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Sample records for integral thermonuclear neutronics

  1. Thermonuclear runaways on neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taam, R. E.; Picklum, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Thermonuclear runaways which develop when neutron stars of 0.476 solar masses accrete hydrogen-rich material at 10 to the -10th and 2 x 10 to the -9th solar masses/year have been followed using a numerical model. It is found that a thermal instability occurs at densities in excess of 10 to the 5th g/cu cm and that the maximum accumulated mass required to initiate the runaway is 0.7 x 10 to the -12th and 2.1 x 10 to the -12th solar masses for the mass accretion rates of 10 to the -10th and 2 x 10 to the -9th solar masses/year, respectively. Heating the of the neutron star envelope by hydrogen burning leads to the ignition of helium. The nonequilibrium burning of helium by a combination of (alpha, p), (p, gamma), and (alpha, gamma) reactions involving O-14, O-15, and other heavy nuclei provides the energy for an X-ray burst. The gross properties of these models bear suggestive resemblance to those observed for some X-ray burst sources.

  2. Neutron Stars and Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, Supid

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes neutron stars and thermonuclear x ray bursts. The contents include: 1) Neutron Stars: why do we care?; 2) Thermonuclear Bursts: why do we care?; 3) Neutron Stars: Mass, Radius and Spin: a. Continuum Spectroscopy of Bursts b. Spectral Lines from Bursts c. Timing Properties of Bursts; 4) Neutron Star Atmosphere: Thermonuclear Flame Spreading; and 5) Future Prospects and Conclusions.

  3. Thermonuclear flashes on accreting neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, P. C.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of X-ray bursts from binary pulsars and globular clusters are reviewed. The previously proposed hypothesis is considered that such X-ray bursts result from thermonuclear flashes on accreting neutron stars. A general scenario for this mechanism is outlined, and numerical computations of the evolution of the surface layers of an accreting neutron star are discussed. The relation of these calculations to X-ray bursts and other phenomena is examined. Possible improvements in the numerical calculations are suggested.

  4. Thermonuclear processes on accreting neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, P. C.

    1981-01-01

    Theoretical models for X-ray burst sources that invoke thermonuclear flashes on the surface layers of an accreting neutron star are discussed. The historical development of X-ray burst observation is summarized, and a physical picture of a neutron star undergoing accretion is drawn. Detailed numerical computations of the evolution of the surface layers of such a star are reviewed. The need for general relativistic corrections to the model is pointed out. Finally, comparisons are made with observations of X-ray bursts, the rapid burster, fast X-ray transients, X-ray pulsars, and gamma-ray burst sources.

  5. Neutron Stars and Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2007-01-01

    Studies of thermonuclear X-ray bursts can be very useful to constrain the spin rate, mass and radius of a neutron star approaching EOS model of high density cold matter in the neutron star cores. +k Extensive observation and analysis of the data from the rising portions of the bursts - modeling of burst oscillations and thermonuclear flame spreading. +k Theoretical study of thermonuclear flame spreading on the rapidly spinning neutron stars should be done considering all the main physical effects (including magnetic field, nuclear energy generation, Coriolis effect, strong gravity, etc.).

  6. Understanding Neutron Stars using Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of thermonuclear X-ray bursts can be very useful to constrain the spin rate, mass and radius of a neutron star = EOS model of high density cold matter in the neutron star cores. Extensive observation and analysis of the data from the rising portions of the bursts = modeling of burst oscillations and thermonuclear flame spreading. Theoretical study of thermonuclear flame spreading on the rapidly spinning neutron stars should be done considering all the main physical effects (including magnetic field, nuclear energy generation, Coriolis effect, strong gravity, etc.).

  7. X-ray bursts and neutron-star thermonuclear flashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, P. C.

    1977-01-01

    A description is presented of a model concerning the production of X-ray bursts by thermonuclear flashes in the freshly accreted matter near the surface of an accreting neutron star. An investigation is conducted regarding the physical processes relevant to such thermonuclear flashes. It is concluded that thermonuclear flashes may account for some, but not all, of the observed X-ray burst sources. Attention is given to a neutron star undergoing accretion of mass from a binary stellar companion, aspects of energetics, nuclear reactions, and heat transport mechanisms.

  8. Thermonuclear bursts from slowly and rapidly accreting neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linares, Manuel

    2012-07-01

    Models of thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars predict different ignition regimes, depending mainly on the mass accretion rate per unit area. For more than three decades, testing these regimes observationally has met with only partial success. I will present recent results from the Fermi-GBM all-sky X-ray burst monitor, which is yielding robust measurements of recurrence time of rare and highly energetic thermonuclear bursts at the lowest mass accretion rates. I will also present RXTE observations of thermonuclear bursts at high mass accretion rates, including the discovery of millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations and several bursting regimes in a neutron star transient and 11 Hz X-ray pulsar. This unusual neutron star, with higher magnetic field and slower rotation than any other known burster, showed copious bursting activity when the mass accretion rate varied between 10% and 50% of the Eddington rate. I will discuss the role of fuel composition and neutron star spin in setting the burst properties of this system, and the possible implications for the rest of thermonuclear bursters.

  9. Thermonuclear Burning as a Probe of Neutron Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2008-01-01

    Thermonuclear fusion is a fundamental process taking place in the matter transferred onto neutron stars in accreting binary systems. The heat deposited by nuclear reactions becomes readily visible in the X-ray band when the burning is either unstable or marginally stable, and results in the rich phenomenology of X-ray bursts, superbursts, and mHz quasiperiodic oscillations. Fast X-ray timing observations with NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) over the past decade have revealed a wealth of new phenomena associated with thermonuclear burning on neutron stars, including the discovery of nuclear powered pulsations during X-ray bursts and superbursts. I will briefly review our current observational and theoretical understanding of these new phenomena, with an emphasis on recent findings, and discuss what they are telling us about the structure of neutron stars.

  10. Thermonuclear runaways in thick hydrogen rich envelopes of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S. G.; Kenyon, S.; Truran, J. W.; Sparks, W. M.

    1981-01-01

    A Lagrangian, fully implicit, one dimensional hydrodynamic computer code was used to evolve thermonuclear runaways in the accreted hydrogen rich envelopes of 1.0 Msub solar neutron stars with radii of 10 km and 20 km. Simulations produce outbursts which last from about 750 seconds to about one week. Peak effective temeratures and luninosities were 26 million K and 80 thousand Lsub solar for the 10 km study and 5.3 millison and 600 Lsub solar for the 20 km study. Hydrodynamic expansion on the 10 km neutron star produced a precursor lasting about one ten thousandth seconds.

  11. Neutron capture of 26Mg at thermonuclear energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, P.; Beer, H.; Oberhummer, H.; Staudt, G.

    1998-08-01

    The neutron capture cross section of 26Mg was measured relative to the known gold cross section at thermonuclear energies using the fast cyclic activation technique. The experiment was performed at the 3.75 MV Van-de-Graaff accelerator, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The experimental capture cross section is the sum of resonant and direct contributions. For the resonance at En,lab=220 keV our new results are in disagreement with the data from Weigmann, Macklin, and Harvey [Phys. Rev. C 14, 1328 (1976)]. An improved Maxwellian averaged capture cross section is derived from the new experimental data taking into account s- and p-wave capture and resonant contributions. The properties of so-called potential resonances which influence the p-wave neutron capture of 26Mg are discussed in detail.

  12. Thermonuclear runaways in thick hydrogen rich envelopes of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S.; Kenyon, S.; Truran, J. W.; Sparks, W. M.

    1982-01-01

    A Lagrangian, fully implicit, one-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code is used to evolve thermonuclear runaways in the accreted hydrogen-rich envelopes of 1.0-solar-mass neutron stars with radii of 10 km and 20 km. The simulations produce outbursts lasting from approximately 750 seconds to approximately one week. The peak effective temperatures and luminosities are 2.6 x 10 to the 7th K and 8 x 10 to the 4th solar luminosities for the 10 km study and 5.3 x 10 to the 6th K and 600 solar luminosities for the 20 km study. It is found that hydrodynamic expansion on the 10 km neutron star produced a precursor lasting approximately 0.0001 second. The study assumes that the bursters and transient X-ray sources occur as a result of mass transfer from a secondary onto a neutron star in a fashion analogous to the nova phenomena. The peak temperatures and luminosities are found to be inversely proportional to the radius of the neutron stars and the calculations here, together with those in the literature, indicate that the actual radii of most neutron stars must be closer to 10 km than 20 km.

  13. Relativistic outflow from two thermonuclear shell flashes on neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    in't Zand, J. J. M.; Keek, L.; Cavecchi, Y.

    2014-08-01

    We study the exceptionally short (32-43 ms) precursors of two intermediate-duration thermonuclear X-ray bursts observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer from the neutron stars in 4U 0614+09 and 2S 0918-549. They exhibit photon fluxes that surpass those at the Eddington limit later in the burst by factors of 2.6 to 3.1. We are able to explain both the short duration and the super-Eddington flux by mildly relativistic outflow velocities of 0.1c to 0.3c subsequent to the thermonuclear shell flashes on the neutron stars. These are the highest velocities ever measured from any thermonuclear flash. The precursor rise times are also exceptionally short: about 1 ms. This is inconsistent with predictions for nuclear flames spreading laterally as deflagrations and suggests detonations instead. This is the first time that a detonation is suggested for such a shallow ignition column depth (yign ≈ 1010 g cm-2). The detonation would possibly require a faster nuclear reaction chain, such as bypassing the α-capture on 12C with the much faster 12C(p,γ)13N(α,p)16O process previously proposed. We confirm the possibility of a detonation, albeit only in the radial direction, through the simulation of the nuclear burning with a large nuclear network and at the appropriate ignition depth, although it remains to be seen whether the Zel'dovich criterion is met. A detonation would also provide the fast flame spreading over the surface of the neutron star to allow for the short rise times. This needs to be supported by future two-dimensional calculations of flame spreading at the relevant column depth. As an alternative to the detonation scenario, we speculate on the possibility that the whole neutron star surface burns almost instantly in the auto-ignition regime. This is motivated by the presence of 150 ms precursors with 30 ms rise times in some superexpansion bursts from 4U 1820-30 at low ignition column depths of ~108 g cm-2.

  14. Thermonuclear processes on accreting neutron stars - A systematic study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayasli, S.; Joss, P. C.

    1982-01-01

    A series of model calculations for the evolution of the surface layers of an accreting neutron star is carried out. The neutron star mass, radius, core temperature, and surface magnetic field strength are systematically varied, as are the accretion rate onto the neutron star surface and the metallicity of the accreting matter, in order to determine the effects of these parameters on the properties of thermonuclear flashes in the surface layers and the emitted X-ray bursts that result from such flashes. The core temperatures required for thermal equilibrium are found to be approximately a factor of 2 lower than estimated in earlier work. Owing to the effects of the gravitational redshift, the emitted X-ray bursts have lower peak luminosities and longer durations than those calculated in the Newtonian approximation. The entrainment of hydrogen into helium flashes can cause the flashes to exhibit a rather wide range of observable effects and can decrease by a factor of more than 2 the ratio of persistent accretion-driven luminosity to time-averaged burst luminosity emitted by the neutron star.

  15. Efficient GPU Accelerationfor Integrating Large Thermonuclear Networks in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidry, Mike

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate the systematic implementation of recently-developed fast explicit kinetic integration algorithms on modern graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerators. We take as representative test cases Type Ia supernova explosions with extremely stiff thermonuclear reaction networks having 150-365 isotopic species and 1600-4400 reactions, assumed coupled to hydrodynamics using operator splitting. In such examples we demonstrate the capability to integrate independent thermonuclear networks from ~250-500 hydro zones (assumed to be deployed on CPU cores) in parallel on a single GPU in the same wall clock time that standard implicit methods can integrate the network for a single zone. This two or more orders of magnitude increase in efficiency for solving systems of realistic thermonuclear networks coupled to fluid dynamics implies that important coupled, multiphysics problems in various scientific and technical disciplines that were intractable, or could be simulated only with highly schematic kinetic networks, are now computationally feasible. As examples of such applications I will discuss our ongoing deployment of these new methods for Type Ia supernova explosions in astrophysics and for simulation of the complex atmospheric chemistry entering into weather and climate problems.

  16. Probing thermonuclear flame spreading on neutron stars using burst rise oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Manoneeta; Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2016-07-01

    Intense X-ray bursts (type-I bursts), originated from runaway thermonuclear processes, are observed from the surfaces of many accreting neutron star Low Mass X-ray Binary (LMXB) systems and they provide an important tool to constrain the neutron star equation of state. Periodic intensity variations during these bursts, termed burst oscillations, are observed in about 10% of thermonuclear bursts. Oscillations during the rising phases of thermonuclear bursts are hypothesized to originate from an expanding hot-spot on the surface of the neutron star. We studied the evolution of oscillations during the rising phase of a large sample of thermonuclear bursts from 10 bursting neutron stars in order to probe the process of burning front propagation during an X-ray burst. Our results show observational evidences of expanding hot-spot with spin modulated flame speeds, possibly due to the effects of the Coriolis force present as a result of the high stellar spin (270-620 Hz). This implies that the flame propagation is latitude-dependent and we address the factors affecting the detection and non-detection of burst rise oscillations in the light of this Coriolis force modulated flame spreading scenario.

  17. Oscillations During Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts: A New Probe of Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Observations of thermonuclear (also called Type 1) X-ray bursts from neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB) with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) have revealed large amplitude, high coherence X-ray brightness oscillations with frequencies in the 300 - 600 Hz range. Substantial spectral and timing evidence point to rotational modulation of the X-ray burst flux as the cause of these oscillations, and it is likely that they reveal the spin frequencies of neutron stars in LMXB from which they are detected. Here we review the status of our knowledge of these oscillations and describe how they can be used to constrain the masses and radii of neutron stars as well as the physics of thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars.

  18. Thermonuclear reactions in cool accreting neutron stars and burst phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyaji, S.; Nomoto, K.

    1985-01-01

    The ignition of accreting materials on neutron stars is explored using strongly coupled plasma analytical techniques. The calculations cover the ignition temperature and density at the bottom of the accreted envelope of a neutron star. Emphasis is placed on low-temperature ignitions which take place at high densities. The investigation is extended to the accretion of material from a white dwarf in the form of pure He, C + O, or O + Ne + Mg. It is shown that electrons are strongly degenerate in low-temperature flashes, where the ignition is more dependent on density than on temperature. Precursor flashes 0.4-0.7 the intensity of the main burst will appear before the main bursts. The intensity relationship indicates that the appropriate model for an X-ray burst from a neutron star accreting from a white dwarf is a He shell flash in the presence of a hydrogen-rich atmosphere. The flash will have a maximum energy of 2 x 10 to the 43 ergs and could last as long as 40,000 sec.

  19. Masses And Radii Of Neutron Stars Measured From Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guver, Tolga; Ozel, F.

    2011-09-01

    Low mass X-ray binaries that show thermonuclear bursts are ideal targets for constraining the equation of state of neutron star matter. The analysis of the time resolved, high count rate X-ray spectra allow a measurement of the Eddington limits and the apparent radii of neutron stars. Combined with an independent distance estimate, these spectroscopic quantities lead to the measurement of neutron star masses and radii. I will discuss the results of the application of this method to a number of X-ray binaries including EXO 1745-248, 4U 1820-30, 4U 1608-52,KS 1731-260, and SAX J1748.9-2021. I will also present the results from a comprehensive analysis of the entire RXTE archive of X-ray burst observations, which allows for a better quantification of the systematic uncertainties in these measurements.

  20. Thermonuclear processes and accretion onto neutron star envelopes - X-ray burst and transient sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S.; Kenyon, S.; Truran, J. W.; Sparks, W. M.

    1982-01-01

    A Lagrangian, fully implicit, one-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code is used to investigate the evolution of thermonuclear runaways in the thick accreted hydrogen-rich envelopes of 1.0-solar-mass neutron stars having radii of 10 km and 20 km. The simulations produce outbursts that range in time scale from about 2000 seconds to more than a day. For the 10-km study, the peak effective temperature is 3.3 x 10 to the 7th K, and the peak luminosity is 2 x 10 to the 5th solar luminosities. The 20-km neutron star produces a peak effective temperature and luminosity of 5.3 x 10 to the 6th K and 5.9 x 10 to the 2nd solar luminosities. Also investigated are the effects of changes in the rates of the O-14(alpha, proton) and O-15(alpha, gamma) reactions on the evolution. Hydrodynamic expansion on the 10-km neutron star produces a precursor lasting about 10 to the -6th sec. The evolution of a gas cloud impacting the surface of a 20-km, 1-solar-mass neutron star is studied in an attempt to simulate the magnetospheric gate model of the X-ray burst sources.

  1. Ion heating and thermonuclear neutron production from high-intensity subpicosecond laser pulses interacting with underdense plasmas.

    PubMed

    Fritzler, S; Najmudin, Z; Malka, V; Krushelnick, K; Marle, C; Walton, B; Wei, M S; Clarke, R J; Dangor, A E

    2002-10-14

    Thermonuclear fusion neutrons produced by D(d,n)3He reactions have been measured from the interaction of a high-intensity laser with underdense deuterium plasmas. For an input laser energy of 62 J, more than (1.0+/-0.2)x10(6) neutrons with a mean kinetic energy of (2.5+/-0.2) MeV were detected. These neutrons were observed to have an isotropic angular emission profile. By comparing these measurements with those using a secondary solid CD2 target it was determined that neutrons are produced from direct ion heating during this interaction. PMID:12398731

  2. Spreading of thermonuclear flames on the neutron star in SAX J1808.4-3658: an observational tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2005-01-01

    We analyse archival Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) proportional counter array (PCA) data of thermonuclear X-ray bursts from the 2002 outburst of the accreting millisecond pulsar SAX 51808.4-3658. We present evidence of a complex frequency modulation of oscillations during burst rise, and correlations among the time evolution of the oscillation frequency, amplitude, and the inferred burning region area. We discuss these findings in the context of a model, based on thermonuclear flame spreading on the neutron star surface, that can qualitatively explain these features. From our model, we infer that for the 2002 Oct. 15 thermonuclear burst, the ignition likely occurred in the mid-latitudes, the burning region took approx. 0.2 s to nearly encircle the equatorial region of the neutron star, and after that the lower amplitude oscillation originated from the remaining asymmetry of the burning front in the same hemisphere where the burst ignited. We emphasize that studies of the evolution of burst oscillation properties during burst rise can provide a powerful tool to understand thermonuclear flame spreading on neutron star surfaces under extreme physical conditions.

  3. Evidence of thermonuclear flame spreading on neutron stars from burst rise oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Manoneeta; Bhattacharyya, Sudip E-mail: sudip@tifr.res.in

    2014-09-01

    Burst oscillations during the rising phases of thermonuclear X-ray bursts are usually believed to originate from flame spreading on the neutron star surface. However, the decrease of fractional oscillation amplitude with rise time, which provides a main observational support for the flame spreading model, have so far been reported from only a few bursts. Moreover, the non-detection and intermittent detections of rise oscillations from many bursts are not yet understood considering the flame spreading scenario. Here, we report the decreasing trend of fractional oscillation amplitude from an extensive analysis of a large sample of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array bursts from 10 neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries. This trend is 99.99% significant for the best case, which provides, to the best of our knowledge, by far the strongest evidence of such a trend. Moreover, it is important to note that an opposite trend is not found in any of the bursts. The concave shape of the fractional amplitude profiles for all the bursts suggests latitude-dependent flame speeds, possibly due to the effects of the Coriolis force. We also systematically study the roles of low fractional amplitude and low count rate for non-detection and intermittent detections of rise oscillations, and attempt to understand them within the flame spreading scenario. Our results support a weak turbulent viscosity for flame spreading, and imply that burst rise oscillations originate from an expanding hot spot, thus making these oscillations a more reliable tool to constrain the neutron star equations of state.

  4. Mechanism of thermonuclear burning propagation in a helium layer on a neutron star surface: A simplified adiabatic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonenko, V. A.; Gryaznykh, D. A.; Litvinenko, I. A.; Lykov, V. A.; Shushlebin, A. N.

    2012-04-01

    Some thermonuclear X-ray bursters exhibit a high-frequency (about 300 Hz or more) brightness modulation at the rising phase of some bursts. These oscillations are explained by inhomogeneous heating of the surface layer on a rapidly rotating neutron star due to the finite propagation speed of thermonuclear burning. We suggest and substantiate a mechanism of this propagation that is consistent with experimental data. Initially, thermonuclear ignition occurs in a small region of the neutron star surface layer. The burning products rapidly rise and spread in the upper atmospheric layers due to turbulent convection. The accumulation of additional matter leads to matter compression and ignition at the bottom of the layer. This determines the propagation of the burning front. To substantiate this mechanism, we use the simplifying assumptions about a helium composition of the neutron star atmosphere and its initial adiabatic structure with a density of 1.75 × 108 g cm-3 at the bottom. 2D numerical simulations have been performed using a modified particle method in the adiabatic approximation.

  5. Reaction rate and composition dependence of the stability of thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Keek, L.; Cyburt, R. H.; Heger, A.

    2014-06-01

    The stability of thermonuclear burning of hydrogen and helium accreted onto neutron stars is strongly dependent on the mass accretion rate. The burning behavior is observed to change from Type I X-ray bursts to stable burning, with oscillatory burning occurring at the transition. Simulations predict the transition at a 10 times higher mass accretion rate than observed. Using numerical models we investigate how the transition depends on the hydrogen, helium, and CNO mass fractions of the accreted material, as well as on the nuclear reaction rates of 3α and the hot-CNO breakout reactions {sup 15}O(α, γ){sup 19}Ne and {sup 18}Ne(α, p){sup 21}Na. For a lower hydrogen content the transition is at higher accretion rates. Furthermore, most experimentally allowed reaction rate variations change the transition accretion rate by at most 10%. A factor 10 decrease of the {sup 15}O(α, γ){sup 19}Ne rate, however, produces an increase of the transition accretion rate of 35%. None of our models reproduce the transition at the observed rate, and depending on the true {sup 15}O(α, γ){sup 19}Ne reaction rate, the actual discrepancy may be substantially larger. We find that the width of the interval of accretion rates with marginally stable burning depends strongly on both composition and reaction rates. Furthermore, close to the stability transition, our models predict that X-ray bursts have extended tails where freshly accreted fuel prolongs nuclear burning.

  6. X-Ray Reflection of Thermonuclear Bursts from Neutron Stars: Constraining Flames with RXTE and an Outlook on NICER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keek, Laurens

    2016-04-01

    Thermonuclear X-ray bursts observed from accreting neutron stars are employed to study, e.g., the nuclear physics of rare isotopes and the dense matter equation of state. Recent observations indicate that bursts strongly affect their accretion environment, and reprocessed burst emission may reflect off the inner accretion disk. The spectra of the short (10-100s) bursts are, however, of insufficient quality to accurately separate the neutron star signal from accretion disk emission and burst reflection. Only for two rare "superbursts" with durations of several hours did RXTE/PCA spectra show burst reflection signatures. We discuss the case of 4U 1636-536, where the reflection signal traced the evolution of the ionization state of the inner disk. Our simulations show that a large reflection fraction may indicate that the disk puffs up due to burst irradiation. After separating the direct burst emission from reflection, we show that the rise of the superburst light curve is shaped by a stalling carbon flame. In the near future, the Neutron Star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) will have a band-pass that extends below 2 keV, where reflection dominates the burst spectrum, and which was not probed by RXTE. Therefore, NICER will be able to detect reflection features during the frequent short bursts. NICER will open a new field of studying the interaction of bursts and the accretion environment, which will inform us of which bursts are optimally suited for neutron star mass-radius measurements.

  7. Mapping Neutron-Star Surfaces During Thermonuclear Flashes using Archival RXTE Observations of Burst Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psaltis, Dimitrios

    Pointing observations of accreting neutron stars with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer have amassed a large database of X-ray bursts from 48 sources. In 317 of such bursts from 18 sources, nearly coherent oscillations have been detected at frequencies that are very similar to the spin frequencies of the neutron stars. The physical mechanism responsible for these oscillations remains unknown, despite many years of intense observations and theoretical modeling. The timing properties of burst oscillations, such as their overall amplitudes and frequency shifts, have been analyzed extensively but are not sufficient to break degeneracies between model predictions. On the other hand, the expected dependence of the energy spectra of these oscillations on the rotational phase of the neutron stars has not been explored. In the proposed research project, we will perform a systematic study of the evolution with rotational phase of the energy spectra during burst oscillations, for all neutron stars from which such oscillations have been detected. We will then compare the measurements with accurate calculations of ray tracing in the spacetimes of spinning neutron stars in order to map the brightness of surface emission on the stellar surface that causes the burst oscillations. Our results will allow us to distinguish between different models of the oscillations, infer the ignition latitudes of bursts and the propagation velocities of the burning fronts, as well as constrain the compactness (M/R) of each neutron star. In this way, they will help answer one of the key questions in the 2010 Science Plan for NASA's Science Mission Directorate: "How do matter, energy, space, and time behave under the extraordinarily diverse conditions of the cosmos?"

  8. Probing the effects of a thermonuclear X-ray burst on the neutron star accretion flow with NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degenaar, N.; Koljonen, K. I. I.; Chakrabarty, D.; Kara, E.; Altamirano, D.; Miller, J. M.; Fabian, A. C.

    2016-03-01

    Observational evidence has been accumulating that thermonuclear X-ray bursts ignited on the surface of neutron stars influence the surrounding accretion flow. Here, we exploit the excellent sensitivity of NuSTAR up to 79 keV to analyse the impact of an X-ray burst on the accretion emission of the neutron star LMXB 4U 1608-52. The ≃200 s long X-ray burst occurred during a hard X-ray spectral state, and had a peak intensity of ≃30-50 per cent of the Eddington limit with no signs of photospheric radius expansion. Spectral analysis suggests that the accretion emission was enhanced up to a factor of ≃5 during the X-ray burst. We also applied a linear unsupervised decomposition method, namely non-negative matrix factorization (NMF), to study this X-ray burst. We find that the NMF performs well in characterizing the evolution of the burst emission and is a promising technique to study changes in the underlying accretion emission in more detail than is possible through conventional spectral fitting. For the burst of 4U 1608-52, the NMF suggests a possible softening of the accretion spectrum during the X-ray burst, which could potentially be ascribed to cooling of a corona. Finally, we report a small (≃3 per cent) but significant rise in the accretion emission ≃0.5 h before the X-ray burst, although it is unclear whether this was related to the X-ray burst ignition.

  9. Propagation of Thermonuclear Flames on Rapidly Rotating Neutron Stars: Extreme Weather during Type I X-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitkovsky, Anatoly; Levin, Yuri; Ushomirsky, Greg

    2002-02-01

    We analyze the global hydrodynamic flow in the ocean of an accreting, rapidly rotating, nonmagnetic neutron star in a low-mass X-ray binary during a type I X-ray burst. We use both analytical arguments and numerical simulations of simplified models for ocean burning. Our analysis extends previous work by taking into account the rapid rotation of the star and the lift-up of the burning ocean during the burst. We find a new regime for the spreading of a nuclear burning front, where the flame is carried along a coherent shear flow across the front. If turbulent viscosity is weak, the speed of flame propagation is vflame~(gh)1/2/ftn~20 km s-1, where h is the scale height of the burning ocean, g is the local gravitational acceleration, tn is the timescale for fast nuclear burning during the burst, and f is the Coriolis parameter, i.e., twice the local vertical component of the spin vector. If turbulent viscosity is dynamically important, the flame speed increases and reaches the maximum value, vmaxflame~(gh/ftn)1/2~300 km s-1, when the eddy overturn frequency is comparable to the Coriolis parameter f. We show that, as a result of rotationally reduced gravity, the thermonuclear runaway which ignites the ocean is likely to begin on the equator. The equatorial belt is ignited at the beginning of the burst, and the flame then propagates from the equator to the poles. Inhomogeneous cooling (equator first, poles second) of the hot ashes drives strong zonal currents which may be unstable to the formation of Jupiter-type vortices; we conjecture that these vortices are responsible for coherent modulation of X-ray flux in the tails of some bursts. We consider the effect of strong zonal currents on the frequency of modulation of the X-ray flux and show that the large values of the frequency drifts observed in some bursts can be accounted for within our model combined with the model of homogeneous radial expansion. Additionally, if vortices or other inhomogeneities are trapped in

  10. The thermonuclear-flash model for X-ray burst sources - A new tool for observing neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, P. C.

    1979-01-01

    The helium-flash model for X-ray burst sources, in which matter is presumed to accrete onto the surface of a neutron star, is discussed. Attention is given to the accretion process, nuclear burning, X-ray emission, and the energy released by convection as well as by radiative diffusion near the surface. The rise times of observed bursts, their spectral evolution, and the properties of the spectrally soft X-ray transients are considered. Problems in interpreting the continuum spectra are discussed, along with problems in the detection and measurement of line features in the spectra. Also considered are the ratio of time-averaged persistent luminosity to time-averaged burst luminosity, peak burst luminosities, and the possibility of detecting binary membership for burst sources.

  11. Nucleosynthesis in Thermonuclear Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Claudia, Travaglio; Hix, William Raphael

    2013-01-01

    We review our understanding of the nucleosynthesis that occurs in thermonuclear supernovae and their contribution to Galactic Chemical evolution. We discuss the prospects to improve the modeling of the nucleosynthesis within simulations of these events.

  12. Novae as Thermonuclear Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, D. D.

    2003-07-01

    Fred Hoyle undertook a study of observational consequences of the thermonuclear paradigm for the nova event in the years following his 1972 resignation from Cambridge University. The most fruitful of these have been in the areas of gamma-ray astronomy, by which one attempts to measure the level of radioactivity in the nova envelope, and of presolar grain studies in laboratories, by which one measures anomalous isotopic ratios that fingerprint condensation in the thermonuclear event. This work summarizes progress with these two astronomical measures of the novae.

  13. Thermonuclear land of plenty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasior, P.

    2014-11-01

    Since the process of energy production in the stars has been identified as the thermonuclear fusion, this mechanism has been proclaimed as a future, extremely modern, reliable and safe for sustaining energetic needs of the humankind. However, the idea itself was rather straightforward and the first attempts to harness thermonuclear reactions have been taken yet in 40s of the twentieth century, it quickly appeared that physical and technical problems of domesticating exotic high temperature medium known as plasma are far from being trivial. Though technical developments as lasers, superconductors or advanced semiconductor electronics and computers gave significant contribution for the development of the thermonuclear fusion reactors, for a very long time their efficient performance was out of reach of technology. Years of the scientific progress brought the conclusions that for the development of the thermonuclear power plants an enormous interdisciplinary effort is needed in many fields of science covering not only plasma physics but also material research, superconductors, lasers, advanced diagnostic systems (e.g. spectroscopy, interferometry, scattering techniques, etc.) with huge amounts of data to be processed, cryogenics, measurement-control systems, automatics, robotics, nanotechnology, etc. Due to the sophistication of the problems with plasma control and plasma material interactions only such a combination of the research effort can give a positive output which can assure the energy needs of our civilization. In this paper the problems of thermonuclear technology are briefly outlined and it is shown why this domain can be a broad field for the experts dealing with electronics, optoelectronics, programming and numerical simulations, who at first glance can have nothing common with the plasma or nuclear physics.

  14. Oscillations During Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    High amplitude, nearly coherent X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts were discovered with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in early 1996. Spectral and timing evidence strongly supports the conclusion that these oscillations are caused by rotational modulation of the burst emission and that they reveal the spin frequency of neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries, a long sought goal of X-ray astronomy. Studies carried out over the past year have led to the discovery of burst oscillations in four new sources, bringing to ten the number with confirmed burst oscillations. I review the status of our knowledge of these oscillations and indicate how they can be used to probe the physics of neutron stars. For a few burst oscillation sources it has been proposed that the strongest and most ubiquitous frequency is actually the first overtone of the spin frequency and hence that two nearly antipodal hot spots are present on the neutron star. This inference has important implications for both the physics of thermonuclear burning as well as the mass - radius relation for neutron stars, so its confirmation is crucial. I discuss recent attempts to confirm this hypothesis for 4U 1636-53, the source for which a signal at the putative fundamental (290Hz) has, been claimed.

