi, Franco; Burlacchini, Gloria; Sivieri, Francesca; Spratt, Dave; Canepari, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    Caries and gingivitis are the most prevalent oral infectious diseases of humans and are due to the accumulation of dental plaque (a microbial biofilm) on the tooth surface and at the gingival margin, respectively. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that many natural components of foods and beverages inhibit the adhesion of and/or exert activity against oral bacteria. These biological activities have mainly been attributed to the polyphenol fraction. In order to explore the possibility that diet can alter the dental plaque community, in this study we evaluated the composition of the microbiota of supra- and subgingival plaque samples collected from 75 adult subjects with different drinking habits (drinkers of coffee, red wine, or water for at least 2 years) by analyzing the microbial population through the separation of PCR-amplified fragments using the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) technique. The mean numbers of bands of the DGGE profiles from all three categories were evaluated. There were no significant differences between the two kinds of plaque collected from the control group (water drinkers), and this group showed the highest number of bands (supragingival plaque, 18.98 ± 3.16 bands; subgingival plaque, 18.7 ± 3.23 bands). The coffee and wine drinker groups generated the lowest numbers of bands for both supragingival plaque (coffee drinkers, 8.25 ± 3.53 bands; wine drinkers, 7.93 ± 2.55 bands) and subgingival plaque (coffee drinkers, 8.3 ± 3.03 bands; wine drinkers, 7.65 ± 1.68 bands). The differences between coffee drinkers or wine drinkers and the control group (water drinkers) were statistically significant. A total of 34 microorganisms were identified, and the frequency of their distribution in the three subject categories was analyzed. A greater percentage of subjects were positive for facultative aerobes when supragingival plaque was analyzed, while anaerobes were more frequent in subgingival plaque samples. It is noteworthy that the frequency of identification of anaerobes was significantly reduced when the frequencies for coffee and wine drinkers were compared with the frequencies for subjects in the control group. The DGGE profiles of the organisms in both plaque samples from all groups were generated and were used to construct dendrograms. A number of distinct clusters of organisms from water, coffee, and wine drinkers were formed. The clustering of some of the DGGE results into cohort-specific clusters implies similarities in the microbiotas within these groups and relevant differences in the microbiotas between cohorts. This supports the notion that the drinking habits of the subjects may influence the microbiota at both the supragingival and the subgingival levels. PMID:19955272

  17. Drinking habits are associated with changes in the dental plaque microbial community.

    PubMed

    Signoretto, Caterina; Bianchi, Franco; Burlacchini, Gloria; Sivieri, Francesca; Spratt, Dave; Canepari, Pietro

    2010-02-01

    Caries and gingivitis are the most prevalent oral infectious diseases of humans and are due to the accumulation of dental plaque (a microbial biofilm) on the tooth surface and at the gingival margin, respectively. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that many natural components of foods and beverages inhibit the adhesion of and/or exert activity against oral bacteria. These biological activities have mainly been attributed to the polyphenol fraction. In order to explore the possibility that diet can alter the dental plaque community, in this study we evaluated the composition of the microbiota of supra- and subgingival plaque samples collected from 75 adult subjects with different drinking habits (drinkers of coffee, red wine, or water for at least 2 years) by analyzing the microbial population through the separation of PCR-amplified fragments using the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) technique. The mean numbers of bands of the DGGE profiles from all three categories were evaluated. There were no significant differences between the two kinds of plaque collected from the control group (water drinkers), and this group showed the highest number of bands (supragingival plaque, 18.98 +/- 3.16 bands; subgingival plaque, 18.7 +/- 3.23 bands). The coffee and wine drinker groups generated the lowest numbers of bands for both supragingival plaque (coffee drinkers, 8.25 +/- 3.53 bands; wine drinkers, 7.93 +/- 2.55 bands) and subgingival plaque (coffee drinkers, 8.3 +/- 3.03 bands; wine drinkers, 7.65 +/- 1.68 bands). The differences between coffee drinkers or wine drinkers and the control group (water drinkers) were statistically significant. A total of 34 microorganisms were identified, and the frequency of their distribution in the three subject categories was analyzed. A greater percentage of subjects were positive for facultative aerobes when supragingival plaque was analyzed, while anaerobes were more frequent in subgingival plaque samples. It is noteworthy that the frequency of identification of anaerobes was significantly reduced when the frequencies for coffee and wine drinkers were compared with the frequencies for subjects in the control group. The DGGE profiles of the organisms in both plaque samples from all groups were generated and were used to construct dendrograms. A number of distinct clusters of organisms from water, coffee, and wine drinkers were formed. The clustering of some of the DGGE results into cohort-specific clusters implies similarities in the microbiotas within these groups and relevant differences in the microbiotas between cohorts. This supports the notion that the drinking habits of the subjects may influence the microbiota at both the supragingival and the subgingival levels. PMID:19955272

  18. Functionalization of gadolinium metallofullerenes for detecting atherosclerotic plaque lesions by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The hallmark of atherosclerosis is the accumulation of plaque in vessel walls. This process is initiated when monocytic cells differentiate into macrophage foam cells under conditions with high levels of atherogenic lipoproteins. Vulnerable plaque can dislodge, enter the blood stream, and result in acute myocardial infarction and stroke. Imaging techniques such as cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) provides one strategy to identify patients with plaque accumulation. Methods We synthesized an atherosclerotic-targeting contrast agent (ATCA) in which gadolinium (Gd)-containing endohedrals were functionalized and formulated into liposomes with CD36 ligands intercalated into the lipid bilayer. In vitro assays were used to assess the specificity of the ATCA for foam cells. The ability of ATCA to detect atherosclerotic plaque lesions in vivo was assessed using CMR. Results The ATCA was able to detect scavenger receptor (CD36)-expressing foam cells in vitro and were specifically internalized via the CD36 receptor as determined by focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) and Western blotting analysis of CD36 receptor-specific signaling pathways. The ATCA exhibited time-dependent accumulation in atherosclerotic plaque lesions of ApoE −/− mice as determined using CMR. No ATCA accumulation was observed in vessels of wild type (C57/b6) controls. Non-targeted control compounds, without the plaque-targeting moieties, were not taken up by foam cells in vitro and did not bind plaque in vivo. Importantly, the ATCA injection was well tolerated, did not demonstrate toxicity in vitro or in vivo, and no accumulation was observed in the major organs. Conclusions The ATCA is specifically internalized by CD36 receptors on atherosclerotic plaque providing enhanced visualization of lesions under physiological conditions. These ATCA may provide new tools for physicians to non-invasively detect atherosclerotic disease. PMID:23324435

  19. Ruthenium-106 plaque brachytherapy for uveal melanoma: Factors associated with local tumor recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Christopher A.; Francis, Jasmine H.; Cohen, Gil’ad N.; Marr, Brian P.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; McCormick, Beryl; Abramson, David H.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Plaque brachytherapy is a common form of treatment for uveal melanoma, and the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS) employed I-125. Recently, Ru-106 has been reintroduced for plaque brachytherapy in the United States. We reviewed our experience treating uveal melanoma with Ru-106 plaque brachytherapy using COMS planning techniques, hypothesizing we would observe similar outcomes to those in the COMS. METHODS AND MATERIALS Medical records of patients undergoing Ru-106 plaque brachytherapy were reviewed retrospectively. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were recorded. Outcomes including visual acuity, local tumor recurrence, salvage treatment, metastasis and survival were recorded. Cox regression analyses were used to determine factors associated with local tumor recurrence and enucleation. RESULTS Twenty-eight patients were studied. Median age was 60 and 50% were men. Median tumor base diameter and height were 9.4 and 2.6 mm. Ophthalmic complications were rare. Local tumor recurrence and enucleation occurred in 13 and 4 patients, respectively. Local tumor recurrence was associated with low visual acuity in the tumor-bearing eye, posterior tumors, small plaque size, and difference in plaque-tumor diameter <6 mm. Enucleation was associated with low visual acuity and posteriorly located tumor. Estimated 5-year rate of death and metastasis was 18.5% and 11.4%. CONCLUSIONS Among patients treated with Ru-106 plaque brachytherapy using COMS planning techniques, we found a greater than expected rate of local tumor recurrence. Planning Ru-106 plaque brachytherapy should be done carefully at centers that have previously used COMS protocols and I-125. PMID:24880583

  20. SOPROCARE - 450 nm wavelength detection tool for microbial plaque and gingival inflammation: a clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechmann, P.; Liou, Shasan W.; Rechmann, Beate M.; Featherstone, John D.

    2014-02-01

    Gingivitis due to microbial plaque and calculus can lead over time if left untreated to advanced periodontal disease with non-physiological pocket formation. Removal of microbial plaque in the gingivitis stage typically achieves gingival health. The SOPROCARE camera system emits blue light at 450 nm wavelength using three blue diodes. The 450 nm wavelength is located in the non-ionizing, visible spectral wavelength region and thus is not dangerous. It is assumed that using the SOPROCARE camera in perio-mode inflamed gingiva can easily be observed and inflammation can be scored due to fluorescence from porphyrins in blood. The assumption is also that illumination of microbial plaque with blue light induces fluorescence due to the bacteria and porphyrin content of the plaque and thus can help to make microbial plaque and calculus visible. Aim of the study with 55 subjects was to evaluate the ability of the SOPROCARE fluorescence camera system to detect, visualize and allow scoring of microbial plaque in comparison to the Turesky modification of the Quigley and Hein plaque index. A second goal was to detect and score gingival inflammation and correlated the findings to the Silness and Löe gingival inflammation index. The study showed that scoring of microbial plaque as well as gingival inflammation levels similar to the established Turesky modified Quigley Hein index and the Silness and Löe gingival inflammation index can easily be done using the SOPROCARE fluorescence system in periomode. Linear regression fits between the different clinical indices and SOPROCARE scores in fluorescence perio-mode revealed the system's capacity for effective discrimination between scores.

  1. Phage display identification of CD100 in human atherosclerotic plaque macrophages and foam cells.

    PubMed

    Luque, Maria Carolina Aquino; Gutierrez, Paulo Sampaio; Debbas, Victor; Martins, Waleska Kerllen; Puech-Leao, Pedro; Porto, Georgia; Coelho, Verônica; Boumsell, Laurence; Kalil, Jorge; Stolf, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a complex disease in which vessels develop plaques comprising dysfunctional endothelium, monocyte derived lipid laden foam cells and activated lymphocytes. Considering that humans and animal models of the disease develop quite distinct plaques, we used human plaques to search for proteins that could be used as markers of human atheromas. Phage display peptide libraries were probed to fresh human carotid plaques, and a bound phage homologous to plexin B1, a high affinity receptor for CD100, was identified. CD100 is a member of the semaphorin family expressed by most hematopoietic cells and particularly by activated T cells. CD100 expression was analyzed in human plaques and normal samples. CD100 mRNA and protein were analyzed in cultured monocytes, macrophages and foam cells. The effects of CD100 in oxLDL-induced foam cell formation and in CD36 mRNA abundance were evaluated. Human atherosclerotic plaques showed strong labeling of CD100/SEMA4D. CD100 expression was further demonstrated in peripheral blood monocytes and in in vitro differentiated macrophages and foam cells, with diminished CD100 transcript along the differentiation of these cells. Incubation of macrophages with CD100 led to a reduction in oxLDL-induced foam cell formation probably through a decrease of CD36 expression, suggesting for the first time an atheroprotective role for CD100 in the human disease. Given its differential expression in the numerous foam cells and macrophages of the plaques and its capacity to decrease oxLDL engulfment by macrophages we propose that CD100 may have a role in atherosclerotic plaque development, and may possibly be employed in targeted treatments of these atheromas. PMID:24098722

  2. The Neuroimmune Guidance Cue Semaphorin 3E is Expressed in Atherosclerotic Plaques and Regulates Macrophage Retention

    PubMed Central

    Wanschel, Amarylis; Seibert, Tara; Hewing, Bernd; Ramkhelawon, Bhama; Ray, Tathagat D.; van Gils, Janine M; Rayner, Katey J; Feig, Jonathan E.; O’Brien, Edward R.; Fisher, Edward A; Moore, Kathryn J

    2013-01-01

    Objective The persistence of myeloid-derived cells in the artery wall is a characteristic of advanced atherosclerotic plaques. However, the mechanisms by which these cells are retained are poorly understood. Semaphorins, a class of neuronal guidance molecules, play a critical role in vascular patterning and development, and recent studies suggest that they may also have immunomodulatory functions. The present study evaluates the expression of Semaphorin 3E (Sema3E) in settings relevant to atherosclerosis and its contribution to macrophage accumulation in plaques. Approach and Results Immunofluorescence staining of Sema3E, and its receptor PlexinD1, demonstrated their expression in macrophages of advanced atherosclerotic lesions of Apoe–/– mice. Notably, in two different mouse models of atherosclerosis regression, Sema3E mRNA was highly downregulated in plaque macrophages, coincident with a reduction in plaque macrophage content and an enrichment in markers of reparative M2 macrophages. In vitro, Sema3E mRNA was highly expressed in inflammatory “M1” macrophages, and in macrophages treated with physiological drivers of plaque progression and inflammation, such as oxidized LDL and hypoxia. To explore mechanistically how Sema3E affects macrophage behavior, we treated macrophages with recombinant protein in the presence/absence of chemokines, including CCL19, a chemokine implicated in the egress of macrophages from atherosclerotic plaques. Sema3E blocked actin polymerization and macrophage migration stimulated by the chemokines, suggesting that it may immobilize these cells in the plaque. Conclusions Sema3E is up-regulated in macrophages of advanced plaques, is dynamically regulated by multiple atherosclerosis-relevant factors, and acts as a negative regulator of macrophage migration, which may promote macrophage retention and chronic inflammation in vivo. PMID:23430613

  3. Correlations between bacterial levels in autologous subgingival plaque and saliva of adult Sudanese.

    PubMed

    Darout, Ismail A; Albandar, Jasim M; Skaug, Nils

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess levels of oral bacteria and their correlations in paired samples of saliva and subgingival plaque in a population of adult Sudanese. Whole saliva and pooled subgingival plaque samples from six probing sites of one tooth in each jaw were obtained from 56 Sudanese adults (mean age 35.2+/-8.9 years). Levels of 24 oral bacteria in the autologous saliva and pooled plaque sample of each subject were assessed by DNA probes and checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. There were significantly ( P< or =0.01) higher percentages of subjects with > or =10(5) bacterial cells of Prevotella intermedia, Campylobacter rectus, Veillonella parvula, Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Streptococcus anginosus, Streptococcus salivarius, and Leptotrichia buccalis and significantly ( P< or =0.01) lower percentages with Treponema denticola in saliva than in subgingival plaque. The detection frequencies at > or =10(6) bacterial cells were significantly higher for Selenomonas sputigena, S. anginosus, Streptococcus sanguis, and S. salivarius and significantly lower for Porphyromonas gingivalis in saliva than in subgingival plaque ( P< or =0.01). Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, S. sputigena, S. sanguis, and Streptococcus mitis demonstrated significant ( P< or =0.05) positive correlations between their levels in plaque and saliva. This study indicates that the levels of P. gingivalis, F. nucleatum, S. sputigena, S. sanguis, and S. mitis correlate significantly in saliva and subgingival plaque and that higher accuracy of detection and assessment of the levels of these bacteria in the oral cavity may be achieved by concurrent sampling of saliva and subgingival plaque. PMID:12483235

  4. Plaque pH response to snack foods in children with different levels of mutans streptococci.

    PubMed

    Thaweboon, Sroisiri; Suddhasthira, Theeralaksana; Thaweboon, Boonyanit; Soo-Ampon, Surin; Dechkunakorn, Surachai

    2007-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of some snack foods on plaque pH in children with different levels of mutans streptococci (MS). Six children, aged 9-12 years, with low (<10(4)) and 6 children, aged 10-12 years, with high (>106) numbers of MS/ml saliva participated in the study. Dental plaque pH changes, after the consumption of milk chocolate, sweet biscuit, instant noodle, sticky rice with banana and a 10% sucrose positive control were measured using pH-electrode. The measurements of plaque pH were made on forty-eight-hour accumulated plaque, at baseline to determine the resting pH of the fasted plaque and at time intervals of 2, 5, 10, 20 and 30 minutes after food consumption. The plaque pH curves, delta pH values and area under curve for pH 6.0 for each test food were determined. Plaque acidogenicity was more pronounced for the high-MS group at almost all test periods compared to the low-MS group with all test foods. The test foods were ranked according to maximum pH drop in about the same order in both groups as follows: 10% sucrose > milk chocolate > sweet biscuit > sticky rice with banana > instant noodle. The plaque pH also stayed below pH 6.00 for a longer period in the high-MS group with sweet biscuit, milk chocolate, and sticky rice with banana. Findings suggest that pH responses were more acidic in high-MS group than low-MS group. PMID:17877240

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of the Effect of Plaques in the Left Coronary Artery

    PubMed Central

    Chaichana, Thanapong; Sun, Zhonghua; Jewkes, James

    2012-01-01

    This study was to investigate the hemodynamic effect of simulated plaques in left coronary artery models, which were generated from a sample patient's data. Plaques were simulated and placed at the left main stem and the left anterior descending (LAD) to produce at least 60% coronary stenosis. Computational fluid dynamics analysis was performed to simulate realistic physiological conditions that reflect the in vivo cardiac hemodynamics, and comparison of wall shear stress (WSS) between Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid models was performed. The pressure gradient (PSG) and flow velocities in the left coronary artery were measured and compared in the left coronary models with and without presence of plaques during cardiac cycle. Our results showed that the highest PSG was observed in stenotic regions caused by the plaques. Low flow velocity areas were found at postplaque locations in the left circumflex, LAD, and bifurcation. WSS at the stenotic locations was similar between the non-Newtonian and Newtonian models although some more details were observed with non-Newtonian model. There is a direct correlation between coronary plaques and subsequent hemodynamic changes, based on the simulation of plaques in the realistic coronary models. PMID:22400051

  6. Homocysteine and Carotid Plaque Stability: A Cross-Sectional Study in Chinese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Anxin; Guo, Yuming; Li, Wen; Zhao, Xingquan; Liang, Wannian

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study aimed to explore the possible association of plasma total homocysteine with carotid plaque stability. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from 2010 to 2011. A stratified random sample of 2,919 Chinese participants aged 40 years or older was enrolled. Plasma total homocysteine levels were measured and carotid plaques were evaluated by ultrasonography. Logistic regression model was used to analyze the association of homocysteine levels to the progression of carotid plaque development, while adjusting for demographics and vascular risk factors. Results The mean level of plasma homocysteine in the subjects was 14.9 µmol/l. Along with increase in homocysteine level, the risk of advanced carotid plaque elevated (odds ratio = 1.28; 95% confidence interval = 1.09–1.51) after adjusting for age, sex, and other potential confounders. Stratified by sex, higher homocysteine level was strongly associated with advanced carotid plaque in men (OR = 1.41; 95% confidence interval = 1.17–1.70), but not in women. Conclusion The findings suggest that plasma level of homocysteine may be associated with advanced carotid plaque, which constitutes high risks of stroke, in male Chinese adults. PMID:24736609

  7. Carotid plaque characterization using CT and MRI scans for synergistic image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getzin, Matthew; Xu, Yiqin; Rao, Arhant; Madi, Saaussan; Bahadur, Ali; Lennartz, Michelle R.; Wang, Ge

    2014-09-01

    Noninvasive determination of plaque vulnerability has been a holy grail of medical imaging. Despite advances in tomographic technologies , there is currently no effective way to identify vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques with high sensitivity and specificity. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are widely used, but neither provides sufficient information of plaque properties. Thus, we are motivated to combine CT and MRI imaging to determine if the composite information can better reflect the histological determination of plaque vulnerability. Two human endarterectomy specimens (1 symptomatic carotid and 1 stable femoral) were imaged using Scanco Medical Viva CT40 and Bruker Pharmascan 16cm 7T Horizontal MRI / MRS systems. μCT scans were done at 55 kVp and tube current of 70 mA. Samples underwent RARE-VTR and MSME pulse sequences to measure T1, T2 values, and proton density. The specimens were processed for histology and scored for vulnerability using the American Heart Association criteria. Single modality-based analyses were performed through segmentation of key imaging biomarkers (i.e. calcification and lumen), image registration, measurement of fibrous capsule, and multi-component T1 and T2 decay modeling. Feature differences were analyzed between the unstable and stable controls, symptomatic carotid and femoral plaque, respectively. By building on the techniques used in this study, synergistic CT+MRI analysis may provide a promising solution for plaque characterization in vivo.

