Sample records for instrumental adl iadl

  1. The Classic Measure of Disability in Activities of Daily Living Is Biased by Age but an Expanded IADL/ADL Measure Is Not

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate, by age, the performance of 2 disability measures based on needing help: one using 5 classic activities of daily living (ADL) and another using an expanded set of 14 activities including instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), walking, getting outside, and ADL (IADL/ADL). Methods. Guttman and item response theory (IRT) scaling methods are used with a large (N = 25,470) nationally representative household survey of individuals aged 18 years and older. Results. Guttman scalability of the ADL items increases steadily with age, reaching a high level at ages 75 years and older. That is reflected in an IRT model by age-related differential item functioning (DIF) resulting in age-biased measurement of ADL. Guttman scalability of the IADL/ADL items also increases with age but is lower than the ADL. Although age-related DIF also occurs with IADL/ADL items, DIF is lower in magnitude and balances out without causing age bias. Discussion. An IADL/ADL scale measuring need for help is hierarchical, unidimensional, and unbiased by age. It has greater content validity for measuring need for help in the community and shows greater sensitivity by age than the classic ADL measure. As demand for community services is increasing among adults of all ages, an expanded IADL/ADL measure is more useful than ADL. PMID:20100786

  2. Trends in ADL and IADL Disability in Community-Dwelling Older Adults in Shanghai, China, 1998–2008

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated trends in activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) disability from 1998 to 2008 among elder adults in Shanghai, China. Method. Our data came from 4 waves of the Shanghai Longitudinal Survey of Elderly Life and Opinion (1998, 2003, 2005, and 2008). ADL and IADL disabilities were recorded dichotomously (difficulty vs. no difficulty). The major independent variable was survey year. Covariates included demographics, socioeconomic conditions, family and social support, and other health conditions. Nested random-effect models were applied to estimate trends over time, referenced to 1998. Results. In comparison with the baseline year (1998), older adults in 2008 had lower odds of being ADL disabled, though the effect was no longer statistically significant when other health conditions were taken into account. Elders in 2003, 2005, and 2008 were 20%–26%, 17%–38%, and 53%–64% less likely to be IADL disabled than those in 1998, respectively, depending on the set of covariates included in the model. Discussion. Shanghai elders experienced substantial improvements in both ADL and IADL disability prevalence over the past decade. The trend toward improvement in IADL function is more consistent and substantial than that of ADL function. PMID:23525547

  3. Evaluating elements of executive functioning as predictors of instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs)

    PubMed Central

    Jefferson, Angela L.; Paul, Robert H.; Ozonoff, Al; Cohen, Ronald A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Executive functioning has been repeatedly linked to the integrity of instrumental activities of daily living (IADL). The present study examined the association of multiple executive functioning elements (i.e., working memory, generation, inhibition, planning, and sequencing) to IADLs among an older adult cohort at risk for future cognitive and functional decline. METHODS Seventy-two participants with prevalent but stable cardiovascular disease completed a neuropsychological protocol assessing multiple elements of executive functioning, including COWA, PASAT, DKEFS Color-Word Interference Test, DKEFS Trail-Making Test, DKEFS Tower Test, and Ruff Figural Fluency Test. Reliable informants completed a measure of IADLs. RESULTS Stepwise logistic regression selected a model involving a single significant predictor, a measure of inhibition (i.e., DKEFS Color-Word Interference Test), which had a significant regression coefficient. Subsequent correlation analyses confirmed an association between the inhibition measure and multiple IADL items. Inter-item comparisons among the IADLs revealed significant differences, such that telephone use and laundry were significantly more intact than most other IADLs while shopping and housekeeping were most compromised. CONCLUSIONS Our data suggest that inhibition, also known as susceptibility to interference, is most strongly related to IADL impairment among patients at risk for future cognitive and functional decline. PMID:16814980

  4. Establishing an Approach to Activity of Daily Living and Instrumental Activity of Daily Living Staging in the United States Adult Community-Dwelling Medicare Population

    PubMed Central

    Stineman, Margaret G.; Streim, Joel E.; Pan, Qiang; Kurichi, Jibby E.; Rose, Sophia Miryam Schüssler-Fiorenza; Xie, Dawei

    2014-01-01

    Background Stages quantify severity like conventional measures but further specify the activities that people are still able to perform without difficulty. Objective To develop Activity Limitation Stages for defining and monitoring groups of adult community-dwelling Medicare beneficiaries. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Community. Participants There were 14,670 respondents to the 2006 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey. Methods Stages were empirically derived for the Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) and the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs) by profiling the distribution of performance difficulties as reported by beneficiaries or their proxies. Stage prevalence estimates were determined, and associations with demographic and health variables were examined for all community-dwelling Medicare beneficiaries. Main outcome measures ADL and IADL stage prevalence. Results Stages (0-IV) define 5 groups across the separate ADL and IADL domains according to hierarchically organized profiles of retained abilities and difficulties. For example, at ADL-I, people are guaranteed to be able to eat, toilet, dress, and bathe/shower without difficulty, whereas they experience limitations getting in and out of bed or chairs and difficulties walking. In 2006, an estimated 6.0, 2.9, 2.2, and 0.5 million beneficiaries had mild (ADL-I), moderate (ADL-II), severe (ADL-III), and complete (ADL-IV) difficulties, respectively, with estimates for IADL stages even higher. ADL and IADL stages showed expected associations with age and health-related concepts, supporting construct validity. Stages showed the strongest associations with conditions that impair cognition. Conclusions Stages as aggregate measures reveal the ADLs and IADLs that people are still able to do without difficulty, along with those activities in which they report having difficulty, consequently emphasizing how groups of people with difficulties can still participate in their own lives. Over the coming decades, stages applied to populations served by vertically integrated clinical practices could facilitate large-scale planning, with the goal of maximizing personal autonomy among groups of community-dwelling people with disabilities. PMID:24798263

  5. Alexandria Digital Library (ADL)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The ADL collection provides searching capabilities over geographically-referenced materials. Geographically-referenced means information objects are associated with one or more regions, often called footprints, on the Earth's surface. The ADL collection contains information that supports basic science, including the Earth and social sciences. The ADL collection offers geospatial search as the primary search mechanism. This collection contains photographs, digital elevation models, digital raster graphics, Landsat and AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) satellite imagery and world maps.

  6. Trajectories of Mobility and IADL Function in Older Patients Diagnosed with Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Pieper, Carl F.; Blazer, Dan G.; Fillenbaum, Gerda G.; Steffens, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Research has shown an association between depression and functional limitations in older adults. Our aim was to explore the latent traits of trajectories of limitations in mobility and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) tasks in a sample of older adults diagnosed with major depression. Methods Participants were 248 patients enrolled in a naturalistic depression treatment study. Mobility/IADL tasks included walking ¼ mile, going up/down stairs, getting around the neighborhood, shopping, handling money, taking care of children, cleaning house, preparing meals, and doing yardwork/gardening. Latent class trajectory analysis was used to identify classes of mobility/IADL function over a 4-year period. Class membership was then used to predict functional status over time. Results Using time as the only predictor, three latent class trajectories were identified: 1) Patients with few mobility/IADL limitations (42%), 2) Patients with considerable mobility/IADL limitations (37%), and 3) Patients with basically no limitations (21%). The classes differed primarily in their initial functional status, with some immediate improvement followed by no further change for patients in classes 1 and 2, and a stable course for patients in class 3. In a repeated measures mixed model controlling for potential confounders, class was a significant predictor of functional status. The effect of baseline depression score, cognitive status, self-perceived health, and sex on mobility/IADL score differed by class. Conclusions These findings show systematic variability in functional status over time among older patients with major depression, indicating that a single trajectory may not reflect the pattern for all patients. PMID:19548209

  7. Shallow encoding and forgetting are associated with dependence in instrumental activities of daily living among older adults living with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Fazeli, Pariya L; Doyle, Katie L; Scott, J Cobb; Iudicello, Jennifer E; Casaletto, Kaitlin B; Weber, Erica; Moore, David J; Morgan, Erin E; Grant, Igor; Woods, Steven Paul

    2014-05-01

    Aging and HIV are both risk factors for memory deficits and declines in real-world functioning. However, we know little about the profile of memory deficits driving instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) declines across the lifespan in HIV. This study examined 145 younger (<50 years) and 119 older (?50 years) adults with HIV who completed the California Verbal Learning Test-Second Edition (CVLT-II), the Wechsler Memory Scale-Third Edition Logical Memory subtest (WMS-III LM), and a modified Lawton and Brody ADL questionnaire. No memory predictors of IADL dependence emerged in the younger cohort. In the older group, IADL dependence was uniquely associated with worse performance on all primary CVLT-II variables, as well as elevated recency effects. Poorer immediate and delayed recall of the WMS-III LM was also associated with IADL dependence, although recognition was intact. Findings suggest older HIV-infected adults with shallow encoding and forgetting are at risk for IADL dependence. PMID:24695591

  8. Examination of Children's Recess Physical Activity Patterns Using the Activities for Daily Living-Playground Participation (ADL-PP) Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stellino, Megan Babkes; Sinclair, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Thorough assessment of children's physical activity is essential to efficacious interventions to reduce childhood obesity prevalence. The purpose of this study was to examine children's recess physical activity (RPA) patterns of behavior using the Activities of Daily Living-Playground Participation (ADL-PP: Watkinson et al., 2001)…

  9. HomeADL for adaptive ADL monitoring within smart homes.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xin; Nugent, Chris D; Finlay, Dewar D; Mulvenna, Maurice

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present homeADL: a representation standard for an inference hierarchy of activities of daily living which may be monitored in a sensor equipped smart home. The approach allows a free exchange of ADL monitoring structures between different communities who share the same concern of providing high quality healthcare to the elderly. Its ability of matching different ADL protocols enables a mapping between an ADL protocol to a suitable smart home which makes an effective management of smart homes within a community hence, not only being able to satisfy an individual's healthcare requirements but also efficiently using monitoring resources at hand. PMID:19163419

  10. Preliminary cognitive scale of basic and instrumental activities of daily living for dementia and mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Bailón, María; Montoro-Membila, Nuria; Garcia-Morán, Tamara; Arnedo-Montoro, María Luisa; Funes Molina, María Jesús

    2015-05-01

    In the present study we explored cognitive and functional deficits in patients with multidomain mild cognitive impairment (MCI), patients with dementia, and healthy age-matched control participants using the Cognitive Scale for Basic and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living, a new preliminary informant-based assessment tool. This tool allowed us to evaluate four key cognitive abilities-task memory schema, error detection, problem solving, and task self-initiation-in a range of basic and instrumental activities of daily living (BADL and IADL, respectively). The first part of the present study was devoted to testing the psychometric adequateness of this new informant-based tool and its convergent validity with other global functioning and neuropsychological measures. The second part of the study was aimed at finding the patterns of everyday cognitive factors that best discriminate between the three groups. We found that patients with dementia exhibited impairment in all cognitive abilities in both basic and instrumental activities. By contrast, patients with MCI were found to have preserved task memory schema in both types of ADL; however, such patients exhibited deficits in error detection and task self-initiation but only in IADL. Finally, patients with MCI also showed a generalized problem solving deficit that affected even BADL. Studying various cognitive processes instantiated in specific ADL differing in complexity seems a promising strategy to further understand the specific relationships between cognition and function in these and other cognitively impaired populations. PMID:25805061

  11. Validation of the Dementia Care Assessment Packet-Instrumental Activities of Daily Living

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seok Bum; Park, Jeong Ran; Yoo, Jeong-Hwa; Park, Joon Hyuk; Lee, Jung Jae; Yoon, Jong Chul; Jhoo, Jin Hyeong; Lee, Dong Young; Woo, Jong Inn; Han, Ji Won; Huh, Yoonseok; Kim, Tae Hui

    2013-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the psychometric properties of the IADL measure included in the Dementia Care Assessment Packet (DCAP-IADL) in dementia patients. Methods The study involved 112 dementia patients and 546 controls. The DCAP-IADL was scored in two ways: observed score (OS) and predicted score (PS). The reliability of the DCAP-IADL was evaluated by testing its internal consistency, inter-rater reliability and test-retest reliability. Discriminant validity was evaluated by comparing the mean OS and PS between dementia patients and controls by ANCOVA. Pearson or Spearman correlation analysis was performed with other instruments to assess concurrent validity. Receiver operating characteristics curve analysis was performed to examine diagnostic accuracy. Results Chronbach's ? coefficients of the DCAP-IADL were above 0.7. The values in dementia patients were much higher (OS=0.917, PS=0.927), indicating excellent degrees of internal consistency. Inter-rater reliabilities and test-retest reliabilities were statistically significant (p<0.05). PS exhibited higher reliabilities than OS. The mean OS and PS of dementia patients were significantly higher than those of the non-demented group after controlling for age, sex and education level. The DCAP-IADL was significantly correlated with other IADL instruments and MMSE-KC (p<0.001). Areas under the curves of the DCAP-IADL were above 0.9. Conclusion The DCAP-IADL is a reliable and valid instrument for evaluating instrumental ability of daily living for the elderly, and may also be useful for screening dementia. Moreover, administering PS may enable the DCAP-IADL to overcome the differences in gender, culture and life style that hinders accurate evaluation of the elderly in previous IADL instruments. PMID:24302946

  12. Type of High-School Credentials and Older Age ADL and IADL Limitations: Is the GED Credential Equivalent to a Diploma?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Sze Yan; Chavan, Niraj R.; Glymour, M. Maria

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Educational attainment is a robust predictor of disability in elderly Americans: older adults with high-school (HS) diplomas have substantially lower disability than individuals who did not complete HS. General Educational Development (GED) diplomas now comprise almost 20% of new HS credentials issued annually in the United States but it…

  13. Developing next generation ADLs through MDE techniques

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Davide Di Ruscio; Ivano Malavolta; Henry Muccini; Patrizio Pelliccione; Alfonso Pierantonio

    2010-01-01

    Despite the flourishing of languages to describe software architectures,\\u000aexisting Architecture Description Languages (ADLs) are still\\u000afar away from what it is actually needed. In fact, while they support\\u000aa traditional perception of a Software Architecture (SA) as a set of\\u000aconstituting elements (such as components, connectors and interfaces),\\u000athey mostly fail to capture multiple stakeholders concerns\\u000aand their design

  14. Staging Activity Limitation and Participation Restriction in Elderly Community-Dwelling Persons According to Difficulties in Self-Care and Domestic Life Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Stineman, Margaret G.; Henry-Sánchez, John T.; Kurichi, Jibby E.; Pan, Qiang; Xie, Dawei; Saliba, Debra; Zhang, Zi; Streim, Joel E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to describe the conceptual foundation and development of an activity limitation and participation restriction staging system for community-dwelling people 70 yrs or older according to the severity and types of self-care (activities of daily living [ADLs]) and domestic life (instrumental ADLs (IADLs)) limitations experienced. Design Data from the second Longitudinal Study of Aging (N = 9447) were used to develop IADL stages through the analyses of self- and proxy-reported difficulties in performing IADLs. An analysis of activity limitation profiles identified hierarchical thresholds of difficulty that defined each stage. IADL stages are combined with ADL stages to profile status for independent living. Results IADL stages define five ordered thresholds of increasing activity limitations and a “not relevant” stage for those who normally have someone else do those activities. Approximately 42% of the population experience IADL limitations. To achieve a stage, a person must meet or exceed stage-specific thresholds of retained functioning defined for each activity. Combined ADL and IADL stages de-fine 29 patterns of activity limitations expressing the individual’s potential for participating in life situations pertinent to self-care and independent community life. Conclusions ADL and IADL stages can serve to distinguish between groups of people according to both severity and the types of limitations experienced during home or outpatient assessments, in population surveillance, and in research. PMID:22248806

  15. Alexandria Digital Library Project The ADL Gazetteer Protocol

    E-print Network

    Janée, Greg

    Alexandria Digital Library Project The ADL Gazetteer Protocol Greg Janée gjanee@alexandria.ucsb.edu #12;Alexandria Digital Library Project 2Greg Janée / ESRI User Conference / July 11, 2001 Outline Goals Abstract gazetteer model Services Query language Examples #12;Alexandria Digital Library Project 3

  16. Good Architecture = Good (ADL + Practices) Vincent Le Gloahec

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Good Architecture = Good (ADL + Practices) Vincent Le Gloahec 1,3 , Regis Fleurquin 2 , and Salah of the software architecture. We treat rst the case of architecture design activity because it's the basis from the context of our indus- trial partner. Key words: Best Practices, Design, Software Architecture

  17. Dependence for basic and instrumental activities of daily living after hip fractures.

    PubMed

    González-Zabaleta, Jorge; Pita-Fernandez, Salvador; Seoane-Pillado, Teresa; López-Calviño, Beatriz; Gonzalez-Zabaleta, Jose Luis

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study is to determine basic activities of daily living (Barthel Index) and instrumental activities of daily living (Lawton-Brody Index) before and after hip fracture. Follow-up study of patients (n=100) with hip fracture, operated at Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de A Coruña (Spain). Period January/2009-December/2011. Demographic characteristic of the patients, Charlson Index, Glomerular filtration rate, Barthel index, Lawton index, type of proximal femur fracture and surgical treatment delay were recorded. Multivariate regression was performed. Informed patient consent and ethical review approval were obtained. Before fracture were independent for activities of daily living (ADL) a 38.0%, at 90 days were 15.4%. The Barthel index score decreased from 75.2±28.2 to 56.5±31.8) (p<0.0001). If we consider the age, gender, comorbidity (Charlson index), renal function, fracture type and surgical delay objectify the only independent variable to predict dependency effect is age. If we also consider the Barthel score objectify the variable that significantly modifies that score at 90 days is the baseline value of the index. The prevalence of independence for instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) at the baseline moment is 11% and at 90 days is decreased to 2.2%. There is a decrease in the independence effect in all activities. The variable predictor of independence for all activities after taking into consideration age, sex, comorbidity, fracture type, surgical delay and renal function is the baseline score of the Barthel and Lawton index. PMID:25465506

  18. Audio Development Laboratory (ADL) User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romero, Andy

    2012-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ADL. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  19. Evaluation of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living in Greek Patients with Advanced Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mystakidou, Kyriaki; Parpa, Efi; Tsilika, Eleni; Panagiotoua, Irene; Roumeliotou, Anna; Symeonidi, Matina; Galanos, Antonis; Kouvaris, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Translation of the instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) was carried out and its psychometric properties were assessed in a Greek sample of patients with advanced cancer. The scale was translated with the forward-backward procedure into the Greek language. It was initially administered to 136 advanced cancer patients. To assess…

  20. Two-year course of cognitive function and instrumental activities of daily living in older adults with bipolar disorder: evidence for neuroprogression?

    PubMed Central

    Gildengers, A. G.; Chisholm, D.; Butters, M. A.; Anderson, S. J.; Begley, A.; Holm, M.; Rogers, J. C.; Reynolds, C. F.; Mulsant, B. H.

    2013-01-01

    Background While bipolar disorder (BD) is a leading cause of disability, and an important contributor to disability in BD is cognitive impairment, there is little systematic research on the longitudinal course of cognitive function and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) in late-life. In this report, we characterize the 2-year course of cognitive function and IADLs in older adults with BD. Method We recruited non-demented individuals 50 years and older with BD I or BD II (n=47) from out-patient clinics or treatment studies at the University of Pittsburgh. Comparator subjects (`controls') were 22 individuals of comparable age and education with no psychiatric or neurologic history, but similar levels of cardiovascular disease. We assessed cognitive function and IADLs at baseline, 1- and 2-year time-points. The neuropsychological evaluation comprised 21 well-established and validated tests assessing multiple cognitive domains. We assessed IADLs using a criterion-referenced, performance-based instrument. We employed repeated-measures mixed-effects linear models to examine trajectory of cognitive function. We employed non-parametric tests for analysis of IADLs. Results The BD group displayed worse cognitive function in all domains and worse IADL performance than the comparator group at baseline and over follow-up. Global cognitive function and IADLs were correlated at all time-points. The BD group did not exhibit accelerated cognitive decline over 2 years. Conclusions Over 2 years, cognitive impairment and associated functional disability of older adults with BD appear to be due to long-standing neuroprogressive processes compounded by normal cognitive aging rather than accelerated cognitive loss in old age. PMID:22846332

  1. 42 CFR 441.520 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...ADLs, IADLs, and health-related tasks through...ADLs, IADLs, and health-related tasks...to transition from a nursing facility, institution for mental diseases, or...

  2. 42 CFR 441.520 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...ADLs, IADLs, and health-related tasks through...ADLs, IADLs, and health-related tasks...to transition from a nursing facility, institution for mental diseases, or...

  3. 42 CFR 441.520 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...ADLs, IADLs, and health-related tasks through...ADLs, IADLs, and health-related tasks...to transition from a nursing facility, institution for mental diseases, or...

  4. Impact of gait speed and instrumental activities of daily living on all-cause mortality in adults ?65 years with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lo, Alexander X; Donnelly, John P; McGwin, Gerald; Bittner, Vera; Ahmed, Ali; Brown, Cynthia J

    2015-03-15

    Mobility and function are important predictors of survival. However, their combined impact on mortality in adults ?65 years with heart failure (HF) is not well understood. This study examined the role of gait speed and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) in all-cause mortality in a cohort of 1,119 community-dwelling Cardiovascular Health Study participants ?65 years with incident HF. Data on HF and mortality were collected through annual examinations or contact during the 10-year follow-up period. Slower gait speed (<0.8 m/s vs ?0.8 m/s) and IADL impairment (?1 vs 0 areas of dependence) were determined from baseline and follow-up assessments. A total of 740 (66%) of the 1,119 participants died during the follow-up period. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models showed that impairments in either gait speed (hazard ratio 1.37, 95% confidence interval 1.10 to 1.70; p = 0.004) or IADL (hazard ratio 1.56, 95% confidence interval 1.29-1.89; p <0.001), measured within 1 year before the diagnosis of incident HF, were independently associated with mortality, adjusting for sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. The combined presence of slower gait speed and IADL impairment was associated with a greater risk of mortality and suggested an additive relation between gait speed and IADL. In conclusion, gait speed and IADL are important risk factors for mortality in adults ?65 years with HF, but the combined impairments of both gait speed and IADL can have an especially important impact on mortality. PMID:25655868

  5. Towards the Architectural Definition of the Health Watcher System with AO-ADL

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Monica Pinto; Nadia Gamez; Lidia Fuentes

    2007-01-01

    AO-ADL is an aspect-oriented architecture description language. The main contributions of AO-ADL are two. First contribution is the definition of a symmetric composition model, where functional and non-functional concerns are modeled by the same architectural block. Second contribution is the extension of the semantic of connectors with aspectual composition information. In this paper we describe the software architecture of the

  6. Firearms in Frail Hands: An ADL or A Public Health Crisis!

    PubMed

    Patel, Dupal; Syed, Quratulain; Messinger-Rapport, Barbara J; Rader, Erin

    2015-06-01

    The incidence of neurocognitive disorders, which may impair the ability of older adults to perform activities of daily living (ADLs), rises with age. Depressive symptoms are also common in older adults and may affect ADLs. Safe storage and utilization of firearms are complex ADLs, which require intact judgment, executive function, and visuospatial ability, and may be affected by cognitive impairment. Depression or cognitive impairment may cause paranoia, delusions, disinhibition, apathy, or aggression and thereby limit the ability to safely utilize firearms. These problems may be superimposed upon impaired mobility, arthritis, visual impairment, or poor balance. Inadequate attention to personal protection may also cause hearing impairment and accidents. In this article, we review the data on prevalence of firearms access among older adults; safety concerns due to age-related conditions; barriers to addressing this problem; indications prompting screening for firearms access; and resources available to patients, caregivers, and health care providers. PMID:25107933

  7. Intravascular injections of a conditional replicative adenovirus (adl118) prevent metastatic disease in human breast carcinoma xenografts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A Fabra; C Parada; A Vinyals; P Martín Duque; V Fernandez; R Sanchez-Prieto; S Ramon y Cajal

    2001-01-01

    We describe a study showing that the adenovirus adl118, lacking both E1B proteins, very efficiently kills human malignant cells ‘in vitro’ and ‘in vivo’. Since many breast cancer patients do not have metastasis at the time of diagnosis, but finally develop it, we planned to study whether intravascular injections of adl118 could prevent metastatic development. We studied the effects of

  8. A Co-Twin Control Study of Physical Function in Elderly African American Women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sylvia E. Furner; Barbara E. Giloth; Lester Arguelles; Toni P. Miles; Jack H. Goldberg

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated variables associated with physical functioning limitations among elderly African American women, controlling for genetics and common family environment. Method: Activities of daily living limitations (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living limitations (IADL) are examined in 180 pairs of African American elderly twins using a co-twin control design. The association of chronic disease, other physical problems,

  9. Women Over 50: Caregiving Issues

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rosalie J. Ackerman; Martha E. Banks

    Caregiving involves direct personal assistance [assistance with activities of daily living (ADLs3) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs4)], as well as primary responsibility for the health and welfare of people receiving informal care in the community or formal\\u000a care in institutions. Many women over the age of 50 provide caregiving.

  10. MDS-Based State Medicaid Reimbursement and the ADL-Decline Quality Indicator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellows, Nicole M.; Halpin, Helen A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We examined the relationship between the quality indicator for decline in activities of daily living (ADL) and the use of the Minimum Data Set (MDS) for determining Medicaid skilled nursing facility reimbursement. Design and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis using the 2004 National MDS Facility Quality Indicator reports as…

  11. MDS-Based State Medicaid Reimbursement and the ADL-Decline Quality Indicator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicole M. Bellows; Helen A. Halpin

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We examined the relationship between the quality indicator for decline in activities of daily living (ADL) and the use of the Minimum Data Set (MDS) for determining Medicaid skilled nursing facility reim- bursement. Design and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis using the 2004 National MDS Facility Quality Indicator reports as the de- pendent variable in a multilevel regression

  12. Hospital Readmission among Older Adults Who Return Home with Unmet Need for ADL Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePalma, Glen; Xu, Huiping; Covinsky, Kenneth E.; Craig, Bruce A.; Stallard, Eric; Thomas, Joseph, III.; Sands, Laura P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study determined whether returning to the community from a recent hospitalization with unmet activities of daily living (ADL) need was associated with probability of readmission. Methods: A total of 584 respondents to the 1994, 1999, and/or 2004 National Long-Term Care Surveys (NLTCS) who were hospitalized within 90 days prior to the…

  13. Monitoring Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) of Elderly Based on 3D Key Human Postures

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of these activities require to detect a fine description of human body such as postures. For this purpose, we proposeMonitoring Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) of Elderly Based on 3D Key Human Postures Nadia ZOUBA analysis component contains person detection, person tracking and human posture recognition. A human

  14. JPSS Cryosphere Algorithms: Integration and Testing in Algorithm Development Library (ADL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsidulko, M.; Mahoney, R. L.; Meade, P.; Baldwin, D.; Tschudi, M. A.; Das, B.; Mikles, V. J.; Chen, W.; Tang, Y.; Sprietzer, K.; Zhao, Y.; Wolf, W.; Key, J.

    2014-12-01

    JPSS is a next generation satellite system that is planned to be launched in 2017. The satellites will carry a suite of sensors that are already on board the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite. The NOAA/NESDIS/STAR Algorithm Integration Team (AIT) works within the Algorithm Development Library (ADL) framework which mimics the operational JPSS Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS). The AIT contributes in development, integration and testing of scientific algorithms employed in the IDPS. This presentation discusses cryosphere related activities performed in ADL. The addition of a new ancillary data set - NOAA Global Multisensor Automated Snow/Ice data (GMASI) - with ADL code modifications is described. Preliminary GMASI impact on the gridded Snow/Ice product is estimated. Several modifications to the Ice Age algorithm that demonstrates mis-classification of ice type for certain areas/time periods are tested in the ADL. Sensitivity runs for day time, night time and terminator zone are performed and presented. Comparisons between the original and modified versions of the Ice Age algorithm are also presented.

  15. Predicting ADL disability in community-dwelling elderly people using physical frailty indicators: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Disability in Activities of Daily Living (ADL) is an adverse outcome of frailty that places a burden on frail elderly people, care providers and the care system. Knowing which physical frailty indicators predict ADL disability is useful in identifying elderly people who might benefit from an intervention that prevents disability or increases functioning in daily life. The objective of this study was to systematically review the literature on the predictive value of physical frailty indicators on ADL disability in community-dwelling elderly people. Methods A systematic search was performed in 3 databases (PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE) from January 1975 until April 2010. Prospective, longitudinal studies that assessed the predictive value of individual physical frailty indicators on ADL disability in community-dwelling elderly people aged 65 years and older were eligible for inclusion. Articles were reviewed by two independent reviewers who also assessed the quality of the included studies. Results After initial screening of 3081 titles, 360 abstracts were scrutinized, leaving 64 full text articles for final review. Eventually, 28 studies were included in the review. The methodological quality of these studies was rated by both reviewers on a scale from 0 to 27. All included studies were of high quality with a mean quality score of 22.5 (SD 1.6). Findings indicated that individual physical frailty indicators, such as weight loss, gait speed, grip strength, physical activity, balance, and lower extremity function are predictors of future ADL disability in community-dwelling elderly people. Conclusions This review shows that physical frailty indicators can predict ADL disability in community-dwelling elderly people. Slow gait speed and low physical activity/exercise seem to be the most powerful predictors followed by weight loss, lower extremity function, balance, muscle strength, and other indicators. These findings should be interpreted with caution because the data of the different studies could not be pooled due to large variations in operationalization of the indicators and ADL disability across the included studies. Nevertheless, our study suggests that monitoring physical frailty indicators in community-dwelling elderly people might be useful to identify elderly people who could benefit from disability prevention programs. PMID:21722355

  16. Sarcopenic Obesity Predicts Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Disability in the Elderly

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard N. Baumgartner; Sharon J. Wayne; Debra L. Waters; Ian Janssen; Dympna Gallagher; John E. Morley

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the association of sarcopenic obesity with the onset of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) disability in a cohort of 451 elderly men and women followed for up to 8 years.Research Methods and Procedures: Sarcopenic obesity was defined at study baseline as appendicular skeletal muscle mass divided by stature squared <7.26 kg\\/m2 in men and 5.45 kg\\/m2

  17. Behavioral Intention to Use a Virtual Instrumental Activities of Daily Living System Among People With Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Richard; White, Marga; Diamond, Paul

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to investigate the behavioral intention to use (BIU) regarding a virtual system for practicing instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) among people with stroke. METHOD. Fourteen people who had sustained a stroke used a virtual world–based system over four sessions to participate in virtual occupations of preparing meals and putting away groceries. To investigate intention to use the technology, participants responded to a questionnaire based on the Technology Acceptance Model and were interviewed about the experience. RESULTS. Analysis of questionnaire responses revealed favorable attitudes toward the technology and statistically significant correlations between these attitudes and positive BIU. Analysis of qualitative data revealed four themes to support system use: Use of the affected arm increased, the virtual practice was enjoyable, the technology was user-friendly, and the system reflected real-life activities. CONCLUSION. This study shows that participants reported a positive BIU for the virtual system for practicing IADLs. PMID:25871604

  18. Predictors of Improvement or Decline in Instrumental Activities of Daily Living among Community-Dwelling Older Japanese

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoshinori Fujiwara; Hiroto Yoshida; Hidenori Amano; Taro Fukaya; Jersey Liang; Hayato Uchida; Shoji Shinkai

    2008-01-01

    Background: To explore predictors of functional improvement or decline in instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) among community-dwelling older people. Methods: Of all the residents (?65 years, n = 1,673) living in Yoita town, Niigata prefecture, Japan, in 2000, 1,544 subjects who participated in the baseline interview survey (T1) were followed up until 2002 (T2). A wide range of variables

  19. Trends in US Older Adult Disability: Exploring Age, Period, and Cohort Effects

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Audrey N.; Finch, Brian K.; Hummer, Robert A.; Master, Ryan K.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We elucidated how US late-life disability prevalence has changed over the past 3 decades. Methods. We examined activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) disability trends by using age–period–cohort (APC) models among older adults aged 70 years or older who responded to the National Health Interview Survey between 1982 and 2009. We fitted logistic regressions for ADL and IADL disabilities and for each of the 3 APC trends with 2 models: unadjusted and fully adjusted for age, period, cohort, and sociodemographic variables. Results. The unadjusted and adjusted period trends showed a substantial decline in IADL disability, and ADL disability remained stable across time. Unadjusted cohort trends for both outcomes also showed continual declines across successive cohorts; however, increasing cohort trends were evident in the adjusted models. Conclusions. More recent cohorts of US older adults are becoming more disabled, net of aging and period effects. The net upward cohort trends in ADL and IADL disabilities remain unexplained. Further studies should explore cohort-specific determinants contributing to the increase of cohort-based disability among US older adults. PMID:22994192

  20. A systematic review of instruments for assessment of capacity in activities of daily living in children with developmental co-ordination disorder.

    PubMed

    van der Linde, B W; van Netten, J J; Otten, E; Postema, K; Geuze, R H; Schoemaker, M M

    2015-01-01

    Children with developmental co-ordination disorder (DCD) face evident motor difficulties in activities of daily living (ADL). Assessment of their capacity in ADL is essential for diagnosis and intervention, in order to limit the daily consequences of the disorder. The aim of this study is to systematically review potential instruments for standardized and objective assessment of children's capacity in ADL, suited for children with DCD. As a first step, databases of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsycINFO were searched to identify studies that described instruments with potential for assessment of capacity in ADL. Second, instruments were included for review when two independent reviewers agreed that the instruments (1) are standardized and objective; (2) assess at activity level and comprise items that reflect ADL; and (3) are applicable to school-aged children that can move independently. Out of 1507 publications, 66 publications were selected, describing 39 instruments. Seven of these instruments were found to fulfil the criteria and were included for review: the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Performance-2 (BOT2); the Do-Eat (Do-Eat); the Movement Assessment Battery for Children-2 (MABC2); the school-Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (schoolAMPS); the Tuffts Assessment of Motor Performance (TAMP); the Test of Gross Motor Development (TGMD); and the Functional Independence Measure for Children (WeeFIM). As a third step, for the included instruments, suitability for children with DCD was discussed based on the ADL comprised, ecological validity and other psychometric properties. We concluded that current instruments do not provide comprehensive and ecologically valid assessment of capacity in ADL as required for children with DCD. PMID:24283800

  1. The Arabidopsis Cell Plate-Associated Dynamin-Like Protein, ADL1Ap, Is Required for Multiple Stages of Plant Growth and Development1

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Byung-Ho; Busse, James S.; Dickey, Carrie; Rancour, David M.; Bednarek, Sebastian Y.

    2001-01-01

    Dynamin and dynamin-like proteins are GTP-binding proteins involved in vesicle trafficking. In soybean, a 68-kD dynamin-like protein called phragmoplastin has been shown to be associated with the cell plate in dividing cells (Gu and Verma, 1996). Five ADL1 genes encoding dynamin-like proteins related to phragmoplastin have been identified in the completed Arabidopsis genome. Here we report that ADL1Ap is associated with punctate subcellular structures and with the cell plate in dividing cells. To assess the function of ADL1Ap we utilized a reverse genetic approach to isolate three separate Arabidopsis mutant lines containing T-DNA insertions in ADL1A. Homozygous adl1A seeds were shriveled and mutant seedlings arrested soon after germination, producing only two leaf primordia and severely stunted roots. Immunoblotting revealed that ADL1Ap expression was not detectable in the mutants. Despite the loss of ADL1Ap, the mutants did not display any defects in cytokinesis, and growth of the mutant seedlings could be rescued in tissue culture by the addition of sucrose. Although these sucrose-rescued plants displayed normal vegetative growth and flowered, they set very few seeds. Thus, ADL1Ap is critical for several stages of plant development, including embryogenesis, seedling development, and reproduction. We discuss the putative role of ADL1Ap in vesicular trafficking, cytokinesis, and other aspects of plant growth. PMID:11351070

  2. A SIMPLE FRAILTY QUESTIONNAIRE (FRAIL) PREDICTS OUTCOMES IN MIDDLE AGED AFRICAN AMERICANS

    PubMed Central

    MORLEY, J.E.; MALMSTROM, T.K.; MILLER, D.K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To validate the FRAIL scale. Design Longitudinal study. Setting Community. Participants Representative sample of African Americans age 49 to 65 years at onset of study. Measurements The 5-item FRAIL scale (Fatigue, Resistance, Ambulation, Illnesses, & Loss of Weight), at baseline and activities of daily living (ADLs), instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), mortality, short physical performance battery (SPPB), gait speed, one-leg stand, grip strength and injurious falls at baseline and 9 years. Blood tests for CRP, SIL6R, STNFR1, STNFR2 and 25 (OH) vitamin D at baseline. Results Cross-sectionally the FRAIL scale correlated significantly with IADL difficulties, SPPB, grip strength and one-leg stand among participants with no baseline ADL difficulties (N=703) and those outcomes plus gait speed in those with no baseline ADL dependencies (N=883). TNFR1 was increased in pre-frail and frail subjects and CRP in some subgroups. Longitudinally (N=423 with no baseline ADL difficulties or N=528 with no baseline ADL dependencies), and adjusted for the baseline value for each outcome, being pre-frail at baseline significantly predicted future ADL difficulties, worse one-leg stand scores, and mortality in both groups, plus IADL difficulties in the dependence-excluded group. Being frail at baseline significantly predicted future ADL difficulties, IADL difficulties, and mortality in both groups, plus worse SPPB in the dependence-excluded group. Conclusion This study has validated the FRAIL scale in a late middle-aged African American population. This simple 5-question scale is an excellent screening test for clinicians to identify frail persons at risk of developing disability as well as decline in health functioning and mortality. PMID:22836700

  3. Ecological Assessment of Autonomy in Instrumental Activities of Daily Living in Dementia Patients by the Means of an Automatic Video Monitoring System

    PubMed Central

    König, Alexandra; Crispim-Junior, Carlos Fernando; Covella, Alvaro Gomez Uria; Bremond, Francois; Derreumaux, Alexandre; Bensadoun, Gregory; David, Renaud; Verhey, Frans; Aalten, Pauline; Robert, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the assessment of autonomy and functional ability involves clinical rating scales. However, scales are often limited in their ability to provide objective and sensitive information. By contrast, information and communication technologies may overcome these limitations by capturing more fully functional as well as cognitive disturbances associated with Alzheimer disease (AD). We investigated the quantitative assessment of autonomy in dementia patients based not only on gait analysis but also on the participant performance on instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) automatically recognized by a video event monitoring system (EMS). Three groups of participants (healthy controls, mild cognitive impairment, and AD patients) had to carry out a standardized scenario consisting of physical tasks (single and dual task) and several IADL such as preparing a pillbox or making a phone call while being recorded. After, video sensor data were processed by an EMS that automatically extracts kinematic parameters of the participants’ gait and recognizes their carried out activities. These parameters were then used for the assessment of the participants’ performance levels, here referred as autonomy. Autonomy assessment was approached as classification task using artificial intelligence methods that takes as input the parameters extracted by the EMS, here referred as behavioral profile. Activities were accurately recognized by the EMS with high precision. The most accurately recognized activities were “prepare medication” with 93% and “using phone” with 89% precision. The diagnostic group classifier obtained a precision of 73.46% when combining the analyses of physical tasks with IADL. In a further analysis, the created autonomy group classifier which obtained a precision of 83.67% when combining physical tasks and IADL. Results suggest that it is possible to quantitatively assess IADL functioning supported by an EMS and that even based on the extracted data the groups could be classified with high accuracy. This means that the use of such technologies may provide clinicians with diagnostic relevant information to improve autonomy assessment in real time decreasing observer biases.

  4. Effects of aquatic PNF lower extremity patterns on balance and ADL of stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Young-Mi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of aquatic proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) patterns in the lower extremity on balance and activities of daily living (ADL) in stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty poststroke participants were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 10) or a control group (n = 10). The experimental group performed lower extremity patterns in an aquatic environment, and the control group performed lower extremity patterns on the ground. Both exercises were conducted for 30 minutes/day, 5 days/week for 6 weeks. Balance was measured with the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Timed Up and Go Test (TUGT), Functional Reach Test (FRT), and One Leg Stand Test (OLST). Activities of daily living were measured with the Functional Independence Measure (FIM). A paired t-test was used to measure pre- and post-experiment differences, and an independent t-test was used to measure between-group differences. [Results] The experimental and control groups showed significant differences for all pre- and post-experiment variables. In the between-group comparison, the experimental group was significantly difference from the control group. [Conclusion] These results indicate that performing aquatic proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation patterns in the lower extremity enhances balance and ADL in stroke patients. PMID:25642076

  5. Association of early-onset dementia with activities of daily living (ADL) in middle-aged adults with intellectual disabilities: the caregiver's perspective.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Hsia, Yi-Chen; Wu, Chia-Ling; Chu, Cordia; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2014-03-01

    Few studies have investigated in detail which factors influence activities of daily living (ADL) in adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) comorbid with/without dementia conditions. The objective of the present study was to describe the relation between early onset dementia conditions and progressive loss of ADL capabilities and to examine the influence of dementia conditions and other possible factors toward ADL scores in adults with ID. This study was part of the "Healthy Aging Initiatives for Persons with an Intellectual Disability in Taiwan: A Social Ecological Approach" project. We analyzed data from 459 adults aged 45 years or older with an ID regarding their early onset symptoms of dementia and their ADL profile based on the perspective of the primary caregivers. Results show that a significant negative correlation was found between dementia score and ADL score in a Pearson's correlation test (r=-0.28, p<0.001). The multiple linear regression model reported that factors of male gender (?=4.187, p<0.05), marital status (?=4.79, p<0.05), education level (primary: ?=5.544, p<0.05; junior high or more: ?=8.147, p<0.01), Down's syndrome (?=-9.290, p<0.05), severe or profound disability level (?=-6.725, p<0.05; ?=-15.773, p<0.001), comorbid condition (?=-4.853, p<0.05) and dementia conditions (?=-9.245, p<0.001) were variables that were able to significantly predict the ADL score (R(2)=0.241) after controlling for age. Disability level and comorbidity can explain 10% of the ADL score variation, whereas dementia conditions can only explain 3% of the ADL score variation in the study. The present study highlights that future studies should scrutinize in detail the reasons for the low explanatory power of dementia for ADL, particularly in examining the appropriateness of the measurement scales for dementia and ADL in aging adults with ID. PMID:24467810

  6. To What Degree Does Provider Performance Affect a Quality Indicator? The Case of Nursing Homes and ADL Change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles D. Phillips; Min Chen; Michael Sherman

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This research investigates what factors affect the degree to which nursing home performance explains variance in residents' change in status of ac- tivities of daily living (ADL) after admission. Design and Methods: The database included all residents admitted in 2002 to a 10% random sample of nurs- ing homes in the United States. Longitudinal analyses of outcomes at 3

  7. To What Degree Does Provider Performance Affect a Quality Indicator? The Case of Nursing Homes and ADL Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Charles D.; Chen, Min; Sherman, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This research investigates what factors affect the degree to which nursing home performance explains variance in residents' change in status of activities of daily living (ADL) after admission. Design and Methods: The database included all residents admitted in 2002 to a 10% random sample of nursing homes in the United States.…

  8. Vrification d'une architecture UML2.0 avec l'ADL Wright Mohamed Graiet I, III

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Vérification d'une architecture UML2.0 avec l'ADL Wright Mohamed Graiet I, III Mohamed Tahar Bhiri Multimédia de Sfax, rue mharza, 3018 SFAX Abdelmajid.benhamadou@isimsf.rnu.tn Résumé : UML2.0 offre des composite permettant de décrire une architecture logicielle. Mais UML2.0 ne permet pas l'étude formelle de

  9. Restoring ADL function after wrist surgery in children with cerebral palsy: a novel Bilateral robot system design.

    PubMed

    Holley, D; Theriault, A; Kamara, S; Anewenter, V; Hughes, D; Johnson, M J

    2013-06-01

    Cerebral palsy is a leading cause of disability in children and reducing its effects on arm function will improve quality of life. Our goal is to train children with CP after wrist tendon transfer surgery using a robotic therapy system consisting of two robot arms and wrist robots. The therapeutic goal is to determine if the robot training combined with surgery intervention improved functional outcomes significantly more than surgery alone. To accomplish this long-term goal we have developed a Bilateral ADL Exercise Robot, BiADLER aimed at training children with CP in reach to grasp coordination on ADLs. Specifically, the robot will provide active training using an assist-as-needed. This paper presents the design concepts. PMID:24187280

  10. Framework for preventing accidental falls in hospitals - management plan for ADL, medication and medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shogo; Tsuru, Satoko; Iizuka, Yoshinori

    2009-01-01

    Prevention and reduction of medical accidents is essential. Among medical accidents, accidental falls remain a serious problem. While "assessment score sheets" have already been used in hospitals to prevent accidental falls, satisfactory results have not actually been achieved. In this study, we aim to establish a methodology for preventing accidental falls. We consider that the 'management plan' for each patient includes three factors. A plan of instructions for patients on actions they can take for safety in their ADL (Activities of Daily Living) is essential as a base. Second, a plan to keep up with any short term change in a patient's state is needed, because the state of a hospitalized patient will usually be temporarily affected by medication and changing medical conditions. We develop a model for preventing accidental falls, which enable us to design appropriate management plan for each patient. Then, we develop a prototype system based on the designed model. Finally, we address the result of verification of the model, by applying the prototype system into actual cases in hospitals. PMID:19592884

  11. The assessment of disability with the Groningen Activity Restriction Scale. Conceptual framework and psychometric properties.

