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Sample records for integrated object-oriented solution

  1. Integration of object-oriented knowledge representation with the CLIPS rule based system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logie, David S.; Kamil, Hasan

    1990-01-01

    The paper describes a portion of the work aimed at developing an integrated, knowledge based environment for the development of engineering-oriented applications. An Object Representation Language (ORL) was implemented in C++ which is used to build and modify an object-oriented knowledge base. The ORL was designed in such a way so as to be easily integrated with other representation schemes that could effectively reason with the object base. Specifically, the integration of the ORL with the rule based system C Language Production Systems (CLIPS), developed at the NASA Johnson Space Center, will be discussed. The object-oriented knowledge representation provides a natural means of representing problem data as a collection of related objects. Objects are comprised of descriptive properties and interrelationships. The object-oriented model promotes efficient handling of the problem data by allowing knowledge to be encapsulated in objects. Data is inherited through an object network via the relationship links. Together, the two schemes complement each other in that the object-oriented approach efficiently handles problem data while the rule based knowledge is used to simulate the reasoning process. Alone, the object based knowledge is little more than an object-oriented data storage scheme; however, the CLIPS inference engine adds the mechanism to directly and automatically reason with that knowledge. In this hybrid scheme, the expert system dynamically queries for data and can modify the object base with complete access to all the functionality of the ORL from rules.

  2. Object-oriented design: Deriving conceptual solutions to large-scale information processing problems

    SciTech Connect

    Whiting, M.A.

    1990-05-01

    The Vertical Integration of Science, Technology, and Applications (VISTA) Project is a long-term effort conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) directed toward accelerating the process of making research results (data, models, advanced concepts) usable and available to R D applications. The initial goal of the program is to develop a software-based information system to guide the assessment and remediation process for hazardous waste sites at the US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The information system will link users (DOE, laboratories, and remediation contractors) to computer models and technical data available at PNL, to speed up the remediation process, while decreasing costs and accelerating the deployment of new technologies. This report describes a methodology used to design components of the VISTA information system based on an object-oriented computing model. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Efficient electronic integrals and their generalized derivatives for object oriented implementations of electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Flocke, N; Lotrich, V

    2008-12-01

    For the new parallel implementation of electronic structure methods in ACES III (Lotrich et al., in preparation) the present state-of-the-art algorithms for the evaluation of electronic integrals and their generalized derivatives were implemented in new object oriented codes with attention paid to efficient execution on modern processors with a deep hierarchy of data storage including multiple caches and memory banks. Particular attention has been paid to define proper integral blocks as basic building objects. These objects are stand-alone units and are no longer tied to any specific software. They can hence be used by any quantum chemistry code without modification. The integral blocks can be called at any time and in any sequence during the execution of an electronic structure program. Evaluation efficiency of these integral objects has been carefully tested and it compares well with other fast integral programs in the community. Correctness of the objects has been demonstrated by several application runs on real systems using the ACES III program. PMID:18496792

  4. A uniform object-oriented solution to the eigenvalue problem for real symmetric and Hermitian matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, María Eugenia; Díaz, Javier; Muñoz-Caro, Camelia; Niño, Alfonso

    2011-09-01

    and conquer, can be used to factorize the matrices in order to apply a parallel computing approach. However, it is still interesting to have a core procedure able to tackle the computation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors once the matrix has been factorized to pieces of enough small size. Several available software packages, such as LAPACK, tackled this problem under the traditional imperative programming paradigm. In order to ease the modelling of complex quantum mechanical models it could be interesting to apply an object-oriented approach to the treatment of the eigenproblem. This approach offers the advantage of a single, uniform treatment for the real symmetric and Hermitian cases. Solution method: To reach the above goals, we have developed a system of classes: SHMatrix. SHMatrix is composed by an abstract base class and two descendant classes, one for real symmetric matrices and the other for the Hermitian case. The object-oriented characteristics of inheritance and polymorphism allows handling both cases using a single reference of the base class. The basic computing strategy applied in SHMatrix allows computing subsets of eigenvalues and (optionally) eigenvectors. The tests performed show that SHMatrix is competitive, and more efficient for large matrices, than the equivalent routines of the LAPACK package. Running time: The examples included in the distribution take only a couple of seconds to run.

  5. An object-oriented 3D integral data model for digital city and digital mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lixin; Wang, Yanbing; Che, Defu; Xu, Lei; Chen, Xuexi; Jiang, Yun; Shi, Wenzhong

    2005-10-01

    With the rapid development of urban, city space extended from surface to subsurface. As the important data source for the representation of city spatial information, 3D city spatial data have the characteristics of multi-object, heterogeneity and multi-structure. It could be classified referring to the geo-surface into three kinds: above-surface data, surface data and subsurface data. The current research on 3D city spatial information system is divided naturally into two different branch, 3D City GIS (3D CGIS) and 3D Geological Modeling (3DGM). The former emphasizes on the 3D visualization of buildings and the terrain of city, while the latter emphasizes on the visualization of geological bodies and structures. Although, it is extremely important for city planning and construction to integrate all the city spatial information including above-surface, surface and subsurface objects to conduct integral analysis and spatial manipulation. However, either 3D CGIS or 3DGM is currently difficult to realize the information integration, integral analysis and spatial manipulation. Considering 3D spatial modeling theory and methodologies, an object-oriented 3D integral spatial data model (OO3D-ISDM) is presented and software realized. The model integrates geographical objects, surface buildings and geological objects together seamlessly with TIN being its coupling interface. This paper introduced the conceptual model of OO3D-ISDM, which is comprised of 4 spatial elements, i.e. point, line, face and body, and 4 geometric primitives, i.e. vertex, segment, triangle and generalized tri-prism (GTP). The spatial model represents the geometry of surface buildings and geographical objects with triangles, and geological objects with GTP. Any of the represented objects, no mater surface buildings, terrain or subsurface objects, could be described with the basic geometry element, i.e. triangle. So the 3D spatial objects, surface buildings, terrain and geological objects can be

  6. Integrating end-to-end threads of control into object-oriented analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccandlish, Janet E.; Macdonald, James R.; Graves, Sara J.