  8. Error propagation in the characterization of atheromatic plaque types based on imaging.

    PubMed

    Athanasiou, Lambros S; Rigas, George; Sakellarios, Antonis; Bourantas, Christos V; Stefanou, Kostas; Fotiou, Evangelos; Exarchos, Themis P; Siogkas, Panagiotis; Naka, Katerina K; Parodi, Oberdan; Vozzi, Federico; Teng, Zhongzhao; Young, Victoria E L; Gillard, Jonathan H; Prati, Francesco; Michalis, Lampros K; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2015-10-01

    Imaging systems transmit and acquire signals and are subject to errors including: error sources, signal variations or possible calibration errors. These errors are included in all imaging systems for atherosclerosis and are propagated to methodologies implemented for the segmentation and characterization of atherosclerotic plaque. In this paper, we present a study for the propagation of imaging errors and image segmentation errors in plaque characterization methods applied to 2D vascular images. More specifically, the maximum error that can be propagated to the plaque characterization results is estimated, assuming worst-case scenarios. The proposed error propagation methodology is validated using methods applied to real datasets, obtained from intravascular imaging (IVUS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) for coronary arteries, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for carotid arteries. The plaque characterization methods have recently been presented in the literature and are able to detect the vessel borders, and characterize the atherosclerotic plaque types. Although, these methods have been extensively validated using as gold standard expert annotations, by applying the proposed error propagation methodology a more realistic validation is performed taking into account the effect of the border detection algorithms error and the image formation error into the final results. The Pearson's coefficient of the detected plaques has changed significantly when the method was applied to IVUS and OCT, while there was not any variation when the method was applied to MRI data. PMID:26165637

  9. Identification of carotid plaque tissue properties using an experimental-numerical approach.

    PubMed

    Heiland, Vincent M; Forsell, Caroline; Roy, Joy; Hedin, Ulf; Gasser, T Christian

    2013-11-01

    A biomechanical stress analysis could help to identify carotid plaques that are vulnerable to rupture, and hence reduce the risk of thrombotic strokes. Mechanical stress predictions critically depend on the plaque's constitutive properties, and the present study introduces a concept to derive viscoelastic parameters through an experimental-numerical approach. Carotid plaques were harvested from two patients during carotid endarterectomy (CEA), and, in total, nine test specimens were investigated. A novel in-vitro mechanical testing protocol, which allows for dynamic testing, keeping the carotid plaque components together, was introduced. Macroscopic pictures overlaid by histological stains allowed for the segmentation of plaque tissues, in order to develop high-fidelity and low-fidelity Finite Element Method (FEM) models of the test specimens. The FEM models together with load-displacement data from the mechanical testing were used to extract constitutive parameters through inverse parameter estimation. The applied inverse parameter estimation runs in stages, first addressing the hyperelastic parameters then the viscoelastic ones. Load-displacement curves from the mechanical testing showed strain stiffening and viscoelasticity, as is expected for both normal and diseased carotid tissue. The estimated constitutive properties of plaque tissue were comparable to previously reported studies. Due to the highly non-linear elasticity of vascular tissue, the applied parameter estimation approach is, as with many similar approaches, sensitive to the initial guess of the parameters. PMID:23790614

  10. Intravascular optical imaging of high-risk plaques in vivo by targeting macrophage mannose receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Bak; Park, Kyeongsoon; Ryu, Jiheun; Lee, Jae Joong; Lee, Min Woo; Cho, Han Saem; Nam, Hyeong Soo; Park, Ok Kyu; Song, Joon Woo; Kim, Tae Shik; Oh, Dong Joo; Gweon, DaeGab; Oh, Wang-Yuhl; Yoo, Hongki; Kim, Jin Won

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages mediate atheroma expansion and disruption, and denote high-risk arterial plaques. Therefore, they are substantially gaining importance as a diagnostic imaging target for the detection of rupture-prone plaques. Here, we developed an injectable near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) probe by chemically conjugating thiolated glycol chitosan with cholesteryl chloroformate, NIRF dye (cyanine 5.5 or 7), and maleimide-polyethylene glycol-mannose as mannose receptor binding ligands to specifically target a subset of macrophages abundant in high-risk plaques. This probe showed high affinity to mannose receptors, low toxicity, and allowed the direct visualization of plaque macrophages in murine carotid atheroma. After the scale-up of the MMR-NIRF probe, the administration of the probe facilitated in vivo intravascular imaging of plaque inflammation in coronary-sized vessels of atheromatous rabbits using a custom-built dual-modal optical coherence tomography (OCT)-NIRF catheter-based imaging system. This novel imaging approach represents a potential imaging strategy enabling the identification of high-risk plaques in vivo and holds promise for future clinical implications. PMID:26948523

  11. Interaction between sulfur and lead in toxicity, iron plaque formation and lead accumulation in rice plant.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junxing; Liu, Zhiyan; Wan, Xiaoming; Zheng, Guodi; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Hanzhi; Guo, Lin; Wang, Xuedong; Zhou, Xiaoyong; Guo, Qingjun; Xu, Ruixiang; Zhou, Guangdong; Peters, Marc; Zhu, Guangxu; Wei, Rongfei; Tian, Liyan; Han, Xiaokun

    2016-06-01

    Human activities have resulted in lead and sulfur accumulation in paddy soils in parts of southern China. A combined soil-sand pot experiment was conducted to investigate the influence of S supply on iron plaque formation and Pb accumulation in rice (Oryza sativa L.) under two Pb levels (0 and 600mgkg(-1)), combined with four S concentrations (0, 30, 60, and 120mgkg(-1)). Results showed that S supply significantly decreased Pb accumulation in straw and grains of rice. This result may be attributed to the enhancement of Fe plaque formation, decrease of Pb availability in soil, and increase of reduced glutathione (GSH) in rice leaves. Moderate S supply (30mgkg(-1)) significantly increased Fe plaque formation on the root surface and in the rhizosphere, whereas excessive S supply (60 and 120mgkg(-)(1)) significantly decreased the amounts of iron plaque on the root surface. Sulfur supply significantly enhanced the GSH contents in leaves of rice plants under Pb treatment. With excessive S application, the rice root acted as a more effective barrier to Pb accumulation compared with iron plaque. Excessive S supply may result in a higher monosulfide toxicity and decreased iron plaque formation on the root surface during flooded conditions. However, excessive S supply could effectively decrease Pb availability in soils and reduce Pb accumulation in rice plants. PMID:26946285

  12. Linking CD11b+ Dendritic Cells and Natural Killer T Cells to Plaque Inflammation in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rombouts, Miche; Ammi, Rachid; Van Brussel, Ilse; Roth, Lynn; De Winter, Benedicte Y.; Vercauteren, Sven R.; Hendriks, Jeroen M. H.; Lauwers, Patrick; Van Schil, Paul E.; De Meyer, Guido R. Y.; Fransen, Erik; Cools, Nathalie; Schrijvers, Dorien M.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis remains the leading cause of death and disability in our Western society. To investigate whether the dynamics of leukocyte (sub)populations could be predictive for plaque inflammation during atherosclerosis, we analyzed innate and adaptive immune cell distributions in blood, plaques, and lymphoid tissue reservoirs in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE−/−) mice and in blood and plaques from patients undergoing endarterectomy. Firstly, there was predominance of the CD11b+ conventional dendritic cell (cDC) subset in the plaque. Secondly, a strong inverse correlation was observed between CD11b+ cDC or natural killer T (NKT) cells in blood and markers of inflammation in the plaque (including CD3, T-bet, CCR5, and CCR7). This indicates that circulating CD11b+ cDC and NKT cells show great potential to reflect the inflammatory status in the atherosclerotic plaque. Our results suggest that distinct changes in inflammatory cell dynamics may carry biomarker potential reflecting atherosclerotic lesion progression. This not only is crucial for a better understanding of the immunopathogenesis but also bares therapeutic potential, since immune cell-based therapies are emerging as a promising novel strategy in the battle against atherosclerosis and its associated comorbidities. The cDC-NKT cell interaction in atherosclerosis serves as a good candidate for future investigations. PMID:27051078

  13. The effect of iron plaque on lead translocation in soil-Carex cinerascens kukenth. system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunying; Gong, Xiaofeng; Chen, Chunli; Yang, Juyun; Xu, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of iron plaque on Pb uptake by and translocation in Carex cinerascens Kukenth. grown under open-air conditions. Using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometry, iron plaque was present as an amorphous coating on root surfaces with uneven distribution. The amount of iron plaque increased significantly with increasing Fe additions regardless of Pb additions. The presence of iron plaque on the root surface of Carex cinerascens Kukenth. increased the concentrations of Pb adsorbed by iron plaque. The Pb percentage in whole roots increased by 14.52% at 500 mg kg(-1) Fe treatment than at 0 mg kg(-1) Fe, and the distribution coefficient (DC) of Pb and translocation factor (TF) root increased with Fe additions, but translocation factor (TF) shoot decreased with Fe additions. The results suggested that iron plaque could promote the translocation of Pb from soil to roots to some extent, and it played a role to reduce heavy metals pollution of Poyang Lake wetland. PMID:26364868

  14. Contribution of neovascularization and intraplaque haemorrhage to atherosclerotic plaque progression and instability.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, D A; Orekhov, A N; Bobryshev, Y V

    2015-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is a continuous pathological process that starts early in life and progresses frequently to unstable plaques. Plaque rupture leads to deleterious consequences such as acute coronary syndrome, stroke and atherothrombosis. The vulnerable lesion has several structural and functional hallmarks that distinguish it from the stable plaque. The unstable plaque has large necrotic core (over 40% plaque volume) composed of cholesterol crystals, cholesterol esters, oxidized lipids, fibrin, erythrocytes and their remnants (haeme, iron, haemoglobin), and dying macrophages. The fibrous cap is thin, depleted of smooth muscle cells and collagen, and is infiltrated with proinflammatory cells. In unstable lesion, formation of neomicrovessels is increased. These neovessels have weak integrity and leak thereby leading to recurrent haemorrhages. Haemorrhages deliver erythrocytes to the necrotic core where they degrade promoting inflammation and oxidative stress. Inflammatory cells mostly presented by monocytes/macrophages, neutrophils and mast cells extravagate from bleeding neovessels and infiltrate adventitia where they support chronic inflammation. Plaque destabilization is an evolutionary process that could start at early atherosclerotic stages and whose progression is influenced by many factors including neovascularization, intraplaque haemorrhages, formation of cholesterol crystals, inflammation, oxidative stress and intraplaque protease activity. PMID:25515699

  15. Comparison of the plaque microflora from natural and appliance-borne enamel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, L M; MacFarlane, T W; Weetman, D A; Stephen, K W

    1991-01-01

    Human enamel sections and slabs, mounted on a mandibular removable appliance, were worn by 5 adult subjects for a 1-week period. Plaque was allowed to accumulate on the in situ test sites and on the adjacent natural dentition. At the end of the experimental period, the plaque microflora associated with (1) the enamel sections, (2) the enamel slabs, and (3) the acrylic base of the appliance test site was compared with that obtained from lingual and interproximal areas of the lower molar teeth. In addition, the acid anion and pH profiles of plaque obtained from both the exogenous and natural tooth surfaces were also determined. Although some quantitative differences were found between the proportions of isolates obtained from the different enamel surfaces, qualitatively the microflora was very similar, and no significant differences were found in the plaque lactate/acetate ratios or pH measurements following a sucrose mouthrinse. Thus, human tooth specimens mounted on the intra-oral device produced a plaque ecosystem similar to that present on the adjacent natural dentition, suggesting that the model is suitable for studies on early plaque development and the microbiology of enamel demineralization. PMID:2070382

  16. Type I collagen gene expression in human atherosclerosis. Localization to specific plaque regions.

    PubMed Central

    Rekhter, M. D.; Zhang, K.; Narayanan, A. S.; Phan, S.; Schork, M. A.; Gordon, D.

    1993-01-01

    Because collagen is a major component of the human atherosclerotic plaque, factors controlling collagen synthesis may have a profound influence on the volume growth of these intimal lesions. In human arteries, we compared normal vs atherosclerotic media vs intimas for type I collagen gene expression using immunocytochemistry and in situ messenger RNA hybridization with subsequent correlations with plaque topographical features. We also determined the associations of such collagen gene expression with proximity to monocyte/macrophages and T lymphocytes. Type I collagen synthesis appears to be upregulated in atherosclerotic plaques compared with their underlying medias and normal internal mammary arteries and coronary diffuse intimal thickenings. At least in established and advanced coronary and carotid plaques, type I collagen gene expression is focal and especially prevalent in fibrous cap and vascularized regions. Although macrophages and type I procollagen messenger RNA and protein are both found in atherosclerotic plaques, no apparent spatial correlation between macrophage presence and type I procollagen presence was found within these atherosclerotic intimas. Type I procollagen presence appears to be negatively associated with the spatial presence of T cells. Thus, human atherosclerotic plaques exhibit nonuniform patterns of type I collagen gene expression. Although the biochemical determinants of this focal gene expression have yet to be determined, it is conceivable that stimulatory/inhibitory cytokines and other factors (eg hemodynamics) play important roles in determining the focal nature of collagen synthesis in atherosclerosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:7504887

  17. Effect of ozonated oil and chlorhexidine gel on plaque induced gingivitis: A randomized control clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Indurkar, Maya Sanjeev; Verma, Renu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several chemotherapeutic agents have been developed to prevent gingivitis and its progression into periodontitis. In this present study, the efficacy of ozonated oil and chlorhexidine gel was assessed and compared on plaque induced gingivitis. Aim: To evaluate the effect of ozonated oil on plaque induced gingivitis and to compare its efficacy with chlorhexidine gel. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 subjects, aged from 18 to 65 years, with plaque-induced gingivitis were selected from the outpatient Department of Periodontology, Government Dental College and Hospital, Aurangabad, for this study. They were divided randomly into the test or ozonated oil group (Group I) and the control or chlorhexidine gel group (Group II) with 10 subjects in each group. Subjects were randomly assigned to massage their gingiva thrice a day for 3 weeks with ozonated oil (test), and chlorhexidine gel (control). Plaque index and gingival index scores were recorded for the 20 subjects at baseline and after 3 weeks. Results: Ozonated oil (Group I) and chlorhexidine gel (Group II) groups showed statistically significant differences with respect to plaque index and gingival index, from the baseline to 3 weeks (P < 0.001 in both). But the difference between Group I and Group II, at the end of the study period, was not statistically significant with respect to the plaque index and gingival index. Conclusions: The ozonated oil and chlorhexidine gel, both can be used as an effective agent in maintaining and improving gingival health. PMID:27041835

  18. Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging of vulnerable plaques: a finite element method parametric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Joshua R.; Dumont, Douglas M.; Trahey, Gregg E.; Palmeri, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    Plaque rupture is the most common cause of complications such as stroke and coronary heart failure. Recent histopathological evidence suggests that several plaque features, including a large lipid core and a thin fibrous cap, are associated with plaques most at risk for rupture. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging, a recently developed ultrasound-based elasticity imaging technique, shows promise for imaging these features noninvasively. Clinically, this could be used to distinguish vulnerable plaques, for which surgical intervention may be required, from those less prone to rupture. In this study, a parametric analysis using Finite-Element Method (FEM) models was performed to simulate ARFI imaging of five different carotid artery plaques across a wide range of material properties. It was demonstrated that ARFI could resolve the softer lipid pool from the surrounding, stiffer media and fibrous cap and was most dependent upon the stiffness of the lipid pool component. Stress concentrations due to an ARFI excitation were located in the media and fibrous cap components. In all cases, the maximum Von Mises stress was < 1.2 kPa. In comparing these results with others investigating plaque rupture, it is concluded that while the mechanisms may be different, the Von Mises stresses imposed by ARFI are orders of magnitude lower than the stresses associated with blood pressure. PMID:23122224

  19. Intravascular optical imaging of high-risk plaques in vivo by targeting macrophage mannose receptors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Bak; Park, Kyeongsoon; Ryu, Jiheun; Lee, Jae Joong; Lee, Min Woo; Cho, Han Saem; Nam, Hyeong Soo; Park, Ok Kyu; Song, Joon Woo; Kim, Tae Shik; Oh, Dong Joo; Gweon, DaeGab; Oh, Wang-Yuhl; Yoo, Hongki; Kim, Jin Won

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages mediate atheroma expansion and disruption, and denote high-risk arterial plaques. Therefore, they are substantially gaining importance as a diagnostic imaging target for the detection of rupture-prone plaques. Here, we developed an injectable near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) probe by chemically conjugating thiolated glycol chitosan with cholesteryl chloroformate, NIRF dye (cyanine 5.5 or 7), and maleimide-polyethylene glycol-mannose as mannose receptor binding ligands to specifically target a subset of macrophages abundant in high-risk plaques. This probe showed high affinity to mannose receptors, low toxicity, and allowed the direct visualization of plaque macrophages in murine carotid atheroma. After the scale-up of the MMR-NIRF probe, the administration of the probe facilitated in vivo intravascular imaging of plaque inflammation in coronary-sized vessels of atheromatous rabbits using a custom-built dual-modal optical coherence tomography (OCT)-NIRF catheter-based imaging system. This novel imaging approach represents a potential imaging strategy enabling the identification of high-risk plaques in vivo and holds promise for future clinical implications. PMID:26948523

  20. The Comparative Evaluation of the Effects of Tongue Cleaning on Existing Plaque Levels in Children

    PubMed Central

    Winnier, J Jasmin; Nayak, Ullal Anand; Reddy, Venugopal; Prasad Rao, Arun

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The present study compared and evaluated the effects of tongue scraping and tongue brushing on existing plaque levels in children. The investigation was a single blind, stratified comparison of three parallel groups of children who performed either tongue scraping or tongue brushing along with tooth brushing or only tooth brushing twice daily under professional supervision for a 21 day period. Dental plaque was recorded using the plaque index described by Silness and Loe at baseline, on day 10 and on day 21. All data was subjected to statistical analysis using Wilcoxon's Signed Ranks Sum Test and Mann-Whitney U-test. The results of the present study show that the tongue scraping and tongue brushing groups showed statistically significant reductions in plaque levels after 10 days and also after 21 days. It was also noted that both tongue scraping and tongue brushing were equally effective in reducing the plaque load in children. How to cite this article: Winnier JJ, Rupesh S, Nayak UA, Reddy V, Rao AP. The Comparative Evaluation of the Effects of Tongue Cleaning on Existing Plaque Levels in Children. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(3):188-192. PMID:25206220

  1. Imaging Plaques to Predict and Better Manage Patients with Acute Coronary Events

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, Hector M.; Jang, Ik-Kyung; Serruys, Patrick W.; Kovacic, Jason C.; Narula, Jagat; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2014-01-01

    Culprit lesions of patients who have had an acute coronary syndrome commonly are ruptured coronary plaques with superimposed thrombus. The precursor of such lesions is an inflamed thin-capped fibroatheroma. These plaques can be imaged by means of invasive techniques such as intravascular ultrasound (and derived techniques), optical coherence tomography and near-infrared spectroscopy. Very often these patients exhibit similar (multiple) plaques beyond the culprit lesion. These remote plaques can be assessed non invasively by computed tomography angiography and magnetic resonance imaging and also using invasive imaging. The detection of these remote plaques is not only feasible, but also in natural history studies have been associated with clinical coronary events. Different systemic pharmacological treatments have been studied (mostly statins) with modest success and therefore newer approaches are being tested. Local treatment for such lesions is in its infancy and larger, prospective and randomized trials are needed. This review will describe the pathological and imaging findings in culprit lesions of patients with acute coronary syndrome and as well as the assessment of remote plaques. In addition, the pharmacological and local treatment options will be reviewed. PMID:24902974

  2. Thymidine plaque autoradiography of thymidine kinase-positive and thymidine kinase-negative herpesviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Tenser, R.B.; Jones, J.C.; Ressel, S.J.; Fralish, F.A.

    1983-01-01

    Plaques formed by herpes simplex virus (HSV), pseudorabies virus, and varicella-zoster virus were studied by plaque autoradiography after (/sup 14/C)thymidine labeling. Standard thymidine kinase-positive (TK+) viruses and TK- mutants of HSV types 1 and 2 and pseudorabies virus were studied, including cell cultured viruses and viruses isolated from animals. Autoradiography was performed with X-ray film with an exposure time of 5 days. After development of films, TK+ plaques showed dark rims due to isotope incorporation, whereas TK- plaques were minimally labeled. Plaque autoradiography of stock TK- viruses showed reversion frequencies to the TK+ phenotype of less than 10(-3). Autoradiography indicated that TK- virus retained the TK- phenotype after replication in vivo. In addition, it was shown that TK- HSV could be isolated from mouse trigeminal ganglion tissue after corneal inoculation of TK- HSV together with TK+ HSV. The plaque autoradiographic procedure was very useful to evaluate proportions of TK+ and TK- virus present in TK+-TK- virus mixtures.

