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Sample records for integral membrane domain

  1. Porous Nanocomposites with Integrated Internal Domains: Application to Separation Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenle; Walz, John Y.

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetric membranes with layered structure have made significant achievements due to their balanced properties and multi-functionalities that come from a combination of multiple layers. However, issues such as delamination and substructure resistance are generated by the intrinsic layered structure. Here, we present a strategy to integrate the traditional layered structure into an asymmetric but continuous porous network. Through infiltrations of microparticles and nanoparticles to targeted regions, active domains are created inside the porous scaffold versus having them applied externally. The fabricated internal active domains are highly adjustable in terms of its dimensions, pore size, and materials. We demonstrate that it is a general method that can be applicable to a wide variety of particles regardless of their material, dimensions, or geometry. By eliminating the external layered structure, problems such as those mentioned above can be eliminated. This integration technique can be extended to other devices required a layered structure, such as solid oxide fuel cells and lithium ion battery. PMID:24646923

  2. Porous Nanocomposites with Integrated Internal Domains: Application to Separation Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenle; Walz, John Y.

    2014-03-01

    Asymmetric membranes with layered structure have made significant achievements due to their balanced properties and multi-functionalities that come from a combination of multiple layers. However, issues such as delamination and substructure resistance are generated by the intrinsic layered structure. Here, we present a strategy to integrate the traditional layered structure into an asymmetric but continuous porous network. Through infiltrations of microparticles and nanoparticles to targeted regions, active domains are created inside the porous scaffold versus having them applied externally. The fabricated internal active domains are highly adjustable in terms of its dimensions, pore size, and materials. We demonstrate that it is a general method that can be applicable to a wide variety of particles regardless of their material, dimensions, or geometry. By eliminating the external layered structure, problems such as those mentioned above can be eliminated. This integration technique can be extended to other devices required a layered structure, such as solid oxide fuel cells and lithium ion battery.

  3. Different Transmembrane Domains Associate with Distinct Endoplasmic Reticulum Components during Membrane Integration of a Polytopic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Meacock, Suzanna L.; Lecomte, Fabienne J.L.; Crawshaw, Samuel G.; High, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    We have been studying the insertion of the seven transmembrane domain (TM) protein opsin to gain insights into how the multiple TMs of polytopic proteins are integrated at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We find that the ER components associated with the first and second TMs of the nascent opsin polypeptide chain are clearly distinct. The first TM (TM1) is adjacent to the α and β subunits of the Sec61 complex, and a novel component, a protein associated with the ER translocon of 10 kDa (PAT-10). The most striking characteristic of PAT-10 is that it remains adjacent to TM1 throughout the biogenesis and membrane integration of the full-length opsin polypeptide. TM2 is also found to be adjacent to Sec61α and Sec61β during its membrane integration. However, TM2 does not form any adducts with PAT-10; rather, a transient association with the TRAM protein is observed. We show that the association of PAT-10 with opsin TM1 does not require the N-glycosylation of the nascent chain and occurs irrespective of the amino acid sequence and transmembrane topology of TM1. We conclude that the precise makeup of the ER membrane insertion site can be distinct for the different transmembrane domains of a polytopic protein. We find that the environment of a particular TM can be influenced by both the “stage” of nascent chain biosynthesis reached, and the TM's relative location within the polypeptide. PMID:12475939

  4. A Novel Family of Soluble Minimal Scaffolds Provides Structural Insight into the Catalytic Domains of Integral Membrane Metallopeptidases*

    PubMed Central

    López-Pelegrín, Mar; Cerdà-Costa, Núria; Martínez-Jiménez, Francisco; Cintas-Pedrola, Anna; Canals, Albert; Peinado, Juan R.; Marti-Renom, Marc A.; López-Otín, Carlos; Arolas, Joan L.; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2013-01-01

    In the search for structural models of integral-membrane metallopeptidases (MPs), we discovered three related proteins from thermophilic prokaryotes, which we grouped into a novel family called “minigluzincins.” We determined the crystal structures of the zymogens of two of these (Pyrococcus abyssi proabylysin and Methanocaldococcus jannaschii projannalysin), which are soluble and, with ∼100 residues, constitute the shortest structurally characterized MPs to date. Despite relevant sequence and structural similarity, the structures revealed two unique mechanisms of latency maintenance through the C-terminal segments previously unseen in MPs as follows: intramolecular, through an extended tail, in proabylysin, and crosswise intermolecular, through a helix swap, in projannalysin. In addition, structural and sequence comparisons revealed large similarity with MPs of the gluzincin tribe such as thermolysin, leukotriene A4 hydrolase relatives, and cowrins. Noteworthy, gluzincins mostly contain a glutamate as third characteristic zinc ligand, whereas minigluzincins have a histidine. Sequence and structural similarity further allowed us to ascertain that minigluzincins are very similar to the catalytic domains of integral membrane MPs of the MEROPS database families M48 and M56, such as FACE1, HtpX, Oma1, and BlaR1/MecR1, which are provided with trans-membrane helices flanking or inserted into a minigluzincin-like catalytic domain. In a time where structural biochemistry of integral-membrane proteins in general still faces formidable challenges, the minigluzincin soluble minimal scaffold may contribute to our understanding of the working mechanisms of these membrane MPs and to the design of novel inhibitors through structure-aided rational drug design approaches. PMID:23733187

  5. The cytoplasmic domain is essential for transport function of the integral membrane transport protein SLC4A11.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Sampath K; Lukowski, Chris M; Casey, Joseph R

    2016-01-15

    Large cytoplasmic domains (CD) are a common feature among integral membrane proteins. In virtually all cases, these CD have a function (e.g., binding cytoskeleton or regulatory factors) separate from that of the membrane domain (MD). Strong associations between CD and MD are rare. Here we studied SLC4A11, a membrane transport protein of corneal endothelial cells, the mutations of which cause genetic corneal blindness. SLC4A11 has a 41-kDa CD and a 57-kDa integral MD. One disease-causing mutation in the CD, R125H, manifests a catalytic defect, suggesting a role of the CD in transport function. Expressed in HEK-293 cells without the CD, MD-SLC4A11 is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, indicating a folding defect. Replacement of CD-SLC4A11 with green fluorescent protein did not rescue MD-SLC4A11, suggesting some specific role of CD-SLC4A11. Homology modeling revealed that the structure of CD-SLC4A11 is similar to that of the Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchange protein AE1 (SLC4A1) CD. Fusion to CD-AE1 partially rescued MD-SLC4A11 to the cell surface, suggesting that the structure of CD-AE1 is similar to that of CD-SLC4A11. The CD-AE1-MD-SLC4a11 chimera, however, had no functional activity. We conclude that CD-SLC4A11 has an indispensable role in the transport function of SLC4A11. CD-SLC4A11 forms insoluble precipitates when expressed in bacteria, suggesting that the domain cannot fold properly when expressed alone. Consistent with a strong association between CD-SLC4A11 and MD-SLC4A11, these domains specifically associate when coexpressed in HEK-293 cells. We conclude that SLC4A11 is a rare integral membrane protein in which the CD has strong associations with the integral MD, which contributes to membrane transport function. PMID:26582474

  6. Intracellular distribution of an integral nuclear pore membrane protein fused to green fluorescent protein--localization of a targeting domain.

    PubMed

    Söderqvist, H; Imreh, G; Kihlmark, M; Linnman, C; Ringertz, N; Hallberg, E

    1997-12-15

    The 121-kDa pore membrane protein (POM121) is a bitopic integral membrane protein specifically located in the pore membrane domain of the nuclear envelope with its short N-terminal tail exposed on the luminal side and its major C-terminal portion adjoining the nuclear pore complex. In order to locate a signal for targeting of POM121 to the nuclear pores, we overexpressed selected regions of POM121 alone or fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in transiently transfected COS-1 cells or in a stably transfected neuroblastoma cell line. Microscopic analysis of the GFP fluorescence or immunostaining was used to determine the intracellular distribution of the overexpressed proteins. The endofluorescent GFP tag had no effect on the distribution of POM121, since the chimerical POM121-GFP fusion protein was correctly targeted to the nuclear pores of both COS-1 cells and neuroblastoma cells. Based on the differentiated intracellular sorting of the POM121 variants, we conclude that the first 128 amino acids of POM121 contains signals for targeting to the continuous endoplasmic reticulum/nuclear envelope membrane system but not specifically to the nuclear pores and that a specific nuclear pore targeting signal is located between amino acids 129 and 618 in the endoplasmically exposed portion of POM121. PMID:9461306

  7. P13, an Integral Membrane Protein of Borrelia burgdorferi, Is C-Terminally Processed and Contains Surface-Exposed Domains

    PubMed Central

    Noppa, Laila; Östberg, Yngve; Lavrinovicha, Marija; Bergström, Sven

    2001-01-01

    To elucidate antigens present on the bacterial surface of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato that may be involved in pathogenesis, we characterized a protein, P13, with an apparent molecular mass of 13 kDa. The protein was immunogenic and was expressed in large amounts during in vitro cultivation compared to other known antigens. An immunofluorescence assay, immunoelectron microscopy, and protease sensitivity assays indicated that P13 is surface exposed. The deduced sequence of the P13 peptide revealed a possible signal peptidase type I cleavage site, and computer analysis predicted that P13 is an integral membrane protein with three transmembrane-spanning domains. Mass spectrometry, in vitro translation, and N- and C-terminal amino acid sequencing analyses indicated that P13 was posttranslationally processed at both ends and modified by an unknown mechanism. Furthermore, p13 belongs to a gene family with five additional members in B. burgdorferi sensu stricto. The p13 gene is located on the linear chromosome of the bacterium, in contrast to five paralogous genes, which are located on extrachromosomal plasmids. The size of the p13 transcript was consistent with a monocistronic transcript. This new gene family may be involved in functions that are specific for this spirochete and its pathogenesis. PMID:11292755

  8. Characterization of lipid domains in erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, W; Glaser, M

    1991-01-01

    Fluorescence digital imaging microscopy was used to study the lateral distribution of the lipid components in erythrocyte membranes. Intact erythrocytes labeled with phospholipids containing a fluorophore attached to one fatty acid chain showed an uneven distribution of the phospholipids in the membrane thereby demonstrating the presence of membrane domains. The enrichment of the lipotropic compound chlor-promazine in domains in intact erythrocytes also suggested that the domains are lipid-enriched regions. Similar membrane domains were present in erythrocyte ghosts. The phospholipid enrichment was increased in the domains by inducing membrane protein aggregation. Double-labeling experiments were done to determine the relative distributions of different phospholipids in the membrane. Vesicles made from extracted lipids did not show the presence of domains consistent with the conclusion that membrane proteins were responsible for creating the domains. Overall, it was found that large domains exist in the red blood cell membrane with unequal enrichment of the different phospholipid species. Images PMID:1996337

  9. Membrane Domain Formation on Nanostructured Scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Charles; Liu, Fangjie; Srijanto, Bernadeta

    The spatial organization of lipids and proteins in biological membranes seems to have a functional role in the life of a cell. Separation of the lipids into distinct domains of greater order and anchoring to the cytoskeleton are two main mechanisms for organizing the membrane in cells. We propose a novel model membrane consisting of a lipid bilayer suspended over a nanostructured scaffold consisting of arrays of fabricated nanopillars. Unlike traditional model membranes, our model will have well-defined lateral structure and distributed substrate attachments that will emulate the connections of cellular membranes to the underlying cytoskeleton. Membranes will be characterized using neutron reflectometry, atomic force microscopy and fluorescence to verify a suspended, planar geometry with restricted diffusion at suspension points, and free diffusion in between. This architecture will allow the controlled study of lipid domain reorganization, viral infection and signal transduction that depend on the lateral structure of the membrane.

  10. Expression and characterization of the integral membrane domain of bacterial histidine kinase SCO3062 for structural studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Kwon Joo; Kwak, Su-Nam; Kim, Hyun Jung; Cheong, Chaejoon; Kim, Myung Hee; Jeon, Young Ho

    2008-11-14

    Bacterial histidine kinases play an important role in the response to external stimuli. Structural studies of the histidine kinase transmembrane domain are challenging due to difficulties in protein expression and sample preparation. After carrying out expression screening of a series of histidine kinases, we investigated sample preparation methods for obtaining high quality samples of the periplasmic and transmembrane domain (PTD) of the bacterial histidine kinase SCO3062. Various sample conditions were tested for their ability to give homogeneous NMR spectra of the SCO3062 PTD with well-resolved resonances. Circular dichroism and 3D {sup 15}N-edited NOESY spectrum results demonstrate that the SCO3062 PTD is predominantly {alpha}-helical. This method should be applicable to the NMR analysis of other transmembrane proteins.

  11. Matrix membranes and integrability

    SciTech Connect

    Zachos, C.; Fairlie, D.; Curtright, T.

    1997-06-01

    This is a pedagogical digest of results reported in Curtright, Fairlie, {ampersand} Zachos 1997, and an explicit implementation of Euler`s construction for the solution of the Poisson Bracket dual Nahm equation. But it does not cover 9 and 10-dimensional systems, and subsequent progress on them Fairlie 1997. Cubic interactions are considered in 3 and 7 space dimensions, respectively, for bosonic membranes in Poisson Bracket form. Their symmetries and vacuum configurations are explored. Their associated first order equations are transformed to Nahm`s equations, and are hence seen to be integrable, for the 3-dimensional case, by virtue of the explicit Lax pair provided. Most constructions introduced also apply to matrix commutator or Moyal Bracket analogs.

  12. The integrity of the alpha-helical domain of intestinal fatty acid binding protein is essential for the collision-mediated transfer of fatty acids to phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Franchini, G R; Storch, J; Corsico, B

    2008-04-01

    Intestinal FABP (IFABP) and liver FABP (LFABP), homologous proteins expressed at high levels in intestinal absorptive cells, employ markedly different mechanisms of fatty acid transfer to acceptor model membranes. Transfer from IFABP occurs during protein-membrane collisional interactions, while for LFABP transfer occurs by diffusion through the aqueous phase. In addition, transfer from IFABP is markedly faster than from LFABP. The overall goal of this study was to further explore the structural differences between IFABP and LFABP which underlie their large functional differences in ligand transport. In particular, we addressed the role of the alphaI-helix domain in the unique transport properties of intestinal FABP. A chimeric protein was engineered with the 'body' (ligand binding domain) of IFABP and the alphaI-helix of LFABP (alpha(I)LbetaIFABP), and the fatty acid transfer properties of the chimeric FABP were examined using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay. The results showed a significant decrease in the absolute rate of FA transfer from alpha(I)LbetaIFABP compared to IFABP. The results indicate that the alphaI-helix is crucial for IFABP collisional FA transfer, and further indicate the participation of the alphaII-helix in the formation of a protein-membrane "collisional complex". Photo-crosslinking experiments with a photoactivable reagent demonstrated the direct interaction of IFABP with membranes and further support the importance of the alphaI helix of IFABP in its physical interaction with membranes. PMID:18284926

  13. Attractive membrane domains control lateral diffusion.

    PubMed

    Forstner, Martin B; Martin, Douglas S; Rückerl, Florian; Käs, Josef A; Selle, Carsten

    2008-05-01

    Lipid membranes play a fundamental role in vital cellular functions such as signal transduction. Many of these processes rely on lateral diffusion within the membrane, generally a complex fluid containing ordered microdomains. However, little attention has been paid to the alterations in transport dynamics of a diffusing species caused by long-range interactions with membrane domains. In this paper, we address the effect of such interactions on diffusive transport by studying lateral diffusion in a phase-separated Langmuir phospholipid monolayer via single-particle tracking. We find that attractive dipole-dipole interactions between condensed phase domains and diffusing probe beads lead to transient confinement at the phase boundaries, causing a transition from two- to one-dimensional diffusion. Using Brownian dynamics simulations, the long-term diffusion constant for such a system is found to have a sensitive, Boltzmann-like, dependence on the interaction strength. In addition, this interaction strength is shown to be a strong function of the ratio of domain to particle size. As similar interactions are expected in biological membranes, the modulation of diffusive transport dynamics by varying interaction strength and/or domain size may offer cells selective spatial and temporal control over signaling processes. PMID:18643101

  14. Disrupting membrane raft domains by alkylphospholipids.

    PubMed

    Gomide, A B; Thomé, C H; dos Santos, G A; Ferreira, G A; Faça, V M; Rego, E M; Greene, L J; Stabeli, R G; Ciancaglini, P; Itri, R

    2013-05-01

    Using phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy we study the influence of the alkylphospholipid, ALP, 10-(octyloxy) decyl-2-(trimethylammonium) ethyl phosphate, ODPC, in giant unilamellar vesicles, GUVs, composed of DOPC (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), brain sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol (Chol). The results show that adding 100μM ODPC (below CMC) to the outer solution of GUVs promotes DOPC membrane disruption over a period of 1h of continuous observation. On the other hand, the presence of SM and Chol in homogeneous fluid lipid bilayers protects the membrane from disruption. Interestingly, by adding 100μM ODPC to GUVs containing DOPC:SM:Chol (1:1:1), which display liquid ordered (Lo)-liquid disordered (Ld) phase coexistence, the domains rapidly disappear in less than 1min of ODPC contact with the membrane. The lipids are subsequently redistributed to liquid domains within a time course of 14-18min, reflecting that the homogenous phase was not thermodynamically stable, followed by rupture of the GUVs. A similar mechanism of action is also observed for perifosine, although to a larger extent. Therefore, the initial stage of lipid raft disruption by both ODPC and perifosine, and maybe other ALPS, by promoting lipid mixing, may be correlated with their toxicity upon neoplastic cells, since selective (dis)association of essential proteins within lipid raft microdomains must take place in the plasma membrane. PMID:23376656

  15. Composite membrane with integral rim

    SciTech Connect

    Routkevitch, Dmitri; Polyakov, Oleg G

    2015-01-27

    Composite membranes that are adapted for separation, purification, filtration, analysis, reaction and sensing. The composite membranes can include a porous support structure having elongate pore channels extending through the support structure. The composite membrane also includes an active layer comprising an active layer material, where the active layer material is completely disposed within the pore channels between the surfaces of the support structure. The active layer is intimately integrated within the support structure, thus enabling great robustness, reliability, resistance to mechanical stress and thermal cycling, and high selectivity. Methods for the fabrication of composite membranes are also provided.

  16. Lipid membrane domains in cell surface and vacuolar systems.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Hirabayashi, Y

    2000-01-01

    Detergent insoluble sphingolipid-cholesterol enriched 'raft'-like membrane microdomains have been implicated in a variety of biological processes including sorting, trafficking, and signaling. Mutant cells and knockout animals of sphingolipid biosynthesis are clearly useful to understand the biological roles of lipid components in raft-like domains. It is suggested that raft-like domains distribute in internal vacuolar membranes as well as plasma membranes. In addition to sphingolipid-cholesterol-rich membrane domains, recent studies suggest the existence of another lipid-membrane domain in the endocytic pathway. This domain is enriched with a unique phospholipid, lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA) and localized in the internal membrane of multivesicular endosome. LBPA-rich membrane domains are involved in lipid and protein sorting within the endosomal system. Possible interaction between sphingolipids and LBPA in sphingolipid-storage disease is discussed. PMID:11201787

  17. EH domain proteins regulate cardiac membrane protein targeting

    PubMed Central

    Gudmundsson, Hjalti; Hund, Thomas J.; Wright, Patrick J.; Kline, Crystal F.; Snyder, Jedidiah S.; Qian, Lan; Koval, Olha M.; Cunha, Shane R.; George, Manju; Rainey, Mark A.; Kashef, Farshid E.; Dun, Wen; Boyden, Penelope A.; Anderson, Mark E.; Band, Hamid; Mohler, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Cardiac membrane excitability is tightly regulated by an integrated network of membrane-associated ion channels, transporters, receptors, and signaling molecules. Membrane protein dynamics in health and disease are maintained by a complex ensemble of intracellular targeting, scaffolding, recycling, and degradation pathways. Surprisingly, despite decades of research linking dysfunction in membrane protein trafficking with human cardiovascular disease, essentially nothing is known regarding the molecular identity or function of these intracellular targeting pathways in excitable cardiomyocytes. Objective We sought to discover novel pathways for membrane protein targeting in primary cardiomyocytes. Methods and Results We report the initial characterization of a large family of membrane trafficking proteins in human heart. We employed a tissue-wide screen for novel ankyrin-associated trafficking proteins and identified four members of a unique Eps15 homology (EH) domain-containing protein family (EHD1, EHD2, EHD3, EHD4) that serve critical roles in endosome-based membrane protein targeting in other cell types. We show that EHD1-4 directly associate with ankyrin, provide the first information on the expression and localization of these molecules in primary cardiomyocytes, and demonstrate that EHD1-4 are co-expressed with ankyrin-B in the myocyte perinuclear region. Notably, the expression of multiple EHD proteins is increased in animal models lacking ankyrin-B, and EHD3-deficient cardiomyocytes display aberrant ankyrin-B localization and selective loss of Na/Ca exchanger expression and function. Finally, we report significant modulation of EHD expression following myocardial infarction, suggesting that these proteins may play a key role in regulating membrane excitability in normal and diseased heart. Conclusions Our findings identify and characterize a new class of cardiac trafficking proteins, define the first group of proteins associated with the ankyrin

  18. Effects of the oncogenic V(664)E mutation on membrane insertion, structure, and sequence-dependent interactions of the Neu transmembrane domain in micelles and model membranes: an integrated biophysical and simulation study.

    PubMed

    Beevers, Andrew J; Nash, Anthony; Salazar-Cancino, Martha; Scott, David J; Notman, Rebecca; Dixon, Ann M

    2012-03-27

    Receptor tyrosine kinases bind ligands such as cytokines, hormones, and growth factors and regulate key cellular processes, including cell division. They are also implicated in the development of many types of cancer. One such example is the Neu receptor tyrosine kinase found in rats (homologous to the human ErbB2 protein), which can undergo a valine to glutamic acid (V(664)E) mutation at the center of its α-helical transmembrane domain. This substitution results in receptor activation and oncogenesis. The molecular basis of this dramatic change in behavior upon introduction of the V(664)E mutation has been difficult to pin down, with conflicting results reported in the literature. Here we report the first quantitative, thermodynamic analysis of dimerization and biophysical characterization of the rat Neu transmembrane domain and several mutants in a range of chemical environments. These data have allowed us to identify the effects of the V(664)E mutation in the isolated TM domain with respect to protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions, membrane insertion, and secondary structure. We also report the results from a 100 ns atomistic molecular dynamics simulation of the Neu transmembrane domain in a model membrane bilayer (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine). The results from simulation and experiment are in close agreement and suggest that, in the model systems investigated, the V(664)E mutation leads to a weakening of the TM dimer and a change in sequence-dependent interactions. These results are contrary to recent results obtained in mammalian membranes, and the implications of this are discussed. PMID:22385253

  19. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains

    PubMed Central

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J.; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein–protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes. PMID:25635869

  20. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J.; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein-protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes.

  1. Lipid Bilayer Domain Fluctuations as a Probe of Membrane Viscosity

    PubMed Central

    Camley, Brian A.; Esposito, Cinzia; Baumgart, Tobias; Brown, Frank L.H.

    2010-01-01

    We argue that membrane viscosity, ηm, plays a prominent role in the thermal fluctuation dynamics of micron-scale lipid domains. A theoretical expression is presented for the timescales of domain shape relaxation, which reduces to the well-known ηm = 0 result of Stone and McConnell in the limit of large domain sizes. Experimental measurements of domain dynamics on the surface of ternary phospholipid and cholesterol vesicles confirm the theoretical results and suggest domain flicker spectroscopy as a convenient means to simultaneously measure both the line tension, σ, and the membrane viscosity, ηm, governing the behavior of individual lipid domains. PMID:20858410

  2. Transient domain formation in membrane-bound organelles undergoing maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Sens, Pierre

    2013-12-01

    The membrane components of cellular organelles have been shown to segregate into domains as the result of biochemical maturation. We propose that the dynamical competition between maturation and lateral segregation of membrane components regulates domain formation. We study a two-component fluid membrane in which enzymatic reaction irreversibly converts one component into another and phase separation triggers the formation of transient membrane domains. The maximum domain size is shown to depend on the maturation rate as a power law similar to the one observed for domain growth with time in the absence of maturation, despite this time dependence not being verified in the case of irreversible maturation. This control of domain size by enzymatic activity could play a critical role in regulating exchange between organelles or within compartmentalized organelles such as the Golgi apparatus.

  3. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer. PMID:26512702

  4. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer. PMID:26512702

  5. Membrane-Sculpting BAR Domains Generate Stable Lipid Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongxia; Michelot, Alphée; Koskela, Essi V.; Tkach, Vadym; Stamou, Dimitrios; Drubin, David G.; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain proteins are central regulators of many cellular processes involving membrane dynamics. BAR domains sculpt phosphoinositide-rich membranes to generate membrane protrusions or invaginations. Here, we report that, in addition to regulating membrane geometry, BAR domains can generate extremely stable lipid microdomains by “freezing” phosphoinositide dynamics. This is a general feature of BAR domains, because the yeast endocytic BAR and Fes/CIP4 homology BAR (F-BAR) domains, the inverse BAR domain of Pinkbar, and the eisosomal BAR protein Lsp1 induced phosphoinositide clustering and halted lipid diffusion, despite differences in mechanisms of membrane interactions. Lsp1 displays comparable low diffusion rates in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that BAR domain proteins also generate stable phosphoinositide microdomains in cells. These results uncover a conserved role for BAR superfamily proteins in regulating lipid dynamics within membranes. Stable microdomains induced by BAR domain scaffolds and specific lipids can generate phase boundaries and diffusion barriers, which may have profound impacts on diverse cellular processes. PMID:24055060

  6. Superdiffusive motion of membrane-targeting C2 domains

    PubMed Central

    Campagnola, Grace; Nepal, Kanti; Schroder, Bryce W.; Peersen, Olve B.; Krapf, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Membrane-targeting domains play crucial roles in the recruitment of signalling molecules to the plasma membrane. For most peripheral proteins, the protein-to-membrane interaction is transient. After proteins dissociate from the membrane they have been observed to rebind following brief excursions in the bulk solution. Such membrane hops can have broad implications for the efficiency of reactions on membranes. We study the diffusion of membrane-targeting C2 domains using single-molecule tracking in supported lipid bilayers. The ensemble-averaged mean square displacement (MSD) exhibits superdiffusive behaviour. However, traditional time-averaged MSD analysis of individual trajectories remains linear and does not reveal superdiffusion. Our observations are explained in terms of bulk excursions that introduce jumps with a heavy-tail distribution. These hopping events allow proteins to explore large areas in a short time. The experimental results are shown to be consistent with analytical models of bulk-mediated diffusion and numerical simulations. PMID:26639944

  7. Superdiffusive motion of membrane-targeting C2 domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campagnola, Grace; Nepal, Kanti; Schroder, Bryce W.; Peersen, Olve B.; Krapf, Diego

    2015-12-01

    Membrane-targeting domains play crucial roles in the recruitment of signalling molecules to the plasma membrane. For most peripheral proteins, the protein-to-membrane interaction is transient. After proteins dissociate from the membrane they have been observed to rebind following brief excursions in the bulk solution. Such membrane hops can have broad implications for the efficiency of reactions on membranes. We study the diffusion of membrane-targeting C2 domains using single-molecule tracking in supported lipid bilayers. The ensemble-averaged mean square displacement (MSD) exhibits superdiffusive behaviour. However, traditional time-averaged MSD analysis of individual trajectories remains linear and does not reveal superdiffusion. Our observations are explained in terms of bulk excursions that introduce jumps with a heavy-tail distribution. These hopping events allow proteins to explore large areas in a short time. The experimental results are shown to be consistent with analytical models of bulk-mediated diffusion and numerical simulations.

  8. Membrane shape instabilities induced by BAR domain proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, Tobias

    2014-03-01

    Membrane curvature has developed into a forefront of membrane biophysics. Numerous proteins involved in membrane curvature sensing and membrane curvature generation have recently been discovered, including proteins containing the crescent-shaped BAR domain as membrane binding and shaping module. Accordingly, the structure determination of these proteins and their multimeric complexes is increasingly well-understood. Substantially less understood, however, are thermodynamic and kinetic aspects and the detailed mechanisms of how these proteins interact with membranes in a curvature-dependent manner. New experimental approaches need to be combined with established techniques to be able to fill in these missing details. Here we use model membrane systems in combination with a variety of biophysical techniques to characterize mechanistic aspects of BAR domain protein function. This includes a characterization of membrane curvature sensing and membrane generation. We also establish kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of BAR protein dimerization in solution, and investigate kinetic aspects of membrane binding. We present two new approaches to investigate membrane shape instabilities and demonstrate that membrane shape instabilities can be controlled by protein binding and lateral membrane tension. This work is supported through NIH grant GM-097552 and NSF grant CBET-1053857.

  9. Calmodulin Promotes N-BAR Domain-Mediated Membrane Constriction and Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Myers, Margaret D; Ryazantsev, Sergey; Hicke, Linda; Payne, Gregory S

    2016-04-18

    Membrane remodeling by BAR (Bin, Amphiphysin, RVS) domain-containing proteins, such as endophilins and amphiphysins, is integral to the process of endocytosis. However, little is known about the regulation of endocytic BAR domain activity. We have identified an interaction between the yeast Rvs167 N-BAR domain and calmodulin. Calmodulin-binding mutants of Rvs167 exhibited defects in endocytic vesicle release. In vitro, calmodulin enhanced membrane tubulation and constriction by wild-type Rvs167 but not calmodulin-binding-defective mutants. A subset of mammalian N-BAR domains bound calmodulin, and co-expression of calmodulin with endophilin A2 potentiated tubulation in vivo. These studies reveal a conserved role for calmodulin in regulating the intrinsic membrane-sculpting activity of endocytic N-BAR domains. PMID:27093085

  10. Separation and characterization of late endosomal membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Toshihide; Beuchat, Marie-Hélène; Chevallier, Julien; Makino, Asami; Mayran, Nathalie; Escola, Jean-Michel; Lebrand, Cecile; Cosson, Pierre; Kobayashi, Tetsuyuki; Gruenberg, Jean

    2002-08-30

    Very little is known about the biophysical properties and the lipid or protein composition of membrane domains presumably present in endocytic and biosynthetic organelles. Here we analyzed the membrane composition of late endosomes by suborganellar fractionation in the absence of detergent. We found that the internal membranes of this multivesicular organelle can be separated from the limiting membrane and that each membrane population exhibited a defined composition. Our data also indicated that internal membranes may consist of at least two populations, containing primarily phosphatidylcholine or lysobisphosphatidic acid as major phospholipid, arguing for the existence of significant microheterogeneity within late endosomal membranes. We also found that lysobisphosphatidic acid exhibited unique pH-dependent fusogenic properties, and we speculated that this lipid is an ideal candidate to regulate the dynamic properties of this internal membrane mosaic. PMID:12065580

  11. SH4-domain-induced plasma membrane dynamization promotes bleb-associated cell motility.

    PubMed

    Tournaviti, Stella; Hannemann, Sebastian; Terjung, Stefan; Kitzing, Thomas M; Stegmayer, Carolin; Ritzerfeld, Julia; Walther, Paul; Grosse, Robert; Nickel, Walter; Fackler, Oliver T

    2007-11-01

    SH4 domains provide bipartite membrane-targeting signals for oncogenic Src family kinases. Here we report the induction of non-apoptotic plasma membrane (PM) blebbing as a novel and conserved activity of SH4 domains derived from the prototypic Src kinases Src, Fyn, Yes and Lck as well as the HASPB protein of Leishmania parasites. SH4-domain-induced blebbing is highly dynamic, with bleb formation and collapse displaying distinct kinetics. These reorganizations of the PM are controlled by Rho but not Rac or Cdc42 GTPase signalling pathways. SH4-induced membrane blebbing requires the membrane association of the SH4 domain, is regulated by the activities of Rock kinase and myosin II ATPase, and depends on the integrity of F-actin as well as microtubules. Endogenous Src kinase activity is crucial for PM blebbing in SH4-domain-expressing cells, active Src and Rock kinases are enriched in SH4-domain-induced PM blebs, and PM blebbing correlates with enhanced cell invasion in 3D matrices. These results establish a novel link between SH4 domains, Src activity and Rho signalling, and implicate SH4-domain-mediated PM dynamization as a mechanism that influences invasiveness of cells transformed by SH4-domain-containing oncoproteins. PMID:17959630

  12. A PH domain in ACAP1 possesses key features of the BAR domain in promoting membrane curvature.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiaoyun; Fan, Jun; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Kai; Gao, Bingquan; Ma, Jun; Li, Jian; Deng, Yuchen; Zhou, Qiangjun; Egelman, Edward H; Hsu, Victor W; Sun, Fei

    2014-10-13

    The BAR (Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs) domain undergoes dimerization to produce a curved protein structure, which superimposes onto membrane through electrostatic interactions to sense and impart membrane curvature. In some cases, a BAR domain also possesses an amphipathic helix that inserts into the membrane to induce curvature. ACAP1 (Arfgap with Coil coil, Ankyrin repeat, and PH domain protein 1) contains a BAR domain. Here, we show that this BAR domain can neither bind membrane nor impart curvature, but instead requires a neighboring PH (Pleckstrin Homology) domain to achieve these functions. Specific residues within the PH domain are responsible for both membrane binding and curvature generation. The BAR domain adjacent to the PH domain instead interacts with the BAR domains of neighboring ACAP1 proteins to enable clustering at the membrane. Thus, we have uncovered the molecular basis for an unexpected and unconventional collaboration between PH and BAR domains in membrane bending. PMID:25284369

  13. The Observation of Highly Ordered Domains in Membranes with Cholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Clare L; Marquardt, Drew; Dies, Hannah; Kucerka, Norbert; Yamani, Zahra; Harroun, Thad; Katsaras, John; Shi, A-C; Rheinstadter, Maikel C

    2013-01-01

    Rafts, or functional domains, are transient nano- or mesoscopic structures in the exoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane, and are thought to be essential for many cellular processes. Using neutron diffraction and computer modelling, we present evidence for the existence of highly ordered lipid domains in the cholesterol-rich (32.5 mol%) liquid-ordered (lo) phase of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine membranes. The liquid ordered phase in one-component lipid membranes has previously been thought to be a homogeneous phase. The presence of highly ordered lipid domains embedded in a disordered lipid matrix implies non-uniform distribution of cholesterol between the two phases. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with recent computer simulations of DPPC/cholesterol complexes [Meinhardt, Vink and Schmid (2013). Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 110(12): 4476 4481], which reported the existence of nanometer size lo domains in a liquid disordered lipid environment.

  14. The Observation of Highly Ordered Domains in Membranes with Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Clare L.; Marquardt, Drew; Dies, Hannah; Kučerka, Norbert; Yamani, Zahra; Harroun, Thad A.; Katsaras, John; Shi, An-Chang; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.

    2013-01-01

    Rafts, or functional domains, are transient nano- or mesoscopic structures in the exoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane, and are thought to be essential for many cellular processes. Using neutron diffraction and computer modelling, we present evidence for the existence of highly ordered lipid domains in the cholesterol-rich (32.5 mol%) liquid-ordered () phase of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine membranes. The liquid ordered phase in one-component lipid membranes has previously been thought to be a homogeneous phase. The presence of highly ordered lipid domains embedded in a disordered lipid matrix implies non-uniform distribution of cholesterol between the two phases. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with recent computer simulations of DPPC/cholesterol complexes [Meinhardt, Vink and Schmid (2013). Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 110(12): 4476–4481], which reported the existence of nanometer size domains in a liquid disordered lipid environment. PMID:23823623

  15. Random pinning limits the size of membrane adhesion domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speck, Thomas; Vink, Richard L. C.

    2012-09-01

    Theoretical models describing specific adhesion of membranes predict (for certain parameters) a macroscopic phase separation of bonds into adhesion domains. We show that this behavior is fundamentally altered if the membrane is pinned randomly due to, e.g., proteins that anchor the membrane to the cytoskeleton. Perturbations which locally restrict membrane height fluctuations induce quenched disorder of the random-field type. This rigorously prevents the formation of macroscopic adhesion domains following the Imry-Ma argument [Imry and Ma, Phys. Rev. Lett.10.1103/PhysRevLett.35.1399 35, 1399 (1975)]. Our prediction of random-field disorder follows from analytical calculations and is strikingly confirmed in large-scale Monte Carlo simulations. These simulations are based on an efficient composite Monte Carlo move, whereby membrane height and bond degrees of freedom are updated simultaneously in a single move. The application of this move should prove rewarding for other systems also.

  16. Synaptotagmin-1 C2B domain interacts simultaneously with SNAREs and membranes to promote membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shen; Li, Yun; Ma, Cong

    2016-01-01

    Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) acts as a Ca(2+) sensor for neurotransmitter release through its C2 domains. It has been proposed that Syt1 promotes SNARE-dependent fusion mainly through its C2B domain, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, we show that the C2B domain interacts simultaneously with acidic membranes and SNARE complexes via the top Ca(2+)-binding loops, the side polybasic patch, and the bottom face in response to Ca(2+). Disruption of the simultaneous interactions completely abrogates the triggering activity of the C2B domain in liposome fusion. We hypothesize that the simultaneous interactions endow the C2B domain with an ability to deform local membranes, and this membrane-deformation activity might underlie the functional significance of the Syt1 C2B domain in vivo. PMID:27083046

  17. Synaptotagmin-1 C2B domain interacts simultaneously with SNAREs and membranes to promote membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shen; Li, Yun; Ma, Cong

    2016-01-01

    Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) acts as a Ca2+ sensor for neurotransmitter release through its C2 domains. It has been proposed that Syt1 promotes SNARE-dependent fusion mainly through its C2B domain, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, we show that the C2B domain interacts simultaneously with acidic membranes and SNARE complexes via the top Ca2+-binding loops, the side polybasic patch, and the bottom face in response to Ca2+. Disruption of the simultaneous interactions completely abrogates the triggering activity of the C2B domain in liposome fusion. We hypothesize that the simultaneous interactions endow the C2B domain with an ability to deform local membranes, and this membrane-deformation activity might underlie the functional significance of the Syt1 C2B domain in vivo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14211.001 PMID:27083046

  18. Efficient integration method for fictitious domain approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duczek, Sascha; Gabbert, Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    In the current article, we present an efficient and accurate numerical method for the integration of the system matrices in fictitious domain approaches such as the finite cell method (FCM). In the framework of the FCM, the physical domain is embedded in a geometrically larger domain of simple shape which is discretized using a regular Cartesian grid of cells. Therefore, a spacetree-based adaptive quadrature technique is normally deployed to resolve the geometry of the structure. Depending on the complexity of the structure under investigation this method accounts for most of the computational effort. To reduce the computational costs for computing the system matrices an efficient quadrature scheme based on the divergence theorem (Gauß-Ostrogradsky theorem) is proposed. Using this theorem the dimension of the integral is reduced by one, i.e. instead of solving the integral for the whole domain only its contour needs to be considered. In the current paper, we present the general principles of the integration method and its implementation. The results to several two-dimensional benchmark problems highlight its properties. The efficiency of the proposed method is compared to conventional spacetree-based integration techniques.