    PubMed

    Kempen, G I; Miedema, I; Ormel, J; Molenaar, W

    1996-12-01

    The conceptual framework, psychometric properties, descriptive statistics, and the rules for administration and scoring of the Groningen Activity Restriction Scale (GARS) for assessing disability in the area of ADL (Activities of Daily Living including mobility) as well as IADL (Instrumental Activities of Daily Living) are presented. The result show that the GARS, which can be administered both face-to-face and by mail questionnaire, is an easy to administer, comprehensive, reliable, hierarchical, and valid measure for assessing disability in older people. By integrating previously developed scales measuring different domains of disability (ADL, IADL, and mobility) and the use of a four-category response format, an accurate and detailed measure of disability can be obtained and a broader range of needs of subjects can be described. The GARS manual, including detailed procedures for administration and scoring, encourages unambiguous administration and interpretation which results in more comparable research outcomes. PMID:8961404

  12. Age-Related Variation in Health Status after Age 60

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Disability, functionality, and morbidity are often used to describe the health of the elderly. Although particularly important when planning health and social services, knowledge about their distribution and aggregation at different ages is limited. We aim to characterize the variation of health status in a 60+ old population using five indicators of health separately and in combination. Methods 3080 adults 60+ living in Sweden between 2001 and 2004 and participating at the SNAC-K population-based cohort study. Health indicators: number of chronic diseases, gait speed, Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), disability in instrumental-activities of daily living (I-ADL), and in personal-ADL (P-ADL). Results Probability of multimorbidity and probability of slow gait speed were already above 60% and 20% among sexagenarians. Median MMSE and median I-ADL showed good performance range until age 84; median P-ADL was close to zero up to age 90. Thirty% of sexagenarians and 11% of septuagenarians had no morbidity and no impairment, 92% and 80% of them had no disability. Twenty-eight% of octogenarians had multimorbidity but only 27% had some I-ADL disability. Among nonagenarians, 13% had severe disability and impaired functioning while 12% had multimorbidity and slow gait speed. Conclusions Age 80-85 is a transitional period when major health changes take place. Until age 80, most people do not have functional impairment or disability, despite the presence of chronic disorders. Disability becomes common only after age 90. This implies an increasing need of medical care after age 70, whereas social care, including institutionalization, becomes a necessity only in nonagenarians. PMID:25734828

  13. The prediction of disability by self-reported physical frailty components of the Tilburg Frailty Indicator (TFI).

    PubMed

    Gobbens, R J J; van Assen, M A L M; Schalk, M J D

    2014-01-01

    Disability is an important health outcome for older persons; it is associated with impaired quality of life, future hospitalization, and mortality. Disability also places a high burden on health care professionals and health care systems. Disability is regarded as an adverse outcome of physical frailty. The main objective of this study was to assess the predictive validity of the eight individual self-reported components of the physical frailty subscale of the TFI for activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) disability. This longitudinal study was carried out with a sample of Dutch citizens. At baseline the sample consisted at 429 people aged 65 years and older and a subset of all respondents participated again two and a half years later (N=355, 83% response rate). The respondents completed a web-based questionnaire comprising the TFI and the Groningen Activity Restriction Scale (GARS) for measuring disability. Five components together (unintentional weakness, weakness, poor endurance, slowness, low physical activity), referring to the phenotype of Fried et al., predicted disability, even after controlling for previous disability and other background characteristics. The other three components of the physical frailty subscale of the TFI (poor balance, poor hearing, poor vision) together did not predict disability. Low physical activity predicted both total and ADL disability, and slowness both total and IADL disability. In conclusion, self-report assessment using the physical subscale of the TFI aids the prediction of future ADL and IADL disability in older persons two and a half years later. PMID:25042994

  14. ADL ORVIS: an air-delay-leg, line-imaging optically recording velocity interferometer system.

    PubMed

    Trott, Wayne M; Castañeda, Jaime N; Cooper, Marcia A

    2014-04-01

    An interferometry system that enables acquisition of spatially resolved velocity-time profiles with very high velocity sensitivity has been designed and applied to two diverse, instructive experimental problems: (1) measurement of low-amplitude reverberations in laser-driven flyer plates and (2) measurement of ramp-wave profiles in symmetric impact studies of fused silica. The delay leg in this version of a line-imaging optically recording velocity interferometer system (ORVIS) consists of a long air path that includes relay optics to transmit the optical signal through the interferometer cavity. Target image quality from the delay path at the image recombination plane is preserved by means of a compact and flexible optical design utilizing two parabolic reflectors (serving as the relay optics) in a folded path. With an instrument tuned to a velocity per fringe constant of 22.4 m s(-1) fringe(-1), differences of 1-2 m s(-1) across the probe line segment can be readily distinguished. Measurements that capture small spatial variations in flyer velocity are presented and briefly discussed. In the fused silica impact experiments, the ramp-wave profile observed by this air-delay instrument compares favorably to the profile recorded simultaneously by a conventional line-imaging ORVIS. PMID:24784670

  15. The selective mu-opioid receptor antagonist ADL5510 reduces levodopa-induced dyskinesia without affecting antiparkinsonian action in MPTP-lesioned macaque model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Koprich, James B; Fox, Susan H; Johnston, Tom H; Goodman, Allan; Le Bourdonnec, Bertrand; Dolle, Roland E; DeHaven, Robert N; DeHaven-Hudkins, Diane L; Little, Patrick J; Brotchie, Jonathan M

    2011-06-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), dyskinesia develops following long-term treatment with 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa). Given the prominent role of the opioid system in basal ganglia function, nonselective opioid receptor antagonists have been tested for antidyskinetic efficacy in the clinic (naltrexone and naloxone), although without success. In the current study, ADL5510, a novel, orally active opioid antagonist with mu opioid receptor selectivity, was examined in L-dopa-treated 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) macaques. Antidyskinetic effects were compared with those of naltrexone. Parkinsonian monkeys with established L-dopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) received acute challenges with L-dopa (subcutaneously) in combination with either vehicle, ADL5510 (0.1, 1, 3 or 10 mg/kg by mouth), or naltrexone (1, 3, or 10 mg/kg subcutaneously). Following treatments, behavior was monitored for 6 hours. Parameters assessed were total activity, parkinsonism, and dyskinesia. ADL5510 (1, 3, and 10 mg/kg) reduced activity and LID (chorea and dystonia) without affecting the antiparkinsonian benefits of L-dopa. The antidyskinetic effect of ADL5510 showed a U-shaped dose-response. It was inactive at 0.1 mg/kg, efficacious at 1 and 3 mg/kg (72% and 40% reductions, respectively), and then less effective at 10 mg/kg. The quality of ON time produced by L-dopa was improved, as indicated by a reduction in the percentage of ON time spent experiencing disabling dyskinesia (70% and 61% reductions with 1 and 3 mg/kg, respectively, compared with L-dopa). Naltrexone, in contrast, did not alleviate LID or affect the antiparkinsonian actions of L-dopa. Mu-selective opioid antagonists have the potential to form the basis of novel antidyskinetic therapies for PD. PMID:21465551

  16. Activities of daily living, instrumental activities for daily living and predictors of functional capacity of older men in Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, Paul Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Background: An extensive search of the literature found no studies that have examined functional capacity [Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and Instrumental Activities for Daily Living (I) ADL)] of Jamaican older men as well as factors that determine their functional capacity. Aims: The current study examines 1) ADL, 2) (I) ADL), 3) self-reported health status, 4) functional capacity, and 5) factors that determine functional capacity of older men. Methods and Method: Stratified multistage probability sampling technique was used to draw a sample of 2,000 55+ year men. A132-item questionnaire was used to collect the data. Descriptive statistics provide background information on the sample, cross tabulations were used to examine non-metric variables and logistic regression provides a model of predictors of functional capacity. Result: Fifty-five percent of sample indicated good current health status. Four percent was mostly satisfied with life; 21.7% had moderate dependence; 77.1% had high dependence (i.e. independence); 1.2% had low dependence; 21.9% were ages 75 years and older; 35.6% were ages 65 to 74 years and 42.6% reported ages 55 to 64 years. Functional capacity can be determined by church attendance (?=0.245; 95% CI: 0.264, 1.291); social support (?=0.129; 95% CI: 0.129, 0.258), area of residence (?=-0.060; 95% CI: -0.427, -0.061) and lastly by age of respondents. Conclusion: Ageing in explains deterioration in their (I) ADL, suggesting the challenges of ageing men's independence. More rural men were rarely satisfied with life; but more of them had a greater functional capacity than urban men. Depression was found to negatively relate to functional capacity, and church attendees had a greater functional status than non-attendees. PMID:22666693

  17. Assessments of functional status, comorbidities, polypharmacy, nutritional status and sarcopenia in Turkish community-dwelling male elderly.

    PubMed

    Bahat, Gulistan; Tufan, Fatih; Bahat, Zumrut; Aydin, Yucel; Tufan, Asli; Akpinar, Timur Selcuk; Erten, Nilgun; Karan, Mehmet Akif

    2013-06-01

    Functionality, comorbidities, polypharmacy, nutritional status and sarcopenia affect the prognosis of elderly excessively. These parameters are influenced by the population, living settings and age. We aimed to study these parameters in Turkish community-dwelling male elderly. We studied 274 male elderly ?60 years of age admitted to our Geriatrics outpatient clinics. Mean age was 74.4?±?7.1 years; 47.4% of the subjects were ?75 years, 24.1% were ?80 years. Mean activities-of-daily-living (ADL) and instrumental ADL (IADL) scores were 9.4 and 11.1, respectively. Patients with at least one-dependence at ADL-IADL were 22.6%-47.2%, and more than half-dependence at ADL-IADL were 2.8%-17.9%, respectively. Mean number of comorbidities were 2.6. Most common diagnosis was hypertension with 65%; mean number of drugs were 4.5; 55.3% were using ?4 chronic drugs. Prevalences of malnutrition were 3.7%-6.9%, malnutrition risk were 23.5%-26.7% by the mini nutritional assessment test-long form and short form, respectively. Calf circumference was measured <31?cm in 10.5%. Our findings suggest that Turkish community-dwelling male elderly may have greater prevalences of functional dependence, sarcopenia but lower rates of malnutrition and similar rates of polypharmacy compared with the western developing countries and developed countries. This study emphasized the geographical differences in and/or between the individual countries highlighting the need for studies both country- and world-wide. PMID:23461711

  18. Exertion instruments

    E-print Network

    Vawter, Noah (Noah Theodore)

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation describes the research, development and reasoning behind a family of musical instruments called Exertion Instruments. They use inline electrical generators to run a synthesizer and an amplifier while ...

  19. Errorless learning and spaced retrieval techniques to relearn instrumental activities of daily living in mild Alzheimer’s disease: A case report study

    PubMed Central

    Thivierge, Stéphanie; Simard, Martine; Jean, Léonie; Grandmaison, Éric

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies on cognitive training in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) were principally aimed at making patients learn items not related to functional needs. However, AD patients also experience difficulties with instrumental activities of daily living (IADL). The goal of the present multiple baseline case report study was to assess the preliminary efficacy and tolerability of an individualized cognitive training program using the errorless learning (EL) and spaced-retrieval (SR) techniques to relearn forgotten IADLs in mild AD. Following an exhaustive neuropsychological assessment, two participants received two training sessions per week during four weeks. Participant A was trained to use his voice mail and Participant B, to manage the messages from his answering machine. The results showed that the program was well tolerated and improved performance on the trained tasks. These ameliorations were maintained over a 5-week period. The effects of the training did not have any impact on global cognitive functions since the results on these measures remained relatively stable. This case report demonstrated preliminary efficacy of a new cognitive training program using EL and SR techniques tailored to the needs of AD patients. This is an important finding since the loss of these capacities alters autonomy in AD patients. PMID:19183790

  20. The Relationship Between Body Weight, Frailty, and the Disablement Process

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To prospectively examine the relationship between body weight, frailty, and the disablement process. Method. Longitudinal data from the Health and Retirement Study (1998–2006) were used to examine the relationship between being underweight, overweight, or obese (compared with normal weight) and the onset and progression of functional limitations and disabilities in instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and activities of daily living (ADL) among a nationally representative sample of community-dwelling older adults (aged 50 and older) with characteristics of frailty (n = 11,491). Nonlinear multilevel models additionally adjusted for demographic characteristics and intra-individual changes in body weight, socioeconomic status, health behaviors, and health conditions over the course of 8 years. Results. Compared with their nonfrail normal weight counterparts, prefrail obese respondents have a 16% (p ? 0.001) reduction in the expected functional limitations rate and frail overweight and obese respondents have a 10% (p ? 0.01) and 36% (p ? 0.001) reduction in the expected functional limitations rate, respectively. In addition, frail obese respondents have a 27% (p ? 0.05) reduction in the expected ADL disability rate. Discussion. This study’s findings suggest that underweight, overweight, and obese status differentially affect the risk for functional limitations and disabilities in IADL and ADL. Among prefrail and frail adults, some excess body weight in later life may be beneficial, reducing the rate of functional limitations and disability. PMID:22967933

  1. The Impact of Body Mass Index and Weight Changes on Disability Transitions and Mortality in Brazilian Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Drumond Andrade, Flávia Cristina; Mohd Nazan, Ahmad Iqmer Nashriq; Lebrão, Maria Lúcia; de Oliveira Duarte, Yeda Aparecida

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between body mass index and weight changes on disability transitions and mortality among Brazilian older adults. Longitudinal data from the Health, Well-Being, and Aging in Latin America and the Caribbean Study conducted in São Paulo, Brazil (2000 and 2006), were used to examine the impact of obesity on disability and mortality and of weight changes on health transitions related to disability. Logistic and multinomial regression models were used in the analyses. Individuals who were obese were more likely than those of normal weight to have limitations on activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activity of daily living (IADL), and Nagi's limitations. Obesity was associated with higher incidence of ADL and IADL limitations and with lower recovery from Nagi's limitations. Compared to those who maintained their weight, those who gained weight experienced higher incidence of ADL and Nagi's limitations, even after controlling for initial body mass index. Higher mortality among overweight individuals was only found when the reference category was “remaining free of Nagi limitations.” The findings of the study underline the importance of maintaining normal weight for preventing disability at older ages. PMID:23691319

  2. Astronomical instruments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, R. N.

    Indian astronomers have devised a number of instruments and the most important of these is the armillary sphere. The earliest armillary spheres were very simple instruments. Ptolemy in his Almagest enumerates at least three. The simplest of all was the equinoctial armilla. They had also the solstitial armilla which was a double ring, erected in the plane of the meridian with a rotating inner circle. This was used to measure the solar altitude.

  3. Weather Instruments

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Topic in Depth discusses the variety of instruments used to collect climate and weather data. The first two websites provide simple introductions to the many weather instruments. Bethune Academy's Weather Center (1) discusses the functions of psychrometers, anemometers, weather balloons, thermometers, and barometers. The Illinois State Water Survey (2) furnishes many images of various instruments that collect data daily for legal issues, farmers, educators, students, and researchers. The third website (3), created by the Center for Improving Engineering and Science Education (CIESE), provides a classroom activity to educate users on how to build and use weather instruments. By the end of the group project, students should know all about wind vanes, rain gauges, anemometers, and thermometers. Next, the Miami Museum of Science provides a variety of activities to help students learn about the many weather instruments including wind scales and wind chimes (4). Students can learn about the wind, air pressure, moisture, and temperature. At the fifth website, the Tyson Research Center at Washington University describes the devices it uses in its research (5). At the various links, users can find out the center's many projects that utilize meteorological data such as acid rain monitoring. The sixth website, a pdf document created by Dr. John Guyton at the Mississippi State University Extension Service, provides guidance to teachers about the education of weather patterns and instruments (6). Users can find helpful information on pressure systems, humidity, cloud patterns, and much more. Next, the University of Richmond discusses the tools meteorologists use to learn about the weather (7). While providing materials about the basic tools discussed in the other websites, this site also offers information about weather satellites, radar, and computer models. After discovering the many weather instruments, users can learn about weather data output and analysis at the Next Generation Weather Lab website (8). This expansive website provides an abundance of surface data and upper air data as well as satellite and radar images for the United States.

  4. Instrumented SSH

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Scott; Campbell, Scott

    2009-05-27

    NERSC recently undertook a project to access and analyze Secure Shell (SSH) related data. This includes authentication data such as user names and key fingerprints, interactive session data such as keystrokes and responses, and information about noninteractive sessions such as commands executed and files transferred. Historically, this data has been inaccessible with traditional network monitoring techniques, but with a modification to the SSH daemon, this data can be passed directly to intrusion detection systems for analysis. The instrumented version of SSH is now running on all NERSC production systems. This paper describes the project, details about how SSH was instrumented, and the initial results of putting this in production.

  5. Research Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The GENETI-SCANNER, newest product of Perceptive Scientific Instruments, Inc. (PSI), rapidly scans slides, locates, digitizes, measures and classifies specific objects and events in research and diagnostic applications. Founded by former NASA employees, PSI's primary product line is based on NASA image processing technology. The instruments karyotype - a process employed in analysis and classification of chromosomes - using a video camera mounted on a microscope. Images are digitized, enabling chromosome image enhancement. The system enables karyotyping to be done significantly faster, increasing productivity and lowering costs. Product is no longer being manufactured.

  6. Simple Instruments

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-18

    Students work with partners to create four different instruments to investigate the frequency of the sounds they make. Teams may choose to make a shoebox guitar, water-glass xylophone, straw panpipe or a soda bottle organ (or all four!). Conduct this activity in conjunction with Lesson 3 of the Sound and Light unit.

  7. Online Supplemental Material Appendix-Table A: Association between metabolic syndrome components mutually adjusted for metabolic syndrome and social restriction,

    E-print Network

    Online Supplemental Material Appendix- Table A: Association between metabolic syndrome components mutually adjusted for metabolic syndrome and social restriction, mobility and IADL limitations. MetS: metabolic syndrome; TG: triglycerides; BP: blood pressure; FBG: fasting blood glucose; IADL: instrumental

  8. Prevalence of Self-Reported Stroke and Disability in the French Adult Population: A Transversal Study

    PubMed Central

    Schnitzler, Alexis; Woimant, France; Tuppin, Philippe; de Peretti, Christine

    2014-01-01

    In France, the prevalence of stroke and the level of disability of stroke survivors are little known. The aim of this study was to evaluate functional limitations in adults at home and in institutions, with and without self-reported stroke. A survey named “the Disability Health survey” was carried out in people's homes (DHH) and in institutions (DHI). Medical history and functional level (activities-of-daily-living, ADL and instrumented-activities-of-daily-living IADL) were collected through interviews. The modified Rankin score (mRS) and the level of dependence and disability were compared between participants with and without stroke. 33896 subjects responded. The overall prevalence of stroke was 1.6% (CI95% [1.4%–1.7%]). The mRS was over 2 for 34.4% of participants with stroke (28.7% of participants at home and 87.8% of participants in institutions) versus respectively 3.9%, 3.1% and 71.6% without stroke. Difficulty washing was the most frequently reported ADL for those with stroke (30.6% versus 3% for those without stroke). Difficulty with ADL and IADL increased with age but the relative risk was higher below the age of 60 (17 to 25) than over 85 years (1.5 to 2.2), depending on the ADL. In the overall population, 22.6% of those confined to bed or chair reported a history of stroke. These results thus demonstrate a high national prevalence of stroke. Older people are highly dependent, irrespective of stroke history and the relative risk of dependence in young subjects with a history of stroke is high compared with those without. PMID:25521057

  9. PREX Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado, Luis; Happex Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    The Lead Radius Experiment (PREx) took place in the Spring of 2010 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Its goal was to obtain a clean measurement of the root mean square neutron radius of 208Pb to 1% accuracy. This was done by measuring the parity violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from a Lead target. In order to obtain such a precise measurement, numerous improvements and upgrades were made to the instrumentation and electronics of Hall A. This talk will discuss developments related to the PREx main detectors, Data Acquisition system and Luminosity Monitor.

  10. Depression, disability and functional status among community dwelling older adults in South Africa: Evidence from the first South African National Income Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Andrew; Burns, Jonathan K

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study examined the relationship between depression and functional status among a community-dwelling elderly population of 65 years and older in South Africa. Method Data from the first wave of the South African National Income Dynamics Study (SA-NIDS) was used, this being the first longitudinal panel survey of a nationally representative sample of households. The study focused on the data for resident adults 65 years and older (n=1,429). Depression was assessed using the 10-item version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Functional status, pertaining to both difficulty and dependency in activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), and physical functioning and mobility (PFM), were assessed using 11 items. Results Functional challenges were generally higher in the older age group. There was a significant association between depression and functional dependency in ADL (adjusted OR=2.57 [CI: 1.03-6.41]), IADL (adjusted OR=2.76 [CI: 1.89-4.04]) and PFM (adjusted OR=1.66 [CI: 1.18-2.33]) but the relationship between depression and functional status, particularly PFM, appeared weaker in older age. Conclusion The relationship between depression symptoms and function is complex. Functional characteristics between older and younger older populations are diverse, and caution is indicated against overgeneralizing the challenges related to depression and function among this target population. PMID:23512338

  11. Development of a body sensor network to detect motor patterns of epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Anthony; Patel, Shyamal; Chowdhury, Atanu Roy; Welsh, Matt; Pang, Trudy; Schachter, Steven; OLaighin, Gearóid; Bonato, Paolo

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was the development of a remote monitoring system to monitor and detect simple motor seizures. Using accelerometer-based kinematic sensors, data were gathered from subjects undergoing medication titration at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Over the course of the study, subjects repeatedly performed a predefined set of instrumental activities of daily living (iADLs). During the monitoring sessions, EEG and video data were also recorded and provided the gold standard for seizure detection. To distinguish seizure events from iADLs, we developed a template matching algorithm. Considering the unique signature of seizure events and the inherent temporal variability of seizure types across subjects, we incorporated a customized mass-spring template into the dynamic time warping algorithm. We then ported this algorithm onto a commercially available internet tablet and developed our body sensor network on the Mercury platform. We designed several policies on this platform to compare the tradeoffs between feature calculation, raw data transmission, and battery lifetime. From a dataset of 21 seizures, the sensitivity for our template matching algorithm was found to be 0.91 and specificity of 0.84. We achieved a battery lifetime of 10.5 h on the Mercury platform. PMID:22717505

  12. [Disability and use of health services by the elderly in Greater Metropolitan Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil: a population-based study].

    PubMed

    Fialho, Camila Bruno; Lima-Costa, Maria Fernanda; Giacomin, Karla Cristina; Loyola Filho, Antônio Ignácio de

    2014-03-01

    This study focused on the association between disability and use of health services among elderly individuals in Greater Metropolitan Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The study included 1,624 elderly patients (? 60 years) selected by representative sampling. The dependent variable was use of health services, based on three descriptors: number of physician visits, home consultations, and hospitalizations. The target independent variable was disability, including difficulty in performing activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL). IADL was only associated with hospitalization (PR = 1.62; 95%CI: 1.16-2.26), while ADL was associated with hospitalization (PR = 1.73; 95%CI: 1.24-2.42) and home consultations (PR = 8.54; 95%CI: 4.22-17.27). The findings show increased use of health services (especially more costly ones) among older adults with disabilities, and that functional health dimensions have not oriented health services, still largely conditioned on the presence of diseases. PMID:24714949

  13. Optical Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Precision Lapping and Optical Co. has developed a wide variety of hollow retroreflector systems for applications involving the entire optical spectrum; they are, according to company literature, cheaper, more accurate, lighter and capable of greater size than solid prisms. Precision Lapping's major customers are aerospace and defense companies, government organizations, R&D and commercial instrument companies. For example, Precision Lapping supplies hollow retroreflectors for the laser fire control system of the Army's Abrams tank, and retroreflectors have been and are being used in a number of space tests relative to the Air Force's Strategic Defense Initiative research program. An example of a customer/user is Chesapeake Laser Systems, producer of the Laser Tracker System CMS-2000, which has applications in SDI research and industrial robotics. Another customer is MDA Scientific, Inc., manufacturer of a line of toxic gas detection systems used to monitor hazardous gases present in oil fields, refineries, offshore platforms, chemical plants, waste storage sites and other locations where gases are released into the environment.

  14. Instruments in Grid: the Instrument Element

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Vuerli; G. Taffoni; I. Coretti; F. Pasian; P. Santin; M. Pucillov

    This work is focused on the interoperability aspects between the Grid and the scientific instrumentation. The IE (Instrument\\u000a Element) makes possible the monitoring and the remote control of any kind of scientific instrumentation, although the test-bed\\u000a of this first implementation is constituted of telescopes and related astronomical instrumentation. The first implementation\\u000a of the IE deals with monitoring aspects; astronomers can

  15. Unique Instruments' Origins

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mr. Smith

    2012-09-11

    The purpose of this activity is to help you find unique instruments from a specific country. For whatever country you have chosen, the following resources should help you locate some unique instruments from that country. For starters, check out this link: Instruments By Country You will find a list of musical instruments for many countries in the world. Once you find an instrument from your country you want to explore, look here: Unique World Instruments Here ...

  16. Evaluating musical instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, D. Murray

    2014-04-01

    Scientific measurements of sound generation and radiation by musical instruments are surprisingly hard to correlate with the subtle and complex judgments of instrumental quality made by expert musicians.

  17. What is virtual instrumentation?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Goldberg

    2000-01-01

    A virtual instrument is composed of some specialized subunits, some general-purpose computers, some software, and a little know-how. The instrument no longer has to be in one box. Virtual instruments can be simple or very complex. Understanding the real field of virtual instrumentation is just beginning. Over the next few years, there will be a rash of subunits specifically designed

  18. Astronomical Instruments in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Sreeramula Rajeswara

    The earliest astronomical instruments used in India were the gnomon and the water clock. In the early seventh century, Brahmagupta described ten types of instruments, which were adopted by all subsequent writers with minor modifications. Contact with Islamic astronomy in the second millennium AD led to a radical change. Sanskrit texts began to lay emphasis on the importance of observational instruments. Exclusive texts on instruments were composed. Islamic instruments like the astrolabe were adopted and some new types of instruments were developed. Production and use of these traditional instruments continued, along with the cultivation of traditional astronomy, up to the end of the nineteenth century.

  19. Regional Instrumentation Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromie, William J.

    1980-01-01

    Focuses on the activities of regional instrumentation centers that utilize the state-of-the-art instruments and methodology in basic scientific research. The emphasis is on the centers involved in mass spectroscopy, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, lasers, and accelerators. (SA)

  20. Woodwind Instrument Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperl, Gary

    1980-01-01

    The author presents a simple maintenance program for woodwind instruments which includes the care of tendon corks, the need for oiling keys, and methods of preventing cracks in woodwind instruments. (KC)

  1. Improved PHIP Instrumentation

    E-print Network

    Agraz, Jose

    2013-01-01

    Submitted LabVIEW Instrumentation control software for RFuse of LabVIEW to control PHIP instrumentation has stronginstrumentation relies on four factors to hyperpolarize endogenous substances externally, a static magnetic field (B o ), temperature, pressure, and software sample control.

  2. ICESat Instrument Support Facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Jester; D. W. Hancock; S. Rowton; J. E. Golder

    2003-01-01

    The Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) mission main instrument is Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS). The interface between the ICESat Mission Operation Center (I-MOC) and the GLAS Science and Instrument teams is the ICESat Instrument Support Facility (ISF). The ISF monitors the GLAS performance and provides specific GLAS command request to I-MOC. Standard displays are available in realtime

  3. Graphical Programming National Instruments

    E-print Network

    Wedeward, Kevin

    needs change, LabVIEW virtual instrumentation systems have the flexibility to be modified easily withoutLabVIEW Graphical Programming LabVIEW LabVIEW National Instruments Phone: (512) 794-0100 · Fax libraries for: GPIB/VXI/PXI/Computer-based instruments RS-232/485 protocol Plug-in data acquisition Analog

  4. Aeronautic Instruments. Section VI : Oxygen Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, F L

    1923-01-01

    This report contains statements as to amount of oxygen required at different altitudes and the methods of storing oxygen. The two types of control apparatus - the compressed oxygen type and the liquid oxygen type - are described. Ten different instruments of the compressed type are described, as well as the foreign instruments of the liquid types. The performance and specifications and the results of laboratory tests on all representative types conclude this report.

  5. [Instrumental variable analysis].

    PubMed

    Boef, Anna G C; le Cessie, Saskia; Dekkers, Olaf M

    2013-01-01

    Instrumental variable analysis is a recently propagated method to deal with confounding and to estimate therapeutic effects in observational studies. An instrumental variable is a factor which affects treatment but is not related to patient prognosis. A theoretical advantage of a well-chosen instrumental variable is that both measured and unmeasured confounders do not influence the effect estimator. Examples of instrumental variables previously used are regional differences in treatment and physician prescribing preference. Application of instrumental variable analysis seems most suited to large patient registries with considerable expected residual confounding in case standard analytical methods are applied. PMID:23343737

  6. Present status of aircraft instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1932-01-01

    This report gives a brief description of the present state of development and of the performance characteristics of instruments included in the following group: speed instruments, altitude instruments, navigation instruments, power-plant instruments, oxygen instruments, instruments for aerial photography, fog-flying instruments, general problems, summary of instrument and research problems. The items considered under performance include sensitivity, scale errors, effects of temperature and pressure, effects of acceleration and vibration, time lag, damping, leaks, elastic defects, and friction.

  7. The Relationship between Health and Community across Aging Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Keith T.

    2014-01-01

    Research is needed to examine the connection between older adults and their community as they age. This is important as increasing numbers of older adults wish to age in place. Regression models were examined across 3 cohorts testing relationships among social capital indicators (neighborhood trust, neighborhood support, neighborhood cohesion, neighborhood participation, and telephone interaction) with health outcomes (self-rated health, activities of daily living (ADL), and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL)). Results showed that most social capital indicators remained significant for all health outcomes into very old age. Development of tools for individual and community interventions to ensure optimal fit between the aging individual and their environment is discussed, along with recommendations for enhancing social work theory and practice. PMID:25006460

  8. Cardiovascular aging and psychometric performances: correlations in a group of ultraseptagenarian elderly.

    PubMed

    Maugeri, D; Testaì, M; Santangelo, A; Abbate, S; Bennati, E; Bonanno, M R; Lo Giudice, F; Mamazza, C; Panebianco, P

    2005-01-01

    Aging of the Italian population resulted in a net increase of the cardiovascular pathologies, and the correlated disabilities. In addition, the cardiovascular diseases represent actually in Italy the most frequent cause of death. With advancing age, both the heart and the blood vessels undergo numerous morphological and functional modifications, which are reducing the functional reserves of these organs. The present study looked for correlation between the cardiac functionality and the cognitive, as well as affective functions. Furthermore, we evaluated the functional variations of the autonomy and autosufficiency of the same patients. We had 171 enrolled subjects (108 women and 63 men), all above the age of 70 years. Based on the classification of the New York Heart Association (NYHA), 85 of these patients (35 men and 50 women) had a II class (Group A), and 86 of them (28 men and 58 women) a III NYHA class of heart function (Group B). We included only patients who did not have any cerebrovascular event yet, and were not bed-ridden. The psychometric performance has been evaluated by using the mini-mental state examination (MMSE), the geriatric depression scale (GDS), the activities of daily living (ADL) and the instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) scales. Cardiac functions have been measured by Doppler echocardiography, in M-mode. The Group A (of mean age 71 +/- 3 years) displayed ventricular ejection fraction (VEF) values in average of 43 +/- 4%, MMSE scores 27 +/- 2; GDS scores 14 +/- 3; IADL 6 +/- 1, and ADL = 6, i.e., maintained a complete autosufficiency. The Group B (mean age 74 +/- 4 years) displayed VEF values in average of 26 +/- 3%, MMSE scores 23 +/- 4; GDS scores 22 +/- 3; IADL 4 +/- 2, and ADL = 4 +/- 1, i.e., had a reduced autosufficiency. These results confirm that also the heart pays a toll for aging: the myocardial contractility becomes significantly altered, meaning the loss of cardiac functions itself. These morpho-functional heart alterations are accompanied by decreased psychometric performances during aging, with consequent reductions of cognitivity, affectivity, autosufficiency and autonomy, involving a complex decrease of the quality of life. PMID:15531018

  9. The TMT instrumentation program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simard, Luc; Crampton, David; Ellerbroek, Brent; Boyer, Corinne

    2010-07-01

    An overview of the current status of the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) instrumentation program is presented. Conceptual designs for the three first light instruments (IRIS, WFOS and IRMS) are in progress, as well as feasibility studies of MIRES. Considerable effort is underway to understand the end-to-end performance of the complete telescopeadaptive optics-instrument system under realistic conditions on Mauna Kea. Highly efficient operation is being designed into the TMT system, based on a detailed investigation of the observation workflow to ensure very fast target acquisition and set up of all subsystems. Future TMT instruments will almost certainly involve contributions from institutions in many different locations in North America and partner nations. Coordinating and optimizing the design and construction of the instruments to ensure delivery of the best possible scientific capabilities is an interesting challenge. TMT welcomes involvement from all interested instrument teams.

  10. VIRUS instrument enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochaska, T.; Allen, R.; Mondrik, N.; Rheault, J. P.; Sauseda, M.; Boster, E.; James, M.; Rodriguez-Patino, M.; Torres, G.; Ham, J.; Cook, E.; Baker, D.; DePoy, Darren L.; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Hill, G. J.; Perry, D.; Savage, R. D.; Good, J. M.; Vattiat, Brian L.

    2014-08-01

    The Visible Integral-Field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS) instrument will be installed at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope† in the near future. The instrument will be housed in two enclosures that are mounted adjacent to the telescope, via the VIRUS Support Structure (VSS). We have designed the enclosures to support and protect the instrument, to enable servicing of the instrument, and to cool the instrument appropriately while not adversely affecting the dome environment. The system uses simple HVAC air handling techniques in conjunction with thermoelectric and standard glycol heat exchangers to provide efficient heat removal. The enclosures also provide power and data transfer to and from each VIRUS unit, liquid nitrogen cooling to the detectors, and environmental monitoring of the instrument and dome environments. In this paper, we describe the design and fabrication of the VIRUS enclosures and their subsystems.

  11. Wet chemistry instrument prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A wet chemistry instrument prototype for detecting amino acids in planetary soil samples was developed. The importance of amino acids and their condensation products to the development of life forms is explained. The characteristics of the instrument and the tests which were conducted to determine the materials compatibility are described. Diagrams are provided to show the construction of the instrument. Data obtained from the performance tests are reported.

  12. Instrument validation project

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, B.A.; Daymo, E.A.; Geeting, J.G.H.; Zhang, J.

    1996-06-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company Project W-211 is responsible for providing the system capabilities to remove radioactive waste from ten double-shell tanks used to store radioactive wastes on the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The project is also responsible for measuring tank waste slurry properties prior to injection into pipeline systems, including the Replacement of Cross-Site Transfer System. This report summarizes studies of the appropriateness of the instrumentation specified for use in Project W-211. The instruments were evaluated in a test loop with simulated slurries that covered the range of properties specified in the functional design criteria. The results of the study indicate that the compact nature of the baseline Project W-211 loop does not result in reduced instrumental accuracy resulting from poor flow profile development. Of the baseline instrumentation, the Micromotion densimeter, the Moore Industries thermocouple, the Fischer and Porter magnetic flow meter, and the Red Valve Pressure transducer meet the desired instrumental accuracy. An alternate magnetic flow meter (Yokagawa) gave nearly identical results as the baseline fischer and Porter. The Micromotion flow meter did not meet the desired instrument accuracy but could potentially be calibrated so that it would meet the criteria. The Nametre on-line viscometer did not meet the desired instrumental accuracy and is not recommended as a quantitative instrument although it does provide qualitative information. The recommended minimum set of instrumentation necessary to ensure the slurry meets the Project W-058 acceptance criteria is the Micromotion mass flow meter and delta pressure cells.

  13. Turning Ideas into Instruments

    E-print Network

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Turning Ideas into Instruments Design & fabrication services Cost-effective prototypes Precision enterprises - Science, technology, medicine, research, manufacturing, product development, and engineering Our

  14. Space applications instrumentation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minzner, R. A.; Oberholtzer, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    A compendium of resumes of 158 instrument systems or experiments, of particular interest to space applications, is presented. Each resume exists in a standardized format, permitting entries for 26 administrative items and 39 scientific or engineering items. The resumes are organized into forty groups determined by the forty spacecraft with which the instruments are associated. The resumes are followed by six different cross indexes, each organized alphabetically according to one of the following catagories: instrument name, acronym, name of principal investigator, name of organization employing the principal investigator, assigned experiment number, and spacecraft name. The resumes are associated with a computerized instrument resume search and retrieval system.

  15. REACTOR SAFETY INSTRUMENTATION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Schultz

    1963-01-01

    A review is presented of the development of reactor safety ; instrumentation. The reliability of multiple-channel instrumentation is ; discussed, and various checking systems for extending reliability are reviewed. ; The influence of transistorization on circuit design and the future trends in ; safety system design (particularly digitalization) are discussed. (D.L.C.);

  16. Contaminated dental instruments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Smith; M. Dickson; J. Aitken; J. Bagg

    2002-01-01

    There is current concern in the UK over the possible transmission of prions via contaminated surgical instruments. Some dental instruments (endodontic files) raise particular concerns by virtue of their intimate contact with terminal branches of the trigeminal nerve. A visual assessment using a dissecting light microscope and scanning electron microscopy of endodontic files after clinical use and subsequent decontamination was

  17. Johannes Kepler's astronomical instruments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. L. Chenakal

    1975-01-01

    The life and activity of Kepler coincided with an important period in the history of astronomy, when every decade new instruments were being invented, bringing about many great discoveries. At this time many scientists and artisans participated in the construction of astronomical instruments. The contribution made by them is fairly well known, but Kepler's work in this field has been

  18. Instrument Landing Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Sanders

    1973-01-01

    A historical background of instrumental approach and landing equipment for aircraft is given beginning with post-World War I efforts of J. D. Doolittle and emphasizing military-civil standardization efforts that began in 1948 and are continuing. The inadequacies of the current Instrument Landing System (ILS) are detailed and the various efforts of special committees to define an eventual replacement system are

  19. Micromachining inertial instruments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marc S. Weinberg; Jonathan Bernstein; Jeffrey T. Borenstein; J. Campbell; J. Cousens; Robert K. Cunningham; R. Fields; Paul Greiff; B. Hugh; Les Niles; Jerome B. Sohn

    1996-01-01

    Draper Laboratory, using silicon microfabrication techniques to achieve high yields by batch processing, has been developing miniature microelectromechanical instruments for over 10 years. During this time, considerable progress has been made in the development and fabrication of micromechanical gyroscopes, accelerometers, and acoustic sensors. Inertial instruments have become a worldwide research and commercial topic. Draper gyroscopes and accelerometers have been fabricated

  20. LMFBR Instrumentation and Control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. R. Pflasterer

    1973-01-01

    Reactor control and core surveillance instrumentation are important to the safety and economics of LMFBR design and operation. Considerable world wide effort has been expended during the past 10 years on such instrumentation. The results of these efforts in France will be tested in Phenix and the U.K. will test theirs in the PFR reactor when these reactors start up

  1. Better Instrument Springs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert W. Carson

    1933-01-01

    Electrical measuring instruments play an important part in the generation, distribution, and sale of electrical power, and in the development and testing of electrical machinery. The accuracy of electrical measuring instruments depends as much on the quality of the control springs as on the design of the torque producing elements. Unstable effects found in the application of spiral springs to

  2. TIRGO and its instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baffa, Carlo; Gennari, Sandro; Hunt, Leslie K.; Lisi, Franco; Tofani, Gianni; Vanzi, Leonardo

    1995-09-01

    We describe the general characteristics of the TIRGO infrared telescope, located on Gornergrat (Switzerland), and its most recent instrumentation. This telescope is specifically designed for infrared astronomical observations. Two newly designed instruments are presented: the imaging camera Arnica and the long-slit spectrometer LonGSp, both based on two-dimensional array detectors.

  3. Hematologic improvement and response in elderly AML/RAEB patients treated with valproic acid and low-dose Ara-C.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, M T; Salvi, F; Perticone, S; Baraldi, A; De Paoli, L; Gatto, S; Pietrasanta, D; Pini, M; Primon, V; Zallio, F; Tonso, A; Alvaro, M G; Ciravegna, G; Levis, A

    2011-08-01

    The histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) valproic acid (VPA) has been shown to be active on acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and refractory anemia with excess of blasts (RAEB). Thirty-one elderly AML/RAEB patients (AML n=25; RAEB n=6) with a high rate of comorbidity were entered in a phase II study with low-dose cytarabine (Ara-C) and VPA. Fitness was evaluated by means of the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA), including the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale (CIRS) score, the self-sufficiency scores of Activity of Daily Living (ADL) and Instrumental Activity of Daily Living (IADL). Eight patients obtained a lasting complete remission and 3 other patients obtained hematologic improvement for a total response rate of 35%. Five of 11 responding patients were relapsed or resistant after a previous treatment with Ara-C. Seven of 11 responding patients were assessed as frail at enrollment and/or had IADL impairment. Grades 3 and 4 toxicities were mainly hematological. Low-dose Ara-C and VPA is a relatively non-toxic combination with good therapeutic activity in elderly patients with AML/RAEB. This therapeutic approach represents an alternative treatment for patients who cannot undergo standard induction therapy. PMID:21474179

  4. Safeguards instrumentation at NUCEF

    SciTech Connect

    Okazaki, S.; Miyauchi, M.; Okamoto, H. [Japanese Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Puckett, J. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Hsue, S.T.; Collins, M.; Cole, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-06-01

    As part of the US Department of Energy/Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute research cooperation, a hybrid K-edge/x-ray fluorescence densitometer was developed and fabricated by Los Alamos National Laboratory. The instrument, designed for accountability measurements and for International Atomic Energy Agency inspections, was installed at the analytical laboratory of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Institute in 1994. The system was calibrated with uranium solutions in 1995. This paper will describe the features of the instrument. They will also discuss the calibration of the instrument and compare the techniques of hybrid densitometry and chemical analysis for measuring routine samples.

  5. Instrument Attitude Precision Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan

    2004-01-01

    A novel approach is presented in this paper to analyze attitude precision and control for an instrument gimbaled to a spacecraft subject to an internal disturbance caused by a moving component inside the instrument. Nonlinear differential equations of motion for some sample cases are derived and solved analytically to gain insight into the influence of the disturbance on the attitude pointing error. A simple control law is developed to eliminate the instrument pointing error caused by the internal disturbance. Several cases are presented to demonstrate and verify the concept presented in this paper.

  6. Aircraft Speed Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beij, K Hilding

    1933-01-01

    This report presents a concise survey of the measurement of air speed and ground speed on board aircraft. Special attention is paid to the pitot-static air-speed meter which is the standard in the United States for airplanes. Air-speed meters of the rotating vane type are also discussed in considerable detail on account of their value as flight test instruments and as service instruments for airships. Methods of ground-speed measurement are treated briefly, with reference to the more important instruments. A bibliography on air-speed measurement concludes the report.

