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Sample records for insulin-mediated glucose disposal

  1. Relationship between insulin-mediated glucose disposal and lipid metabolism in man.

    PubMed Central

    Lillioja, S; Bogardus, C; Mott, D M; Kennedy, A L; Knowler, W C; Howard, B V

    1985-01-01

    To assess the possible effects of lipid metabolism on insulin-mediated glucose disposal, 18 nondiabetic Pima Indian women (age 18-35 yr) were studied using 1-14C-palmitate infusion to measure free fatty acid turnover rate followed by a euglycemic clamp (clamp) to measure in vivo insulin-mediated glucose disposal (M). Indirect calorimetry was performed in the basal state and during the clamp. This was used to assess glucose oxidation rate, lipid oxidation rate, and to calculate nonoxidative glucose disposal (storage). Basal and clamp lipid oxidation rate correlated with basal plasma free fatty acid concentration (r = 0.81, P less than or equal to 0.0001, r = 0.67, P less than 0.003, respectively). The fall in lipid oxidation was highly correlated with the increase in glucose oxidation during the insulin infusion (r = 0.96, P less than or equal to 0.0001). The clamp lipid oxidation rate negatively correlated with the glucose oxidation rate (r = -0.85, P less than 0.0001) and with the M value (r = -0.60, P less than 0.01) but was not correlated with the clamp glucose storage (r = -0.2, P = 0.4). On the other hand, glucose storage appeared to make a greater contribution to the difference in M value between the upper and lower extremes of M than did glucose oxidation, as evidenced by an increase in glucose storage of 0.59 mg/kg fat-free mass times minute per 1 mg/kg fat-free mass times minute increase in glucose disposal. The M value was negatively correlated with obesity as measured by percent body fat (r = -0.64, P less than 0.004), but neither basal free fatty acid concentration, basal free fatty acid turnover, basal lipid oxidation, nor clamp lipid oxidation correlated with percent body fat. We conclude that an interaction of lipid and glucose metabolism in a glucose fatty acid cycle, as proposed by Randle et al. (1), may be operative in the regulation of glucose oxidation in man. The disposal of glucose however has two components. The storage component does not

  2. TUSC5 regulates insulin-mediated adipose tissue glucose uptake by modulation of GLUT4 recycling

    PubMed Central

    Beaton, Nigel; Rudigier, Carla; Moest, Hansjörg; Müller, Sebastian; Mrosek, Nadja; Röder, Eva; Rudofsky, Gottfried; Rülicke, Thomas; Ukropec, Jozef; Ukropcova, Barbara; Augustin, Robert; Neubauer, Heike; Wolfrum, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Objective Failure to properly dispose of glucose in response to insulin is a serious health problem, occurring during obesity and is associated with type 2 diabetes development. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake is facilitated by the translocation and plasma membrane fusion of vesicles containing glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), the rate-limiting step of post-prandial glucose disposal. Methods We analyzed the role of Tusc5 in the regulation of insulin-stimulated Glut4-mediated glucose uptake in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we measured Tusc5 expression in two patient cohorts. Results Herein, we report that TUSC5 controls insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes, in vitro and in vivo. TUSC5 facilitates the proper recycling of GLUT4 and other key trafficking proteins during prolonged insulin stimulation, thereby enabling proper protein localization and complete vesicle formation, processes that ultimately enable insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Tusc5 knockout mice exhibit impaired glucose disposal and TUSC5 expression is predictive of glucose tolerance in obese individuals, independent of body weight. Furthermore, we show that TUSC5 is a PPARγ target and in its absence the anti-diabetic effects of TZDs are significantly blunted. Conclusions Collectively, these findings establish TUSC5 as an adipose tissue-specific protein that enables proper protein recycling, linking the ubiquitous vesicle traffic machinery with tissue-specific insulin-mediated glucose uptake into adipose tissue and the maintenance of a healthy metabolic phenotype in mice and humans. PMID:26629404

  3. Opposite effects of genistein on the regulation of insulin-mediated glucose homeostasis in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Wang, M; Gao, X J; Zhao, W W; Zhao, W J; Jiang, C H; Huang, F; Kou, J P; Liu, B L; Liu, K

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Genistein is an isoflavone phytoestrogen found in a number of plants such as soybeans and there is accumulating evidence that it has beneficial effects on the regulation of glucose homeostasis. In this study we evaluated the effect of genistein on glucose homeostasis and its underlying mechanisms in normal and insulin-resistant conditions. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH To induce insulin resistance, mice or differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with macrophage-derived conditioned medium. A glucose tolerance test was used to investigate the effect of genistein. Insulin signalling activation, glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4) translocation and AMP-activated PK (AMPK) activation were detected by Western blot analysis or elisa. KEY RESULTS Genistein impaired glucose tolerance and attenuated insulin sensitivity in normal mice by inhibiting the insulin-induced phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) at tyrosine residues, leading to inhibition of insulin-mediated GLUT4 translocation in adipocytes. Mac-CM, an inflammatory stimulus induced glucose intolerance accompanied by impaired insulin sensitivity; genistein reversed these changes by restoring the disturbed IRS1 function, leading to an improvement in GLUT4 translocation. In addition, genistein increased AMPK activity under both normal and inflammatory conditions; this was shown to contribute to the anti-inflammatory effect of genistein, which leads to an improvement in insulin signalling and the amelioration of insulin resistance. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Genistein showed opposite effects on insulin sensitivity under normal and inflammatory conditions in adipose tissue and this action was derived from its negative or positive regulation of IRS1 function. Its up-regulation of AMPK activity contributes to the inhibition of inflammation implicated in insulin resistance. PMID:23763311

  4. Insulin Mediated 14C-Glucose Incorporation Into Adipose Tissue: An Undergraduate Biochemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landman, A. D.; Eskin, N. A. M.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which rat adipose tissue samples are exposed to labeled glucose; insulin is added to one sample. Subsequent scintillation counting demonstrates the ability of insulin to facilitate the entry of glucose into the tissue. (MLH)

  5. Central NMDA enhances hepatic glucose output and non-insulin-mediated glucose uptake by a nonadrenergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Molina, P E; Tepper, P G; Yousef, K A; Abumrad, N N; Lang, C H

    1994-01-14

    One of the hallmarks of the stress response is an increased rate of hepatic glucose production (HGP) which, in conjunction with the presence of insulin resistance, leads to hyperglycemia. Excitatory amino acids (EAA) within the brain mediate some of the cardiovascular responses to stress, but their role in the hormonal and metabolic alterations is poorly defined. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of either N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) or kainate would produce metabolic alterations comparable to those observed under stress conditions. An i.c.v. cannula and vascular catheters were placed in rats prior to the experiment. After an overnight fast, HGP and peripheral glucose utilization (GU) were assessed in conscious unrestrained rats using [3-3H]glucose. Arterial glucose levels were increased 34% by 15 min after the i.c.v. injection of NMDA (1 microgram) and remained elevated throughout the 3-h protocol. The hyperglycemia resulted from an early increase in HGP (84%) that exceeded a smaller elevation (66%) in GU. The increased glucose flux was associated with sustained insulinopenia (-30%), and elevated levels of corticosterone (40-100%) and epinephrine (75-216%). The hormonal and glucose metabolic responses were quantitatively similar, although of shorter duration, in rats injected with kainate (10 ng). Intravenous adrenergic blockade completely prevented the NMDA-induced hyperglycemia. Adrenergic blockade blunted the early rise in HGP, so that in this group the NMDA-induced increase in HGP was offset by a comparable elevation in GU.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8156391

  6. Insulin-mediated vasodilatation, but not glucose uptake or endothelium-mediated vasodilatation, is enhanced in young females compared with males.

    PubMed

    Lind, Lars; Fugmann, Andreas; Millgård, Jonas; Berne, Christian; Lithell, Hans

    2002-02-01

    In order to evaluate possible differences between men and women with regard to the ability of insulin to induce vasodilatation, promote glucose uptake and enhance endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, 12 young (22-28 years), non-obese women and 15 corresponding males were subjected to 2 h of euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemia (insulin infusion rate of 56 m-units x min(-1) x m(-2)). Forearm blood flow was measured by venous occlusion plethysmography. Endothelium-dependent vasodilatation was evaluated by the local intra-arterial infusion of methacholine into the brachial artery (2-4 microg/min). The cardiac index was measured by thoracic bioimpedance. A 2 h period of hyperinsulinaemia increased the plasma insulin concentration to a similar degree in both sexes (females, 84 +/- 8.8 m-units/l; males, 87 +/- 7.5 m-units/l), but induced a more marked increase in forearm blood flow in females than in males (+104 +/- 67% and +52 +/- 30% respectively; P<0.01; 95% confidence interval for difference 11-94%). Furthermore, a significant decrease in total peripheral resistance (-20 +/- 6.9%; P<0.01) and an increase in cardiac index (+23 +/- 13%; P<0.01) were seen in women only (P<0.05 compared with men). Blood pressure and heart rate were not altered in either sex. Whole-body insulin-mediated glucose uptake and forearm glucose uptake did not differ between the sexes, and the ability of insulin to enhance endothelium-dependent vasodilatation (+19%; P<0.01) was similar in men and women. In conclusion, the present study shows that the ability of insulin to cause vasodilatation was greater in non-obese young women compared with men. However, no differences between the sexes were seen with regard to insulin-mediated glucose uptake and the ability of insulin to enhance endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. PMID:11834144

  7. Computational model of cellular metabolic dynamics: effect of insulin on glucose disposal in human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanjun; Solomon, Thomas P. J.; Haus, Jacob M.; Saidel, Gerald M.; Cabrera, Marco E.

    2010-01-01

    Identifying the mechanisms by which insulin regulates glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle is critical to understanding the etiology of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Our knowledge of these mechanisms is limited by the difficulty of obtaining in vivo intracellular data. To quantitatively distinguish significant transport and metabolic mechanisms from limited experimental data, we developed a physiologically based, multiscale mathematical model of cellular metabolic dynamics in skeletal muscle. The model describes mass transport and metabolic processes including distinctive processes of the cytosol and mitochondria. The model simulated skeletal muscle metabolic responses to insulin corresponding to human hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies. Insulin-mediated rate of glucose disposal was the primary model input. For model validation, simulations were compared with experimental data: intracellular metabolite concentrations and patterns of glucose disposal. Model variations were simulated to investigate three alternative mechanisms to explain insulin enhancements: Model 1 (M.1), simple mass action; M.2, insulin-mediated activation of key metabolic enzymes (i.e., hexokinase, glycogen synthase, pyruvate dehydrogenase); or M.3, parallel activation by a phenomenological insulin-mediated intracellular signal that modifies reaction rate coefficients. These simulations indicated that models M.1 and M.2 were not sufficient to explain the experimentally measured metabolic responses. However, by application of mechanism M.3, the model predicts metabolite concentration changes and glucose partitioning patterns consistent with experimental data. The reaction rate fluxes quantified by this detailed model of insulin/glucose metabolism provide information that can be used to evaluate the development of type 2 diabetes. PMID:20332360

  8. Ophthalmic glucose monitoring using disposable contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Geddes, Chris

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a range of disposable and colorless tear glucose sensing contact lenses, using off-the-shelf lenses embedded with new water soluble, highly fluorescent and glucose sensitive boronic acid containing fluorophores. The new lenses are readily able to track tear glucose levels and therefore blood glucose levels, which are ideally suited for potential use by diabetics. The fluorescence responses from the lenses can be monitored using simple excitation and emission detection devices. The novelty of our approach is two fold. Firstly, the notion of sensing extremely low glucose concentrations in tears, which track blood levels, by our contact lens approach, and secondly, the unique compatibility of our new glucose signaling probes with the internal mildly acidic contact lens environment. The new lenses are therefore ideal for the noninvasive and continuous monitoring of tear glucose, with a 15 minute response time, and a measured shelf life in excess of 3 months. In this invited article, we show that fluorescence based signaling using plastic disposable lenses, which have already been industrially optimized with regard to vision correction and oxygen / analyte permeability etc, may a notable alternative to invasive and random finger pricking, the most widely used glucose monitoring technology by diabetics. PMID:17271473

  9. Taurine exerts hypoglycemic effect in alloxan-induced diabetic rats, improves insulin-mediated glucose transport signaling pathway in heart and ameliorates cardiac oxidative stress and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Joydeep; Vasan, Vandana; Sil, Parames C.

    2012-01-15

    Hyperlipidemia, inflammation and altered antioxidant profiles are the usual complications in diabetes mellitus. In the present study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of taurine in diabetes associated cardiac complications using a rat model. Rats were made diabetic by alloxan (ALX) (single i.p. dose of 120 mg/kg body weight) and left untreated or treated with taurine (1% w/v, orally, in water) for three weeks either from the day of ALX exposure or after the onset of diabetes. Animals were euthanized after three weeks. ALX-induced diabetes decreased body weight, increased glucose level, decreased insulin content, enhanced the levels of cardiac damage markers and altered lipid profile in the plasma. Moreover, it increased oxidative stress (decreased antioxidant enzyme activities and GSH/GSSG ratio, increased xanthine oxidase enzyme activity, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation and ROS generation) and enhanced the proinflammatory cytokines levels, activity of myeloperoxidase and nuclear translocation of NFκB in the cardiac tissue of the experimental animals. Taurine treatment could, however, result to a decrease in the elevated blood glucose and proinflammatory cytokine levels, diabetes-evoked oxidative stress, lipid profiles and NFκB translocation. In addition, taurine increased GLUT 4 translocation to the cardiac membrane by enhanced phosphorylation of IR and IRS1 at tyrosine and Akt at serine residue in the heart. Results also suggest that taurine could protect cardiac tissue from ALX induced apoptosis via the regulation of Bcl2 family and caspase 9/3 proteins. Taken together, taurine supplementation in regular diet could play a beneficial role in regulating diabetes and its associated complications in the heart. Highlights: ► Taurine controls blood glucose via protection of pancreatic β cells in diabetic rat. ► Taurine controls blood glucose via increasing the insulin level in diabetic rat. ► Taurine improves cardiac AKT/GLUT4 signaling

  10. A type IV P-type ATPase affects insulin-mediated glucose uptake in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle in mice.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Madhu S; Yuan, Joshua S; Elliott, Sarah B; Sommardahl, Carla

    2006-12-01

    Mice carrying two pink-eyed dilution (p) locus heterozygous deletions represent a novel polygenic mouse model of type 2 diabetes associated with obesity. Atp10c, a putative aminophospholipid transporter on mouse chromosome 7, is a candidate for the phenotype. The phenotype is diet-induced. As a next logical step in the validation and characterization of the model, experiments to analyze metabolic abnormalities associated with these mice were carried out. Results demonstrate that mutants (inheriting the p deletion maternally) heterozygous for Atp10c are hyperinsulinemic, insulin-resistant and have an altered insulin-stimulated response in peripheral tissues. Adipose tissue and the skeletal muscle are the targets, and GLUT4-mediated glucose uptake is the specific metabolic pathway associated with Atp10c deletion. Insulin resistance primarily affects the adipose tissue and the skeletal muscle, and the effect in the liver is secondary. Gene expression profiling using microarray and real-time PCR show significant changes in the expression of four genes--Vamp2, Dok1, Glut4 and Mapk14--involved in insulin signaling. The expression of Atp10c is also significantly altered in the adipose tissue and the soleus muscle. The most striking observation is the loss of Atp10c expression in the mutants, specifically in the soleus muscle, after eating the high-fat diet for 12 weeks. In conclusion, experiments suggest that the target genes and/or their cognate factors in conjunction with Atp10c presumably affect the normal translocation and sequestration of GLUT4 in both the target tissues. PMID:16517145

  11. Ophthalmic glucose monitoring using disposable contact lenses--a review.

    PubMed

    Badugu, Ramachandram; Lakowicz, Joseph R; Geddes, Chris D

    2004-09-01

    We have developed a range of disposable and colorless tear glucose sensing contact lenses, using off-the-shelf lenses embedded with new water soluble, highly fluorescent and glucose sensitive boronic acid containing fluorophores. The new lenses are readily able to track tear glucose levels and therefore blood glucose levels, which are ideally suited for potential use by diabetics. The fluorescence responses from the lenses can be monitored using simple excitation and emission detection devices. The novelty of our approach is two fold. Firstly, the notion of sensing extremely low glucose concentrations in tears, which track blood levels, by our contact lens approach, and secondly, the unique compatibility of our new glucose signaling probes with the internal mildly acidic contact lens environment. The new lenses are therefore ideal for the non-invasive and continuous monitoring of tear glucose, with about 15-min response time, and a measured shelf life in excess of 3 months. In this review article, we show that fluorescence based signaling using plastic disposable lenses, which have already been industrially optimized with regard to vision correction and oxygen/analyte permeability etc, may a notable alternative to invasive and random finger pricking, the most widely used glucose monitoring technology by diabetics. PMID:15617269

  12. Ophthalmic Glucose Monitoring Using Disposable Contact Lenses—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Badugu, Ramachandram; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Geddes, Chris D.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a range of disposable and colorless tear glucose sensing contact lenses, using off-the-shelf lenses embedded with new water soluble, highly fluorescent and glucose sensitive boronic acid containing fluorophores. The new lenses are readily able to track tear glucose levels and therefore blood glucose levels, which are ideally suited for potential use by diabetics. The fluorescence responses from the lenses can be monitored using simple excitation and emission detection devices. The novelty of our approach is two fold. Firstly, the notion of sensing extremely low glucose concentrations in tears, which track blood levels, by our contact lens approach, and secondly, the unique compatibility of our new glucose signaling probes with the internal mildly acidic contact lens environment. The new lenses are therefore ideal for the non-invasive and continuous monitoring of tear glucose, with about 15-min response time, and a measured shelf life in excess of 3 months. In this review article, we show that fluorescence based signaling using plastic disposable lenses, which have already been industrially optimized with regard to vision correction and oxygen/analyte permeability etc, may a notable alternative to invasive and random finger pricking, the most widely used glucose monitoring technology by diabetics. PMID:15617269

  13. Effects of GLP-1 on Forearm Vasodilator Function and Glucose Disposal During Hyperinsulinemia in the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tesauro, Manfredi; Schinzari, Francesca; Adamo, Angelo; Rovella, Valentina; Martini, Francesca; Mores, Nadia; Barini, Angela; Pitocco, Dario; Ghirlanda, Giovanni; Lauro, Davide; Campia, Umberto; Cardillo, Carmine

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Patients with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) have impaired insulin-induced enhancement of vasodilator responses. The incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), beyond its effects on blood glucose, has beneficial actions on vascular function. This study, therefore, aimed to assess whether GLP-1 affects insulin-stimulated vasodilator reactivity in patients with the MetS. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Forearm blood flow responses to acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were assessed in MetS patients before and after the addition of GLP-1 to an intra-arterial infusion of saline (n = 5) or insulin (n = 5). The possible involvement of oxidative stress in the vascular effects of GLP-1 in this setting was investigated by infusion of vitamin C (n = 5). The receptor specificity of GLP-1 effect during hyperinsulinemia was assessed by infusing its metabolite GLP-1(9-36) (n = 5). The metabolic actions of GLP-1 were also tested by analyzing forearm glucose disposal during hyperinsulinemia (n = 5). RESULTS In MetS patients, GLP-1 enhanced endothelium-dependent and -independent responses to ACh and SNP, respectively, during hyperinsulinemia (P < 0.001 for both), but not during saline (P > 0.05 for both). No changes in vasodilator reactivity to ACh and SNP were seen after GLP-1 was added to insulin and vitamin C (P > 0.05 for both) and after GLP-1(9-36) was given during hyperinsulinemia (P > 0.05 for both). Also, GLP-1 did not affect forearm glucose extraction and uptake during hyperinsulinemia (P > 0.05 for both). CONCLUSIONS In patients with the MetS, GLP-1 improves insulin-mediated enhancement of endothelium-dependent and -independent vascular reactivity. This effect may be influenced by vascular oxidative stress and is possibly exerted through a receptor-mediated mechanism. PMID:23069838

  14. Direct electron transfer type disposable sensor strip for glucose sensing employing an engineered FAD glucose dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yuki; Ferri, Stefano; Huynh, Mai Linh; Shimizu, Hitomi; Yamaoka, Hideaki; Sode, Koji

    2013-02-01

    The FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (FADGDH) from Burkholderia cepacia has several attractive features for glucose sensing. However, expanding the application of this enzyme requires improvement of its substrate specificity, especially decreasing its high activity toward maltose. A three-dimensional structural model of the FADGDH catalytic subunit was generated by homology modeling. By comparing the predicted active site with that of glucose oxidase, the two amino acid residues serine 326 and serine 365 were targeted for site-directed mutagenesis. The single mutations that produced the highest glucose specificity were combined, leading to the creation of the S326Q/S365Y double mutant, which was virtually nonreactive to maltose while retaining high glucose dehydrogenase activity. The engineered FADGDH was used to develop a direct electron transfer-type, disposable glucose sensor strip by immobilizing the enzyme complex onto a carbon screen-printed electrode. While the electrode employing wild-type FADGDH provided dangerously flawed results in the presence of maltose, the sensor employing our engineered FADGDH showed a clear glucose concentration-dependent response that was not affected by the presence of maltose. PMID:23273282

  15. Local overexpression of the myostatin propeptide increases glucose transporter expression and enhances skeletal muscle glucose disposal

    PubMed Central

    Jarmin, S.; Eilers, W.; Elashry, M.; Andersen, D. K.; Dickson, G.; Foster, K.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) in skeletal muscle is a prerequisite for type 2 diabetes and is often associated with obesity. IR also develops alongside muscle atrophy in older individuals in sarcopenic obesity. The molecular defects that underpin this syndrome are not well characterized, and there is no licensed treatment. Deletion of the transforming growth factor-β family member myostatin, or sequestration of the active peptide by overexpression of the myostatin propeptide/latency-associated peptide (ProMyo) results in both muscle hypertrophy and reduced obesity and IR. We aimed to establish whether local myostatin inhibition would have a paracrine/autocrine effect to enhance glucose disposal beyond that simply generated by increased muscle mass, and the mechanisms involved. We directly injected adeno-associated virus expressing ProMyo in right tibialis cranialis/extensor digitorum longus muscles of rats and saline in left muscles and compared the effects after 17 days. Both test muscles were increased in size (by 7 and 11%) and showed increased radiolabeled 2-deoxyglucose uptake (26 and 47%) and glycogen storage (28 and 41%) per unit mass during an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. This was likely mediated through increased membrane protein levels of GLUT1 (19% higher) and GLUT4 (63% higher). Interestingly, phosphorylation of phosphoinositol 3-kinase signaling intermediates and AMP-activated kinase was slightly decreased, possibly because of reduced expression of insulin-like growth factor-I in these muscles. Thus, myostatin inhibition has direct effects to enhance glucose disposal in muscle beyond that expected of hypertrophy alone, and this approach may offer potential for the therapy of IR syndromes. PMID:24473441

  16. Glucose Turnover and Disposal in Maturity-Onset Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, H. F.; Moorhouse, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    The glucose turnover rate in maturity-onset diabetes in man has been variously reported as increased, normal, and decreased. The present experiments suggest that these discrepancies may have been due to methodology, and to nonrecognition of a circadian cycle in the glucose turnover rate that is present in health, and marked in diabetes. During the early morning hours the glucose turnover rate in maturity-onset diabetes is increased in proportion to the fasting blood glucose level. It may reach three to four times the rate found in health. During the evening hours the increments are about one-half as great. The glucose outflow rate constant, k, lower in diabetes than in health, is also lower in both groups in the evening than in the morning. An analysis of the relative contributions of glucose overproduction and underutilization to the development of hyperglycemia in maturity-onset diabetes indicates that overproduction is the greater factor. The relative role of underutilization appears to increase as the fasting blood glucose level increases. The circulating glucose oxidation rate in maturity-onset diabetes is only slightly lower than in health, but the fraction oxidized is markedly lower, and only a small fraction is excreted. The principal conclusion is that in maturity-onset diabetes there is a hypertrophied flux of endogenous glucose, most of which is neither oxidized nor excreted. The precursors and the qualitative and quantitative metabolic fates of this excess glucose are unknown. Images PMID:4750440

  17. Ophthalmic glucose sensing: a novel monosaccharide sensing disposable and colorless contact lens

    PubMed Central

    Badugu, Ramachandram; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a technology for continuous tear glucose monitoring, and therefore potentially blood glucose monitoring, using a daily use, disposable contact lens embedded with sugar-sensing boronic acid containing fluorophores. The novelty of our approach is two fold. Firstly, the notion of sensing extremely low glucose concentrations in tears by our approach, and secondly, the unique compatibility of our new probes with the internal environment of the disposable, off-the-shelf, contact lenses, chosen because the physiological compatibility of disposable plastic contact lenses has already been assessed and optimized with regard to vision correction, size and oxygen / analyte permeability. Our findings show that our approach is indeed suitable for the continuous monitoring of tear glucose levels in the concentration range (50–500 µM), which track blood glucose levels which are ≈ 5–10 fold higher. We believe our approach offers unique opportunities for non-invasive continuous glucose monitoring for diabetics, especially since many have eye disorders and require vision correction by either contact lenses or glasses, which is thought to be due to glycation of protein in blood vessels. PMID:15152329

  18. Disposable amperometric biosensor based on nanostructured bacteriophages for glucose detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yu Ri; Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Kim, Ju Hwan; Nam, Chang Hoon; Kim, Soo Won

    2010-10-01

    The selection of electrode material profoundly influences biosensor science and engineering, as it heavily influences biosensor sensitivity. Here we propose a novel electrochemical detection method using a working electrode consisting of bio-nanowires from genetically modified filamentous phages and nanoparticles. fd-tet p8MMM filamentous phages displaying a three-methionine (MMM) peptide on the major coat protein pVIII (designated p8MMM phages) were immobilized on the active area of an electrochemical sensor through physical adsorption and chemical bonding. Bio-nanowires composed of p8MMM phages and silver nanoparticles facilitated sensitive, rapid and selective detection of particular molecules. We explored whether the composite electrode with bio-nanowires was an effective platform to detect the glucose oxidase. The current response of the bio-nanowire sensor was high at various glucose concentrations (0.1 µm-0.1 mM). This method provides a considerable advantage to demonstrate analyte detection over low concentration ranges. Especially, phage-enabled bio-nanowires can serve as receptors with high affinity and specificity for the detection of particular biomolecules and provide a convenient platform for designing site-directed multifunctional scaffolds based on bacteriophages and may serve as a simple method for label-free detection.

  19. Facile and scalable disposable sensor based on laser engraved graphene for electrochemical detection of glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehrani, Farshad; Bavarian, Behzad

    2016-06-01

    A novel and highly sensitive disposable glucose sensor strip was developed using direct laser engraved graphene (DLEG) decorated with pulse deposited copper nanocubes (CuNCs). The high reproducibility (96.8%), stability (97.4%) and low cost demonstrated by this 3-step fabrication method indicates that it could be used for high volume manufacturing of disposable glucose strips. The fabrication method also allows for a high degree of flexibility, allowing for control of the electrode size, design, and functionalization method. Additionally, the excellent selectivity and sensitivity (4,532.2 μA/mM.cm2), low detection limit (250 nM), and suitable linear range of 25 μM–4 mM, suggests that these sensors may be a great potential platform for glucose detection within the physiological range for tear, saliva, and/or sweat.

  20. Facile and scalable disposable sensor based on laser engraved graphene for electrochemical detection of glucose

    PubMed Central

    Tehrani, Farshad; Bavarian, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    A novel and highly sensitive disposable glucose sensor strip was developed using direct laser engraved graphene (DLEG) decorated with pulse deposited copper nanocubes (CuNCs). The high reproducibility (96.8%), stability (97.4%) and low cost demonstrated by this 3-step fabrication method indicates that it could be used for high volume manufacturing of disposable glucose strips. The fabrication method also allows for a high degree of flexibility, allowing for control of the electrode size, design, and functionalization method. Additionally, the excellent selectivity and sensitivity (4,532.2 μA/mM.cm2), low detection limit (250 nM), and suitable linear range of 25 μM–4 mM, suggests that these sensors may be a great potential platform for glucose detection within the physiological range for tear, saliva, and/or sweat. PMID:27306706

  1. Design and synthesis of inositolphosphoglycan putative insulin mediators.

    PubMed

    López-Prados, Javier; Cuevas, Félix; Reichardt, Niels-Christian; de Paz, José-Luis; Morales, Ezequiel Q; Martín-Lomas, Manuel

    2005-03-01

    The binding modes of a series of molecules, containing the glucosamine (1-->6) myo-inositol structural motif, into the ATP binding site of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) have been analysed using molecular docking. These calculations predict that the presence of a phosphate group at the non-reducing end in pseudodisaccharide and pseudotrisaccharide structures properly orientate the molecule into the binding site and that pseudotrisaccharide structures present the best shape complementarity. Therefore, pseudodisaccharides and pseudotrisaccharides have been synthesised from common intermediates using effective synthetic strategies. On the basis of this synthetic chemistry, the feasibility of constructing small pseudotrisaccharide libraries on solid-phase using the same intermediates has been explored. The results from the biological evaluation of these molecules provide additional support to an insulin-mediated signalling system which involves the intermediacy of inositolphosphoglycans as putative insulin mediators. PMID:15731862

  2. Glucose oxidation and nonoxidative glucose disposal during prolonged fasts of the northern elephant seal pup (Mirounga angustirostris).