  19. Kinetics of Domains Registration in Multicomponent Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Sornbundit, Kan; Modchang, Charin; Triampo, Wannapong; Triampo, Darapond; Nuttavut, Narin; Sunil Kumar, P.B; Laradji, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    The kinetics of registration of lipid domains in the apposing leaflets of symmetric bilayer membranes is investigated via systematic dissipative particle dynamics simulations. The decay of the distance between the centres of mass of the domains in the apposing leaflets is almost linear during early stages, and then becomes exponential during late times. The time scales of both linear and exponential decays are found to increase with decreasing the strength of interleaflet coupling. The ratio between the time scales of the exponential and linear regimes decreases with increasing the domain size, implying that the decay of the distance between the domains centres of mass is essentially linear for large domains. These numerical results are largely in agreement with the recent theoretical predictions of Han and Haataja [Soft Matter (2013) 9:2120-2124]. We also found that the domains become elongated during the registration process. PMID:25090030

  20. Domain Organization of Membrane-Bound Factor VIII

    PubMed Central

    Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla; Lynch, Gillian C.; Ludtke, Steven; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2014-01-01

    Factor VIII (FVIII) is the blood coagulation protein which when defective or deficient causes for hemophilia A, a severe hereditary bleeding disorder. Activated FVIII (FVIIIa) is the cofactor to the serine protease factor IXa (FIXa) within the membrane-bound Tenase complex, responsible for amplifying its proteolytic activity more than 100,000 times, necessary for normal clot formation. FVIII is composed of two noncovalently linked peptide chains: a light chain (LC) holding the membrane interaction sites and a heavy chain (HC) holding the main FIXa interaction sites. The interplay between the light and heavy chains (HCs) in the membrane-bound state is critical for the biological efficiency of FVIII. Here, we present our cryo-electron microscopy (EM) and structure analysis studies of human FVIII-LC, when helically assembled onto negatively charged single lipid bilayer nanotubes. The resolved FVIII-LC membrane-bound structure supports aspects of our previously proposed FVIII structure from membrane-bound two-dimensional (2D) crystals, such as only the C2 domain interacts directly with the membrane. The LC is oriented differently in the FVIII membrane-bound helical and 2D crystal structures based on EM data, and the existing X-ray structures. This flexibility of the FVIII-LC domain organization in different states is discussed in the light of the FVIIIa-FIXa complex assembly and function. PMID:23616213

  1. VAMP-1: a synaptic vesicle-associated integral membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Trimble, W S; Cowan, D M; Scheller, R H

    1988-06-01

    Several proteins are associated with, or are integral components of, the lipid bilayer that forms the delineating membrane of neuronal synaptic vesicles. To characterize these molecules, we used a polyclonal antiserum raised against purified cholinergic synaptic vesicles from Torpedo to screen a cDNA expression library constructed from mRNA of the electromotor nucleus. One clone encodes VAMP-1 (vesicle-associated membrane protein 1), a nervous-system-specific protein of 120 amino acids whose primary sequence can be divided into three domains: a proline-rich amino terminus, a highly charged internal region, and a hydrophobic carboxyl-terminal domain that is predicted to comprise a membrane anchor. Tryptic digestion of intact and lysed vesicles suggests that the protein faces the cytoplasm, where it may play a role in packaging, transport, or release of neurotransmitters. PMID:3380805

  2. Kinetics of enzymatic reactions in lipid membranes containing domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.; Höök, Fredrik

    2015-04-01

    An appreciable part of enzymes operating in vivo is associated with lipid membranes. The function of such enzymes can be influenced by the presence of domains containing proteins and/or composed of different lipids. The corresponding experimental model-system studies can be performed under well controlled conditions, e.g., on a planar supported lipid bilayer or surface-immobilized vesicles. To clarify what may happen in such systems, we propose general kinetic equations describing the enzyme-catalyzed substrate conversion occurring via the Michaelis-Menten (MM) mechanism on a membrane with domains which do not directly participate in reaction. For two generic situations when a relatively slow reaction takes place primarily in or outside domains, we take substrate saturation and lateral substrate-substrate interactions at domains into account and scrutinize the dependence of the reaction rate on the average substrate coverage. With increasing coverage, depending on the details, the reaction rate reaches saturation via an inflection point or monotonously as in the conventional MM case. In addition, we show analytically the types of reaction kinetics occurring primarily at domain boundaries. In the physically interesting situation when the domain growth is fast on the reaction time scale, the latter kinetics are far from conventional. The opposite situation when the reaction is fast and controlled by diffusion has been studied by using the Monte Carlo technique. The corresponding results indicate that the dependence of the reaction kinetics on the domain size may be weak.

  3. Structure of the membrane domain of respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Efremov, Rouslan G; Sazanov, Leonid A

    2011-08-25

    Complex I is the first and largest enzyme of the respiratory chain, coupling electron transfer between NADH and ubiquinone to the translocation of four protons across the membrane. It has a central role in cellular energy production and has been implicated in many human neurodegenerative diseases. The L-shaped enzyme consists of hydrophilic and membrane domains. Previously, we determined the structure of the hydrophilic domain. Here we report the crystal structure of the Esherichia coli complex I membrane domain at 3.0 Å resolution. It includes six subunits, NuoL, NuoM, NuoN, NuoA, NuoJ and NuoK, with 55 transmembrane helices. The fold of the homologous antiporter-like subunits L, M and N is novel, with two inverted structural repeats of five transmembrane helices arranged, unusually, face-to-back. Each repeat includes a discontinuous transmembrane helix and forms half of a channel across the membrane. A network of conserved polar residues connects the two half-channels, completing the proton translocation pathway. Unexpectedly, lysines rather than carboxylate residues act as the main elements of the proton pump in these subunits. The fourth probable proton-translocation channel is at the interface of subunits N, K, J and A. The structure indicates that proton translocation in complex I, uniquely, involves coordinated conformational changes in six symmetrical structural elements. PMID:21822288

  4. Adaptive Lipid Packing and Bioactivity in Membrane Domains

    PubMed Central

    Sezgin, Erdinc; Gutmann, Theresia; Buhl, Tomasz; Dirkx, Ron; Grzybek, Michal; Coskun, Ünal; Solimena, Michele; Simons, Kai; Levental, Ilya; Schwille, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Lateral compositional and physicochemical heterogeneity is a ubiquitous feature of cellular membranes on various length scales, from molecular assemblies to micrometric domains. Segregated lipid domains of increased local order, referred to as rafts, are believed to be prominent features in eukaryotic plasma membranes; however, their exact nature (i.e. size, lifetime, composition, homogeneity) in live cells remains difficult to define. Here we present evidence that both synthetic and natural plasma membranes assume a wide range of lipid packing states with varying levels of molecular order. These states may be adapted and specifically tuned by cells during active cellular processes, as we show for stimulated insulin secretion. Most importantly, these states regulate both the partitioning of molecules between coexisting domains and the bioactivity of their constituent molecules, which we demonstrate for the ligand binding activity of the glycosphingolipid receptor GM1. These results confirm the complexity and flexibility of lipid-mediated membrane organization and reveal mechanisms by which this flexibility could be functionalized by cells. PMID:25905447

  5. Designing lipids for selective partitioning into liquid ordered membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Momin, Noor; Lee, Stacey; Gadok, Avinash K; Busch, David J; Bachand, George D; Hayden, Carl C; Stachowiak, Jeanne C; Sasaki, Darryl Y

    2015-04-28

    Self-organization of lipid molecules into specific membrane phases is key to the development of hierarchical molecular assemblies that mimic cellular structures. While the packing interaction of the lipid tails should provide the major driving force to direct lipid partitioning to ordered or disordered membrane domains, numerous examples show that the headgroup and spacer play important but undefined roles. We report here the development of several new biotinylated lipids that examine the role of spacer chemistry and structure on membrane phase partitioning. The new lipids were prepared with varying lengths of low molecular weight polyethylene glycol (EGn) spacers to examine how spacer hydrophilicity and length influence their partitioning behavior following binding with FITC-labeled streptavidin in liquid ordered (Lo) and liquid disordered (Ld) phase coexisting membranes. Partitioning coefficients (Kp Lo/Ld) of the biotinylated lipids were determined using fluorescence measurements in studies with giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). Compared against DPPE-biotin, DPPE-cap-biotin, and DSPE-PEG2000-biotin lipids, the new dipalmityl-EGn-biotin lipids exhibited markedly enhanced partitioning into liquid ordered domains, achieving Kp of up to 7.3 with a decaethylene glycol spacer (DP-EG10-biotin). We further demonstrated biological relevance of the lipids with selective partitioning to lipid raft-like domains observed in giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) derived from mammalian cells. Our results found that the spacer group not only plays a pivotal role for designing lipids with phase selectivity but may also influence the structural order of the domain assemblies. PMID:25772372

  6. Spatially distinct and metabolically active membrane domain in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Jennifer M; Luo, Chu-Yuan; Mayfield, Jacob A; Hsu, Tsungda; Fukuda, Takeshi; Walfield, Andrew L; Giffen, Samantha R; Leszyk, John D; Baer, Christina E; Bennion, Owen T; Madduri, Ashoka; Shaffer, Scott A; Aldridge, Bree B; Sassetti, Christopher M; Sandler, Steven J; Kinoshita, Taroh; Moody, D Branch; Morita, Yasu S

    2016-05-10

    Protected from host immune attack and antibiotic penetration by their unique cell envelope, mycobacterial pathogens cause devastating human diseases such as tuberculosis. Seamless coordination of cell growth with cell envelope elongation at the pole maintains this barrier. Unraveling this spatiotemporal regulation is a potential strategy for controlling mycobacterial infections. Our biochemical analysis previously revealed two functionally distinct membrane fractions in Mycobacterium smegmatis cell lysates: plasma membrane tightly associated with the cell wall (PM-CW) and a distinct fraction of pure membrane free of cell wall components (PMf). To provide further insight into the functions of these membrane fractions, we took the approach of comparative proteomics and identified more than 300 proteins specifically associated with the PMf, including essential enzymes involved in cell envelope synthesis such as a mannosyltransferase, Ppm1, and a galactosyltransferase, GlfT2. Furthermore, comparative lipidomics revealed the distinct lipid composition of the PMf, with specific association of key cell envelope biosynthetic precursors. Live-imaging fluorescence microscopy visualized the PMf as patches of membrane spatially distinct from the PM-CW and notably enriched in the pole of the growing cells. Taken together, our study provides the basis for assigning the PMf as a spatiotemporally distinct and metabolically active membrane domain involved in cell envelope biogenesis. PMID:27114527

  7. Transmembrane helices can induce domain formation in crowded model membranes.

    PubMed

    Domański, Jan; Marrink, Siewert J; Schäfer, Lars V

    2012-04-01

    We studied compositionally heterogeneous multi-component model membranes comprised of saturated lipids, unsaturated lipids, cholesterol, and α-helical TM protein models using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. Reducing the mismatch between the length of the saturated and unsaturated lipid tails reduced the driving force for segregation into liquid-ordered (l(o)) and liquid-disordered (l(d)) lipid domains. Cholesterol depletion had a similar effect, and binary lipid mixtures without cholesterol did not undergo large-scale phase separation under the simulation conditions. The phase-separating ternary dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/dilinoleoyl-PC (DLiPC)/cholesterol bilayer was found to segregate into l(o) and l(d) domains also in the presence of a high concentration of ΤΜ helices. The l(d) domain was highly crowded with TM helices (protein-to-lipid ratio ~1:5), slowing down lateral diffusion by a factor of 5-10 as compared to the dilute case, with anomalous (sub)-diffusion on the μs time scale. The membrane with the less strongly unsaturated palmitoyl-linoleoyl-PC instead of DLiPC, which in the absence of TM α-helices less strongly deviated from ideal mixing, could be brought closer to a miscibility critical point by introducing a high concentration of TM helices. Finally, the 7-TM protein bacteriorhodopsin was found to partition into the l(d) domains irrespective of hydrophobic matching. These results show that it is possible to directly study the lateral reorganization of lipids and proteins in compositionally heterogeneous and crowded model biomembranes with coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, a step toward simulations of realistic, compositionally complex cellular membranes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Folding in Membranes. PMID:21884678

  8. Domain formation in membranes caused by lipid wetting of protein.

    PubMed

    Akimov, Sergey A; Frolov, Vladimir A J; Kuzmin, Peter I; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Chizmadzhev, Yuri A; Cohen, Fredric S

    2008-05-01

    Formation of rafts and other domains in cell membranes is considered as wetting of proteins by lipids. The membrane is modeled as a continuous elastic medium. Thermodynamic functions of the lipid films that wet proteins are calculated using a mean-field theory of liquid crystals as adapted to biomembranes. This approach yields the conditions necessary for a macroscopic wetting film to form; its thickness could also be determined. It is shown that films of macroscopic thicknesses form around large (tens nanometers in diameter) lipid-protein aggregates; only thin adsorption films form around single proteins or small complexes. The means by which wetting films can facilitate the merger of these aggregates is considered. It is shown that a wetting film prevents a protein from leaving an aggregate. Using experimentally derived values of elastic moduli and spontaneous curvatures as well as height mismatch between aggregates and bulk membrane, we obtained numerical results, which can be compared with the experimental data. PMID:18643096

  9. Thermodynamics of Membrane Insertion and Refolding of the Diphtheria Toxin T-Domain.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Uribe, Mauricio; Rodnin, Mykola V; Öjemalm, Karin; Holgado, Aurora; Kyrychenko, Alexander; Nilsson, IngMarie; Posokhov, Yevgen O; Makhatadze, George; von Heijne, Gunnar; Ladokhin, Alexey S

    2015-06-01

    The diphtheria toxin translocation (T) domain inserts into the endosomal membrane in response to the endosomal acidification and enables the delivery of the catalytic domain into the cell. The insertion pathway consists of a series of conformational changes that occur in solution and in the membrane and leads to the conversion of a water-soluble state into a transmembrane state. In this work, we utilize various biophysical techniques to characterize the insertion pathway from the thermodynamic perspective. Thermal and chemical unfolding measured by differential scanning calorimetry, circular dichroism, and tryptophan fluorescence reveal that the free energy of unfolding of the T-domain at neutral and mildly acidic pH differ by 3-5 kcal/mol, depending on the experimental conditions. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements show that the free energy change from the membrane-competent state to the interfacial state is approximately -8 kcal/mol and is pH-independent, while that from the membrane-competent state to the transmembrane state ranges between -9.5 and -12 kcal/mol, depending on the membrane lipid composition and pH. Finally, the thermodynamics of transmembrane insertion of individual helices was tested using an in vitro assay that measures the translocon-assisted integration of test sequences into the microsomal membrane. These experiments suggest that even the most hydrophobic helix TH8 has only a small favorable free energy of insertion. The free energy for the insertion of the consensus insertion unit TH8-TH9 is slightly more favorable, yet less favorable than that measured for the entire protein, suggesting a cooperative effect for the membrane insertion of the helices of the T-domain. PMID:25281329

  10. Layilin, a Novel Integral Membrane Protein, Is a Hyaluronan Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bono, Petri; Rubin, Kristofer; Higgins, Jonathan M. G.; Hynes, Richard O.

    2001-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton plays a significant role in changes of cell shape and motility, and interactions between the actin filaments and the cell membrane are crucial for a variety of cellular processes. Several adaptor proteins, including talin, maintain the cytoskeleton-membrane linkage by binding to integral membrane proteins and to the cytoskeleton. Layilin, a recently characterized transmembrane protein with homology to C-type lectins, is a membrane-binding site for talin in peripheral ruffles of spreading cells. To facilitate studies of layilin's function, we have generated a layilin-Fc fusion protein comprising the extracellular part of layilin joined to human immunoglobulin G heavy chain and used this chimera to identify layilin ligands. Here, we demonstrate that layilin-Fc fusion protein binds to hyaluronan immobilized to Sepharose. Microtiter plate-binding assays, coprecipitation experiments, and staining of sections predigested with different glycosaminoglycan-degrading enzymes and cell adhesion assays all revealed that layilin binds specifically to hyaluronan but not to other tested glycosaminoglycans. Layilin's ability to bind hyaluronan, a ubiquitous extracellular matrix component, reveals an interesting parallel between layilin and CD44, because both can bind to cytoskeleton-membrane linker proteins through their cytoplasmic domains and to hyaluronan through their extracellular domains. This parallelism suggests a role for layilin in cell adhesion and motility. PMID:11294894

  11. Functional and Evolutionary Analysis of the CASPARIAN STRIP MEMBRANE DOMAIN PROTEIN Family1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Roppolo, Daniele; Boeckmann, Brigitte; Pfister, Alexandre; Boutet, Emmanuel; Rubio, Maria C.; Dénervaud-Tendon, Valérie; Vermeer, Joop E.M.; Gheyselinck, Jacqueline; Xenarios, Ioannis; Geldner, Niko

    2014-01-01

    CASPARIAN STRIP MEMBRANE DOMAIN PROTEINS (CASPs) are four-membrane-span proteins that mediate the deposition of Casparian strips in the endodermis by recruiting the lignin polymerization machinery. CASPs show high stability in their membrane domain, which presents all the hallmarks of a membrane scaffold. Here, we characterized the large family of CASP-like (CASPL) proteins. CASPLs were found in all major divisions of land plants as well as in green algae; homologs outside of the plant kingdom were identified as members of the MARVEL protein family. When ectopically expressed in the endodermis, most CASPLs were able to integrate the CASP membrane domain, which suggests that CASPLs share with CASPs the propensity to form transmembrane scaffolds. Extracellular loops are not necessary for generating the scaffold, since CASP1 was still able to localize correctly when either one of the extracellular loops was deleted. The CASP first extracellular loop was found conserved in euphyllophytes but absent in plants lacking Casparian strips, an observation that may contribute to the study of Casparian strip and root evolution. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), CASPL showed specific expression in a variety of cell types, such as trichomes, abscission zone cells, peripheral root cap cells, and xylem pole pericycle cells. PMID:24920445

  12. Endogenous sphingomyelin segregates into submicrometric domains in the living erythrocyte membrane[S

    PubMed Central

    Carquin, Mélanie; Pollet, Hélène; Veiga-da-Cunha, Maria; Cominelli, Antoine; Van Der Smissen, Patrick; N’kuli, Francisca; Emonard, Hervé; Henriet, Patrick; Mizuno, Hideaki; Courtoy, Pierre J.; Tyteca, Donatienne

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported that trace insertion of exogenous fluorescent (green BODIPY) analogs of sphingomyelin (SM) into living red blood cells (RBCs), partially spread onto coverslips, labels submicrometric domains, visible by confocal microscopy. We here extend this feature to endogenous SM, upon binding of a SM-specific nontoxic (NT) fragment of the earthworm toxin, lysenin, fused to the red monomeric fluorescent protein, mCherry [construct named His-mCherry-NT-lysenin (lysenin*)]. Specificity of lysenin* binding was verified with composition-defined liposomes and by loss of 125I-lysenin* binding to erythrocytes upon SM depletion by SMase. The 125I-lysenin* binding isotherm indicated saturation at 3.5 × 106 molecules/RBC, i.e., ∼3% of SM coverage. Nonsaturating lysenin* concentration also labeled sub­micrometric domains on the plasma membrane of partially spread erythrocytes, colocalizing with inserted green BODIPY-SM, and abrogated by SMase. Lysenin*-labeled domains were stable in time and space and were regulated by temperature and cholesterol. The abundance, size, positioning, and segregation of lysenin*-labeled domains from other lipids (BODIPY-phosphatidylcholine or -glycosphingolipids) depended on membrane tension. Similar lysenin*-labeled domains were evidenced in RBCs gently suspended in 3D-gel. Taken together, these data demonstrate submicrometric compartmentation of endogenous SM at the membrane of a living cell in vitro, and suggest it may be a genuine feature of erythrocytes in vivo. PMID:24826836

  13. Sterol-Rich Membrane Domains Define Fission Yeast Cell Polarity.

    PubMed

    Makushok, Tatyana; Alves, Paulo; Huisman, Stephen Michiel; Kijowski, Adam Rafal; Brunner, Damian

    2016-05-19

    Cell polarization is crucial for the functioning of all organisms. The cytoskeleton is central to the process but its role in symmetry breaking is poorly understood. We study cell polarization when fission yeast cells exit starvation. We show that the basis of polarity generation is de novo sterol biosynthesis, cell surface delivery of sterols, and their recruitment to the cell poles. This involves four phases occurring independent of the polarity factor cdc42p. Initially, multiple, randomly distributed sterol-rich membrane (SRM) domains form at the plasma membrane, independent of the cytoskeleton and cell growth. These domains provide platforms on which the growth and polarity machinery assembles. SRM domains are then polarized by the microtubule-dependent polarity factor tea1p, which prepares for monopolar growth initiation and later switching to bipolar growth. SRM polarization requires F-actin but not the F-actin organizing polarity factors for3p and bud6p. We conclude that SRMs are key to cell polarization. PMID:27180904

  14. Integrated Ceramic Membrane System for Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Joseph; Lim, Hankwon; Drnevich, Raymond

    2010-08-05

    Phase I was a technoeconomic feasibility study that defined the process scheme for the integrated ceramic membrane system for hydrogen production and determined the plan for Phase II. The hydrogen production system is comprised of an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) and a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM). Two process options were evaluated: 1) Integrated OTM-HTM reactor – in this configuration, the HTM was a ceramic proton conductor operating at temperatures up to 900°C, and 2) Sequential OTM and HTM reactors – in this configuration, the HTM was assumed to be a Pd alloy operating at less than 600°C. The analysis suggested that there are no technical issues related to either system that cannot be managed. The process with the sequential reactors was found to be more efficient, less expensive, and more likely to be commercialized in a shorter time than the single reactor. Therefore, Phase II focused on the sequential reactor system, specifically, the second stage, or the HTM portion. Work on the OTM portion was conducted in a separate program. Phase IIA began in February 2003. Candidate substrate materials and alloys were identified and porous ceramic tubes were produced and coated with Pd. Much effort was made to develop porous substrates with reasonable pore sizes suitable for Pd alloy coating. The second generation of tubes showed some improvement in pore size control, but this was not enough to get a viable membrane. Further improvements were made to the porous ceramic tube manufacturing process. When a support tube was successfully coated, the membrane was tested to determine the hydrogen flux. The results from all these tests were used to update the technoeconomic analysis from Phase I to confirm that the sequential membrane reactor system can potentially be a low-cost hydrogen supply option when using an existing membrane on a larger scale. Phase IIB began in October 2004 and focused on demonstrating an integrated HTM/water gas shift (WGS) reactor to

  15. Dendritic Domains with Hexagonal Symmetry Formed by X-Shaped Bolapolyphiles in Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Stefan; Ebert, Helgard; Lechner, Bob-Dan; Lange, Frank; Achilles, Anja; Bärenwald, Ruth; Poppe, Silvio; Blume, Alfred; Saalwächter, Kay; Tschierske, Carsten; Bacia, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    A novel class of bolapolyphile (BP) molecules are shown to integrate into phospholipid bilayers and self-assemble into unique sixfold symmetric domains of snowflake-like dendritic shapes. The BPs comprise three philicities: a lipophilic, rigid, π–π stacking core; two flexible lipophilic side chains; and two hydrophilic, hydrogen-bonding head groups. Confocal microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, XRD, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy confirm BP-rich domains with transmembrane-oriented BPs and three to four lipid molecules per BP. Both species remain well organized even above the main 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine transition. The BP molecules only dissolve in the fluid membrane above 70 °C. Structural variations of the BP demonstrate that head-group hydrogen bonding is a prerequisite for domain formation. Independent of the head group, the BPs reduce membrane corrugation. In conclusion, the BPs form nanofilaments by π stacking of aromatic cores, which reduce membrane corrugation and possibly fuse into a hexagonal network in the dendritic domains. PMID:25940233

  16. Role of tetanus neurotoxin insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein in membrane domains transport and homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Molino, Diana; Nola, Sébastien; Lam, Sin Man; Verraes, Agathe; Proux-Gillardeaux, Véronique; Boncompain, Gaëlle; Perez, Franck; Wenk, Markus; Shui, Guanghou; Danglot, Lydia; Galli, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Biological membranes in eukaryotes contain a large variety of proteins and lipids often distributed in domains in plasma membrane and endomembranes. Molecular mechanisms responsible for the transport and the organization of these membrane domains along the secretory pathway still remain elusive. Here we show that vesicular SNARE TI-VAMP/VAMP7 plays a major role in membrane domains composition and transport. We found that the transport of exogenous and endogenous GPI-anchored proteins was altered in fibroblasts isolated from VAMP7-knockout mice. Furthermore, disassembly and reformation of the Golgi apparatus induced by Brefeldin A treatment and washout were impaired in VAMP7-depleted cells, suggesting that loss of VAMP7 expression alters biochemical properties and dynamics of the Golgi apparatus. In addition, lipid profiles from these knockout cells indicated a defect in glycosphingolipids homeostasis. We conclude that VAMP7 is required for effective transport of GPI–anchored proteins to cell surface and that VAMP7-dependent transport contributes to both sphingolipids and Golgi homeostasis. PMID:26196023

  17. Formation of functional cell membrane domains: the interplay of lipid- and protein-mediated interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Harder, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Numerous cell membrane associated processes, including signal transduction, membrane sorting, protein processing and virus trafficking take place in membrane subdomains. Protein-protein interactions provide the frameworks necessary to generate biologically functional membrane domains. For example, coat proteins define membrane areas destined for sorting processes, viral proteins self-assemble to generate a budding virus, and adapter molecules organize multimolecular signalling assemblies, which catalyse downstream reactions. The concept of raft lipid-based membrane domains provides a different principle for compartmentalization and segregation of membrane constituents. Accordingly, rafts are defined by the physical properties of the lipid bilayer and function by selective partitioning of membrane lipids and proteins into membrane domains of specific phase behaviour and lipid packing. Here, I will discuss the interplay of these independent principles of protein scaffolds and raft lipid microdomains leading to the generation of biologically functional membrane domains. PMID:12803918

  18. Influenza M2 Transmembrane Domain Senses Membrane Heterogeneity and Enhances Membrane Curvature.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chian Sing; Khadka, Nawal K; She, Fengyu; Cai, Jianfeng; Pan, Jianjun

    2016-07-01

    Targeting host cell membranes by M2 of influenza A virus is important for virus invasion and replication. We study the transmembrane domain of M2 (M2TM) interacting with mica-supported planar bilayers and free-standing giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). Using solution atomic force microscopy (AFM), we show that the size of M2TM oligomers is dependent on lipid composition. The addition of M2TM to lipid bilayers containing liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered (Ld) phases reveals that M2TM preferentially partitions into the Ld phase; phase-dependent partitioning results in a larger rigidity of the Ld phase. We next use fluorescence microscopy to study the effects of M2TM on phase-coexisting GUVs. In particular, M2TM is found to increase GUVs' miscibility transition temperature Tmix. The augmented thermodynamic stability can be accounted for by considering an enhanced energy barrier of lipid mixing between coexisting phases. Our GUV study also shows that M2TM can elicit an array of vesicle shapes mimicking virus budding. M2TM enhanced membrane curvature is consistent with our AFM data, which show altered membrane rigidity and consequently line tension at domain edges. Together, our results highlight that in addition to conducting protons, M2TM can actively regulate membrane heterogeneity and augment membrane curvature. PMID:27285399

  19. Arabidopsis synaptotagmin 1 is required for the maintenance of plasma membrane integrity and cell viability.

    PubMed

    Schapire, Arnaldo L; Voigt, Boris; Jasik, Jan; Rosado, Abel; Lopez-Cobollo, Rosa; Menzel, Diedrik; Salinas, Julio; Mancuso, Stefano; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Baluska, Frantisek; Botella, Miguel A

    2008-12-01

    Plasma membrane repair in animal cells uses synaptotagmin 7, a Ca(2+)-activated membrane fusion protein that mediates delivery of intracellular membranes to wound sites by a mechanism resembling neuronal Ca(2+)-regulated exocytosis. Here, we show that loss of function of the homologous Arabidopsis thaliana Synaptotagmin 1 protein (SYT1) reduces the viability of cells as a consequence of a decrease in the integrity of the plasma membrane. This reduced integrity is enhanced in the syt1-2 null mutant in conditions of osmotic stress likely caused by a defective plasma membrane repair. Consistent with a role in plasma membrane repair, SYT1 is ubiquitously expressed, is located at the plasma membrane, and shares all domains characteristic of animal synaptotagmins (i.e., an N terminus-transmembrane domain and a cytoplasmic region containing two C2 domains with phospholipid binding activities). Our analyses support that membrane trafficking mediated by SYT1 is important for plasma membrane integrity and plant fitness. PMID:19088329

  20. High Efficiency Solar Integrated Roof Membrane Product

    SciTech Connect

    Partyka, Eric; Shenoy, Anil

    2013-05-15

    This project was designed to address the Solar Energy Technology Program objective, to develop new methods to integrate photovoltaic (PV) cells or modules within a building-integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) application that will result in lower installed cost as well as higher efficiencies of the encapsulated/embedded PV module. The technology assessment and development focused on the evaluation and identification of manufacturing technologies and equipment capable of producing such low-cost, high-efficiency, flexible BIPV solar cells on single-ply roofing membranes.

  1. Assessing equine sperm-membrane integrity.

    PubMed

    Lagares, M A; Petzoldt, R; Sieme, H; Klug, E

    2000-05-01

    The swelling of cells in a hypo-osmotic medium has been described as an important criterion for assessing the functional integrity of the sperm plasma membrane. The resistance of equine spermatozoa to osmolarity changes was studied by extending 98 semen samples collected from nine stallions in media at five osmolarities (300, 200, 150, 100, and 50 mOsmol l(-1)). The response of the cells was measured by the spermatocrit technique and eosin staining. Spermatocrit determines the increase on spermatozoal volume under hypo-osmotic conditions, a sign of functional integrity of sperm plasma membrane, whereas the eosin staining evaluates the viability of spermatozoa. A significant positive correlation (P<0.01) was observed between spermatocrit values and percentage of eosin-unstained cells. Spermatocrit measurements and eosin staining proved to be useful methods to evaluate the integrity of sperm plasma membrane under hypo-osmotic conditions and could be used as an additional criterion to predict semen preservation ability. PMID:10863971

  2. Solution NMR Structure of Membrane-Integral Diacylglycerol Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Van Horn, Wade D.; Kim, Hak-Jun; Ellis, Charles D.; Hadziselimovic, Arina; Sulistijo, Endah S.; Karra, Murthy D.; Tian, Changlin; Sönnichsen, Frank D.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2009-01-01

    Escherichia coli diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) represents a family of integral membrane enzymes that is unrelated to all other phosphotransferases. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of the DAGK homotrimer using solution NMR. The third transmembrane helix from each subunit is domain-swapped with the first and second transmembrane segments from an adjacent subunit. Each of DAGK’s three active sites resembles a portico. The cornice of the portico appears to be the determinant of DAGK’s lipid substrate specificity and overhangs the site of phosphoryl transfer near the water-membrane interface. Mutations to cysteine that caused severe misfolding were located in or near the active site, indicating a high degree of overlap between sites responsible for folding and for catalysis. PMID:19556511

  3. Pinkbar is an epithelial-specific BAR domain protein that generates planar membrane structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pykäläinen, Anette; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Zhao, Hongxia; Saarikangas, Juha; Rebowski, Grzegorz; Jansen, Maurice; Hakanen, Janne; Koskela, Essi V.; Peränen, Johan; Vihinen, Helena; Jokitalo, Eija; Salminen, Marjo; Ikonen, Elina; Dominguez, Roberto; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2013-05-29

    Bin/amphipysin/Rvs (BAR)-domain proteins sculpt cellular membranes and have key roles in processes such as endocytosis, cell motility and morphogenesis. BAR domains are divided into three subfamilies: BAR- and F-BAR-domain proteins generate positive membrane curvature and stabilize cellular invaginations, whereas I-BAR-domain proteins induce negative curvature and stabilize protrusions. We show that a previously uncharacterized member of the I-BAR subfamily, Pinkbar, is specifically expressed in intestinal epithelial cells, where it localizes to Rab13-positive vesicles and to the plasma membrane at intercellular junctions. Notably, the BAR domain of Pinkbar does not induce membrane tubulation but promotes the formation of planar membrane sheets. Structural and mutagenesis analyses reveal that the BAR domain of Pinkbar has a relatively flat lipid-binding interface and that it assembles into sheet-like oligomers in crystals and in solution, which may explain its unique membrane-deforming activity.

  4. Membrane Binding and Self-Association of the Epsin N-Terminal Homology Domain

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chun-Liang; Jao, Christine C.; Lyman, Edward; Gallop, Jennifer L.; Peter, Brian J.; McMahon, Harvey T.; Langen, Ralf; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    Epsin possesses a conserved epsin N-terminal homology (ENTH) domain that acts as a phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate‐lipid‐targeting and membrane‐curvature‐generating element. Upon binding phosphatidylinositol 4,5‐bisphosphate, the N-terminal helix (H0) of the ENTH domain becomes structured and aids in the aggregation of ENTH domains, which results in extensive membrane remodeling. In this article, atomistic and coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to investigate the structure and the stability of ENTH domain aggregates on lipid bilayers. EPR experiments are also reported for systems composed of different ENTH-bound membrane morphologies, including membrane vesicles as well as preformed membrane tubules. The EPR data are used to help develop a molecular model of ENTH domain aggregates on preformed lipid tubules that are then studied by CG MD simulation. The combined computational and experimental approach suggests that ENTH domains exist predominantly as monomers on vesiculated structures, while ENTH domains self-associate into dimeric structures and even higher‐order oligomers on the membrane tubes. The results emphasize that the arrangement of ENTH domain aggregates depends strongly on whether the local membrane curvature is isotropic or anisotropic. The molecular mechanism of ENTH‐domain-induced membrane vesiculation and tubulation and the implications of the epsin's role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis resulting from the interplay between ENTH domain membrane binding and ENTH domain self-association are also discussed. PMID:22922484

  5. Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporation Subsystem operational improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehner, G. F.; Winkler, H. E.; Reysa, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    A three-man preprototype Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporation Subsystem (TIMES) has been developed to provide high quality water recovery from waste fluids on extended duration space flights. In the most recent effort, a number of improvements have been made to simplify subsystem operation and increase performance. These modifications include changes to the hollow fiber membrane evaporator, the condensing section of the thermoelectric heat pump, and the electronic controller logic and display. This paper describes the results of the test program that was conducted to evaluate the implemented improvements. In addition, an advanced design concept is discussed that will provide lower electrical power consumption, greater water production capacity, lower weight, and a smaller package than the present subsystem configuration.

  6. Thermoelectric integrated membrane evaporation water recovery technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebelen, G. J., Jr.; Winkler, H. E.; Dehner, G. F.

    1982-01-01

    The recently developed Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporation Subsystem (TIMES) offers a highly competitive approach to water recovery from waste fluids for future on-orbit stations such as the Space Operations Center. Low power, compactness and gravity insensitive operation are featured in this vacuum distillation subsystem that combines a hollow fiber membrane evaporator with a thermoelectric heat pump. The hollow fiber elements provide positive liquid/gas phase control with no moving parts other than pumps and an accumulator, thus solving problems inherent in other reclamation subsystem designs. In an extensive test program, over 850 hours of operation were accumulated during which time high quality product water was recovered from both urine and wash water at an average steady state production rate of 2.2 pounds per hour.

  7. Physiochemical Properties of Aluminum Adjuvants Elicit Differing Reorganization of Phospholipid Domains in Model Membranes.

    PubMed

    Antúnez, Lorena R; Livingston, Andrea; Berkland, Cory; Dhar, Prajnaparamita

    2016-05-01

    Most vaccines contain aluminum adjuvants; however, their exact mechanism of action remains unclear. A novel mechanism by Shi and colleagues proposes aluminum adjuvants may enhance immune activation by binding and reorganizing lipids that are key components of lipid rafts. To better understand the specificity of interaction between aluminum adjuvants and the cell membrane lipids, we present a biophysical study of lipid domain clustering in simple model phospholipid monolayers containing dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dioleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) exposed to two aluminum adjuvants, Alhydrogel and Adju-Phos. Surface pressure measurements and fluorescence microscopy images verified aluminum adjuvant-induced increase in lipid domain size, even in the key lipid raft components. Additionally, adjuvant induced lipid clustering differed based on the physicochemical properties of the adjuvants. Alhydrogel appeared to reduce monolayer compressibility and insert into the monolayer, while Adju-Phos induced more significant changes in domain size, without compromising the integrity of the monolayer. The Alhydrogel and Adju-Phos-mediated reorganization of phospholipid domains reported here supports the new mechanistic paradigm proposed by Shi and co-workers, and further suggests that lipid clustering is induced even in simple phospholipid membranes. The results present the basis for future exploration into lipid-mediated mechanisms of action for adjuvants. PMID:26998680

  8. The N-Terminal Domain of Bcl-xL Reversibly Binds Membranes in a pH-Dependent Manner†

    PubMed Central

    Thuduppathy, Guruvasuthevan R.; Terrones, Oihana; Craig, Jeffrey W.; Basañez, Gorka; Hill, R. Blake

    2006-01-01

    Bcl-xL regulates apoptosis by maintaining the integrity of the mitochondrial outer membrane by adopting both soluble and membrane-associated forms. The membrane-associated conformation does not require a conserved, C-terminal transmembrane domain and appears to be inserted into the bilayer of synthetic membranes as assessed by membrane permeabilization and critical surface pressure measurements. Membrane association is reversible and is regulated by the cooperative binding of approximately two protons to the protein. Two acidic residues, Glu153 and Asp156, that lie in a conserved hairpin of Bcl-xLΔTM appear to be important in this process on the basis of a 16% increase in the level of membrane association of the double mutant E153Q/D156N. Contrary to that for the wild type, membrane permeabilization for the mutant is not correlated with membrane association. Monolayer surface pressure measurements suggest that this effect is primarily due to less membrane penetration. These results suggest that E153 and D156 are important for the Bcl-xLΔTM conformational change and that membrane binding can be distinct from membrane permeabilization. Taken together, these studies support a model in which Bcl-xL activity is controlled by reversible insertion of its N-terminal domain into the mitochondrial outer membrane. Future studies with Bcl-xL mutants such as E153Q/D156N should allow determination of the relative contributions of membrane binding, insertion, and permeabilization to the regulation of apoptosis. PMID:17128992

  9. Membrane-Tethered Intracellular Domain of Amphiregulin Promotes Keratinocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Stefan W.; Stuart, Philip E.; Lambert, Sylviane; Gandarillas, Alberto; Rittié, Laure; Johnston, Andrew; Elder, James T.