  3. Pharmacogenomic interaction between the Haptoglobin genotype and vitamin E on atherosclerotic plaque progression and stability

    PubMed Central

    Veiner, Hilla-Lee; Gorbatov, Rostic; Vardi, Moshe; Doros, Gheorghe; Miller-Lotan, Rachel; Zohar, Yaniv; Sabo, Edmond; Asleh, Rabea; Levy, Nina S.; Goldfarb, Levi J.; Berk, Thomas A.; Haas, Tali; Shalom, Hadar; Suss-Toby, Edith; Kam, Adi; Kaplan, Marielle; Tamir, Ronit; Ziskind, Anna; Levy, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Structured Abstract Objective Homozygosity for a 1.7kb intragenic duplication of the Haptoglobin (Hp) gene (Hp 2-2 genotype), present in 36% of the population, has been associated with a 2–3 fold increased incidence of atherothrombosis in individuals with Diabetes (DM) in 10 longitudinal studies compared to DM individuals not homozygous for this duplication (Hp 1-1/2-1). The increased CVD risk associated with the Hp 2-2 genotype has been shown to be prevented with vitamin E supplementation in man. We sought to determine if there was an interaction between the Hp genotype and vitamin E on atherosclerotic plaque growth and stability in a transgenic model of the Hp polymorphism. Methods and Results Brachiocephalic artery atherosclerotic plaque volume was serially assessed by high resolution ultrasound in 28 Hp 1-1 and 26 Hp 2-2 mice in a C57Bl/6 ApoE−/− background. Hp 2-2 mice had more rapid plaque growth and an increased incidence of plaque hemorrhage and rupture. Vitamin E significantly reduced plaque growth in Hp 2-2 but not in Hp 1-1 mice with a significant pharmacogenomic interaction between the Hp genotype and vitamin E on plaque growth. Conclusions These results may help explain why vitamin E supplementation in man can prevent CVD in Hp 2-2 DM but not in non Hp 2-2 DM individuals. PMID:25618031

  4. Effects of Exogenous Gibberellic Acid3 on Iron and Manganese Plaque Amounts and Iron and Manganese Uptake in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yue; Zhu, Changhua; Gan, Lijun; Ng, Denny; Xia, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Gibberellins (GA) regulate various components of plant development. Iron and Mn plaque result from oxiding and hydroxiding Fe and Mn, respectively, on the roots of aquatic plant species such as rice (Oryza sativa L.). In this study, we found that exogenous gibberellic acid3 (GA3) spray decreased Fe plaque, but increased Mn plaque, with applications of Kimura B nutrient solution. Similar effects from GA3, leading to reduced Fe plaque and increased Mn plaque, were also found by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometric microanalysis. Reduced Fe plaque was observed after applying GA3 to the groups containing added Fe2+ (17 and 42 mg•L-1) and an increasing trend was detected in Mn plaques of the Mn2+ (34 and 84 mg•L-1) added treatments. In contrast, an inhibitor of GA3, uniconazole, reversed the effects of GA3. The uptake of Fe or Mn in rice plants was enhanced after GA3 application and Fe or Mn plaque production. Strong synergetic effects of GA3 application on Fe plaque production were detected. However, no synergetic effects on Mn plaque production were detected. PMID:25710173

  5. Effect of Fluoride and Chlorhexidine Digluconate Mouthrinses on Plaque Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Rabe, Per; Twetman, Svante; Kinnby, Bertil; Svensäter, Gunnel; Davies, Julia R

    2015-01-01

    Objective : To develop a model in which to investigate the architecture of plaque biofilms formed on enamel surfaces in vivo and to compare the effects of anti-microbial agents of relevance for caries on biofilm vitality. Materials and Methodology : Enamel discs mounted on healing abutments in the pre-molar region were worn by three subjects for 7 days. Control discs were removed before subjects rinsed with 0.1% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) or 0.2% sodium fluoride (NaF) for 1 minute. Biofilms were stained with Baclight Live/Dead and z-stacks of images created using confocal scanning laser micoscopy. The levels of vital and dead/damaged bacteria in the biofilms, assessed as the proportion of green and red pixels respectively, were analysed using ImageTrak® software. Results : The subjects showed individual differences in biofilm architecture. The thickness of the biofilms varied from 28-96µm although cell density was always the greatest in the middle layers. In control biofilms, the overall levels of vitality were high (71-98%) especially in the area closest to the enamel interface. Rinsing with either CHX or NaF caused a similar reduction in overall vitality. CHX exerted an effect throughout the biofilm, particularly on the surface of cell clusters whereas NaF caused cell damage/death mainly in the middle to lower biofilm layers. Conclusion : We describe a model that allows the formation of mature, undisturbed oral biofilms on human enamel surfaces in vivo and show that CHX and NaF have a similar effect on overall vitality but differ in their sites of action. PMID:25870718

  6. Helicobacter Pylori Gastritis, a Presequeale to Coronary Plaque

    PubMed Central

    Raut, Shrikant C.; Patil, Vinayak W.; Dalvi, Shubhangi M.; Bakhshi, Girish D.

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori are considered the most common human pathogen colonizing gastric mucosa. Gastritis with or without H. pylori infection is associated with increase in levels of homocysteine and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) but a more pronounced increase is noted in gastritis with H. pylori infection. Increasing level of homocysteine, due to decreased absorption of vitamin B12 and folic acid, together with increased CRP levels in gastritis with H. pylori infection may be the earliest event in the process of atherosclerosis and plaque formation. Retrospective study conducted at tertiary care hospital in Mumbai by Department of Biochemistry in association with Department of Surgery. Eighty patients who underwent gastroscopy in view of gastritis were subjected to rapid urease test for diagnosis of H. pylori infection. Vitamin B12, folic acid, homocysteine and hs-CRP were analyzed using chemiluminescence immuno assay. Student’s t-test, Pearson’s correlation and linear regression used for statistical analysis. Patients with H. pylori gastritis had significantly lower levels of vitamin B12 (271.6±101.3 vs 390.6±176.7 pg/mL; P=0.0005), as well as higher levels of homocysteine (17.4±7.4 vs 13.8±7.8 µmol/L; P=0.037) and hs-CRP (2.5±2.9 vs 1.2±1.1 mg/L; P=0.017), than in patients without H. pylori gastritis. However, folic acid showed (8.9±3.2 vs 10.0±3.6 ng/mL; P=0.171) no significant difference. Elevated homocysteine and hs-CRP in H. pylori gastritis may independently induce endothelial dysfunction, leading to cardiovascular pathology. PMID:25918633

  7. Helicobacter pylori gastritis, a presequeale to coronary plaque.

    PubMed

    Raut, Shrikant C; Patil, Vinayak W; Dalvi, Shubhangi M; Bakhshi, Girish D

    2015-01-28

    Helicobacter pylori are considered the most common human pathogen colonizing gastric mucosa. Gastritis with or without H. pylori infection is associated with increase in levels of homocysteine and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) but a more pronounced increase is noted in gastritis with H. pylori infection. Increasing level of homocysteine, due to decreased absorption of vitamin B12 and folic acid, together with increased CRP levels in gastritis with H. pylori infection may be the earliest event in the process of atherosclerosis and plaque formation. Retrospective study conducted at tertiary care hospital in Mumbai by Department of Biochemistry in association with Department of Surgery. Eighty patients who underwent gastroscopy in view of gastritis were subjected to rapid urease test for diagnosis of H. pylori infection. Vitamin B12, folic acid, homocysteine and hs-CRP were analyzed using chemiluminescence immuno assay. Student's t-test, Pearson's correlation and linear regression used for statistical analysis. Patients with H. pylori gastritis had significantly lower levels of vitamin B12 (271.6101.3 vs 390.6176.7 pg/mL; P=0.0005), as well as higher levels of homocysteine (17.47.4 vs 13.87.8 mol/L; P=0.037) and hs-CRP (2.52.9 vs 1.21.1 mg/L; P=0.017), than in patients without H. pylori gastritis. However, folic acid showed (8.93.2 vs 10.03.6 ng/mL; P=0.171) no significant difference. Elevated homocysteine and hs-CRP in H. pylori gastritis may independently induce endothelial dysfunction, leading to cardiovascular pathology. PMID:25918633

  8. {sup 106}Ruthenium Plaque Therapy (RPT) for Retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Naoya; Suzuki, Shigenobu; Ito, Yoshinori; Yoshimura, Ryoichi; Inaba, Koji; Kuroda, Yuki; Morota, Madoka; Mayahara, Hiroshi; Sakudo, Mototake; Wakita, Akihisa; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Sumi, Minako; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Ohtomo, Kuni; Itami, Jun

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of episcleral {sup 106}ruthenium plaque therapy (RPT) in the management of retinoblastoma. Methods and Materials: One hundred one RPTs were retrospectively analyzed that were performed in 90 eyes of 85 patients with retinoblastoma at National Cancer Center Hospital between 1998 and 2008. Each RPT had a corresponding tumor and 101 tumors were considered in the analysis of local control. Median follow-up length was 72.8 months. Median patient age at the RPT was 28 months. Median prescribed doses at reference depth and outer surface of the sclera were 47.4 Gy and 162.3 Gy, respectively. Results: Local control rate (LCR) and ocular retention rate (ORR) at 2 years were 33.7% and 58.7%, respectively. Unilateral disease, International Classification of Retinoblastoma group C or more advanced at the first presentation or at the time of RPT, vitreous and/or subretinal seeding, tumor size greater than 5 disc diameter (DD), reference depth greater than 5 mm, dose rate at reference depth lower than 0.7 Gy/hour, dose at the reference depth lower than 35 Gy, and (biologically effective dose with an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 10 Gy) at the reference depth lower than 40 Gy{sub 10} were associated with unfavorable LCR. Two patients died of metastatic disease. Radiation complications included retinal detachment in 12 eyes (13.3%), proliferative retinopathy in 6 (6.7%), rubeosis iris in 2 (2.2%), and posterior subcapsular cataract in 23 (25.6%). Conclusion: RPT is an effective eye-preserving treatment for retinoblastoma.

  9. Immunohistochemical analysis of small plaque parapsoriasis: involvement of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Zeybek, N Dilara; Asan, Esin; Erbil, A Hakan; Dagdeviren, Attila

    2008-01-01

    Small plaque parapsoriasis (SPP) is one of the cutaneous T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. The aim of the present study was to show the antigenic profile of a subset of dendritic cells and lymphocytes in SPP in comparison with normal cells to provide data on the role of these two cell types in the pathogenesis of SPP. Skin biopsy specimens of lesions were obtained from 8 patients with SPP. Biopsies of the healthy skin from 9 control individuals were also analyzed. Immunohistochemistry was performed on the frozen tissue sections to reveal binding of anti-HLA Class II, anti-CD1a, anti-CD4, anti-CD8, anti-CD44, anti-CD45, and anti-CD68 monoclonal antibodies. There was a statistically significant increase in the number of CD1a(+), Langerhans cells (LCs), HLA-DR-immunoreactive and, CD1a-positive dermal dendritic cells and CD68(+) macrophages in the SPP group (p=0.008, 0.008, 0.002 and <0.0009, respectively). The number of lymphocytes positive for CD4, CD8 and CD45 was significantly higher than normal in the SPP group (p=0.015, <0.0009 and <0.0009, respectively). Our study demonstrates that both peptide- and lipid-based antigens are involved in the persistent antigenic exposure in SPP. Dendritic cells play a pivotal role in SPP by presenting antigens by both LC and dermal dendritic cells via MHC Class II and CD1a molecules. The CD68(+) macrophages are thought to be involved in the immune response in this pathology as an antigen-presenting cell. PMID:18258285

  10. The influence of inaccuracies in carotid MRI segmentation on atherosclerotic plaque stress computations.

    PubMed

    Nieuwstadt, Harm A; Speelman, Lambert; Breeuwer, Marcel; van der Lugt, Aad; van der Steen, Anton F W; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Gijsen, Frank J H

    2014-02-01

    Biomechanical finite element analysis (FEA) based on in vivo carotid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to assess carotid plaque vulnerability noninvasively by computing peak cap stress. However, the accuracy of MRI plaque segmentation and the influence this has on FEA has remained unreported due to the lack of a reliable submillimeter ground truth. In this study, we quantify this influence using novel numerical simulations of carotid MRI. Histological sections from carotid plaques from 12 patients were used to create 33 ground truth plaque models. These models were subjected to numerical computer simulations of a currently used clinically applied 3.0 T T1-weighted black-blood carotid MRI protocol (in-plane acquisition voxel size of 0.62 × 0.62 mm2) to generate simulated in vivo MR images from a known underlying ground truth. The simulated images were manually segmented by three MRI readers. FEA models based on the MRI segmentations were compared with the FEA models based on the ground truth. MRI-based FEA model peak cap stress was consistently underestimated, but still correlated (R) moderately with the ground truth stress: R = 0.71, R = 0.47, and R = 0.76 for the three MRI readers respectively (p < 0.01). Peak plaque stretch was underestimated as well. The peak cap stress in thick-cap, low stress plaques was substantially more accurately and precisely predicted (error of -12 ± 44 kPa) than the peak cap stress in plaques with caps thinner than the acquisition voxel size (error of -177 ± 168 kPa). For reliable MRI-based FEA to compute the peak cap stress of carotid plaques with thin caps, the current clinically used in-plane acquisition voxel size (∼0.6 mm) is inadequate. FEA plaque stress computations would be considerably more reliable if they would be used to identify thick-cap carotid plaques with low stresses instead. PMID:24317274

  11. Correlation of Cognitive Function with Ultrasound Strain Indices in Carotid Plaque

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X.; Jackson, D.C.; Varghese, T.; Mitchell, C.C.; Hermann, B.P.; Kliewer, M.A.; Dempsey, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    Instability in carotid vulnerable plaque can generate cerebral microemboli, that may be related to both stroke and eventual cognitive abnormality. Strain imaging to detect plaque vulnerability based on regions with large strain fluctuations, with arterial pulsation, may be able to determine risk of cognitive impairment. Plaque instability may be characterized by increased strain variations over a cardiac cycle. Radiofrequency signals for ultrasound strain imaging were acquired from the carotid arteries of 24 human subjects using a Siemens Antares with a VFX 13-5 linear array transducer. These patients underwent standardized cognitive assessment (Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS)). Plaque regions were segmented by a radiologist at end-diastole using the Medical Imaging Interaction Toolkit. A hierarchical block-matching motion tracking algorithm was utilized to estimate the cumulated axial, lateral, and shear strains within the imaging plane. The maximum, minimum and peak-to-peak strain indices in the plaque computed from the mean cumulated strain over a small region of interest in the plaque with large deformations, were obtained. The maximum and peak-to-peak mean cumulated strain indices over the entire plaque region were also computed. All the strain indices were then correlated with RBANS Total performance. Overall cognitive performance (RBANS Total) was negatively associated with values of the maximum strain and the peak-to-peak for axial and lateral strains respectively. There was no significant correlation between the RBANS Total score and shear strain, and strain indices averaged over the entire identified plaque for this group of patients. However, correlation of the maximum lateral strain was higher for symptomatic patients (r=?0.650, p=0.006) than that for asymptomatic patients (r=?0.115, p=0.803). On the other hand correlation for maximum axial strain averaged over the entire plaque region was significantly higher for asymptomatic patients (r=?0.817, p=0.016) than that for symptomatic patients (r=?0.224, p=0.402). The results reveal a direct relationship between the maximum axial and lateral strain indices in carotid plaque with cognitive impairment. PMID:24120415

  12. Towards coronary plaque imaging using simultaneous PET-MR: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petibon, Y.; El Fakhri, G.; Nezafat, R.; Johnson, N.; Brady, T.; Ouyang, J.

    2014-03-01

    Coronary atherosclerotic plaque rupture is the main cause of myocardial infarction and the leading killer in the US. Inflammation is a known bio-marker of plaque vulnerability and can be assessed non-invasively using fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography imaging (FDG-PET). However, cardiac and respiratory motion of the heart makes PET detection of coronary plaque very challenging. Fat surrounding coronary arteries allows the use of MRI to track plaque motion during simultaneous PET-MR examination. In this study, we proposed and assessed the performance of a fat-MR based coronary motion correction technique for improved FDG-PET coronary plaque imaging in simultaneous PET-MR. The proposed methods were evaluated in a realistic four-dimensional PET-MR simulation study obtained by combining patient water-fat separated MRI and XCAT anthropomorphic phantom. Five small lesions were digitally inserted inside the patients coronary vessels to mimic coronary atherosclerotic plaques. The heart of the XCAT phantom was digitally replaced with the patient's heart. Motion-dependent activity distributions, attenuation maps, and fat-MR volumes of the heart, were generated using the XCAT cardiac and respiratory motion fields. A full Monte Carlo simulation using Siemens mMR's geometry was performed for each motion phase. Cardiac/respiratory motion fields were estimated using non-rigid registration of the transformed fat-MR volumes and incorporated directly into the system matrix of PET reconstruction along with motion-dependent attenuation maps. The proposed motion correction method was compared to conventional PET reconstruction techniques such as no motion correction, cardiac gating, and dual cardiac-respiratory gating. Compared to uncorrected reconstructions, fat-MR based motion compensation yielded an average improvement of plaque-to-background contrast of 29.6%, 43.7%, 57.2%, and 70.6% for true plaque-to-blood ratios of 10, 15, 20 and 25:1, respectively. Channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was used to quantify plaque detectability. CHO-SNR improvement ranged from 105% to 128% for fat-MR-based motion correction as compared to no motion correction. Likewise, CHO-SNR improvement ranged from 348% to 396% as compared to both cardiac and dual cardiac-respiratory gating approaches. Based on this study, our approach, a fat-MR based motion correction for coronary plaque PET imaging using simultaneous PET-MR, offers great potential for clinical practice. The ultimate performance and limitation of our approach, however, must be fully evaluated in patient studies.

  13. [Influence of the fluoride releasing dental materials on the bacterial flora of dental plaque].

    PubMed

    P?uciennik, Ma?gorzata; Sakowska, Danuta; Krzemi?ski, Zbigniew; Piatowska, Danuta

    2008-01-01

    The assessment of influence of silver-free, fluor releasing dental materials on dental plaque bacteria quantity. 17 patients were included into the study. 51 restorations were placed following manufacturers recommendations. Following materials were used: conventional glassionomer Ketac-Molar ESPE, resin modified glassionomer Fuji II LC GC and fluor containing composite Charisma Heraeus Kulzer Class V restorations were placed in following teeth of upper and lower jaw: canines, first bicuspids, second bicuspids. Sound enamel was a control. After 10 weeks the 72 hours old dental plaque was collected from surface of restorations and control using sterile probe. Total amount of 68 dental plaques were investigated. Each plaque was placed on scaled and sterile aluminum foil. The moist weight of dental plaque was scaled. Dental plaque was moved into 7 ml 0.85% NaCl solution reduced by cystein chlorine hydrogen and disintegrated by ultrasounds (power:100 Watt, wave amplitude: 5 micorm). The suspension of dental plaque was serially diluted from 10(-4) to 10(-5) in sterile 0,85% NaCl solution, and seeded with amount of 0.1 ml on appropriate base. In dental plaque trials the amount of cariogenic bacteria was calculated--Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, Veillonella and Neisseria, and also total amount of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria was measured. Microbiologic studies were performed in Institute of Microbiology, Medical University, ?d?. Statistical analysis of collected data was accomplished. In 72 hours old dental plaques collected from the surfaces of Ketac -Molar, Fuji II LC, Charisma after 10 weeks since being placed into the class V cavity, results show no statistically significant differences in the amount of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus spp., Lactobacillus spp., Veillonella spp., Neisseria spp, in total amount of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and in the quantity proportion of Streptococcus mutans versus Streptococcus spp. in comparison with control trail. Results show no statistically significant differences in the amount of listed above bacteria and in the proportion of Streptococcus mutans versus Streptococcus spp. in 72 hours old dental plaques collected from surfaces of investigated restorative materials. PMID:18819449

  14. Coronary Plaque Burden at Coronary CT Angiography in Asymptomatic Men and Women.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Karen; Kwan, Alan C; Lai, Shenghan; Lima, João A C; Vigneault, Davis; Sandfort, Veit; Pattanayak, Puskar; Ahlman, Mark A; Mallek, Marissa; Sibley, Christopher T; Bluemke, David A

    2015-10-01

    Purpose To assess the relationship between total, calcified, and noncalcified coronary plaque burdens throughout the entire coronary vasculature at coronary computed tomographic (CT) angiography in relationship to cardiovascular risk factors in asymptomatic individuals with low-to-moderate risk. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant study had institutional review board approval, and written informed consent was obtained. Two hundred two subjects were recruited to an ongoing prospective study designed to evaluate the effect of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors on atherosclerosis. Eligible subjects were asymptomatic individuals older than 55 years who were eligible for statin therapy. Coronary CT angiography was performed by using a 320-detector row scanner. Coronary wall thickness and plaque were evaluated in all epicardial coronary arteries greater than 2 mm in diameter. Images were analyzed by using dedicated software involving an adaptive lumen attenuation algorithm. Total plaque index (calcified plus noncalcified plaque) was defined as plaque volume divided by vessel length. Multivariable regression analysis was performed to determine the relationship between risk factors and plaque indexes. Results The mean age of the subjects was 65.5 years ± 6.9 (standard deviation) (36% women), and the median coronary artery calcium (CAC) score was 73 (interquartile range, 1-434). The total coronary plaque index was higher in men than in women (42.06 mm(2) ± 9.22 vs 34.33 mm(2) ± 8.35; P < .001). In multivariable analysis controlling for all risk factors, total plaque index remained higher in men than in women (by 5.01 mm(2); P = .03) and in those with higher simvastatin doses (by 0.44 mm(2)/10 mg simvastatin dose equivalent; P = .02). Noncalcified plaque index was positively correlated with systolic blood pressure (β = 0.80 mm(2)/10 mm Hg; P = .03), diabetes (β = 4.47 mm(2); P = .03), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol level (β = 0.04 mm(2)/mg/dL; P = .02); the association with LDL cholesterol level remained significant (P = .02) after additional adjustment for the CAC score. Conclusion LDL cholesterol level, systolic blood pressure, and diabetes were associated with noncalcified plaque burden at coronary CT angiography in asymptomatic individuals with low-to-moderate risk. (©) RSNA, 2015 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26035436

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Stabilize Atherosclerotic Vulnerable Plaque by Anti-Inflammatory Properties

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuang-shuang; Hu, Si-wang; Zhang, Qing-hua; Xia, Ai-xiang

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Formation and progression of atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque (VP) is the primary cause of many cardio-cerebrovascular diseases such as acute coronary syndrome and stroke. It has been reported that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) exhibit protective effects against many kinds of diseases including myocardial infarction. Here, we examined the effects of intravenous MSC infusion on a VP model and provide novel evidence of its influence as a therapy in this animal disease model. Subjects and methods Thirty healthy male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into a MSC, VP or stable plaque (SP) group (n = 10/group) and received high fat diet and cold-induced common carotid artery intimal injury with liquid nitrogen to form atherosclerotic plaques. Serum hs-CRP, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 levels were measured by ELISA at 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after MSC transplantation. The animals were sacrificed at 4 weeks after MSC transplantation. Lesions in the right common carotid were observed using H&E and Masson staining, and the fibrous cap/lipid core ratio of atherosclerotic plaques were calculated. The expression of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and matrix metalloproteinase 1, 2, 9 (MMP-1,2,9) in the plaque were detected using immunohistochemistry, and apoptotic cells in the plaques were detected by TUNEL. In addition, the level of TNF-α stimulated gene/protein 6 (TSG-6) mRNA and protein were measured by quantitative Real-Time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Results Two rabbits in the VP group died of lung infection and cerebral infarction respectively at 1 week after plaque injury by liquid nitrogen. Both H&E and Masson staining revealed that the plaques from the SP and MSC groups had more stable morphological structure and a larger fibrous cap/lipid core ratio than the VP group. Serum hs-CRP, TNF-α and IL-6 were significantly down-regulated, whereas IL-10 was significantly up-regulated in the MSC group compared with the VP group. .Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that NF-κB and MMP expression was reduced in the MSC and SP groups compared to the VP group. Cell apoptosis decreased significantly in both the MSC and SP groups in comparison to the VP group. TSG-6 mRNA and protein expression were higher in the plaques of the MSC group compared to the VP and SP groups. Conclusions Our study results suggest that MSC transplantation can effectively stabilize vulnerable plaques in atherosclerotic rabbits. This may potentially offer a new clinical application of MSC in atherosclerosis. PMID:26288013