    PubMed

    Houser, Dorian S; Crocker, Daniel E; Tift, Michael S; Champagne, Cory D

    2012-09-01

    Elephant seal weanlings demonstrate rates of endogenous glucose production (EGP) during protracted fasts that are higher than predicted on the basis of mass and time fasting. To determine the nonoxidative and oxidative fate of endogenously synthesized glucose, substrate oxidation, metabolic rate, glycolysis, and EGP were measured in fasting weanlings. Eight weanlings were sampled at 14 days of fasting, and a separate group of nine weanlings was sampled at 49 days of fasting. Metabolic rate was determined via flow-through respirometry, and substrate-specific oxidation was determined from the respiratory quotient and urinary nitrogen measurements. The rate of glucose disposal (Glu((R)(d))) was determined through a primed, constant infusion of [3-(3)H]glucose, and glycolysis was determined from the rate of appearance of (3)H in the body water pool. Glu((R)(d)) was 1.41 ± 0.27 and 0.95 ± 0.21 mmol/min in the early and late fasting groups, respectively. Nearly all EGP went through glycolysis, but the percentage of Glu((R)(d)) oxidized to meet the daily metabolic demand was only 24.1 ± 4.4% and 16.7 ± 5.9% between the early and late fasting groups. Glucose oxidation was consistently less than 10% of the metabolic rate in both groups. This suggests that high rates of EGP do not support substrate provisions for glucose-demanding tissues. It is hypothesized that rates of EGP may be ancillary to the upregulation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle to meet high rates of lipid oxidation while mitigating ketosis. PMID:22814669

  3. Normalization of blood glucose in diabetic rats with phlorizin treatment reverses insulin-resistant glucose transport in adipose cells without restoring glucose transporter gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, B B; Shulman, G I; DeFronzo, R A; Cushman, S W; Rossetti, L

    1991-01-01

    Evidence is emerging for a direct role of glucose, independent of changes in insulin, in the regulation of cellular glucose transport and glucose utilization in vivo. In this study we investigate potential cellular and molecular mechanisms for this regulatory effect of glucose by determining how normalization of glycemia without insulin therapy in diabetic rats influences 3-O-methylglucose transport and the expression and translocation of two genetically distinct species of glucose transporters (GTs) in adipose cells. These results are compared with alterations in glucose disposal in vivo measured by euglycemic clamp. In rats rendered diabetic by 90% pancreatectomy, insulin-stimulated glucose transport in adipose cells is decreased 50% in parallel with reduced insulin-mediated glucose disposal in vivo. Levels of adipose/muscle GTs measured by immunoblotting are decreased in adipose cell subcellular membrane fractions, as are the corresponding mRNA levels assessed by Northern blotting of total adipose cell RNA. Normalization of blood glucose in diabetic rats with phlorizin, which impairs renal tubular glucose reabsorption and thus enhances glucose excretion, restores insulin-stimulated glucose transport in adipose cells and insulin-mediated glucose disposal in vivo. Importantly, levels of the adipose/muscle GT protein remain 43% reduced in the low-density microsomes in the basal state and 46% reduced in the plasma membranes in the insulin-stimulated state. Adipose/muscle GT mRNA levels remain approximately 50% depressed. Levels of the HepG2/brain GT protein and mRNA are unaltered by diabetes or phlorizin treatment. Thus, changes in ambient glucose independent of changes in ambient insulin can regulate the glucose transport response to insulin in isolated adipose cells and changes in responsiveness parallel alterations in glucose uptake in vivo. Since this effect can occur without alteration in the expression of the two species of glucose transporters present in

  4. Exercise Improves Glucose Disposal and Insulin Signaling in Pregnant Mice Fed a High Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Lindsay G; Ngo Tenlep, Sara Y; Woollett, Laura A; Pearson, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Objective Physical activity has been suggested as a non-pharmacological intervention that can be used to improve glucose homeostasis in women with gestational diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of voluntary exercise on glucose tolerance and body composition in pregnant high fat diet fed mice. Methods Female mice were put on a standard diet or high fat diet for two weeks. The mice were then split into 4 groups; control standard diet fed, exercise standard diet fed, control high fat diet fed, and exercise high fat diet fed. Exercise mice had voluntary access to a running wheel in their home cage one week prior to mating, during mating, and throughout pregnancy. Glucose tolerance and body composition were measured during pregnancy. Akt levels were quantified in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue isolated from saline or insulin injected pregnant dams as a marker for insulin signaling. Results Consumption of the high fat diet led to significantly increased body weight, fat mass, and impaired glucose tolerance in control mice. However, voluntary running in the high fat diet fed dams significantly reduced weight gain and fat mass and ultimately improved glucose tolerance compared to control high fat diet fed dams. Further, body weight, fat mass, and glucose disposal in exercise high fat diet dams were indistinguishable from control dams fed the standard diet. High fat diet fed exercise dams also had significantly increased insulin stimulated phosphorylated Akt expression in adipose tissue, but not skeletal muscle, compared to control dams on high fat diet. Conclusion The use of voluntary exercise improves glucose homeostasis and body composition in pregnant female mice. Thus, future studies could investigate potential long-term health benefits in offspring born to obese exercising dams. PMID:26966635

  5. Urocortin 3 activates AMPK and AKT pathways and enhances glucose disposal in rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Roustit, Manon M; Vaughan, Joan M; Jamieson, Pauline M; Cleasby, Mark E

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) in skeletal muscle is an important component of both type 2 diabetes and the syndrome of sarcopaenic obesity, for which there are no effective therapies. Urocortins (UCNs) are not only well established as neuropeptides but also have their roles in metabolism in peripheral tissues. We have shown recently that global overexpression of UCN3 resulted in muscular hypertrophy and resistance to the adverse metabolic effects of a high-fat diet. Herein, we aimed to establish whether short-term local UCN3 expression could enhance glucose disposal and insulin signalling in skeletal muscle. UCN3 was found to be expressed in right tibialis cranialis and extensor digitorum longus muscles of rats by in vivo electrotransfer and the effects studied vs the contralateral muscles after 1 week. No increase in muscle mass was detected, but test muscles showed 19% larger muscle fibre diameter (P=0.030), associated with increased IGF1 and IGF1 receptor mRNA and increased SER256 phosphorylation of forkhead transcription factor. Glucose clearance into the test muscles after an intraperitoneal glucose load was increased by 23% (P=0.018) per unit mass, associated with increased GLUT1 (34% increase; P=0.026) and GLUT4 (48% increase; P=0.0009) proteins, and significantly increased phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1, AKT, AKT substrate of 160 kDa, glycogen synthase kinase-3β, AMP-activated protein kinase and its substrate acetyl coA carboxylase. Thus, UCN3 expression enhances glucose disposal and signalling in muscle by an autocrine/paracrine mechanism that is separate from its pro-hypertrophic effects, implying that such a manipulation may have promised for the treatment of IR syndromes including sarcopaenic obesity. PMID:25122003

  6. Retinoblastoma Protein Knockdown Favors Oxidative Metabolism and Glucose and Fatty Acid Disposal in Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Petar D; Ribot, Joan; López-Mejía, Isabel C; Fajas, Lluís; Palou, Andreu; Bonet, M Luisa

    2016-03-01

    Deficiency in the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) favors leanness and a healthy metabolic profile in mice largely attributed to activation of oxidative metabolism in white and brown adipose tissues. Less is known about Rb modulation of skeletal muscle metabolism. This was studied here by transiently knocking down Rb expression in differentiated C2C12 myotubes using small interfering RNAs. Compared with control cells transfected with non-targeting RNAs, myotubes silenced for Rb (by 80-90%) had increased expression of genes related to fatty acid uptake and oxidation such as Cd36 and Cpt1b (by 61% and 42%, respectively), increased Mitofusin 2 protein content (∼2.5-fold increase), increased mitochondrial to nuclear DNA ratio (by 48%), increased oxygen consumption (by 65%) and decreased intracellular lipid accumulation. Rb silenced myotubes also displayed up-regulated levels of glucose transporter type 4 expression (∼5-fold increase), increased basal glucose uptake, and enhanced insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation. Interestingly, exercise in mice led to increased Rb phosphorylation (inactivation) in skeletal muscle as evidenced by immunohistochemistry analysis. In conclusion, the silencing of Rb enhances mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and fatty acid and glucose disposal in skeletal myotubes, and changes in Rb status may contribute to muscle physiological adaptation to exercise. PMID:26241807

  7. Laforin and malin knockout mice have normal glucose disposal and insulin sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    DePaoli-Roach, Anna A.; Segvich, Dyann M.; Meyer, Catalina M.; Rahimi, Yasmeen; Worby, Carolyn A.; Gentry, Matthew S.; Roach, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Lafora disease is a fatal, progressive myoclonus epilepsy caused in ∼90% of cases by mutations in the EPM2A or EPM2B genes. Characteristic of the disease is the formation of Lafora bodies, insoluble deposits containing abnormal glycogen-like material in many tissues, including neurons, muscle, heart and liver. Because glycogen is important for glucose homeostasis, the aberrant glycogen metabolism in Lafora disease might disturb whole-body glucose handling. Indeed, Vernia et al. [Vernia, S., Heredia, M., Criado, O., Rodriguez de Cordoba, S., Garcia-Roves, P.M., Cansell, C., Denis, R., Luquet, S., Foufelle, F., Ferre, P. et al. (2011) Laforin, a dual-specificity phosphatase involved in Lafora disease, regulates insulin response and whole-body energy balance in mice. Hum. Mol. Genet., 20, 2571–2584] reported that Epm2a−/− mice had enhanced glucose disposal and insulin sensitivity, leading them to suggest that laforin, the Epm2a gene product, is involved in insulin signaling. We analyzed 3-month- and 6–7-month-old Epm2a−/− mice and observed no differences in glucose tolerance tests (GTTs) or insulin tolerance tests (ITTs) compared with wild-type mice of matched genetic background. At 3 months, Epm2b−/− mice also showed no differences in GTTs and ITTs. In the 6–7-month-old Epm2a−/− mice, there was no evidence for increased insulin stimulation of the phosphorylation of Akt, GSK-3 or S6 in skeletal muscle, liver and heart. From metabolic analyses, these animals were normal with regard to food intake, oxygen consumption, energy expenditure and respiratory exchange ratio. By dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan, body composition was unaltered at 3 or 6–7 months of age. Echocardiography showed no defects of cardiac function in Epm2a−/− or Epm2b−/− mice. We conclude that laforin and malin have no effect on whole-body glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity, and that laforin is not involved in insulin signaling. PMID:22186021

  8. Hexim1, a Novel Regulator of Leptin Function, Modulates Obesity and Glucose Disposal.

    PubMed

    Dhar-Mascareno, Manya; Ramirez, Susan N; Rozenberg, Inna; Rouille, Yves; Kral, John G; Mascareno, Eduardo J

    2016-03-01

    Leptin triggers signaling events with significant transcriptional responses that are essential to metabolic processes affecting obesity and glucose disposal. We asked whether hexamethylene bis-acetamide inducible-1 (Hexim1), an inhibitor of RNA II polymerase-dependent transcription elongation, regulates leptin-Janus kinase 2 signaling axis in the hypothalamus. We subjected C57BL6 Hexim1 heterozygous (HT) mice to high-fat diet and when compared with wild type, HT mice were resistant to high-fat diet-induced weight gain and remain insulin sensitive. HT mice exhibited increased leptin-pY(705)Stat3 signaling in the hypothalamus, with normal adipocyte size, increased type I oxidative muscle fiber density, and enhanced glucose transporter 4 expression. We also observed that normal Hexim1 protein level is required to facilitate the expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs) required for adipogenesis and inducible suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS) expression. Further support on the role of Hexim1 regulating C/EBPs during adipocyte differentiation was shown when HT 3T3L1 fibroblasts failed to undergo adipogenesis. Hexim1 selectively modulates leptin-mediated signal transduction pathways in the hypothalamus, the expression of C/EBPs and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR γ) in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue during the adaptation to metabolic stress. We postulate that Hexim1 might be a novel factor involved in maintaining whole-body energy balance. PMID:26859361

  9. Hexim1, a Novel Regulator of Leptin Function, Modulates Obesity and Glucose Disposal

    PubMed Central

    Dhar-Mascareno, Manya; Ramirez, Susan N.; Rozenberg, Inna; Rouille, Yves; Kral, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Leptin triggers signaling events with significant transcriptional responses that are essential to metabolic processes affecting obesity and glucose disposal. We asked whether hexamethylene bis-acetamide inducible-1 (Hexim1), an inhibitor of RNA II polymerase-dependent transcription elongation, regulates leptin-Janus kinase 2 signaling axis in the hypothalamus. We subjected C57BL6 Hexim1 heterozygous (HT) mice to high-fat diet and when compared with wild type, HT mice were resistant to high-fat diet-induced weight gain and remain insulin sensitive. HT mice exhibited increased leptin-pY705Stat3 signaling in the hypothalamus, with normal adipocyte size, increased type I oxidative muscle fiber density, and enhanced glucose transporter 4 expression. We also observed that normal Hexim1 protein level is required to facilitate the expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs) required for adipogenesis and inducible suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS) expression. Further support on the role of Hexim1 regulating C/EBPs during adipocyte differentiation was shown when HT 3T3L1 fibroblasts failed to undergo adipogenesis. Hexim1 selectively modulates leptin-mediated signal transduction pathways in the hypothalamus, the expression of C/EBPs and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR γ) in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue during the adaptation to metabolic stress. We postulate that Hexim1 might be a novel factor involved in maintaining whole-body energy balance. PMID:26859361

  10. Microfluidic devices with disposable enzyme electrode for electrochemical monitoring of glucose concentrations.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Zhang, Fan; Shi, Jian; Wang, Li; Tian, Jing-Hua; Zhou, Xiong-Tu; Jiang, Lian-Mei; Liu, Li; Zhao, Zhen-Jie; He, Pin-Gang; Chen, Yong

    2011-11-01

    This article describes the fabrication of tube-like microchannels made of UV curable polymer on a glass substrate and the device assembling with a disposable enzyme-working electrode for high-sensitivity electrochemical detection. While both reference and counter electrodes are patterned on the surface of the glass substrate, the working electrode is flipped on the top of the channel with an open access, providing a face-to-face probing configuration. When the enzyme electrode is contaminated or degraded, it can be easily replaced by a new one, keeping the main body of the device and the detection schema unchanged. Using glucose oxidase-coated gold electrodes, we were able to determine a linear amperometry response to the glucose concentrations in the range of 2-16  mM. By replacing the as-prepared working electrode by the one after thermal treatments, we showed a much more degraded enzyme electrode activity, enabling efficient determination of the electrode quality as well as the whole process optimization. PMID:22038673

  11. Stearidonic and γ-linolenic acids in echium oil improves glucose disposal in insulin resistant monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, K; Flynn, D M; Jenkins, K A; Wilson, M D; Chilton, F H

    2013-07-01

    Echium oil (EO) contains stearidonic acid (18:4), a n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), and gamma-linolenic acids (18:3), a n-6 PUFA that can be converted to long chain (LC)-PUFAs. We aimed to compare a safflower oil (SO)-enriched diet to EO- and fish oil (FO)-enriched diets on circulating and tissue PUFAs levels and glycemic, inflammatory, and cardiovascular health biomarkers in insulin resistant African green monkeys. In a Latin-square cross-over study, eight monkeys consumed matched diets for 6 weeks with 3-week washout periods. Monkeys consuming FO had significantly higher levels of n-3 LC-PUFAs and EO supplementation resulted in higher levels of circulating n-3 LC-PUFAs and a significant increase in dihomo-gamma linolenic acid (DGLA) in red blood cells and muscle. Glucose disposal was improved after EO consumption. These data suggest that PUFAs in EO supplementation have the capacity to alter circulating, RBC and muscle LC-PUFA levels and improve glucose tolerance in insulin-resistant monkeys. PMID:23664597

  12. Cultured 3T3L1 adipocytes dispose of excess medium glucose as lactate under abundant oxygen availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabater, David; Arriarán, Sofía; Romero, María Del Mar; Agnelli, Silvia; Remesar, Xavier; Fernández-López, José Antonio; Alemany, Marià

    2014-01-01

    White adipose tissue (WAT) produces lactate in significant amount from circulating glucose, especially in obesity;Under normoxia, 3T3L1 cells secrete large quantities of lactate to the medium, again at the expense of glucose and proportionally to its levels. Most of the glucose was converted to lactate with only part of it being used to synthesize fat. Cultured adipocytes were largely anaerobic, but this was not a Warburg-like process. It is speculated that the massive production of lactate, is a process of defense of the adipocyte, used to dispose of excess glucose. This way, the adipocyte exports glucose carbon (and reduces the problem of excess substrate availability) to the liver, but the process may be also a mechanism of short-term control of hyperglycemia. The in vivo data obtained from adipose tissue of male rats agree with this interpretation.

  13. Loss of neuronatin promotes "browning" of primary mouse adipocytes while reducing Glut1-mediated glucose disposal.

    PubMed

    Gburcik, Valentina; Cleasby, Mark E; Timmons, James A

    2013-04-15

    Failure of white adipose tissue to appropriately store excess metabolic substrate seems to underpin obesity-associated type 2 diabetes. Encouraging "browning" of white adipose has been suggested as a therapeutic strategy to help dispose of excess stored lipid and ameliorate the resulting insulin resistance. Genetic variation at the DNA locus encoding the novel proteolipid neuronatin has been associated with obesity, and we recently observed that neuronatin expression is reduced in subcutaneous adipose tissue from obese humans. Thus, to explore the function of neuronatin further, we used RNAi to silence its expression in murine primary adipocyte cultures and examined the effects on adipocyte phenotype. We found that primary adipocytes express only the longer isoform of neuronatin. Loss of neuronatin led to increased mitochondrial biogenesis, indicated by greater intensity of MitoTracker Green staining. This was accompanied by increased expression of UCP1 and the key genes in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, PGC-1α, Cox8b, and Cox4 in primary subcutaneous white adipocytes, indicative of a "browning" effect. In addition, phosphorylation of AMPK and ACC was increased, suggestive of increased fatty acid utilization. Similar, but less pronounced, effects of neuronatin silencing were also noted in primary brown adipocytes. In contrast, loss of neuronatin caused a reduction in both basal and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis, likely mediated by a reduction in Glut1 protein upon silencing of neuronatin. In contrast, loss of neuronatin had no effect on insulin signaling. In conclusion, neuronatin appears to be a novel regulator of browning and metabolic substrate disposal in white adipocytes. PMID:23482445

  14. A disposable glucose biosensor based on drop-coating of screen-printed carbon electrodes with magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bo-Wen; Chen, Wen-Chang

    2006-09-01

    Magnetic Fe 3O 4 nanoparticles (Nano-Fe 3O 4) were prepared by co-precipitation method and a disposable glucose biosensor was fabricated by drop coating of ferricyanide (Ferri)-Nano-Fe 3O 4 mixture onto the surface of screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs), and then by layering-on glucose oxidase (GOD). The electrochemical characteristics of modified SPCEs were analyzed by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and chronoamperometry (CA). The glucose biosensors exhibit a relatively fast response (<15 s) and high sensitivity (ca. 1.74 μA mM -1) with a wide linear range up to 33.3 mM (600 mg dL -1) of glucose.

  15. 18F9 (4-(3,6-bis (ethoxycarbonyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydrothieno (2,3-c) pyridin-2-ylamino)-4-oxobutanoic acid) enhances insulin-mediated glucose uptake in vitro and exhibits antidiabetic activity in vivo in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Anandharajan, Rathinasabapathy; Sayyed, Sufyan G; Doshi, Lalit S; Dixit, Pooja; Chandak, Prakash G; Dixit, Amol V; Brahma, Manoja K; Deshmukh, Nitin J; Gupte, Ravindra; Damre, Anagha; Suthar, Jaspreet; Padigaru, Muralidhara; Sharma, Somesh D; Nemmani, Kumar V S

    2009-10-01

    Insulin resistance is central to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Previous studies have demonstrated that compounds that cause adipogenesis and improve glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 cells are potential insulin sensitizers. Therefore, we evaluated one such compound, 18F9, for (1) adipogenesis in human subcutaneous preadipocyte (SQ) cells, (2) glucose uptake in human skeletal muscle myotubes and SQ cells, and (3) antidiabetic activity in db/db mice. We also investigated its effect on ex vivo glucose uptake in soleus muscle isolated from continuously treated db/db mice. Gene expression profiling in soleus muscle and epididymal fat of db/db mice was performed to understand its effect on glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism, and thermogenesis. 18F9 enhanced adipogenesis in SQ cells and increased glucose uptake in SQ and human skeletal muscle myotubes cells. In db/db mice, 18F9 exhibited dose-dependent reduction in plasma glucose and insulin level. Interestingly, 18F9 was as efficacious as rosiglitazone but did not cause body weight gain and hepatic adverse effects. In addition, 18F9 demonstrated no change in plasma volume in Wistar rats. Furthermore, it enhanced ex vivo glucose uptake in soleus muscles in these mice, which substantiates our in vitro findings. Human peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma transactivation assay revealed a weak peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma transactivation potential (44% of rosiglitazone at 10 mumol/L) of 18F9. Gene expression profiling indicated that 18F9 increased insulin sensitivity mainly through a phosphoinositide 3-kinase-dependent mechanism. 18F9 also up-regulated genes involved in lipid transport and synthesis at par with rosiglitazone. Unlike rosiglitazone, 18F9 elevated the expression of Pdk4. In addition, 18F9 elevated the expression of glycogen synthase and adiponectin significantly higher than rosiglitazone. Taken together, these observations suggest that 18F9 is a safer and potent insulin

  16. Disposable electrochemiluminescent biosensor using bidentate-chelated CdTe quantum dots as emitters for sensitive detection of glucose.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lingxiao; Deng, Shengyuan; Lei, Jianping; Ju, Huangxian

    2012-01-01

    A novel disposable solid-state electrochemiluminescent (ECL) biosensor was fabricated by immobilizing glucose oxidase and surface-unpassivated CdTe quantum dots (QDs) on a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE). The surface morphology of the biosensor was characterized with scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. With dissolved O(2) as an endogenous coreactant, QDs/SPCE showed strong ECL emission in pH 9.0 HCl-Tris buffer solution with low ECL peak potential at -0.89 V. The ECL intensity was twice that with hydrogen peroxide as coreactant at the same concentration. This phenomenon meant the ECL decreased upon consumption of dissolved O(2) and thus could be applied to the construction of oxidase-based ECL biosensors. With glucose oxidase as a model enzyme, the biosensor showed rapid response to glucose with a linear range of 0.8 to 100 μM and a detection limit of 0.3 μM. Further detection of glucose contained in human serum samples showed acceptable sensitivity and selectivity. This work provided a promising application of QDs in ECL-based disposable biosensors. PMID:22034620

  17. A novel method for simulating insulin mediated GLUT4 translocation.

    PubMed

    Jezewski, Andrew J; Larson, Joshua J; Wysocki, Beata; Davis, Paul H; Wysocki, Tadeusz

    2014-12-01

    Glucose transport in humans is a vital process which is tightly regulated by the endocrine system. Specifically, the insulin hormone triggers a cascade of intracellular signals in target cells mediating the uptake of glucose. Insulin signaling triggers cellular relocalization of the glucose transporter protein GLUT4 to the cell surface, which is primarily responsible for regulated glucose import. Pathology associated with the disruption of this pathway can lead to metabolic disorders, such as type II diabetes mellitus, characterized by the failure of cells to appropriately uptake glucose from the blood. We describe a novel simulation tool of the insulin intracellular response, incorporating the latest findings regarding As160 and GEF interactions. The simulation tool differs from previous computational approaches which employ algebraic or differential equations; instead, the tool incorporates statistical variations of kinetic constants and initial molecular concentrations which more accurately mimic the intracellular environment. Using this approach, we successfully recapitulate observed in vitro insulin responses, plus the effects of Wortmannin-like inhibition of the pathway. The developed tool provides insight into transient changes in molecule concentrations throughout the insulin signaling pathway, and may be employed to identify or evaluate potentially critical components of this pathway, including those associated with insulin resistance. In the future, this highly tractable platform may be useful for simulating other complex cell signaling pathways. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014;111: 2454-2465. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24917169

  18. Disposable Non-Enzymatic Glucose Sensors Using Screen-Printed Nickel/Carbon Composites on Indium Tin Oxide Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Won-Yong; Choi, Young-Bong; Kim, Hyug-Han

    2015-01-01

    Disposable screen-printed nickel/carbon composites on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes (DSPNCE) were developed for the detection of glucose without enzymes. The DSPNCE were prepared by screen-printing the ITO substrate with a 50 wt% nickel/carbon composite, followed by curing at 400 °C for 30 min. The redox couple of Ni(OH)2/NiOOH was deposited on the surface of the electrodes via cyclic voltammetry (CV), scanning from 0–1.5 V for 30 cycles in 0.1 M NaOH solution. The DSPNCE were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrochemical methods. The resulting electrical currents, measured by CV and chronoamperometry at 0.65 V vs. Ag/AgCl, showed a good linear response with glucose concentrations from 1.0–10 mM. Also, the prepared electrodes showed no interference from common physiologic interferents such as uric acid (UA) or ascorbic acid (AA). Therefore, this approach allowed the development of a simple, disposable glucose biosensor. PMID:26690438

  19. Disposable Non-Enzymatic Glucose Sensors Using Screen-Printed Nickel/Carbon Composites on Indium Tin Oxide Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Won-Yong; Choi, Young-Bong; Kim, Hyug-Han

    2015-01-01

    Disposable screen-printed nickel/carbon composites on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes (DSPNCE) were developed for the detection of glucose without enzymes. The DSPNCE were prepared by screen-printing the ITO substrate with a 50 wt% nickel/carbon composite, followed by curing at 400 °C for 30 min. The redox couple of Ni(OH)₂/NiOOH was deposited on the surface of the electrodes via cyclic voltammetry (CV), scanning from 0-1.5 V for 30 cycles in 0.1 M NaOH solution. The DSPNCE were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrochemical methods. The resulting electrical currents, measured by CV and chronoamperometry at 0.65 V vs. Ag/AgCl, showed a good linear response with glucose concentrations from 1.0-10 mM. Also, the prepared electrodes showed no interference from common physiologic interferents such as uric acid (UA) or ascorbic acid (AA). Therefore, this approach allowed the development of a simple, disposable glucose biosensor. PMID:26690438

  20. A disposable, reagentless, third-generation glucose biosensor based on overoxidized poly(pyrrole)/tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane composite.

    PubMed

    Palmisano, Francesco; Zambonin, Pier Giorgio; Centonze, Diego; Quinto, Maurizio

    2002-12-01

    A disposable glucose biosensor based on glucose oxidase immobilized on tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane (ITF-TCNQ) conducting organic salt synthesized in situ onto an overoxidized poly(pyrrole) (PPy(ox).) film is described. The TIF-TCNQ crystals grow through the nonconducting polypyrrole film (ensuring electrical connection to the underlying Pt electrode) and emerge from the film forming a treelike structure. The PPy(ox) film prevents the interfering substances from reaching the electrode surface. The sensor behavior can be modeled by assuming a direct reoxidation of the enzyme at the surface of the TTF-TCNQ crystals. A heterogeneous rate constant around 10(-6) - 10(-7) cm s(-1) has been estimated. The biosensor is nearly oxygen- and interference-free and when integrated in a flow injection system displays a remarkable sensitivity (70 nA/mM) and stability. PMID:12498183

  1. Soy pinitol acts partly as an insulin sensitizer or insulin mediator in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Do, Gyeong-Min; Choi, Myung-Sook; Kim, Hye-Jin; Woo, Myung-Nam; Lee, Mi-Kyung

    2007-01-01

    The blood glucose-lowering property of pinitol is mediated via the insulin signaling pathway. This study was carried out to evaluate the effects of soy pinitol on adipogenesis in a 3T3-L1 cell line; 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were treated with pinitol (0–1 mM) together with insulin for 9 days. The regulation of lipid metabolism was assessed by oil-red-O staining of intracellular lipids and real-time PCR of adipogenesis-related factors. The inhibition of cell proliferation was estimated by MTT assay. Pinitol treatment did not inhibit lipid accumulation, nor did it affect expression of adipogenesis-related factors, including ADD1, aP2 and FAS, in a dose-dependent manner. Expression of adiponectin, GLUT4, IRS, C/EBPα and PPARγ mRNAs, however, increased in cells treated with 0.5 mM and/or 1 mM pinitol. Pinitol treatment did not affect the inhibition of cell growth and proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, we suggest that pinitol is nontoxic to this cell line, and that it enhances adipogenesis by acting as an insulin sensitizer or insulin mediator via the upregulation of adiponectin, GLUT4, IRS, C/EBPα and PPARγ in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. PMID:18850231

  2. Disposable amperometric glucose sensor electrode with enzyme-immobilized nitrocellulose strip.

    PubMed

    Cui, G; Yoo, J H; Woo, B W; Kim, S S; Cha, G S; Nam, H

    2001-07-01

    Electrochemical properties of screen-printed carbon paste electrodes (CPEs) with a glucose oxidase-immobilized and hexamineruthenium (III) chloride ([Ru(NH(3))(6)](3+)) containing nitrocellulose (NC) strip were examined. The NC strip (2x8 mm) placed on the CPEs printed on polyester (PE) film is tightly sealed using another PE film on the top with open edges on both sides. Samples containing macromolecules and particles (e.g. proteins and blood cells) are applied at one edge of the NC strip and reach the detection area, chromatographically separating small molecules (e.g. glucose, ascorbate, acetaminophen, and uric acid) of analytical interests. Since sample volumes and the amount of catalytic reagents (mediator and glucose oxidase) are precisely predefined by the dimension and pore size (8 mum) of the NC strip, the sensor-to-sensor reproducibility and accuracy of analysis are greatly improved. The use of [Ru(NH(3))(6)](3+) mediator, which exhibits characteristic substantially lowers the applied potential (0.0 V vs Ag/AgCl) for glucose determination and eliminates the interference from other oxidizable species, providing improved analytical results. PMID:18968332

  3. A novel, disposable, screen-printed amperometric biosensor for glucose in serum fabricated using a water-based carbon ink.

    PubMed

    Crouch, Eric; Cowell, David C; Hoskins, Stephen; Pittson, Robin W; Hart, John P

    2005-11-15

    Screen-printed amperometric glucose biosensors have been fabricated using a water-based carbon ink. The enzyme glucose oxidase (GOD) and the electro-catalyst cobalt phthalocyanine were mixed with the carbon ink prior to the screen-printing process; therefore, biosensors are prepared in a one-step fabrication procedure. Optimisation of the biosensor performance was achieved by studying the effects of pH, buffer strength, and applied potential on the analytical response. Calibration studies were performed under optimum conditions, using amperometry in stirred solution, with an operating potential of +500 mV versus SCE. The sensitivity was found to be 1170 nA mM(-1), with a linear range of 0.025-2 mM; the former represents the detection limit. The disposable amperometric biosensor was evaluated by carrying out replicate determinations on a sample of bovine serum. This was achieved by the method of multiple standard additions and included a correction for background currents arising from oxidizable serum components. The mean serum concentration was calculated to be 8.63 mM and compared well with the supplier's value of 8.3 mM; the coefficient of variation was calculated to be 3.3% (n=6). PMID:16242609

  4. Disposable, enzymatically modified printed film carbon electrodes for use in the high-performance liquid chromatographic-electrochemical detection of glucose or hydrogen peroxide from immobilized enzyme reactors.

    PubMed

    Osborne, P G; Yamamoto, K

    1998-04-10

    Disposable screen-printed, film carbon electrodes (PFCE) were modified with cast-coated Osmium-polyvinylpyrridine-wired horse radish peroxidase gel polymer (Os-gel-HRP) to enable the detection of the reduction at 0 mV of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) derived from a post-column immobilized enzyme reactor (IMER) containing acetylcholinesterase and choline oxidase. In another series of experiments PFCE were initially modified with cast-coated Os-gel-HRP and then treated with glucose oxidase in bovine serum albumin (BSA) and cross-linked with glutaraldehyde to form a bi-layer glucose-Os-gel-HRP PFCE. This bi-layer glucose-Os-gel-HRP PFCE generated a reduction current at 0 mV to H2O2 derived from the reaction of glucose oxidase and glucose in solution. These enzyme-modified PFCE were housed in a radial flow cell and coupled with cation-exchange liquid chromatographic methods to temporally separate substrates in solution for the determination of acetylcholine (ACh) and choline (Ch) in the first experimental series, or glucose in the second experimental series. These two disposable enzyme-modified PFCE exhibited linear current vs. substrate relations, were durable, being usable for approximately 40 determinations, and were sufficiently sensitive to be employed in biological sampling. Both assays utilized the same HPLC equipment. The limit of detection for ACh was 16 fmol/10 microl and that for glucose was 12 micromol/7.5 microl. ACh and Ch were measured from a microdialysate from the frontal cortex of a rat. Glucose in human urine was determined using the bi-layer glucose oxidase-Os-gel-HRP PFCE. PMID:9613927

  5. Disposable all-solid-state pH and glucose sensors based on conductive polymer covered hierarchical AuZn oxide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Min; Cho, Seong Je; Cho, Chul-Ho; Kim, Kwang Bok; Kim, Min-Yeong; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2016-05-15

    Poly(terthiophene benzoic acid) (pTBA) layered-AuZn alloy oxide (AuZnOx) deposited on the screen printed carbon electrode (pTBA/AuZnOx/SPCE) was prepared to create a disposable all-solid-state pH sensor at first. Further, FAD-glucose oxidase (GOx) was immobilized onto the pTBA/AuZnOx/SPCE to fabricate a glucose sensor. The characterizations of the sensor probe reveal that AuZnOx forms a homogeneous hierarchical structure, and that the polymerized pTBA layer on the alloy oxide surface captures GOx covalently. The benzoic acid group of pTBA coated on the probe layer synergetically improved the pH response of the alloy oxide and provide chemical binding sites to enzyme, which resulted in a Nernstian behavior (59.2 ± 0.5 mV/pH) in the pH range of 2-13. The experimental parameters affecting the glucose analysis were studied in terms of pH, temperature, humidity, and interferences. The sensor exhibited a fast response time <1s and a dynamic range between 30 and 500 mg/dL glucose with a detection limit of 17.23 ± 0.32 mg/dL. The reliabilities of the disposable pH and glucose sensors were examined for biological samples. PMID:26703994

  6. Disposable immunosensor array for ultrasensitive detection of tumor markers using glucose oxidase-functionalized silica nanosphere tags.

    PubMed

    Lai, Guosong; Wu, Jie; Leng, Chuan; Ju, Huangxian; Yan, Feng

    2011-05-15

    An ultrasensitive multiplexed electrochemical immunoassay method was developed for the detection of tumor markers by combining a newly designed trace tag and a disposable immunosensor array. The array was prepared by immobilizing capture antibodies on gold nanoparticles which were assembled on carbon nanotubes-chitosan modified screen-printed carbon electrodes. The trace tag was prepared by loading signal antibodies and high-content glucose oxidase on amino-functionalized silica nanosphere. With a sandwich-type immunoassay format, ultrahigh sensitivity was achieved by the enzymatic signal amplification with ferrocenecarboxylic acid as electron transfer mediator and the accelerated electron transfer by carbon nanotubes. Using carcinoembryonic antigen and α-fetoprotein as model analytes, this method showed wide linear ranges with the detection limits down to 3.2 and 4.0 pg/mL, respectively. The proposed immunosensor array exhibited acceptable stability and reproducibility. The assay results of serum samples were in acceptable agreement with the reference values. This method excluded completely the effect of dissolved oxygen and showed potential application for multianalyte determination in clinical diagnostics. PMID:21411307

  7. The effect of euglucaemic hyperinsulinaemia on forearm blood flow and glucose uptake in the human forearm.

    PubMed

    Fugmann, A; Lind, L; Andersson, P E; Millgård, J; Hänni, A; Berne, C; Lithell, H

    1998-12-01

    Insulin-mediated stimulation of blood flow to skeletal muscle has been proposed to be of major importance for insulin-mediated glucose uptake. The aim of this study was to investigate the relative importance of blood flow and glucose extraction as determinants of insulin-mediated glucose uptake in the human forearm. Forearm blood flow (FBF), glucose extraction and oxygen consumption were evaluated for 100 min during the euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp (92 mU/l) in nine healthy subjects. FBF was measured by venous occlusion plethysmography. Forearm glucose uptake increased sevenfold during the hyperinsulinaemia (P<0.001). Forearm glucose extraction showed a minor increase during the first 10 min of hyperinsulinaemia, but the most marked increase took place between 10 and 20 min (+170%). Thereafter, only a minor further increase was seen. During the first 10 min of hyperinsulinaemia FBF was unchanged. Thereafter, FBF increased steadily to a plateau reached after 60 min (+50%, P<0.001). A close relationship between whole body glucose uptake and FBF was seen at the end of the clamp (r = 0.75, P<0.02), but at this time the relationship between whole body glucose uptake and forearm glucose extraction was not significant. The modest increase in O2 consumption seen at the beginning of the clamp (+19%) was not related to FBF during the early phase of the clamp. In conclusion, the early course of insulin-mediated glucose uptake in the human forearm was mainly due to an increase in glucose extraction. However, with time the insulin-mediated increase in blood flow increased in importance and after 100 min of hyperinsulinaemia FBF was the major determinant of glucose uptake. PMID:9934819

  8. FDP-E induces adipocyte inflammation and suppresses insulin-stimulated glucose disposal: effect of inflammation and obesity on fibrinogen Bβ mRNA.