    2016-01-01

    The EGF receptor (EGFR) and its ligands are essential regulators of epithelial biology, which are often amplified in cancer cells. We have previously shown that shRNA-mediated silencing of one of these ligands, amphiregulin (AREG), results in keratinocyte growth arrest that cannot be rescued by soluble extracellular EGFR ligands. To further explore the functional importance of specific AREG domains, we stably transduced keratinocytes expressing tetracycline-inducible AREG-targeted shRNA with lentiviruses expressing silencing-proof, membrane-tethered AREG cytoplasmic and extracellular domains (AREG-CTD and AREG-ECD), as well as full-length AREG precursor (proAREG). Here we show that growth arrest of AREG-silenced keratinocytes occurs in G2/M and is significantly restored by proAREG and AREG-CTD, but not by AREG-ECD. Moreover, the AREG-CTD was sufficient to normalize cell cycle distribution profiles and expression of mitosis-related genes. Our findings uncover an important role of the AREG-CTD in regulating cell division, which may be relevant to tumor resistance to EGFR-directed therapies. PMID:26802239

  10. Localization of membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase in caveolae membrane domains.

    PubMed Central

    Annabi, B; Lachambre, M; Bousquet-Gagnon, N; Pagé, M; Gingras, D; Béliveau, R

    2001-01-01

    Membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is a membrane-associated MMP that has been recently reported to have a central role in tumour cell invasion. Here we report that both the native and overexpressed recombinant forms of MT1-MMP are highly enriched in low-density Triton X-100-insoluble membrane domains that contain the caveolar marker protein caveolin 1. Moreover, the MT1-MMP-dependent activation of proMMP-2 induced by concanavalin A and cytochalasin D was correlated with the processing of MT1-MMP to its proteolytically inactive 43 kDa fragment in U-87 glioblastoma and HT-1080 fibrosarcoma tumour cell lines; this processing was also preferentially observed within the caveolar fraction. Interestingly, whereas the expression of caveolin 1 had no effect on the MT1-MMP-dependent activation of proMMP-2, its co-expression with MT1-MMP antagonized the MT1-MMP-increased migratory potential of COS-7 cells. Taken together, our results provide evidence that MT1-MMP is preferentially compartmentalized and proteolytically processed in caveolae of cancer cells. The inhibition of MT1-MMP-dependent cell migration by caveolin 1 also suggests that the localization of MT1-MMP to caveolin-enriched domains might have an important function in the control of its enzymic activity. PMID:11171051

  11. Membrane Association of the Diphtheria Toxin Translocation Domain Studied by Coarse-Grained Simulations and Experiment.

    PubMed

    Flores-Canales, Jose C; Vargas-Uribe, Mauricio; Ladokhin, Alexey S; Kurnikova, Maria

    2015-06-01

    Diphtheria toxin translocation (T) domain inserts in lipid bilayers upon acidification of the environment. Computational and experimental studies have suggested that low pH triggers a conformational change of the T-domain in solution preceding membrane binding. The refolded membrane-competent state was modeled to be compact and mostly retain globular structure. In the present work, we investigate how this refolded state interacts with membrane interfaces in the early steps of T-domain's membrane association. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations suggest two distinct membrane-bound conformations of the T-domain in the presence of bilayers composed of a mixture of zwitteronic and anionic phospholipids (POPC:POPG with a 1:3 molar ratio). Both membrane-bound conformations show a common near parallel orientation of hydrophobic helices TH8-TH9 relative to the membrane plane. The most frequently observed membrane-bound conformation is stabilized by electrostatic interactions between the N-terminal segment of the protein and the membrane interface. The second membrane-bound conformation is stabilized by hydrophobic interactions between protein residues and lipid acyl chains, which facilitate deeper protein insertion in the membrane interface. A theoretical estimate of a free energy of binding of a membrane-competent T-domain to the membrane is provided. PMID:25650178

  12. Interaction of the Intermembrane Space Domain of Tim23 Protein with Mitochondrial Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Rakhi; Munari, Francesca; Becker, Stefan; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Tim23 mediates protein translocation into mitochondria. Although inserted into the inner membrane, the dynamic association of its intermembrane space (IMS) domain with the outer membrane promotes protein import. However, little is known about the molecular basis of this interaction. Here, we demonstrate that the IMS domain of Tim23 tightly associates with both inner and outer mitochondrial membrane-like membranes through a hydrophobic anchor at its N terminus. The structure of membrane-bound Tim23IMS is highly dynamic, allowing recognition of both the incoming presequence and other translocase components at the translocation contact. Cardiolipin enhances Tim23 membrane attachment, suggesting that cardiolipin can influence preprotein import. PMID:25349212

  13. Evidence that Membrane Insertion of the Cytosolic Domain of Bcl-xL is Governed by an Electrostatic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Thuduppathy, Guruvasuthevan R.; Craig, Jeffrey W.; Schon, Victoria Kholodenko Arne; Hill, R. Blake

    2006-01-01

    Signals from different cellular networks are integrated at the mitochondria in the regulation of apoptosis. This integration is controlled by the Bcl-2 proteins, many of which change localization fromthe cytosol to the mitochondrial outer membrane in this regulation. For Bcl-xL, this change in localization reflects the ability to undergo a conformational change from a solution to integral membrane conformation. To characterize this conformational change, structural and thermodynamic measurements were performed in the absence and presence of lipid vesicles with Bcl-xL. A pH-dependent model is proposed for the solution to membrane conformational change that consists of three stable conformations: a solution conformation, a conformation similar to the solution conformation but anchored to the membrane by its C-terminal transmembrane domain, and a membrane conformation that is fully associated with the membrane. This model predicts that the solution to membrane conformational change is independent of the C-terminal trans-membrane domain, which is experimentally demonstrated. The conformational change is associated with changes in secondary and, especially, tertiary structure of the protein, as measured by far and near-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy, respectively. Membrane insertion was distinguished from peripheral association with the membrane by quenching of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence by acrylamide and brominated lipids. For the cytosolic domain, the free energy of insertion ( ΔGox) into lipid vesicles was determined to be −6.5 k cal mol−1 at pH4.9 by vesicle binding experiments. To test whether electrostatic interactions were significant to this process, the salt dependence of this conformational change was measured and analyzed in terms of Gouy–Chapman theory to estimate an electrostatic contribution of ΔGoel ~−2.5 kcal mol−1 and a non-electrostatic contribution of ΔGonel ~−4.0 kcal mol−1 to the free energy of insertion, ΔGox. Calcium

  14. Quality control of integral membrane proteins by assembly-dependent membrane integration.

    PubMed

    Feige, Matthias J; Hendershot, Linda M

    2013-08-01

    Cell-surface multiprotein complexes are synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where they undergo cotranslational membrane integration and assembly. The quality control mechanisms that oversee these processes remain poorly understood. We show that less hydrophobic transmembrane (TM) regions derived from several single-pass TM proteins can enter the ER lumen completely. Once mislocalized, they are recognized by the Hsp70 chaperone BiP. In a detailed analysis for one of these proteins, the αβT cell receptor (αβTCR), we show that unassembled ER-lumenal subunits are rapidly degraded, whereas specific subunit interactions en route to the native receptor promote membrane integration of the less hydrophobic TM segments, thereby stabilizing the protein. For the TCR α chain, both complete ER import and subunit assembly depend on the same pivotal residue in its TM region. Thus, membrane integration linked to protein assembly allows cellular quality control of membrane proteins and connects the lumenal ER chaperone machinery to membrane protein biogenesis. PMID:23932713

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the periplasmic domain of FliP, an integral membrane component of the bacterial flagellar type III protein-export apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Fukumura, Takuma; Furukawa, Yukio; Kawaguchi, Tatsuya; Saijo-Hamano, Yumiko; Namba, Keiichi; Imada, Katsumi; Minamino, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar proteins are transported via a specific export apparatus to the distal end of the growing structure for their self-assembly. FliP is an essential membrane component of the export apparatus. FliP has an N-terminal signal peptide and is predicted to have four transmembrane (TM) helices and a periplasmic domain (FliPP) between TM-2 and TM-3. In this study, FliPP from Thermotoga maritima (TmFliPP) and its selenomethionine derivative (SeMet-TmFliPP) were purified and crystallized. TmFliPP formed a homotetramer in solution. Crystals of TmFliPP and SeMet-TmFliPP were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique with 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol as a precipitant. These two crystals grew in the hexagonal space group P6222 or P6422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 114.9, c = 193.8 Å. X-ray diffraction data were collected from crystals of TmFliPP and SeMet-TmFliPP to 2.4 and 2.8 Å resolution, respectively. PMID:25195894

  16. On the First Eigenvalues of Free Vibrating Membranes in Conformal Regular Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gol'dshtein, V.; Ukhlov, A.

    2016-08-01

    In 1961 G. Polya published a paper about the eigenvalues of vibrating membranes. The "free vibrating membrane" corresponds to the Neumann-Laplace operator in bounded plane domains. In this paper we obtain estimates for the first non-trivial eigenvalue of this operator in a large class of domains that we call conformal regular domains. This class includes convex domains, John domains etc. On the basis of our estimates we conjecture that the eigenvalues of the Neumann- Laplace operator depend on the hyperbolic metrics of plane domains. We propose a new method for the estimates which is based on weighted Poincaré-Sobolev inequalities, obtained by the authors recently.

  17. Higher-order assemblies of BAR domain proteins for shaping membranes.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Shiro

    2016-06-01

    Most cellular organelles contain lipid bilayer membranes. The earliest characterization of cellular organelles was performed by electron microscopy observation of such membranes. However, the precise mechanisms for shaping the membrane in particular subcellular organelles is poorly understood. Classically, the overall cellular shape, i.e. the shape of the plasma membrane, was thought to be governed by the reorganization of cytoskeletal components such as actin and microtubules. The plasma membrane contains various submicron structures such as clathrin-coated pits, caveolae, filopodia and lamellipodia. These subcellular structures are either invaginations or protrusions and are associated with the cytoskeleton. Therefore, it could be hypothesized that there are membrane-binding proteins that cooperates with cytoskeleton in shaping of plasma membrane organelles. Proteins with the Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain connect a variety of membrane shapes to actin filaments. The BAR domains themselves bend the membranes by their rigidity and then mold the membranes into tubules through their assembly as spiral polymers, which are thought to be involved in the various submicron structures. Membrane tubulation by polymeric assembly of the BAR domains is supposed to be regulated by binding proteins, binding lipids and the mechanical properties of the membrane. This review gives an overview of BAR protein assembly, describes the significance of the assembly and discusses how to study the assembly in the context of membrane and cellular morphology. The technical problems encountered in microscopic observation of BAR domain assembly are also discussed. PMID:26884618

  18. Determining the Topology of Integral Membrane Peptides Using EPR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Inbaraj, Johnson J.; Cardon, Thomas B.; Laryukhin, Mikhail; Grosser, Stuart M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a new structural biology technique for determining the membrane topology of an integral membrane protein inserted into magnetically aligned phospholipid bilayers (bicelles) using EPR spectroscopy. The nitroxide spin probe, 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl-4-amino-4-carboxylic acid (TOAC) was attached to the pore-lining transmembrane domain (M2δ) of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and incorporated into a bicelle. The corresponding EPR spectra revealed hyperfine splittings that were highly dependent on the macroscopic orientation of the bicelles with respect to the static magnetic field. The helical tilt of the peptide can be easily calculated using the hyperfine splittings gleaned from the orientational dependent EPR spectra. A helical tilt of 14° was calculated for the M2δ peptide with respect to the bilayer normal of the membrane, which agrees well with previous 15N solid-state NMR studies. The helical tilt of the peptide was verified by simulating the corresponding EPR spectra using the standardized MOMD approach. This new method is advantageous because: (1) bicelle samples are easy to prepare, (2) the helical tilt can be directly calculated from the orientational-dependent hyperfine splitting in the EPR spectra, and (3) EPR spectroscopy is approximately 1000 fold more sensitive than 15N solid-state NMR spectroscopy; thus, the helical tilt of an integral membrane peptide can be determined with only 100 μg of peptide. The helical tilt can be determined more accurately by placing TOAC spin labels at several positions with this technique. PMID:16848493

  19. Treatment of domain integrals in boundary element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Nintcheu Fata, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    A systematic and rigorous technique to calculate domain integrals without a volume-fitted mesh has been developed and validated in the context of a boundary element approximation. In the proposed approach, a domain integral involving a continuous or weakly-singular integrand is first converted into a surface integral by means of straight-path integrals that intersect the underlying domain. Then, the resulting surface integral is carried out either via analytic integration over boundary elements or by use of standard quadrature rules. This domain-to-boundary integral transformation is derived from an extension of the fundamental theorem of calculus to higher dimension, and the divergence theorem. In establishing the method, it is shown that the higher-dimensional version of the first fundamental theorem of calculus corresponds to the well-known Poincare lemma. The proposed technique can be employed to evaluate integrals defined over simply- or multiply-connected domains with Lipschitz boundaries which are embedded in an Euclidean space of arbitrary but finite dimension. Combined with the singular treatment of surface integrals that is widely available in the literature, this approach can also be utilized to effectively deal with boundary-value problems involving non-homogeneous source terms by way of a collocation or a Galerkin boundary integral equation method using only the prescribed surface discretization. Sample problems associated with the three-dimensional Poisson equation and featuring the Newton potential are successfully solved by a constant element collocation method to validate this study.

  20. Enrichment of Integral Membrane Proteins for Proteomic Analysis Using Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Blonder, Josip; Goshe, Michael B.; Moore, Ronald J.; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Masselon, Christophe D.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2002-04-01

    Currently, most proteomic studies rely on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to detect and identify constituent peptides of enzymatically digested proteins obtained from various organisms and cell types. However, sample preparation methods for isolating membrane proteins typically involve the use of detergents, chaotropes, or reducing reagents that often interfere with electrospray ionization (ESI). To increase the identification of integral membrane proteins by LC-ESI-MS/MS, a sample preparation method combining carbonate extraction and surfactant-free organics solvent-assisted solubilization and proteolysis was developed and used to target the membrane subproteome of Deinococcus radiodurans. Out of 503 proteins identified, 135 were recognized as hydrophobic based on their positive grand average of hydropathicity values that covers 15% of the theoretical hydrophobic proteome. Using the PSORT algorithm, 268 identified proteins were recognized as integral membrane proteins covering 21% and 43% of the predicted integral cytoplasmic and outer membrane proteins, respectively. Of the integral cytoplasmic membrane proteins containing four or more predicted transmembrane domains (TMDs), 65% were identified by detecting at least one peptide spanning a TMD using LC-MS/MS. The extensive identification of highly hydrophobic proteins containing multiple TMDs confirms the efficacy of the described sample preparation protocol to isolate and solubilize integral membrane proteins and validates the method for large-scale analysis of bacterial membrane subproteomes using LC-ESI-MS/MS.

  1. Localization of lysobisphosphatidic acid-rich membrane domains in late endosomes.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Startchev, K; Whitney, A J; Gruenber, J

    2001-03-01

    Late endosomes accumulate internal membranes within the lumen of the organelle. These internal membranes are enriched in the late endosome specific phospholipid, lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA). The organization of LBPA-rich membrane domains is not well characterized. Using an LBPA-specific monoclonal antibody (6C4), we show that these membrane domains are not accessible from the cytoplasm. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we also show that 6C4 only binds sonicated, but not intact, late endosomes, presumably reflecting the release of internal membranes upon endosome rupture. PMID:11347897

  2. Regulation of membrane-shape transitions induced by I-BAR domains.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiming; Shi, Zheng; Baumgart, Tobias

    2015-07-21

    I-BAR proteins are well-known actin-cytoskeleton adaptors and have been observed to be involved in the formation of plasma membrane protrusions (filopodia). I-BAR proteins contain an all-helical, crescent-shaped IRSp53-MIM domain (IMD) dimer that is believed to be able to couple with a membrane shape. This coupling could involve the sensing and even the generation of negative plasma membrane curvature. Indeed, the in vitro studies have shown that IMDs can induce inward tubulation of liposomes. While N-BAR domains, which generate positive membrane curvature, have received a considerable amount of attention from both theory and experiments, the mechanisms of curvature coupling through IMDs are comparatively less studied and understood. Here we used a membrane-shape stability assay developed recently in our lab to quantitatively characterize IMD-induced membrane-shape transitions. We determined a membrane-shape stability diagram for IMDs that reveals how membrane tension and protein density can comodulate the generation of IMD-induced membrane protrusions. From comparison to analytical theory, we determine three key parameters that characterize the curvature coupling of IMD. We find that the curvature generation capacity of IMDs is significantly stronger compared to that of endophilin, an N-BAR protein known to be involved in plasma membrane shape transitions. Contrary to N-BAR domains, where amphipathic helix insertion is known to promote its membrane curvature generation, for IMDs we find that amphipathic helices inhibit membrane shape transitions, consistent with the inverse curvature that IMDs generate. Importantly, in both of these types of BAR domains, electrostatic interactions affect membrane-binding capacity, but do not appear to affect the curvature generation capacity of the protein. These two types of BAR domain proteins show qualitatively similar membrane shape stability diagrams, suggesting an underlying ubiquitous mechanism by which peripheral proteins

  3. Integrating the Affective Domain into the Instructional Design Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Main, Robert G.

    This study begins with a definition of the affective domain and its importance to learning, outlining its impact both in achieving affective behaviors and in facilitating cognitive and psychomotor objectives. The study then develops a model of instructional design that incorporates the affective domain as an integral component. The model combines…

  4. An Integrated Model of Information Literacy, Based upon Domain Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Gary B.; Lathey, Johnathan W.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Grounded in Alexander's model of domain learning, this study presents an integrated micro-model of information literacy. It is predicated upon the central importance of domain learning for the development of the requisite research skills by students. Method. The authors reviewed previous models of information literacy and…

  5. Architecture of a single membrane spanning cytochrome P450 suggests constraints that orient the catalytic domain relative to a bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Monk, Brian C.; Tomasiak, Thomas M.; Keniya, Mikhail V.; Huschmann, Franziska U.; Tyndall, Joel D. A.; O’Connell, Joseph D.; Cannon, Richard D.; McDonald, Jeffrey G.; Rodriguez, Andrew; Finer-Moore, Janet S.; Stroud, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Bitopic integral membrane proteins with a single transmembrane helix play diverse roles in catalysis, cell signaling, and morphogenesis. Complete monospanning protein structures are needed to show how interaction between the transmembrane helix and catalytic domain might influence association with the membrane and function. We report crystal structures of full-length Saccharomyces cerevisiae lanosterol 14α-demethylase, a membrane monospanning cytochrome P450 of the CYP51 family that catalyzes the first postcyclization step in ergosterol biosynthesis and is inhibited by triazole drugs. The structures reveal a well-ordered N-terminal amphipathic helix preceding a putative transmembrane helix that would constrain the catalytic domain orientation to lie partly in the lipid bilayer. The structures locate the substrate lanosterol, identify putative substrate and product channels, and reveal constrained interactions with triazole antifungal drugs that are important for drug design and understanding drug resistance. PMID:24613931

  6. Architecture of a single membrane spanning cytochrome P450 suggests constraints that orient the catalytic domain relative to a bilayer.

    PubMed

    Monk, Brian C; Tomasiak, Thomas M; Keniya, Mikhail V; Huschmann, Franziska U; Tyndall, Joel D A; O'Connell, Joseph D; Cannon, Richard D; McDonald, Jeffrey G; Rodriguez, Andrew; Finer-Moore, Janet S; Stroud, Robert M

    2014-03-11

    Bitopic integral membrane proteins with a single transmembrane helix play diverse roles in catalysis, cell signaling, and morphogenesis. Complete monospanning protein structures are needed to show how interaction between the transmembrane helix and catalytic domain might influence association with the membrane and function. We report crystal structures of full-length Saccharomyces cerevisiae lanosterol 14α-demethylase, a membrane monospanning cytochrome P450 of the CYP51 family that catalyzes the first postcyclization step in ergosterol biosynthesis and is inhibited by triazole drugs. The structures reveal a well-ordered N-terminal amphipathic helix preceding a putative transmembrane helix that would constrain the catalytic domain orientation to lie partly in the lipid bilayer. The structures locate the substrate lanosterol, identify putative substrate and product channels, and reveal constrained interactions with triazole antifungal drugs that are important for drug design and understanding drug resistance. PMID:24613931

  7. ABCA1, ABCG1, and ABCG4 are distributed to distinct membrane meso-domains and disturb detergent-resistant domains on the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Sano, Osamu; Ito, Shiho; Kato, Reiko; Shimizu, Yuji; Kobayashi, Aya; Kimura, Yasuhisa; Kioka, Noriyuki; Hanada, Kentaro; Ueda, Kazumitsu; Matsuo, Michinori

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and ABCG4 are lipid transporters that mediate the efflux of cholesterol from cells. To analyze the characteristics of these lipid transporters, we examined and compared their distributions and lipid efflux activity on the plasma membrane. The efflux of cholesterol mediated by ABCA1 and ABCG1, but not ABCG4, was affected by a reduction of cellular sphingomyelin levels. Detergent solubility and gradient density ultracentrifugation assays indicated that ABCA1, ABCG1, and ABCG4 were distributed to domains that were solubilized by Triton X-100 and Brij 96, resistant to Triton X-100 and Brij 96, and solubilized by Triton X-100 but resistant to Brij 96, respectively. Furthermore, ABCG1, but not ABCG4, was colocalized with flotillin-1 on the plasma membrane. The amounts of cholesterol extracted by methyl-β-cyclodextrin were increased by ABCA1, ABCG1, or ABCG4, suggesting that cholesterol in non-raft domains was increased. Furthermore, ABCG1 and ABCG4 disturbed the localization of caveolin-1 to the detergent-resistant domains and the binding of cholera toxin subunit B to the plasma membrane. These results suggest that ABCA1, ABCG1, and ABCG4 are localized to distinct membrane meso-domains and disturb the meso-domain structures by reorganizing lipids on the plasma membrane; collectively, these observations may explain the different substrate profiles and lipid efflux roles of these transporters. PMID:25302608

  8. Nonbilayer lipids affect peripheral and integral membrane proteins via changes in the lateral pressure profile.

    PubMed

    van den Brink-van der Laan, Els; Killian, J Antoinette; de Kruijff, Ben

    2004-11-01

    Nonbilayer lipids can be defined as cone-shaped lipids with a preference for nonbilayer structures with a negative curvature, such as the hexagonal phase. All membranes contain these lipids in large amounts. Yet, the lipids in biological membranes are organized in a bilayer. This leads to the question: what is the physiological role of nonbilayer lipids? Different models are discussed in this review, with a focus on the lateral pressure profile within the membrane. Based on this lateral pressure model, predictions can be made for the effect of nonbilayer lipids on peripheral and integral membrane proteins. Recent data on the catalytic domain of Leader Peptidase and the potassium channel KcsA are discussed in relation to these predictions and in relation to the different models on the function of nonbilayer lipids. The data suggest a general mechanism for the interaction between nonbilayer lipids and membrane proteins via the membrane lateral pressure. PMID:15519321

  9. Membrane Fission Is Promoted by Insertion of Amphipathic Helices and Is Restricted by Crescent BAR Domains

    PubMed Central

    Boucrot, Emmanuel; Pick, Adi; Çamdere, Gamze; Liska, Nicole; Evergren, Emma; McMahon, Harvey T.; Kozlov, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Shallow hydrophobic insertions and crescent-shaped BAR scaffolds promote membrane curvature. Here, we investigate membrane fission by shallow hydrophobic insertions quantitatively and mechanistically. We provide evidence that membrane insertion of the ENTH domain of epsin leads to liposome vesiculation, and that epsin is required for clathrin-coated vesicle budding in cells. We also show that BAR-domain scaffolds from endophilin, amphiphysin, GRAF, and β2-centaurin limit membrane fission driven by hydrophobic insertions. A quantitative assay for vesiculation reveals an antagonistic relationship between amphipathic helices and scaffolds of N-BAR domains in fission. The extent of vesiculation by these proteins and vesicle size depend on the number and length of amphipathic helices per BAR domain, in accord with theoretical considerations. This fission mechanism gives a new framework for understanding membrane scission in the absence of mechanoenzymes such as dynamin and suggests how Arf and Sar proteins work in vesicle scission. PMID:22464325

  10. Simultaneous evaluation of plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential in bovine spermatozoa by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Chihiro; Kang, Sung-Sik; Kitade, Yasuyuki; Yanagawa, Yojiro; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Nagano, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    The present study aimed to develop an objective evaluation procedure to estimate the plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential of bull spermatozoa simultaneously by flow cytometry. Firstly, we used frozen-thawed semen mixed with 0, 25, 50, 75 or 100% dead spermatozoa. Semen was stained using three staining solutions: SYBR-14, propidium iodide (PI), and phycoerythrin-conjugated peanut agglutinin (PE-PNA), for the evaluation of plasma membrane integrity and acrosomal integrity. Then, characteristics evaluated by flow cytometry and by fluorescence microscopy were compared. Characteristics of spermatozoa (viability and acrosomal integrity) evaluated by flow cytometry and by fluorescence microscopy were found to be similar. Secondly, we attempted to evaluate the plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and also mitochondrial membrane potential of spermatozoa by flow cytometry using conventional staining with three dyes (SYBR-14, PI, and PE-PNA) combined with MitoTracker Deep Red (MTDR) staining (quadruple staining). The spermatozoon characteristics evaluated by flow cytometry using quadruple staining were then compared with those of staining using SYBR-14, PI, and PE-PNA and staining using SYBR-14 and MTDR. There were no significant differences in all characteristics (viability, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential) evaluated by quadruple staining and the other procedures. In conclusion, quadruple staining using SYBR-14, PI, PE-PNA, and MTDR for flow cytometry can be used to evaluate the plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential of bovine spermatozoa simultaneously. PMID:26369275

  11. Membrane Binding and Modulation of the PDZ Domain of PICK1

    PubMed Central

    Erlendsson, Simon; Madsen, Kenneth Lindegaard

    2015-01-01

    Scaffolding proteins serve to assemble protein complexes in dynamic processes by means of specific protein-protein and protein-lipid binding domains. Many of these domains bind either proteins or lipids exclusively; however, it has become increasingly evident that certain domains are capable of binding both. Especially, many PDZ domains, which are highly abundant protein-protein binding domains, bind lipids and membranes. Here we provide an overview of recent large-scale studies trying to generalize and rationalize the binding patterns as well as specificity of PDZ domains towards membrane lipids. Moreover, we review how these PDZ-membrane interactions are regulated in the case of the synaptic scaffolding protein PICK1 and how this might affect cellular localization and function. PMID:26501328

  12. HIV gp41-Mediated Membrane Fusion Occurs at Edges of Cholesterol-Rich Lipid Domains

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Kiessling, Volker; Simmons, James A.; White, Judith M.; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2015-01-01

    Lipid rafts in plasma membranes have emerged as possible platforms for entry of HIV and other viruses into cells. However, how lipid phase heterogeneity contributes to viral entry is little known due to the fine-grained and still poorly understood complexity of biological membranes. We used model systems mimicking HIV envelopes and T-cell membranes and showed that raft-like (Lo phase) lipid domains are necessary and sufficient for efficient membrane targeting and fusion. Interestingly, membrane binding and fusion was low in homogeneous Ld and Lo phase membranes, indicating that lipid phase heterogeneity is essential. The HIV fusion peptide preferentially targeted to Lo/Ld boundary regions and promoted full fusion at the interface between ordered and disordered lipids. Ld phase vesicles proceeded only to hemifusion. Thus, we propose that the edges, but not the areas of raft-like ordered lipid domains are vital for HIV entry and membrane fusion. PMID:25915200

  13. The BAR Domain Proteins: Molding Membranes in Fission, Fusion, and Phagy

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Gang; Vajjhala, Parimala; Lee, Janet S.; Winsor, Barbara; Munn, Alan L.

    2006-01-01

    The Bin1/amphiphysin/Rvs167 (BAR) domain proteins are a ubiquitous protein family. Genes encoding members of this family have not yet been found in the genomes of prokaryotes, but within eukaryotes, BAR domain proteins are found universally from unicellular eukaryotes such as yeast through to plants, insects, and vertebrates. BAR domain proteins share an N-terminal BAR domain with a high propensity to adopt α-helical structure and engage in coiled-coil interactions with other proteins. BAR domain proteins are implicated in processes as fundamental and diverse as fission of synaptic vesicles, cell polarity, endocytosis, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, transcriptional repression, cell-cell fusion, signal transduction, apoptosis, secretory vesicle fusion, excitation-contraction coupling, learning and memory, tissue differentiation, ion flux across membranes, and tumor suppression. What has been lacking is a molecular understanding of the role of the BAR domain protein in each process. The three-dimensional structure of the BAR domain has now been determined and valuable insight has been gained in understanding the interactions of BAR domains with membranes. The cellular roles of BAR domain proteins, characterized over the past decade in cells as distinct as yeasts, neurons, and myocytes, can now be understood in terms of a fundamental molecular function of all BAR domain proteins: to sense membrane curvature, to bind GTPases, and to mold a diversity of cellular membranes. PMID:16524918

  14. The BAR domain proteins: molding membranes in fission, fusion, and phagy.

    PubMed

    Ren, Gang; Vajjhala, Parimala; Lee, Janet S; Winsor, Barbara; Munn, Alan L

    2006-03-01

    The Bin1/amphiphysin/Rvs167 (BAR) domain proteins are a ubiquitous protein family. Genes encoding members of this family have not yet been found in the genomes of prokaryotes, but within eukaryotes, BAR domain proteins are found universally from unicellular eukaryotes such as yeast through to plants, insects, and vertebrates. BAR domain proteins share an N-terminal BAR domain with a high propensity to adopt alpha-helical structure and engage in coiled-coil interactions with other proteins. BAR domain proteins are implicated in processes as fundamental and diverse as fission of synaptic vesicles, cell polarity, endocytosis, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, transcriptional repression, cell-cell fusion, signal transduction, apoptosis, secretory vesicle fusion, excitation-contraction coupling, learning and memory, tissue differentiation, ion flux across membranes, and tumor suppression. What has been lacking is a molecular understanding of the role of the BAR domain protein in each process. The three-dimensional structure of the BAR domain has now been determined and valuable insight has been gained in understanding the interactions of BAR domains with membranes. The cellular roles of BAR domain proteins, characterized over the past decade in cells as distinct as yeasts, neurons, and myocytes, can now be understood in terms of a fundamental molecular function of all BAR domain proteins: to sense membrane curvature, to bind GTPases, and to mold a diversity of cellular membranes. PMID:16524918

  15. Elastic Membrane Deformations Govern Interleaflet Coupling of Lipid-Ordered Domains.

    PubMed

    Galimzyanov, Timur R; Molotkovsky, Rodion J; Bozdaganyan, Marine E; Cohen, Fredric S; Pohl, Peter; Akimov, Sergey A

    2015-08-21

    The mechanism responsible for domain registration in two membrane leaflets has thus far remained enigmatic. Using continuum elasticity theory, we show that minimum line tension is achieved along the rim between thicker (ordered) and thinner (disordered) domains by shifting the rims in opposing leaflets by a few nanometers relative to each other. Increasing surface tension yields an increase in line tension, resulting in larger domains. Because domain registration is driven by lipid deformation energy, it does not require special lipid components or interactions at the membrane midplane. PMID:26340212

  16. ELASTIC MEMBRANE DEFORMATIONS GOVERN INTERLEAFLET COUPLING OF LIPID-ORDERED DOMAINS

    PubMed Central

    Galimzyanov, Timur R.; Molotkovsky, Rodion J.; Bozdaganyan, Marine E.; Cohen, Fredric S.; Pohl, Peter; Akimov, Sergey A.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for domain registration in two membrane leaflets has thus far remained enigmatic. Using continuum elasticity theory, we show that minimum line tension is achieved along the rim between thicker (ordered) and thinner (disordered) domains by shifting the rims in opposing leaflets by a few nanometers relative to each other. Increasing surface tension yields an increase in line tension, resulting in larger domains. Because domain registration is driven by lipid deformation energy, it does not require special lipid components nor interactions at the membrane midplane. PMID:26340212

  17. Closed membrane shapes with attached BAR domains subject to external force of actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Mesarec, Luka; Góźdź, Wojciech; Iglič, Veronika Kralj; Kralj, Samo; Iglič, Aleš

    2016-05-01

    Membrane deformations induced by attached BAR superfamily domains could trigger or facilitate the growth of plasma membrane protrusions. The BAR domain family consists of BAR, F-BAR and I-BAR domains, each enforcing a different local curvature when attached to the membrane surface. Our theoretical study mainly focuses on the role of I-BAR in the membrane tubular deformations generated or stabilised by actin filaments. The influence of the area density of membrane attached BAR domains and their intrinsic curvature on the closed membrane shapes (vesicles) was investigated numerically. We derived an analytical approximative expression for the critical relative area density of BARs at which the membrane tubular protrusions on vesicles are most prominent. We have shown that the BARs with a higher intrinsic curvature induce thinner and longer cylindrical protrusions. The average orientation of the membrane attached BARs is altered when the vesicle shape is subjected to external force of growing actin rod-like structure inside a vesicle. The average orientation angle of membrane attached BARs may indicate whether the actin filaments are just stabilising the protrusion or generating it by stretching the vesicle. PMID:26854580

  18. Integrated system for extraction, purification, and digestion of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiying; Yan, Guoquan; Gao, Mingxia; Deng, Chunhui; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2016-05-01

    An integrated system was developed for directly processing living cells into peptides of membrane proteins. Living cells were directly injected into the system and cracked in a capillary column by ultrasonic treatment. Owing to hydrophilicity for broken pieces of the cell membrane, the obtained membranes were retained in a well-designed bi-filter. While cytoplasm proteins were eluted from the bi-filter, the membranes were dissolved and protein released by flushing 4 % SDS buffer through the bi-filter. The membrane proteins were subsequently transferred into a micro-reactor and covalently bound in the reactor for purification and digestion. As the system greatly simplified the whole pretreatment processes and minimized both sample loss and contamination, it could be used to analyze the membrane proteome samples of thousand-cell-scales with acceptable reliability and stability. We totally identified 1348 proteins from 5000 HepG2 cells, 615 of which were annotated as membrane proteins. In contrast, with conventional method, only 233 membrane proteins were identified. It is adequately demonstrated that the integrated system shows promising practicability for the membrane proteome analysis of small amount of cells. Graphical Abstract The legend of online abstract figure is (a) schematic illustration of membrane proteins extraction, purification and digestion from living cells; (b) diagrammatic sketch of the automatic integrated membrane proteome analysis system. PMID:26922343

  19. Membrane Anchoring of Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases by Convergent Acquisition of a Novel Protein Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Olmedo-Verd, Elvira; Santamaría-Gómez, Javier; Ochoa de Alda, Jesús A. G.; Ribas de Pouplana, Lluis; Luque, Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    Four distinct aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) found in some cyanobacterial species contain a novel protein domain that bears two putative transmembrane helices. This CAAD domain is present in glutamyl-, isoleucyl-, leucyl-, and valyl-tRNA synthetases, the latter of which has probably recruited the domain more than once during evolution. Deleting the CAAD domain from the valyl-tRNA synthetase of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 did not significantly modify the catalytic properties of this enzyme, suggesting that it does not participate in its canonical tRNA-charging function. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that the function of the CAAD domain is structural, mediating the membrane anchorage of the enzyme, although membrane localization of aaRSs has not previously been described in any living organism. Synthetases containing the CAAD domain were localized in the intracytoplasmic thylakoid membranes of cyanobacteria and were largely absent from the plasma membrane. The CAAD domain was necessary and apparently sufficient for protein targeting to membranes. Moreover, localization of aaRSs in thylakoids was important under nitrogen limiting conditions. In Anabaena, a multicellular filamentous cyanobacterium often used as a model for prokaryotic cell differentiation, valyl-tRNA synthetase underwent subcellular relocation at the cell poles during heterocyst differentiation, a process also dependent on the CAAD domain. PMID:21965654

  20. Approximation method to compute domain related integrals in structural studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oanta, E.; Panait, C.; Raicu, A.; Barhalescu, M.; Axinte, T.

    2015-11-01

    Various engineering calculi use integral calculus in theoretical models, i.e. analytical and numerical models. For usual problems, integrals have mathematical exact solutions. If the domain of integration is complicated, there may be used several methods to calculate the integral. The first idea is to divide the domain in smaller sub-domains for which there are direct calculus relations, i.e. in strength of materials the bending moment may be computed in some discrete points using the graphical integration of the shear force diagram, which usually has a simple shape. Another example is in mathematics, where the surface of a subgraph may be approximated by a set of rectangles or trapezoids used to calculate the definite integral. The goal of the work is to introduce our studies about the calculus of the integrals in the transverse section domains, computer aided solutions and a generalizing method. The aim of our research is to create general computer based methods to execute the calculi in structural studies. Thus, we define a Boolean algebra which operates with ‘simple’ shape domains. This algebraic standpoint uses addition and subtraction, conditioned by the sign of every ‘simple’ shape (-1 for the shapes to be subtracted). By ‘simple’ shape or ‘basic’ shape we define either shapes for which there are direct calculus relations, or domains for which their frontiers are approximated by known functions and the according calculus is carried out using an algorithm. The ‘basic’ shapes are linked to the calculus of the most significant stresses in the section, refined aspect which needs special attention. Starting from this idea, in the libraries of ‘basic’ shapes, there were included rectangles, ellipses and domains whose frontiers are approximated by spline functions. The domain triangularization methods suggested that another ‘basic’ shape to be considered is the triangle. The subsequent phase was to deduce the exact relations for the

  1. Sphingolipid domains in the plasma membranes of fibroblasts are not enriched with cholesterol

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Frisz, Jessica F.; Klitzing, Haley A.; Lou, Kaiyan; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Weber, Peter K.; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Kraft, Mary L.

    2013-04-22

    The plasma membranes of mammalian cells are widely expected to contain domains that are enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids. In this work, we have used high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry to directly map the distributions of isotope-labeled cholesterol and sphingolipids in the plasma membranes of intact fibroblast cells. Although acute cholesterol depletion reduced sphingolipid domain abundance, cholesterol was evenly distributed throughout the plasma membrane and was not enriched within the sphingolipid domains. As a result, we rule out favorable cholesterol-sphingolipid interactions as dictating plasma membrane organization in fibroblast cells. Because the sphingolipid domains are disrupted by drugs that depolymerize themore » cells actin cytoskeleton, cholesterol must instead affect the sphingolipid organization via an indirect mechanism that involves the cytoskeleton.« less

  2. Sphingolipid Domains in the Plasma Membranes of Fibroblasts Are Not Enriched with Cholesterol*

    PubMed Central

    Frisz, Jessica F.; Klitzing, Haley A.; Lou, Kaiyan; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Weber, Peter K.; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Kraft, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    The plasma membranes of mammalian cells are widely expected to contain domains that are enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids. In this work, we have used high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry to directly map the distributions of isotope-labeled cholesterol and sphingolipids in the plasma membranes of intact fibroblast cells. Although acute cholesterol depletion reduced sphingolipid domain abundance, cholesterol was evenly distributed throughout the plasma membrane and was not enriched within the sphingolipid domains. Thus, we rule out favorable cholesterol-sphingolipid interactions as dictating plasma membrane organization in fibroblast cells. Because the sphingolipid domains are disrupted by drugs that depolymerize the cells actin cytoskeleton, cholesterol must instead affect the sphingolipid organization via an indirect mechanism that involves the cytoskeleton. PMID:23609440

  3. Sphingolipid domains in the plasma membranes of fibroblasts are not enriched with cholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Frisz, Jessica F.; Klitzing, Haley A.; Lou, Kaiyan; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Weber, Peter K.; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Kraft, Mary L.