  15. Integrated neutron/gamma-ray portal monitors for nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Fehlau, P.E.

    1993-09-01

    Radiation monitoring is one nuclear-safeguards measure used to protect against the theft of special nuclear materials (SNM) by pedestrians departing from SNM access areas. The integrated neutron/gamma-ray portal monitor is an ideal radiation monitor for the task when the SNM is plutonium. It achieves high sensitivity for detecting both bare and shielded plutonium by combining two types of radiation detector. One type is a neutron-chamber detector, comprising a large, hollow, neutron moderator that contains a single thermal-neutron proportional counter. The entrance wall of each chamber is thin to admit slow neutrons from plutonium contained in a moderating shield, while the other walls are thick to moderate fast neutrons from bare or lead-shielded plutonium so that they can be detected. The other type of detector is a plastic scintillator that is primarily for detecting gamma rays from small amounts of unshielded plutonium. The two types of detector are easily integrated by making scintillators part of the thick back wall of each neutron chamber or by inserting them into each chamber void. We compared the influence of the two methods of integration on detecting neutrons and gamma rays, and we examined the effectiveness of other design factors and the methods for signal detection as well.

  16. Thermonuclear flashes in the envelopes of accreting hot neutron stars. II. M = 10/sup 16/, 10/sup 18/ g/sec

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryashov, A.D.; Ergma, V.

    1983-11-01

    The results of calculations of the accretion of matter and the subsequent flash at the surface of a hot neutron star for accretion rates of 10/sup 16/< or =M< or =10/sup 18/ g/sec are presented. It is found that a helium layer is formed for M< or approx. =M/sub c//sub r/approx. =4x10/sup 16/ g/sec. Hydrogen--helium flashes occur for M>M/sub c//sub r/. The connection between the different types of flashes and the observed properties of bursters and fast transients is discussed. The results are compared with observations of the burster XB 1608-522.

  17. A Computerized Library and Evaluation System for Integral Neutron Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampel, Viktor E.; And Others

    A computerized library of references to integral neutron experiments has been developed at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory at Livermore. This library serves as a data base for the systematic retrieval of documents describing diverse critical and bulk nuclear experiments. The evaluation and reduction of the physical parameters of the experiments…

  18. Thermonuclear-flash models for X-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical models for X-ray burst sources that invoke thermonuclear flashes in the surface layers of an accreting neutron star are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the studies by Joss (1978) and Joss and Li (1979) on the evolution of the helium-burning shell. Numerical calculations with regard to the mass accretion rate, core temperature of the neutron star and the sensitivity of the flash properties to the assumed mass and radius of the neutron star are considered. Attention is also given to the behavior of the surface luminosity following a thermonuclear flash, the decline from maximum X-ray luminosity, structure of the surface layers prior to and during the first helium-burning flash and the temporal evolution of the first X-ray burst.

  19. Delayed neutron detection with an integrated differential die-away and delayed neutron instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, Pauline; Tobin, Stephen J; Lee, Taehoon; Hu, Jianwei S; Hendricks, John; Croft, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has funded a multilab/university collaboration to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass and detect the diversion of pins from spent nuclear fuel. The first two years of this NGSI effort was focused on quantifying the capability of a range of nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques with Monte Carlo (MCNPX) modeling and the second current phase involves measuring Spent Fuel. One of the techniques of interest in this paper involves measuring delayed neutrons. A delayed neutron instrument using 36 fission chambers and a 14 MeV neutron generator so called DT generator (Deuterium + Tritium) surrounding the fuel was previously studied as part of the NGSI effort. This paper will quantify the capability of a standalone delayed neutron instrument using 4 {sup 3}He gas filled tubes and a DT generator with significant spectrum tailoring, located far from the fuel. So that future research can assess how well a delayed neutron instrument will function as part of an integrated NDA system. A new design is going to be used to respond to the need of the techniques. This design has been modeled for a water media and is currently being optimized for borated water and air media as part of ongoing research. This new design was selected in order to minimize the fission of {sup 238}U, to use a more realistic neutron generator design in the model, to reduce cost and facilitate the integration of a delayed neutron (DN) with a differential die-away (DDA) instrument. Since this paper will focus on delayed neutron detection, the goal is to quantify the signal from {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu, which are the isotopes present in Spent Fuel that respond significantly to a neutron interrogation. This report will quantify the capability of this new delayed neutron design to measure the combined mass of {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu for 16 of the 64 assemblies of the NGSI Spent Fuel library in one

  20. Counter-beam thermonuclear fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumakhov, M. A.

    2013-11-01

    A method of organizing counter beams of deuterium and tritium in a ring with electrified walls is suggested. In such a ring, beams of ions are locked in a potential well the height of which is much larger than the energy of colliding particles. In this instance, the phase volume of the ion beams increases due to multiple scattering. Estimates are made of the probability of thermonuclear reactions under these conditions and of the parameters of a thermonuclear reactor based on this principle. A number of risks and hazards that researchers might expect to encounter on this way are considered.

  1. Simultaneous and integrated neutron-based techniques for material analysis of a metallic ancient flute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Festa, G.; Pietropaolo, A.; Grazzi, F.; Sutton, L. F.; Scherillo, A.; Bognetti, L.; Bini, A.; Barzagli, E.; Schooneveld, E.; Andreani, C.

    2013-09-01

    A metallic 19th century flute was studied by means of integrated and simultaneous neutron-based techniques: neutron diffraction, neutron radiative capture analysis and neutron radiography. This experiment follows benchmark measurements devoted to assessing the effectiveness of a multitask beamline concept for neutron-based investigation on materials. The aim of this study is to show the potential application of the approach using multiple and integrated neutron-based techniques for musical instruments. Such samples, in the broad scenario of cultural heritage, represent an exciting research field. They may represent an interesting link between different disciplines such as nuclear physics, metallurgy and acoustics.

  2. Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (ORSNS) target station design integration

    SciTech Connect

    McManamy, T.; Booth, R.; Cleaves, J.; Gabriel, T.

    1996-06-01

    The conceptual design for a 1- to 3-MW short pulse spallation source with a liquid mercury target has been started recently. The design tools and methods being developed to define requirements, integrate the work, and provide early cost guidance will be presented with a summary of the current target station design status. The initial design point was selected with performance and cost estimate projections by a systems code. This code was developed recently using cost estimates from the Brookhaven Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source study and experience from the Advanced Neutron Source Project`s conceptual design. It will be updated and improved as the design develops. Performance was characterized by a simplified figure of merit based on a ratio of neutron production to costs. A work breakdown structure was developed, with simplified systems diagrams used to define interfaces and system responsibilities. A risk assessment method was used to identify potential problems, to identify required research and development (R&D), and to aid contingency development. Preliminary 3-D models of the target station are being used to develop remote maintenance concepts and to estimate costs.

  3. Thermonuclear runaways in nova outbursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, Anurag; Arnett, David; Fryxell, Bruce A.

    1992-01-01

    Results of exploratory, two-dimensional numerical calculations of a local thermonuclear runaway on the surface of a white dwarf are reported. It is found that the energy released by the runaway can induce a significant amount of vorticity near the burning region. Such mass motions account naturally for mixing of core matter into the envelope during the explosion. A new mechanism for the lateral spread of nuclear burning is also discussed.

  4. On thermonuclear ignition criterion at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Baolian; Kwan, Thomas J. T.; Wang, Yi-Ming; Batha, Steven H.

    2014-10-15

    Sustained thermonuclear fusion at the National Ignition Facility remains elusive. Although recent experiments approached or exceeded the anticipated ignition thresholds, the nuclear performance of the laser-driven capsules was well below predictions in terms of energy and neutron production. Such discrepancies between expectations and reality motivate a reassessment of the physics of ignition. We have developed a predictive analytical model from fundamental physics principles. Based on the model, we obtained a general thermonuclear ignition criterion in terms of the areal density and temperature of the hot fuel. This newly derived ignition threshold and its alternative forms explicitly show the minimum requirements of the hot fuel pressure, mass, areal density, and burn fraction for achieving ignition. Comparison of our criterion with existing theories, simulations, and the experimental data shows that our ignition threshold is more stringent than those in the existing literature and that our results are consistent with the experiments.

  5. Tidally-Induced Thermonuclear Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Rosswog, S.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Hix, William Raphael

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the results of 3D simulations of tidal disruptions of white dwarfs by moderate-mass black holes as they may exist in the cores of globular clusters or dwarf galaxies. Our simulations follow self-consistently the hydrodynamic and nuclear evolution from the initial parabolic orbit over the disruption to the build-up of an accretion disk around the black hole. For strong enough encounters (pericentre distances smaller than about 1/3 of the tidal radius) the tidal compression is reversed by a shock and finally results in a thermonuclear explosion. These explosions are not restricted to progenitor masses close to the Chandrasekhar limit, we find exploding examples throughout the whole white dwarf mass range. There is, however, a restriction on the masses of the involved black holes: black holes more massive than 2x105M{circle_dot} swallow a typical 0.6M{circle_dot} white dwarf before their tidal forces can overwhelm the star's selfgravity. Therefore, this mechanism is characteristic for black holes of moderate masses. The material that remains bound to the black hole settles into an accretion disk and produces an Xray flare close to the Eddington limit of L{sub Edd} {approx} 10{sup 41}erg/s (Mbh/1000M{circle_dot}), typically lasting for a few months. The combination of a peculiar thermonuclear supernova together with an X-ray flare thus whistle-blows the existence of such moderate-mass black holes. The next generation of wide field space-based instruments should be able to detect such events.

  6. Parameters affecting temporal resolution of Time Resolved Integrative Optical Neutron Detector (TRION)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mor, I.; Vartsky, D.; Dangendorf, V.; Bar, D.; Feldman, G.; Goldberg, M. B.; Tittelmeier, K.; Bromberger, B.; Brandis, M.; Weierganz, M.

    2013-11-01

    The Time-Resolved Integrative Optical Neutron (TRION) detector was developed for Fast Neutron Resonance Radiography (FNRR), a fast-neutron transmission imaging method that exploits characteristic energy-variations of the total scattering cross-section in the En = 1-10 MeV range to detect specific elements within a radiographed object. As opposed to classical event-counting time of flight (ECTOF), it integrates the detector signal during a well-defined neutron Time of Flight window corresponding to a pre-selected energy bin, e.g., the energy-interval spanning a cross-section resonance of an element such as C, O and N. The integrative characteristic of the detector permits loss-free operation at very intense, pulsed neutron fluxes, at a cost however, of recorded temporal resolution degradation This work presents a theoretical and experimental evaluation of detector related parameters which affect temporal resolution of the TRION system.

  7. Controlled thermonuclear fusion, high temperature plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-05-01

    The primary source of nuclear energy comes from the fission process of heavy nuclei. To utilize the energy released by a thermonuclear fusion process, methods of controlling the fusion reaction were studied. This is controlled thermonuclear fusion technology. The fuel used in a thermonuclear fusion process are isotopes of hydrogen: deuterium and tritium. They can be extracted from the almost unlimited seawater. Nuclear fusion also produces very little radioactive waste. Thermonuclear fusion is a promising energy source with an almost unlimited supply; it is economical, safe, and relatively clean. Ways to raise plasma temperature to a very high level and to maintain it to allow fusion reactions to take place are studied. The physical laws of high temperature plasma was studied to reach this goal which resulted in the development of high temperature plasma physics.

  8. Demonstration of thermonuclear conditions in magnetized liner inertial fusion experimentsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Hahn, K. D.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Ruiz, C. L.; Sinars, D. B.; Harding, E. C.; Jennings, C. A.; Awe, T. J.; Geissel, M.; Rovang, D. C.; Smith, I. C.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Herrmann, M. C.; Hess, M. H.; Lamppa, D. C.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Rochau, G. A.; Savage, M. E.; Schroen, D. G.; Stygar, W. A.; Vesey, R. A.

    2015-05-01

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] utilizes a magnetic field and laser heating to relax the pressure requirements of inertial confinement fusion. The first experiments to test the concept [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] were conducted utilizing the 19 MA, 100 ns Z machine, the 2.5 kJ, 1 TW Z Beamlet laser, and the 10 T Applied B-field on Z system. Despite an estimated implosion velocity of only 70 km/s in these experiments, electron and ion temperatures at stagnation were as high as 3 keV, and thermonuclear deuterium-deuterium neutron yields up to 2 × 1012 have been produced. X-ray emission from the fuel at stagnation had widths ranging from 50 to 110 μm over a roughly 80% of the axial extent of the target (6-8 mm) and lasted approximately 2 ns. X-ray yields from these experiments are consistent with a stagnation density of the hot fuel equal to 0.2-0.4 g/cm3. In these experiments, up to 5 × 1010 secondary deuterium-tritium neutrons were produced. Given that the areal density of the plasma was approximately 1-2 mg/cm2, this indicates the stagnation plasma was significantly magnetized, which is consistent with the anisotropy observed in the deuterium-tritium neutron spectra. Control experiments where the laser and/or magnetic field were not utilized failed to produce stagnation temperatures greater than 1 keV and primary deuterium-deuterium yields greater than 1010. An additional control experiment where the fuel contained a sufficient dopant fraction to substantially increase radiative losses also failed to produce a relevant stagnation temperature. The results of these experiments are consistent with a thermonuclear neutron source.

  9. Demonstration of thermonuclear conditions in magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gomez, Matthew R.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Sefkow, Adam B.; Hahn, Kelly D.; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Knapp, Patrick F.; Schmit, Paul F.; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Harding, Eric C.; et al

    2015-04-29

    In this study, the magnetized liner inertial fusion concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas17, 056303 (2010)] utilizes a magnetic field and laser heating to relax the pressure requirements of inertial confinement fusion. The first experiments to test the concept [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] were conducted utilizing the 19 MA, 100 ns Z machine, the 2.5 kJ, 1 TW Z Beamlet laser, and the 10 T Applied B-field on Z system. Despite an estimated implosion velocity of only 70 km/s in these experiments, electron and ion temperatures at stagnation were as highmore » as 3 keV, and thermonuclear deuterium-deuterium neutron yields up to 2 × 1012 have been produced. X-ray emission from the fuel at stagnation had widths ranging from 50 to 110 μm over a roughly 80% of the axial extent of the target (6–8 mm) and lasted approximately 2 ns. X-ray yields from these experiments are consistent with a stagnation density of the hot fuel equal to 0.2–0.4 g/cm3. In these experiments, up to 5 ×1010 secondary deuterium-tritium neutrons were produced. Given that the areal density of the plasma was approximately 1–2 mg/cm2, this indicates the stagnation plasma was significantly magnetized, which is consistent with the anisotropy observed in the deuterium-tritium neutron spectra. Control experiments where the laser and/or magnetic field were not utilized failed to produce stagnation temperatures greater than 1 keV and primary deuterium-deuterium yields greater than 1010. An additional control experiment where the fuel contained a sufficient dopant fraction to substantially increase radiative losses also failed to produce a relevant stagnation temperature. The results of these experiments are consistent with a thermonuclear neutron source.« less

  10. Integration of neutron time-of-flight single-crystal Bragg peaks in reciprocal space

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Arthur J; Joergensen, Mads; Wang, Xiaoping; Mikkelson, Ruth L; Mikkelson, Dennis J; Lynch, Vickie E; Peterson, Peter F; Green, Mark L; Hoffmann, Christina

    2014-01-01

    The intensity of single crystal Bragg peaks obtained by mapping neutron time-of-flight event data into reciprocal space and integrating in various ways are compared. These include spherical integration with a fixed radius, ellipsoid fitting and integrating of the peak intensity and one-dimensional peak profile fitting. In comparison to intensities obtained by integrating in real detector histogram space, the data integrated in reciprocal space results in better agreement factors and more accurate atomic parameters. Furthermore, structure refinement using integrated intensities from one-dimensional profile fitting is demonstrated to be more accurate than simple peak-minus-background integration.

  11. Ignition Column Depths of Helium-rich Thermonuclear Bursts from 4U 1728-34

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misanovic, Zdenka; Galloway, Duncan K.; Cooper, Randall L.

    2010-08-01

    We analyzed thermonuclear (type I) X-ray bursts observed from the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1728-34 by RXTE, Chandra, and INTEGRAL. We compared the variation in burst energy and recurrence times as a function of accretion rate with the predictions of a numerical ignition model including a treatment of the heating and cooling in the crust. We found that the measured burst ignition column depths are significantly below the theoretically predicted values, regardless of the assumed thermal structure of the neutron star (NS) interior. While it is possible that the accretion rate measured by Chandra is underestimated, due to additional persistent spectral components outside the sensitivity band, the required correction factor is typically 3.6 and as high as 6, which is implausible. Furthermore, such underestimation is even more unlikely for RXTE and INTEGRAL, which have much broader bandpasses. Possible explanations for the observed discrepancy include shear-triggered mixing of the accreted helium to larger column depths, resulting in earlier ignition, or the fractional covering of the accreted fuel on the NS surface.

  12. IGNITION COLUMN DEPTHS OF HELIUM-RICH THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS FROM 4U 1728-34

    SciTech Connect

    Misanovic, Zdenka; Galloway, Duncan K.; Cooper, Randall L.

    2010-08-01

    We analyzed thermonuclear (type I) X-ray bursts observed from the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1728-34 by RXTE, Chandra, and INTEGRAL. We compared the variation in burst energy and recurrence times as a function of accretion rate with the predictions of a numerical ignition model including a treatment of the heating and cooling in the crust. We found that the measured burst ignition column depths are significantly below the theoretically predicted values, regardless of the assumed thermal structure of the neutron star (NS) interior. While it is possible that the accretion rate measured by Chandra is underestimated, due to additional persistent spectral components outside the sensitivity band, the required correction factor is typically 3.6 and as high as 6, which is implausible. Furthermore, such underestimation is even more unlikely for RXTE and INTEGRAL, which have much broader bandpasses. Possible explanations for the observed discrepancy include shear-triggered mixing of the accreted helium to larger column depths, resulting in earlier ignition, or the fractional covering of the accreted fuel on the NS surface.

  13. On extended thermonuclear functions through pathway model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dilip

    when α → 1. The beauty of the result is that these different families of three different functional forms are covered through the pathway parameter α. In a physical set up if f (x) in (3) is the stable or limiting form, the Maxwell-Boltzmann approach to thermonuclear functions, then f (x) in (1) and (2) will contain a large variety of unstable or chaotic situations which will all tend to (3) in the limit. Thus we get a clear idea of all the stable and unstable situations around the Maxwell-Boltzmann approach. Thus the current theory is given a mathematical extension and physical interpretations can be found to situations in (1) and (2). Incidently Tsallis statistics is a special case of (1) for γ = 0, a = 1, δ = 1, η = 1. The Beck-Cohen superstatistics, discussed in current statistical mechanics literature is a special case of (2) for a = 1, η = 1, α > 1. The main purpose of the present paper is to investigate in some more detail, mathematically, the extended thermonuclear functions for Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics and in the cut-off case. The extended thermonuclear functions will be evaluated in closed form for all convenient values of the parameter by means of residue calculus. A comparison of the standard thermonuclear functions with the extended thermonuclear functions is also done. The results and derivations in this paper are new and these will be of interest to physicists, mathematicians, probabilists, and statisticians.

  14. Vulnerability assessment of a space based weapon platform electronics system exposed to a thermonuclear weapon detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, C.L.; Johnson, J.O.

    1994-05-01

    The utilization of reconnaissance/surveillance satellite and weapon platform assets in space will subject the sensitive electronic equipment to a variety of natural and man-made radiation environments. These include Van Allen Belt protons and electrons; galactic and solar flare protons; neutrons, gamma rays, and X-rays from fission and fusion weapons; and directed neutral particle beams and lasers. Electronic equipment, including modem integrated circuits, may undergo permanent or transient changes of the electrical properties of the active components when exposed to these sources of radiation. This report summarizes the results of the Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding code system -- MASH v1.0 calculations designed to estimate the dose to the critical electronics components of an idealized spaced based weapon platform from neutron and gamma-ray radiation emanating from a thermonuclear weapon detonation. The MASH calculations modeled several source/platform geometry configurations, obtaining results for multiple distances and weapon detonation positions relative to the platform. For certain source/platform orientations, the results indicate vulnerabilities to the C{sup 3} bay critical components box to radiation damage from a nuclear weapon detonation. Neutron protection factors ranged from 0.7 to 3.4 for the three platform configurations analyzed, and gamma-ray protection factors ranged from approximately 1.5 to 9.8. The results further indicate the source has a direct line-of-sight to the critical components box for certain source/platform orientations, regardless of the number of interceptors present. The merits of utilizing the MASH code system for estimating dose and shielding factors for spaced based assets has been demonstrated. The geometry configuration studied here is greatly simplified compared to those that will be encountered in an actual design.

  15. An integrated mobile system for non-destructive analysis with tagged neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cester, D.; Nebbia, G.; Stevanato, L.; Viesti, G.; Neri, F.; Petrucci, S.; Selmi, S.; Tintori, C.

    2013-04-01

    An integrated mobile system for port security is presented. The system is designed to perform active investigations by using the tagged neutron inspection technique of suspect dangerous materials as well as passive measurements of neutrons and gamma rays to search and identify radioactive and special nuclear materials. The system has been employed in detection tests of special nuclear material as well as in a seaport demonstration.

  16. An integrated mobile system for non-destructive analysis with tagged neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Cester, D.; Stevanato, L.; Viesti, G.; Nebbia, G.; Neri, F.; Petrucci, S.; Selmi, S.; Tintori, C.

    2013-04-19

    An integrated mobile system for port security is presented. The system is designed to perform active investigations by using the tagged neutron inspection technique of suspect dangerous materials as well as passive measurements of neutrons and gamma rays to search and identify radioactive and special nuclear materials. The system has been employed in detection tests of special nuclear material as well as in a seaport demonstration.

  17. Computational Study of Integrated Neutron/Photon Imaging for Illicit Material Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Jessica; Barzilov, Alexander

    The feasibility of integration of photon and neutron radiography for nondestructive detection of illicit materials was examined. The MCNP5 code was used to model a radiography system consisting of accelerator-based neutron and photon sources and the imaging detector array, with an object under scrutiny placed between them. For this examination, the objects consisted of a matrix of low-Z and high-Z materials of various shapes and density. Transmission-radiography computations were carried out using 2.5-MeV deuterium-deuterium and 14-MeV deuterium-tritium neutron sources, and a 0.3-MeV photon source. The radiography tallies for both neutron and photon sources were modeled for the same geometry of the system. The photon-to- neutron transmission ratios were determined for each pixel of the detector array and utilized to identify the presence of specific materials in the radiographic images. By focusing on the inherent difference between neutron and photon interactions, it was possible to determine the shape and material composition of complex objects present within a pallet or a shipping container. The use of a single imaging array of scintillation detectors for simultaneous measurements of fast neutrons and photons is discussed, and its function in the dual neutron/photon radiography applications is addressed.

  18. Cryogenic thermonuclear fuel implosions on the National Ignition Facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenzer, S. H.; Callahan, D. A.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Kline, J. L.; Grim, G.; Alger, E. T.; Berger, R. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Betti, R.; Bleuel, D. L.; Boehly, T. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Burkhart, S. C.; Burr, R.; Caggiano, J. A.; Castro, C.; Casey, D. T.; Choate, C.; Clark, D. S.; Celliers, P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L.; DiNicola, P.; DiNicola, J. M.; Divol, L.; Dixit, S.; Döppner, T.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Dzenitis, E.; Eckart, M.; Erbert, G.; Farley, D.; Fair, J.; Fittinghoff, D.; Frank, M.; Frenje, L. J. A.; Friedrich, S.; Casey, D. T.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Gibson, C.; Giraldez, E.; Glebov, V.; Glenn, S.; Guler, N.; Haan, S. W.; Haid, B. J.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Haynam, C. A.; Heestand, G. M.; Hermann, M.; Hermann, H. W.; Hicks, D. G.; Hinkel, D. E.; Holder, J. P.; Holunda, D. M.; Horner, J. B.; Hsing, W. W.; Huang, H.; Izumi, N.; Jackson, M.; Jones, O. S.; Kalantar, D. H.; Kauffman, R.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Klingmann, J.; Kohut, T.; Knauer, J. P.; Koch, J. A.; Kozioziemki, B.; Kyrala, G. A.; Kritcher, A. L.; Kroll, J.; La Fortune, K.; Lagin, L.; Landen, O. L.; Larson, D. W.; LaTray, D.; Leeper, R. J.; Le Pape, S.; Lindl, J. D.; Lowe-Webb, R.; Ma, T.; McNaney, J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Malsbury, T. N.; Mapoles, E.; Marshall, C. D.; Meezan, N. B.; Merrill, F.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Moran, M.; Moreno, K. A.; Munro, D. H.; Nathan, B. R.; Nikroo, A.; Olson, R. E.; Orth, C. D.; Pak, A. E.; Patel, P. K.; Parham, T.; Petrasso, R.; Ralph, J. E.; Rinderknecht, H.; Regan, S. P.; Robey, H. F.; Ross, J. S.; Rosen, M. D.; Sacks, R.; Salmonson, J. D.; Saunders, R.; Sater, J.; Sangster, C.; Schneider, M. B.; Séguin, F. H.; Shaw, M. J.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.; Stoeffl, W.; Suter, L. J.; Thomas, C. A.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.; Walters, C.; Weaver, S.; Weber, S. V.; Wegner, P. J.; Whitman, P. K.; Widmann, K.; Widmayer, C. C.; Wilde, C. H.; Wilson, D. C.; Van Wonterghem, B.; MacGowan, B. J.; Atherton, L. J.; Edwards, M. J.; Moses, E. I.

    2012-05-01

    The first inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments with equimolar deuterium-tritium thermonuclear fuel have been performed on the National Ignition Facility. These experiments use 0.17 mg of fuel with the potential for ignition and significant fusion yield conditions. The thermonuclear fuel has been fielded as a cryogenic layer on the inside of a spherical plastic capsule that is mounted in the center of a cylindrical gold hohlraum. Heating the hohlraum with 192 laser beams for a total laser energy of 1.6 MJ produces a soft x-ray field with 300 eV temperature. The ablation pressure produced by the radiation field compresses the initially 2.2-mm diameter capsule by a factor of 30 to a spherical dense fuel shell that surrounds a central hot-spot plasma of 50 μm diameter. While an extensive set of x-ray and neutron diagnostics has been applied to characterize hot spot formation from the x-ray emission and 14.1 MeV deuterium-tritium primary fusion neutrons, thermonuclear fuel assembly is studied by measuring the down-scattered neutrons with energies in the range of 10 to 12 MeV. X-ray and neutron imaging of the compressed core and fuel indicate a fuel thickness of (14 ± 3) μm, which combined with magnetic recoil spectrometer measurements of the fuel areal density of (1 ± 0.09) g cm-2 result in fuel densities approaching 600 g cm-3. The fuel surrounds a hot-spot plasma with average ion temperatures of (3.5 ± 0.1) keV that is measured with neutron time of flight spectra. The hot-spot plasma produces a total fusion neutron yield of 1015 that is measured with the magnetic recoil spectrometer and nuclear activation diagnostics that indicate a 14.1 MeV yield of (7.5±0.1)×1014 which is 70% to 75% of the total fusion yield due to the high areal density. Gamma ray measurements provide the duration of nuclear activity of (170 ± 30) ps. These indirect-drive implosions result in the highest areal densities and neutron yields achieved on laser facilities to date

  19. Cryogenic thermonuclear fuel implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Glenzer, S. H.; Callahan, D. A.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Alger, E. T.; Berger, R. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bradley, D. K.; Burkhart, S. C.; Burr, R.; Caggiano, J. A.; Castro, C.; Choate, C.; Clark, D. S.; Celliers, P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L.; DiNicola, P.; DiNicola, J. M.; and others

    2012-05-15

    The first inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments with equimolar deuterium-tritium thermonuclear fuel have been performed on the National Ignition Facility. These experiments use 0.17 mg of fuel with the potential for ignition and significant fusion yield conditions. The thermonuclear fuel has been fielded as a cryogenic layer on the inside of a spherical plastic capsule that is mounted in the center of a cylindrical gold hohlraum. Heating the hohlraum with 192 laser beams for a total laser energy of 1.6 MJ produces a soft x-ray field with 300 eV temperature. The ablation pressure produced by the radiation field compresses the initially 2.2-mm diameter capsule by a factor of 30 to a spherical dense fuel shell that surrounds a central hot-spot plasma of 50 {mu}m diameter. While an extensive set of x-ray and neutron diagnostics has been applied to characterize hot spot formation from the x-ray emission and 14.1 MeV deuterium-tritium primary fusion neutrons, thermonuclear fuel assembly is studied by measuring the down-scattered neutrons with energies in the range of 10 to 12 MeV. X-ray and neutron imaging of the compressed core and fuel indicate a fuel thickness of (14 {+-} 3) {mu}m, which combined with magnetic recoil spectrometer measurements of the fuel areal density of (1 {+-} 0.09) g cm{sup -2} result in fuel densities approaching 600 g cm{sup -3}. The fuel surrounds a hot-spot plasma with average ion temperatures of (3.5 {+-} 0.1) keV that is measured with neutron time of flight spectra. The hot-spot plasma produces a total fusion neutron yield of 10{sup 15} that is measured with the magnetic recoil spectrometer and nuclear activation diagnostics that indicate a 14.1 MeV yield of (7.5{+-}0.1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} which is 70% to 75% of the total fusion yield due to the high areal density. Gamma ray measurements provide the duration of nuclear activity of (170 {+-} 30) ps. These indirect-drive implosions result in the highest areal densities

  20. The thermonuclear model for γ-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woosley, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    The evolution of magnetized neutron stars with field strengths of ~1012 gauss that are accreting mass onto kilometer-sized polar regions at a rate of ~10-13 Msolar yr-1 is examined. Based on the results of one-dimensional calculations, one finds that stable hydrogen burning, mediated by the ``hot'' CNO-cycle, will lead to a critical helium mass in the range 1020 to 1022 g km-2. Owing to the extreme degeneracy of the electron gas providing pressure support, helium burning occurs as a violent thermonuclear runaway which may propagate either as a convective deflagration (Type I burst) or as a detonation wave (Type II burst). Complete combustion of helium into 56Ni releases from 1038 to 1040 erg km-2 and pushes hot plasma with β>~1 above the surface of the neutron star. Rapid expansion of the plasma channels a substantial fraction of the explosion energy into magnetic field stress. Spectral properties are expected to be complex with emission from both thermal and non-thermal processes. The hard γ-outburst of several seconds softens as the event proceeds and is followed by a period, typically of several minutes duration, of softer x-ray emission as the subsurface ashes of the thermonuclear explosion cool. In this model, most γ-ray bursts currently being observed are located at a distance of several hundred parsecs and should recur on a timescale of months to centuries with convective deflagrations (Type I bursts) being the more common variety. An explanation for ``Jacobson-like'' transients is also offered.

  1. Neutron intensity modulation and time-focusing with integrated Larmor and resonant frequency techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jinkui Hamilton, William A.; Robertson, J. L.; Crow, Lowell; Lee, Sung-Woo; Kang, Yoon W.

    2015-09-14

    The analysis of neutron diffraction experiments often assumes that neutrons are elastically scattered from the sample. However, there is growing evidence that a significant fraction of the detected neutrons is in fact inelastically scattered, especially from soft materials and aqueous samples. Ignoring these inelastic contributions gives rise to inaccurate experimental results. To date, there has been no simple method with broad applicability for inelastic signal separation in neutron diffraction experiments. Here, we present a simple and robust method that we believe could be suited for this purpose. We use two radio frequency resonant spin flippers integrated with a Larmor precession field to modulate the neutron intensity and to encode the inelastic scattering information into the neutron data. All three components contribute to the spin encoding. The Larmor field serves several additional purposes. Its usage facilitates neutron time-focusing, eliminates the need for stringent magnetic shielding, and allows for compact setups. The scheme is robust, simple, and flexible. We believe that, with further improvements, it has the potential of adding inelastic signal discrimination capabilities to many existing diffraction instruments in the future.

  2. Neutron intensity modulation and time-focusing with integrated Larmor and resonant frequency techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jinkui; Hamilton, William A.; Lee, Sung-Woo; Robertson, J. L.; Crow, Lowell; Kang, Yoon W.