    PubMed

    Kang, Minsung; Vaughan, Roger A; Paton, Chad M

    2015-12-01

    Obesity is associated with increased fibrinogen production and fibrin formation, which produces fibrin degradation products (FDP-E and FDP-D). Fibrin and FDPs both contribute to inflammation, which would be expected to suppress glucose uptake and insulin signaling in adipose tissue, yet the effect of FDP-E and FDP-D on adipocyte function and glucose disposal is completely unknown. We tested the effects of FDPs on inflammation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and primary macrophages and adipocyte glucose uptake in vitro. High-fat-fed mice increased hepatic fibrinogen mRNA expression ninefold over chow-fed mice, with concomitant increases in plasma fibrinogen protein levels. Obese mice also displayed increased fibrinogen content of epididymal fat pads. We treated cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes and primary macrophages with FDP-E, FDP-D, or fibrinogen degradation products (FgnDP-E). FDP-D and FgnDP-E had no effect on inflammation or glucose uptake. Cytokine mRNA expression in RAW264.7 macrophage-like cells and 3T3-L1 adipocytes treated with FDP-E induced inflammation with maximal effects at 100 nM and 6 h. Insulin-stimulated 2-deoxy-d-[(3)H]glucose uptake was reduced by 71% in adipocytes treated with FDP-E. FDP-E, but not FDP-D or FgnDP-E, induces inflammation in macrophages and adipocytes and decreases glucose uptake in vitro. FDP-E may contribute toward obesity-associated acute inflammation and glucose intolerance, although its chronic role in obesity remains to be elucidated. PMID:26447203

  9. Prehepatic secretion and disposal of insulin in obese adolescents as estimated by three-hour, eight-sample oral glucose tolerance tests.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Josef A; Domzig, Christian; Wabitsch, Martin; Denzer, Christian

    2016-07-01

    The body compensates for early-stage insulin resistance by increasing insulin secretion. A reliable and easy-to-use mathematical assessment of insulin secretion and disposal could be a valuable tool for identifying patients at risk for the development of type 2 diabetes. Because the pathophysiology of insulin resistance is incompletely understood, assessing insulin metabolism with minimal assumptions regarding its metabolic regulation is a major challenge. To assess insulin secretion and indexes of insulin disposal, our marginalized and regularized absorption approach (MRA) was applied to a sparse sampling oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) protocol measuring the insulin and C-peptide concentrations. Identifiability and potential bias of metabolic parameters were estimated from published data with dense sampling. The MRA was applied to OGTT data from 135 obese adolescents to demonstrate its clinical applicability. Individual prehepatic basal and dynamic insulin secretion and clearance levels were determined with a precision and accuracy greater than 10% of the nominal value. The intersubject variability in these parameters was approximately four times higher than the intrasubject variability, and there was a strong negative correlation between prehepatic secretion and plasma clearance of insulin. MRA-based analysis provides reliable estimates of insulin secretion and clearance, thereby enabling detailed glucose homeostasis characterization based on restricted datasets that are obtainable during routine patient care. PMID:27143555

  10. Heat Stress Alters Ovarian Insulin-Mediated Phosphatidylinositol-3 Kinase and Steroidogenic Signaling in Gilt Ovaries.

    PubMed

    Nteeba, Jackson; Sanz-Fernandez, M Victoria; Rhoads, Robert P; Baumgard, Lance H; Ross, Jason W; Keating, Aileen F

    2015-06-01

    Heat stress (HS) compromises a variety of reproductive functions in several mammalian species. Inexplicably, HS animals are frequently hyperinsulinemic despite marked hyperthermia-induced hypophagia. Our objectives were to determine the effects of HS on insulin signaling and components essential to steroid biosynthesis in the pig ovary. Female pigs (35 ± 4 kg) were exposed to constant thermoneutral (20°C; 35%-50% humidity; n = 6) or HS conditions (35°C; 20%-35% humidity; n = 6) for either 7 (n = 10) or 35 days (n = 12). After 7 days, HS increased (P < 0.05) ovarian mRNA abundance of the insulin receptor (INSR), insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), protein kinase B subunit 1 (AKT1), low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), luteinizing hormone receptor (LHCGR), and aromatase (CYP19a). After 35 days, HS increased INSR, IRS1, AKT1, LDLR, LHCGR, CYP19a, and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR) ovarian mRNA abundance. In addition, after 35 days, HS increased ovarian phosphorylated IRS1 (pIRS1), phosphorylated AKT (pAKT), STAR, and CYP19a protein abundance. Immunostaining analysis revealed similar localization of INSR and pAKT1 in the cytoplasmic membrane and oocyte cytoplasm, respectively, of all stage follicles, and in theca and granulosa cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate that HS alters ovarian insulin-mediated PI3K signaling pathway members, which likely impacts follicle activation and viability. In summary, environmentally induced HS is an endocrine-disrupting exposure that modifies ovarian physiology and potentially compromises production of ovarian hormones essential for fertility and pregnancy maintenance. PMID:25926439

  11. Dual Actions of Apolipoprotein A-I on Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion and Insulin-Independent Peripheral Tissue Glucose Uptake Lead to Increased Heart and Skeletal Muscle Glucose Disposal.

    PubMed

    Domingo-Espín, Joan; Lindahl, Maria; Nilsson-Wolanin, Oktawia; Cushman, Samuel W; Stenkula, Karin G; Lagerstedt, Jens O

    2016-07-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) of HDL is central to the transport of cholesterol in circulation. ApoA-I also provides glucose control with described in vitro effects of apoA-I on β-cell insulin secretion and muscle glucose uptake. In addition, apoA-I injections in insulin-resistant diet-induced obese (DIO) mice lead to increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and peripheral tissue glucose uptake. However, the relative contribution of apoA-I as an enhancer of GSIS in vivo and as a direct stimulator of insulin-independent glucose uptake is not known. Here, DIO mice with instant and transient blockade of insulin secretion were used in glucose tolerance tests and in positron emission tomography analyses. Data demonstrate that apoA-I to an equal extent enhances GSIS and acts as peripheral tissue activator of insulin-independent glucose uptake and verify skeletal muscle as an apoA-I target tissue. Intriguingly, our analyses also identify the heart as an important target tissue for the apoA-I-stimulated glucose uptake, with potential implications in diabetic cardiomyopathy. Explorations of apoA-I as a novel antidiabetic drug should extend to treatments of diabetic cardiomyopathy and other cardiovascular diseases in patients with diabetes. PMID:27207515

  12. Glucose metabolism in non-diabetic and insulin-dependent diabetic subjects with end-stage renal failure.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, O

    1991-02-01

    Chronic uremia is frequently associated with an impaired carbohydrate tolerance. During the past decade considerable progress have been made in characterizing and quantifying this biochemical abnormality in end-stage renal failure (ESRF). Primarily, this has been possible by means of the glucose clamp technique which basically makes it possible to evaluate insulin sensitivity and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Combined with the use of tracer dilution technique, hepatic vein catheterization technique, infusion of somatostatin, forearm or leg techniques and indirect calorimetry, insight into several other major parameters of glucose kinetics has been achieved; i.e. insulin-mediated glucose uptake (IMGU), glucose-induced glucose uptake (GIGU), hepatic glucose production (HGP) splanchnic glucose uptake and oxidative and nonoxidative glucose disposal. Of course, these extra facets make the clamp procedure less feasible to accomplish for technical reasons and demand an extensive knowledge of the limitations of these methods. One major factor behind the reduced glucose tolerance in uremia is an impaired sensitivity to insulin (insulin resistance) in peripheral tissues, mainly in skeletal muscle. In non-dialysed uremic patients the insulin dose-response curve is characterized by a decreased maximal response and by a rightward shift. In general, the insulin resistance is pronounced, but a few weeks on maintenance hemodialysis (HD) or continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) are enough to improve insulin action significantly. Occasionally, IMGU has been found normal in patients on long-term HD. In contrast to insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, basal glucose turnover is normal in patients with ESRF. The ability of glucose to enhance its own uptake is difficult to measure in human studies, because even small amounts of insulin is able to modulate GIGU profoundly. At basal insulinemia, however, GIGU is markedly impaired in uremia. Recently, it has been suggested

  13. Metformin Protects Kidney Cells From Insulin-Mediated Genotoxicity In Vitro and in Male Zucker Diabetic Fatty Rats.

    PubMed

    Othman, Eman Maher; Oli, R G; Arias-Loza, Paula-Anahi; Kreissl, Michael C; Stopper, Helga

    2016-02-01

    Hyperinsulinemia is thought to enhance cancer risk. A possible mechanism is induction of oxidative stress and DNA damage by insulin, Here, the effect of a combination of metformin with insulin was investigated in vitro and in vivo. The rationales for this were the reported antioxidative properties of metformin and the aim to gain further insights into the mechanisms responsible for protecting the genome from insulin-mediated oxidative stress and damage. The comet assay, a micronucleus frequency test, and a mammalian gene mutation assay were used to evaluate the DNA damage produced by insulin alone or in combination with metformin. For analysis of antioxidant activity, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial disturbances, the cell-free ferric reducing antioxidant power assay, the superoxide-sensitive dye dihydroethidium, and the mitochondrial membrane potential-sensitive dye 5,5',6,6'tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazol-carbocyanine iodide were applied. Accumulation of p53 and pAKT were analyzed. As an in vivo model, hyperinsulinemic Zucker diabetic fatty rats, additionally exposed to insulin during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, were treated with metformin. In the rat kidney samples, dihydroethidium staining, p53 and pAKT analysis, and quantification of the oxidized DNA base 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine were performed. Metformin did not show intrinsic antioxidant activity in the cell-free assay, but protected cultured cells from insulin-mediated oxidative stress, DNA damage, and mutation. Treatment of the rats with metformin protected their kidneys from oxidative stress and genomic damage induced by hyperinsulinemia. Metformin may protect patients from genomic damage induced by elevated insulin levels. This may support efforts to reduce the elevated cancer risk that is associated with hyperinsulinemia. PMID:26636185

  14. Long-term effects of rapamycin treatment on insulin mediated phosphorylation of Akt/PKB and glycogen synthase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Varma, Shailly; Shrivastav, Anuraag; Changela, Sheena; Khandelwal, Ramji L.

    2008-04-01

    Protein kinase B (Akt/PKB) is a Ser/Thr kinase that is involved in the regulation of cell proliferation/survival through mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the regulation of glycogen metabolism through glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}) and glycogen synthase (GS). Rapamycin is an inhibitor of mTOR. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of rapamycin pretreatment on the insulin mediated phosphorylation of Akt/PKB phosphorylation and GS activity in parental HepG2 and HepG2 cells with overexpression of constitutively active Akt1/PKB-{alpha} (HepG2-CA-Akt/PKB). Rapamycin pretreatment resulted in a decrease (20-30%) in the insulin mediated phosphorylation of Akt1 (Ser 473) in parental HepG2 cells but showed an upregulation of phosphorylation in HepG2-CA-Akt/PKB cells. Rictor levels were decreased (20-50%) in parental HepG2 cells but were not significantly altered in the HepG2-CA-Akt/PKB cells. Furthermore, rictor knockdown decreased the phosphorylation of Akt (Ser 473) by 40-60% upon rapamycin pretreatment. GS activity followed similar trends as that of phosphorylated Akt and so with rictor levels in these cells pretreated with rapamycin; parental HepG2 cells showed a decrease in GS activity, whereas as HepG2-CA-Akt/PKB cells showed an increase in GS activity. The changes in the levels of phosphorylated Akt/PKB (Ser 473) correlated with GS and protein phoshatase-1 activity.

  15. The Insulin-Mediated Modulation of Visually Evoked Magnetic Fields Is Reduced in Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Tschritter, Otto; Rogic, Maja; Heni, Martin; Stingl, Katarina; Hallschmid, Manfred; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Fritsche, Andreas; Preissl, Hubert; Hennige, Anita M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Insulin is an anorexigenic hormone that contributes to the termination of food intake in the postprandial state. An alteration in insulin action in the brain, named “cerebral insulin resistance”, is responsible for overeating and the development of obesity. Methodology/Principal Findings To analyze the direct effect of insulin on food-related neuronal activity we tested 10 lean and 10 obese subjects. We conducted a magnetencephalography study during a visual working memory task in both the basal state and after applying insulin or placebo spray intranasally to bypass the blood brain barrier. Food and non-food pictures were presented and subjects had to determine whether or not two consecutive pictures belonged to the same category. Intranasal insulin displayed no effect on blood glucose, insulin or C-peptide concentrations in the periphery; however, it led to an increase in the components of evoked fields related to identification and categorization of pictures (at around 170 ms post stimuli in the visual ventral stream) in lean subjects when food pictures were presented. In contrast, insulin did not modulate food-related brain activity in obese subjects. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrated that intranasal insulin increases the cerebral processing of food pictures in lean whereas this was absent in obese subjects. This study further substantiates the presence of a “cerebral insulin resistance” in obese subjects and might be relevant in the pathogenesis of obesity. PMID:21589921

  16. Quantitative Analysis of Robustness of Dynamic Response and Signal Transfer in Insulin mediated PI3K/AKT Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Shibin; Banerjee, Ipsita

    2014-01-01

    Robustness is a critical feature of signaling pathways ensuring signal propagation with high fidelity in the event of perturbations. Here we present a detailed quantitative analysis of robustness in insulin mediated PI3K/AKT pathway, a critical signaling pathway maintaining self-renewal in human embryonic stem cells. Using global sensitivity analysis, we identified robustness promoting mechanisms that ensure (1) maintenance of a first order or overshoot dynamics of self-renewal molecule, p-AKT and (2) robust transfer of signals from oscillatory insulin stimulus to p-AKT in the presence of noise. Our results indicate that negative feedback controls the robustness to most perturbations. Faithful transfer of signal from the stimulating ligand to p-AKT occurs even in the presence of noise, albeit with signal attenuation and high frequency cut-off. Negative feedback contributes to signal attenuation, while positive regulators upstream of PIP3 contribute to signal amplification. These results establish precise mechanisms to modulate self-renewal molecules like p-AKT. PMID:25506104

  17. Distinct effects of aerobic exercise training and weight loss on glucose homeostasis in obese sedentary men.

    PubMed

    Dengel, D R; Pratley, R E; Hagberg, J M; Rogus, E M; Goldberg, A P

    1996-07-01

    The decline in glucose homeostasis with aging may be due to the physical deconditioning and obesity that often develop with aging. The independent and combined effects of aerobic exercise training (AEX) and weight loss (WL) on glucose metabolism were studied in 47 nondiabetic sedentary older men. There were 14 men in a weekly behavioral modification/WL program, 10 in a 3 times/wk AEX program, 14 in an AEX+WL program, and 9 in the control (Con) group. The 10-mo intervention increased maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) in both the AEX and AEX+WL groups [0.33 +/- 0.05 and 0.37 +/- 0.09 (SE) l/min, respectively], but VO2max did not significantly change in the WL (0.01 +/- 0.06 l/min) and Con groups (-0.04 +/- 0.05 l/min; P > 0.05). The AEX+WL and WL groups had comparable reductions in body weight (-8.5 +/- 0.9 and -8.8 +/- 1.2 kg, respectively) and percent fat (-5.5 +/- 0.7 and -5.9 +/- 1.1%, respectively) that were significantly greater than those in the Con and AEX groups. Oral glucose tolerance tests showed significant reductions in insulin responses in the AEX, WL, and AEX+WL groups, but the decrease in insulin response in the AEX+WL group was significantly greater than that in the other three groups. The glucose area decreased significantly in the WL and AEX+WL groups but did not change in the Con or AEX groups. There were significant increases in insulin-mediated glucose disposal rates as measured by the hyperinsulinemic (600 pmol.m-2.min-1) euglycemic clamps in the AEX and AEX+WL groups [1.66 +/- 0.50 and 1.76 +/- 0.41 mg.kg fat-free mass (FFM)-1.min-1, respectively] that were significantly greater than those in the WL (0.13 +/- 0.31 mg.kg FFM-1.min-1) and Con groups (-0.05 +/- 0.51 mg.kg FFM-1.min-1; n = 5). These data suggest that AEX and WL improve glucose metabolism through different mechanisms and that the combined intervention of AEX+WL is necessary to improve both glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in older men. PMID:8828680

  18. Relationships between insulin secretion, insulin action, and fasting plasma glucose concentration in nondiabetic and noninsulin-dependent diabetic subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Bogardus, C; Lillioja, S; Howard, B V; Reaven, G; Mott, D

    1984-01-01

    The relationships between insulin secretion, insulin action, and fasting plasma glucose concentration (FPG) were examined in 34 southwest American Indians (19 nondiabetics, 15 noninsulin-dependent diabetics) who had a broad range of FPG (88-310 mg/100 ml). Fasting, glucose-stimulated, and meal-stimulated plasma insulin concentrations were negatively correlated with FPG in diabetics but not in nondiabetics. In contrast, fasting and glucose-stimulated plasma C-peptide concentrations did not decrease with increasing FPG in either group and 24-h urinary C-peptide excretion during a diet of mixed composition was positively correlated with FPG for all subjects (r = 0.36, P less than 0.05). Fasting free fatty acid (FFA) was correlated with FPG in nondiabetics (r = 0.49, P less than 0.05) and diabetics (r = 0.77, P less than 0.001). Fasting FFA was also correlated with the isotopically determined endogenous glucose production rate in the diabetics (r = 0.54, P less than 0.05). Endogenous glucose production was strongly correlated with FPG in the diabetics (r = 0.90, P less than 0.0001), but not in the nondiabetics. Indirect calorimetry showed that FPG was also negatively correlated with basal glucose oxidation rates (r = -0.61, P less than 0.001), but positively with lipid oxidation (r = 0.74, P less than 0.001) in the diabetics. Insulin action was measured as total insulin-mediated glucose disposal, glucose oxidation, and storage rates, using the euglycemic clamp with simultaneous indirect calorimetry at plasma insulin concentrations of 135 +/- 5 and 1738 +/- 59 microU/ml. These parameters of insulin action were significantly, negatively correlated with FPG in the nondiabetics at both insulin concentrations, but not in the diabetics although all the diabetics had markedly decreased insulin action. We conclude that decreased insulin action is present in the noninsulin-dependent diabetics in this population and marked hyperglycemia occurs with the addition of decreased

  19. A Molecular and Whole Body Insight of the Mechanisms Surrounding Glucose Disposal and Insulin Resistance with Hypoxic Treatment in Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, R W A; Watt, P

    2016-01-01

    Although the mechanisms are largely unidentified, the chronic or intermittent hypoxic patterns occurring with respiratory diseases, such as chronic pulmonary disease or obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and obesity, are commonly associated with glucose intolerance. Indeed, hypoxia has been widely implicated in the development of insulin resistance either via the direct action on insulin receptor substrate (IRS) and protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) or indirectly through adipose tissue expansion and systemic inflammation. Yet hypoxia is also known to encourage glucose transport using insulin-dependent mechanisms, largely reliant on the metabolic master switch, 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In addition, hypoxic exposure has been shown to improve glucose control in type 2 diabetics. The literature surrounding hypoxia-induced changes to glycemic control appears to be confusing and conflicting. How is it that the same stress can seemingly cause insulin resistance while increasing glucose uptake? There is little doubt that acute hypoxia increases glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle and does so using the same pathway as muscle contraction. The purpose of this review paper is to provide an insight into the mechanisms underpinning the observed effects and to open up discussions around the conflicting data surrounding hypoxia and glucose control. PMID:27274997

  20. A Molecular and Whole Body Insight of the Mechanisms Surrounding Glucose Disposal and Insulin Resistance with Hypoxic Treatment in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, R. W. A.; Watt, P.

    2016-01-01

    Although the mechanisms are largely unidentified, the chronic or intermittent hypoxic patterns occurring with respiratory diseases, such as chronic pulmonary disease or obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and obesity, are commonly associated with glucose intolerance. Indeed, hypoxia has been widely implicated in the development of insulin resistance either via the direct action on insulin receptor substrate (IRS) and protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) or indirectly through adipose tissue expansion and systemic inflammation. Yet hypoxia is also known to encourage glucose transport using insulin-dependent mechanisms, largely reliant on the metabolic master switch, 5′ AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In addition, hypoxic exposure has been shown to improve glucose control in type 2 diabetics. The literature surrounding hypoxia-induced changes to glycemic control appears to be confusing and conflicting. How is it that the same stress can seemingly cause insulin resistance while increasing glucose uptake? There is little doubt that acute hypoxia increases glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle and does so using the same pathway as muscle contraction. The purpose of this review paper is to provide an insight into the mechanisms underpinning the observed effects and to open up discussions around the conflicting data surrounding hypoxia and glucose control. PMID:27274997

  1. In adenosine A2B knockouts acute treatment with inorganic nitrate improves glucose disposal, oxidative stress, and AMPK signaling in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Peleli, Maria; Hezel, Michael; Zollbrecht, Christa; Persson, A. Erik G.; Lundberg, Jon O.; Weitzberg, Eddie; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Carlström, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Accumulating studies suggest that nitric oxide (NO) deficiency and oxidative stress are central pathological mechanisms in type 2 diabetes (T2D). Recent findings demonstrate therapeutic effects by boosting the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway, which is an alternative pathway for NO formation. This study aimed at investigating the acute effects of inorganic nitrate on glucose and insulin signaling in adenosine A2B receptor knockout mice (A−/−2B), a genetic mouse model of impaired metabolic regulation. Methods: Acute effects of nitrate treatment were investigated in aged wild-type (WT) and A−/−2B mice. One hour after injection with nitrate (0.1 mmol/kg, i.p.) or placebo, metabolic regulation was evaluated by intraperitoneal glucose and insulin tolerance tests. NADPH oxidase-mediated superoxide production and AMPK phosphorylation were measured in livers obtained from non-treated or glucose-treated mice, with or without prior nitrate injection. Plasma was used to determine insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and NO signaling. Results: A−/−2B displayed increased body weight, reduced glucose clearance, and attenuated overall insulin responses compared with age-matched WT mice. Nitrate treatment increased circulating levels of nitrate, nitrite and cGMP in the A−/−2B, and improved glucose clearance. In WT mice, however, nitrate treatment did not influence glucose clearance. HOMA-IR increased following glucose injection in the A−/−2B, but remained at basal levels in mice pretreated with nitrate. NADPH oxidase activity in livers from A−/−2B, but not WT mice, was reduced by nitrate treatment. Livers from A−/−2B displayed reduced AMPK phosphorylation compared with WT mice, and this was increased by nitrate treatment. Finally, injection with the anti-diabetic agent metformin induced similar therapeutic effects in the A−/−2B as observed with nitrate. Conclusion: The A−/−2B mouse is a genetic mouse model of metabolic syndrome. Acute treatment

  2. Increased Slc12a1 expression in β-cells and improved glucose disposal in Slc12a2 heterozygous mice.

    PubMed

    Alshahrani, Saeed; Almutairi, Mohammed Mashari; Kursan, Shams; Dias-Junior, Eduardo; Almiahuob, Mohamed Mahmoud; Aguilar-Bryan, Lydia; Di Fulvio, Mauricio

    2015-12-01

    The products of the Slc12a1 and Slc12a2 genes, commonly known as Na(+)-dependent K(+)2Cl(-) co-transporters NKCC2 and NKCC1, respectively, are the targets for the diuretic bumetanide. NKCCs are implicated in the regulation of intracellular chloride concentration ([Cl(-)]i) in pancreatic β-cells, and as such, they may play a role in glucose-stimulated plasma membrane depolarization and insulin secretion. Unexpectedly, permanent elimination of NKCC1 does not preclude insulin secretion, an event potentially linked to the homeostatic regulation of additional Cl(-) transporters expressed in β-cells. In this report we provide evidence for such a mechanism. Mice lacking a single allele of Slc12a2 exhibit lower fasting glycemia, increased acute insulin response (AIR) and lower blood glucose levels 15-30 min after a glucose load when compared to mice harboring both alleles of the gene. Furthermore, heterozygous expression or complete absence of Slc12a2 associates with increased NKCC2 protein expression in rodent pancreatic β-cells. This has been confirmed by using chronic pharmacological down-regulation of NKCC1 with bumetanide in the mouse MIN6 β-cell line or permanent molecular silencing of NKCC1 in COS7 cells, which results in increased NKCC2 expression. Furthermore, MIN6 cells chronically pretreated with bumetanide exhibit increased initial rates of Cl(-) uptake while preserving glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Together, our results suggest that NKCCs are involved in insulin secretion and that a single Slc12a2 allele may protect β-cells from failure due to increased homeostatic expression of Slc12a1. PMID:26400961

  3. Increased Slc12a1 expression in β-cells and improved glucose disposal in Slc12a2 heterozygous mice

    PubMed Central

    Alshahrani, Saeed; Almutairi, Mohammed Mashari; Kursan, Shams; Dias-Junior, Eduardo; Almiahuob, Mohamed Mahmoud; Aguilar-Bryan, Lydia; Di Fulvio, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    The products of the Slc12a1 and Slc12a2 genes, commonly known as Na+-dependent K+2Cl− co-transporters NKCC2 and NKCC1, respectively, are the targets for the diuretic bumetanide. NKCCs are implicated in the regulation of intracellular chloride concentration ([Cl−]i) in pancreatic β-cells, and as such, they may play a role in glucose-stimulated plasma membrane depolarization and insulin secretion. Unexpectedly, permanent elimination of NKCC1 does not preclude insulin secretion, an event potentially linked to the homeostatic regulation of additional Cl− transporters expressed in β-cells. In this report we provide evidence for such a mechanism. Mice lacking a single allele of Slc12a2 exhibit lower fasting glycemia, increased acute insulin response (AIR) and lower blood glucose levels 15–30 min after a glucose load when compared to mice harboring both alleles of the gene. Furthermore, heterozygous expression or complete absence of Slc12a2 associates with increased NKCC2 protein expression in rodent pancreatic β-cells. This has been confirmed by using chronic pharmacological down-regulation of NKCC1 with bumetanide in the mouse MIN6 β-cell line or permanent molecular silencing of NKCC1 in COS7 cells, which results in increased NKCC2 expression. Furthermore, MIN6 cells chronically pretreated with bumetanide exhibit increased initial rates of Cl− uptake while preserving glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Together, our results suggest that NKCCs are involved in insulin secretion and that a single Slc12a2 allele may protect β-cells from failure due to increased homeostatic expression of Slc12a1. PMID:26400961

  4. Differential effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 on microvascular recruitment and glucose metabolism in short- and long-term insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sjøberg, Kim A; Rattigan, Stephen; Jeppesen, Jacob F; Lundsgaard, Anne-Marie; Holst, Jens J; Kiens, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute infusion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has potent effects on blood flow distribution through the microcirculation in healthy humans and rats. A high fat diet induces impairments in insulin-mediated microvascular recruitment (MVR) and muscle glucose uptake, and here we examined whether this could be reversed by GLP-1. Using contrast-enhanced ultrasound, microvascular recruitment was assessed by continuous real-time imaging of gas-filled microbubbles in the microcirculation after acute (5 days) and prolonged (8 weeks) high fat diet (HF)-induced insulin resistance in rats. A euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp (3 mU min−1 kg−1), with or without a co-infusion of GLP-1 (100 pmol l−1), was performed in anaesthetized rats. Consumption of HF attenuated the insulin-mediated MVR in both 5 day and 8 week HF interventions which was associated with a 50% reduction in insulin-mediated glucose uptake compared to controls. Acute administration of GLP-1 restored the normal microvascular response by increasing the MVR after both 5 days and 8 weeks of HF intervention (P < 0.05). This effect of GLP-1 was associated with a restoration of both whole body insulin sensitivity and increased insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle by 90% (P < 0.05) after 5 days of HF but not after 8 weeks of HF. The present study demonstrates that GLP-1 increases MVR in rat skeletal muscle and can reverse early stages of high fat diet-induced insulin resistance in vivo. Key points Acute glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) infusion reversed the high fat diet-induced microvascular insulin resistance that occurred after both 5 days and 8 weeks of a high fat diet intervention. When GLP-1 was co-infused with insulin it had overt effects on whole body insulin sensitivity as well as insulin-mediated skeletal muscle glucose uptake after 5 days of a high fat diet, but not after 8 weeks of high fat diet intervention. Acute GLP-1 infusion did not have an additive

  5. Effect of prior immobilization on muscular glucose clearance in resting and running rats

    SciTech Connect

    Vissing, J.; Ohkuwa, Tetsuo; Ploug, T.; Galbo, H. Nagoya Institute of Technology )

    1988-10-01

    In vitro studies have shown that prior disuse impairs the glucose clearance of red skeletal muscle because of a developed insensitivity to insulin. We studied whether an impaired glucose clearance is present in vivo in 42-h immobilized muscles of resting rats and, furthermore, whether the exercise-induced increase in glucose clearance of red muscles is affected by prior immobilization. The 2-({sup 3}H)deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) bolus injection method was used to determine glucose clearance of individual muscles. At rest, glucose clearance was markedly impaired in rats with previously immobilized red muscles compared with nonimmobilized control rats. During running, glucose clearance did not differ between muscles in previously immobilized and control rats. Insulin levels were always similar in the two groups and decreased during exercise. Intracellular nonphosphorylated 2DG was present in tissues with high glucose clearances. In conclusion, 42 h of immobilization markedly impairs glucose clearance of resting red muscle fibers in vivo. Apparently, physical inactivity in particular affects steps involved in insulin-mediated action that are not part of contraction-induced glucose uptake and metabolism. Presence of intracellular 2DG shows that separate determination of phosphorylated 2DG is necessary for accurate estimates of glucose metabolism and that accumulation of phosphorylated 2DG does not accurately reflect glucose transport.

  6. Activation of the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway alone is not sufficient to induce glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed Central

    van den Berghe, N; Ouwens, D M; Maassen, J A; van Mackelenbergh, M G; Sips, H C; Krans, H M

    1994-01-01

    The signal transduction pathway by which insulin stimulates glucose transport is largely unknown, but a role for tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases has been proposed. Since mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase is activated by insulin through phosphorylation on both tyrosine and threonine residues, we investigated whether MAP kinase and its upstream regulator, p21ras, are involved in insulin-mediated glucose transport. We did this by examining the time- and dose-dependent stimulation of glucose uptake in relation to the activation of Ras-GTP formation and MAP kinase by thrombin, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and insulin in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Ras-GTP formation was stimulated transiently by all three agonists, with a peak at 5 to 10 min. Thrombin induced a second peak at approximately 30 min. The activation of p21ras was paralleled by both the phosphorylation and the activation of MAP kinase: transient for insulin and EGF and biphasic for thrombin. However, despite the strong activation of Ras-GTP formation and MAP kinase by EGF and thrombin, glucose uptake was not stimulated by these agonists, in contrast to the eightfold stimulation of 2-deoxy-D-[14C]glucose uptake by insulin. In addition, insulin-mediated glucose transport was not potentiated by thrombin or EGF. Although these results cannot exclude the possibility that p21ras and/or MAP kinase is needed in conjunction with other signaling molecules that are activated by insulin and not by thrombin or EGF, they show that the Ras/MAP kinase signaling pathway alone is not sufficient to induce insulin-mediated glucose transport. Images PMID:7511205

  7. The gut microbiota suppresses insulin-mediated fat accumulation via the short-chain fatty acid receptor GPR43.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Ikuo; Ozawa, Kentaro; Inoue, Daisuke; Imamura, Takeshi; Kimura, Kumi; Maeda, Takeshi; Terasawa, Kazuya; Kashihara, Daiji; Hirano, Kanako; Tani, Taeko; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Miyauchi, Satoshi; Shioi, Go; Inoue, Hiroshi; Tsujimoto, Gozoh

    2013-01-01

    The gut microbiota affects nutrient acquisition and energy regulation of the host, and can influence the development of obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes. During feeding, gut microbes produce short-chain fatty acids, which are important energy sources for the host. Here we show that the short-chain fatty acid receptor GPR43 links the metabolic activity of the gut microbiota with host body energy homoeostasis. We demonstrate that GPR43-deficient mice are obese on a normal diet, whereas mice overexpressing GPR43 specifically in adipose tissue remain lean even when fed a high-fat diet. Raised under germ-free conditions or after treatment with antibiotics, both types of mice have a normal phenotype. We further show that short-chain fatty acid-mediated activation of GPR43 suppresses insulin signalling in adipocytes, which inhibits fat accumulation in adipose tissue and promotes the metabolism of unincorporated lipids and glucose in other tissues. These findings establish GPR43 as a sensor for excessive dietary energy, thereby controlling body energy utilization while maintaining metabolic homoeostasis. PMID:23652017

  8. Blood flow is an important determinant of forearm glucose uptake following a mixed meal.

    PubMed

    Fugmann, A; Sarabi, M; Karlström, B; Berne, C; Lithell, H; Lind, L

    2003-09-01

    Insulin-mediated vasodilation has been suggested to be of importance for glucose uptake during normoglycemic hyperinsulinemia. If this also is valid after an ordinary mixed meal remains to be evaluated. Forearm blood flow (FBF) and forearm glucose uptake change (evaluated by venous occlusion plethysmography) and glucose arteriovenous differences were evaluated over 120 minutes in 10 healthy volunteers following an ordinary mixed meal (700-900 kcal, 34% of energy from fat). Fasting arterial glucose level was 4.9+/-0.9 mmol/l, and the maximum glucose level was reached 30 minutes after the start of ingestion (6.6+/-0.8 mmol/l, p<0.0001). Plasma insulin levels were increased four-fold. FBF increased rapidly within 20 minutes after the start of ingestion and reached its maximum after 50 minutes (94% higher than baseline level, p<0.01). After 2 hours FBF was still substantially elevated (75% above baseline level, p<0.01). Forearm glucose uptake increased fivefold already after 20 minutes ( p<0.01). During the 2 hours, the increase in FBF contributed to 41% of the forearm glucose uptake ( p<0.05). The present study showed that the increase in FBF seen after an ordinary mixed meal is important for the change in forearm glucose uptake. These results support the view that modulation of limb blood flow is a determinant of glucose uptake. PMID:14605966

  9. FOXO1 and GSK-3β Are Main Targets of Insulin-Mediated Myogenesis in C2C12 Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Litwiniuk, Anna; Pijet, Barbara; Pijet-Kucicka, Maja; Gajewska, Małgorzata; Pająk, Beata; Orzechowski, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    , inhibition of GSK-3β activity by insulin alone or together with LiCl raised the expression of genes and some proteins central to the metabolic activity of mitochondria resulting in higher ATP synthesis and accelerated myogenesis. The results of this study indicate that there are at least two main targets in insulin-mediated myogenesis: notably FOXO1 and GSK-3β both playing apparent negative role in muscle fiber formation. PMID:26785133

  10. FOXO1 and GSK-3β Are Main Targets of Insulin-Mediated Myogenesis in C2C12 Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Litwiniuk, Anna; Pijet, Barbara; Pijet-Kucicka, Maja; Gajewska, Małgorzata; Pająk, Beata; Orzechowski, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    , inhibition of GSK-3β activity by insulin alone or together with LiCl raised the expression of genes and some proteins central to the metabolic activity of mitochondria resulting in higher ATP synthesis and accelerated myogenesis. The results of this study indicate that there are at least two main targets in insulin-mediated myogenesis: notably FOXO1 and GSK-3β both playing apparent negative role in muscle fiber formation. PMID:26785133

  11. Insulin/glucose induces natriuretic peptide clearance receptor in human adipocytes: a metabolic link with the cardiac natriuretic pathway.