    2013-04-22

    The plasma membranes of mammalian cells are widely expected to contain domains that are enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids. In this work, we have used high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry to directly map the distributions of isotope-labeled cholesterol and sphingolipids in the plasma membranes of intact fibroblast cells. Although acute cholesterol depletion reduced sphingolipid domain abundance, cholesterol was evenly distributed throughout the plasma membrane and was not enriched within the sphingolipid domains. As a result, we rule out favorable cholesterol-sphingolipid interactions as dictating plasma membrane organization in fibroblast cells. Because the sphingolipid domains are disrupted by drugs that depolymerize the cells actin cytoskeleton, cholesterol must instead affect the sphingolipid organization via an indirect mechanism that involves the cytoskeleton.

  4. Valorization of artichoke wastewaters by integrated membrane process.

    PubMed

    Conidi, C; Cassano, A; Garcia-Castello, E

    2014-01-01

    In this work an integrated membrane system was developed on laboratory scale to fractionate artichoke wastewaters. In particular, a preliminary ultrafiltration (UF) step, based on the use of hollow fibre membranes, was investigated to remove suspended solids from an artichoke extract. The clarified solution was then submitted to a nanofiltration (NF) step. Two different 2.5 × 21 in. spiral-wound membranes (Desal DL and NP030) with different properties were investigated. Both membranes showed a high rejection towards the phenolic compounds analysed (chlorogenic acid, cynarin and apigenin-7-O-glucoside) and, consequently, towards the total antioxidant activity (TAA). On the other hand, the Desal DL membrane was characterized by a high rejection towards sugar compounds (glucose, fructose and sucrose) (100%) when compared with the NP030 membrane (4.02%). The performance of selected membranes in terms of permeate flux, fouling index and water permeability recovery was also evaluated. On the base of experimental results, an integrated membrane process for the fractionation of artichoke wastewaters was proposed. This conceptual process design permitted to obtain different valuable products: a retentate fraction (from the NP030 membrane) enriched in phenolic compounds suitable for nutraceutical, cosmeceutical or food application; a retentate fraction (from the Desal DL membrane), enriched in sugar compounds, of interest for food applications; a clear permeate (from the Desal DL membrane) which can be reused as process water or for membrane cleaning. PMID:24125635

  5. Imaging lipid domains in cell membranes: the advent of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Dylan M.; Gaus, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    The lipid bilayer of model membranes, liposomes reconstituted from cell lipids, and plasma membrane vesicles and spheres can separate into two distinct liquid phases to yield lipid domains with liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered properties. These observations are the basis of the lipid raft hypothesis that postulates the existence of cholesterol-enriched ordered-phase lipid domains in cell membranes that could regulate protein mobility, localization and interaction. Here we review the evidence that nano-scaled lipid complexes and meso-scaled lipid domains exist in cell membranes and how new fluorescence microscopy techniques that overcome the diffraction limit provide new insights into lipid organization in cell membranes. PMID:24376453

  6. Membrane activity of the phospholipase C-δ1 pleckstrin homology (PH) domain

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    PH-PLCδ1 [the PH domain (pleckstrin homology domain) of PLCδ1 (phospholipase C-δ1)] is among the best-characterized phosphoinositide-binding domains. PH-PLCδ1 binds with high specificity to the headgroup of PtdIns(4,5)P2, but little is known about its interfacial properties. In the present study, we show that PH-PLCδ1 is also membrane-active and can insert significantly into PtdIns(4,5)P2-containing monolayers at physiological (bilayer-equivalent) surface pressures. However, this membrane activity appears to involve interactions distinct from those that target PH-PLCδ1 to the PtdIns(4,5)P2 headgroup. Whereas the majority of PtdIns(4,5)P2-bound PH-PLCδ1 can be displaced by adding excess of soluble headgroup [Ins(1,4,5)P3], membrane activity of PH-PLCδ1 cannot. PH-PLCδ1 differs from other phosphoinositide-binding domains in that its membrane insertion does not require that the phosphoinositide-binding site be occupied. Significant monolayer insertion remains when the phosphoinositide-binding site is mutated, and PH-PLCδ1 can insert into monolayers that contain no PtdIns(4,5)P2 at all. Our results suggest a model in which reversible membrane binding of PH-PLCδ1, mediated by PtdIns(4,5)P2 or other acidic phospholipids, occurs without membrane insertion. Accumulation of the PH domain at the membrane surface enhances the efficiency of insertion, but does not significantly affect its extent, whereas the presence of phosphatidylethanolamine and cholesterol in the lipid mixture promotes the extent of insertion. This is the first report of membrane activity in an isolated PH domain and has implications for understanding the membrane targeting by this common type of domain. PMID:15755258

  7. Phase Separation on Bicontinuous Cubic Membranes: Symmetry Breaking, Reentrant, and Domain Faceting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paillusson, Fabien; Pennington, Matthew R.; Kusumaatmaja, Halim

    2016-07-01

    We study the phase separation of binary lipid mixtures that form bicontinuous cubic phases. The competition between the nonuniform Gaussian membrane curvature and line tension leads to a very rich phase diagram, where we observe symmetry breaking of the membrane morphologies and reentrant phenomena due to the formation of bridges between segregated domains. Upon increasing the line tension contribution, we also find faceting of lipid domains that we explain using a simple argument based on the symmetry of the underlying surface and topology.

  8. Investigating the role of viral integral membrane proteins in promoting the assembly of nepovirus and comovirus replication factories

    PubMed Central

    Sanfaçon, Hélène

    2013-01-01

    Formation of plant virus membrane-associated replication factories requires the association of viral replication proteins and viral RNA with intracellular membranes, the recruitment of host factors and the modification of membranes to form novel structures that house the replication complex. Many viruses encode integral membrane proteins that act as anchors for the replication complex. These hydrophobic proteins contain transmembrane domains and/or amphipathic helices that associate with the membrane and modify its structure. The comovirus Co-Pro and NTP-binding (NTB, putative helicase) proteins and the cognate nepovirus X2 and NTB proteins are among the best characterized plant virus integral membrane replication proteins and are functionally related to the picornavirus 2B, 2C, and 3A membrane proteins. The identification of membrane association domains and analysis of the membrane topology of these proteins is discussed. The evidence suggesting that these proteins have the ability to induce membrane proliferation, alter the structure and integrity of intracellular membranes, and modulate the induction of symptoms in infected plants is also reviewed. Finally, areas of research that need further investigation are highlighted. PMID:23439982

  9. Arabidopsis Synaptotagmin 1 Is Required for the Maintenance of Plasma Membrane Integrity and Cell Viability[W

    PubMed Central

    Schapire, Arnaldo L.; Voigt, Boris; Jasik, Jan; Rosado, Abel; Lopez-Cobollo, Rosa; Menzel, Diedrik; Salinas, Julio; Mancuso, Stefano; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Baluska, Frantisek; Botella, Miguel A.

    2008-01-01

    Plasma membrane repair in animal cells uses synaptotagmin 7, a Ca2+-activated membrane fusion protein that mediates delivery of intracellular membranes to wound sites by a mechanism resembling neuronal Ca2+-regulated exocytosis. Here, we show that loss of function of the homologous Arabidopsis thaliana Synaptotagmin 1 protein (SYT1) reduces the viability of cells as a consequence of a decrease in the integrity of the plasma membrane. This reduced integrity is enhanced in the syt1-2 null mutant in conditions of osmotic stress likely caused by a defective plasma membrane repair. Consistent with a role in plasma membrane repair, SYT1 is ubiquitously expressed, is located at the plasma membrane, and shares all domains characteristic of animal synaptotagmins (i.e., an N terminus-transmembrane domain and a cytoplasmic region containing two C2 domains with phospholipid binding activities). Our analyses support that membrane trafficking mediated by SYT1 is important for plasma membrane integrity and plant fitness. PMID:19088329

  10. Study of Raft Domains in Model Membrane of DPPC/PE/Cholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lor, Chai; Hirst, Linda

    2010-10-01

    Raft domains in bilayer membrane are thought to play an important role in many cell functions such as cell signaling or trans-membrane protein activation. Here we use a model membrane consisting of DPPC/PE/cholesterol to examine the structure of membrane rafts and phase interactions. In particular we are interested in lipids containing the highly polyunsaturated fatty acid DHA. We use both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy to obtain information on the structural properties of raft regions and track cholesterol. As expected, we find phase separation of raft regions between saturated and unsaturated lipids. Moreover, we find that the roughness of the domains change with varying cholesterol concentration possibly due to overpacking. This model study provides further understanding of the role of cholesterol in bilayer membrane leading towards a better knowledge of cell membranes.

  11. Identification of Novel Membrane-binding Domains in Multiple Yeast Cdc42 Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Satoe

    2007-01-01

    The Rho-type GTPase Cdc42 is a central regulator of eukaryotic cell polarity and signal transduction. In budding yeast, Cdc42 regulates polarity and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling in part through the PAK-family kinase Ste20. Activation of Ste20 requires a Cdc42/Rac interactive binding (CRIB) domain, which mediates its recruitment to membrane-associated Cdc42. Here, we identify a separate domain in Ste20 that interacts directly with membrane phospholipids and is critical for its function. This short region, termed the basic-rich (BR) domain, can target green fluorescent protein to the plasma membrane in vivo and binds PIP2-containing liposomes in vitro. Mutation of basic or hydrophobic residues in the BR domain abolishes polarized localization of Ste20 and its function in both MAP kinase–dependent and independent pathways. Thus, Cdc42 binding is required but is insufficient; instead, direct membrane binding by Ste20 is also required. Nevertheless, phospholipid specificity is not essential in vivo, because the BR domain can be replaced with several heterologous lipid-binding domains of varying lipid preferences. We also identify functionally important BR domains in two other yeast Cdc42 effectors, Gic1 and Gic2, suggesting that cooperation between protein–protein and protein–membrane interactions is a prevalent mechanism during Cdc42-regulated signaling and perhaps for other dynamic localization events at the cell cortex. PMID:17914055

  12. Fragmentation of Integral Membrane Proteins in the Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins (IMPs) are of great biophysical and clinical interest because of the key role they play in many cellular processes. Here, a comprehensive top down study of 152 IMPs and 277 soluble proteins from human H1299 cells including 11 087 fragments obtained from collisionally activated dissociation (CAD), 6452 from higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD), and 2981 from electron transfer dissociation (ETD) shows their great utility and complementarity for the identification and characterization of IMPs. A central finding is that ETD is ∼2-fold more likely to cleave in soluble regions than threshold fragmentation methods, whereas the reverse is observed in transmembrane domains with an observed ∼4-fold bias toward CAD and HCD. The location of charges just prior to dissociation is consistent with this directed fragmentation: protons remain localized on basic residues during ETD but easily mobilize along the backbone during collisional activation. The fragmentation driven by these protons, which is most often observed in transmembrane domains, both is of higher yield and occurs over a greater number of backbone cleavage sites. Further, while threshold dissociation events in transmembrane domains are on average 10.1 (CAD) and 9.2 (HCD) residues distant from the nearest charge site (R, K, H, N-terminus), fragmentation is strongly influenced by the N- or C-terminal position relative to that site: the ratio of observed b- to y-fragments is ∼1:3 if the cleavage occurs >7 residues N-terminal and ∼3:1 if it occurs >7 residues C-terminal to the nearest basic site. Threshold dissociation products driven by a mobilized proton appear to be strongly dependent on not only relative position of a charge site but also N- or C-terminal directionality of proton movement. PMID:24689519

  13. BamA POTRA Domain Interacts with a Native Lipid Membrane Surface.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Patrick J; Patel, Dhilon S; Wu, Emilia L; Qi, Yifei; Yeom, Min Sun; Sousa, Marcelo Carlos; Fleming, Karen G; Im, Wonpil

    2016-06-21

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is an asymmetric membrane with lipopolysaccharides on the external leaflet and phospholipids on the periplasmic leaflet. This outer membrane contains mainly β-barrel transmembrane proteins and lipidated periplasmic proteins (lipoproteins). The multisubunit protein β-barrel assembly machine (BAM) catalyzes the insertion and folding of the β-barrel proteins into this membrane. In Escherichia coli, the BAM complex consists of five subunits, a core transmembrane β-barrel with a long periplasmic domain (BamA) and four lipoproteins (BamB/C/D/E). The BamA periplasmic domain is composed of five globular subdomains in tandem called POTRA motifs that are key to BAM complex formation and interaction with the substrate β-barrel proteins. The BAM complex is believed to undergo conformational cycling while facilitating insertion of client proteins into the outer membrane. Reports describing variable conformations and dynamics of the periplasmic POTRA domain have been published. Therefore, elucidation of the conformational dynamics of the POTRA domain in full-length BamA is important to understand the function of this molecular complex. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we present evidence that the conformational flexibility of the POTRA domain is modulated by binding to the periplasmic surface of a native lipid membrane. Furthermore, membrane binding of the POTRA domain is compatible with both BamB and BamD binding, suggesting that conformational selection of different POTRA domain conformations may be involved in the mechanism of BAM-facilitated insertion of outer membrane β-barrel proteins. PMID:27332128

  14. A nodal domain theorem for integrable billiards in two dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Samajdar, Rhine; Jain, Sudhir R.

    2014-12-15

    Eigenfunctions of integrable planar billiards are studied — in particular, the number of nodal domains, ν of the eigenfunctions with Dirichlet boundary conditions are considered. The billiards for which the time-independent Schrödinger equation (Helmholtz equation) is separable admit trivial expressions for the number of domains. Here, we discover that for all separable and non-separable integrable billiards, ν satisfies certain difference equations. This has been possible because the eigenfunctions can be classified in families labelled by the same value of mmodkn, given a particular k, for a set of quantum numbers, m,n. Further, we observe that the patterns in a family are similar and the algebraic representation of the geometrical nodal patterns is found. Instances of this representation are explained in detail to understand the beauty of the patterns. This paper therefore presents a mathematical connection between integrable systems and difference equations. - Highlights: • We find that the number of nodal domains of eigenfunctions of integrable, planar billiards satisfy a class of difference equations. • The eigenfunctions labelled by quantum numbers (m,n) can be classified in terms of mmodkn. • A theorem is presented, realising algebraic representations of geometrical patterns exhibited by the domains. • This work presents a connection between integrable systems and difference equations.

  15. Affinity Labeling of Highly Hydrophobic Integral Membrane Proteins for Proteome-Wide Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Goshe, Michael B.; Blonder, Josip; Smith, Richard D.

    2003-03-01

    The ability to identify and quantify integral membrane proteins is an analytical challenge for mass spectrometry-based proteomics. The use of surfactants to solubilize and derivatize these proteins can suppress peptide ionization and interfere with chromatographic separations during microcapillary reversed-phase liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry. To circumvent the use of surfactants and increase proteome coverage, an affinity labeling method has been developed to target highly hydrophobic integral membrane proteins using organic-assisted extraction and solubilization followed by cysteinyl-specific labeling using biotinylation reagents. As demonstrated on the membrane subproteome of Deinococcus radiodurans, specific and quantitative labeling of integral membrane proteins was achieved using a 60% methanol-aqueous buffer system and (+)-biotinyl-iodoacetamidyl-3,6-dioxaoctanediamine as the cysteinyl-alkylating reagent. From a total of 220 unique Cys-labeled peptides, 89 proteins were identified of which 40 were integral membrane proteins containing from 1 to 9 mapped transmembrane domains with a maximum positive GRAVY of 1.08. The protocol described can be used with other stable isotope labeling reagents (e.g. ICAT) to enable comparative measurements to be made on differentially expressed hydrophobic membrane proteins from various organisms (e.g. pathogenic bacteria) and cell types and provide a viable method for comparative proteome-wide analyses.

  16. Raft-Like Membrane Domains in Pathogenic Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Farnoud, Amir M.; Toledo, Alvaro M.; Konopka, James B.; Del Poeta, Maurizio; London, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    The lipid bilayer of the plasma membrane is thought to be compartmentalized by the presence of lipid-protein microdomains. In eukaryotic cells, microdomains composed of sterols and sphingolipids packed in a liquid-ordered state, commonly known as lipid rafts, are believed to exist. While less studied in bacterial cells, reports on the presence of sterol or protein-mediated microdomains in bacterial cell membranes are also appearing with increasing frequency. Recent efforts have been focused on addressing the biophysical and biochemical properties of lipid rafts. However, most studies have been focused on synthetic membranes, mammalian cells, and/or model, non-pathogenic microorganisms. Much less is known about microdomains in the plasma membrane of pathogenic microorganisms. This review attempts to provide an overview of the current state of knowledge of lipid rafts in pathogenic fungi and the developing field of microdomains in pathogenic bacteria. The current literature on the structure and function and of microdomains is reviewed and the potential role of microdomains in growth, pathogenesis, and drug resistance of pathogens are discussed. Better insight into the structure and function of membrane microdomains in pathogenic microorganisms might lead to a better understanding of the process of pathogenesis and development of raft-mediated approaches for new methods of therapy. PMID:26015285

  17. Supramolecular organization of the human N-BAR domain in shaping the sarcolemma membrane.

    PubMed

    Daum, Bertram; Auerswald, Andrea; Gruber, Tobias; Hause, Gerd; Balbach, Jochen; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Meister, Annette

    2016-06-01

    The 30kDa N-BAR domain of the human Bin1 protein is essential for the generation of skeletal muscle T-tubules. By electron cryo-microscopy and electron cryo-tomography with a direct electron detector, we found that Bin1-N-BAR domains assemble into scaffolds of low long-range order that form flexible membrane tubules. The diameter of the tubules closely matches the curved shape of the N-BAR domain, which depends on the composition of the target membrane. These insights are fundamental to our understanding of T-tubule formation and function in human skeletal muscle. PMID:27016283

  18. Virus removal and integrity in aged RO membranes.

    PubMed

    Pype, Marie-Laure; Donose, Bogdan C; Martí, Llucia; Patureau, Dominique; Wery, Nathalie; Gernjak, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    Membrane ageing reduces the quality of the filtered water. Therefore, in order to warrant public health, monitoring membrane performances are of utmost importance. Reverse osmosis (RO) membranes are generally used to remove viruses and salt. However, there is no detailed study demonstrating the impact of aged membrane on the rejection of viruses and of membrane integrity indicators. In this paper, the impact of hypochlorite induced RO ageing on the rejection of a virus surrogate (MS2 phage) and four membrane integrity indicators (salt, dissolved organic matter, rhodamine WT and sulphate) was evaluated. Hypochlorite exposure was either active (under filtration) or passive (soaking), and the changes of the membrane surface chemistry were characterised using several autopsy techniques. Under this accelerated ageing condition, the introduction of chlorine in the membrane chemistry and the breakage of amide bonds caused an increase of the water permeability and a decrease of the virus surrogate's and indicators' rejection. Ageing resulted in a more negatively charged membrane and also in a higher hydrophobicity, which lead to the adsorption of MS2 phage. Despite severe physical membrane damage leading to a reduction of salt rejection to 1.2 log (94%), the minimum rejection of MS2 phage stayed on or above 4 log. PMID:26724450

  19. Yeast cell wall integrity sensors form specific plasma membrane microdomains important for signalling.

    PubMed

    Kock, Christian; Arlt, Henning; Ungermann, Christian; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2016-09-01

    The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae relies on the detection of cell surface stress by five sensors (Wsc1, Wsc2, Wsc3, Mid2, Mtl1). Each sensor contains a single transmembrane domain and a highly mannosylated extracellular region, and probably detects mechanical stress in the cell wall or the plasma membrane. We here studied the distribution of the five sensors at the cell surface by using fluorescently tagged variants in conjunction with marker proteins for established membrane compartments. We find that each of the sensors occupies a specific microdomain at the plasma membrane. The novel punctate 'membrane compartment occupied by Wsc1' (MCW) shows moderate overlap with other Wsc-type sensors, but not with those of the Mid-type sensors or other established plasma membrane domains. We further observed that sensor density and formation of the MCW compartment depends on the cysteine-rich head group near the N-terminus of Wsc1. Yet, signalling capacity depends more on the sensor density in the plasma membrane than on clustering within its microcompartment. We propose that the MCW microcompartment provides a quality control mechanism for retaining functional sensors at the plasma membrane to prevent them from endocytosis. PMID:27337501

  20. Integral estimates for differentiable functions on irregular domains

    SciTech Connect

    Besov, Oleg V

    2011-02-11

    Integral representations for functions and their partial derivatives in terms of some fixed system of partial derivatives are constructed on irregular domains in a Euclidean space. Embedding theorems for Sobolev-type spaces into a Lebesgue space are established and the norms of the derivatives are estimated. Bibliography: 17 titles.

  1. Quantifying the lateral lipid domain properties in erythrocyte ghost membranes using EPR-spectra decomposition.

    PubMed

    Arsov, Zoran; Schara, Milan; Strancar, Janez

    2002-07-01

    Using EPR spectroscopy a typical lateral domain structure was detected in the membranes of spin-labeled bovine erythrocyte ghosts. The spectral parameters were determined by decomposing the EPR spectrum into three spectral components and tuned by a hybrid-evolutionary-optimization method. In our experiments the lateral domain structure and its properties were influenced by the variation in the temperature and by the addition of n-butanol. The specific responses of the particular domain types were detected. For the most-ordered domain type a break was seen in the temperature dependence of its order parameter, while the order parameters of the two less-ordered domain types exhibited a continuous decrease. Below the break-point temperature the alcohol-induced membrane fluidity variation is mainly a consequence of the change in the proportions of the least- and the most-ordered domain type and not the change of the domain-type ordering or dynamics (with n-butanol concentration). On the other hand, the fluidity variation above the break-point temperature arises from both types of changes. Interestingly, the proportion of the domain type that has its order parameter between that of the least- and the most-ordered domain type remains almost constant with concentration as well as with temperature, which implies its stability. Such characterization of the lateral membrane domain structure could be beneficial when considering the lipid-protein interactions, because it can be assumed that the activity of the membrane-bound enzyme depends on the properties of the particular domain type. PMID:12202132

  2. Molecular assemblies and membrane domains in multivesicular endosome dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Falguieres, Thomas; Luyet, Pierre-Philippe; Gruenberg, Jean

    2009-05-15

    Along the degradation pathway, endosomes exhibit a characteristic multivesicular organization, resulting from the budding of vesicles into the endosomal lumen. After endocytosis and transport to early endosomes, activated signaling receptors are incorporated into these intralumenal vesicles through the action of the ESCRT machinery, a process that contributes to terminate signaling. Then, the vesicles and their protein cargo are further transported towards lysosomes for degradation. Evidence also shows that intralumenal vesicles can undergo 'back-fusion' with the late endosome limiting membrane, a route exploited by some pathogens and presumably followed by proteins and lipids that need to be recycled from within the endosomal lumen. This process depends on the late endosomal lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid and its putative effector Alix/AIP1, and is presumably coupled to the invagination of the endosomal limiting membrane at the molecular level via ESCRT proteins. In this review, we discuss the intra-endosomal transport routes in mammalian cells, and in particular the different mechanisms involved in membrane invagination, vesicle formation and fusion in a space inaccessible to proteins known to control intracellular membrane traffic.

  3. Molecular assemblies and membrane domains in multivesicular endosome dynamics.

    PubMed

    Falguières, Thomas; Luyet, Pierre-Philippe; Gruenberg, Jean

    2009-05-15

    Along the degradation pathway, endosomes exhibit a characteristic multivesicular organization, resulting from the budding of vesicles into the endosomal lumen. After endocytosis and transport to early endosomes, activated signaling receptors are incorporated into these intralumenal vesicles through the action of the ESCRT machinery, a process that contributes to terminate signaling. Then, the vesicles and their protein cargo are further transported towards lysosomes for degradation. Evidence also shows that intralumenal vesicles can undergo "back-fusion" with the late endosome limiting membrane, a route exploited by some pathogens and presumably followed by proteins and lipids that need to be recycled from within the endosomal lumen. This process depends on the late endosomal lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid and its putative effector Alix/AIP1, and is presumably coupled to the invagination of the endosomal limiting membrane at the molecular level via ESCRT proteins. In this review, we discuss the intra-endosomal transport routes in mammalian cells, and in particular the different mechanisms involved in membrane invagination, vesicle formation and fusion in a space inaccessible to proteins known to control intracellular membrane traffic. PMID:19133258

  4. Solid-state NMR Study of the YadA Membrane-Anchor Domain in the Bacterial Outer Membrane.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Shakeel A; Nagaraj, Madhu; Chauhan, Nandini; Franks, Trent W; Bardiaux, Benjamin; Habeck, Michael; Orwick-Rydmark, Marcella; Linke, Dirk; van Rossum, Barth-J

    2015-10-19

    MAS-NMR was used to study the structure and dynamics at ambient temperatures of the membrane-anchor domain of YadA (YadA-M) in a pellet of the outer membrane of E. coli in which it was expressed. YadA is an adhesin from the pathogen Yersinia enterocolitica that is involved in interactions with the host cell, and it is a model protein for studying the autotransport process. Existing assignments were sucessfully transferred to a large part of the YadA-M protein in the E. coli lipid environment by using (13) C-(13) C DARR and PDSD spectra at different mixing times. The chemical shifts in most regions of YadA-M are unchanged relative to those in microcrystalline YadA-M preparations from which a structure has previously been solved, including the ASSA region that is proposed to be involved in transition-state hairpin formation for transport of the soluble domain. Comparisons of the dynamics between the microcrystalline and membrane-embedded samples indicate greater flexibility of the ASSA region in the outer-membrane preparation at physiological temperatures. This study will pave the way towards MAS-NMR structure determination of membrane proteins, and a better understanding of functionally important dynamic residues in native membrane environments. PMID:26332158

  5. delta-Opioid receptors exhibit high efficiency when activating trimeric G proteins in membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Bourova, Lenka; Kostrnova, Alexandra; Hejnova, Lucie; Moravcova, Zuzana; Moon, Hyo-Eun; Novotny, Jiri; Milligan, Graeme; Svoboda, Petr

    2003-04-01

    Low-density membrane fragments (domains) were separated from the bulk of plasma membranes of human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells expressing a delta-opioid (DOP) receptor-Gi1alpha fusion protein by drastic homogenization and flotation on equilibrium sucrose density gradients. The functional activity of trimeric G proteins and capacity of the DOP receptor to stimulate both the fusion protein-linked Gi1alpha and endogenous pertussis-toxin sensitive G proteins was measured as d-Ala2, d-Leu5-enkephalin stimulated high-affinity GTPase or guanosine-5'-[gamma-35S]triphosphate ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding. The maximum d-Ala2-d-Leu5 enkephalin (DADLE)-stimulated GTPase was two times higher in low-density membrane fragments than in bulk of plasma membranes; 58 and 27 pmol/mg/min, respectively. The same difference was obtained for [35S]GTPgammaS binding. Contrarily, the low-density domains contained no more than half the DOP receptor binding sites (Bmax = 6.6 pmol/mg versus 13.6 pmol/mg). Thus, when corrected for expression levels of the receptor, low-density domains exhibited four times higher agonist-stimulated GTPase and [35S]GTPgammaS binding than the bulk plasma membranes. The regulator of G protein signaling RGS1, enhanced further the G protein functional activity but did not remove the difference between domain-bound and plasma membrane pools of G protein. The potency of the agonist in functional studies and the affinity of specific [3H]DADLE binding to the receptor were, however, the same in both types of membranes - EC50 = 4.5 +/- 0.1 x 10(-8) and 3.2 +/- 1.4 x 10(-8) m for GTPase; Kd = 1.2 +/- 0.1 and 1.3 +/- 0.1 nm for [3H]DADLE radioligand binding assay. Similar results were obtained when sodium bicarbonate was used for alkaline isolation of membrane domains. By contrast, detergent-insensitive membrane domains isolated following treatment of cells with Triton X100 exhibited no DADLE-stimulated GTPase or GTPgammaS binding. Functional coupling between the DOP receptor

  6. Slow Relaxation of Shape and Orientational Texture in Membrane Gel Domains.

    PubMed

    Jeppesen, Jonas Camillus; Solovyeva, Vita; Brewer, Jonathan R; Johannes, Ludger; Hansen, Per Lyngs; Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    2015-11-24

    Gel domains in lipid bilayers are structurally more complex than fluid domains. Growth dynamics can lead to noncircular domains with a heterogeneous orientational texture. Most model membrane studies involving gel domain morphology and lateral organization assume the domains to be static. Here we show that rosette shaped gel domains, with heterogeneous orientational texture and a central topological defect, after early stage growth, undergo slow relaxation. On a time scale of days to weeks domains converge to circular shapes and approach uniform texture. 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) enriched gel domains are grown by cooling 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC):DPPC bilayers into the solid-liquid phase coexistence region and are visualized with fluorescence microscopy. The relaxation of individual domains is quantified through image analysis of time-lapse image series. We find a shape relaxation mechanism which is inconsistent with Ostwald ripening and coalescence as observed in membrane systems with coexisting liquid phases. Moreover, domain texture changes in parallel with the changes in domain shape, and selective melting and growth of particular subdomains cause the texture to become more uniform. We propose a relaxation mechanism based on relocation of lipids from high-energy lattice positions, through evaporation-condensation and edge diffusion, to low-energy positions. The relaxation process is modified significantly by binding Shiga toxin, a bacterial toxin from Shigella dysenteriae, to the membrane surface. Binding alters the equilibrium shape of the gel domains from circular to eroded rosettes with disjointed subdomains. This observation may be explained by edge diffusion while evaporation-condensation is restricted, and it provides further support for the proposed overall relaxation mechanism. PMID:26501924

  7. Bilayer-thickness-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kahraman, Osman; Koch, Peter D; Klug, William S; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2016-04-01

    Hydrophobic thickness mismatch between integral membrane proteins and the surrounding lipid bilayer can produce lipid bilayer thickness deformations. Experiment and theory have shown that protein-induced lipid bilayer thickness deformations can yield energetically favorable bilayer-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins, and large-scale organization of integral membrane proteins into protein clusters in cell membranes. Within the continuum elasticity theory of membranes, the energy cost of protein-induced bilayer thickness deformations can be captured by considering compression and expansion of the bilayer hydrophobic core, membrane tension, and bilayer bending, resulting in biharmonic equilibrium equations describing the shape of lipid bilayers for a given set of bilayer-protein boundary conditions. Here we develop a combined analytic and numerical methodology for the solution of the equilibrium elastic equations associated with protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations. Our methodology allows accurate prediction of thickness-mediated protein interactions for arbitrary protein symmetries at arbitrary protein separations and relative orientations. We provide exact analytic solutions for cylindrical integral membrane proteins with constant and varying hydrophobic thickness, and develop perturbative analytic solutions for noncylindrical protein shapes. We complement these analytic solutions, and assess their accuracy, by developing both finite element and finite difference numerical solution schemes. We provide error estimates of our numerical solution schemes and systematically assess their convergence properties. Taken together, the work presented here puts into place an analytic and numerical framework which allows calculation of bilayer-mediated elastic interactions between integral membrane proteins for the complicated protein shapes suggested by structural biology and at the small protein separations most relevant for the crowded membrane

  8. Bilayer-thickness-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahraman, Osman; Koch, Peter D.; Klug, William S.; Haselwandter, Christoph A.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrophobic thickness mismatch between integral membrane proteins and the surrounding lipid bilayer can produce lipid bilayer thickness deformations. Experiment and theory have shown that protein-induced lipid bilayer thickness deformations can yield energetically favorable bilayer-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins, and large-scale organization of integral membrane proteins into protein clusters in cell membranes. Within the continuum elasticity theory of membranes, the energy cost of protein-induced bilayer thickness deformations can be captured by considering compression and expansion of the bilayer hydrophobic core, membrane tension, and bilayer bending, resulting in biharmonic equilibrium equations describing the shape of lipid bilayers for a given set of bilayer-protein boundary conditions. Here we develop a combined analytic and numerical methodology for the solution of the equilibrium elastic equations associated with protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations. Our methodology allows accurate prediction of thickness-mediated protein interactions for arbitrary protein symmetries at arbitrary protein separations and relative orientations. We provide exact analytic solutions for cylindrical integral membrane proteins with constant and varying hydrophobic thickness, and develop perturbative analytic solutions for noncylindrical protein shapes. We complement these analytic solutions, and assess their accuracy, by developing both finite element and finite difference numerical solution schemes. We provide error estimates of our numerical solution schemes and systematically assess their convergence properties. Taken together, the work presented here puts into place an analytic and numerical framework which allows calculation of bilayer-mediated elastic interactions between integral membrane proteins for the complicated protein shapes suggested by structural biology and at the small protein separations most relevant for the crowded membrane

  9. Specific effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids on the cholesterol-poor membrane domain in a model membrane.

    PubMed

    Onuki, Yoshinori; Hagiwara, Chihiro; Sugibayashi, Ko; Takayama, Kozo

    2008-08-01

    To understand more fully the effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on lipid bilayers, we investigated the effects of treatment with fatty acids on the properties of a model membrane. Three kinds of liposomes comprising dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), dioleylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), and cholesterol (Ch) were used as the model membrane, and the fluorescence anisotropy of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) and detergent insolubility were determined. Characterization of the liposomes clarified that DPPC, DPPC/Ch, and DPPC/DOPC/Ch existed as solid-ordered phase (L beta), liquid-ordered phase (l o), and a mixture of l o and liquid-disordered phase (L alpha) membranes at room temperature. Treatment with unsaturated fatty acids such as oleic acid (OA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) markedly decreased the fluorescence anisotropy value and detergent insolubility. PUFAs and OA had different effects on the model membranes. In DPPC liposomes, the most prominent change was induced by PUFAs, whereas, in DPPC/Ch and DPPC/DOPC/Ch liposomes, OA had a stronger effect than PUFAs. The effect of PUFAs was strongly affected by the amount of Ch in the membrane, which confirmed a specific effect of PUFAs on the Ch-poor membrane domain. We further explored the effect of fatty acids dispersed in a water-in-oil-in-water multiple emulsion and found that unsaturated fatty acids acted on the membranes even when incorporated in emulsion form. These findings suggest that treatment with PUFAs increases the segregation of ordered and disordered phase domains in membranes. PMID:18670110

  10. Kinetics of Endophilin N-BAR Domain Dimerization and Membrane Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Capraro, Benjamin R.; Shi, Zheng; Wu, Tingting; Chen, Zhiming; Dunn, Joanna M.; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Baumgart, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    The recruitment to plasma membrane invaginations of the protein endophilin is a temporally regulated step in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Endophilin is believed to sense or stabilize membrane curvature, which in turn likely depends on the dimeric structure of the protein. The dynamic nature of the membrane association and dimerization of endophilin is thus functionally important and is illuminated herein. Using subunit exchange Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), we determine dimer dissociation kinetics and find a dimerization equilibrium constant orders of magnitude lower than previously published values. We characterize N-BAR domain membrane association kinetics under conditions where the dimeric species predominates, by stopped flow, observing prominent electrostatic sensitivity of membrane interaction kinetics. Relative to membrane binding, we find that protein monomer/dimer species equilibrate with far slower kinetics. Complementary optical microscopy studies reveal strikingly slow membrane dissociation and an increase of dissociation rate constant for a construct lacking the amphipathic segment helix 0 (H0). We attribute the slow dissociation kinetics to higher-order protein oligomerization on the membrane. We incorporate our findings into a kinetic scheme for endophilin N-BAR membrane binding and find a significant separation of time scales for endophilin membrane binding and subsequent oligomerization. This separation may facilitate the regulation of membrane trafficking phenomena. PMID:23482561

  11. Quantifying Membrane Curvature Generation of Drosophila Amphiphysin N-BAR Domains

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Michael C.; Capraro, Benjamin R.; Tian, Aiwei; Isas, Jose M.; Langen, Ralf; Baumgart, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Biological membrane functions are coupled to membrane curvature, the regulation of which often involves membrane-associated proteins. The membrane-binding N-terminal amphipathic helix-containing BIN/Amphiphysin/Rvs (N-BAR) domain of amphiphysin is implicated in curvature generation and maintenance. Improving the mechanistic understanding of membrane curvature regulation by N-BAR domains requires quantitative experimental characterization. We have measured tube pulling force modulation by the N-BAR domain of Drosophila amphiphysin (DA-N-BAR) bound to tubular membranes pulled from micropipette-aspirated giant vesicles. We observed that fluorescently-labeled DA-N-BAR showed significantly higher protein density on tubules compared to the connected low-curvature vesicle membrane. Furthermore, we found the equilibrium tube pulling force to be systematically dependent on the aqueous solution concentration of DA-N-BAR, thereby providing the first quantitative assessment of spontaneous curvature generation. At sufficiently high protein concentrations, pulled tubes required no external force to maintain mechanical equilibrium, in agreement with the qualitative spontaneous tubulation previously reported for amphiphysin. PMID:23772271

  12. INTRAOPERATIVE SPECTRAL DOMAIN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY IMAGING AFTER INTERNAL LIMITING MEMBRANE PEELING IN IDIOPATHIC EPIRETINAL MEMBRANE WITH CONNECTING STRANDS

    PubMed Central

    NAM, DONG HEUN; DESOUZA, PHILIP J.; HAHN, PAUL; TAI, VINCENT; SEVILLA, MONICA B.; TRAN-VIET, DU; CUNEFARE, DAVID; FARSIU, SINA; IZATT, JOSEPH A.; TOTH, CYNTHIA A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report the intraoperative optical coherence tomography findings in idiopathic epiretinal membrane (ERM) with connecting strands and to describe the postoperative outcomes. Methods A retrospective, case series study within a prospective observational intraoperative optical coherence tomography imaging study was performed. Epiretinal membranes with connecting strands were characterized on preoperative spectral domain optical coherence tomography images and assessed against corresponding intraoperative (after internal limiting membrane [ILM] peeling) and postoperative spectral domain optical coherence tomography images. Results Eleven locations of the connecting strands in 7 eyes were studied. The connecting strands had visible connections from the inner retinal surface to the ERM in all locations, and the reflectivity was moderate in 8 locations and high in 3 locations. After ERM and ILM peeling, disconnected strands were identified in all of the intraoperative optical coherence tomography images. The reflectivity of the remaining intraoperative strands was higher than that of the preoperative lesions and appeared as “finger-like” and branching projections. The remaining disconnected lesions were contiguous with the inner retinal layers. Postoperatively, the intraoperative lesions disappeared completely in all locations, and recurrent formation of ERM was not identified in any eyes. Conclusion In ERM eyes with connecting strands, intraoperative spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging showed moderately to highly reflective sub-ILM finger-like lesions that persist immediately after membrane and ILM peeling. Postoperatively, the hyperreflective lesions disappeared spontaneously without localized nerve fiber layer loss. The sub-ILM connecting strands may represent glial retinal attachments. PMID:25829349

  13. The nanoscale organization of signaling domains at the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Griffié, Juliette; Burn, Garth; Owen, Dylan M

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we present an overview of the role of the nanoscale organization of signaling domains in regulating key cellular processes. In particular, we illustrate the importance of protein and lipid nanodomains as triggers and mediators of cell signaling. As particular examples, we summarize the state of the art of understanding the role of nanodomains in the mounting of an immune response, cellular adhesion, intercellular communication, and cell proliferation. Thus, this chapter underlines the essential role the nanoscale organization of key signaling proteins and lipid domains. We will also see how nanodomains play an important role in the lifecycle of many pathogens relevant to human disease and therefore illustrate how these structures may become future therapeutic targets. PMID:26015282

  14. Model lipid bilayer with facile diffusion of lipids and integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tingting; Ingram, Colin; Weisshaar, James C

    2010-07-01

    A model membrane system is formed by the rupture of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) onto a passivating layer comprising a PEG polymer cushion anchored in a lipid bilayer supported on glass. The novel use of pH-dependent electrostatic interactions between NeutrAvidin in the passivating layer and anionic lipids in the GUV drives vesicle rupture. The resulting "GUV pancakes" are single, planar lipid bilayer patches whose diameters vary from approximately 20 to 50 microm. The pancakes have several potential advantages for the in vitro study of protein-lipid interactions and integral membrane protein function. All components are commercially available. The pancakes resist nonspecific binding of vesicles containing protein. Both lipids and integral membrane proteins exhibit good lateral mobility in the GUV pancakes, as evidenced by single-particle tracking (SPT) of the DiD double-tailed fluorescent probe and of the integral membrane protein syntaxin-1A, labeled with AlexaFluor 633 (AF633-Syx). At least 80% of both probes exhibit free, homogeneous diffusion with a diffusion coefficient of approximately 5.5 microm(2) s(-1), which is more than 10 times faster than diffusion in a GUV pancake supported on bare glass. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) suggests that the polymer cushion has a height of approximately 4 nm. The mobility of a large fraction of the AF633-Syx probe suggests that even integral membrane proteins with large domains on both sides of the lipid bilayer should exhibit free diffusion within a GUV pancake. PMID:20459075

  15. Detergent-free domain isolated from Xenopus egg plasma membrane with properties similar to those of detergent-resistant membranes.