  16. Butyrylcholinesterase is Associated with β-Amyloid Plaques in the Transgenic APPSWE/PSEN1dE9 Mouse Model of Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Darvesh, Sultan; Cash, Meghan K.; Reid, G. Andrew; Martin, Earl; Mitnitski, Arnold; Geula, Changiz

    2011-01-01

    Histochemical analysis of Alzheimer disease (AD) brain tissues indicates that butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) is present in β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques. The role of BuChE in AD pathology is unknown but an animal model developing similar BuChE-associated Aβ plaques could provide insights. The APPSWE/PSEN1dE9 mouse (ADTg), which develops Aβ plaques, was examined to determine if BuChE associates with these plaques, as in AD. We found that in mature ADTg mice, BuChE activity associated with Aβ plaques. Aβ-, thioflavin-S- and BuChE-positive plaques mainly accumulated in olfactory structures, cerebral cortex, hippocampal formation, amygdala and cerebellum. No plaques were stained for acetylcholinesterase activity. The distribution and abundance of plaque staining in ADTg closely resembled many aspects of plaque staining in AD. BuChE staining consistently showed fewer plaques than were detected with Aβ immunostaining but a greater number of plaques than were visualized with thioflavin-S. Double-labelling experiments demonstrated that all BuChE-positive plaques were Aβ-positive while only some BuChE-positive plaques were thioflavin-S-positive. These observations suggest that BuChE is associated with a subpopulation of Aβ plaques and may play a role in AD plaque maturation. Further study of this animal model could clarify the role of BuChE in AD pathology. PMID:22157615

  17. Predictors of change in carotid atherosclerotic plaque inflammation and burden as measured by 18-FDG-PET and MRI, respectively, in the dal-PLAQUE study

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Mark; Samber, Daniel; Bucerius, Jan; Tawakol, Ahmed; Kallend, David; Rudd, James H. F.; Abt, Markus; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2014-01-01

    Baseline predictors of response to treatment of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) with respect to vascular inflammation and atherosclerotic plaque burden are poorly understood. From post hoc analysis of the dal-PLAQUE study (NCT00655473), 18F–fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (18-FDG-PET) imaging and carotid black blood magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to track changes in these vascular parameters. Baseline demographics, imaging, and biomarkers were collected/measured in 130 patients with CHD or CHD risk-equivalents, and imaging follow-up at 6 months (PET) and 24 months (MRI) was performed. Using stepwise linear regression, predictors of change in carotid plaque inflammation by PET [target-to-background ratio (TBR), n = 92] and plaque burden by MRI [wall area (WA) and total vessel area (TVA), n = 89] were determined. Variables with p < 0.05 in multivariable models were considered independently significant. Interleukin-6, systolic blood pressure and standard deviation of wall thickness (WT) at baseline were independently positively associated with 18-FDG uptake (mean of maximum [MeanMax] TBR change over 6 months). Mean of mean TBR, phospholipase A2, apolipoprotein A-I, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein at baseline were independently negatively associated with MeanMax TBR change over 6 months. Mean WT and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) activity at baseline, and age, were independently associated with change in WA over 24 months. For TVA changes; mean WA and PAI-1 activity at baseline, age, and female gender were independent predictors. These findings may help determine patients most suitable for clinical trials employing plaque inflammation or burden changes as endpoints. PMID:24458953

  18. A mechanistic analysis of the role of microcalcifications in atherosclerotic plaque stability: potential implications for plaque rupture.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Natalia; Kelly-Arnold, Adreanne; Vengrenyuk, Yuliya; Laudier, Damien; Fallon, John T; Virmani, Renu; Cardoso, Luis; Weinbaum, Sheldon

    2012-09-01

    The role of microcalcifications (μCalcs) in the biomechanics of vulnerable plaque rupture is examined. Our laboratory previously proposed (Ref. 44), using a very limited tissue sample, that μCalcs embedded in the fibrous cap proper could significantly increase cap instability. This study has been greatly expanded. Ninety-two human coronary arteries containing 62 fibroatheroma were examined using high-resolution microcomputed tomography at 6.7-μm resolution and undecalcified histology with special emphasis on calcified particles <50 μm in diameter. Our results reveal the presence of thousands of μCalcs, the vast majority in lipid pools where they are not dangerous. However, 81 μCalcs were also observed in the fibrous caps of nine of the fibroatheroma. All 81 of these μCalcs were analyzed using three-dimensional finite-element analysis, and the results were used to develop important new clinical criteria for cap stability. These criteria include variation of the Young's modulus of the μCalc and surrounding tissue, μCalc size, and clustering. We found that local tissue stress could be increased fivefold when μCalcs were closely spaced, and the peak circumferential stress in the thinnest nonruptured cap (66 μm) if no μCalcs were present was only 107 kPa, far less than the proposed minimum rupture threshold of 300 kPa. These results and histology suggest that there are numerous μCalcs < 15 μm in the caps, not visible at 6.7-μm resolution, and that our failure to find any nonruptured caps between 30 and 66 μm is a strong indication that many of these caps contained μCalcs. PMID:22777419

  19. Comparison of erythritol and xylitol saliva stimulants in the control of dental plaque and mutans streptococci.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, K K; Isotupa, K P; Kivilompolo, T; Mäkinen, P L; Toivanen, J; Söderling, E

    2001-01-01

    The effect of 2-month usage of saliva-stimulating pastils containing either erythritol or xylitol was studied in a cohort of 30 subjects assigned to the respective polyol groups (n = 15). The daily consumption level of both polyols was 5.2 g, used in 5 daily chewing episodes. The mean weight of total plaque mass (collectable during a standard period of 3 min from all available tooth surfaces) was reduced significantly in the xylitol-group, while no such effect was observed in the erythritol-group. This reduction in plaque mass was accompanied by a significant reduction in the turbidity readings (A(660)) of aqueous plaque suspensions; no such effect was observed in the erythritol-group. However, plaque protein levels did not differ between baseline and endpoint in either polyol group. The plaque and salivary levels of Streptococcus mutans and plaque levels of total streptococci were reduced significantly in the xylitol-group, while no such effect was detected in the erythritol-group. However, either polyol regimen had no effect on plaque levels of S. sobrinus. The results suggest that systematic use of xylitol-containing saliva stimulants may be more effective in controlling some oral-hygiene-related and caries-associated parameters than similar use of erythritol-containing products. The results also speak for a special relationship between xylitol and S. mutans. However, owing to the great potential of erythritol as a caries-reducing agent -- based on the tetritol nature of erythritol -- the present laboratory results should be considered preliminary and subject to verifying clinical studies. PMID:11275673

  20. Angiopoietin-2 blocking antibodies reduce early atherosclerotic plaque development in mice

    PubMed Central

    Theelen, Thomas L.; Lappalainen, Jari P.; Sluimer, Judith C.; Gurzeler, Erika; Cleutjens, Jack P.; Gijbels, Marion J.; Biessen, Erik A.L.; Daemen, Mat J.A.P.; Alitalo, Kari; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    Objective Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) blocking agents are currently undergoing clinical trials for use in cancer treatment. Ang-2 has also been associated with rupture-prone atherosclerotic plaques in humans, suggesting a role for Ang-2 in plaque stability. Despite the availability of Ang-2 blocking agents, their clinical use is still lacking. Our aim was to establish if Ang-2 has a role in atheroma development and in the transition of subclinical to clinically relevant atherosclerosis. We investigated the effect of antibody-mediated Ang-2 blockage on atherogenesis after in a mouse model of atherosclerosis. Methods Hypercholesterolemic (low-density lipoprotein receptor−/− apolipoprotein B100/100) mice were subjected to high-cholesterol diet for eight weeks, one group with and one group without Ang-2 blocking antibody treatment during weeks 4–8.To enhance plaque development, a peri-adventitial collar was placed around the carotid arteries at the start of antibody treatment. Aortic root, carotid arteries and brachiocephalic arteries were analyzed to evaluate the effect of Ang-2 blockage on atherosclerotic plaque size and stable plaque characteristics. Results Anti-Ang-2 treatment reduced the size of fatty streaks in the brachiocephalic artery (−72%, p < 0.05). In addition, antibody-mediated Ang-2 blockage reduced plasma triglycerides (−27%, p < 0.05). In contrast, Ang-2 blockage did not have any effect on the size or composition (collagen content, macrophage percentage, adventitial microvessel density) of pre-existing plaques in the aortic root or collar-induced plaques in the carotid artery. Conclusions Ang-2 blockage was beneficial as it decreased fatty streak formation and plasma triglyceride levels, but had no adverse effect on pre-existing atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic mice. PMID:26062989

  1. Role of chemokines in promoting instability of coronary atherosclerotic plaques and the underlying molecular mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Z.X.; Li, B.; Li, C.R.; Zhang, Q.F.; Liu, Z.D.; Zhang, P.F.; Gu, X.F.; Luo, H.; Li, M.J.; Luo, H.S.; Ye, G.H.; Wen, F.L.

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the role of chemokines in promoting instability of coronary atherosclerotic plaques and the underlying molecular mechanism. Coronary angiography and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) were performed in 60 stable angina pectoris (SAP) patients and 60 unstable angina pectoris (UAP) patients. The chemotactic activity of monocytes in the 2 groups of patients was examined in Transwell chambers. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), regulated on activation in normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), and fractalkine in serum were examined with ELISA kits, and expression of MCP-1, RANTES, and fractalkine mRNA was examined with real-time PCR. In the SAP group, 92 plaques were detected with IVUS. In the UAP group, 96 plaques were detected with IVUS. The plaques in the UAP group were mainly lipid 51.04% (49/96) and the plaques in the SAP group were mainly fibrous 52.17% (48/92). Compared with the SAP group, the plaque burden and vascular remodeling index in the UAP group were significantly greater than in the SAP group (P<0.01). Chemotactic activity and the number of mobile monocytes in the UAP group were significantly greater than in the SAP group (P<0.01). Concentrations of hs-CRP, MCP-1, RANTES, and fractalkine in the serum of the UAP group were significantly higher than in the serum of the SAP group (P<0.05 or P<0.01), and expression of MCP-1, RANTES, and fractalkine mRNA was significantly higher than in the SAP group (P<0.05). MCP-1, RANTES, and fractalkine probably promote instability of coronary atherosclerotic plaque. PMID:25424368

  2. Role of chemokines in promoting instability of coronary atherosclerotic plaques and the underlying molecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Z X; Li, B; Li, C R; Zhang, Q F; Liu, Z D; Zhang, P F; Gu, X F; Luo, H; Li, M J; Luo, H S; Ye, G H; Wen, F L

    2015-02-01

    Our aim was to investigate the role of chemokines in promoting instability of coronary atherosclerotic plaques and the underlying molecular mechanism. Coronary angiography and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) were performed in 60 stable angina pectoris (SAP) patients and 60 unstable angina pectoris (UAP) patients. The chemotactic activity of monocytes in the 2 groups of patients was examined in Transwell chambers. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), regulated on activation in normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), and fractalkine in serum were examined with ELISA kits, and expression of MCP-1, RANTES, and fractalkine mRNA was examined with real-time PCR. In the SAP group, 92 plaques were detected with IVUS. In the UAP group, 96 plaques were detected with IVUS. The plaques in the UAP group were mainly lipid 51.04% (49/96) and the plaques in the SAP group were mainly fibrous 52.17% (48/92). Compared with the SAP group, the plaque burden and vascular remodeling index in the UAP group were significantly greater than in the SAP group (P<0.01). Chemotactic activity and the number of mobile monocytes in the UAP group were significantly greater than in the SAP group (P<0.01). Concentrations of hs-CRP, MCP-1, RANTES, and fractalkine in the serum of the UAP group were significantly higher than in the serum of the SAP group (P<0.05 or P<0.01), and expression of MCP-1, RANTES, and fractalkine mRNA was significantly higher than in the SAP group (P<0.05). MCP-1, RANTES, and fractalkine probably promote instability of coronary atherosclerotic plaque. PMID:25424368

  3. [Vulnerable plaque imaging: is it time for its application in clinical practice?].

    PubMed

    Prati, Francesco; Zimarino, Marco

    2010-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is a slowly progressive degenerative disease occasionally characterized by a sudden shift in its natural history with a rupture of the atherosclerotic plaque and consequent acute thrombosis and clinical events. In recent years, biological and morphological factors responsible for the instability of coronary plaques have been identified. According to the most frequent pathophysiological sequence the fibrous cap that separates the lipid core of the atherosclerotic plaque from the circulation, ruptures thus exposing the highly thrombogenic biochemical elements and resulting in acute thrombosis and possible vessel occlusion. In this scenario, plaque morphology plays a crucial role along with systemic responses, such as activation of inflammation and coagulation cascade, in the definition of the patients at risk of acute myocardial infarction. Recent advances in intracoronary imaging techniques capable of defining the morphological characteristics of vulnerable plaques with high resolution, have given us the reasonable expectation that, in the immediate future, critical information on the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and the direct causes of myocardial infarction can be obtained. It is conceivable that in the next few years these new high-resolution imaging techniques will be able to identify the crucial characteristics that define a vulnerable plaque that is likely to rupture. A scoring system designed to assess the specific risk of instability for any given atherosclerotic plaque could be generated with the purpose of identifying prospectively acute coronary events. In this perspective, optical coherence tomography is certainly the most promising imaging technique. Thus, the association of specific morphological information with systemic markers of vulnerability may allow in the near future to predict the true risk of acute myocardial infarction for each individual patient. PMID:20860156

  4. Assessment of coronary plaque collagen with polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giattina, Susanne D.; Courtney, Brian K.; Herz, Paul R.; Harman, Michelle; Shortkroff, Sonya; Stamper, Debra L.; Liu, Bin; Fujimoto, James G.; Brezinski, Mark E.

    2006-02-01

    Current evidence indicates that most plaques classified as vulnerable or ruptured plaques do not lead to unstable angina or myocardial infarction. Improved methods are needed to risk stratify plaques to identify those which lead to most acute coronary syndromes. Collagen depletion in the intima overlying lipid collections appears to be a critical component of unstable plaques. In this study, we use polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) for the assessment of coronary plaque collagen. Collagen is birefringent, meaning that different polarization states travel through it at different velocities. Changes in PS-OCT images are a measure of tissue birefringence. Twenty-two coronary artery segments were imaged with PS-OCT and analyzed by picrosirius staining (a measure of collagen intensity and fiber size) and trichrome blue. The regression plot between PS-OCT changes and measured collagen yielded a correlation coefficient value of 0.475 (p<0.002). Good correlation was noted between two blinded investigators both with respect to PS-OCT measurements as well as luminosity as assessed by picrosirius. The predictive value of a PS-OCT measurement of negligible birefringence (less than 33% change) for minimal collagen was 93% while the predictive value of high birefringence (greater than 66% change) for high collagen concentrations was 89%. The effect of fiber type (chemical composition) was minimal relative to the effect due to fiber concentration. The capability of PS-OCT to assess plaque collagen content, in addition to its ability to generate high resolution structural assessments, make it a potentially powerful technology for identifying high risk plaques.

  5. Outcomes of Iodine-125 Plaque Brachytherapy for Uveal Melanoma With Intraoperative Ultrasonography and Supplemental Transpupillary Thermotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Badiyan, Shahed N.; Rao, Rajesh C.; Apicelli, Anthony J.; Acharya, Sahaja; Verma, Vivek; Garsa, Adam A.; DeWees, Todd; Speirs, Christina K.; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose; Esthappan, Jacqueline; Grigsby, Perry W.; Harbour, J. William

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the impact on local tumor control of intraoperative ultrasonographic plaque visualization and selective application of transpupillary thermotherapy (TTT) in the treatment of posterior uveal melanoma with iodine-125 (I-125) episcleral plaque brachytherapy (EPB). Methods and Materials: Retrospective analysis of 526 patients treated with I-125 EPB for posterior uveal melanoma. Clinical features, dosimetric parameters, TTT treatments, and local tumor control outcomes were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazards and Kaplan-Meier life table method. Results: The study included 270 men (51%) and 256 women (49%), with a median age of 63 years (mean, 62 years; range, 16-91 years). Median dose to the tumor apex was 94.4 Gy (mean, 97.8; range, 43.9-183.9) and to the tumor base was 257.9 Gy (mean, 275.6; range, 124.2-729.8). Plaque tilt >1 mm away from the sclera at plaque removal was detected in 142 cases (27%). Supplemental TTT was performed in 72 patients (13.7%). One or 2 TTT sessions were required in 71 TTT cases (98.6%). After a median follow-up of 45.9 months (mean, 53.4 months; range, 6-175 months), local tumor recurrence was detected in 19 patients (3.6%). Local tumor recurrence was associated with lower dose to the tumor base (P=.02). Conclusions: Ultrasound-guided plaque localization of I-125 EPB is associated with excellent local tumor control. Detection of plaque tilt by ultrasonography at plaque removal allows supplemental TTT to be used in patients at potentially higher risk for local recurrence while sparing the majority of patients who are at low risk. Most patients require only 1 or 2 TTT sessions.

  6. Plaque-Associated Local Toxicity Increases over the Clinical Course of Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Betensky, Rebecca A; Frosch, Matthew P; Hyman, Bradley T

    2016-02-01

    Amyloid (senile) plaques, one of the two pathologic hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD), are associated with dystrophic neurites and glial responses, both astrocytic and microglial. Although plaque burden remains relatively stable through the clinical course of AD, whether these features of local plaque toxicity continue to worsen over the course of the disease is unclear. We performed an unbiased plaque-centered quantification of SMI312(+) dystrophic neurites, GFAP(+) reactive astrocytes, and IBA1(+) and CD68(+) activated microglia in randomly selected dense-core (Thioflavin-S(+)) plaques from the temporal neocortex of 40 AD subjects with a symptom duration ranging from 4 to 20 years, and nine nondemented control subjects with dense-core plaques. Dystrophic neurites (Kendall τ = 0.34, P = 0.001), reactive astrocytes (Kendall τ = 0.30, P = 0.003), and CD68(+) (Kendall τ = 0.48, P < 0.0001), but not IBA1 microglia (Kendall τ = 0.045, P = 0.655), exhibited a significant positive correlation with symptom duration. When excluding control subjects, only the positive association between CD68(+) microglia and symptom duration remained significant (Kendall τ = 0.39, P = 0.0003). The presence of the APOEε4 allele did not affect these results. We conclude that plaques exert an increasing toxicity in the surrounding neuropil over the clinical course of AD, thereby potentially contributing to cognitive decline. PMID:26687817

  7. Identification of High-Risk Plaques by MRI and Fluorescence Imaging in a Rabbit Model of Atherothrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Ning; Baik, Fred; Pham, Tuan; Phinikaridou, Alkystis; Giordano, Nick; Friedman, Beth; Whitney, Michael; Nguyen, Quyen T.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Hamilton, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The detection of atherosclerotic plaques at risk for disruption will be greatly enhanced by molecular probes that target vessel wall biomarkers. Here, we test if fluorescently-labeled Activatable Cell Penetrating Peptides (ACPPs) could differentiate stable plaques from vulnerable plaques that disrupt, forming a luminal thrombus. Additionally, we test the efficacy of a combined ACPP and MRI technique for identifying plaques at high risk of rupture. Methods and Results In an atherothrombotic rabbit model, disrupted plaques were identified with in vivo MRI and co-registered in the same rabbit aorta with the in vivo uptake of ACPPs, cleaved by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) or thrombin. ACPP uptake, mapped ex vivo in whole aortas, was higher in disrupted compared to non-disrupted plaques. Specifically, disrupted plaques demonstrated a 4.5~5.0 fold increase in fluorescence enhancement, while non-disrupted plaques showed only a 2.2~2.5 fold signal increase. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis indicates that both ACPPs (MMP and thrombin) show high specificity (84.2% and 83.2%) and sensitivity (80.0% and 85.7%) in detecting disrupted plaques. The detection power of ACPPs was improved when combined with the MRI derived measure, outward remodeling ratio. Conclusions Our targeted fluorescence ACPP probes distinguished disrupted plaques from stable plaques with high sensitivity and specificity. The combination of anatomic, MRI-derived predictors for disruption and ACPP uptake can further improve the power for identification of high-risk plaques and suggests future development of ACPPs with molecular MRI as a readout. PMID:26448434

  8. Methods for labeling .beta.-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles

    DOEpatents

    Barrio, Jorge R.; Petric, Andrej; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Small, Gary W.; Cole, Gregory M.; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2001-01-01

    A method for labeling .beta.-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in vivo and in vitro, comprises contacting a compound of formula (I): ##STR1## with mammalian tissue. In formula (I), R.sub.1 is selected from the group consisting of --C(O)-alkyl, --C(O)-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C(O)O-alkyl, --C(O)O-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C.dbd.C(CN).sub.2 -alkyl, --C.dbd.C(CN).sub.2 -alkylenyl-R.sub.4 , ##STR2## R.sub.4 is a radical selected from the group consisting of alkyl, substituted alkyl, aryl and substituted aryl; R.sub.5, is a radical selected from the group consisting of --NH.sub.2, --OH, --SH, --NH-alkyl, --NHR.sub.4, --NH-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --O-alkyl, --O-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --S-alkyl, and --S-alkylenyl-R.sub.4 ; R.sub.6 is a radical selected from the group consisting of --CN, --COOH, --C(O)O-alkyl, --C(O)O-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C(O)-alkyl, --C(O)-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C(O)-halogen, --C(O)NH , --C(O)NH-alkyl, --C(O)NH-alkylenyl-R.sub.4 ; R.sub.7 is a radical selected from the group consisting of O, NH, and S; and R.sub.8 is N, O or S. R.sub.2 and R.sub.3 are each independently selected from the group consisting of alkyl and alkylenyl-R.sub.10, wherein R.sub.10 is selected from the group consisting of --OH, --OTs, halogen, spiperone, spiperone ketal and spiperone-3-yl. Alternatively, R.sub.2 and R.sub.3 together form a heterocyclic ring, optionally substituted with at least one radical selected from the group consisting of alkyl, alkoxy, OH, OTs, halogen, alkylenyl-R.sub.10, carbonyl, spiperone, spiperone ketal and spiperone-3-yl. In the compounds of formula (I), one or more of the hydrogen, halogen or carbon atoms can, optionally, be replaced with a radiolabel.