    1993-01-01

    Current object-oriented analysis and design methodologies fall short in their use of mechanisms for identifying threads of control for the system being developed. The scenarios which typically describe a system are more global than looking at the individual objects and representing their behavior. Unlike conventional methodologies that use data flow and process-dependency diagrams, object-oriented methodologies do not provide a model for representing these global threads end-to-end. Tracing through threads of control is key to ensuring that a system is complete and timing constraints are addressed. The existence of multiple threads of control in a system necessitates a partitioning of the system into processes. This paper describes the application and representation of end-to-end threads of control to the object-oriented analysis and design process using object-oriented constructs. The issue of representation is viewed as a grouping problem, that is, how to group classes/objects at a higher level of abstraction so that the system may be viewed as a whole with both classes/objects and their associated dynamic behavior. Existing object-oriented development methodology techniques are extended by adding design-level constructs termed logical composite classes and process composite classes. Logical composite classes are design-level classes which group classes/objects both logically and by thread of control information. Process composite classes further refine the logical composite class groupings by using process partitioning criteria to produce optimum concurrent execution results. The goal of these design-level constructs is to ultimately provide the basis for a mechanism that can support the creation of process composite classes in an automated way. Using an automated mechanism makes it easier to partition a system into concurrently executing elements that can be run in parallel on multiple processors.

  7. Enhancement of Integrated Power System Analysis Package Capability by Integration of Object-Oriented Physical System Modeling Language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongesombut, Komsan; Takazawa, Tsuyoshi; Tada, Yasuyuki; Mitani, Yasunori

    There are many commercial power system analysis packages available on the market. Although most of these tools are typically computationally efficient, they do not provide the flexibility and ability to simulate generic models of generators or networks. This is cumbersome for research and development purposes. The development of power system models of appropriate fidelity is a key aspect of power system simulation processes. The models must allow all relevant multi-disciplinary modeling criteria, e.g. model structure and data handling, to be computed efficiently, easily, and with sufficient accuracy. This paper presents how the adoption of recent technology on object-oriented physical systems modeling can be implemented with an integrated power system analysis package MidFielder. Used in combination with MidFielder, this can provide the completeness of power system analysis package for industrial, educational and research purposes. In order to realize the proposed interface system, this paper also discusses about methods to manage a large set of power system data by using database technology and means of graphical user interface (GUI).

  8. An object-oriented and quadrilateral-mesh based solution adaptive algorithm for compressible multi-fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, H. W.; Shu, C.; Chew, Y. T.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, an object-oriented and quadrilateral-mesh based solution adaptive algorithm for the simulation of compressible multi-fluid flows is presented. The HLLC scheme (Harten, Lax and van Leer approximate Riemann solver with the Contact wave restored) is extended to adaptively solve the compressible multi-fluid flows under complex geometry on unstructured mesh. It is also extended to the second-order of accuracy by using MUSCL extrapolation. The node, edge and cell are arranged in such an object-oriented manner that each of them inherits from a basic object. A home-made double link list is designed to manage these objects so that the inserting of new objects and removing of the existing objects (nodes, edges and cells) are independent of the number of objects and only of the complexity of O( 1). In addition, the cells with different levels are further stored in different lists. This avoids the recursive calculation of solution of mother (non-leaf) cells. Thus, high efficiency is obtained due to these features. Besides, as compared to other cell-edge adaptive methods, the separation of nodes would reduce the memory requirement of redundant nodes, especially in the cases where the level number is large or the space dimension is three. Five two-dimensional examples are used to examine its performance. These examples include vortex evolution problem, interface only problem under structured mesh and unstructured mesh, bubble explosion under the water, bubble-shock interaction, and shock-interface interaction inside the cylindrical vessel. Numerical results indicate that there is no oscillation of pressure and velocity across the interface and it is feasible to apply it to solve compressible multi-fluid flows with large density ratio (1000) and strong shock wave (the pressure ratio is 10,000) interaction with the interface.

  9. Groundwater economics: An object-oriented foundation for integrated studies of irrigated agricultural systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An integrated foundation is presented to study the impacts of external forcings on irrigated agricultural systems. Individually, models are presented that simulate groundwater hydrogeology and econometric farm level crop choices and irrigated water use. The natural association between groundwater we...