    2015-09-01

    The analysis of neutron diffraction experiments often assumes that neutrons are elastically scattered from the sample. However, there is growing evidence that a significant fraction of the detected neutrons is in fact inelastically scattered, especially from soft materials and aqueous samples. Ignoring these inelastic contributions gives rise to inaccurate experimental results. To date, there has been no simple method with broad applicability for inelastic signal separation in neutron diffraction experiments. Here, we present a simple and robust method that we believe could be suited for this purpose. We use two radio frequency resonant spin flippers integrated with a Larmor precession field to modulate the neutron intensity and to encode the inelastic scattering information into the neutron data. All three components contribute to the spin encoding. The Larmor field serves several additional purposes. Its usage facilitates neutron time-focusing, eliminates the need for stringent magnetic shielding, and allows for compact setups. The scheme is robust, simple, and flexible. We believe that, with further improvements, it has the potential of adding inelastic signal discrimination capabilities to many existing diffraction instruments in the future.

  3. The polonium-210 problem in thermonuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Shchipakhin, O.L.; Borisov, N.B.; Churkin, S.L.

    1993-12-31

    Polonium 210 forms in the lithium-lead eutectic blanket of a thermonuclear reactor. On the basis of obtained experimental data some estimates have been calculated on the ITER blanket accident consequences. The LOCA type accident represents the failure of eutectic circuit in the process of transfusion of liquid eutectic from blanket to the tritium reprocessing plant.

  4. Plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Krikorian, R. )

    1989-01-01

    This proceedings contains papers on plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear fusion. Included are the following topics: Plasma focus and Z-pinch, Review of mirror fusion research, Progress in studies of x-ray and ion-beam emission from plasma focus facilities.

  5. Laser Fusion - A New Thermonuclear Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Ralph S.

    1975-01-01

    Describes thermonuclear processes induced by interaction of a laser beam with the surface of a fuel pellet. An expanding plasma is formed which results in compression of the element. Laser and reactor technology are discussed. Pictures and diagrams are included. (GH)

  6. Local thermonuclear runaways among classical novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orio, Marina; Shaviv, Giora

    1993-04-01

    A classical nova may accrete a nonhomogeneous envelope, which can result in the ignition of a local thermonuclear runaway on the surface of the white dwarf. We studied the propagation of thermal flows along the meridian in the hydrogen rich envelope, to find the conditions under which a thermonuclear runaway is not spherically symmetric. We included mass accretion and tested the effect of temperature inhomogeneities in the secular evolution of the envelope, supposing perturbations with different wavelengths, ranging from very small to comparable with the radius of the white dwarf. The calculations were stopped at the onset of a thermonuclear runaway, when the hydrodynamic expansion starts. We found the ranges of accretion rates and masses of white dwarfs for which the runaway ignites locally. The propagation time of the runaway along the meridian may be as long as days and weeks. 'Local' thermonuclear runaways can explain the asymmetries and inhomogeneities of the nova shells and account for the slow rise time to maximum (about one week) of many novae.

  7. Neutron and gamma detector using an ionization chamber with an integrated body and moderator

    DOEpatents

    Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Lestone, John Paul

    2006-07-18

    A detector for detecting neutrons and gamma radiation includes a cathode that defines an interior surface and an interior volume. A conductive neutron-capturing layer is disposed on the interior surface of the cathode and a plastic housing surrounds the cathode. A plastic lid is attached to the housing and encloses the interior volume of the cathode forming an ionization chamber, into the center of which an anode extends from the plastic lid. A working gas is disposed within the ionization chamber and a high biasing voltage is connected to the cathode. Processing electronics are coupled to the anode and process current pulses which are converted into Gaussian pulses, which are either counted as neutrons or integrated as gammas, in response to whether pulse amplitude crosses a neutron threshold. The detector according to the invention may be readily fabricated into single or multilayer detector arrays.

  8. Theoretical determination of the strength characteristics of multilayer materials intended for nuclear and thermonuclear engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitkovskii, I. V.; Leshukov, A. Yu.; Romashin, S. N.; Shorkin, V. S.

    2015-12-01

    A method is developed to estimate the integrity of multilayer structures. This method is based on the version of the theory of adhesion and cohesion interactions of structure elements that only takes into account their thermomechanical properties. The structures to be studied are the material of the multilayer wall of the liquid-metal thermonuclear reactor blanket and a heat-resistant magnet wire with a bimetallic conductor, which is the base of the windings of the magnetohydrodynamic machines and electric motors intended for operation at high temperatures under ionizing radiation in, e.g., the machines and facilities in nuclear and thermonuclear reactors.

  9. Frascati neutron generator (FNG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martone, M.; Angelone, M.; Pillon, Mario

    1995-03-01

    The 14 MeV neutron generator (FNG), in operation at the ENEA Energy Center of Frascati, Italy, is described. It produces up to 1 X 1011 neutrons per second and consists essentially of a deuterium-ion accelerator, a beam transport system, and a target of titanium tritide, where neutrons are produced by the T(d,n)4He fusion reactions. An application of FNG in the context of research activity on controlled thermonuclear fusion research is also briefly described.

  10. Thermal neutron capture and resonance integral cross sections of 45Sc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Do, Nguyen; Duc Khue, Pham; Tien Thanh, Kim; Thi Hien, Nguyen; Kim, Guinyun; Kim, Kwangsoo; Shin, Sung-Gyun; Cho, Moo-Hyun; Lee, Manwoo

    2015-11-01

    The thermal neutron cross section (σ0) and resonance integral (I0) of the 45Sc(n,γ)46Sc reaction have been measured relative to that of the 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction by means of the activation method. High-purity natural scandium and gold foils without and with a cadmium cover of 0.5 mm thickness were irradiated with moderated pulsed neutrons produced from the Pohang Neutron Facility (PNF). The induced activities in the activated foils were measured with a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector. In order to improve the accuracy of the experimental results the counting losses caused by the thermal (Gth) and resonance (Gepi) neutron self-shielding, the γ-ray attenuation (Fg) and the true γ-ray coincidence summing effects were made. In addition, the effect of non-ideal epithermal spectrum was also taken into account by determining the neutron spectrum shape factor (α). The thermal neutron cross-section and resonance integral of the 45Sc(n,γ)46Sc reaction have been determined relative to the reference values of the 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction, with σo,Au = 98.65 ± 0.09 barn and Io,Au = 1550 ± 28 barn. The present thermal neutron cross section has been determined to be σo,Sc = 27.5 ± 0.8 barn. According to the definition of cadmium cut-off energy at 0.55 eV, the present resonance integral cross section has been determined to be Io,Sc = 12.4 ± 0.7 barn. The present results are compared with literature values and discussed.

  11. Integral Data Benchmark of HENDL2.0/MG Compared with Neutronics Shielding Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jieqiong; Xu, Dezheng; Zheng, Shanliang; He, Zhaozhong; Hu, Yanglin; Li, Jingjing; Zou, Jun; Zeng, Qin; Chen, Mingliang; Wang, Minghuang

    2009-10-01

    HENDL2.0, the latest version of the hybrid evaluated nuclear data library, was developed based upon some evaluated data from FENDL2.1 and ENDF/B-VII. To qualify and validate the working library, an integral test for the neutron production data of HENDL2.0 was performed with a series of existing spherical shell benchmark experiments (such as V, Be, Fe, Pb, Cr, Mn, Cu, Al, Si, Co, Zr, Nb, Mo, W and Ti). These experiments were simulated numerically using HENDL2.0/MG and a home-developed code VisualBUS. Calculations were conducted with both FENDL2.1/MG and FENDL2.1/MC, which are based on a continuous-energy Monte Carlo Code MCNP/4C. By comparison and analysis of the neutron leakage spectra and the integral test, benchmark results of neutron production data are presented in this paper.

  12. Demonstration of thermonuclear conditions in magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Hahn, K. D.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Ruiz, C. L.; Sinars, D. B.; Harding, E. C.; Jennings, C. A.; Awe, T. J.; Geissel, M.; Rovang, D. C.; Smith, I. C.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Hess, M. H.; and others

    2015-05-15

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] utilizes a magnetic field and laser heating to relax the pressure requirements of inertial confinement fusion. The first experiments to test the concept [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] were conducted utilizing the 19 MA, 100 ns Z machine, the 2.5 kJ, 1 TW Z Beamlet laser, and the 10 T Applied B-field on Z system. Despite an estimated implosion velocity of only 70 km/s in these experiments, electron and ion temperatures at stagnation were as high as 3 keV, and thermonuclear deuterium-deuterium neutron yields up to 2 × 10{sup 12} have been produced. X-ray emission from the fuel at stagnation had widths ranging from 50 to 110 μm over a roughly 80% of the axial extent of the target (6–8 mm) and lasted approximately 2 ns. X-ray yields from these experiments are consistent with a stagnation density of the hot fuel equal to 0.2–0.4 g/cm{sup 3}. In these experiments, up to 5 × 10{sup 10} secondary deuterium-tritium neutrons were produced. Given that the areal density of the plasma was approximately 1–2 mg/cm{sup 2}, this indicates the stagnation plasma was significantly magnetized, which is consistent with the anisotropy observed in the deuterium-tritium neutron spectra. Control experiments where the laser and/or magnetic field were not utilized failed to produce stagnation temperatures greater than 1 keV and primary deuterium-deuterium yields greater than 10{sup 10}. An additional control experiment where the fuel contained a sufficient dopant fraction to substantially increase radiative losses also failed to produce a relevant stagnation temperature. The results of these experiments are consistent with a thermonuclear neutron source.

  13. Demonstration of thermonuclear conditions in magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Matthew R.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Sefkow, Adam B.; Hahn, Kelly D.; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Knapp, Patrick F.; Schmit, Paul F.; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Harding, Eric C.; Jennings, Christopher A.; Awe, Thomas James; Geissel, Matthias; Rovang, Dean C.; Smith, Ian C.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Harvey-Thompson, Adam James; Herrmann, Mark C.; Mark Harry Hess; Lamppa, Derek C.; Martin, Matthew R.; McBride, Ryan D.; Peterson, Kyle J.; Porter, John L.; Rochau, Gregory A.; Savage, Mark E.; Schroen, Diana G.; Stygar, William A.; Vesey, Roger Alan

    2015-04-29

    In this study, the magnetized liner inertial fusion concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas17, 056303 (2010)] utilizes a magnetic field and laser heating to relax the pressure requirements of inertial confinement fusion. The first experiments to test the concept [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] were conducted utilizing the 19 MA, 100 ns Z machine, the 2.5 kJ, 1 TW Z Beamlet laser, and the 10 T Applied B-field on Z system. Despite an estimated implosion velocity of only 70 km/s in these experiments, electron and ion temperatures at stagnation were as high as 3 keV, and thermonuclear deuterium-deuterium neutron yields up to 2 × 1012 have been produced. X-ray emission from the fuel at stagnation had widths ranging from 50 to 110 μm over a roughly 80% of the axial extent of the target (6–8 mm) and lasted approximately 2 ns. X-ray yields from these experiments are consistent with a stagnation density of the hot fuel equal to 0.2–0.4 g/cm3. In these experiments, up to 5 ×1010 secondary deuterium-tritium neutrons were produced. Given that the areal density of the plasma was approximately 1–2 mg/cm2, this indicates the stagnation plasma was significantly magnetized, which is consistent with the anisotropy observed in the deuterium-tritium neutron spectra. Control experiments where the laser and/or magnetic field were not utilized failed to produce stagnation temperatures greater than 1 keV and primary deuterium-deuterium yields greater than 1010. An additional control experiment where the fuel contained a sufficient dopant fraction to substantially increase radiative losses also failed to produce a relevant stagnation temperature. The results of these experiments are consistent with a thermonuclear neutron source.

  14. Measuring Neutron-Star Spins via Burst Oscillations (core Program)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Measuring the spin of neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries is one of the great strengths and highest priorities for RXTE. We propose targeted observations of known thermonuclear burst sources which do not have confirmed burst oscillations, as well as previously unknown sources, in order to detect new examples of burst oscillations and thus add to the sample of neutron star spins. We will target sources in states of frequent, bright bursts by triggering on the detection of bursts by INTEGRAL and/or Swift. Detection of neutron stars spinning beyond the present maximum will allow us to significantly constrain the neutron-star equation of state, presently an area of major uncertainty.

  15. Numerical analysis of thermonuclear detonation in dense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avronin, Y. N.; Bunatyan, A. A.; Gadzhiyev, A. D.; Mustafin, K. A.; Nurbakov, A. S.; Pisarev, V. N.; Feoktistov, L. P.; Frolov, V. D.; Shibarshov, L. I.

    1985-01-01

    The propagation of thermonuclear combustion from the region heated to thermonuclear temperatures by an external source to the remaining part of the target was investigated. The target was a tube of inert material (gold, lead, beryllium, etc.) filled with a deuterium-tritium mixture. It was determined analytically that thermonuclear combustion can propagate from a small portion of a nonspherical target to the remainder of the target and that a steady-state thermonuclear detonation wave can be formed. The role of various physical processes in thermonuclear detonation was investigated. Shock wave is the main mechanism underlying detonation propagation. The detonation rate and intensity of the thermonuclear reaction is influenced by the leakage of heat due to transvere heat conductivity. The critical diameter for thermonuclear detonation was determined approximately for a plasma filament encased in a housing with twice the density of the fuel.

  16. Neutron-induced latch-up immunity in metal gate CMOS integrated circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.E.; Rollins, J.G.; Hachey, D.

    1987-12-01

    Neutron-induced latch-up immunity has been studied in metal gate CMOS integrated circuits as a function of neutron fluence by measuring both the current gain products (beta product) of parasitic NPN and PNP transistors, and the flash x-ray latch-up thresholds prior to and following irradiation and subsequent stabilization anneal. Correlations between the actual latch-up thresholds and the measured beta products are established for the three part types investigated. These correlations indicate that the measurement of beta products on judiciously chosen parasitic transistors is a viable technique for estimating latch-up susceptibility when the observed margin is substantial.

  17. Merging white dwarfs and thermonuclear supernovae.

    PubMed

    van Kerkwijk, M H

    2013-06-13

    Thermonuclear supernovae result when interaction with a companion reignites nuclear fusion in a carbon-oxygen white dwarf, causing a thermonuclear runaway, a catastrophic gain in pressure and the disintegration of the whole white dwarf. It is usually thought that fusion is reignited in near-pycnonuclear conditions when the white dwarf approaches the Chandrasekhar mass. I briefly describe two long-standing problems faced by this scenario, and the suggestion that these supernovae instead result from mergers of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs, including those that produce sub-Chandrasekhar-mass remnants. I then turn to possible observational tests, in particular, those that test the absence or presence of electron captures during the burning. PMID:23630372

  18. Thermonuclear microdetonation macron accelerator for impact ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, F.

    2008-03-01

    It is proposed to replace the expensive ~150 kJ petawatt laser as a means for the fast ignition of a highly compressed dense DT target by a small flyer plate propelled to high velocities by a thermonuclear microdetonation ignited at one end of a super-pinch. It appears that this can most efficiently be done with the previously proposed modification of the dense plasma focus device, adding a high voltage relativistic electron beam emitting diode inside the coaxial plasma focus discharge tube, igniting at the end of the plasma focus pinch column a thermonuclear detonation wave, propagating in the axial direction and accelerating at the end of the pinch a flyer plate to a velocity of 103 km s-1.

  19. Thermonuclear dynamo inside ultracentrifuge with supersonic plasma flow stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, F.

    2016-01-01

    Einstein's general theory of relativity implies the existence of virtual negative masses in the rotational reference frame of an ultracentrifuge with the negative mass density of the same order of magnitude as the positive mass density of a neutron star. In an ultracentrifuge, the repulsive gravitational field of this negative mass can simulate the attractive positive mass of a mini-neutron star, and for this reason can radially confine a dense thermonuclear plasma placed inside the centrifuge, very much as the positive mass of a star confines its plasma by its own attractive gravitational field. If the centrifuge is placed in an externally magnetic field to act as the seed field of a magnetohydrodynamic generator, the configuration resembles a magnetar driven by the release of energy through nuclear fusion, accelerating the plasma to supersonic velocities, with the magnetic field produced by the thermomagnetic Nernst effect insulating the hot plasma from the cold wall of the centrifuge. Because of the supersonic flow and the high plasma density the configuration is stable.

  20. Theoretical analysis of integral neutron transport equation using collision probability method with quadratic flux approach

    SciTech Connect

    Shafii, Mohammad Ali Meidianti, Rahma Wildian, Fitriyani, Dian; Tongkukut, Seni H. J.; Arkundato, Artoto

    2014-09-30

    Theoretical analysis of integral neutron transport equation using collision probability (CP) method with quadratic flux approach has been carried out. In general, the solution of the neutron transport using the CP method is performed with the flat flux approach. In this research, the CP method is implemented in the cylindrical nuclear fuel cell with the spatial of mesh being conducted into non flat flux approach. It means that the neutron flux at any point in the nuclear fuel cell are considered different each other followed the distribution pattern of quadratic flux. The result is presented here in the form of quadratic flux that is better understanding of the real condition in the cell calculation and as a starting point to be applied in computational calculation.

  1. Multigroup Neutron/Gamma-Ray Direct Integration Transport Code System for Two-Dimensional Cylindrical Geometry.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1980-10-15

    Version 00 PALLAS-2DCY-FX is a code for direct integration of the transport equation in two-dimensional (r,z) geometry. It solves the energy and angular-dependent Boltzmann transport equation with general anisotropic scattering in cylindrical geometry. Its principal applications are to neutron or gamma-ray transport problems in the forward mode. The code is particularly designed for and suited to the solution of deep penetration radiation transport problems with an external (fixed) source.

  2. METHOD OF MEASURING THE INTEGRATED ENERGY OUTPUT OF A NEUTRONIC CHAIN REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Sturm, W.J.

    1958-12-01

    A method is presented for measuring the integrated energy output of a reactor conslsting of the steps of successively irradiating calibrated thin foils of an element, such as gold, which is rendered radioactive by exposure to neutron flux for periods of time not greater than one-fifth the mean life of the induced radioactlvity and producing an indication of the radioactivity induced in each foil, each foil belng introduced into the reactor immediately upon removal of its predecessor.

  3. Theory of neutrino emission from nucleon-hyperon matter in neutron stars: angular integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminker, A. D.; Yakovlev, D. G.; Haensel, P.

    2016-08-01

    Investigations of thermal evolution of neutron stars with hyperon cores require neutrino emissivities for many neutrino reactions involving strongly degenerate particles (nucleons, hyperons, electrons, muons). We calculate the angular integrals In (over orientations of momenta of n degenerate particles) for major neutrino reactions with n=3, 4, 5 at all possible combinations of particle Fermi momenta. The integrals In are necessary ingredients for constructing a uniform database of neutrino emissivities in dense nucleon-hyperon matter. The results can also be used in many problems of physical kinetics of strongly degenerate systems.

  4. Experimental investigation of the 30S(α, p) thermonuclear reaction in x-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, D.; Chen, A. A.; Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Binh, D. N.; Chen, J.; Cherubini, S.; Duy, N. N.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Iwasa, N.; Jung, H. S.; Kato, S.; Kwon, Y. K.; Nishimura, S.; Ota, S.; Setoodehnia, K.; Teranishi, T.; Tokieda, H.; Yamada, T.; Yun, C. C.; Zhang, L. Y.

    2016-02-01

    We performed the first measurement of 30S+α resonant elastic scattering to experimentally examine the 30S(α, p) stellar reaction rate in type I x-ray bursts. These bursts are the most frequent thermonuclear explosions in the galaxy, resulting from thermonuclear runaway on the surface of accreting neutron star binaries. The 30S(α, p) reaction plays a critical role in burst models, yet very little is known about the compound nucleus 34Ar at these energies nor the reaction rate itself. We performed a measurement of alpha elastic scattering with a radioactive beam of 30S to experimentally probe the entrance channel. Utilizing a gaseous active target system and silicon detector array, we extracted the excitation function from 1.8 to 5.5 MeV near 160° in the center-of-mass frame. The experimental data were analyzed with an R-Matrix calculation, and we discovered several new resonances and extracted their quantum properties (resonance energy, width, spin, and parity). Finally, we calculated the narrow resonant thermonuclear reaction rate of 30S(α, p) for these new resonances.

  5. Nucleosynthesis in type Ia supernovae driven by asymmetric thermonuclear ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Keiichi

    2012-11-12

    Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) are believed to be thermonuclear explosions of a white dwarf. They can be used as mature cosmological standardized candles, leading to the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe. However, the explosion mechanism has not yet been fully clarified. In this paper, we first present nucleosynthetic features of a leading explosion scenario, namely a delayed-detonation scenario. Based on this, we propose a new and strong observational constraint on the explosion mechanism through emission lines from neutron-rich Fe-peaks. Especially, we show that an asymmetry in the explosion is likely a generic feature. We further argue that the diversity arising from various viewing angles can be an origin of observational diversities of SNe Ia seen in their spectral features (suspected possible biases in cosmology) and colors (related to the extinction estimate in cosmology). Using these new insights could open up a possibility of using SNe Ia as more precise distance indicators than currently employed.

  6. Analysis of Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Prototype of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)‡

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, Tim; Maglich, Bogdan; Scott, Dan; Calsec Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    TFTR produced world record of 10 million watts of controlled fusion power1 (CFP-1994) was summarized in Review1. We present evidence3 that: (1) TFTR input vs. output was 40 to 10 MW i.e. a power loss. (2) Review claims no experimental evidence for thermonuclear CFP production (only a calculation). (3) Ultra-high vacuum (UHV) required for τE = 0.2 s is 10-9 torr. TFTR had no UHV pumps, resulting in 10-3 torr, restricting τE <10-6 s, << thermalization time; 0.1 s., hence DT plasma did not occur. (4) Carbon ions were presented as D-T plasma. (5) Unknown neutron detector on unexplained neutron diamagnetic effect, measured ``fusion neutron power'' without particle energy identification, energy or coincidence. (6) 8 of 9 parameters claimed were inferred not measured. Quadratic test of TFTR data results2 in zero thermonuclear fusion power contribution to 10 MW: SFP = (0 +/- 1)%. ‡ Submitted to Physics of Plasmas†

  7. Criticality and axial offset searches based on the integrated neutron balance approach

    SciTech Connect

    Dall'Osso, A.; Van Geemert, R.

    2013-07-01

    Criticality and axial offset (AO) searches are key features in the simulation of plant operation procedures. Typically, the dedicated algorithms consist of either a Newton method or a secant method that features the successive computation of difference quotients to be used as derivatives. Within this context, computational robustness and efficiency are of paramount importance. This applies in particular to when the variations imposed during the search are spatially heterogeneous, such as in the case of tuning control rod positions for achieving target AO. In order to optimize this kind of search capability in AREVA NP's reactor code ARTEMIS in accordance with this design principle, a generalized approach has been implemented that harmonizes very well numerically with the overall multi-physics iterative solution process. As embedded in the latter, the new neutronic integral re-balancing approach is defined through periodic whole-core space-energy integrations of the principal terms in the core-integrated process-rate balance terms (i.e. neutron absorption, production and leakage). This procedure yields sequences of single zero-dimensional equations from which the chosen tuning parameters can be solved directly in dependence of the imposed (and systematically fixed) values for the response quantities k{sub eff} and/or AO. The converged result of the iteration sequence of successively obtained search parameter values is final in terms of being fully consistent with the entire set of multi-physics equations while enabling the accurate fulfillment of the target response value. The k etc and AO searches can be pursued simultaneously. Judging from the results of pursued verifications, the neutronic integral re-balancing approach fulfils the above-mentioned expectations convincingly. Specific verification examples are presented, such as the determination of the insertion depth of a critical control bank, a double search on target criticality and target AO by adjusting the

  8. Integral measurements of neutron and gamma-ray leakage fluxes from the Little Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Muckenthaler, F.J.

    1984-03-01

    This report presents integral measurements of neutron and gamma-ray leakage fluxes from a critical mockup of the Hiroshima bomb Little Boy at Los Alamos National Laobratory with detector systems developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Bonner ball detectors were used to map the neutron fluxes in the horizontal midplane at various distances from the mockup and for selected polar angles, keeping the source-detector separation constant. Gamma-ray energy deposition measurements were made with thermoluminescent detectors at several locations on the iron shell of the source mockup. The measurements were performed as part of a larger progam to provide benchmark data for testing the methods used to calculate the radiation released from the Little Boy bomb over Hiroshima. 3 references, 10 figures.

  9. Integrating advanced materials simulation techniques into an automated data analysis workflow at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Borreguero Calvo, Jose M; Campbell, Stuart I; Delaire, Olivier A; Doucet, Mathieu; Goswami, Monojoy; Hagen, Mark E; Lynch, Vickie E; Proffen, Thomas E; Ren, Shelly; Savici, Andrei T; Sumpter, Bobby G

    2014-01-01

    This presentation will review developments on the integration of advanced modeling and simulation techniques into the analysis step of experimental data obtained at the Spallation Neutron Source. A workflow framework for the purpose of refining molecular mechanics force-fields against quasi-elastic neutron scattering data is presented. The workflow combines software components to submit model simulations to remote high performance computers, a message broker interface for communications between the optimizer engine and the simulation production step, and tools to convolve the simulated data with the experimental resolution. A test application shows the correction to a popular fixed-charge water model in order to account polarization effects due to the presence of solvated ions. Future enhancements to the refinement workflow are discussed. This work is funded through the DOE Center for Accelerating Materials Modeling.

  10. Motofit - integrating neutron reflectometry acquisition, reduction and analysis into one, easy to use, package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    The efficient use of complex neutron scattering instruments is often hindered by the complex nature of their operating software. This complexity exists at each experimental step: data acquisition, reduction and analysis, with each step being as important as the previous. For example, whilst command line interfaces are powerful at automated acquisition they often reduce accessibility by novice users and sometimes reduce the efficiency for advanced users. One solution to this is the development of a graphical user interface which allows the user to operate the instrument by a simple and intuitive "push button" approach. This approach was taken by the Motofit software package for analysis of multiple contrast reflectometry data. Here we describe the extension of this package to cover the data acquisition and reduction steps for the Platypus time-of-flight neutron reflectometer. Consequently, the complete operation of an instrument is integrated into a single, easy to use, program, leading to efficient instrument usage.

  11. First implosion experiments with cryogenic thermonuclear fuel on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenzer, Siegfried H.; Spears, Brian K.; Edwards, M. John; Alger, Ethan T.; Berger, Richard L.; Bleuel, Darren L.; Bradley, David K.; Caggiano, Joseph A.; Callahan, Debra A.; Castro, Carlos; Casey, Daniel T.; Choate, Christine; Clark, Daniel S.; Cerjan, Charles J.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Dewald, Eduard L.; Di Nicola, Jean-Michel G.; Di Nicola, Pascale; Divol, Laurent; Dixit, Shamasundar N.; Döppner, Tilo; Dylla-Spears, Rebecca; Dzenitis, Elizabeth G.; Fair, James E.; Frenje, Lars Johan Anders; Gatu Johnson, M.; Giraldez, E.; Glebov, Vladimir; Glenn, Steven M.; Haan, Steven W.; Hammel, Bruce A.; Hatchett, Stephen P., II; Haynam, Christopher A.; Heeter, Robert F.; Heestand, Glenn M.; Herrmann, Hans W.; Hicks, Damien G.; Holunga, Dean M.; Horner, Jeffrey B.; Huang, Haibo; Izumi, Nobuhiko; Jones, Ogden S.; Kalantar, Daniel H.; Kilkenny, Joseph D.; Kirkwood, Robert K.; Kline, John L.; Knauer, James P.; Kozioziemski, Bernard; Kritcher, Andrea L.; Kroll, Jeremy J.; Kyrala, George A.; LaFortune, Kai N.; Landen, Otto L.; Larson, Douglas W.; Leeper, Ramon J.; Le Pape, Sebastien; Lindl, John D.; Ma, Tammy; Mackinnon, Andrew J.; MacPhee, Andrew G.; Mapoles, Evan; McKenty, Patrick W.; Meezan, Nathan B.; Michel, Pierre; Milovich, Jose L.; Moody, John D.; Moore, Alastair S.; Moran, Mike; Moreno, Kari Ann; Munro, David H.; Nathan, Bryan R.; Nikroo, Abbas; Olson, Richard E.; Orth, Charles D.; Pak, Arthur; Patel, Pravesh K.; Parham, Tom; Petrasso, Richard; Ralph, Joseph E.; Rinderknecht, Hans; Regan, Sean P.; Robey, Harry F.; Ross, J. Steven; Salmonson, Jay D.; Sangster, Craig; Sater, Jim; Schneider, Marilyn B.; Séguin, F. H.; Shaw, Michael J.; Shoup, Milton J.; Springer, Paul T.; Stoeffl, Wolfgang; Suter, Larry J.; Avery Thomas, Cliff; Town, Richard P. J.; Walters, Curtis; Weber, Stephen V.; Wegner, Paul J.; Widmayer, Clay; Whitman, Pamela K.; Widmann, Klaus; Wilson, Douglas C.; Van Wonterghem, Bruno M.; MacGowan, Brian J.; Atherton, L. Jeff; Moses, Edward I.

    2012-04-01

    Non-burning thermonuclear fuel implosion experiments have been fielded on the National Ignition Facility to assess progress toward ignition by indirect drive inertial confinement fusion. These experiments use cryogenic fuel ice layers, consisting of mixtures of tritium and deuterium with large amounts of hydrogen to control the neutron yield and to allow fielding of an extensive suite of optical, x-ray and nuclear diagnostics. The thermonuclear fuel layer is contained in a spherical plastic capsule that is fielded in the center of a cylindrical gold hohlraum. Heating the hohlraum with 1.3 MJ of energy delivered by 192 laser beams produces a soft x-ray drive spectrum with a radiation temperature of 300 eV. The radiation field produces an ablation pressure of 100 Mbar which compresses the capsule to a spherical dense fuel shell that contains a hot plasma core 80 µm in diameter. The implosion core is observed with x-ray imaging diagnostics that provide size, shape, the absolute x-ray emission along with bangtime and hot plasma lifetime. Nuclear measurements provide the 14.1 MeV neutron yield from fusion of deuterium and tritium nuclei along with down-scattered neutrons at energies of 10-12 MeV due to energy loss by scattering in the dense fuel that surrounds the central hot-spot plasma. Neutron time-of-flight spectra allow the inference of the ion temperature while gamma-ray measurements provide the duration of nuclear activity. The fusion yield from deuterium-tritium reactions scales with ion temperature, which is in agreement with modeling over more than one order of magnitude to a neutron yield in excess of 1014 neutrons, indicating large confinement parameters on these first experiments. Part of the EPS 2011 special issue. Based on the plenary talk by S H Glenzer at the 38th EPS Plasma Physics meeting in Strassbourg, 2011.

  12. Fermi-GBM detection of a thermonuclear burst from 4U 1608-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenke, P.; Linares, M.; Connaughton, V.; van der Horst, A. J.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Finger, M.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Kouveliotou, C.

    2012-05-01

    We report the detection with Fermi-GBM (daily CTIME data, 12-25 keV band) of an X-ray burst from a location consistent with the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary and thermonuclear burster 4U 1608-52. The burst peak occurred on May 2, 2012 at 06:47:54 UTC. The Fermi-GBM location of the burst is R.A.(J2000) = 241.3 deg, DEC(J2000) = -51.1 deg (1.8 deg from 4U 1608-52) with a 1 sigma error of 4.7 deg.

  13. MILLIHERTZ QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS AND THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS FROM TERZAN 5: A SHOWCASE OF BURNING REGIMES

    SciTech Connect

    Linares, M.; Chakrabarty, D.; Altamirano, D.; Cumming, A.; Keek, L.