    PubMed

    Bordicchia, M; Ceresiani, M; Pavani, M; Minardi, D; Polito, M; Wabitsch, M; Cannone, V; Burnett, J C; Dessì-Fulgheri, P; Sarzani, R

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac natriuretic peptides (NP) are involved in cardiorenal regulation and in lipolysis. The NP activity is largely dependent on the ratio between the signaling receptor NPRA and the clearance receptor NPRC. Lipolysis increases when NPRC is reduced by starving or very-low-calorie diet. On the contrary, insulin is an antilipolytic hormone that increases sodium retention, suggesting a possible functional link with NP. We examined the insulin-mediated regulation of NP receptors in differentiated human adipocytes and tested the association of NP receptor expression in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) with metabolic profiles of patients undergoing renal surgery. Differentiated human adipocytes from VAT and Simpson-Golabi-Behmel Syndrome (SGBS) adipocyte cell line were treated with insulin in the presence of high-glucose or low-glucose media to study NP receptors and insulin/glucose-regulated pathways. Fasting blood samples and VAT samples were taken from patients on the day of renal surgery. We observed a potent insulin-mediated and glucose-dependent upregulation of NPRC, through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway, associated with lower lipolysis in differentiated adipocytes. No effect was observed on NPRA. Low-glucose medium, used to simulate in vivo starving conditions, hampered the insulin effect on NPRC through modulation of insulin/glucose-regulated pathways, allowing atrial natriuretic peptide to induce lipolysis and thermogenic genes. An expression ratio in favor of NPRC in adipose tissue was associated with higher fasting insulinemia, HOMA-IR, and atherogenic lipid levels. Insulin/glucose-dependent NPRC induction in adipocytes might be a key factor linking hyperinsulinemia, metabolic syndrome, and higher blood pressure by reducing NP effects on adipocytes. PMID:27101299

  12. Insulin signalling and glucose transport in the ovary and ovarian function during the ovarian cycle.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Joëlle; Scaramuzzi, Rex J

    2016-06-01

    Data derived principally from peripheral tissues (fat, muscle and liver) show that insulin signals via diverse interconnecting intracellular pathways and that some of the major intersecting points (known as critical nodes) are the IRSs (insulin receptor substrates), PI3K (phosphoinositide kinase)/Akt and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase). Most of these insulin pathways are probably also active in the ovary and their ability to interact with each other and also with follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) signalling pathways enables insulin to exert direct modulating influences on ovarian function. The present paper reviews the intracellular actions of insulin and the uptake of glucose by ovarian tissues (granulosa, theca and oocyte) during the oestrous/menstrual cycle of some rodent, primate and ruminant species. Insulin signals through diverse pathways and these are discussed with specific reference to follicular cell types (granulosa, theca and oocyte). The signalling pathways for FSH in granulosa cells and LH in granulosa and theca cells are summarized. The roles of glucose and of insulin-mediated uptake of glucose in folliculogenesis are discussed. It is suggested that glucose in addition to its well-established role of providing energy for cellular function may also have insulin-mediated signalling functions in ovarian cells, involving AMPK (AMP-dependent protein kinase) and/or hexosamine. Potential interactions of insulin signalling with FSH or LH signalling at critical nodes are identified and the available evidence for such interactions in ovarian cells is discussed. Finally the action of the insulin-sensitizing drugs metformin and the thiazolidinedione rosiglitazone on follicular cells is reviewed. PMID:27234585

  13. Insulin signalling and glucose transport in the ovary and ovarian function during the ovarian cycle

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Joëlle; Scaramuzzi, Rex J.

    2016-01-01

    Data derived principally from peripheral tissues (fat, muscle and liver) show that insulin signals via diverse interconnecting intracellular pathways and that some of the major intersecting points (known as critical nodes) are the IRSs (insulin receptor substrates), PI3K (phosphoinositide kinase)/Akt and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase). Most of these insulin pathways are probably also active in the ovary and their ability to interact with each other and also with follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) signalling pathways enables insulin to exert direct modulating influences on ovarian function. The present paper reviews the intracellular actions of insulin and the uptake of glucose by ovarian tissues (granulosa, theca and oocyte) during the oestrous/menstrual cycle of some rodent, primate and ruminant species. Insulin signals through diverse pathways and these are discussed with specific reference to follicular cell types (granulosa, theca and oocyte). The signalling pathways for FSH in granulosa cells and LH in granulosa and theca cells are summarized. The roles of glucose and of insulin-mediated uptake of glucose in folliculogenesis are discussed. It is suggested that glucose in addition to its well-established role of providing energy for cellular function may also have insulin-mediated signalling functions in ovarian cells, involving AMPK (AMP-dependent protein kinase) and/or hexosamine. Potential interactions of insulin signalling with FSH or LH signalling at critical nodes are identified and the available evidence for such interactions in ovarian cells is discussed. Finally the action of the insulin-sensitizing drugs metformin and the thiazolidinedione rosiglitazone on follicular cells is reviewed. PMID:27234585

  14. Disposal rabbit

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, L.C.; Trammell, D.R.

    1983-10-12

    A disposable rabbit for transferring radioactive samples in a pneumatic transfer system comprises aerated plastic shaped in such a manner as to hold a radioactive sample and aerated such that dissolution of the rabbit in a solvent followed by evaporation of the solid yields solid waste material having a volume significantly smaller than the original volume of the rabbit.

  15. Disposable rabbit

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Leroy C.; Trammell, David R.

    1986-01-01

    A disposable rabbit for transferring radioactive samples in a pneumatic transfer system comprises aerated plastic shaped in such a manner as to hold a radioactive sample and aerated such that dissolution of the rabbit in a solvent followed by evaporation of the solid yields solid waste material having a volume significantly smaller than the original volume of the rabbit.

  16. Disposable Scholarship?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Fredrick

    2004-01-01

    The digital materials that faculty produce for their classrooms often are saved only to storage devices that might become obsolete in a few years. Without an institutional effort to provide access systems, storage, and services for their digital media, are campuses in danger of creating "Disposable Scholarship"? In this article, the author…

  17. Coping with an exogenous glucose overload: glucose kinetics of rainbow trout during graded swimming.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kevin; Weber, Jean-Michel

    2016-03-15

    This study examines how chronically hyperglycemic rainbow trout modulate glucose kinetics in response to graded exercise up to critical swimming speed (Ucrit), with or without exogenous glucose supply. Our goals were 1) to quantify the rates of hepatic glucose production (Ra glucose) and disposal (Rd glucose) during graded swimming, 2) to determine how exogenous glucose affects the changes in glucose fluxes caused by exercise, and 3) to establish whether exogenous glucose modifies Ucrit or the cost of transport. Results show that graded swimming causes no change in Ra and Rd glucose at speeds below 2.5 body lengths per second (BL/s), but that glucose fluxes may be stimulated at the highest speeds. Excellent glucoregulation is also achieved at all exercise intensities. When exogenous glucose is supplied during exercise, trout suppress hepatic production from 16.4 ± 1.6 to 4.1 ± 1.7 μmol·kg(-1)·min(-1) and boost glucose disposal to 40.1 ± 13 μmol·kg(-1)·min(-1). These responses limit the effects of exogenous glucose to a 2.5-fold increase in glycemia, whereas fish showing no modulation of fluxes would reach dangerous levels of 114 mM of blood glucose. Exogenous glucose reduces metabolic rate by 16% and, therefore, causes total cost of transport to decrease accordingly. High glucose availability does not improve Ucrit because the fish are unable to take advantage of this extra fuel during maximal exercise and rely on tissue glycogen instead. In conclusion, trout have a remarkable ability to adjust glucose fluxes that allows them to cope with the cumulative stresses of a glucose overload and graded exercise. PMID:26719305

  18. Insulin Resistance, Defective Insulin-Mediated Fatty Acid Suppression, and Coronary Artery Calcification in Subjects With and Without Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Schauer, Irene E.; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; Bergman, Bryan C.; Maahs, David M.; Kretowski, Adam; Eckel, Robert H.; Rewers, Marian

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess insulin action on peripheral glucose utilization and nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) suppression as a predictor of coronary artery calcification (CAC) in patients with type 1 diabetes and nondiabetic controls. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Insulin action was measured by a three-stage hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (4, 8, and 40 mU/m2/min) in 87 subjects from the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes cohort (40 diabetic, 47 nondiabetic; mean age 45 ± 8 years; 55% female). RESULTS Peripheral glucose utilization was lower in subjects with type 1 diabetes compared with nondiabetic controls: glucose infusion rate (mg/kg FFM/min) = 6.19 ± 0.72 vs. 12.71 ± 0.66, mean ± SE, P < 0.0001, after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, fasting glucose, and final clamp glucose and insulin. Insulin-induced NEFA suppression was also lower in type 1 diabetic compared with nondiabetic subjects: NEFA levels (μM) during 8 mU/m2/min insulin infusion = 370 ± 27 vs. 185 ± 25, P < 0.0001, after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, fasting glucose, and time point insulin. Lower glucose utilization and higher NEFA levels, correlated with CAC volume (r = −0.42, P < 0.0001 and r = 0.41, P < 0.0001, respectively) and predicted the presence of CAC (odds ratio [OR] = 0.45, 95% CI = 0.22–0.93, P = 0.03; OR = 2.4, 95% CI = 1.08–5.32, P = 0.032, respectively). Insulin resistance did not correlate with GHb or continuous glucose monitoring parameters. CONCLUSIONS Type 1 diabetic patients are insulin resistant compared with nondiabetic subjects, and the degree of resistance is not related to current glycemic control. Insulin resistance predicts the extent of coronary artery calcification and may contribute to the increased risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 1 diabetes as well as subjects without diabetes. PMID:20978091

  19. Glucose control.

    PubMed

    Preiser, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    Stress-related hyperglycemia is a common finding in acutely ill patients, and is related to the severity and outcome of the critical illness. The pathophysiology of stress hyperglycemia includes hormonal and neural signals, leading to increased production of glucose by the liver and peripheral insulin resistance mediated by the translocation of transmembrane glucose transporters. In one pioneering study, tight glycemic control by intensive insulin therapy in critically ill patients was associated with improved survival. However, this major finding was not confirmed in several other prospective randomized controlled trials. The reasons underlying the discrepancy between the first and the subsequent studies could include nutritional strategy (amount of calories provided, use of parenteral nutrition), case-mix, potential differences in the optimal blood glucose level (BG) in different types of patients, hypoglycemia and its correction, and the magnitude of glucose variability. Therefore, an improved understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of glycemic regulation during acute illness is needed. Safe and effective glucose control will need improvement in the definition of optimal BG and in the measurement techniques, perhaps including continuous monitoring of insulin algorithms and closed-loop systems. PMID:23075589

  20. Free fatty acid-induced PP2A hyperactivity selectively impairs hepatic insulin action on glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Galbo, Thomas; Olsen, Grith Skytte; Quistorff, Bjørn; Nishimura, Erica

    2011-01-01

    In type 2 Diabetes (T2D) free fatty acids (FFAs) in plasma are increased and hepatic insulin resistance is "selective", in the sense that the insulin-mediated decrease of glucose production is blunted while insulin's effect on stimulating lipogenesis is maintained. We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying this pathogenic paradox. Primary rat hepatocytes were exposed to palmitate for twenty hours. To establish the physiological relevance of the in vitro findings, we also studied insulin-resistant Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats. While insulin-receptor phosphorylation was unaffected, activation of Akt and inactivation of the downstream targets Glycogen synthase kinase 3α (Gsk3α and Forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) was inhibited in palmitate-exposed cells. Accordingly, dose-response curves for insulin-mediated suppression of the FoxO1-induced gluconeogenic genes and for de novo glucose production were right shifted, and insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation and glycogen synthesis were impaired. In contrast, similar to findings in human T2D, the ability of insulin to induce triglyceride (TG) accumulation and transcription of the enzymes that catalyze de novo lipogenesis and TG assembly was unaffected. Insulin-induction of these genes could, however, be blocked by inhibition of the atypical PKCs (aPKCs). The activity of the Akt-inactivating Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) was increased in the insulin-resistant cells. Furthermore, inhibition of PP2A by specific inhibitors increased insulin-stimulated activation of Akt and phosphorylation of FoxO1 and Gsk3α. Finally, PP2A mRNA levels were increased in liver, muscle and adipose tissue, while PP2A activity was increased in liver and muscle tissue in insulin-resistant ZDF rats. In conclusion, our findings indicate that FFAs may cause a selective impairment of insulin action upon hepatic glucose metabolism by increasing PP2A activity. PMID:22087313

  1. A novel fiber composite ingredient incorporated into a beverage and bar blunts postprandial serum glucose and insulin responses: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Lauren E; Campbell, Wayne W

    2016-03-01

    Previous research supports that consumption of resistant starch and guar gum independently influences insulin-mediated glucose responses to meals. This research assessed a novel co-processed fiber composite (FC) ingredient comprising whole-grain high-amylose maize flour and viscous guar gum on glucose and insulin responses to co-consumed and subsequent meals in humans. It was hypothesized that a smoothie-type beverage or a cold-pressed snack bar containing the FC would blunt and sustain serum glucose and insulin postprandial responses compared with maltodextrin (MD). The beverage and bar were assessed in 2 separate studies using identical protocols. Young, nondiabetic, nonobese adults participated in 2 testing days (randomized crossover design) separated by at least 1 week for both food forms. On each testing day, the FC or MD product was consumed with a low-fiber standardized breakfast followed by a low-fiber standardized lunch (with no FC or MD) 4 hours later. Blood samples were collected at baseline and incrementally throughout the 8-hour testing day. One-tailed paired t tests were performed to compare treatment areas under the curve, and a doubly repeated-measures analysis of variance was performed to compare treatment responses at individual time points (P< .05, Bonferroni corrected). The FC blunted the postprandial glucose and insulin responses compared with MD, including a robust glucose and insulin response reduction after breakfast and a continued modest glycemic second-meal reduction after lunch in both the beverage and the bar. These findings support the use of this novel whole-grain FC ingredient in a beverage or bar for insulin-mediated glucose control in young healthy adults. PMID:26923512

  2. Glucose Variability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The proposed contribution of glucose variability to the development of the complications of diabetes beyond that of glycemic exposure is supported by reports that oxidative stress, the putative mediator of such complications, is greater for intermittent as opposed to sustained hyperglycemia. Variability of glycemia in ambulatory conditions defined as the deviation from steady state is a phenomenon of normal physiology. Comprehensive recording of glycemia is required for the generation of any measurement of glucose variability. To avoid distortion of variability to that of glycemic exposure, its calculation should be devoid of a time component. PMID:23613565

  3. Interleukin-6 Attenuates Insulin-Mediated Increases in Endothelial Cell Signaling but Augments Skeletal Muscle Insulin Action via Differential Effects on Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Expression

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Derek Y.C.; Dwyer, Renee M.; Matthews, Vance B.; Zhang, Lei; Drew, Brian G.; Neill, Bronwyn; Kingwell, Bronwyn A.; Clark, Michael G.; Rattigan, Stephen; Febbraio, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) stimulates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and insulin signaling in skeletal muscle, both of which result in the activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). We hypothesized that IL-6 promotes endothelial cell signaling and capillary recruitment in vivo, contributing to increased glucose uptake. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The effect of IL-6 with and without insulin on AMPK, insulin, and eNOS signaling in and nitric oxide (NO) release from human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) was examined. The physiological significance of these in vitro signaling events was assessed by measuring capillary recruitment in rats during control and euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamps with or without IL-6 infusion. RESULTS IL-6 blunted increases in insulin signaling, eNOS phosphorylation (Ser1177), and NO production and reduced phosphorylation of AMPK in HAEC in vitro and capillary recruitment in vivo. In contrast, IL-6 increased Akt phosphorylation (Ser473) in hindlimb skeletal muscle and enhanced whole-body glucose disappearance and glucose uptake during the clamp. The differences in endothelial cell and skeletal muscle signaling were mediated by the cell-specific, additive effects of IL-6 and insulin because this treatment markedly increased tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α protein expression in HAECs without any effect on TNF-α in skeletal muscle. When HAECs were incubated with a TNF-α–neutralizing antibody, the negative effects of IL-6 on eNOS signaling were abolished. CONCLUSIONS In the presence of insulin, IL-6 contributes to aberrant endothelial cell signaling because of increased TNF-α expression. PMID:19188427

  4. Plin2 Inhibits Cellular Glucose Uptake through Interactions with SNAP23, a SNARE Complex Protein

    PubMed Central

    Senthivinayagam, Subramanian; McIntosh, Avery L.; Moon, Kenneth C.; Atshaves, Barbara P.

    2013-01-01

    Although a link between excess lipid storage and aberrant glucose metabolism has been recognized for many years, little is known what role lipid storage droplets and associated proteins such as Plin2 play in managing cellular glucose levels. To address this issue, the influence of Plin2 on glucose uptake was examined using 2-NBD-Glucose and [3H]-2-deoxyglucose to show that insulin-mediated glucose uptake was decreased 1.7- and 1.8-fold, respectively in L cell fibroblasts overexpressing Plin2. Conversely, suppression of Plin2 levels by RNAi-mediated knockdown increased 2-NBD-Glucose uptake several fold in transfected L cells and differentiated 3T3-L1 cells. The effect of Plin2 expression on proteins involved in glucose uptake and transport was also examined. Expression of the SNARE protein SNAP23 was increased 1.6-fold while levels of syntaxin-5 were decreased 1.7-fold in Plin2 overexpression cells with no significant changes observed in lipid droplet associated proteins Plin1 or FSP27 or with the insulin receptor, GLUT1, or VAMP4. FRET experiments revealed a close proximity of Plin2 to SNAP23 on lipid droplets to within an intramolecular distance of 51 Å. The extent of targeting of SNAP23 to lipid droplets was determined by co-localization and co-immunoprecipitation experiments to show increased partitioning of SNAP23 to lipid droplets when Plin2 was overexpressed. Taken together, these results suggest that Plin2 inhibits glucose uptake by interacting with, and regulating cellular targeting of SNAP23 to lipid droplets. In summary, the current study for the first time provides direct evidence for the role of Plin2 in mediating cellular glucose uptake. PMID:24040030

  5. A Glucose Sensing Contact Lens: A Non-Invasive Technique for Continuous Physiological Glucose Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Badugu, Ramachandram; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Geddes, Chris D.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a range of glucose sensing contact lenses, using a daily, disposable contact lens embedded with newly developed boronic acid containing fluorophores. Our findings show that our approach may be suitable for the continuous monitoring of tear glucose levels in the range 50–1000 μM, which typically track blood glucose levels, which are ≈5–10 fold higher. Our non-invasive approach may well offer an alternative solution to current invasive glucose monitoring techniques for diabetes, such as “finger pricking.” PMID:27340364

  6. An Alternative Procedure for the Glucose Oxidase Assay of Glucose as Applied to the Lactase Activity Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin Mullis, T.; Winge, Jeffery T.; Deal, S. Todd

    1999-12-01

    The glucose oxidase assay of glucose has been modified to eliminate the use of micropipets. The modification involves the use of disposable Pasteur pipets and a specified number of drops of each reagent. This simplified technique gives accurate and reproducible results.

  7. Glucose kinetics during prolonged exercise in highly trained human subjects: effect of glucose ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Jeukendrup, Asker E; Raben, Anne; Gijsen, Annemie; Stegen, Jos H C H; Brouns, Fred; Saris, Wim H M; Wagenmakers, Anton J M

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to investigate whether glucose ingestion during prolonged exercise reduces whole body muscle glycogen oxidation, (2) to determine the extent to which glucose disappearing from the plasma is oxidized during exercise with and without carbohydrate ingestion and (3) to obtain an estimate of gluconeogenesis. After an overnight fast, six well-trained cyclists exercised on three occasions for 120 min on a bicycle ergometer at 50% maximum velocity of O2 uptake and ingested either water (Fast), or a 4% glucose solution (Lo-Glu) or a 22% glucose solution (Hi-Glu) during exercise. Dual tracer infusion of [U-13C]-glucose and [6,6-2H2]-glucose was given to measure the rate of appearance (Ra) of glucose, muscle glycogen oxidation, glucose carbon recycling, metabolic clearance rate (MCR) and non-oxidative disposal of glucose. Glucose ingestion markedly increased total Ra especially with Hi-Glu. After 120 min Ra and rate of disappearance (Rd) of glucose were 51-52 μmol kg−1 min−1 during Fast, 73-74 μmol kg−1 min−1 during Lo-Glu and 117–119 μmol kg−1 min−1 during Hi-Glu. The percentage of Rd oxidized was between 96 and 100% in all trials. Glycogen oxidation during exercise was not reduced by glucose ingestion. The vast majority of glucose disappearing from the plasma is oxidized and MCR increased markedly with glucose ingestion. Glucose carbon recycling was minimal suggesting that gluconeogenesis in these conditions is negligible. PMID:10050023

  8. Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 impair insulin-mediated brain activity by interleukin-6 and osteopontin and alter sleep architecture.

    PubMed

    Sartorius, Tina; Lutz, Stefan Z; Hoene, Miriam; Waak, Jens; Peter, Andreas; Weigert, Cora; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Kahle, Philipp J; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Hennige, Anita M

    2012-05-01

    Impaired insulin action in the brain represents an early step in the progression toward type 2 diabetes, and elevated levels of saturated free fatty acids are known to impair insulin action in prediabetic subjects. One potential mediator that links fatty acids to inflammation and insulin resistance is the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family. Therefore, C3H/HeJ/TLR2-KO (TLR2/4-deficient) mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD), and insulin action in the brain as well as cortical and locomotor activity was analyzed by using telemetric implants. TLR2/4-deficient mice were protected from HFD-induced glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in the brain and displayed an improvement in cortical and locomotor activity that was not observed in C3H/HeJ mice. Sleep recordings revealed a 42% increase in rapid eye movement sleep in the deficient mice during daytime, and these mice spent 41% more time awake during the night period. Treatment of control mice with a neutralizing IL-6 antibody improved insulin action in the brain as well as cortical activity and diminished osteopontin protein to levels of the TLR2/4-deficient mice. Together, our data suggest that the lack of functional TLR2/4 protects mice from a fat-mediated impairment in insulin action, brain activity, locomotion, and sleep architecture by an IL-6/osteopontin-dependent mechanism. PMID:22278939

  9. Curcuma longa polyphenols improve insulin-mediated lipid accumulation and attenuate proinflammatory response of 3T3-L1 adipose cells during oxidative stress through regulation of key adipokines and antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Septembre-Malaterre, Axelle; Le Sage, Fanny; Hatia, Sarah; Catan, Aurélie; Janci, Laurent; Gonthier, Marie-Paule

    2016-07-01

    Plant polyphenols may exert beneficial action against obesity-related oxidative stress and inflammation which promote insulin resistance. This study evaluated the effect of polyphenols extracted from French Curcuma longa on 3T3-L1 adipose cells exposed to H2 O2 -mediated oxidative stress. We found that Curcuma longa extract exhibited high amounts of curcuminoids identified as curcumin, demethoxycurcumin, and bisdemethoxycurcumin, which exerted free radical-scavenging activities. Curcuma longa polyphenols improved insulin-mediated lipid accumulation and upregulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma gene expression and adiponectin secretion which decreased in H2 O2 -treated cells. Curcuminoids attenuated H2 O2 -enhanced production of pro-inflammatory molecules such as interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and nuclear factor κappa B. Moreover, they reduced intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species elevated by H2 O2 and modulated the expression of genes encoding superoxide dismutase and catalase antioxidant enzymes. Collectively, these findings highlight that Curcuma longa polyphenols protect adipose cells against oxidative stress and may improve obesity-related metabolic disorders. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(4):418-430, 2016. PMID:27094023

  10. Overexpression of Rad inhibits glucose uptake in cultured muscle and fat cells.

    PubMed

    Moyers, J S; Bilan, P J; Reynet, C; Kahn, C R

    1996-09-20

    Rad is a Ras-like GTPase that was isolated by subtraction cloning of human muscle and shown to have increased expression in some individuals with Type II diabetes. To ascertain the potential role of Rad in insulin-mediated signaling, we have overexpressed Rad in myocyte and adipocyte cell lines. Expression of Rad resulted in a 50-90% reduction in insulin-stimulated 2-deoxyglucose glucose uptake in C2C12 murine myotubes, L6 rat myotubes, and 3T3-L1 adipocytes and a 25% reduction in 3-O-methylglucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. This occurred despite unaltered levels of glucose transporter expression, with no detectable change in Glut4 translocation and with no alteration in insulin receptor or substrate phosphorylation or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity. These data indicate that Rad is a negative regulator of glucose uptake and that this effect may be due to a decrease in the intrinsic activity of the transporter molecules, rather than an effect on the translocation of Glut4. PMID:8798502

  11. Glucose test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... person with diabetes constantly manages their blood's sugar (glucose) levels. After a blood sample is taken and tested, it is determined whether the glucose levels are low or high. If glucose levels ...

  12. Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia) What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia, also called low ... actions can also help prevent hypoglycemia: Check blood glucose levels Knowing your blood glucose level can help ...

  13. Glucose Homeostatic Law: Insulin Clearance Predicts the Progression of Glucose Intolerance in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Uda, Shinsuke; Kubota, Hiroyuki; Iwaki, Toshinao; Fukuzawa, Hiroki; Komori, Yasunori; Fujii, Masashi; Toyoshima, Yu; Sakaguchi, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Wataru; Kuroda, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    Homeostatic control of blood glucose is regulated by a complex feedback loop between glucose and insulin, of which failure leads to diabetes mellitus. However, physiological and pathological nature of the feedback loop is not fully understood. We made a mathematical model of the feedback loop between glucose and insulin using time course of blood glucose and insulin during consecutive hyperglycemic and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps in 113 subjects with variety of glucose tolerance including normal glucose tolerance (NGT), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We analyzed the correlation of the parameters in the model with the progression of glucose intolerance and the conserved relationship between parameters. The model parameters of insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion significantly declined from NGT to IGT, and from IGT to T2DM, respectively, consistent with previous clinical observations. Importantly, insulin clearance, an insulin degradation rate, significantly declined from NGT, IGT to T2DM along the progression of glucose intolerance in the mathematical model. Insulin clearance was positively correlated with a product of insulin sensitivity and secretion assessed by the clamp analysis or determined with the mathematical model. Insulin clearance was correlated negatively with postprandial glucose at 2h after oral glucose tolerance test. We also inferred a square-law between the rate constant of insulin clearance and a product of rate constants of insulin sensitivity and secretion in the model, which is also conserved among NGT, IGT and T2DM subjects. Insulin clearance shows a conserved relationship with the capacity of glucose disposal among the NGT, IGT and T2DM subjects. The decrease of insulin clearance predicts the progression of glucose intolerance. PMID:26623647

  14. The effect of endurance training and subsequent physical inactivity on glycaemic control after oral glucose load and physical exercise in healthy men

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radikova, Zofia; Ksinantova, Lucia; Kaciuba-Uscilko, Hanna; Nazar, Krystyna; Vigas, Milan; Koska, Juraj

    2007-02-01

    Physical inactivity during space flight has a profound effect on glucose metabolism. The aim of this study was to test whether endurance training (ET) may improve a negative effect of subsequent -6∘ head-down bed rest (HDBR) on glucose metabolism. Fourteen healthy males completed the study consisting of 6 weeks lasting ET followed by 6 days HDBR. Treadmill exercise at 80% of pre-training VO2max and 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were performed before and after ET as well as after HDBR. ET increased VO2max by 11%. ET significantly lowered while HDBR had no effect on fasting and OGTT plasma glucose levels. ET had no effect while HDBR was followed by an augmentation of insulin and C-peptide response to OGTT. Insulin sensitivity tended to increase after ET and to decrease during HDBR, however, mostly without statistical significance. Plasma glucose, insulin and C-peptide response to exercise were elevated after HDBR only. Our study shows that antecedent physical training could ameliorate a negative effect of simulated microgravity on insulin-mediated glucose metabolism.

  15. Frequent interruptions of sedentary time modulates contraction- and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake pathways in muscle: Ancillary analysis from randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bergouignan, Audrey; Latouche, Celine; Heywood, Sarah; Grace, Megan S; Reddy-Luthmoodoo, Medini; Natoli, Alaina K; Owen, Neville; Dunstan, David W; Kingwell, Bronwyn A

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have observed associations between frequent interruptions of sitting time with physical activity bouts and beneficial metabolic outcomes, even in individuals who regularly exercise. Frequent interruptions to prolonged sitting reduce postprandial plasma glucose. Here we studied potential skeletal muscle mechanisms accounting for this improved control of glycemia in overweight adults under conditions of one day uninterrupted sitting and sitting interrupted with light-intensity or moderate-intensity walking every 20-min (n = 8); and, after three days of either uninterrupted sitting or light-intensity walking interruptions (n = 5). Contraction- and insulin-mediated glucose uptake signaling pathways as well as changes in oxidative phosphorylation proteins were examined. We showed that 1) both interventions reduce postprandial glucose concentration, 2) acute interruptions to sitting over one day stimulate the contraction-mediated glucose uptake pathway, 3) both acute interruptions to sitting with moderate-intensity activity over one day and light-intensity activity over three days induce a transition to modulation of the insulin-signaling pathway, in association with increased capacity for glucose transport. Only the moderate-intensity interruptions resulted in greater capacity for glycogen synthesis and likely for ATP production. These observations contribute to a mechanistic explanation of improved postprandial glucose metabolism with regular interruptions to sitting time, a promising preventive strategy for metabolic diseases. PMID:27554943

  16. Frequent interruptions of sedentary time modulates contraction- and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake pathways in muscle: Ancillary analysis from randomized clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Bergouignan, Audrey; Latouche, Celine; Heywood, Sarah; Grace, Megan S.; Reddy-Luthmoodoo, Medini; Natoli, Alaina K.; Owen, Neville; Dunstan, David W.; Kingwell, Bronwyn A.

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have observed associations between frequent interruptions of sitting time with physical activity bouts and beneficial metabolic outcomes, even in individuals who regularly exercise. Frequent interruptions to prolonged sitting reduce postprandial plasma glucose. Here we studied potential skeletal muscle mechanisms accounting for this improved control of glycemia in overweight adults under conditions of one day uninterrupted sitting and sitting interrupted with light-intensity or moderate-intensity walking every 20-min (n = 8); and, after three days of either uninterrupted sitting or light-intensity walking interruptions (n = 5). Contraction- and insulin-mediated glucose uptake signaling pathways as well as changes in oxidative phosphorylation proteins were examined. We showed that 1) both interventions reduce postprandial glucose concentration, 2) acute interruptions to sitting over one day stimulate the contraction-mediated glucose uptake pathway, 3) both acute interruptions to sitting with moderate-intensity activity over one day and light-intensity activity over three days induce a transition to modulation of the insulin-signaling pathway, in association with increased capacity for glucose transport. Only the moderate-intensity interruptions resulted in greater capacity for glycogen synthesis and likely for ATP production. These observations contribute to a mechanistic explanation of improved postprandial glucose metabolism with regular interruptions to sitting time, a promising preventive strategy for metabolic diseases. PMID:27554943

  17. Glucose biosensor based on multi-wall carbon nanotubes and screen printed carbon electrodes.

    PubMed

    Guan, Wen-Jun; Li, Yu; Chen, Yu-Quan; Zhang, Xiao-Bin; Hu, Gui-Quan

    2005-09-15

    This paper describes a disposable electrochemical biosensor for glucose monitoring. The sensor was based on multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) immobilized with glucose oxidase and upon screen printed carbon electrode. The effect of MWCNTs on the response of amperometric glucose oxidase electrode for glucose was examined. Results obtained, of interest for basic and applied biochemistry, represent a first step in construction of a MWCNT-enzyme electrode biosensor with potentialities for a successful application in the biosensor area. PMID:16076441

  18. Blood Test: Glucose

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Blood Test: Glucose KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Test: Glucose Print A A A Text Size What's in ... de sangre: glucosa What It Is A blood glucose test measures the amount of glucose (the main ...