  10. Active Participation of Integrated Development Environments in the Teaching of Object-Oriented Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Depradine, Colin; Gay, Glenda

    2004-01-01

    With the strong link between programming and the underlying technology, the incorporation of computer technology into the teaching of a programming language course should be a natural progression. However, the abstract nature of programming can make such integration a difficult prospect to achieve. As a result, the main development tool, the…

  11. BioInt: an integrative biological object-oriented application framework and interpreter.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sanket; Burra, Prasad

    2015-01-01

    BioInt, a biological programming application framework and interpreter, is an attempt to equip the researchers with seamless integration, efficient extraction and effortless analysis of the data from various biological databases and algorithms. Based on the type of biological data, algorithms and related functionalities, a biology-specific framework was developed which has nine modules. The modules are a compilation of numerous reusable BioADTs. This software ecosystem containing more than 450 biological objects underneath the interpreter makes it flexible, integrative and comprehensive. Similar to Python, BioInt eliminates the compilation and linking steps cutting the time significantly. The researcher can write the scripts using available BioADTs (following C++ syntax) and execute them interactively or use as a command line application. It has features that enable automation, extension of the framework with new/external BioADTs/libraries and deployment of complex work flows. PMID:26561020

  12. Groundwater economics: An object-oriented foundation for integrated studies of irrigated agricultural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steward, David R.; Peterson, Jeffrey M.; Yang, Xiaoying; Bulatewicz, Tom; Herrera-Rodriguez, Mauricio; Mao, Dazhi; Hendricks, Nathan

    2009-05-01

    An integrated foundation is presented to study the impacts of external forcings on irrigated agricultural systems. Individually, models are presented that simulate groundwater hydrogeology and econometric farm level crop choices and irrigated water use. The natural association between groundwater wells and agricultural parcels is employed to couple these models using geographic information science technology and open modeling interface protocols. This approach is used to study the collective action problem of the common pool. Three different policies (existing, regulation, and incentive based) are studied in the semiarid grasslands overlying the Ogallala Aquifer in the central United States. Results show that while regulation using the prior appropriation doctrine and incentives using a water buy-back program may each achieve the same level of water savings across the study region, each policy has a different impact on spatial patterns of groundwater declines and farm level economic activity. This represents the first time that groundwater and econometric models of irrigated agriculture have been integrated at the well-parcel level and provides methods for scientific investigation of this coupled natural-human system. Results are useful for science to inform decision making and public policy debate.

  13. Object Oriented Learning Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Ed

    2005-01-01

    We apply the object oriented software engineering (OOSE) design methodology for software objects (SOs) to learning objects (LOs). OOSE extends and refines design principles for authoring dynamic reusable LOs. Our learning object class (LOC) is a template from which individualised LOs can be dynamically created for, or by, students. The properties…

  14. Object Oriented Modeling and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaykhian, Gholam Ali

    2007-01-01

    The Object Oriented Modeling and Design seminar is intended for software professionals and students, it covers the concepts and a language-independent graphical notation that can be used to analyze problem requirements, and design a solution to the problem. The seminar discusses the three kinds of object-oriented models class, state, and interaction. The class model represents the static structure of a system, the state model describes the aspects of a system that change over time as well as control behavior and the interaction model describes how objects collaborate to achieve overall results. Existing knowledge of object oriented programming may benefit the learning of modeling and good design. Specific expectations are: Create a class model, Read, recognize, and describe a class model, Describe association and link, Show abstract classes used with multiple inheritance, Explain metadata, reification and constraints, Group classes into a package, Read, recognize, and describe a state model, Explain states and transitions, Read, recognize, and describe interaction model, Explain Use cases and use case relationships, Show concurrency in activity diagram, Object interactions in sequence diagram.

  15. Object-oriented productivity metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John L.; Eller, Nancy

    1992-01-01

    Software productivity metrics are useful for sizing and costing proposed software and for measuring development productivity. Estimating and measuring source lines of code (SLOC) has proven to be a bad idea because it encourages writing more lines of code and using lower level languages. Function Point Analysis is an improved software metric system, but it is not compatible with newer rapid prototyping and object-oriented approaches to software development. A process is presented here for counting object-oriented effort points, based on a preliminary object-oriented analysis. It is proposed that this approach is compatible with object-oriented analysis, design, programming, and rapid prototyping. Statistics gathered on actual projects are presented to validate the approach.

  16. Pedagogical Issues in Object Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nerur, Sridhar; Ramanujan, Sam; Kesh, Someswar

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the need for people with object-oriented (OO) skills, explains benefits of OO in software development, and addresses some of the difficulties in teaching OO. Topics include the evolution of programming languages; differences between OO and traditional approaches; differences from data modeling; and Unified Modeling Language (UML) and…

  17. Object-Oriented Performance Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Ian; Schaffer, Scott P.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a framework to support an object-oriented approach to performance analysis and instructional design that includes collaboration, automation, visual modeling, and reusable Web-based repositories of analysis knowledge. Relates the need for a new framework to the increasing concern with the cost effectiveness of student and employee…

  18. Object-oriented knowledge representation for expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Stephen L.

    1991-01-01

    Object oriented techniques have generated considerable interest in the Artificial Intelligence (AI) community in recent years. This paper discusses an approach for representing expert system knowledge using classes, objects, and message passing. The implementation is in version 4.3 of NASA's C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS), an expert system tool that does not provide direct support for object oriented design. The method uses programmer imposed conventions and keywords to structure facts, and rules to provide object oriented capabilities.

  19. Research directions in object-oriented programming

    SciTech Connect

    Shriver, B.; Wegner, P.

    1987-01-01

    The contributions in this book provide the most complete survey available in programming languages, databases, and programming semantics. The contents include: The Beta Programming Language: Common Objects: An Object-Oriented Programming Language with Encapsulation and Inheritance: Actors: A Conceptual Foundation for Object-Oriented Programmming: Vulcan; A model for Object-Based Inheritance; Definition Groups; Block-Structure and Object-Oriented Languages; A Mechanism for Specifying the Structure of Large Layered Programs; Classification in Object-Oriented Systems; Extensions and Foundations of Object-Oriented Programming; Object-Oriented Specification; Object-Oriented Databases; Development and Implementation of an Object-Oriented Database Management System; Maintaining Consistency in Databases with Changing Types; Object-Oriented Environments; An Object-Oriented Framework for Graphical Programming; A Substrate for Object-Oriented Interface Design.