    PubMed

    Luria, Ayala; Vegelyte-Avery, Vaida; Stith, Brad; Tsvetkova, Nelly M; Wolkers, Willem F; Crowe, John H; Tablin, Fern; Nuccitelli, Richard

    2002-11-01

    Microdomains known as "rafts" have been isolated from many cell types as detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) and are enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol. However, there has been considerable controversy over whether such domains are found in native membranes or are artificially generated by the purification procedure. This controversy is based at least in part on the fact that raft membranes were first detected following detergent extraction in the cold. We isolated two plasma membrane fractions, without detergent treatment, using a discontinuous sucrose density gradient. One fraction was designated "light" and the other "heavy." These fractions were compared with DRMs, which were isolated in the presence of 1% Triton X-100. We found that Xenopus DRMs are enriched with sphingomyelin and cholesterol and exhibit a phase state similar to the liquid-ordered phase. Comparison of DRM complexes with the light and heavy plasma membrane fractions revealed some physical and biochemical similarities between the light fraction of the plasma membrane and the DRM complexes, based on (1) the phosphatidylcholine/sphingomyelin ratio and (2) the protein composition visualized on a two-dimensional gel. These two fractions are also quite similar in their thermotropic phase behavior, and their high levels of ganglioside GM1. We conclude that the light membrane fraction isolated in a detergent-free environment has many of the characteristics normally associated with DRMs. PMID:12403620

  16. Membrane protein stability can be compromised by detergent interactions with the extramembranous soluble domains

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhengrong; Wang, Chi; Zhou, Qingxian; An, Jianli; Hildebrandt, Ellen; Aleksandrov, Luba A; Kappes, John C; DeLucas, Lawrence J; Riordan, John R; Urbatsch, Ina L; Hunt, John F; Brouillette, Christie G

    2014-01-01

    Detergent interaction with extramembranous soluble domains (ESDs) is not commonly considered an important determinant of integral membrane protein (IMP) behavior during purification and crystallization, even though ESDs contribute to the stability of many IMPs. Here we demonstrate that some generally nondenaturing detergents critically destabilize a model ESD, the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) from the human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a model IMP. Notably, the detergents show equivalent trends in their influence on the stability of isolated NBD1 and full-length CFTR. We used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy to monitor changes in NBD1 stability and secondary structure, respectively, during titration with a series of detergents. Their effective harshness in these assays mirrors that widely accepted for their interaction with IMPs, i.e., anionic > zwitterionic > nonionic. It is noteworthy that including lipids or nonionic detergents is shown to mitigate detergent harshness, as will limiting contact time. We infer three thermodynamic mechanisms from the observed thermal destabilization by monomer or micelle: (i) binding to the unfolded state with no change in the native structure (all detergent classes); (ii) native state binding that alters thermodynamic properties and perhaps conformation (nonionic detergents); and (iii) detergent binding that directly leads to denaturation of the native state (anionic and zwitterionic). These results demonstrate that the accepted model for the harshness of detergents applies to their interaction with an ESD. It is concluded that destabilization of extramembranous soluble domains by specific detergents will influence the stability of some IMPs during purification. PMID:24652590

  17. Membrane protein stability can be compromised by detergent interactions with the extramembranous soluble domains.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhengrong; Wang, Chi; Zhou, Qingxian; An, Jianli; Hildebrandt, Ellen; Aleksandrov, Luba A; Kappes, John C; DeLucas, Lawrence J; Riordan, John R; Urbatsch, Ina L; Hunt, John F; Brouillette, Christie G

    2014-06-01

    Detergent interaction with extramembranous soluble domains (ESDs) is not commonly considered an important determinant of integral membrane protein (IMP) behavior during purification and crystallization, even though ESDs contribute to the stability of many IMPs. Here we demonstrate that some generally nondenaturing detergents critically destabilize a model ESD, the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) from the human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a model IMP. Notably, the detergents show equivalent trends in their influence on the stability of isolated NBD1 and full-length CFTR. We used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy to monitor changes in NBD1 stability and secondary structure, respectively, during titration with a series of detergents. Their effective harshness in these assays mirrors that widely accepted for their interaction with IMPs, i.e., anionic > zwitterionic > nonionic. It is noteworthy that including lipids or nonionic detergents is shown to mitigate detergent harshness, as will limiting contact time. We infer three thermodynamic mechanisms from the observed thermal destabilization by monomer or micelle: (i) binding to the unfolded state with no change in the native structure (all detergent classes); (ii) native state binding that alters thermodynamic properties and perhaps conformation (nonionic detergents); and (iii) detergent binding that directly leads to denaturation of the native state (anionic and zwitterionic). These results demonstrate that the accepted model for the harshness of detergents applies to their interaction with an ESD. It is concluded that destabilization of extramembranous soluble domains by specific detergents will influence the stability of some IMPs during purification. PMID:24652590

  18. Interconnect modeling using integrated time-domain and frequency-domain techniques

    SciTech Connect

    You, Hong; Yeh, Chune-Sin; Gadepally, B.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents an integrated time- and-frequency-domain technique for characterization and modeling of parasitic effects associated with interconnects. This technique enables direct measurements of critical transient as well as frequency responses of interconnects; accurate and efficient SPICE model extraction for coupled lines; and cross-domain verification of the measured data as well as the extracted models. To illustrate its application this technique is applied to characterize and extract the equivalent circuit model of the I/O bus on a real-world printed circuit board.

  19. Membrane Domains Based on Ankyrin and Spectrin Associated with Cell–Cell Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Vann; Healy, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Nodes of Ranvier and axon initial segments of myelinated nerves, sites of cell–cell contact in early embryos and epithelial cells, and neuromuscular junctions of skeletal muscle all perform physiological functions that depend on clustering of functionally related but structurally diverse ion transporters and cell adhesion molecules within microdomains of the plasma membrane. These specialized cell surface domains appeared at different times in metazoan evolution, involve a variety of cell types, and are populated by distinct membrane-spanning proteins. Nevertheless, recent work has shown that these domains all share on their cytoplasmic surfaces a membrane skeleton comprised of members of the ankyrin and spectrin families. This review will summarize basic features of ankyrins and spectrins, and will discuss emerging evidence that these proteins are key players in a conserved mechanism responsible for assembly and maintenance of physiologically important domains on the surfaces of diverse cells. PMID:20457566

  20. Mechanistic similarities in docking of the FYVE and PX domains to phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate containing membranes

    PubMed Central

    Kutateladze, Tatiana G.

    2007-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PtdIns(3)P], a phospholipid produced by PI 3-kinases in early endosomes and multivesicular bodies, often serves as a marker of endosomal membranes. PtdIns(3)P recruits and activates effector proteins containing the FYVE or PX domain and therefore regulates a variety of biological processes including endo- and exocytosis, membrane trafficking, protein sorting, signal transduction and cytoskeletal rearrangement. Structures and PtdIns(3)P binding modes of several FYVE and PX domains have recently been characterized, unveiling the molecular basis underlying multiple cellular functions of these proteins. Here, structural and functional aspects and current mechanisms of the multivalent membrane anchoring by the FYVE and PX domains are reviewed and compared. PMID:17707914

  1. Xenon and Other Volatile Anesthetics Change Domain Structure in Model Lipid Raft Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Weinrich, Michael; Worcester, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation anesthetics have been in clinical use for over 160 years, but the molecular mechanisms of action continue to be investigated. Direct interactions with ion channels received much attention after it was found that anesthetics do not change the structure of homogeneous model membranes. However, it was recently found that halothane, a prototypical anesthetic, changes domain structure of a binary lipid membrane. The noble gas xenon is an excellent anesthetic and provides a pivotal test of the generality of this finding, extended to ternary lipid raft mixtures. We report that xenon and conventional anesthetics change the domain equilibrium in two canonical ternary lipid raft mixtures. These findings demonstrate a membrane-mediated mechanism whereby inhalation anesthetics can affect the lipid environment of trans-membrane proteins. PMID:24299622

  2. Muscle specific kinase: organiser of synaptic membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Ghazanfari, Nazanin; Fernandez, Kristine J; Murata, Yui; Morsch, Marco; Ngo, Shyuan T; Reddel, Stephen W; Noakes, Peter G; Phillips, William D

    2011-03-01

    Muscle Specific Kinase (MuSK) is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase vital for forming and maintaining the mammalian neuromuscular junction (NMJ: the synapse between motor nerve and skeletal muscle). MuSK expression switches on during skeletal muscle differentiation. MuSK then becomes restricted to the postsynaptic membrane of the NMJ, where it functions to cluster acetylcholine receptors (AChRs). The expression, activation and turnover of MuSK are each regulated by signals from the motor nerve terminal. MuSK forms the core of an emerging signalling complex that can be acutely activated by neural agrin (N-agrin), a heparin sulfate proteoglycan secreted from the nerve terminal. MuSK activation initiates complex intracellular signalling events that coordinate the local synthesis and assembly of synaptic proteins. The importance of MuSK as a synapse organiser is highlighted by cases of autoimmune myasthenia gravis in which MuSK autoantibodies can deplete MuSK from the postsynaptic membrane, leading to complete disassembly of the adult NMJ. PMID:20974278

  3. Critical fluctuations in the domain structure of lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halstenberg, S.; Schrader, W.; Das, P.; Bhattacharjee, J. K.; Kaatze, U.

    2003-03-01

    Between 100 kHz and 2 GHz ultrasonic attenuation spectra of two aqueous solutions of vesicles from 1,2-dimyristoyl-L-3-phosphatidylcholine have been measured at 13 temperatures around the main phase transition temperature of the membranes. The spectra are analyzed in terms of an asymptotic high frequency background contribution and three relaxation terms. Two of these terms can be represented by a discrete relaxation time, respectively, the other one extends over a significantly broader frequency range than a Debye-type relaxation term. It was found to nicely follow the predictions of the Bhattacharjee-Ferrell model of three-dimensional critical fluctuations. This finding has been additionally verified by measurements of the scaling function and by an analysis of the relaxation rate of order parameter fluctuations following from the fit of the experimental scaling function data to the theoretical form. Theoretical arguments are presented to indicate why the three-dimensional theory applies so well to the quasi-two-dimensional membrane system.

  4. Two-photon fluorescence microscopy of laurdan generalized polarization domains in model and natural membranes.

    PubMed

    Parasassi, T; Gratton, E; Yu, W M; Wilson, P; Levi, M

    1997-06-01

    Two-photon excitation microscopy shows coexisting regions of different generalized polarization (GP) in phospholipid vesicles, in red blood cells, in a renal tubular cell line, and in purified renal brushborder and basolateral membranes labeled with the fluorescent probe laurdan. The GP function measures the relative water content of the membrane. In the present study we discuss images obtained with polarized laser excitation, which selects different molecular orientations of the lipid bilayer corresponding to different spatial regions. The GP distribution in the gel-phase vesicles is relatively narrow, whereas the GP distribution in the liquid-crystalline phase vesicles (DOPC and DLPC) is broad. Analysis of images obtained with polarized excitation of the liquid-crystalline phase vesicles leads to the conclusion that coexisting regions of different GP must have dimensions smaller than the microscope resolution (approximately 200 nm radially and 600 nm axially). Vesicles of an equimolar mixture of DOPC and DPPC show coexisting rigid and fluid domains (high GP and low GP), but the rigid domains, which are preferentially excited by polarized light, have GP values lower than the pure gel-phase domains. Cholesterol strongly modifies the domain morphology. In the presence of 30 mol% cholesterol, the broad GP distribution of the DOPC/DPPC equimolar sample becomes narrower. The sample is still very heterogeneous, as demonstrated by the separations of GP disjoined regions, which are the result of photoselection of regions of different lipid orientation. In intact red blood cells, microscopic regions of different GP can be resolved, whereas in the renal cells GP domains have dimensions smaller than the microscope resolution. Preparations of renal apical brush border membranes and basolateral membranes show well-resolved GP domains, which may result from a different local orientation, or the domains may reflect a real heterogeneity of these membranes. PMID:9168019

  5. Regulation of Rac1 translocation and activation by membrane domains and their boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Moissoglu, Konstadinos; Kiessling, Volker; Wan, Chen; Hoffman, Brenton D.; Norambuena, Andres; Tamm, Lukas K.; Schwartz, Martin Alexander

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The activation of Rac1 and related Rho GTPases involves dissociation from Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor proteins and translocation to membranes, where they bind effectors. Previous studies have suggested that the binding of Rac1 to membranes requires, and colocalizes with, cholesterol-rich liquid-ordered (lo) membrane domains (lipid rafts). Here, we have developed a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay that robustly detects Rac1 membrane targeting in living cells. Surprisingly, FRET with acceptor constructs that were targeted to either raft or non-raft areas indicated that Rac1 was present in both regions. Functional studies showed that Rac1 localization to non-raft regions decreased GTP loading as a result of inactivation by GTPase-activating proteins. In vitro, Rac1 translocation to supported lipid bilayers also required lo domains, yet Rac1 was concentrated in the liquid-disordered (ld) phase. Single-molecule analysis demonstrated that translocation occurred preferentially at lo–ld boundaries. These results, therefore, suggest that Rac1 translocates to the membrane at domain boundaries, then diffuses into raft and non-raft domains, which controls interactions. These findings resolve discrepancies in our understanding of Rac biology and identify novel mechanisms by which lipid rafts modulate Rho GTPase signaling. PMID:24695858

  6. Phase Separation on Bicontinuous Cubic Membranes: Symmetry Breaking, Reentrant, and Domain Faceting.

    PubMed

    Paillusson, Fabien; Pennington, Matthew R; Kusumaatmaja, Halim

    2016-07-29

    We study the phase separation of binary lipid mixtures that form bicontinuous cubic phases. The competition between the nonuniform Gaussian membrane curvature and line tension leads to a very rich phase diagram, where we observe symmetry breaking of the membrane morphologies and reentrant phenomena due to the formation of bridges between segregated domains. Upon increasing the line tension contribution, we also find faceting of lipid domains that we explain using a simple argument based on the symmetry of the underlying surface and topology. PMID:27517794

  7. LdFlabarin, a New BAR Domain Membrane Protein of Leishmania Flagellum

    PubMed Central

    Thonnus, Magali; Salin, Bénédicte; Boissier, Fanny; Blancard, Corinne; Sauvanet, Cécile; Metzler, Christelle; Espiau, Benoît; Sahin, Annelise; Merlin, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    During the Leishmania life cycle, the flagellum undergoes successive assembly and disassembly of hundreds of proteins. Understanding these processes necessitates the study of individual components. Here, we investigated LdFlabarin, an uncharacterized L. donovani flagellar protein. The gene is conserved within the Leishmania genus and orthologous genes only exist in the Trypanosoma genus. LdFlabarin associates with the flagellar plasma membrane, extending from the base to the tip of the flagellum as a helicoidal structure. Site-directed mutagenesis, deletions and chimera constructs showed that LdFlabarin flagellar addressing necessitates three determinants: an N-terminal potential acylation site and a central BAR domain for membrane targeting and the C-terminal domain for flagellar specificity. In vitro, the protein spontaneously associates with liposomes, triggering tubule formation, which suggests a structural/morphogenetic function. LdFlabarin is the first characterized Leishmania BAR domain protein, and the first flagellum-specific BAR domain protein. PMID:24086735

  8. Opening of holes in liposomal membranes is induced by proteins possessing the FERM domain.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shuichi; Saitoh, Akihiko; Furuta, Mayumi; Satomi, Nao; Ishino, Atsushi; Nishida, Gakushi; Sudo, Hiroaki; Hotani, Hirokazu; Takiguchi, Kingo

    2006-09-22

    The destabilization of vesicles caused by interactions between lipid bilayers and proteins was studied by direct, real-time observation using high-intensity dark-field microscopy. We previously reported that talin, a cytoskeletal submembranous protein, can reversibly open stable large holes in giant liposomes made of neutral and acidic phospholipids. Talin and other proteins belonging to the band 4.1 superfamily have the FERM domain at their N-terminal and interact with lipid membranes via that domain. Here, we observed that band 4.1, ezrin and moesin, members of the band 4.1 superfamily, are also able to open stable holes in liposomes. However, truncation of their C-terminal domains, which can interact with the N-terminal FERM domain, impaired their hole opening activities. Oligomeric states of ezrin affected the capability of the membrane hole formation. Phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2), which binds to the FERM domain and disrupts the interaction between the N and C termini of the band 4.1 superfamily, down-regulates their membrane opening activity. These results suggest that the intermolecular interaction plays a key role in the observed membrane hole formation. PMID:16934293

  9. Gramicidin Induce Local Non-Uniform Distribution of Lipids in Multi-Component Membrane Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yu; Hussain, Fazle; Huang, Juyang

    2015-03-01

    In lipid membranes, gramicidin form trans-membrane channels that are specific for monovalent cations. We performed Molecular Dynamics simulations of gramicidin in coexisting liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid disordered (Ld) domains using GROMACS. The lipid compositions of Lo and Ld domains are DOPC/DSPC/Cholesterol = 6.5/52.6/40.9 and 74.4/10.6/15, respectively. In the Ld domain, the membrane thickness matches the hydrophobic length of gramicidin quite well, and water molecules can diffuse through the gramicidin channels. However, in the Lo lipid domain, the bilayer thickness is far greater than the hydrophobic length of gramicidin and majority of gramicidin do not form conducting channel. The simulation result explained our experimental finding that gramicidin partition favorably into the Ld domains. The calculated radial distribution functions of lipids indicate that gramicidin recruit a layer of short DOPC surrounding each protein and keep cholesterol and taller DSPC away from the protein-bilayer interface. Our result indicates that membrane proteins are capable of inducing non-uniform distributions of lipids and creating a local bilayer environment, which favors protein function.

  10. Activation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide (eNOS) Occurs through Different Membrane Domains in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Jason; Magenau, Astrid; Rodriguez, Macarena; Rentero, Carles; Royo, Teresa; Enrich, Carlos; Thomas, Shane R.; Grewal, Thomas; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to a large range of stimuli including circulating lipoproteins, growth factors and changes in haemodynamic mechanical forces to regulate the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and maintain blood pressure. While many signalling pathways have been mapped, the identities of membrane domains through which these signals are transmitted are less well characterized. Here, we manipulated bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) with cholesterol and the oxysterol 7-ketocholesterol (7KC). Using a range of microscopy techniques including confocal, 2-photon, super-resolution and electron microscopy, we found that sterol enrichment had differential effects on eNOS and caveolin-1 (Cav1) colocalisation, membrane order of the plasma membrane, caveolae numbers and Cav1 clustering. We found a correlation between cholesterol-induced condensation of the plasma membrane and enhanced high density lipoprotein (HDL)-induced eNOS activity and phosphorylation suggesting that cholesterol domains, but not individual caveolae, mediate HDL stimulation of eNOS. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced and shear stress-induced eNOS activity was relatively independent of membrane order and may be predominantly controlled by the number of caveolae on the cell surface. Taken together, our data suggest that signals that activate and phosphorylate eNOS are transmitted through distinct membrane domains in endothelial cells. PMID:26977592

  11. Nano-domain formation in charged membranes: Beyond the Debye-Hückel approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Ryuichi; Shimokawa, Naofumi; Komura, Shigeyuki

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the microphase separation in a membrane composed of charged lipids, by taking into account explicitly the electrostatic potential and the ion densities in the surrounding solvent. While the overall (membrane and solvent) charge neutrality is assumed, the membrane can have a non-zero net charge. The static structure factor in the homogeneous state is analytically obtained without using the Debye-Hückel approximation and is found to have a peak at an intermediate wave number. For a binary membrane composed of anionic and neutral lipids, the characteristic wave number corresponds to a scale from several to tens of nanometers. Our numerical calculation further predicts the existence of nano-domains in charged membranes.

  12. Tracking Cholesterol/Sphingomyelin-Rich Membrane Domains with the Ostreolysin A-mCherry Protein

    PubMed Central

    Skočaj, Matej; Resnik, Nataša; Grundner, Maja; Ota, Katja; Rojko, Nejc; Hodnik, Vesna; Anderluh, Gregor; Sobota, Andrzej; Maček, Peter; Veranič, Peter; Sepčić, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Ostreolysin A (OlyA) is an ∼15-kDa protein that has been shown to bind selectively to membranes rich in cholesterol and sphingomyelin. In this study, we investigated whether OlyA fluorescently tagged at the C-terminal with mCherry (OlyA-mCherry) labels cholesterol/sphingomyelin domains in artificial membrane systems and in membranes of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells. OlyA-mCherry showed similar lipid binding characteristics to non-tagged OlyA. OlyA-mCherry also stained cholesterol/sphingomyelin domains in the plasma membranes of both fixed and living MDCK cells, and in the living cells, this staining was abolished by pretreatment with either methyl-β-cyclodextrin or sphingomyelinase. Double labelling of MDCK cells with OlyA-mCherry and the sphingomyelin-specific markers equinatoxin II–Alexa488 and GST-lysenin, the cholera toxin B subunit as a probe that binds to the ganglioside GM1, or the cholesterol-specific D4 domain of perfringolysin O fused with EGFP, showed different patterns of binding and distribution of OlyA-mCherry in comparison with these other proteins. Furthermore, we show that OlyA-mCherry is internalised in living MDCK cells, and within 90 min it reaches the juxtanuclear region via caveolin-1–positive structures. No binding to membranes could be seen when OlyA-mCherry was expressed in MDCK cells. Altogether, these data clearly indicate that OlyA-mCherry is a promising tool for labelling a distinct pool of cholesterol/sphingomyelin membrane domains in living and fixed cells, and for following these domains when they are apparently internalised by the cell. PMID:24664106

  13. Membrane translocation assay based on proteolytic cleavage: Application to diphtheria toxin T domain

    PubMed Central

    Rodnin, Mykola V.; Ladokhin, Alexey S.

    2014-01-01

    The function of diphtheria toxin translocation (T) domain is to transfer the catalytic domain across the endosomal membrane upon acidification. The goal of this study was to develop and apply an in vitro functional assay for T domain activity, suitable for investigation of structure-function relationships of translocation across lipid bilayers of various compositions. Traditionally, T domain activity in vitro is estimated by measuring either conductance in planar lipid bilayers or the release of fluorescent markers from lipid vesicles. While an in vivo cell death assay is the most relevant to physiological function, it cannot be applied to studying the effects of pH or membrane lipid composition on translocation. Here we suggest an assay based on cleavage of the N-terminal part of T domain upon translocation into protease-loaded vesicles. A series of control experiment was used to confirm that cleavage occurs inside the vesicle and not as the result of vesicle disruption. Translocation of the N-terminus of the T domain is shown to require the presence of a critical fraction of anionic lipids, which is consistent with our previous biophysical measurements of insertion. Application of the proposed assay to a series of T domain mutants correlated well with the results of cytotoxicity assay. PMID:25291602

  14. Groundnut Bud Necrosis Virus Encoded NSm Associates with Membranes via Its C-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pratibha; Indi, Shantinath S.; Savithri, Handanahal S.

    2014-01-01

    Groundnut Bud Necrosis Virus (GBNV) is a tripartite ambisense RNA plant virus that belongs to serogroup IV of Tospovirus genus. Non-Structural protein-m (NSm), which functions as movement protein in tospoviruses, is encoded by the M RNA. In this communication, we demonstrate that despite the absence of any putative transmembrane domain, GBNV NSm associates with membranes when expressed in E. coli as well as in N. benthamiana. Incubation of refolded NSm with liposomes ranging in size from 200–250 nm resulted in changes in the secondary and tertiary structure of NSm. A similar behaviour was observed in the presence of anionic and zwitterionic detergents. Furthermore, the morphology of the liposomes was found to be modified in the presence of NSm. Deletion of coiled coil domain resulted in the inability of in planta expressed NSm to interact with membranes. Further, when the C-terminal coiled coil domain alone was expressed, it was found to be associated with membrane. These results demonstrate that NSm associates with membranes via the C-terminal coiled coil domain and such an association may be important for movement of viral RNA from cell to cell. PMID:24919116

  15. Nucleocytoplasmic transport in the midzone membrane domain controls yeast mitotic spindle disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Lucena, Rafael; Dephoure, Noah; Gygi, Steve P.; Kellogg, Douglas R.; Tallada, Victor A.

    2015-01-01

    During each cell cycle, the mitotic spindle is efficiently assembled to achieve chromosome segregation and then rapidly disassembled as cells enter cytokinesis. Although much has been learned about assembly, how spindles disassemble at the end of mitosis remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that nucleocytoplasmic transport at the membrane domain surrounding the mitotic spindle midzone, here named the midzone membrane domain (MMD), is essential for spindle disassembly in Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells. We show that, during anaphase B, Imp1-mediated transport of the AAA-ATPase Cdc48 protein at the MMD allows this disassembly factor to localize at the spindle midzone, thereby promoting spindle midzone dissolution. Our findings illustrate how a separate membrane compartment supports spindle disassembly in the closed mitosis of fission yeast. PMID:25963819

  16. SMP-domain proteins at membrane contact sites: Structure and function.

    PubMed

    Reinisch, Karin M; De Camilli, Pietro

    2016-08-01

    SMP-domains are found in proteins that localize to membrane contact sites. Elucidation of the properties of these proteins gives clues as to the molecular bases underlying processes that occur at such sites. Described here are recent discoveries concerning the structure, function, and regulation of the Extended-Synaptotagmin proteins and ERMES complex subunits, SMP-domain proteins at endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-plasma membrane and ER-mitochondrial contacts, respectively. They act as tethers contributing to the architecture of these sites and as lipid transporters that convey glycerolipids between apposed membranes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon. PMID:26686281

  17. Endogenous sphingomyelin segregates into submicrometric domains in the living erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Carquin, Mélanie; Pollet, Hélène; Veiga-da-Cunha, Maria; Cominelli, Antoine; Van Der Smissen, Patrick; N'kuli, Francisca; Emonard, Hervé; Henriet, Patrick; Mizuno, Hideaki; Courtoy, Pierre J; Tyteca, Donatienne

    2014-07-01

    We recently reported that trace insertion of exogenous fluorescent (green BODIPY) analogs of sphingomyelin (SM) into living red blood cells (RBCs), partially spread onto coverslips, labels submicrometric domains, visible by confocal microscopy. We here extend this feature to endogenous SM, upon binding of a SM-specific nontoxic (NT) fragment of the earthworm toxin, lysenin, fused to the red monomeric fluorescent protein, mCherry [construct named His-mCherry-NT-lysenin (lysenin*)]. Specificity of lysenin* binding was verified with composition-defined liposomes and by loss of (125)I-lysenin* binding to erythrocytes upon SM depletion by SMase. The (125)I-lysenin* binding isotherm indicated saturation at 3.5 × 10(6) molecules/RBC, i.e., ∼3% of SM coverage. Nonsaturating lysenin* concentration also labeled sub-micrometric domains on the plasma membrane of partially spread erythrocytes, colocalizing with inserted green BODIPY-SM, and abrogated by SMase. Lysenin*-labeled domains were stable in time and space and were regulated by temperature and cholesterol. The abundance, size, positioning, and segregation of lysenin*-labeled domains from other lipids (BODIPY-phosphatidylcholine or -glycosphingolipids) depended on membrane tension. Similar lysenin*-labeled domains were evidenced in RBCs gently suspended in 3D-gel. Taken together, these data demonstrate submicrometric compartmentation of endogenous SM at the membrane of a living cell in vitro, and suggest it may be a genuine feature of erythrocytes in vivo. PMID:24826836

  18. Damping identification in frequency domain using integral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhiwei; Sheng, Meiping; Ma, Jiangang; Zhang, Wulin

    2015-03-01

    A new method for damping identification of linear system in frequency domain is presented, by using frequency response function (FRF) with integral method. The FRF curve is firstly transformed to other type of frequency-related curve by changing the representations of horizontal and vertical axes. For the newly constructed frequency-related curve, integral is conducted and the area forming from the new curve is used to determine the damping. Three different methods based on integral are proposed in this paper, which are called FDI-1, FDI-2 and FDI-3 method, respectively. For a single degree of freedom (Sdof) system, the formulated relation of each method between integrated area and loss factor is derived theoretically. The numeral simulation and experiment results show that, the proposed integral methods have high precision, strong noise resistance and are very stable in repeated measurements. Among the three integral methods, FDI-3 method is the most recommended because of its higher accuracy and simpler algorithm. The new methods are limited to linear system in which modes are well separated, and for closely spaced mode system, mode decomposition process should be conducted firstly.

  19. MALDI Tissue Profiling of Integral Membrane Proteins from Ocular Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Thibault, Danielle B.; Gillam, Christopher J.; Grey, Angus C.; Han, Jun; Schey, Kevin L.

    2008-01-01

    MALDI tissue profiling and imaging have become valuable tools for rapid, direct analysis of tissues to investigate spatial distributions of proteins, potentially leading to an enhanced understanding of the molecular basis of disease. Sample preparation methods developed to date for these techniques produce protein expression profiles from predominantly hydrophilic, soluble proteins. The ability to obtain information about the spatial distribution of integral membrane proteins is critical to more fully understand their role in physiological processes, including transport, adhesion, and signaling. In this communication, a sample preparation method for direct tissue profiling of integral membrane proteins is presented. Spatially resolved profiles for the abundant lens membrane proteins aquaporin 0 (AQP0) and MP20, and the retinal membrane protein opsin, were obtained using this method. MALDI tissue profiling results were validated by analysis of dissected tissue prepared by traditional membrane protein processing methods. Furthermore, direct tissue profiling of lens membrane proteins revealed aged related post-translational modifications, as well as a novel modification that had not been detected using conventional tissue homogenization methods. PMID:18396059

  20. GPI-anchored proteins do not reside in ordered domains in the live cell plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Sevcsik, Eva; Brameshuber, Mario; Fölser, Martin; Weghuber, Julian; Honigmann, Alf; Schütz, Gerhard J

    2015-01-01

    The organization of proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane has been the subject of a long-lasting debate. Membrane rafts of higher lipid chain order were proposed to mediate protein interactions, but have thus far not been directly observed. Here we use protein micropatterning combined with single-molecule tracking to put current models to the test: we rearranged lipid-anchored raft proteins (glycosylphosphatidylinositol(GPI)-anchored-mGFP) directly in the live cell plasma membrane and measured the effect on the local membrane environment. Intriguingly, this treatment does neither nucleate the formation of an ordered membrane phase nor result in any enrichment of nanoscopic-ordered domains within the micropatterned regions. In contrast, we find that immobilized mGFP-GPIs behave as inert obstacles to the diffusion of other membrane constituents without influencing their membrane environment over distances beyond their physical size. Our results indicate that phase partitioning is not a fundamental element of protein organization in the plasma membrane. PMID:25897971

  1. GPI-anchored proteins do not reside in ordered domains in the live cell plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Sevcsik, Eva; Brameshuber, Mario; Fölser, Martin; Weghuber, Julian; Honigmann, Alf; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2015-01-01

    The organization of proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane has been subject of a long-lasting debate. Membrane rafts of higher lipid chain order were proposed to mediate protein interactions, but have thus far not been directly observed. Here, we use protein micropatterning combined with single-molecule tracking to put current models to the test: we rearranged lipid-anchored raft proteins (glycosylphosphatidylinositol(GPI)-anchored mGFP) directly in the live cell plasma membrane and measured the effect on the local membrane environment. Intriguingly, this treatment does neither nucleate the formation of an ordered membrane phase, nor result in any enrichment of nanoscopic ordered domains within the micropatterned regions. In contrast, we find that immobilized mGFP-GPIs behave as inert obstacles to the diffusion of other membrane constituents without influencing their membrane environment over distances beyond their physical size. Our results indicate that phase partitioning is not a fundamental element of protein organization in the plasma membrane. PMID:25897971

  2. Efficient integration of a realistic two-dimensional cardiac tissue model by domain decomposition.

    PubMed

    Quan, W; Evans, S J; Hastings, H M

    1998-03-01

    The size of realistic cardiac tissue models has been limited by their high computational demands. In particular, the Luo-Rudy phase II membrane model, used to simulate a thin sheet of ventricular tissue with arrays of coupled ventricular myocytes, is usually limited to 100 x 100 arrays. We introduce a new numerical method based on domain decomposition and a priority queue integration scheme which reduces the computational cost by a factor of 3-17. In the standard algorithm all the nodes advance with the same time step delta t, whose size is limited by the time scale of activation. However, at any given time, many regions may be inactive and do not require the same small delta t and consequent extensive computations. Hence, adjusting delta t locally is a key factor in improving computational efficiency, since most of the computing time is spent calculating ionic currents. This paper proposes an efficient adaptive numerical scheme for integrating a two-dimensional (2-D) propagation model, by incorporating local adjustments of delta t. In this method, alternating direction Cooley-Dodge and Rush-Larsen methods were used for numerical integration. Between consecutive integrations over the whole domain using an implicit method, the model was spatially decomposed into many subdomains, and delta t adjusted locally. The Euler method was used for numerical integration in the subdomains. Local boundary values were determined from the boundary mesh elements of the neighboring subdomains using linear interpolation. Because delta t was defined locally, a priority queue was used to store and order next update times for each subdomain. The subdomain with the earliest update time was given the highest priority and advanced first. This new method yielded stable solutions with relative errors less than 1% and reduced computation time by a factor of 3-17 and will allow much larger (e.g., 500 x 500) models based on realistic membrane kinetics and realistic dimensions to simulate

  3. Membranes for the Sulfur-Iodine Integrated Laboratory Scale Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick F. Stewart

    2007-08-01

    INL has developed polymeric membrane-based chemical separations to enable the thermochemical production of hydrogen. Major activities included studies of sulfuric acid concentration membranes, hydriodic acid concentration membranes, SO2/O2 separation membranes, potential applications of a catalyst reactor system for the decomposition of HI, and evaluation of the chemical separation needs for alternate thermochemical cycles. Membranes for the concentration of sulfuric acid were studied using pervaporation. The goal of this task was to offer the sulfur-iodine (S-I) and the hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycles a method to concentrate the sulfuric acid containing effluent from the decomposer without boiling. In this work, sulfuric acid decomposer effluent needs to be concentrated from ~50 % acid to 80 %. This task continued FY 2006 efforts to characterize water selective membranes for use in sulfuric acid concentration. In FY 2007, experiments were conducted to provide specific information, including transmembrane fluxes, separation factors, and membrane durability, necessary for proper decision making on the potential inclusion of this process into the S-I or HyS Integrated Laboratory Scale demonstration.

  4. Eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits glucose-induced membrane cholesterol crystalline domain formation through a potent antioxidant mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mason, R Preston; Jacob, Robert F

    2015-02-01

    Lipid oxidation leads to endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and foam cell formation during atherogenesis. Glucose also contributes to lipid oxidation and promotes pathologic changes in membrane structural organization, including the development of cholesterol crystalline domains. In this study, we tested the comparative effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), an omega-3 fatty acid indicated for the treatment of very high triglyceride (TG) levels, and other TG-lowering agents (fenofibrate, niacin, and gemfibrozil) on lipid oxidation in human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) as well as membrane lipid vesicles prepared in the presence of glucose (200 mg/dL). We also examined the antioxidant effects of EPA in combination with atorvastatin o-hydroxy (active) metabolite (ATM). Glucose-induced changes in membrane structural organization were measured using small angle x-ray scattering approaches and correlated with changes in lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH) levels. EPA was found to inhibit LDL oxidation in a dose-dependent manner (1.0-10.0 µM) and was distinguished from the other TG-lowering agents, which had no significant effect as compared to vehicle treatment alone. Similar effects were observed in membrane lipid vesicles exposed to hyperglycemic conditions. The antioxidant activity of EPA, as observed in glucose-treated vesicles, was significantly enhanced in combination with ATM. Glucose treatment produced highly-ordered, membrane-restricted, cholesterol crystalline domains, which correlated with increased LOOH levels. Of the agents tested in this study, only EPA inhibited glucose-induced cholesterol domain formation. These data demonstrate that EPA, at pharmacologic levels, inhibits hyperglycemia-induced changes in membrane lipid structural organization through a potent antioxidant mechanism associated with its distinct, physicochemical interactions with the membrane bilayer. PMID:25449996

  5. Photonic integration in indium-phosphide membranes on silicon (IMOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Tol, Jos; Pello, Josselin; Bhat, Shrivatsa; Jiao, Yuqing; Heiss, Dominik; Roelkens, Gunther; Ambrosius, Huub; Smit, Meint

    2014-03-01

    A new photonic integration technique is presented, based on the use of an indium phosphide membrane on top of a silicon chip. This can provide electronic chips (CMOS) with an added optical layer (IMOS) for resolving the communication bottleneck. A major advantage of InP is the possibility to integrate passive and active components (SOAs, lasers) in a single membrane. In this paper we describe progress achieved in both the passive and active components. For the passive part of the circuit we succeeded to bring the propagation loss of our circuits close to the values obtained with silicon; we achieved propagation loss as low as 3.3 dB/cm through optimization of the lithography and the introduction of C60 (fullerene) in an electro resist. Further we report the smallest polarisation converter reported for membrane waveguides ( <10 μm) with low-loss (< 1 dB from 1520- 1550 nm), > 95% polarisation conversion efficiency over the whole C-band and tolerant fabrication. We also demonstrate an InP-membrane wavelength demultiplexer with a loss of 2.8 dB, a crosstalk level of better than 18 dB and a uniformity over the 8 channels of better than 1.2 dB. For the integration of active components we are testing a twin guide integration scheme. We present our design based on optical and electrical simulations and the fabrication techniques.