  7. Pain Characteristics Associated With the Onset of Disability in Older Adults: The MOBILIZE Boston Study

    PubMed Central

    Eggermont, Laura H.P.; Leveille, Suzanne G.; Shi, Ling; Kiely, Dan K.; Shmerling, Robert H.; Jones, Rich N.; Guralnik, Jack M.; Bean, Jonathan F.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives To determine the effects of chronic pain on the development of disability and decline in physical performance over time among older adults. Design Longitudinal cohort study with 18 months follow-up. Setting Urban/suburban communities Participants 634 community-dwelling older adults aged >64 years. Measurements Chronic pain assessment consisted of musculoskeletal pain locations, and pain severity and pain interference by subscales of the Brief Pain Inventory. Disability was self-reported as any difficulty in mobility and basic and instrumental activities of daily living (ADL, IADL). Mobility performance was measured using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB). Relationships between baseline pain and incident disability in 18 months were determined using risk ratios (RRs) from multivariable Poisson regression models. Results Almost 65% of participants reported chronic musculoskeletal pain at baseline. New onset of mobility difficulty at 18-months was strongly associated with baseline pain distribution: 7% (no sites), 18% (1 site), 24% (multisite) and 39% (widespread pain, p-value for trend <0.001). Similar graded effects were found for other disability measures. Elders with multisite or widespread pain had at least a three-fold increased risk for onset of mobility difficulty compared to their peers without pain after adjusting for disability risk factors (multisite pain: RR=2.95, 95%CI, 1.58–5.50; widespread pain: RR=3.57, 95%CI, 1.71–7.48). Widespread pain contributed to decline in mobility performance (1 point decline in SPPB, RR=1.47, 95%CI, 1.08–2.01). Similar associations were found for baseline pain interference predicting subsequent mobility decline and (I)ADL disability. Weaker and less consistent associations were observed with pain severity. Conclusion Older community-dwelling adults living with chronic pain in multiple musculoskeletal locations have a substantial increased risk for developing disability over time and for clinically meaningful decline in mobility performance. PMID:24823985

  8. RHIC beam instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, M.; Cameron, P.; Cerniglia, P.; Connolly, R.; Cupolo, J.; Degen, C.; Drees, A.; Fliller, R.; Gassner, D.; Mead, J.; Ptitsyn, V.; Satogata, T.; Shea, T.; Sikora, R.; Thompson, P.; Witkover, R.

    2003-03-01

    RHIC instrumentation systems must accurately characterize diverse beams of up to 110 bunches in each of the two collider rings, ranging from 10 11 protons/bunch at 250 GeV to 10 9 Au +79 ions/bunch at 100 GeV/ nucleon, as well as lower-intensity commissioning and pilot bunches. The collider instrumentation includes: 667 beam position monitor (BPM) channels, 363 beam loss monitor (BLM) channels, wall current monitors, DC current transformers, ionization profile monitors, tune measurement devices, and resonant Schottky monitors. Collider instrumentation is also used in the AGS-to-RHIC transfer line, including 52 BPM channels, 56 BLM channels, 5 fast integrating current transformers, and 12 video beam profile monitors (RHIC Design Manual, April 1998; Proceedings of the' 98 Beam Instrumentation Workshop, 1998).

  9. Advances in Medical Instrumentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ream, Allen K.

    1978-01-01

    The influence of new medical instruments is large but not always easy to interpret. However, this author attempts to do just that. Included topics are: general trends, computers, economic considerations, and regulatory constraints. (BB)

  10. Tools and Instrumentation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Joseph S. Krajcik

    2009-10-14

    Development of new tools and instruments helps drive scientific progress. Recent development of specialized tools has led to new levels of understanding of matter by helping scientists detect, manipulate, isolate, measure, fabricate, and investigate nanos

  11. Fiber Optics Instrumentation Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Patrick Hon Man; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Richards, W. Lance

    2010-01-01

    This is a general presentation of fiber optics instrumentation development work being conducted at NASA Dryden for the past 10 years and recent achievements in the field of fiber optics strain sensors.

  12. The GONG instrument

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. Harvey; K. Abdel-Gawad; Warren Ball; B. Boxum; F. Bull; J. Cole; L. Cole; S. Colley; K. Dowdney; R. Drake

    1988-01-01

    An instrument is being developed to provide high-quality Doppler oscillation measurements for the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) project. This instrument uses the Fourier tachometer principle of sweeping a squared-cosine transmission function across a limited region of the solar spectrum centered on the Ni I line at 676.8 nm. Doppler shift is detected as a phase shift between the modulated

  13. Advanced optical instruments technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Mike; Chrisp, Michael; Cheng, Li-Jen; Eng, Sverre; Glavich, Thomas; Goad, Larry; Jones, Bill; Kaarat, Philip; Nein, Max; Robinson, William

    1992-08-01

    The science objectives for proposed NASA missions for the next decades push the state of the art in sensitivity and spatial resolution over a wide range of wavelengths, including the x-ray to the submillimeter. While some of the proposed missions are larger and more sensitive versions of familiar concepts, such as the next generation space telescope, others use concepts, common on the Earth, but new to space, such as optical interferometry, in order to provide spatial resolutions impossible with other concepts. However, despite their architecture, the performance of all of the proposed missions depends critically on the back-end instruments that process the collected energy to produce scientifically interesting outputs. The Advanced Optical Instruments Technology panel was chartered with defining technology development plans that would best improve optical instrument performance for future astrophysics missions. At this workshop the optical instrument was defined as the set of optical components that reimage the light from the telescope onto the detectors to provide information about the spatial, spectral, and polarization properties of the light. This definition was used to distinguish the optical instrument technology issues from those associated with the telescope, which were covered by a separate panel. The panel identified several areas for optical component technology development: diffraction gratings; tunable filters; interferometric beam combiners; optical materials; and fiber optics. The panel also determined that stray light suppression instruments, such as coronagraphs and nulling interferometers, were in need of general development to support future astrophysics needs.

  14. The Nebraska Instrument Sharing Consortium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, David H.

    1986-01-01

    The Nebraska Instrument Sharing Consortium (NISC) is a group of small colleges that have banded together to provide modern instrumentation to their students at an affordable price. Consortium activities are described, including how the instruments are moved between campuses. (JN)

  15. Aeronautic Instruments. Section III : Aircraft Speed Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Franklin L; Stearns, H O

    1923-01-01

    Part 1 contains a discussion and description of the various types of air speed measuring instruments. The authors then give general specifications and performance requirements with the results of tests on air speed indicators at the Bureau of Standards. Part 2 reports methods and laboratory apparatus used at the Bureau of Standards to make static tests. Methods are also given of combining wind tunnel tests with static tests. Consideration is also given to free flight tests. Part 3 discusses the problem of finding suitable methods for the purpose of measuring the speed of aircraft relative to the ground.

  16. Aeronautic Instruments. Section V : Power Plant Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, G E; Sylvander, R C; Mueller, E F; Wilhelm, R M; Eaton, H N; Warner, John A C

    1923-01-01

    Part 1 gives a general discussion of the uses, principles, construction, and operation of airplane tachometers. Detailed description of all available instruments, both foreign and domestic, are given. Part 2 describes methods of tests and effect of various conditions encountered in airplane flight such as change of temperature, vibration, tilting, and reduced air pressure. Part 3 describes the principal types of distance reading thermometers for aircraft engines, including an explanation of the physical principles involved in the functioning of the instruments and proper filling of the bulbs. Performance requirements and testing methods are given and a discussion of the source of error and results of tests. Part 4 gives methods of tests and calibration, also requirements of gauges of this type for the pressure measurement of the air pressure in gasoline tanks and the engine oil pressure on airplanes. Part 5 describes two types of gasoline gauges, the float type and the pressure type. Methods of testing and calibrating gasoline depth gauges are given. The Schroeder, R. A. E., and the Mark II flowmeters are described.

  17. Inspector-instrument interface in portable NDA instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Halbig, J.K.; Klosterbuer, S.F.

    1981-01-01

    Recent electronics technology advances make it possible to design sophisticated instruments in small packages for convenient field implementation. This report describes an inspector-instrument interface design which allows communication of procedures, responses, and results between the instrument and user. The interface has been incorporated into new spent-fuel instrumentation and a battery-powered multichannel analyzer.

  18. Building Musical Instruments

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Not many people go around wishing to be the Stradivarius of the hurdy-gurdy, but this websiteâ??s instructional materials might just make this dream a reality for some lucky individual. The staff at WannaLearn.com have brought together a set of resources for the aspiring musical instrument craftsperson that will be a source of delight, inspiration, and potentially, future innovation. Within categories that include flutes, guitars, and keyboard instruments, visitors can learn how to make wind chimes, banjos, a tinwhistle, and a dulcimer. Most of the instructional materials are quite easy to follow, and in no time at all, visitors can realize the joy of creating their own instruments from such basic materials as plumbing pipe, wine boxes, and nylon string.

  19. Nonmetallic Diaphragms for Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, H N; Buckingham, C T

    1925-01-01

    This report, the second of a series of reports relating to the general subject of instrument diaphragms. The first report of the series was published as Technical Report no. 165, "diaphragms for aeronautic instruments," and comprised an outline of historical developments and theoretical principles. The present report relates entirely to nonmetallic diaphragms, the use of which in certain types of pressure elements has been increasing for some time. Little, if any, information has been available to aid the designer of instruments using this form of pressure element. It was to attempt to meet the need for such information that the investigation reported in this paper was undertaken. The report describes the various materials which have been used as nonmetallic diaphragms, discusses the factors which affect the performance of the diaphragms and gives the results of tests made for the purpose of investigating the effect produced by these factors.

  20. Advanced instrumentation for reprocessing.

    SciTech Connect

    Cipiti, Benjamin B.

    2005-10-01

    Recent interest in reprocessing nuclear fuel in the U.S. has led to advanced separations processes that employ continuous processing and multiple extraction steps. These advanced plants will need to be designed with state-of-the-art instrumentation for materials accountancy and control. This research examines the current and upcoming instrumentation for nuclear materials accountancy for those most suited to the reprocessing environment. Though this topic has received attention time and again in the past, new technologies and changing world conditions require a renewed look and this subject. The needs for the advanced UREX+ separations concept are first identified, and then a literature review of current and upcoming measuring techniques is presented. The report concludes with a preliminary list of recommended instruments and measurement locations.

  1. Virtual Sensor Test Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Roy

    2011-01-01

    Virtual Sensor Test Instrumentation is based on the concept of smart sensor technology for testing with intelligence needed to perform sell-diagnosis of health, and to participate in a hierarchy of health determination at sensor, process, and system levels. A virtual sensor test instrumentation consists of five elements: (1) a common sensor interface, (2) microprocessor, (3) wireless interface, (4) signal conditioning and ADC/DAC (analog-to-digital conversion/ digital-to-analog conversion), and (5) onboard EEPROM (electrically erasable programmable read-only memory) for metadata storage and executable software to create powerful, scalable, reconfigurable, and reliable embedded and distributed test instruments. In order to maximize the efficient data conversion through the smart sensor node, plug-and-play functionality is required to interface with traditional sensors to enhance their identity and capabilities for data processing and communications. Virtual sensor test instrumentation can be accessible wirelessly via a Network Capable Application Processor (NCAP) or a Smart Transducer Interlace Module (STIM) that may be managed under real-time rule engines for mission-critical applications. The transducer senses the physical quantity being measured and converts it into an electrical signal. The signal is fed to an A/D converter, and is ready for use by the processor to execute functional transformation based on the sensor characteristics stored in a Transducer Electronic Data Sheet (TEDS). Virtual sensor test instrumentation is built upon an open-system architecture with standardized protocol modules/stacks to interface with industry standards and commonly used software. One major benefit for deploying the virtual sensor test instrumentation is the ability, through a plug-and-play common interface, to convert raw sensor data in either analog or digital form, to an IEEE 1451 standard-based smart sensor, which has instructions to program sensors for a wide variety of functions. The sensor data is processed in a distributed fashion across the network, providing a large pool of resources in real time to meet stringent latency requirements.

  2. Studying the Instrument Shelter

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The GLOBE Program, UCAR (University Corporation for Atmospheric Research)

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this activity is to discover why an instrument shelter is built the way it is. Students construct shelters that have varying properties and place them in the same location or place similar shelters in different locations and compare temperature data taken in each shelter. Students should predict what will happen for each of the different shelter designs or placements and perform the steps of student research. Intended outcomes are that students gain an understanding of GLOBE specifications for the instrument shelter and perform a guided inquiry project.

  3. Microtechnology for instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Mariella, R.

    1998-01-01

    For the last two decades, the majority of research and development at LLNL in microtechnology has focused on photonics devices and bulk micromachining, including miccroelectro-mechanical systems and associated areas. For the last ten years, we have used these capabilities to address our analytical instrumentation needs. Just as the miniature photonics have enable the fabrication of analytical instruments that are either higher performance, smaller, more portable, or are combinations of these. Examples of these are our portable thermal cyclers for DNA analysis, our hand-held gas chromatograph, our flow-stream-waveguide-based flow cytometer, and our etched-microchannel electrophoresis systems. This presentation will describe these and related developments.

  4. Instrumentation in medical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.T. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Accelerator and Fusion Research Div.

    1995-05-01

    The demand for clinical use of accelerated heavy charged-particle (proton and light-ion) beams for cancer treatment is now burgeoning worldwide. Clinical trials are underway at more than a dozen accelerators. Several hospital-based accelerator facilities dedicated to radiation treatment of human cancer have been constructed, and their number is growing. Many instruments in medical systems have been developed for modifying extracted particle beams for clinical application, monitoring the delivery of the treatment beams, and controlling the treatment processes to ensure patient safety. These in turn demand new developments of instruments in controlling beam extraction, beam tuning, and beam transportation at the medical systems.

  5. Lightning Instrumentation at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colon, Jose L.; Eng, D.

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes lightning phenomena with a brief explanation of lightning generation and lightning activity as related to KSC. An analysis of the instrumentation used at launching Pads 39 A&B for measurements of lightning effects is included with alternatives and recommendations to improve the protection system and upgrade the actual instrumentation system. An architecture for a new data collection system to replace the present one is also included. A novel architecture to obtain lightning current information from several sensors using only one high speed recording channel while monitoring all sensors to replace the actual manual lightning current recorders and a novel device for the protection system are described.

  6. Spectroelectrochemical Instrument Measures TOC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kounaves, Sam

    2011-01-01

    A spectroelectrochemical instrument has been developed for measuring the total organic carbon (TOC) content of an aqueous solution. Measurements of TOC are frequently performed in environmental, clinical, and industrial settings. Until now, techniques for performing such measurements have included, various ly, the use of hazardous reagents, ultraviolet light, or ovens, to promote reactions in which the carbon contents are oxidized. The instrument now being developed is intended to be a safer, more economical means of oxidizing organic carbon and determining the TOC levels of aqueous solutions and for providing a low power/mass unit for use in planetary missions.

  7. Standard NIM instrumentation system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    NIM is a standard modular instrumentation system that is in wide use throughout the world. As the NIM system developed and accommodations were made to a dynamic instrumentation field and a rapidly advancing technology, additions, revisions and clarifications were made. These were incorporated into the standard in the form of addenda and errata. This standard is a revision of the NIM document, AEC Report TID-20893 (Rev. 4) dated July 1974. It includes all the addenda and errata items that were previously issued as well as numerous additional items to make the standard current with modern technology and manufacturing practice.

  8. Interfacing to accelerator instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, T.J.

    1995-12-31

    As the sensory system for an accelerator, the beam instrumentation provides a tremendous amount of diagnostic information. Access to this information can vary from periodic spot checks by operators to high bandwidth data acquisition during studies. In this paper, example applications will illustrate the requirements on interfaces between the control system and the instrumentation hardware. A survey of the major accelerator facilities will identify the most popular interface standards. The impact of developments such as isochronous protocols and embedded digital signal processing will also be discussed.

  9. Instrumentation and control system design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenji Saito; Hiroaki Sawahata; Fumitaka Homma; Makoto Kondo; Toshihiko Mizushima

    2004-01-01

    The instrumentation and control system of the high temperature engineering test reactor consists of the instrumentation, control equipments and safety protection systems. There are not many differences in the instrumentation and control equipments design between the HTTR and light water reactors except for some features. Various kinds of R&D of reactor instrumentation were performed taking into account the HTTR operational

  10. New Instrumentation for the WHT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutten, R.

    2000-03-01

    In order for the William Herschel Telescope to keep offering the best possible instrumentation in the future, it is important that new ideas and instruments are developed. For that reason, in June 1999 an announcement was sent out inviting novel ideas for new instrumentation for the WHT to be brought forward. The following four proposals for new instruments were received.

  11. Geotechnical Instruments in Structural Monitoring

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaoli Ding; Hui Qin

    Geotechnical instruments are used widely as a complementary tool to geodetic methods in monitoring natural and man-made structures. This paper provides an overview of geotechnical instruments used in structural monitoring. The transducers commonly used in geotechnical instrumentation are first introduced. This is followed by an introduction of the various types of instruments including their working principles and applications. The advantages

  12. Space science instrumentation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. H. Holzworth

    1989-01-01

    This grant was intended to be used for the purchase of high quality laboratory and data analysis instrumentation for the pursuit of space plasma physics research. Two of the first purchases were a 6250 BPI magnetic tape drive and a large, fast disk drive. These improved the satellite data analysis capability greatly and reduced the system backup time. With the

  13. Survey overview Instrument Construction

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    #12;Outline Survey overview Instrument Construction Survey Logistics Response Rates Uses of Survey (Faculty) and September 2003 (Staff) in SAS datasets #12;Survey Overview ­ Response Rates Response Rates) #12;Survey Overview ­ Response Rates Response Rates (Cont'd) Staff: 47.6% (N=513) Women higher than

  14. Instrumentation in medical systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. T. Chu

    1995-01-01

    The demand for clinical use of accelerated heavy charged particle (proton and light-ion) beams for cancer treatment is now burgeoning worldwide. Clinical trials are underway at more than a dozen accelerators. Several hospital-based accelerator facilities dedicated to radiation treatment of human cancer have been constructed, and their number is growing. Many instruments in medical systems have been developed for modifying

  15. Safety Instrumented Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steve Gillespie; I. Eng

    Summary: In an increasingly multidisciplinary engineering environment, and in the face of ever increasing system complexity, there is a growing need for all engineers and technicians involved in process engineering to be aware of the implications of designing and operating safety-related systems. This includes knowledge of the relevant safety standards. Safety Instrumented Systems play a vital role in providing the

  16. Instrumentation Technology Program Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This publication provides program standards for diploma and degree instrumentation technology programs. Fifteen categories of standards are presented. Each category is divided into one or more subcategories, and each subcategory has the following components: standard statement, explanatory comment, evaluative criteria, exhibits. Standards in the…

  17. LHC beam instrumentation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jacques Bosser; Claude Bovet; C. Fischer; R. Jung; R. Koziol; Hermann Schmickler; L. Vos

    1999-01-01

    Six years before the scheduled commissioning of the LHC at CERN, the basic list of beam instruments has been established. This early date is needed due to the impact of the mechanical design of some detectors (mainly the beam position detectors) on the cryogenic part of the machine as well as for other projects due to the long R&D period

  18. Developments in Synchrotron Instrumentation

    E-print Network

    Magee, Joseph W.

    Slide: 1 Developments in Synchrotron Instrumentation A. Fitch #12;Synchrotron Radiation and Powder; Slide: 2 · High angular resolution, i.e. narrow peak widths; · Rapid data collection / good statistics insertion device sources (e.g. undulators) · Hard energy operation · Large 2d on-line detectors Slide: 3

  19. Analytical chemistry instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Laing, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    In nine sections, 48 chapters cover 1) analytical chemistry and the environment 2) environmental radiochemistry 3) automated instrumentation 4) advances in analytical mass spectrometry 5) fourier transform spectroscopy 6) analytical chemistry of plutonium 7) nuclear analytical chemistry 8) chemometrics and 9) nuclear fuel technology.

  20. Analytical chemistry instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Laing, W.R. (ed.)

    1986-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 48 papers in these conference proceedings. The topics covered include: analytical chemistry and the environment; environmental radiochemistry; automated instrumentation; advances in analytical mass spectrometry; Fourier transform spectroscopy; analytical chemistry of plutonium; nuclear analytical chemistry; chemometrics; and nuclear fuel technology. (LEW)

  1. Rain radar instrument definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Nicolas; Chenebault, J.; Suinot, Noel; Mancini, Paolo L.

    1996-12-01

    As a result of a pre-phase a study, founded by ESA, this paper presents the definition of a spaceborne Rain Radar, candidate instrument for earth explorer precipitation mission. Based upon the description of user requirements for such a dedicated mission, a mission analysis defines the most suitable space segment. At system level, a parametric analysis compares pros and cons of instrument concepts associated with rain rate retrieval algorithms in order to select the most performing one. Several trade-off analysis at subsystem level leads then to the definition of the proposed design. In particular, as pulse compression is implemented in order to increase the radar sensitivity, the selected method to achieve a pulse response with a side-lobe level below--60 dB is presented. Antenna is another critical rain radar subsystem and several designs are com pared: direct radiating array, single or dual reflector illuminated by single or dual feed arrays. At least, feasibility of centralized amplification using TWTA is compared with criticality of Tx/Rx modules for distributed amplification. Mass and power budgets of the designed instrument are summarized as well as standard deviations and bias of simulated rain rate retrieval profiles. The feasibility of a compliant rain radar instrument is therefore demonstrated.

  2. Music: Instrumental Techniques, Percussion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearl, Jesse

    A course in introduction to music emphasizing harmony is presented. The approach used is a laboratory approach in which pupils will develop skill in playing percussion instruments, sing, listen to, read and compose music with emphasis on elementary concepts of harmony. Course objectives include: (1) The student will recognize duple, triple,…

  3. Instrument Technique Staff Assisted &

    E-print Network

    Braun, Paul

    CM Furnace Furnace $30 $75 CNT Furnace Furnace $30 $75 E-beam Evaporator 1 Electron Beam Evaporation point probe $0 $115 Lead Furnace Furnace $30 $75 Laser and Spectroscopy Facility Micro & Nano funding instrument or agreement. #12;Lindberg 1 Furnace - 2 inch Furnace $30 $75 Lindberg 2 Furnace - 2

  4. Instrument Technique Staff Assisted &

    E-print Network

    Braun, Paul

    $175 CM Furnace Furnace $65 $120 CNT Furnace Furnace $65 $120 E-beam Evaporator 1 Electron Beam Point Probe Four point probe $0 $175 Lead Furnace Furnace $65 $120 Laser and Spectroscopy Facility Micro funding instrument or agreement. #12;Lindberg 1 Furnace - 2 inch Furnace $65 $120 Lindberg 2 Furnace - 2

  5. Instrumentation for Thyristor Control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Neil Stanton

    1968-01-01

    Since thyristor control produces nonsinusoidal periodic waveforms with high harmonic content, the electrical measurements associated with such controls require some adaptation of the existing techniques which have evolved mainly for the measurement of constant (dc) or sinusoidally varying (ac) electrical quantities. The basic principles and instruments discussed are relevant to voltage, current, real and reactive power, and power factor measurement

  6. Instruments for Natural Philosophy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Greenslade, Thomas Boardman

    This web site is an extensive collection of images and descriptions of historical instruments used in the physical sciences. Images of over 1800 pieces of apparatus are included along with information and references about each. The collection is divided into topics covering all of classical physics. Many of the items were used for demonstrations, labs, or other teaching purposes.

  7. Elementary Instrumental Music Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Dolores A.

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: Our former Elementary Instrumental Music Program for 4th-6th graders was costly and ineffective. Students were bused to a high school in the middle of the instructional day--costs (time and transportation) were not compensatory with the program, which was experiencing a significant drop-out rate.…

  8. Portable dynamic fundus instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Gerald R. (inventor); Meehan, Richard T. (inventor); Hunter, Norwood R. (inventor); Caputo, Michael P. (inventor); Gibson, C. Robert (inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A portable diagnostic image analysis instrument is disclosed for retinal funduscopy in which an eye fundus image is optically processed by a lens system to a charge coupled device (CCD) which produces recordable and viewable output data and is simultaneously viewable on an electronic view finder. The fundus image is processed to develop a representation of the vessel or vessels from the output data.

  9. Frailty predicts waitlist mortality in liver transplant candidates.

    PubMed

    Lai, J C; Feng, S; Terrault, N A; Lizaola, B; Hayssen, H; Covinsky, K

    2014-08-01

    We aimed to determine whether frailty, a validated geriatric construct of increased vulnerability to physiologic stressors, predicts mortality in liver transplant candidates. Consecutive adult outpatients listed for liver transplant with laboratory Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD)???12 at a single center (97% recruitment rate) underwent four frailty assessments: Fried Frailty, Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and Instrumental ADL (IADL) scales. Competing risks models associated frailty with waitlist mortality (death/delisting for being too sick for liver transplant). Two hundred ninety-four listed liver transplant patients with MELD???12, median age 60 years and MELD 15 were followed for 12 months. By Fried Frailty score ?3, 17% were frail; 11/51 (22%) of the frail versus 25/243 (10%) of the not frail died/were delisted (p?=?0.03). Each 1-unit increase in the Fried Frailty score was associated with a 45% (95% confidence interval, 4-202) increased risk of waitlist mortality adjusted for MELD. Similarly, the adjusted risk of waitlist mortality associated with each 1-unit decrease (i.e. increasing frailty) in the Short Physical Performance Battery (hazard ratio 1.19, 95% confidence interval 1.07-1.32). Frailty is prevalent in liver transplant candidates. It strongly predicts waitlist mortality, even after adjustment for liver disease severity demonstrating the applicability and importance of the frailty construct in this population. PMID:24935609

  10. Simulation visualization through dynamic instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Bisset, K.R.

    1998-09-01

    The goal of the instrument composition system is to allow a simulation user to dynamically create instruments as a simulation executes. Instruments can include graphical displays, data collectors, and debugging aides. Instruments are made up of small building blocks which can be easily combined into larger, more complex instruments. Through the sue of an Attribute Server (a distributed publication/subscription mechanism), the actors and instruments in a simulation can interact without direct knowledge of each other. Instead, each actor publishes the attributes which it has available. An instrument subscribes to the attributes in which it is interested, and is notified whenever the value of one of these attribute changes. An instrument can also publish attributes for use by other instruments. Since the Attribute Server is distributed, the publisher of an attribute need not execute on the same machine as the subscriber. This allows CPU intensive data visualization to execute on separate machines from the simulation, minimizing the impact on the simulation.

  11. Superfluid helium tanker instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Woodhouse, C.E. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (USA). School of Medicine); Kashani, A. (Sterling Federal Systems, Inc., NASA/Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (US)); Lukemire, A.T. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (USA). Goddard Space Flight Center)

    1990-02-01

    An instrumentation system for a 1992 space shuttle flight demonstration of a superfluid helium (SFHe) tanker and transfer technology is presented. This system provides measurement of helium temperatures, pressures, flow rates, mass, and the presence of liquid or vapor. The instrumentation system described consists of analog and digital portions which provide a space qualified electronics system that is fault tolerant, compact, and relatively lightweight. The data processing hardware and software are ground commandable, perform measurements asynchronously, and format telemetry for transmission to the ground. The novel heat pulse mass gaging technique is described. A new liquid/vapor sensor is presented. Flowmeters for SFHe are discussed. A SFHe fountain effect pump is described. Results of tests to date are presented.

  12. Musical Instrument Makers Forum

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    With links to over 400 pages on acoustic guitar building, violin, dulcimer, flute, recorder, and bagpipe making, brass instrument building and repair, drum making and much, much more this is the site to visit to better understand how musical instruments are made and maintained. The Forum itself hosts a long list of topics which include discussions related to everything from splitting spruce billets to how to alter a violin to better fit a musician's hand to how to use bird's eye maple in guitar building. And as if all of that were not enough the site also provides links to appropriate books, magazines and hosts a tools store section with links to wood turning tools, hand tools and everything else that's needed to keep your fiddle, guitar or flute in tip top shape.

  13. The LSST Instrument Concept

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Starra; C. F. Clavera; S. Wolff; J. A. Tyson; M. Lesser; L. Daggert; R. Domingueza; R. Gomez; G. Muller

    The LSST Instrument is a wide-field optical (0.3 to 1um) imager designed to provide a three degree field-of-view with better than 0.2 arcsecond sampling. The image surface of the LSST is approximately 55cm in diameter with a curvature radius over 30 meters. The detector format is currently defined to be a circular mosaic of 568 2k x 2k devices faceted

  14. Dental care and instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Easley, J

    1998-08-01

    Equine dentistry is not just carpentry work that involves floating the sharp enamel points off cheek teeth. Although floating is the most common and essential part of equine dentistry, every horse deserves a complete veterinary dental examination on a regular basis. Without such an examination, the equine practitioner can not determine the corrective procedures needed inside the horse's mouth. Dentistry for all ages is covered. Necessary instruments for a complete oral examination are also discussed. PMID:9742666

  15. Frontiers of accelerator instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M.

    1992-08-01

    New technology has permitted significant performance improvements of established instrumentation techniques including beam position and profile monitoring. Fundamentally new profile monitor strategies are required for the next generation of accelerators, especially linear colliders (LC). Beams in these machines may be three orders of magnitude smaller than typical beams in present colliders. In this paper we review both the present performance levels achieved by conventional systems and present some new ideas for future colliders.

  16. Distributed virtual instrumentation architecture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Groza; V. Cretu; M. Bogoevici; E. M. Petriu

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a virtual instrumentation architecture that was conceived by these authors to address specific issues of real-time data acquisition and remote processing in distributed environments for monitoring or C2 (command and control) applications. An object-oriented approach is considered to make full use of the state-of-the-art design and development techniques and technologies. An implementation based on Real-Time Java is

  17. An ice lithography instrument.

    PubMed

    Han, Anpan; Chervinsky, John; Branton, Daniel; Golovchenko, J A

    2011-06-01

    We describe the design of an instrument that can fully implement a new nanopatterning method called ice lithography, where ice is used as the resist. Water vapor is introduced into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) vacuum chamber above a sample cooled down to 110 K. The vapor condenses, covering the sample with an amorphous layer of ice. To form a lift-off mask, ice is removed by the SEM electron beam (e-beam) guided by an e-beam lithography system. Without breaking vacuum, the sample with the ice mask is then transferred into a metal deposition chamber where metals are deposited by sputtering. The cold sample is then unloaded from the vacuum system and immersed in isopropanol at room temperature. As the ice melts, metal deposited on the ice disperses while the metals deposited on the sample where the ice had been removed by the e-beam remains. The instrument combines a high beam-current thermal field emission SEM fitted with an e-beam lithography system, cryogenic systems, and a high vacuum metal deposition system in a design that optimizes ice lithography for high throughput nanodevice fabrication. The nanoscale capability of the instrument is demonstrated with the fabrication of nanoscale metal lines. PMID:21721733

  18. An ice lithography instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Anpan [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Chervinsky, John [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Branton, Daniel [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Golovchenko, J. A. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    We describe the design of an instrument that can fully implement a new nanopatterning method called ice lithography, where ice is used as the resist. Water vapor is introduced into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) vacuum chamber above a sample cooled down to 110 K. The vapor condenses, covering the sample with an amorphous layer of ice. To form a lift-off mask, ice is removed by the SEM electron beam (e-beam) guided by an e-beam lithography system. Without breaking vacuum, the sample with the ice mask is then transferred into a metal deposition chamber where metals are deposited by sputtering. The cold sample is then unloaded from the vacuum system and immersed in isopropanol at room temperature. As the ice melts, metal deposited on the ice disperses while the metals deposited on the sample where the ice had been removed by the e-beam remains. The instrument combines a high beam-current thermal field emission SEM fitted with an e-beam lithography system, cryogenic systems, and a high vacuum metal deposition system in a design that optimizes ice lithography for high throughput nanodevice fabrication. The nanoscale capability of the instrument is demonstrated with the fabrication of nanoscale metal lines.

  19. An ice lithography instrument

    PubMed Central

    Han, Anpan; Chervinsky, John; Branton, Daniel; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the design of an instrument that can fully implement a new nanopatterning method called ice lithography, where ice is used as the resist. Water vapor is introduced into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) vacuum chamber above a sample cooled down to 110 K. The vapor condenses, covering the sample with an amorphous layer of ice. To form a lift-off mask, ice is removed by the SEM electron beam (e-beam) guided by an e-beam lithography system. Without breaking vacuum, the sample with the ice mask is then transferred into a metal deposition chamber where metals are deposited by sputtering. The cold sample is then unloaded from the vacuum system and immersed in isopropanol at room temperature. As the ice melts, metal deposited on the ice disperses while the metals deposited on the sample where the ice had been removed by the e-beam remains. The instrument combines a high beam-current thermal field emission SEM fitted with an e-beam lithography system, cryogenic systems, and a high vacuum metal deposition system in a design that optimizes ice lithography for high throughput nanodevice fabrication. The nanoscale capability of the instrument is demonstrated with the fabrication of nanoscale metal lines. PMID:21721733

  20. Mandolin Family Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, David J.; Rossing, Thomas D.

    The mandolin family of instruments consists of plucked chordophones, each having eight strings in four double courses. With the exception of the mandobass, the courses are tuned in intervals of fifths, as are the strings in violin family instruments. The soprano member of the family is the mandolin, tuned G3-D4-A4-E5. The alto member of the family is the mandola, tuned C3-G3-D4-A4. The mandola is usually referred to simply as the mandola in the USA, but is called the tenor mandola in Europe. The tenor member of the family is the octave mandolin, tuned G2-D3-A3-E4. It is referred to as the octave mandolin in the USA, and as the octave mandola in Europe. The baritone member of the family is the mandocello, or mandoloncello, tuned C2-G2-D3-A3. A variant of the mandocello not common in the USA is the five-course liuto moderno, or simply liuto, designed for solo repertoire. Its courses are tuned C2-G2-D3-A3-E4. A mandobass was also made by more than one manufacturer during the early twentieth century, though none are manufactured today. They were fretted instruments with single string courses tuned E1-A1-D2-G2. There are currently a few luthiers making piccolo mandolins, tuned C4-G4-D5-A5.

  1. Instrumentation: Software-Driven Instrumentation: The New Wave.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salit, M. L.; Parsons, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    Software-driven instrumentation makes measurements that demand a computer as an integral part of either control, data acquisition, or data reduction. The structure of such instrumentation, hardware requirements, and software requirements are discussed. Examples of software-driven instrumentation (such as wavelength-modulated continuum source…

  2. FHR Process Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride salt-cooled High temperature Reactors (FHRs) are entering into early phase engineering development. Initial candidate technologies have been identified to measure all of the required process variables. The purpose of this paper is to describe the proposed measurement techniques in sufficient detail to enable assessment of the proposed instrumentation suite and to support development of the component technologies. This paper builds upon the instrumentation chapter of the recently published FHR technology development roadmap. Locating instruments outside of the intense core radiation and high-temperature fluoride salt environment significantly decreases their environmental tolerance requirements. Under operating conditions, FHR primary coolant salt is a transparent, low-vapor-pressure liquid. Consequently, FHRs can employ standoff optical measurements from above the salt pool to assess in-vessel conditions. For example, the core outlet temperature can be measured by observing the fuel s blackbody emission. Similarly, the intensity of the core s Cerenkov glow indicates the fission power level. Short-lived activation of the primary coolant provides another means for standoff measurements of process variables. The primary coolant flow and neutron flux can be measured using gamma spectroscopy along the primary coolant piping. FHR operation entails a number of process measurements. Reactor thermal power and core reactivity are the most significant variables for process control. Thermal power can be determined by measuring the primary coolant mass flow rate and temperature rise across the core. The leading candidate technologies for primary coolant temperature measurement are Au-Pt thermocouples and Johnson noise thermometry. Clamp-on ultrasonic flow measurement, that includes high-temperature tolerant standoffs, is a potential coolant flow measurement technique. Also, the salt redox condition will be monitored as an indicator of its corrosiveness. Both electrochemical techniques and optical spectroscopy are candidate fluoride salt redox measurement methods. Coolant level measurement can be performed using radar-level gauges located in standpipes above the reactor vessel. While substantial technical development remains for most of the instruments, industrially compatible instruments based upon proven technology can be reasonably extrapolated from the current state of the art.

  3. CARMENES instrument overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirrenbach, A.; Amado, P. J.; Caballero, J. A.; Mundt, R.; Reiners, A.; Ribas, I.; Seifert, W.; Abril, M.; Aceituno, J.; Alonso-Floriano, F. J.; Ammler-von Eiff, M.; Antona Jiménez, R.; Anwand-Heerwart, H.; Azzaro, M.; Bauer, F.; Barrado, D.; Becerril, S.; Béjar, V. J. S.; Benítez, D.; Berdiñas, Z. M.; Cárdenas, M. C.; Casal, E.; Claret, A.; Colomé, J.; Cortés-Contreras, M.; Czesla, S.; Doellinger, M.; Dreizler, S.; Feiz, C.; Fernández, M.; Galadí, D.; Gálvez-Ortiz, M. C.; García-Piquer, A.; García-Vargas, M. L.; Garrido, R.; Gesa, L.; Gómez Galera, V.; González Álvarez, E.; González Hernández, J. I.; Grözinger, U.; Guàrdia, J.; Guenther, E. W.; de Guindos, E.; Gutiérrez-Soto, J.; Hagen, H.-J.; Hatzes, A. P.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Helmling, J.; Henning, T.; Hermann, D.; Hernández Castaño, L.; Herrero, E.; Hidalgo, D.; Holgado, G.; Huber, A.; Huber, K. F.; Jeffers, S.; Joergens, V.; de Juan, E.; Kehr, M.; Klein, R.; Kürster, M.; Lamert, A.; Lalitha, S.; Laun, W.; Lemke, U.; Lenzen, R.; López del Fresno, Mauro; López Martí, B.; López-Santiago, J.; Mall, U.; Mandel, H.; Martín, E. L.; Martín-Ruiz, S.; Martínez-Rodríguez, H.; Marvin, C. J.; Mathar, R. J.; Mirabet, E.; Montes, D.; Morales Muñoz, R.; Moya, A.; Naranjo, V.; Ofir, A.; Oreiro, R.; Pallé, E.; Panduro, J.; Passegger, V.-M.; Pérez-Calpena, A.; Pérez Medialdea, D.; Perger, M.; Pluto, M.; Ramón, A.; Rebolo, R.; Redondo, P.; Reffert, S.; Reinhardt, S.; Rhode, P.; Rix, H.-W.; Rodler, F.; Rodríguez, E.; Rodríguez-López, C.; Rodríguez-Pérez, E.; Rohloff, R.-R.; Rosich, A.; Sánchez-Blanco, E.; Sánchez Carrasco, M. A.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Sarmiento, L. F.; Schäfer, S.; Schiller, J.; Schmidt, C.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Solano, E.; Stahl, O.; Storz, C.; Stürmer, J.; Suárez, J. C.; Ulbrich, R. G.; Veredas, G.; Wagner, K.; Winkler, J.; Zapatero Osorio, M. R.; Zechmeister, M.; Abellán de Paco, F. J.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; del Burgo, C.; Klutsch, A.; Lizon, J. L.; López-Morales, M.; Morales, J. C.; Perryman, M. A. C.; Tulloch, S. M.; Xu, W.

    2014-07-01

    This paper gives an overview of the CARMENES instrument and of the survey that will be carried out with it during the first years of operation. CARMENES (Calar Alto high-Resolution search for M dwarfs with Exoearths with Near-infrared and optical Echelle Spectrographs) is a next-generation radial-velocity instrument under construction for the 3.5m telescope at the Calar Alto Observatory by a consortium of eleven Spanish and German institutions. The scientific goal of the project is conducting a 600-night exoplanet survey targeting ~ 300 M dwarfs with the completed instrument. The CARMENES instrument consists of two separate echelle spectrographs covering the wavelength range from 0.55 to 1.7 ?m at a spectral resolution of R = 82,000, fed by fibers from the Cassegrain focus of the telescope. The spectrographs are housed in vacuum tanks providing the temperature-stabilized environments necessary to enable a 1 m/s radial velocity precision employing a simultaneous calibration with an emission-line lamp or with a Fabry-Perot etalon. For mid-M to late-M spectral types, the wavelength range around 1.0 ?m (Y band) is the most important wavelength region for radial velocity work. Therefore, the efficiency of CARMENES has been optimized in this range. The CARMENES instrument consists of two spectrographs, one equipped with a 4k x 4k pixel CCD for the range 0.55 - 1.05 ?m, and one with two 2k x 2k pixel HgCdTe detectors for the range from 0.95 - 1.7?m. Each spectrograph will be coupled to the 3.5m telescope with two optical fibers, one for the target, and one for calibration light. The front end contains a dichroic beam splitter and an atmospheric dispersion corrector, to feed the light into the fibers leading to the spectrographs. Guiding is performed with a separate camera; on-axis as well as off-axis guiding modes are implemented. Fibers with octagonal cross-section are employed to ensure good stability of the output in the presence of residual guiding errors. The fibers are continually actuated to reduce modal noise. The spectrographs are mounted on benches inside vacuum tanks located in the coudé laboratory of the 3.5m dome. Each vacuum tank is equipped with a temperature stabilization system capable of keeping the temperature constant to within +/-0.01°C over 24 hours. The visible-light spectrograph will be operated near room temperature, while the near-IR spectrograph will be cooled to ~ 140 K. The CARMENES instrument passed its final design review in February 2013. The MAIV phase is currently ongoing. First tests at the telescope are scheduled for early 2015. Completion of the full instrument is planned for the fall of 2015. At least 600 useable nights have been allocated at the Calar Alto 3.5m Telescope for the CARMENES survey in the time frame until 2018. A data base of M stars (dubbed CARMENCITA) has been compiled from which the CARMENES sample can be selected. CARMENCITA contains information on all relevant properties of the potential targets. Dedicated imaging, photometric, and spectroscopic observations are underway to provide crucial data on these stars that are not available in the literature.

  4. Evaluation Instruments for Technology Projects

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Online Evaluation Resource Library (OERL) was developed for professionals seeking to design, conduct, document, or review project evaluations. OERL's instrument collection is designed to provide models for the development of new instruments. Users are encouraged to use or adapt instruments, sections, or individual questions to create instruments that are tailored to their projects. The instruments were selected from data collection forms and protocols developed especially for evaluations of actual NSF-funded projects. There are also some instruments from technology projects funded by the U.S. Department of Education. The instruments gather information that is not contained in data and indicators available from archival sources (such as registrar records of courses taken and grade-point averages). The instruments are grouped by respondent (e.g., teachers/faculty, students) and by type (e.g., questionnaires, surveys, interviews, assessments).

  5. Outsider's look at flight instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Lundy, A.S.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents ideas and speculations on possible diagnostic instrumentation for use in missile flight testing. A plea is made for increased instrumentation efforts. There is some discussion of telemetry methods.

  6. A new innovative instrument for space plasma instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torbert, Roy B.

    1993-01-01

    The Faraday Ring Ammeter was the subject of this grant for a new innovative instrument for space plasma instrumentation. This report summarizes our progress in this work. Briefly, we have conducted an intensive series of experiments and trials over three years, testing some five configurations of the instrument to measure currents, resulting in two Ph.D. theses, supported by this grant, and two flight configurations of the instrument. The first flight would have been on a NASA-Air Force collaborative sounding rocket, but was not flown because of instrumental difficulties. The second has been successfully integrated on the NASA Auroral Turbulence payload which is to be launched in February, 1994.

  7. Geothermal high temperature instrumentation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Normann, R.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Livesay, B.J. [Livesay Consultants (United States)

    1998-06-11

    A quick look at the geothermal industry shows a small industry producing about $1 billion in electric sales annually. The industry is becoming older and in need of new innovative solutions to instrumentation problems. A quick look at problem areas is given along with basic instrumentation requirements. The focus of instrumentation is on high temperature electronics.

  8. Spacecraft instrument calibration and stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gille, J. C.; Feldman, P.; Hudson, R.; Lean, J.; Madden, R.; Mcmaster, L.; Mount, G.; Rottman, G.; Simon, P. C.

    1989-01-01

    The following topics are covered: instrument degradation; the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) Experiment; the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS); the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 1 (SAGE-1) and SAGE-2 instruments; the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) UV ozone and near infrared airglow instruments; and the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS).

  9. WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT INSTRUMENTATION HANDBOOK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Instruments are required for proper operation of wastewater plants. To be of use the instruments must be operable and maintainable. This requires care in the selection, application and installation of instruments and control equipment. Contents of the handbook address the 'how-to...