  20. Leveraging object-oriented development at Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenneson, Greg; Connell, John

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents lessons learned by the Software Engineering Process Group (SEPG) from results of supporting two projects at NASA Ames using an Object Oriented Rapid Prototyping (OORP) approach supported by a full featured visual development environment. Supplemental lessons learned from a large project in progress and a requirements definition are also incorporated. The paper demonstrates how productivity gains can be made by leveraging the developer with a rich development environment, correct and early requirements definition using rapid prototyping, and earlier and better effort estimation and software sizing through object-oriented methods and metrics. Although the individual elements of OO methods, RP approach and OO metrics had been used on other separate projects, the reported projects were the first integrated usage supported by a rich development environment. Overall the approach used was twice as productive (measured by hours per OO Unit) as a C++ development.

  1. Object-oriented persistent homology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bao; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Persistent homology provides a new approach for the topological simplification of big data via measuring the life time of intrinsic topological features in a filtration process and has found its success in scientific and engineering applications. However, such a success is essentially limited to qualitative data classification and analysis. Indeed, persistent homology has rarely been employed for quantitative modeling and prediction. Additionally, the present persistent homology is a passive tool, rather than a proactive technique, for classification and analysis. In this work, we outline a general protocol to construct object-oriented persistent homology methods. By means of differential geometry theory of surfaces, we construct an objective functional, namely, a surface free energy defined on the data of interest. The minimization of the objective functional leads to a Laplace-Beltrami operator which generates a multiscale representation of the initial data and offers an objective oriented filtration process. The resulting differential geometry based object-oriented persistent homology is able to preserve desirable geometric features in the evolutionary filtration and enhances the corresponding topological persistence. The cubical complex based homology algorithm is employed in the present work to be compatible with the Cartesian representation of the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The proposed Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology method is extensively validated. The consistence between Laplace-Beltrami flow based filtration and Euclidean distance based filtration is confirmed on the Vietoris-Rips complex for a large amount of numerical tests. The convergence and reliability of the present Laplace-Beltrami flow based cubical complex filtration approach are analyzed over various spatial and temporal mesh sizes. The Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology approach is utilized to study the intrinsic topology of proteins and fullerene molecules. Based on a

  2. Object-oriented concurrent programming

    SciTech Connect

    Yonezawa, A.; Tokoro, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book deals with a major theme of the Japanese Fifth Generation Project, which emphasizes logic programming, parallelism, and distributed systems. It presents a collection of tutorials and research papers on a new programming and design methodology in which the system to be constructed is modeled as a collection of abstract entities called ''objects'' and concurrent messages passing among objects. The book includes proposals for programming languages that support this methodology, as well as the applications of object-oriented concurrent programming to such areas as artificial intelligence, software engineering, music synthesis, office information systems, and system programming.

  3. Linking the physical and the socio-economic compartments of an integrated water and land use management model on a river basin scale using an object-oriented water supply model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthel, Roland; Nickel, Darla; Meleg, Alejandro; Trifkovic, Aleksandar; Braun, Juergen

    Within the framework of the research project ‘GLOWA-Danube’, a model of the water supply sector has been developed. GLOWA-Danube investigates long-term changes in the water cycle of the Upper Danube river basin in light of global change. For this purpose, the decision support system DANUBIA, comprising 15 fully coupled models, has been developed. Within DANUBIA the water supply model (‘WaterSupply’) forms the link between various physical models determining water quality and availability and several socio-economic models determining water consumption and demand. Having a central focus on public drinking water supply, its purpose is to correctly simulate the present day system of water extraction and distribution and the related costs, but also to allow meaningful response to possible future changes of boundary conditions, first and foremost changes in water demand or water availability and quality. Response mechanisms are also envisioned for changes in political and economic boundary conditions, and advances in technology. The model will be used locate critical regions which could experience water stress in the future, but does not aim to find the appropriate solutions or to predict the optimal organisation of water supply in the Danube Basin under such changing conditions. In the object-oriented model structure, both water supply companies (WSC) and communities are represented by main classes. Both classes have a limited view and knowledge of their environment. A community knows where and how much water is consumed and from which WSC it is served. A WSC possesses information regarding extraction sites and water rights, raw water quality and potential collaborating WSC. The WSC can perform actions that are different from ‘business as usual’. These deviations from their usual behaviour can be interpreted by decision makers but should not be regarded as a replacement for the decision-making process itself. The model is conceptualised using object-oriented

  4. Object-oriented Tools for Distributed Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Richard M.

    1993-01-01

    Distributed computing systems are proliferating, owing to the availability of powerful, affordable microcomputers and inexpensive communication networks. A critical problem in developing such systems is getting application programs to interact with one another across a computer network. Remote interprogram connectivity is particularly challenging across heterogeneous environments, where applications run on different kinds of computers and operating systems. NetWorks! (trademark) is an innovative software product that provides an object-oriented messaging solution to these problems. This paper describes the design and functionality of NetWorks! and illustrates how it is being used to build complex distributed applications for NASA and in the commercial sector.

  5. An object-oriented environment for computer vision and pattern recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, J.E.