    2012-04-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the thermonuclear bursts and millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations (mHz QPOs) from the neutron star (NS) transient and 11 Hz X-ray pulsar IGR J17480-2446, located in the globular cluster Terzan 5. The increase in burst rate that we found during its 2010 outburst, when persistent luminosity rose from 0.1 to 0.5 times the Eddington limit, is in qualitative agreement with thermonuclear burning theory yet contrary to all previous observations of thermonuclear bursts. Thermonuclear bursts gradually evolved into a mHz QPO when the accretion rate increased, and vice versa. The mHz QPOs from IGR J17480-2446 resemble those previously observed in other accreting NSs, yet they feature lower frequencies (by a factor {approx}3) and occur when the persistent luminosity is higher (by a factor 4-25). We find four distinct bursting regimes and a steep (close to inverse cubic) decrease of the burst recurrence time with increasing persistent luminosity. We compare these findings to nuclear burning models and find evidence for a transition between the pure helium and mixed hydrogen/helium ignition regimes when the persistent luminosity was about 0.3 times the Eddington limit. We also point out important discrepancies between the observed bursts and theory, which predicts brighter and less frequent bursts, and suggest that an additional source of heat in the NS envelope is required to reconcile the observed and expected burst properties. We discuss the impact of NS magnetic field and spin on the expected nuclear burning regimes, in the context of this particular pulsar.

  14. Design considerations for neutron activation and neutron source strength monitors for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W.; Jassby, D.L.; LeMunyan, G.; Roquemore, A.L.; Walker, C.

    1997-12-31

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor will require highly accurate measurements of fusion power production in time, space, and energy. Spectrometers in the neutron camera could do it all, but experience has taught us that multiple methods with redundancy and complementary uncertainties are needed. Previously, conceptual designs have been presented for time-integrated neutron activation and time-dependent neutron source strength monitors, both of which will be important parts of the integrated suite of neutron diagnostics for this purpose. The primary goals of the neutron activation system are: to maintain a robust relative measure of fusion energy production with stability and wide dynamic range; to enable an accurate absolute calibration of fusion power using neutronic techniques as successfully demonstrated on JET and TFTR; and to provide a flexible system for materials testing. The greatest difficulty is that the irradiation locations need to be close to plasma with a wide field of view. The routing of the pneumatic system is difficult because of minimum radius of curvature requirements and because of the careful need for containment of the tritium and activated air. The neutron source strength system needs to provide real-time source strength vs. time with {approximately}1 ms resolution and wide dynamic range in a robust and reliable manner with the capability to be absolutely calibrated by in-situ neutron sources as done on TFTR, JT-60U, and JET. In this paper a more detailed look at the expected neutron flux field around ITER is folded into a more complete design of the fission chamber system.

  15. Development of an integrated thermal-hydraulics capability incorporating RELAP5 and PANTHER neutronics code

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R.; Jones, J.R.

    1997-07-01

    Ensuring that safety analysis needs are met in the future is likely to lead to the development of new codes and the further development of existing codes. It is therefore advantageous to define standards for data interfaces and to develop software interfacing techniques which can readily accommodate changes when they are made. Defining interface standards is beneficial but is necessarily restricted in application if future requirements are not known in detail. Code interfacing methods are of particular relevance with the move towards automatic grid frequency response operation where the integration of plant dynamic, core follow and fault study calculation tools is considered advantageous. This paper describes the background and features of a new code TALINK (Transient Analysis code LINKage program) used to provide a flexible interface to link the RELAP5 thermal hydraulics code with the PANTHER neutron kinetics and the SIBDYM whole plant dynamic modelling codes used by Nuclear Electric. The complete package enables the codes to be executed in parallel and provides an integrated whole plant thermal-hydraulics and neutron kinetics model. In addition the paper discusses the capabilities and pedigree of the component codes used to form the integrated transient analysis package and the details of the calculation of a postulated Sizewell `B` Loss of offsite power fault transient.

  16. Variational Determination of the Neutron Integral Transport Equation Eigenvalues Using Space Asymptotic Trial Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, V.; Ravetto, P.; Sumini, M.

    1988-08-01

    An approximate determination of the critical eigenvalue of the neutron transport equation in integral form, within both the one speed and energy multigroup models, for a homogeneous medium, is achieved by means of a variational technique. The space asymptotic solutions for both the direct and adjoint problems are used as trial functions. A variational procedure is also developed and numerically exploited within the Fourier transformed domain, where noticeable theoretical features can be demonstrated. It is evidenced that excellent results can be obtained with little computational effort, and a set of critical calculations in plane geometry is presented and discussed.

  17. Variational determination of the neutron integral transport equation eigenvalues using space asymptotic trial functions

    SciTech Connect

    Colombo, V.; Ravetto, P.; Sumini, M.

    1988-08-01

    An approximate determination of the critical eigenvalue of the neutron transport equation in integral form, within both the one speed and energy multigroup models, for a homogeneous medium, is achieved by means of a variational technique. The space asymptotic solutions for both the direct and adjoint problems are used as trial functions. A variational procedure is also developed and numerically exploited within the Fourier transformed domain, where noticeable theoretical features can be demonstrated. It is evidenced that excellent results can be obtained with little computational effort, and a set of critical calculations in plane geometry is presented and discussed. copyright 1988 Academic Press, Inc.

  18. Intergalactic thermonuclear gamma-ray line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    The possibility of thermonculear reactions occurring in dilute space is briefly considered. X-ray emission from clusters of galaxies demonstrates that perhaps as much as 10 to the 14th solar masses of hot gas (T of about 100 million K) may often surround galaxies in clusters with a density of perhaps 0.004/cu cm. If the ion temperature is 100 million K, the thermonuclear reaction p + d to He-3 + gamma ray should emit gamma rays at a rate of roughly 4 x 10 to the 41st/sec with energy 5.516 + or -0.016 MeV. Such a source in teh virgo cluster at 15.7 Mpc would present a line flux of 1 x 10 to the -11th/sq cm/sec.

  19. Recent Augmentations of the Functionality of the Thermonuclear Reaction Rate Calculator (TReRaC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Kyle; Smith, Michael

    2011-10-01

    The chemical variety of our universe can be explained by stellar nucleosynthesis. Many thermonuclear reactions are studied by reproducing them in accelerator experiments and determining their rates. Using the codes available through the Computational Infrastructure for Nuclear Astrophysics (CINA), researchers can process the results of these experiments. One such program is the Thermonuclear Reaction Rate Calculator (TReRaC), which uses various experimental inputs including resonant energies, strengths, channel widths, and information on non-resonant contributions to calculate reaction rates. Presently, TReRaC is capable of quickly generating accurate rates which closely match those given in a number of publications. This adds to CINA capabilities by enabling a wider variety of nuclear information to generate rates. The next step in TReRaC's evolution is integration into the existing CINA complex so that it can be used by researchers worldwide.

  20. Kinetic simulation of neutron production in a deuterium z-pinch.

    SciTech Connect

    Mostrom, C.; Stygar, William A.; Thoma, Carsten; Welch, Dale Robert; Clark, R. E.; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Rose, David V.

    2010-11-01

    We have found computationally that, at sufficiently high currents, half of the neutrons produced by a deuterium z pinch are thermonuclear in origin. Early experiments below 1-MA current found that essentially all of the neutrons produced by a deuterium pinch are not thermonuclear, but are initiated by an instability that creates beam-target neutrons. Many subsequent authors have supported this result while others have claimed that pinch neutrons are thermonuclear. To resolve this issue, we have conducted fully kinetic, collisional, and electromagnetic simulations of the complete time evolution of a deuterium pinch. We find that at 1-MA pinch currents, most of the neutrons are, indeed, beam-target in origin. At much higher current, half of the neutrons are thermonuclear and half are beam-target driven by instabilities that produce a power law fall off in the ion energy distribution function at large energy. The implications for fusion energy production with such pinches are discussed.

  1. Design considerations for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) magnet systems

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.D.; Miller, J.R.

    1988-10-09

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is now completing a definition phase as a beginning of a three-year design effort. Preliminary parameters for the superconducting magnet system have been established to guide further and more detailed design work. Radiation tolerance of the superconductors and insulators has been of prime importance, since it sets requirements for the neutron-shield dimension and sensitively influences reactor size. The major levels of mechanical stress in the structure appear in the cases of the inboard legs of the toroidal-field (TF) coils. The cases of the poloidal-field (PF) coils must be made thin or segmented to minimize eddy current heating during inductive plasma operation. As a result, the winding packs of both the TF and PF coils includes significant fractions of steel. The TF winding pack provides support against in-plane separating loads but offers little support against out-of-plane loads, unless shear-bonding of the conductors can be maintained. The removal of heat due to nuclear and ac loads has not been a fundamental limit to design, but certainly has non-negligible economic consequences. We present here preliminary ITER magnetic systems design parameters taken from trade studies, designs, and analyses performed by the Home Teams of the four ITER participants, by the ITER Magnet Design Unit in Garching, and by other participants at workshops organized by the Magnet Design Unit. The work presented here reflects the efforts of many, but the responsibility for the opinions expressed is the authors'. 4 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Spontaneous Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition in Thermonuclear Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poludnenko, Alexei; Gamezo, Vadim; Oran, Elaine

    2013-11-01

    We present the analysis of the spontaneous deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in turbulent thermonuclear flames in Type Ia supernovae - explosions of degenerate white dwarf stars in binary stellar systems. We show results of first-principles numerical calculations that are used to develop and validate a subgrid-scale model for predicting the onset of DDT in full-star calculations. We also discuss detailed properties of laminar thermonuclear deflagrations for compositions and densities, at which DDT is expected to occur.

  3. Operating large controlled thermonuclear fusion research facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudreau, M.P.J.; Tarrh, J.M.; Post, R.S.; Thomas, P.

    1987-10-01

    The MIT Tara Tandem Mirror is a large, state of the art controlled thermonuclear fusion research facility. Over the six years of its design, implementation, and operation, every effort was made to minimize cost and maximize performance by using the best and latest hardware, software, and scientific and operational techniques. After reviewing all major DOE fusion facilities, an independent DOE review committee concluded that the Tara operation was the most automated and efficient of all DOE facilities. This paper includes a review of the key elements of the Tara design, construction, operation, management, physics milestones, and funding that led to this success. We emphasize a chronological description of how the system evolved from the proposal stage to a mature device with an emphasis on the basic philosophies behind the implementation process. This description can serve both as a qualitative and quantitative database for future large experiment planning. It includes actual final costs and manpower spent as well as actual run and maintenance schedules, number of data shots, major system failures, etc. The paper concludes with recommendations for the next generation of facilities. 13 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) in perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.D. )

    1989-10-20

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) team is completing the second year of a three-year conceptual design phase. The purpose of ITER is to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion power. It is to demonstrate plasma ignition and extended burn with steady state as the ultimate goal. In so doing, it is to provide the physics data base needed for a demonstration tokamak power reactor and to demonstrate reactor-relevant technologies, such as high-heat-flux and nuclear components for fusion power. To meet these objectives, many design compromises had to be reached by the participants following a careful review of the physics and technology base for fusion. The current ITER design features a 6-m major radius, a 2.15-m minor radius and a 22-MA plasma current. About 330 volt-seconds in the poloidal field system inductively drive the current for hundreds of seconds. Moreover, about 125 MW of neutral-beam, lower-hybrid, and electron-cyclotron power are provided for steady-state current drive and heating all these systems are discussed in this paper. 3 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. ATR LEU Monolithic Foil-Type Fuel with Integral Cladding Burnable Absorber – Neutronics Performance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gray Chang

    2012-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), currently operating in the United States, is used for material testing at very high neutron fluxes. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth. Because of the large test volumes located in high flux areas, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting HEU driven reactor cores to low-enriched uranium (LEU) cores. The burnable absorber - 10B, was added in the inner and outer plates to reduce the initial excess reactivity, and to improve the peak ratio of the inner/outer heat flux. The present work investigates the LEU Monolithic foil-type fuel with 10B Integral Cladding Burnable Absorber (ICBA) design and evaluates the subsequent neutronics operating effects of this proposed fuel designs. The proposed LEU fuel specification in this work is directly related to both the RERTR LEU Development Program and the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) LEU Conversion Project at Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  6. Line integration effects on ion temperatures in tokamak plasmas measured with neutron emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ognissanto, F.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Albergante, M.; Ballabio, L.; Conroy, S.; Kaellne, J.

    2008-10-15

    The line integrated line emission measured by neutron spectrometers at JET along sight lines in the vertical and horizontal planes has been simulated in Monte Carlo calculations to determine the relationship between the measured (effective) ion temperature (T{sub eff}) relative to the peak value of the profile (T{sub 0}). The general sight line dependence of (T{sub eff}) was expressed analytically for circular plasmas which was used to explain the simulated results for the actual JET sight lines. The analytical model with parametrization of sight lines and plasma profiles is described and the results are used to discuss dual sight line measurements that can be tested at JET and its forward implications for study burning (nearly thermal) plasmas of ITER.

  7. Measurement of the thermal neutron capture cross section and the resonance integral of radioactive Hf182

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vockenhuber, C.; Bichler, M.; Wallner, A.; Kutschera, W.; Dillmann, I.; Käppeler, F.

    2008-04-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of the radioactive isotope Hf182 (t1/2=8.9×106 yr) in the thermal and epithermal energy regions have been measured by activation at the TRIGA Mark-II reactor of the Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities in Vienna, Austria, and subsequent γ-ray spectroscopy of Hf183. High values for the thermal (kT=25 meV) cross section σ0=133±10 b and for the resonance integral I0=5850±660 b were found. Additionally, the absolute intensities of the main γ-ray transitions in the decay of Hf182 have been considerably improved.

  8. On the Integration of a Readout System Dedicated for Neutron Discrimination in Harsh Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Krit, S.; Rahajandraibe, W.; Coulié-Castellani, K.; Micolau, G.; Lyoussi, A.

    2016-02-01

    New insights related to the integration of a readout system dedicated for the detection and discrimination of neutrons are presented here. This study takes place in the framework of the I_SMART European project. This system will have to work later in a harsh environment in terms of temperature and radiations, what makes not only the development of specifications for operation and reliability of the components necessary but also the investigation of margins for the interplay of the system. Implementation of the analog conditioning chain at transistor level (AMS (Analog/Mixed Signal) 0.35μm CMOS technology) is investigated here where electrical performances have been validated at SPICE-level simulations using "Spectre" simulator (SPICE-based) under Cadence DFII.

  9. Burst Oscillations: A New Spin on Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2007-01-01

    Observations with NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) have shown that the X-ray flux during thermonuclear X-ray bursts fr-om accreting neutron stars is often strongly pulsed at frequencies as high as 620 Hz. We now know that these oscillations are produced by spin modulation of the thermonuclear flux from the neutron star surface. In addition to revealing the spin frequency, they provide new ways to probe the properties and physics of accreting neutron stars. I will briefly review our current observational and theoretical understanding of these oscillations and discuss what they are telling us about neutron stars.

  10. Constraining the mass-radius relation of neutron stars through superbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In't Zand, Jean

    2011-10-01

    Superbursts are thermonuclear X-ray flashes on neutron stars that last up to 14~hr. We propose to carry out 2 quick 25 ks XMM-Newton triggered observations on superbursts from any of 30 (candidate) superbursters that persistently radiate at 30% of Eddington or slower, with the purpose to carry out X-ray spectroscopy of the neutron star surface and constrain the mass-radius relation and equation of state of neutron stars. We will make use of superburst alerts from INTEGRAL/IBIS, Swift/BAT and ISS-MAXI. The potential of this program is at least as good as that of the program on EXO 0748-676, but at much reduced exposure requirements (50 ks in total).

  11. Constraining the mass-radius relation of neutron stars through superbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    in't Zand, Jean

    2010-10-01

    Superbursts are thermonuclear X-ray flashes on neutron stars that last up to 14 hr. We propose to carry out 2 quick 25 ks XMM-Newton triggered observations on superbursts from any of 23 (candidate) superbursters that persistently radiate at 30% of Eddington or slower, to carry out high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the neutron star surface and constrain the mass-radius relation and equation of state of neutron stars. We will make use of superburst alerts from INTEGRAL/IBIS and Swift/BAT. The potential of this program is at least as good as that of the program on EXO 0748-676, but at much reduced exposure requirements (50 ks in total).

  12. Neutron Cross Section Processing Methods for Improved Integral Benchmarking of Unresolved Resonance Region Evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Jonathan A.; Forget, Benoit; Smith, Kord S.; Brown, Forrest B.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we describe the development and application of computational methods for processing neutron cross section data in the unresolved resonance region (URR). These methods are integrated with a continuous-energy Monte Carlo neutron transport code, thereby enabling their use in high-fidelity analyses. Enhanced understanding of the effects of URR evaluation representations on calculated results is then obtained through utilization of the methods in Monte Carlo integral benchmark simulations of fast spectrum critical assemblies. First, we present a so-called on-the-fly (OTF) method for calculating and Doppler broadening URR cross sections. This method proceeds directly from ENDF-6 average unresolved resonance parameters and, thus, eliminates any need for a probability table generation pre-processing step in which tables are constructed at several energies for all desired temperatures. Significant memory reduction may be realized with the OTF method relative to a probability table treatment if many temperatures are needed. Next, we examine the effects of using a multi-level resonance formalism for resonance reconstruction in the URR. A comparison of results obtained by using the same stochastically-generated realization of resonance parameters in both the single-level Breit-Wigner (SLBW) and multi-level Breit-Wigner (MLBW) formalisms allows for the quantification of level-level interference effects on integrated tallies such as keff and energy group reaction rates. Though, as is well-known, cross section values at any given incident energy may differ significantly between single-level and multi-level formulations, the observed effects on integral results are minimal in this investigation. Finally, we demonstrate the calculation of true expected values, and the statistical spread of those values, through independent Monte Carlo simulations, each using an independent realization of URR cross section structure throughout. It is observed that both probability table

  13. Symmetrically converging plane thermonuclear burn waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charakhch'yan, A. A.; Khishchenko, K. V.

    2013-10-01

    Five variants of a one-dimensional problem on synchronous bilateral action of two identical drivers on opposite surfaces of a plane layer of DT fuel with the normal or five times greater initial density, where the solution includes two thermonuclear burn waves propagating to meet one another at the symmetry plane, are simulated. A laser pulse with total absorption of energy at the critical density (in two variants) and a proton bunch that provides for a nearly isochoric heating (in three variants) are considered as drivers. A wide-range equation of state for the fuel, electron and ion heat conduction, self-radiation of plasma and plasma heating by α-particles are taken into account. In spite of different ways of ignition, various models of α-particle heat, whether the burn wave remains slow or transforms into the detonation wave, and regardless of way of such a transformation, the final value of the burn-up factor depends essentially on the only parameter Hρ0, where H is the half-thickness of the layer and ρ0 is the initial fuel density. This factor is about 0.35 at Hρ0 ≈ 1 g cm-2 and about 0.7 at Hρ0 ≈ 5 g cm-2. The expansion stage of the flow (after reflecting the burn or detonation wave from the symmetry plane) gives the main contribution in forming the final values of the burn-up factor and the gain at Hρ0 ≈ 1 g cm-2 and increases them approximately two times at Hρ0 ≈ 5 g cm-2. In the case of the proton driver, the final value of the gain is about 200 at Hρ0 ≈ 1 g cm-2 and about 2000 at Hρ0 ≈ 5 g cm-2. In the case of the laser driver, the above values are four times less in conformity with the difference between the driver energies.

  14. A consistent, differential versus integral, method for measuring the delayed neutron yield in fissions

    SciTech Connect

    Flip, A.; Pang, H.F.; D`Angelo, A.

    1995-12-31

    Due to the persistent uncertainties: {approximately} 5 % (the uncertainty, here and there after, is at 1{sigma}) in the prediction of the `reactivity scale` ({beta}{sub eff}) for a fast power reactor, an international project was recently initiated in the framework of the OECD/NEA activities for reevaluation, new measurements and integral benchmarking of delayed neutron (DN) data and related kinetic parameters (principally {beta}{sub eff}). Considering that the major part of this uncertainty is due to uncertainties in the DN yields (v{sub d}) and the difficulty for further improvement of the precision in differential (e.g. Keepin`s method) measurements, an international cooperative strategy was adopted aiming at extracting and consistently interpreting information from both differential (nuclear) and integral (in reactor) measurements. The main problem arises from the integral side; thus the idea was to realize {beta}{sub eff} like measurements (both deterministic and noise) in `clean` assemblies. The `clean` calculational context permitted the authors to develop a theory allowing to link explicitly this integral experimental level with the differential one, via a unified `Master Model` which relates v{sub d} and measurables quantities (on both levels) linearly. The combined error analysis is consequently largely simplified and the final uncertainty drastically reduced (theoretically, by a factor {radical}3). On the other hand the same theoretical development leading to the `Master Model`, also resulted in a structured scheme of approximations of the general (stochastic) Boltzmann equation allowing a consistent analysis of the large range of measurements concerned (stochastic, dynamic, static ... ). This paper is focused on the main results of this theoretical development and its application to the analysis of the Preliminary results of the BERENICE program ({beta}{sub eff} measurements in MASURCA, the first assembly in CADARACHE-FRANCE).

  15. Demonstration of a time-integrated short line of sight neutron imaging system for inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, R.; Christensen, K.; Danly, C.; Fatherley, V. E.; Fittinghoff, D.; Grim, G. P.; Izumi, N.; Jedlovec, D.; Merrill, F. E.; Skulina, K.; Volegov, P.; Wilde, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Neutron Imaging System (NIS) is an important diagnostic for understanding implosions of deuterium-tritium capsules at the National Ignition Facility. While the detectors for the existing system must be positioned 28 m from the source to produce sufficient imaging magnification and resolution, recent testing of a new short line of sight neutron imaging system has shown sufficient resolution to allow reconstruction of the source image with quality similar to that of the existing NIS on a 11.6 m line of sight. The new system used the existing pinhole aperture array and a stack of detectors composed of 2 mm thick high-density polyethylene converter material followed by an image plate. In these detectors, neutrons enter the converter material and interact with protons, which recoil and deposit energy within the thin active layer of the image plate through ionization losses. The described system produces time-integrated images for all neutron energies passing through the pinhole. We present details of the measurement scheme for this novel technique to produce energy-integrated neutron images as well as source reconstruction results from recent experiments at NIF.

  16. Demonstration of a time-integrated short line of sight neutron imaging system for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, R. Danly, C.; Fatherley, V. E.; Merrill, F. E.; Volegov, P.; Wilde, C.; Christensen, K.; Fittinghoff, D.; Grim, G. P.; Izumi, N.; Jedlovec, D.; Skulina, K.

    2015-12-15

    The Neutron Imaging System (NIS) is an important diagnostic for understanding implosions of deuterium-tritium capsules at the National Ignition Facility. While the detectors for the existing system must be positioned 28 m from the source to produce sufficient imaging magnification and resolution, recent testing of a new short line of sight neutron imaging system has shown sufficient resolution to allow reconstruction of the source image with quality similar to that of the existing NIS on a 11.6 m line of sight. The new system used the existing pinhole aperture array and a stack of detectors composed of 2 mm thick high-density polyethylene converter material followed by an image plate. In these detectors, neutrons enter the converter material and interact with protons, which recoil and deposit energy within the thin active layer of the image plate through ionization losses. The described system produces time-integrated images for all neutron energies passing through the pinhole. We present details of the measurement scheme for this novel technique to produce energy-integrated neutron images as well as source reconstruction results from recent experiments at NIF.

  17. Demonstration of a time-integrated short line of sight neutron imaging system for inertial confinement fusion.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R; Christensen, K; Danly, C; Fatherley, V E; Fittinghoff, D; Grim, G P; Izumi, N; Jedlovec, D; Merrill, F E; Skulina, K; Volegov, P; Wilde, C

    2015-12-01

    The Neutron Imaging System (NIS) is an important diagnostic for understanding implosions of deuterium-tritium capsules at the National Ignition Facility. While the detectors for the existing system must be positioned 28 m from the source to produce sufficient imaging magnification and resolution, recent testing of a new short line of sight neutron imaging system has shown sufficient resolution to allow reconstruction of the source image with quality similar to that of the existing NIS on a 11.6 m line of sight. The new system used the existing pinhole aperture array and a stack of detectors composed of 2 mm thick high-density polyethylene converter material followed by an image plate. In these detectors, neutrons enter the converter material and interact with protons, which recoil and deposit energy within the thin active layer of the image plate through ionization losses. The described system produces time-integrated images for all neutron energies passing through the pinhole. We present details of the measurement scheme for this novel technique to produce energy-integrated neutron images as well as source reconstruction results from recent experiments at NIF. PMID:26724078

  18. Thermonuclear flash model for long X-ray tails from Aquila X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fushiki, Ikko; Taam, Ronald E.; Woosley, S. E.; Lamb, D. Q.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to a thermonuclear flash model for long X-ray tails from the recurrent transient Aql X-1, in which the extended phase of nuclear burning is due to the fact that the envelope is out of thermal equilibrium. Only the first X-ray burst emitted by Aql X-1 during its transient outburst exhibits a long X-ray tail. The properties of subsequent bursts are distinguished by a lack of an X-ray tail reflecting the much smaller accumulated masses which result from the effects of thermal inertia in the neutron star envelope. The characteristics of the latter bursts are similar to those of typical X-ray bursters. For a neutron star characterized by a mass and radius of 1.4 solar mass and 9.1 km, respectively, the occurrence of the long X-ray tail requires that the mass of the accumulated layer be less than 10 exp 23 g and that the envelope temperatures of the neutron star be less than 1.5 x 10 exp 7. This interpretation is found to be consistent with the thermal relaxation of the neutron star envelope during the quiescent state of Aql X-1 and with the mass accretion rates inferred for the transient outburst itself.

  19. THE RETURN OF THE BURSTS: THERMONUCLEAR FLASHES FROM CIRCINUS X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Linares, M.; Homan, J.; Chakrabarty, D.; Watts, A.; Altamirano, D.; Degenaar, N.; Yang, Y.; Wijnands, R.; Armas-Padilla, M.; Cavecchi, Y.; Kalamkar, M.; Kaur, R.; Patruno, A.; Van der Klis, M.; Soleri, P.; Casella, P.; Rea, N.

    2010-08-10

    We report the detection of 15 X-ray bursts with RXTE and Swift observations of the peculiar X-ray binary Circinus X-1 (Cir X-1) during its 2010 May X-ray re-brightening. These are the first X-ray bursts observed from the source after the initial discovery by Tennant and collaborators, 25 years ago. By studying their spectral evolution, we firmly identify nine of the bursts as type I (thermonuclear) X-ray bursts. We obtain an arcsecond location of the bursts that confirms once and for all the identification of Cir X-1 as a type I X-ray burst source, and therefore as a low magnetic field accreting neutron star. The first five bursts observed by RXTE are weak and show approximately symmetric light curves, without detectable signs of cooling along the burst decay. We discuss their possible nature. Finally, we explore a scenario to explain why Cir X-1 shows thermonuclear bursts now but not in the past, when it was extensively observed and accreting at a similar rate.

  20. Thermonuclear supernova light curves: Progenitors and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodney, Steven A.

    Thermonuclear Supernovae (TN SNe) are an extremely important tool in modern astronomy. In their role as cosmological distance probes, they have revealed the accelerated expansion of the universe and have begun to constrain the nature of the dark energy that may be driving that expansion. The next decade will see a succession of wide-field surveys producing thousands of TNSN detections each year. Traditional methods of SN analysis, rooted in time-intensive spectroscopic follow-up, will become completely impractical. To realize the potential of this coming tide of massive data sets, we will need to extract cosmographic parameters (redshift and luminosity distance) from SN photometry without any spectroscopic support. In this dissertation, I present the Supernova Ontology with Fuzzy Templates (SOFT) method, an innovative new approach to the analysis of SN light curves. SOFT uses the framework of fuzzy set theory to perform direct comparisons of SN candidates against template light curves, simultaneously producing both classifications and cosmological parameter estimates. The SOFT method allows us to shed new light on two rich archival data sets. I revisit the IfA Deep Survey and HST GOODS to extract new and improved measurements of the TNSN rate from z=0.2 out to z=1.6. Our new analysis shows a steady increase in the TNSN rate out to z˜1, and adds support for a decrease in the rate at z=1.5. Comparing these rate measurements to theoretical models, I conclude that the progenitor scenario most favored by the collective observational data is a single degenerate model, regulated by a strong wind from the accreting white dwarf. Using a compilation of SN light curves from five recent surveys, I demonstrate that SOFT is able to derive useful constraints on cosmological models from a data set with no spectroscopic information at all. Looking ahead to the near future, I find that photometric analysis of data sets containing 2,000 SNe will be able to improve our constraints on

  1. Thermonuclear Supernovae: Simulations of the Deflagration Stage and Their Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamezo, Vadim N.; Khokhlov, Alexei M.; Oran, Elaine S.; Chtchelkanova, Almadena Y.; Rosenberg, Robert O.

    2003-01-01

    Large-scale, three-dimensional numerical simulations of the deflagration stage of a thermonuclear supernova explosion show the formation and evolution of a highly convoluted turbulent flame in the gravitational field of an expanding carbon-oxygen white dwarf. The flame dynamics are dominated by the gravity-induced Rayleigh-Taylor instability that controls the burning rate. The thermonuclear deflagration releases enough energy to produce a healthy explosion. The turbulent flame, however, leaves large amounts of unburned and partially burned material near the star center, whereas observations that imply these materials are present only in outer layers. This disagreement could be resolved if the deflagration triggers a detonation.

  2. Thermonuclear supernovae: simulations of the deflagration stage and their implications.

    PubMed

    Gamezo, Vadim N; Khokhlov, Alexei M; Oran, Elaine S; Chtchelkanova, Almadena Y; Rosenberg, Robert O

    2003-01-01

    Large-scale, three-dimensional numerical simulations of the deflagration stage of a thermonuclear supernova explosion show the formation and evolution of a highly convoluted turbulent flame in the gravitational field of an expanding carbon-oxygen white dwarf. The flame dynamics are dominated by the gravity-induced Rayleigh-Taylor instability that controls the burning rate. The thermonuclear deflagration releases enough energy to produce a healthy explosion. The turbulent flame, however, leaves large amounts of unburned and partially burned material near the star center, whereas observations that imply these materials are present only in outer layers. This disagreement could be resolved if the deflagration triggers a detonation. PMID:12446871

  3. A low-level activation technique for monitoring thermonuclear fusion plasma conditions.

    PubMed

    Gasparro, Joël; Hult, Mikael; Bonheure, Georges; Johnston, Peter N

    2006-01-01

    Optimisation of the confinement and sustainability of a thermonuclear plasma requires methods to monitor processes in the plasma. In this work three materials were used as activation targets (Ti, MgF2 and a TiVAl compound). They were placed inside the joint European Torus (JET) vacuum chamber. Certain gamma-ray emitting radionuclides (7Be, 54Mn, 56Co, 57Co, 58Co and 46Sc) were measured using ultra low-level gamma-ray spectrometry in an underground laboratory 1-2 months after activation. They were found to arise from neutron activation of bulk sample material and surface contaminants sputtered from other Tokamak parts. Decision thresholds for some activation products were determined in order to aid in giving upper bounds for the flux of charged particles. PMID:16580838

  4. Astrophysics Simulations from the ASC/Alliances Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes

    DOE Data Explorer

    The "Flash Center" works to solve the long-standing problem of thermonuclear flashes on the surfaces of compact stars such as neutron stars and white dwarfs, and in the interior of white dwarfs (i.e., Type I supernovae). The physical conditions, and many of the physical phenomena, are similar to those confronted by the Department of Energy Stockpile Stewardship program. The (fully ionized) plasmas are at very high temperatures and densities; and the physical problems of nuclear ignition, deflagration or detonation, turbulent mixing, and interface dynamics for complex multicomponent fluids are common to the weapons program. Because virtually every aspect of this problem represents a computational Grand Challenge, large-scale numerical simulations are at the heart of its resolution (Taken from Executive Summary page). More than 35 simulations and computer animations developed through research at the "Flash Center" are available here. The collection offers .avi, .flv, or .mpeg file downloads as well as references to related research papers or presentations.

  5. Integrated doses calculation in evacuation scenarios of the neutron generator facility at Missouri S&T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manish K.; Alajo, Ayodeji B.