  9. Methods for labeling .beta.-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles

    DOEpatents

    Barrio, Jorge R.; Petric, Andrej; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Small, Gary W.; Cole, Gregory M.; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2003-12-09

    A method for labeling .beta.-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in vivo and in vitro, comprises contacting a compound of formula (I): ##STR1## with mammalian tissue. In formula (I), R.sub.1 is selected from the group consisting of --C(O)-alkyl, --C(O)-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C(O)O-alkyl, --C(O)O-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C.dbd.C(CN).sub.2 -alkyl, --C.dbd.C(CN).sub.2 -alkylenyl-R.sub.4, ##STR2## R.sub.4 is a radical selected from the group consisting of alkyl, substituted alkyl, aryl and substituted aryl; R.sub.5 is a radical selected from the group consisting of --NH.sub.2, --OH, --SH, --NH-alkyl, --NHR.sub.4, --NH-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --O-alkyl, --O-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --S-alkyl, and --S-alkylenyl-R.sub.4 ; R.sub.6 is a radical selected from the group consisting of --CN, --COOH, --C(O)O-alkyl, --C(O)O-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C(O)-alkyl, --C(O)-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C(O)-halogen, --C(O)NH, --C(O)NH-alkyl, --C(O)NH-alkylenyl-R.sub.4 ; R.sub.7 is a radical selected from the group consisting of O, NH, and S; and R.sub.8 is N, O or S. R.sub.2 and R.sub.3 are each independently selected from the group consisting of alkyl and alkylenyl-R.sub.10, wherein R.sub.10 is selected from the group consisting of --OH, --OTs, halogen, spiperone, spiperone ketal and spiperone-3-yl. Alternatively, R.sub.2 and R.sub.3 together form a heterocyclic ring, optionally substituted with at least one radical selected from the group consisting of alkyl, alkoxy, OH, OTs, halogen, alkylenyl-R.sub.10, carbonyl, spiperone, spiperone ketal and spiperone-3-yl. In the compounds of formula (I), one or more of the hydrogen, halogen or carbon atoms can, optionally, be replaced with a radiolabel.

  10. Compositions for labeling .beta.-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles

    DOEpatents

    Barrio, Jorge R.; Petric, Andrej; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Small, Gary W.; Cole, Gregory M.; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2008-03-11

    Compositions useful for labeling .beta.-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are provided. The compositions comprises compounds of formula (I): ##STR00001## wherein R.sub.1 is selected from the group consisting of --C(O)-alkyl, --C(O)-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C(O)O-alkyl, --C(O)O-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C.dbd.C(CN).sub.2-alkyl, --C.dbd.C(CN).sub.2-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, ##STR00002## wherein R.sub.4 is a radical selected from the group consisting of alkyl, substituted alkyl, aryl and substituted aryl; R.sub.5 is a radical selected from the group consisting of --NH.sub.2, --OH, --SH, --NH-alkyl, --NHR.sub.4, --NH-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --O-alkyl, --O-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --S-alkyl, and --S-alkylenyl-R.sub.4; R.sub.6 is a radical selected from the group consisting of --CN, --COOH, --C(O)O-alkyl, --C(O)O-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C(O)-alkyl, --C(O)-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C(O)-halogen, --C(O)NH-alkyl, --C(O)NH-alkylenyl-R.sub.4 and --C(O)NH.sub.2; R.sub.7 is a radical selected from the group consisting of O, NH, and S; and R.sub.8 is N, O or S; and R.sub.2 is selected from the group consisting of alkyl and alkylenyl-R.sub.10 and R.sub.3 is alkylenyl-R.sub.10, wherein R.sub.10 is selected from the group consisting of --OH, --OTs, halogen, spiperone, spiperone ketal, and spiperone-3-yl, or R.sub.2 and R.sub.3 together form a heterocyclic ring, optionally substituted with at least one radical selected from the group consisting of alkyl, alkoxy, OH, OTs, halogen, alkyl-R.sub.10, carbonyl, spiperone, spiperone ketal and spiperone-3-yl, and further wherein one or more of the hydrogen, halogen or carbon atoms are optionally replaced with a radiolabel.

  11. A Unified Theory on the Pathogenesis of Randall’s Plaques and Plugs

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saeed R.; Canales, Benjamin K.

    2015-01-01

    Kidney stones develop attached to sub-epithelial plaques of calcium phosphate (CaP) crystals (termed Randall’s plaque) and/or form as a result of occlusion of the openings of the Ducts of Bellini by stone forming crystals (Randall’s plugs). These plaques and plugs eventually extrude into the urinary space, acting as a nidus for crystal overgrowth and stone formation. To better understand these regulatory mechanisms and the pathophysiology of idiopathic calcium stone disease, this review provides in-depth descriptions of the morphology and potential origins of these plaques and plugs, summarizes existing animal models of renal papillary interstitial deposits, and describes factors that are believed to regulate plaque formation and calcium overgrowth. Based on evidence provided within this review and from the vascular calcification literature, we propose a “unified” theory of plaque formation – one similar to pathological biomineralization observed elsewhere in the body. Abnormal urinary conditions (hypercalciuria, hyperoxaluria, hypocitraturia), renal stress or trauma, and perhaps even the normal aging process leads to transformation of renal epithelial cells into an osteblastic phenotype. With this de-differentiation comes an increased production of bone specific proteins (i.e. osteopontin), a reduction in crystallization inhibitors (such as fetuin and matrix-gla-protein), and creation of matrix vesicles, which support nucleation of CaP crystals. These small deposits promote aggregation and calcification of surrounding collagen. Mineralization continues by calcification of membranous cellular degradation products and other fibers until the plaque reaches the papillary epithelium. Through the activity of matrix metalloproteinases or perhaps by brute physical force produced by the large subepithelial crystalline mass, the surface is breached and further stone growth occurs by organic matrix-associated nucleation of CaOx or by the transformation of the outer layer of CaP crystals into CaOx crystals. Should this theory hold true, developing an understanding of the cellular mechanisms involved in progression of a small, basic interstitial plaque to that of an expanding, penetrating plaque could assist in the development of new therapies for stone prevention. PMID:25119506

  12. Dual-mode ultrasound arrays for image-guided targeting of atheromatous plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, John R.; Casper, Andrew J.; Liu, Dalong; Haritonova, Alyona; Shehata, Islam A.; Troutman, Mitchell; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2012-11-01

    A feasibility study was undertaken in order to investigate alternative noninvasive treatment options for atherosclerosis. In particular, the aim of this study was to investigate the potential use of Dual-Mode Ultrasound Arrays (DMUAs) for image guided treatment of atheromatous plaques. DMUAs offer a unique treatment paradigm for image-guided surgery allowing for robust image-based identification of tissue targets for localized application of HIFU. In this study we present imaging and therapeutic results form a 3.5 MHz, 64-element fenestrated prototype DMUA for targeting lesions in the femoral artery of familial hypercholesterolemic (FH) swine. Before treatment, diagnostic ultrasound was used to verify the presence of plaque in the femoral artery of the swine. Images obtained with the DMUA and a diagnostic (HST 15-8) transducer housed in the fenestration were analyzed and used for guidance in targeting of the plaque. Discrete therapeutic shots with an estimated focal intensity of 4000-5600 W/cm2 and 500-2000 msec duration were performed at several planes in the plaque. During therapy, pulsed HIFU was interleaved with single transmit focus imaging from the DMUA and M2D imaging from the diagnostic transducer for further analysis of lesion formation. After therapy, the swine's were recovered and later sacrificed after 4 and 7 days for histological analysis of lesion formation. At sacrifice, the lower half of the swine was perfused and the femoral artery with adjoining muscle was fixed and stained with H&E to characterize HIFU-induced lesions. Histology has confirmed that localized thermal lesion formation within the plaque was achieved according to the planned lesion maps. Furthermore, the damage was confined to the plaque tissue without damage to the intima. These results offer the promise of a new treatment potentially suited for vulnerable plaques. The results also provide the first real-time demonstration of DMUA technology in targeting fine tissue structures for precise lesion formation in the presence or arterial pulsation and tissue motion. In this paper, we show results from targeting both proximal and distal sides of the vessel wall with a series of 5 - 7 discrete shots in each plane (typically three planes per plaque). Experiments to demonstrate a full treatment forming contiguous lesion within the target plaque are currently underway.

  13. Noninvasive In Vivo Characterization of Human Carotid Plaques with Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Ultrasound: Comparison with Histology Following Endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Czernuszewicz, Tomasz J.; Homeister, Jonathon W.; Caughey, Melissa C.; Farber, Mark A.; Fulton, Joseph J.; Ford, Peter F.; Marston, William A.; Vallabhaneni, Raghuveer; Nichols, Timothy C.; Gallippi, Caterina M.

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke from thromboembolic sources is linked to carotid artery atherosclerotic disease with a trend toward medical management in asymptomatic patients. Extent of disease is currently diagnosed by noninvasive imaging techniques that measure luminal stenosis, but it has been suggested that a better biomarker for determining risk of future thromboembolic events is plaque morphology and composition. Specifically, plaques that are composed of mechanically-soft lipid/necrotic regions covered by thin fibrous caps are the most vulnerable to rupture. An ultrasound technique that noninvasively interrogates the mechanical properties of soft tissue, called acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging, has been developed as a new modality for atherosclerotic plaque characterization using phantoms and atherosclerotic pigs, but the technique has yet to be validated in vivo in humans. In this preliminary study, in vivo ARFI imaging is presented in a case-study format from four patients undergoing clinically-indicated carotid endarterectomy and compared to histology. In two type Va plaques, characterized by lipid/necrotic cores covered by fibrous caps, mean ARFI displacements in focal regions were high relative to the surrounding plaque material, suggesting soft features covered by stiffer layers within the plaques. In two type Vb plaques, characterized by heavy calcification, mean ARFI peak displacements were low relative to the surrounding plaque and arterial wall, suggesting stiff tissue. This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility and challenges of transcutaneous ARFI for characterizing the material and structural composition of carotid atherosclerotic plaques via mechanical properties, in humans, in vivo. PMID:25619778

  14. The diversity and abundance of As(III) oxidizers on root iron plaque is critical for arsenic bioavailability to rice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Min; Li, Fangbai; Liu, Chuanping; Wu, Weijian

    2015-01-01

    Iron plaque is a strong adsorbent on rice roots, acting as a barrier to prevent metal uptake by rice. However, the role of root iron plaque microbes in governing metal redox cycling and metal bioavailability is unknown. In this study, the microbial community structure on the iron plaque of rice roots from an arsenic-contaminated paddy soil was explored using high-throughput next-generation sequencing. The microbial composition and diversity of the root iron plaque were significantly different from those of the bulk and rhizosphere soils. Using the aoxB gene as an identifying marker, we determined that the arsenite-oxidizing microbiota on the iron plaque was dominated by Acidovorax and Hydrogenophaga-affiliated bacteria. More importantly, the abundance of arsenite-oxidizing bacteria (AsOB) on the root iron plaque was significantly negatively correlated with the arsenic concentration in the rice root, straw and grain, indicating that the microbes on the iron plaque, particularly the AsOB, were actively catalyzing arsenic transformation and greatly influencing metal uptake by rice. This exploratory research represents a preliminary examination of the microbial community structure of the root iron plaque formed under arsenic pollution and emphasizes the importance of the root iron plaque environment in arsenic biogeochemical cycling compared with the soil-rhizosphere biotope. PMID:26324258

  15. Ultrasound-guided imaging of junctional adhesion molecule-A-targeted microbubbles identifies vulnerable plaque in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Jun; Bai, Dan-Na; Du, Jing-Xi; Jin, Liang; Ma, Jing; Yang, Jia-Lei; Cai, Wen-Bin; Feng, Yang; Xing, Chang-Yang; Yuan, Li-Jun; Duan, Yun-You

    2016-07-01

    Identification of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques by imaging the molecular characteristics is intensively studied recently, in which verification of specific markers is the critical step. JAM-A, a junctional membrane protein, is involved in the plaque formation, while it is unknown whether it can serve as a marker for vulnerable plaques. Vulnerable and stable plaques were created in rabbits with high cholesterol diet with or without partial ligation of carotid artery respectively. Significant higher JAM-A expression was found in vulnerable plaques than that in stable plaques. Furthermore, JAM-A was not only expressed in the endothelium, but also abundantly expressed in CD68-positive area. Next, JAM-A antibody conjugated microbubbles (MBJAM-A) or control IgG-conjugated microbubbles (MBC) were developed by conjugating the biotinylated antibodies to the streptavidin modified microbubbles, and visualization by contrast-enhance ultrasound (CEUS). Signal intensity of MBJAM-A was substantially enhanced and prolonged in the vulnerable plaque and some of the MBJAM-A was found colocalized with CD68 positive macrophages. In addition, cell model revealed that MBJAM-A were able to be phagocytized by activated macrophages. Taken together, we have found that increase of JAM-A serves as a marker for vulnerable plaques and targeted CEUS would be possibly a novel non-invasive molecular imaging method for plaque vulnerability. PMID:27088407

  16. Application of IR and NIR fiber optic imaging in thermographic and spectroscopic diagnosis of atherosclerotic vulnerable plaques: preliminary experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghavi, Morteza; Khan, Tania; Gu, Bujin; Soller, Babs R.; Melling, Peter; Asif, Mohammed; Gul, Khawar; Madjid, Mohammad; Casscells, S. W.; Willerson, James T.

    2000-12-01

    Despite major advances in cardiovascular science and technology during the past three decades, approximately half of all myocardial infarctions and sudden deaths occur unexpectedly. It is widely accepted that coronary atherosclerotic plaques and thrombotic complications resulting from their rupture or erosion are the underlying causes of this major health problem. The majority of these vulnerable plaques exhibit active inflammation, a large necrotic lipid core, a thin fibrous cap, and confer a stenosis of less than 70%. These lesions are not detectable by stress testing or coronary angiography. Our group is exploring the possibility of a functional classification based on physiological variables such as plaque temperature, pH, oxygen consumption, lactate production etc. We have shown that heat accurately locates the inflamed plaques. We also demonstrated human atherosclerotic plaques are heterogeneous with regard to pH and hot plaques and are more likely to be acidic. To develop a nonsurgical method for locating the inflamed plaques, we are developing both IR fiber optic imaging and NIR spectroscopic systems in our laboratory to detect hot and acidic plaque in atherosclerotic arterial walls. Our findings introduce the possibility of an isolated/combined IR and NIR fiber optic catheter that can bring new insight into functional assessment of atherosclerotic plaque and thereby detection of active and inflamed lesions responsible for heart attacks and strokes.

  17. Plaques from different individuals yield different microbiota responses to oral-antiseptic treatment.

    PubMed

    Filoche, Sara K; Soma, Dennes; van Bekkum, Margo; Sissons, Chris H

    2008-10-01

    Dental caries is a polymicrobial disease and complicated to treat. Understanding the microbiota responses to treatment from different individuals is a key factor in developing effective treatments. The aim of this study was to investigate the 24-h posttreatment effect of two oral antiseptics (chlorhexidine and Listerine) on species composition of microplate plaque biofilms that had been initiated from the saliva of five different donors and grown in both 0.15% and 0.5% sucrose. Plaque composition was analyzed using checkerboard DNA : DNA hybridization analysis, which comprised of a panel of 40 species associated with oral health and disease. The supernatant pH of the plaques grown in 0.15% sucrose ranged from 4.3 to 6 and in 0.5% sucrose, it ranged from 3.8 to 4. Plaque biomass was largely unaffected by either antiseptic. Each donor had a different salivary microbial profile, differentiating according to the prevalence of either caries or periodontal/anaerobic pathogens. Despite similar plaque microbiota compositions being elicited through the sucrose growth conditions, microbiota responses to chlorhexidine and Listerine differentiated according to the donor. These findings indicate that efficacious caries treatments would depend on the responses of an individual's microbiota, which may differ from person to person. PMID:18647353

  18. PET Imaging of Atherosclerotic Disease: Advancing Plaque Assessment from Anatomy to Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Evans, Nicholas R; Tarkin, Jason M; Chowdhury, Mohammed M; Warburton, Elizabeth A; Rudd, James H F

    2016-06-01

    Atherosclerosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. It is now widely recognized that the disease is more than simply a flow-limiting process and that the atheromatous plaque represents a nidus for inflammation with a consequent risk of plaque rupture and atherothrombosis, leading to myocardial infarction or stroke. However, widely used conventional clinical imaging techniques remain anatomically focused, assessing only the degree of arterial stenosis caused by plaques. Positron emission tomography (PET) has allowed the metabolic processes within the plaque to be detected and quantified directly. The increasing armory of radiotracers has facilitated the imaging of distinct metabolic aspects of atherogenesis and plaque destabilization, including macrophage-mediated inflammatory change, hypoxia, and microcalcification. This imaging modality has not only furthered our understanding of the disease process in vivo with new insights into mechanisms but has also been utilized as a non-invasive endpoint measure in the development of novel treatments for atherosclerotic disease. This review provides grounding in the principles of PET imaging of atherosclerosis, the radioligands in use and in development, its research and clinical applications, and future developments for the field. PMID:27108163

  19. Fully automated carotid plaque segmentation in combined contrast-enhanced and B-mode ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Akkus, Zeynettin; Carvalho, Diego D B; van den Oord, Stijn C H; Schinkel, Arend F L; Niessen, Wiro J; de Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Antonius F W; Klein, Stefan; Bosch, Johan G

    2015-02-01

    Carotid plaque segmentation in B-mode ultrasound (BMUS) and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is crucial to the assessment of plaque morphology and composition, which are linked to plaque vulnerability. Segmentation in BMUS is challenging because of noise, artifacts and echo-lucent plaques. CEUS allows better delineation of the lumen but contains artifacts and lacks tissue information. We describe a method that exploits the combined information from simultaneously acquired BMUS and CEUS images. Our method consists of non-rigid motion estimation, vessel detection, lumen-intima segmentation and media-adventitia segmentation. The evaluation was performed in training (n = 20 carotids) and test (n = 28) data sets by comparison with manually obtained ground truth. The average root-mean-square errors in the training and test data sets were comparable for media-adventitia (411 ± 224 and 393 ± 239 μm) and for lumen-intima (362 ± 192 and 388 ± 200 μm), and were comparable to inter-observer variability. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first method to perform fully automatic carotid plaque segmentation using combined BMUS and CEUS. PMID:25542485

  20. Is the red fluorescence of dental plaque related to its cariogenicity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittar, Daniela G.; Pontes, Laura Regina A.; Calvo, Ana Flávia B.; Novaes, Tatiane F.; Braga, Mariana M.; Freitas, Patrícia M.; Tabchoury, Cinthia P. M.; Mendes, Fausto M.

    2014-06-01

    It has been speculated that the red fluorescence emitted by dental plaque could be related to its cariogenicity. To test this hypothesis, we designed this crossover in situ study, with two experimental phases of 14 days each. Seventeen volunteers, wearing a palatal appliance with bovine enamel blocks, were instructed to drip a 20% sucrose solution (experimental group) or purified water (control group) onto the enamel blocks eight times daily. The specimens were removed after 4, 7, 10, and 14 days, and the red fluorescence of dental plaque formed on the enamel blocks was assessed using a quantitative light-induced fluorescence device. After the plaque removal, surface and cross-sectional microhardness tests were performed to assess the mineral loss. The comparisons were made by a multilevel linear regression analysis. We observed a significant increase in the red fluorescence of the dental plaque after longer periods of formation, but this trend was verified in both groups. The mineral loss assessed by the microhardness techniques, contrariwise, showed a significant increase only in the experimental group. In conclusion, the red fluorescence emitted by the dental plaque indicates a mature biofilm, but this fact is not necessarily associated with its cariogenicity.