    1992-12-01

    Vision is a flexible and extensible object-oriented programming environment for prototyping solutions to problems requiring computer vision and pattern recognition techniques. Vision integrates signal/image processing, statistical pattern recognition, neural networks, low and mid level computer vision, and graphics into a cohesive framework useful for a wide variety of applications at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  6. Object-oriented numerical computing C++

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanrosendale, John

    1994-01-01

    An object oriented language is one allowing users to create a set of related types and then intermix and manipulate values of these related types. This paper discusses object oriented numerical computing using C++.

  7. General object-oriented software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidewitz, Edwin V.; Stark, Mike

    1986-01-01

    Object-oriented design techniques are gaining increasing popularity for use with the Ada programming language. A general approach to object-oriented design which synthesizes the principles of previous object-oriented methods into the overall software life-cycle, providing transitions from specification to design and from design to code. It therefore provides the basis for a general object-oriented development methodology.

  8. Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment

    SciTech Connect

    2014-02-12

    The Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) software library developed at Idaho National Laboratory is a tool. MOOSE, like other tools, doesn’t actually complete a task. Instead, MOOSE seeks to reduce the effort required to create engineering simulation applications. MOOSE itself is a software library: a blank canvas upon which you write equations and then MOOSE can help you solve them. MOOSE is comparable to a spreadsheet application. A spreadsheet, by itself, doesn’t do anything. Only once equations are entered into it will a spreadsheet application compute anything. Such is the same for MOOSE. An engineer or scientist can utilize the equation solvers within MOOSE to solve equations related to their area of study. For instance, a geomechanical scientist can input equations related to water flow in underground reservoirs and MOOSE can solve those equations to give the scientist an idea of how water could move over time. An engineer might input equations related to the forces in steel beams in order to understand the load bearing capacity of a bridge. Because MOOSE is a blank canvas it can be useful in many scientific and engineering pursuits.

  9. Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-02-12

    The Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) software library developed at Idaho National Laboratory is a tool. MOOSE, like other tools, doesn’t actually complete a task. Instead, MOOSE seeks to reduce the effort required to create engineering simulation applications. MOOSE itself is a software library: a blank canvas upon which you write equations and then MOOSE can help you solve them. MOOSE is comparable to a spreadsheet application. A spreadsheet, by itself, doesn’t do anything.more » Only once equations are entered into it will a spreadsheet application compute anything. Such is the same for MOOSE. An engineer or scientist can utilize the equation solvers within MOOSE to solve equations related to their area of study. For instance, a geomechanical scientist can input equations related to water flow in underground reservoirs and MOOSE can solve those equations to give the scientist an idea of how water could move over time. An engineer might input equations related to the forces in steel beams in order to understand the load bearing capacity of a bridge. Because MOOSE is a blank canvas it can be useful in many scientific and engineering pursuits.« less

  10. Assessing anthropogenic influence on the hydrology of small peri-urban catchments: Development of the object-oriented PUMMA model by integrating urban and rural hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankowfsky, S.; Branger, F.; Braud, I.; Rodriguez, F.; Debionne, S.; Viallet, P.

    2014-09-01

    Distributed hydrological models are useful tools for process understanding and water management, especially in peri-urban catchments where the landscape heterogeneity is large, caused by a patchwork of natural and urbanized areas. This paper presents the Peri-Urban Model for landscape MAnagement (PUMMA) built within the LIQUID® modeling framework, specifically designed to study the hydrology of peri-urban catchments. It combines rural and urban hydrological models, and is used for process understanding. The originality of PUMMA is to follow a fully object-oriented approach, for both model mesh building and process representation. Urban areas, represented by cadastral units and rural areas divided in Hydrological Response Units are thus modeled with different interacting process modules. This provides a detailed representation of the runoff generation on natural and impervious areas. Furthermore, the exchange between process modules facilitates the simulation of subsurface and overland flow, as well as groundwater drainage by sewer pipes. Several drainage networks can coexist and interact (e.g. via storm water overflow devices) and water can be stored in retention basins, which allows the modeling of complex suburban drainage systems with multiple outlets. The model is then applied to the Chaudanne catchment (2.7 km2), located in the suburbs of Lyon, France. The uncalibrated model results show the importance of surface runoff from impervious areas for summer events and flow contributions from rural zones for winter events. Furthermore, the model reveals that the retention capacity of the Chaudanne catchment is larger than for classical urban catchments due to the peri-urban character of the catchment.

  11. Object-oriented Geographic Information System Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Lurie, Gordon

    2003-03-01

    JeoViewer is an intelligent object-oriented geographic information system (GIS) framework written in Java that provides transparent linkage to any object’s data, behaviors, and optimized spatial geometry representation. Tools are provided for typical GIS functionality, data ingestion, data export, and integration with other frameworks. The primary difference between Jeo Viewer and traditional GIS systems is that traditional GIS systems offer static views of geo-spatial data while JeoViewer can be dynamically coupled to models and live data streams which dynamically change the state of the object which can be immediately represented in JeoViewer. Additionally, JeoViewer’s object-oriented paradigm provides a more natural representation of spatial data. A rich layer hierarchy allows arbitrary grouping of objects based on any relationship as well as the traditional GIS vertical ordering of objects. JeoViewer can run as a standalone product, extended with additional analysis functionality, or embedded in another framework.