    2016-08-01

    Any source of ionizing radiations could lead to considerable dose acquisition to individuals in a nuclear facility. Evacuation may be required when elevated levels of radiation is detected within a facility. In this situation, individuals are more likely to take the closest exit. This may not be the most expedient decision as it may lead to higher dose acquisition. The strategy followed in preventing large dose acquisitions should be predicated on the path that offers least dose acquisition. In this work, the neutron generator facility at Missouri University of Science and Technology was analyzed. The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code was used to model the entire floor of the generator's building. The simulated dose rates in the hallways were used to estimate the integrated doses for different paths leading to exits. It was shown that shortest path did not always lead to minimum dose acquisition and the approach was successful in predicting the expedient path as opposed to the approach of taking the nearest exit.

  6. Left–right asymmetry in integral spectra of γ-quanta in the interaction of nuclei with polarized thermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Vesna, V. A.; Gledenov, Yu. M.; Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Sedyshev, P. V.; Shul’gina, E. V.

    2015-10-15

    The paper presents results of preliminarymeasurements of the left–right asymmetry in integral spectra of γ-quanta emitted in the interaction of polarized thermal neutrons with nuclei. These results indicate that for all cases of measured statistically significant P-odd asymmetry, the left–right asymmetry coefficient is much smaller than the P-odd asymmetry coefficient. This observation is not consistent with the predictions of theoretical calculations.

  7. On thermonuclear processes in cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigmatulin, R. I.; Lahey, R. T., Jr.; Taleyarkhan, R. P.; West, C. D.; Block, R. C.

    2014-09-01

    The theoretical and experimental foundations of so-called bubble nuclear fusion are reviewed. In the nuclear fusion process, a spherical cavitation cluster ˜ 10-2 m in diameter is produced of spherical bubbles at the center of a cylindrical chamber filled with deuterated acetone using a focused acoustic field having a resonant frequency of about 20 kHz. The acoustically-forced bubbles effectuate volume oscillations with sharp collapses during the compression stage. At the final stages of collapse, the bubble cluster emits 2.5 MeV D-D fusion neutron pulses at a rate of ˜ 2000 per second. The neutron yield is ˜ 10^5 s -1. In parallel, tritium nuclei are produced at the same yield. It is shown numerically that, for bubbles having sufficient molecular mass, spherical shock waves develop in the center of the cluster and that these spherical shock waves (microshocks) produce converging shocks within the interior bubbles, which focus energy on the centers of the bubbles. When these shock waves reflect from the centers of the bubbles, extreme conditions of temperature ( ˜ 10^8 K) and density ( ˜ 10^4 kg m -3) arise in a (nano)spherical region ( ˜ 10-7 m in size) that last for ˜ 10-12 s, during which time about ten D-D fusion neutrons and tritium nuclei are produced in the region. A paradoxical result in our experiments is that it is bubble cluster (not streamer) cavitation and the sufficiently high molecular mass of (and hence the low sound speed in) D-acetone ( C3D6O) vapor (as compared, for example, to deuterated water D2O) which are necessary conditions for the formation of convergent spherical microshock waves in central cluster bubbles. It is these waves that allow the energy to be sufficiently focused in the nanospherical regions near the bubble centers for fusion events to occur. The criticism to which the concept of 'bubble fusion' has been subjected in the literature, in particular, most recently in Uspekhi Fizicheskikh Nauk (Physics - Uspekhi) journal, is

  8. Thermonuclear Fusion: An Energy Source for the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, William E.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses current research in thermonuclear fusion with particular emphasis on the problem of confining hot plasma. Recent experiments indicate that magnetic bottles called tokamaks may achieve the necessary confinement times, and this break-through has given renewed optimism to the feasibility of commercial fusion power by the turn of the…

  9. Nuclear physics problems for accreting neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, R.K.; Woosley, S.E.

    1983-01-01

    The importance of p(e/sup -/nu)n and of (p,..gamma..) reactions on /sup 56/Ni during a thermonuclear runaway on a neutron star surface is pointed out. A fast 16-isotope approximate nuclear reaction network is developed that is suitable for use in hydrodynamic calculations of such events.

  10. Parameters affecting image quality with Time-Resolved Optical Integrative Neutron (TRION) detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mor, I.; Vartsky, D.; Feldman, G.; Dangendorf, V.; Bar, D.; Goldberg, M. B.; Tittelmeier, K.; Bromberger, B.; Weierganz, M.; Brandis, M.

    2011-06-01

    We have investigated by simulations and experimentally the parameters that affect image quality (contrast and spatial-resolution) of the fast neutron TRION detector. A scintillating fiber screen with 0.5×0.5 mm 2 square fibers, few centimeters thick, provides superior spatial-resolution to that of a slab scintillator of the same thickness. A detailed calculation of the neutron interaction processes that influence the point-spread function (PSF) in the scintillating screen has been performed using the GEANT 3.21 code. The calculations showed that neutron scattering within the screen accounts for a significant loss of image contrast. The factors that limit the spatial-resolution of the image are the cross-sectional scintillating-fiber dimensions within the screen and the spatial response of the image-intensifier. A deconvolution method has been applied for restoring the contrast and the spatial-resolution of the fast neutron image.

  11. Simulated Performance of the Integrated Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity and Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry Detector Designed for Spent Fuel Measurement at the Fugen Reactor in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Timothy J. II; Lafleur, Adrienne M.; Menlove, Howard O.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Tobin, Stephen J.; Seya, Michio; Bolind, Alan M.

    2012-07-16

    An integrated nondestructive assay instrument, which combined the Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity (PNAR) and the Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) techniques, is the research focus for a collaborative effort between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency as part of the Next Generation Safeguard Initiative. We will quantify the anticipated performance of this experimental system in two physical environments: (1) At LANL we will measure fresh Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) assemblies for which the average enrichment can be varied from 0.2% to 3.2% and for which Gd laced rods will be included. (2) At Fugen we will measure spent Mixed Oxide (MOX-B) and LEU spent fuel assemblies from the heavy water moderated Fugen reactor. The MOX-B assemblies will vary in burnup from {approx}3 GWd/tHM to {approx}20 GWd/tHM while the LEU assemblies ({approx}1.9% initial enrichment) will vary from {approx}2 GWd/tHM to {approx}7 GWd/tHM. The estimated count rates will be calculated using MCNPX. These preliminary results will help the finalization of the hardware design and also serve a guide for the experiment. The hardware of the detector is expected to be fabricated in 2012 with measurements expected to take place in 2012 and 2013. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  12. Neutron Capture by Cadmium: Thermal Cross Sections and Resonance Integrals of ^106,108,110,112,114,116Cd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gicking, Allison M.; Krane, Kenneth S.

    2011-10-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of the stable, even-mass Cd isotopes (A = 106, 108, 110, 112, 114, and 116) have been previously measured in sources of natural abundance or low enrichment, often making the results uncertain owing to the large absorption cross section of naturally occurring ^113Cd. Ambiguities in values of the isomeric branching ratios have also contributed to uncertainties in previous results. We have remeasured the Cd neutron capture cross sections using samples of greater than 90% isotopic enrichment irradiated in the OSU TRIGA reactor. Gamma-ray emission spectra were analyzed to determine the effective resonance integrals and thermal cross sections leading to eight radioactive ground and isomeric states in the Cd isotopes.

  13. Integral Quantification of Soil Water Content at the Intermediate Catchment Scale by Ground Albedo Neutron Sensing (GANS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera Villarreyes, C. A.; Baroni, G.; Oswald, S. E.

    2012-04-01

    Soil water content at the plot or hill-slope scale is an important link between local vadose zone hydrology and catchment hydrology. However, so far only few methods are on the way to close this gap between point measurements and remote sensing. One new measurement methodology for integral quantifications of mean areal soil water content at the intermediate catchment scale is the aboveground sensing of cosmic-ray neutrons, more precisely ground albedo neutron sensing (GANS). Ground albedo natural neutrons, are generated by collisions of secondary cosmic rays with land surface materials (soil, water, biomass, snow, etc). Neutrons measured at the air/ground interface correlate with soil moisture contained in a footprint of ca. 600 m diameter and a depth ranging down to a few decimeters. This correlation is based on the crucial role of hydrogen as neutron moderator compared to others landscape materials. The present study performed ground albedo neutron sensing in different locations in Germany under different vegetative situations (cropped and bare field) and different seasonal conditions (summer, autumn and winter). Ground albedo neutrons were measured at (i) a farmland close to Potsdam (Brandenburg, Germany) cropped with corn in 2010 and sunflowers in 2011, and (ii) a mountainous farmland catchment (Schaefertal, Harz Mountains, Germany) in 2011. In order to test this method, classical soil moisture devices and meteorological data were used for comparison. Moreover, calibration approach, and transferability of calibration parameters to different times and locations are also evaluated. Our observations suggest that GANS can overcome the lack of data for hydrological processes at the intermediate scale. Soil water content from GANS compared quantitatively with mean water content values derived from a network of classical devices (RMSE = 0.02 m3/m3 and r2 = 0.98) in three calibration periods with cropped-field conditions. Then, same calibration parameters corresponded

  14. Overview of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) engineering design activities*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Y.

    1994-05-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1988), ITER Documentation Series, No. 1] project is a multiphased project, presently proceeding under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency according to the terms of a four-party agreement among the European Atomic Energy Community (EC), the Government of Japan (JA), the Government of the Russian Federation (RF), and the Government of the United States (US), ``the Parties.'' The ITER project is based on the tokamak, a Russian invention, and has since been brought to a high level of development in all major fusion programs in the world. The objective of ITER is to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy for peaceful purposes. The ITER design is being developed, with support from the Parties' four Home Teams and is in progress by the Joint Central Team. An overview of ITER Design activities is presented.

  15. Shock ignition of thermonuclear fuel with high areal density.

    PubMed

    Betti, R; Zhou, C D; Anderson, K S; Perkins, L J; Theobald, W; Solodov, A A

    2007-04-13

    A novel method by C. Zhou and R. Betti [Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, 140 (2005)] to assemble and ignite thermonuclear fuel is presented. Massive cryogenic shells are first imploded by direct laser light with a low implosion velocity and on a low adiabat leading to fuel assemblies with large areal densities. The assembled fuel is ignited from a central hot spot heated by the collision of a spherically convergent ignitor shock and the return shock. The resulting fuel assembly features a hot-spot pressure greater than the surrounding dense fuel pressure. Such a nonisobaric assembly requires a lower energy threshold for ignition than the conventional isobaric one. The ignitor shock can be launched by a spike in the laser power or by particle beams. The thermonuclear gain can be significantly larger than in conventional isobaric ignition for equal driver energy. PMID:17501359

  16. Sonoluminescence, shock waves, and micro-thermonuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, W.C.; Clarke, D.B.; White, J.W.; Young, D.A.

    1995-08-01

    We have performed numerical hydrodynamic simulations of the growth and collapse of a sonoluminescing bubble in a liquid. Our calculations show that spherically converging shock waves are generated during the collapse of the bubble. The combination of the shock waves and a realistic equation of state for the gas in the bubble provides an explanation for the measured picosecond optical pulse widths and indicates that the temperatures near the center of the bubble may exceed 3O eV. This leads naturally to speculation about obtaining micro-thermonuclear fusion in a bubble filled with deuterium (D{sub 2}) gas. Consequently, we performed numerical simulations of the collapse of a D{sub 2} bubble in D{sub 2}0. A pressure spike added to the periodic driving amplitude creates temperatures that may be sufficient to generate a very small, but measurable number of thermonuclear D-D fusion reactions in the bubble.

  17. Use of liquid metals in nuclear and thermonuclear engineering, and in other innovative technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachkov, V. I.; Arnol'dov, M. N.; Efanov, A. D.; Kalyakin, S. G.; Kozlov, F. A.; Loginov, N. I.; Orlov, Yu. I.; Sorokin, A. P.

    2014-05-01

    By now, a good deal of experience has been gained with using liquid metals as coolants in nuclear power installations; extensive knowledge has been gained about the physical, thermophysical, and physicochemical properties of these coolants; and the scientific principles and a set of methods and means for handling liquid metals as coolants for nuclear power installations have been elaborated. Prototype and commercialgrade sodium-cooled NPP power units have been developed, including the BOR-60, BN-350, and BN-600 power units (the Soviet Union); the Rapsodie, Phenix, and Superphenix power units (France), the EBR-II power unit (the United States); and the PFR power unit (the United Kingdom). In Russia, dedicated nuclear power installations have been constructed, including those with a lead-bismuth coolant for nuclear submarines and with sodium-potassium alloy for spacecraft (the Buk and Topol installations), which have no analogs around the world. Liquid metals (primarily lithium and its alloy with lead) hold promise for use in thermonuclear power engineering, where they can serve not only as a coolant, but also as tritium-producing medium. In this article, the physicochemical properties of liquid metal coolants, as well as practical experience gained from using them in nuclear and thermonuclear power engineering and in innovative technologies are considered, and the lines of further research works are formulated. New results obtained from investigations carried out on the Pb-Bi and Pb for the SVBR and BREST fast-neutron reactors (referred to henceforth as fast reactors) and for controlled accelerator systems are described.

  18. MULTI-INSTRUMENT X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS WITH SHORT RECURRENCE TIMES

    SciTech Connect

    Keek, L.; Heger, A.; Galloway, D. K.; In't Zand, J. J. M.

    2010-07-20

    Type I X-ray bursts from low-mass X-ray binaries result from a thermonuclear runaway in the material accreted onto the neutron star. Although typical recurrence times are a few hours, consistent with theoretical ignition model predictions, there are also observations of bursts occurring as promptly as 10 minutes or less after the previous event. We present a comprehensive assessment of this phenomenon using a catalog of 3387 bursts observed with the BeppoSAX/WFCs and RXTE/PCA X-ray instruments. This catalog contains 136 bursts with recurrence times of less than 1 hr, that come in multiples of up to four events, from 15 sources. Short recurrence times are not observed from the so-called ultra-compact binaries, indicating that hydrogen-burning processes play a crucial role. As far as the neutron star spin frequency is known, these sources all spin fast at over 500 Hz; the rotationally induced mixing may explain burst recurrence times of the order of 10 minutes. Short recurrence time bursts generally occur at all mass accretion rates where normal bursts are observed, but for individual sources the short recurrence times may be restricted to a smaller interval of accretion rate. The fraction of such bursts is roughly 30%. We also report the shortest known recurrence time of 3.8 minutes.

  19. Vulnerability assessment of a space based weapon platform electronic system exposed to a thermonuclear weapon detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, C.L.; Johnson, J.O.

    1994-03-01

    Rapidly changing world events, the increased number of nations with inter-continental ballistic missile capability, and the proliferation of nuclear weapon technology will increase the number of nuclear threats facing the world today. Monitoring these nation`s activities and providing an early warning and/or intercept system via reconnaissance and surveillance satellites and space based weapon platforms is a viable deterrent against a surprise nuclear attack. However, the deployment of satellite and weapon platform assets in space will subject the sensitive electronic equipment to a variety of natural and man-made radiation environments. These include Van Allen Belt protons and electrons; galactic and solar flare protons; and, neutrons, gamma rays, and X-rays from intentionally detonated fission and fusion weapons. In this paper, the MASH vl.0 code system is used to estimate the dose to the critical electronics components of an idealized space based weapon platform from neutron and gamma-ray radiation emitted from a thermonuclear weapon detonation in space. Fluence and dose assessments were performed for the platform fully loaded, and in several stages representing limited engagement scenarios. The results indicate vulnerabilities to the Command, Control, and Communication (C) bay instruments from radiation damage for a nuclear weapon detonation for certain source/platform orientations. The distance at which damage occurs will depend on the weapon yield (n,{gamma}/kiloton) and size (kilotons).

  20. Method of achieving the controlled release of thermonuclear energy

    DOEpatents

    Brueckner, Keith A.

    1986-01-01

    A method of achieving the controlled release of thermonuclear energy by illuminating a minute, solid density, hollow shell of a mixture of material such as deuterium and tritium with a high intensity, uniformly converging laser wave to effect an extremely rapid build-up of energy in inwardly traveling shock waves to implode the shell creating thermonuclear conditions causing a reaction of deuterons and tritons and a resultant high energy thermonuclear burn. Utilizing the resulting energy as a thermal source and to breed tritium or plutonium. The invention also contemplates a laser source wherein the flux level is increased with time to reduce the initial shock heating of fuel and provide maximum compression after implosion; and, in addition, computations and an equation are provided to enable the selection of a design having a high degree of stability and a dependable fusion performance by establishing a proper relationship between the laser energy input and the size and character of the selected material for the fusion capsule.

  1. Accreting Neutron Stars as Astrophysical Laboratories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarty, Deepto

    2004-01-01

    In the last year, we have made an extremely important breakthrough in establishing the relationship between thermonuclear burst oscillations in accreting neutron stars and the stellar spin. More broadly, we have continued t o make significant scientific progress in all four of the key focus areas identified in our original proposal: (1) the disk-magnetosphere interaction in neutron stars, (2) rapid variability in accreting neutron stars, (3) physics of accretion flows, and (4) fundamental properties of neutron stars. A list of all publications that have arising from this work since the start of our program is given.

  2. Integrated diagnostic analysis of inertial confinement fusion capsule performancea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerjan, Charles; Springer, Paul T.; Sepke, Scott M.

    2013-05-01

    A conceptual model is developed for typical inertial confinement fusion implosion conditions that integrates available diagnostic information to determine the stagnation properties of the interior fill and surrounding shell. Assuming pressure equilibrium at peak compression and invoking radiative and equation-of-state relations, the pressure, density, and electron temperature are obtained by optimized fitting of the experimental output to smooth, global functional forms. Typical observational data that may be used includes x-ray self-emission, directional neutron time-of-flight signals, neutron yield, high-resolution x-ray spectra, and radiographic images. This approach has been validated by comparison with radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, producing semi-quantitative agreement. Model results implicate poor kinetic energy coupling to the hot core as the primary cause of the observed low thermonuclear burn yields.

  3. Measurement of thermal neutron cross section and resonance integral for the {sup 170}Er(n,{gamma}){sup 171}Er reaction by using a {sup 55}Mn monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Yuecel, Haluk; Budak, M. Gueray; Karadag, Mustafa

    2007-09-15

    The thermal neutron cross section and the resonance integral of the reaction {sup 170}Er(n,{gamma}){sup 171}Er were measured by the Cd-ratio method using a {sup 55}Mn monitor as single comparator. Analytical grade MnO{sub 2} and Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder samples with and without a cylindrical 1 mm Cd shield box were irradiated in an isotropic neutron field obtained from three {sup 241}Am-Be neutron sources. The induced activities in the samples were measured with a 120.8% relative efficiency p-type HPGe detector. The correction factors for gamma-ray attenuation (F{sub g}), thermal neutron self-shielding (G{sub th}), and resonance neutron self-shielding (G{sub epi}) effects, and the epithermal neutron spectrum shape factor ({alpha}) were taken into account. The thermal neutron cross section for the (n,{gamma}) reaction in {sup 170}Er has been determined to be 8.00 {+-} 0.56 b, relative to that of the {sup 55}Mn monitor. However, some previously reported experimental results compared to the present result show a large discrepancy ranging from 8.3 to 86%. The present result is, in general, in good agreement with the recently measured values by 9%. According to the definition of Cd cut-off energy at 0.55 eV, the resonance integral obtained is 44.5 {+-} 4.0 b, which is determined relative to the reference integral value of the {sup 55}Mn monitor by using cadmium ratios. The existing experimental data for the resonance integral are distributed between 18 and 43 b. The present resonance integral value agrees only with the measurement of 43 {+-} 5 b by Gillette [Thermal Cross Section and Resonance Integral Studies, ORNL-4155, 15 (1967)] within uncertainty limits.

  4. Ground Albedo Neutron Sensing (GANS) for Measurement of Integral Soil Water Content at the Small Catchment Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera Villarreyes, C.; Baroni, G.; Oswald, S. E.

    2012-12-01

    Soil water content at the plot or hill-slope scale is an important link between local vadose zone hydrology and catchment hydrology. One largest initiative to cover the measuring gap of soil moisture between point scale and remote sensing observations is the COSMOS network (Zreda et al., 2012). Here, cosmic-ray neutron sensing, which may be more precisely named ground albedo neutron sensing (GANS), is applied. The measuring principle is based on the crucial role of hydrogen as neutron moderator compared to others landscape materials. Soil water content contained in a footprint of ca. 600 m diameter and a depth ranging down to a few decimeters is inversely correlated to the neutron flux at the air-ground interface. This approach is now implemented, e.g. in USA (Zreda et al., 2012) and Germany (Rivera Villarreyes et al., 2011), based on its simple installation and integral measurement of soil moisture at the small catchment scale. The present study performed Ground Albedo Neutron Sensing on farmland at two locations in Germany under different vegetative situations (cropped and bare field) and different seasonal conditions (summer, autumn and winter). Ground albedo neutrons were measured at (i) a farmland close to Potsdam and Berlin cropped with corn in 2010, sunflower in 2011 and winter rye in 2012, and (ii) a mountainous farmland catchment (Schaefertal, Harz Mountains) since middle 2011. In order to test this methodology, classical soil moisture devices and meteorological data were used for comparison. Moreover, several calibration approaches, role of vegetation cover and transferability of calibration parameters to different times and locations were also evaluated. Observations suggest that GANS can overcome the lack of data for hydrological processes at the intermediate scale. Soil moisture from GANS compared quantitatively with mean values derived from a network of classical devices under vegetated and non- vegetated conditions. The GANS approach responded well

  5. An integral test of the inelastic cross sections of Pb and Mo using measured neutron spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shook, D. F.; Fieno, D.; Ford, C. H.; Wrights, G. N.

    1972-01-01

    Comparison of measurements and calculations of fast neutron spectra from a radioactive neutron source inside spheres of Mo or Pb and from a cylindrical reactor containing a thick Pb or Mo reflector are used as a test of ENDF cross sections. The sphere leakage spectra were measured at a sphere-to-spectrometer distance of 2 meters using a 54 Ci spherical Am-Be neutron source. Reactor leakage spectrum measurements were made at the surface of the ZP-1 reactor when bare, with a Pb radial reflector 21 cm thick, and with a metallic Mo radial reflector 10 cm thick. In the case of the thin Mo sphere there is agreement between the calculation and measurement. The Pb calculation is much lower than the measurement except at the highest neutron energy. Two-dimensional calculations of reactor spectra result indicate that the reactor source is reasonably well known. Significant differences in leakage spectrum shape for both Mo and Pb reflectors suggest that there are large uncertainties in the inelastic cross sections for Pb and some for Mo.

  6. An algorithm for charge-integration, pulse-shape discrimination and estimation of neutron/photon misclassification in organic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polack, J. K.; Flaska, M.; Enqvist, A.; Sosa, C. S.; Lawrence, C. C.; Pozzi, S. A.

    2015-09-01

    Organic scintillators are frequently used for measurements that require sensitivity to both photons and fast neutrons because of their pulse shape discrimination capabilities. In these measurement scenarios, particle identification is commonly handled using the charge-integration pulse shape discrimination method. This method works particularly well for high-energy depositions, but is prone to misclassification for relatively low-energy depositions. A novel algorithm has been developed for automatically performing charge-integration pulse shape discrimination in a consistent and repeatable manner. The algorithm is able to estimate the photon and neutron misclassification corresponding to the calculated discrimination parameters, and is capable of doing so using only the information measured by a single organic scintillator. This paper describes the algorithm and assesses its performance by comparing algorithm-estimated misclassification to values computed via a more traditional time-of-flight estimation. A single data set was processed using four different low-energy thresholds: 40, 60, 90, and 120 keVee. Overall, the results compared well between the two methods; in most cases, the algorithm-estimated values fell within the uncertainties of the TOF-estimated values.

  7. The Fermi-GBM X-Ray Burst Monitor: Thermonuclear Bursts from 4U 0614+09

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linares, M.; Connaughton, V.; Jenke, P.; van der Horst, A. J.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Chakrabarty, D.; Beklen, E.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Finger, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; von Kienlin, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Thermonuclear bursts from slowly accreting neutron stars (NSs) have proven difficult to detect, yet they are potential probes of the thermal properties of the NS interior. During the first year of a systematic all-sky search for X-ray bursts using the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope we have detected 15 thermonuclear bursts from the NS low-mass X-ray binary 4U 0614+09 when it was accreting at nearly 1% of the Eddington limit. We measured an average burst recurrence time of 12 ± 3 days (68% confidence interval) between 2010 March and 2011 March, classified all bursts as normal duration bursts and placed a lower limit on the recurrence time of long/intermediate bursts of 62 days (95% confidence level). We discuss how observations of thermonuclear bursts in the hard X-ray band compare to pointed soft X-ray observations and quantify such bandpass effects on measurements of burst radiated energy and duration. We put our results for 4U 0614+09 in the context of other bursters and briefly discuss the constraints on ignition models. Interestingly, we find that the burst energies in 4U 0614+09 are on average between those of normal duration bursts and those measured in long/intermediate bursts. Such a continuous distribution in burst energy provides a new observational link between normal and long/intermediate bursts. We suggest that the apparent bimodal distribution that defined normal and long/intermediate duration bursts during the last decade could be due to an observational bias toward detecting only the longest and most energetic bursts from slowly accreting NSs.

  8. THE FERMI-GBM X-RAY BURST MONITOR: THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS FROM 4U 0614+09

    SciTech Connect

    Linares, M.; Chakrabarty, D.; Connaughton, V.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Preece, R.; Jenke, P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Finger, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Beklen, E.; Von Kienlin, A.

    2012-12-01

    Thermonuclear bursts from slowly accreting neutron stars (NSs) have proven difficult to detect, yet they are potential probes of the thermal properties of the NS interior. During the first year of a systematic all-sky search for X-ray bursts using the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope we have detected 15 thermonuclear bursts from the NS low-mass X-ray binary 4U 0614+09 when it was accreting at nearly 1% of the Eddington limit. We measured an average burst recurrence time of 12 {+-} 3 days (68% confidence interval) between 2010 March and 2011 March, classified all bursts as normal duration bursts and placed a lower limit on the recurrence time of long/intermediate bursts of 62 days (95% confidence level). We discuss how observations of thermonuclear bursts in the hard X-ray band compare to pointed soft X-ray observations and quantify such bandpass effects on measurements of burst radiated energy and duration. We put our results for 4U 0614+09 in the context of other bursters and briefly discuss the constraints on ignition models. Interestingly, we find that the burst energies in 4U 0614+09 are on average between those of normal duration bursts and those measured in long/intermediate bursts. Such a continuous distribution in burst energy provides a new observational link between normal and long/intermediate bursts. We suggest that the apparent bimodal distribution that defined normal and long/intermediate duration bursts during the last decade could be due to an observational bias toward detecting only the longest and most energetic bursts from slowly accreting NSs.

  9. Comparison between initial Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments and integrated simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefkow, A. B.; Gomez, M. R.; Geissel, M.; Hahn, K. D.; Hansen, S. B.; Harding, E. C.; Peterson, K. J.; Slutz, S. A.; Koning, J. M.; Marinak, M. M.

    2014-10-01

    The Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) approach to ICF has obtained thermonuclear fusion yields using the Z facility. Integrated magnetohydrodynamic simulations provided the design for the first neutron-producing experiments using capabilities that presently exist, and the initial experiments measured stagnation radii rstag < 75 μm, temperatures around 3 keV, and isotropic neutron yields up to YnDD = 2 ×1012 from imploded liners reaching peak velocities around 70 km/s over an implosion time of about 60 ns. We present comparisons between the experimental observables and post-shot degraded integrated simulations. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. On the ignition of high gain thermonuclear microexplosions with electric pulse power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, F.

    2004-02-01

    It was recently shown that the ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions seems possible with two Marx generators of modest size, one with a high current lower voltage for compression and confinement, and one with a high voltage lower current for ignition, transmitting their energy to the thermonuclear target by two nested magnetically insulated transmission lines. Here it is shown in much greater detail how this concept has the potential for the ignition of high gain thermonuclear microexplosions with a yield sufficiently low for a thermonuclear reactor and rocket propulsion. The concept also offers the possibility for the concurrent burn of deuterium-tritium with natural uranium or thorium.

  11. Thermal insulating barrier and neutron shield providing integrated protection for a nuclear reactor vessel

    DOEpatents

    Schreiber, Roger B.; Fero, Arnold H.; Sejvar, James

    1997-01-01

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel to form a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive valving also includes bistable vents at the upper end of the thermal insulating barrier for releasing steam. A removable, modular neutron shield extending around the upper end of the reactor cavity below the nozzles forms with the upwardly and outwardly tapered transition on the outer surface of the reactor vessel, a labyrinthine channel which reduces neutron streaming while providing a passage for the escape of steam during a severe accident, and for the cooling air which is circulated along the reactor cavity walls outside the thermal insulating barrier during normal operation of the reactor.

  12. Neutron beam measurement of industrial polymer materials for composition and bulk integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogante, M.; Rosta, L.; Heaton, M. E.

    2013-10-01

    Neutron beam techniques, among other non-destructive diagnostics, are particularly irreplaceable in the complete analysis of industrial materials and components when supplying fundamental information. In this paper, nanoscale small-angle neutron scattering analysis and prompt gamma activation analysis for the characterization of industrial polymers are considered. The basic theoretical aspects are briefly introduced and some applications are presented. The investigations of the SU-8 polymer in axial airflow microturbines—i.e. microelectromechanical systems—are presented foremost. Also presented are full and feasibility studies on polyurethanes, composites based on cross-linked polymers reinforced by carbon fibres and polymer cement concrete. The obtained results have provided a substantial contribution to the improvement of the considered materials, and indeed confirmed the industrial applicability of the adopted techniques in the analysis of polymers.

  13. Thermal insulating barrier and neutron shield providing integrated protection for a nuclear reactor vessel

    DOEpatents

    Schreiber, R.B.; Fero, A.H.; Sejvar, J.

    1997-12-16

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel to form a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive valving also includes bistable vents at the upper end of the thermal insulating barrier for releasing steam. A removable, modular neutron shield extending around the upper end of the reactor cavity below the nozzles forms with the upwardly and outwardly tapered transition on the outer surface of the reactor vessel, a labyrinthine channel which reduces neutron streaming while providing a passage for the escape of steam during a severe accident, and for the cooling air which is circulated along the reactor cavity walls outside the thermal insulating barrier during normal operation of the reactor. 8 figs.

  14. On the implementation of a chain nuclear reaction of thermonuclear fusion on the basis of the p+11B process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, V. S.; Krainov, V. P.; Zagreev, B. V.; Matafonov, A. P.

    2015-07-01

    Various theoretical and experimental schemes for implementing a thermonuclear reactor on the basis of the p+11B reaction are considered. They include beam collisions, fusion in degenerate plasmas, ignition upon plasma acceleration by ponderomotive forces, and the irradiation of a solid-state target from 11B with a proton beam under conditions of a Coulomb explosion of hydrogen microdrops. The possibility of employing ultra-short high-intensity laser pulses to initiate the p+11B reaction under conditions far from thermodynamic equilibrium is discussed. This and some other weakly radioactive thermonuclear reactions are promising owing to their ecological cleanness—there are virtually no neutrons among fusion products. Nuclear reactions that follow the p+11B reaction may generate high-energy protons, sustaining a chain reaction, and this is an advantage of the p+11B option. The approach used also makes it possible to study nuclear reactions under conditions close to those in the early Universe or in the interior of stars.

  15. A Remarkable Three Hour Thermonuclear Burst from 4U 1820-30

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Brown, Edward F.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present a detailed observational and theoretical study of an approximately three hour long X-ray burst (the "super burst") observed by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) from the low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) 4U 1820-30. This is the longest X-ray burst ever observed from this source, and perhaps one of the longest ever observed in great detail from any source. We show that the super burst is thermonuclear in origin. Its peak luminosity of approximately 3.4 x 10(exp 38) ergs s(exp -1) is consistent with the helium Eddington limit for a neutron star at approximately 7 kpc, as well as the peak luminosity of other, shorter, thermonuclear bursts from the same source. The super burst begins in the decaying tail of a more typical (approximately equal to 20 s duration) thermonuclear burst. These shorter, more frequent bursts are well known helium flashes from this source. The level of the accretion driven flux as well as the observed energy release of upwards of 1.5 x 10(exp 42) ergs indicate that helium could not be the energy source for the super burst. We outline the physics relevant to carbon production and burning on helium accreting neutron stars and present calculations of the thermal evolution and stability of a carbon layer and show that this process is the most likely explanation for the super burst. Ignition at the temperatures in the deep carbon "ocean" requires greater than 30 times the mass of carbon inferred from the observed burst energetics unless the He flash is able to trigger a deflagration from a much smaller mass of carbon. We show, however, that for large columns of accreted carbon fuel, a substantial fraction of the energy released in the carbon burning layer is radiated away as neutrinos, and the heat that is conducted from the burning layer in large part flows inward, only to be released on timescales longer than the observed burst. Thus the energy released during the event possibly exceeds that observed in X-rays by more than a factor of

  16. Verification of Neutron Data for Main Reactor Materials from RUSFOND Library based on Integral Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshcheev, V. N.; Manturov, G. N.; Nikolaev, M. N.; Tsibouliya, A. M.