  6. AHEAD: Integrated Activities in the High Energy Astrophysics Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piro, Luigi; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Ahead Consortium

    2015-09-01

    AHEAD (Integrated Activities in the High Energy Astrophysics Domain) is a forthcoming project approved in the framework of the European Horizon 2020 program (Research Infrastructures for High Energy Astrophysics). The overall objective of AHEAD is to integrate national efforts in high-energy Astrophysics and to promote the domain at the European level, to keep its community at the cutting edge of science and technology and ensure that space observatories for high-energy astrophysics, with particular regard to Athena, are at the state of the art. AHEAD will integrate key research infrastructures for on-ground test and calibration of space-based sensors and electronics and promote their coordinated use. In parallel, the best facilities for data analysis of high-energy astrophysical observatories will be made available to the European community. The technological development will focus on the improvement of selected critical technologies, background modeling, cross calibration, and feasibility studies of space-based instrumentation for the benefit of future high energy missions like Athena, and the best exploitation of existing observatories. AHEAD will support the community via grants for collaborative studies, dissemination of results, and promotion of workshops. A strong public outreach package will ensure that the domain is well publicized at national, European and International level. Networking, joint research activities and access to infrastructures as devised in AHEAD, will serve to establish strong connections between institutes and industry to create the basis for a more rapid advancement of high-energy astrophysical science, space oriented instrumentation and cutting-edge sensor technology in Europe. This enables the development of new technologies and the associated growth of the European technology market with a dedicated technology innovation package, as well as the creation of a new generation of researchers.

  7. In Situ Determination of Structure and Fluctuations of Coexisting Fluid Membrane Domains

    PubMed Central

    Heftberger, Peter; Kollmitzer, Benjamin; Rieder, Alexander A.; Amenitsch, Heinz; Pabst, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Biophysical understanding of membrane domains requires accurate knowledge of their structural details and elasticity. We report on a global small angle x-ray scattering data analysis technique for coexisting liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered (Ld) domains in fully hydrated multilamellar vesicles. This enabled their detailed analysis for differences in membrane thickness, area per lipid, hydrocarbon chain length, and bending fluctuation as demonstrated for two ternary mixtures (DOPC/DSPC/CHOL and DOPC/DPPC/CHOL) at different cholesterol concentrations. Lo domains were found to be ∼10 Å thicker, and laterally up to 20 Å2/lipid more condensed than Ld domains. Their bending fluctuations were also reduced by ∼65%. Increase of cholesterol concentration caused significant changes in structural properties of Ld, while its influence on Lo properties was marginal. We further observed that temperature-induced melting of Lo domains is associated with a diffusion of cholesterol to Ld domains and controlled by Lo/Ld thickness differences. PMID:25692590

  8. Investigation of system integration methods for bubble domain flight recorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, T. T.; Bohning, O. D.

    1975-01-01

    System integration methods for bubble domain flight records are investigated. Bubble memory module packaging and assembly, the control electronics design and construction, field coils, and permanent magnet bias structure design are studied. A small 60-k bit engineering model was built and tested to demonstrate the feasibility of the bubble recorder. Based on the various studies performed, a projection is made on a 50,000,000-bit prototype recorder. It is estimated that the recorder will occupy 190 cubic in., weigh 12 lb, and consume 12 w power when all of its four tracks are operated in parallel at 150 kHz data rate.

  9. Lipid Membrane Deformation Accompanied by Disk-to-Ring Shape Transition of Cholesterol-Rich Domains.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Yoo, Daehan; Wittenberg, Nathan J; Jordan, Luke R; Lee, Sin-Doo; Parikh, Atul N; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2015-07-15

    During vesicle budding or endocytosis, biomembranes undergo a series of lipid- and protein-mediated deformations involving cholesterol-enriched lipid rafts. If lipid rafts of high bending rigidities become confined to the incipient curved membrane topology such as a bud-neck interface, they can be expected to reform as ring-shaped rafts. Here, we report on the observation of a disk-to-ring shape morpho-chemical transition of a model membrane in the absence of geometric constraints. The raft shape transition is triggered by lateral compositional heterogeneity and is accompanied by membrane deformation in the vertical direction, which is detected by height-sensitive fluorescence interference contrast microscopy. Our results suggest that a flat membrane can become curved simply by dynamic changes in local chemical composition and shape transformation of cholesterol-rich domains. PMID:26053547

  10. Chain ordering of hybrid lipids can stabilize domains in saturated/hybrid/cholesterol lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Brewster, R.; Safran, S. A.

    2010-07-01

    We use a liquid-crystal model to predict that hybrid lipids (lipids that have one saturated and one unsaturated tail) can stabilize line interfaces between domains in mixed membranes of saturated lipids, hybrid lipids, and cholesterol (SHC membranes). The model predicts the phase separation of SHC membranes with both parabolic and loop binodals depending on the cholesterol concentration, modeled via an effective pressure. In some cases, the hybrid lipids can reduce the line tension to zero in SHC membranes at temperatures that approach the critical temperature as the pressure is increased. The differences in the hybrid saturated tail conformational order in bulk and at the interface are responsible for the reduction of the line tension.

  11. Multiple membrane-cytoplasmic domain contacts in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mediate regulation of channel gating.

    PubMed

    He, Lihua; Aleksandrov, Andrei A; Serohijos, Adrian W R; Hegedus, Tamás; Aleksandrov, Luba A; Cui, Liying; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Riordan, John R

    2008-09-26

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a unique ATP-binding cassette (ABC) ion channel mutated in patients with cystic fibrosis. The most common mutation, deletion of phenylalanine 508 (DeltaF508) and many other disease-associated mutations occur in the nucleotide binding domains (NBD) and the cytoplasmic loops (CL) of the membrane-spanning domains (MSD). A recently constructed computational model of the CFTR three-dimensional structure, supported by experimental data (Serohijos, A. W., Hegedus, T., Aleksandrov, A. A., He, L., Cui, L., Dokholyan, N. V., and Riordan, J. R. (2008) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 105, 3256-3261) revealed that several of these mutations including DeltaF508 disrupted interfaces between these domains. Here we have used cysteine cross-linking experiments to verify all NBD/CL interfaces predicted by the structural model and observed that their cross-linking has a variety of different effects on channel gating. The interdomain contacts comprise aromatic clusters important for stabilization of the interfaces and also involve the Q-loops and X-loops that are in close proximity to the ATP binding sites. Cross-linking of all domain-swapping contacts between NBDs and MSD cytoplasmic loops in opposite halves of the protein rapidly and reversibly arrest single channel gating while those in the same halves have lesser impact. These results reinforce the idea that mediation of regulatory signals between cytoplasmic- and membrane-integrated domains of the CFTR channel apparently relies on an array of precise but highly dynamic interdomain structural joints. PMID:18658148

  12. The tail domain of tomosyn controls membrane fusion through tomosyn displacement by VAMP2

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yasunori; Fujikura, Kohei; Sakaue, Mio; Okimura, Kenjiro; Kobayashi, Yuta; Nakamura, Toshihiro; Sakisaka, Toshiaki

    2010-08-13

    Research highlights: {yields} The tail domain of tomosyn has no effect on the tomosyn-SNARE complex formation. {yields} The tail domain binding to the VAMP-like domain allows VAMP2 to displace tomosyn. {yields} Tomosyn displacement by VAMP2 leads to SNARE complex formation. {yields} The SNARE complex formation drives membrane fusion. -- Abstract: Neurotransmitter release is regulated by SNARE complex-mediated synaptic vesicle fusion. Tomosyn sequesters target SNAREs (t-SNAREs) through its C-terminal VAMP-like domain (VLD). Cumulative biochemical results suggest that the tomosyn-SNARE complex is so tight that VAMP2 cannot displace tomosyn. Based on these results, the tomosyn-SNARE complex has been believed to be a dead-end complex to inhibit neurotransmitter release. On the other hand, some studies using siRNA depletion of tomosyn suggest that tomosyn positively regulates exocytosis. Therefore, it is still controversial whether tomosyn is a simple inhibitor for neurotransmitter release. We recently reported that the inhibitory activity of tomosyn is regulated by the tail domain binding to the VLD. In this study, we employed the liposome fusion assay in order to further understand modes of action of tomosyn in detail. The tail domain unexpectedly had no effect on binding of the VLD to t-SNARE-bearing liposomes. Nonetheless, the tail domain decreased the inhibitory activity of the VLD on the SNARE complex-mediated liposome fusion. These results indicate that the tail domain controls membrane fusion through tomosyn displacement by VAMP2. Deletion of the tail domain-binding region in the VLD retained the binding to t-SNAREs and promoted the liposome fusion. Together, we propose here a novel mechanism of tomosyn that controls synaptic vesicle fusion positively by serving as a placeholder for VAMP2.

  13. The solution structure of the C-terminal domain of NfeD reveals a novel membrane-anchored OB-fold.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Yohta; Ohno, Ayako; Morii, Taichi; Yokoyama, Hideshi; Matsui, Ikuo; Tochio, Hidehito; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2008-11-01

    Nodulation formation efficiency D (NfeD) is a member of a class of membrane-anchored ClpP-class proteases. There is a second class of NfeD homologs that lack the ClpP domain. The genes of both NfeD classes usually are part of an operon that also contains a gene for a prokaryotic homolog of stomatin. (Stomatin is a major integral-membrane protein of mammalian erythrocytes.) Such NfeD/stomatin homolog gene pairs are present in more than 290 bacterial and archaeal genomes, and their protein products may be part of the machinery used for quality control of membrane proteins. Herein, we report the structure of the isolated C-terminal domain of PH0471, a Pyrococcus horikoshii NfeD homolog, which lacks the ClpP domain. This C-terminal domain (termed NfeDC) contains a five-strand beta-barrel, which is structurally very similar to the OB-fold (oligosaccharide/oligonucleotide-binding fold) domain. However, there is little sequence similarity between it and previously characterized OB-fold domains. The NfeDC domain lacks the conserved surface residues that are necessary for the binding of an OB-fold domain to DNA/RNA, an ion. Instead, its surface is composed of residues that are uniquely conserved in NfeD homologs and that form the structurally conserved surface turns and beta-bulges. There is also a conserved tryptophan present on the surface. We propose that, in general, NfeDC domains may interact with other spatially proximal membrane proteins and thereby regulate their activities. PMID:18687870

  14. DNA damage targets PKC{eta} to the nuclear membrane via its C1b domain

    SciTech Connect

    Tamarkin, Ana; Zurgil, Udi; Braiman, Alex; Hai, Naama; Krasnitsky, Ella; Maissel, Adva; Ben-Ari, Assaf; Yankelovich, Liat; Livneh, Etta

    2011-06-10

    Translocation to cellular membranes is one of the hallmarks of PKC activation, occurring as a result of the generation of lipid secondary messengers in target membrane compartments. The activation-induced translocation of PKCs and binding to membranes is largely directed by their regulatory domains. We have previously reported that PKC{eta}, a member of the novel subfamily and an epithelial specific isoform, is localized at the cytoplasm and ER/Golgi and is translocated to the plasma membrane and the nuclear envelope upon short-term activation by PMA. Here we show that PKC{eta} is shuttling between the cytoplasm and the nucleus and that upon etoposide induced DNA damage is tethered at the nuclear envelope. Although PKC{eta} expression and its phosphorylation on the hydrophobic motif (Ser675) are increased by etoposide, this phosphorylation is not required for its accumulation at the nuclear envelope. Moreover, we demonstrate that the C1b domain is sufficient for translocation to the nuclear envelope. We further show that, similar to full-length PKC{eta}, the C1b domain could also confer protection against etoposide-induced cell death. Our studies demonstrate translocation of PKC{eta} to the nuclear envelope, and suggest that its spatial regulation could be important for its cellular functions including effects on cell death.

  15. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone-induced depletion of G(q)alpha/G(11)alpha proteins from detergent-insensitive membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Pesanová, Z; Novotný, J; Cerný, J; Milligan, G; Svoboda, P

    1999-12-24

    The role of detergent-insensitive membrane domains (DIMs) in desensitisation of the G protein-coupled receptor-mediated hormone response was studied in clone E2M11 of HEK293 cells which stably express high levels of both thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) receptors and G(11)alpha G protein. DIMs were prepared by flotation in equilibrium sucrose density gradients and characterised by a panel of membrane markers representing peripheral, glycosylphosphatidylinositol-bound as well as integral membrane proteins (caveolin, CD29, CD55, CD59, CD147, the alpha subunit of Na, K-ATPase) and enzyme activities (alkaline phosphatase, adenylyl cyclase). Caveolin-containing DIMs represented only a small fraction of the overall pool of G(q)alpha/G(11)alpha-rich domains. Prolonged stimulation of E2M11 cells with TRH resulted in dramatic depletion of G(q)alpha/G(11)alpha from all DIMs, which was paralleled by a concomitant G(q)alpha/G(11)alpha increase in the high-density gradient fractions containing the bulk-phase membrane constituents soluble in 1% Triton X-100. Distribution of membrane markers was unchanged under these conditions. Membrane domains thus represent a substantial structural determinant of the G protein pool relevant to desensitisation of hormone action. PMID:10611479

  16. Structure and dynamics of nano-sized raft-like domains on the plasma membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Fernando E.; Pantano, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Cell membranes are constitutively composed of thousands of different lipidic species, whose specific organization leads to functional heterogeneities. In particular, sphingolipids, cholesterol and some proteins associate among them to form stable nanoscale domains involved in recognition, signaling, membrane trafficking, etc. Atomic-detail information in the nanometer/second scale is still elusive to experimental techniques. In this context, molecular simulations on membrane systems have provided useful insights contributing to bridge this gap. Here we present the results of a series of simulations of biomembranes representing non-raft and raft-like nano-sized domains in order to analyze the particular structural and dynamical properties of these domains. Our results indicate that the smallest (5 nm) raft domains are able to preserve their distinctive structural and dynamical features, such as an increased thickness, higher ordering, lower lateral diffusion, and specific lipid-ion interactions. The insertion of a transmembrane protein helix into non-raft, extended raft-like, and raft-like nanodomain environments result in markedly different protein orientations, highlighting the interplay between the lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions.

  17. Allosteric signalling in the outer membrane translocation domain of PapC usher

    PubMed Central

    Farabella, Irene; Pham, Thieng; Henderson, Nadine S; Geibel, Sebastian; Phan, Gilles; Thanassi, David G; Delcour, Anne H; Waksman, Gabriel; Topf, Maya

    2014-01-01

    PapC ushers are outer-membrane proteins enabling assembly and secretion of P pili in uropathogenic E. coli. Their translocation domain is a large β-barrel occluded by a plug domain, which is displaced to allow the translocation of pilus subunits across the membrane. Previous studies suggested that this gating mechanism is controlled by a β-hairpin and an α-helix. To investigate the role of these elements in allosteric signal communication, we developed a method combining evolutionary and molecular dynamics studies of the native translocation domain and mutants lacking the β-hairpin and/or the α-helix. Analysis of a hybrid residue interaction network suggests distinct regions (residue ‘communities’) within the translocation domain (especially around β12–β14) linking these elements, thereby modulating PapC gating. Antibiotic sensitivity and electrophysiology experiments on a set of alanine-substitution mutants confirmed functional roles for four of these communities. This study illuminates the gating mechanism of PapC ushers and its importance in maintaining outer-membrane permeability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03532.001 PMID:25271373

  18. Acute acidification of stratum corneum membrane domains using polyhydroxyl acids improves lipid processing and inhibits degradation of corneodesmosomes.

    PubMed

    Hachem, Jean-Pierre; Roelandt, Truus; Schürer, Nanna; Pu, Xu; Fluhr, Joachim; Giddelo, Christina; Man, Mao-Qiang; Crumrine, Debra; Roseeuw, Diane; Feingold, Kenneth R; Mauro, Theodora; Elias, Peter M

    2010-02-01

    Neutralization of the normally acidic stratum corneum (SC) has deleterious consequences for permeability barrier homeostasis and SC integrity/cohesion attributable to serine proteases (SPs) activation leading to deactivation/degradation of lipid-processing enzymes and corneodesmosomes (CD). As an elevated pH compromises SC structure and function, we asked here whether SC hyperacidification would improve the structure and function. We lowered the pH of mouse SC using two polyhydroxyl acids (PHA), lactobionic acid (LBA), or gluconolactone (GL). Applications of the PHA reduced the pH at all levels of SC of hairless mouse, with further selective acidification of SC membrane domains, as shown by fluorescence lifetime imaging. Hyperacidification improved permeability barrier homeostasis, attributable to increased activities of two key membrane-localized, ceramide-generating hydrolytic enzymes (beta-glucocerebrosidase and acidic sphingomyelinase), which correlated with accelerated extracellular maturation of SC lamellar membranes. Hyperacidification generated "supernormal" SC integrity/cohesion, attributable to an SP-dependent decreased degradation of desmoglein-1 (DSG1) and the induction of DSG3 expression in lower SC. As SC hyperacidification improves the structure and function, even of normal epidermis, these studies lay the groundwork for an assessment of the potential utility of SC acidification as a therapeutic strategy for inflammatory dermatoses, characterized by abnormalities in barrier function, cohesion, and surface pH. PMID:19741713

  19. Acute Acidification of Stratum Corneum Membrane Domains Using Polyhydroxyl Acids Improves Lipid Processing and Inhibits Degradation of Corneodesmosomes

    PubMed Central

    Hachem, Jean-Pierre; Roelandt, Truus; Schürer, Nanna; Pu, Xu; Fluhr, Joachim; Giddelo, Christina; Man, Mao-Qiang; Crumrine, Debra; Roseeuw, Diane; Feingold, Kenneth R.; Mauro, Theodora; Elias, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    Neutralization of the normally acidic stratum corneum (SC) has deleterious consequences for permeability barrier homeostasis and SC integrity/cohesion attributable to serine proteases (SPs) activation leading to deactivation/degradation of lipid-processing enzymes and corneodesmosomes (CD). As an elevated pH compromises SC structure and function, we asked here whether SC hyperacidification would improve the structure and function. We lowered the pH of mouse SC using two polyhydroxyl acids (PHA), lactobionic acid (LBA), or gluconolactone (GL). Applications of the PHA reduced the pH at all levels of SC of hairless mouse, with further selective acidification of SC membrane domains, as shown by fluorescence lifetime imaging. Hyperacidification improved permeability barrier homeostasis, attributable to increased activities of two key membrane-localized, ceramide-generating hydrolytic enzymes (β-glucocerebrosidase and acidic sphingomyelinase), which correlated with accelerated extracellular maturation of SC lamellar membranes. Hyperacidification generated “supernormal” SC integrity/cohesion, attributable to an SP-dependent decreased degradation of desmoglein-1 (DSG1) and the induction of DSG3 expression in lower SC. As SC hyperacidification improves the structure and function, even of normal epidermis, these studies lay the groundwork for an assessment of the potential utility of SC acidification as a therapeutic strategy for inflammatory dermatoses, characterized by abnormalities in barrier function, cohesion, and surface pH. PMID:19741713

  20. Membrane curvature sensing by the C-terminal domain of complexin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snead, David; Wragg, Rachel T.; Dittman, Jeremy S.; Eliezer, David

    2014-09-01

    Complexin functions at presynaptic nerve terminals to inhibit spontaneous SNARE-mediated synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis, while enhancing stimulated neurotransmitter release. The C-terminal domain (CTD) of complexin is essential for its inhibitory function and has been implicated in localizing complexin to SVs via direct membrane interactions. Here we show that complexin’s CTD is highly sensitive to membrane curvature, which it senses via tandem motifs, a C-terminal motif containing a mix of bulky hydrophobic and positively charged residues, and an adjacent amphipathic region that can bind membranes in either a disordered or a helical conformation. Helix formation requires membrane packing defects found on highly curved membrane surfaces. Mutations that disrupt helix formation without disrupting membrane binding compromise complexin’s inhibitory function in vivo. Thus, this membrane curvature-dependent conformational transition, combined with curvature-sensitive binding by the adjacent C-terminal motif, constitute a novel mechanism for activating complexin’s inhibitory function on the surface of SVs.

  1. Structure and analysis of FCHo2 F-BAR domain: a dimerizing and membrane recruitment module that effects membrane curvature.

    PubMed

    Henne, William Mike; Kent, Helen M; Ford, Marijn G J; Hegde, Balachandra G; Daumke, Oliver; Butler, P Jonathan G; Mittal, Rohit; Langen, Ralf; Evans, Philip R; McMahon, Harvey T

    2007-07-01

    A spectrum of membrane curvatures exists within cells, and proteins have evolved different modules to detect, create, and maintain these curvatures. Here we present the crystal structure of one such module found within human FCHo2. This F-BAR (extended FCH) module consists of two F-BAR domains, forming an intrinsically curved all-helical antiparallel dimer with a Kd of 2.5 microM. The module binds liposomes via a concave face, deforming them into tubules with variable diameters of up to 130 nm. Pulse EPR studies showed the membrane-bound dimer is the same as the crystal dimer, although the N-terminal helix changed conformation on membrane binding. Mutation of a phenylalanine on this helix partially attenuated narrow tubule formation, and resulted in a gain of curvature sensitivity. This structure shows a distant relationship to curvature-sensing BAR modules, and suggests how similar coiled-coil architectures in the BAR superfamily have evolved to expand the repertoire of membrane-sculpting possibilities. PMID:17540576

  2. The Dysferlin Domain-Only Protein, Spo73, Is Required for Prospore Membrane Extension in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Yuuya; Nakamura, Tsuyoshi S; Tanaka, Takayuki; Inoue, Ichiro; Suda, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Nakanishi, Hideki; Nakamura, Shugo; Gao, Xiao-Dong; Tachikawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Sporulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a developmental process in which an ascus containing four haploid spores forms from a diploid cell. During this process, newly formed membrane structures called prospore membranes extend along the nuclear envelope and engulf and package daughter nuclei along with cytosol and organelles to form precursors of spores. Proteins involved in prospore membrane extension, Vps13 and Spo71, have recently been reported; however, the overall mechanism of membrane extension remains unclear. Here, we identified Spo73 as an additional factor involved in prospore membrane extension. Analysis of a spo73∆ mutant revealed that it shows defects similar to those of a spo71∆ mutant during prospore membrane formation. Spo73 localizes to the prospore membrane, and this localization is independent of Spo71 and Vps13. In contrast, a Spo73 protein carrying mutations in a surface basic patch mislocalizes to the cytoplasm and overexpression of Spo71 can partially rescue localization to the prospore membrane. Similar to spo71∆ mutants, spo73∆ mutants display genetic interactions with the mutations in the SMA2 and SPO1 genes involved in prospore membrane bending. Further, our bioinformatic analysis revealed that Spo73 is a dysferlin domain-only protein. Thus, these results suggest that a dysferlin domain-only protein, Spo73, functions with a dual pleckstrin homology domain protein, Spo71, in prospore membrane extension. Analysis of Spo73 will provide insights into the conserved function of dysferlin domains, which is related to dysferlinopathy. IMPORTANCE Prospore membrane formation consists of de novo double-membrane formation, which occurs during the developmental process of sporulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Membranes are formed into their proper size and shape, and thus, prospore membrane formation has been studied as a general model of membrane formation. We identified SPO73, previously shown to be required for spore wall formation

  3. The Dysferlin Domain-Only Protein, Spo73, Is Required for Prospore Membrane Extension in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Yuuya; Nakamura, Tsuyoshi S.; Tanaka, Takayuki; Inoue, Ichiro; Suda, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Nakanishi, Hideki; Nakamura, Shugo; Gao, Xiao-Dong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sporulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a developmental process in which an ascus containing four haploid spores forms from a diploid cell. During this process, newly formed membrane structures called prospore membranes extend along the nuclear envelope and engulf and package daughter nuclei along with cytosol and organelles to form precursors of spores. Proteins involved in prospore membrane extension, Vps13 and Spo71, have recently been reported; however, the overall mechanism of membrane extension remains unclear. Here, we identified Spo73 as an additional factor involved in prospore membrane extension. Analysis of a spo73∆ mutant revealed that it shows defects similar to those of a spo71∆ mutant during prospore membrane formation. Spo73 localizes to the prospore membrane, and this localization is independent of Spo71 and Vps13. In contrast, a Spo73 protein carrying mutations in a surface basic patch mislocalizes to the cytoplasm and overexpression of Spo71 can partially rescue localization to the prospore membrane. Similar to spo71∆ mutants, spo73∆ mutants display genetic interactions with the mutations in the SMA2 and SPO1 genes involved in prospore membrane bending. Further, our bioinformatic analysis revealed that Spo73 is a dysferlin domain-only protein. Thus, these results suggest that a dysferlin domain-only protein, Spo73, functions with a dual pleckstrin homology domain protein, Spo71, in prospore membrane extension. Analysis of Spo73 will provide insights into the conserved function of dysferlin domains, which is related to dysferlinopathy. IMPORTANCE Prospore membrane formation consists of de novo double-membrane formation, which occurs during the developmental process of sporulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Membranes are formed into their proper size and shape, and thus, prospore membrane formation has been studied as a general model of membrane formation. We identified SPO73, previously shown to be required for spore wall

  4. Factors Influencing Local Membrane Curvature Induction by N-BAR Domains as Revealed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Blood, Philip D.; Swenson, Richard D.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2008-01-01

    N-BAR domains are protein modules that bind to and induce curvature in membranes via a charged concave surface and N-terminal amphipathic helices. Recently, molecular dynamics simulations have demonstrated that the N-BAR domain can induce a strong local curvature that matches the curvature of the BAR domain surface facing the bilayer. Here we present further molecular dynamics simulations that examine in greater detail the roles of the concave surface and amphipathic helices in driving local membrane curvature. We find that the strong curvature induction observed in our previous simulations requires the stable presentation of the charged concave surface to the membrane and is not driven by the membrane-embedded amphipathic helices. Nevertheless, without these amphipathic helices embedded in the membrane, the N-BAR domain does not maintain a close association with the bilayer, and fails to drive membrane curvature. Increasing the membrane negative charge through the addition of PIP2 facilitates closer association with the membrane in the absence of embedded helices. At sufficiently high concentrations, amphipathic helices embedded in the membrane drive membrane curvature independently of the BAR domain. PMID:18469070

  5. Comparison of methods for assessing integrity of equine sperm membranes.

    PubMed

    Foster, M L; Love, C C; Varner, D D; Brinsko, S P; Hinrichs, K; Teague, S; Lacaze, K; Blanchard, T L

    2011-07-15

    Sperm membrane integrity (SMI) is thought to be an important measure of stallion sperm quality. The objective was to compare three methods for evaluating SMI: flow cytometry using SYBR-14/propidium iodide (PI) stain; an automated cell counting device using PI stain; and eosin-nigrosin stain. Raw equine semen was subjected to various treatments containing 20 to 80% seminal plasma in extender, with differing sperm concentrations, to simulate spontaneous loss of SMI. The SMI was assessed immediately, and after 1 and 2 d of cooled storage. Agreement between methods was determined according to Bland-Altman methodology. Eosin-nigrosin staining yielded higher (2%) overall mean values for SMI than did flow cytometry. Flow cytometry yielded higher (6%) overall mean values for SMI than did the automated cell counter. As percentage of membrane-damaged sperm increased, agreement of SMI measurement between methods decreased. When semen contained 50-79% membrane-intact sperm, the 95% limits of agreement between SMI determined by flow cytometry and eosin-nigrosin staining were greater (range = -26.9 to 24.3%; i.e., a 51.2% span) than for SMI determined by flow cytometry and the automated cell counter (range = -3.1 to 17.0%; 20.1% span). When sperm populations contained <50% membrane-intact sperm, the 95% limits of agreement between SMI determined by flow cytometry and eosin-nigrosin staining were greater (range = -35.9 to 19.0%; 54.9% span) than for SMI determined by flow cytometry and the automated cell counter (range = -11.6 to 28.7%; 40.3% span). We concluded that eosin-nigrosin staining assessments of percent membrane-intact sperm agreed less with flow cytometry when <80% of sperm had intact membranes, whereas automated cell counter assessments of percent membrane-intact sperm agreed less with flow cytometry when <30% of sperm had intact membranes. PMID:21496902

  6. Lipid domains in supported SM-Chol membranes measured by GISANS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhernenkov, Mikhail; Dubey, Manish; Toperverg, Boris; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Fitzsimmons, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Cell membranes are known to contain regions (called lipid domains, or rafts) described as sphingolipid-cholesterol assemblies which also may contain a subset of membrane proteins. Currently, the main point of discussion is the methodology to study lipid domains and their sizes. We report on Grazing Incidence Small Angle Neutron Scattering (GISANS) measurements of lipid domains in supported sphingomyelin(SM)-cholesterol(Chol) bilayers in a fully aqueous environment. The model bilayers SM:Chol(2:1), SM:Chol(1:2), and a pure SM were deposited using Langmuir-Blodgett/Langmuir-Schaefer technique at a surface pressure of 10 mN/m and measured at 25rC. First measurements revealed short range inhomogeneities of the order of 100 AA in both binary systems. The control measurement of a pure SM bilayer exhibited nearly no GISANS indicating an absence of lipid domains in the SM bilayer. This observation is consistent with the notion that a single component system studied below the liquid-gel transition temperature will not produce lipid domains. Work was supported by DOE-BES.

  7. TMEM115 is an integral membrane protein of the Golgi complex involved in retrograde transport

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Yan Shan; Tran, Ton Hoai Thi; Gounko, Natalia V.; Hong, Wanjin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Searching and evaluating the Human Protein Atlas for transmembrane proteins enabled us to identify an integral membrane protein, TMEM115, that is enriched in the Golgi complex. Biochemical and cell biological analysis suggested that TMEM115 has four candidate transmembrane domains located in the N-terminal region. Both the N- and C-terminal domains are oriented towards the cytoplasm. Immunofluorescence analysis supports that TMEM115 is enriched in the Golgi cisternae. Functionally, TMEM115 knockdown or overexpression delays Brefeldin-A-induced Golgi-to-ER retrograde transport, phenocopying cells with mutations or silencing of the conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex. Co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro binding experiments reveals that TMEM115 interacts with the COG complex, and might self-interact to form dimers or oligomers. A short region (residues 206–229) immediately to the C-terminal side of the fourth transmembrane domain is both necessary and sufficient for Golgi targeting. Knockdown of TMEM115 also reduces the binding of the lectins peanut agglutinin (PNA) and Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA), suggesting an altered O-linked glycosylation profile. These results establish that TMEM115 is an integral membrane protein of the Golgi stack regulating Golgi-to-ER retrograde transport and is likely to be part of the machinery of the COG complex. PMID:24806965

  8. Interactions of Pleckstrin Homology Domains with Membranes: Adding Back the Bilayer via High-Throughput Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Eiji; Kalli, Antreas C; Yasuoka, Kenji; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-08-01

    A molecular simulation pipeline for determining the mode of interaction of pleckstrin homology (PH) domains with phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP)-containing lipid bilayers is presented. We evaluate our methodology for the GRP1 PH domain via comparison with structural and biophysical data. Coarse-grained simulations yield a 2D density landscape for PH/membrane interactions alongside residue contact profiles. Predictions of the membrane localization and interactions of 13 PH domains reveal canonical, non-canonical, and dual PIP-binding sites on the proteins. Thus, the PH domains associate with the PIP molecules in the membrane via a highly positively charged loop. Some PH domains exhibit modes of interaction with PIP-containing membranes additional to this canonical binding mode. All 13 PH domains cause a degree of local clustering of PIP molecules upon binding to the membrane. This provides a global picture of PH domain interactions with membranes. The high-throughput approach could be extended to other families of peripheral membrane proteins. PMID:27427480

  9. Two photon fluorescence imaging of lipid membrane domains and potentials using advanced fluorescent probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilin, Vasyl; Darwich, Zeinab; Richert, Ludovic; Didier, Pascal; Klymchenko, Andrey; Mély, Yves

    2013-02-01

    Biomembranes are ordered and dynamic nanoscale structures critical for cell functions. The biological functions of the membranes strongly depend on their physicochemical properties, such as electrostatics, phase state, viscosity, polarity and hydration. These properties are essential for the membrane structure and the proper folding and function of membrane proteins. To monitor these properties, fluorescence techniques and notably, two-photon microscopy appear highly suited due to their exquisite sensitivity and their capability to operate in complex biological systems, such as living cells and tissues. In this context, we have developed multiparametric environment-sensitive fluorescent probes tailored for precise location in the membrane bilayer. We notably developed probes of the 3-hydroxychromone family, characterized by an excited state intramolecular proton transfer reaction, which generates two tautomeric emissive species with well-separated emission bands. As a consequence, the response of these probes to changes in their environment could be monitored through changes in the ratios of the two bands, as well as through changes in the fluorescence lifetimes. Using two-photon ratiometric imaging and FLIM, these probes were used to monitor the surface membrane potential, and were applied to detect apoptotic cells and image membrane domains.

  10. Electrostatics, hydration, and proton transfer dynamics in the membrane domain of respiratory complex I

    PubMed Central

    Kaila, Ville R. I.; Wikström, Mårten; Hummer, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Complex I serves as the primary electron entry point into the mitochondrial and bacterial respiratory chains. It catalyzes the reduction of quinones by electron transfer from NADH, and couples this exergonic reaction to the translocation of protons against an electrochemical proton gradient. The membrane domain of the enzyme extends ∼180 Å from the site of quinone reduction to the most distant proton pathway. To elucidate possible mechanisms of the long-range proton-coupled electron transfer process, we perform large-scale atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the membrane domain of complex I from Escherichia coli. We observe spontaneous hydration of a putative proton entry channel at the NuoN/K interface, which is sensitive to the protonation state of buried glutamic acid residues. In hybrid quantum mechanics/classical mechanics simulations, we find that the observed water wires support rapid proton transfer from the protein surface to the center of the membrane domain. To explore the functional relevance of the pseudosymmetric inverted-repeat structures of the antiporter-like subunits NuoL/M/N, we constructed a symmetry-related structure of a possible alternate-access state. In molecular dynamics simulations, we find the resulting structural changes to be metastable and reversible at the protein backbone level. However, the increased hydration induced by the conformational change persists, with water molecules establishing enhanced lateral connectivity and pathways for proton transfer between conserved ionizable residues along the center of the membrane domain. Overall, the observed water-gated transitions establish conduits for the unidirectional proton translocation processes, and provide a possible coupling mechanism for the energy transduction in complex I. PMID:24778264

  11. Functional analysis of the transmembrane domain in paramyxovirus F protein-mediated membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Bissonnette, Mei Lin Z.; Donald, Jason E.; DeGrado, William F.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    To enter cells enveloped viruses use fusion-mediating glycoproteins to facilitate the merger of the viral and host cell membranes. These glycoproteins undergo large-scale irreversible refolding during membrane fusion. The paramyxovirus parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) mediates membrane merger through its fusion protein (F). The transmembrane (TM) domains of viral fusion proteins are typically required for fusion. The TM domain of F is particularly interesting in that it is potentially unusually long; multiple calculations suggest a TM helix length between 25 and 48 residues. Oxidative cross-linking of single cysteine substitutions indicates the F TM trimer forms a helical bundle within the membrane. To assess the functional role of the PIV5 F protein TM domain, alanine scanning mutagenesis was performed. Two residues located in the outer leaflet of the bilayer are critical for fusion. Multiple amino acid substitutions at these positions indicate the physical properties of the side chain play a critical role in supporting or blocking fusion. Analysis of intermediate steps in F protein refolding indicated that the mutants were not trapped at the open stalk intermediate or the prehairpin intermediate. Incorporation of a known F protein destabilizing mutation that causes a hyperfusogenic phenotype restored fusion activity to the mutants. Further, altering the curvature of the lipid bilayer by addition of oleic acid promoted fusion of the F protein mutants. In aggregate, these data indicate that the TM domain plays a functional role in fusion beyond merely anchoring the protein in the viral envelope and that it can affect the structures and steady-state concentrations of the various conformational intermediates en route to the final postfusion state. We suggest that the unusual length of this TM helix might allow it to serve as a template for formation of or specifically stabilize the lipid stalk intermediate in fusion. PMID:19121325

  12. A new integrated membrane filtration and chromatographic device.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanke; Sirkar, Kamalesh K; Dai, Xiao-Ping; Luo, Robert G

    2005-01-01

    To improve protein separation, a novel integrated device combining membrane filtration and chromatography has been developed. The device basically consists of a hollow fiber filtration module whose shell side is filled with chromatographic resin beads. However, there is an essentially impermeable coated zone near the hollow fiber module outlet. The integrated device enjoys the advantages of both membrane filtration and chromatography; it also allows one to load the chromatographic media directly from the fermentation broth or lysate and separate the adsorbed proteins through the subsequent elution step in a cyclic process. Interfacial polymerization was carried out to coat the bottom section of the hollow fiber membrane; the rest of the hollow fiber membrane remained unaffected. Myoglobin (Mb) and alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA) were primarily used as model proteins in a binary mixture; binary mixtures of Mb and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were also investigated. Separation behaviors of binary protein mixtures were studied in devices having either an ultrafiltration (UF) or a microfiltration (MF) membrane. Experimental results show that the breakthrough time and the protein loading capacities were dramatically improved after introducing the impermeable coating in both UF and MF modules. For a synthetic yeast fermentation broth feed, four loading-washing-elution-reequilibration-based cyclic runs for separation of Mb and alpha-LA were performed in the device using a MF membrane with a coated zone without cleaning in between. The Mb and alpha-LA elution profiles for the four consecutive runs were almost superimposable. Due to lower transmembrane flux in this device plus the periodical washing-elution during the chromatographic separation, fouling was not a problem, unlike in conventional microfiltration. PMID:15801803

  13. A conserved polybasic domain mediates plasma membrane targeting of Lgl and its regulation by hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wei; Zhang, Xuejing; Liu, Weijie; Chen, Yi-jiun; Huang, Juan; Austin, Erin; Celotto, Alicia M.; Jiang, Wendy Z.; Palladino, Michael J.; Jiang, Yu; Hammond, Gerald R.V.