  10. Transparent Dynamic Instrumentation Derek Bruening

    E-print Network

    Tomkins, Andrew

    Transparent Dynamic Instrumentation Derek Bruening Google, Inc. bruening@google.com Qin Zhao Google application can be monitored and con- trolled while it executes. The provided layer of control can be used instrumentation is one method for implementing process virtualization which dynamically instruments an application

  11. SOFIE instrument ground calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Scott; Fish, Chad; Romrell, Devin; Gordley, Larry; Hervig, Mark

    2006-08-01

    Space Dynamics Laboratory (SDL), in partnership with GATS, Inc., designed and built an instrument to conduct the Solar Occultation for Ice Experiment (SOFIE). SOFIE is the primary infrared sensor in the NASA Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) instrument suite. AIM's mission is to study polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs). SOFIE will make measurements in 16 separate spectral bands, arranged in eight pairs between 0.29 and 5.3 ?m. Each band pair will provide differential absorption limb-path transmission profiles for an atmospheric component of interest, by observing the sun through the limb of the atmosphere during solar occultation as AIM orbits Earth. A pointing mirror and imaging sun sensor coaligned with the detectors are used to track the sun during occultation events and maintain stable alignment of the sun on the detectors. Ground calibration experiments were performed to measure SOFIE end-to-end relative spectral response, nonlinearity, and spatial characteristics. SDL's multifunction infrared calibrator #1 (MIC1) was used to present sources to the instrument for calibration. Relative spectral response (RSR) measurements were performed using a step-scan Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). Out-of-band RSR was measured to approximately 0.01% of in-band peak response using the cascaded filter Fourier transform spectrometer (CFFTS) method. Linearity calibration was performed using a calcium fluoride attenuator in combination with a 3000K blackbody. Spatial characterization was accomplished using a point source and the MIC1 pointing mirror. SOFIE sun sensor tracking algorithms were verified using a heliostat and relay mirrors to observe the sun from the ground. These techniques are described in detail, and resulting SOFIE performance parameters are presented.

  12. ZBLAN Viscosity Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William

    2001-01-01

    The past year's contribution from Dr. Kaukler's experimental effort consists of these 5 parts: a) Construction and proof-of-concept testing of a novel shearing plate viscometer designed to produce small shear rates and operate at elevated temperatures; b) Preparing nonlinear polymeric materials to serve as standards of nonlinear Theological behavior; c) Measurements and evaluation of above materials for nonlinear rheometric behavior at room temperature using commercial spinning cone and plate viscometers available in the lab; d) Preparing specimens from various forms of pitch for quantitative comparative testing in a Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer, Thermal Mechanical Analyzer; and Archeological Analyzer; e) Arranging to have sets of pitch specimens tested using the various instruments listed above, from different manufacturers, to form a baseline of the viscosity variation with temperature using the different test modes offered by these instruments by compiling the data collected from the various test results. Our focus in this project is the shear thinning behavior of ZBLAN glass over a wide range of temperature. Experimentally, there are no standard techniques to perform such measurements on glasses, particularly at elevated temperatures. Literature reviews to date have shown that shear thinning in certain glasses appears to occur, but no data is available for ZBLAN glass. The best techniques to find shear thinning behavior require the application of very low rates of shear. In addition, because the onset of the thinning behavior occurs at an unknown elevated temperature, the instruments used in this study must provide controlled low rates of shear and do so for temperatures approaching 600 C. In this regard, a novel shearing parallel plate viscometer was designed and a prototype built and tested.

  13. Micromachining inertial instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Marc S.; Bernstein, Jonathan J.; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.; Campbell, J.; Cousens, J.; Cunningham, Robert K.; Fields, R.; Greiff, Paul; Hugh, Brenda; Niles, Les; Sohn, Jerome B.

    1996-09-01

    Draper Laboratory, using silicon microfabrication techniques to achieve high yields by batch processing, has been developing miniature microelectromechanical instruments for over 10 years. During this time, considerable progress has been made in the development and fabrication of micromechanical gyroscopes, accelerometers, and acoustic sensors. Inertial instruments have become a worldwide research and commercial topic. Draper gyroscopes and accelerometers have been fabricated with measurement ranges from 50 to 500 deg/s and 10 to 100,000 g, respectively. In gyroscopes, stabilities are 20 deg/h in room temperature tests and 4.4 deg/h applying 0.3 degrees C thermal control. For accelerometers, less than 1 mg has been demonstrated in room temperature tests. These units have performed successfully across a temperature range of -40 to 85 degrees C, and have survived 80,000- to 120,000-g shock tests along all axes. Continuing development activities are expected to yield over an order of magnitude in performance enhancement. These micromechanical instruments are built using a silicon wafer process that results in crystal silicon structures that are anodically bonded on a Pyrex substrate that contains sensing and control electrodes. This silicon-on-glass configuration has low stray capacitance, and is ideally suited for hybrid or flip-chip bonding technology. Draper's inertial sensors incorporate excellent fabrication, however, building the silicon and Pyrex sensor chip is only one of many important contributions in a complete sensor system. Other equally important steps include: 1) electronics and application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) 2) packaging, 3) test, and 4) modeling and analysis. This presentation focuses on sensor fabrication. Draper's accelerometers and gyroscopes and the dissolved wafer fabrication process are described. The evolution of gyro design, fabrication, and performance is summarized. Garnered through experience in both conventional and micromachined inertial sensors, rules of thumb that have guided Draper's micromachining efforts are discussed.

  14. Diaphragms for Aeronautic Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersey, M D

    1924-01-01

    This investigation was carried out at the request of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and comprises an outline of historical developments and theoretical principles, together with a discussion of expedients for making the most effective use of existing diaphragms actuated by the hydrostatic pressure form an essential element of a great variety instruments for aeronautic and other technical purposes. The various physical data needed as a foundation for rational methods of diaphragm design have not, however, been available hitherto except in the most fragmentary form.

  15. Biomagnetic instrumentation and measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iufer, E. J.

    1978-01-01

    The instruments and techniques of biomagnetic measurement have progressed greatly in the past 15 years and are now of a quality appropriate to clinical applications. The paper reports on recent developments in the design and application of SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) magnetometers to biomagnetic measurement. The discussion covers biomagnetic field levels, magnetocardiography, magnetic susceptibility plethysmography, ambient noise and sensor types, principles of operation of a SQUID magnetometer, and laboratory techniques. Of the many promising applications of noninvasive biomagnetic measurement, magnetocardiography is the most advanced and the most likely to find clinical application in the near future.

  16. Space science instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzworth, R. H.

    1989-03-01

    This grant was intended to be used for the purchase of high quality laboratory and data analysis instrumentation for the pursuit of space plasma physics research. Two of the first purchases were a 6250 BPI magnetic tape drive and a large, fast disk drive. These improved the satellite data analysis capability greatly and reduced the system backup time. With the big disk drive it became possible to dump entire magnetic tapes to disk for faster, more efficient processing. Several microcomputers improve both personnel computing as well as general connectivity within the group and on campus in general. Other microcomputers function in the laboratory setting by acting as hosts for several instrument interfaces for communication with satellite and balloon payloads as well as laboratory VLF signal processing equipment. Perhaps the single most expensive item purchased was an analog tape drive for reading and writing 16 in. analog magnetic tapes. This analog tape drive is used for the direct processing of FM and directly recorded telemetry data from the balloon and rocket payloads.

  17. Instrumentation and control systems, equipment location; instrumentation and control building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Instrumentation and control systems, equipment location; instrumentation and control building, instrumentation room, bays and console plan. Specifications No. Eng-04-353-55-72; drawing no. 60-09-12; sheet 110 of 148; file no. 1321/61. Stamped: Record drawing - as constructed. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Control Center, Test Area 1-115, near Altair & Saturn Boulevards, Boron, Kern County, CA

  18. Virtual Instrument Simulator for CERES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J.

    1997-01-01

    A benchtop virtual instrument simulator for CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System) has been built at NASA, Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA. The CERES instruments will fly on several earth orbiting platforms notably NASDA's Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) and NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites. CERES measures top of the atmosphere radiative fluxes using microprocessor controlled scanning radiometers. The CERES Virtual Instrument Simulator consists of electronic circuitry identical to the flight unit's twin microprocessors and telemetry interface to the supporting spacecraft electronics and two personal computers (PC) connected to the I/O ports that control azimuth and elevation gimbals. Software consists of the unmodified TRW developed Flight Code and Ground Support Software which serves as the instrument monitor and NASA/TRW developed engineering models of the scanners. The CERES Instrument Simulator will serve as a testbed for testing of custom instrument commands intended to solve in-flight anomalies of the instruments which could arise during the CERES mission. One of the supporting computers supports the telemetry display which monitors the simulator microprocessors during the development and testing of custom instrument commands. The CERES engineering development software models have been modified to provide a virtual instrument running on a second supporting computer linked in real time to the instrument flight microprocessor control ports. The CERES Instrument Simulator will be used to verify memory uploads by the CERES Flight Operations TEAM at NASA. Plots of the virtual scanner models match the actual instrument scan plots. A high speed logic analyzer has been used to track the performance of the flight microprocessor. The concept of using an identical but non-flight qualified microprocessor and electronics ensemble linked to a virtual instrument with identical system software affords a relatively inexpensive simulation system capable of high fidelity.

  19. Instrumentation Working Group Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaller, Michelle; Miake-Lye, Richard

    1999-01-01

    The Instrumentation Working Group compiled a summary of measurement techniques applicable to gas turbine engine aerosol precursors and particulates. An assessment was made of the limits, accuracy, applicability, and technology readiness of the various techniques. Despite advances made in emissions characterization of aircraft engines, uncertainties still exist in the mechanisms by which aerosols and particulates are produced in the near-field engine exhaust. To adequately assess current understanding of the formation of sulfuric acid aerosols in the exhaust plumes of gas turbine engines, measurements are required to determine the degree and importance of sulfur oxidation in the turbine and at the engine exit. Ideally, concentrations of all sulfur species would be acquired, with emphasis on SO2 and SO3. Numerous options exist for extractive and non-extractive measurement of SO2 at the engine exit, most of which are well developed. SO2 measurements should be performed first to place an upper bound on the percentage of SO2 oxidation. If extractive and non-extractive techniques indicate that a large amount of the fuel sulfur is not detected as SO2, then efforts are needed to improve techniques for SO3 measurements. Additional work will be required to account for the fuel sulfur in the engine exhaust. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CI-MS) measurements need to be pursued, although a careful assessment needs to be made of the sampling line impact on the extracted sample composition. Efforts should also be placed on implementing non-intrusive techniques and extending their capabilities by maximizing exhaust coverage for line-of-sight measurements, as well as development of 2-D techniques, where feasible. Recommendations were made to continue engine exit and combustor measurements of particulates. Particulate measurements should include particle size distribution, mass fraction, hydration properties, and volatile fraction. However, methods to ensure that unaltered samples are obtained need to be developed. Particulate speciation was also assigned a high priority for quantifying the fractions of carbon soot, PAH, refractory materials, metals, sulfates, and nitrates. High priority was also placed on performing a comparison of particle sizing instruments. Concern was expressed by the workshop attendees who routinely make particulate measurements about the variation in number density measured during in-flight tests by different instruments. In some cases, measurements performed by different groups of researchers during the same flight tests showed an order of magnitude variation. Second priority was assigned to measuring concentrations of odd hydrogen and oxidizing species. Since OH, HO2, H2O2, and O are extremely reactive, non-extractive measurements are recommended. A combination of absorption and fluorescence is anticipated to be effective for OH measurements in the combustor and at the engine exit. Extractive measurements of HO2 have been made in the stratosphere, where the ambient level of OH is relatively low. Use of techniques that convert HO2 to OH for combustor and engine exit measurements needs to be evaluated, since the ratio of HO2/OH may be 1% or less at both the combustor and engine exit. CI-MS might be a viable option for H2O2, subject to sampling line conversion issues. However, H2O2 is a low priority oxidizing species in the combustor and at the engine exit. Two candidates for atomic oxygen measurements are Resonance Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization (REMPI) and Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF). Particulate measurement by simultaneous extractive and non-extractive techniques was given equal priority to the oxidizer measurements. Concern was expressed over the ability of typical ground test sampling lines to deliver an unaltered sample to a remotely located instrument. It was suggested that the sampling probe and line losses be checked out by attempting measurements using an optical or non-extractive technique immediately upstream of the sampling probe. This is a possible application for Laser Induced Incandesc

  20. LANDSAT instruments characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Y. (principal investigator)

    1984-01-01

    Work performed for the LANDSAT instrument characterization task in the areas of absolute radiometry, coherent noise analysis, and between-date smoothing is reported. Absolute radiometric calibration for LANDSAT-5 TM under ambient conditions was performed. The TM Radiometric Algorithms and Performance Program (TRAPP) was modified to create optional midscan data files and to match the TM Image Processing System (TIPS) algorithm for pulse determination. Several data reduction programs were developed, including a linear regression and its plotted result. A fast Fourier transformation study was conducted on the resequenced TM data. Subscenes of homogeneous water within scenes over Pensacola, Florida were used for testing the FFT on the resequenced data. Finally, a gain and pulse height stability study of LANDSAT 5 TM spectral bands was performed.

  1. Ideology as instrument.

    PubMed

    Glassman, Michael; Karno, Donna

    2007-12-01

    Comments on the article by J. T. Jost, which argued that the end-of-ideology claims that emerged in the aftermath of World War II were both incorrect and detrimental to the field of political psychology. M. Glassman and D. Karno make three critical points. First, Jost objectified ideology as a grand strategy implemented at the individual level, rather than as an instrument used for a specific purpose in activity. In doing so, he set ideology up as an "object" that guides human behavior rather than as a rational part of human experience. Second, they take issue with the idea that, because somebody acts in a manner that can be categorized as ideological, there actually is such a thing as ideology separate from that event and/or political experience and that psychologists ought to understand the meaning of ideology in order to understand future human activities as outside observers. Third, Jost seems to see this objective ideology as a unidirectional, causal mechanism for activity, a mechanism that assumes individuals act according to ideology, which eclipses the possibility that immediate ideological positions are the residue of purposeful activity. Glassman and Karno suggest that it may be better to take a pluralistic view of ideology in human action. Where ideology does exist, it is as a purposeful instrument--part of a logically based action to meet some ends-in-view--a mixture of immediate goals tied to secondary belief systems (which have been integrated to serve the material purposes of the purveyors of these ideologies). So if we are to understand ideology, we can only understand it through its use in human activity. PMID:18085858

  2. National Instruments Developer Zone: Tutorials

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    These tutorials will help you learn about a specific common measurement application topic through theoretical explanations and practical examples. Many of today's test and measurement applications consist of a broad range of instruments and measurement hardware such as high-speed data acquisition, RF, switching, high-precision measurements, motion control, digital I/O, counter operations, virtual instrumentation, and more. This set of tutorials provides essential information on the instruments you use to measure and automate the world around you.

  3. A virtual instrumentation support system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. F. F. Brito Palma; Adelino R. F. da Silva

    1998-01-01

    A virtual instrumentation support system that permits one to run several concurrent virtual instruments has been developed. In this paper, we present a multi-tasking graphical environment (named AGMT) and two main virtual instrumentation applications-a digital oscilloscope and a digital image processor. The AGMT was designed to work in real-time and interact with sensors and actuators via data acquisition boards, and

  4. Instrumentality of Voice 1 Running head: INSTRUMENTALITY OF VOICE

    E-print Network

    not account for the effects of voice on perceived fairness. Results suggest that although voice does indeed have important instrumental meaning, this instrumentality does not actually explain why people value that they regard as procedurally fair (referred to as the fair process effect; Blader & Tyler, 2005; Brockner

  5. Optical distance measuring instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B. (inventor)

    1986-01-01

    An optical instrument, such as a stability monitor or a target range finder, uses an unstabilized laser to project a composite optical signal of coherent light having two naturally occurring longitudinal mode components. A beamsplitter divides the signal into a reference beam which is directed toward one photodetector and a transmitted beam which illuminates and is reflected from a distant target onto a second photodetector optically isolated from the first photodetector. Both photodetectors are operated on the square law principle to provide electrical signals modulated at a frequency equal to the separation between the frequencies of the two longitudinal mode components of the optical signal projected by the laser. Slight movement of the target may be detected and measured by electrically monitoring the phase difference between the two signals provided by the photodetectors and the range of the target measured with the aid of a microprocessor by changing the separation between the longitudinal modes by shifting the length of the resonator cavity in an iterative series of increments.

  6. The Clementine instrument complement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucey, Paul G.

    1993-01-01

    The recent successes of the Galileo solid-state imaging (SSI) experiment at the Moon and Gaspra show the utility of multispectral imaging of planetary objects. 'Clementine' is the planetary community's 'code name' for the SDIO (Space Defense Initiative Organization), mission to the Moon and the asteroid Geographos. This mission is designed as a long term stressing test on sensors and space systems developed for SDIO. In the course of this test Clementine will obtain science data using a varied and powerful array of remote sensing instruments which were developed by or for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California. Clementine carries five cameras, one for navigation and four for science experiments. In addition, a laser ranger is included which will serve as a laser altimeter. The Clementine cameras cover a wider range of spatial resolutions and wavelength range than did Galileo and are almost ideally suited to mapping of mafic rock types as are present on the Moon and expected at Geographos. Calibration of the cameras will occur at the sensor calibration laboratory at LLNL. In flight calibrations, using standard stars and other standards should improve the stated accuracies. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) include the following noise sources: shot noise, calibration error, digitization noise, readout noise, and frame transfer noise (where applicable). The achieved SNRs are a balance between detector saturation and acceptable image smear. The 'worst' case uses the longest possible integration times.

  7. Ultrasonics and space instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The design topic selected was an outgrowth of the experimental design work done in the Fluid Behavior in Space experiment, which relies on the measurement of minute changes of the pressure and temperature to obtain reasonably accurate volume determinations. An alternative method of volume determination is the use of ultrasonic imaging. An ultrasonic wave system is generated by wall mounted transducer arrays. The interior liquid configuration causes reflection and refraction of the pattern so that analysis of the received wave system provides a description of the configuration and hence volume. Both continuous and chirp probe beams were used in a laboratory experiment simulating a surface wetting propellant. The hardware included a simulated tank with gaseous voids, transmitting and receiving transducers, transmitters, receivers, computer interface, and computer. Analysis software was developed for image generation and interpretation of results. Space instrumentation was pursued in support of a number of experiments under development for GAS flights. The program included thirty undergraduate students pursuing major qualifying project work under the guidance of eight faculty supported by a teaching assistant. Both mechanical and electrical engineering students designed and built several microprocessor systems to measure parameters such as temperature, acceleration, pressure, velocity, and circulation in order to determine combustion products, vortex formation, gas entrainment, EMR emissions from thunderstorms, and milli-g-accelerations due to crew motions.

  8. Detectors for Tomorrow's Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, Harvey

    2009-01-01

    Cryogenically cooled superconducting detectors have become essential tools for a wide range of measurement applications, ranging from quantum limited heterodyne detection in the millimeter range to direct searches for dark matter with superconducting phonon detectors operating at 20 mK. Superconducting detectors have several fundamental and practical advantages which have resulted in their rapid adoption by experimenters. Their excellent performance arises in part from reductions in noise resulting from their low operating temperatures, but unique superconducting properties provide a wide range of mechanisms for detection. For example, the steep dependence of resistance with temperature on the superconductor/normal transition provides a sensitive thermometer for calorimetric and bolometric applications. Parametric changes in the properties of superconducting resonators provides a mechanism for high sensitivity detection of submillimeter photons. From a practical point of view, the use of superconducting detectors has grown rapidly because many of these devices couple well to SQUID amplifiers, which are easily integrated with the detectors. These SQUID-based amplifiers and multiplexers have matured with the detectors; they are convenient to use, and have excellent noise performance. The first generation of fully integrated large scale superconducting detection systems are now being deployed. I will discuss the prospects for a new generation of instruments designed to take full advantage of the revolution in detector technology.

  9. Arecibo Upgrade Notes INSTRUMENTAL POLARIZATION

    E-print Network

    Memo Instrumental Polarization: Cross Coupling and Hybrid Conversion Issues we showed that the measuredArecibo Upgrade Notes INSTRUMENTAL POLARIZATION: POLARIZATION ISOLATION & ERRORS IN STOKES polarization isolation is related to errors in Stokes parameters; 2 estimate a tolerable level of errors

  10. Arecibo Upgrade Notes INSTRUMENTAL POLARIZATION

    E-print Network

    In our 1992 Memo (Instrumental Polarization: Cross Coupling and Hybrid Conversion Issues) we showedArecibo Upgrade Notes INSTRUMENTAL POLARIZATION: POLARIZATION ISOLATION & ERRORS IN STOKES polarization isolation is related to errors in Stokes parameters; (2) estimate a tolerable level of errors

  11. Space Shuttle technology flight instrumentation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Dunstan

    1979-01-01

    The paper discusses the Shuttle technology flight instrumentation (TFI) system recording flight data during the operational phase of the Shuttle. Consideration is given to pertinent background information, such as Shuttle operation, flight verification, and instrumentation provided for the development and operational phase.

  12. Associations in Human Instrumental Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamez, A. Matias; Rosas, Juan M.

    2007-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted to study the contents of human instrumental conditioning. Experiment 1 found positive transfer between a discriminative stimulus (S[superscript D] and an instrumental response (R) that shared the outcome (O) with the response that was originally trained with the S[superscript D], showing the formation of an…

  13. The Boomerang/ldb Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piacentini, F.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bock, J. J.; Boscaleri, A.; Cardoni, P.; Coble, K.; Crill, B. P.; de Bernardis, P.; de Troia, G.; Farese, P.; Giacometti, M.; Hivon, E.; Hristov, V. V.; Iacoangeli, A.; Lange, A. E.; Martinis, L.; Masi, S.; Mason, P. V.; Mauskopf, P. D.; Miglio, L.; Montroy, T.; Netterfield, C. B.; Pascale, E.; Pongetti, F.; Romeo, G.; Ruhl, J. E.; Scaramuzzi, F.; Sforna, D.

    2002-12-01

    The BOOMERANG experiment provided the first high resolution map of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation. In this paper we summarize the main parts of the instrument, including bolometers, cryogenics, optics and pointing system. We show then how the instrument is designed to be robust to systematic effects.

  14. Technician Program Uses Advanced Instruments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinson, Stephen

    1981-01-01

    Describes various aspects of a newly-developed computer-assisted drafting/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) facility in the chemical engineering technology department at Broome Community College, Binghamton, New York. Stresses the use of new instruments such as microcomputers and microprocessor-equipped instruments. (CS)

  15. Development of instrumentation in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    de Divitiis, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is intended as a synopsis of the development of instrumentation in neurosurgery, with information about current status, evolution, and needs. Surgical instruments have been manufactured since the dawn of prehistory. Rough trephines for performing round craniotomies were discovered in Neolithic sites in many places. PMID:21492642

  16. Cryogenic Caging for Science Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin; Chui, Talso C.

    2011-01-01

    A method has been developed for caging science instrumentation to protect from pyro-shock and EDL (entry, descent, and landing) acceleration damage. Caging can be achieved by immersing the instrument (or its critical parts) in a liquid and solidifying the liquid by cooling. After the launch shock and/or after the payload has landed, the solid is heated up and evaporated.

  17. Replacing obsolete instrumentation — Lessons learned

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Wolle

    2010-01-01

    Overcoming test-equipment obsolescence is paramount in military and aerospace applications where test systems are supporting equipment with a service life of more than 20 years. However, replacing one or more obsolete instruments in a test system can have major consequences for the deployed Test Program Set (TPS). An emulation strategy can help you incorporate new test instruments to migrate from

  18. Ethnic Studies Materials Analysis Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Science Education Consortium, Inc., Boulder, CO.

    An instrument for analyzing ethnic studies curriculum materials for grades K-12 is presented. The Social Science Education Consortium (SSEC), Inc. staff designed the analysis instrument to check ethnic accuracy of materials as an aid to classroom teachers who are preparing ethnic studies curriculum. The booklet is divided into two main sections.…

  19. Career Education Materials Analysis Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedstrom, Judith E.; Williams, Constance M.

    An instrument for analyzing career education curriculum materials for grades K-12 is presented. The Social Science Education Consortium (SSEC), Inc. staff designed the analysis instrument to check the educational soundness and accuracy of career education materials. The booklet is divided into two main sections. Part I is a modified version of the…

  20. Virtual instrument simulator for CERES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John J. Chapman

    1997-01-01

    A benchtop virtual instrument simulator for CERES (clouds and the Earth's radiant energy system) has been built at NASA, Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. The CERES instruments will fly on several earth orbiting platforms notably NASDA's tropical rainfall measurement mission (TRMM) and NASA's Earth observing system (EOS) satellites. CERES measures top of the atmosphere radiative fluxes using microprocessor controlled

  1. RAIL: code instrumentation for .NET

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruno Cabral; Paulo Marques; Luís Moura Silva

    2005-01-01

    Code instrumentation is a mechanism that allows modules of programs to be completely rewritten at runtime. With the advent of virtual machines, this type of functionality is becoming more interesting because it allows the introduction of new functionality after an application has been deployed, easy implementation of aspect-oriented programming, performing security verifications, dynamic software upgrading, among others.The Runtime Assembly Instrumentation

  2. Virtual instrumentation and virtual environments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. J. W. Spoelder

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this work is to chart intriguing new possibilities and challenges resulting from the driving force and enabling factors of computing power and bandwidth that lie ahead of the instrumentation-and-measurement community. We do so by describing research and applications on the boundary between measurement, instrumentation, and virtual environments, and elucidate trends with some examples. We focus on three

  3. Virtual instrumentation and intelligent sensors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. H. Taner; J. E. Brignell

    1997-01-01

    An intelligent sensor is a far more sophisticated and complex device than a traditional dumb sensor. A virtual instrument approach in the research and development stages of intelligent sensors greatly reduces the burden of dealing with the potential complexities of behaviour. An example of such an instrument is presented, and it is conjectured that this approach would also be beneficial

  4. Experimenting with String Musical Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    What follows are several investigations involving string musical instruments developed for and used in a "Science of Sound & Light" course. The experiments make use of a guitar, orchestral string instruments and data collection and graphing software. They are designed to provide students with concrete examples of how mathematical formulae, when…

  5. Current and Nascent SETI Instruments

    E-print Network

    Siemion, Andrew P V; Chen, Henry; Cordes, Jim; Filiba, Terry; Foster, Griffin; Fries, Adam; Howard, Andrew; von Korff, Josh; Korpela, Eric; Lebofsky, Matt; McMahon, Peter L; Parsons, Aaron; Spitler, Laura; Wagner, Mark; Werthimer, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe our ongoing efforts to develop high-performance and sensitive instrumentation for use in the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence (SETI). These efforts include our recently deployed Search for Extraterrestrial Emissions from Nearby Developed Intelligent Populations Spectrometer (SERENDIP V.v) and two instruments currently under development; the Heterogeneous Radio SETI Spectrometer (HRSS) for SETI observations in the radio spectrum and the Optical SETI Fast Photometer (OSFP) for SETI observations in the optical band. We will discuss the basic SERENDIP V.v instrument design and initial analysis methodology, along with instrument architectures and observation strategies for OSFP and HRSS. In addition, we will demonstrate how these instruments may be built using low-cost, modular components and programmed and operated by students using common languages, e.g. ANSI C.

  6. The Planck Low Frequency Instrument

    E-print Network

    N. Mandolesi; C. Burigana; R. C. Butler; F. Cuttaia; A. De Rosa; F. Finelli; E. Franceschi; A. Gruppuso; M. Malaspina; G. Morgante; G. Morigi; L. Popa; M. Sandri; L. Stringhetti; L. Terenzi; L. Valenziano; F. Villa

    2004-11-15

    Planck is the third generation of mm-wave instruments designed for space observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies within the new Cosmic Vision 2020 ESA Science Program. Planck will map the whole sky with unprecedented sensitivity, angular resolution, and frequency coverage, and it likely leads us to the final comprehension of the CMB anisotropies. The Low Frequency Instrument (LFI), operating in the 30-70 GHz range, is one of the two instruments onboard Planck satellite, sharing the focal region of a 1.5 meter off-axis dual reflector telescope together with the High Frequency Instrument (HFI) operating at 100-857 GHz. We present LFI and discuss the major instrumental systematic effects that could degrade the measurements and the solutions adopted in the design and data analysis phase in order to adequately reduce and control them.

  7. Special observations by CERES instruments for validating the GERB instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szewczyk, Z. P.; Smith, G. L.; Priestley, K. J.

    There exist a consistent, two-decades-long Earth radiation budget data set established based on measurements obtained from various instruments. By carefully validating instruments with respect to each other, such a set can be used for long-term climate studies. CERES instrument measurements have been part of this dataset since 1998. The GERB instrument measurements need to become a part of this set as well, as they offer unprecedented information about the diurnal cycle of heating and cooling of the Earth. In order to include its measurements, however, GERB radiances must be validated for their consistency with CERES instruments. The main objective of CERES/GERB campaign is an attempt to establish the consistency between their measurements. In order to make a valid comparison of radiance measurements by two different instruments, it is important to match their viewing geometries at a given time instance. In addition to this spatial and temporal alignment, selecting homogenous energy sources to be measured is required for valid comparison. Despite the fact that a LEO and a GEO satellites Earth viewing geometries are quite different, it is possible to match them utilizing a unique feature of CERES scanners, so called Programmable Azimuth Plane Scan (PAPS) mode. This is accomplished by rotating the CERES scanning plane to align it with the GERB relative azimuth as the satellite flies over the GERB instrument visible portion of the Earth. There are no ideal energy sources to be measured by both instruments. Therefore, collecting a large amount of data for different scene types and averaging alleviates the problem of non-uniform radiation sources. In addition, the first GERB ground validation station near Valencia offers a place for cross-referencing measurements from different instruments, as its surface is reasonably homogeneous. The CERES/GERB campaign is on-going activity that is repeated twice a year, close to summer and winter solstices. It was run for the first time between May 24 and June 6, 2003; and repeated in December 10-31, 2003. The validation activity over the Valencia Anchor Station took place in June 18-24, 2003, and it was also repeated in February 9-12, 2004. In all these activities, CERES instruments on Terra and Aqua were put in the PAPS mode to collect validation data. The paper presents CERES instruments participation in the validation of GERB radiances. A focus of the paper is not only validation data collection, but also cross-referencing measurements from different instruments. Results for averaged, one-degree gridded data will be shown. Preliminary results indicate the promising consistency between GERB and CERES as long as geolocation errors of the former are kept within 1%.

  8. Foundations of measurement and instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warshawsky, Isidore

    1990-01-01

    The user of instrumentation has provided an understanding of the factors that influence instrument performance, selection, and application, and of the methods of interpreting and presenting the results of measurements. Such understanding is prerequisite to the successful attainment of the best compromise among reliability, accuracy, speed, cost, and importance of the measurement operation in achieving the ultimate goal of a project. Some subjects covered are dimensions; units; sources of measurement error; methods of describing and estimating accuracy; deduction and presentation of results through empirical equations, including the method of least squares; experimental and analytical methods of determining the static and dynamic behavior of instrumentation systems, including the use of analogs.

  9. Comparing Dietary Assessment Instruments | Dietary Assessment Primer

    Cancer.gov

    This table provides an at-a-glance comparison of the major features of self-report instruments for assessing diet. Further details on each instrument can be found in the Instrument Profiles. Considerations for the use of different instruments or combinations of instruments in different types of studies can be found in Choosing an Approach for Dietary Assessment.

  10. Arecibo Upgrade Notes INSTRUMENTAL POLARIZATION

    E-print Network

    Arecibo Upgrade Notes INSTRUMENTAL POLARIZATION: CROSS COUPLING AND HYBRID CONVERSION ISSUES Jim routine measurement of circular polarizations. The linears thus need conversion to circular polarization% polarization. (B) We also consider cross coupling combined with imperfect conversion. Calibration

  11. Arecibo Upgrade Notes INSTRUMENTAL POLARIZATION

    E-print Network

    Arecibo Upgrade Notes INSTRUMENTAL POLARIZATION: CROSS COUPLING AND HYBRID CONVERSION ISSUES Jim require routine measurement of circular polarizations. The linears thus need conversion to circular 1 polarization. B We also consider cross coupling combined with imperfect conversion. Calibration

  12. Life support subsystem monitoring instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. D.; Kostell, G. D.

    1974-01-01

    The recognition of the need for instrumentation in manned spacecraft life-support subsystems has increased significantly over the past several years. Of the required control and monitoring instrumentation, this paper will focus on the monitoring instrumentation as applied to life-support subsystems. The initial approach used independent sensors, independent sensor signal conditioning circuitry, and independent logic circuitry to provide shutdown protection only. This monitoring system was replaced with a coordinated series of printed circuit cards, each of which contains all the electronics to service one sensor and provide performance trend information, fault detection and isolation information, and shutdown protection. Finally, a review of sensor and instrumentation problems is presented, and the requirement for sensors with built-in signal conditioning and provisions for in situ calibration is discussed.

  13. Spacecraft instrument technology and cosmochemistry.

    PubMed

    McSween, Harry Y; McNutt, Ralph L; Prettyman, Thomas H

    2011-11-29

    Measurements by instruments on spacecraft have significantly advanced cosmochemistry. Spacecraft missions impose serious limitations on instrument volume, mass, and power, so adaptation of laboratory instruments drives technology. We describe three examples of flight instruments that collected cosmochemical data. Element analyses by Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometers on the Mars Exploration Rovers have revealed the nature of volcanic rocks and sedimentary deposits on Mars. The Gamma Ray Spectrometer on the Lunar Prospector orbiter provided a global database of element abundances that resulted in a new understanding of the Moon's crust. The Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer on Cassini has analyzed the chemical compositions of the atmosphere of Titan and active plumes on Enceladus. PMID:21402932

  14. Aircraft Power-Plant Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sontag, Harcourt; Brombacher, W G

    1934-01-01

    This report supersedes NACA-TR-129 which is now obsolete. Aircraft power-plant instruments include tachometers, engine thermometers, pressure gages, fuel-quantity gages, fuel flow meters and indicators, and manifold pressure gages. The report includes a description of the commonly used types and some others, the underlying principle utilized in the design, and some design data. The inherent errors of the instrument, the methods of making laboratory tests, descriptions of the test apparatus, and data in considerable detail in the performance of commonly used instruments are presented. Standard instruments and, in cases where it appears to be of interest, those used as secondary standards are described. A bibliography of important articles is included.

  15. Tailoring Instrumentation to the Operator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abplanalp, Glen H.; Menzenhauer, Fred C.

    1978-01-01

    This article provides guidelines in selecting appropriate instrumentation for water treatment facilities. Major areas of concern include: technical operating requirements of the process; equipment design and quality; installations; and mechanical aptitude of personnel. (CS)

  16. NCL Instrumentation - Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory

    Cancer.gov

    The mention of trade names and manufacturers is for informational purposes only. The NCL does not endorse any of the suppliers listed below. Equivalent instrumentation from alternate vendors can be substituted.

  17. Modular Approach to Instrumental Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deming, Richard L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    To remedy certain deficiencies, an instrument analysis course was reorganized into six one-unit modules: optical spectroscopy, magnetic resonance, separations, electrochemistry, radiochemistry, and computers and interfacing. Selected aspects of the course are discussed. (SK)

  18. Course on Instruments Updates Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Describes a course in chemical instrumentation for high school chemistry teachers, paid for by Union Carbide. Teachers used spectrophotometer, nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, atomic absorption spectrograph, gas chromatograph, liquid chromatograph and infrared spectrophotometer. Also describes other teacher education seminars. (JM)

  19. Islamic Astronomical Instruments and Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidarzadeh, Tofigh

    This chapter is a brief survey of astronomical instruments being used and developed in Islamic territories from the eighth to the fifteenth centuries as well as a concise account of major observatories and observational programs in this period.

  20. HTGR Measurements and Instrumentation Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sydney J Ball; David Eugene Holcomb; Mustafa Sacit Cetiner

    2012-01-01

    This report provides an integrated overview of measurements and instrumentation for near-term future high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). Instrumentation technology has undergone revolutionary improvements since the last HTGR was constructed in the United States. This report briefly describes the measurement and communications needs of HTGRs for normal operations, maintenance and inspection, fuel fabrication, and accident response. The report includes a description

  1. The Planck Low Frequency Instrument

    E-print Network

    N. Mandolesi; M. Bersanelli; C. Burigana; F. Villa; on behalf of LFI Consortium

    1999-04-12

    The Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) of the "Planck Surveyor" ESA mission will perform high-resolution imaging of the Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies at four frequencies in the 30-100 GHz range. We review the LFI main scientific objectives, the current status of the instrument design and the on-going effort to develop software simulations of the LFI observations. In particular we discuss the design status of the PLANCK telescope, which is critical for reaching adequate effective angular resolution.

  2. INSTRUMENTATION FOR FAR INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY.

    SciTech Connect

    GRIFFITHS, P.R.; HOMES, C.

    2001-05-04

    Fourier transform spectrometers developed in three distinct spectral regions in the early 1960s. Pierre Connes and his coworkers in France developed remarkably sophisticated step-scan interferometers that permitted near-infrared spectra to be measured with a resolution of better than 0.0 1 cm{sup {minus}1}. These instruments may be considered the forerunners of the step-scan interferometers made by Bruker, Bio-Rad (Cambridge, MA, USA) and Nicolet although their principal application was in the field of astronomy. Low-resolution rapid-scanning interferometers were developed by Larry Mertz and his colleagues at Block Engineering (Cambridge, MA, USA) for remote sensing. Nonetheless, the FT-IR spectrometers that are so prevalent in chemical laboratories today are direct descendants of these instruments. The interferometers that were developed for far-infrared spectrometry in Gebbie's laboratory ,have had no commercial counterparts for at least 15 years. However, it could be argued that these instruments did as much to demonstrate the power of Fourier transform spectroscopy to the chemical community as any of the instruments developed for mid- and near-infrared spectrometry. Their performance was every bit as good as today's rapid-scanning interferometers. However, the market for these instruments is so small today that it has proved more lucrative to modify rapid-scanning interferometers that were originally designed for mid-infrared spectrometry than to compete with these instruments with slow continuous scan or step-scan interferometers.

  3. Ralf Siebenmorgen IR instrument from Antarctica (thermal) IR instruments from Antarctica

    E-print Network

    Siebenmorgen, Ralf

    Ralf Siebenmorgen IR instrument from Antarctica (thermal) IR instruments from Antarctica: what can Antarctica Atmospheric optical thickness spectrum #12;Ralf Siebenmorgen IR instrument from Antarctica Siebenmorgen IR instrument from Antarctica Paranal Dome C (30m) Atmospheric transmission #12;Ralf Siebenmorgen

  4. Using Mathcad To Teach Instrumental Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Bramer, Scott E.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a set of Mathcad instrument simulations and documents that introduce important concepts for instrumental analysis. Enables students to adjust parameters and optimize an instrument in a timely fashion. (DDR)

  5. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Coagulation instrument. 864.5400 Section 864...Semi-Automated Hematology Devices § 864.5400 Coagulation instrument. (a) Identification. A coagulation instrument is an automated or...

  6. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Coagulation instrument. 864.5400 Section 864...Semi-Automated Hematology Devices § 864.5400 Coagulation instrument. (a) Identification. A coagulation instrument is an automated or...

  7. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Coagulation instrument. 864.5400 Section 864...Semi-Automated Hematology Devices § 864.5400 Coagulation instrument. (a) Identification. A coagulation instrument is an automated or...

  8. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Coagulation instrument. 864.5400 Section 864...Semi-Automated Hematology Devices § 864.5400 Coagulation instrument. (a) Identification. A coagulation instrument is an automated or...

  9. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Coagulation instrument. 864.5400 Section 864...Semi-Automated Hematology Devices § 864.5400 Coagulation instrument. (a) Identification. A coagulation instrument is an automated or...

  10. Formal home-care utilisation by older adults in Ireland: evidence from the Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA).

    PubMed

    Murphy, Catriona M; Whelan, Brendan J; Normand, Charles

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a population-based estimate of the utilisation of publicly financed formal home care by older adults in Ireland and to identify the principal characteristics of those utilising formal home care. Data were collected through computer-aided personal interviews from a representative sample of community living older adults in Ireland. The interviews were conducted between 2009 and 2011 as part of the first wave of the Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA). The study is cross-sectional in design and limited to participants aged 65 years and older (n = 3507). Results reveal that 8.2% (95% CI 7.1%-9.3%) of participants utilised publicly financed formal home care in the form of home help and/or personal care. Key determinants of formal home-care utilisation were Instrumental Activity of Daily Living (IADL) difficulty (Adj OR 3.8, 95% CI 2.7-5.3), older age (Adj OR 3.4, 95% CI 2.4-4.8) and living alone (Adj OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.9-3.8). Almost half of those utilising formal care did not self-report an Activity of Daily Living (ADL) difficulty or an IADL difficulty. Government policy aims to reduce the need for long-term residential care by providing formal home care for older adults with low to moderate levels of dependency. This requires an increasing emphasis on personal care provision in the home. No evidence was found in this study to suggest that a shift in emphasis from formal domestic to personal care is taking place in Ireland. The absence of standardised assessment and eligibility criteria are deemed to be barriers to reorientation of the system. From a health services perspective, the current situation is not sustainable into the future and requires a focused policy response. PMID:25442330

  11. From Chronic Low Back Pain to Disability, a Multifactorial Mediated Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Di Iorio, Angelo; Abate, Michele; Guralnik, Jack M.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Cecchi, Francesca; Cherubini, Antonio; Corsonello, Andrea; Foschini, Nunzia; Guglielmi, Marianna; Lauretani, Fulvio; Volpato, Stefano; Abate, Giuseppe; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    Study Design Clinicoepidemiologic study in the Chianti area (Tuscany, Italy). Objective To evaluate whether performance measures of lower extremity function confounds the association of low back pain (LBP) with self-report disability in specific basic and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs). Summary of Background Data LBP is high prevalent in older population and has a negative impact on functional status. Studies on the pathway leading from LBP to disability are limited and often the role played by important confounders is not considered. Methods A total of 956 InCHIANTI study participants aged 65 and older able to complete performance-based tests of lower extremity function were included in this analysis. LBP was defined as a self-report of back pain “quite often-almost every day” in the past 12 months. Lower extremity function was evaluated administering the Short Physical Performance Battery. In addition, participants were asked to walk on a 7-m course and collect an object from the ground. Depressive symptoms (CES-D score), trunk flexion–extension range of motion, and hip–knee–foot pain were also considered in the pathway from LBP to disability. Results Compared with participants who did not report LBP, those with LBP were more likely to report difficulty in performing most activities of daily living. LBP was also associated with disability in the activities of bathing, doing the laundry, performing heavy household chores, cutting toenails, shopping, and carrying a shopping bag. The association between LBP and disability in selected ADLs and IADLs was no longer statistical significant, after adjustment for performance in lower extremity function, with exception of the activity of “carrying a shopping bag”. Conclusion The cross-sectional association between LBP and self-reported disability, in specific tasks is modulated by performance measures. Specific performance-based tests that explore the functional consequences of LBP may help design specific interventions of disability prevention and treatment in patients with LBP. PMID:18091475

  12. High Data Rate Instrument Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schober, Wayne; Lansing, Faiza; Wilson, Keith; Webb, Evan

    1999-01-01

    The High Data Rate Instrument Study was a joint effort between the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The objectives were to assess the characteristics of future high data rate Earth observing science instruments and then to assess the feasibility of developing data processing systems and communications systems required to meet those data rates. Instruments and technology were assessed for technology readiness dates of 2000, 2003, and 2006. The highest data rate instruments are hyperspectral and synthetic aperture radar instruments which are capable of generating 3.2 Gigabits per second (Gbps) and 1.3 Gbps, respectively, with a technology readiness date of 2003. These instruments would require storage of 16.2 Terebits (Tb) of information (RF communications case of two orbits of data) or 40.5 Tb of information (optical communications case of five orbits of data) with a technology readiness date of 2003. Onboard storage capability in 2003 is estimated at 4 Tb; therefore, all the data created cannot be stored without processing or compression. Of the 4 Tb of stored data, RF communications can only send about one third of the data to the ground, while optical communications is estimated at 6.4 Tb across all three technology readiness dates of 2000, 2003, and 2006 which were used in the study. The study includes analysis of the onboard processing and communications technologies at these three dates and potential systems to meet the high data rate requirements. In the 2003 case, 7.8% of the data can be stored and downlinked by RF communications while 10% of the data can be stored and downlinked with optical communications. The study conclusion is that only 1 to 10% of the data generated by high data rate instruments will be sent to the ground from now through 2006 unless revolutionary changes in spacecraft design and operations such as intelligent data extraction are developed.