    2013-03-01

    In this work the modern state of the library of evaluated nuclear data files RUSFOND for the main reactor materials, U235, U238, Pu239, Fe, Cr, Ni, Na, Pb, etc., is given. Calculations are performed and comparison with experimental data is done for the following characteristics: (i) Removal cross-sections under the threshold of fission of U-238 etc… (ii) Average cross-sections with different standard neutron fission spectra; (iii) Criticality of fast uranium and plutonium systems. Calculations are performed using continuous energy cross-sections and a Monte-Carlo code.

  17. The Classification of Magnetohydrodynamic Regimes of Thermonuclear Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remming, Ian S.; Khokhlov, Alexei M.

    2014-10-01

    Physical properties of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) reaction fronts are studied as functions of the thermodynamic conditions, and the strength and orientation of the magnetic field in the unburned matter through which the fronts propagate. We determine the conditions for the existence of the various types of MHD reaction fronts and the character of the changes in physical quantities across these reaction fronts. The analysis is carried out in general for a perfect gas equation of state and a constant energy release, and then extended to thermonuclear reaction fronts in degenerate carbon-oxygen mixtures and degenerate helium in conditions typical of Type Ia supernova explosions. We find that as unburned matter enters perpendicular to a reaction front, the release of energy through burning generates shear velocity in the reacting gas that, depending on the type of reaction front, strengthens or weakens the magnetic field. In addition, we find that the steady-state propagation of a reaction front is impossible for certain ranges of magnetic field direction. Our results provide insight into the phenomena of MHD thermonuclear combustion that is relevant to the interpretation of future simulations of SN Ia explosions that have magnetic fields systematically incorporated.

  18. The classification of magnetohydrodynamic regimes of thermonuclear combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Remming, Ian S.; Khokhlov, Alexei M.

    2014-10-10

    Physical properties of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) reaction fronts are studied as functions of the thermodynamic conditions, and the strength and orientation of the magnetic field in the unburned matter through which the fronts propagate. We determine the conditions for the existence of the various types of MHD reaction fronts and the character of the changes in physical quantities across these reaction fronts. The analysis is carried out in general for a perfect gas equation of state and a constant energy release, and then extended to thermonuclear reaction fronts in degenerate carbon-oxygen mixtures and degenerate helium in conditions typical of Type Ia supernova explosions. We find that as unburned matter enters perpendicular to a reaction front, the release of energy through burning generates shear velocity in the reacting gas that, depending on the type of reaction front, strengthens or weakens the magnetic field. In addition, we find that the steady-state propagation of a reaction front is impossible for certain ranges of magnetic field direction. Our results provide insight into the phenomena of MHD thermonuclear combustion that is relevant to the interpretation of future simulations of SN Ia explosions that have magnetic fields systematically incorporated.

  19. Thermonuclear Supernova Explosions From Hybrid White Dwarf Progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willcox, Donald E.; Townsley, Dean; Calder, Alan; Denissenkov, Pavel; Herwig, Falk

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by recent results in stellar evolution in which convective boundary mixing in SAGB stars can give rise to hybrid white dwarf (WD) stars with a C-O core inside an O-Ne shell, we simulate thermonuclear (Type Ia) supernovae from these hybrid progenitors. We use the FLASH code to perform multidimensional simulations in the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) explosion paradigm from progenitor models produced with the MESA stellar evolution code that include the thermal energetics of the Urca process. We performed a suite of DDT simulations over a range of ignition conditions and compare to previous results from a suite of C-O white dwarfs. Despite significant variability within each suite, distinguishing trends are apparent in their Ni-56 yields and the kinetic properties of their ejecta. We comment on the feasibility of these hybrid WD explosions as the source of some classes of observed subluminous events. This research was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy under grant DE-FG02-87ER40317 and by resources at the Institute for Advanced Computational Science at Stony Brook University. The software used in this work was in part developed by the DOE-supported ASC/Alliances Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes at the University of Chicago.

  20. Measurement of the thermal neutron capture cross section and the resonance integral of radioactive {sup 182}Hf

    SciTech Connect

    Vockenhuber, C.; Bichler, M.; Wallner, A.; Kutschera, W.; Dillmann, I.; Kaeppeler, F.

    2008-04-15

    The neutron capture cross sections of the radioactive isotope {sup 182}Hf (t{sub 1/2}=8.9x10{sup 6} yr) in the thermal and epithermal energy regions have been measured by activation at the TRIGA Mark-II reactor of the Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities in Vienna, Austria, and subsequent {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of {sup 183}Hf. High values for the thermal (kT=25 meV) cross section {sigma}{sub 0}=133{+-}10 b and for the resonance integral I{sub 0}=5850{+-}660 b were found. Additionally, the absolute intensities of the main {gamma}-ray transitions in the decay of {sup 182}Hf have been considerably improved.

  1. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION Nanostructures in controlled thermonuclear fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauz, V. I.; Martynenko, Yurii V.; Svechnikov, N. Yu; Smirnov, Valentin P.; Stankevich, V. G.; Khimchenko, L. N.

    2011-01-01

    It is shown that the presence of nano-sized and nano-structured erosion products not only affects the operation of thermonuclear devices but also, to a large extent, determines the safety and economy of future thermonuclear reactors. The formation mechanisms and the characteristics and properties of deposited films and nano-sized dust that form in tokamaks are reviewed.

  2. On the Evolution of Thermonuclear Flames on Large Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ju; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Khokhlov, Alexei M.; Plewa, Tomasz

    2007-02-01

    The thermonuclear explosion of a massive white dwarf in a Type Ia supernova explosion is characterized by vastly disparate spatial and temporal scales. The extreme dynamic range inherent to the problem prevents the use of direct numerical simulation and forces modelers to resort to subgrid models to describe physical processes taking place on unresolved scales. We consider the evolution of a model thermonuclear flame in a constant gravitational field on a periodic domain. The gravitational acceleration is aligned with the overall direction of the flame propagation, making the flame surface subject to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The flame evolution is followed through an extended initial transient phase well into the steady state regime. The properties of the evolution of flame surface are examined. We confirm the form of the governing equation of the evolution suggested by Khokhlov in 1995. The mechanism of vorticity production and the interaction between vortices and the flame surface are discussed. Previously observed periodic behavior of the flame evolution is reproduced and is found to be caused by the turnover of the largest eddies. The characteristic timescales are found to be similar to the turnover time of these eddies. Relations between flame surface creation and destruction processes and basic characteristics of the flow are discussed. We find that the flame surface creation strength is associated with the Rayleigh-Taylor timescale. Also, in fully developed turbulence, the flame surface destruction strength scales as 1/L3, where L is the turbulent driving scale. The results of our investigation provide support for Khokhlov's self-regulating model of turbulent thermonuclear flames. Based on these results, one can revise and extend the original model. The revision uses a local description of the flame surface enhancement and the evolution of the flame surface since the onset of turbulence, rendering it free from the assumption of an instantaneous

  3. The dynamic mutation characteristics of thermonuclear reaction in Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Quan, Tingting; Zhang, Wei; Deng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The stability and bifurcations of multiple limit cycles for the physical model of thermonuclear reaction in Tokamak are investigated in this paper. The one-dimensional Ginzburg-Landau type perturbed diffusion equations for the density of the plasma and the radial electric field near the plasma edge in Tokamak are established. First, the equations are transformed to the average equations with the method of multiple scales and the average equations turn to be a Z 2-symmetric perturbed polynomial Hamiltonian system of degree 5. Then, with the bifurcations theory and method of detection function, the qualitative behavior of the unperturbed system and the number of the limit cycles of the perturbed system for certain groups of parameter are analyzed. At last, the stability of the limit cycles is studied and the physical meaning of Tokamak equations under these parameter groups is given. PMID:24892099

  4. Laser induced sonofusion: A new road toward thermonuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadighi-Bonabi, Rasoul; Gheshlaghi, Maryam

    2016-03-01

    The Possibility of the laser assisted sonofusion is studied via single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) in Deuterated acetone (C3D6O) using quasi-adiabatic and hydro-chemical simulations at the ambient temperatures of 0 and -28.5 °C. The interior temperature of the produced bubbles in Deuterated acetone is 1.6 × 106 K in hydro-chemical model and it is reached up to 1.9 × 106 K in the laser induced SBSL bubbles. Under these circumstances, temperature up to 107 K can be produced in the center of the bubble in which the thermonuclear D-D fusion reactions are promising under the controlled conditions.

  5. NASA superconducting magnetic mirror facility. [for thermonuclear research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinmann, J. J.; Swanson, M. C.; Nichols, C. R.; Bloy, S. J.; Nagy, L. A.; Brady, F. J.

    1973-01-01

    The design details and initial test results of a superconducting magnetic mirror facility that has been constructed at NASA Lewis Research Center for use in thermonuclear research are summarized. The magnet system consists of four solenoidal coils which are individually rated at 5.0 T. Each coll is composed of an inner, middle, and outer winding. The inner winding is wound of stabilized Nb3Sn superconducting ribbon, and the middle and outer windings are wound of stabilized Nb-Ti superconducting wire. When arranged in the mirror geometry, the four coils will produce 8.7 T at the mirrors and a 1.8 mirror ratio. The magnet has a 41-cm diameter clear bore which is open to atmosphere. Distance between the mirrors is 111 cm. Presently there are only three magnets in the facility; the fourth magnet is being rebuilt.

  6. The Dynamic Mutation Characteristics of Thermonuclear Reaction in Tokamak

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Quan, Tingting; Zhang, Wei; Deng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The stability and bifurcations of multiple limit cycles for the physical model of thermonuclear reaction in Tokamak are investigated in this paper. The one-dimensional Ginzburg-Landau type perturbed diffusion equations for the density of the plasma and the radial electric field near the plasma edge in Tokamak are established. First, the equations are transformed to the average equations with the method of multiple scales and the average equations turn to be a Z2-symmetric perturbed polynomial Hamiltonian system of degree 5. Then, with the bifurcations theory and method of detection function, the qualitative behavior of the unperturbed system and the number of the limit cycles of the perturbed system for certain groups of parameter are analyzed. At last, the stability of the limit cycles is studied and the physical meaning of Tokamak equations under these parameter groups is given. PMID:24892099

  7. Hot subdwarf stars and their connection to thermonuclear supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, S.; Kupfer, T.; Ziegerer, E.; Heber, U.; Németh, P.; Irrgang, A.; pre=", team

    2016-07-01

    Hot subdwarf stars (sdO/Bs) are evolved core helium-burning stars with very thin hydrogen envelopes, which can be formed by common envelope ejection. Close sdB binaries with massive white dwarf (WD) companions are potential progenitors of thermonuclear supernovae type Ia (SN Ia). We discovered such a progenitor candidate as well as a candidate for a surviving companion star, which escapes from the Galaxy. More candidates for both types of objects have been found by crossmatching known sdB stars with proper motion and light curve catalogues. The Gaia mission will provide accurate astrometry and light curves of all the stars in our hot subdwarf sample and will allow us to compile a much larger all-sky catalogue of those stars. In this way we expect to find hundreds of progenitor binaries and ejected companions.

  8. Current drive at plasma densities required for thermonuclear reactors.

    PubMed

    Cesario, R; Amicucci, L; Cardinali, A; Castaldo, C; Marinucci, M; Panaccione, L; Santini, F; Tudisco, O; Apicella, M L; Calabrò, G; Cianfarani, C; Frigione, D; Galli, A; Mazzitelli, G; Mazzotta, C; Pericoli, V; Schettini, G; Tuccillo, A A

    2010-01-01

    Progress in thermonuclear fusion energy research based on deuterium plasmas magnetically confined in toroidal tokamak devices requires the development of efficient current drive methods. Previous experiments have shown that plasma current can be driven effectively by externally launched radio frequency power coupled to lower hybrid plasma waves. However, at the high plasma densities required for fusion power plants, the coupled radio frequency power does not penetrate into the plasma core, possibly because of strong wave interactions with the plasma edge. Here we show experiments performed on FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade) based on theoretical predictions that nonlinear interactions diminish when the peripheral plasma electron temperature is high, allowing significant wave penetration at high density. The results show that the coupled radio frequency power can penetrate into high-density plasmas due to weaker plasma edge effects, thus extending the effective range of lower hybrid current drive towards the domain relevant for fusion reactors. PMID:20975718

  9. The Thermonuclear Runaway and the Classical Nova Outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starrfield, S.; Iliadis, C.; Hix, W. R.

    2016-05-01

    Nova explosions occur on the white dwarf component of a cataclysmic variable binary stellar system that is accreting matter lost by its companion. When sufficient material has been accreted by the white dwarf, a thermonuclear runaway occurs and ejects material in what is observed as a classical nova explosion. We describe both the recent advances in our understanding of the progress of the outburst and outline some of the puzzles that are still outstanding. We report on the effects of improving both the nuclear reaction rate library and including a modern nuclear reaction network in our one-dimensional, fully implicit, hydrodynamic computer code. In addition, there has been progress in observational studies of supernovae Ia with implications about the progenitors, and we discuss that in this review.

  10. RFQ (radio-frequency quadrupole) accelerators for heating thermonuclear plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, R.H.; Wangler, T.P.; Crandall, K.R.

    1987-01-01

    The radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator has been developed to generate high-current ion beams for a wide variety of applications. It has also been suggested that this type of accelerator could be used to produce megawatt ion beams to heat thermonuclear reactor plasmas. For a tokamak reactor, an RFQ accelerator can be designed to provide negative deuterium ions that are neutralized before injection through the tokamak magentic field. Also, it may be possible to use singly charged, positive, heavier ions that trasverse the magnetic field with minimal deflection and then become multiply ionized upon striking the tokamak plasma. We present preliminary RFQ beam-dynamics designs for both deuterium and oxygen ions.

  11. MANTA. An Integral Reactor Physics Experiment to Infer the Neutron Capture Cross Sections of Actinides and Fission Products in Fast and Epithermal Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Youinou, Gilles Jean-Michel

    2015-10-01

    neutron irradiation allows to infer energy-integrated neutron cross sections, i.e. ∫₀σ(E)φ(E)dE, where φ(E) is the neutron flux “seen” by the sample. This approach, which is usually defined and led by reactor physicists, is referred to as integral and is the object of this report. These two sources of information, i.e. differential and integral, are complementary and are used by the nuclear physicists in charge of producing the evaluated nuclear data files used by the nuclear community (ENDF, JEFF…). The generation of accurate nuclear data files requires an iterative process involving reactor physicists and nuclear data evaluators. This experimental program has been funded by the ATR National Scientific User Facility (ATR-NSUF) and by the DOE Office of Science in the framework of the Recovery Act. It has been given the name MANTRA for Measurement of Actinides Neutron TRAnsmutation.

  12. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  13. Pulsating Instability of Turbulent Thermonuclear Flames in Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poludnenko, Alexei Y.

    2014-01-01

    Presently, one of the main explosion scenarios of type Ia supernovae (SNIa), aimed at explaining both "normal" and subluminous events, is the thermonuclear incineration of a white-dwarf in a single-degenerate system. The underlying engine of such explosions is the turbulent thermonuclear flame. Modern, large-scale, multidimensional simulations of SNIa cannot resolve the internal flame structure, and instead must include a subgrid-scale prescription for the turbulent-flame properties. As a result, development of robust, parameter-free, large-scale models of SNIa crucially relies on the detailed understanding of the turbulent flame properties during each stage of the flame evolution. Due to the complexity of the flame dynamics, such understanding must be validated by the first-principles direct numerical simulations (DNS). In our previous work, we showed that sufficiently fast turbulent flames are inherently susceptible to the development of detonations, which may provide the mechanism for the deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in the delayed-detonation model of SNIa. Here we extend this study by performing detailed analysis of the turbulent flame properties at turbulent intensities below the critical threshold for DDT. We carried out a suite of 3D DNS of turbulent flames for a broad range of turbulent intensities and system sizes using a simplified, single-step, Arrhenius-type reaction kinetics. Our results show that at the later stages of the explosion, as the turbulence intensity increases prior to the possible onset of DDT, the flame front will become violently unstable. We find that the burning rate exhibits periodic pulsations with the energy release rate varying by almost an order of magnitude. Furthermore, such flame pulsations can produce pressure waves and shocks as the flame speed approaches the critical Chapman-Jouguet deflagration speed. Finally, in contrast with the current theoretical understanding, such fast turbulent flames can propagate at

  14. Assessment of radiation shield integrity of DD/DT fusion neutron generator facilities by Monte Carlo and experimental methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, P.; Priya, S.; Patel, Tarun; Gopalakrishnan, R. K.; Sharma, D. N.

    2015-01-01

    DD/DT fusion neutron generators are used as sources of 2.5 MeV/14.1 MeV neutrons in experimental laboratories for various applications. Detailed knowledge of the radiation dose rates around the neutron generators are essential for ensuring radiological protection of the personnel involved with the operation. This work describes the experimental and Monte Carlo studies carried out in the Purnima Neutron Generator facility of the Bhabha Atomic Research Center (BARC), Mumbai. Verification and validation of the shielding adequacy was carried out by measuring the neutron and gamma dose-rates at various locations inside and outside the neutron generator hall during different operational conditions both for 2.5-MeV and 14.1-MeV neutrons and comparing with theoretical simulations. The calculated and experimental dose rates were found to agree with a maximum deviation of 20% at certain locations. This study has served in benchmarking the Monte Carlo simulation methods adopted for shield design of such facilities. This has also helped in augmenting the existing shield thickness to reduce the neutron and associated gamma dose rates for radiological protection of personnel during operation of the generators at higher source neutron yields up to 1 × 1010 n/s.

  15. Development of multifilamentary niobium titanium and niobium tin strands for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L.; Zhang, P. X.; Tang, X. D.; Liu, X. H.; Lu, Y. F.; Weng, P. D.; Grunblatt, G.; Hoang, Gia K.; Verwaerde, C.

    2007-05-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor(ITER) device should demonstrate the scientific and technological possibility of commercial fusion energy production in large scale in order to solve the worldwide energy problem in the future. The superconducting magnet system is the key part of the ITER device to supply high magnetic fields for confining the deuterium-tritium plasma. The multifilament NbTi and Nb3Sn strands with high quality have been studied to meet the specifications of superconducting strands for fabricating poloidal field coils (PF) and toroidal field coils (TF). For NbTi strands with 8306 filaments, Jc of 2910 A mm-2 (4.2 K, 5 T, 0.1 μV cm-1) has been obtained by a conventional process. The proposed process could be used for fabrication of long strands with a unit length more than 5000 m. By an internal tin process the multifilamentary Nb3Sn strands with a diameter of 0.79 mm and a unit length longer than 5000 m have been successfully fabricated. The highest non-Cu Jcn (12 T, 4.2 K, 0.1 μV cm-1) value of 1249 A mm-2 has been obtained. The n-value of Nb3Sn strands is larger than 20 and the residual resistance ratio (RRR) value lies between 150 and 220. The formation of the Nb3Sn superconducting phase together with the evolution of microstructure has been investigated by neutron diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate that the properties of NbTi and Nb3Sn strands have already met basically the specifications proposed by the ITER program.

  16. Design considerations for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) magnet systems: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.D.; Miller, J.R.

    1988-10-09

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is now completing a definition phase as a beginning of a three-year design effort. Preliminary parameters for the superconducting magnet system have been established to guide further and more detailed design work. Radiation tolerance of the superconductors and insulators has been of prime importance, since it sets requirements for the neutron-shield dimension and sensitively influences reactor size. The major levels of mechanical stress in the structure appear in the cases of the inboard legs of the toroidal-field (TF) coils. The cases of the poloidal-field (PF) coils must be made thin or segmented to minimize eddy current heating during inductive plasma operation. As a result, the winding packs of both the TF and PF coils includes significant fractions of steel. The TF winding pack provides support against in-plane separating loads but offers little support against out-of-plane loads, unless shear-bonding of the conductors can be maintained. The removal of heat due to nuclear and ac loads has not been a fundamental limit to design, but certainly has non-negligible economic consequences. We present here preliminary ITER magnet systems design parameters taken from trade studies, designs, and analyses performed by the Home Teams of the four ITER participants, by the ITER Magnet Design Unit in Garching, and by other participants at workshops organized by the Magnet Design Unit. The work presented here reflects the efforts of many, but the responsibility for the opinions expressed is the authors'. 4 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Ignition of a Thermonuclear Detonation Wave in the Focus of Two Magnetically Insulated Transmission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, F.

    2003-04-01

    For the ignition of a thermonuclear detonation wave assisted by a strong magnetic field, it is proposed to use two concentrically nested magnetically insulated transmission lines, the inner one transmitting a high- voltage lower-current-, and the outer one a high-current lower-voltage- electromagnetic pulse drawn from two Marx generators. The concept has the potential of large thermonuclear gains with an input energy conceivably as small as 105 J.

  18. High energy components and collective modes in thermonuclear plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Coppi, B.; Cowley, S.; Detragiache, P.; Kulsrud, R.; Pegoraro, F.

    1986-02-01

    The theory of a class of collective modes of a thermonuclear magnetically confined plasma, with frequencies in the range of the ion cyclotron frequency and of its harmonics, is presented. These modes can be excited by their resonant cyclotron interaction with a plasma component of relatively high energy particles characterized by a strongly anisotropic distribution in velocity space. Normal modes that are spatially localized by the inhomogeneity of the plasma density are found. This ensures that the energy gained by their resonant interaction is not convected away. The mode spatial localization can be significantly altered by the magnetic field inhomogeneity for a given class of plasma density profiles. Special attention is devoted to the case of a spin polarized plasma, where the charged products of fusion reactions are anisotropically distributed. We show that for the mode of polarization that enhances nuclear reaction rates the tritium will be rapidly depolarized to toroidal configurations with relatively mild gradients of the confining magnetic field. 18 refs., 9 figs.

  19. Wideband Heterodyne QWIP Receiver Development for Thermonuclear Fusion Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C.A.; Buchanan, M.; Hutchinson, D.P.; Liu, H.C.; Richards, R.K.; Simpson, M.L.

    1998-11-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing heterodyne receivers for plasma diagnostic applications for over 20 years. One area of this work has been the development of a diagnostic system for the measurement of the energy of alpha particles created in a thermonuclear fusion reactor. These particles originate with an energy of 3.5 MeV and cool to the thermal energy of the plasma (around 15 keV) after several seconds. To measure the velocity distribution of these alpha particles, a Thomson scattering diagnostic is under development based on a high power CO{sub 2} laser at 10 microns with a heterodyne receiver. The Doppler shift generated by Thomson scattering of the alpha particles requires a wideband heterodyne receiver (greater than 10 GHz). Because Mercury-Cadimum-Telluride (MCT) detectors are limited to a bandwidth of approximately 2 GHz, a Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector (QWIP) detector was obtained from the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) and evaluated for its heterodyne performance using the heterodyne testing facility developed at ORNL.

  20. Current drive for stability of thermonuclear plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amicucci, L.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.; Galli, A.; Panaccione, L.; Paoletti, F.; Schettini, G.; Spigler, R.; Tuccillo, A.

    2016-01-01

    To produce in a thermonuclear fusion reactor based on the tokamak concept a sufficiently high fusion gain together stability necessary for operations represent a major challenge, which depends on the capability of driving non-inductive current in the hydrogen plasma. This request should be satisfied by radio-frequency (RF) power suitable for producing the lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) effect, recently demonstrated successfully occurring also at reactor-graded high plasma densities. An LHCD-based tool should be in principle capable of tailoring the plasma current density in the outer radial half of plasma column, where other methods are much less effective, in order to ensure operations in the presence of unpredictably changes of the plasma pressure profiles. In the presence of too high electron temperatures even at the periphery of the plasma column, as envisaged in DEMO reactor, the penetration of the coupled RF power into the plasma core was believed for long time problematic and, only recently, numerical modelling results based on standard plasma wave theory, have shown that this problem should be solved by using suitable parameter of the antenna power spectrum. We show here further information on the new understanding of the RF power deposition profile dependence on antenna parameters, which supports the conclusion that current can be actively driven over a broad layer of the outer radial half of plasma column, thus enabling current profile control necessary for the stability of a reactor.

  1. Poloidal flux linkage requirements for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jardin, S.C.; Kessel, C.; Pomphrey, N.

    1994-01-01

    We have applied two computational models to calculate the poloidal flux linkage requirements for the current ramp-up and for the flattop phase of the proposed International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). For the current ramp-up phase, we have used the TSC code to simulate the entire current ramp-up period as described in the TAC-3 Physics Report. We have extended the time of the simulation to cover the full current penetration time, that is, until the loop voltage is a constant throughout the plasma. Sensitivity studies have been performed with respect to current ramp-up time, impurity concentration, and to the time of onset of auxiliary heating. We have also used a steady state plasma equilibrium code that has the constant loop voltage constraint built in to survey the dependence of the steady state loop-voltage on the density and temperature profiles. This calculation takes into account the plasma bootstrap current contribution, including non-circular and collisional corrections. The results can be displayed as contours of the loop-voltage on a POPCON like diagram.

  2. Calculations of neutron spectra after neutron neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, B. E.; Stephenson, S. L.; Howell, C. R.; Mitchell, G. E.; Tornow, W.; Furman, W. I.; Lychagin, E. V.; Muzichka, A. Yu; Nekhaev, G. V.; Strelkov, A. V.; Sharapov, E. I.; Shvetsov, V. N.

    2004-09-01

    A direct neutron-neutron scattering length, ann, measurement with the goal of 3% accuracy (0.5 fm) is under preparation at the aperiodic pulsed reactor YAGUAR. A direct measurement of ann will not only help resolve conflicting results of ann by indirect means, but also in comparison to the proton-proton scattering length, app, shed light on the charge-symmetry of the nuclear force. We discuss in detail the analysis of the nn-scattering data in terms of a simple analytical expression. We also discuss calibration measurements using the time-of-flight spectra of neutrons scattered on He and Ar gases and the neutron activation technique. In particular, we calculate the neutron velocity and time-of-flight spectra after scattering neutrons on neutrons and after scattering neutrons on He and Ar atoms for the proposed experimental geometry, using a realistic neutron flux spectrum—Maxwellian plus epithermal tail. The shape of the neutron spectrum after scattering is appreciably different from the initial spectrum, due to collisions between thermal-thermal and thermal-epithermal neutrons. At the same time, the integral over the Maxwellian part of the realistic scattering spectrum differs by only about 6 per cent from that of a pure Maxwellian nn-scattering spectrum.

  3. A neutron sensor based on synthetic single crystal diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, G J; Koch, J A; Lerche, R A; Moran, M J

    2003-10-17

    We report the first neutron data for a single crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond sensor. Results are presented for 2.5, 14.1, and 14.9 MeV incident neutrons. We show that the energy resolution for 14.1 MeV neutrons is at least 2.9% (as limited by the energy spread of the incident neutrons), and perhaps as good as 0.4% (as extrapolated from high resolution {alpha} particle data). This result could be relevant to fusion neutron spectroscopy at machines like the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). We also show that our sensor has a high neutron linear attenuation coefficient, due to the high atomic density of diamond, and this could lead to applications in fission neutron detection.

  4. Theory of supercompression of vapor bubbles and nanoscale thermonuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nigmatulin, Robert I.; Akhatov, Iskander Sh.; Topolnikov, Andrey S.; Bolotnova, Raisa Kh.; Vakhitova, Nailya K.; Lahey, Richard T. Jr.; Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    2005-10-01

    This paper provides the theoretical basis for energetic vapor bubble implosions induced by a standing acoustic wave. Its primary goal is to describe, explain, and demonstrate the plausibility of the experimental observations by Taleyarkhan et al. [Science 295, 1868 (2002); Phys. Rev. E 69, 036109 (2004)] of thermonuclear fusion for imploding cavitation bubbles in chilled deuterated acetone. A detailed description and analysis of these data, including a resolution of the criticisms that have been raised, together with some preliminary HYDRO code simulations, has been given by Nigmatulin et al. [Vestnik ANRB (Ufa, Russia) 4, 3 (2002); J. Power Energy 218-A, 345 (2004)] and Lahey et al. [Adv. Heat Transfer (to be published)]. In this paper a hydrodynamic shock (i.e., HYDRO) code model of the spherically symmetric motion for a vapor bubble in an acoustically forced liquid is presented. This model describes cavitation bubble cluster growth during the expansion period, followed by a violent implosion during the compression period of the acoustic cycle. There are two stages of the bubble dynamics process. The first, low Mach number stage, comprises almost all the time of the acoustic cycle. During this stage, the radial velocities are much less than the sound speeds in the vapor and liquid, the vapor pressure is very close to uniform, and the liquid is practically incompressible. This process is characterized by the inertia of the liquid, heat conduction, and the evaporation or condensation of the vapor. The second, very short, high Mach number stage is when the radial velocities are the same order, or higher, than the sound speeds in the vapor and liquid. In this stage high temperatures, pressures, and densities of the vapor and liquid take place. The model presented herein has realistic equations of state for the compressible liquid and vapor phases, and accounts for nonequilibrium evaporation/condensation kinetics at the liquid/vapor interface. There are interacting

  5. Thermonuclear Fusion Research Progress and the Way to the Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Raymond

    2006-06-01

    The paper reviews the progress of fusion research and its prospects for electricity generation. It starts with a reminder of the principles of thermonuclear fusion and a brief discussion of its potential role in the future of the world energy production. The reactions allowing energy production by fusion of nuclei in stars and on earth and the conditions required to sustain them are reviewed. At the high temperatures required for fusion (hundred millions kelvins), matter is completely ionized and has reached what is called its 4th state: the plasma state. The possible means to achieve these extreme temperatures is discussed. The remainder of the paper focuses on the most promising of these approaches, magnetic confinement. The operating principles of the presently most efficient machine of this type — the tokamak — is described in some detail. On the road to producing energy with fusion, a number of obstacles have to be overcome. The plasma, a fluid that reacts to electromagnetic forces and carries currents and charges, is a complex medium. Fusion plasma is strongly heated and is therefore a good example of a system far from equilibrium. A wide variety of instabilities can grow in this system and lead to self-organized structures and spontaneous cycles. Turbulence is generated that degrades the confinement and hinders easy achievement of long lasting hot plasmas. Physicists have learned how to quench turbulence, thereby creating sort of insulating bottles inside the plasma itself to circumvent this problem. The recent history of fusion performance is outlined and the prospect of achieving power generation by fusion in a near future is discussed in the light of the development of the "International Tokamak Experimental Reactor" project ITER.

  6. Spontaneous Formation of Detonations by Turbulent Flames in Thermonuclear Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poludnenko, Alexei Y.; Oran, E. S.