  19. Actin filaments participate in the relocalization of phosphatidylinositol3-kinase to glucose transporter-containing compartments and in the stimulation of glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q; Bilan, P J; Tsakiridis, T; Hinek, A; Klip, A

    1998-01-01

    Insulin stimulates the rate of glucose uptake into muscle and adipose cells by translocation of glucose transporters from an intracellular storage pool to the plasma membrane. This event requires the prior activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase). Here we report that insulin causes an increase in wortmannin-sensitive PI 3-kinase activity and a gain in the enzyme's regulatory and catalytic subunits p85alpha and p110beta (but not p110alpha) in the intracellular compartments containing glucose transporters. The hormone also caused a marked reorganization of actin filaments, which was prevented by cytochalasin D. Cytochalasin D also decreased significantly the insulin-dependent association of PI 3-kinase activity and the levels of insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1, p85alpha and p110beta with immunopurified GLUT4-containing compartments. In contrast, the drug did not alter the insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1, the association of PI 3-kinase with IRS-1, or the stimulation of PI 3-kinase by insulin in anti-(IRS-1) or anti-p85 immunoprecipitates from whole cell lysates. Cytochalasin D, and the chemically unrelated latrunculin B, which also inhibits actin filament reassembly, prevented the insulin stimulation of glucose transport by approx. 50%. Cytochalasin D decreased by about one-half the insulin-dependent translocation to the plasma membrane of the GLUT1 and GLUT4 glucose transporters. The results suggest that the existence of intact actin filament is correlated with the full recruitment of glucose transporters by insulin. The underlying function of the actin filaments might be to facilitate the insulin-mediated association of the p85-p110 PI 3-kinase with glucose-transporter-containing compartments. PMID:9560323

  20. Effects of maternal undernutrition and exercise on glucose kinetics in fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Leury, B J; Chandler, K D; Bird, A R; Bell, A W

    1990-09-01

    Fetal glucose kinetics were measured using a combination of isotope-dilution and Fick-principle methodology in single-pregnant ewes which were either well-fed throughout, or fed at 0.3-0.4 predicted energy requirement for 7-21 d during late pregnancy. All ewes were studied while standing at rest and then while walking on a treadmill at 0.7 m/s on a 10 degree slope for 60 min. Underfed ewes suffered major decreases in fetal total disposal rate, fetal-placental transfer and umbilical net uptake of glucose, each of which were significantly related to declines in maternal and fetal blood glucose concentrations respectively. In well-fed ewes, fetal endogenous glucose production was negligible, as indicated by the similarity between fetal utilization rate (total glucose disposal rate minus placental uptake of fetal glucose) and umbilical net uptake of glucose, and by nearly identical fetal and maternal arterial blood specific radioactivities of maternally infused D-[2-3H]glucose. By contrast, in underfed ewes, fetal utilization rate greatly exceeded umbilical net uptake of glucose, and the fetal:maternal [3H]glucose specific activity ratio declined significantly, suggesting induction of a substantial rate of fetal endogenous glucogenesis. Exercise caused increases in fetal total glucose disposal rate and glycaemia in fed and underfed ewes. In underfed ewes only, this was accompanied by increased placental uptake of fetal glucose and umbilical net glucose uptake, unchanged fetal glucose utilization and decreased fetal endogenous glucose production. It is concluded that fetal gluconeogenesis makes a major contribution to fetal glucose requirements in undernourished ewes. Increased maternal supply of fetal glucose during exercise substitutes for rather than adds to fetal endogenous glucogenesis. PMID:2223747

  1. The evolution of commercialized glucose sensors in China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jamie

    2009-01-01

    The glucose monitor with a screen-printed carbon sensor has been in commercial production since 1994. In last 15 years, around 10 companies have been involved in manufacturing and marketing the meters and glucose test strips and are being strong competitors of the companies which import these products. Comparison of early stage glucose meters and glucose test strips with latest fabrications showed a large increase in production volume and improved functional features. It also showed technological development of glucose monitors including circuit improvement, as more integrated computer processor units (CPU) are now being used. The technology of mass-production of disposable screen-printed test strips has been widely used in local industries mainly for the production of blood glucose test strips. The opportunities and challenges in local diabetes market are discussed in this paper. PMID:18929476

  2. Disposable Diapers Are OK.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poore, Patricia

    1992-01-01

    A personal account of measuring the pros and cons of disposable diaper usage leads the author to differentiate between a garbage problem and environmental problem. Concludes the disposable diaper issue is a political and economic issue with a local environmental impact and well within our abilities to manage. (MCO)

  3. Long-term exposure to abnormal glucose levels alters drug metabolism pathways and insulin sensitivity in primary human hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Matthew D.; Ballinger, Kimberly R.; Khetani, Salman R.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus has been linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can progress to inflammation, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding how chronic hyperglycemia affects primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) can facilitate the development of therapeutics for these diseases. Conversely, elucidating the effects of hypoglycemia on PHHs may provide insights into how the liver adapts to fasting, adverse diabetes drug reactions, and cancer. In contrast to declining PHH monocultures, micropatterned co-cultures (MPCCs) of PHHs and 3T3-J2 murine embryonic fibroblasts maintain insulin-sensitive glucose metabolism for several weeks. Here, we exposed MPCCs to hypo-, normo- and hyperglycemic culture media for ~3 weeks. While albumin and urea secretion were not affected by glucose level, hypoglycemic MPCCs upregulated CYP3A4 enzyme activity as compared to other glycemic states. In contrast, hyperglycemic MPCCs displayed significant hepatic lipid accumulation in the presence of insulin, while also showing decreased sensitivity to insulin-mediated inhibition of glucose output relative to a normoglycemic control. In conclusion, we show for the first time that PHHs exposed to hypo- and hyperglycemia can remain highly functional, but display increased CYP3A4 activity and selective insulin resistance, respectively. In the future, MPCCs under glycemic states can aid in novel drug discovery and mechanistic investigations. PMID:27312339

  4. Calorie restriction leads to greater Akt2 activity and glucose uptake by insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle from old rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiyan; Arias, Edward B; Cartee, Gregory D

    2016-03-01

    Skeletal muscle insulin resistance is associated with many common age-related diseases, but moderate calorie restriction (CR) can substantially elevate glucose uptake by insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle from both young and old rats. The current study evaluated the isolated epitrochlearis muscle from ∼24.5-mo-old rats that were either fed ad libitum (AL) or subjected to CR (consuming ∼65% of ad libitum, AL, intake beginning at ∼22.5 mo old). Some muscles were also incubated with MK-2206, a potent and selective Akt inhibitor. The most important results were that in isolated muscles, CR vs. AL resulted in 1) greater insulin-stimulated glucose uptake 2) that was accompanied by significantly increased insulin-mediated activation of Akt2, as indicated by greater phosphorylation on both Thr(309) and Ser(474) along with greater Akt2 activity, 3) concomitant with enhanced phosphorylation of several Akt substrates, including an Akt substrate of 160 kDa on Thr(642) and Ser(588), filamin C on Ser(2213) and proline-rich Akt substrate of 40 kDa on Thr(246), but not TBC1D1 on Thr(596); and 4) each of the CR effects was eliminated by MK-2206. These data provide compelling new evidence linking greater Akt2 activation to the CR-induced elevation of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by muscle from old animals. PMID:26739650

  5. Long-term exposure to abnormal glucose levels alters drug metabolism pathways and insulin sensitivity in primary human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Matthew D; Ballinger, Kimberly R; Khetani, Salman R

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus has been linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can progress to inflammation, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding how chronic hyperglycemia affects primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) can facilitate the development of therapeutics for these diseases. Conversely, elucidating the effects of hypoglycemia on PHHs may provide insights into how the liver adapts to fasting, adverse diabetes drug reactions, and cancer. In contrast to declining PHH monocultures, micropatterned co-cultures (MPCCs) of PHHs and 3T3-J2 murine embryonic fibroblasts maintain insulin-sensitive glucose metabolism for several weeks. Here, we exposed MPCCs to hypo-, normo- and hyperglycemic culture media for ~3 weeks. While albumin and urea secretion were not affected by glucose level, hypoglycemic MPCCs upregulated CYP3A4 enzyme activity as compared to other glycemic states. In contrast, hyperglycemic MPCCs displayed significant hepatic lipid accumulation in the presence of insulin, while also showing decreased sensitivity to insulin-mediated inhibition of glucose output relative to a normoglycemic control. In conclusion, we show for the first time that PHHs exposed to hypo- and hyperglycemia can remain highly functional, but display increased CYP3A4 activity and selective insulin resistance, respectively. In the future, MPCCs under glycemic states can aid in novel drug discovery and mechanistic investigations. PMID:27312339

  6. A glucose-sensing contact lens: a new approach to noninvasive continuous physiological glucose monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badugu, Ramachandram; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Geddes, Chris D.

    2004-06-01

    We have developed a new technology for the non-invasive continuous monitoring of tear glucose using a daily use, disposable contact lens, embedded with sugar-sensing boronic acid containing fluorophores. Our findings show that our approach may be suitable for the continuous monitoring of tear glucose levels in the range 50 - 500 μM, which track blood glucose levels that are typically ~ 5-10 fold higher. We initially tested the sensing concept with well-established, previously published, boronic acid probes and the results could conclude the used probes, with higher pKa values, are almost insensitive toward glucose within the contact lens, attributed to the low pH and polarity inside the lens. Subsequently, we have developed a range of probes based on the quinolinium backbone, having considerably lower pKa values, which enables them to be suitable to sense the physiological glucose in the acidic pH contact lens. Herein we describe the results based on our findings towards the development of glucose sensing contact lens and therefore an approach to non-invasive continuous monitoring of tear glucose using a contact lens.

  7. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003671.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a type of ...

  8. Your Glucose Meter

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Your Glucose Meter Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Español Basic Facts 7 Tips for Testing Your Blood Sugar and Caring for Your Meter Glucose meters test ...

  9. Continuous Glucose Monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... catalog. Additional Links ​ Alternative Devices for Taking Insulin Children and Diabetes Glucose Meters Juvenile Diabetes (Teens and Diabetes ) Know Your Blood Glucose Numbers Your Guide to Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2 Contact Us Health Information Center ...

  10. Effects of aspartame and glucose administration on brain and plasma levels of large neutral amino acids and brain 5-hydroxyindoles.

    PubMed

    Yokogoshi, H; Roberts, C H; Caballero, B; Wurtman, R J

    1984-07-01

    Administration of the artificial sweetener aspartame (L-aspartylphenylalanylmethyl ester; 200 mg/kg) by gavage to rats caused large increments in brain and plasma levels of phenylalanine and its product tyrosine. Glucose administration (3 g/kg, by gavage, a dose sufficient to cause insulin-mediated reductions in plasma levels of the large neutral amino acids leucine, isoleucine, and valine) also elevated brain phenylalanine and tyrosine, and enhanced the increments caused by the aspartame, nearly doubling the rise in brain phenylalanine. Each animal's brain phenylalanine or tyrosine levels were highly correlated (r = 0.97 and 0.99, respectively) with its plasma phenylalanine or tyrosine ratios, affirming that aspartame's effects on the brain amino acids result from the changes it produces in plasma composition. As described previously, glucose consumption increased brain tryptophan levels, and consequently, brain levels of the 5-hydroxyindoles serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid. Aspartame alone had no effect on these compounds but completely blocked the changes in 5-hydroxyindoles caused by glucose. Each animal's brain level of tryptophan (r = 0.89) and 5-hydroxyindoles (r = 0.74) was also significantly correlated with its plasma tryptophan ratio, affirming that the effects of glucose or aspartame on these brain constituents also result from the changes they produce in plasma composition. The aspartame-glucose combination also reduced brain levels of leucine, isoleucine, and valine to a significantly greater extent than aspartame or glucose alone. These observations indicate that high aspartame doses can generate major neurochemical changes in rats, especially when consumed along with carbohydrate-containing foods. However, they should not in any way be interpreted as demonstrating that aspartame significantly affects the human brain. PMID:6204522

  11. A low-protein diet combined with low-dose endotoxin leads to changes in glucose homeostasis in weanling rats.

    PubMed

    Bandsma, Robert H J; Ackerley, Cameron; Koulajian, Khajag; Zhang, Ling; van Zutphen, Tim; van Dijk, Theo H; Xiao, Changting; Giacca, Adria; Lewis, Gary F

    2015-09-01

    Severe malnutrition is a leading cause of global childhood mortality, and infection and hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia are commonly present. The etiology behind the changes in glucose homeostasis is poorly understood. Here, we generated an animal model of severe malnutrition with and without low-grade inflammation to investigate the effects on glucose homeostasis. Immediately after weaning, rats were fed diets containing 5 [low-protein diet (LP)] or 20% protein [control diet (CTRL)], with or without repeated low-dose intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 2 mg/kg), to mimic inflammation resulting from infections. After 4 wk on the diets, hyperglycemic clamps or euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps were performed with infusion of [U-(13)C6]glucose and [2-(13)C]glycerol to assess insulin secretion, action, and hepatic glucose metabolism. In separate studies, pancreatic islets were isolated for further analyses of insulin secretion and islet morphometry. Glucose clearance was reduced significantly by LP feeding alone (16%) and by LP feeding with LPS administration (43.8%) compared with control during the hyperglycemic clamps. This was associated with a strongly reduced insulin secretion in LP-fed rats in vivo as well as ex vivo in islets but signficantly enhanced whole body insulin sensitivity. Gluconeogenesis rates were unaffected by LP feeding, but glycogenolysis was higher after LP feeding. A protein-deficient diet in young rats leads to a susceptibility to low-dose endotoxin-induced impairment in glucose clearance with a decrease in the islet insulin secretory pathway. A protein-deficient diet is associated with enhanced peripheral insulin sensitivity but impaired insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glycogenolysis. PMID:26152763

  12. CSF glucose test

    MedlinePlus

    Glucose test - CSF; Cerebrospinal fluid glucose test ... The glucose level in the CSF should be 50 to 80 mg/100 mL (or greater than 2/3 of the blood sugar level). Note: Normal value ranges may vary slightly ...

  13. Effects of Insulin-Like Growth Factor (IGF)-I/IGF-Binding Protein-3 Treatment on Glucose Metabolism and Fat Distribution in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients with Abdominal Obesity and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Madhu N.; Mulligan, Kathleen; Tai, Viva; Wen, Michael J.; Dyachenko, Artem; Weinberg, Melissa; Li, Xiaojuan; Lang, Thomas; Grunfeld, Carl; Schwarz, Jean-Marc; Schambelan, Morris

    2010-01-01

    Context: HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy are at increased risk for excess visceral adiposity and insulin resistance. Treatment with GH decreases visceral adiposity but worsens glucose metabolism. IGF-I, which mediates many of the effects of GH, improves insulin sensitivity in HIV-negative individuals. Objective: Our objective was to determine whether IGF-I, complexed to its major binding protein, IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), improves glucose metabolism and alters body fat distribution in HIV-infected patients with abdominal obesity and insulin resistance. Methods: We conducted a pilot, open-label study in 13 HIV-infected men with excess abdominal adiposity and insulin resistance to assess the effect of 3 months of treatment with IGF-I/IGFBP-3 on glucose metabolism and fat distribution. Glucose metabolism was assessed by oral glucose tolerance test and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Endogenous glucose production (EGP), gluconeogenesis, whole-body lipolysis, and de novo lipogenesis (DNL) were measured with stable isotope infusions. Body composition was assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and abdominal computed tomography scan. Results: Glucose tolerance improved and insulin-mediated glucose uptake increased significantly during treatment. EGP increased under fasting conditions, and suppression of EGP by insulin was blunted. Fasting triglycerides decreased significantly in association with a decrease in hepatic DNL. Lean body mass increased and total body fat decreased, whereas visceral adipose tissue did not change. Conclusions: Treatment with IGF-I/IGFBP-3 improved whole-body glucose uptake and glucose tolerance, while increasing hepatic glucose production. Fasting triglycerides improved, reflecting decreased DNL, and visceral adiposity was unchanged. PMID:20610601

  14. Economics of the hydrolysis of cellulosic sludge to glucose.

    PubMed

    Mora, Sandeep; Banerjee, Sujit

    2013-08-01

    Cellulosic sludge from paper mills making bleached products can be enzymatically converted to glucose. A kinetic model that accounts for product inhibition was used to estimate the cost:benefits of the process. In the proposed scheme, the sludge is enzymatically hydrolyzed in a sequence of CSTRs, the ash separated, and the product glucose concentrated through reverse osmosis. The water recovered is mostly recycled. By far, the most important economic variable is the value of the glucose. However, even if the glucose is assumed to be of no value the avoided cost of sludge disposal approximately offsets the process costs. The approach should generate significant revenue if the glucose is valued at market. PMID:23149860

  15. [Glucose Metabolism: Stress Hyperglycemia and Glucose Control].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Katsuya; Tsutsumi, Yasuo M

    2016-05-01

    It is important for the anesthesiologists to understand pathophysiology of perioperative stress hyperglycemia, because it offers strategies for treatment of stress hyperglycemia. The effect of glucose tolerance is different in the choice of the anesthetic agent used in daily clinical setting. Specifically, the volatile anesthetics inhibit insulin secretion after glucose load and affects glucose tolerance. During minor surgery by the remifentanil anesthesia, the stress reaction is hard to be induced, suggesting that we should consider low-dose glucose load. Finally it is necessary to perform the glycemic control of the patients who fell into stress hyperglycemia depending on the individual patient. However, there are a lot of questions to be answered in the future. The prognosis of the perioperative patients is more likely to be greatly improved if we can control stress hyperglycemia. PMID:27319094

  16. Noninvasive Diagnostic Devices for Diabetes through Measuring Tear Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Hodge, William; Hutnick, Cindy; Wang, Xianbin

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the development of a noninvasive diagnostic for diabetes by detecting ocular glucose. Early diagnosis and daily management are very important to diabetes patients to ensure a healthy life. Commercial blood glucose sensors have been used since the 1970s. Millions of diabetes patients have to prick their finger for a drop of blood 4–5 times a day to check blood glucose levels—almost 1800 times annually. There is a strong need to have a noninvasive device to help patients to manage the disease easily and painlessly. Instead of detecting the glucose in blood, monitoring the glucose level in other body fluids may provide a feasible approach for noninvasive diagnosis and diabetes control. Tear glucose has been studied for several decades. This article reviews studies on ocular glucose and its monitoring methods. Attempts to continuously monitor the concentration of tear glucose by using contact lens-based sensors are discussed as well as our current development of a nanostructured lens-based sensor for diabetes. This disposable biosensor for the detection of tear glucose may provide an alternative method to help patients manage the disease conveniently. PMID:21303640

  17. Noninvasive diagnostic devices for diabetes through measuring tear glucose.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Hodge, William; Hutnick, Cindy; Wang, Xianbin

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the development of a noninvasive diagnostic for diabetes by detecting ocular glucose. Early diagnosis and daily management are very important to diabetes patients to ensure a healthy life. Commercial blood glucose sensors have been used since the 1970s. Millions of diabetes patients have to prick their finger for a drop of blood 4-5 times a day to check blood glucose levels--almost 1800 times annually. There is a strong need to have a noninvasive device to help patients to manage the disease easily and painlessly. Instead of detecting the glucose in blood, monitoring the glucose level in other body fluids may provide a feasible approach for noninvasive diagnosis and diabetes control. Tear glucose has been studied for several decades. This article reviews studies on ocular glucose and its monitoring methods. Attempts to continuously monitor the concentration of tear glucose by using contact lens-based sensors are discussed as well as our current development of a nanostructured lens-based sensor for diabetes. This disposable biosensor for the detection of tear glucose may provide an alternative method to help patients manage the disease conveniently. PMID:21303640

  18. Diabetes and the Mediterranean diet: a beneficial effect of oleic acid on insulin sensitivity, adipocyte glucose transport and endothelium-dependent vasoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Ryan, M; McInerney, D; Owens, D; Collins, P; Johnson, A; Tomkin, G H

    2000-02-01

    Abnormalities in endothelial function may be associated with increased cardiovascular risk in diabetic patients. We examined the effect of an oleic-acid-rich diet on insulin resistance and endothelium-dependent vasoreactivity in type 2 diabetes. Eleven type 2 diabetic patients were changed from their usual linoleic-acid-rich diet and treated for 2 months with an oleic-acid-rich diet. Insulin-mediated glucose transport was measured in isolated adipocytes. Fatty acid composition of the adipocyte membranes was determined by gas-liquid chromatography and flow-mediated endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilatation were measured in the superficial femoral artery at the end of each dietary period. There was a significant increase in oleic acid and a decrease in linoleic acid on the oleic-acid-rich diet (p<0.0001). Diabetic control was not different between the diets, but there was a small but significant decrease in fasting glucose/insulin on the oleic-acid-rich diet. Insulin-stimulated (1 ng/ml) glucose transport was significantly greater on the oleic- acid-rich diet (0.56+/-0.17 vs. 0.29+/-0.14 nmol/10(5) cells/3 min, p<0.0001). Endothelium-dependent flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) was significantly greater on the oleic-acid-rich diet (3.90+/-0.97% vs. 6.12+/-1.36% p<0.0001). There was a significant correlation between adipocyte membrane oleic/linoleic acid and insulin-mediated glucose transport (p<0.001) but no relationship between insulin-stimulated glucose transport and change in endothelium-dependent FMD. There was a significant positive correlation between adipocyte membrane oleic/linoleic acid and endothelium-dependent FMD (r=0.61, p<0.001). Change from polyunsaturated to monounsaturated diet in type 2 diabetes reduced insulin resistance and restored endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, suggesting an explanation for the anti-atherogenic benefits of a Mediterranean-type diet. PMID:10700478

  19. Glyceollins, soy isoflavone phytoalexins, improve oral glucose disposal by stimulating glucose uptake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glyceollins (glyceollin I, II, and III), isoflavone phytoalexins synthesized by soy in response to environmental stresses such as microbial infections. Glyceollins exhibited anti-cancer and anti-diabetes effects: previously we showed that glyceollins inhibited cancer cell growth in vitro and in viv...

  20. Depleted uranium disposal options.

    SciTech Connect

    Biwer, B. M.; Ranek, N. L.; Goldberg, M.; Avci, H. I.

    2000-04-01

    Depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) has been produced in the United States since the 1940s as part of both the military program and the civilian nuclear energy program. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the agency responsible for managing most of the depleted UF{sub 6} that has been produced in the United States. The total quantity of depleted UF{sub 6} that DOE has to or will have to manage is approximately 700,000 Mg. Studies have been conducted to evaluate the various alternatives for managing this material. This paper evaluates and summarizes the alternative of disposal as low-level waste (LLW). Results of the analysis indicate that UF{sub 6} needs to be converted to a more stable form, such as U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, before disposal as LLW. Estimates of the environmental impacts of disposal in a dry environment are within the currently applicable standards and regulations. Of the currently operating LLW disposal facilities, available information indicates that either of two DOE facilities--the Hanford Site or the Nevada Test Site--or a commercial facility--Envirocare of Utah--would be able to dispose of up to the entire DOE inventory of depleted UF{sub 6}.

  1. Magnesium battery disposal characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soffer, Louis; Atwater, Terrill

    1994-12-01

    This study assesses the disposal characteristics of U.S. Army procured military magnesium batteries under current Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste identification regulations administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Magnesium batteries were tested at 100, 50, 10 and 0 percent remaining state of charge. Present findings indicate that magnesium batteries with less than 50 percent remaining charge do not exceed the federal regulatory limit of 5.0 mg/L for chromium. All other RCRA contaminates were below regulatory limits at all levels of remaining charge. Assay methods, findings, disposal requirements and design implications are discussed.

  2. Nuclear Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, Glendon W.; Meyer, Philip D.; Ward, Andy L.

    2005-01-12

    Nuclear wastes are by-products of nuclear weapons production and nuclear power generation, plus residuals of radioactive materials used by industry, medicine, agriculture, and academia. Their distinctive nature and potential hazard make nuclear wastes not only the most dangerous waste ever created by mankind, but also one of the most controversial and regulated with respect to disposal. Nuclear waste issues, related to uncertainties in geologic disposal and long-term protection, combined with potential misuse by terrorist groups, have created uneasiness and fear in the general public and remain stumbling blocks for further development of a nuclear industry in a world that may soon be facing a global energy crisis.

  3. Glucose monitoring during Ramadan.

    PubMed

    Jabbar, Abdul

    2015-05-01

    In patients with diabetes who intend to fast during Ramadan, self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is an important tool. During this month, a long established treatment regimen, including medications, physical activity and diet plan, is changed to achieve concordance with the rules of fasting. Without proper glucose monitoring, it is not possible to achieve good glycaemic control. PMID:26013788

  4. Glucose: detection and analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucose is an aldosic monosaccharide that is centrally entrenched in the processes of photosynthesis and respiration, serving as an energy reserve and metabolic fuel in most organisms. As both a monomer and as part of more complex structures such as polysaccharides and glucosides, glucose also pla...

  5. Monitor blood glucose - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100220.htm Monitoring blood glucose - Series—Monitoring blood glucose: Using a self-test meter To use the ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Blood Sugar A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  6. Diminishing impairments in glucose uptake, mitochondrial content, and ADP-stimulated oxygen flux by mesenchymal stem cell therapy in the infarcted heart.

    PubMed

    Hughey, Curtis C; James, Freyja D; Ma, Lianli; Bracy, Deanna P; Wang, Zhizhang; Wasserman, David H; Rottman, Jeffrey N; Shearer, Jane

    2014-01-01

    A constant provision of ATP is of necessity for cardiac contraction. As the heart progresses toward failure following a myocardial infarction (MI), it undergoes metabolic alterations that have the potential to compromise the ability to meet energetic demands. This study evaluated the efficacy of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation into the infarcted heart to minimize impairments in the metabolic processes that contribute to energy provision. Seven and twenty-eight days following the MI and MSC transplantation, MSC administration minimized cardiac systolic dysfunction. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps, coupled with 2-[(14)C]deoxyglucose administration, were employed to assess systemic insulin sensitivity and tissue-specific, insulin-mediated glucose uptake 36 days following the MI in the conscious, unrestrained, C57BL/6 mouse. The improved systolic performance in MSC-treated mice was associated with a preservation of in vivo insulin-stimulated cardiac glucose uptake. Conserved glucose uptake in the heart was linked to the ability of the MSC treatment to diminish the decline in insulin signaling as assessed by Akt phosphorylation. The MSC treatment also sustained mitochondrial content, ADP-stimulated oxygen flux, and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation efficiency in the heart. Maintenance of mitochondrial function and density was accompanied by preserved peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, a master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. These studies provide insight into mechanisms of action that lead to an enhanced energetic state in the infarcted heart following MSC transplantation that may assist in energy provision and dampen cardiac dysfunction. PMID:24196528

  7. Diminishing impairments in glucose uptake, mitochondrial content, and ADP-stimulated oxygen flux by mesenchymal stem cell therapy in the infarcted heart

    PubMed Central

    James, Freyja D.; Ma, Lianli; Bracy, Deanna P.; Wang, Zhizhang; Wasserman, David H.; Rottman, Jeffrey N.; Shearer, Jane

    2013-01-01

    A constant provision of ATP is of necessity for cardiac contraction. As the heart progresses toward failure following a myocardial infarction (MI), it undergoes metabolic alterations that have the potential to compromise the ability to meet energetic demands. This study evaluated the efficacy of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation into the infarcted heart to minimize impairments in the metabolic processes that contribute to energy provision. Seven and twenty-eight days following the MI and MSC transplantation, MSC administration minimized cardiac systolic dysfunction. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps, coupled with 2-[14C]deoxyglucose administration, were employed to assess systemic insulin sensitivity and tissue-specific, insulin-mediated glucose uptake 36 days following the MI in the conscious, unrestrained, C57BL/6 mouse. The improved systolic performance in MSC-treated mice was associated with a preservation of in vivo insulin-stimulated cardiac glucose uptake. Conserved glucose uptake in the heart was linked to the ability of the MSC treatment to diminish the decline in insulin signaling as assessed by Akt phosphorylation. The MSC treatment also sustained mitochondrial content, ADP-stimulated oxygen flux, and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation efficiency in the heart. Maintenance of mitochondrial function and density was accompanied by preserved peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, a master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. These studies provide insight into mechanisms of action that lead to an enhanced energetic state in the infarcted heart following MSC transplantation that may assist in energy provision and dampen cardiac dysfunction. PMID:24196528

  8. Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program

    SciTech Connect

    Krummel, J.R.; Policastro, A.J.; Olshansky, S.J.; McGinnis, L.D.

    1990-10-01

    As part of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program mandated by Public Law 99--145 (Department of Defense Authorization Act), an independent review is presented of the US Army Phase I environmental report for the disposal program at the Umatilla Depot Activity (UMDA) in Hermiston, Oregon. The Phase I report addressed new and additional concerns not incorporated in the final programmatic environmental impact statement (FPEIS). Those concerns were addressed by examining site-specific data for the Umatilla Depot Activity and by recommending the scope and content of a more detailed site-specific study. This independent review evaluates whether the new site-specific data presented in the Phase I report would alter the decision in favor of on-site disposal that was reached in the FPEIS, and whether the recommendations for the scope and content of the site-specific study are adequate. Based on the methods and assumptions presented in the FPEIS, the inclusion of more detailed site-specific data in the Phase I report does not change the decision reached in the FPEIS (which favored on-site disposal at UMDA). It is recommended that alternative assumptions about meteorological conditions be considered and that site-specific data on water, ecological, socioeconomic, and cultural resources; seismicity; and emergency planning and preparedness be considered explicitly in the site-specific EIS decision-making process. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program

    SciTech Connect

    Krummel, J.R.; Policastro, A.J.; Olshansky, S.J.; McGinnis, L.D.

    1990-10-01

    As part of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program mandated by Public Law 99--145 (Department of Defense Authorization Act), an independent review is presented of the US Army Phase I environmental report for the disposal program at the Pine Bluff Arsenal (PBA) in Arkansas. The Phase I report addressed new and additional concerns not incorporated in the final programmatic environmental impact statement (FPEIS). Those concerns were addressed by examining site-specific data for the PBA and by recommending the scope and content of a more detailed site- specific study. This dependent review evaluates whether the new site-specific data presented in the Phase I report would alter the decision in favor of on-site disposal that was reached in the FPEIS, and whether the recommendations for the scope and content of the site-specific study are adequate. Based on the methods and assumptions presented in the FPEIS, the inclusion of more detailed site-specific data in the Phase I report does not change the decision reached in the FPEIS (which favored on-site disposal at PBA). It is recommended that alternative assumptions about meteorological conditions be considered and that site-specific data on water, ecological, socioeconomic, and cultural resources, and emergency planning and preparedness be considered explicitly in the site-specific EIS decision-making process. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Plumbing and Sewage Disposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutliff, Ronald D.; And Others

    This self-study course is designed to familiarize Marine enlisted personnel with the principles of plumbing and sewage disposal used by Marine Hygiene Equipment Operators to perform their mission. The course contains three study units. Each study unit begins with a general objective, which is a statement of what the student should learn from the…

  11. Radioactive waste disposal package

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1986-11-04

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  12. Radioactive waste disposal package

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1986-01-01

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  13. Nanomaterial disposal by incineration

    EPA Science Inventory

    As nanotechnology-based products enter into widespread use, nanomaterials will end up in disposal waste streams that are ultimately discharged to the environment. One possible end-of-life scenario is incineration. This review attempts to ascertain the potential pathways by which ...

  14. Alternative Trench Disposal Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhite, E.

    2001-09-05

    During Fiscal Year 2000, a number of activities were conducted to expand the use of trenches for disposal of low-level waste in the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility (LLWF). This document presents a summary and interpretation of these activities in the context of future work.

  15. Waste disposal package

    DOEpatents

    Smith, M.J.

    1985-06-19

    This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

  16. Interference Reduction in Glucose Detection by Redox Potential Tuning: New Glucose Meter Development.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seong Je; Cho, Chul-Ho; Kim, Kwang Bok; Lee, Min-Hyoung; Kim, Jae Hong; Lee, Suho; Cho, Jaegeol; Jung, Suntae; Kim, Dong-Min; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2015-01-01

    A new glucose meter was developed employing a novel disposable glucose sensor strip comprising a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-glucose dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) and a mixture of Fe compounds as a mediator. An iron complex, 5-(2,5-di(thiophen-2-yl)-1H-pyrrol-1-yl)-1,10-phenanthroline iron(III) chloride (Fe-PhenTPy), was synthesized as a new mediator for the NAD-GDH system. Due to the high oxidation potential of the mediator, the detection potential was tuned to be more closely fitted toward the enzyme reaction potential, less than 400 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl), by mixing with an additional iron mediator. The impedance spectrometry for the enzyme sensor containing the mixed mediators showed an enhanced charge transfer property. In addition, a new cartridge-type glucose meter was manufactured using effective aligned-electrodes, which showed an enhanced response compared with conventional electrode alignment. The proposed glucose sensor resulted in a wide dynamic range in the concentration range of 30 - 500 mg dL(-1) with a reduced interference effect and a good sensitivity of 0.57 μA mM(-1). PMID:26165295

  17. Oil field waste disposal costs at commercial disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.A.

    1997-10-01

    The exploration and production segment of the U.S. oil and gas industry generates millions of barrels of nonhazardous oil field wastes annually. In most cases, operators can dispose of their oil fields wastes at a lower cost on-site than off site and, thus, will choose on-site disposal. However, a significant quantity of oil field wastes are still sent to off-site commercial facilities for disposal. This paper provides information on the availability of commercial disposal companies in different states, the treatment and disposal methods they employ, and how much they charge. There appear to be two major off-site disposal trends. Numerous commercial disposal companies that handle oil field wastes exclusively are located in nine oil-and gas-producing states. They use the same disposal methods as those used for on-site disposal. In addition, the Railroad Commission of Texas has issued permits to allow several salt caverns to be used for disposal of oil field wastes. Twenty-two other oil- and gas-producing states contain few or no disposal companies dedicated to oil and gas industry waste. The only off-site commercial disposal companies available handle general industrial wastes or are sanitary landfills. In those states, operators needing to dispose of oil field wastes off-site must send them to a local landfill or out of state. The cost of off-site commercial disposal varies substantially, depending on the disposal method used, the state in which the disposal company is located, and the degree of competition in the area.