  13. On Representative Spaceflight Instrument and Associated Instrument Sensor Web Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Patel, Umeshkumar; Vootukuru, Meg

    2007-01-01

    Sensor Web-based adaptation and sharing of space flight mission resources, including those of the Space-Ground and Control-User communication segment, could greatly benefit from utilization of heritage Internet Protocols and devices applied for Spaceflight (SpaceIP). This had been successfully demonstrated by a few recent spaceflight experiments. However, while terrestrial applications of Internet protocols are well developed and understood (mostly due to billions of dollars in investments by the military and industry), the spaceflight application of Internet protocols is still in its infancy. Progress in the developments of SpaceIP-enabled instrument components will largely determine the SpaceIP utilization of those investments and acceptance in years to come. Likewise SpaceIP, the development of commercial real-time and instrument colocated computational resources, data compression and storage, can be enabled on-board a spacecraft and, in turn, support a powerful application to Sensor Web-based design of a spaceflight instrument. Sensor Web-enabled reconfiguration and adaptation of structures for hardware resources and information systems will commence application of Field Programmable Arrays (FPGA) and other aerospace programmable logic devices for what this technology was intended. These are a few obvious potential benefits of Sensor Web technologies for spaceflight applications. However, they are still waiting to be explored. This is because there is a need for a new approach to spaceflight instrumentation in order to make these mature sensor web technologies applicable for spaceflight. In this paper we present an approach in developing related and enabling spaceflight instrument-level technologies based on the new concept of a representative spaceflight Instrument Sensor Web (ISW).

  14. AMO Instrumentation for the LCLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozek, John

    2008-05-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free electron laser (FEL) facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is quickly nearing completion. When finished in summer 2009, the LCLS will produce ultrafast pulses of x-rays with photon energies of 800 -- 8000 eV, intensities >= 10^13 ph/s and pulse durations of 150 fs, at a repetition rate of 120Hz. A suite of four instruments, including one dedicated to AMO science, are currently being designed for first experiments with the LCLS source. The design of the AMO instrument is in the final stages with construction to begin later this year. Included in the AMO instrumentation are optics to focus the LCLS beam to a waist of ˜2?m, an experimental chamber with a supersonic pulsed gas jet, a set of five time-of-flight electron energy spectrometers, one of three ion spectrometers, and two x-ray fluorescence spectrometers, and a synchronized laser for pump-probe experiments. A downstream diagnostics chamber with instruments to measure the relevant parameters of each FEL pulse is also included. Plans for first experiments along with designs of the instrumentation will be presented. Guidance for experimental proposals for the LCLS will also be provided for prospective users.

  15. SEA applications to wind instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoekje, Peter L.

    2003-04-01

    The behavior of wind instruments, including brass instruments, is primarily determined by the shapes of their air columns, and their interaction with the sound generation mechanism. However, the influence of the surrounding body of the instrument has been a matter of some debate, and papers exploring this question have been published since the early years of the J. Acoust Soc. Am. An apparent correlation between instrument material and playing behavior is disputed by arguments that the structure is stiff and massive compared to the air inside, and that many of the apparent effects are linked to machining differences among materials. The complexity of the instrument body makes this problem well suited for Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA), which treats the air column and the external structure as coupled statistical subsystems that share energy. For trumpets and trombones, the power radiated from the structural vibrations is about 40 dB lower than the energy radiated directly from the air column, with an enhancement at high frequencies due in part to the increasing modal density of the three dimensional structure. The coupling to the structural vibrations themselves from the player's lips and from the air vibrations are similar to each other in magnitude.

  16. ATR NSUF Instrumentation Enhancement Efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Joy L. Rempe; Mitchell K. Meyer; Darrell L. Knudson; Keith G. Condie; Joshua E. Daw; Curtis Wilkins

    2011-01-01

    A key component of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) effort is to expand instrumentation available to users conducting irradiation tests in this unique facility. In particular, development of sensors capable of providing real-time measurements of key irradiation parameters is emphasized because of their potential to increase data fidelity and reduce posttest examination costs. This paper describes the strategy for identifying new instrumentation needed for ATR irradiations and the program underway to develop and evaluate new sensors to address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing new sensors now available to users of the ATR NSUF. In addition, progress is reported on current research efforts to provide improved in-pile instrumentation to users.

  17. Multifunction Imaging and Spectroscopic Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouroulis, Pantazis

    2004-01-01

    A proposed optoelectronic instrument would perform several different spectroscopic and imaging functions that, heretofore, have been performed by separate instruments. The functions would be reflectance, fluorescence, and Raman spectroscopies; variable-color confocal imaging at two different resolutions; and wide-field color imaging. The instrument was conceived for use in examination of minerals on remote planets. It could also be used on Earth to characterize material specimens. The conceptual design of the instrument emphasizes compactness and economy, to be achieved largely through sharing of components among subsystems that perform different imaging and spectrometric functions. The input optics for the various functions would be mounted in a single optical head. With the exception of a targeting lens, the input optics would all be aimed at the same spot on a specimen, thereby both (1) eliminating the need to reposition the specimen to perform different imaging and/or spectroscopic observations and (2) ensuring that data from such observations can be correlated with respect to known positions on the specimen. The figure schematically depicts the principal components and subsystems of the instrument. The targeting lens would collect light into a multimode optical fiber, which would guide the light through a fiber-selection switch to a reflection/ fluorescence spectrometer. The switch would have four positions, enabling selection of spectrometer input from the targeting lens, from either of one or two multimode optical fibers coming from a reflectance/fluorescence- microspectrometer optical head, or from a dark calibration position (no fiber). The switch would be the only moving part within the instrument.

  18. Vibration specifications for VLT instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, Gerd; Lizon, Jean-Louis

    2014-08-01

    ESO invested enormous effort in developing and commissioning the VLT-Interferometer (VLT-I), a unique facility providing a spatial resolution equivalent to that of a 200m-telescope. Complementary to the regular VLT operations, latterly additional 230 nights per year were scheduled to execute scientific observations with large VLT-I baselines. But to the same degree as the VLT-I performance and stability were improving over the past years, likewise the vibration sensitivity of the optical system was increasing and stricter requirements on mechanical stability were necessary. As a consequence ESO started years ago an extensive program to identify and mitigate potential vibration issues. In the scope of this work, the mechanical vibrations induced by cryo-coolers, widely used in ESO's VLT instrumentation suite, were diagnosed as one of the major disturbance sources. In order to be able to better control their impact, the development of a more significant vibration specification for VLT instruments became essential. In the course of preparing such a specification, we first followed an experimental approach where we installed a dedicated dummy instrument equipped with current ESO standard cryo-coolers in different VLT foci configurations and performed a comprehensive vibration measurement test campaign under real VLT/VLT-I operation conditions. All obtained vibration measurement data were spectral analyzed with respect to the actual VLT-I optical path length difference acceptance levels. This campaign gave valuable information about typical cryo-cooler induced vibration levels and their consequence for VLT-I operations. It also enabled the release if novel conform cryo-cooler instrument design and operation recommendations. This paper describes the applied vibration measurement methodology on the basis of examples, the development and description of the significant VLT instrument vibration specification, and a proposal for a generic verification procedure for standalone instruments or sub-units prior final acceptance.

  19. Instrumental Variables, Local Instrumental Variables and Control Functions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. Florens; J. J. Heckman; C. Meghir; E. Vytlacil

    2001-01-01

    We consider the identification of the average treatment effect in models with continuous endogenous variables whose impact is heterogeneous. We derive an testable restriction that allows us to assess the degree of unobserved heterogene- ity. Our analysis uses assumptions relating to the Local Instrumental Variables (LIV ) approach and the control function approach.

  20. Virtual instrument based instrumentation for harmonic current emission measurement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Mahesh; Sisir K Das; Bohy George; V. Jayashankar; V. Jagadeesh Kumar

    2003-01-01

    An instrumentation system for the measurement of harmonic emission to IEC 61000-3-2 is a subset of the general problem of harmonic measurements. A condition is derived for the SNR of a signal (with monotonically decaying harmonic amplitudes) to be zero due to quantization errors. This is enlarged to cover Gaussian noise in the analog front end of the measuring system.

  1. Development of optical instrument transformer

    SciTech Connect

    Sawa, T.; Kurosawa, K. (Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (Japan)); Kaminishi, T.; Yokota, T. (Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (JP))

    1990-04-01

    The optical instrument transformer is a current and voltage measuring system based on Faraday and Pockels effects,whose principles differ from those of conventional industrial transformers. In principle, this transformer is excellent in such aspects as control of electromagnetic induction noise, rationalization of electric insulation, and extension of dynamic ranges and frequency bands. By making use of such excellent properties, it is possible to achieve higher performance, higher compactness, and higher reliability of instrument transformers. This paper deals with the designing, assembling, and testing results of a prototype of an optical current transformer (CT) and that of a voltage dividing-type voltage transformer (PD).

  2. Occipitocervical junction: imaging, pathology, instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Benke, Michael; Yu, Warren D; Peden, Sean C; O'Brien, Joseph R

    2011-10-01

    The occipitocervical junction (OCJ) is a highly specialized area of the spine. Understanding the unique anatomy, imaging, and craniometry of this area is paramount in recognizing and managing the potentially devastating effects that pathology has on it. Instrumentation techniques continue to evolve, the goal being to safely obtain durable, rigid constructs that allow immediate stability, anatomical alignment, and osseous fusion. This article reviews the pathologic conditions at the OCJ and the current instrumentation and fusion options available for treatment. The general orthopedist needs to recognize the pathology common in this region and appropriately refer patients for treatment. PMID:22263204

  3. Instrumentation in Diffuse Optical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse optical imaging is highly versatile and has a very broad range of applications in biology and medicine. It covers diffuse optical tomography, fluorescence diffuse optical tomography, bioluminescence, and a number of other new imaging methods. These methods of diffuse optical imaging have diversified instrument configurations but share the same core physical principle – light propagation in highly diffusive media, i.e., the biological tissue. In this review, the author summarizes the latest development in instrumentation and methodology available to diffuse optical imaging in terms of system architecture, light source, photo-detection, spectral separation, signal modulation, and lastly imaging contrast. PMID:24860804

  4. Formation Flying and Deformable Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Rio, Yvon [CEA/IRFU/Sap, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2009-05-11

    Astronomers have always attempted to build very stable instruments. They fight all that can cause mechanical deformation or image motion. This has led to well established technologies (autoguide, active optics, thermal control, tip/tilt correction), as well as observing methods based on the use of controlled motion (scanning, micro scanning, shift and add, chopping and nodding). Formation flying disturbs this practice. It is neither possible to reduce the relative motion to very small amplitudes, nor to control it at will. Some impacts on Simbol-X instrument design, and operation are presented.

  5. Evaluation, comparison and calibration of oceanographic instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This book reviews oceanographic instrumentation. The parameters for which instrumentation is reviewed are limited to those where continuous monitoring is possible. The discussion is also limited to parameters of interest to physical oceanography and ocean engineering. Specific instruments reviewed include: meterological sensors and instruments; wave sensors; ocean current sensors; pressure sensors; and CTD sensors. Various types of oceanographic measurements are also evaluated.

  6. Concurrent Validity of Four Androgyny Instruments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, F. Robert; Cook, Ellen Piel

    1984-01-01

    Compares concurrent validity of four sex-role instruments administered to a group of 281 urban university students. Reports that the instruments are sufficiently different in their measurement characteristics to warrant limiting generalizations about behavior based on these instruments to a particular instrument being used. (KH)

  7. Dynamic program instrumentation for scalable performance tools

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey K. Hollingsworth; Barton P. Miller; Jon Cargille

    1994-01-01

    Presents a new technique called `dynamic instrumentation' that provides efficient, scalable, yet detailed data collection for large-scale parallel applications. Our approach is unique because it defers inserting any instrumentation until the application is in execution. We can insert or change instrumentation at any time during execution by modifying the application's binary image. Only the instrumentation required for the currently selected

  8. Academic Research Instruments: Expenditures 1993, Needs 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arena, Carolyn B.

    The National Survey of Academic Research Instruments and Instrumentation Needs is a congressionally mandated program that collects data concerning scientific research instruments and the academic departments and facilities in which they are located. This report analyzes overall instrumentation issues and trends in all the fields covered by the…

  9. A design automation toolkit for virtual instrumentation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Z. Elorza; C. R. Allen; I. C. Leggett

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes an electronic design automation (EDA) toolkit for Web page designers to produce a working virtual model of an instrument. The toolkit comprises an instrument workspace in which the instrument operates upon 2D active “appliances”. The instrument software is encapsulated in a finite state diagram model which may be used hierarchically. The designer is also provided with a

  10. Reference instrument complement for IPNS Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, R.K.

    1993-07-01

    A feasibility study for a new 1 MW pulsed neutron source has recently been completed at Argonne. As part of this feasibility study, an instrument package to instrument 24 of the 36 beam ports has been considered. This complement of instruments is outlined, and details of some of the instruments are discussed. Developments required before some of these instruments can be built are also indicated.

  11. ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information - June 2009

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  12. ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information September 2009

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  13. Radiation Effects on NERVA Instrumentation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. P. Gilles

    1968-01-01

    The NERVA program presented the instrumentation engineer with difficult radiation-effects problems. Gamma fluxes reach 109 rads(C)\\/hr and neutron fluences approach 1018 n\\/cm2 (E>l.0 Mev). These Problems and some of their solutions and test results are presented.

  14. Instrument independent diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bing; Fu, Henry L.; Ramanujam, Nirmala

    2011-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy with a fiber optic probe is a powerful tool for quantitative tissue characterization and disease diagnosis. Significant systematic errors can arise in the measured reflectance spectra and thus in the derived tissue physiological and morphological parameters due to real-time instrument fluctuations. We demonstrate a novel fiber optic probe with real-time, self-calibration capability that can be used for UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in biological tissue in clinical settings. The probe is tested in a number of synthetic liquid phantoms over a wide range of tissue optical properties for significant variations in source intensity fluctuations caused by instrument warm up and day-to-day drift. While the accuracy for extraction of absorber concentrations is comparable to that achieved with the traditional calibration (with a reflectance standard), the accuracy for extraction of reduced scattering coefficients is significantly improved with the self-calibration probe compared to traditional calibration. This technology could be used to achieve instrument-independent diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in vivo and obviate the need for instrument warm up and post?premeasurement calibration, thus saving up to an hour of precious clinical time. PMID:21280897

  15. Ozone Monitoring Instrument geolocation verification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Kroon; M. R. Dobber; R. Dirksen; J. P. Veefkind; P. F. Levelt

    2008-01-01

    Verification of the geolocation assigned to individual ground pixels as measured by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) aboard the NASA EOS-Aura satellite was performed by comparing geophysical Earth surface details as observed in OMI false color images with the high-resolution continental outline vector map as provided by the Interactive Data Language (IDL) software tool from ITT Visual Information Solutions. The

  16. The JWST MIRI instrument concept

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gillian S. Wright; George H. Rieke; Luis Colina; Ewine van Dishoeck; Greg Goodson; Tom Greene; Pierre-Olivier Lagage; Avinash Karnik; Scott D. Lambros; Dietrich Lemke; Margaret Meixner; Hans-Ulrich Norgaard; Goran Oloffson; Tom Ray; Michael Ressler; Christoffel Waelkens; David Wright; Alex Zhender

    2004-01-01

    The MIRI is the mid-IR instrument for JWST and provides imaging, coronography and low and medium resolution spectroscopy over the 5-28mum band. In this paper we provide an overview of the key driving requirements and design status.

  17. Drug-taking instruments recognition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ruiguang Hu; Nianhua Xie; Weiming Hu

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we propose an algorithm for the recognition of three kinds of drug-taking instruments, including bongs, hookahs and spoons. A global feature - Pyramid of Histograms of Orientation Gradients (PHOG) - is used to represent images. PHOG is calculated by partitioning an image into increasingly fine sub-regions and concatenating the appropriately weighted histograms of orientation gradients of each

  18. Instrumentation System Diagnoses a Thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose; Santiago, Josephine; Mata, Carlos; Vokrot, Peter; Zavala, Carlos; Burns, Bradley

    2008-01-01

    An improved self-validating thermocouple (SVT) instrumentation system not only acquires readings from a thermocouple but is also capable of detecting deterioration and a variety of discrete faults in the thermocouple and its lead wires. Prime examples of detectable discrete faults and deterioration include open- and short-circuit conditions and debonding of the thermocouple junction from the object, the temperature of which one seeks to measure. Debonding is the most common cause of errors in thermocouple measurements, but most prior SVT instrumentation systems have not been capable of detecting debonding. The improved SVT instrumentation system includes power circuitry, a cold-junction compensator, signal-conditioning circuitry, pulse-width-modulation (PWM) thermocouple-excitation circuitry, an analog-to-digital converter (ADC), a digital data processor, and a universal serial bus (USB) interface. The system can operate in any of the following three modes: temperature measurement, thermocouple validation, and bonding/debonding detection. The software running in the processor includes components that implement statistical algorithms to evaluate the state of the thermocouple and the instrumentation system. When the power is first turned on, the user can elect to start a diagnosis/ monitoring sequence, in which the PWM is used to estimate the characteristic times corresponding to the correct configuration. The user also has the option of using previous diagnostic values, which are stored in an electrically erasable, programmable read-only memory so that they are available every time the power is turned on.

  19. 6, 649671, 2006 NOy instrument

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    aboard Airbus A340 in-service aircraft) employed a Rosemount probe with 80 cm of FEP-tubing con-10 instruments. This puts an up- per limit on potential losses of HNO3 in the Rosemount inlet of the MOZAIC

  20. Project no. 004089 Instrument : IP

    E-print Network

    Guichard, Francoise

    Project no. 004089 AMMA Instrument : IP D.2.1.A.e The impacts of contrasting atmospheric date: December 2009 Start date of project: 1st January of 2005 Duration: 60 months Organisation name of lead contractor for this deliverable: CNRM Prepared by F. Guichard (CNRM) Project co

  1. Teaching Audiation in Instrumental Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalby, Bruce

    1999-01-01

    Provides suggestions for teachers new to Edwin Gordon's music learning theory, describing an incremental approach to audiation-based instrumental music instruction. Discusses teaching methods to introduce audiation, improving students' audiation skills, using tonal patterns to improve intonation, and Gordon's rhythm syllable system. Includes a…

  2. Experimenting with Brass Musical Instruments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2003-01-01

    Describes experiments to address the properties of brass musical instruments that can be used to demonstrate sound in any level physics course. The experiments demonstrate in a quantitative fashion the effects of the mouthpiece and bell on the frequencies of sound waves and thus the musical pitches produced. (Author/NB)

  3. Plasma cleaning of dental instruments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. G Whittaker; E. M Graham; R. L Baxter; A. C Jones; P. R Richardson; G Meek; G. A Campbell; A Aitken; H. C Baxter

    2004-01-01

    The theoretical risk of prion transmission via surgical instruments is of current public and professional concern. These concerns are further heightened by reports of the strong surface affinity of the prion protein, and that the removal of organic material by conventional sterilization is often inadequate. Recent reports of contamination on sterilized endodontic files are of particular relevance given the close

  4. Embedded Systems and Instrumentation Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    Embedded Systems and Instrumentation Laboratory Dr. Roger Walker Computer Science and Engineering Surface Roughness Index New Surface Index Analysis · Design and development of an embedded Method Members: Akshay Joshi Digant Shah Modi, Kenan K #12;Major System Modules · Embedded Transverse Profile

  5. RAIL: code instrumentation for .NET

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruno Cabral; Paulo Marques; Luís Moura Silva

    2004-01-01

    Code instrumentation is a mechanism that allows modules of programs to be completely rewritten at runtime. With the advent of virtual machines, this type of functionality is becoming more and more interesting because it allows the introduction of new functionality after an application has been deployed, easy implementation of aspect-oriented programming, performing security verifications, dynamic software upgrading, among others. The

  6. The SCEC Borehole Instrumentation Program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H. Steidl; R. J. Archuleta

    2002-01-01

    The Uniform Building Code used in the design of structures by the engineering community places a great deal of emphasis on the average shear wave velocity in the upper 30 meters to classify sites and to assign site response correction factors. The emphasis on characterization of the near-surface properties in California, especially at sites with strong motion instrumentation, provides a

  7. Seismic Instrumentation Placement Recommendations Report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1998-01-01

    DOE Order 420.1, ''Facility Safety'', requires that facilities or sites with hazardous materials be provided with instrumentation or other means to detect and record the occurrences and severity of seismic events. These requirements assure that necessary records are available after an earthquake for evaluation purposes and to supplement other data to justify a facility restart or curtailing plant operations after

  8. Remote Instrumentation for Teaching Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baran, Jit; Currie, Ron; Kennepohl, Dietmar

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of using current software, such as PC-Duo, PCAnywhere or LabVIEW, in training students in instrumental analysis from a remote location is investigated. Findings show that creation of online features is crucial to the use and learning by students and the development of a suitable Web site, which provides an easy-to-use interface to…

  9. Building scalable virtual instrumentation systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Kimery

    1996-01-01

    Test managers and professionals recognize the key role test plays in their business, and expect that role to become even more challenging in the future. Embracing virtual instrumentation at the system level, as well as at the component level, is the key to testing more for less

  10. Functional impairment trajectories among persons with HIV disease: a hierarchical linear models approach.

    PubMed Central

    Crystal, S; Sambamoorthi, U

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigates the level, time course, and stability of functional impairment in a population of persons with symptomatic HIV disease, and illustrates the application of hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) to trajectories of functional status in unbalanced longitudinal data. STUDY POPULATION: We utilized longitudinal interview data on a demographically diverse cohort of 246 individuals participating in New Jersey's Medicaid waiver program for persons with AIDS or symptomatic HIV disease, with a mean of nine repeated observations per individual. MEASURES AND STATISTICAL METHODS: Impairment in ability to perform 16 activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) was assessed at monthly intervals. To achieve unbiased, efficient estimation of the level and within-individual rate of change of functional status utilizing all observations for each individual, hierarchical linear models were used. Time slopes were compared to those from a single-level model estimated on the pooled observations. Stability of functional status within individuals was also evaluated. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A single-level pooled model showed no significant time trend in functional impairment, while the multilevel models did indicate such a trend. In the final HLM model, functional impairment was estimated to increase at a rate of .32 tasks per month. Female gender was associated with impairment in an additional 1.88 tasks and AIDS diagnosis with an additional 1.35 tasks. There was substantial variability within individuals over time, most of which was not explained by time trend. CONCLUSIONS: The multilevel models indicated a significant month-to-month worsening of functional status that was masked in the single-level model by between-person variation. Impairment was found to increase over time, but followed a variable and episodic course rather than a steady or consistent decline. Women appeared to experience special problems in performing ADL and IADL tasks. RELEVANCE/IMPACT: Results demonstrate the need for flexible and responsive systems for authorizing and managing in-home services for persons with HIV disease, systems that can respond to frequent changes in the functional status and level of care needs of these individuals. They suggest further attention to special care needs that may be experienced by women with HIV disease. They illustrate that hierarchical linear modeling can be an important tool in understanding change in functional status over time, providing a multilevel model that disaggregates within-individual and between-individual variation in functional status. This approach can be generalized to a wide variety of problems in health services research in which outcomes are observed over time with unbalanced longitudinal data. PMID:8885859

  11. Evaluation of the Prevention and Reactivation Care Program (PreCaP) for the hospitalized elderly: a prospective nonrandomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Asmus-Szepesi, Kirsten J; Flinterman, Linda E; Koopmanschap, Marc A; Nieboer, Anna P; Bakker, Ton J; Mackenbach, Johan P; Steyerberg, Ewout W

    2015-01-01

    Background The hospitalized elderly are at risk of functional decline. We evaluated the effects and care costs of a specialized geriatric rehabilitation program aimed at preventing functional decline among at-risk hospitalized elderly. Methods The prospective nonrandomized controlled trial reported here was performed in three hospitals in the Netherlands. One hospital implemented the Prevention and Reactivation Care Program (PReCaP), while two other hospitals providing usual care served as control settings. Within the PReCaP hospital we compared patients pre-implementation with patients post-implementation of the PReCaP (“within-hospital analysis”), while our nonrandomized controlled trial compared patients of the PReCaP hospital post-implementation with patients from the two control hospitals providing usual care (“between-hospital analysis”). Hospitalized patients 65 years or older and at risk of functional decline were interviewed at baseline and at 3 and 12 months using validated questionnaires to score functioning, depression, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). We estimated costs per unit of care from hospital information systems and national data sources. We used adjusted general linear mixed models to analyze functioning and HRQoL. Results Between-hospital analysis showed no difference in activities of daily living (ADL) or instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) between PReCaP patients and control groups. PReCaP patients did have slightly better cognitive functioning (Mini Mental State Examination; 0.4 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.2–0.6]), lower depression (Geriatric Depression Scale 15; ?0.9 [95% ?1.1 to ?0.6]) and higher perceived health (Short-Form 20; 5.6 [95% CI 2.8–8.4]) than control patients. Analyses within the PReCaP hospital comparing patients pre-and post-implementation of the PReCaP showed no improvement over time in functioning, depression, and HRQoL. One-year health care costs were higher for PReCaP patients, both for the within-hospital analysis (+€7,000) and the between-hospital analysis (+€2,500). Conclusion We did not find any effect of the PReCaP on ADL and IADL. The PReCaP may possibly provide some benefits to hospitalized patients at risk of functional decline with respect to cognitive functioning, depression, and perceived health. Further evaluations of integrated intervention programs to limit functional decline are therefore required. PMID:25878492

  12. New instrumentation in percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, Joseph W.; Canales, Benjamin K.

    2010-01-01

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is the procedure of choice for removing large, complex, and/or multiple renal calculi. Since its first description in 1976, PCNL techniques and equipment have evolved to maximize procedural efficacy, safety, and reproducibility. We reviewed current literature from January 2004 to November 2009 using Medline search regarding PCNL instrumentation and technology. Additional equipment discovered during the review process without published Medline evidence was summarized from manufacturer brochures and data. Included in this review are summaries of intracorporeal lithotriptors and accessory equipment, stone manipulation devices, PCNL tract sealants, and a digital rigid nephroscope. The evolution of these devices from their predecessors has increased the instrumentation options for the treating urologist and may represent more effective technology for the percutaneous treatment of large renal stones. PMID:21116361

  13. The USNA MIDN Microdosimeter Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisacane, V. L.; Ziegler, J. F.; Nelson, M. E.; Dolecek, Q.; Heyne, J.; Veade, T.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Zaider, M.; Dicello, J. F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the MIcroDosimetry iNstrument (MIDN) mission now under development at the United States Naval Academy. The instrument is manifested to fly on the MidSTAR-1 spacecraft, which is the second spacecraft to be developed and launched by the Academy s faculty and midshipmen. Launch is scheduled for 1 September 2006 on an ATLAS-5 launch vehicle. MIDN is a rugged, portable, low power, low mass, solid-state microdosimeter designed to measure in real time the energy distributions of energy deposited by radiation in microscopic volumes. The MIDN microdosimeter sensor is a reverse-biased silicon p-n junction array in a Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) configuration. Microdosimetric frequency distributions as a function of lineal energies determine the radiation quality factors in support of radiation risk estimation to humans.

  14. Systematic Differences Between Radiosonde Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lait, Leslie R.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Deviations of radiosonde reports' geopotential heights from the zonal mean are examined. In the summer Northern Hemisphere stratosphere, systematic differences are found between radiosonde instrument types. Persistent meridional wind anomalies, approximately constant in magnitude and fixed in location, have previously been reported in the summer stratosphere, and one such anomaly over Europe is found to be co-located with boundaries between regions in which differing types of radiosonde instruments are used. The magnitude and orientation of the radiosonde geopotential height biases are consistent with the wind anomalies. Because the overall winds tend to be light in this region and season, these wind anomalies can represent significant perturbations of the flow and must be considered when interpreting the results of trajectory and diagnostic studies.

  15. Instrumented fuels test for FFTF

    SciTech Connect

    Feigenbutz, L.V.; Hoth, C.W.

    1980-01-01

    In support of the LMFBR Fuels Development Program, Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) has designed the Fuels Open Test Assembly (FOTA) for fuels testing at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The FOTA is a test vehicle designed to contain and support instrumented fuel experiments in the Fast Test Reactor (FTR) at FFTF. The initial two FOTA experiments will characterize the reference Driver Fuel Assembly performance in the FTR and provide experimental data to evaluate thermohydraulic models used to predict assembly performance. The design features and fabrication are described for the first two FOTA instrumented fuel experiments, which have been fabricated and are now in the FTR. A brief description of the FOTA test vehicle is included.

  16. Holy Trinity of Instrumentation Development

    SciTech Connect

    Ursic, Rok; Solar, Borut [Instrumentation Technologies, Srebrnicev trg 4a, SI-5250 Solkan (Slovenia)

    2004-11-10

    Being user friendly should be the main guidance, beside the self-understood high performance, in today's instrumentation development. Here we identify three components of the user-friendly policy: the all-in-one concept, customization, and connectivity. All-in-one is the concept of unification of various building blocks and thus various functionalities in one product. The customization is enabled by the product's reconfigurability that allows a product to grow and support new requirements and applications without changing hardware. The consequence of the two is the capacity of the single instrument to perform a variety of tasks that before were split among different devices. The last of the three is connectivity that improves the relationship between controls and beam diagnostics, brings out-of-the-crate freedom, and opens unforeseen possibilities for intra-accelerator cooperation and remote technical support.

  17. Dual physiological rate measurement instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Tommy G. (inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The object of the invention is to provide an instrument for converting a physiological pulse rate into a corresponding linear output voltage. The instrument which accurately measures the rate of an unknown rectangular pulse wave over an extended range of values comprises a phase-locked loop including a phase comparator, a filtering network, and a voltage-controlled oscillator, arranged in cascade. The phase comparator has a first input responsive to the pulse wave and a second input responsive to the output signal of the voltage-controlled oscillator. The comparator provides a signal dependent on the difference in phase and frequency between the signals appearing on the first and second inputs. A high-input impedance amplifier accepts an output from the filtering network and provides an amplified output DC signal to a utilization device for providing a measurement of the rate of the pulse wave.

  18. Energy Transfer in Musical Instruments

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Engineering K-PhD Program,

    This lesson covers concepts of energy and energy transfer, with a focus on energy transfer in musical instruments. More specifically, students learn the two different ways in which energy can be transferred between a system and its environment. The law of conservation of energy is also described. Example systems are presented (two cars on a track and a tennis ball falling to the ground) and students make predictions and explain the energy transfer mechanisms. The engineering focus becomes clear in the associated activity when students apply the concepts learned in the lesson to design musical instruments. The systems analyzed in the lesson help in discussing how to apply conservation of energy and energy transfer to make things.

  19. Cyclic Fatigue of Protaper Instruments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hélio Pereira Lopes; Edson Jorge Lima Moreira; Carlos Nelson Elias; Renata Andriola de Almeida; Mônica Schultz Neves

    2007-01-01

    The present work evaluated the influence of the curved segment length of artificial root canals (the arc) and the number of cycles necessary to fracture engine-driven nickel-titanium endodontic instruments. ProTaper F3 25-mm files at 250 rpm were used in two artificial canals. The artificial canals were made of stainless steel with an inner diameter of 1.04 mm, a total length

  20. Biomagnetic susceptometer with SQUID instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, D.N.; Fagaly, R.L.; Toussaint, R.M. (Biomagnetic Technologies, Inc., San Diego, CA (US)); Fisher, R. (Hamburg Univ. (Germany))

    1991-03-01

    This paper discusses the use of a new SQUID magnetometer for noninvasive measurements of hepatic (liver) iron stores. Placement of the SQUID, detection coil, and magnetie in the dewar vacuum region significantly reduced system noise. In addition, the system incorporates multiple magnets and detection coils which may allow the discrimination of the surface skin layer from the deeper (weaker signal) true liver iron concentration. Measurements indicate an instrumental noise level {lt} 20 {mu}g/g of equivalent iron concentration.

  1. Cryogenic Detectors (Narrow Field Instruments)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Hoevers; P. Verhoeve

    2003-01-01

    Two cryogenic imaging spectrometer arrays are currently considered as focal plane instruments for XEUS. The narrow field imager 1 (NFI 1) will cover the energy range from 0.05 to 3 keV with an energy resolution of 2 eV, or better, at 500 eV. A second narrow field imager (NFI 2) covers the energy range from 1 to 15 keV with

  2. Thermal Integrity Profiling Instrumentation Development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Byron Keith Anderson

    2011-01-01

    \\u000aThis thesis has shown that the development of the instrumentation necessary to provide in-situ thermal imaging for the determination of homogeneity of concrete is theoretically sound.\\u000aDrilled shafts are large diameter underground cast-in-place columns that necessarily rely on sound integrity to properly withstand imposed loadings. As a by-product of the most common construction techniques, the entire process is often completely

  3. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefitted greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  4. INSTRUMENTS 250 Long Beach Boulevard

    E-print Network

    Kleinfeld, David

    66180-M INSTRUMENTS 250 Long Beach Boulevard Stratford, GT 06497-0872 Phone: (203) 377-8282 Fax TO FAX NO. 203-378-2457 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS i iNTRODUCTiON 3 li SUMMARY OF HAZARDS 4 IM RADIATION 4 11 HOUSING OPTICS 12 V.I COLLIMATED BEAMS 12 V.2 IMAGING THE FILAMENT 14 V.3 REAL LENSES 14 V.3a Spherical

  5. SMAP Instrument Mechanical System Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slimko, Eric; French, Richard; Riggs, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, scheduled for launch by the end of 2014, is being developed to measure the soil moisture and soil freeze/thaw state on a global scale over a three-year period. The accuracy, resolution, and global coverage of SMAP measurements are invaluable across many science and applications disciplines including hydrology, climate, carbon cycle, and the meteorological, environment, and ecology applications communities. The SMAP observatory is composed of a despun bus and a spinning instrument platform that includes both a deployable 6 meter aperture low structural frequency Astromesh reflector and a spin control system. The instrument section has engendered challenging mechanical system issues associated with the antenna deployment, flexible antenna pointing in the context of a multitude of disturbances, spun section mass properties, spin control system development, and overall integration with the flight system on both mechanical and control system levels. Moreover, the multitude of organizations involved, including two major vendors providing the spin subsystem and reflector boom assembly plus the flight system mechanical and guidance, navigation, and control teams, has led to several unique system engineering challenges. Capturing the key physics associated with the function of the flight system has been challenging due to the many different domains that are applicable. Key interfaces and operational concepts have led to complex negotiations because of the large number of organizations that integrate with the instrument mechanical system. Additionally, the verification and validation concerns associated with the mechanical system have had required far-reaching involvement from both the flight system and other subsystems. The SMAP instrument mechanical systems engineering issues and their solutions are described in this paper.

  6. Spatial Displays and Spatial Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R. (editor); Kaiser, Mary K. (editor); Grunwald, Arthur J. (editor)

    1989-01-01

    The conference proceedings topics are divided into two main areas: (1) issues of spatial and picture perception raised by graphical electronic displays of spatial information; and (2) design questions raised by the practical experience of designers actually defining new spatial instruments for use in new aircraft and spacecraft. Each topic is considered from both a theoretical and an applied direction. Emphasis is placed on discussion of phenomena and determination of design principles.

  7. The Rosetta Langmuir Probe Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, Anders; Edberg, Niklas; Odelstad, Elias; Wahlund, Jan-Erik; Vigren, Erik; Karlson, Tomas; Lindqvist, Per-Arne; Jarvinen, Riku; Lybekk, Bjorn; Miloch, Wojciech; Pedersen, Arne; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Henri, Pierre; Carr, Chris; Cupido, Emanuele

    2015-04-01

    Rosetta provides an unprecedented opportunity to follow the evolution of the plasma environment close to a comet as activity grows and recedes from 4 AU to perihelion and out again. Like the rest of the Rosetta Plasma Consortium (RPC), the Langmuir probe instrument (RPC-LAP) has been operational from early summer 2014 to cover also the approach of Rosetta toward comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The instrument uses two spherical probes mounted on short (few meters) solid booms protruding from the spacecraft body. The probes can be used as classical Langmuir probes, as electric field probes with bias current and for wave observations up to 8 kHz. In the low density solar wind before Rosetta arrived close to the comet, probe bias sweeps were dominated by spacecraft photoelectrons. This changed as plasma densities increased when Rosetta closed up to the nucleus, where a plasma of cometary origin has dominated from well outside 3 AU. As collisions are rare, this early activity comet plasma shows much higher electron temperature (order 10 eV) than expected for the inner coma of a fully developed comet (order 10 meV). This also caused negative spacecraft potential of sometimes tens of volts, clearly visible in the LAP data. We show example LAP data and discuss the performance of the instrument for various kinds of measurements in the plasmas yet encountered.

  8. The APEX-SZ Instrument

    E-print Network

    Schwan, Daniel; Basu, Kaustuv; Bender, Amy N; Bertoldi, Frank; Cho, Hsaio-Mei; Chon, Guyong; Clarke, John; Dobbs, Matt; Ferrusca, Daniel; Gusten, Rolfe; Halverson, Nils W; Holzapfel, William L; Horellou, Cathy; Johansson, Daniel; Johnson, Bradley R; Kennedy, James; Kermish, Zigmund; Kneissl, Ruediger; Lanting, Trevor; Lee, Adrian T; Lueker, Martin; Mehl, Jared; Menten, Karl M; Muders, Dirk; Pacaud, Florian; Plagge, Thomas; Reichardt, Christian L; Richards, Paul L; Schaaf, Rienhold; Schilke, Peter; Sommer, Martin W; Spieler, Helmuth; Tucker, Carole; Weiss, Axel; Westbrook, Benjamin; Zahn, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    The APEX-SZ instrument is a millimeter-wave cryogenic receiver designed to observe galaxy clusters via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect from the 12 m APEX telescope on the Atacama plateau in Chile. The receiver contains a focal plane of 280 superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers instrumented with a frequency-domain multiplexed readout system. The bolometers are cooled to 280 mK via a three-stage helium sorption refrigerator and a mechanical pulse-tube cooler. Three warm mirrors, two 4 K lenses, and a horn array couple the TES bolometers to the telescope. APEX-SZ observes in a single frequency band at 150 GHz with 1' angular resolution and a 22' field-of-view, all well suited for cluster mapping. The APEX-SZ receiver has played a key role in the introduction of several new technologies including TES bolometers, the frequency-domain multiplexed readout, and the use of a pulse-tube cooler with bolometers. As a result of these new technologies, the instrument has a higher instantaneous sensitivity a...

  9. Multimodality Instrument for Tissue Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, Robert W. (Inventor); Andrews, Russell J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A system with multimodality instrument for tissue identification includes a computer-controlled motor driven heuristic probe with a multisensory tip is discussed. For neurosurgical applications, the instrument is mounted on a stereotactic frame for the probe to penetrate the brain in a precisely controlled fashion. The resistance of the brain tissue being penetrated is continually monitored by a miniaturized strain gauge attached to the probe tip. Other modality sensors may be mounted near the probe tip to provide real-time tissue characterizations and the ability to detect the proximity of blood vessels, thus eliminating errors normally associated with registration of pre-operative scans, tissue swelling, elastic tissue deformation, human judgement, etc., and rendering surgical procedures safer, more accurate, and efficient. A neural network, program adaptively learns the information on resistance and other characteristic features of normal brain tissue during the surgery and provides near real-time modeling. A fuzzy logic interface to the neural network program incorporates expert medical knowledge in the learning process. Identification of abnormal brain tissue is determined by the detection of change and comparison with previously learned models of abnormal brain tissues. The operation of the instrument is controlled through a user friendly graphical interface. Patient data is presented in a 3D stereographics display. Acoustic feedback of selected information may optionally be provided. Upon detection of the close proximity to blood vessels or abnormal brain tissue, the computer-controlled motor immediately stops probe penetration.

  10. High-temperature borehole instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Koczan, S. P.; Stephani, E. L.

    1985-10-01

    A new method of extracting natural heat from the Earth's crust was invented at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1970. It uses fluid pressures (hydraulic fracturing) to produce cracks that connect two boreholes drilled into hot rock formations of low initial permeability. Pressurized water is then circulated through this connected underground loop to extract heat from the rock and bring it to the surface. The creation of the fracture reservior began with drilling boreholes deep within the Precambrian basement rock at the Fenton Hill Test Site. Hydraulic fracturing, flow testing, and well-completion operations required unique wellbore measurements using downhole instrumentation systems that would survive the very high borehole temperatures, 320(0)C (610(0)F). These instruments were not available in the oil and gas industrial complex, so the Los Alamos National Laboratory initiated an intense program upgrading existing technology where applicable, subcontracting materials and equipment development to industrial manufactures, and using the Laboratory resources to develop the necessary downhole instruments to meet programmatic schedules.

  11. The Polar Plasma Wave Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Persoon, A. M.; Randall, R. F.; Odem, D. L.; Remington, S. L.; Averkamp, T. F.; Debower, M. M.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Huff, R. L.; Kirchner, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    The Plasma Wave Instrument on the Polar spacecraft is designed to provide measurements of plasma waves in the Earth's polar regions over the frequency range from 0.1 Hz to 800 kHz. Three orthogonal electric dipole antennas are used to detect electric fields, two in the spin plane and one aligned along the spacecraft spin axis. A magnetic loop antenna and a triaxial magnetic search coil antenna are used to detect magnetic fields. Signals from these antennas are processed by five receiver systems: a wideband receiver, a high-frequency waveform receiver, a low-frequency waveform receiver, two multichannel analyzers; and a pair of sweep frequency receivers. Compared to previous plasma wave instruments, the Polar plasma wave instrument has several new capabilities. These include (1) an expanded frequency range to improve coverage of both low- and high-frequency wave phenomena, (2) the ability to simultaneously capture signals from six orthogonal electric and magnetic field sensors, and (3) a digital wideband receiver with up to 8-bit resolution and sample rates as high as 249k samples s(exp -1).

  12. High-temperature borehole instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, B.R.; Koczan, S.P.; Stephani, E.L.

    1985-10-01

    A new method of extracting natural heat from the earth's crust was invented at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1970. It uses fluid pressures (hydraulic fracturing) to produce cracks that connect two boreholes drilled into hot rock formations of low initial permeability. Pressurized water is then circulated through this connected underground loop to extract heat from the rock and bring it to the surface. The creation of the fracture reservior began with drilling boreholes deep within the Precambrian basement rock at the Fenton Hill Test Site. Hydraulic fracturing, flow testing, and well-completion operations required unique wellbore measurements using downhole instrumentation systems that would survive the very high borehole temperatures, 320/sup 0/C (610/sup 0/F). These instruments were not available in the oil and gas industrial complex, so the Los Alamos National Laboratory initiated an intense program upgrading existing technology where applicable, subcontracting materials and equipment development to industrial manufactures, and using the Laboratory resource to develop the necessary downhole instruments to meet programmatic schedules. 60 refs., 11 figs.

  13. The space instrument SODISM and the ground instrument SODISM II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, M.; Meissonnier, M.; Irbah, A.; Abbaki, S.; Assus, P.; Bertran, E.; Dubois, J. P.; Ducourt, E.; Dufour, C.; Marcovici, J. P.; Poiet, G.; Vieau, A. J.; Thuillier, G.

    2010-07-01

    PICARD is a French space scientific mission. Its objectives are the study of the origin of the solar variability and the study of the relations between the Sun and the Earth's climate. The launch is scheduled for 2010 on a Sun Synchronous Orbit at 725 km altitude. The mission lifetime is two years, however that can be extended to three years. The payload consists of two absolute radiometers measuring the TSI (Total Solar Irradiance) and an imaging telescope to determine the solar diameter, the limb shape and asphericity. SOVAP (SOlar VAriability PICARD) is an absolute radiometer provided by the RMIB (Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium) to measure the TSI. It also carries a bolometer used for increasing the TSI sampling and ageing control. PREMOS (PREcision MOnitoring Sensor) radiometer is provided by the PMOD/WRC (Physikalisch Meteorologisches Observatorium of Davos / World Radiation Center) to measure the TSI and the Spectral Solar Irradiance. SODISM (SOlar Diameter Imager and Surface Mapper), is an 11-cm Ritchey-Chr´etien imaging telescope developed at CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique) by LATMOS (Laboratoire, ATmosphere, Milieux, Observations Spatiales) ex Service d'A´eronomie, associated with a 2Kx2K CCD (Charge-Coupled Device), taking solar images at five wavelengths. It carries a four-prism system to ensure a metrological control of the optics magnification. SODISM allows us to measure the solar diameter and shape with an accuracy of a few milliarcseconds, and to perform helioseismologic observations to probe the solar interior. In this article, we describe the space instrument SODISM and its thermo-elastic properties. We also present the PICARD payload data center and the ground instrument SODISM II which will observe together with the space instrument.