  12. Object-oriented Geographic Information System Framework

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2003-03-01

    JeoViewer is an intelligent object-oriented geographic information system (GIS) framework written in Java that provides transparent linkage to any object’s data, behaviors, and optimized spatial geometry representation. Tools are provided for typical GIS functionality, data ingestion, data export, and integration with other frameworks. The primary difference between Jeo Viewer and traditional GIS systems is that traditional GIS systems offer static views of geo-spatial data while JeoViewer can be dynamically coupled to models and live datamore » streams which dynamically change the state of the object which can be immediately represented in JeoViewer. Additionally, JeoViewer’s object-oriented paradigm provides a more natural representation of spatial data. A rich layer hierarchy allows arbitrary grouping of objects based on any relationship as well as the traditional GIS vertical ordering of objects. JeoViewer can run as a standalone product, extended with additional analysis functionality, or embedded in another framework.« less

  13. Building a genome database using an object-oriented approach.

    PubMed

    Barbasiewicz, Anna; Liu, Lin; Lang, B Franz; Burger, Gertraud

    2002-01-01

    GOBASE is a relational database that integrates data associated with mitochondria and chloroplasts. The most important data in GOBASE, i. e., molecular sequences and taxonomic information, are obtained from the public sequence data repository at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), and are validated by our experts. Maintaining a curated genomic database comes with a towering labor cost, due to the shear volume of available genomic sequences and the plethora of annotation errors and omissions in records retrieved from public repositories. Here we describe our approach to increase automation of the database population process, thereby reducing manual intervention. As a first step, we used Unified Modeling Language (UML) to construct a list of potential errors. Each case was evaluated independently, and an expert solution was devised, and represented as a diagram. Subsequently, the UML diagrams were used as templates for writing object-oriented automation programs in the Java programming language. PMID:12542407

  14. Teaching Object-Oriented Modelling Using UML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boberić-Krstićev, Danijela; Tešendić, Danijela

    2011-09-01

    The paper elaborates on experiences and lessons learned from the course on object-oriented analyses and design at the Faculty of Sciences, Novi Sad. In the paper we identify a set of issues concerning teaching modeling and UML. It is described experience of teaching UML to students with and without previous knowledge of object-oriented programming.

  15. An outline of object-oriented philosophy.

    PubMed

    Harman, Graham

    2013-01-01

    This article summarises the principles of object-oriented philosophy and explains its similarities with, and differences from, the outlook of the natural sciences. Like science, the object-oriented position avoids the notion (quite common in philosophy) that the human-world relation is the ground of all others, such that scientific statements about the world would only be statements about the world as it is for humans. But unlike science, object-oriented metaphysics treats artificial, social, and fictional entities in the same way as natural ones, and also holds that the world can only be known allusively rather than directly. PMID:23901635

  16. Object-oriented models of cognitive processing.

    PubMed

    Mather, G

    2001-05-01

    Information-processing models of vision and cognition are inspired by procedural programming languages. Models that emphasize object-based representations are closely related to object-oriented programming languages. The concepts underlying object-oriented languages provide a theoretical framework for cognitive processing that differs markedly from that offered by procedural languages. This framework is well-suited to a system designed to deal flexibly with discrete objects and unpredictable events in the world. PMID:11323249

  17. Parallel object-oriented adaptive mesh refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Balsara, D.; Quinlan, D.J.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper we study adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) for elliptic and hyperbolic systems. We use the Asynchronous Fast Adaptive Composite Grid Method (AFACX), a parallel algorithm based upon the of Fast Adaptive Composite Grid Method (FAC) as a test case of an adaptive elliptic solver. For our hyperbolic system example we use TVD and ENO schemes for solving the Euler and MHD equations. We use the structured grid load balancer MLB as a tool for obtaining a load balanced distribution in a parallel environment. Parallel adaptive mesh refinement poses difficulties in expressing both the basic single grid solver, whether elliptic or hyperbolic, in a fashion that parallelizes seamlessly. It also requires that these basic solvers work together within the adaptive mesh refinement algorithm which uses the single grid solvers as one part of its adaptive solution process. We show that use of AMR++, an object-oriented library within the OVERTURE Framework, simplifies the development of AMR applications. Parallel support is provided and abstracted through the use of the P++ parallel array class.

  18. Object oriented development of engineering software using CLIPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, C. John

    1991-01-01

    Engineering applications involve numeric complexity and manipulations of a large amount of data. Traditionally, numeric computation has been the concern in developing an engineering software. As engineering application software became larger and more complex, management of resources such as data, rather than the numeric complexity, has become the major software design problem. Object oriented design and implementation methodologies can improve the reliability, flexibility, and maintainability of the resulting software; however, some tasks are better solved with the traditional procedural paradigm. The C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS), with deffunction and defgeneric constructs, supports the procedural paradigm. The natural blending of object oriented and procedural paradigms has been cited as the reason for the popularity of the C++ language. The CLIPS Object Oriented Language's (COOL) object oriented features are more versatile than C++'s. A software design methodology based on object oriented and procedural approaches appropriate for engineering software, and to be implemented in CLIPS was outlined. A method for sensor placement for Space Station Freedom is being implemented in COOL as a sample problem.

  19. Model-Based Software Testing for Object-Oriented Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biju, Soly Mathew

    2008-01-01

    Model-based testing is one of the best solutions for testing object-oriented software. It has a better test coverage than other testing styles. Model-based testing takes into consideration behavioural aspects of a class, which are usually unchecked in other testing methods. An increase in the complexity of software has forced the software industry…

  20. ROOM: A recursive object oriented method for information systems development

    SciTech Connect

    Thelliez, T.; Donahue, S.