  1. Diminished Perisomatic GABAergic Terminals on Cortical Neurons Adjacent to Amyloid Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Marin, Virginia; Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Rodriguez, José-Rodrigo; Boluda, Susana; Muntane, Gerard; Ferrer, Isidro; DeFelipe, Javier

    2009-01-01

    One of the main pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the accumulation of plaques in the cerebral cortex, which may appear either in the neuropil or in direct association with neuronal somata. Since different axonal systems innervate the dendritic (mostly glutamatergic) and perisomatic (mostly GABAergic) regions of neurons, the accumulation of plaques in the neuropil or associated with the soma might produce different alterations to synaptic circuits. We have used a variety of conventional light, confocal and electron microscopy techniques to study their relationship with neuronal somata in the cerebral cortex from AD patients and APP/PS1 transgenic mice. The main finding was that the membrane surfaces of neurons (mainly pyramidal cells) in contact with plaques lack GABAergic perisomatic synapses. Since these perisomatic synapses are thought to exert a strong influence on the output of pyramidal cells, their loss may lead to the hyperactivity of the neurons in contact with plaques. These results suggest that plaques modify circuits in a more selective manner than previously thought. PMID:19949482

  2. Lessons learned from psoriatic plaques concerning mechanisms of tissue repair, remodeling, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nickoloff, Brian J; Bonish, Brian K; Marble, Deborah J; Schriedel, Kellean A; DiPietro, Luisa A; Gordon, Kenneth B; Lingen, Mark W

    2006-09-01

    Following injury, skin establishes a balance between too little inflammation increasing risk of infection, and excessive inflammation contributing to delayed wound healing and scarring. Mounting evidence indicates both initiation and termination of inflammation involve active mechanisms. Not only does inflammation itself seem to be a paradox because inflammatory responses are both essential and potentially detrimental, but one chronic inflammatory skin disease (e.g. psoriasis) presents additional paradoxes. While plaques share several factors with wound healing, two understudied and puzzling aspects include why do not inflamed plaques more frequently transform?; and why do not plaques result in scarring? To get at these questions, we review responses involved in wound repair. Oral mucosa was probed because, like fetal skin, wound repair is characterized by its rapidity, low inflammation, and scarless resolution. Active roles for macrophages as both initiators and terminators of inflammation are highlighted. Therapeutic implications are discussed regarding psoriasis and pyoderma gangrenosum. Based on biochemical and immunohistochemical considerations linking psoriatic plaques to hard palate, a novel metaplastic model is presented. We hypothesize saliva and chronic trauma contribute to a constitutive epithelial program where keratinocyte proliferation is more intense prior to differentiation, accompanied by keratin 16 expression in hard palate, thereby resembling plaques. Rather than viewing psoriasis as a nonspecific response to inflammation, we postulate a metaplastic switch by which prepsoriatic skin is converted to a distinct adult tissue type resembling hard palate. In summary, many lessons can be learned by focusing on complex processes involved in regulation of inflammation, tissue repair, and remodeling. PMID:17069007

  3. Dietary supplementation with resveratrol reduces plaque pathology in a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Karuppagounder, Saravanan S; Pinto, John T; Xu, Hui; Chen, Huan-Lian; Beal, M Flint; Gibson, Gary E

    2009-02-01

    Resveratrol, a polyphenol found in red wine, peanuts, soy beans, and pomegranates, possesses a wide range of biological effects. Since resveratrol's properties seem ideal for treating neurodegenerative diseases, its ability to diminish amyloid plaques was tested. Mice were fed clinically feasible dosages of resveratrol for forty-five days. Neither resveratrol nor its conjugated metabolites were detectable in brain. Nevertheless, resveratrol diminished plaque formation in a region specific manner. The largest reductions in the percent area occupied by plaques were observed in medial cortex (-48%), striatum (-89%) and hypothalamus (-90%). The changes occurred without detectable activation of SIRT-1 or alterations in APP processing. However, brain glutathione declined 21% and brain cysteine increased 54%. The increased cysteine and decreased glutathione may be linked to the diminished plaque formation. This study supports the concept that onset of neurodegenerative disease may be delayed or mitigated with use of dietary chemo-preventive agents that protect against beta-amyloid plaque formation and oxidative stress. PMID:19041676

  4. Plaque Rupture and Thrombosis: the Value of the Atherosclerotic Rabbit Model in Defining the Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Abela, Oliver G; Ahsan, Chowdhury H; Alreefi, Fadi; Salehi, Negar; Baig, Imran; Janoudi, Abed; Abela, George S

    2016-06-01

    Persistent inflammation and mechanical injury associated with cholesterol crystal accretion within atherosclerotic plaques typically precedes plaque disruption (rupture and/or erosion) and thrombosis-often the terminal events of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. To elucidate the mechanisms of these events, the atherosclerotic rabbit model provides a unique and powerful tool that facilitates studies of atherogenesis starting with plaque buildup to eventual disruption. Examination of human coronary arteries obtained from patients who died with myocardial infarction demonstrates evidence of cholesterol crystals perforating the plaque cap and intimal surface of the arterial wall that can lead to rupture. These observations were made possible by omitting ethanol, an avid lipid solvent, from the tissue processing steps. Importantly, the atherosclerotic rabbit model exhibits a similar pathology of cholesterol crystals perforating the intimal surface as seen in ruptured human plaques. Local and systemic inflammatory responses in the model are also similar to those observed in humans. The strong parallel between the rabbit and human pathology validates the atherosclerotic rabbit model as a predictor of human pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Thus, the atherosclerotic rabbit model can be used with confidence to evaluate diagnostic imaging and efficacy of novel anti-atherosclerotic therapy. PMID:27091328

  5. Potential role of ixekizumab in the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Vicky; Dao, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Background Psoriasis is a debilitating autoimmune skin disease that affects 2%–3% of the world’s population. Patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis suffer from a decreased quality of life as well as comorbidities. Newer biological agents have been shown to be more effective than traditional therapies. In this article, we assess the potential role of ixekizumab, an anti-interleukin (IL)-17 antibody, in treating moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. Method We reviewed PubMed for articles regarding ixekizumab and the epidemiology and management of plaque psoriasis. Results In a Phase I clinical trial, treatment with ixekizumab resulted in both clinical and histopathologic improvement of psoriasis, which suggests that IL-17 may be a key driver in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. In a Phase II clinical trial, treatment with ixekizumab resulted in rapid clinical improvement of psoriasis, which lends further support to its role as an effective treatment for patients with chronic moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. Reductions in Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) score are comparable to those associated with currently marketed biologics. Conclusion Literature concerning the effects of ixekizumab on chronic moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis is currently limited to two clinical trials. Results suggest that ixekizumab shows great therapeutic promise. However, more large-scale and long-term trials are needed to establish safety and efficacy. PMID:23515267

  6. Modeling of Mechanical Stress Exerted by Cholesterol Crystallization on Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Dongyao; Yu, Xiaojun; Chen, Si; Liu, Xinyu; Tang, Hongying; Wang, Xianghong; Liu, Linbo

    2016-01-01

    Plaque rupture is the critical cause of cardiovascular thrombosis, but the detailed mechanisms are not fully understood. Recent studies have found abundant cholesterol crystals in ruptured plaques, and it has been proposed that the rapid expansion of cholesterol crystals in a limited space during crystallization may contribute to plaque rupture. To evaluate the effect of cholesterol crystal growth on atherosclerotic plaques, we modeled the expansion of cholesterol crystals during the crystallization process in the necrotic core and estimated the stress on the thin cap with different arrangements of cholesterol crystals. We developed a two-dimensional finite element method model of atherosclerotic plaques containing expanding cholesterol crystals and investigated the effect of the magnitude and distribution of crystallization on the peak circumferential stress born by the cap. Using micro-optical coherence tomography (μOCT), we extracted the cross-sectional geometric information of cholesterol crystals in human atherosclerotic aorta tissue ex vivo and applied the information to the model. The results demonstrate that (1) the peak circumference stress is proportionally dependent on the cholesterol crystal growth; (2) cholesterol crystals at the cap shoulder impose the highest peak circumference stress; and (3) spatial distributions of cholesterol crystals have a significant impact on the peak circumference stress: evenly distributed cholesterol crystals exert less peak circumferential stress on the cap than concentrated crystals. PMID:27149381

  7. Multi-analyte profiling in human carotid atherosclerosis uncovers pro-inflammatory macrophage programming in plaques.

    PubMed

    Shalhoub, Joseph; Viiri, Leena E; Cross, Amanda J; Gregan, Scott M; Allin, David M; Astola, Nagore; Franklin, Ian J; Davies, Alun H; Monaco, Claudia

    2016-05-01

    Molecular characterisation of vulnerable atherosclerosis is necessary for targeting functional imaging and plaque-stabilising therapeutics. Inflammation has been linked to atherogenesis and the development of high-risk plaques. We set to quantify cytokine, chemokine and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) protein production in cells derived from carotid plaques to map the inflammatory milieu responsible for instability. Carotid endarterectomies from carefully characterised symptomatic (n=35) and asymptomatic (n=32) patients were enzymatically dissociated producing mixed cell type atheroma cell suspensions which were cultured for 24 hours. Supernatants were interrogated for 45 analytes using the Luminex 100 platform. Twenty-nine of the 45 analytes were reproducibly detectable in the majority of donors. The in vitro production of a specific network of mediators was found to be significantly higher in symptomatic than asymptomatic plaques, including: tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin (IL) 1β, IL-6, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), CCL5, CCL20, CXCL9, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 and MMP-9. Ingenuity pathway analysis of differentially expressed analytes between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients identified a number of key biological pathways (p< 10(-25)). In conclusion, the carotid artery plaque culprit of ischaemic neurological symptoms is characterised by an inflammatory milieu favouring inflammatory cell recruitment and pro-inflammatory macrophage polarisation. PMID:26763091

  8. An integrated approach for the mechanisms responsible for atherosclerotic plaque regression

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Andrew A; Pierce, Grant N

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerosis was originally considered to be an ongoing process that was inevitably associated with age. However, plaques are highly dynamic, and are able to progress, stabilize or regress depending on their surrounding milieu. A great deal of research attention has been focused on understanding the involvement of high-density lipoprotein in atherosclerotic plaque regression. However, atherosclerotic plaque regression encompasses a variety of processes that can be grouped into three main areas: removal of lipids and necrotic material; restoration of endothelial function and repair of denuded areas; and cessation of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and phenotype reversal. In addition to the role of high-density lipoproteins in lipid removal, resident macrophages and foam cells are able to regain motility and rapidly migrate on milieu improvement, moving both lipids and necrotic material to regional lymph nodes. Neighbouring endothelial cells can proliferate and replace dead and dysfunctional cells. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells can similarly restore vessel function. Finally, abrogation of smooth muscle cell proliferation occurs secondarily to these processes. This information is integrated in the current article to present a comprehensive and clear depiction of plaque regression. This integrated view of regression is essential to optimize the pharmaceutical targeting of the many processes and pathways involved in plaque regression. PMID:22065938

  9. Comprehensive overview of definitions for optical coherence tomography-based plaque and stent analyses.

    PubMed

    Di Vito, Luca; Yoon, Joo Heung; Kato, Koji; Yonetsu, Taishi; Vergallo, Rocco; Costa, Marco; Bezerra, Hiram G; Arbustini, Eloisa; Narula, Jagat; Crea, Filippo; Prati, Francesco; Jang, Ik-Kyung

    2014-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is the current state-of-the-art intracoronary imaging modality that allows visualization of detailed morphological characteristics of both atherosclerotic plaque and stent. So far, three expert review documents have been released for standardization of OCT image analysis. In the real world, a variety of definitions are being used by different groups and by different core laboratories to analyze OCT findings because of different clinical/procedural contexts in which OCT research has been carried out. This comprehensive overview is aimed to summarize different applicable definitions used by different research groups in plaque and stent analysis using OCT. In addition, it presents readers with a panoramic view to select the best definition of OCT measurement for one's own study purpose. We divided this review article into two parts: Part I - Plaque analysis, and Part II - Stent analysis. The plaque analysis section summarizes the definitions of plaque composition, rupture, erosion, protruding calcific nodules, macrophages, microvessels, and cholesterol crystal. The stent analysis section includes the classification of stent struts, features of neointimal hyperplasia, and other stent-related findings such as tissue protrusion, thrombus, intrastent, and stent edge dissections. In each case of controversy, an explanation for the specific context is provided. PMID:24356250

  10. A Statin-Loaded Reconstituted High-Density Lipoprotein Nanoparticle Inhibits Atherosclerotic Plaque Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Tang, Jun; Cormode, David P.; Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Ozcan, Canturk; Otten, Maarten J.; Zaidi, Neeha; Lobatto, Mark E.; van Rijs, Sarian M.; Priem, Bram; Kuan, Emma L.; Martel, Catherine; Hewing, Bernd; Sager, Hendrik; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Stroes, Erik S.G.; Fuster, Valentin; Fisher, Edward A.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a key feature of atherosclerosis and a target for therapy. Statins have potent anti-inflammatory properties but these cannot be fully exploited with oral statin therapy due to low systemic bioavailability. Here we present an injectable reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (rHDL) nanoparticle carrier vehicle that delivers statins to atherosclerotic plaques. We demonstrate the anti-inflammatory effect of statin-rHDL in vitro and show this effect is mediated through inhibition of the mevalonate pathway. We also apply statin-rHDL nanoparticles in vivo in an apolipoprotein E-knockout mouse model of atherosclerosis and show they accumulate in atherosclerotic lesions where they directly affect plaque macrophages. Finally we demonstrate that a three-month low-dose statin-rHDL treatment regimen inhibits plaque inflammation progression, while a one-week high-dose regimen markedly decreases inflammation in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Statin-rHDL represents a novel potent atherosclerosis nanotherapy that directly affects plaque inflammation. PMID:24445279

  11. Effects of a Novel Dental Gel on Plaque and Gingivitis: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Dadkhah, M; Chung, NE; Ajdaharian, J; Wink, C; Klokkevold, P; Wilder-Smith, P

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The goal of this prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blinded study was to evaluate the effects of a novel dental gel on plaque and gingival health. The dental gel was designed to (1) break up and prevent re-accumulation of microbial biofilm, and (2) inhibit metal mediated inflammation. Materials and Methods Twenty-five subjects with moderate gingival inflammation (Löe and Silness Gingival Index ≥2) and pocket depths <4 were randomly assigned to brush twice daily for 21 days with the test or the control dental gel. On Days 0, 7, 14 and 21, plaque levels (Quigley-Hein, Turesky Modification Plaque Index), gingival inflammation (Löe and Silness Gingival Index) and gingival bleeding (modified Sulcus Bleeding Index) were determined by one blinded, investigator using a pressure sensitive probe. Results After 3 weeks, all 3 clinical indices were significantly improved in both groups (P<0.05) and significantly lower in the test group (P<0.05). Conclusion The novel dental gel formulation was provided effective plaque control and reduced gingival inflammation. Clinical Relevance A novel dentifrice formulation may be an effective tool for plaque removal and maintaining gingival health. PMID:26052472

  12. Plaque-associated lipids in Alzheimer’s diseased brain tissue visualized by nonlinear microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kiskis, Juris; Fink, Helen; Nyberg, Lena; Thyr, Jacob; Li, Jia-Yi; Enejder, Annika

    2015-01-01

    By simultaneous coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and 2-photon fluorescence microscopy of Thioflavin-S stained Alzheimer´s diseased human brain tissues, we show evidence of lipid deposits co-localizing with fibrillar β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques. Two lipid morphologies can be observed; lamellar structures and coalescing macro-aggregates of sub-micron sizes to ~25 μm. No significant lipid deposits were observed in non-fibrillar, diffuse plaques identified by Aβ immuno-staining. CARS microscopy of unlabeled samples confirms the lamellar and macro-aggregate lipid morphologies. The composition of the plaques was analyzed by CARS microspectroscopy and Raman microscopy; vibrational signatures of lipids with long acyl chains co-localize with the β-sheet vibrations. The lipid fluidity was evaluated from the CARS spectra, illustrating that the lipid composition/organization varies throughout the plaques. Altogether this indicates close amyloid-lipid interplay in fibrillar Aβ plaques, rendering them more dynamic compositions than previously believed and, hence, potential sources of toxic oligomers. PMID:26311128

  13. Enrichment of cholesterol in microdissected Alzheimer's disease senile plaques as assessed by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Panchal, Maï; Loeper, Jacqueline; Cossec, Jack-Christophe; Perruchini, Claire; Lazar, Adina; Pompon, Denis; Duyckaerts, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Extensive knowledge of the protein components of the senile plaques, one of the hallmark lesions of Alzheimer's disease, has been acquired over the years, but their lipid composition remains poorly known. Evidence suggests that cholesterol contributes to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. However, its presence within senile plaques has never been ascertained with analytic methods. Senile plaques were microdissected from sections of the isocortex in three Braak VI Alzheimer's disease cases and compared with a similar number of samples from the adjoining neuropil, free of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) deposit. Two cases were apoϵ4/apoϵ3, and one case was apoϵ3/apoϵ3. A known quantity of 13C-labeled cholesterol was added to the samples as a standard. After hexane extraction, cholesterol content was analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The mean concentration of free cholesterol was 4.25 ± 0.1 attomoles/µm3 in the senile plaques and 2.2 ± 0.49 attomoles/µm3 in the neuropil (t = 4.41, P < 0.0009). The quantity of free cholesterol per senile plaque (67 ± 16 femtomol) is similar to the published quantity of Aβ peptide. The highly significant increase in the cholesterol concentration, associated with the increased risk of Alzheimer's disease linked to the apoϵ4 allele, suggests new pathogenetic mechanisms. PMID:19779135

  14. Analysis of treatment results in 36 children with retinoblastoma treated by scleral plaque irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Amendola, B.E.; Markoe, A.M.; Augsburger, J.J.; Karlsson, U.L.; Giblin, M.; Shields, J.A.; Brady, L.W.; Woodleigh, R.

    1989-07-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of treatment results in 36 patients with retinoblastoma treated by the Radiation Oncology Department of Hahnemann University Hospital and the Division of Oncology of Wills Eye Hospital between January 1975 and December 1986. There were 14 females and 22 males; ages ranged from 2 months to 4 1/2 years of age at presentation. Leukocoria was the most common clinical sign of presentation. These patients were treated with external beam radiation therapy in combination with scleral plaque irradiation in 20 patients and with scleral plaque alone in 16 patients. Cobalt-60, Iodine-125, Iridium-192, and Ruthenium-106, scleral plaques were used. The dose delivered to the mid plane of the globe was 40 Gy and the scleral dose adjacent to the plaque was in the range of 180-200 Gy. The treatment was successful in 30 of 36 patients. Complications of radiation therapy were minimal in patients treated by scleral plaque alone. The advantages of this treatment modality are discussed.

  15. Quantitative assessment of MS plaques and brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis using semiautomatic segmentation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinonen, Tomi; Dastidar, Prasun; Ryymin, Pertti; Lahtinen, Antti J.; Eskola, Hannu; Malmivuo, Jaakko

    1997-05-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain is useful in multiple sclerosis (MS) in order to obtain reliable indices of disease progression. The goal of this project was to estimate the total volume of gliotic and non gliotic plaques in chronic progressive multiple sclerosis with the help of a semiautomatic segmentation method developed at the Ragnar Granit Institute. Youth developed program running on a PC based computer provides de displays of the segmented data, in addition to the volumetric analyses. The volumetric accuracy of the program was demonstrated by segmenting MR images of fluid filed syringes. An anatomical atlas is to be incorporated in the segmentation system to estimate the distribution of MS plaques in various neural pathways of the brain. A total package including MS plaque volume estimation, estimation of brain atrophy and ventricular enlargement, distribution of MS plaques in different neural segments of the brain has ben planned for the near future. Our study confirmed that total lesion volumes in chronic MS disease show a poor correlation to EDSS scores but show a positive correlation to neuropsychological scores. Therefore accurate total volume measurements of MS plaques using the developed semiautomatic segmentation technique helped us to evaluate the degree of neuropsychological impairment.

  16. A New F-18 Labeled PET Agent For Imaging Alzheimer's Plaques

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Padmakar V.; Hao Guiyang; Arora, Veera; Long, Michael; Slavine, Nikolai; Chiguru, Srinivas; Qu Baoxi; Sun Xiankai; Bennett, Michael; Antich, Peter P.; Bonte, Frederick J.; Vasdev, Neil

    2011-06-01

    Amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Advances in development of imaging agents have focused on targeting amyloid plaques. Notable success has been the development of C-11 labeled PIB (Pittsburgh Compound) and a number of studies have demonstrated the utility of this agent. However, the short half life of C-11 (t1/2: 20 min), is a limitation, thus has prompted the development of F-18 labeled agents. Most of these agents are derivatives of amyloid binding dyes; Congo red and Thioflavin. Some of these agents are in clinical trials with encouraging results. We have been exploring new class of agents based on 8-hydroxy quinoline, a weak metal chelator, targeting elevated levels of metals in plaques. Iodine-123 labeled clioquinol showed affinity for amyloid plaques however, it had limited brain uptake and was not successful in imaging in intact animals and humans. We have been successful in synthesizing F-18 labeled 8-hydroxy quinoline. Small animal PET/CT imaging studies with this agent showed high (7-10% ID/g), rapid brain uptake and fast washout of the agent from normal mice brains and delayed washout from transgenic Alzheimer's mice. These promising results encouraged us in further evaluation of this class of compounds for imaging AD plaques.

  17. A statin-loaded reconstituted high-density lipoprotein nanoparticle inhibits atherosclerotic plaque inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Tang, Jun; Cormode, David P.; Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Ozcan, Canturk; Otten, Maarten J.; Zaidi, Neeha; Lobatto, Mark E.; van Rijs, Sarian M.; Priem, Bram; Kuan, Emma L.; Martel, Catherine; Hewing, Bernd; Sager, Hendrik; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Fuster, Valentin; Fisher, Edward A.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a key feature of atherosclerosis and a target for therapy. Statins have potent anti-inflammatory properties but these cannot be fully exploited with oral statin therapy due to low systemic bioavailability. Here we present an injectable reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (rHDL) nanoparticle carrier vehicle that delivers statins to atherosclerotic plaques. We demonstrate the anti-inflammatory effect of statin-rHDL in vitro and show that this effect is mediated through the inhibition of the mevalonate pathway. We also apply statin-rHDL nanoparticles in vivo in an apolipoprotein E-knockout mouse model of atherosclerosis and show that they accumulate in atherosclerotic lesions in which they directly affect plaque macrophages. Finally, we demonstrate that a 3-month low-dose statin-rHDL treatment regimen inhibits plaque inflammation progression, while a 1-week high-dose regimen markedly decreases inflammation in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Statin-rHDL represents a novel potent atherosclerosis nanotherapy that directly affects plaque inflammation.