  14. Aeronautic Instruments. Section VI : Aerial Navigation and Navigating Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, H N

    1923-01-01

    This report outlines briefly the methods of aerial navigation which have been developed during the past few years, with a description of the different instruments used. Dead reckoning, the most universal method of aerial navigation, is first discussed. Then follows an outline of the principles of navigation by astronomical observation; a discussion of the practical use of natural horizons, such as sea, land, and cloud, in making extant observations; the use of artificial horizons, including the bubble, pendulum, and gyroscopic types. A description is given of the recent development of the radio direction finder and its application to navigation.

  15. Distributed Instrumentation Deployment During the IHY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davila, J. M.; Thompson, B. J.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2005-12-01

    A major thrust of the International Heliophysical Year (IHY) is to deploy arrays of small, inexpensive instruments such as magnetometers, radio antennas, GPS receivers, all-sky cameras, etc. around the world to provide global measurements of ionospheric and heliospheric phenomena. This program is a collaboration between the IHY and the United Nations Basic Space Science (UNBSS) program, which has been dedicated to the IHY through 2009. The small instrument program is envisioned as a partnership between instrument providers, and instrument host countries. The lead scientist will provide the instruments (or fabrication plans for instruments) in the array; the host country will provide manpower, facilities, and operational support to obtain data with the instrument typically at a local university. Instrument operational support for local scientists, facilities, data acquisition, etc will be provided by the host nation.

  16. 14 CFR 33.29 - Instrument connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...in presenting the safety analysis, or complying...dependence is placed on instrumentation that is not otherwise...must specify this instrumentation in the engine installation...f) As part of the System Safety Assessment...

  17. 14 CFR 33.29 - Instrument connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...in presenting the safety analysis, or complying...dependence is placed on instrumentation that is not otherwise...must specify this instrumentation in the engine installation...f) As part of the System Safety Assessment...

  18. 14 CFR 33.29 - Instrument connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...in presenting the safety analysis, or complying...dependence is placed on instrumentation that is not otherwise...must specify this instrumentation in the engine installation...f) As part of the System Safety Assessment...

  19. 14 CFR 33.29 - Instrument connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...in presenting the safety analysis, or complying...dependence is placed on instrumentation that is not otherwise...must specify this instrumentation in the engine installation...f) As part of the System Safety Assessment...

  20. 14 CFR 33.29 - Instrument connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...in presenting the safety analysis, or complying...dependence is placed on instrumentation that is not otherwise...must specify this instrumentation in the engine installation...f) As part of the System Safety Assessment...

  1. Session 2659 Instrumentation with Computerized Data Acquisition

    E-print Network

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    Session 2659 Instrumentation with Computerized Data Acquisition for an Innovative Thermal on the results. The emphasis here is given to the apparatus' instrumentation and computerized data acquisition and control are accomplished and integrated by using a computerized data acquisition system

  2. EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL VOC SCREENING INSTRUMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the evaluation of potential fugitive source emission screening instruments for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). An initial review of available portable VOC detection instruments indicated that detectors operating on several principles (i.e., fla...

  3. Regional Instrumentation Facilities Established by NSF.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Analytical Chemistry, 1979

    1979-01-01

    This article describes the six regional instrumentation facilities established by the National Science Foundation. These centers make available to scientists state-of-the-art instrumentation such as: gas chromatographs; lasers; NMR spectrometers; X-rays; and others. (CS)

  4. Encapsulation process sterilizes and preserves surgical instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, L. C.; Morelli, F. A.

    1964-01-01

    Ethylene oxide is blended with an organic polymer to form a sterile material for encapsulating surgical instruments. The material does not bond to metal and can be easily removed when the instruments are needed.

  5. Mariner Jupiter/Saturn infrared instrument study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Mariner Jupiter/Saturn infrared instrumentation conceptual design study was conducted to determine the physical and operational characteristics of the instruments needed to satisfy the experiment science requirements. The design of the instruments is based on using as many proven concepts as possible. Many design features are taken from current developments such as the Mariner, Pioneer 10, Viking Orbiter radiometers, and Nimbus D spectrometer. Calibration techniques and error analysis for the instrument system are discussed.

  6. Virtual instrumentation interface for SRRC control system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jenny Chen; C. H. Kuo; Gloria Huang; C. J. Wang; K. T. Hsu; G. J. Jan

    1995-01-01

    Virtual instrumentation system has been developed for the control system of SRRC. Almost of the measurement instruments are to provide IEEE-488 interface, they are distributed around the accelerator facilities, the virtual instrumentation system connects these instruments by local area network, Ethernet, to GPIB adapter. The man-machine interface developed by using LabVIEW, which is running at Sun's workstation. The workstation to

  7. ICFA Instrumentation Bulletin, Volume 14, Spring 1997

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The publication of the ICFA Instrumentation Bulletin is an activity of the Panel on Future Innovation and Development of ICFA (International Committee for Future Accelerators). The Bulletin reports on research and progress in the field of instrumentation with emphasis on application in the field of high-energy physics. It encourages issues of generic instrumentation.

  8. ICFA Instrumentation Bulletin, Volume 13, Fall 1996

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    The publication of the ICFA Instrumentation Bulletin is an activity of the Panel on Future Innovation and Development of ICFA (International Committee for Future Accelerators). The Bulletin reports on research and progress in the field of instrumentation with emphasis on application in the field of high-energy physics. It encourages issues of generic instrumentation.

  9. Endodontic rotary nickel-titanium instrument systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lieutenant Brent; J. Crumpton; Captain Scott McClanahan

    Since the end of the nineteenth century, automated root canal instrumentation has been available, but systems had many problems. The challenges of increased canal blockage, instrument breakage, and insufficient canal debridement were related to the use of stainless steel instruments and have been dramatically improved with the introduction of nickel -titanium (NiTi) files. The first useable NiTi alloy was developed

  10. EE 5340/EE7340 Biomedical Instrumentation

    E-print Network

    Davila, Carlos E.

    of Biomedical Engineering C. General Instrumentation System D. Gener- alized Static and Dynamic Characteristics. Instrumentation Amplifiers C. Filters D. Electrical Safety Issues VI. Cardiopulmonary Support: A. Cardiac Pacing BEE 5340/EE7340 Biomedical Instrumentation Fall 2006 Course Description: Application of engineering

  11. The Treatment Validity of Autism Screening Instruments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew Livanis; Angela Mouzakitis

    2010-01-01

    Treatment validity is a frequently neglected topic of screening instruments used to identify autism spectrum disorders. Treatment validity, however, should represent an important aspect of these instruments to link the resulting data to the selection of interventions as well as make decisions about treatment length and intensity. Research investigating the treatment validity of screening instruments is an important aspect to

  12. (abstract) Microwave Instrument for Rosetta Orbiter (MIRO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulkis, S.; Frerking, M.; Allen, A.; Janssen, M.; Hofstadter, M.; Spilker, T.; Muhleman, D.; Schloerb, F. P.; Crovisier, J.; Beaudin, G.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Encrenaz, P.; Encrenaz, T.; Lellouch, E; Despois, D.; Ip, W. H.; Hartogh, P.; Mann, I.; Rauer, H.

    1996-01-01

    MIRO is a scientific instrument designed for the orbiter of the Rosetta International Mission. It will address the nature of the cometary nucleus, outgassing, and the development of the coma as strongly interrelated aspects of cometary physics. Detailed parameters of the MIRO instrument and the scientific objectives to be met will be discussed. Simulated observations with the MIRO instrument will be shown.

  13. Development of Engineering Thermodynamics Concept Inventory instruments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Clark Midkiff; Thomas A. Litzinger; D. L. Evans

    2001-01-01

    Preliminary instruments for the assessment of undergraduate engineering student understanding of fundamental thermodynamics concept are presented. The Thermodynamics Concept Inventory (TCI) instruments are patterned after the existing Force Concept Inventory (FCI) instruments. Numerous studies have supported the efficacy of pre- and post-course administration of the FCI as a means of assessing the effectiveness of educational reform activities. The objective of

  14. Common Lisp Instrumentation Package: User Manual

    E-print Network

    Southern California, University of

    Common Lisp Instrumentation Package: User Manual David L. Westbrook, Scott D. Anderson, David M;#12;Common Lisp Instrumentation Package: User Manual Experimental Knowledge Systems Laboratory Computer for the Common Lisp Instrumentation Package (Clip), a tool for automating experimentation and data collection

  15. Measuring Language Attitudes: The Speech Evaluation Instrument

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher J. Zahn; Robert Hopper

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes investigations in the measurement of listeners' evaluations of spoken language. Lack of integration in research in this area has been due in part to the numerous measurement instruments used to assess such evaluative reactions. The paper reviews the development of past instruments, describes the design, analysis, and implementation of an omnibus measure, the Speech Evaluation Instrument (SEI),

  16. An Instrumental Perspective on CSCL Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonchamp, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    The theory of instrumental genesis of Rabardel relates the social and the technical through the concept of instrument. An instrument is defined as a mixed entity made up by an artifact, the technical/material part, and a set of utilization schemes, the social/behavioural part, which both result from users' constructive activities. This theory is…

  17. Operation and performance of the OSSE instrument

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. A. Cameron; J. D. Kurfess; W. N. Johnson; R. L. Kinzer; R. A. Kroeger; M. D. Leising; R. J. Murphy; G. H. Share; M. S. Strickman; J. E. Grove

    1992-01-01

    The Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) on the Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory is described. An overview of the operation and control of the instrument is given, together with a discussion of typical observing strategies used with OSSE and basic data types produced by the instrument. Some performance measures for the instrument are presented that were obtained from pre-launch

  18. Advanced Java Bytecode Instrumentation Walter Binder

    E-print Network

    Binder, Walter

    applied bytecode instrumentation in or- der to monitor and control resource consumption in standard JavaAdvanced Java Bytecode Instrumentation Walter Binder Faculty of Informatics University of Lugano CH University of Lugano CH­6900 Lugano Switzerland philippe.moret@unisi.ch ABSTRACT Bytecode instrumentation

  19. Instrumentation and control in EHV substations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. K. Tseng; H. J. Stanford; B. D. Cooperstein; D. F. Koenig

    1975-01-01

    This paper reports technical findings and recommendations resulting from a joint SCE\\/TRW study of Instrumentation and Control alternatives for use in future EHV substations on the Edison system. It contains analyses and design criteria that should be followed when a digital, computer-oriented, instrumentation and control system is contemplated as the primary instrumentation and control system in an EHV substation. Attention

  20. Industrial Instrument Mechanic. Occupational Analyses Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Ann; Zagorac, Mike; Bumbaka, Nick

    This analysis covers tasks performed by an industrial instrument mechanic, an occupational title some provinces and territories of Canada have also identified as industrial instrumentation and instrument mechanic. A guide to analysis discusses development, structure, and validation method; scope of the occupation; trends; and safety. To facilitate…

  1. Robotic-surgical instrument wrist pose estimation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephan Fabel; Kyungim Baek; Peter Berkelman

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Lightweight Surgery Robot from the University of Hawaii includes two teleoperated instruments and one endoscope manipulator which act in accord to perform assisted interventional medicine. The relative positions and orientations of the robotic instruments and endoscope must be known to the teleoperation system so that the directions of the instrument motions can be controlled to correspond closely to

  2. FPGA based control system for space instrumentation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anna M. Di Giorgio; Pasquale Cerulli Irelli; Francesco Nuzzolo; Renato Orfei; Luigi Spinoglio; Giovanni S. Liu; Paolo Saraceno

    2008-01-01

    The prototype for a general purpose FPGA based control system for space instrumentation is presented, with particular attention to the instrument control application software. The system HW is based on the LEON3FT processor, which gives the flexibility to configure the chip with only the necessary HW functionalities, from simple logic up to small dedicated processors. The instrument control SW is

  3. Animations in an Instrumental Methods Chemistry Class?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Chasteen, Thomas G.

    This website provides an introduction to animations as a tool for teaching instrumental techniques in the instrumental analysis course - why one might wish to use animations, some information on how to go about developing them, and it provides a number of examples of animations for analytical instrumentation. The site should prove a valuable resource to college educators teaching analytical chemistry.

  4. Evaluation method for climate change mitigation instruments

    E-print Network

    Kouroupetroglou, Georgios

    Evaluation method for climate change mitigation instruments Popi A. Konidari* National of these instruments is to be effective in mitigating climate change through GHG emissions reductions. The second level@kepa.uoa.gr Abstract. AMS is a specially developed evaluation method for climate policy instruments. The same method

  5. Educational Virtual Instrumentation Application for System Identification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mircea Popa; Raul Ionel; Voicu Groza; Marius Marcu

    2006-01-01

    The PC based virtual instrumentation is a dynamic and attractive alternative to the classic instrumentation. Its main advantages are: flexibility and adaptability, low cost, wide development of extension PC boards with measurements features, attractive representation of measurement results, in different forms, on the PC's monitor. The paper presents a system identification application with PC based (virtual) instrumentation. The virtual system

  6. Laboratory of virtual instrumentation for industrial electronics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Marino; J. Nogueira; H. Hernandez

    2000-01-01

    The authors present an ATE system designed for teaching practices about programmable electronic instrumentation, by means of GPIB and VXI instruments connected to a local area network (LAN). The aim of this system intended for students of electronic engineering, is the introduction of more relevant technologies involved in hardware instrumentation for ATE applications, besides the handling of their software environments

  7. Electronics laboratory practices based on virtual instrumentation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Marino; J. Nogueira; H. Hernandez

    1999-01-01

    The authors present an ATE system designed for teaching practices about programmable electronic instrumentation, by means of GPIB and VXI instruments connected to a local area network (LAN). The aim of this system, intended for students of electronic engineering, is the introduction of more relevant technologies involved in hardware instrumentation for ATE applications, besides the handling of their software environments

  8. Instrumentation for Sensitive Gas Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OKeefe, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    An improved instrument for optical absorption spectroscopy utilizes off-axis paths in an optical cavity in order to increase detection sensitivity while suppressing resonance effects. The instrument is well suited for use in either cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) [in which one pulses an incident light beam and measures the rate of decay of light in the cavity] or integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) [in which one uses a continuous-wave incident light beam and measures the power of light in the cavity as a function of wavelength]. Typically, in optical absorption spectroscopy, one seeks to measure absorption of a beam of light in a substance (usually a gas or liquid) in a sample cell. In CRDS or ICOS, the sample cell is placed in (or consists of) an optical cavity, so that one can utilize multiple reflections of the beam to increase the effective optical path length through the absorbing substance and thereby increase the sensitivity for measuring absorption. If an absorbing substance is not present in the optical cavity, one can utilize the multiple passes of the light beam to increase the sensitivity for measuring absorption and scattering by components of the optical cavity itself. It is desirable to suppress the effects of resonances in the cavity in order to make the spectral response of the cavity itself as nearly constant as possible over the entire wavelength range of interest. In the present instrument, the desired flattening of the spectral response is accomplished by utilizing an off-axis beam geometry to effectively decrease the frequency interval between longitudinal electromagnetic modes of the cavity, such that the resulting transmission spectrum of the cavity is nearly continuous: in other words, the cavity becomes a broad-band optical device.

  9. Multimodality instrument for tissue characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, Robert W. (Inventor); Andrews, Russell J. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A system with multimodality instrument for tissue identification includes a computer-controlled motor driven heuristic probe with a multisensory tip. For neurosurgical applications, the instrument is mounted on a stereotactic frame for the probe to penetrate the brain in a precisely controlled fashion. The resistance of the brain tissue being penetrated is continually monitored by a miniaturized strain gauge attached to the probe tip. Other modality sensors may be mounted near the probe tip to provide real-time tissue characterizations and the ability to detect the proximity of blood vessels, thus eliminating errors normally associated with registration of pre-operative scans, tissue swelling, elastic tissue deformation, human judgement, etc., and rendering surgical procedures safer, more accurate, and efficient. A neural network program adaptively learns the information on resistance and other characteristic features of normal brain tissue during the surgery and provides near real-time modeling. A fuzzy logic interface to the neural network program incorporates expert medical knowledge in the learning process. Identification of abnormal brain tissue is determined by the detection of change and comparison with previously learned models of abnormal brain tissues. The operation of the instrument is controlled through a user friendly graphical interface. Patient data is presented in a 3D stereographics display. Acoustic feedback of selected information may optionally be provided. Upon detection of the close proximity to blood vessels or abnormal brain tissue, the computer-controlled motor immediately stops probe penetration. The use of this system will make surgical procedures safer, more accurate, and more efficient. Other applications of this system include the detection, prognosis and treatment of breast cancer, prostate cancer, spinal diseases, and use in general exploratory surgery.

  10. A portable luminescence dating instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kook, M. H.; Murray, A. S.; Lapp, T.; Denby, P. H.; Ankjærgaard, C.; Thomsen, K.; Jain, M.; Choi, J. H.; Kim, G. H.

    2011-06-01

    We describe a portable luminescence reader suitable for use in remote localities in the field. The instrument weighs about 8 kg and is based around a 30 mm bialkali photomultiplier detecting signals through a glass filter centered on 340 nm. Stimulation is by 470 nm blue LEDs (24 W in total) operating in both continuous wave and pulsed mode; photon counting can be gated such that it is active only during the pulse off-period. There are also two bleaching light sources (470 nm, 5 W and 940 nm, 3 W), and the luminescence signals can be regenerated using a cold-cathode 30 kV X-ray tube, delivering ˜0.06 Gy.s -1. The three position sampling device has a heating element under each sampling position, able to heat the sample at 3 °C.s -1 up to at least 250 °C. The sampler can be inserted into unconsolidated sediments, and is designed to prevent exposure of the mineral grains to ambient light during sampling. The performance of the instrument in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility is comparable to that of the standard bench-top laboratory TL/OSL Risø reader. We show that the portable luminescence reader is able to measure accurately an ˜20 Gy quartz burial dose in a natural (unpretreated, no mineral separation) sandy sediment. We also show that, because of the configuration of the measurement head, the portable reader can be used to measure radioluminescence at elevated temperature in the presence of stimulation light; this facility is not available on conventional bench-top instruments. It is concluded that the portable luminescence reader can be used to accurately determine the quartz burial dose in loose sandy sediments in the field, without sample preparation or darkroom facilities.

  11. Small satellite radiation budget instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    A major diagnostic in understanding the response of the Earth's climate to natural or anthropogenic changes is the radiative balance at the top of the atmosphere. Two classes of measurements may be undertaken: (1) a monitoring of the radiation balance over decade-long long time-scales, and (2) measurements designed to provide a sufficiently complete data set to validate or improve models. This paper discusses some of the important ingredients in obtaining such data, and presents a description of some candidate instrumentation for use on a small satellite. 23 refs.

  12. Small satellite radiation budget instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.

    1992-05-01

    A major diagnostic in understanding the response of the Earth`s climate to natural or anthropogenic changes is the radiative balance at the top of the atmosphere. Two classes of measurements may be undertaken: (1) a monitoring of the radiation balance over decade-long long time-scales, and (2) measurements designed to provide a sufficiently complete data set to validate or improve models. This paper discusses some of the important ingredients in obtaining such data, and presents a description of some candidate instrumentation for use on a small satellite. 23 refs.

  13. Solwind instrument destroyed in test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The U.S. Air Force's destruction of one of its own satellites last month ended what had been the longest continuous stream of data from an instrument observing the sun's corona. Satellite P78-1 served as the target in a test of antisatellite (ASAT) weaponry on September 13, 1985. The satellite carried Solwind, a white light coronagraph that observed the solar corona at distances of 3-10 solar radii, according to Robert M. MacQueen, director of the High Altitude Observatory at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colo.

  14. The Ultraviolet Plume Instrument (UVPI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horan, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    The Ultraviolet Plume Instrument (UVPI) was launched aboard the Low-power Atmospheric Compensation Experiment (LACE) satellite on 14 Feb. 1990. Both the spacecraft and the UVPI were sponsored by the Directed Energy Office of the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization. The mission of the UVPI was to obtain radiometrically calibrated images of rocket plumes at high altitude and background image data of the Earth, Earth's limb, and celestial objects in the near- and middle-UV wave bands. The UVPI was designed for nighttime observations, i.e., to acquire and track relatively bright objects against a dark background.

  15. Instrument Deployment for Mars Rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, Liam; Bualat, Maria; Kunz, C.; Lee, Susan; Sargent, Randy; Washington, Rich; Wright, Anne; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Future Mars rovers, such as the planned 2009 MSL rover, require sufficient autonomy to robustly approach rock targets and place an instrument in contact with them. It took the 1997 Sojourner Mars rover between 3 and 5 communications cycles to accomplish this. This paper describes the technologies being developed and integrated onto the NASA Ames K9 prototype Mars rover to both accomplish this in one cycle, and to extend the complexity and duration of operations that a Mars rover can accomplish without intervention from mission control.

  16. pH Optrode Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabacco, Mary Beth; Zhou, Quan

    1995-01-01

    pH-sensitive chromophoric reagents immobilized in porous optical fibers. Optoelectronic instrumentation system measures acidity or alkalinity of aqueous nutrient solution. Includes one or more optrodes, which are optical-fiber chemical sensors, in sense, analogous to electrodes but not subject to some of spurious effects distorting readings taken by pH electrodes. Concept of optrodes also described in "Ethylene-Vapor Optrodes" (KSC-11579). pH optrode sensor head, with lead-in and lead-out optical fibers, convenient for monitoring solutions located away from supporting electronic equipment.

  17. Virtual instrumentation to study galaxies

    E-print Network

    Ph. Prugniel; I. Chilingarian; H. Flores; J. Guibert; R. Haigron; I. Jegouzo; F. Royer; F. Tajahmady; G. Theureau; J. Vetois

    2004-10-13

    The MIGALE project (http://www.sai.msu.su/migale) provides databases and data analysis tools to study the evolution of galaxies from z=1 to z=0. It develops and maintain a general database, HyperLeda, to give a homogenized parameterization for 3 million objects, and several archives or specialized databases. It also develops tools to analyse on-the-fly data extracted from the database or obtained through the Virtual Observatory (Virtual Instruments). The package made for this project, Pleinpot, is distributed as open source.

  18. Identifying the Potential for Robotics to Assist Older Adults in Different Living Environments.

    PubMed

    Mitzner, Tracy L; Chen, Tiffany L; Kemp, Charles C; Rogers, Wendy A

    2014-04-01

    As the older adult population grows and becomes more diverse, so will their needs and preferences for living environments. Many adults over 65 years of age require some assistance [1, 2]; yet it is important for their feelings of well-being that the assistance not restrict their autonomy [3]. Not only is autonomy correlated with quality of life [4], autonomy enhancement may improve functionality [2, 5]. The goal of this paper is to provide guidance for the development of technology to enhance autonomy and quality of life for older adults. We explore the potential for robotics to meet these needs. We evaluated older adults' diverse living situations and the predictors of residential moves to higher levels of care in the United States. We also examined older adults' needs for assistance with activities of daily living (ADLs), instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), and medical conditions when living independently or in a long-term care residence. By providing support for older adults, mobile manipulator robots may reduce need-driven, undesired moves from residences with lower levels of care (i.e., private homes, assisted living) to those with higher levels of care (i.e., skilled nursing). PMID:24729800

  19. PASSCAL Instrument Center at New Mexico Tech

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The PASSCAL Instrument Center at New Mexico Tech offers support of seismic instrumentation, maintenance of equipment, training, and logistical field support for seismology experiments. The website provides thorough explanations of the sensors, data acquisition systems, and other instrumentation. Researchers can find a users guide, schedules of the instrumentation, and forms to request the use PASSCAL equipment with the stipulation that the data will be made available through the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) Data Management Center (DMC) two years after the field work is completed. Users can learn about the growing number of technological instruments available at the Center due to the support of the Department of Energy.

  20. Instrumentation for detailed bridge-scour measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landers, Mark N.; Mueller, David S.; Trent, Roy E.

    1993-01-01

    A portable instrumentation system is being developed to obtain channel bathymetry during floods for detailed bridge-scour measurements. Portable scour measuring systems have four components: sounding instrument, horizontal positioning instrument, deployment mechanisms, and data storage device. The sounding instrument will be a digital fathometer. Horizontal position will be measured using a range-azimuth based hydrographic survey system. The deployment mechanism designed for this system is a remote-controlled boat using a small waterplane area, twin-hull design. An on-board computer and radio will monitor the vessel instrumentation, record measured data, and telemeter data to shore.

  1. Preliminary analysis of a flexible instrument mount for large instruments on the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A flexible instrument mount for large instruments on the space shuttle is analyzed. Concepts for pointing instruments while in orbit, with weights up to 2000 Kg and dimensions of 2 to 3 m were identified and analyzed. A mechanical concept was selected that can accommodate a set class of scientific instruments such as the LAMAR X-ray experiment with 24 LAMAR telescopes.

  2. Instrumenting the Intelligence Analysis Process

    SciTech Connect

    Hampson, Ernest; Cowley, Paula J.

    2005-05-02

    The Advanced Research and Development Activity initiated the Novel Intelligence from Massive Data (NIMD) program to develop advanced analytic technologies and methodologies. In order to support this objective, researchers and developers need to understand what analysts do and how they do it. In the past, this knowledge generally was acquired through subjective feedback from analysts. NIMD established the innovative Glass Box Analysis (GBA) Project to instrument a live intelligence mission and unobtrusively capture and objectively study the analysis process. Instrumenting the analysis process requires tailor-made software hooks that grab data from a myriad of disparate application operations and feed into a complex relational database and hierarchical file store to collect, store, retrieve, and distribute analytic data in a manner that maximizes researchers’ understanding. A key to success is determining the correct data to collect and aggregate low-level data into meaningful analytic events. This paper will examine how the GBA team solved some of these challenges, continues to address others, and supports a growing user community in establishing their own GBA environments and/or studying the data generated by GBA analysts working in the Glass Box.

  3. The Dark Energy Survey Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaugher, Brenna; Dark Energy Survey Collaboration

    2006-12-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is designed to measure the dark energy equation of state parameter, w, to a statistical precision of 5%, with four complementary techniques: galaxy cluster counts, weak lensing, angular power spectrum and type Ia supernovae. We present an overview of the DES instrument (DECam) which will be mounted at the prime focus of the Blanco 4m telescope at the Cerro-Tololo International Observatory (CTIO). DECam includes a focal plane of 62 2kx4k CCDs, a five element optical corrector, four filters (g,r,i,z), and the associated infrastructure for operation in a new prime focus cage. To reach redshifts of 1, we plan to use the 250 micron thick fully-depleted CCDs that have been developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). A CCD packaging and testing facility has been established at Fermilab to produce fully characterized four-side buttable modules. DECam also includes design features to enhance the image quality and the efficiency of operations. DECam will be devoted to the DES for 30% of the time over the five year survey and will otherwise be available to the community as an NOAO facility instrument. Status of the design and prototyping efforts will be described.

  4. SCIAMACHY instrument on ENVISAT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, S.; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Burrows, John P.; Frerick, Johannes; Chance, Kelly V.; Goede, Albert P.; Muller, C.

    1998-12-01

    SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY) is a contribution to the ENVISAT-1 satellite, which is to be launched in spring 2000. The SCIAMACHY instrument is designed to measure sunlight transmitted, reflected and scattered by the Earth's atmosphere or surface. The instrument measures simultaneously from the UV to the NIB spectral spectral region (240 - 2380 nm). Observations are made in alternate nadir and limb viewing geometries and also for solar sunrise and lunar moonrise occultation. Inversion of the SCIAMACHY measurements will provide the following: the amount and distributions of some important trace gases O(subscript 3), BrO, OClO, ClO, SO(subscript 2), H(subscript 2)CO, NO(subscript 2), CO, CO(subscript 2), CH(subscript 4), H(subscript 2)O, N(subscript 2)O, p, T, aerosol, and radiation flux profiles, cloud cover and cloud top height. Combination of the near simultaneous limb and nadir observations enables the tropospheric column amounts of O(subscript 3), NO(subscript 2), CO, CH(subscript 4), H(subscript 2)O, N(subscript 2)O, SO(subscript 2), and H(subscript 2)CO to be detected. SCIAMACHY will provide new insight into the global behavior of the troposphere and the stratosphere.

  5. The Museum of Musical Instruments

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Not to be mistaken for or confused with MoMA, the Museum of Musical Instruments (MoMI) is an amazing online tribute to American music and its enduring primary instrument - the guitar. Founded by Hank Risan and Bianca Soros, MoMI features studies and works by some of Americaâ??s greatest musical artists, including Scott Joplin, Woody Guthrie, and Gene Autry, to name only a few. Investigating the history behind the people and their music, the site offers presentations on key periods and movements in American music, among them jazz, ragtime, hip, country, and Spanish serenades. For guitar enthusiasts alone, this site is a gold mine and an education, featuring a running side-bar on the MoMI front page that highlights specific artistâ??s guitars, each with a photo and its own tale to tell. Last but not least, the site also showcases elemental figures in the history of American music and its guitar players. Up for the edification of current readers is Bound for Glory: the Life and Times of Woody Guthrie, a multimedia study of the artistâ??s lasting legacy.

  6. Focal Plane Instrumentation of VERITAS

    E-print Network

    VERITAS Collaboration; T. Nagai; R. McKay; G. Sleege; D. Petry

    2007-09-28

    VERITAS is a new atmospheric Cherenkov imaging telescope array to detect very high energy gamma rays above 100 GeV. The array is located in southern Arizona, USA, at an altitude of 1268m above sea level. The array consists of four 12-m telescopes of Davies-Cotton design and structurally resembling the Whipple 10-m telescope. The four focal plane instruments are equipped with high-resolution (499 pixels) fast photo-multiplier-tube (PMT) cameras covering a 3.5 degree field of view with 0.15 degree pixel separation. Light concentrators reduce the dead-space between PMTs to 25% and shield the PMTs from ambient light. The PMTs are connected to high-speed preamplifiers allowing operation at modest anode current and giving good single photoelectron peaks in situ. Electronics in the focus box provides real-time monitoring of the anode currents for each pixel and ambient environmental conditions. A charge injection subsystem installed in the focus box allows daytime testing of the trigger and data acquisition system by injecting pulses of variable amplitude and length directly into the photomultiplier preamplifiers. A brief description of the full VERITAS focal plane instrument is given in this paper.

  7. The TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veefkind, Pepijn; Kleipool, Quintus; Aben, Ilse; Levelt, Pieternel

    2015-04-01

    The Copernicus Sentinel 5 Precursor (S5P), scheduled for launch in 2016, is the first of the sentinels dedicated to monitoring of the atmospheric composition. The main application areas of the mission are air quality, climate and the ozone layer. The single payload of the S5P mission is TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI). TROPOMI is a nadir viewing shortwave spectrometer that will measure in the UV-visible wavelength range (270-500 nm), the near infrared (710-770 nm) and the shortwave infrared (2314-2382 nm). TROPOMI will have an unprecedented spatial resolution of about 7x7 km2 at nadir. The spatial resolution is combined with a wide swath to allow for daily global coverage. The high spatial resolution serves two goals: (1) emissions sources can be detected with more accuracy and (2) the number of cloud-free ground pixels will increase substantially. The TROPOMI/S5P geophysical (Level 2) data products include nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, ozone (total column, tropospheric column & profile), methane, sulphur dioxide, formaldehyde and aerosol and cloud parameters. In this contribution we will present the TROPOMI instrument performance and the new science opportunities that it will enable.

  8. Instrumentation: Analytical Capabilities on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westall, Frances; Allen, Carl; Braiser, Martin; Farmer, Jack; Massell, Wulf; Agee, Carl B.; Steele, Andrew; Fortson, Russ

    1998-01-01

    Human exploration of Mars will consist of a series of long-term missions, with early missions focusing upon establishing the Mars base, and undertaking basic field reconnaissance. A capable laboratory on Mars is an essential element in the exploration strategy. Analytical equipment both in the field and in the laboratory serves to extend the senses of the crew and help them sharpen their sampling skills as they learn to recognize rocks in the field and understand their geologic context and significance. On-site sample analyses allow results to be incorporated into evolving surface exploration plans and strategies, which will be developing in real-time as we learn more about Mars. Early Mars missions will focus on reconnaissance EVAs to collect rock and soil samples, maximizing the amount of Mars material returned to Earth. Later missions will be increasingly devoted to both extensive field campaigns and laboratory analyses. The capabilities and equipment described below will be built up at the Mars base incrementally over many missions, with science payloads and investigative infrastructure being partitioned among launch opportunities. This discussion considers what we require to measure, observe, and explore on a new planetary territory. Alternatively, what do we need to know and how do we equip ourselves to provide ample capabilities to acquire these data? Suggestions follow describing specific instruments that we could use. Appendix 5 lists a strawman science instrument payload, and a feasibility study of equipment transportation into the field on pressurized or unpressurized rovers.

  9. Instrumentation at the Anglo-Australian Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barden, Samuel C.

    2004-09-01

    The Anglo-Australian Observatory (AAO) has an instrumentation group for engineering, design, and fabrication that integrates tightly with an energetic group of instrument scientists1 to develop complex astronomical instruments. This instrumentation group puts ideas for innovative technical solutions generated by the instrument scientist group into reality. One demonstration of past achievement is the highly ambitious and successful 2dF instrument that yielded invaluable scientific insight into the cosmological structure of the universe. The more recent successes of the instrumentation group include the OzPoz fiber positioner for the FLAMES facility on the VLT and the award-winning, imaging and multi-object IRIS-2 infrared spectrograph for the AAT. VPH gratings were first put into action in LDSS++ on the AAT and numerous VPH gratings are now in routine use on the 6dF spectrograph for the UKST. Under development are a completely new and unique fiber positioning scheme (Echidna) for use in the FMOS instrument for Subaru; a double-beamed, VPH-based, bench-mounted spectrograph for 2dF; new IR and optical detector controllers; a renovation of the telescope and instrument control systems for the AAT; and a feasibility study for an Echidna-style positioner for the Gemini telescopes. Several other design studies are underway for new instrument technologies using leading edge and innovative concepts in robotics and fibers. The synergy between our scientists and engineers establishes a sound basis for solving the instrumentation challenges facing us.

  10. Program Instrumentation and Trace Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havelund, Klaus; Goldberg, Allen; Filman, Robert; Rosu, Grigore; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Several attempts have been made recently to apply techniques such as model checking and theorem proving to the analysis of programs. This shall be seen as a current trend to analyze real software systems instead of just their designs. This includes our own effort to develop a model checker for Java, the Java PathFinder 1, one of the very first of its kind in 1998. However, model checking cannot handle very large programs without some kind of abstraction of the program. This paper describes a complementary scalable technique to handle such large programs. Our interest is turned on the observation part of the equation: How much information can be extracted about a program from observing a single execution trace? It is our intention to develop a technology that can be applied automatically and to large full-size applications, with minimal modification to the code. We present a tool, Java PathExplorer (JPaX), for exploring execution traces of Java programs. The tool prioritizes scalability for completeness, and is directed towards detecting errors in programs, not to prove correctness. One core element in JPaX is an instrumentation package that allows to instrument Java byte code files to log various events when executed. The instrumentation is driven by a user provided script that specifies what information to log. Examples of instructions that such a script can contain are: 'report name and arguments of all called methods defined in class C, together with a timestamp'; 'report all updates to all variables'; and 'report all acquisitions and releases of locks'. In more complex instructions one can specify that certain expressions should be evaluated and even that certain code should be executed under various conditions. The instrumentation package can hence be seen as implementing Aspect Oriented Programming for Java in the sense that one can add functionality to a Java program without explicitly changing the code of the original program, but one rather writes an aspect and compiles it into the original program using the instrumentation. Another core element of JPaX is an observation package that supports the analysis of the generated event stream. Two kinds of analysis are currently supported. In temporal analysis the execution trace is evaluated against formulae written in temporal logic. We have implemented a temporal logic evaluator on finite traces using the Maude rewriting system from SRI International, USA. Temporal logic is defined in Maude by giving its syntax as a signature and its semantics as rewrite equations. The resulting semantics is extremely efficient and can handle event streams of hundreds of millions events in few minutes. Furthermore, the implementation is very succinct. The second form of even stream analysis supported is error pattern analysis where an execution trace is analyzed using various error detection algorithms that can identify error-prone programming practices that may potentially lead to errors in some different executions. Two such algorithms focusing on concurrency errors have been implemented in JPaX, one for deadlocks and the other for data races. It is important to note, that a deadlock or data race potential does not need to occur in order for its potential to be detected with these algorithms. This is what makes them very scalable in practice. The data race algorithm implemented is the Eraser algorithm from Compaq, however adopted to Java. The tool is currently being applied to a code base for controlling a spacecraft by the developers of that software in order to evaluate its applicability.

  11. (Analytical instrumentation in clinical chemistry)

    SciTech Connect

    Burtis, C.A.

    1987-07-14

    As chairman of the Expert Panel on Instrumentation (EPI) of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC), I presided over its closed and open meetings held on June 29, 1987, and July 2, 1987, respectively. As chairman-elect of the Organizing Committee of the 1990 International Congress on Clinical Chemistry, I also attended the meeting of the IFCC Congress Committee to give a progress report. This report was subsequently also presented to the IFCC Executive Board and Council and to its corporate members. These meetings were held prior to, or in conjunction with, the 13th International Congress of Clinical Chemistry. Consequently, I had an opportunity to attend several of the scientific sessions and the Trade Exposition of the Congress.

  12. Application of Fiber Optic Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, William Lance; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Ko, William L.; Piazza, Anthony; Chan, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Fiber optic sensing technology has emerged in recent years offering tremendous advantages over conventional aircraft instrumentation systems. The advantages of fiber optic sensors over their conventional counterparts are well established; they are lighter, smaller, and can provide enormous numbers of measurements at a fraction of the total sensor weight. After a brief overview of conventional and fiber-optic sensing technology, this paper presents an overview of the research that has been conducted at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center in recent years to advance this promising new technology. Research and development areas include system and algorithm development, sensor characterization and attachment, and real-time experimentally-derived parameter monitoring for ground- and flight-based applications. The vision of fiber optic smart structure technology is presented and its potential benefits to aerospace vehicles throughout the lifecycle, from preliminary design to final retirement, are presented.

  13. Optimal calibration of nuclear instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, J.M.; Bray, M.A.; Feeley, J.J.

    1981-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of core power level is essential for the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants. Ionization chambers located outside the reactor core have the necessary reliability and response time characteristics and have been used extensively to indicate power level. The calibration of the ion chamber, and associated nuclear instrumentation (NI), has traditionally been based on the thermal power in the secondary coolant system. The usual NI calibration procedure consists of establishing steady-state operating conditions, calorimetrically determining the power at the secondary side of the steam generator, and adjusting the NI output to correspond to the measured thermal power. This study addresses certain questions including; (a) what sampling rate should be employed, (b) how many measurements are required, and (c) how can additional power level related information such as primary coolant loop measurements and knowledge of plant dynamics be included in the calibration procedure.

  14. Images from Phoenix's MECA Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The image on the upper left is from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Optical Microscope after a sample informally called 'Sorceress' was delivered to its silicon substrate on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008).

    A 3D representation of the same sample is on the right, as seen by Phoenix's Atomic Force Microscope. This is 100 times greater magnification than the view from the Optical Microscope, and the most highly magnified image ever seen from another world.

    The Optical Microscope and the Atomic Force Microscope are part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer instrument.

    The Atomic Force Microscope was developed by a Swiss-led consortium in collaboration with Imperial College London.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. Asteroid electrostatic instrumentation and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aplin, K. L.; Bowles, N. E.; Urbak, E.; Keane, D.; Sawyer, E. C.

    2011-06-01

    Asteroid surface material is expected to become photoelectrically charged, and is likely to be transported through electrostatic levitation. Understanding any movement of the surface material is relevant to proposed space missions to return samples to Earth for detailed isotopic analysis. Motivated by preparations for the Marco Polo sample return mission, we present electrostatic modelling for a real asteroid, Itokawa, for which detailed shape information is available, and verify that charging effects are likely to be significant at the terminator and at the edges of shadow regions for the Marco Polo baseline asteroid, 1999JU3. We also describe the Asteroid Charge Experiment electric field instrumentation intended for Marco Polo. Finally, we find that the differing asteroid and spacecraft potentials on landing could perturb sample collection for the short landing time of 20min that is currently planned.

  16. Laparoscopic splenectomy using conventional instruments

    PubMed Central

    Dalvi, A. N.; Thapar, P. M.; Deshpande, A. A.; Rege, S. A.; Prabhu, R. Y.; Supe, A. N.; Kamble, R. S.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Laparoscopic splenectomy (LS) is an accepted procedure for elective splenectomy. Advancement in technology has extended the possibility of LS in massive splenomegaly [Choy et al., J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Tech A 14(4), 197–200 (2004)], trauma [Ren et al., Surg Endosc 15(3), 324 (2001); Mostafa et al., Surg Laparosc Endosc Percutan Tech 12(4), 283–286 (2002)], and cirrhosis with portal hypertension [Hashizume et al., Hepatogastroenterology 49(45), 847–852 (2002)]. In a developing country, these advanced gadgets may not be always available. We performed LS using conventional and reusable instruments in a public teaching the hospital without the use of the advanced technology. The technique of LS and the outcome in these patients is reported. Materials and Methods: Patients undergoing LS for various hematological disorders from 1998 to 2004 were included. Electrocoagulation, clips, and intracorporeal knotting were the techniques used for tackling short-gastric vessels and splenic pedicle. Specimen was delivered through a Pfannensteil incision. Results: A total of 26 patients underwent LS. Twenty-two (85%) of patients had spleen size more than 500 g (average weight being 942.55 g). Mean operative time was 214 min (45–390 min). The conversion rate was 11.5% (n = 3). Average duration of stay was 5.65 days (3–30 days). Accessory spleen was detected and successfully removed in two patients. One patient developed subphrenic abscess. There was no mortality. There was no recurrence of hematological disease. Conclusion: Laparoscopic splenectomy using conventional equipment and instruments is safe and effective. Advanced technology has a definite advantage but is not a deterrent to the practice of LS. PMID:21206648

  17. Spiral Development for Safeguards Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Koskelo, M.; Undem, Halvor A.; Good, Morris S.; Frazar, Sarah L.; Schanfein, Mark; Kadner, S.

    2012-10-12

    Safeguards instrumentation is highly specialized, so a common approach in the US has been to develop initial prototypes for performance, operability and security within the US National Laboratories for the IAEA and then seek one or more commercial partners. Transfer of technology from US National Laboratories is a legal requirement for products that have the potential for mass production. Other important objectives include minimizing time to deployment and lifecycle cost, and optimizing product maintainability, sustainability and manufacturability. Unfortunately, the deployment of systems developed via this model has sometimes been seriously delayed or never adopted because of the difficulty of optimizing the significant parameters of the process between the public and private sectors. The authors suggest that forming an R&D partnership between a research laboratory and a commercial company much earlier in the process would provide significant advantages. The present US practice leads to unnecessary expenditures during the early R&D phase since many decisions are made based on research needs that are counterproductive for commercialization and manufacturability. If the ultimate goal of the project is to produce a reliable and cost effective commercial product, the commercial input is needed early and often. The new “model” of developing systems in a closer collaboration with the private sector, in a spiral “Commercialization by Design” approach, should also limit the long term financial mortgages that Member States frequently experience with respect to safeguards instrumentation development using the present process. As a concrete example, the potential for incorporating Wire Integrity Verification Technology into the iCobra Reader System is discussed.