    1994-02-09

    Although complementary for the development of complex systems, top-down structured design and object oriented approach are still opposed and not integrated. As the complexity of the systems are still growing, and the so-called software crisis still not solved, it is urgent to provide a framework mixing the two paradigms. This paper presents an elegant attempt in this direction through our Recursive Object-Oriented Method (ROOM) in which a top-down approach divides the complexity of the system and an object oriented method studies a given level of abstraction. Illustrating this recursive schema with a simple example, we demonstrate that we achieve the goal of creating loosely coupled and reusable components.

  1. Object-oriented Technology for Compressor Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, C. K.; Follen, G. J.; Cannon, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    An object-oriented basis for interdisciplinary compressor simulation can, in principle, overcome several barriers associated with the traditional structured (procedural) development approach. This paper presents the results of a research effort with the objective to explore the repercussions on design, analysis, and implementation of a compressor model in an object oriented (OO) language, and to examine the ability of the OO system design to accommodate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code for compressor performance prediction. Three fundamental results are that: (1) the selection of the object oriented language is not the central issue; enhanced (interdisciplinary) analysis capability derives from a broader focus on object-oriented technology; (2) object-oriented designs will produce more effective and reusable computer programs when the technology is applied to issues involving complex system inter-relationships (more so than when addressing the complex physics of an isolated discipline); and (3) the concept of disposable prototypes is effective for exploratory research programs, but this requires organizations to have a commensurate long-term perspective. This work also suggests that interdisciplinary simulation can be effectively accomplished (over several levels of fidelity) with a mixed language treatment (i.e., FORTRAN-C++), reinforcing the notion the OO technology implementation into simulations is a 'journey' in which the syntax can, by design, continuously evolve.

  2. Object-oriented layers in ELIST.

    SciTech Connect

    Widing, M. A.; Simunich, K. L.; Blachowicz, D.; Braun, M.; VanGroningen, C.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2004-01-01

    Planning for the transportation of large amounts of equipment, troops, and supplies presents a complex problem for military analysts. Software tools are critical in defining and analyzing these plans. Argonne National Laboratory developed the Enhanced Logistics Intra-theater Support Tool (ELIST) to assist military planners in determining the logistical feasibility of an intra-theater course of action. This article focuses on the object-oriented design strategies we used in developing the latest version of this successful system. Details of the specific military, logistical algorithms that were implemented can be found in other sources. In developing large, complex software systems, object-oriented programming techniques can provide many benefits. In addition to using an object-oriented language developers should also employ other techniques such as layers to fully obtain these benefits. This article discusses several of these design details that were used in developing a military logistics system called ELIST.

  3. Object-oriented fault tree models applied to system diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iverson, David L.; Patterson-Hine, F. A.

    1990-01-01

    When a diagnosis system is used in a dynamic environment, such as the distributed computer system planned for use on Space Station Freedom, it must execute quickly and its knowledge base must be easily updated. Representing system knowledge as object-oriented augmented fault trees provides both features. The diagnosis system described here is based on the failure cause identification process of the diagnostic system described by Narayanan and Viswanadham. Their system has been enhanced in this implementation by replacing the knowledge base of if-then rules with an object-oriented fault tree representation. This allows the system to perform its task much faster and facilitates dynamic updating of the knowledge base in a changing diagnosis environment. Accessing the information contained in the objects is more efficient than performing a lookup operation on an indexed rule base. Additionally, the object-oriented fault trees can be easily updated to represent current system status. This paper describes the fault tree representation, the diagnosis algorithm extensions, and an example application of this system. Comparisons are made between the object-oriented fault tree knowledge structure solution and one implementation of a rule-based solution. Plans for future work on this system are also discussed.

  4. Object-Oriented Geographical Database Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, M. L.; Bryant, N.; Sapounas, D.

    1996-01-01

    Terbase is an Object-Oriented database system under development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Terbase is designed for flexibility, reusability, maintenace ease, multi-user collaboration and independence, and efficiency. This paper details the design and development of Terbase as a geographic data server...

  5. Object-oriented accelerator design with HPF

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Qiang; Ryne, R.D.; Habib, S.

    1998-12-31

    In this paper, object-oriented design is applied to codes for beam dynamics simulations in accelerators using High Performance Fortran (HPF). This results in good maintainability, reusability, and extensibility of software, combined with the ease of parallel programming provided by HPF.

  6. GUI and Object Oriented Programming in COBOL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorents, Alden C.

    Various schools are struggling with the introduction of Object Oriented (OO) programming concepts and GUI (graphical user interfaces) within the traditional COBOL sequence. OO programming has been introduced in some of the curricula with languages such as C++, Smalltalk, and Java. Introducing OO programming into a typical COBOL sequence presents…

  7. Object-oriented design of preconditioned iterative methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bruaset, A.M.

    1994-12-31

    In this talk the author discusses how object-oriented programming techniques can be used to develop a flexible software package for preconditioned iterative methods. The ideas described have been used to implement the linear algebra part of Diffpack, which is a collection of C++ class libraries that provides high-level tools for the solution of partial differential equations. In particular, this software package is aimed at rapid development of PDE-based numerical simulators, primarily using finite element methods.

  8. Preliminary Development of an Object-Oriented Optimization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-gi

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center has developed a FORTRAN-based object-oriented optimization (O3) tool that leverages existing tools and practices and allows easy integration and adoption of new state-of-the-art software. The object-oriented framework can integrate the analysis codes for multiple disciplines, as opposed to relying on one code to perform analysis for all disciplines. Optimization can thus take place within each discipline module, or in a loop between the central executive module and the discipline modules, or both. Six sample optimization problems are presented. The first four sample problems are based on simple mathematical equations; the fifth and sixth problems consider a three-bar truss, which is a classical example in structural synthesis. Instructions for preparing input data for the O3 tool are presented.