    2015-01-01

    Lethal giant larvae (Lgl) plays essential and conserved functions in regulating both cell polarity and tumorigenesis in Drosophila melanogaster and vertebrates. It is well recognized that plasma membrane (PM) or cell cortex localization is crucial for Lgl function in vivo, but its membrane-targeting mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we discovered that hypoxia acutely and reversibly inhibits Lgl PM targeting through a posttranslational mechanism that is independent of the well-characterized atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) or Aurora kinase–mediated phosphorylations. Instead, we identified an evolutionarily conserved polybasic (PB) domain that targets Lgl to the PM via electrostatic binding to membrane phosphatidylinositol phosphates. Such PB domain–mediated PM targeting is inhibited by hypoxia, which reduces inositol phospholipid levels on the PM through adenosine triphosphate depletion. Moreover, Lgl PB domain contains all the identified phosphorylation sites of aPKC and Aurora kinases, providing a molecular mechanism by which phosphorylations neutralize the positive charges on the PB domain to inhibit Lgl PM targeting. PMID:26483556

  14. Lipid packing drives the segregation of transmembrane helices into disordered lipid domains in model membranes

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Lars V.; de Jong, Djurre H.; Holt, Andrea; Rzepiela, Andrzej J.; de Vries, Alex H.; Poolman, Bert; Killian, J. Antoinette; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2011-01-01

    Cell membranes are comprised of multicomponent lipid and protein mixtures that exhibit a complex partitioning behavior. Regions of structural and compositional heterogeneity play a major role in the sorting and self-assembly of proteins, and their clustering into higher-order oligomers. Here, we use computer simulations and optical microscopy to study the sorting of transmembrane helices into the liquid-disordered domains of phase-separated model membranes, irrespective of peptide–lipid hydrophobic mismatch. Free energy calculations show that the enthalpic contribution due to the packing of the lipids drives the lateral sorting of the helices. Hydrophobic mismatch regulates the clustering into either small dynamic or large static aggregates. These results reveal important molecular driving forces for the lateral organization and self-assembly of transmembrane helices in heterogeneous model membranes, with implications for the formation of functional protein complexes in real cells. PMID:21205902

  15. Investigation of domain size in polymer membranes using double quantum filtered spin diffusion MAS NMR.

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Cy H.; Alam, Todd Michael; Cherry, Brian Ray; Cornelius, Christopher James

    2005-02-01

    Solid-state {sup 1}H magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR was used to investigate sulfonated Diels-Alder poly(phenlylene) polymer membranes. Under high spinning speed {sup 1}H MAS conditions, the proton environments of the sulfonic acid and phenylene polymer backbone are resolved. A double-quantum (DQ) filter using the rotor-synchronized back-to-back (BABA) NMR multiple-pulse sequence allowed the selective suppression of the sulfonic proton environment in the {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra. This DQ filter in conjunction with a spin diffusion NMR experiment was then used to measure the domain size of the sulfonic acid component within the membrane. In addition, the temperature dependence of the sulfonic acid spin-spin relaxation time (T{sub 2}) was determined, providing an estimate of the activation energy for the proton dynamics of the dehydrated membrane.

  16. Integral Membrane Protein Sorting to Vacuoles in Plant Cells: Evidence for Two Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Liwen; Rogers, John C.

    1998-01-01

    Plant cells may contain two functionally distinct vacuolar compartments. Membranes of protein storage vacuoles (PSV) are marked by the presence of α-tonoplast intrinsic protein (TIP), whereas lytic vacuoles (LV) are marked by the presence of γ-TIP. Mechanisms for sorting integral membrane proteins to the different vacuoles have not been elucidated. Here we study a chimeric integral membrane reporter protein expressed in tobacco suspension culture protoplasts whose traffic was assessed biochemically by following acquisition of complex Asn-linked glycan modifications and proteolytic processing, and whose intracellular localization was determined with confocal immunofluorescence. We show that the transmembrane domain of the plant vacuolar sorting receptor BP-80 directs the reporter protein via the Golgi to the LV prevacuolar compartment, and attaching the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of γ-TIP did not alter this traffic. In contrast, the α-TIP CT prevented traffic of the reporter protein through the Golgi and caused it to be localized in organelles separate from ER and from Golgi and LV prevacuolar compartment markers. These organelles had a buoyant density consistent with vacuoles, and α-TIP protein colocalized in them with the α-TIP CT reporter protein when the two were expressed together in protoplasts. These results are consistent with two separate pathways to vacuoles for membrane proteins: a direct ER to PSV pathway, and a separate pathway via the Golgi to the LV. PMID:9832548

  17. High resolution nanomechanical characterization of multi-domain model membranes by fast Force Volume.

    PubMed

    Seghezza, Silvia; Dante, Silvia; Diaspro, Alberto; Canale, Claudio

    2015-12-01

    Plasma membrane is a complex structure, mainly composed by lipids and proteins, which plays a pivotal role in cell metabolism by regulating its selective permeability to ions and molecules. According to the "raft hypothesis", lipids in the bilayer are not forming a structurally passive solvent, but are rather organized in specific domains, which present different structural and functional characteristics. The mechanical properties of the lipid part of plasma membrane have been recently characterized through Atomic Force Microscopy, by analyzing the features of force vs distance curves collected on supported lipid bilayers (SLBs). In case of lipid domains sizing from tens to hundreds of nanometers, which mimic in a good way the lateral organization of real membranes, a high lateral resolution and a large number of curves are often required for properly expressing the complexity of the system, with a consequent exponential growth of acquisition and processing time. In this paper we propose a method, based on a recently developed high speed Force Volume technique and on home-built data processing software, for the mechanical characterization of nanostructured SLBs. With our software we have been able to process data set composed by tens of thousands of curves, collected with a spatial resolution ranging from 8 to 40 nm/pixel. Multiparametric maps and distribution histograms produced by our analysis allowed identifying a specific behavior for each lipid phase in the investigated model membranes, even in presence of nanosized features. PMID:26224416

  18. Membrane insertion of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab toxin: single mutation in domain II block partitioning of the toxin into the brush border membrane.

    PubMed

    Nair, Manoj S; Liu, Xinyan Sylvia; Dean, Donald H

    2008-05-27

    The umbrella and penknife models hypothesize that insecticidal Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins partition into the apical membrane of the insect midgut by insertion of only two alpha-helices from domain I of the protein, alpha-helices 4 and 5 in the case of the umbrella model and alpha-helices 5 and 6 in the case of the penknife model. Neither model envisages membrane partitioning by domains II and III. In this study, we present data suggesting that mutations in the domain II residue, F371, affect insertion of the whole toxin into Manduca sexta brush border membrane vesicles (BBMVs). Using steady state fluorescence measurements combined with a proteinase K protection assay, we show that mutants of F371 have lost their ability to insert into the BBMV, even though binding to cadherin is almost unaffected. The study also identifies a difference in partitioning of toxins into artificial lipid vesicles (SUVs) as opposed to native BBMVs. While the F371 mutations block insertion of domains I and II into BBMVs, they only block domain II insertion into SUVs. Bioassay and voltage clamping of midguts also confirm the fluorescence data that the noninserting mutants are nontoxic. Our study leads us to propose that, in contrast to previous models of individual free helices inserting into the membrane, the toxin enters into the membrane as a whole molecule or oligomers of the molecule, wherein the domain II residue F371 has a vital role to play in membrane insertion. PMID:18457427

  19. Mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein MLKL causes necrotic membrane disruption upon phosphorylation by RIP3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huayi; Sun, Liming; Su, Lijing; Rizo, Josep; Liu, Lei; Wang, Li-Feng; Wang, Fu-Sheng; Wang, Xiaodong

    2014-04-10

    Programmed necrotic cell death induced by the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) family of cytokines is dependent on a kinase cascade consisting of receptor-interacting kinases RIP1 and RIP3. How these kinase activities cause cells to die by necrosis is not known. The mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein MLKL is a functional RIP3 substrate that binds to RIP3 through its kinase-like domain but lacks kinase activity of its own. RIP3 phosphorylates MLKL at the T357 and S358 sites. Reported here is the development of a monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes phosphorylated MLKL in cells dying of this pathway and in human liver biopsy samples from patients suffering from drug-induced liver injury. The phosphorylated MLKL forms an oligomer that binds to phosphatidylinositol lipids and cardiolipin. This property allows MLKL to move from the cytosol to the plasma and intracellular membranes, where it directly disrupts membrane integrity, resulting in necrotic death. PMID:24703947

  20. Understanding the Role of Amphipathic Helices in N-BAR Domain Driven Membrane Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Haosheng; Mim, Carsten; Vázquez, Francisco X.; Lyman, Edward; Unger, Vinzenz M.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    Endophilin N-BAR (N-terminal helix and Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs) domain tubulates and vesiculates lipid membranes in vitro via its crescent-shaped dimer and four amphipathic helices that penetrate into membranes as wedges. Like F-BAR domains, endophilin N-BAR also forms a scaffold on membrane tubes. Unlike F-BARs, endophilin N-BARs have N-terminal H0 amphipathic helices that are proposed to interact with other N-BARs in oligomer lattices. Recent cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions shed light on the organization of the N-BAR lattice coats on a nanometer scale. However, because of the resolution of the reconstructions, the precise positioning of the amphipathic helices is still ambiguous. In this work, we applied a coarse-grained model to study various membrane remodeling scenarios induced by endophilin N-BARs. We found that H0 helices of N-BARs prefer to align in an antiparallel manner at two ends of the protein to form a stable lattice. The deletion of H0 helices causes disruption of the lattice. In addition, we analyzed the persistence lengths of the protein-coated tubes and found that the stiffness of endophilin N-BAR-coated tubules qualitatively agrees with previous experimental work studying N-BAR-coated tubules. Large-scale simulations on membrane liposomes revealed a systematic relation between H0 helix density and local membrane curvature fluctuations. The data also suggest that the H0 helix is required for BARs to form organized structures on the liposome, further illustrating its important function. PMID:23442862

  1. Formation of irreversibly bound annexin A1 protein domains on POPC/POPS solid supported membranes.

    PubMed

    Faiss, Simon; Kastl, Katja; Janshoff, Andreas; Steinem, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    The specific interaction of annexin A1 with phospholipid bilayers is scrutinized by means of scanning force and fluorescence microscopy, quartz crystal microbalance, ellipsometry, and modeled by dynamic Monte Carlo simulations. It was found that POPC/POPS bilayers exhibit phase separation in POPC- and POPS-enriched domains as a function of Ca2+ concentration. Annexin A1 interacts with POPC/POPS bilayers by forming irreversibly bound protein domains with monolayer thickness on POPS-enriched nanodomains, while the attachment of proteins to the POPC-enriched regions is fully reversible. A thorough kinetic analysis of the process reveals that both, the binding constant of annexin A1 at the POPC-rich areas as well as the irreversible adsorption rate to the POPS-rich domains increases with calcium ion concentration. Based on the thermodynamic and kinetic data, a possible mechanism of the annexin A1 membrane interaction can be proposed. PMID:18237543

  2. Integral ceramic superstructure evaluation using time domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Bradu, Adrian; Topala, Florin I.; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2014-02-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive low coherence interferometry technique that includes several technologies (and the corresponding devices and components), such as illumination and detection, interferometry, scanning, adaptive optics, microscopy and endoscopy. From its large area of applications, we consider in this paper a critical aspect in dentistry - to be investigated with a Time Domain (TD) OCT system. The clinical situation of an edentulous mandible is considered; it can be solved by inserting 2 to 6 implants. On these implants a mesostructure will be manufactured and on it a superstructure is needed. This superstructure can be integral ceramic; in this case materials defects could be trapped inside the ceramic layers and those defects could lead to fractures of the entire superstructure. In this paper we demonstrate that a TD-OCT imaging system has the potential to properly evaluate the presence of the defects inside the ceramic layers and those defects can be fixed before inserting the prosthesis inside the oral cavity. Three integral ceramic superstructures were developed by using a CAD/CAM technology. After the milling, the ceramic layers were applied on the core. All the three samples were evaluated by a TD-OCT system working at 1300 nm. For two of the superstructures evaluated, no defects were found in the most stressed areas. The third superstructure presented four ceramic defects in the mentioned areas. Because of those defects the superstructure may fracture. The integral ceramic prosthesis was send back to the dental laboratory to fix the problems related to the material defects found. Thus, TD-OCT proved to be a valuable method for diagnosing the ceramic defects inside the integral ceramic superstructures in order to prevent fractures at this level.

  3. Nonspecific Binding Domains in Lipid Membranes Induced by Phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chia Yee; Han, Chung-Ta; Chao, Ling

    2016-07-12

    Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) is a peripheral membrane protein that can hydrolyze phospholipids to produce lysolipids and fatty acids. It has been found to play crucial roles in various cellular processes and is thought as a potential candidate for triggering drug release from liposomes for medical treatment. Here, we directly observed that PLA2 hydrolysis reaction can induce the formation of PLA2-binding domains at lipid bilayer interface and found that the formation was significantly influenced by the fluidity of the lipid bilayer. We prepared supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) with various molar ratios of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) to adjust the reactivity and fluidity of the lipid bilayers. A significant amount of the PLA2-induced domains was observed in mixtures of DPPC and DOPC (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) but not in either pure DPPC or pure DOPC bilayer, which might be the reason that previous studies rarely observed these domains in lipid bilayer systems. The fluorescently labeled PLA2 experiment showed that newly formed domains acted as binding templates for PLA2. The AFM result showed that the induced domain has stepwise plateau structure, suggesting that PLA2 hydrolysis products may align as bilayers and accumulate layer by layer on the support, and the hydrophobic acyl chains at the side of the layer structure may be exposed to the outside aqueous environment. The introduced hydrophobic region could have hydrophobic interactions with proteins and therefore can attract the binding of not only PLA2 but also other types of proteins such as proteoglycans and streptavidin. The results suggest that the formation of PLA2-induced domains may convert part of a zwitterionic nonsticky lipid membrane to a site where biomolecules can nonspecifically bind. PMID:27218880

  4. Crystal Structures of the Outer Membrane Domain of Intimin and Invasin from Enterohemorrhagic E. coli and Enteropathogenic Y. pseudotuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fairman, James W.; Dautin, Nathalie; Wojtowicz, Damian; Liu, Wei; Noinaj, Nicholas; Barnard, Travis J.; Udho, Eshwar; Przytycka, Teresa M.; Cherezov, Vadim; Buchanan, Susan K.

    2012-12-10

    Intimins and invasins are virulence factors produced by pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. They contain C-terminal extracellular passenger domains that are involved in adhesion to host cells and N-terminal {beta} domains that are embedded in the outer membrane. Here, we identify the domain boundaries of an E. coli intimin {beta} domain and use this information to solve its structure and the {beta} domain structure of a Y. pseudotuberculosis invasin. Both {beta} domain structures crystallized as monomers and reveal that the previous range of residues assigned to the {beta} domain also includes a protease-resistant domain that is part of the passenger. Additionally, we identify 146 nonredundant representative members of the intimin/invasin family based on the boundaries of the highly conserved intimin and invasin {beta} domains. We then use this set of sequences along with our structural data to find and map the evolutionarily constrained residues within the {beta} domain.

  5. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance structure of membrane-integral diacylglycerol kinase.

    PubMed

    Van Horn, Wade D; Kim, Hak-Jun; Ellis, Charles D; Hadziselimovic, Arina; Sulistijo, Endah S; Karra, Murthy D; Tian, Changlin; Sönnichsen, Frank D; Sanders, Charles R

    2009-06-26

    Escherichia coli diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) represents a family of integral membrane enzymes that is unrelated to all other phosphotransferases. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of the DAGK homotrimer with the use of solution nuclear magnetic resonance. The third transmembrane helix from each subunit is domain-swapped with the first and second transmembrane segments from an adjacent subunit. Each of DAGK's three active sites resembles a portico. The cornice of the portico appears to be the determinant of DAGK's lipid substrate specificity and overhangs the site of phosphoryl transfer near the water-membrane interface. Mutations to cysteine that caused severe misfolding were located in or near the active site, indicating a high degree of overlap between sites responsible for folding and for catalysis. PMID:19556511

  6. Structural Plasticity in the Topology of the Membrane-Interacting Domain of HIV-1 gp41

    PubMed Central

    Kyrychenko, Alexander; Freites, J. Alfredo; He, Jing; Tobias, Douglas J.; Wimley, William C.; Ladokhin, Alexey S.

    2014-01-01

    We use a number of computational and experimental approaches to investigate the membrane topology of the membrane-interacting C-terminal domain of the HIV-1 gp41 fusion protein. Several putative transmembrane regions are identified using hydrophobicity analysis based on the Wimley-White scales, including the membrane-proximal external region (MPER). The MPER region is an important target for neutralizing anti-HIV monoclonal antibodies and is believed to have an interfacial topology in the membrane. To assess the possibility of a transmembrane topology of MPER, we examined the membrane interactions of a peptide corresponding to a 22-residue stretch of the MPER sequence (residues 662–683) using fluorescence spectroscopy and oriented circular dichroism. In addition to the previously reported interfacial location, we identify a stable transmembrane conformation of the peptide in synthetic lipid bilayers. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the MPER-derived peptide in a lipid bilayer demonstrate a stable helical structure with an average tilt of 24 degrees, with the five tryptophan residues sampling different environments inside the hydrocarbon core of the lipid bilayer, consistent with the observed spectral properties of intrinsic fluorescence. The degree of lipid bilayer penetration obtained by computer simulation was verified using depth-dependent fluorescence quenching of a selectively attached fluorescence probe. Overall, our data indicate that the MPER sequence can have at least two stable conformations in the lipid bilayer, interfacial and transmembrane, and suggest a possibility that external perturbations can switch the topology during physiological functioning. PMID:24507601

  7. The Influenza Hemagglutinin Fusion Domain Is an Amphipathic Helical Hairpin That Functions by Inducing Membrane Curvature*

    PubMed Central

    Smrt, Sean T.; Draney, Adrian W.; Lorieau, Justin L.

    2015-01-01

    The highly conserved N-terminal 23 residues of the hemagglutinin glycoprotein, known as the fusion peptide domain (HAfp23), is vital to the membrane fusion and infection mechanism of the influenza virus. HAfp23 has a helical hairpin structure consisting of two tightly packed amphiphilic helices that rest on the membrane surface. We demonstrate that HAfp23 is a new class of amphipathic helix that functions by leveraging the negative curvature induced by two tightly packed helices on membranes. The helical hairpin structure has an inverted wedge shape characteristic of negative curvature lipids, with a bulky hydrophobic region and a relatively small hydrophilic head region. The F3G mutation reduces this inverted wedge shape by reducing the volume of its hydrophobic base. We show that despite maintaining identical backbone structures and dynamics as the wild type HAfp23, the F3G mutant has an attenuated fusion activity that is correlated to its reduced ability to induce negative membrane curvature. The inverted wedge shape of HAfp23 is likely to play a crucial role in the initial stages of membrane fusion by stabilizing negative curvature in the fusion stalk. PMID:25398882

  8. Spectral domain ocular coherence tomography findings pre- and post vitrectomy with fibrovascular membrane delamination for proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Dooley, I; Laviers, H; Papavasileiou, E; Mckechnie, C; Zambarakji, H

    2016-01-01

    PurposeTo describe the intraretinal microstructure using serial spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) preceding and following pars plana vitrectomy and delamination of fibrovascular membranes in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR).MethodsThis retrospective, interventional case series includes 28 eyes. Outcome measures included LogMAR distance best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), SD-OCT integrity of photoreceptor inner and outer segments junction (IS/OS), and integrity of external limiting membrane (ELM).ResultsPre-operative central macular thickness (CMT) was significantly correlated with the final post-operative LogMAR BCVA (Pearson's coefficient r=0.89; P=0.001). The eyes were categorised into three groups based on post-operative IS/OS integrity (group 0: IS/OS intact; group 1: IS/OS irregular but not completely disrupted; group 2: IS/OS completely disrupted). Mean BCVA improved significantly in group 0 (n=9) from 1.13±0.75 preoperatively to 0.34±0.21 (Student's t-test: P=0.06), in group 1 (n=10) the BCVA improved from 0.88±0.56 to 0.58±0.31 (Student's t-test: P=0.053) and in group 2 (n=9) the BCVA improved from 1.64±0.53 to 1.53±0.75 (Student's t-test: P=0.652).IS/OS integrity and ELM integrity at 3 months post operatively, were significantly and positively correlated with final BCVA (Pearson's coefficient: r=0.83, P<0.001 and r=0.72, P<0.001, respectively).ConclusionsPre-operative CMT and post-operative disruption of the IS/OS and ELM are useful prognostic indicators in fibrovascular delamination surgery for patients with PDR. PMID:26403326

  9. Formation and Properties of Membrane-Ordered Domains by Phytoceramide: Role of Sphingoid Base Hydroxylation.

    PubMed

    Marquês, Joaquim T; Cordeiro, André M; Viana, Ana S; Herrmann, Andreas; Marinho, H Susana; de Almeida, Rodrigo F M

    2015-09-01

    Phytoceramide is the backbone of major sphingolipids in fungi and plants and is essential in several tissues of animal organisms, such as human skin. Its sphingoid base, phytosphingosine, differs from that usually found in mammals by the addition of a hydroxyl group to the 4-ene, which may be a crucial factor for the different properties of membrane microdomains among those organisms and tissues. Recently, sphingolipid hydroxylation in animal cells emerged as a key feature in several physiopathological processes. Hence, the study of the biophysical properties of phytosphingolipids is also relevant in that context since it helps us to understand the effects of sphingolipid hydroxylation. In this work, binary mixtures of N-stearoyl-phytoceramide (PhyCer) with palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC) were studied. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence of membrane probes, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and confocal microscopy were employed. As for other saturated ceramides, highly rigid gel domains start to form with just ∼5 mol % PhyCer at 24 °C. However, PhyCer gel-enriched domains in coexistence with POPC-enriched fluid present additional complexity since their properties (maximal order, shape, and thickness) change at specific POPC/PhyCer molar ratios, suggesting the formation of highly stable stoichiometric complexes with their own properties, distinct from both POPC and PhyCer. A POPC/PhyCer binary phase diagram, supported by the different experimental approaches employed, is proposed with complexes of 3:1 and 1:2 stoichiometries which are stable at least from ∼15 to ∼55 °C. Thus, it provides mechanisms for the in vivo formation of sphingolipid-enriched gel domains that may account for stable membrane compartments and diffusion barriers in eukaryotic cell membranes. PMID:26262576

  10. Energy- and temperature-dependent transport of integral proteins to the inner nuclear membrane via the nuclear pore

    PubMed Central

    Ohba, Tomoyuki; Schirmer, Eric C.; Nishimoto, Takeharu; Gerace, Larry

    2004-01-01

    Resident integral proteins of the inner nuclear membrane (INM) are synthesized as membrane-integrated proteins on the peripheral endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are transported to the INM throughout interphase using an unknown trafficking mechanism. To study this transport, we developed a live cell assay that measures the movement of transmembrane reporters from the ER to the INM by rapamycin-mediated trapping at the nuclear lamina. Reporter constructs with small (<30 kD) cytosolic and lumenal domains rapidly accumulated at the INM. However, increasing the size of either domain by 47 kD strongly inhibited movement. Reduced temperature and ATP depletion also inhibited movement, which is characteristic of membrane fusion mechanisms, but pharmacological inhibition of vesicular trafficking had no effect. Because reporter accumulation at the INM was inhibited by antibodies to the nuclear pore membrane protein gp210, our results support a model wherein transport of integral proteins to the INM involves lateral diffusion in the lipid bilayer around the nuclear pore membrane, coupled with active restructuring of the nuclear pore complex. PMID:15611332

  11. Membrane anchoring of diacylglycerol-lactones substituted with rigid hydrophobic acyl domains correlates with biological activities

    PubMed Central

    Raifman, Or; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Comin, Maria J.; Kedei, Noemi; Lewin, Nancy E.; Blumberg, Peter M.; Marquez, Victor E.; Jelinek, Raz

    2009-01-01

    Summary Synthetic diacylglycerol lactones (DAG-lactones) are effective modulators of critical cellular signaling pathways, downstream of the lipophilic second messenger diacylglycerol, that activate a host of protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes as well as other non-kinase proteins that share with PKC similar C1 membrane-targeting domains. A fundamental determinant of the biological activity of these amphiphilic molecules is the nature of their interactions with cellular membranes. This study characterizes the membrane interactions and bilayer anchoring of a series of DAG-lactones in which the hydrophobic moiety is a “molecular rod”, namely a rigid 4-[2-(R-phenyl)ethynyl]benzoate moiety in the acyl position. Application of assays employing chromatic biomimetic vesicles and biophysical techniques reveals that the mode of membrane anchoring of the DAG-lactone derivatives was markedly affected by the presence of the hydrophobic diphenyl rod and by the size of the functional unit displayed at the terminus of the rod. Two primary mechanisms of interaction were observed: surface binding of the DAG-lactones at the lipid/water interface and deep insertion of the ligands into the alkyl core of the lipid bilayer. These membrane-insertion properties could explain the different patterns of PKC translocation from cytosol to membranes induced by the molecular-rod DAG-lactones. This investigation emphasizes that the side-residues of DAG-lactones, rather than simply conferring hydrophobicity, profoundly influence membrane interactions and in that fashion may further contribute to the diversity of biological actions of these synthetic biomimetic ligands. PMID:19961537

  12. Trp[superscript 2313]-His[superscript 2315] of Factor VIII C2 Domain Is Involved in Membrane Binding Structure of a Complex Between the C[subscript 2] Domain and an Inhibitor of Membrane Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhuo; Lin, Lin; Yuan, Cai; Nicolaes, Gerry A.F.; Chen, Liqing; Meehan, Edward J.; Furie, Bruce; Furie, Barbara; Huang, Mingdong

    2010-11-03

    Factor VIII (FVIII) plays a critical role in blood coagulation by forming the tenase complex with factor IXa and calcium ions on a membrane surface containing negatively charged phospholipids. The tenase complex activates factor X during blood coagulation. The carboxyl-terminal C2 domain of FVIII is the main membrane-binding and von Willebrand factor-binding region of the protein. Mutations of FVIII cause hemophilia A, whereas elevation of FVIII activity is a risk factor for thromboembolic diseases. The C2 domain-membrane interaction has been proposed as a target of intervention for regulation of blood coagulation. A number of molecules that interrupt FVIII or factor V (FV) binding to cell membranes have been identified through high throughput screening or structure-based design. We report crystal structures of the FVIII C2 domain under three new crystallization conditions, and a high resolution (1.15 {angstrom}) crystal structure of the FVIII C2 domain bound to a small molecular inhibitor. The latter structure shows that the inhibitor binds to the surface of an exposed {beta}-strand of the C2 domain, Trp{sup 2313}-His{sup 2315}. This result indicates that the Trp{sup 2313}-His{sup 2315} segment is an important constituent of the membrane-binding motif and provides a model to understand the molecular mechanism of the C2 domain membrane interaction.

  13. Immunogenic integral membrane proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi are lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Brandt, M E; Riley, B S; Radolf, J D; Norgard, M V

    1990-04-01

    The pathogenic spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi contains a set of integral membrane proteins which were selectively extracted into the detergent phase upon solubilization of intact B. burgdorferi with the nonionic detergent Triton X-114. Virtually all of these hydrophobic proteins were recognized by antibodies in pooled sera from patients with chronic Lyme arthritis, demonstrating that proteins partitioning into the detergent phase of Triton X-114 encompass the major B. burgdorferi immunogens. Furthermore, most of these immunogenic proteins, including the previously characterized OspA and OspB membrane antigens, could be biosynthetically labeled when B. burgdorferi was incubated in vitro with [3H]palmitate. The OspA and OspB antigens were radioimmunoprecipitated from [3H]palmitate-labeled detergent-phase proteins with monoclonal antibodies, and [3H]palmitate was recovered unaltered from these proteins after sequential alkaline and acid hydrolyses. The combined results provide formal confirmation that the major B. burgdorferi immunogens extracted by Triton X-114 are lipoproteins. The demonstration that B. burgdorferi integral membrane antigens are lipoproteins may explain the basis of their immunogenicity and may help to improve our understanding of the surface topology of B. burgdorferi. PMID:2318538

  14. Multiscale Simulations Suggest a Mechanism for the Association of the Dok7 PH Domain with PIP-Containing Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Buyan, Amanda; Kalli, Antreas C.; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2016-01-01

    Dok7 is a peripheral membrane protein that is associated with the MuSK receptor tyrosine kinase. Formation of the Dok7/MuSK/membrane complex is required for the activation of MuSK. This is a key step in the complex exchange of signals between neuron and muscle, which lead to neuromuscular junction formation, dysfunction of which is associated with congenital myasthenic syndromes. The Dok7 structure consists of a Pleckstrin Homology (PH) domain and a Phosphotyrosine Binding (PTB) domain. The mechanism of the Dok7 association with the membrane remains largely unknown. Using multi-scale molecular dynamics simulations we have explored the formation of the Dok7 PH/membrane complex. Our simulations indicate that the PH domain of Dok7 associates with membranes containing phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PIPs) via interactions of the β1/β2, β3/β4, and β5/β6 loops, which together form a positively charged surface on the PH domain and interact with the negatively charged headgroups of PIP molecules. The initial encounter of the Dok7 PH domain is followed by formation of additional interactions with the lipid bilayer, and especially with PIP molecules, which stabilizes the Dok7 PH/membrane complex. We have quantified the binding of the PH domain to the model bilayers by calculating a density landscape for protein/membrane interactions. Detailed analysis of the PH/PIP interactions reveal both a canonical and an atypical site to be occupied by the anionic lipid. PH domain binding leads to local clustering of PIP molecules in the bilayer. Association of the Dok7 PH domain with PIP lipids is therefore seen as a key step in localization of Dok7 to the membrane and formation of a complex with MuSK. PMID:27459095

  15. Co-existence of Gel and Fluid Lipid Domains in Single-component Phospholipid Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Clare L; Barrett, M; Toppozini, L; Yamani, Zahra; Kucerka, Norbert; Katsaras, John; Fragneto, Giovanna; Rheinstadter, Maikel C

    2012-01-01

    Lateral nanostructures in membranes, so-called rafts, are believed to strongly influence membrane properties and functions. The experimental observation of rafts has proven difficult as they are thought to be dynamic structures that likely fluctuate on nano- to microsecond time scales. Using neutron diffraction we present direct experimental evidence for the co-existence of gel and fluid lipid domains in a single-component phospholipid membrane made of DPPC as it undergoes its main phase transition. The coherence length of the neutron beam sets a lower limit for the size of structures that can be observed. Neutron coherence lengths between 30 and 242A used in this study were obtained by varying the incident neutron energy and the resolution of the neutron spectrometer. We observe Bragg peaks corresponding to co-existing nanometer sized structures, both in out-of-plane and in-plane scans, by tuning the neutron coherence length. During the main phase transition, instead of a continuous transition that shows a pseudo-critical behavior, we observe the co-existence of gel and fluid domains.

  16. Isolation and characterization of the outer membrane of Escherichia coli with autodisplayed Z-domains.

    PubMed

    Park, Min; Yoo, Gu; Bong, Ji-Hong; Jose, Joachim; Kang, Min-Jung; Pyun, Jae-Chul

    2015-03-01

    "Autodisplay technology" is an expression technique used to display the various recombinant proteins on the outer membrane (OM) of Escherichia coli. The resulting autodisplayed Z-domain has been used to improve the sensitivity of immunoassays. In this work, a facile isolation method of the OM fraction of E. coli with autodisplayed Z-domains was presented using (1) an enzyme reaction for the hydrolysis of the peptidoglycan layer and (2) short centrifugation steps. The purity of the isolated OM fraction was analyzed. For the estimation of contamination with bacterial proteins from other parts of E. coli, Western blots of marker proteins for the OM (OmpA), periplasm (β-lactamase), inner membrane (SecA), and cytoplasm (β-galactosidase) were performed. Additionally, assays of marker components or enzymes from each part of E. coli were carried out including the OM (KDO), inner membrane (NADH oxidase), periplasm (β-lactamase), and cytoplasm (β-galactosidase). The yield of OM isolation using this new method was determined to be 80% of the total OM amount, with less than 1% being contaminants from other parts of E. coli. PMID:25528472

  17. Neuronal membranes are key to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease: the role of both raft and non-raft membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Williamson, R; Sutherland, C

    2011-03-01

    Membrane rafts are sterol- and sphingolipid-enriched domains that compartmentalize cellular processes. Membrane rafts isolated from post-mortem AD brain are enriched in both β-amyloid and phosphorylated tau. Proteolytic processing of APP to generate β-amyloid, the principle component of amyloid plaques, can occur in membrane rafts, implicating them in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Secondary to their role in β-amyloid generation, membrane rafts have more recently been implicated in the accumulation, aggregation and degradation of β-amyloid, with evidence supporting a specific role for membrane raft gangliosides in the binding and aggregation of β-amyloid. In addition, membrane domain composition has a direct impact on both the generation of β-amyloid and its subsequent toxic actions and as such is a key target for the development of therapeutic strategies. This mini-review will focus on recent advances in our understanding of the relevance of membrane composition, of both raft and non-raft domains, to AD progression in models and in human disease. We will discuss how manipulation of membrane composition can alter both the proteolytic processing of APP and the subsequent binding and aggregation of β-amyloid peptide. PMID:21222605

  18. The dynamin-binding domains of Dap160/intersectin affect bulk membrane retrieval in synapses

    PubMed Central

    Winther, Åsa M. E.; Jiao, Wei; Vorontsova, Olga; Rees, Kathryn A.; Koh, Tong-Wey; Sopova, Elena; Schulze, Karen L.; Bellen, Hugo J.; Shupliakov, Oleg

    2013-01-01

    Summary Dynamin-associated protein 160 kDa (Dap160)/intersectin interacts with several synaptic proteins and affects endocytosis and synapse development. The functional role of the different protein interaction domains is not well understood. Here we show that Drosophila Dap160 lacking the dynamin-binding SH3 domains does not affect the development of the neuromuscular junction but plays a key role in synaptic vesicle recycling. dap160 mutants lacking dynamin-interacting domains no longer accumulate dynamin properly at the periactive zone, and it becomes dispersed in the bouton during stimulation. This is accompanied by a reduction in uptake of the dye FM1-43 and an accumulation of large vesicles and membrane invaginations. However, we do not observe an increase in the number of clathrin-coated intermediates. We also note a depression in evoked excitatory junction potentials (EJPs) during high-rate stimulation, accompanied by aberrantly large miniature EJPs. The data reveal the important role of Dap160 in the targeting of dynamin to the periactive zone, where it is required to suppress bulk synaptic vesicle membrane retrieval during high-frequency activity. PMID:23321638

  19. Membrane fusion by the GTPase atlastin requires a conserved C-terminal cytoplasmic tail and dimerization through the middle domain

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Tyler J.; Andreazza, Camilla; Verma, Avani; Daga, Andrea; McNew, James A.

    2011-01-01

    The biogenesis and maintenance of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) requires membrane fusion. ER homotypic fusion is driven by the large GTPase atlastin. Domain analysis of atlastin shows that a conserved region of the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail is absolutely required for fusion activity. Atlastin in adjacent membranes must associate to bring the ER membranes into molecular contact. Drosophila atlastin dimerizes in the presence of GTPγS but is monomeric with GDP or without nucleotide. Oligomerization requires the juxtamembrane middle domain three-helix bundle, as does efficient GTPase activity. A soluble version of the N-terminal cytoplasmic domain that contains the GTPase domain and the middle domain three-helix bundle serves as a potent, concentration-dependent inhibitor of membrane fusion both in vitro and in vivo. However, atlastin domains lacking the middle domain are without effect. GTP-dependent dimerization of atlastin generates an enzymatically active protein that drives membrane fusion after nucleotide hydrolysis and conformational reorganization. PMID:21690399

  20. An equivalent domain integral for analysis of two-dimensional mixed mode problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Shivakumar, K. N.

    1989-01-01

    An equivalent domain integral (EDI) method for calculating J-integrals for two-dimensional cracked elastic bodies subjected to mixed mode loading is presented. The total and product integrals consist of the sum of an area or domain integral and line integrals on the crack faces. The EDI method gave accurate values of the J-integrals for two mode I and two mixed mode problems. Numerical studies showed that domains consisting of one layer of elements are sufficient to obtain accurate J-integral values. Two procedures for separating the individual modes from the domain integrals are presented. The procedure that uses the symmetric and antisymmetric components of the stress and displacement fields to calculate the individual modes gave accurate values of the integrals for all the problems analyzed.

  1. Structure of anti-FLAG M2 Fab domain and its use in the stabilization of engineered membrane proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Roosild, Tarmo P.; Castronovo, Samantha; Choe, Senyon

    2006-09-01

    The X-ray crystallographic analysis of anti-FLAG M2 Fab is reported and the implications of the structure on FLAG epitope binding are described as a first step in the development of a tool for the structural and biophysical study of membrane proteins. The inherent difficulties of stabilizing detergent-solubilized integral membrane proteins for biophysical or structural analysis demand the development of new methodologies to improve success rates. One proven strategy is the use of antibody fragments to increase the ‘soluble’ portion of any membrane protein, but this approach is limited by the difficulties and expense associated with producing monoclonal antibodies to an appropriate exposed epitope on the target protein. Here, the stabilization of a detergent-solubilized K{sup +} channel protein, KvPae, by engineering a FLAG-binding epitope into a known loop region of the protein and creating a complex with Fab fragments from commercially available anti-FLAG M2 monoclonal antibodies is reported. Although well diffracting crystals of the complex have not yet been obtained, during the course of crystallization trials the structure of the anti-FLAG M2 Fab domain was solved to 1.86 Å resolution. This structure, which should aid future structure-determination efforts using this approach by facilitating molecular-replacement phasing, reveals that the binding pocket appears to be specific only for the first four amino acids of the traditional FLAG epitope, namely DYKD. Thus, the use of antibody fragments for improving the stability of target proteins can be rapidly applied to the study of membrane-protein structure by placing the short DKYD motif within a predicted peripheral loop of that protein and utilizing commercially available anti-FLAG M2 antibody fragments.