    2012-01-01

    Presently, the scenario best capable of explaining the observational properties of "normal" type Ia supernovae (SNIa), which are of primary importance for cosmology, is the delayed-detonation model. This model postulates that a subsonic thermonuclear deflagration, which originates close to the center of a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf (WD) in a single-degenerate binary system, transitions to a supersonic detonation (deflagration-to-detonation transition, or DDT) during the later stages of the explosion. Modern large-scale multidimensional simulations of SNIa cannot capture the DDT process and, thus, are forced to make two crucial assumptions, namely (a) that DDT does occur at some point, and (b) when and where it occurs. Significant progress has been made over the years in elucidating the nature of DDT in terrestrial confined systems with walls, obstacles, or pre-existing shocks. It remains unclear, however, whether and how a detonation can form in an unpressurized, unconfined system such as the interior of a WD. Here we show, through first-principles numerical simulations, that sufficiently fast, but subsonic, turbulent flames in such unconfined environments are inherently susceptible to DDT. The associated mechanism is based on the unsteady evolution of turbulent flames faster than the Chapman-Jouguet deflagrations and is qualitatively different from the traditionally suggested gradient (spontaneous reaction wave) model. It also does not require the formation of distributed flames. The proposed mechanism predicts the DDT density in SNIa to be 107 g/cm3, in agreement with the values previously found to give the best match with observations. This DDT mechanism opens the possibility for eliminating the transition density as a free parameter and, thus, for developing fully self-consistent global multidimensional SNIa models. This work was supported in part by the Naval Research Laboratory, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and by the Department of Defense

  7. Neutron field characteristics of Ciemat's Neutron Standards Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Guzman-Garcia, Karen A; Mendez-Villafañe, Roberto; Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene

    2015-06-01

    Monte Carlo calculations were carried out to characterize the neutron field produced by the calibration neutron sources of the Neutron Standards Laboratory at the Research Center for Energy, Environment, and Technology (CIEMAT) in Spain. For (241)AmBe and (252)Cf neutron sources, the neutron spectra, the ambient dose equivalent rates and the total neutron fluence rates were estimated. In the calibration hall, there are several items that modify the neutron field. To evaluate their effects different cases were used, from point-like source in vacuum up to the full model. Additionally, using the full model, the neutron spectra were estimated to different distances along the bench; with these spectra, the total neutron fluence and the ambient dose equivalent rates were calculated. The hall walls induce the largest changes in the neutron spectra and the respective integral quantities. The free-field neutron spectrum is modified due the room return effect. PMID:25468287

  8. Organic metal neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Butler, Michael A.; Ginley, David S.

    1987-01-01

    A device for detecting neutrons comprises a layer of conductive polymer sandwiched between electrodes, which may be covered on each face with a neutron transmissive insulating material layer. Conventional electrodes are used for a non-imaging integrating total neutron fluence-measuring embodiment, while wire grids are used in an imaging version of the device. The change in conductivity of the polymer after exposure to a neutron flux is determined in either case to provide the desired data. Alternatively, the exposed conductive polymer layer may be treated with a chemical reagent which selectively binds to the sites altered by neutrons to produce an image of the flux detected.

  9. Sensitivity study of explosive nucleosynthesis in type Ia supernovae: Modification of individual thermonuclear reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Eduardo; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2012-05-01

    0.1. The changes in the nucleosynthesis owing to the modification of the rates of these fusion reactions are also quite modest; for instance, no species with a mass fraction larger than 0.02 experiences a variation of its yield larger than a factor of 2. We provide the sensitivity of the yields of the most abundant species with respect to the rates of the most intense reactions with protons, neutrons, and α. In general, the yields of Fe-group nuclei are more robust than the yields of intermediate-mass elements. Among the species with yields larger than 10-8M⊙, 35S has the largest sensitivity to the nuclear reaction rates. It is remarkable that the reactions involving elements with Z>22 have a tiny influence on the supernova nucleosynthesis. Among the charged-particle reactions, the most influential on supernova nucleosynthesis are 30Si+p⇄31P+γ, 20Ne+α⇄24Mg+γ, and 24Mg+α⇄27Al+p. The temperatures at which a modification of their rate has a larger impact are in the range 2≲T≲4 GK.Conclusions: The explosion model (i.e., the assumed conditions and propagation of the flame) chiefly determines the element production of type Ia supernovae and derived quantities such as their luminosity, while the nuclear reaction rates used in the simulations have a small influence on the kinetic energy and final chemical composition of the ejecta. Our results show that the uncertainty in individual thermonuclear reaction rates cannot account for discrepancies of a factor of 2 between isotopic ratios in type Ia supernovae and those in the solar system, especially within the Fe group.

  10. Integration of cosmic-ray neutron probes into production agriculture: Lessons from the Platte River cosmic-ray neutron probe monitoring network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avery, W. A.; Finkenbiner, C. E.; Franz, T. E.; Nguy-Robertson, A. L.; Munoz-Arriola, F.; Suyker, A.; Arkebauer, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    Projected increases in global population will put enormous pressure on fresh water resources in the coming decades. Approximately 70 percent of human water use is allocated to agriculture with 40 percent of global food production originating from irrigated lands. Growing demand for food will only worsen the strain placed on many irrigated agricultural systems resulting in an unsustainable reliance on groundwater. This work presents an overview of the Platte River Cosmic-ray Neutron Probe Monitoring Network, which consists of 10 fixed probes and 3 mobile probes located across the Platte River Basin. The network was installed in 2014 and is part of the larger US COSMOS (70+ probes) and global COSMOS networks (200+ probes). Here we will present an overview of the network, comparison of fixed neutron probe results across the basin, spatial mapping results of the mobile sensors at various sites and spatial scales, and lessons learned by working with various producers and water stakeholder groups. With the continued development of this technique, its incorporation for soil moisture management in large producer operations has the potential to increase irrigation water use efficiency in the Platte River Basin and beyond.

  11. On the implementation of a chain nuclear reaction of thermonuclear fusion on the basis of the p+{sup 11}B process

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, V. S.; Krainov, V. P.; Zagreev, B. V.; Matafonov, A. P.

    2015-07-15

    Various theoretical and experimental schemes for implementing a thermonuclear reactor on the basis of the p+{sup 11}B reaction are considered. They include beam collisions, fusion in degenerate plasmas, ignition upon plasma acceleration by ponderomotive forces, and the irradiation of a solid-state target from {sup 11}B with a proton beam under conditions of a Coulomb explosion of hydrogen microdrops. The possibility of employing ultra-short high-intensity laser pulses to initiate the p+{sup 11}B reaction under conditions far from thermodynamic equilibrium is discussed. This and some other weakly radioactive thermonuclear reactions are promising owing to their ecological cleanness—there are virtually no neutrons among fusion products. Nuclear reactions that follow the p+{sup 11}B reaction may generate high-energy protons, sustaining a chain reaction, and this is an advantage of the p+{sup 11}B option. The approach used also makes it possible to study nuclear reactions under conditions close to those in the early Universe or in the interior of stars.

  12. The Nova Outburst: Thermonuclear Runaways on Degenerated Dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Starrfield, S.; Truran, J.W.; Sparks, W.M.

    1999-07-08

    Observational and theoretical studies of the outbursts of classical novae have provided critical insights into a broad range of astrophysical phenomena. Thermonuclear runaways (TNRs) in accreted hydrogen-rich envelopes on the white dwarf (WD) components of close binary systems constitute not only the outburst mechanism for a classical nova explosion, but also the recurrent novae and a fraction of the symbiotic novae explosions. Studies of the general characteristics of these explosions, both in our own galaxy and in neighboring galaxies of varying metallicity, can teach us about binary stellar evolution, while studies of the evolution of nova binary systems can constrain models for the (as yet unidentified) progenitors of Type Ia supernovae. Further, the empirical relation between the peak luminosity of a nova and the rate of decline, which presents a challenge to theoretical models, allows novae to be utilized as standard candles for distance determinations out to the Virgo Cluster. E xtensive studies of novae with IUE and the resulting abundance determinations have revealed the existence of oxygen-neon white dwarfs in some systems. The high levels of enrichment of novae ejecta in elements ranging from carbon to sulfur confirm that there is significant dredge-up of matter from the core of the underlying white dwarf and enable novae to contribute to the chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium. Observations of the epoch of dust formation in the expanding shells of novae allow important constraints to be placed on the dust formation process and confirm that graphite, SiC, and SiO{sub 2} grains are formed by the outburst. It is possible that grains from novae were injected into the pre-solar nebula and can be identified with some of the pre-solar grains or ''stardust'' found in meteorites. Finally, g-ray observations during the first several years of their outburst, using the next generation of satellite observatories, could confirm

  13. Method and System to Directly Produce Electrical Power within the Lithium Blanket Region of a Magnetically Confined, Deuterium-Tritium (DT) Fueled, Thermonuclear Fusion Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, Robert D.

    1998-09-22

    A method for integrating liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power generation with fusion blanket technology to produce electrical power from a thermonuclear fusion reactor located within a confining magnetic field and within a toroidal structure. A hot liquid metal flows from a liquid metal blanket region into a pump duct of an electromagnetic pump which moves the liquid metal to a mixer where a gas of predetermined pressure is mixed with the pressurized liquid metal to form a Froth mixture. Electrical power is generated by flowing the Froth mixture between electrodes in a generator duct. When the Froth mixture exits the generator the gas is separated from the liquid metal and both are recycled.

  14. Method and system to directly produce electrical power within the lithium blanket region of a magnetically confined, deuterium-tritium (DT) fueled, thermonuclear fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Woolley, Robert D.

    1999-01-01

    A method for integrating liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power generation with fusion blanket technology to produce electrical power from a thermonuclear fusion reactor located within a confining magnetic field and within a toroidal structure. A hot liquid metal flows from a liquid metal blanket region into a pump duct of an electromagnetic pump which moves the liquid metal to a mixer where a gas of predetermined pressure is mixed with the pressurized liquid metal to form a Froth mixture. Electrical power is generated by flowing the Froth mixture between electrodes in a generator duct. When the Froth mixture exits the generator the gas is separated from the liquid metal and both are recycled.

  15. Model-Based Least Squares Reconstruction of Coded Source Neutron Radiographs: Integrating the ORNL HFIR CG1D Source Model

    SciTech Connect

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Gregor, Jens; Bingham, Philip R

    2014-01-01

    At the present, neutron sources cannot be fabricated small and powerful enough in order to achieve high resolution radiography while maintaining an adequate flux. One solution is to employ computational imaging techniques such as a Magnified Coded Source Imaging (CSI) system. A coded-mask is placed between the neutron source and the object. The system resolution is increased by reducing the size of the mask holes and the flux is increased by increasing the size of the coded-mask and/or the number of holes. One limitation of such system is that the resolution of current state-of-the-art scintillator-based detectors caps around 50um. To overcome this challenge, the coded-mask and object are magnified by making the distance from the coded-mask to the object much smaller than the distance from object to detector. In previous work, we have shown via synthetic experiments that our least squares method outperforms other methods in image quality and reconstruction precision because of the modeling of the CSI system components. However, the validation experiments were limited to simplistic neutron sources. In this work, we aim to model the flux distribution of a real neutron source and incorporate such a model in our least squares computational system. We provide a full description of the methodology used to characterize the neutron source and validate the method with synthetic experiments.

  16. A fast neutron spectrometer for D-D fusion neutron measurements at the Alcator C tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, W. A.; Chen, S. H.; Gwinn, D.; Parker, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    A neutron spectrometer using a high pressure 3He ionization chamber has been designed and used to measure the neutron spectrum from an ohmically heated deuterium plasma. The resolution of the spectrometer at 2.45 MeV is determine to be 46 keV full width at half-maximum (fwhm). Particular attention has been paid to optimizing the detector shielding and collimation to reject thermal and epithermal neutrons scattered from the tokamak structure. As a result, measurements indicate that the ratio of the number of counts in the 2.45 MeV peak to the total number of detected neutron events is {1}/{67}. For the 8 μs amplifier time constant used, a count rate as high as 44 counts per second has been achieved in the thermonuclear peak. The observed spectra have been compared with calculated spectra using the MCNP Monte Carlo Neutral Particle Transport code and they show good agreement. There is little evidence of neutrons produced from photoneutron reactions or electrodisintegration. It has been possible to confirm that the shape of the thermonuclear peak is consistent with the Gaussian shape predicted and that the ion temperature as determined from the line width is consistent with other Alcator C ion temperature diagnostics, and follows the trends predicted by the theory of Doppler line broadening.

  17. Fusion-neutron measurements for magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on the Z accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Cooper, G. W.; Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Awe, T. J.; Geissel, M.; Rovang, D. C.; Torres, J. A.; Bur, J. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Glebov, V. Yu; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Herrman, M. C.; Hess, M. H.; Johns, O.; Jones, B.; Lamppa, D. C.; Lash, J. S.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Reneker, J.; Robertson, G. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Savage, M. E.; Smith, I. C.; Styron, J. D.; Vesey, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    Several magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) experiments have been conducted on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories since late 2013. Measurements of the primary DD (2.45 MeV) neutrons for these experiments suggest that the neutron production is thermonuclear. Primary DD yields up to 3e12 with ion temperatures ∼2-3 keV have been achieved. Measurements of the secondary DT (14 MeV) neutrons indicate that the fuel is significantly magnetized. Measurements of down-scattered neutrons from the beryllium liner suggest ρRliner∼1g/cm2. Neutron bang times, estimated from neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) measurements, coincide with peak x-ray production. Plans to improve and expand the Z neutron diagnostic suite include neutron burn-history diagnostics, increased sensitivity and higher precision nTOF detectors, and neutron recoil-based yield and spectral measurements.

  18. Comparison of Integral Parameter Estimated Uncertainties in Fast Neutron Systems with COMMARA-2.1 and COMMARA-2.0 Covariance Data

    SciTech Connect

    Aliberti, G.; Palmiotti, G.; Salvatores, M.

    2015-01-15

    This paper shows the main differences between the COMMARA-2.0 and COMMARA-2.1 evaluated covariance data in the uncertainty estimation of integral parameters of interest for a large number of typical innovative fast neutron systems. The study provides some guidelines to the nuclear data evaluators on which materials and which reaction types need to be evaluated most accurately to achieve reliable results in computational analyses of similar systems. The assessment of the quality and reliability of the covariance data is outside the scope of the study.

  19. Comparison of Integral Parameter Estimated Uncertainties in Fast Neutron Systems with COMMARA-2.1 and COMMARA-2.0 Covariance Data

    SciTech Connect

    Palmiotti, Giuseppe; Salvatores, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows the main differences between the COMMARA-2.0 and COMMARA-2.1 evaluated covariance data in the uncertainty estimation of integral parameters of interest for a large number of typical innovative fast neutron systems. The study provides some guidelines to the nuclear data evaluators on which materials and which reaction types need to be evaluated most accurately to achieve reliable results in computational analyses of similar systems. The assessment of the quality and reliability of the covariance data is outside the scope of the study.

  20. Code System to Calculate Neutron and Gamma-Ray Skyshine Doses Using the Integral Line-Beam Method.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2000-11-16

    Version 03 This package includes the SKYNEUT 1.1, SKYDOSE 2.3, MCSKY 2.3 and SKYCONES 1.1 codes plus the DLC-188/SKYDATA library to form a comprehensive system for calculating skyshine doses. See the author's web site for related information: http://athena.mne.ksu.edu/~jks/ SKYNEUT evaluates the neutron and neutron-induced secondary gamma-ray skyshine doses from an isotropic, point, neutron source collimated by three simple geometries: an open silo, a vertical black (perfectly absorbing) wall, and a rectangular building. The source maymore » emit monoenergetic neutrons or neutrons with an arbitrary multigroup spectrum of energies. SKYDOSE evaluates the gamma-ray skyshine dose from an isotropic, monoenergetic, point gamma-photon source collimated by three simple geometries: (1) a source in a silo, (2) a source behind an infinitely long, vertical, black wall, and (3) a source in a rectangular building. In all three geometries an optional overhead slab shield may be specified. MCSKY evaluates the gamma-ray skyshine dose from an isotropic, monoenergetic, point gamma-photon source collimated into either a vertical cone (i.e., silo geometry) or into a vertically oriented structure with an N-sided polygon cross section. An overhead laminate shield composed of two different materials is assumed, although shield thicknesses of zero may be specified to model an unshielded SKYSHINE source. SKYCONES evaluates the skyshine doses produced by a point neutron or gamma-photon source emitting, into the atmosphere, radiation that is collimated into an upward conical annulus between two arbitrary polar angles. The source is assumed to be axially (azimuthally) symmetric about a vertical axis through the source and can have an arbitrary polyenergetic spectrum. Nested contiguous annular cones can thus be used to represent the energy and polar-angle dependence of a skyshine source emitting radiation into the atmosphere.« less

  1. Epidemiology of a thermonuclear bomb-burst over Nashville, Tennessee: a theoretic study

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, R.W.

    1983-07-01

    A thermonuclear bomb explosion over any city in the world would have a devastating effect on the population and environment. For those who survive, with or without injuries, life would become primitive with little or no uncontaminated food or water, and with inadequate housing, fuel, and medical care, resulting in a breakdown of family and interpersonal relationships. This theoretic study of the potential outcome of a thermonuclear bomb-burst over Nashville, Tennessee, discusses epidemiologically the wide range of medical and psychologic effects from the direct trauma of blast and fire, widespread epidemics of otherwise controlled disease, long-term chronic illness, genetic damage, and catastrophic environmental havoc.

  2. Theoretical z -pinch scaling relations for thermonuclear-fusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Stygar, W A; Cuneo, M E; Vesey, R A; Ives, H C; Mazarakis, M G; Chandler, G A; Fehl, D L; Leeper, R J; Matzen, M K; McDaniel, D H; McGurn, J S; McKenney, J L; Muron, D J; Olson, C L; Porter, J L; Ramirez, J J; Seamen, J F; Speas, C S; Spielman, R B; Struve, K W; Torres, J A; Waisman, E M; Wagoner, T C; Gilliland, T L

    2005-08-01

    implosion time tau(i). For an accelerator coupled to a double-pinch-driven hohlraum that drives the implosion of an ICF fuel capsule, we find that the accelerator power and energy required to achieve high-yield fusion scale as tau(i)0.36 and tau(i)1.36, respectively. Thus the accelerator requirements decrease as the implosion time is decreased. However, the x-ray-power and thermonuclear-yield efficiencies of such a coupled system increase with tau(i). We also find that increasing the anode-cathode gap of the pinch from 2 to 4 mm increases the requisite values of P(a) and E(a) by as much as a factor of 2. PMID:16196715

  3. Initial results of systems analysis of the ETR/ITER (Engineering Test Reactor/International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) design space

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Galambos, J.D.; Reid, R.L.; Strickler, D.J.; Kalsi, S.; Deleanu, L.

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary versions of the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) systems code TETRA (Tokamak Engineering Test Reactor Analysis), which determines design solutions by the method of constrained optimization, are used to characterize the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and its design parameter space. We find that the physics objectives of high ignition margin and high plasma current lead to minimum size at relatively low aspect ratios (A = 2.5-3.0), while the engineering objective of high neutron wall load (W/sub L/ /approx gt/ 1.0 MW/m/sup 2/) leads to minimum size at higher A (/approximately/3.5). For minimum-size ITERs, the optimal toroidal field coil (TFC) designs fall within a narrow range of maximum fields (10-11 T) with R varying over only a few percent despite a factor of two change in the winding pack current density J/sub wp/. The major radius of the design is found to be sensitive to changes in elongation, inboard distances (such as plasma scrape-off), inductive flux capability, plasma temperature, beta limit, and ignition margin. A preliminary characterization of the US ITER designs with plasma current I/sub p/ > 15 MA and R < 4.5 m has been obtained by combining the engineering assumptions for devices such as the Tokamak Ignition/Burn Engineering Reactor (TIBER) with the physics assumptions for devices such as the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) and the Next European Torus (NET). These devices can accommodate a range of full- to reduced-bore, driven (Q < 10), steady-state plasmas for the engineering phase that produces high neutron wall load and fluence. 12 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Classification of JET Neutron and Gamma Emissivity Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craciunescu, T.; Murari, A.; Kiptily, V.; Vega, J.; Contributors, JET

    2016-05-01

    In thermonuclear plasmas, emission tomography uses integrated measurements along lines of sight (LOS) to determine the two-dimensional (2-D) spatial distribution of the volume emission intensity. Due to the availability of only a limited number views and to the coarse sampling of the LOS, the tomographic inversion is a limited data set problem. Several techniques have been developed for tomographic reconstruction of the 2-D gamma and neutron emissivity on JET. In specific experimental conditions the availability of LOSs is restricted to a single view. In this case an explicit reconstruction of the emissivity profile is no longer possible. However, machine learning classification methods can be used in order to derive the type of the distribution. In the present approach the classification is developed using the theory of belief functions which provide the support to fuse the results of independent clustering and supervised classification. The method allows to represent the uncertainty of the results provided by different independent techniques, to combine them and to manage possible conflicts.

  5. [Human life and energy production. Prospects opened up by controlled thermonuclear fusion].

    PubMed

    Escande, D

    1997-03-18

    The massive and presently increasing energy production is going to confront mankind with a very important problem in the forthcoming decades, in particular due to the vanishing of resources and to the greenhouse effect. The share of fossil fuels in the energy production will have to decrease, and other energy sources will be needed. Among them controlled thermonuclear fusion has may assets due to its non-radioactive fuel with plentiful supply, its non radioactive and non polluting ashes, its safety, its weak environmental impact, and its irrelevance to nuclear proliferation in a normal setting. During the last three decades, physicists have made a series of steps toward the peaceful use of the dominant source of energy in the Universe. They have learned how to confine by magnetic fields plasmas at temperatures of 200 millions degrees centigrade, and they have developed several specific technologies. This way, they produced 11 million watts of nuclear power by fusing two isotopes of hydrogen. These investigations are conducted in a responsible spirit, that of ecoproduction, where possible negative consequences are anticipated, are made as low as reasonably achievable, and their management is studied. Yet several fundamental issues still have to be solved before on economically efficient industrial thermonuclear power plant be operated. A huge international collaboration involving Japan, the USA, the Russian Federation, and the European Union joined with Switzerland and Canada, is presently designing the first experimental thermonuclear reactor, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). It would cost 9 billion dollars, a cost similar to other large scientific projects. This is an important step toward an electricity producing thermonuclear reactor that would be both safe and respectful of human health and of environment. PMID:9203740

  6. Observational constraints on neutron star masses and radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. Coleman; Lamb, Frederick K.

    2016-03-01

    Precise and reliable measurements of the masses and radii of neutron stars with a variety of masses would provide valuable guidance for improving models of the properties of cold matter with densities above the saturation density of nuclear matter. Several different approaches for measuring the masses and radii of neutron stars have been tried or proposed, including analyzing the X-ray fluxes and spectra of the emission from neutron stars in quiescent low-mass X-ray binary systems and thermonuclear burst sources; fitting the energy-dependent X-ray waveforms of rotation-powered millisecond pulsars, burst oscillations with millisecond periods, and accretion-powered millisecond pulsars; and modeling the gravitational radiation waveforms of coalescing double neutron star and neutron star - black hole binary systems. We describe the strengths and weaknesses of these approaches, most of which currently have substantial systematic errors, and discuss the prospects for decreasing the systematic errors in each method.

  7. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.; Babcock, Dale F.; Menegus, Robert L.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear reactor includes an active portion with fissionable fuel and neutron moderating material surrounded by neutron reflecting material. A control element in the active portion includes a group of movable rods constructed of neutron-absorbing material. Each rod is movable with respect to the other rods to vary the absorption of neutrons and effect control over neutron flux.

  8. Fast neutron spectrometry with organic scintillators applied to magnetic fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaschuck, Yu. A.; Esposito, B.; Trykov, L. A.; Semenov, V. P.

    2002-01-01

    Neutron spectrometry with NE213 liquid scintillators is commonly used in thermonuclear fusion experiments to measure the 2.45 and 14.1 MeV neutron flux. We present the unfolded neutron spectrum, which was accumulated during several ohmic deuterium plasma discharges in the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade using a 2″×2″ NE213 scintillator. In this paper, we review the application of organic scintillator neutron spectrometers to tokamaks, focusing in particular on the comparison between NE213 and stilbene scintillators. Various aspects of the calibration technique and neutron spectra unfolding procedure are considered in the context of their application for fusion neutron spectrometry. Testing and calibration measurements have been carried out using D-D and D-T neutron generator facilities with both NE213 and stilbene scintillators. The main result from these measurements is that stilbene scintillator has better neutron energy resolution than NE213. Our stilbene detector could be used for the determination of the ion temperature ( Ti) from neutron spectrum broadening in tokamak thermonuclear plasmas with Ti=4 keV and higher.

  9. Validating Neutron Star Radius Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Deepto

    2010-09-01

    Spectral analysis of transient neutron star X-ray emission during bursts and quiescence were both used to estimate the NS radii for different sources. The validities of these methods need to be verified by performing them on the same source respectively. Transient type-I (thermonuclear) X-ray bursters are excellent candidates for testing the consistency between these methods, since they were detected in both bursts and quiescence. Out of 3 candidates: Cen X-4, Aql X-1 and 4U 1608-52, 4U 1608-52 turns out to be the best one due to the lack of archival RXTE burst data for Cen X-4 and the previous reported significant luminosity and temperature variability for Aql X-1 in quiescence. Therefore, we propose a 25 ks Chandra/ACIS-S observation of 4U 1608-52.

  10. A review of the thermonuclear runaway model of a nova outburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, W. M.; Starrfield, S.; Truran, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Kraft's (1963) model for a nova outburst caused by a thermonuclear runaway in the hydrogen-rich matter accreted onto the white dwarf in a binary system is reviewed. Hydrostatic and hydrodynamic studies of this phenomenon are summarized, analyses of shock ejection based on hydrodynamic computer codes are discussed, and one specific hydrodynamic code is outlined. Results obtained with this code are presented and evaluated for an initial model containing a white dwarf with a hydrogen-rich envelope of 0.0001 to 0.001 solar mass in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium. It is shown that an implicit hydrodynamic computer code is required in order to study the thermonuclear-runaway phenomenon. The early evolution of three models with different intrinsic luminosities is illustrated, and enhancement of CNO nuclei at the bottom of the hydrogen-rich envelope is investigated. It is suggested that the concentration of C-13, N-15, and O-17 should be greatly enhanced in nova ejecta.

  11. Compression and combustion of non-cryogenic targets with a solid thermonuclear fuel for inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Sherman, V. E.

    2013-04-15

    Variants of a target with a solid thermonuclear fuel in the form of deuterium-tritium hydrides of light metals for an inertial fusion have been proposed. The laser-pulse-induced compression of non-cryogenic targets, as well as ignition and combustion of such targets, has been examined. The numerical calculations show that, despite a decrease in the caloric content of the fuel and an increase in the energy losses on intrinsic radiation in the target containing deuterium-tritium hydrides of light metals as compared to the target containing deuterium-tritium ice, the non-cryogenic target can ensure the fusion gain sufficient for its use in the energy cycle of a thermonuclear power plant based on the inertial plasma confinement method.

  12. The structure of poly(ethylene oxide) liquids : comparison of integral equation theory with molecular dynamics simulations and neutron scaling.

    SciTech Connect

    Curro, John G.; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile

    2005-01-01

    Polymer reference interaction site model (PRISM) calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out on poly(ethylene oxide) liquids using a force field of Smith, Jaffe, and Yoon. The intermolecular pair correlation functions and radius of gyration from theory were in very good agreement with MD simulations when the partial charges were turned off. When the charges were turned on, considerably more structure was seen in the intermolecular correlations obtained from MD simulation. Moreover, the radius of gyration increased by 38% due to electrostatic repulsions along the chain backbone. Because the partial charges greatly affect the structure, significant differences were seen between the PRISM calculations (without charges) and the wide angle neutron scattering measurements of Annis and coworkers for the total structure factor, and the hydrogen/hydrogen intermolecular correlation function. This is in contrast to previous PRISM calculations on poly (dimethyl siloxane).

  13. Neutrino Signal of Collapse-induced Thermonuclear Supernovae: The Case for Prompt Black Hole Formation in SN 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Kfir; Kushnir, Doron

    2016-09-01

    Collapse-induced thermonuclear explosion (CITE) may explain core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). We analyze the neutrino signal in CITE and compare it to the neutrino burst of SN 1987A. For strong (≳ {10}51 erg) CCSNe, such as SN 1987A, CITE predicts a proto-neutron star (PNS) accretion phase lasting up to a few seconds that is cut off by black hole (BH) formation. The neutrino luminosity can later be revived by accretion disk emission after a dead time of a few to a few tens of seconds. In contrast, the neutrino mechanism for CCSNe predicts a short (≲s) PNS accretion phase, followed by slowly declining PNS cooling luminosity. We repeat statistical analyses used in the literature to interpret the neutrino mechanism, and apply them to CITE. The first 1–2 s of the neutrino burst are equally compatible with CITE and with the neutrino mechanism. However, the data points toward a luminosity drop at t = 2–3 s, which is in some tension with the neutrino mechanism but can be naturally attributed to BH formation in CITE. The occurrence of neutrino signal events at 5 s suggests that, within CITE, the accretion disk formed by that time. We perform two-dimensional numerical simulations showing that CITE may be able to accommodate this disk formation time while reproducing the ejected 56Ni mass and ejecta kinetic energy within factors of 2–3 of observations. We estimate the accretion disk neutrino luminosity, finding it to be on the low side but compatible with the data to a factor of 10. Given comparable uncertainties in the disk luminosity simulation, we conclude that direct BH formation may have occurred in SN 1987A.

  14. A Deep Search for Prompt Radio Emission from Thermonuclear Supernovae with the Very Large Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chomiuk, Laura; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Chevalier, Roger A.; Bruzewski, Seth; Foley, Ryan J.; Parrent, Jerod; Strader, Jay; Badenes, Carles; Fransson, Claes; Kamble, Atish; Margutti, Raffaella; Rupen, Michael P.; Simon, Joshua D.

    2016-04-01

    Searches for circumstellar material around Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are some of the most powerful tests of the nature of SN Ia progenitors, and radio observations provide a particularly sensitive probe of this material. Here, we report radio observations for SNe Ia and their lower-luminosity thermonuclear cousins. We present the largest, most sensitive, and spectroscopically diverse study of prompt ({{Δ }}t≲ 1 years) radio observations of 85 thermonuclear SNe, including 25 obtained by our team with the unprecedented depth of the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. With these observations, SN 2012cg joins SN 2011fe and SN 2014J as an SN Ia with remarkably deep radio limits and excellent temporal coverage (six epochs, spanning 5–216 days after explosion, implying \\dot{M}/{v}w≲ 5× {10}-9 \\tfrac{{M}ȯ {{{yr}}}-1}{100 {km} {{{s}}}-1}, assuming {ε }B = 0.1 and {ε }e = 0.1). All observations yield non-detections, placing strong constraints on the presence of circumstellar material. We present analytical models for the temporal and spectral evolution of prompt radio emission from thermonuclear SNe as expected from interaction with either wind-stratified or uniform density media. These models allow us to constrain the progenitor mass loss rates, with limits in the range of \\dot{M}≲ {10}-9-{10}-4 {M}ȯ yr‑1, assuming a wind velocity of vw = 100 km s‑1. We compare our radio constraints with measurements of Galactic symbiotic binaries to conclude that ≲10% of thermonuclear SNe have red giant companions.

  15. The historical record for Sirius - Evidence for a white-dwarf thermonuclear runaway?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruhweiler, Frederick C.; Kondo, Yoji; Sion, Edward M.

    1986-01-01

    Evidence was recently presented that in medieval times Sirius was a bright red star, rather than the present bluish-white star. Here, the results of attempts to detect possible planetary nebula ejecta toward Sirius using data obtained by the IUE are presented. Based on these results and in the light of recent advances in understanding white-dwarf evolution, it is proposed that Sirius B underwent a recent thermonuclear runaway event triggered by a diffusion-induced CN reaction.

  16. Frontiers in propulsion research: Laser, matter-antimatter, excited helium, energy exchange thermonuclear fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papailiou, D. D. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    Concepts are described that presently appear to have the potential for propulsion applications in the post-1990 era of space technology. The studies are still in progress, and only the current status of investigation is presented. The topics for possible propulsion application are lasers, nuclear fusion, matter-antimatter annihilation, electronically excited helium, energy exchange through the interaction of various fields, laser propagation, and thermonuclear fusion technology.

  17. Rocket propulsion by thermonuclear micro-bombs ignited with intense relativistic electron beams.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winterberg, F.

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of a method for the ignition of a thermonuclear microbomb by means of an intense relativistic electron beam with regard to its potential application to rocket propulsion. With such a system, exhaust velocities up to 1000 km/sec, corresponding to a specific impulse of 100,000 sec, seem to be within the realm of possibility. The rocket is propelled by a chain of thermonuclear microbombs exploded in a concave magnetic mirror produced by superconducting field coils. The magnetic pressure of the field reflects the fireball generated by the explosion. For the large capacitor bank required to generate the intense relativistic electron beam, a desirable lightweight design may be possible through use of ferroelectric materials. Because of the high cost of the T-D and He 3-D thermonuclear material, the system has to be optimized by minimizing the T-D and He 3-D consumption by a proper TD and He 3-D fuel to hydrogen propellant mass ratio, leading to a larger total system mass than would be absolutely necessary.