  18. Recent Developments in PET Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hao; Levin, Craig S.

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is used in the clinic and in vivo small animal research to study molecular processes associated with diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and neurological disorders, and to guide the discovery and development of new treatments. This paper reviews current challenges of advancing PET technology and some of newly developed PET detectors and systems. The paper focuses on four aspects of PET instrumentation: high photon detection sensitivity; improved spatial resolution; depth-of-interaction (DOI) resolution and time-of-flight (TOF). Improved system geometry, novel non-scintillator based detectors, and tapered scintillation crystal arrays are able to enhance the photon detection sensitivity of a PET system. Several challenges for achieving high resolution with standard scintillator-based PET detectors are discussed. Novel detectors with 3-D positioning capability have great potential to be deployed in PET for achieving spatial resolution better than 1 mm, such as cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) and position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs). DOI capability enables a PET system to mitigate parallax error and achieve uniform spatial resolution across the field-of-view (FOV). Six common DOI designs, as well as advantages and limitations of each design, are discussed. The availability of fast scintillation crystals such as LaBr3, and the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) greatly advances TOF-PET development. Recent instrumentation and initial results of clinical trials are briefly presented. If successful, these technology advances, together with new probe molecules, will substantially enhance the molecular sensitivity of PET and thus increase its role in preclinical and clinical research as well as evaluating and managing disease in the clinic. PMID:20497121

  19. MC and A instrumentation catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Neymotin, L. [ed.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Sviridova, V. [ed.] [All-Russian Research Inst. of Automatics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1998-06-01

    In 1981 and 1985, two editions of a catalog of non-destructive nuclear measurement instrumentation, and material control and surveillance equipment, were published by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The last edition of the catalog included one hundred and twenty-five entries covering a wide range of devices developed in the US and abroad. More than ten years have elapsed since the publication of the more recent Catalog. Devices described in it have undergone significant modifications, and new devices have been developed. Therefore, in order to assist specialists in the field of Material Control and Accounting (MC and A), a new catalog has been created. Work on this instrumentation catalog started in 1997 as a cooperative effort of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), operated by Brookhaven Science Associates under contract to the US Department of Energy, and the All-Russian Research Institute of Automatics (VNIIA), subordinate institute of the Atomic Energy Ministry of the Russian Federation, within the collaborative US-Russia Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC and A) Program. Most of the equipment included in the Catalog are non-destructive assay (NDA) measurement devices employed for purposes of accounting, confirmation, and verification of nuclear materials. Other devices also included in the Catalog are employed in the detection and deterrence of unauthorized access to or removal of nuclear materials (material control: containment and surveillance). Equipment found in the Catalog comprises either: (1) complete devices or systems that can be used for MC and A applications; or (2) parts or components of complete systems, such as multi-channel analyzers, detectors, neutron generators, and software. All devices are categorized by their status of development--from prototype to serial production.

  20. Instrument Considerations for Pre-Phase A Proposals

    E-print Network

    Christian, Eric

    Traceability Matrix Signal-to-Noise Ratio Instrument Constraints on the Spacecraft System and Vice Versa Instrument System Thermal Requirements Field-of-View and Scanning Requirements Instrument Level Contamination Effects Radiation Effects on Instrument System Performance Test requirements

  1. Care and sterilization of endourologic instruments.

    PubMed

    Gregory, E; Simmons, D; Weinberg, J J

    1988-08-01

    All endourologic instruments must be handled properly if they are to continue to function properly. Care must be taken in washing and sterilizing of this equipment, as not all endoscopic equipment can endure all methods, and people who are working with these instruments must be taught the proper care and sterilization methods of each. For example, fiberoptic telescopes and light cables must never be autoclaved; ethylene oxide is the method of choice. Disinfectant is an alternative. Loops, sheaths, high-frequency cables, resectoscopes, and working elements should be sterilized by ethylene oxide. Loops and high-frequency cables should not be soaked in a disinfectant, but other instruments may be soaked. All instruments should be dried before sterilization. Too much emphasis cannot be placed on the importance of proper storage of these very fragile fiberoptic instruments. With proper care and sterilization, these instruments will need fewer repairs and function properly for a longer time. PMID:3407043

  2. Scientific Set of Instruments "Solar Cosmic Rays"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, S. N.; Bogomolov, A. V.; Galkin, V. I.; Denisov, Yu. I.; Podorolsky, A. N.; Ryumin, S. P.; Kudela, K.; Rojko, J.

    A set of scientific instruments SCR (Solar Cosmic Rays) was developed by the scientists of SINP MSU and IEP SAS in order to study relations between the radiation conditions in the near-Earth space and solar activity. This set of instruments was installed on board the satellites CORONAS-I and CORONAS-F launched to the orbit on March 2, 1994, and July 30, 2001, respectively. Detailed description of the instruments is presented.

  3. Operation and performance of the OSSE instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, R. A.; Kurfess, J. D.; Johnson, W. N.; Kinzer, R. L.; Kroeger, R. A.; Leising, M. D.; Murphy, R. J.; Share, G. H.; Strickman, M. S.; Grove, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    The Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) on the Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory is described. An overview of the operation and control of the instrument is given, together with a discussion of typical observing strategies used with OSSE and basic data types produced by the instrument. Some performance measures for the instrument are presented that were obtained from pre-launch and in-flight data. These include observing statistics, continuum and line sensitivity, and detector effective area and gain stability.

  4. Operation and performance of the OSSE instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, R. A.; Kurfess, J. D.; Johnson, W. N.; Kinzer, R. L.; Kroeger, R. A.; Leising, M. D.; Murphy, R. J.; Share, G. H.; Strickman, M. S.; Grove, J. E.

    1992-02-01

    The Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) on the Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory is described. An overview of the operation and control of the instrument is given, together with a discussion of typical observing strategies used with OSSE and basic data types produced by the instrument. Some performance measures for the instrument are presented that were obtained from pre-launch and in-flight data. These include observing statistics, continuum and line sensitivity, and detector effective area and gain stability.

  5. Instrument for automation of large diameter testing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1963-01-01

    1.Instruments based on the decimal system of readings have certain advantages as compared with other instruments: their design is simpler, they have a longer life, are economical and provide a simple transition to 0.01 mm readings.2.An instrument based on a decimal system of reading provides the most efficient and effective measurement of dimensions owing to the possibility of switching the

  6. Computational and experimental study of instrumented indentation

    E-print Network

    Chollacoop, Nuwong, 1977-

    2004-01-01

    The effect of characteristic length scales, through dimensional and microstructural miniaturizations, on mechanical properties is systematically investigated by recourse to instrumented micro- and/or nanoindentation. This ...

  7. Portable instrument for detection of illicit drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacson, Sabatino; Walker, H.; Chang, Allan; Siu, Tony; McNelles, L.; Uffe, M.

    1997-02-01

    A novel, portable instrument, model NDS-2000 for the detection of illicit drugs was developed. The instrument is based on surface ionization detection system, where ionization is carried out on a heated filament. Positive ions formed in the process are drifted to a collector and a signal is registered. The front-end of the instrument consists of an integral vacuum sampler with built-in desorber system for narcotic particles. The model NDS-2000 has an internal microprocessor and LCD display, as well as visible and audible alarm indicators. RS-232 port on the instrument provides communication to an external PC for data storage and printing.

  8. Rotary mode system initial instrument calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, B.R.

    1994-10-01

    The attached report contains the vendor calibration procedures used for the initial instrument calibration of the rotary core sampling equipment. The procedures are from approved vendor information files.

  9. Kids with disabilities inspire a musical instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, Dan; Pfeifer, Kent

    2013-11-21

    The Midiwing is a musical instrument that unites music and computer technology for those who lack the experience, physical ability, or maturity to play music with traditional instruments. To create the instrument, Dan Daily, Director of Musicode Innovations, reworked and recoded Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) technology and introduced ergonomic design. He applied to the New Mexico Small Business Assistance (NMSBA) Program to receive help when he discovered the microcontroller he used was being phased out. Daily and Kent Pfeifer, an engineer at Sandia National Laboratories and musician himself, partnered to create a new state-of-the-art design.

  10. Tablatures for Stringed Instruments and Generating Functions

    E-print Network

    Merlini, Donatella

    Tablatures for Stringed Instruments and Generating Functions Davide Baccherini, Donatella Merlini, [baccherini,merlini,sprugnoli]@dsi.unifi.it baccherini@gmail.com Abstract. We study some combinatorial

  11. Kids with disabilities inspire a musical instrument

    ScienceCinema

    Daily, Dan; Pfeifer, Kent

    2014-02-10

    The Midiwing is a musical instrument that unites music and computer technology for those who lack the experience, physical ability, or maturity to play music with traditional instruments. To create the instrument, Dan Daily, Director of Musicode Innovations, reworked and recoded Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) technology and introduced ergonomic design. He applied to the New Mexico Small Business Assistance (NMSBA) Program to receive help when he discovered the microcontroller he used was being phased out. Daily and Kent Pfeifer, an engineer at Sandia National Laboratories and musician himself, partnered to create a new state-of-the-art design.

  12. In the Spotlight: BioInstrumentation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ken-ichi Yamakoshi

    2010-01-01

    This paper discussed physiological measurement instrumentation for ambulatory\\/wearable physiological monitoring, cardio-pulmonary monitoring, activity monitoring, and biochemical monitoring. Future aspects also were discussed

  13. CICADA, CCD and Instrument Control Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Peter J.; Brooks, Mick; Meatheringham, Stephen J.; Roberts, William H.

    Computerised Instrument Control and Data Acquisition (CICADA) is a software system for control of telescope instruments in a distributed computing environment. It is designed using object-oriented techniques and built with standard computing tools such as RPC, SysV IPC, Posix threads, Tcl, and GUI builders. The system is readily extensible to new instruments and currently supports the Astromed 3200 CCD controller and MSSSO's new tip-tilt system. Work is currently underway to provide support for the SDSU CCD controller and MSSSO's Double Beam Spectrograph. A core set of processes handle common communication and control tasks, while specific instruments are ``bolted'' on using C++ inheritance techniques.

  14. Pinhole Calibrator For Particle-Sizing Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovenac, Edward

    1993-01-01

    Rotating-pinhole calibrator designed for use in calibrating and testing optical instrument measuring sizes of cloud droplets, dust particles, and other small particles suspended in flowing air. Easily attachable to particle-size-measuring instrument and suitable for both quick verification of calibration in field and detailed calibration studies in laboratory. Calibrator used to determine such operating parameters of instrument as optical collection angles, depth of field, profile of laser beam used to measure particles, and response to trajectory of particle. Also used to align instrument. Pinhole reused any number of times without risk of variation in diffraction pattern. Furthermore, size of pinhole chosen precisely and at will.

  15. New instruments for solar research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, David M.; O'Byrne, John W.; Sterner, Raymond E., II

    1990-01-01

    In fulfilment of its goal to develop early detection and warning of emerging solar magnetic fields, the Center for Applied Solar Physics (CASP) has designed and constructed a solar vector magnetograph (VMG) that will provide unique data on the sunspot regions where flares originate. The instrument is reportedly beginning to approach its goals of measuring all three components of the solar magnetic field with a sensitivity of 50 to 100 G and a spatial resolution on the sun of about 700 km (1 arcsec). Importance of new high-resolution capabilities is stressed and the interpretation of VMG measurements is discussed. The performance of the solar VMG, installed in a 6-m dome at the National Solar Observatory at Sacramento Peak in Sunspot, New Mexico, and its construction and environment are described; particular attention is given to the use and function of the filters. Initial results are examined, including a description and analysis of a magnetogram obtained after installation of an improved blocking filter.

  16. Lidar instruments proposed for Eos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.; Browell, Edward V.

    1990-01-01

    Lidar, an acronym for light detection and ranging, represents a class of instruments that utilize lasers to send probe beams into the atmosphere or onto the surface of the Earth and detect the backscattered return in order to measure properties of the atmosphere or surface. The associated technology has matured to the point where two lidar facilities, Geodynamics Laser Ranging System (GLRS), and Laser Atmospheric Wind Sensor (LAWS) were accepted for Phase 2 studies for Eos. A third lidar facility Laser Atmospheric Sounder and Altimeter (LASA), with the lidar experiment EAGLE (Eos Atmospheric Global Lidar Experiment) was proposed for Eos. The generic lidar system has a number of components. They include controlling electronics, laser transmitters, collimating optics, a receiving telescope, spectral filters, detectors, signal chain electronics, and a data system. Lidar systems that measure atmospheric constituents or meteorological parameters record the signal versus time as the beam propagates through the atmosphere. The backscatter arises from molecular (Rayleigh) and aerosol (Mie) scattering, while attenuation arises from molecular and aerosol scattering and absorption. Lidar systems that measure distance to the Earth's surface or retroreflectors in a ranging mode record signals with high temporal resolution over a short time period. The overall characteristics and measurements objectives of the three lidar systems proposed for Eos are given.

  17. Human pavlovian-instrumental transfer.

    PubMed

    Talmi, Deborah; Seymour, Ben; Dayan, Peter; Dolan, Raymond J

    2008-01-01

    The vigor with which a participant performs actions that produce valuable outcomes is subject to a complex set of motivational influences. Many of these are believed to involve the amygdala and the nucleus accumbens, which act as an interface between limbic and motor systems. One prominent class of influences is called pavlovian-instrumental transfer (PIT), in which the motivational characteristics of a predictor influence the vigor of an action with respect to which it is formally completely independent. We provide a demonstration of behavioral PIT in humans, with an audiovisual predictor of the noncontingent delivery of money inducing participants to perform more avidly an action involving squeezing a handgrip to earn money. Furthermore, using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we show that this enhanced motivation was associated with a trial-by-trial correlation with the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal in the nucleus accumbens and a subject-by-subject correlation with the BOLD signal in the amygdala. Our data dovetails well with the animal literature and sheds light on the neural control of vigor. PMID:18184778

  18. Surgical Instrument Restraint in Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Mark R.; Dawson, David L.; Melton, Shannon; Hooker, Dona; Cantu, Hilda

    2000-01-01

    Performing a surgical procedure during spaceflight will become more likely with longer duration missions in the near future. Minimal surgical capability has been present on previous missions as the definitive medical care time was short and the likelihood of surgical events too low to justify surgical hardware availability. Early demonstrations of surgical procedures in the weightlessness of parabolic flight indicated the need for careful logistical planning and restraint of surgical hardware. The consideration of human ergonomics also has more impact in weightlessness than in the conventionall-g environment. Three methods of surgical instrument restraint - a Minor Surgical Kit (MSK), a Surgical Restraint Scrub Suit (SRSS), and a Surgical Tray (ST) were evaluated in parabolic flight surgical procedures. The Minor Surgical Kit was easily stored, easily deployed, and demonstrated the best ability to facilitate a surgical procedure in weightlessness. Important factors in this surgical restraint system include excellent organization of supplies, ability to maintain sterility, accessibility while providing secure restraint, ability to dispose of sharp items and biological trash, and ergonomical efficiency.

  19. Biomagnetic Measurements Using SQUID Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rassi, D.; Zhuravlev, Y.

    2000-09-01

    Biomagnetic measurements involve the detection of the magnetic fields generated by physiological activity in living organisms. Because magnetic fields are sensed remotely, no physical contact with the subject is required, making the technique totally non-invasive Furthermore, only the magnetic fields originating within the body are measured. No external field is applied and it can therefore be confidently stated that the technique is completely safe. These characteristics make biomagnetometry an ideal tool for the investigation of physiological processes. The only magnetic field detector capable of measuring these extremely weak biomagnetic signals is the Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). In the last thirty years SQUID-based ultrasensitive magnetometers have been widely used in the investigation of physiologically produced magnetic fields for diagnostic purposes. Owing to the numerous sources of noise and interference typical of an urban environment, it has until recently been considered almost impossible to operate a SQUID magnetometer in such a location without magnetic shielding. We have overcome these technical problems and have successfully used our specially developed unshielded SQUID systems in laboratory and hospital environments. This instrumentation is suitable for recording the biomagnetic fields in adults, neonates and fetuses, and has been applied in a number of clinical studies including fetal magnetocardiography.

  20. Instrumentation, Control, and Intelligent Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-09-01

    Abundant and affordable energy is required for U.S. economic stability and national security. Advanced nuclear power plants offer the best near-term potential to generate abundant, affordable, and sustainable electricity and hydrogen without appreciable generation of greenhouse gases. To that end, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been charged with leading the revitalization of nuclear power in the U.S. The INL vision is to become the preeminent nuclear energy laboratory with synergistic, world-class, multi-program capabilities and partnerships by 2015. The vision focuses on four essential destinations: (1) Be the preeminent internationally-recognized nuclear energy research, development, and demonstration laboratory; (2) Be a major center for national security technology development and demonstration; (3) Be a multi-program national laboratory with world-class capabilities; (4) Foster academic, industry, government, and international collaborations to produce the needed investment, programs, and expertise. Crucial to that effort is the inclusion of research in advanced instrumentation, control, and intelligent systems (ICIS) for use in current and advanced power and energy security systems to enable increased performance, reliability, security, and safety. For nuclear energy plants, ICIS will extend the lifetime of power plant systems, increase performance and power output, and ensure reliable operation within the system's safety margin; for national security applications, ICIS will enable increased protection of our nation's critical infrastructure. In general, ICIS will cost-effectively increase performance for all energy security systems.

  1. Human Pavlovian–Instrumental Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Talmi, Deborah; Seymour, Ben; Dayan, Peter; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2009-01-01

    The vigor with which a participant performs actions that produce valuable outcomes is subject to a complex set of motivational influences. Many of these are believed to involve the amygdala and the nucleus accumbens, which act as an interface between limbic and motor systems. One prominent class of influences is called pavlovian–instrumental transfer (PIT), in which the motivational characteristics of a predictor influence the vigor of an action with respect to which it is formally completely independent. We provide a demonstration of behavioral PIT in humans, with an audiovisual predictor of the noncontingent delivery of money inducing participants to perform more avidly an action involving squeezing a handgrip to earn money. Furthermore, using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we show that this enhanced motivation was associated with a trial-by-trial correlation with the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal in the nucleus accumbens and a subject-by-subject correlation with the BOLD signal in the amygdala. Our data dovetails well with the animal literature and sheds light on the neural control of vigor. PMID:18184778

  2. LISA Pathfinder instrument data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, Felipe

    LISA Pathfinder (LPF) is an ESA-launched demonstration mission of key technologies required for the joint NASA-ESA gravitational wave observatory in space, LISA. As part of the LPF interferometry investigations, analytic models of noise sources and corresponding noise subtrac-tion techniques have been developed to correct for effects like the coupling of test mass jitter into displacement readout, and fluctuations of the laser frequency or optical pathlength difference. Ground testing of pre-flight hardware of the Optical Metrology Subsystem is currently ongoing at the Albert Einstein Institute Hannover. In collaboration with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, the LPF mission data analysis tool LTPDA is being used to analyze the data product of these tests. Furthermore, the noise subtraction techniques and in-flight experiment runs for noise characterization are being defined as part of the mission experiment master plan. We will present the data analysis outcome of pre-flight hardware ground tests and possible noise subtraction strategies for in-flight instrument operations.

  3. Comet coma sample return instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albee, A. L.; Brownlee, Don E.; Burnett, Donald S.; Tsou, Peter; Uesugi, K. T.

    1994-01-01

    The sample collection technology and instrument concept for the Sample of Comet Coma Earth Return Mission (SOCCER) are described. The scientific goals of this Flyby Sample Return are to return to coma dust and volatile samples from a known comet source, which will permit accurate elemental and isotopic measurements for thousands of individual solid particles and volatiles, detailed analysis of the dust structure, morphology, and mineralogy of the intact samples, and identification of the biogenic elements or compounds in the solid and volatile samples. Having these intact samples, morphologic, petrographic, and phase structural features can be determined. Information on dust particle size, shape, and density can be ascertained by analyzing penetration holes and tracks in the capture medium. Time and spatial data of dust capture will provide understanding of the flux dynamics of the coma and the jets. Additional information will include the identification of cosmic ray tracks in the cometary grains, which can provide a particle's process history and perhaps even the age of the comet. The measurements will be made with the same equipment used for studying micrometeorites for decades past; hence, the results can be directly compared without extrapolation or modification. The data will provide a powerful and direct technique for comparing the cometary samples with all known types of meteorites and interplanetary dust. This sample collection system will provide the first sample return from a specifically identified primitive body and will allow, for the first time, a direct method of matching meteoritic materials captured on Earth with known parent bodies.

  4. Magnetoresistive sensors for string instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenssen, K.-M. H.; Somers, G. H. J.; van Zon, J. B. A. D.

    2002-05-01

    Pickup elements for string instruments, in particular for electric guitars, represent a new application area for magnetoresistive sensors. Recently we developed a sensor configuration with permanent magnets for this purpose. For the first experiments we used commercial anisotropic magnetoresistance sensors (Philips KMZ10) mounted on small ferrite bias magnets. Recently we equipped an electric guitar with prototypes comprising giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors. These prototype MR pickup elements showed several clear advantages compared to the presently commonly used inductive pickup units. They are much less sensitive to disturbing electromagnetic fields (>1000×at 5 kHz), mainly because their active sensor area is several orders of magnitude smaller (a few mm2 instead of cm2). Also the larger freedom in the choice of the permanent magnets (due to the larger sensitivity of the GMR elements) is advantageous: employing smaller magnets reduces the damping and thus significantly improves the sustain, the magnets can be less expensive and more stable magnet materials can be chosen so that aging effects are eliminated.

  5. Aeronautic instruments. Section I : general classification of instruments and problems including bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersey, Mayo D

    1923-01-01

    This report is intended as a technical introduction to the series of reports on aeronautic instruments. It presents a discussion of those subjects which are common to all instruments. First, a general classification is given, embracing all types of instruments used in aeronautics. Finally, a classification is given of the various problems confronted by the instrument expert and investigator. In this way the following groups of problems are brought up for consideration: problems of mechanical design, human factor, manufacturing problems, supply and selection of instruments, problems concerning the technique of testing, problems of installation, problems concerning the use of instruments, problems of maintenance, and physical research problems. This enumeration of problems which are common to instruments in general serves to indicate the different points of view which should be kept in mind in approaching the study of any particular instrument.

  6. Instrumentation in Health Education and the Adolescent Health Risk Behavior Survey (AHRBS) Instrument 

    E-print Network

    Smith, Matthew L.

    2010-01-14

    the validity and reliability of data collected from 1,992 Indiana middle and high school students with the Adolescent Health Risk Behavior Survey (AHRBS) instrument. The AHRBS instrument was created using the Biopsychosocial Model (BPSM) theoretical framework...

  7. BIT: A Tool for Instrumenting Java Bytecodes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Han Bok Lee; Benjamin G. Zorn

    1997-01-01

    BIT (Bytecode Instrumenting Tool) is a collection of Java classes that allow one to build customized tools to instrument Java Virtual Machine (JVM) bytecodes. Because understanding program behavior is an essential part of developing effective optimization algorithms, researchers and software developers have built numerous tools that carry out program analysis. Although there are existing tools that analyze and modify executables

  8. Spinal Instrumentation With A Low Complication Rate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott A Shapiro; William Snyder

    1997-01-01

    BackgroundSpinal instrumentation has become an increasing part of the armamentarium of neurosurgery and neurosurgical training. For noncontroversial indications for spine fusion the arthrodesis rate seems to be better. For both noncontroversial and controversial indications, the reported complication rate with spinal instrumentation tends to be greater than that with noninstrumented spine surgeries. These reported complications include a 2–3% neurologic injury rate,

  9. Infrared Multispectral Imaging: Principles and Instrumentation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chieu D. Tran

    2003-01-01

    A multispectral imaging spectrometer is an instrument that can simultaneously record spectral and spatial information of a samples. Chemical and physical properties of the sample can be elucidated from such images. In a multispectral imaging instrument, a camera is used to record the spatial distribution of the sample, and the spectral information is gained by scanning a dispersive device to

  10. IMTC 2003 Instrumentation and Measurement Technology Conference

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the cost of systems, which own a relatively great number of instruments, and which therefore offer a wide analysis, Safety analysis, Automatic process control, Communications systems, Distributed Measurement. IIMTC 2003 ­ Instrumentation and Measurement Technology Conference Vail, CO, USA, 20-22 May 2003

  11. Lasso Methods for Gaussian Instrumental Variables Models

    E-print Network

    Belloni, Alexandre

    2011-02-25

    In this note, we propose the use of sparse methods (e.g., LASSO, Post-LASSO, p LASSO, and Post-p LASSO) to form first-stage predictions and estimate optimal instruments in linear instrumental variables (IV) models with ...

  12. Spaceborne imaging radar-C instrument

    Microsoft Academic Search

    BRYAN L. HUNEYCUTT

    1989-01-01

    The Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR)-C instrument has been designed to obtain simultaneous multifrequency and simultaneous multipolarization radar images from a low Earth orbit. It is a multiparameter imaging radar that will be flown during two different seasons. The instrument has been designed to operate in innovative modes such as the squint mode, the extended aperture mode, and the scansar mode,

  13. 32 CFR 22.610 - Award instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Award instruments. 22.610 Section 22.610 National...AGREEMENT REGULATIONS DoD GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS-AWARD AND ADMINISTRATION Award § 22.610 Award instruments. (a)...

  14. The Treatment Validity of Autism Screening Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livanis, Andrew; Mouzakitis, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Treatment validity is a frequently neglected topic of screening instruments used to identify autism spectrum disorders. Treatment validity, however, should represent an important aspect of these instruments to link the resulting data to the selection of interventions as well as make decisions about treatment length and intensity. Research…

  15. The Trumpet, Cornet, and Related Instruments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    th century a long, metal straight trumpet, called the buisine was in common use. For the next several centuries brass trumpets retained the basic playing properties of this early instrument, although they were made in several different shapes. Since keys and valves were not yet invented for brass instruments, these trumpets could only play in a single key, on a

  16. Advances in fiber optic Raman instrumentation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin L. Davis; James M. Tedesco; Jeremy M. Shaver

    1999-01-01

    The analytical potential for routine Raman analyses has promoted the development of class 1 instruments configured for analytical laboratory use. A particular topic of interest regarding these systems for the biomedical and pharmaceutical fields is calibration standardization. Widespread acceptance of Raman spectroscopy in regulated industries requires automated, reliable, traceable instrument calibration. Key dispersive Raman analyzer elements that require calibration include

  17. SOFIE instrument model and performance comparison

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott Hansen; Andrew Shumway; Chad Fish; Jim Peterson; Peter Mace; James Cook; Joel Nelsen; Dale Hooper; Quinn Young; Steve Wassom; John Kemp; Larry Gordley; Mark Hervig

    2006-01-01

    Space Dynamics Laboratory (SDL), in partnership with GATS, Inc., designed, built, and calibrated an instrument to conduct the Solar Occultation for Ice Experiment (SOFIE). SOFIE is the primary infrared sensor in the NASA Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) instrument suite. AIM's mission is to study polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs). SOFIE will make measurements in 16 separate spectral bands,

  18. Jet-driven instruments and the edgetone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. E. Rauch

    1975-01-01

    On the basis of observations due to Coltman and Powell a simplified (linear, small, signal) model of jet action in jet-driven instruments and the edgetone is presented. The model leads, by means of an elementary phase analysis, to very simple and intuitive pictures of the feedback models of Powell and Cremer and Ising. For jet-driven instruments the sole demand that

  19. Internal Borders as Naturalized Political Instruments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wayne Fife

    2010-01-01

    This article explores how internal borders can become naturalized political instruments that are heavily implicated in the extension of state control over rural populations and rural landscapes. It shows how seemingly innocuous instruments such as national parks and hunting and sport fishing regulations can be utilized to create essentialist ecological arguments for the extension of class and urban-based centers of

  20. METEOROLOGY 163: Meteorological Instrumentation Course Description

    E-print Network

    Clements, Craig

    with upper-air sounding techniques, remote sensing instruments such as SODAR and Radar, air-quality gas 2001. 2. CR1000 datalogger manual (PDF version, www.campbellsci.com) 3. Supplemental readings Lectures that is not included in the text book, i.e., instrument manuals, etc. San José State University Spring 2013 DH 614/ DH

  1. Instrumented impact testing at high velocities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Delfosse; Gilles Pageau; Roger Bennett; Anoush Poursartip

    1993-01-01

    Impact loading of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic CFRP) aircraft parts is a major concern. Birds or hailstones striking an aircraft generally have a low mass and a high velocity, whereas typically instrumented impact experiments are performed with a high mass and a low velocity. Our aim has been to build an instrumented impact facility with a low-mass projectile capable of simulating

  2. PORTABLE MULTISPECTRAL IMAGING INSTRUMENT FOR FOOD INDUSTRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this paper is to design and fabricate a hand-held multispectral instrument for real-time contaminant detection. Specifically, the protocol to develop a portable multispectral instrument including optical sensor design, fabrication, calibration, data collection, analysis and algorith...

  3. Practical Aspects of Prototyping Instrument Clusters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Green; Alan Olson

    This paper describes an ongoing effort to develop computer-simulated instrumentation for the UMTRI Driver Interface Research Simulator. The speedometer, tachometer, engine and fuel gauges, along with warning lights are back projected onto a screen in front of the driver. The image is generated by a Macintosh running LabVIEW. Simulated instrumentation (instead of a production cluster) was provided so that new

  4. Needed: Instruments as Good as Our Eyes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brickell, Henry M.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluators use their eyes to see what is there, whether it is intended or not. But they use their test instruments to measure what is intended, whether it is there or not. Evaluators have been broadening their repertoire of instruments for years: curriculum-embedded tests, observer checklists, audiotape recorders, videotape recorders, unobtrusive…

  5. Adjustable two-axis instrument mount

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William H. Nedderman

    1994-01-01

    A two-axis adjustable instrument mount having a fixed base plate, an intermediate plate, and an instrument mount plate is disclosed. The intermediate plate is attached to the base plate by a three-point mount in the shape of an isosceles triangle. The two mounting points corresponding to the base of the triangle include hinge flex plates fixed to the base plate

  6. Instrumentation for interstellar exploration Mike Gruntman *

    E-print Network

    Gruntman, Mike

    mission into interstellar space and outline constraints on the instrumentation. Measurement of particles; Instrumentation; Interstellar probe mission 1. First step into interstellar space Our first step into the galactic Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1191, USA Received 1 December 2002

  7. The Shiva target alignment and viewing instrument

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Monjes; K. R. Manes; W. C. Oneal; F. Rienecker

    1978-01-01

    To view and align Shiva laser targets, two new telemicroscopic instruments integral with TV camera and He-Ne laser illuminator have been designed. The common requirement of both instruments is the capability of imaging two objects of different sizes on a TV screen: the large surrogate target (5 mm diameter) and the laser fusion target (0.250 mm diameter) with the same

  8. Selected Instrumentation Films, 1969-1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Raymond L., Ed.

    This list of currently available films and filmstrips pertinent to instrumentation has been compiled from information solicited from many government and private sources. The 1969 compilation has been organized into the following eight categories: (1) principles of measurement and basic measurements; (2) analysis instrumentation; (3) automation and…

  9. Virtual instrumentation for test, control, and design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Berger

    2008-01-01

    Virtual instrumentation has been widely adopted in test and measurement areas. It has gradually increased addressable applications through continuous LabVIEW innovation and hundreds of measurement hardware devices. Today, National Instruments is leading the charge to expand this technology to the control and design sectors. The benefits that have accelerated test development are beginning to accelerate control and design. Engineers and

  10. 305 Stimulus Isolator WORLD PRECISION INSTRUMENTS 1

    E-print Network

    Kleinfeld, David

    , 67 1/2V or equivalent #12;305 Stimulus Isolator WORLD PRECISION INSTRUMENTS 3 Operation Connect305 Stimulus Isolator WORLD PRECISION INSTRUMENTS 1 Description The Model 305 Stimulus Isolator Dual Stimulus Isolator. The outputs of two units can be combined to produce bipolar and other complex

  11. A laser tracking dynamic robot metrology instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, G. A.; Mayer, J. R. R.

    1989-01-01

    Research work over several years has resulted in the development of a laser tracking instrument capable of dynamic 3-D measurements of robot end-effector trajectories. The instrument characteristics and experiments to measure the static and dynamic performance of a robot in an industrial manufacturing environment are described. The use of this technology for space applications is examined.

  12. Instrumental variable methods for ARMA spectral estimation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Friedlander

    1983-01-01

    The modified Yule-Walker technique of ARMA spectral estimation is shown to be a special case of the instrumental variable method of system identification. Several recursive instrumental variable algorithms are proposed for adaptive spectral estimation, including a new algorithm for the overdetermined case. An efficient lattice algorithm is presented for solving the modified Yule-Walker equations, given the sample correlation coefficients. The

  13. Study of high speed photography measuring instrument

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhijun Zhang; Jiyu Sun; Keyong Wu

    2007-01-01

    High speed photograph measuring instrument is mainly used to measure and track the exterior ballistics, which can measure the flying position of the missile in the initial phase and trajectory. A new high speed photograph measuring instrument is presented in this paper. High speed photography measuring system records the parameters of object real-time, and then acquires the flying position and

  14. The NGST Science Instrument Procurement Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NGST Project Office Team

    1999-05-01

    The NGST will carry approximately 3 science instruments (SI) that together enable the wide field imaging and spectroscopic capability needed to perform the Design Reference Mission (http://www.ngst.nasa.gov/science/drm.html). The NGST telescope will permit these instruments to achieve Zodiacal light limited sensitivity over a wavelength range of 0.6 - 10+ microns. During April 2000, responsibility to provide these instruments will be allocated among the NGST partner agencies: NASA, ESA, and CSA. Instruments allocated to NASA will be solicited via a NASA Announcement of Opportunity (AO) during June 2001. This AO will be open to university, government, and industry scientists. At the present time, 11 science instrument concept studies are being conducted by US, European, and Canadian teams. Final results from these 1 year studies will be presented at the NGST Science and Technology Exposition at Woods Hole MA during September 1999 (http://ngst.gsfc.nasa.gov/science/meetings/WHannouncement.html). It is not necessary to have participated in these pre-Phase A activities in order to answer the up coming instrument technologies NRA or the flight instrument AO. In this poster, we present the process by which SI concepts will be allocated among NASA, ESA, and CSA prior to the AO solicitation as well as top level time lines for instrument acquisition and development.

  15. An Analysis of Selected Skinfold Measuring Instruments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Jerald D.

    1983-01-01

    The performance of three relatively inexpensive skinfold calipers were compared with that of the Lange Skinfold Caliper. The instruments were used with 800 students ranging from elementary school to the college level. The Fat-O-Meter and Adipometer calipers compared favorably with the Lange instrument for accuracy and wearability while the…

  16. Computer-Aided Instruction in Automated Instrumentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, David T.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses functions of automated instrumentation systems, i.e., systems which combine electrical measuring instruments and a controlling computer to measure responses of a unit under test. The computer-assisted tutorial then described is programmed for use on such a system--a modern microwave spectrum analyzer--to introduce engineering students to…

  17. GSM MOBILE PHONE IN DISTRIBUTED VIRTUAL INSTRUMENTATION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Winiecki; A. Kuran; R. ?ukaszewski

    Remote, wireless controlling of distributed virtual instrument (DVI) using GSM mobile phones is considered. Interactive WAP service is applied to configure measuring system, to control measurement process and to access to measurement data. The service is based on ASP technology and dynamic databases. National Instruments PC-1200 DAQ card, programmed with LabVIEW, was applied to design a wireless DVI (WDVI).

  18. ANALYTICAL INSTRUMENT SAFETY Many labs use intricate analytical instrumentation to perform parts of their

    E-print Network

    Slatton, Clint

    ANALYTICAL INSTRUMENT SAFETY Many labs use intricate analytical instrumentation to perform parts of their experiments. Although each type of instrument will have its own specific safety information, there are some system when working in the lab to ensure your safety should an accident occur. #12;

  19. [Myofunction in players of wind instruments].

    PubMed

    Methfessel, G

    1990-07-01

    Within the framework of a longitudinal study, tongue function was examined for maximum pressure, force/time ratio and motility with the aid of a force, pressure and impulse transducer in 181 pupils playing wind instruments and 120 control persons. The methods designed for this purpose provided a reproduction of tongue performance during the act of blowing a wind instrument. The results of this study show statistically significant differences between persons who play wind instruments and those who do not and players of other types of instruments. The data derived from these results permit statements about the degree of muscular malfunction among players of wind instruments. Furthermore, they are helpful in the assessment of therapeutic success or failure. PMID:2269152

  20. The nonlinear physics of musical instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, N. H.

    1999-05-01

    Musical instruments are often thought of as linear harmonic systems, and a first-order description of their operation can indeed be given on this basis, once we recognise a few inharmonic exceptions such as drums and bells. A closer examination, however, shows that the reality is very different from this. Sustained-tone instruments, such as violins, flutes and trumpets, have resonators that are only approximately harmonic, and their operation and harmonic sound spectrum both rely upon the extreme nonlinearity of their driving mechanisms. Such instruments might be described as `essentially nonlinear'. In impulsively excited instruments, such as pianos, guitars, gongs and cymbals, however, the nonlinearity is `incidental', although it may produce striking aural results, including transitions to chaotic behaviour. This paper reviews the basic physics of a wide variety of musical instruments and investigates the role of nonlinearity in their operation.

  1. Means for Positioning and Repositioning Scanning Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polites, Michael E. (Inventor); Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A method is presented for positioning a scanning instrument to point toward the center of the desired scan wherein the scan is achieved by rotating unbalanced masses (RUMs) rotating about fixed axes of rotation relative to and associated with the instrument, the RUMs being supported on drive shafts spaced from the center of the mass of the instrument and rotating 180 degrees out-of-phase with each other and in planes parallel to each other to achieve the scan. The elevation and cross-elevation angles of the instrument are sensed to determine any offset and offset time rate-of-change, and the magnitude and direction are converted to a RUM cycle angular velocity component to be superimposed on the nominal velocity of the RUMs. This RUM angular velocity component modulates the RUM angular velocity to cause the speed of the RUMs to increase and decrease during each revolution to drive the instrument toward the desired center of the scan.

  2. Intonation and Compensation of Fretted String Instruments

    E-print Network

    Varieschi, Gabriele U

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present mathematical models and we analyze the physics related to the problem of intonation of musical instruments such as guitars, mandolins and similar, i.e., we study how to produce perfectly in tune notes on these instruments. This analysis begins with the correct fret placement on the instrument fingerboard, following precise mathematical laws, but then it becomes increasingly complicated due to the geometrical deformation of the strings when these instruments are played, and also due to the inharmonic characteristics of the same strings. As a consequence of these factors, perfect intonation of all the notes on the instrument can never be achieved, but complex compensation procedures are introduced and studied to minimize the problem. To test the validity of these compensation procedures, we have performed extensive measurements using standard monochord sonometers and other basic acoustical devices, which confirm the correctness of our theoretical models. In particular, these experimenta...

  3. [What's new in instrumental dermatology?].

    PubMed

    Amici, J-M

    2014-12-01

    This "What's new in instrumental dermatology" focuses on cutaneous oncologic surgery, base on a review of the 2012-2014 literature. First, the ability of dermatologists to make a good "oncologic reading of tumors" is the key of radical surgical treatment. Advantages and disadvantages of the biopsy are discussed. Then, the second message is the management of anticoagulants, that should not be interrupted for skin surgery. Despite recommendations, this practice is not followed in 40% of cases; this point is critical because bleeding complications are minor compared to potential morbidity of thrombotic events when stopping these medications. Regarding infection, nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus is identified as a risk factor for wound infection. A preoperative shower with chlorhexidine and mupirocin topical decolonization of nostril reduces this risk. Surgical techniques are trying to reach minimalism, by reducing undermining and scarring. On the trunk, using deep slow resorbable sutures improve scarring. In addition using adhesive sutures (strip) reduce the wideness of scar. On the face, the lower third of the nose is the most challenging because of the free edges, which are deformable. In this location bilobed or trilobed transposition flap offer the advantage of remaining in the nasal aesthetic unit and not disturbing the free edges of the nasal orifices. Regarding scarring, early hypertrophic scar is now well defined and linked with transposition flaps of the nasal region. An early treatment with intralesional corticosteroid injection appears to be effective. Finally, the biological mechanism of the effectiveness of compression in the prevention and treatment of dystrophic scar is now clear. The mechanotransduction explain how a mechanical stress of the skin activates biological cell pathways, which regulate the quality of collagen synthesis and the arrangement of skin fibrosis. PMID:25539752

  4. Images from Phoenix's MECA Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The image on the upper left is from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Optical Microscope after a sample informally called 'Sorceress' was delivered to its silicon substrate on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008).

    A 3D representation of the same sample is on the right, as seen by Phoenix's Atomic Force Microscope. This is 200 times greater magnification than the view from the Optical Microscope, and the most highly magnified image ever seen from another world.

    The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate, which is the background plane shown in red. This image has been processed to reflect the levelness of the substrate.

    A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit.

    The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The Optical Microscope and the Atomic Force Microscope are part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer instrument.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  5. [Centenarians in the county of Funen. Morbidity and functional capacity].

    PubMed

    Olsen, H; Jeune, B; Andersen-Ranberg, K

    1996-12-16

    The aim was to examine the feasibility of a study of centenarians and to describe morbidity and functional capacity of centenarians in the County of Funen. A total of 51 out of 58 centenarians on Funen born on May 1, 1894 or before participated. An interview could be carried out almost completely in 80.4% of the 51 participants, cognitive testing (MMSE) in 78.4% and physical performance test (PPT) in 49%. Additional information on morbidity and activities of daily living (ADL) was collected on all 51 centenarians from family members, nursing staff, GP's, hospital registries and the National Cancer Registry. Almost 3/4 were women and 58.8% were in an old people's home. Osteoarthrosis, urinary incontinence, heart failure, dizziness and eye diseases were found to be frequently prevalent, while hypertension, diabetes, cancer and stroke were found to be rare. Based on Katz' ADL index approx. 1/3 could be considered to be independent of help, while almost everybody was dependent on help for the instrumental activities (IADL). A low average score was found at the PPT, especially the walking speed was found to be very slow. Only 32.5% scored over 23 points at the MMSE, but allowing for severe impairment of vision and hearing more than 1/3 were found to be cognitively well-functioning. Severe dementia was found among 15.7%. Dependency on help for the ADL-functions was not found to be associated with health measurement, but strongly associated with visual function, PPT and MMSE (p < 0.001). The characterization of centenarians as described in a number of foreign studies as being an homogeneous, relatively healthy and independent group could therefore not be confirmed. On the contrary, they were found to be very heterogeneous and characterized by multi-morbidity. By far the great part of them were in addition dependent on help in their activities of daily life. Approx. 1/3, however, were found to be relatively independent of help for basic functions, more than 1/3 were cognitively well-functioning, and a very small number could even manage a few outdoor functions by themselves. PMID:9012057

  6. Advanced Instrumentation for Extreme Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Melin, Alexander M [ORNL; Kisner, Roger [ORNL; Fugate, David L [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) is pursuing embedded instrumentation and controls (I&C) technology for next generation nuclear power generation applications. Embedded systems encompass a wide range of configurations and technologies; we define embedding in this instance as the integration of the sensors and the control system design into the component design using a systems engineering process. Embedded I&C systems are often an essential part of developing new capabilities, improving reliability, enhancing performance, and reducing operational costs. The new intrinsically safe, more efficient, and cost effective reactor technologies (Next Generation Nuclear Plant and Small Modular Reactors) require the development and application of new I&C technologies. These new designs raise extreme environmental challenges such as high temperatures (over 700 C) and material compatibility (e.g., molten salts). The desired reliability and functionality requires measurements in these extreme conditions including high radiation environments which were not previously monitored in real time. The DOE/NE Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program currently has several projects investigating I&C technologies necessary to make these reactor designs realizable. The project described in this paper has the specific goal of investigating embedded I&C with the following objectives: 1.Explore and quantify the potential gains from embedded I&C improved reliability, increased performance, and reduced cost 2.Identify practical control, sensing, and measurement techniques for the extreme environments found in high-temperature reactors 3.Design and fabricate a functional prototype high-temperature cooling pump for molten salts represents target demonstration of improved performance, reliability, and widespread usage There are many engineering challenges in the design of a high-temperature liquid salt cooling pump. The pump and motor are in direct contact with molten fluoride salt at 700 C (1,292 F) as part of a reactor cooling loop. The motor-pump combination during normal operation would be red-hot (Figure 1). This environment challenges every facet of the design including seals, wiring, magnetic materials, and sensors. In this paper, we discuss the challenges of sensor design in extreme environments and specifically the sensor design for a high-temperature fluoride salt coolant pump. This pump will be used as a test-bed for embedded I&C development and validation in extreme environments.

  7. Instrumentation and Evaluation of Distributed Computations

    E-print Network

    Dinkel, William

    2013-08-31

    use the Data Streams Kernel Interface (DSKI) and User Interface (DSUI) to instrument both the kernel and user code. These interfaces allow run-time enabling of desired trace events and log the data to memory buffers during the experiment. They also... and with the buffering disabled. 3.2 Instrumentation The Data Stream Kernel and User Interface (DSKI and DSUI) are subsystems that support gathering system behavioral data from instrumentation points [21]. These points are 13 macros inserted into the kernel and user...