  18. Disposal of Some Problem Chemicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes procedures for the disposal of chemicals commonly used in secondary school chemistry laboratories. Special reference is given to inorganic salts. It is suggested that cyanides and other highly toxic salts should be disposed of by experts. (MA)

  19. DSEM. Disposal Site Economic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.R.

    1989-01-01

    The DISPOSAL SITE ECONOMIC MODEL calculates the average generator price, or average price per cubic foot charged by a disposal facility to a waste generator, one measure of comparing the economic attractiveness of different waste disposal site and disposal technology combinations. The generator price is calculated to recover all costs necessary to develop, construct, operate, close, and care for a site through the end of the institutional care period and to provide the necessary financial returns to the site developer and lender (when used). Six alternative disposal technologies, based on either private or public financing, can be considered - shallow land disposal, intermediate depth disposal, above or below ground vaults, modular concrete canister disposal, and earth mounded concrete bunkers - based on either private or public development.

  20. Radium bearing waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Tope, W.G.; Nixon, D.A.; Smith, M.L.; Stone, T.J.; Vogel, R.A.; Schofield, W.D.

    1995-07-01

    Fernald radium bearing ore residue waste, stored within Silos 1 and 2 (K-65) and Silo 3, will be vitrified for disposal at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). A comprehensive, parametric evaluation of waste form, packaging, and transportation alternatives was completed to identify the most cost-effective approach. The impacts of waste loading, waste form, regulatory requirements, NTS waste acceptance criteria, as-low-as-reasonably-achievable principles, and material handling costs were factored into the recommended approach.

  1. Failure of Hyperglycemia and Hyperinsulinemia to Compensate for Impaired Metabolic Response to an Oral Glucose Load

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M; Janghorbani, M; Schuette, S; Considine, RV; Chisholm, RL; Mather, KJ

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether the augmented insulin and glucose response to a glucose challenge is sufficient to compensate for defects in glucose utilization in obesity and type 2 diabetes, using a breath test measurement of integrated glucose metabolism. Methods Non-obese, obese normoglycemic and obese Type 2 diabetic subjects were studied on 2 consecutive days. A 75g oral glucose load spiked with 13C-glucose was administered, measuring exhaled breath 13CO2 as an integrated measure of glucose metabolism and oxidation. A hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp was performed, measuring whole body glucose disposal rate. Body composition was measured by DEXA. Multivariable analyses were performed to evaluate the determinants of the breath 13CO2. Results Breath 13CO2 was reduced in obese and type 2 diabetic subjects despite hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. The primary determinants of breath response were lean mass, fat mass, fasting FFA concentrations, and OGTT glucose excursion. Multiple approaches to analysis showed that hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia were not sufficient to compensate for the defect in glucose metabolism in obesity and diabetes. Conclusions Augmented insulin and glucose responses during an OGTT are not sufficient to overcome the underlying defects in glucose metabolism in obesity and diabetes. PMID:25511878

  2. Marine sewage disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, D.W.

    1981-03-03

    An activated sludge marine sewage disposal apparatus is described that includes an aeration chamber immediately adjacent to a flooded settling tank, rising above a disinfectant chamber and a holding chamber disposed around the lower part of the tank. Flow from the aeration chamber to the settling tank is through a port in the common wall between the aeration chamber and settling tank, and up inside a pond separated from the rest of the tank by a downwardly flaring baffle of skirt depending from the top of the tank. A single shimmer at the center of the area at the top of the pond picks up floating solids and returns them to the top of the aeration chamber. A vent disposed directly over the shimmer continuously draws off air and gas to the aeration chamber. A sludge return line picks up heavy solids for the bottom of the tank and returns them to the top of the aeration chamber through a riser located in the aeration chamber. Liquid in the settling tank flows out through a submerged perforated pipe into a standpipe in the aeration chamber, with is located centrally in the aeration chamber, and overflows through an inverted U tube, vented to the aeration chamber, the tube connecting to a downcomer sending the liquid back through the common wall to the disinfectant compartment. When sufficient volume of fluid accumulates in the disinfectant compartment, it overflows into a holding tank, from which it emerges via a port.

  3. All about Blood Glucose

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Glucose Before meals: 80 to 130 mg/dl My Usual Results My Goals ______ to ______ ______ to ______ 2 ... the start of a meal: below 180 mg/dl below ______ below ______ What’s the best way to keep ...

  4. Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

    MedlinePlus

    ... Glucose NIH Medline Plus - Diabetes Spotlight FDA permits marketing of first system of mobile medical apps for ... feeds Follow FDA on Twitter Follow FDA on Facebook View FDA videos on YouTube View FDA photos ...

  5. Vascular Glucose Sensor Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Jeffrey I; Torjman, Marc C.; Strasma, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and glycemic variability have been associated with increased morbidity, mortality, length of stay, and cost in a variety of critical care and non–critical care patient populations in the hospital. The results from prospective randomized clinical trials designed to determine the risks and benefits of intensive insulin therapy and tight glycemic control have been confusing; and at times conflicting. The limitations of point-of-care blood glucose (BG) monitoring in the hospital highlight the great clinical need for an automated real-time continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) that can accurately measure the concentration of glucose every few minutes. Automation and standardization of the glucose measurement process have the potential to significantly improve BG control, clinical outcome, safety and cost. PMID:26078254

  6. Recombinant glucose uptake system

    DOEpatents

    Ingrahm, Lonnie O.; Snoep, Jacob L.; Arfman, Nico

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant organisms are disclosed that contain a pathway for glucose uptake other than the pathway normally utilized by the host cell. In particular, the host cell is one in which glucose transport into the cell normally is coupled to PEP production. This host cell is transformed so that it uses an alternative pathway for glucose transport that is not coupled to PEP production. In a preferred embodiment, the host cell is a bacterium other than Z. mobilis that has been transformed to contain the glf and glk genes of Z. mobilis. By uncoupling glucose transport into the cell from PEP utilization, more PEP is produced for synthesis of products of commercial importance from a given quantity of biomass supplied to the host cells.

  7. Effect of Global ATGL Knockout on Murine Fasting Glucose Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Margarida; Nunes, Patricia; Mendes, Vera M.; Manadas, Bruno; Heerschap, Arend; Jones, John G.

    2015-01-01

    Mice deficient in adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL−/−) present elevated ectopic lipid levels but are paradoxically glucose-tolerant. Measurement of endogenous glucose production (EGP) and Cori cycle activity provide insights into the maintenance of glycemic control in these animals. These parameters were determined in 7 wild-type (ATGL+/−) and 6 ATGL−/− mice by a primed-infusion of [U-13C6]glucose followed by LC-MS/MS targeted mass-isotopomer analysis of blood glucose. EGP was quantified by isotope dilution of [U-13C6]glucose while Cori cycling was estimated by analysis of glucose triose 13C-isotopomers. Fasting plasma free fatty-acids were significantly lower in ATGL−/− versus control mice (0.43 ± 0.05 mM versus 0.73 ± 0.11 mM, P < 0.05). Six-hour fasting EGP rates were identical for both ATGL−/− and control mice (79 ± 11 versus 71 ± 7 μmol/kg/min, resp.). Peripheral glucose metabolism was dominated by Cori cycling (80 ± 2% and 82 ± 7% of glucose disposal for ATGL−/− and control mice, resp.) indicating that peripheral glucose oxidation was not significantly upregulated in ATGL−/− mice under these conditions. The glucose 13C-isotopomer distributions in both ATGL−/− and control mice were consistent with extensive hepatic pyruvate recycling. This suggests that gluconeogenic outflow from the Krebs cycle was also well compensated in ATGL−/− mice. PMID:26236747

  8. Landfill disposal systems.

    PubMed

    Slimak, K M

    1978-12-01

    The current status of landfill disposal of hazardous wastes in the United States is indicated by presenting descriptions of six operating landfills. These landfills illustrate the variety of techniques that exist in landfill disposal of hazardous wastes. Although some landfills more effectively isolate hazardous waste than others, all landfills must deal with the following problems. Leachate from hazardous waste landfills is generally highly polluted. Most landfills attempt to contain leachate at the site and prevent its discharge to surface or groundwaters. To retain leachate within a disposal area, subsurface barriers of materials such as concrete, asphalt, butyl rubber, vinyl, and clay are used. It is difficult to assure that these materials can seal a landfill indefinitely. When a subsurface barrier fails, the leachate enters the groundwater in a concentrated, narrow band which may bypass monitoring wells. Once a subsurface barrier has failed, repairs are time-consuming and costly, since the waste above the repair site may have to be removed. The central problem in landfill disposal is leachate control. Recent emphasis has been on developing subsurface barriers to contain the wastes and any leachate. Future emphasis should also be on techniques for removing water from hazardous wastes before they are placed in landfills, and on methods for preventing contact of the wastes with water during and after disposal operations. When leachate is eliminated, the problems of monitoring, and subsurface barrier failure and repair can be addressed, and a waste can be effectively isolated.A surface seal landfill design is recommended for maintaining the dry state of solid hazardous wastes and for controlling leachate. Any impervious liner is utilized over the top of the landfill to prevent surface water from seeping into the waste. The surface barrier is also the site where monitoring and maintenance activities are focused. Barrier failure can be detected by visual

  9. Landfill disposal systems

    PubMed Central

    Slimak, Karen M.

    1978-01-01

    The current status of landfill disposal of hazardous wastes in the United States is indicated by presenting descriptions of six operating landfills. These landfills illustrate the variety of techniques that exist in landfill disposal of hazardous wastes. Although some landfills more effectively isolate hazardous waste than others, all landfills must deal with the following problems. Leachate from hazardous waste landfills is generally highly polluted. Most landfills attempt to contain leachate at the site and prevent its discharge to surface or groundwaters. To retain leachate within a disposal area, subsurface barriers of materials such as concrete, asphalt, butyl rubber, vinyl, and clay are used. It is difficult to assure that these materials can seal a landfill indefinitely. When a subsurface barrier fails, the leachate enters the groundwater in a concentrated, narrow band which may bypass monitoring wells. Once a subsurface barrier has failed, repairs are time-consuming and costly, since the waste above the repair site may have to be removed. The central problem in landfill disposal is leachate control. Recent emphasis has been on developing subsurface barriers to contain the wastes and any leachate. Future emphasis should also be on techniques for removing water from hazardous wastes before they are placed in landfills, and on methods for preventing contact of the wastes with water during and after disposal operations. When leachate is eliminated, the problems of monitoring, and subsurface barrier failure and repair can be addressed, and a waste can be effectively isolated. A surface seal landfill design is recommended for maintaining the dry state of solid hazardous wastes and for controlling leachate. Any impervious liner is utilized over the top of the landfill to prevent surface water from seeping into the waste. The surface barrier is also the site where monitoring and maintenance activities are focused. Barrier failure can be detected by visual

  10. Space disposal of nuclear wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priest, C. C.; Nixon, R. F.; Rice, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The DOE has been studying several options for nuclear waste disposal, among them space disposal, which NASA has been assessing. Attention is given to space disposal destinations noting that a circular heliocentric orbit about halfway between Earth and Venus is the reference option in space disposal studies. Discussion also covers the waste form, showing that parameters to be considered include high waste loading, high thermal conductivity, thermochemical stability, resistance to leaching, fabrication, resistance to oxidation and to thermal shock. Finally, the Space Shuttle nuclear waste disposal mission profile is presented.

  11. Uptake and release of glucose by the human kidney. Postabsorptive rates and responses to epinephrine.

    PubMed Central

    Stumvoll, M; Chintalapudi, U; Perriello, G; Welle, S; Gutierrez, O; Gerich, J

    1995-01-01

    Despite ample evidence that the kidney can both produce and use appreciable amounts of glucose, the human kidney is generally regarded as playing a minor role in glucose homeostasis. This view is based on measurements of arteriorenal vein glucose concentrations indicating little or no net release of glucose. However, inferences from net balance measurements do not take into consideration the simultaneous release and uptake of glucose by the kidney. Therefore, to assess the contribution of release and uptake of glucose by the human kidney to overall entry and removal of plasma glucose, we used a combination of balance and isotope techniques to measure renal glucose net balance, fractional extraction, uptake and release as well as overall plasma glucose appearance and disposal in 10 normal volunteers under basal postabsorptive conditions and during a 3-h epinephrine infusion. In the basal postabsorptive state, there was small but significant net output of glucose by the kidney (66 +/- 22 mumol.min-1, P = 0.016). However, since renal glucose fractional extraction averaged 2.9 +/- 0.3%, there was considerable renal glucose uptake (2.3 +/- 0.2 mumol.kg-1.min-1) which accounted for 20.2 +/- 1.7% of systemic glucose disposal (11.4 +/- 0.5 mumol.kg-1.min-1). Renal glucose release (3.2 +/- 0.2 mumol.kg-1.min-1) accounted for 27.8 +/- 2.1% of systemic glucose appearance (11.4 +/- 0.5 mumol.kg-1.min-1). Epinephrine infusion, which increased plasma epinephrine to levels observed during hypoglycemia (3722 +/- 453 pmol/liter) increased renal glucose release nearly twofold (5.2 +/- 0.5 vs 2.8 +/- 0.1 mol.kg-1.min-1, P = 0.01) so that at the end of the infusion, renal glucose release accounted for 40.3 +/- 5.5% of systemic glucose appearance and essentially all of the increase in systemic glucose appearance. These observations suggest an important role for the human kidney in glucose homeostasis. PMID:7593645

  12. Keratin 8/18 regulation of glucose metabolism in normal versus cancerous hepatic cells through differential modulation of hexokinase status and insulin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Jasmin; Loranger, Anne; Gilbert, Stéphane; Faure, Robert; Marceau, Normand

    2013-02-15

    As differentiated cells, hepatocytes primarily metabolize glucose for ATP production through oxidative phosphorylation of glycolytic pyruvate, whereas proliferative hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells undergo a metabolic shift to aerobic glycolysis despite oxygen availability. Keratins, the intermediate filament (IF) proteins of epithelial cells, are expressed as pairs in a lineage/differentiation manner. Hepatocyte and HCC (hepatoma) cell IFs are made solely of keratins 8/18 (K8/K18), thus providing models of choice to address K8/K18 IF functions in normal and cancerous epithelial cells. Here, we demonstrate distinctive increases in glucose uptake, glucose-6-phosphate formation, lactate release, and glycogen formation in K8/K18 IF-lacking hepatocytes and/or hepatoma cells versus their respective IF-containing counterparts. We also show that the K8/K18-dependent glucose uptake/G6P formation is linked to alterations in hexokinase I/II/IV content and localization at mitochondria, with little effect on GLUT1 status. In addition, we find that the insulin-stimulated glycogen formation in normal hepatocytes involves the main PI-3 kinase-dependent signaling pathway and that the K8/K18 IF loss makes them more efficient glycogen producers. In comparison, the higher insulin-dependent glycogen formation in K8/K18 IF-lacking hepatoma cells is associated with a signaling occurring through a mTOR-dependent pathway, along with an augmentation in cell proliferative activity. Together, the results uncover a key K8/K18 regulation of glucose metabolism in normal and cancerous hepatic cells through differential modulations of mitochondrial HK status and insulin-mediated signaling.

  13. Nuclear waste disposal site

    SciTech Connect

    Mallory, C.W.; Watts, R.E.; Sanner, W.S. Jr.; Paladino, J.B.; Lilley, A.W.; Winston, S.J.; Stricklin, B.C.; Razor, J.E.

    1988-11-15

    This patent describes a disposal site for the disposal of toxic or radioactive waste, comprising: (a) a trench in the earth having a substantially flat bottom lined with a layer of solid, fluent, coarse, granular material having a high hydraulic conductivity for obstructing any capillary-type flow of ground water to the interior of the trench; (b) a non-rigid, radiation-blocking cap formed from a first layer of alluvium, a second layer of solid, fluent, coarse, granular material having a high hydraulic conductivity for blocking any capillary-type flow of water between the layer of alluvium and the rest of the cap, a layer of water-shedding silt for directing surface water away from the trench, and a layer of rip-rap over the silt layer for protecting the silt layer from erosion and for providing a radiation barrier; (c) a solidly-packed array of abutting modules of uniform size and shape disposed in the trench and under the cap for both encapsulating the wastes from water and for structurally supporting the cap, wherein each module in the array is slidable movable in the vertical direction in order to allow the array of modules to flexibly conform to variations in the shape of the flat trench bottom caused by seismic disturbances and to facilitate the recoverability of the modules; (d) a layer of solid, fluent, coarse, granular materials having a high hydraulic conductivity in the space between the side of the modules and the walls of the trench for obstructing any capillary-type flow of ground water to the interior of the trench; and (e) a drain and wherein the layer of silt is sloped to direct surface water flowing over the cap into the drain.

  14. Electron-transfer mediator for a NAD-glucose dehydrogenase-based glucose sensor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Min; Kim, Min-yeong; Reddy, Sanapalli S; Cho, Jaegeol; Cho, Chul-ho; Jung, Suntae; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2013-12-01

    A new electron-transfer mediator, 5-[2,5-di (thiophen-2-yl)-1H-pyrrol-1-yl]-1,10-phenanthroline iron(III) chloride (FePhenTPy) oriented to the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent-glucose dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) system was synthesized through a Paal-Knorr condensation reaction. The structure of the mediator was confirmed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, proton and carbon nucler magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and mass spectroscopy, and its electron-transfer characteristic for a glucose sensor was investigated using voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy. A disposable amperometric glucose sensor with NAD-GDH was constructed with FePhenTPy as an electron-transfer mediator on a screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE) and its performance was evaluated, where the addition of reduces graphene oxide (RGO) to the mediator showed the enhanced sensor performance. The experimental parameters to affect the analytical performance and the stability of the proposed glucose sensor were optimized, and the sensor exhibited a dynamic range between 30 mg/dL and 600 mg/dL with the detection limit of 12.02 ± 0.6 mg/dL. In the real sample experiments, the interference effects by acetaminophen, ascorbic acid, dopamine, uric acid, caffeine, and other monosaccharides (fructose, lactose, mannose, and xylose) were completely avoided through coating the sensor surface with the Nafion film containing lead(IV) acetate. The reliability of proposed glucose sensor was evaluated by the determination of glucose in artificial blood and human whole blood samples. PMID:24199942

  15. Radioactive waste material disposal

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1995-10-24

    The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

  16. Radioactive waste material disposal

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.; Beahm, Edward C.; Parker, George W.

    1995-01-01

    The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

  17. A glucose-sensing contact lens: from bench top to patient

    PubMed Central

    Badugu, Ramachandram; Lakowicz, Joseph R; Geddes, Chris D

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years we have seen the development of several new technologies for the continuous and non-invasive monitoring of physiological glucose, such as the GlucoWatch®, glucose-sensing skin patches and approaches based on a glucose-sensing tattoo. One approach that differs from current thinking is based on the determination and monitoring of tear glucose, which is well known to track blood glucose with an approximate 30 min lag time, using disposable and colorless contact lenses. These contact lenses can be worn by diabetics who can colorimetrically see changes in their contact lens color or other fluorescence-based properties, giving an indication of tear and blood glucose levels. PMID:15722022

  18. Glucose homoeostasis following injury.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, P. D.

    1979-01-01

    Metabolic changes following injury have been observed for many years, and John Hunter discussed such changes in 1794. Changes in carbohydrate metabolism have been observed for a similar length of time, and glycosuria and hyperglycaemia have been reported by a number of observers. This paper records and quantitates the extent of hyperglycaemia in patients undergoing surgery of different degrees of severity and relates them to changes in blood insulin, growth hormone, cortisol, and catecholamine concentrations. Further animal studies were performed which suggested that a fall in intracellular glucose utilisation may be a contributory factor. The use of isotope labelling of glucose in man has enabled further studies to be done to clarify changes in exchangeable glucose mass, replacement rate, and space both in the normal situation and in the presence of infusions of glucagon, noradrenaline, glucose, and amino-acids. The hyperglycaemia is clearly the result of a complex interaction of changes in the availability and activity of hormones which control glucose metabolism both within and outside the cell. PMID:496234

  19. How to monitor blood glucose.

    PubMed

    Dunning, Trisha

    2016-01-27

    Rationale and key points Capillary blood glucose monitoring is an essential component of diabetes care. Blood glucose tests provide important information about how the body is controlling blood glucose metabolism, and the effect of glucose-lowering medicines, illness and stress. ▶ The nurse should consider the rationale for testing blood glucose each time they perform a test, and reflect on the result, taking into consideration the patient's blood glucose target range and recommended care guidelines. ▶ Blood glucose testing times and testing frequency should be planned to suit the glucose-lowering medicine regimen and the clinical situation. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. What you have gained from this article. 2. How this article will influence your practice when monitoring blood glucose. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:26967884

  20. Radioactive mixed waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

    1993-02-01

    Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste.

  1. Insulin-induced activation of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase by a chiro-inositol-containing insulin mediator is defective in adipocytes of insulin-resistant, type II diabetic, Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    PubMed Central

    Farese, R V; Standaert, M L; Yamada, K; Huang, L C; Zhang, C; Cooper, D R; Wang, Z; Yang, Y; Suzuki, S; Toyota, T

    1994-01-01

    Type II diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats were insulin-resistant in euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp studies. We therefore examined insulin signaling systems in control Wistar and diabetic GK rats. Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (G3PAT), which is activated by headgroup mediators released from glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI), was activated by insulin in intact and cell-free adipocyte preparations of control, but not diabetic, rats. A specific chiro-inositol-containing inositol phosphoglycan (IPG) mediator, prepared from beef liver, bypassed this defect and comparably activated G3PAT in cell-free adipocyte preparations of both diabetic GK and control rats. A myo-inositol-containing IPG mediator did not activate G3PAT. Relative to control adipocytes, labeling of GPI by [3H]glucosamine was diminished by 50% and insulin failed to stimulate GPI hydrolysis in GK adipocytes. In contrast to GPI-dependent G3PAT activation, insulin-stimulated hexose transport was intact in adipocytes and soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of the GK rat, as was insulin-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and protein kinase C. We conclude that (i) chiro-inositol-containing IPG mediator activates G3PAT during insulin action, (ii) diabetic GK rats have a defect in synthesizing or releasing functional chiro-inositol-containing IPG, and (iii) defective IPG-regulated intracellular glucose metabolism contributes importantly to insulin resistance in diabetic GK rats. PMID:7972005

  2. Blood glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Davey, Sarah

    2014-06-10

    I found the CPD article on blood glucose monitoring and management in acute stroke care interesting and informative. As I am a mental health nursing student, my knowledge of chronic physical conditions is limited, so I learned a lot. PMID:24894257

  3. Glucose Tolerance and Hyperkinesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langseth, Lillian; Dowd, Judith

    Examined were medical records of 265 hyperkinetic children (7-9 years old). Clinical blood chemistries, hematology, and 5-hour glucose tolerance test (GTT) results indicated that hematocrit levels were low in 27% of the Ss, eosinophil levels were abnormally high in 86% of the Ss, and GTT results were abnormal in a maority of Ss. (CL)

  4. Glucose urine test

    MedlinePlus

    ... with a color-sensitive pad. The color the dipstick changes to tells the provider the level of glucose in your urine. If needed, your provider may ask you to collect your urine at home over 24 hours . Your provider will tell you how to do ...

  5. Renal Glucose Handling

    PubMed Central

    Ferrannini, Ele; Veltkamp, Stephan A.; Smulders, Ronald A.; Kadokura, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Ipragliflozin, a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor, stimulates glycosuria and lowers glycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The objective of this study was to assess the pharmacodynamics of ipragliflozin in T2DM patients with impaired renal function. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Glycosuria was measured before and after a single ipragliflozin dose in 8 nondiabetic subjects and 57 T2DM patients (age 62 ± 9 years, fasting glucose 133 ± 39 mg/dL, mean ± SD) with normal renal function (assessed as the estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR]) (eGFR1 ≥90 mL · min–1 · 1.73 m−2), mild (eGFR2 ≥60 to <90), moderate (eGFR3 ≥30 to <60), or severe reduction in eGFR (eGFR4 ≤15 to <30). RESULTS Ipragliflozin significantly increased urinary glucose excretion in each eGFR class (P < 0.0001). However, ipragliflozin-induced glycosuria declined (median [IQR]) across eGFR class (from 46 mg/min [33] in eGFR1 to 8 mg/min [7] in eGFR4, P < 0.001). Ipragliflozin-induced fractional glucose excretion (excretion/filtration) was 39% [27] in the T2DM patients (pooled data), similar to that of the nondiabetic subjects (37% [17], P = ns). In bivariate analysis of the pooled data, ipragliflozin-induced glycosuria was directly related to eGFR and fasting glucose (P < 0.0001 for both, r2 = 0.55), predicting a decrement in 24-h glycosuria of 15 g for each 20 mL/min decline in eGFR and an increase of 7 g for each 10 mg/dL increase in glucose above fasting normoglycemia. CONCLUSIONS In T2DM patients, ipragliflozin increases glycosuria in direct, linear proportion to GFR and degree of hyperglycemia, such that its amount can be reliably predicted in the individual patient. Although absolute glycosuria decreases with declining GFR, the efficiency of ipragliflozin action (fractional glucose excretion) is maintained in patients with severe renal impairment. PMID:23359360

  6. Nuclear waste disposal in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. E.; Causey, W. E.; Galloway, W. E.; Nelson, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Work on nuclear waste disposal in space conducted by the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and contractors are reported. From the aggregate studies, it is concluded that space disposal of nuclear waste is technically feasible.

  7. Chemical Waste Management and Disposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armour, Margaret-Ann

    1988-01-01

    Describes simple, efficient techniques for treating hazardous chemicals so that nontoxic and nonhazardous residues are formed. Discusses general rules for management of waste chemicals from school laboratories and general techniques for the disposal of waste or surplus chemicals. Lists specific disposal reactions. (CW)

  8. Melter Disposal Strategic Planning Document

    SciTech Connect

    BURBANK, D.A.

    2000-09-25

    This document describes the proposed strategy for disposal of spent and failed melters from the tank waste treatment plant to be built by the Office of River Protection at the Hanford site in Washington. It describes program management activities, disposal and transportation systems, leachate management, permitting, and safety authorization basis approvals needed to execute the strategy.

  9. NASA Personal Property Disposal Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Personal Property Disposal Manual is issued pursuant to Subchapters E and H of the Federal Property Management Regulations and the Space Act of 1958, as amended. It sets forth policy and procedural guidance for NASA personnel for the reporting, utilization, redistribution, and disposal of installation and contractor-held NASA excess and surplus personal property.

  10. Sensing of Salivary Glucose Using Nano-Structured Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yunqing; Zhang, Wenjun; Wang, Ming L.

    2016-01-01

    The anxiety and pain associated with frequent finger pricking has always been troublesome for diabetics measuring blood glucose (BG) in their daily lives. For this reason, a reliable glucose monitoring system that allows noninvasive measurements is highly desirable. Our main objective is to develop a biosensor that can detect low-level glucose in saliva (physiological range 0.5–20 mg/dL). Salivary glucose (SG) sensors were built using a layer-by-layer self-assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes, chitosan, gold nanoparticles, and glucose oxidase onto a screen-printed platinum electrode. An electrochemical method was utilized for the quantitative detection of glucose in both buffer solution and saliva samples. A standard spectrophotometric technique was used as a reference method to validate the glucose content of each sample. The disposable glucose sensors have a detection limit of 0.41 mg/dL, a sensitivity of 0.24 μA·s·dL·mg−1, a linear range of 0.5–20 mg/dL in buffer solution, and a response time of 30 s. A study of 10 healthy subjects was conducted, and SG levels between 1.1 to 10.1 mg/dL were successfully detected. The results revealed that the noninvasive SG monitoring could be an alternative for diabetes self-management at home. This paper is not intended to replace regular BG tests, but to study SG itself as an indicator for the quality of diabetes care. It can potentially help patients control and monitor their health conditions, enabling them to comply with prescribed treatments for diabetes. PMID:26999233

  11. Sensing of Salivary Glucose Using Nano-Structured Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Du, Yunqing; Zhang, Wenjun; Wang, Ming L

    2016-03-01

    The anxiety and pain associated with frequent finger pricking has always been troublesome for diabetics measuring blood glucose (BG) in their daily lives. For this reason, a reliable glucose monitoring system that allows noninvasive measurements is highly desirable. Our main objective is to develop a biosensor that can detect low-level glucose in saliva (physiological range 0.5-20 mg/dL). Salivary glucose (SG) sensors were built using a layer-by-layer self-assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes, chitosan, gold nanoparticles, and glucose oxidase onto a screen-printed platinum electrode. An electrochemical method was utilized for the quantitative detection of glucose in both buffer solution and saliva samples. A standard spectrophotometric technique was used as a reference method to validate the glucose content of each sample. The disposable glucose sensors have a detection limit of 0.41 mg/dL, a sensitivity of 0.24 μA·s·dL·mg(-1), a linear range of 0.5-20 mg/dL in buffer solution, and a response time of 30 s. A study of 10 healthy subjects was conducted, and SG levels between 1.1 to 10.1 mg/dL were successfully detected. The results revealed that the noninvasive SG monitoring could be an alternative for diabetes self-management at home. This paper is not intended to replace regular BG tests, but to study SG itself as an indicator for the quality of diabetes care. It can potentially help patients control and monitor their health conditions, enabling them to comply with prescribed treatments for diabetes. PMID:26999233

  12. Glucose Metabolism in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Stephen A.; Stein, Stefanie; Hines, James

    1974-01-01

    The metabolism of glucose was examined in several clinical isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Radiorespirometric studies revealed that growing cells metabolized glucose by a combination on the Entner-Doudoroff and pentose phosphate pathways. A portion of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate formed via the Entner-Doudoroff pathway was recycled by conversion to glucose-6-phosphate. Subsequent catabolism of this glucose-6-phosphate by either the Entner-Doudoroff or pentose phosphate pathways yielded CO2 from the original C6 of glucose. Enzyme analyses confirmed the presence of all enzymes of the Entner-Doudoroff, pentose phosphate, and Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathways. There was always a high specific activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49) relative to that of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.44). The glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase utilized either nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide as electron acceptor. Acetate was the only detectable nongaseous end product of glucose metabolism. Following the disappearance of glucose, acetate was metabolized by the tricarboxylic acid cycle as evidenced by the preferential oxidation of [1-14C]acetate over that of [2-14C]acetate. When an aerobically grown log-phase culture was subjected to anaerobic conditions, lactate and acetate were formed from glucose. Radiorespirometric studies showed that under these conditions, glucose was dissimilated entirely by the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. Further studies determined that this anaerobic dissimilation of glucose was not growth dependent. PMID:4156358

  13. Unreviewed Disposal Question Evaluation: Waste Disposal In Engineered Trench #3

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, L. L.; Smith, F. G. III; Flach, G. P.; Hiergesell, R. A.; Butcher, B. T.

    2013-07-29

    Because Engineered Trench #3 (ET#3) will be placed in the location previously designated for Slit Trench #12 (ST#12), Solid Waste Management (SWM) requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) determine if the ST#12 limits could be employed as surrogate disposal limits for ET#3 operations. SRNL documented in this Unreviewed Disposal Question Evaluation (UDQE) that the use of ST#12 limits as surrogates for the new ET#3 disposal unit will provide reasonable assurance that Department of Energy (DOE) 435.1 performance objectives and measures (USDOE, 1999) will be protected. Therefore new ET#3 inventory limits as determined by a Special Analysis (SA) are not required.

  14. Nanomaterial disposal by incineration.

    PubMed

    Holder, Amara L; Vejerano, Eric P; Zhou, Xinzhe; Marr, Linsey C

    2013-09-01

    As nanotechnology-based products enter into widespread use, nanomaterials will end up in disposal waste streams that are ultimately discharged to the environment. One possible end-of-life scenario is incineration. This review attempts to ascertain the potential pathways by which nanomaterials may enter incinerator waste streams and the fate of these nanomaterials during the incineration process. Although the literature on incineration of nanomaterials is scarce, results from studies of their behavior at high temperature or in combustion environments for other applications can help predict their fate within an incinerator. Preliminary evidence suggests nanomaterials may catalyze the formation or destruction of combustion by-products. Depending on their composition, nanomaterials may undergo physical and chemical transformations within the incinerator, impacting their partitioning within the incineration system (e.g., bottom ash, fly ash) and the effectiveness of control technology for removing them. These transformations may also drastically affect nanomaterial transport and impacts in the environment. Current regulations on incinerator emissions do not specifically address nanomaterials, but limits on particle and metal emissions may prove somewhat effective at reducing the release of nanomaterials in incinerator effluent. Control technology used to meet these regulations, such as fabric filters, electrostatic precipitators, and wet electrostatic scrubbers, are expected to be at least partially effective at removing nanomaterials from incinerator flue gas. PMID:23880913

  15. Glucose and Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, John T. A.

    2008-04-01

    When a human's enzymes attach glucose to proteins they do so at specific sites on a specific molecule for a specific purpose that also can include ascorbic acid (AA) at a high level such as 1 gram per hour during exposure. In an AA synthesizing animal the manifold increase of AA produced in response to illness is automatic. In contrast, the human non-enzymatic process adds glucose haphazardly to any number of sites along available peptide chains. As Cerami clarified decades ago, extensive crosslinking of proteins contributes to loss of elasticity in aging tissues. Ascorbic acid reduces the random non-enyzmatic glycation of proteins. Moreover, AA is a cofactor for hydroxylase enzymes that are necessary for the production and replacement of collagen and other structural proteins. We will discuss the relevance of ``aging is scurvy'' to the biochemistry of human aging.

  16. 10 CFR 61.51 - Disposal site design for land disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Disposal site design for land disposal. 61.51 Section 61.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF... disposal. (a) Disposal site design for near-surface disposal. (1) Site design features must be...

  17. 10 CFR 61.50 - Disposal site suitability requirements for land disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Disposal site suitability requirements for land disposal. 61.50 Section 61.50 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Technical Requirements for Land Disposal Facilities § 61.50 Disposal site suitability requirements for land disposal....