  18. Three-Dimensional Carotid Plaque Progression Simulation Using Meshless Generalized Finite Difference Method Based on Multi-Year MRI Patient-Tracking Data.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Tang, Dalin; Atluri, Satya

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is becoming the number one cause of death worldwide. Atherosclerotic plaque rupture and progression are closely related to most severe cardiovascular syndromes such as heart attack and stroke. Mechanisms governing plaque rupture and progression are not well understood. A computational procedure based on three-dimensional meshless generalized finite difference (MGFD) method and serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data was introduced to quantify patient-specific carotid atherosclerotic plaque growth functions and simulate plaque progression. Participating patients were scanned three times (T1, T2, and T3, at intervals of about 18 months) to obtain plaque progression data. Vessel wall thickness (WT) changes were used as the measure for plaque progression. Since there was insufficient data with the current technology to quantify individual plaque component growth, the whole plaque was assumed to be uniform, homogeneous, isotropic, linear, and nearly incompressible. The linear elastic model was used. The 3D plaque model was discretized and solved using a meshless generalized finite difference (GFD) method. Four growth functions with different combinations of wall thickness, stress, and neighboring point terms were introduced to predict future plaque growth based on previous time point data. Starting from the T2 plaque geometry, plaque progression was simulated by solving the solid model and adjusting wall thickness using plaque growth functions iteratively until T3 is reached. Numerically simulated plaque progression agreed very well with the target T3 plaque geometry with errors ranging from 11.56%, 6.39%, 8.24%, to 4.45%, given by the four growth functions. We believe this is the first time 3D plaque progression simulation based on multi-year patient-tracking data was reported. Serial MRI-based progression simulation adds time dimension to plaque vulnerability assessment and will improve prediction accuracy for potential plaque rupture risk. PMID:20730039

  19. Near-infrared fluorescent probes for imaging of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Tong, Hongjuan; Lou, Kaiyan; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    One of the early pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer׳s disease (AD) is the deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques in the brain. There has been a tremendous interest in the development of Aβ plaques imaging probes for early diagnosis of AD in the past decades. Optical imaging, particularly near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging, has emerged as a safe, low cost, real-time, and widely available technique, providing an attractive approach for in vivo detection of Aβ plaques among many different imaging techniques. In this review, we provide a brief overview of the state-of-the-art development of NIRF Aβ probes and their in vitro and in vivo applications with special focus on design strategies and optical, binding, and brain-kinetic properties. PMID:26579421

  20. [Effects of sodium doecyl sulfate on the artificial dental plaque in chemostat].

    PubMed

    Wei, G; Qiao, W; Bian, Z

    1997-11-01

    Sodium doecyl sulfate (SDS) is widely used as a detergent in dentifrices. It has been shown to interfere with the protein adsorption to hydroxyapatite (HA), and inhibit acquired pellicle formation. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of SDS on the artificial dental plaque in chemostat. The amount of the 3H-labelled bacteria adhered on the enamel fragment surface was determined with scintillometer. The artificial dental plaque was observed under the scanning electron microscope. The results showed that enamel fragments treated with SDS adsorbed less bacteria than untreated ones, and had no plague formed. It suggested that SDS can inhibit the bacterial adherence on enamel surface and thus reduce dental plaque formation. PMID:11189307

  1. Milia En Plaque as a Distinct Follicular Hamartoma With Cystic Trichoepitheliomatous Features

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Akira; Yamasaki, Kenshi; Aiba, Setsuya

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Milia en plaque (MEP) is an uncommon disorder characterized by an erythematous plaque containing numerous milia. The pathogenesis of MEP is not clear. The authors report a man with an erythematous plaque on the right retroauricular area, containing numerous white-yellow cysts varying in size. Histological examination showed that multiple cystic structures at various levels of the dermis that were lined by stratified squamous epithelium and contained keratinous material—these findings were consistent with the diagnosis of multiple milia. In addition to epidermal cysts, however, the lesion consisted of a branched proliferation of pale-staining keratinocytes lined with basal keratinocytes budding from the overlying epidermis. Moreover, some cysts were formed within the branched epithelial proliferation, had thicker cyst walls than the ordinary milium, or had irregular or branched projections toward the surrounding dermis. From these findings, the authors conclude that MEP is a distinct follicular hamartoma with cystic trichoepitheliomatous features. PMID:26381115

  2. Milia En Plaque as a Distinct Follicular Hamartoma With Cystic Trichoepitheliomatous Features.

    PubMed

    Terui, Hitoshi; Hashimoto, Akira; Yamasaki, Kenshi; Aiba, Setsuya

    2016-03-01

    Milia en plaque (MEP) is an uncommon disorder characterized by an erythematous plaque containing numerous milia. The pathogenesis of MEP is not clear. The authors report a man with an erythematous plaque on the right retroauricular area, containing numerous white-yellow cysts varying in size. Histological examination showed that multiple cystic structures at various levels of the dermis that were lined by stratified squamous epithelium and contained keratinous material-these findings were consistent with the diagnosis of multiple milia. In addition to epidermal cysts, however, the lesion consisted of a branched proliferation of pale-staining keratinocytes lined with basal keratinocytes budding from the overlying epidermis. Moreover, some cysts were formed within the branched epithelial proliferation, had thicker cyst walls than the ordinary milium, or had irregular or branched projections toward the surrounding dermis. From these findings, the authors conclude that MEP is a distinct follicular hamartoma with cystic trichoepitheliomatous features. PMID:26381115

  3. Plaque Morphology of Teschen Disease Viruses and Certain Pig Enteroviruses in Primary pig Kidney Monolayer Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Dardiri, A. H.

    1968-01-01

    Plaque patterns and diameters of four virulent strains and one tissue culture mutant of Teschen disease virus were compared with six pig enteroviruses isolated in the United States. They are described as they were produced in primary pig kidney monolayer cultures. Reproducible plaques, with similar characteristics and class-types of each of the viruses tested were obtained with the application of a 45-minute virus adsorption time. Their morphologic characteristics and the proportion in which the plaque types appeared may assist in the differentiation of these virus strains. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6.Fig. 7.Fig. 8.Fig. 9.Fig. 10.Fig. 11.Fig. 12. PMID:4299823

  4. Antibacterial activity of aqueous extracts of Indian chewing sticks on dental plaque: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Dola Srinivasa; Penmatsa, Tanuja; Kumar, Alapati Kranthi; Reddy, M. Narendra; Gautam, Nalam Sai; Gautam, Nalam Radhika

    2014-01-01

    The anti-microbial efficacy of aqueous extracts of Indian chewing sticks against different kinds of plaque bacteria in vitro was investigated. Supra-gingival plaque is cultured and subjected to the antibacterial activity of the aqueous extracts of chewing sticks (Neem, Acacia, Pongamia glabra, Achyranthes aspera, Streblus asper) separately. The results of the study demonstrate that all the five chewing sticks under study possess inhibitory potential against bacteria present in dental plaque mainly on aerobes. The antibacterial efficacy of aqueous extracts has antibacterial effects and could be used as a therapeutic agent and therefore, it appears to be potent anti-microbial agents that could be considered as a medicinal plant. Results of this study showed chewing sticks contained antibacterial agents, but the concentration and composition of the active substances differed among the plants. PMID:25210357

  5. Clinical and economic review of secukinumab for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ian Ty; Shojania, Kam; Dutz, Jan; Tsao, Nicole W

    2016-04-01

    Secukinumab represents the first IL-17A antagonist among the available biologic therapies approved for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis management. Secukinumab demonstrated greater efficacy over placebo, etanercept and ustekinumab in patients that had limited benefit from non-biologic systemic therapies and phototherapy. Despite standard-of-care systemic therapies being more likely to be cost-effective at this time, a Canadian cost-utility analysis found secukinumab to display benefit in quality-of-life gains in moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis patients, and greater cost-effectiveness when compared to other biologic systemic therapies. Determination of the true economic value of secukinumab amongst the available therapies for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis will require continued economic evaluation. PMID:26681527

  6. Aβ alters the connectivity of olfactory neurons in the absence of amyloid plaques in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Luxiang; Schrank, Benjamin R.; Rodriguez, Steve; Benz, Eric G.; Moulia, Thomas W.; Rickenbacher, Gregory T.; Gomez, Alexis C.; Levites, Yona; Edwards, Sarah R.; Golde, Todd E.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Barnea, Gilad; Albers, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Aβ peptide aggregates into amyloid plaques at presymptomatic stages of Alzheimer's disease, but the temporal relationship between plaque formation and neuronal dysfunction is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the connectivity of the peripheral olfactory neural circuit is perturbed in mice overexpressing human APPsw (Swedish mutation) prior to the onset of plaques. Expression of hAPPsw exclusively in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) also perturbs connectivity with associated reductions in odor-evoked gene expression and olfactory acuity. By contrast, OSN axons project correctly in mice overexpressing wild type human APP throughout the brain and in mice overexpressing human APPmv, a missense mutation that reduces Aβ production, exclusively in OSNs. Furthermore, expression of Aβ40 or Aβ42 solely in the olfactory epithelium disrupts OSN axon targeting. Our data indicate that altering the structural connectivity and function of highly plastic neural circuits is one of the pleiotropic actions of soluble human Aβ. PMID:22910355

  7. Computer-implemented system and method for automated and highly accurate plaque analysis, reporting, and visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemp, James Herbert (Inventor); Talukder, Ashit (Inventor); Lambert, James (Inventor); Lam, Raymond (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A computer-implemented system and method of intra-oral analysis for measuring plaque removal is disclosed. The system includes hardware for real-time image acquisition and software to store the acquired images on a patient-by-patient basis. The system implements algorithms to segment teeth of interest from surrounding gum, and uses a real-time image-based morphing procedure to automatically overlay a grid onto each segmented tooth. Pattern recognition methods are used to classify plaque from surrounding gum and enamel, while ignoring glare effects due to the reflection of camera light and ambient light from enamel regions. The system integrates these components into a single software suite with an easy-to-use graphical user interface (GUI) that allows users to do an end-to-end run of a patient record, including tooth segmentation of all teeth, grid morphing of each segmented tooth, and plaque classification of each tooth image.

  8. Evidence of Helicobacter sp. in dental plaque of captive dolphins (Tursiops gephyreus).

    PubMed

    Goldman, Cinthia G; Loureiro, Julio D; Quse, Viviana; Corach, Daniel; Calderon, Enrique; Caro, Ricardo A; Boccio, José; Rodríguez Heredia, Sergio; Di Carlo, Maria B; Zubillaga, Marcela B

    2002-07-01

    Gastrointestinal lesions have been extensively reported in wild and captive marine mammals. However, their etiology remains unclear. In humans and other animals, chronic gastritis and peptic ulcers have been associated with Helicobacter sp. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate the presence of Helicobacter sp. in the gastric juice, dental plaque, and saliva of marine mammals living in a controlled environment. Five dolphins (Tursiops gephyreus), one killer whale (Orcinus orca), one false killer whale (Pseudorca crassidens), three sea lions (Otaria flavescens), two elephant seals (Mirounga leonina), and two fur seals (Arctocephalus australis) were studied. Saliva, dental plaque, and gastric juice samples were examined for Helicobacter sp. using polymerase chain reaction. None of the gastric juice or saliva samples were positive for Helicobacter sp. However, Helicobacter sp. DNA was detected in dental plaque from two dolphins, suggesting the oral cavity might be a reservoir of this bacterium. PMID:12238390

  9. Actinic comedonal plaque-variant of Favre-Racouchot syndrome: report of two cases*

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Fernanda; Nakandakari, Sadamitsu; Zattar, Gabrielle Aline; Soares, Cleverson Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    The actinic comedonal plaque is characterized by papules, cysts and comedones forming a yellowish plaque in areas of chronic sun exposure skin. There are few reports in literature about this entity, considered a rare and ectopic form of Favré-Racouchot Syndrome. We report two cases of lesions located on forearms and thorax. Favré-Racouchot Syndrome is a condition usually restricted to the periorbital area; however, there are reports of similar findings in atypical locations, such as forearms and chest, which are known as actinic comedonal plaque. Ultraviolet radiation exposure is the main factor involved in its pathogenesis. The objective of this study was to provide accurate knowledge of this dermatosis and stimulate dermatologists to provide a correct diagnosis of the condition. PMID:26312711

  10. Clinical effect of a gel containing Lippia sidoides on plaque and gingivitis control

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Srgio Luis da Silva; Praxedes, Yuri Carvalho Machado; Bastos, Thiago Catunda; Alencar, Phillipe Nogueira Barbosa; da Costa, Flvio Nogueira

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This parallel controlled clinical trial evaluated the effect of a gel containing Lippia sidoides essential oil on plaque and gingivitis control. Methods: Thirty patients (n=30) were randomly selected and allocated into three groups: Lippia sidoides (LS, n=10), chlorhexidine (CLX, n=10) or placebo (control, n=10). Plaque and bleeding index were recorded at baseline and after three months. All volunteers were instructed to brush with the gel three times a day throughout the experiment period. Results: There was a significant reduction on plaque and gingivitis in the test groups (P<.05), but no statistically significant difference was observed between them (P>.05). Conclusion: A gel preparation containing 10% Lippia sidoides essential oil was an efficient herbal antiplaque and antigingivitis agent. PMID:23408652

  11. [Erionite-induced pleural plaques. Exposition to urban pollution in a female Turkish migrant in Germany].

    PubMed

    Grsel, B; Kaya, A; Stahl, U; Rauber, K; Kuntz, C

    2008-06-01

    Erionite is a zeolite mineral of volcanic origin which contains no asbestos. It is found in different regions of the world, including southeast Turkey in ash and dust, from which it can cause inflammatory pleural plaques or malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). We report a female Turkish migrant exposed to urban pollution in her home country who decades later suffered from pleural plaques with a nonspecific chronic inflammatory disease. The differential diagnosis of inflammatory pleural plaques was assumed radiologically and confirmed by video-assisted thoracoscopic biopsy. Short-term clinical and radiologic control of the patient will be necessary because of the risk of MPM. For epidemiologic considerations discussed referring to current literature, a growing incidence of this type of disease in migrants from high-risk areas must be reckoned with in Germany, even without exposition to asbestos. PMID:18506411

  12. Fully automated and adaptive detection of amyloid plaques in stained brain sections of Alzheimer transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Feki, Abdelmonem; Teboul, Olivier; Dubois, Albertine; Bozon, Bruno; Faure, Alexis; Hantraye, Philippe; Dhenain, Marc; Delatour, Benoit; Delzescaux, Thierry

    2007-01-01

    Automated detection of amyloid plaques (AP) in post mortem brain sections of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) or in mouse models of the disease is a major issue to improve quantitative, standardized and accurate assessment of neuropathological lesions as well as of their modulation by treatment. We propose a new segmentation method to automatically detect amyloid plaques in Congo Red stained sections based on adaptive thresholds and a dedicated amyloid plaque/tissue modelling. A set of histological sections focusing on anatomical structures was used to validate the method in comparison to expert segmentation. Original information concerning global amyloid load have been derived from 6 mouse brains which opens new perspectives for the extensive analysis of such a data in 3-D and the possibility to integrate in vivo-post mortem information for diagnosis purposes. PMID:18044661

  13. Dental Caries, and Supragingival Plaque and Calculus among Students, Tanga, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, L. C.; Kabulwa, M. N.

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of dental caries and supragingival plaque and calculus in 785 secondary schools students was assessed. More than half (53.6%) of the students were caries-free, and the majority of those with dental caries experience were aged 14–17 (68.1%) and females (53%). Mean DMFT was 1.26, with mean D-component of 1.05, and molars were most affected. Most students had supragingival plaque (74%) and calculus (56.9%) and more so in males than females (P > 0.05). Less than half of the students had experience of dental caries and those with caries were mostly females and of the younger age group. The low DMFT was contributed to the D-component, and molars were the tooth type most affected.The majority of students had supra-gingival plaque and calculus and more so in males than females. PMID:22461985

  14. A Reduced Astrocyte Response to β-Amyloid Plaques in the Ageing Brain Associates with Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Ryan; Ince, Paul G.; Minett, Thais; Garwood, Claire J.; Shaw, Pamela J.; Matthews, Fiona E.; Brayne, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Aims β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques are a key feature of Alzheimer’s disease pathology but correlate poorly with dementia. They are associated with astrocytes which may modulate the effect of Aβ-deposition on the neuropil. This study characterised the astrocyte response to Aβ plaque subtypes, and investigated their association with cognitive impairment. Methods Aβ plaque subtypes were identified in the cingulate gyrus using dual labelling immunohistochemistry to Aβ and GFAP+ astrocytes, and quantitated in two cortical areas: the area of densest plaque burden and the deep cortex near the white matter border (layer VI). Three subtypes were defined for both diffuse and compact plaques (also known as classical or core-plaques): Aβ plaque with (1) no associated astrocytes, (2) focal astrogliosis or (3) circumferential astrogliosis. Results In the area of densest burden, diffuse plaques with no astrogliosis (β = -0.05, p = 0.001) and with focal astrogliosis (β = -0.27, p = 0.009) significantly associated with lower MMSE scores when controlling for sex and age at death. In the deep cortex (layer VI), both diffuse and compact plaques without astrogliosis associated with lower MMSE scores (β = -0.15, p = 0.017 and β = -0.81, p = 0.03, respectively). Diffuse plaques with no astrogliosis in layer VI related to dementia status (OR = 1.05, p = 0.025). In the area of densest burden, diffuse plaques with no astrogliosis or with focal astrogliosis associated with increasing Braak stage (β = 0.01, p<0.001 and β = 0.07, p<0.001, respectively), and ApoEε4 genotype (OR = 1.02, p = 0.001 and OR = 1.10, p = 0.016, respectively). In layer VI all plaque subtypes associated with Braak stage, and compact amyloid plaques with little and no associated astrogliosis associated with ApoEε4 genotype (OR = 1.50, p = 0.014 and OR = 0.10, p = 0.003, respectively). Conclusions Reactive astrocytes in close proximity to either diffuse or compact plaques may have a neuroprotective role in the ageing brain, and possession of at least one copy of the ApoEε4 allele impacts the astroglial response to Aβ plaques. PMID:25707004

  15. Effects of Stent Design and Atherosclerotic Plaque Composition on Arterial Wall Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Timmins, Lucas H.; Meyer, Clark A.; Moreno, Michael R.; Moore, James E.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the solid mechanical effects of varying stent design and atherosclerotic plaque stiffness on the biomechanical environment induced in a diseased artery wall model. Methods: Computational modeling techniques were employed to investigate the final radius of the lumen and artery wall stresses after stent implantation. Two stent designs were studied (one stiff and one less stiff). The stenotic artery was modeled as an axisymmetrical diseased vessel with a 20% stenosis by diameter. The material properties of the diseased tissue in the artery models varied. Atherosclerotic plaques half as stiff (0.5×), of equal stiffness (1.0×), or twice as stiff (2.0×) as the artery wall were investigated. Results: Final lumen radius was dependent on stent design, and the stiffer stent deformed the artery to an approximately 10% greater radius than the more compliant design. Alternatively, circumferential stress levels were dependent on both stent design and plaque material properties. Overall, the stiffer stent subjected the artery wall to much higher stress values than the more compliant design, with differences in peak values of 0.50, 0.31, and 0.09 MPa for the 2.0×, 1.0×, and 0.5× stiff plaques, respectively. Conclusion: Evidence suggests that a judicious choice of stent design can minimize stress while maintaining a patent lumen in stenotic arteries. If confronted with a rigid, calcified plaque, stent design is more important, as design differences can impose dramatically different stress fields, while still providing arterial patency. Alternatively, stent design is not as much of an issue when treating a soft, lipid-laden plaque, as stress fields do not vary significantly among stent designs. PMID:19090628

  16. Receptor-targeted Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Molecular MR Imaging of Inflamed Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Chuqiao; Ng, Thomas S.C.; Sohi, Hargun; Palko, Heather; House, Adrian; Jacobs, Russell E.; Louie, Angelique Y.