  2. A Link between Integral Membrane Protein Expression and Simulated Integration Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Stephen S; Niesen, Michiel J M; Müller, Axel; Tiemann, Katrin; Saladi, Shyam M; Galimidi, Rachel P; Zhang, Bin; Clemons, William M; Miller, Thomas F

    2016-08-23

    Integral membrane proteins (IMPs) control the flow of information and nutrients across cell membranes, yet IMP mechanistic studies are hindered by difficulties in expression. We investigate this issue by addressing the connection between IMP sequence and observed expression levels. For homologs of the IMP TatC, observed expression levels vary widely and are affected by small changes in protein sequence. The effect of sequence changes on experimentally observed expression levels strongly correlates with the simulated integration efficiency obtained from coarse-grained modeling, which is directly confirmed using an in vivo assay. Furthermore, mutations that improve the simulated integration efficiency likewise increase the experimentally observed expression levels. Demonstration of these trends in both Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium smegmatis suggests that the results are general to other expression systems. This work suggests that IMP integration is a determinant for successful expression, raising the possibility of controlling IMP expression via rational design. PMID:27524616

  3. A Link Between Integral Membrane Protein Expression and Simulated Integration Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Axel; Tiemann, Katrin; Saladi, Shyam M.; Galimidi, Rachel P.; Zhang, Bin; Clemons, William M.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins (IMP) control the flow of information and nutrients across cell membranes, yet IMP mechanistic studies are hindered by difficulties in expression. We investigate this issue by addressing the connection between IMP sequence and observed expression levels. For homologs of the IMP TatC, observed expression levels widely vary and are affected by small changes in protein sequence. The effect of sequence changes on experimentally observed expression levels strongly correlates with the simulated integration efficiency obtained from coarse-grained modeling, which is directly confirmed using an in vivo assay. Furthermore, mutations that improve the simulated integration efficiency likewise increase the experimentally observed expression levels. Demonstration of these trends in both Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium smegmatis suggests that the results are general to other expression systems. This work suggests that IMP integration is a determinant for successful expression, raising the possibility of controlling IMP expression via rational design. PMID:27524616

  4. Localization of cell surface glycoproteins in membrane domains associated with the underlying filament network.

    PubMed

    Roos, E; Spiele, H; Feltkamp, C A; Huisman, H; Wiegant, F A; Traas, J; Mesland, D A

    1985-11-01

    To visualize the localization of cell surface constituents in relation to the plasma membrane-associated filament network, we developed a method based on a combination of immunogold labeling and dry-cleaving. For labeling we used trinitrophenyl-derivatized ligand, anti-TNP antibodies, and protein A-coated colloidal gold. Dry-cleaving (Mesland, D. A. M., H. Spiele, and E. Roos, 1981, Exp. Cell Res., 132: 169-184) involves cleavage of lightly fixed critical point-dried cells by means of adhesive tape. Since cells cleave close to the cell surface, the remaining layer is thin enough to be examined in transmission electron microscopy. Using this method, we studied concanavalin A-binding constituents on the medium-facing surface of H35 hepatoma cells. The distribution of the gold particles, which was partly dispersed and partly patchy, coincided strikingly with membrane-associated filaments, and label was virtually absent from areas overlying openings in the filament network. In stereo pairs we observed the label to be localized to areas of somewhat enhanced electron density at the plane of the membrane. These areas were interconnected in a pattern congruent with the filament network. Preliminary observations on wheat germ agglutinin receptors on the hepatoma cells as well as concanavalin A receptors on isolated hepatocytes yielded comparable results. It thus appears that surface glycoproteins, although seemingly randomly distributed as observed in thin sections, may actually be localized to particular membrane domains associated with underlying filaments. PMID:3902855

  5. Transmembrane domain-dependent sorting of proteins to the ER and plasma membrane in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Rayner, J C; Pelham, H R

    1997-01-01

    Sorting of membrane proteins between compartments of the secretory pathway is mediated in part by their transmembrane domains (TMDs). In animal cells, TMD length is a major factor in Golgi retention. In yeast, the role of TMD signals is less clear; it has been proposed that membrane proteins travel by default to the vacuole, and are prevented from doing so by cytoplasmic signals. We have investigated the targeting of the yeast endoplasmic reticulum (ER) t-SNARE Ufe1p. We show that the amino acid sequence of the Ufe1p TMD is important for both function and ER targeting, and that the requirements for each are distinct. Targeting is independent of Rer1p, the only candidate sorting receptor for TMD sequences currently known. Lengthening the Ufe1p TMD allows transport along the secretory pathway to the vacuole or plasma membrane. The choice between these destinations is determined by the length and composition of the TMD, but not by its precise sequence. A longer TMD is required to reach the plasma membrane in yeast than in animal cells, and shorter TMDs direct proteins to the vacuole. TMD-based sorting is therefore a general feature of the yeast secretory pathway, but occurs by different mechanisms at different points. PMID:9155009

  6. Lipodisks integrated with weak affinity chromatography enable fragment screening of integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Duong-Thi, Minh-Dao; Bergström, Maria; Edwards, Katarina; Eriksson, Jonny; Ohlson, Sten; Ying, Janet To Yiu; Torres, Jaume; Hernández, Víctor Agmo

    2016-02-01

    Membrane proteins constitute the largest class of drug targets but they present many challenges in drug discovery. Importantly, the discovery of potential drug candidates is hampered by the limited availability of efficient methods for screening drug-protein interactions. In this work we present a novel strategy for rapid identification of molecules capable of binding to a selected membrane protein. An integral membrane protein (human aquaporin-1) was incorporated into planar lipid bilayer disks (lipodisks), which were subsequently covalently coupled to porous derivatized silica and packed into HPLC columns. The obtained affinity columns were used in a typical protocol for fragment screening by weak affinity chromatography (WAC), in which one hit was identified out of a 200 compound collection. The lipodisk-based strategy, which ensures a stable and native-like lipid environment for the protein, is expected to work also with other membrane proteins and screening procedures. PMID:26673836

  7. Kinase Associated-1 Domains Drive MARK/PAR1 Kinases to Membrane Targets by Binding Acidic Phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Moravcevic, Katarina; Mendrola, Jeannine M.; Schmitz, Karl R.; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Slochower, David; Janmey, Paul A.; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2011-09-28

    Phospholipid-binding modules such as PH, C1, and C2 domains play crucial roles in location-dependent regulation of many protein kinases. Here, we identify the KA1 domain (kinase associated-1 domain), found at the C terminus of yeast septin-associated kinases (Kcc4p, Gin4p, and Hsl1p) and human MARK/PAR1 kinases, as a membrane association domain that binds acidic phospholipids. Membrane localization of isolated KA1 domains depends on phosphatidylserine. Using X-ray crystallography, we identified a structurally conserved binding site for anionic phospholipids in KA1 domains from Kcc4p and MARK1. Mutating this site impairs membrane association of both KA1 domains and intact proteins and reveals the importance of phosphatidylserine for bud neck localization of yeast Kcc4p. Our data suggest that KA1 domains contribute to coincidence detection, allowing kinases to bind other regulators (such as septins) only at the membrane surface. These findings have important implications for understanding MARK/PAR1 kinases, which are implicated in Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and autism.

  8. Cryogenic Integrated Offset Compensation for Time Domain SQUID Multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prêle, D.; Voisin, F.; Martino, J.; Bréelle, E.; Bordier, G.; Piat, M.

    2012-06-01

    Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) multiplexing is a common technique in the use of large arrays of Transition Edge Sensors (TES). A Time Domain Multiplexer (TDM) combines input TES signals into one output signal using several SQUIDs. Different TES, SQUID and amplifier characteristics induce unavoidable different offsets on the multiplexed signal. Additionally, given the periodicity of the SQUID characteristic, the Flux Locked Loop (FLL) operating point is only defined modulo Φ 0. This can lead to a large output offset. In multiplexed mode, the difference between offsets associated with different pixels can induce a parasitic signal which is often larger than that of the TES. These offset signals drastically constrain the readout dynamic range and thus the maximum gain allowed. They also limit the signal-to-noise ratio, the FLL stability and the multiplexing frequency. Offsets in SQUID readout are discussed and offset compensation for TDM is presented. The dynamic calibration and compensation on a simplified 4:1 TDM are demonstrated in simulation. Dynamic offset compensation is being implemented on a cryogenic SiGe integrated circuit operated at 4 K for 128:1 TDM.

  9. Perspective taking in language: integrating the spatial and action domains

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, Madeleine E. L.; Pickering, Martin J.

    2013-01-01

    Language is an inherently social behavior. In this paper, we bring together two research areas that typically occupy distinct sections of the literature: perspective taking in spatial language (whether people represent a scene from their own or a different spatial perspective), and perspective taking in action language (the extent to which they simulate an action as though they were performing that action). First, we note that vocabulary is used inconsistently across the spatial and action domains, and propose a more transparent vocabulary that will allow researchers to integrate action- and spatial-perspective taking. Second, we note that embodied theories of language comprehension often make the narrow assumption that understanding action descriptions involves adopting the perspective of an agent carrying out that action. We argue that comprehenders can adopt embodied action-perspectives other than that of the agent, including those of the patient or an observer. Third, we review evidence showing that perspective taking in spatial language is a flexible process. We argue that the flexibility of spatial-perspective taking provides a means for conversation partners engaged in dialogue to maximize similarity between their situation models. These situation models can then be used as the basis for action language simulations, in which language users adopt a particular action-perspective. PMID:24062676

  10. Subnanometer Structure of an Asymmetric Model Membrane: Interleaflet Coupling Influences Domain Properties.

    PubMed

    Heberle, Frederick A; Marquardt, Drew; Doktorova, Milka; Geier, Barbara; Standaert, Robert F; Heftberger, Peter; Kollmitzer, Benjamin; Nickels, Jonathan D; Dick, Robert A; Feigenson, Gerald W; Katsaras, John; London, Erwin; Pabst, Georg

    2016-05-24

    Cell membranes possess a complex three-dimensional architecture, including nonrandom lipid lateral organization within the plane of a bilayer leaflet, and compositional asymmetry between the two leaflets. As a result, delineating the membrane structure-function relationship has been a highly challenging task. Even in simplified model systems, the interactions between bilayer leaflets are poorly understood, due in part to the difficulty of preparing asymmetric model membranes that are free from the effects of residual organic solvent or osmotic stress. To address these problems, we have modified a technique for preparing asymmetric large unilamellar vesicles (aLUVs) via cyclodextrin-mediated lipid exchange in order to produce tensionless, solvent-free aLUVs suitable for a range of biophysical studies. Leaflet composition and structure were characterized using isotopic labeling strategies, which allowed us to avoid the use of bulky labels. NMR and gas chromatography provided precise quantification of the extent of lipid exchange and bilayer asymmetry, while small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to resolve bilayer structural features with subnanometer resolution. Isotopically asymmetric POPC vesicles were found to have the same bilayer thickness and area per lipid as symmetric POPC vesicles, demonstrating that the modified exchange protocol preserves native bilayer structure. Partial exchange of DPPC into the outer leaflet of POPC vesicles produced chemically asymmetric vesicles with a gel/fluid phase-separated outer leaflet and a uniform, POPC-rich inner leaflet. SANS was able to separately resolve the thicknesses and areas per lipid of coexisting domains, revealing reduced lipid packing density of the outer leaflet DPPC-rich phase compared to typical gel phases. Our finding that a disordered inner leaflet can partially fluidize ordered outer leaflet domains indicates some degree of interleaflet coupling, and invites speculation on a role for bilayer

  11. Vacuolar SNARE Protein Transmembrane Domains Serve as Nonspecific Membrane Anchors with Unequal Roles in Lipid Mixing*

    PubMed Central

    Pieren, Michel; Desfougères, Yann; Michaillat, Lydie; Schmidt, Andrea; Mayer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is induced by SNARE complexes that are anchored in both fusion partners. SNAREs zipper up from the N to C terminus bringing the two membranes into close apposition. Their transmembrane domains (TMDs) might be mere anchoring devices, deforming bilayers by mechanical force. Structural studies suggested that TMDs might also perturb lipid structure by undergoing conformational transitions or by zipping up into the bilayer. Here, we tested this latter hypothesis, which predicts that the activity of SNAREs should depend on the primary sequence of their TMDs. We replaced the TMDs of all vacuolar SNAREs (Nyv1, Vam3, and Vti1) by a lipid anchor, by a TMD from a protein unrelated to the membrane fusion machinery, or by artificial leucine-valine sequences. Individual exchange of the native SNARE TMDs against an unrelated transmembrane anchor or an artificial leucine-valine sequence yielded normal fusion activities. Fusion activity was also preserved upon pairwise exchange of the TMDs against unrelated peptides, which eliminates the possibility for specific TMD-TMD interactions. Thus, a specific primary sequence or zippering beyond the SNARE domains is not a prerequisite for fusion. Lipid-anchored Vti1 was fully active, and lipid-anchored Nyv1 permitted the reaction to proceed up to hemifusion, and lipid-anchored Vam3 interfered already before hemifusion. The unequal contribution of proteinaceous TMDs on Vam3 and Nyv1 suggests that Q- and R-SNAREs might make different contributions to the hemifusion intermediate and the opening of the fusion pore. Furthermore, our data support the view that SNARE TMDs serve as nonspecific membrane anchors in vacuole fusion. PMID:25817997

  12. Plasma membrane domains participate in pH banding of Chara internodal cells.

    PubMed

    Schmölzer, Patric M; Höftberger, Margit; Foissner, Ilse

    2011-08-01

    We investigated the identity and distribution of cortical domains, stained by the endocytic marker FM 1-43, in branchlet internodal cells of the characean green algae Chara corallina and Chara braunii. Co-labeling with NBD C(6)-sphingomyelin, a plasma membrane dye, which is not internalized, confirmed their location in the plasma membrane, and co-labelling with the fluorescent pH indicator Lysotracker red indicated an acidic environment. The plasma membrane domains co-localized with the distribution of an antibody against a proton-translocating ATPase, and electron microscopic data confirmed their identity with elaborate plasma membrane invaginations known as charasomes. The average size and the distribution pattern of charasomes correlated with the pH banding pattern of the cell. Charasomes were larger and more frequent at the acidic regions than at the alkaline bands, indicating that they are involved in outward-directed proton transport. Inhibition of photosynthesis by DCMU prevented charasome formation, and incubation in pH buffers resulted in smaller, homogenously distributed charasomes irrespective of whether the pH was clamped at 5.5 or 8.5. These data indicate that the differential size and distribution of charasomes is not due to differences in external pH but reflects active, photosynthesis-dependent pH banding. The fact that pH banding recovered within several minutes in unbuffered medium, however, confirms that pH banding is also possible in cells with evenly distributed charasomes or without charasomes. Cortical mitochondria were also larger and more abundant at the acid bands, and their intimate association with charasomes and chloroplasts suggests an involvement in carbon uptake and photorespiration. PMID:21659328

  13. Differential Dynamic and Structural Behavior of Lipid-Cholesterol Domains in Model Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Luis F.; Pino, José A.; Soto-Arriaza, Marco A.; Cuevas, Francisco J.; Sánchez, Susana; Sotomayor, Carlos P.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the cholesterol (Chol) content of biological membranes are known to alter the physicochemical properties of the lipid lamella and consequently the function of membrane-associated enzymes. To characterize these changes, we used steady-state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and two photon-excitation microscopy techniques. The membrane systems were chosen according to the techniques that were used: large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) for cuvette and giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) for microscopy measurements; they were prepared from dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dioctadecyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) in mixtures that are well known to form lipid domains. Two fluorescent probes, which insert into different regions of the bilayer, were selected: 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) was located at the deep hydrophobic core of the acyl chain regions and 2-dimethylamino-6-lauroylnaphthalene (Laurdan) at the hydrophilic-hydrophobic membrane interface. Our spectroscopy results show that (i) the changes induced by cholesterol in the deep hydrophobic phospholipid acyl chain domain are different from the ones observed in the superficial region of the hydrophilic-hydrophobic interface, and these changes depend on the state of the lamella and (ii) the incorporation of cholesterol into the lamella induces an increase in the orientation dynamics in the deep region of the phospholipid acyl chains with a corresponding decrease in the orientation at the region close to the polar lipid headgroups. The microscopy data from DOPC/DPPC/Chol GUVs using Laurdan generalized polarization (Laurdan GP) suggest that a high cholesterol content in the bilayer weakens the stability of the water hydrogen bond network and hence the stability of the liquid-ordered phase (Lo). PMID:22768264

  14. Subnanometer Structure of an Asymmetric Model Membrane: Interleaflet Coupling Influences Domain Properties

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cell membranes possess a complex three-dimensional architecture, including nonrandom lipid lateral organization within the plane of a bilayer leaflet, and compositional asymmetry between the two leaflets. As a result, delineating the membrane structure–function relationship has been a highly challenging task. Even in simplified model systems, the interactions between bilayer leaflets are poorly understood, due in part to the difficulty of preparing asymmetric model membranes that are free from the effects of residual organic solvent or osmotic stress. To address these problems, we have modified a technique for preparing asymmetric large unilamellar vesicles (aLUVs) via cyclodextrin-mediated lipid exchange in order to produce tensionless, solvent-free aLUVs suitable for a range of biophysical studies. Leaflet composition and structure were characterized using isotopic labeling strategies, which allowed us to avoid the use of bulky labels. NMR and gas chromatography provided precise quantification of the extent of lipid exchange and bilayer asymmetry, while small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to resolve bilayer structural features with subnanometer resolution. Isotopically asymmetric POPC vesicles were found to have the same bilayer thickness and area per lipid as symmetric POPC vesicles, demonstrating that the modified exchange protocol preserves native bilayer structure. Partial exchange of DPPC into the outer leaflet of POPC vesicles produced chemically asymmetric vesicles with a gel/fluid phase-separated outer leaflet and a uniform, POPC-rich inner leaflet. SANS was able to separately resolve the thicknesses and areas per lipid of coexisting domains, revealing reduced lipid packing density of the outer leaflet DPPC-rich phase compared to typical gel phases. Our finding that a disordered inner leaflet can partially fluidize ordered outer leaflet domains indicates some degree of interleaflet coupling, and invites speculation on a role for bilayer

  15. Phosphatidylserine-containing membranes alter the thermal stability of prothrombin's catalytic domain: a differential scanning calorimetric study.

    PubMed

    Lentz, B R; Zhou, C M; Wu, J R

    1994-05-10

    Denaturation profiles of bovine prothrombin and its isolated fragments were examined in the presence of Na2EDTA, 5 mM CaCl2, and CaCl2 plus membranes containing 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-3-sn-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) in combination with bovine brain phosphatidylserine (PS). We have shown previously [Lentz, B. R., Wu, J. R., Sorrentino, A. M., & Carleton, J. A. (1991) Biophys. J. 60, 70] that binding to PS/POPC (25/75) large unilamellar vesicles resulted in an enthalpy loss in the main endotherm of prothrombin denaturation (Tm approximately 57-58 degrees C) and a comparable enthalpy gain in a minor endotherm (Tm approximately 59 degrees C) accompanying an upward shift in peak temperature (Tm approximately 73 degrees C). This minor endotherm was also responsive to Ca2+ binding and, in the absence of PS/POPC membranes, corresponded to melting of the N-terminal, Ca2+ and membrane binding domain (fragment 1). Peak deconvolution analysis of the prothrombin denaturation profile and extensive studies of the denaturation of isolated prothrombin domains in the presence and absence of PS/POPC vesicles suggested that membrane binding induced changes in the C-terminal catalytic domain of prothrombin (prethrombin 2) and in a domain that links fragment 1 with the catalytic domain (fragment 2). Specifically, the results have confirmed that the fragment 2 domain interacts with the stabilizes the prethrombin 2 domain and also have shown that fragment 2 interacts directly with the membrane. In addition, the results have demonstrated a heretofore unrecognized interaction between the catalytic and membrane binding domains. This interaction can account for another portion of the denaturation enthalpy that appears at high temperatures in the presence of membranes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8180168

  16. Detectors for evaluating the cellular landscape of sphingomyelin- and cholesterol-rich membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Takuma; Ishitsuka, Reiko; Kobayashi, Toshihide

    2016-08-01

    Although sphingomyelin and cholesterol are major lipids of mammalian cells, the detailed distribution of these lipids in cellular membranes remains still obscure. However, the recent development of protein probes that specifically bind sphingomyelin and/or cholesterol provides new information about the landscape of the lipid domains that are enriched with sphingomyelin or cholesterol or both. Here, we critically summarize the tools to study distribution and dynamics of sphingomyelin and cholesterol. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon. PMID:26993577

  17. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus nonstructural protein 2 (nsp2) topology and selective isoform integration in artificial membranes.

    PubMed

    Kappes, Matthew A; Miller, Cathy L; Faaberg, Kay S

    2015-07-01

    The membrane insertion and topology of nonstructural protein 2 (nsp2) of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) strain VR-2332 was assessed using a cell free translation system in the presence or absence of artificial membranes. Expression of PRRSV nsp2 in the absence of all other viral factors resulted in the genesis of both full-length nsp2 as well as a select number of C-terminal nsp2 isoforms. Addition of membranes to the translation stabilized the translation reaction, resulting in predominantly full-length nsp2 as assessed by immunoprecipitation. Analysis further showed full-length nsp2 strongly associates with membranes, along with two additional large nsp2 isoforms. Membrane integration of full-length nsp2 was confirmed through high-speed density fractionation, protection from protease digestion, and immunoprecipitation. The results demonstrated that nsp2 integrated into the membranes with an unexpected topology, where the amino (N)-terminal (cytoplasmic) and C-terminal (luminal) domains were orientated on opposite sides of the membrane surface. PMID:25768891

  18. Eisosomes are dynamic plasma membrane domains showing pil1-lsp1 heteroligomer binding equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Olivera-Couto, Agustina; Salzman, Valentina; Mailhos, Milagros; Digman, Michelle A; Gratton, Enrico; Aguilar, Pablo S

    2015-04-01

    Eisosomes are plasma membrane domains concentrating lipids, transporters, and signaling molecules. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, these domains are structured by scaffolds composed mainly by two cytoplasmic proteins Pil1 and Lsp1. Eisosomes are immobile domains, have relatively uniform size, and encompass thousands of units of the core proteins Pil1 and Lsp1. In this work we used fluorescence fluctuation analytical methods to determine the dynamics of eisosome core proteins at different subcellular locations. Using a combination of scanning techniques with autocorrelation analysis, we show that Pil1 and Lsp1 cytoplasmic pools freely diffuse whereas an eisosome-associated fraction of these proteins exhibits slow dynamics that fit with a binding-unbinding equilibrium. Number and brightness analysis shows that the eisosome-associated fraction is oligomeric, while cytoplasmic pools have lower aggregation states. Fluorescence lifetime imaging results indicate that Pil1 and Lsp1 directly interact in the cytoplasm and within the eisosomes. These results support a model where Pil1-Lsp1 heterodimers are the minimal eisosomes building blocks. Moreover, individual-eisosome fluorescence fluctuation analysis shows that eisosomes in the same cell are not equal domains: while roughly half of them are mostly static, the other half is actively exchanging core protein subunits. PMID:25863055

  19. Eisosomes Are Dynamic Plasma Membrane Domains Showing Pil1-Lsp1 Heteroligomer Binding Equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Olivera-Couto, Agustina; Salzman, Valentina; Mailhos, Milagros; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Aguilar, Pablo S.

    2015-01-01

    Eisosomes are plasma membrane domains concentrating lipids, transporters, and signaling molecules. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, these domains are structured by scaffolds composed mainly by two cytoplasmic proteins Pil1 and Lsp1. Eisosomes are immobile domains, have relatively uniform size, and encompass thousands of units of the core proteins Pil1 and Lsp1. In this work we used fluorescence fluctuation analytical methods to determine the dynamics of eisosome core proteins at different subcellular locations. Using a combination of scanning techniques with autocorrelation analysis, we show that Pil1 and Lsp1 cytoplasmic pools freely diffuse whereas an eisosome-associated fraction of these proteins exhibits slow dynamics that fit with a binding-unbinding equilibrium. Number and brightness analysis shows that the eisosome-associated fraction is oligomeric, while cytoplasmic pools have lower aggregation states. Fluorescence lifetime imaging results indicate that Pil1 and Lsp1 directly interact in the cytoplasm and within the eisosomes. These results support a model where Pil1-Lsp1 heterodimers are the minimal eisosomes building blocks. Moreover, individual-eisosome fluorescence fluctuation analysis shows that eisosomes in the same cell are not equal domains: while roughly half of them are mostly static, the other half is actively exchanging core protein subunits. PMID:25863055

  20. Expression and purification of integral membrane metallopeptidase HtpX.

    PubMed

    Arolas, Joan L; García-Castellanos, Raquel; Goulas, Theodoros; Akiyama, Yoshinori; Gomis-Rüth, F Xavier

    2014-07-01

    Little is known about the catalytic mechanism of integral membrane (IM) peptidases. HtpX is an IM metallopeptidase that plays a central role in protein quality control by preventing the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the membrane. Here we report the recombinant overexpression and purification of a catalytically ablated form of HtpX from Escherichia coli. Several E. coli strains, expression vectors, detergents, and purification strategies were tested to achieve maximum yields of pure and well-folded protein. HtpX was successfully overexpressed in E. coli BL21(DE3) cells using a pET-derived vector attaching a C-terminal His8-tag, extracted from the membranes using octyl-β-d-glucoside, and purified to homogeneity in the presence of this detergent in three consecutive steps: cobalt-affinity, anion-exchange, and size-exclusion chromatography. The production of HtpX in milligram amounts paves the way for structural studies, which will be essential to understand the catalytic mechanism of this IM peptidase and related family members. PMID:24769134

  1. An equivalent domain integral method in the two-dimensional analysis of mixed mode crack problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Shivakumar, K. N.

    1990-01-01

    An equivalent domain integral (EDI) method for calculating J-integrals for two-dimensional cracked elastic bodies is presented. The details of the method and its implementation are presented for isoparametric elements. The EDI method gave accurate values of the J-integrals for two mode I and two mixed mode problems. Numerical studies showed that domains consisting of one layer of elements are sufficient to obtain accurate J-integral values. Two procedures for separating the individual modes from the domain integrals are presented.

  2. Membrane Binding of the Rous Sarcoma Virus Gag Protein Is Cooperative and Dependent on the Spacer Peptide Assembly Domain

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Marilia; Jin, Danni; Lösche, Mathias; Vogt, Volker M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The principles underlying membrane binding and assembly of retroviral Gag proteins into a lattice are understood. However, little is known about how these processes are related. Using purified Rous sarcoma virus Gag and Gag truncations, we studied the interrelation of Gag-Gag interaction and Gag-membrane interaction. Both by liposome binding and by surface plasmon resonance on a supported bilayer, Gag bound to membranes much more tightly than did matrix (MA), the isolated membrane binding domain. In principle, this difference could be explained either by protein-protein interactions leading to cooperativity in membrane binding or by the simultaneous interaction of the N-terminal MA and the C-terminal nucleocapsid (NC) of Gag with the bilayer, since both are highly basic. However, we found that NC was not required for strong membrane binding. Instead, the spacer peptide assembly domain (SPA), a putative 24-residue helical sequence comprising the 12-residue SP segment of Gag and overlapping the capsid (CA) C terminus and the NC N terminus, was required. SPA is known to be critical for proper assembly of the immature Gag lattice. A single amino acid mutation in SPA that abrogates assembly in vitro dramatically reduced binding of Gag to liposomes. In vivo, plasma membrane localization was dependent on SPA. Disulfide cross-linking based on ectopic Cys residues showed that the contacts between Gag proteins on the membrane are similar to the known contacts in virus-like particles. Taken together, we interpret these results to mean that Gag membrane interaction is cooperative in that it depends on the ability of Gag to multimerize. IMPORTANCE The retroviral structural protein Gag has three major domains. The N-terminal MA domain interacts directly with the plasma membrane (PM) of cells. The central CA domain, together with immediately adjoining sequences, facilitates the assembly of thousands of Gag molecules into a lattice. The C-terminal NC domain interacts with

  3. Organization of Subunits in the Membrane Domain of the Bovine F-ATPase Revealed by Covalent Cross-linking*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jennifer; Ding, ShuJing; Walpole, Thomas B.; Holding, Andrew N.; Montgomery, Martin G.; Fearnley, Ian M.; Walker, John E.

    2015-01-01

    The F-ATPase in bovine mitochondria is a membrane-bound complex of about 30 subunits of 18 different kinds. Currently, ∼85% of its structure is known. The enzyme has a membrane extrinsic catalytic domain, and a membrane intrinsic domain where the turning of the enzyme's rotor is generated from the transmembrane proton-motive force. The domains are linked by central and peripheral stalks. The central stalk and a hydrophobic ring of c-subunits in the membrane domain constitute the enzyme's rotor. The external surface of the catalytic domain and membrane subunit a are linked by the peripheral stalk, holding them static relative to the rotor. The membrane domain contains six additional subunits named ATP8, e, f, g, DAPIT (diabetes-associated protein in insulin-sensitive tissues), and 6.8PL (6.8-kDa proteolipid), each with a single predicted transmembrane α-helix, but their orientation and topography are unknown. Mutations in ATP8 uncouple the enzyme and interfere with its assembly, but its roles and the roles of the other five subunits are largely unknown. We have reacted accessible amino groups in the enzyme with bifunctional cross-linking agents and identified the linked residues. Cross-links involving the supernumerary subunits, where the structures are not known, show that the C terminus of ATP8 extends ∼70 Å from the membrane into the peripheral stalk and that the N termini of the other supernumerary subunits are on the same side of the membrane, probably in the mitochondrial matrix. These experiments contribute significantly toward building up a complete structural picture of the F-ATPase. PMID:25851905

  4. Comparative genomic analysis of integral membrane transport proteins in ciliates.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ujjwal; Saier, Milton H

    2015-01-01

    Integral membrane transport proteins homologous to those found in the Transporter Classification Database (TCDB; www.tcdb.org) were identified and bioinformatically characterized by transporter class, family, and substrate specificity in three ciliates, Paramecium tetraurelia (Para), Tetrahymena thermophila (Tetra), and Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich). In these three organisms, 1,326 of 39,600 proteins (3.4%), 1,017 of 24,800 proteins (4.2%), and 504 out of 8,100 proteins (6.2%) integral membrane transport proteins were identified, respectively. Thus, an inverse relationship was observed between the % transporters identified and the number of total proteins per genome reported. This surprising observation provides insight into the evolutionary process, giving rise to genome reduction following whole genome duplication (as in the case of Para) or during pathogenic association with a host organism (Ich). Of these transport proteins in Para and Tetra, about 41% were channels (more than any other type of organism studied), 31% were secondary carriers (fewer than most eukaryotes) and 26% were primary active transporters, mostly ATP-hydrolysis driven (more than most other eukaryotes). In Ich, the number of channels was selectively reduced by 66%, relative to Para and Tetra. Para has four times more inorganic anion transporters than Tetra, and Ich has nonselectively lost most of these. Tetra and Ich preferentially transport sugars and monocarboxylates while Para prefers di- and tricarboxylates. These observations serve to characterize the transport proteins of these related ciliates, providing insight into their nutrition and metabolism. PMID:25099884

  5. Syp1 is a conserved endocytic adaptor that contains domains involved in cargo selection and membrane tubulation

    SciTech Connect

    Reider, Amanda; Barker, Sarah L.; Mishra, Sanjay K.; Im, Young Jun; Maldonado-Báez, Lymarie; Hurley, James H.; Traub, Linton M.; Wendland, Beverly

    2010-10-28

    Internalization of diverse transmembrane cargos from the plasma membrane requires a similarly diverse array of specialized adaptors, yet only a few adaptors have been characterized. We report the identification of the muniscin family of endocytic adaptors that is conserved from yeast to human beings. Solving the structures of yeast muniscin domains confirmed the unique combination of an N-terminal domain homologous to the crescent-shaped membrane-tubulating EFC/F-BAR domains and a C-terminal domain homologous to cargo-binding {mu} homology domains ({mu}HDs). In vitro and in vivo assays confirmed membrane-tubulation activity for muniscin EFC/F-BAR domains. The {mu}HD domain has conserved interactions with the endocytic adaptor/scaffold Ede1/eps15, which influences muniscin localization. The transmembrane protein Mid2, earlier implicated in polarized Rho1 signalling, was identified as a cargo of the yeast adaptor protein. These and other data suggest a model in which the muniscins provide a combined adaptor/membrane-tubulation activity that is important for regulating endocytosis.

  6. Lysosome fusion to the cell membrane is mediated by the dysferlin C2A domain in coronary arterial endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wei-Qing; Xia, Min; Xu, Ming; Boini, Krishna M.; Ritter, Joseph K.; Li, Ning-Jun; Li, Pin-Lan

    2012-01-01

    Dysferlin has recently been reported to participate in cell membrane repair in muscle and other cells through lysosome fusion. Given that lysosome fusion is a crucial mechanism that leads to membrane raft clustering, the present study attempted to determine whether dysferlin is involved in this process and its related signalling, and explores the mechanism underlying dysferlin-mediated lysosome fusion in bovine coronary arterial endothelial cells (CAECs). We found that dysferlin is clustered in membrane raft macrodomains after Fas Ligand (FasL) stimulation as detected by confocal microscopy and membrane fraction flotation. Small-interfering RNA targeted to dysferlin prevented membrane raft clustering. Furthermore, the translocation of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) to membrane raft clusters, whereby local ASMase activation and ceramide production – an important step that mediates membrane raft clustering – was attenuated. Functionally, silencing of the dysferlin gene reversed FasL-induced impairment of endothelium-dependent vasodilation in isolated small coronary arteries. By monitoring fluorescence quenching or dequenching, silencing of the dysferlin gene was found to almost completely block lysosome fusion to plasma membrane upon FasL stimulation. Further studies to block C2A binding and silencing of AHNAK (a dysferlin C2A domain binding partner), showed that the dysferlin C2A domain is required for FasL-induced lysosome fusion to the cell membrane, ASMase translocation and membrane raft clustering. We conclude that dysferlin determines lysosome fusion to the plasma membrane through its C2A domain and it is therefore implicated in membrane-raft-mediated signaling and regulation of endothelial function in coronary circulation. PMID:22349696

  7. Evidence for multiple mechanisms for membrane binding and integration via carboxyl-terminal insertion sequences.

    PubMed

    Kim, P K; Janiak-Spens, F; Trimble, W S; Leber, B; Andrews, D W

    1997-07-22

    Subcellular localization of proteins with carboxyl-terminal insertion sequences requires the molecule be both targeted to and integrated into the correct membrane. The mechanism of membrane integration of cytochrome b5 has been shown to be promiscuous, spontaneous, nonsaturable, and independent of membrane proteins. Thus endoplasmic reticulum localization for cytochrome b5 depends primarily on accurate targeting to the appropriate membrane. Here direct comparison of this mechanism with that of three other proteins integrated into membranes via carboxyl-terminal insertion sequences [vesicle-associated membrane protein 1(Vamp1), polyomavirus middle-T antigen, and Bcl-2] revealed that, unlike cytochrome b5, membrane selectivity for these molecules is conferred at least in part by the mechanisms of membrane integration. Bcl-2 membrane integration was similar to that of cytochrome b5 except that insertion into lipid vesicles was inefficient. Unlike cytochrome b5 and Bcl-2, Vamp1 binding to canine pancreatic microsomes was saturable, ATP-dependent, and abolished by mild trypsin treatment of microsomes. Surprisingly, although the insertion sequence of polyomavirus middle-T antigen was sufficient to mediate electrostatic binding to membranes, binding did not lead to integration into the bilayer. Together these results demonstrate that there are at least two different mechanisms for correct membrane integration of proteins with insertion sequences, one mediated primarily by targeting and one relying on factors in the target membrane to mediate selective integration. Our results also demonstrate that, contrary to expectation, hydrophobicity is not sufficient for insertion sequence-mediated membrane integration. We suggest that the structure of the insertion sequence determines whether or not specific membrane-bound receptor proteins are required for membrane integration. PMID:9220974

  8. The Membrane-anchoring Domain of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Ligands Dictates Their Ability to Operate in Juxtacrine Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Jianying; Opresko, Lee; Chrisler, William B.; Orr, Galya; Quesenberry, Ryan D.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Wiley, H S.

    2005-06-01

    All ligands of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are synthesized as membrane-anchored precursors. Previous work has suggested that some ligands, such as EGF, must be proteolytically released to be active, whereas others, such as heparin binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) can function while still anchored to the membrane (i.e., juxtacrine signaling). To explore the structural basis for these differences in ligand activity, we engineered a series of membrane-anchored ligands in which the core, receptor-binding domain of EGF was combined with different domains of both EGF and HB-EGF. We found that ligands having the N-terminal extension of EGF could not bind to the EGFR, even when released from the membrane. Ligands lacking an N-terminal extension, but possessing the membrane-anchoring domain of EGF still required proteolytic release for activity, whereas ligands with the membrane anchoring domain of HB-EGF could elicit full biological activity while still membrane anchored. Ligands containing the HB-EGF membrane anchor, but lacking an N-terminal extension, activated EGFR during their transit through the Golgi apparatus . However, cell-mixing experiments and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) studies showed that juxtacrine signaling typically occurred in trans at the cell surface, at points of cell-cell contact. Our data suggest that the membrane-anchoring domain of ligands selectively controls their ability to participate in juxtacrine signaling and thus, only a subclass of EGFR ligands can act in a juxtacrine mode.

  9. Efficient ethanol recovery from yeast fermentation broth with integrated distillation-membrane process

    EPA Science Inventory

    A hybrid process integrating vapor stripping with vapor compression and vapor permeation membrane separation, termed Membrane Assisted Vapor Stripping (MAVS), was evaluated for recovery and dehydration of ethanol from aqueous solution as an alternative to conventional distillatio...

  10. Fusion Activity of HIV gp41 Fusion Domain is Related to its Secondary Structure and Depth of Membrane Insertion in a Cholesterol-Dependent Fashion

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Alex L.; Moorthy, Anna Eswara; Li, Yinling; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2013-01-01

    The HIV gp41 fusion domain plays a critical role in membrane fusion during viral entry. A thorough understanding of the relationship between the structure and activity of the fusion domain in different lipid environments helps to formulate mechanistic models on how it might function in mediating membrane fusion. The secondary structure of the fusion domain in small liposomes composed of different lipid mixtures was investigated by circular dichroism spectroscopy. In membranes containing less than 30 mol% cholesterol the fusion domain formed an α-helix and in membranes containing equal to or more than 30 mol% cholesterol the fusion domain formed β-sheet secondary structure. EPR spectra of spin-labeled fusion domains also indicated different conformations in membranes with and without cholesterol. Power saturation EPR data were further used to determine the orientation and depth of α-helical fusion domains in lipid bilayers. Fusion and membrane perturbation activities of the gp41 fusion domain were measured by lipid mixing and contents leakage. The fusion domain fused membranes in both its helical and β-sheet forms. High cholesterol, which induced β-sheet, promoted fusion, but acidic lipids, which promoted relatively deep membrane insertion as an α-helix, also induced fusion. The results indicate that the structure of the HIV gp41 fusion domain is plastic and depends critically on the lipid environment. Provided their membrane insertion is deep, α-helical and β-sheet conformations contribute to membrane fusion. PMID:22343048