  18. 10 CFR 61.51 - Disposal site design for land disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... disposal. (a) Disposal site design for near-surface disposal. (1) Site design features must be directed... with wastes after disposal. (b) Disposal site design for other than near-surface disposal. ... extent practicable water infiltration, to direct percolating or surface water away from the...

  19. 10 CFR 61.50 - Disposal site suitability requirements for land disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Disposal site suitability requirements for land disposal. 61.50 Section 61.50 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Technical Requirements for Land Disposal Facilities § 61.50 Disposal site suitability requirements for land disposal....

  20. 10 CFR 61.50 - Disposal site suitability requirements for land disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Disposal site suitability requirements for land disposal. 61.50 Section 61.50 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Technical Requirements for Land Disposal Facilities § 61.50 Disposal site suitability requirements for land disposal....

  1. Glucose-6-phosphate isomerase.

    PubMed

    Achari, A; Marshall, S E; Muirhead, H; Palmieri, R H; Noltmann, E A

    1981-06-26

    Glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (EC 5.3.1.9) is a dimeric enzyme of molecular mass 132000 which catalyses the interconversion of D-glucose-6-phosphate and D-fructose-6-phosphate. The crystal structure of the enzyme from pig muscle has been determined at a nominal resolution of 2.6 A. The structure is of the alpha/beta type. Each subunit consists of two domains and the active site is in both the domain interface and the subunit interface (P.J. Shaw & H. Muirhead (1976), FEBS Lett. 65, 50-55). Each subunit contains 13 methionine residues so that cyanogen bromide cleavage will produce 14 fragments, most of which have been identified and at least partly purified. Sequence information is given for about one-third of the molecule from 5 cyanogen bromide fragments. One of the sequences includes a modified lysine residue. Modification of this residue leads to a parallel loss of enzymatic activity. A tentative fit of two of the peptides to the electron density map has been made. It seems possible that glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, triose phosphate isomerase and pyruvate kinase all contain a histidine and a glutamate residue at the active site. PMID:6115414

  2. SLUDGE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL. VOLUME 2. SLUDGE DISPOSAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This two volume set presents in detail technical design information for the following sludge treatment and disposal processes: incineration, pyrolysis, composting, land utilization, and landfilling. The discussion of each process includes, where possible, a presentation of perfor...

  3. JNK deficiency enhances fatty acid utilization and diverts glucose from oxidation to glycogen storage in cultured myotubes.

    PubMed

    Vijayvargia, Ravi; Mann, Kara; Weiss, Harvey R; Pownall, Henry J; Ruan, Hong

    2010-09-01

    Although germ-line deletion of c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) improves overall insulin sensitivity in mice, those studies could not reveal the underlying molecular mechanism and the tissue site(s) in which reduced JNK activity elicits the observed phenotype. Given its importance in nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) and glucose utilization, we hypothesized that the insulin-sensitive phenotype associated with Jnk deletion originates from loss of JNK function in skeletal muscle. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated gene silencing was used to identify the functions of JNK subtypes in regulating energy metabolism and metabolic responses to elevated concentrations of NEFA in C2C12 myotubes, a cellular model of skeletal muscle. We show for the first time that cellular JNK2- and JNK1/JNK2-deficiency divert glucose from oxidation to glycogenesis due to increased glycogen synthase (GS) activity and induction of Pdk4. We further show that JNK2- and JNK1/JNK2-deficiency profoundly increase cellular NEFA oxidation, and their conversion to phospholipids and triglyceride. The increased NEFA utilization was coupled to increased expressions of selective NEFA handling genes including Cd36, Acsl4, and Chka, and enhanced palmitic acid (PA)-dependent suppression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (Acc). In JNK-intact cells, PA inhibited insulin signaling and glycogenesis. Although silencing Jnk1 and/or Jnk2 prevented PA-induced inhibition of insulin signaling, it did not completely block decreased insulin-mediated glycogenesis, thus indicating JNK-independent pathways in the suppression of glycogenesis by PA. Muscle-specific inhibition of JNK2 (or total JNK) improves the capacity of NEFA utilization and glycogenesis, and is a potential therapeutic target for improving systemic insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes (T2D). PMID:20094041

  4. FFTF disposable solid waste cask

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, J. D.; Goetsch, S. D.

    1983-01-01

    Disposal of radioactive waste from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) will utilize a Disposable Solid Waste Cask (DSWC) for the transport and burial of irradiated stainless steel and inconel materials. Retrievability coupled with the desire for minimal facilities and labor costs at the disposal site identified the need for the DSWC. Design requirements for this system were patterned after Type B packages as outlined in 10 CFR 71 with a few exceptions based on site and payload requirements. A summary of the design basis, supporting analytical methods and fabrication practices developed to deploy the DSWC is provided in this paper.

  5. Contribution of abnormal muscle and liver glucose metabolism to postprandial hyperglycemia in NIDDM

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrakou, A.; Kelley, D.; Veneman, T.; Jenssen, T.; Pangburn, T.; Reilly, J.; Gerich, J. )

    1990-11-01

    To assess the role of muscle and liver in the pathogenesis of postprandial hyperglycemia in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), we administered an oral glucose load enriched with (14C)glucose to 10 NIDDM subjects and 10 age- and weight-matched nondiabetic volunteers and compared muscle glucose disposal by measuring forearm balance of glucose, lactate, alanine, O2, and CO2. In addition, we used the dual-lable isotope method to compare overall rates of glucose appearance (Ra) and disappearance (Rd), suppression of endogenous glucose output, and splanchnic glucose sequestration. During the initial 1-1.5 h after glucose ingestion, plasma glucose increased by approximately 8 mM in NIDDM vs. approximately 3 mM in nondiabetic subjects (P less than 0.01); overall glucose Ra was nearly 11 g greater in NIDDM than nondiabetic subjects, but glucose Rd was not significantly different in NIDDM and nondiabetic subjects. The greater overall glucose Ra of NIDDM subjects was due to 6.8 g greater endogenous glucose output (13.7 +/- 1.1 vs. 6.8 +/- 1.0 g, P less than 0.01) and 3.8 g less oral glucose splanchnic sequestration of the oral load (31.4 +/- 1.5 vs. 27.5 +/- 0.9 g, P less than 0.05). Although glucose taken up by muscle was not significantly different in NIDDM and nondiabetic subjects (39.3 +/- 3.5 vs. 41.0 +/- 2.5 g/5 h), a greater amount of the glucose taken up by muscle in NIDDM was released as lactate and alanine (11.7 +/- 1.0 vs. 5.2 +/- 0.3 g in nondiabetic subjects, P less than 0.01), and less was stored (11.7 +/- 1.3 vs. 16.9 +/- 1.5 g, P less than 0.05). We conclude that increased systemic glucose delivery, due primarily to reduced suppression of endogenous hepatic glucose output and, to a lesser extent, reduced splanchnic glucose sequestration, is the predominant factor responsible for postprandial hyperglycemia in NIDDM.

  6. Improvement of glucose metabolism in patients with type II diabetes after treatment with a hemodialysate.

    PubMed

    Jacob, S; Dietze, G J; Machicao, F; Kuntz, G; Augustin, H J

    1996-03-01

    Insulin resistance of skeletal muscle glucose uptake is a prominent feature of Type II diabetes (NIDDM); therefore, pharmacological intervention should aim to improve insulin sensitivity. Previous studies have shown that Actovegin, a hemodialysate of calf blood, which has been used for treatment of circulatory disorders for many years, improves glucose tolerance in NIDDM without affecting insulin levels; in vitro studies found an improvement of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes. This pilot study was initiated to see whether this compound augments insulin sensitivity after repeated treatment. Ten patients with NIDDM received the hemodialysate (Actovegin 2.000 pro infusions, 500 ml as daily infusions) over a period of 10 days. A hyperinsulinaemic, isoglycaemic glucose-clamp was done on day 0 and day 11; oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT) was done on day -4 and day 12. Parenteral administration of the hemodialysate markedly augmented insulin stimulated glucose disposal (glucose infusion rate and metabolic clearance rate) by more than 80% (p < 0.003 day 11 vs. day 0). Although tested 44 h after the last infusion, oGTT also improved significantly, as documented by the diminished area under the curve (AUC) for glucose, whereas the AUC for insulin remained unchanged. This is the first clinical study to show that parenteral administration of the tested hemodialysate results in a significant increase of insulin-stimulated glucose disposal in NIDDM. The exact mode of action of the hemodialysate in improving insulin sensitivity is currently not known. The hemodialysate possibly acts via a supplementation of inositol-phosphate-oligosaccharides (IPO), as in experimental studies IPOs isolated from the hemodialysate improved glucose uptake in adipocytes in an insulin-independent manner. Further studies are needed to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. PMID:8901147

  7. Ultimate disposal of scrubber wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohenour, B. C.

    1978-01-01

    Part of the initial concern with using the wet scrubbers on the hypergolic propellants was the subsequential disposal of the liquid wastes. To do this, consideration was given to all possible methods to reduce the volume of the wastes and stay within the guidelines established by the state and federal environmental protection agencies. One method that was proposed was the use of water hyacinths in disposal ponds to reduce the waste concentration in the effluent to less than EPA tolerable levels. This method was under consideration and even in use by private industry, municipal governments, and NASA for upgrading existing wastewater treatment facilities to a tertiary system. The use of water hyacinths in disposal ponds appears to be a very cost-effective method for reduction and disposal of hypergolic propellants.

  8. Low cost disposal of MMH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. J.; French, T.

    1980-01-01

    Concentration of gaseous toxic monomethylhydrazine (MMH) can be removed at 99.9% efficiency using scrubbers containing acetylacetone solutions as scrubbing liquors. Resulting product is easily disposable and expensive liners for protecting scrubber from strong oxidizing agents are not needed.

  9. The Necessity of Geologic Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    R. Linden

    2004-07-01

    Nuclear wastes are the radioactive byproducts of nuclear power generation, nuclear weapons production, and other uses of nuclear material. Experts from around the world agree that deep geologic disposal of nuclear waste in a mined repository is the most environmentally sound means of removing these potential sources of radiation from interaction with the biosphere. Of the 360 millirem of background radiation received annually by the average American, from both natural and man-made sources, less than 1 millirem results from the nuclear fuel cycle. Spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, destined for geologic disposal, are located at 126 sites in 39 states. The proposed repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is far more isolated from the general population than any sites where these radioactive materials are presently located. Only solid forms of high-level wastes will be transported for disposal in a geologic repository. For more than 50 years, nuclear materials have been safely transported in North America, Europe, and Asia, without a single significant radiation release. Since the 1950s, select panels from the National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council and interagency advisory groups, and international experts selected by the OECD/Nuclear Energy Agency, have examined the environmental, ethical, and intergenerational aspects of nuclear waste disposal, plus alternatives to geologic disposal. All have concluded that deep geologic disposal in a mined repository is clearly the preferred option. The concept of deep geologic disposal is based on the analogy to ore deposits, which are formed deep within the Earth's crust, commonly remain isolated from the biosphere for millions to billions of years, and are, generally, extremely difficult to detect. Before selecting the unsaturated tuffs at Yucca Mountain, DOE evaluated salt formations, basalts, and both crystalline and sedimentary rocks. Other nations generating nuclear power also plan to use

  10. Disposal phase experimental program plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-31

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility comprises surface and subsurface facilities, including a repository mined in a bedded salt formation at a depth of 2,150 feet. It has been developed to safely and permanently isolate transuranic (TRU) radioactive wastes in a deep geological disposal site. On April 12, 1996, the DOE submitted a revised Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The DOE anticipates receiving an operating permit from the NMED; this permit is required prior to the start of disposal operations. On October 29, 1996, the DOE submitted a Compliance Certification Application (CCA) to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in accordance with the WIPP land Withdrawal Act (LWA) of 1992 (Public Law 102-579) as amended, and the requirements of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR) Parts 191 and 194. The DOE plans to begin disposal operations at the WIPP in November 1997 following receipt of certification by the EPA. The disposal phase is expected to last for 35 years, and will include recertification activities no less than once every five years. This Disposal Phase Experimental Program (DPEP) Plan outlines the experimental program to be conducted during the first 5-year recertification period. It also forms the basis for longer-term activities to be carried out throughout the 35-year disposal phase. Once the WIPP has been shown to be in compliance with regulatory requirements, the disposal phase gives an opportunity to affirm the compliance status of the WIPP, enhance the operations of the WIPP and the national TRU system, and contribute to the resolution of national and international nuclear waste management technical needs. The WIPP is the first facility of its kind in the world. As such, it provides a unique opportunity to advance the technical state of the art for permanent disposal of long-lived radioactive wastes.

  11. GPR142 Controls Tryptophan-Induced Insulin and Incretin Hormone Secretion to Improve Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Efanov, Alexander M.; Fang, Xiankang; Beavers, Lisa S.; Wang, Xuesong; Wang, Jingru; Gonzalez Valcarcel, Isabel C.; Ma, Tianwei

    2016-01-01

    GPR142, a putative amino acid receptor, is expressed in pancreatic islets and the gastrointestinal tract, but the ligand affinity and physiological role of this receptor remain obscure. In this study, we show that in addition to L-Tryptophan, GPR142 signaling is also activated by L-Phenylalanine but not by other naturally occurring amino acids. Furthermore, we show that Tryptophan and a synthetic GPR142 agonist increase insulin and incretin hormones and improve glucose disposal in mice in a GPR142-dependent manner. In contrast, Phenylalanine improves in vivo glucose disposal independently of GPR142. Noteworthy, refeeding-induced elevations in insulin and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide are blunted in Gpr142 null mice. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate GPR142 is a Tryptophan receptor critically required for insulin and incretin hormone regulation and suggest GPR142 agonists may be effective therapies that leverage amino acid sensing pathways for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27322810

  12. Glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kayikci, Ömur; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-09-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration and gluconeogenesis. This dominant effect of glucose on yeast carbon metabolism is coordinated by several signaling and metabolic interactions that mainly regulate transcriptional activity but are also effective at post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review describes effects of glucose repression on yeast carbon metabolism with a focus on roles of the Snf3/Rgt2 glucose-sensing pathway and Snf1 signal transduction in establishment and relief of glucose repression. PMID:26205245

  13. Glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kayikci, Ömur; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration and gluconeogenesis. This dominant effect of glucose on yeast carbon metabolism is coordinated by several signaling and metabolic interactions that mainly regulate transcriptional activity but are also effective at post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review describes effects of glucose repression on yeast carbon metabolism with a focus on roles of the Snf3/Rgt2 glucose-sensing pathway and Snf1 signal transduction in establishment and relief of glucose repression. PMID:26205245

  14. Optical monitoring of glucose concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, I. N.; Mbanu, A.

    1985-02-01

    A device for the monitoring of blood glucose levels is investigated. It measures the sugar concentration using the effect of the glucose on the optical refractive index. Light is transmitted along an optical fibre, and, as most of the internal rays are incident at the fibre surface at an angle less than the critical angle, the refractive index of the surrounding liquid can be calculated. The device can measure glucose concentrations with a sensitivity of better than 0.1%.

  15. Optoelectronic Apparatus Measures Glucose Noninvasively

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Rovati, Luigi L.

    2003-01-01

    An optoelectronic apparatus has been invented as a noninvasive means of measuring the concentration of glucose in the human body. The apparatus performs polarimetric and interferometric measurements of the human eye to acquire data from which the concentration of glucose in the aqueous humor can be computed. Because of the importance of the concentration of glucose in human health, there could be a large potential market for instruments based on this apparatus.

  16. Protein Ingestion Induces Muscle Insulin Resistance Independent of Leucine-Mediated mTOR Activation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gordon I.; Yoshino, Jun; Stromsdorfer, Kelly L.; Klein, Seth J.; Magkos, Faidon; Reeds, Dominic N.; Klein, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Increased plasma branched-chain amino acid concentrations are associated with insulin resistance, and intravenous amino acid infusion blunts insulin-mediated glucose disposal. We tested the hypothesis that protein ingestion impairs insulin-mediated glucose disposal by leucine-mediated mTOR signaling, which can inhibit AKT. We measured glucose disposal and muscle p-mTORSer2448, p-AKTSer473, and p-AKTThr308 in 22 women during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp procedure with and without concomitant ingestion of whey protein (0.6 g/kg fat-free mass; n = 11) or leucine that matched the amount given with whey protein (n = 11). Both whey protein and leucine ingestion raised plasma leucine concentration by approximately twofold and muscle p-mTORSer2448 by ∼30% above the values observed in the control (no amino acid ingestion) studies; p-AKTSer473 and p-AKTThr308 were not affected by whey protein or leucine ingestion. Whey protein ingestion decreased insulin-mediated glucose disposal (median 38.8 [quartiles 30.8, 61.8] vs. 51.9 [41.0, 77.3] µmol glucose/µU insulin · mL−1 · min−1; P < 0.01), whereas ingestion of leucine did not (52.3 [43.3, 65.4] vs. 52.3 [43.9, 73.2]). These results indicate that 1) protein ingestion causes insulin resistance and could be an important regulator of postprandial glucose homeostasis and 2) the insulin-desensitizing effect of protein ingestion is not due to inhibition of AKT by leucine-mediated mTOR signaling. PMID:25475435

  17. Thermoresponsive amperometric glucose biosensor.

    PubMed

    Pinyou, Piyanut; Ruff, Adrian; Pöller, Sascha; Barwe, Stefan; Nebel, Michaela; Alburquerque, Natalia Guerrero; Wischerhoff, Erik; Laschewsky, André; Schmaderer, Sebastian; Szeponik, Jan; Plumeré, Nicolas; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    The authors report on the fabrication of a thermoresponsive biosensor for the amperometric detection of glucose. Screen printed electrodes with heatable gold working electrodes were modified by a thermoresponsive statistical copolymer [polymer I: poly(ω-ethoxytriethylenglycol methacrylate-co-3-(N,N-dimethyl-N-2-methacryloyloxyethyl ammonio) propanesulfonate-co-ω-butoxydiethylenglycol methacrylate-co-2-(4-benzoyl-phenoxy)ethyl methacrylate)] with a lower critical solution temperature of around 28 °C in aqueous solution via electrochemically induced codeposition with a pH-responsive redox-polymer [polymer II: poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-allyl methacrylate-co-poly(ethylene glycol)methacrylate-co-butyl acrylate-co-2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)-[Os(bpy)2(4-(((2-(2-(2-aminoethoxy)ethoxy)ethyl)amino)methyl)-N,N-dimethylpicolinamide)](2+)] and pyrroloquinoline quinone-soluble glucose dehydrogenase acting as biological recognition element. Polymer II bears covalently bound Os-complexes that act as redox mediators for shuttling electrons between the enzyme and the electrode surface. Polymer I acts as a temperature triggered immobilization matrix. Probing the catalytic current as a function of the working electrode temperature shows that the activity of the biosensor is dramatically reduced above the phase transition temperature of polymer I. Thus, the local modulation of the temperature at the interphase between the electrode and the bioactive layer allows switching the biosensor from an on- to an off-state without heating of the surrounding analyte solution. PMID:26702635

  18. Liv.52 up-regulates cellular antioxidants and increase glucose uptake to circumvent oleic acid induced hepatic steatosis in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Vidyashankar, Satyakumar; Sharath Kumar, L M; Barooah, Vandana; Sandeep Varma, R; Nandakumar, Krishna S; Patki, Pralhad Sadashiv

    2012-10-15

    HepG2 cells were rendered steatotic by supplementing 2.0mM oleic acid (OA) in the culture media for 24h. OA induced hepatic steatosis in HepG2 cells was marked by significant accumulation of lipid droplets as determined by Oil-Red-O (ORO) based colorimetric assay, increased triacylglycerol (TAG) and increased lipid peroxidation. It was also marked by increased inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-8 with decreased enzymic and non-enzymic antioxidant molecules and decreased cell proliferation associated with insulin resistance and DNA fragmentation. Addition of Liv.52 hydro-alcoholic extract (LHAE) 50μg/mL to the steatotic cells was effective in increasing the insulin mediated glucose uptake by 3.13 folds and increased cell proliferation by 3.81 folds with decreased TAG content (55%) and cytokines. The intracellular glutathione content was increased by 8.9 folds without substantial increase in GSSG content. LHAE decreased TNF-α and IL-8 by 51% and 6.5% folds respectively, lipid peroxidation by 65% and inhibited DNA fragmentation by 69%. The superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities were increased by 88%, 128% and 64% respectively. Albumin and urea content was increased while the alanine aminotransferase (ALAT) activity was significantly decreased by LHAE. Hence, LHAE effectively attenuate molecular perturbations associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) indications in HepG2 cells. PMID:22940028

  19. Acute effects of ethanol and acetate on glucose kinetics in normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Yki-Jaervinen, H.; Koivisto, V.A.; Ylikahri, R.; Taskinen, M.R. )

    1988-02-01

    The authors compared the effects of two ethanol doses on glucose kinetics and assessed the role of acetate as a mediator of ethanol-induced insulin resistance. Ten normal males were studied on four occasions, during which either a low or moderate ethanol, acetate, or saline dose was administered. Both ethanol doses similarly inhibited basal glucose production. The decrease in R{sub a} was matched by a comparable decrease in glucose utilization (R{sub d}), resulting in maintenance of normoglycemia. During hyperinsulinemia glucose disposal was lower in the moderate than the low-dose ethanol or saline studies. During acetate infusion, the blood acetate level was comparable with those in the ethanol studies. Acetate had no effect on glucose kinetics. In conclusion, (1) in overnight fasted subjects, ethanol does not cause hypoglycemia because its inhibitory effect on R{sub a} is counterbalanced by equal inhibition of R{sub d}; (2) basal R{sub a} and R{sub d} are maximally inhibited already by small ethanol doses, whereas inhibition of insulin-stimulated glucose disposal requires a moderate ethanol dose; and (3) acetate is not the mediator of ethanol-induced insulin resistance.

  20. E4orf1 Enhances Glucose Uptake Independent of Proximal Insulin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Na, Ha-Na; Hegde, Vijay; Dubuisson, Olga; Dhurandhar, Nikhil V.

    2016-01-01

    Impaired proximal insulin signaling is often present in diabetes. Hence, approaches to enhance glucose disposal independent of proximal insulin signaling are desirable. Evidence indicates that Adenovirus-derived E4orf1 protein may offer such an approach. This study determined if E4orf1 improves insulin sensitivity and downregulates proximal insulin signaling in vivo and enhances cellular glucose uptake independent of proximal insulin signaling in vitro. High fat fed mice were injected with a retrovirus plasmid expressing E4orf1, or a null vector. E4orf1 significantly improved insulin sensitivity in response to a glucose load. Yet, their proximal insulin signaling in fat depots was impaired, as indicated by reduced tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor (IR), and significantly increased abundance of ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase-1 (ENPP1). In 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes E4orf1 expression impaired proximal insulin signaling. Whereas, treatment with rosiglitazone reduced ENPP1 abundance. Unaffected by IR-KD (insulin receptor knockdown) with siRNA, E4orf1 significantly up-regulated distal insulin signaling pathway and enhanced cellular glucose uptake. In vivo, E4orf1 impairs proximal insulin signaling in fat depots yet improves glycemic control. This is probably explained by the ability of E4orf1 to promote cellular glucose uptake independent of proximal insulin signaling. E4orf1 may provide a therapeutic template to enhance glucose disposal in the presence of impaired proximal insulin signaling. PMID:27537838

  1. E4orf1 Enhances Glucose Uptake Independent of Proximal Insulin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Na, Ha-Na; Hegde, Vijay; Dubuisson, Olga; Dhurandhar, Nikhil V

    2016-01-01

    Impaired proximal insulin signaling is often present in diabetes. Hence, approaches to enhance glucose disposal independent of proximal insulin signaling are desirable. Evidence indicates that Adenovirus-derived E4orf1 protein may offer such an approach. This study determined if E4orf1 improves insulin sensitivity and downregulates proximal insulin signaling in vivo and enhances cellular glucose uptake independent of proximal insulin signaling in vitro. High fat fed mice were injected with a retrovirus plasmid expressing E4orf1, or a null vector. E4orf1 significantly improved insulin sensitivity in response to a glucose load. Yet, their proximal insulin signaling in fat depots was impaired, as indicated by reduced tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor (IR), and significantly increased abundance of ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase-1 (ENPP1). In 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes E4orf1 expression impaired proximal insulin signaling. Whereas, treatment with rosiglitazone reduced ENPP1 abundance. Unaffected by IR-KD (insulin receptor knockdown) with siRNA, E4orf1 significantly up-regulated distal insulin signaling pathway and enhanced cellular glucose uptake. In vivo, E4orf1 impairs proximal insulin signaling in fat depots yet improves glycemic control. This is probably explained by the ability of E4orf1 to promote cellular glucose uptake independent of proximal insulin signaling. E4orf1 may provide a therapeutic template to enhance glucose disposal in the presence of impaired proximal insulin signaling. PMID:27537838

  2. Resveratrol protects against polychlorinated biphenyl-mediated impairment of glucose homeostasis in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Baker, Nicki A; English, Victoria; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J; Pearson, Kevin J; Cassis, Lisa A

    2013-12-01

    Resveratrol (RSV) is a plant polyphenol that exhibits several favorable effects on glucose homeostasis in adipocytes. Recent studies from our laboratory demonstrated that coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) that are ligands of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor impair glucose homeostasis in mice. PCB-induced impairment of glucose homeostasis was associated with augmented expression of inflammatory cytokines in adipose tissue, a site for accumulation of lipophilic PCBs. This study determined if RSV protects against PCB-77 induced impairment of glucose disposal in vitro and in vivo and if these beneficial effects are associated with enhanced nuclear factor erythoid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling in adipose tissue. PCB-77 increased oxidative stress and abolished insulin stimulated 2-deoxy-d-glucose uptake in 3 T3-L1 adipocytes. These effects were restored by RSV, which resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), the downstream target of Nrf2 signaling. We quantified glucose and insulin tolerance and components of Nrf2 and insulin signaling cascades in adipose tissue of male C57BL/6 mice administered vehicle or PCB-77 (50 mg/kg) and fed a diet with or without resVida (0.1%, or 160 mg/kg per day). PCB-77 impaired glucose and insulin tolerance, and these effects were reversed by RSV. PCB-77 induced reductions in insulin signaling in adipose tissue were also abolished by RSV, which increased NQO1 expression. These results demonstrate that coplanar PCB-induced impairment of glucose homeostasis in mice can be prevented by RSV, potentially through stimulation of Nrf2 signaling and enhanced insulin stimulated glucose disposal in adipose tissue. PMID:24231106

  3. Resveratrol protects against polychlorinated biphenyl-mediated impairment of glucose homeostasis in adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Nicki A.; English, Victoria; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J.; Pearson, Kevin J.; Cassis, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol (RSV) is a plant polyphenol that exhibits several favorable effects on glucose homeostasis in adipocytes. Recent studies from our laboratory demonstrated that coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) that are ligands of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) impair glucose homeostasis in mice. PCB-induced impairment of glucose homeostasis was associated with augmented expression of inflammatory cytokines in adipose tissue, a site for accumulation of lipophilic PCBs. This study determined if RSV protects against PCB-77 induced impairment of glucose disposal in vitro and in vivo, and if these beneficial effects are associated with enhanced nuclear factor erythoid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling in adipose tissue. PCB-77 increased oxidative stress and abolished insulin stimulated 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. These effects were restored by RSV, which resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), the downstream target of Nrf2 signaling. We quantified glucose and insulin tolerance and components of Nrf2 and insulin signaling cascades in adipose tissue of male C57BL/6 mice administered vehicle or PCB-77 (50 mg/kg) and fed a diet with or without resVida® (0.1%, or 160 mg/kg/day). PCB-77 impaired glucose and insulin tolerance, and these effects were reversed by RSV. PCB-77 induced reductions in insulin signaling in adipose tissue were also abolished by RSV, which increased NQO1 expression. These results demonstrate that coplanar PCB-induced impairment of glucose homeostasis in mice can be prevented by RSV, potentially through stimulation of Nrf2 signaling and enhanced insulin stimulated glucose disposal in adipose tissue. PMID:24231106

  4. Tank Waste Disposal Program redefinition

    SciTech Connect

    Grygiel, M.L.; Augustine, C.A.; Cahill, M.A.; Garfield, J.S.; Johnson, M.E.; Kupfer, M.J.; Meyer, G.A.; Roecker, J.H.; Holton, L.K.; Hunter, V.L.; Triplett, M.B.

    1991-10-01

    The record of decision (ROD) (DOE 1988) on the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic and Tank Wastes, Hanford Site, Richland Washington identifies the method for disposal of double-shell tank waste and cesium and strontium capsules at the Hanford Site. The ROD also identifies the need for additional evaluations before a final decision is made on the disposal of single-shell tank waste. This document presents the results of systematic evaluation of the present technical circumstances, alternatives, and regulatory requirements in light of the values of the leaders and constitutents of the program. It recommends a three-phased approach for disposing of tank wastes. This approach allows mature technologies to be applied to the treatment of well-understood waste forms in the near term, while providing time for the development and deployment of successively more advanced pretreatment technologies. The advanced technologies will accelerate disposal by reducing the volume of waste to be vitrified. This document also recommends integration of the double-and single-shell tank waste disposal programs, provides a target schedule for implementation of the selected approach, and describes the essential elements of a program to be baselined in 1992.

  5. Dietary fructose and glucose differentially affect lipid and glucose homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Absorbed glucose and fructose differ in that glucose largely escapes first pass removal by the liver, whereas fructose does not, resulting in different metabolic effects of these two monosaccharides. In short-term controlled feeding studies, dietary fructose significantly increases postprandial trig...

  6. Dietary fructose and glucose differentially affect lipid and glucose homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Absorbed glucose and fructose differ in that glucose largely escapes first-pass removal by the liver, whereas fructose does not, resulting in different metabolic effects of these 2 monosaccharides. In short-term controlled feeding studies, dietary fructose significantly increases postprandial trigly...

  7. Zinc Status Affects Glucose Homeostasis and Insulin Secretion in Patients with Thalassemia

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Ellen B.; Gildengorin, Ginny; Talwar, Siddhant; Hagar, Leah; Lal, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Up to 20% of adult patients with Thalassemia major (Thal) live with diabetes, while 30% may be zinc deficient. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between zinc status, impaired glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in Thal patients. Charts from thirty subjects (16 male, 27.8 ± 9.1 years) with Thal were reviewed. Patients with low serum zinc had significantly lower fasting insulin, insulinogenic and oral disposition indexes (all p < 0.05) and elevated glucose response curve, following a standard 75 g oral load of glucose compared to those with normal serum zinc after controlling for baseline (group × time interaction p = 0.048). Longitudinal data in five patients with a decline in serum zinc over a two year follow up period (−19.0 ± 9.6 μg/dL), showed consistent increases in fasting glucose (3.6 ± 3.2 mg/dL) and insulin to glucose ratios at 120 min post glucose dose (p = 0.05). Taken together, these data suggest that the frequently present zinc deficiency in Thal patients is associated with decreased insulin secretion and reduced glucose disposal. Future zinc trials will require modeling of oral glucose tolerance test data and not simply measurement of static indices in order to understand the complexities of pancreatic function in the Thal patient. PMID:26043030

  8. Zinc status affects glucose homeostasis and insulin secretion in patients with thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Fung, Ellen B; Gildengorin, Ginny; Talwar, Siddhant; Hagar, Leah; Lal, Ashutosh

    2015-06-01

    Up to 20% of adult patients with Thalassemia major (Thal) live with diabetes, while 30% may be zinc deficient. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between zinc status, impaired glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in Thal patients. Charts from thirty subjects (16 male, 27.8 ± 9.1 years) with Thal were reviewed. Patients with low serum zinc had significantly lower fasting insulin, insulinogenic and oral disposition indexes (all p < 0.05) and elevated glucose response curve, following a standard 75 g oral load of glucose compared to those with normal serum zinc after controlling for baseline (group × time interaction p = 0.048). Longitudinal data in five patients with a decline in serum zinc over a two year follow up period (-19.0 ± 9.6 μg/dL), showed consistent increases in fasting glucose (3.6 ± 3.2 mg/dL) and insulin to glucose ratios at 120 min post glucose dose (p = 0.05). Taken together, these data suggest that the frequently present zinc deficiency in Thal patients is associated with decreased insulin secretion and reduced glucose disposal. Future zinc trials will require modeling of oral glucose tolerance test data and not simply measurement of static indices in order to understand the complexities of pancreatic function in the Thal patient. PMID:26043030

  9. Superior long-term stability of a glucose biosensor based on inserted barrel plating gold electrodes.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cheng-Teng; Hsiao, Hung-Chan; Fang, Mei-Yen; Zen, Jyh-Myng

    2009-10-15

    Disposable one shot usage blood glucose strips are routinely used in the diagnosis and management of diabetes mellitus and their performance can vary greatly. In this paper we critically evaluated the long-term stability of glucose strips made of barrel plating gold electrodes. Compared to other glucose biosensing platforms of vapor deposited palladium and screen printed carbon electrodes, the proposed glucose biosensor was found to show the best stability among the three biosensing platforms in thermal acceleration experiments at 40 degrees C for 6 months with an average bias of 3.4% at glucose concentrations of 5-20 mM. The precision test of this barrel plating gold glucose biosensor also showed the best performance (coefficients of variation in the range of 1.4-2.4%) in thermal acceleration experiments at 40 degrees C, 50 degrees C and 70 degrees C for 27 days. Error grid analysis revealed that all measurements fell in zone A and zone B. Regression analysis showed no significant difference between the proposed biosensor and the reference method at 99% confidence level. The amperometric glucose biosensor fabricated by inserting two barrel plating gold electrodes onto an injection-molding plastic base followed by immobilizing with a bio-reagent layer and membrane was very impressive with a long-term stability up to 2.5 years at 25 degrees C. Overall, these results indicated that the glucose oxidase/barrel plating gold biosensing platform is ideal for long-term accurate glycemic control. PMID:19729292

  10. Caffeine and glucose homeostasis during rest and exercise in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Zaharieva, Dessi P; Riddell, Michael C

    2013-08-01

    Caffeine is a substance that has been used in our society for generations, primarily for its effects on the central nervous system that causes wakefulness. Caffeine supplementation has become increasingly more popular as an ergogenic aid for athletes and considerable scientific evidence supports its effectiveness. Because of their potential to alter energy metabolism, the effects of coffee and caffeine on glucose metabolism in diabetes have also been studied both epidemiologically and experimentally. Predominantly targeting the adenosine receptors, caffeine causes alterations in glucose homeostasis by decreasing glucose uptake into skeletal muscle, thereby causing elevations in blood glucose concentration. Caffeine intake has also been proposed to increase symptomatic warning signs of hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes and elevate blood glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. Other effects include potential increases in glucose counterregulatory hormones such as epinephrine, which can also decrease peripheral glucose disposal. Despite these established physiological effects, increased coffee intake has been associated with reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes in large-scale epidemiological studies. This review paper highlights the known effects of caffeine on glucose homeostasis and diabetes metabolism during rest and exercise. PMID:23855268

  11. Changes ahead for Hazwaste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Eilbott, E.

    1995-05-01

    Though hazardous waste disposal standards have been the norm for more than a decade, requiring compliance with transportation, treatment, storage and disposal rules for RCRA Subtitle C wastes. Major changes are in the works, however. For the last two years, EPA has held wide-ranging discussions with a broad variety of interests, including state regulators, waste generating industries, waste management companies, and environmental groups on how to get {open_quotes}low-risk{close_quotes}wastes out of the hazardous waste system. The new political climate ushered in with last November`s elections has intensified these efforts. This article takes you on a brief tour of two key initiatives being feverishly worked on by all those with a stake in Federal laws governing hazardous waste disposal.