  18. 1D-Simulation of Thermonuclear Target Compression and Burning for Laser Facility NIF and LMJ

    SciTech Connect

    Valiev, R. Zh.; Chizhkov, M. N.; Karlyhanov, N. G.; Lusganova, O. V.; Lykov, V. A.; Netsvetayev, D. S.; Timakova, M. S.

    2006-08-03

    The high-power laser facilities NIF and LMJ with the pulse energy as high as 2 MJ are being created in the USA and France. The basic cryogenic indirect-drive targets for thermonuclear ignition on these facilities are a spherical shell from polystyrene doped with oxygen and bromine. (CH+5%O+0,25%Br), whose inner surface is covered with DT-ice layer. The central region of targets is filled with DT-gas. The targets for NIF and LMJ have different external radii (1,11 and 1,215 mm, correspondingly), masses of DT-fuel (210 icy 310 {mu}g), X-ray radiation temperature dependences in time. The thermonuclear yield from the NIF target calculated with LASNEX code is 15 MJ, the yield from the LMJ target calculated with FCI1 code is 25.4 MJ. In RFNC-VNIITF calculations of compression and burning of basic NIF and LMJ targets were performed by using of the 1D ERA code in the spectral diffusion approximation for radiation transfer. We used tabulated opacity calculated by the mean ion model. Thermonuclear yield calculated with ERA code is about 18 MJ for the NIF target and nearly 23 MJ for the LMJ target. Calculated yields are in good agreement with published results. Performed calculations justified the possibility to simulate ICF targets in RFNC-VNIITF. In paper are also presented analysis results of target sensitivity to opacity and X-ray temperature variations.

  19. Upgrade of the IGN-14 neutron generator for research on detection of fusion-plasma products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igielski, Andrzej; Kurowski, Arkadiusz; Janik, Władysław; Gabańska, Barbara; Woźnicka, Urszula

    2015-10-01

    The fast neutron generator (IGN-14) at the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences (IFJ PAN) in Kraków (Poland) is a laboratory multi-purpose experimental device. Neutrons are produced in a beam-target D-D or D-T reactions. A new vacuum chamber installed directly to the end of the ion guide of IGN-14 makes it possible to measure not only neutrons but also alpha particles in the presence of a mixed radiation field of other accompanying reaction products. The new experimental setup allows test detectors dedicated to spectrometric measurements of thermonuclear fusion reaction products.

  20. Calculating fusion neutron energy spectra from arbitrary reactant distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, J.; Conroy, S.; Andersson Sundén, E.; Hellesen, C.

    2016-02-01

    The Directional Relativistic Spectrum Simulator (DRESS) code can perform Monte-Carlo calculations of reaction product spectra from arbitrary reactant distributions, using fully relativistic kinematics. The code is set up to calculate energy spectra from neutrons and alpha particles produced in the D(d, n)3He and T(d, n)4He fusion reactions, but any two-body reaction can be simulated by including the corresponding cross section. The code has been thoroughly tested. The kinematics calculations have been benchmarked against the kinematics module of the ROOT Data Analysis Framework. Calculated neutron energy spectra have been validated against tabulated fusion reactivities and against an exact analytical expression for the thermonuclear fusion neutron spectrum, with good agreement. The DRESS code will be used as the core of a detailed synthetic diagnostic framework for neutron measurements at the JET and MAST tokamaks.

  1. A route to the brightest possible neutron source?

    PubMed

    Taylor, Andrew; Dunne, Mike; Bennington, Steve; Ansell, Stuart; Gardner, Ian; Norreys, Peter; Broome, Tim; Findlay, David; Nelmes, Richard

    2007-02-23

    We review the potential to develop sources for neutron scattering science and propose that a merger with the rapidly developing field of inertial fusion energy could provide a major step-change in performance. In stark contrast to developments in synchrotron and laser science, the past 40 years have seen only a factor of 10 increase in neutron source brightness. With the advent of thermonuclear ignition in the laboratory, coupled to innovative approaches in how this may be achieved, we calculate that a neutron source three orders of magnitude more powerful than any existing facility can be envisaged on a 20- to 30-year time scale. Such a leap in source power would transform neutron scattering science. PMID:17322053

  2. A station blackout simulation for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor using the integrated primary and secondary system model

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, E.A.

    1994-06-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) is a research reactor to be built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This paper deals with thermal-hydraulic analysis of ANSR`s cooling systems during nominal and transient conditions, with the major effort focusing upon the construction and testing of computer models of the reactor`s primary, secondary and reflector vessel cooling systems. The code RELAP5 was used to simulate transients, such as loss of coolant accidents and loss of off-site power, as well as to model the behavior of the reactor in steady state. Three stages are involved in constructing and using a RELAP5 model: (1) construction and encoding of the desired model, (2) testing and adjustment of the model until a satisfactory steady state is achieved, and (3) running actual transients using the steady-state results obtained earlier as initial conditions. By use of the ANSR design specifications, a model of the reactor`s primary and secondary cooling systems has been constructed to run a transient simulating a loss of off-site power. This incident assumes a pump coastdown in both the primary and secondary loops. The results determine whether the reactor can survive the transition from forced convection to natural circulation.

  3. A variable-order time-dependent neutron transport method for nuclear reactor kinetics using analytically-integrated space-time characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, A. J.; Lee, J. C.

    2013-07-01

    A new time-dependent neutron transport method based on the method of characteristics (MOC) has been developed. Whereas most spatial kinetics methods treat time dependence through temporal discretization, this new method treats time dependence by defining the characteristics to span space and time. In this implementation regions are defined in space-time where the thickness of the region in time fulfills an analogous role to the time step in discretized methods. The time dependence of the local source is approximated using a truncated Taylor series expansion with high order derivatives approximated using backward differences, permitting the solution of the resulting space-time characteristic equation. To avoid a drastic increase in computational expense and memory requirements due to solving many discrete characteristics in the space-time planes, the temporal variation of the boundary source is similarly approximated. This allows the characteristics in the space-time plane to be represented analytically rather than discretely, resulting in an algorithm comparable in implementation and expense to one that arises from conventional time integration techniques. Furthermore, by defining the boundary flux time derivative in terms of the preceding local source time derivative and boundary flux time derivative, the need to store angularly-dependent data is avoided without approximating the angular dependence of the angular flux time derivative. The accuracy of this method is assessed through implementation in the neutron transport code DeCART. The method is employed with variable-order local source representation to model a TWIGL transient. The results demonstrate that this method is accurate and more efficient than the discretized method. (authors)

  4. Thermonuclear Processes as a Principal Source of the Earth's Internal Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terez, E. I.; Terez, I. E.

    2011-12-01

    A cosmological model of the formation of the Solar System is presented. It is shown that the main source of the Earth's energy is delivered from the thermonuclear processes in the inner Earth's core consisting of metallic hydrides. Several theoretical studies showed that under low temperature (T<104 K) and sufficiently high density of plasma, the characteristics of nuclear synthesis could be explained only with some adjustments to a thermonuclear synthesis theory. By building a diagram of the mass luminosity for the giant planets and the Earth, Wang Hong-Zhang (1990) illustrated that this diagram was similar to the one corresponding to stars. This could have only one explanation-the energy is due to the thermonuclear reactions and the energy rate is increasing exponentially with temperature and pressure. In the local areas where thermonuclear reactions occur in the Earth core, one should expect a sharp increase in temperature which causes of the dissolution of hydrides, e.g. release of hydrogen from the hydride-ionic form to the proton gas in large quantities (Larin, 2005). The pressure in this zone would sharply rise, and this would cause expulsion of the streams of the hydrogen plasma outside of the Earth's core. As a result of the Earth rotation and existence of the Coriolis' acceleration, the hydrogen plumes (more exactly, the proton gas) characterized by a high electrical conductivity twirl in spirals in the outer core of the Earth. These spirals form solenoid and, as a result, create the dipole magnetic field of the Earth. The suggest hypothesis of the thermonuclear nature of the Earth's energy flux is a main reason for the endogenic geodynamic and tectonic processes in the Earth's history. This hypothesis is supported by known experimental facts, and it opens new ways to study not only our planet but other planets of the Solar System. One should note that according to accepted concepts, the dipole magnetic field could exist in planets with a sufficient

  5. Neutron flux monitoring system for ITER-FEAT (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaschuck, Yu.; Krasilnikov, A.; Alekseyev, A.; Amosov, V.; Frunze, V.

    2001-01-01

    The concept of the neutron flux measurements for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ITER-FEAT is discussed. In spite of the fact that ITER-FEAT has reduced fusion power with respect to ITER-FDR, the requirements for neutron flux monitors are similar—wide dynamic range (seven orders), good temporal resolution (1 ms), and high accuracy (10%). It is clear that fission chambers are the most suitable detectors for this application. However high neutron intensity of the fusion plasma and hard requirements lead to a more sophisticated detection system than the ordinary fission chamber. Another problem is an absolute calibration of the detectors. We propose a neutron flux monitoring system, which consist of microfission chambers placed inside the ITER vacuum chamber, three wide range fission chambers placed outside the vacuum chamber, natural diamond detector based compact neutron monitors placed inside the channels of the neutron cameras, and a compact neutron generator for calibration. Microfission chambers could be installed in the standard plugs with other detectors (vacuum x-ray diode, magnetic probe). 235U could be used as well as threshold fission materials (238U, 237Np, 232Th). In the last case the fission chamber will be covered by a boron shield to reduce the changes in the sensitivity. Wide range fission chambers will operate in both pulse count mode and Campbell mode. High linearity is provided by count mode. Temporal resolution of 1 ms is provided by the count mode at low neutron flux and by the Campbell mode at high flux. The nonlinearity of the fission chamber during the switch from count mode to Campbell mode will be corrected by another fission chamber with low sensitivity operating in count mode. Compact neutron flux monitors placed inside neutron cameras will consist of up to ten natural diamond neutron counters with sensitivity to DT neutrons doubled by properly installed poliethilen radiators. Such monitors provide DT neutron flux

  6. A neutron star with a carbon atmosphere in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant.

    PubMed

    Ho, Wynn C G; Heinke, Craig O

    2009-11-01

    The surface of hot neutron stars is covered by a thin atmosphere. If there is accretion after neutron-star formation, the atmosphere could be composed of light elements (H or He); if no accretion takes place or if thermonuclear reactions occur after accretion, heavy elements (for example, Fe) are expected. Despite detailed searches, observations have been unable to confirm the atmospheric composition of isolated neutron stars. Here we report an analysis of archival observations of the compact X-ray source in the centre of the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant. We show that a carbon atmosphere neutron star (with low magnetic field) produces a good fit to the spectrum. Our emission model, in contrast with others, implies an emission size consistent with theoretical predictions for the radius of neutron stars. This result suggests that there is nuclear burning in the surface layers and also identifies the compact source as a very young ( approximately 330-year-old) neutron star. PMID:19890325

  7. Detailed design of ex-vessel neutron yield monitor for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, K.; Iguchi, T.; Watanabe, K.; Kawarabayashi, J.; Nishitani, T.; Walker, C. I.

    2004-10-01

    Taking into consideration the latest design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) main units, we have made the detailed design consideration for an ex-vessel neutron yield monitor to meet the ITER requirements. The monitoring system is constructed of four detector modules consisting of several 235U fission chambers with different sensitivities and graphite (or beryllium) neutron moderator. We also selected possible spaces in the diagnostic ports to install them at appropriate distances and neutron shielding effects from the plasma. Through Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations, it has been confirmed that the present system can cover all the neutron yields encountered in the ITER experiments including the in situ calibrations with a time resolution around 200 μs without detector replacement over the whole ITER experiments. This system can also be calibrated with 10% of required accuracies in a realistic 50 h of accumulation time using a DT neutron generator.

  8. X-RAY EMISSION AND ABSORPTION FEATURES DURING AN ENERGETIC THERMONUCLEAR X-RAY BURST FROM IGR J17062-6143

    SciTech Connect

    Degenaar, N.; Miller, J. M.; Wijnands, R.; Altamirano, D.; Fabian, A. C.

    2013-04-20

    Type-I X-ray bursts are thermonuclear explosions occurring in the surface layers of accreting neutron stars. These events are powerful probes of the physics of neutron stars and their surrounding accretion flow. We analyze a very energetic type-I X-ray burst from the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary IGR J17062-6143 that was detected with Swift on 2012 June 25. The light curve of the {approx_equal}18 minute long X-ray burst tail shows an episode of {approx_equal}10 minutes during which the intensity is strongly fluctuating by a factor of {approx_equal}3 above and below the underlying decay trend on a timescale of seconds. The X-ray spectrum reveals a highly significant emission line around {approx_equal}1 keV, which can be interpreted as an Fe-L shell line caused by the irradiation of cold gas. We also detect significant absorption lines and edges in the Fe-K band, which are strongly suggestive of the presence of hot, highly ionized gas along the line of sight. None of these features are present in the persistent X-ray spectrum of the source. The timescale of the strong intensity variations, the velocity width of the Fe-L emission line (assuming Keplerian motion), and photoionization modeling of the Fe-K absorption features each independently point to gas at a radius of {approx_equal} 10{sup 3} km as the source of these features. The unusual X-ray light curve and spectral properties could have plausibly been caused by a disruption of the accretion disk due to the super-Eddington fluxes reached during the X-ray burst.

  9. Fusion neutronics-streaming, shielding, heating, activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freiesleben, H.; Richter, D.; Seidel, K.; Unholzer, S.

    2001-07-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) represents an important step towards a fusion power plant. Controlled fusion will be realized in a d-t-plasma magnetically confined by a Tokamak configuration. The first wall of the plasma chamber, blanket and vacuum vessel of ITER form a compact assembly for converting the kinetic energy of fusion neutrons into heat while simultaneously shielding the superconducting coils efficiently against neutron and accompanying photon radiation. This shielding system can be investigated with neutrons generated by low-energy accelerators. We report on experiments concerning shielding and streaming properties of a mock-up where energy spectra of both neutrons and protons were measured. They are compared with predictions of Monte Carlo calculations (code MCNP-4A) using various data libraries. The agreement justified the use of measured spectra as basis to calculate design parameters such as neutron and photon heating, radiation damage, gas production, and activation. Some of these parameters were also directly measured. The results validate the ITER design.

  10. Burst Oscillation Probes of Neutron Stars and Nuclear Burning with LOFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2012-01-01

    X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts--burst oscillations--have provided a new probe of neutron star spins as well as of the dependent nuclear burning processes. The frequency drift and amplitude evolution of the oscillations observed during bursts can in principle place constraints on the physics of thermonuclear flame spreading and the dynamics of the burning atmosphere. I use simulations appropriate to LOFT to explore the precision with which the time dependence of the oscillation frequency can be inferred. This can test, for example, different models for the frequency drift, such as up-lift versus geostrophic drift. I also explore the precision with which asymptotic frequencies can be constrained in order to estimate the capability for LOFT to detect the Doppler shifts induced by orbital motion of the neutron star from a sample of bursts at different orbital phases.

  11. In-situ structural integrity evaluation for high-power pulsed spallation neutron source - Effects of cavitation damage on structural vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Tao; Naoe, Takashi; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    A double-wall structure mercury target will be installed at the high-power pulsed spallation neutron source in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Cavitation damage on the inner wall is an important factor governing the lifetime of the target-vessel. To monitor the structural integrity of the target vessel, displacement velocity at a point on the outer surface of the target vessel is measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). The measured signals can be used for evaluating the damage inside the target vessel because of cyclic loading and cavitation bubble collapse caused by pulsed-beam induced pressure waves. The wavelet differential analysis (WDA) was applied to reveal the effects of the damage on vibrational cycling. To reduce the effects of noise superimposed on the vibration signals on the WDA results, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), statistical methods were applied. Results from laboratory experiments, numerical simulation results with random noise added, and target vessel field data were analyzed by the WDA and the statistical methods. The analyses demonstrated that the established in-situ diagnostic technique can be used to effectively evaluate the structural response of the target vessel.

  12. MHD model of conversion of the plasma energy of a thermonuclear microexplosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkova, L. P.; Kalinin, A. V.; Rutkevich, I. M.

    1980-05-01

    A preliminary analysis is presented of the direct conversion of the energy of a thermonuclear microexplosion into electrical energy in a reactor which is combined with a pulsed induction-type MHD generator connected to a resistive load. The following factors are taken into account: (1) the relation between the average parameters of the plasma and the magnetic field, (2) the finite dimensions of the region of magnetic energy localization, and (3) the effect of the high initial energy density of the plasma. It is found that the choice of the size of the load significantly determines the maximum efficiency of the generator.

  13. a New Approach of the Deflagration to Detonation Transition in SNIa Thermonuclear Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chièze, Jean Pierre; Charignon, Camille

    2015-03-01

    A wide class of type Ia thermonuclear supernovae models relies on the transition from the subsonic deflagration combustion regime to the supersonic detonation regime of the carbon and oxygen mixture of an accreting white dwarf, near the Chandrasekhar mass. We show that this can actually be achieved in a cold C+O white dwarf near the Chandrasekhar mass, with seed sound waves of relatively low Mach number M ˜ 0.02. Moreover, even weaker perturbations, with velocity perturbations as low as M ˜ 0.003 can trigger a detonation wave in SNIa progenitors models wich include the presence of a thin helium surface layer.

  14. Thermonuclear reaction rate of 18Ne(α ,p ) 21Na from Monte Carlo calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, P.; Longland, R.; Iliadis, C.

    2014-12-01

    The 18Ne(α ,p ) 21Na reaction impacts the break-out from the hot CNO cycles to the r p process in type-I x-ray bursts. We present a revised thermonuclear reaction rate, which is based on the latest experimental data. The new rate is derived from Monte Carlo calculations, taking into account the uncertainties of all nuclear physics input quantities. In addition, we present the reaction rate uncertainty and probability density versus temperature. Our results are also consistent with estimates obtained using different indirect approaches.

  15. Saturation levels of neoclassical tearing modes in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Luetjens, Hinrich; Luciani, Jean-Francois

    2005-08-15

    For the future ITER tokamak (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) plasmas [R. Aymar et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1301 (2001)] a simple and robust theoretical model for the prediction of the dynamics of neoclassical tearing modes (NTM) is a crucial topic. Presently, this theory is incomplete. Using full magnetohydrodynamic simulations, saturated NTM island widths significantly smaller than those predicted by any existing NTM theory are found. Nevertheless, these islands are sufficiently large to potentially alter the plasma confinement. Some reasons for the departure of the simulation results from the theoretical predictions are suggested and issues to be addressed to achieve a quantitative model are indicated.

  16. Future Probes of the Neutron Star Equation of State Using X-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2004-01-01

    Observations with NASA s Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) have resulted in the discovery of fast (200 - 600 Hz), coherent X-ray intensity oscillations (hereafter, %urstoscillations ) during thermonuclear X-ray bursts from 12 low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Although many of their detailed properties remain to be fully understood, it is now beyond doubt that these oscillations result from spin modulation of the thermonuclear burst flux from the neutron star surface. Among the new timing phenomena revealed by RXTE the burst oscillations are perhaps the best understood, in the sense that many of their properties can be explained in the framework of this relatively simple model. Because of this, detailed modelling of burst oscillations can be an extremely powerful probe of neutron star structure, and thus the equation of state (EOS) of supra-nuclear density matter. Both the compactness parameter beta = GM/c(sup 2)R, and the surface velocity, nu(sub rot) = Omega(sub spin)R, are encoded in the energy-dependent amplitude and shape of the modulation pulses. The new discoveries have spurred much new theoretical work on thermonuclear burning and propagation on neutron stars, so that in the near future it is not unreasonable to think that detailed physical models of the time dependent flux from burning neutron stars will be available for comparison with the observed pulse profiles from a future, large collecting area X-ray timing observatory. In addition, recent high resolution burst spectroscopy with XMM/Newton suggests the presence of redshifted absorption lines from the neutron star surface during bursts. This leads to the possibility of using large area, high spectral resolution measurements of X-ray bursts as a precise probe of neutron star structure. In this work I will explore the precision with which constraints on neutron star structure, and hence the dense matter EOS, can be made with the implementation of such programs.

  17. Study of the reflection spectrum of the accreting neutron star GX 3+1 using XMM-Newton and INTEGRAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintore, F.; Di Salvo, T.; Bozzo, E.; Sanna, A.; Burderi, L.; D'Aì, A.; Riggio, A.; Scarano, F.; Iaria, R.

    2015-06-01

    Broad emission features of abundant chemical elements, such as iron, are commonly seen in the X-ray spectra of accreting compact objects and their studies can provide useful information about the geometry of the accretion processes. In this work, we focus our attention on GX 3+1, a bright, persistent accreting low-mass X-ray binary, classified as an atoll source. Its spectrum is well described by an accretion disc plus a stable Comptonizing, optically thick corona which dominates the X-ray emission in the 0.3-20 keV energy band. In addition, four broad emission lines are found and we associate them with reflection of hard photons from the inner regions of the accretion disc, where Doppler and relativistic effects are important. We used self-consistent reflection models to fit the spectra of the 2010 XMM-Newton observation and the stacking of the whole data sets of 2010 INTEGRAL observations. We conclude that the spectra are consistent with reflection produced at ˜10 gravitational radii by an accretion disc with an ionization parameter of ξ ˜ 600 erg cm s-1 and viewed under an inclination angle of the system of ˜35°. Furthermore, we detected for the first time for GX 3+1, the presence of a power-law component dominant at energies higher than 20 keV, possibly associated with an optically thin component of non-thermal electrons.

  18. Atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korff, S. A.; Mendell, R. B.; Merker, M.; Light, E. S.; Verschell, H. J.; Sandie, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    Contributions to fast neutron measurements in the atmosphere are outlined. The results of a calculation to determine the production, distribution and final disappearance of atmospheric neutrons over the entire spectrum are presented. An attempt is made to answer questions that relate to processes such as neutron escape from the atmosphere and C-14 production. In addition, since variations of secondary neutrons can be related to variations in the primary radiation, comment on the modulation of both radiation components is made.

  19. Neutron dosimetry

    DOEpatents

    Quinby, Thomas C.

    1976-07-27

    A method of measuring neutron radiation within a nuclear reactor is provided. A sintered oxide wire is disposed within the reactor and exposed to neutron radiation. The induced radioactivity is measured to provide an indication of the neutron energy and flux within the reactor.

  20. Neutron guide

    DOEpatents

    Greene, Geoffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron guide in which lengths of cylindrical glass tubing have rectangular glass plates properly dimensioned to allow insertion into the cylindrical glass tubing so that a sealed geometrically precise polygonal cross-section is formed in the cylindrical glass tubing. The neutron guide provides easier alignment between adjacent sections than do the neutron guides of the prior art.

  1. Portable neutron spectrometer and dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Waechter, D.A.; Erkkila, B.H.; Vasilik, D.G.

    The disclosure relates to a battery operated neutron spectrometer/dosimeter utilizing a microprocessor, a built-in tissue equivalent LET neutron detector, and a 128-channel pulse height analyzer with integral liquid crystal display. The apparatus calculates doses and dose rates from neutrons incident on the detector and displays a spectrum of rad or rem as a function of keV per micron of equivalent tissue and also calculates and displays accumulated dose in millirads and millirem as well as neutron dose rates in millirads per hour and millirem per hour.

  2. Portable neutron spectrometer and dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Waechter, David A.; Erkkila, Bruce H.; Vasilik, Dennis G.

    1985-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a battery operated neutron spectrometer/dosimeter utilizing a microprocessor, a built-in tissue equivalent LET neutron detector, and a 128-channel pulse height analyzer with integral liquid crystal display. The apparatus calculates doses and dose rates from neutrons incident on the detector and displays a spectrum of rad or rem as a function of keV per micron of equivalent tissue and also calculates and displays accumulated dose in millirads and millirem as well as neutron dose rates in millirads per hour and millirem per hour.

  3. Thermonuclear reaction S30(p,γ)Cl31 studied via Coulomb breakup of Cl31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, C.; Lepyoshkina, O.; Aksyutina, Y.; Aumann, T.; Novo, S. Beceiro; Benlliure, J.; Boretzky, K.; Chartier, M.; Cortina, D.; Pramanik, U. Datta; Ershova, O.; Geissel, H.; Gernhäuser, R.; Heil, M.; Ickert, G.; Johansson, H. T.; Jonson, B.; Kelić-Heil, A.; Klimkiewicz, A.; Kratz, J. V.; Krücken, R.; Kulessa, R.; Larsson, K.; Le Bleis, T.; Lemmon, R.; Mahata, K.; Marganiec, J.; Nilsson, T.; Panin, V.; Plag, R.; Prokopowicz, W.; Reifarth, R.; Ricciardi, V.; Rossi, D. M.; Schwertel, S.; Simon, H.; Sümmerer, K.; Streicher, B.; Taylor, J.; Vignote, J. R.; Wamers, F.; Wimmer, C.; Wu, P. Z.

    2014-03-01

    Coulomb breakup at high energy in inverse kinematics of proton-rich Cl31 was used to constrain the thermonuclear S30(p ,γ)Cl31 capture reaction rate under typical Type I x-ray burst conditions. This reaction is a bottleneck during rapid proton-capture nucleosynthesis (rp process), where its rate depends predominantly on the nuclear structure of Cl31. Two low-lying states just above the proton-separation threshold of Sp=296(50) keV in Cl31 have been identified experimentally using the R3B-LAND setup at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH. Both states are considered to play a key role in the thermonuclear S30(p ,γ)Cl31 capture reaction. Excitation energies of the first Jπ=1/2+,5/2+ states have been extracted and the reaction rate for proton capture on S30 under typical rp-process temperatures has been investigated.

  4. Matching of experimental and statistical-model thermonuclear reaction rates at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Joseph; Longland, Richard; Iliadis, Christian

    2009-05-01

    Reliable reaction rates at high stellar temperatures are necessary for the study of advanced stellar burning stages, supernovae and x-ray bursts. We suggest a new procedure for extrapolating experimental thermonuclear reaction rates to these higher temperatures (T > 1 GK) using statistical model (Hauser-Feshbach) results. Current, generally accepted, procedures involve the use of the Gamow peak, which has been shown to be unreliable for narrow resonances at high stellar temperatures [1]. Our new approach defines the effective thermonuclear energy range (ETER) by using the 8^th, 50^th and 92^nd percentiles of the cumulative distribution of fractional resonant reaction contributions. The ETER is then used to define a reliable temperature for matching experimental rates to Hauser-Feshbach rates. The resulting matching temperature is often well above the previous result using the Gamow peak concept. Our new method should provide more accurate extrapolated rates since Hauser-Feshbach rates are more reliable at higher temperatures. These ideas are applied to 21 (p,γ), (p,α) and (α,γ) reactions on a range of A = 20-40 target nuclei and results will be presented. [0pt] [1] J. R. Newton, C. Iliadis, A. E. Champagne, A. Coc, Y. Parpottas and R. Ugalde, Phys. Rev. C 75, 045801 (2007).

  5. SELF-REACTIVATING NEUTRON SOURCE FOR A NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Newson, H.W.

    1959-02-01

    Reactors of the type employing beryllium in a reflector region around the active portion and to a neutron source for use therewith are discussed. The neutron source is comprised or a quantity of antimony permanently incorporated in, and as an integral part of, the reactor in or near the beryllium reflector region. During operation of the reactor the natural occurring antimony isotope of atomic weight 123 absorbs neutrons and is thereby transformed to the antimony isotope of atomic weight 124, which is radioactive and emits gamma rays. The gamma rays react with the beryllium to produce neutrons. The beryllium and antimony thus cooperate to produce a built in neutron source which is automatically reactivated by the operation of the reactor itself and which is of sufficient strength to maintain the slow neutron flux at a sufficiently high level to be reliably measured during periods when the reactor is shut down.

  6. Accreting Millisecond Pulsars: Neutron Star Masses and Radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2004-01-01

    High amplitude X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts were discovered with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in early 1996. Spectral and timing evidence strongly supports the conclusion that these oscillations are caused by rotational modulation of the burst emission and that they reveal the spin frequency of neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries. The recent discovery of X-ray burst oscillations from two accreting millisecond pulsars has confirmed this basic picture and provided a new route to measuring neutron star properties and constraining the dense matter equation of state. I will briefly summarize the current observational understanding of accreting millisecond pulsars, and describe recent attempts to determine the mass and radius of the neutron star in XTE J1814-338.

  7. Fast thermonuclear ignition with two nested high current lower voltage - high voltage lower current magnetically insulated transmission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, F.

    2003-11-01

    Fast thermonuclear ignition with a high gain seems possible with two Marx generators feeding two nested magnetically insulated transmission lines, one delivering a high current lower voltage pulse for compression and confinement, and one delivering a high voltage lower current pulse for fast ignition. With an input energy conceivably as small as 100 kJ the gain can be as large as 10 3. The concept not only would be by orders of magnitude less expensive than laser compression and fast ignition schemes, but because of the large gain with a small yield also be more suitable for a thermonuclear reactor.

  8. The TDF System for Thermonuclear Plasma Reaction Rates, Mean Energies and Two-Body Final State Particle Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Warshaw, S I

    2001-07-11

    The rate of thermonuclear reactions in hot plasmas as a function of local plasma temperature determines the way in which thermonuclear ignition and burning proceeds in the plasma. The conventional model approach to calculating these rates is to assume that the reacting nuclei in the plasma are in Maxwellian equilibrium at some well-defined plasma temperature, over which the statistical average of the reaction rate quantity {sigma}v is calculated, where {sigma} is the cross-section for the reaction to proceed at the relative velocity v between the reacting particles. This approach is well-understood and is the basis for much nuclear fusion and astrophysical nuclear reaction rate data. The Thermonuclear Data File (TDF) system developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Warshaw 1991), which is the topic of this report, contains data on the Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates for various light nuclear reactions and the correspondingly Maxwellian-averaged energy spectra of the particles in the final state of those reactions as well. This spectral information closely models the output particle and energy distributions in a burning plasma, and therefore leads to more accurate computational treatments of thermonuclear burn, output particle energy deposition and diagnostics, in various contexts. In this report we review and derive the theoretical basis for calculating Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates, mean particle energies, and output particle spectral energy distributions for these reactions in the TDF system. The treatment of the kinematics is non-relativistic. The current version of the TDF system provides exit particle energy spectrum distributions for two-body final state reactions only. In a future report we will discuss and describe how output particle energy spectra for three- and four-body final states can be developed for the TDF system. We also include in this report a description of the algorithmic implementation of the

  9. Neutron scattering and absorption properties

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.

    1993-12-01

    The Table in this report presents an evaluated set of values for the experimental quantities, which characterize the properties for scattering and absorption of neutrons. The neutron cross section is given for room temperature neutrons, 20.43{degree}C, corresponds to a thermal neutron energy of 0.0253 electron volts (eV) or a neutron velocity of 2200 meters/second. The neutron resonance integral is defined over the energy range from 0.5 eV to 0.1 {times} 10{sup 6} eV, or 0.1 MeV. A list of the major references used is given below. The literature cutoff data is October 1993. Uncertainties are given in parentheses. Parentheses with two or more numbers indicate values to the excited states(s) and to the ground state of the product nucleus.

  10. Measurements of fusion neutrons from Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion Experiments on the Z accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Harding, E. C.; Awe, T. J.; Torres, J. A.; Jones, B.; Bur, J. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Styron, J. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    Strong evidence of thermonuclear neutron production has been observed during Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments on the Z accelerator. So far, these experiments have utilized deuterium fuel and produced primary DD fusion neutron yields up to 2e12 with electron and ion stagnation temperatures in the 2-3 keV range. We present MagLIF neutron measurements and compare to other data and implosion simulations. In addition to primary DD and secondary DT yields and ion temperatures, other complex physics regarding the degree of fuel magnetization and liner density are elucidated by the neutron measurements. Neutron diagnostic development for deuterium and future deuterium-tritium fuel experiments are also discussed. Sandia is sponsored by the U.S. DOE's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.