  8. Safe storage times for sterile instrument packs.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, R S; Butt, W E; Bradley, D V; Mayhew, R B

    1992-08-01

    Military health care facilities are required to place expiration dates on sterile instrument packs. There are few scientific guidelines for determining these dates. This article reports the findings of two studies conducted at Wilford Hall USAF Medical Center, which investigated the potential shelf-life of three packaging materials for sterile instruments. The results of the studies indicate that sterility is maintained for at least 1 year with all three materials. The maximum storage times allowed for sterile instruments at most military facilities appear to be overly restrictive. PMID:1528486

  9. Implant maintenance using a modified ultrasonic instrument.

    PubMed

    Kwan, J Y; Zablotsky, M H; Meffert, R M

    1990-01-01

    With the increasing number of implants in place, oral hygiene and maintenance are imperative because implants are susceptible to plaque accumulation and calculus formation. This case study evaluated a modification of the common ultrasonic tip to remove calcified deposits on implant abutments and prostheses, and also evaluated ultrastructural changes on polished titanium. A modified "plastic" ultrasonic instrument was found to be clinically effective and efficient. This instrument, unlike a metal ultrasonic tip on an ultrastructural level, produced no irreversible changes on the evaluated commercially pure titanium test strip. The preliminary results of this modification of an ultrasonic instrument show promise for its use as an implant maintenance modality. PMID:2098488

  10. Role of instrumentation in UCG process development

    SciTech Connect

    Hommert, P.J.

    1982-09-01

    Underground coal gasification field test results obtained since 1976 are reviewed, illustrating the important role that the UCG process feature of a varying reactor geometry has on resource recovery and gas quality. The different instrumentation used on these tests is then reviewed, particularly as to its effectiveness or lack of in defining process geometry. Instrumentation such as thermocouples, HFEM, acoustic and surface resistivity are discussed with respect to concept, cost, resolution, data acquisition and data analysis. Results indicate that when instrumentation is appropriately deployed it can provide significant insight into the dynamics of reactor growth.

  11. Development of the physician satisfaction survey instrument.

    PubMed

    Soo Hoo, W E; Ramer, L

    1998-01-01

    Continuous quality improvement (CQI) activities depend on valid and reliable instruments to generate data. An evaluation of internal and external customer satisfaction is one of the pillars of the CQI process. This article describes the development of a valid and reliable instrument for measuring physicians' satisfaction with the orthopedic nursing units at a major medical trauma center. The physician satisfaction survey instrument was found to be internally consistent (alpha = .95). Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that 68% of the variance in physician satisfaction scores (eigenvalue = 8.14) was explained by using a single-factor model. PMID:10181899

  12. Isotopic CO2 Instrumentation for UAV Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, A.; Silver, J.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide is the largest component of anthroprogenic green house gas emissions. Knowing atmospheric 13CO2/12CO2 ratios precisely is important for understanding biogenic and anthroprogenic sources and sinks for carbon. Instrumentation mounted on UAV aircraft would enable important spatial isotopic CO2 information. However, current isotopic CO2 instrumentation have unfavorable attributes for UAV use, such as high power requirements, high cost, high weight, and large size. Here we present the early development of a compact isotopic CO2 instrument that is designed to nullify effects of pressure, temperature and moisture, and will ultimately be suitable for UAV deployment.

  13. Instrumentation for Aerosol and Gas Speciation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coggiola, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Using support from NASA Grant No. NAG 2-963, SRI International successfully completed the project, entitled, 'Instrumentation for Aerosol and Gas Speciation.' This effort (SRI Project 7383) covered the design, fabrication, testing, and deployment of a real-time aerosol speciation instrument in NASA's DC-8 aircraft during the Spring 1996 SUbsonic aircraft: Contrail and Cloud Effects Special Study (SUCCESS) mission. This final technical report describes the pertinent details of the instrument design, its abilities, its deployment during SUCCESS and the data acquired from the mission, and the post-mission calibration, data reduction, and analysis.

  14. A Guide to Medieval and Renaissance Instruments

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Musica Antiqua.

    Musica Antiqua, a group of musicians based at Iowa State University who recreate the music of the Renaissance and Middle Ages, have created a web page that showcases their large collection of 12th to 17th century replica instruments. At this site, users can view pictures and descriptions of the Hurdy-Gurdy, Dulcian, Rebec, Recorder, Crumhorn, and many other lesser and better known old instruments. Descriptions of each instrument include a history, construction, and how they are played. In addition, most include a short bibliography and a recorded sample in .wav format.

  15. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - February 2008

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  16. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - March 2008

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  17. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - October – November 2007

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2007-11-30

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) SBIR instrument development.

  18. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future June 2007

    SciTech Connect

    JC Liljegren

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  19. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - September – October 2007

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2007-10-30

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) SBIR instrument development.

  20. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future July 2007

    SciTech Connect

    JC Liljegren

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of ACRF instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) SBIR instrument development.

  1. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - November – December 2007

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  2. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future January 2007

    SciTech Connect

    JC Liljegren

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  3. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future October 2006

    SciTech Connect

    JC Liljegren

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  4. Virtual instrumentation: a survey of standards and their interrelation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. J. W. Spoelder; A. H. Ullings; F. C. A. Groen

    1997-01-01

    Many standards exist in the field of instrumentation. The ever increasing scale of integration of processing power with instrumentation has opened ways to extend and transform the functionality of instruments in software, i.e. create a virtual instrument. Controlling and standardizing this virtual instrument requires a multi-level definition. In this paper we review some of the most relevant developments in this

  5. Aquarius Instrument and Salinity Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    Aquarius has been designed to map the surface salinity field of the global ocean from space a parameter important for understanding ocean circulation and its relationship to climate and the global water cycle. Salinity is measured remotely from space by measuring the thermal emission from the ocean surface. This is done at the low frequency end of the microwave spectrum (e.g. 1.4 GHz) where the emission is sufficiently sensitive to changes in salinity to be detected with sophisticated radiometers. The goal is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean by providing maps on a monthly basis with a spatial resolution of 150 km and an accuracy of 0.2 psu. These are challenging requirements that have led to some unique features of the instrument. These include: a) The addition of a co-located scatterometer to help provide a correction for roughness; b) The addition of a polarimetric channel (third Stokes parameter) to the radiometer to help correct for Faraday rotation; c) Asun-synchronous orbit with a 6 pm ascending equatorial crossing to minimize Faraday rotation and with the antennas looking away from the sun toward the nighttime side to minimize contamination by radiation from the sun; and d) An antenna designed to limit side lobes in the direction of rays from the sun. In addition, achieving the accuracy goal of 0.2 psu requires averaging over one month and to do this requires a highly stable radiometer. Aquarius has three separate radiometers that image in pushbroom fashion with the three antenna beams looking across track. The antenna is a 2.5-m diameter, offset parabolic reflector with three feed horns and the three beams are arranged to image with the boresight aligned to look across track, roughly perpendicular to the spacecraft heading and pointing away from the Sun. The three beams point at angles of theta = 25.8 deg., 33.8 deg. and 40.3 deg. with respect to the spacecraft nadir which correspond to local incidence angles at the surface of 28.7 deg., 37.8 deg. and 45.6 deg., respectively. The resolution of the three radiometer beams (axes of the 3dB ellipse) is: 76 x 94 km for the inner beam, 84 x 120 km for the middle beam to 96 x 156 km for the outer beam. Together they cover a swath of about 390 km. Aquarius will map the global ice-free ocean every 7-days from which monthly average composites will be derived. This will provide a snapshot of the mean field, as well as resolving the seasonal to interannual variations over the three-year baseline of the mission.

  6. Surgical instrument similarity metrics and tray analysis for multi-sensor instrument identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Bernhard; Schellenberg, Tobias; Franke, Stefan; Dänzer, Stefan; Neumuth, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    A robust identification of the instrument currently used by the surgeon is crucial for the automatic modeling and analysis of surgical procedures. Various approaches for intra-operative surgical instrument identification have been presented, mostly based on radio-frequency identification (RFID) or endoscopic video analysis. A novel approach is to identify the instruments on the instrument table of the scrub nurse with a combination of video and weight information. In a previous article, we successfully followed this approach and applied it to multiple instances of an ear, nose and throat (ENT) procedure and the surgical tray used therein. In this article, we present a metric for the suitability of the instruments of a surgical tray for identification by video and weight analysis and apply it to twelve trays of four different surgical domains (abdominal surgery, neurosurgery, orthopedics and urology). The used trays were digitized at the central sterile services department of the hospital. The results illustrate that surgical trays differ in their suitability for the approach. In general, additional weight information can significantly contribute to the successful identification of surgical instruments. Additionally, for ten different surgical instruments, ten exemplars of each instrument were tested for their weight differences. The samples indicate high weight variability in instruments with identical brand and model number. The results present a new metric for approaches aiming towards intra-operative surgical instrument detection and imply consequences for algorithms exploiting video and weight information for identification purposes.

  7. NASA-Langley helicopter tower instrumentation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoffel, S. W.

    1974-01-01

    Background information is presented for the helicopter rotor test facility, in preface to a more detailed discussion of major subsystems equipment, including error considerations, frequency response, and display instrumentation.

  8. An Innovative Universal Screw Removal Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Elmada?, Mehmet; Uzer, Gökçer; Acar, Mehmet Ali

    2015-01-01

    Objective To present the clinical benefits of an instrument designed to facilitate removal of polyaxial screws during revision surgery. Methods All polyaxial screws can be removed without additional materials or a large amount of debridement using our newly designed instrument. Forty-two screws were removed from five patients without any complications using this instrument. Results We removed the cap screws and rods from the 42 polyaxial screws in five patients and made them monoaxial using the new screw removal apparatus. The screws and rods were removed quickly in a minimally invasive way with no complications. No damage to the pedicle or surrounding soft tissue occurred during screw removal. No neurogenic changes developed during revision surgery after changing the screws. Conclusion This newly designed screw removal instrument was used safely and effectively to remove all polyaxial and monoaxial pedicle screws. PMID:25883660

  9. Continuing Education Instrumentation Training in Clinical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBlanc, Jacqueline; Frankel, Saundra

    1980-01-01

    Describes the continuing education program for clinical chemistry instrumentation training established at The College of Staten Island, New York. A course consisting of 14 sessions is outlined and discussed. (CS)

  10. Support of cooled components in astronomical instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, P. R.; Montgomery, D. M.

    The methods used at the Royal Observatory Edinburgh (ROE) for supporting cooled components in astronomical instruments are described. Support methods and materials are detailed and compared. Thermal compensation of truss structures is described. Specimen design calculations are appended.

  11. The durability of ceramic coated dental instruments.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, R D; Robinson, P B; Rogers, P S

    1995-09-01

    This study investigates the hardness, structure, composition, and thickness of coatings on two dental instruments and the changes which occurred when the instruments were subjected to conditions that closely match their clinical use. One group of instruments had a titanium nitride coating that was approximately 8 micrometers thick and had a hardness of 19.5 GN/m2. The coating on the other instrument was alumina (aluminium oxide) and contained some microcracks even when new; this coating was thicker (approximately 30 micrometers) and had a hardness less than the titanium nitride coating (15.8 GN/m2). The results showed that the titanium nitride coating was structurally superior compared with the aluminium oxide coating. Laboratory wear tests against composite resin showed that the wear resistance of titanium nitride was superior to that of stainless steel whether assessed in terms of weight or volume loss. PMID:8603162

  12. Magnifying absolute instruments for optically homogeneous regions

    SciTech Connect

    Tyc, Tomas [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, CZ-61 137 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2011-09-15

    We propose a class of magnifying absolute optical instruments with a positive isotropic refractive index. They create magnified stigmatic images, either virtual or real, of optically homogeneous three-dimensional spatial regions within geometrical optics.

  13. NONDESTRUCTIVE MULTIELEMENT INSTRUMENTAL NEUTRON ACTIVATION ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A nondestructive instrumental neutron activation analysis procedure permitted accurate and sensitive measurement of most elements with atomic numbers between 11 and 92. The sensitivity of the procedure was dependent on each element's intrinsic characteristics and the sample matri...

  14. PRINCIPLES OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS Spring 2012

    E-print Network

    Sharp, Kim

    method: Lectures are conversational in nature, encouraging discussion and analysis. Emphasis on globally, sensitivity. Why distrust answers? Illustrations. Liebman #12;2 Instrument functional blocks. Transducers, amplifiers, sensitivity, speed. Electricity, time. 3 Electrodiffusion. Electrodes, capacitance, stability

  15. Management Approach for Earth Venture Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hope, Diane L.; Dutta, Sanghamitra

    2013-01-01

    The Earth Venture Instrument (EVI) element of the Earth Venture Program calls for developing instruments for participation on a NASA-arranged spaceflight mission of opportunity to conduct innovative, integrated, hypothesis or scientific question-driven approaches to pressing Earth system science issues. This paper discusses the EVI element and the management approach being used to manage both an instrument development activity as well as the host accommodations activity. In particular the focus will be on the approach being used for the first EVI (EVI-1) selected instrument, Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO), which will be hosted on a commercial GEO satellite and some of the challenges encountered to date and corresponding mitigations that are associated with the management structure for the TEMPO Mission and the architecture of EVI.

  16. Optimization of naïve dynamic binary instrumentation Tools/

    E-print Network

    Kleckner, Reid (Reid N.)

    2011-01-01

    The proliferation of dynamic program analysis tools has done much to ease the burden of developing complex software. However, creating such tools remains a challenge. Dynamic binary instrumentation frameworks such as ...

  17. CICADA -- Configurable Instrument Control and Data Acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Peter J.; Roberts, William H.; Sebo, Kim M.

    CICADA (Young et al. 1997) is a multi-process, distributed application for the control of astronomical data acquisition systems. It comprises elements that control the operation of, and data flow from CCD camera systems; and the operation of telescope instrument control systems. CICADA can be used to dynamically configure support for astronomical instruments that can be made up of multiple cameras and multiple instrument controllers. Each camera is described by a hierarchy of parts that are each individually configured and linked together. Most of CICADA is written in C++ and much of the configurability of CICADA comes from the use of inheritance and polymorphism. An example of a multiple part instrument configuration -- a wide field imager (WFI) -- is described here. WFI, presently under construction, is made up of eight 2k x 4k CCDs with dual SDSU II controllers and will be used at Siding Spring's ANU 40in and AAO 3.9m telescopes.

  18. Which spacecraft and instruments are used?

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-02-24

    ... FM1 & FM2 December 18, 1999 into polar orbit on board the EOS flagship Terra . FM3 & FM4 May 4, ... Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite.   Access CERES Instrument specifications and ...

  19. SSCL RFQ-DTL Matching Section instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Datte, P.; Aielo, R.; Hayworth, M. [and others

    1993-11-01

    A description of the SSCL RFQ-DTL Matching Section instrumentation is presented with emphasis on design issues and early instrumentation commissioning results. The H{sup {minus}} beam energy through the RFQ-DTL matching section is 2.5 MeV, the beam current is 27 mA with a pulse width of 35 Its. The typical beam diameter is 3 mm. The instrumentation consists of three beam position monitors (BPM), a wire scanner, beam loss monitors (BLM), a slit and collector emittance measurement unit (EMU), a current toroid, and a Faraday cup. The instruments were designed to accommodate high current densities, have a large dynamic range with moderate bandwidths, and fit congested spaces.

  20. An instrumentation package for monitoring tractor performance

    E-print Network

    Green, Malcolm Kirk

    1983-01-01

    tractor performance tests. Special thanks go to Mr. David Morris and Mr. Joseph Grogan for their assistance with design and hardware details, and Mr. Wayne Thompson, who assisted in the fabrication and installation of components used on the instrumented...

  1. Case-finding instruments for depression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary A. Whooley; Andrew L. Avins; Jeanne Miranda; Warren S. Browner

    1997-01-01

    Objective  To determine the validity of a two-question case-finding instrument for depression as compared with six previously validated\\u000a instruments.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Design  The test characteristics of a two-question case-fidning instrument that asks about depressed mood and anhedonia were compared\\u000a with six common case-finding instruments, using the Quick Diagnostic Interview Schedule as a criterion standard for the diagnosis\\u000a of major depression.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Setting  Urgent care clinic at

  2. An Instrument to Measure Vocational Maturity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westbrook, Bert W.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    This report describes the Cognitive Vocational Maturity Test (CVMT), and instrument designed to measure career knowledges and abilities within six areas of the cognitive domain of vocational maturity, as well as offers validity and reliability data. (Authors)

  3. The SeaWinds Scatterometer Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C.; Graf, J.; Freilich, M.; Long, D.; Spencer, M.; Tsai, W.; Lisman, D.; Winn, C.

    1994-01-01

    The SeaWinds scatterometer instrument is currently being developed by NASA/JPL, as part of the NASA EOS Program, for flight on the Hapanese ADEOS II mission in 1999. This Ku-band radar scatterometer will infer surface wind speed and direction by measuring the radar normalized backscatter cross-section over several different azimuth angles. This paper presents the design characteristics of and operational approach to the instrument itself.

  4. Instrumental systematics and weak gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelbaum, R.

    2015-05-01

    We present a pedagogical review of the weak gravitational lensing measurement process and its connection to major scientific questions such as dark matter and dark energy. Then we describe common ways of parametrizing systematic errors and understanding how they affect weak lensing measurements. Finally, we discuss several instrumental systematics and how they fit into this context, and conclude with some future perspective on how progress can be made in understanding the impact of instrumental systematics on weak lensing measurements.

  5. A study on dam instrumentation retrofitting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Melih Yanmaz; Onur Ari

    2011-01-01

    Continuous monitoring and inspection of large dams would provide means for proper rehabilitative actions to be taken on time\\u000a which intend to maintain the desired safety throughout the physical life of dams. Comprehensive inspections can be carried\\u000a out using a number of instruments. An ideal dam instrumentation system should provide time-dependent information about critical\\u000a parameters so that possible future behaviour

  6. Absorption coefficient instrument for turbid natural waters.

    PubMed

    Friedman, E; Poole, L; Cherdak, A; Houghton, W

    1980-05-15

    An instrument has been developed that directly measures the multispectral absorption coefficient of turbid natural water. The design incorporates methods for compensation of variation in the internal light source intensity, correction of the spectrally dependent nature of the optical elements, and correction for variation in background light level. When used in conjunction with a spectrally matched total attenuation instrument, the spectrally dependent scattering coefficient can also be derived. Systematic errors associated with multiple scattering have been estimated using Monte Carlo techniques. PMID:20221099

  7. Recent progress in optical oxygen sensor instrumentation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wolfgang Trettnak; Wolfgang Gruber; Franz Reininger; Ingo Klimant

    1995-01-01

    Optical methods for the determination of dissolved or gaseous oxygen are mainly based on the principle of fluorescence quenching. Measurement schemes have been reported which employ various oxygen-sensitive dyes and bulky instrumentation. Typically, expensive fluorescence spectrometers or fibre-optic photometers have been used, and the applicability of such instruments is rather limited. A system based on low-cost semiconductor devices (light-emitting diodes

  8. The observatories and instruments of Tycho Brahe

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gudrun Wolfschmidt

    2002-01-01

    Tycho Brahe (1546-1601) was the most important observational astronomer until the invention of the telescope in 1608. By construction new instruments and devising new observing methods, Tycho succeeded in significantly increasing measurement accuracy: He increased the size of his instruments (e.g. a large wooden quadrant of diameter 5.4 m and a mural quadrant); he used metal and masonry rather than

  9. The Gravity Probe B Science Instrument.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turneaure, John

    2007-04-01

    The Gravity Probe B (GP-B) experiment employs a unique state-of-the-art science instrument to measure the geodetic and frame-dragging precessions predicted by Einstein's theory of general relativity for gyroscopes orbiting a massive spinning body, in this case the Earth. The GP-B instrument comprises four electrostatically suspended gyroscopes, each of which is independently subject to both the geodetic and frame-dragging precessions, and a telescope that tracks the guide star, IM Pegasi. Each gyroscope is read out with a dc SQUID system utilizing the London magnetic moment of the spinning gyroscope. The two axes of the telescope are read out with an image divider assembly, solid-state photo detectors and JFET preamplifiers. The telescope and gyroscopes are mechanically and thermally linked by a fused quartz block, which forms the metrology bench for the experiment. The instrument is located in a probe/helium dewar system, which provides a low-temperature environment of about 2.7 K for the instrument, as well as the ultra-low magnetic field, the ultrahigh magnetic shielding of the on-orbit ambient magnetic field, and the ultrahigh vacuum environments. The instrument was designed to allow a measurement of the geodetic and frame-dragging precessions to an accuracy of better than 0.5 mill-arc second/year for one year of science data collection. The instrument also provides the signals needed for drag-free and attitude control of the space vehicle. This presentation will include a description of the instrument and its principal on-orbit performance characteristics. Many persons at various institutions contributed to the development of the instrument. Numerous contributed presentations in a poster session will provide more detail.

  10. Pluto integrated camera spectrometer (PICS) instrument

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. R. Sandel; R. V. Yelle; C. F. Bruce; G. S. Chen; M. P. Chrisp; G. A. Fraschetti; T. N. Krabach; S. W. Petrick; D. H. Rodgers; J. Rodriguez; S. L. Soll; A. H. Vaughan; L. A. Soderblom

    1995-01-01

    We describe an integrated instrument that will perform the functions of three optical instruments required by a Pluto Fast Flyby mission: a near-IR spectrometer (256 spectral channels, 1300–2600 nm), a two-channel imaging camera (300–500 nm, 500–1000 nm), and a UV spectrometer (80 spectral channels, 70–150 nm). A separate port, aligned in a direction compatible with radio occultation experiments, is provided

  11. Economic design problem: integrating instrumentation and control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jianbo Lu; Robert E. Skelton

    1999-01-01

    The so-called signal-to-noise ratio is used to characterize instrumentation, and a system integration is achieved by jointly optimize the feedback control law and the instrument signal-to-noise ratios in order to meet system performance. The procedure identifies the performance limiting components of a control system, indicates where to spend the money on a system, and generates component design requirements from closed

  12. Validation of the ENVISAT atmospheric chemistry instruments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Snoeij; R. Koopman; E. Attema; C. Zehner; P. Wursteisen; A. Dehn; M. de Laurentius; J. Frerick; R. Mantovani; L. Saavedra de Miguel

    2004-01-01

    Three atmospheric-chemistry sensors form part of the ENVISAT payload that has been placed into orbit in March 2002. This paper presents the ENVISAT mission status and data policy, and reviews the end-to-end performance of the GOMOS, MIPAS and SCIAMACHY observation systems and will discuss the validation aspects of these instruments. In particular, for each instrument, the review addresses mission planning,

  13. On implementing FPGA-based reconfigurable instruments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guo-Ruey Tsai; Min-Chuan Lin; Guo-Shu Sun; Yo-Sum Lin

    2004-01-01

    Based on the FPGA chip with embedded software-core processors and digital signal processing codes, which provides both software-programmable and hardware-reconfigurable abilities, it is possible for us to construct a hardware kernel that can serve as the kernel of versatile measurement instruments. Reprogramming the embedded processors and reconfiguring the internal FPGA logic in the hardware kernel, we can implement various instrumental

  14. An instrumentation package for monitoring tractor performance 

    E-print Network

    Green, Malcolm Kirk

    1983-01-01

    AN INSTRUMENTATION PACKAGE FOR MONITORING TRACTOR PERFORMANCE A Thesis by MALCOLM KIRK GREEN Submitted to the Graduate College of TexaS A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the deg. ee of MASTER OF SCIENCE December...) D . Stephen W. Searcy (Member) Dr. Thomas R. Lalk (Member) Dr. Edward A. Hiler (Head of Department) Decembe" 1983 ABSTRACT An Instrumentation Package por Monitoring Tractor Performance (December 1983) MALCOLM KIRK GREEN, B. S. A. E. , Texas...

  15. Precise controlled-potential coulometry: Instrumental errors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. N. Mogilevskii

    2000-01-01

    Instrumental errors in modern controlled-potential coulometry are analyzed. The instrumental errors are classified into two\\u000a main groups, namely, errors of determining the degree of completion of analyte electrolysis and errors of measuring the quantity\\u000a of electricity taken for electrolysis. Various components of these errors have been estimated numerically. It has been demonstrated\\u000a that, with the use of currently available electronic

  16. Status of the JWST/NIRSpec instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkmann, Stephan M.; Ferruit, Pierre; Alves de Oliveira, Catarina; Böker, Torsten; De Marchi, Guido; Giardino, Giovanna; Sirianni, Marco; Stuhlinger, Martin; Jensen, Peter; Rumler, Peter; Falcolini, Massimo; te Plate, Maurice B. J.; Cresci, Giovanni; Dorner, Bernhard; Ehrenwinkler, Ralf; Gnata, Xavier; Wettemann, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    The Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) is one of the four instruments on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), scheduled for launch in 2018. NIRSpec has been designed and built by the European Space Agency (ESA) with Airbus Defense and Space Germany as prime contractor. The instrument covers the wavelength range from 0.6 to 5.3 micron and will be able to obtain spectra of more than 100 astronomical objects simultaneously by means of a configurable array of micro-shutters. It also features an integral field unit and a suite of slits for high contrast spectroscopy of individual objects. The extensive ground calibration campaign of NIRSpec was completed in Summer 2013, after which it was delivered to NASA for integration into the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM). We highlight the major results from the instrument level calibration campaign which demonstrated full compliance with all opto-mechanical performance requirements. In addition, we present the current status of the instrument, describe the ongoing preparations for the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) test campaign to begin in June 2014, and briefly discuss plans for the pending exchange of the detector and micro-shutter assemblies following the first ISIM test cycle.

  17. Toward an Intelligent Distributed Safety Instrumented Systems: Dependability Evaluation

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Toward an Intelligent Distributed Safety Instrumented Systems: Dependability Evaluation Abdelhak Systems (SIS) in order to determine the contribution of the intelligent instruments in the safety for the evaluation of the dependability of the Intelligent Distributed Safety Instrumented Systems (IDSIS) refer

  18. BE511 Class Syllabus and Schedule -Spring, 2013 Biomedical Instrumentation

    E-print Network

    Vajda, Sandor

    Description: This course is an introduction to biomedical instrument design. We will introduce physiological: Students will understand the major design considerations in biomedical instrumentation. Students methods needed to design and fabricate biomedical instrumentation. Students will achieve proficiency

  19. 21 CFR 886.1360 - Visual field laser instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 false Visual field laser instrument. 886.1360 Section 886...Diagnostic Devices § 886.1360 Visual field laser instrument. (a) Identification. A visual field laser instrument is an AC-powered device...

  20. 21 CFR 886.1360 - Visual field laser instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 false Visual field laser instrument. 886.1360 Section 886...Diagnostic Devices § 886.1360 Visual field laser instrument. (a) Identification. A visual field laser instrument is an AC-powered device...

  1. Adl et al. 2012 FIG. 1.--Maximum likelihood

    E-print Network

    for posterior probabilities = 1.0. Hackett et al. 2007 SAR #12;(Archibald2009) Hacrobia What are algae?? #12 are shown as thick branches for posterior probabilities = 1.0. Hackett et al. 2007 putative single

  2. Adl et al. 2012 FIG. 1.--Maximum likelihood

    E-print Network

    for posterior probabilities = 1.0. Hackett et al. 2007 SAR #12;(Archibald2009) Hacrobia What are algae?? #12 branches for posterior probabilities = 1.0. Hackett et al. 2007 putative single enslavement of a green alga

  3. SAFETY AND MISSION ASSURANCE CKRTWCATEd FLIGHT ReADlNBSS

    E-print Network

    Christian, Eric

    $suraecbunch!k&em Ikuism WD C Q ~ J .#- NASA Ruy;f S a k q #12;4 k I+ KSC iur~iit;il rcprrmtnirc nithr WTK- James HI. Ktnmiy KSC EkntmDirmur #12;i The Flight Planning Board understands the residual risk

  4. Adl et al. 2012Cyanophyta Kde v systmu se nachzme?

    E-print Network

    . canariensis) (Sticta dufourii) forma se zelenou asou forma se sinicí #12;Lobaria amplissima a Dendriscocaulon umhausense 3 Vztah není jen 1 : 1 ... forma se zel. asou a na ní forma se sinicí dohromady ­ více fotobiont

  5. Using XML for Instrument Description, Communication and Control of the SOFIA/HAWC Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ames, T. A.; Sall, K. B.; Warsaw, C. E.; Shafer, R. A.

    1998-12-01

    The goal of the Instrument Remote Control (IRC) project is to develop a distributed framework from science user to instrument which will provide robust interactive and reconfigurable control and monitoring of remote instrumentation. The focus of the joint effort between NASA/GSFC's Advanced Architectures and Automation branch (Code 588) and Century Computing has been infrared astronomy, although most of the techniques employed have much wider applicability. This poster presentation will describe the work currently underway for Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) in developing an Extensible Markup Language (XML) vocabulary to aid in instrument description, communication and control. In particular, the instruments to be controlled are the High-resolution Airborne Wideband Camera (HAWC) and ultimately the Submillimeter And Far InfraRed Experiment (SAFIRE). IRC will enable trusted infrared astronomers around the world to easily access infrared astronomical instruments located in remote, inhospitable environments. The long-term focus is to develop an extensible framework to which new instruments can be added with relative ease. This will eventually be accomplished by implementing our own Instrument Control Markup Language (ICML) based on a custom Document Type Definition (DTD). ICML will be used to describe control capabilities, data streams, message formats, and communication mechanisms, as well as for online documentation and the association of housekeeping metadata with acquired images. Some of these aspects of instrument control will be reflected in Java graphical user interfaces, generated from the instrument descriptions. Other sections of the instrument description will be applied to data capture, as well as to other instrument subsystems.

  6. Astrometric instrument model software tool for Gaia real-time instrument health monitoring and diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busonero, D.; Licata, E.; Gai, M.

    2014-12-01

    The goals of micro-arcsecond space mission rely on the limiting performance associated to the selected instrumental configuration and observing conditions. In particular, variation of the instrumental response over the field, with wavelength and in time, are potentially critical. We discuss the impact on the data quality and how the science data can be used to trace directly and in real time the astrometric instrument response of Gaia. This is one of the driver philosophies behind the Astrometric Instrument Model (AIM) concept. We show results from the test campaigns carried on throughout the 2013.

  7. The Gemini Instrument Feasibilities Studies project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibon, Pascale; Goodsell, Stephen J.; Hardie, Kayla

    2015-01-01

    The Gemini Instrument Feasibilities Studies (GIFS) project is part of a program that will provide a number of community-created science-driven instrumentation design study reports and presentations to the observatory, conforming to a number of desired principles.By the time of the AAS, Gemini will have received a number of proposals and will be evaluating them shortly afterwards with the expectation of placing 3 or more feasibility study contracts based on a facility instrument costing between USD 8,000,000 and USD 12,000,000. These instrument studies will provide synergies with new capabilities coming online (e.g. LSST, JWST, ALMA, etc)Following the project, Gemini together with the Gemini Science and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) and input from the wider community will decide on the top-level instrument requirements for the next facility instrument (Gen4#3) and launch a targeted Request for Proposals to design, build, test and deliver a suitable instrument. Gemini expects to release an RfP for Gen4#3 in Q4 2015.Each feasibility study will include fully developed science case(s), optical, mechanical, electronic and software design elements at the conceptual level as needed to demonstrate the technical viability. In particular, each design study will thoroughly identify and mitigate key risks.Each study team will present a status summary presentation at the 2015 Meeting on the Science and Future of Gemini held in Toronto in June 2015. The final GIFS reports and presentations are expected in Sept 2015.We will discuss the status of GIFS and the currently plans for Gen4#3.

  8. MIRO: Microwave Instrument for Rosetta Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulkis, S.; Frerking, M.; Crovisier, J.; Beaudin, G.; Hartogh, P.; Encrenaz, P.; Koch, T.; Kahn, C.; Salinas, Y.; Nowicki, R.; Irigoyen, R.; Janssen, M.; Stek, P.; Hofstadter, M.; Allen, M.; Backus, C.; Kamp, L.; Jarchow, C.; Steinmetz, E.; Deschamps, A.; Krieg, J.; Gheudin, M.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Biver, N.; Encrenaz, T.; Despois, D.; Ip, W.; Lellouch, E.; Mann, I.; Muhleman, D.; Rauer, H.; Schloerb, P.; Spilker, T.

    2007-02-01

    The European Space Agency Rosetta Spacecraft, launched on March 2, 2004 toward Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, carries a relatively small and lightweight millimeter-submillimeter spectrometer instrument, the first of its kind launched into deep space. The instrument will be used to study the evolution of outgassing water and other molecules from the target comet as a function of heliocentric distance. During flybys of the asteroids (2867) Steins and (21) Lutetia in 2008 and 2010 respectively, the instrument will measure thermal emission and search for water vapor in the vicinity of these asteroids. The instrument, named MIRO (Microwave Instrument for the Rosetta Orbiter), consists of a 30-cm diameter, offset parabolic reflector telescope followed by two heterodyne receivers. Center-band operating frequencies of the receivers are near 190 GHz (1.6 mm) and 562 GHz (0.5 mm). Broadband continuum channels are implemented in both frequency bands for the measurement of near surface temperatures and temperature gradients in Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and the asteroids (2867) Steins and (21) Lutetia. A 4096 channel CTS (Chirp Transform Spectrometer) spectrometer having 180 MHz total bandwidth and 44 kHz resolution is, in addition to the continuum channel, connected to the submillimeter receiver. The submillimeter radiometer/spectrometer is fixed tuned to measure four volatile species CO, CH3OH, NH3 and three, oxygen-related isotopologues of water, H2 16O, H2 17O and H2 18O. The basic quantities measured with the MIRO instrument are surface temperature, gas production rates and relative abundances, and velocity and excitation temperature of each species, along with their spatial and temporal variability. This paper provides a short discussion of the scientific objectives of the investigation, and a detailed discussion of the MIRO instrument system.

  9. Instrumental modelling of PHEBUS/Bepi-Colombo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Quemerais, E.; Reberac, A.

    2013-10-01

    Probing the Hermean Exosphere By Ultraviolet Spectroscopy (PHEBUS) is a double EUV (55-155 nm) and FUV (145 - 320 nm) spectrometer aboard Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) one of the two spacecrafts of the Bepi-Colombo ESA mission. The goal of this instrument is to study the composition; structure and dynamics of the exosphere of Mercury as well as measure the UV albedo of the surface to caracterize water ice deposits in permanently shaded regions. In this presentation, we will present modelling of the instrument performances of exospheric observations and stellar observations needed for in-flight calibration. A new model coupling MPO trajectory and ephemeris, as well as atomic and molecular lines and radiometric model of the instrument has been developped to prepare future data inversion to derive densities and/or upper limits of large number of species. In-flight calibration during the cruise as well as in orbit will be done by observing as many stars as possible. Integration time needed to achieve a signal to noise equal to 10 for different stars from FONDUE database is computed at each wavelength to prepare a strategy of observations. Finally a radiometric model of the instrument taking into account the instrumental defects (mirror’s scattering, baffle’s surface and edge scattering, ...) is used to estimate the pollution by light inside and outside the guard angle on the observations.

  10. [Dystonia, tremor and repetitive instrumental use].

    PubMed

    Jedynak, C P; Youssov, K; Apartis, E; Welter, M-L; Willer, J-C; Agid, Y

    2008-01-01

    Three characteristic observations are presented along with three tables presenting 24 patients with the following elements in common: excessively repeated use of an instrument such as a pen, a musical instrument or a tool. The appearance after that use of a central pathological phenomenon that includes a local dystonia of a hand or the mouth, a tremor, or the association of a tremor and a dystonia, all within the muscular domain corresponding to that of the use. The discussion, which is based exclusively on the clinical findings, deals with the following elements: the role of the use of the instrument rather than task itself, the predominant pathogenic factor which is the repetitive action, to which is added a genetic component in one incompletely penetrant case of DYT 1, and a probable genetic susceptibility in the others. The absence of improvement with rest distinguishes this central pathology from rheumatologic or orthopaedic problems involving repetitive activities. The evolution is slowly declining when the responsible action is continued. This occurs in three stages: a specific disorder involving only the use of the particular instrument, a more enlarged involvement affecting other activities and eventually a dystonia associated with a tremor or a postural tremor always located to the initial area. The therapeutic interventions suggested by the pathologic role of the repetitive movement is: (1) to advise a new training for the instrument that excludes the habitual movement; (2) to advise the patient to vary any newly acquired repetitive movements. PMID:18342058

  11. The neutron instrument simulation package, NISP.

    SciTech Connect

    Seeger, P. A. (Philip A.); Daemen, L. L. (Luc L.)

    2004-01-01

    The Neutron Instrument Simulation Package (NISP) performs complete source-to-detector simulations of neutron instruments, including neutrons that do not follow the expected path. The original user interface (MC{_}Web) is a web-based application, http://strider.lansce.lanl.gov/NISP/Welcome.html. This report describes in detail the newer standalone Windows version, NISP{_}Win. Instruments are assembled from menu-selected elements, including neutron sources, collimation and transport elements, samples, analyzers, and detectors. Magnetic field regions may also be specified for the propagation of polarized neutrons including spin precession. Either interface writes a geometry file that is used as input to the Monte Carlo engine (MC{_}Run) in the user's computer. Both the interface and the engine rely on a subroutine library, MCLIB. The package is completely open source. New features include capillary optics, temperature dependence of Al and Be, revised source files for ISIS, and visualization of neutron trajectories at run time. Also, a single-crystal sample type has been successfully imported from McStas (with more generalized geometry), demonstrating the capability of including algorithms from other sources, and NISP{_}Win may render the instrument in a virtual reality file. Results are shown for two instruments under development.

  12. Reading Instruments: Objects, Texts and Museums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Katharine; Frappier, Mélanie; Neswald, Elizabeth; Trim, Henry

    2013-05-01

    Science educators, historians of science and their students often share a curiosity about historical instruments as a tangible link between past and present practices in the sciences. We less often integrate instruments into our research and pedagogy, considering artefact study as the domain of museum specialists. We argue here that scholars and teachers new to material culture can readily use artefacts to reveal rich and complex networks of narratives. We illustrate this point by describing our own lay encounter with an artefact turned over for our analysis during a week-long workshop at the Canada Science and Technology Museum. The text explains how elements as disparate as the military appearance of the instrument, the crest stamped on its body, the manipulation of its telescopes, or a luggage tag revealed the object's scientific and political significance in different national contexts. In this way, the presence of the instrument in the classroom vividly conveyed the nature of geophysics as a field practice and an international science, and illuminated relationships between pure and applied science for early twentieth century geologists. We conclude that artefact study can be an unexpectedly powerful and accessible tool in the study of science, making visible the connections between past and present, laboratory and field, texts and instruments.

  13. Spring/dimple instrument tube restraint

    DOEpatents

    DeMario, Edmund E. (Columbia, SC); Lawson, Charles N. (Columbia, SC)

    1993-01-01

    A nuclear fuel assembly for a pressurized water nuclear reactor has a spring and dimple structure formed in a non-radioactive insert tube placed in the top of a sensor receiving instrumentation tube thimble disposed in the fuel assembly and attached at a top nozzle, a bottom nozzle, and intermediate grids. The instrumentation tube thimble is open at the top, where the sensor or its connection extends through the cooling water for coupling to a sensor signal processor. The spring and dimple insert tube is mounted within the instrumentation tube thimble and extends downwardly adjacent the top. The springs and dimples restrain the sensor and its connections against lateral displacement causing impact with the instrumentation tube thimble due to the strong axial flow of cooling water. The instrumentation tube has a stainless steel outer sleeve and a zirconium alloy inner sleeve below the insert tube adjacent the top. The insert tube is relatively non-radioactivated inconel alloy. The opposed springs and dimples are formed on diametrically opposite inner walls of the insert tube, the springs being formed as spaced axial cuts in the insert tube, with a web of the insert tube between the cuts bowed radially inwardly for forming the spring, and the dimples being formed as radially inward protrusions opposed to the springs.

  14. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 356 (1995) l-4 INSTRUMENTS

    E-print Network

    Dutz, Hartmut

    1995-01-01

    ELSEVIER Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 356 (1995) l-4 NUCLEAR INSTRUMENTS 8 METHODS IN PHYSICS REgtR?n Thermodynamics of dynamic nuclear polarization W.Th. Wenckebach Faculty ofApplied Physics, Delfr Unicersity of Technology, P.O.B. 5046, 2600 GA De& The Netherlands Abstract Dynamic nuclear

  15. The ECG recording and analysis instrumentation based on virtual instrument technology and continuous wavelet transform

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shuren qin; Zhong Ji; Hongjun Zhu

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces a virtual recording and analysis instrumentation system for recording and identifying ECG signals, the system developed is aimed at constructing a PC-based virtual instrumentation which enables to record, investigate and measure the ECG signal of 12 leads simultaneously and perfectly in order to improve the measuring precision of ECG. Based on the proper feature in time domain

  16. About You and Your Friends: An Instrument of the PRIME Instrument Battery. Technical Report No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agard, Judith A.; And Others

    This technical report is one of a series concerning the instrumentation for Project PRIME, which investigated the relationship of regular and special education classroom environments to student characteristics. About You and Your Friends (AYYF) is a self-report inventory of the affective characteristics of students. The instrument is suitable for…

  17. Instrumentation of Java Bytecode for Runtime Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Allen; Haveland, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes JSpy, a system for high-level instrumentation of Java bytecode and its use with JPaX, OUT system for runtime analysis of Java programs. JPaX monitors the execution of temporal logic formulas and performs predicative analysis of deadlocks and data races. JSpy s input is an instrumentation specification, which consists of a collection of rules, where a rule is a predicate/action pair The predicate is a conjunction of syntactic constraints on a Java statement, and the action is a description of logging information to be inserted in the bytecode corresponding to the statement. JSpy is built using JTrek an instrumentation package at a lower level of abstraction.

  18. Pulse energy measurement at the SXR instrument.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Stefan; Brown, Garth; Dakovski, Georgi; Hill, Bruce; Holmes, Michael; Loos, Jennifer; Maida, Ricardo; Paiser, Ernesto; Schlotter, William; Turner, Joshua J; Wallace, Alex; Jastrow, Ulf; Kreis, Svea; Sorokin, Andrey A; Tiedtke, Kai

    2015-05-01

    A gas monitor detector was implemented and characterized at the Soft X-ray Research (SXR) instrument to measure the average, absolute and pulse-resolved photon flux of the LCLS beam in the energy range between 280 and 2000?eV. The detector is placed after the monochromator and addresses the need to provide reliable absolute pulse energy as well as pulse-resolved measurements for the various experiments at this instrument. This detector provides a reliable non-invasive measurement for determining flux levels on the samples in the downstream experimental chamber and for optimizing signal levels of secondary detectors and for the essential need of data normalization. The design, integration into the instrument and operation are described, and examples of its performance are given. PMID:25931075

  19. Pulse energy measurement at the SXR instrument

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Stefan; Brown, Garth; Dakovski, Georgi; Hill, Bruce; Holmes, Michael; Loos, Jennifer; Maida, Ricardo; Paiser, Ernesto; Schlotter, William; Turner, Joshua J.; Wallace, Alex; Jastrow, Ulf; Kreis, Svea; Sorokin, Andrey A.; Tiedtke, Kai

    2015-01-01

    A gas monitor detector was implemented and characterized at the Soft X-ray Research (SXR) instrument to measure the average, absolute and pulse-resolved photon flux of the LCLS beam in the energy range between 280 and 2000?eV. The detector is placed after the monochromator and addresses the need to provide reliable absolute pulse energy as well as pulse-resolved measurements for the various experiments at this instrument. This detector provides a reliable non-invasive measurement for determining flux levels on the samples in the downstream experimental chamber and for optimizing signal levels of secondary detectors and for the essential need of data normalization. The design, integration into the instrument and operation are described, and examples of its performance are given. PMID:25931075

  20. Diagnostic instruments for behavioural addiction: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Ulrike; Kirschner, Nina Ellen; Grüsser, Sabine M.

    2007-01-01

    In non-substance-related addiction, the so-called behavioural addiction, no external psychotropic substances are consumed. The psychotropic effect consists of the body’s own biochemical processes induced only by excessive activities. Until recently, knowledge was limited with respect to clinically relevant excessive reward-seeking behaviour, such as pathological gambling, excessive shopping and working which meet diagnostic criteria of dependent behaviour. To date, there is no consistent concept for diagnosis and treatment of excessive reward-seeking behaviour, and its classification is uncertain. Therefore, a clear conceptualization of the so-called behavioural addictions is of great importance. The use of adequate diagnostic instruments is necessary for successful therapeutical implications. This article provides an overview of the current popular diagnostic instruments assessing the different forms of behavioural addiction. Especially in certain areas there are only few valid and reliable instruments available to assess excessive rewarding behaviours that fulfill the criteria of addiction. PMID:19742294