  12. Antihypertensive drugs and glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rizos, Christos V; Elisaf, Moses S

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension plays a major role in the development and progression of micro- and macrovascular disease. Moreover, increased blood pressure often coexists with additional cardiovascular risk factors such as insulin resistance. As a result the need for a comprehensive management of hypertensive patients is critical. However, the various antihypertensive drug categories have different effects on glucose metabolism. Indeed, angiotensin receptor blockers as well as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors have been associated with beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis. Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) have an overall neutral effect on glucose metabolism. However, some members of the CCBs class such as azelnidipine and manidipine have been shown to have advantageous effects on glucose homeostasis. On the other hand, diuretics and β-blockers have an overall disadvantageous effect on glucose metabolism. Of note, carvedilol as well as nebivolol seem to differentiate themselves from the rest of the β-blockers class, being more attractive options regarding their effect on glucose homeostasis. The adverse effects of some blood pressure lowering drugs on glucose metabolism may, to an extent, compromise their cardiovascular protective role. As a result the effects on glucose homeostasis of the various blood pressure lowering drugs should be taken into account when selecting an antihypertensive treatment, especially in patients which are at high risk for developing diabetes. PMID:25068013

  13. Alginate cryogel based glucose biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatoni, Amin; Windy Dwiasi, Dian; Hermawan, Dadan

    2016-02-01

    Cryogel is macroporous structure provides a large surface area for biomolecule immobilization. In this work, an alginate cryogel based biosensor was developed to detect glucose. The cryogel was prepared using alginate cross-linked by calcium chloride under sub-zero temperature. This porous structure was growth in a 100 μL micropipette tip with a glucose oxidase enzyme entrapped inside the cryogel. The glucose detection was based on the colour change of redox indicator, potassium permanganate, by the hydrogen peroxide resulted from the conversion of glucose. The result showed a porous structure of alginate cryogel with pores diameter of 20-50 μm. The developed glucose biosensor was showed a linear response in the glucose detection from 1.0 to 5.0 mM with a regression of y = 0.01x+0.02 and R2 of 0.994. Furthermore, the glucose biosensor was showed a high operational stability up to 10 times of uninterrupted glucose detections.

  14. Final disposal of radioactive waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freiesleben, H.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper the origin and properties of radioactive waste as well as its classification scheme (low-level waste - LLW, intermediate-level waste - ILW, high-level waste - HLW) are presented. The various options for conditioning of waste of different levels of radioactivity are reviewed. The composition, radiotoxicity and reprocessing of spent fuel and their effect on storage and options for final disposal are discussed. The current situation of final waste disposal in a selected number of countries is mentioned. Also, the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency with regard to the development and monitoring of international safety standards for both spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste management is described.

  15. Disposable telemetry cable deployment system

    DOEpatents

    Holcomb, David Joseph

    2000-01-01

    A disposable telemetry cable deployment system for facilitating information retrieval while drilling a well includes a cable spool adapted for insertion into a drill string and an unarmored fiber optic cable spooled onto the spool cable and having a downhole end and a stinger end. Connected to the cable spool is a rigid stinger which extends through a kelly of the drilling apparatus. A data transmission device for transmitting data to a data acquisition system is disposed either within or on the upper end of the rigid stinger.

  16. Influence of Acute and Chronic Exercise on Glucose Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Röhling, Martin; Herder, Christian; Stemper, Theodor; Müssig, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance plays a key role in the development of type 2 diabetes. It arises from a combination of genetic predisposition and environmental and lifestyle factors including lack of physical exercise and poor nutrition habits. The increased risk of type 2 diabetes is molecularly based on defects in insulin signaling, insulin secretion, and inflammation. The present review aims to give an overview on the molecular mechanisms underlying the uptake of glucose and related signaling pathways after acute and chronic exercise. Physical exercise, as crucial part in the prevention and treatment of diabetes, has marked acute and chronic effects on glucose disposal and related inflammatory signaling pathways. Exercise can stimulate molecular signaling pathways leading to glucose transport into the cell. Furthermore, physical exercise has the potential to modulate inflammatory processes by affecting specific inflammatory signaling pathways which can interfere with signaling pathways of the glucose uptake. The intensity of physical training appears to be the primary determinant of the degree of metabolic improvement modulating the molecular signaling pathways in a dose-response pattern, whereas training modality seems to have a secondary role. PMID:27069930

  17. Direct effect of incretin hormones on glucose and glycerol metabolism and hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Karstoft, Kristian; Mortensen, Stefan P; Knudsen, Sine H; Solomon, Thomas P J

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the insulin-independent effects of incretin hormones on glucose and glycerol metabolism and hemodynamics under euglycemic and hyperglycemic conditions. Young, healthy men (n=10) underwent three trials in a randomized, controlled, crossover study. Each trial consisted of a two-stage (euglycemia and hyperglycemia) pancreatic clamp (using somatostatin to prevent endogenous insulin secretion). Glucose and lipid metabolism was measured via infusion of stable glucose and glycerol isotopic tracers. Hemodynamic variables (femoral, brachial, and common carotid artery blood flow and flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery) were also measured. The three trials differed as follows: 1) saline [control (CON)], 2) glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1, 0.5 pmol·kg(-1)·min(-1)), and 3) glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP, 1.5 pmol·kg(-1)·min(-1)). No between-trial differences in glucose infusion rates (GIR) or glucose or glycerol kinetics were seen during euglycemia, whereas hyperglycemia resulted in increased GIR and glucose rate of disappearance during GLP-1 compared with CON and GIP (P<0.01 for all). However, when normalized to insulin levels, no differences between trials were seen for GIR or glucose rate of disappearance. Besides a higher femoral blood flow during hyperglycemia with GIP (vs. CON and GLP-1, P<0.001), no between-trial differences were seen for the hemodynamic variables. In conclusion, GLP-1 and GIP have no direct effect on whole body glucose metabolism or hemodynamics during euglycemia. On the contrary, during hyperglycemia, GIP increases femoral artery blood flow with no effect on glucose metabolism, whereas GLP-1 increases glucose disposal, potentially due to increased insulin levels. PMID:25564476

  18. Alteration of de novo glucose production contributes to fasting hypoglycaemia in Fyn deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yingjuan; Tarabra, Elena; Yang, Gong-She; Vaitheesvaran, Bhavapriya; Palacios, Gustavo; Kurland, Irwin J; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Bastie, Claire C

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that glucose disposal is increased in the Fyn knockout (FynKO) mice due to increased insulin sensitivity. FynKO mice also display fasting hypoglycaemia despite decreased insulin levels, which suggested that hepatic glucose production was unable to compensate for the increased basal glucose utilization. The present study investigates the basis for the reduction in plasma glucose levels and the reduced ability for the liver to produce glucose in response to gluconeogenic substrates. FynKO mice had a 5-fold reduction in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene and protein expression and a marked reduction in pyruvate, pyruvate/lactate-stimulated glucose output. Remarkably, de novo glucose production was also blunted using gluconeogenic substrates that bypass the PEPCK step. Impaired conversion of glycerol to glucose was observed in both glycerol tolerance test and determination of the conversion of (13)C-glycerol to glucose in the fasted state. α-glycerol phosphate levels were reduced but glycerol kinase protein expression levels were not changed. Fructose-driven glucose production was also diminished without alteration of fructokinase expression levels. The normal levels of dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate observed in the FynKO liver extracts suggested normal triose kinase function. Fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (aldolase) mRNA or protein levels were normal in the Fyn-deficient livers, however, there was a large reduction in liver fructose-6-phosphate (30-fold) and fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (7-fold) levels as well as a reduction in glucose-6-phosphate (2-fold) levels. These data suggest a mechanistic defect in the allosteric regulation of aldolase activity. PMID:24312371

  19. Glucose oxidase-magnetite nanoparticle bioconjugate for glucose sensing.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Liane M; Quach, Ashley D; Rosenzweig, Zeev

    2004-10-01

    Immobilization of bioactive molecules on the surface of magnetic nanoparticles is of great interest, because the magnetic properties of these bioconjugates promise to greatly improve the delivery and recovery of biomolecules in biomedical applications. Here we present the preparation and functionalization of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles 20 nm in diameter and the successful covalent conjugation of the enzyme glucose oxidase to the amino-modified nanoparticle surface. Functionalization of the magnetic nanoparticle surface with amino groups greatly increased the amount and activity of the immobilized enzyme compared with immobilization procedures involving physical adsorption. The enzymatic activity of the glucose oxidase-coated magnetic nanoparticles was investigated by monitoring oxygen consumption during the enzymatic oxidation of glucose using a ruthenium phenanthroline fluorescent complex for oxygen sensing. The glucose oxidase-coated magnetite nanoparticles could function as nanometric glucose sensors in glucose solutions of concentrations up to 20 mmol L(-1). Immobilization of glucose oxidase on the nanoparticles also increased the stability of the enzyme. When stored at 4 degrees C the nanoparticle suspensions maintained their bioactivity for up to 3 months. PMID:15448967

  20. Glucose-stat, a glucose-controlled continuous culture.

    PubMed Central

    Kleman, G L; Chalmers, J J; Luli, G W; Strohl, W R

    1991-01-01

    A predictive and feedback proportional control algorithm, developed for fed-batch fermentations and described in a companion paper (G. L. Kleman, J. J. Chalmers, G. W. Luli, and W. R. Strohl, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 57:910-917, 1991), was used in this work to control a continuous culture on the basis of the soluble-glucose concentration (called the glucose-stat). This glucose-controlled continuous-culture system was found to reach and maintain steady state for 11 to 24 residence times when four different background glucose concentrations (0.27, 0.50, 0.7, and 1.5 g/liter) were used. The predictive-plus-feedback control system yielded very tight control of the continuous nutristat cultures; glucose concentrations were maintained at the set points with less than 0.003 standard error. Acetate production by Escherichia coli B in glucose-stats was found not to be correlated with the level of steady-state soluble-glucose concentration. PMID:2059050

  1. Glucose-stat, a glucose-controlled continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Kleman, G L; Chalmers, J J; Luli, G W; Strohl, W R

    1991-04-01

    A predictive and feedback proportional control algorithm, developed for fed-batch fermentations and described in a companion paper (G. L. Kleman, J. J. Chalmers, G. W. Luli, and W. R. Strohl, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 57:910-917, 1991), was used in this work to control a continuous culture on the basis of the soluble-glucose concentration (called the glucose-stat). This glucose-controlled continuous-culture system was found to reach and maintain steady state for 11 to 24 residence times when four different background glucose concentrations (0.27, 0.50, 0.7, and 1.5 g/liter) were used. The predictive-plus-feedback control system yielded very tight control of the continuous nutristat cultures; glucose concentrations were maintained at the set points with less than 0.003 standard error. Acetate production by Escherichia coli B in glucose-stats was found not to be correlated with the level of steady-state soluble-glucose concentration. PMID:2059050

  2. Biosensing of glucose in flow injection analysis system based on glucose oxidase-quantum dot modified pencil graphite electrode.

    PubMed

    Sağlam, Özlem; Kızılkaya, Bayram; Uysal, Hüseyin; Dilgin, Yusuf

    2016-01-15

    A novel amperometric glucose biosensor was proposed in flow injection analysis (FIA) system using glucose oxidase (GOD) and Quantum dot (ZnS-CdS) modified Pencil Graphite Electrode (PGE). After ZnS-CdS film was electrochemically deposited onto PGE surface, GOD was immobilized on the surface of ZnS-CdS/PGE through crosslinking with chitosan (CT). A pair of well-defined reversible redox peak of GOD was observed at GOD/CT/ZnS-CdS/PGE based on enzyme electrode by direct electron transfer between the protein and electrode. Further, obtained GOD/CT/ZnS-CdS/PGE offers a disposable, low cost, selective and sensitive electrochemical biosensing of glucose in FIA system based on the decrease of the electrocatalytic response of the reduced form of GOD to dissolved oxygen. Under optimum conditions (flow rate, 1.3mL min(-1); transmission tubing length, 10cm; injection volume, 100μL; and constant applied potential, -500mV vs. Ag/AgCl), the proposed method displayed a linear response to glucose in the range of 0.01-1.0mM with detection limit of 3.0µM. The results obtained from this study would provide the basis for further development of the biosensing using PGE based FIA systems. PMID:26592613

  3. Glucose screening and tolerance tests during pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Oral glucose tolerance test - pregnancy (OGTT); Glucose challenge test - pregnancy ... For the glucose screening test: You do not need to prepare or change your diet in any way. You will be asked to drink a ...

  4. A glucose oxidase sensor based on screen-printed carbon electrodes modified by polypyrrole.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Li, Guang; Wu, Jieying; Wang, You; Liu, Jun

    2005-01-01

    A disposable amperometric biosensor for detecting blood glucose has been developed. The sensor is based on a screen-printed electrode prepared by electrochemical polymerization of pyrrole with glucose oxidase (GOD) and LiClO4 dopants. In citric acid buffer (pH5.0), GOD with negative charges is immobilized within electropositive polypyrrole matrices onto a carbon electrode surface. Afterward, the electron transfer mediator, potassium ferricyanide is immobilized by adsorption. Experimentally the compositions of pyrrole, LiClO4 and potassium ferricyanide are optimized. Amperometry is used for the determination of glucose concentration. Four microliters of glucose solution is needed for one test, and the response time of the sensor is 70s. The amperometric response of the enzyme electrode is linear in the range of 1-30 mM. PMID:17282595

  5. Glucose intolerance induced by blockade of central FGF receptors is linked to an acute stress response

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Jennifer M.; Matsen, Miles E.; Mundinger, Thomas O.; Morton, Gregory J.; Stefanovski, Darko; Bergman, Richard N.; Kaiyala, Karl J.; Taborsky, Gerald J.; Schwartz, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Central administration of ligands for fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) such as fibroblast growth factor-19 (FGF19) and FGF21 exert glucose-lowering effects in rodent models of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Conversely, intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of the non-selective FGFR inhibitor (FGFRi) PD173074 causes glucose intolerance, implying a physiological role for neuronal FGFR signaling in glucose homeostasis. The current studies were undertaken to identify neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying the glucose intolerance induced by pharmacological blockade of central FGFRs. Methods Overnight fasted, lean, male, Long-Evans rats received icv injections of either PD173074 or vehicle (Veh) followed 30 min later by performance of a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIGT). Minimal model analysis of glucose and insulin data from the FSIGT was performed to estimate insulin-dependent and insulin-independent components of glucose disposal. Plasma levels of lactate, glucagon, corticosterone, non-esterified free fatty acids (NEFA) and catecholamines were measured before and after intravenous (iv) glucose injection. Results Within 20 min of icv PD173074 injection (prior to the FSIGT), plasma levels of lactate, norepinephrine and epinephrine increased markedly, and each returned to baseline rapidly (within 8 min) following the iv glucose bolus. In contrast, plasma glucagon levels were not altered by icv FGFRi at either time point. Consistent with a previous report, glucose tolerance was impaired following icv PD173074 compared to Veh injection and, based on minimal model analysis of FSIGT data, this effect was attributable to reductions of both insulin secretion and the basal insulin effect (BIE), consistent with the inhibitory effect of catecholamines on pancreatic β-cell secretion. By comparison, there were no changes in glucose effectiveness at zero insulin (GEZI) or the insulin sensitivity index (SI). To determine if

  6. Catalytic reactor with disposable cartridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccullough, C. M.

    1973-01-01

    Catalytic reactor, disposable cartridge enclosing iron catalyst, acts as container for solid carbon formed by decomposition of carbon monoxide. Deposition of carbon in other parts of oxygen recovery system does not occur because of lack of catalytic activity; filters trap carbon particles and prevent their being transported outside reaction zone.

  7. Disposing of Canada's used fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Torgerson, D.F.

    1990-01-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is assessing the permanent disposal of used nuclear fuel in a waste vault located 500 to 1,000 m deep in the Precambrian granitic rock of the Canadian Shield. The specific objectives of the program are to develop and demonstrate the technology to site, design, build, and operate a disposal facility in a way that creates no, or negligible, burden on future generations. In addition, the program must develop a methodology to evaluate the performance of the disposal system against safety criteria and demonstrate that sites are likely to exist in the Canadian Shield that satisfy regulatory criteria. These criteria are very stringent. As in other national high-level waste management programs, the Canadian concept for the permanent disposal of nuclear fuel wastes employs a multiple barrier system for isolating contaminants from the environment. The current phase of the work is generic in nature and is not site specific. Research and development (R and D) has advanced to the point where the generic concept will be evaluated under the Canadian environmental assessment review process, which involves public hearings and independent scientific review.

  8. Sludge Treatment, Utilization, and Disposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Richard I.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. This review covers such areas: (1) industrial and hazardous sludges; (2) chemical sludges; (3) stabilization and combustion; (4) ocean disposal; and (5) land application. A list of 411 references is also presented. (HM)

  9. Geological considerations in hazardouswaste disposal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cartwright, K.; Gilkeson, R.H.; Johnson, T.M.

    1981-01-01

    Present regulations assume that long-term isolation of hazardous wastes - including toxic chemical, biological, radioactive, flammable and explosive wastes - may be effected by disposal in landfills that have liners of very low hydraulic conductivity. In reality, total isolation of wastes in humid areas is not possible; some migration of leachate from wastes buried in the gound will always occur. Regulations should provide performance standards applicable on a site-by-site basis rather than rigid criteria for site selection and design. The performance standards should take into account several factors: (1) the categories, segregation, degradation and toxicity of the wastes; (2) the site hydrogeology, which governs the direction and rate of contaminant transport; (3) the attenuation of contaminants by geochemical interactions with geologic materials; and (4) the release rate of unattenuated pollutants to surface or groundwater. An adequate monitoring system is essential. The system should both test the extent to which the operation of the site meets performance standards and provide sufficient warning of pollution problems to allow implementation of remedial measures. In recent years there has been a trend away from numerous, small disposal sites toward fewer and larger sites. The size of a disposal site should be based on the attenuation capacity of the geologic material, which has a finite, though generally not well-defined, limit. For slowly degradable wastes, engineered sites with leachate-collection systems appear to be only a temporary solution since the leachate collected will also require final disposal. ?? 1981.

  10. HANDBOOK: SEPTAGE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The principal purpose of the handbook is to present an up-to-date review of available design, performance, operation and maintenance, cost, and energy information pertaining to the receiving, treatment, and disposal of septage. Septage is the liquid and solid material pumped from...

  11. Safe disposal of surplus plutonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, W. L.; Naz, S.; Lutze, W.; Busch, R.; Prinja, A.; Stoll, W.

    2001-06-01

    About 150 tons of weapons grade and weapons usable plutonium (metal, oxide, and in residues) have been declared surplus in the USA and Russia. Both countries plan to convert the metal and oxide into mixed oxide fuel for nuclear power reactors. Russia has not yet decided what to do with the residues. The US will convert residues into a ceramic, which will then be over-poured with highly radioactive borosilicate glass. The radioactive glass is meant to provide a deterrent to recovery of plutonium, as required by a US standard. Here we show a waste form for plutonium residues, zirconia/boron carbide (ZrO 2/B 4C), with an unprecedented combination of properties: a single, radiation-resistant, and chemically durable phase contains the residues; billion-year-old natural analogs are available; and criticality safety is given under all conceivable disposal conditions. ZrO 2/B 4C can be disposed of directly, without further processing, making it attractive to all countries facing the task of plutonium disposal. The US standard for protection against recovery can be met by disposal of the waste form together with used reactor fuel.

  12. DREDGED MATERIAL DISPOSAL MANAGEMENT MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    US Army Corps of Engineers public web site with computer models, available for download, used in evaluating various aspects of dredging and dredged material disposal. (landfill and water Quality models are also available at this site.) The site includes the following dredged mate...

  13. Optimizing High Level Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Dirk Gombert

    2005-09-01

    If society is ever to reap the potential benefits of nuclear energy, technologists must close the fuel-cycle completely. A closed cycle equates to a continued supply of fuel and safe reactors, but also reliable and comprehensive closure of waste issues. High level waste (HLW) disposal in borosilicate glass (BSG) is based on 1970s era evaluations. This host matrix is very adaptable to sequestering a wide variety of radionuclides found in raffinates from spent fuel reprocessing. However, it is now known that the current system is far from optimal for disposal of the diverse HLW streams, and proven alternatives are available to reduce costs by billions of dollars. The basis for HLW disposal should be reassessed to consider extensive waste form and process technology research and development efforts, which have been conducted by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), international agencies and the private sector. Matching the waste form to the waste chemistry and using currently available technology could increase the waste content in waste forms to 50% or more and double processing rates. Optimization of the HLW disposal system would accelerate HLW disposition and increase repository capacity. This does not necessarily require developing new waste forms, the emphasis should be on qualifying existing matrices to demonstrate protection equal to or better than the baseline glass performance. Also, this proposed effort does not necessarily require developing new technology concepts. The emphasis is on demonstrating existing technology that is clearly better (reliability, productivity, cost) than current technology, and justifying its use in future facilities or retrofitted facilities. Higher waste processing and disposal efficiency can be realized by performing the engineering analyses and trade-studies necessary to select the most efficient methods for processing the full spectrum of wastes across the nuclear complex. This paper will describe technologies being

  14. The glucose-6-phosphatase system.

    PubMed Central

    van Schaftingen, Emile; Gerin, Isabelle

    2002-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), an enzyme found mainly in the liver and the kidneys, plays the important role of providing glucose during starvation. Unlike most phosphatases acting on water-soluble compounds, it is a membrane-bound enzyme, being associated with the endoplasmic reticulum. In 1975, W. Arion and co-workers proposed a model according to which G6Pase was thought to be a rather unspecific phosphatase, with its catalytic site oriented towards the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum [Arion, Wallin, Lange and Ballas (1975) Mol. Cell. Biochem. 6, 75--83]. Substrate would be provided to this enzyme by a translocase that is specific for glucose 6-phosphate, thereby accounting for the specificity of the phosphatase for glucose 6-phosphate in intact microsomes. Distinct transporters would allow inorganic phosphate and glucose to leave the vesicles. At variance with this substrate-transport model, other models propose that conformational changes play an important role in the properties of G6Pase. The last 10 years have witnessed important progress in our knowledge of the glucose 6-phosphate hydrolysis system. The genes encoding G6Pase and the glucose 6-phosphate translocase have been cloned and shown to be mutated in glycogen storage disease type Ia and type Ib respectively. The gene encoding a G6Pase-related protein, expressed specifically in pancreatic islets, has also been cloned. Specific potent inhibitors of G6Pase and of the glucose 6-phosphate translocase have been synthesized or isolated from micro-organisms. These as well as other findings support the model initially proposed by Arion. Much progress has also been made with regard to the regulation of the expression of G6Pase by insulin, glucocorticoids, cAMP and glucose. PMID:11879177

  15. Conversion of glucose to sorbose

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Mark E.; Gounder, Rajamani

    2016-02-09

    The present invention is directed to methods for preparing sorbose from glucose, said method comprising: (a) contacting the glucose with a silica-containing structure comprising a zeolite having a topology of a 12 membered-ring or larger, an ordered mesoporous silica material, or an amorphous silica, said structure containing Lewis acidic Ti.sup.4+ or Zr.sup.4+ or both Ti.sup.4+ and Zr.sup.4+ framework centers, said contacting conducted under reaction conditions sufficient to isomerize the glucose to sorbose. The sorbose may be (b) separated or isolated; or (c) converted to ascorbic acid.

  16. Disposal of NORM waste in salt caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.A.; Smith, K.P.; Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Blunt, D.; Williams, G.P.

    1998-07-01

    Some types of oil and gas production and processing wastes contain naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). If NORM is present at concentrations above regulatory levels in oil field waste, the waste requires special disposal practices. The existing disposal options for wastes containing NORM are limited and costly. This paper evaluates the legality, technical feasibility, economics, and human health risk of disposing of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns. Cavern disposal of NORM waste is technically feasible and poses a very low human health risk. From a legal perspective, there are no fatal flaws that would prevent a state regulatory agency from approving cavern disposal of NORM. On the basis of the costs charged by caverns currently used for disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW), NORM waste disposal caverns could be cost competitive with existing NORM waste disposal methods when regulatory agencies approve the practice.

  17. 48 CFR 245.603 - Disposal methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Disposal methods. 245.603 Section 245.603 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Contractor Inventory 245.603 Disposal methods....

  18. [Contribution of the kidney to glucose homeostasis].

    PubMed

    Segura, Julián; Ruilope, Luis Miguel

    2013-09-01

    The kidney is involved in glucose homeostasis through three major mechanisms: renal gluconeogenesis, renal glucose consumption, and glucose reabsorption in the proximal tubule. Glucose reabsorption is one of the most important physiological functions of the kidney, allowing full recovery of filtered glucose, elimination of glucose from the urine, and prevention of calorie loss. Approximately 90% of the glucose is reabsorbed in the S1 segment of the proximal tubule, where glucose transporter-2 (GLUT2) and sodium-glucose transporter-2 (SGLT2) are located, while the remaining 10% is reabsorbed in the S3 segment by SGLT1 and GLUT1 transporters. In patients with hyperglycemia, the kidney continues to reabsorb glucose, thus maintaining hyperglycemia. Most of the renal glucose reabsorption is mediated by SGLT2. Several experimental and clinical studies suggest that pharmacological blockade of this transporter might be beneficial in the management of hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:24444521

  19. Different alterations in the insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in the athlete's heart and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Nuutila, P; Knuuti, M J; Heinonen, O J; Ruotsalainen, U; Teräs, M; Bergman, J; Solin, O; Yki-Järvinen, H; Voipio-Pulkki, L M; Wegelius, U

    1994-01-01

    Physical training increases skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity. Since training also causes functional and structural changes in the myocardium, we compared glucose uptake rates in the heart and skeletal muscles of trained and untrained individuals. Seven male endurance athletes (VO2max 72 +/- 2 ml/kg/min) and seven sedentary subjects matched for characteristics other than VO2max (43 +/- 2 ml/kg/min) were studied. Whole body glucose uptake was determined with a 2-h euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp, and regional glucose uptake in femoral and arm muscles, and myocardium using 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose and positron emission tomography. Glucose uptake in the athletes was increased by 68% in whole body (P < 0.0001), by 99% in the femoral muscles (P < 0.01), and by 62% in arm muscles (P = 0.06), but it was decreased by 33% in the heart muscle (P < 0.05) as compared with the sedentary subjects. The total glucose uptake rate in the heart was similar in the athletes and control subjects. Left ventricular mass in the athletes was 79% greater (P < 0.001) and the meridional wall stress smaller (P < 0.001) as estimated by echocardiography. VO2max correlated directly with left ventricular mass (r = 0.87, P < 0.001) and inversely with left ventricular wall stress (r = -0.86, P < 0.001). Myocardial glucose uptake correlated directly with the rate-pressure product (r = 0.75, P < 0.02) and inversely with left ventricular mass (r = -0.60, P < 0.05) or with the whole body glucose disposal (r = -0.68, P < 0.01). Thus, in athletes, (a) insulin-stimulated glucose uptake is enhanced in the whole body and skeletal muscles, (b) whereas myocardial glucose uptake per muscle mass is reduced possibly due to decreased wall stress and energy requirements or the use of alternative fuels, or both. Images PMID:8182160

  20. The effect of vagal nerve blockade using electrical impulses on glucose metabolism in nondiabetic subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sathananthan, Matheni; Ikramuddin, Sayeed; Swain, James M; Shah, Meera; Piccinini, Francesca; Dalla Man, Chiara; Cobelli, Claudio; Rizza, Robert A; Camilleri, Michael; Vella, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Vagal interruption causes weight loss in humans and decreases endogenous glucose production in animals. However, it is unknown if this is due to a direct effect on glucose metabolism. We sought to determine if vagal blockade using electrical impulses alters glucose metabolism in humans. Patients and methods We utilized a randomized, cross-over study design where participants were studied after 2 weeks of activation or inactivation of vagal nerve blockade (VNB). Seven obese subjects with impaired fasting glucose previously enrolled in a long-term study to examine the effect of VNB on weight took part. We used a standardized triple-tracer mixed meal to enable measurement of the rate of meal appearance, endogenous glucose production, and glucose disappearance. The 550 kcal meal was also labeled with 111In-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) to measure gastrointestinal transit. Insulin action and β-cell responsivity indices were estimated using the minimal model. Results Integrated glucose, insulin, and glucagon concentrations did not differ between study days. This was also reflected in a lack of effect on β-cell responsivity and insulin action. Furthermore, fasting and postprandial endogenous glucose production, integrated meal appearance, and glucose disposal did not differ in the presence or absence of VNB. Similarly, gastric emptying and colonic transit were unchanged by VNB. Conclusion In this pilot study in nondiabetic humans, electrical vagal blockade had no acute effects on glucose metabolism, insulin secretion and action, or gastric emptying. It remains to be determined if more pronounced effects would be observed in diabetic subjects. PMID:25050073

  1. Concept for Underground Disposal of Nuclear Waste

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Packaged waste placed in empty oil-shale mines. Concept for disposal of nuclear waste economically synergistic with earlier proposal concerning backfilling of oil-shale mines. New disposal concept superior to earlier schemes for disposal in hard-rock and salt mines because less uncertainty about ability of oil-shale mine to contain waste safely for millenium.

  2. 40 CFR 191.24 - Disposal standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., HIGH-LEVEL AND TRANSURANIC RADIOACTIVE WASTES Environmental Standards for Ground-Water Protection § 191.24 Disposal standards. (a) Disposal systems. (1) General. Disposal systems for waste and any... of drinking water, in the accessible environment, to exceed the limits specified in 40 CFR part...

  3. Waste disposal options report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, N.E.; McDonald, T.G.; Banaee, J.; Barnes, C.M.; Fish, L.W.; Losinski, S.J.; Peterson, H.K.; Sterbentz, J.W.; Wenzel, D.R.

    1998-02-01

    This report summarizes the potential options for the processing and disposal of mixed waste generated by reprocessing spent nuclear fuel at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. It compares the proposed waste-immobilization processes, quantifies and characterizes the resulting waste forms, identifies potential disposal sites and their primary acceptance criteria, and addresses disposal issues for hazardous waste.

  4. 48 CFR 945.603 - Disposal methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Disposal methods. 945.603 Section 945.603 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTRACT MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY Reporting, Redistribution, and Disposal of Contractor Inventory 945.603 Disposal methods....

  5. 48 CFR 2845.603 - Disposal methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Disposal methods. 2845.603 Section 2845.603 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY Reporting, Redistribution, and Disposal of Contractor Inventory 2845.603 Disposal...

  6. IMPACT OF COAL REFUSE DISPOSAL ON GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to determine the extent of groundwater quality deterioration when coal mine refuse and power plant ashes were disposed of in open pits. In addition, disposal methods were developed and procedures for planning and designing disposal sites were formu...

  7. 48 CFR 2845.603 - Disposal methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Disposal methods. 2845.603 Section 2845.603 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Contract Management GOVERNMENT PROPERTY Reporting, Redistribution, and Disposal of Contractor Inventory 2845.603 Disposal...

  8. 48 CFR 945.603 - Disposal methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Disposal methods. 945.603 Section 945.603 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTRACT MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY Reporting, Redistribution, and Disposal of Contractor Inventory 945.603 Disposal methods....

  9. Safe Disposal of Highly Reactive Chemicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunn, George; Sansone, Eric B.

    1994-01-01

    Provides specific procedures for the disposal of a variety of highly reactive chemicals and reports the results of a study of their safe disposal. Disposal of some problematic sulfur-containing compounds are included. Procedures are based on a combination of literature review and author development. (LZ)

  10. 48 CFR 945.603 - Disposal methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Disposal methods. 945.603 Section 945.603 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTRACT MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY Reporting, Redistribution, and Disposal of Contractor Inventory 945.603 Disposal methods....