    2011-01-01

    In a number of literature reports iron oxide nanoparticles have been investigated for use in imaging atherosclerotic plaques and found to accumulate in plaques via uptake by macrophages, which are critical in the process of atheroma initiation, propagation, and rupture. However, the uptake of these agents is nonspecific, thus the labeling efficiency for plaques in vivo is not ideal. We have developed targeted agents to improve the efficiency for labeling macrophage-laden plaques. These probes are based on iron oxide nanoparticles coated with dextran sulfate, a ligand of macrophage scavenger receptor type A (SR-A). We have sulfated dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (DIO) with sulfur trioxide, thereby targeting our nanoparticle imaging agents to SR-A. The sulfated DIO (SDIO) remained mono-dispersed and had an average hydrodynamic diameter of 62 nm, an r1 relaxivity of 18.1 mM−1s−1, and an r2 relaxivity of 95.8 mM−1s−1 (37 °C, 1.4 T). Cell studies confirmed that these nanoparticles were nontoxic and specifically targeted to macrophages. In vivo MRI after intravenous injection of the contrast agent into an atherosclerotic mouse injury model showed substantial signal loss on the injured carotid at 4 and 24 hours post-injection of SDIO. No discernable signal decrease was seen at the control carotid and only mild signal loss was observed for the injured carotid post-injection of non-sulfated DIO, indicating preferential uptake of the SDIO particles at the site of atherosclerotic plaque. These results indicate that SDIO can facilitate MRI detection and diagnosis of vulnerable plaques in atherosclerosis. PMID:21742374

  17. Imaging of lysophosphatidylcholine in human coronary plaques by color fluorescence angioscopy.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Yasumi; Uchida, Yasuto; Kawai, Seiji; Kanamaru, Ryohei; Kameda, Noriaki

    2010-03-01

    Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) is a proinflammatory and proatherogenic substance, and it plays an important role in the initiation, progression, and destabilization of atherosclerotic plaques. If LPC in the vascular wall is visualized in vivo, the mechanisms of atherosclerosis and the effects of medical and interventional therapies on atherosclerosis can be objectively evaluated. Therefore, this study was carried out to visualize LPC in human coronary plaques using a color fluorescence angioscopy (CFA) system. (1) The fluorescence characteristics of LPC were investigated by color fluorescence microscopy (CFM) using Trypan blue dye (TB) as an indicator. For fluorescence imaging, a combination of a band-pass filter (345 nm) and a band-absorption filter of 420 nm (A imaging), or a combination of a band-pass filter (470 nm) and a band-absorption filter of 520 nm (B imaging) was employed. (2) The fluorescence of LPC in the excised human coronary plaques was investigated by CFA and CFM scanning using the same filters as those in CFM. In the presence of TB, LPC exhibited a red fluorescence in both A and B imaging. This red fluorescence color in both A and B imaging was not observed for the other known major substances that constitute the atherosclerotic plaques. This red fluorescence color in both A and B imaging was detected by CFA in both white and yellow plaques that were classified by conventional angioscopy. This fluorescence color was found to be distributed in a web-like or diffuse configuration by CFM scanning. LPC in the human coronary plaques was successfully visualized by CFA using TB as an indicator. PMID:20379048

  18. High resolution FDG-microPET of carotid atherosclerosis: plaque components underlying enhanced FDG uptake.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Kerwin, William S; Caldwell, James H; Ferguson, Marina S; Hippe, Daniel S; Alessio, Adam M; Martinez-Malo, Vanesa; Pimentel, Kristi; Miyaoka, Robert S; Kohler, Ted R; Hatsukami, Thomas S; Yuan, Chun

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to discover which atherosclerotic plaque components co-localize with enhanced [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in carotid positron emission tomography (PET) images. Although in vivo PET currently lacks the resolution, high-resolution ex vivo FDG-microPET with histology validation of excised carotid plaque might accomplish this goal. Thirteen patients were injected with FDG before carotid endarterectomy. After excision, the plaque specimens were scanned by microPET and magnetic resonance imaging, and then serially sectioned for histological analysis. Two analyses were performed using generalized linear mixed models: (1) a PET-driven analysis which sampled high and low FDG uptake areas from PET images to identify their components in matched histology specimens; and (2) a histology-driven analysis where specific plaque components were selected and matched to corresponding PET images. In the PET-driven analysis, regions of high FDG uptake were more likely to contain inflammatory cells (p < 0.001) and neovasculature (p = 0.008) than regions of low FDG uptake. In the histology-driven analysis, regions with inflammatory cells (p = 0.001) and regions with loose extracellular matrix (p = 0.001) were associated with enhanced FDG uptake. Furthermore, areas of complex inflammatory cell infiltrate (co-localized macrophages, lymphocytes and foam cells) had the highest FDG uptake among inflammatory subgroups (p < 0.001). In conclusion, in carotid plaque, regions of inflammatory cell infiltrate, particularly complex one, co-localized with enhanced FDG uptake in high-resolution FDG-microPET images. Loose extracellular matrix and areas containing neovasculature also produced FDG signal. This study points to the potential ability of FDG-PET to detect the cellular components of the vulnerable plaque. PMID:26280889

  19. Osteoprotegerin, Pericytes and Bone-Like Vascular Calcification Are Associated with Carotid Plaque Stability

    PubMed Central

    Davaine, Jean-Michel; Quillard, Thibaut; Brion, Régis; Lapérine, Olivier; Guyomarch, Béatrice; Merlini, Thierry; Chatelais, Mathias; Guilbaud, Florian; Brennan, Meadhbh Áine; Charrier, Céline; Heymann, Dominique; Gouëffic, Yann; Heymann, Marie-Françoise

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Vascular calcification, recapitulating bone formation, has a profound impact on plaque stability. The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of bone-like vascular calcification (named osteoid metaplasia = OM) and of osteoprotegerin on plaque stability. Methods Tissue from carotid endarterectomies were analysed for the presence of calcification and signs of vulnerability according to AHA grading system. Osteoprotegerin (OPG), pericytes and endothelial cells were sought using immuno-histochemistry. Symptoms and preoperative imaging findings (CT-scan, MRI and Doppler-scan) were analyzed. Human pericytes were cultured to evaluate their ability to secrete OPG and to influence mineralization in the plaque. Results Seventy-three carotid plaques (49 asymptomatic and 24 symptomatic) were harvested. A significantly higher presence of OM (18.4% vs 0%, p<0.01), OPG (10.2% of ROI vs 3.4% of ROI, p<0.05) and pericytes (19% of ROI vs 3.8% of ROI, p<0.05) were noted in asymptomatic compared to symptomatic plaques. Consistently, circulating OPG levels were higher in the plasma of asymptomatic patients (3.2 ng/mL vs 2.5 ng/mL, p = 0.05). In vitro, human vascular pericytes secreted considerable amounts of OPG and underwent osteoblastic differentiation. Pericytes also inhibited the osteoclastic differentiation of CD14+ cells through their secretion of OPG. Conclusions OPG (intraplaque an plasmatic) and OM are associated with carotid plaque stability. Pericytes may be involved in the secretion of intraplaque OPG and in the formation of OM. PMID:25259713

  20. Effects of Phase II Comprehensive Cardiac Rehabilitation on Coronary Plaque Volume After Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nishitani-Yokoyama, Miho; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Shimada, Kazunori; Miyazaki, Tadashi; Ogita, Manabu; Okazaki, Shinya; Shioya, Miki; Koba, Shinji; Tsujita, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Youichi; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    The present study aimed to determine the effects of phase II (PII) comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR) on coronary plaque volume in patients after acute coronary syndrome (ACS).We assigned 46 patients with ACS who had undergone standard phase I CR into groups who proceeded with PII-CR (PII-CR; n = 21) and those who did not (non-PII-CR; n = 25). We then measured anthropometric parameters and daily physical activity using a pedometer for up to 60 days. The isokinetic strength of the knee extensor and flexor muscles and exercise tolerance were tested and non-culprit lesions were analyzed using volumetric intravascular ultrasound at baseline and 6 months later.Baseline characteristics did not significantly differ between the two groups and exercise tolerance was significantly improved in both. Waist size and fat weight were significantly decreased, and muscle strength was significantly increased in the PII-CR group but not in the non-PII-CR group. The percent change in plaque volume (primary endpoint) did not differ significantly between the two groups. The percent change in plaque volume was significantly and negatively correlated with daily physical activity.Although risk factors, muscle strength, and exercise tolerance were improved by PII-CR, plaque regression did not differ significantly between the two study groups. A significant correlation between percent change in coronary plaque volume and physical activity was observed. A comprehensive phase II-CR, including frequent supervised exercise sessions and a program encouraging an increase in daily physical activity, may reduce plaque volume in patients after ACS (UMIN000006038). PMID:26549395

  1. Color image analysis in neuroanatomical research: application to senile plaque subtype quantification in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Defigueiredo, R J; Cummings, B J; Mundkur, P Y; Cotman, C W

    1995-01-01

    Many problems in neuroanatomy and neuropathology require the collection of large data sets and would benefit from a method that allows for rapid quantitative analysis to be carried out on a routine basis. An example is the quantification and subtype classification of the number of senile plaques in post-mortem Alzheimer's disease tissue. A method to reliably automate the analysis of plaques and their underlying subtypes would allow more rigorous and quantitative correlations to be investigated. Computer assisted image analysis of data typically utilizes gray scale images. These methods, however, are only applicable to quantification of objects labeled with a single marker. We sought to extend this type of analysis to double-labeled tissue sections so we could quantify dual labels separately based on their peroxidase color characteristics, analyze the resultant occurrence of overlap between the two labels, and classify senile plaques into discrete subtypes. We present a method for semi-automated color image analysis which allows one to identify separate labels based on histogram mapping of hue, saturation and value as well as apply overlapping feature detection algorithms. The technique is application driven, so that a trained observer can set threshold or object criteria and verify the desired results. These methods were able to yield total "amyloid load" and "dystrophic neurite load" values, generate plaque histograms based on total size, and subtype plaques into diffuse/primitive and neuritic/classical categories. By adjusting feature criteria, we were able to achieve promising agreement (Fisher's R to Z correlation of 0.94) between a human observer and the computer algorithm in the classification of plaque subtypes using three AD cases. PMID:7777139

  2. Mesure des magnitudes stellaires sur les plaques de la Carte du Ciel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoust, E.

    2008-06-01

    Le chapitre détaille la mesure des magnitudes stellaires sur les plaques de la Carte du Ciel. La méthode qui a été mise au point pour déterminer les magnitudes apparentes des étoiles des plaques de la Carte du Ciel est exposée. La plaque photographique est d'abord numérisée par un scanner du commerce, avec une résolution de 2400 dpi. Le fichier obtenu est analysé par le logiciel Sextractor, couramment utilisé pour créer des catalogues d'objets dans des images CCD grand champ. En parallèle, un catalogue des étoiles de magnitude connue dans la zone est créé, qui sert d'abord à calibrer le système de coordonnées de la plaque. Les objets détectés par Sextractor dont les coordonnées correspondent à celles d'étoiles connues servent ensuite à établir la relation entres les densités photographiques mesurées et les magnitudes stellaires bleues. En tenant compte d'un effet lié à la distance des étoiles au centre de la plaque, il est possible de déterminer des magnitudes apparentes avec une précision d'environ un tiers de magnitude. L'objectif est de rechercher des étoiles variables sur les dix mille plaques de la Carte du Ciel de la zone de Toulouse.

  3. The Diagnostic Performance of Coronary CT Angiography for the Assessment of Coronary Stenosis in Calcified Plaque

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yi; Zhu, Xiao-Mei; Zhang, Yu-Dong; Shi, Hai-Bin; Yu, Rong-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To prospectively evaluate the diagnostic performance of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) for the assessment of coronary stenosis in a calcified plaque, by using conventional coronary angiography (CAG) as a standard reference. Materials and Methods Eight hundred and ninety-four patients were known to have or have been suspicious of having coronary artery disease, underwent CCTA and conventional coronary angiography (CAG). All the images acquired were assessed. The calcified plaque in CCTA was classified into four types (I-IV) according to the ratio of calcified plaque volume to vessel circumference (RVTC). Overall diagnostic accuracy was made under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) analysis. CAG was used as the standard reference. Results A total of 12845 segments were evaluated in 894 patients, among which 4955 calcified plaques were detected on 3645(28.4%) segments by CCTA. The overall AUC, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were 0.939, 97.8%, 90.1%, 71.2% and 99.4%, respectively. In type I-II calcification, CCTA had high diagnostic performance in AUC (type I: 0.983; type II: 0.976), sensitivity (96.7%; 98.1%), specificity (99.8%; 97.0%), PPV (95.7%; 90.1%), NPV (99.8%; 99.5%) and accuracy (99.6%; 97.3%). In type III-IV calcification, CCTA has high performance in sensitivity (type III: 97.6%; type IV: 97.9%) and NPV (98.3%; 98.7%), moderate performance in AUC (0.877; 0.829), while remarkable decrease in specificity (78.7%; 67.9%), PPV (71.0%; 56.2%) and accuracy (84.9%; 76.8%). Conclusion CCTA has highest accuracy in diagnosing the coronary artery stenosis of type I-II calcified plaques, but has a significant decrease in specificity, PPV and accuracy in type III-IV calcified plaque. PMID:27149622

  4. Inhibition of amyloid-β plaque formation by α-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Bachhuber, Teresa; Katzmarski, Natalie; McCarter, Joanna F; Loreth, Desiree; Tahirovic, Sabina; Kamp, Frits; Abou-Ajram, Claudia; Nuscher, Brigitte; Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Müller, Alexandra; Prinz, Marco; Steiner, Harald; Hyman, Bradley T; Haass, Christian; Meyer-Luehmann, Melanie

    2015-07-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques and α-synuclein (α-syn)-rich Lewy bodies are the major neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease, respectively. An overlap of pathologies is found in most individuals with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and in more than 50% of AD cases. Their brains display substantial α-syn accumulation not only in Lewy bodies, but also in dystrophic neurites decorating Aβ plaques. Several studies report binding and coaggregation of Aβ and α-syn, yet the precise role of α-syn in amyloid plaque formation remains elusive. Here we performed intracerebral injections of α-syn-containing preparations into amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice (expressing APP695(KM670/671NL) and PSEN1(L166P) under the control of the neuron-specific Thy-1 promoter; referred to here as 'APPPS1'). Unexpectedly, α-syn failed to cross-seed Aβ plaques in vivo, but rather it inhibited plaque formation in APPPS1 mice coexpressing SNCA(A30P) (referred to here as 'APPPS1 × [A30P]aSYN' double-transgenic mice). This was accompanied by increased Aβ levels in cerebrospinal fluid despite unchanged overall Aβ levels. Notably, the seeding activity of Aβ-containing brain homogenates was considerably reduced by α-syn, and Aβ deposition was suppressed in grafted tissue from [A30P]aSYN transgenic mice. Thus, we conclude that an interaction between Aβ and α-syn leads to inhibition of Aβ deposition and to reduced plaque formation. PMID:26099047

  5. The Effect of Sucrose on Plaque and Saliva Urease Levels in vivo

    PubMed Central

    TORO, E; NASCIMENTO, MM; SUAREZ-PEREZ, E; BURNE, RA; ELIAS-BONETA, A; MOROU-BERMUDEZ, E

    2010-01-01

    Objective Dietary sugar exposures induce an immediate drop of the plaque pH. Based on in vitro observations, it was hypothesized that oral bacteria may rapidly respond to this environmental change by increasing the activity or expression of alkali-generating pathways, such as the urease pathway. The objective of this exploratory in vivo study was to determine the short-term effect of a brief sucrose exposure on plaque and saliva urease activity and expression, and to relate this effect to caries experience. Methods Urease activity levels were measured in plaque and saliva samples collected from 20 children during fasting conditions and 30 minutes after rinsing with a sucrose solution. Streptococcus salivarius ureC-specific mRNA in saliva was quantified using Real-Time RT-PCR. The impact of host-related factors, such as age, gender, sugar consumption, salivary mutans streptococci levels and caries status on urease activity was evaluated. Results Plaque urease activity under fasting conditions was higher in subjects with low caries and mutans streptococci levels. This difference was not observed after the sucrose exposure. The response of urease to sucrose in vivo did not depend on caries experience or salivary mutans levels. Significant increase in urease activity of plaque and saliva after exposure to sucrose was observed only in the subjects who had low urease levels at baseline. Conclusions The findings of this exploratory study suggest that plaque urease activity may have an important long-term influence in caries development but not during a cariogenic challenge. PMID:20096398

  6. The acid-tolerant microbiota associated with plaque from initial caries and healthy tooth surfaces.

    PubMed

    Svensäter, G; Borgström, M; Bowden, G H W; Edwardsson, S

    2003-01-01

    The intent of this study was to compare the inherent acid tolerance of bacteria in samples of dental plaque from tooth sites in subjects with and without initial caries. Plaque was collected from approximal surfaces showing early enamel caries and from healthy tooth surfaces in the same subjects, as well as from enamel surfaces of caries-free individuals. In addition to plating on blood agar, the plaque samples were plated directly on non-selective solid agar medium buffered to pH 7.0, 6.0, 5.5, 5.0, 4.5 and 4.0 to avoid any loss of adaptation to acid during primary isolation of plaque bacteria. The results showed that approximately 50% of the total cultivable plaque microbiota from caries, as well as healthy tooth sites, was able to grow at pH 5.5 and 1% at pH 5.0, pH values regarded as critical for the demineralization of tooth enamel. At pH 5.0, members of the genus Streptococcus were the dominant group, but mutans streptococci accounted for less than half of the streptococcal viable count. The other acid-tolerant streptococcal isolates included Streptococcus anginosus, Streptococcus constellatus, Streptococcus gordinii, Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus salivarius and SStreptococcus sanguis. Analysis of the results indicated that the mutans streptococci in dental plaque were highly variable with respect to acid tolerance, and that both caries and healthy sites harboured significant numbers of mutans streptococci that were not acid-tolerant. PMID:14571116

  7. Reproducibility of 3-dimensional ultrasound readings of volume of carotid atherosclerotic plaque

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Malte; Zielinski, Tomasz; Schremmer, Dieter; Stumpe, Klaus O

    2008-01-01

    Background Non-invasive 3-dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US) has emerged as the predominant approach for evaluating the progression of carotid atherosclerosis and its response to treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the quality of a central reading procedure concerning plaque volume (PV), measured by 3D US in a multinational US trial. Methods Two data sets of 45 and 60 3D US patient images of plaques (mean PV, 71.8 and 39.8 μl, respectively) were used. PV was assessed by means of manual planimetry. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was applied to determine reader variabilities. The repeatability coefficient (RC) and the coefficient of variation (CV) were used to investigate the effect of number of slices (S) in manual planimetry and plaque size on measurement variability. Results Intra-reader variability was small as reflected by ICCs of 0.985, 0.967 and 0.969 for 3 appointed readers. The ICC value generated between the 3 readers was 0.964, indicating that inter-reader variability was small, too. Subgroup analyses showed that both intra- and inter-reader variabilities were lower for larger than for smaller plaques. Mean CVs were similar for the 5S- and 10S-methods with a RC of 4.7 μl. The RC between both methods as well as the CVs were comparatively lower for larger plaques. Conclusion By implementing standardised central 3D US reading protocols and strict quality control procedures highly reliable ultrasonic re-readings of plaque images can be achieved in large multicentre trials. PMID:18727816

  8. Monte Carlo dosimetry for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd eye plaque brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, R. M.; Taylor, R. E. P.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2008-12-15

    A Monte Carlo study of dosimetry for eye plaque brachytherapy is performed. BrachyDose, an EGSnrc user code which makes use of Yegin's multi-geometry package, is used to fully model {sup 125}I (model 6711) and {sup 103}Pd (model 200) brachytherapy seeds and the standardized plaques of the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS). Three-dimensional dose distributions in the eye region are obtained. In general, dose to water is scored; however, the implications of replacing water with eye tissues are explored. The effect of the gold alloy (Modulay) backing is investigated and the dose is found to be sensitive to the elemental composition of the backing. The presence of the silicone polymer (Silastic) seed carrier results in substantial dose decreases relative to water, particularly for {sup 103}Pd. For a 20 mm plaque with a Modulay backing and Silastic insert, fully loaded with 24 seeds, the dose decrease relative to water is of the order of 14% for {sup 125}I and 20% for {sup 103}Pd at a distance of 1 cm from the inner sclera along the plaque's central axis. For the configurations of seeds used in COMS plaques, interseed attenuation is a small effect within the eye region. The introduction of an air interface results in a dose reduction in its vicinity which depends on the plaque's position within the eye and the radionuclide. Introducing bone in the eye's vicinity also causes dose reductions. The dose distributions in the eye for the two different radionuclides are compared and, for the same prescription dose, {sup 103}Pd generally offers a lower dose to critical normal structures. BrachyDose is sufficiently fast to allow full Monte Carlo dose calculations for routine clinical treatment planning.

  9. Emergence of a Large-Plaque Variant in Mice Infected with Coxsackievirus B3

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yao

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Coxsackieviruses are enteric viruses that frequently infect humans. To examine coxsackievirus pathogenesis, we orally inoculated mice with the coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) Nancy strain. Using HeLa cell plaque assays with agar overlays, we noticed that some fecal viruses generated plaques >100 times as large as inoculum viruses. These large-plaque variants emerged following viral replication in several different tissues. We identified a single amino acid change, N63Y, in the VP3 capsid protein that was sufficient to confer the large-plaque phenotype. Wild-type CVB3 and N63Y mutant CVB3 had similar plaque sizes when agarose was used in the overlay instead of agar. We determined that sulfated glycans in agar inhibited plaque formation by wild-type CVB3 but not by N63Y mutant CVB3. Furthermore, N63Y mutant CVB3 bound heparin, a sulfated glycan, less efficiently than wild-type CVB3 did. While N63Y mutant CVB3 had a growth defect in cultured cells and reduced attachment, it had enhanced replication and pathogenesis in mice. Infection with N63Y mutant CVB3 induced more severe hepatic damage than infection with wild-type CVB3, likely because N63Y mutant CVB3 disseminates more efficiently to the liver. Our data reinforce the idea that culture-adapted laboratory virus strains can have reduced fitness in vivo. N63Y mutant CVB3 may be useful as a platform to understand viral adaptation and pathogenesis in animal studies. PMID:27025249

  10. Molecular hydrogen stabilizes atherosclerotic plaque in low-density lipoprotein receptor-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Guohua; Zong, Chuanlong; Zhang, Zhaoqiang; Yu, Yang; Yao, Shutong; Jiao, Peng; Tian, Hua; Zhai, Lei; Zhao, Hui; Tian, Shuyan; Zhang, Xiangjian; Wu, Yun; Sun, Xuejun; Qin, Shucun

    2015-10-01

    Hydrogen (H(2)) attenuates the development of atherosclerosis in mouse models. We aimed to examine the effects of H(2) on atherosclerotic plaque stability. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-knockout (LDLR(-/-)) mice fed an atherogenic diet were dosed daily with H(2) and/or simvastatin. In vitro studies were carried out in an oxidized-LDL (ox-LDL)-stimulated macrophage-derived foam cell model treated with or without H(2). H(2) or simvastatin significantly