  9. Reuse Metrics for Object Oriented Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bieman, James M.

    1998-01-01

    One way to increase the quality of software products and the productivity of software development is to reuse existing software components when building new software systems. In order to monitor improvements in reuse, the level of reuse must be measured. In this NASA supported project we (1) derived a suite of metrics which quantify reuse attributes for object oriented, object based, and procedural software, (2) designed prototype tools to take these measurements in Ada, C++, Java, and C software, (3) evaluated the reuse in available software, (4) analyzed the relationship between coupling, cohesion, inheritance, and reuse, (5) collected object oriented software systems for our empirical analyses, and (6) developed quantitative criteria and methods for restructuring software to improve reusability.

  10. Considering Object Oriented Technology in Aviation Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayhurst, Kelly J.; Holloway, C. Michael

    2003-01-01

    Few developers of commercial aviation software products are using object-oriented technology (OOT), despite its popularity in some other industries. Safety concerns about using OOT in critical applications, uncertainty about how to comply with regulatory requirements, and basic conservatism within the aviation community have been factors behind this caution. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) have sponsored research to investigate and workshops to discuss safety and certification concerns about OOT and to develop recommendations for safe use. Two Object Oriented Technology in Aviation (OOTiA) workshops have been held and numerous issues and comments about the effect of OOT features and languages have been collected. This paper gives a high level overview of the OOTiA project, and discusses selected specific results from the March 2003 workshop. In particular, results in the form of questions to consider before making the decision to use OOT are presented.

  11. An object oriented extension to CLIPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobkowicz, Clifford

    1990-01-01

    A presentation of software sub-system developed to augment C Language Production Systems (CLIPS) with facilities for object oriented Knowledge representation. Functions are provided to define classes, instantiate objects, access attributes, and assert object related facts. This extension is implemented via the CLIPS user function interface and does not require modification of any CLIPS code. It does rely on internal CLIPS functions for memory management and symbol representation.

  12. Aspects on Teaching/Learning with Object Oriented Programming for Entry Level Courses of Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Oliveira, Clara Amelia; Conte, Marcos Fernando; Riso, Bernardo Goncalves

    This work presents a proposal for Teaching/Learning, on Object Oriented Programming for Entry Level Courses of Engineering and Computer Science, on University. The philosophy of Object Oriented Programming comes as a new pattern of solution for problems, where flexibility and reusability appears over the simple data structure and sequential…

  13. System safety and reliability using object-oriented programming techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson-Hine, F.A.; Koen, B.V.

    1987-01-01

    Direct evaluation fault tree codes have been written in recursive, list-processing computer languages such as PL/1 (PATREC-I) and LISP (PATREC-L). The pattern-matching strategy implemented in these codes has been used extensively in France to evaluate system reliability. Recent reviews of the risk management process suggest that a data base containing plant-specific information be integrated with a package of codes used for probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) to alleviate some of the difficulties that make a PRA so costly and time-intensive. A new programming paradigm, object-oriented programming, is uniquely suited for the development of such a software system. A knowledge base and fault tree evaluation algorithm, based on previous experience with PATREC-L, have been implemented using object-oriented techniques, resulting in a reliability assessment environment that is easy to develop, modify, and extend.

  14. An object-oriented database for protein structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Gray, P M; Paton, N W; Kemp, G J; Fothergill, J E

    1990-03-01

    An object-oriented database system has been developed which is being used to store protein structure data. The database can be queried using the logic programming language Prolog or the query language Daplex. Queries retrieve information by navigating through a network of objects which represent the primary, secondary and tertiary structures of proteins. Routines written in both Prolog and Daplex can integrate complex calculations with the retrieval of data from the database, and can also be stored in the database for sharing among users. Thus object-oriented databases are better suited to prototyping applications and answering complex queries about protein structure than relational databases. This system has been used to find loops of varying length and anchor positions when modelling homologous protein structures. PMID:2188261

  15. An object oriented generic controller using CLIPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nivens, Cody R.

    1990-01-01

    In today's applications, the need for the division of code and data has focused on the growth of object oriented programming. This philosophy gives software engineers greater control over the environment of an application. Yet the use of object oriented design does not exclude the need for greater understanding by the application of what the controller is doing. Such understanding is only possible by using expert systems. Providing a controller that is capable of controlling an object by using rule-based expertise would expedite the use of both object oriented design and expert knowledge of the dynamic of an environment in modern controllers. This project presents a model of a controller that uses the CLIPS expert system and objects in C++ to create a generic controller. The polymorphic abilities of C++ allow for the design of a generic component stored in individual data files. Accompanying the component is a set of rules written in CLIPS which provide the following: the control of individual components, the input of sensory data from components and the ability to find the status of a given component. Along with the data describing the application, a set of inference rules written in CLIPS allows the application to make use of sensory facts and status and control abilities. As a demonstration of this ability, the control of the environment of a house is provided. This demonstration includes the data files describing the rooms and their contents as far as devices, windows and doors. The rules used for the home consist of the flow of people in the house and the control of devices by the home owner.

  16. Risk-Based Object Oriented Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, Linda H.; Stapko, Ruth; Gallo, Albert

    2000-01-01

    Software testing is a well-defined phase of the software development life cycle. Functional ("black box") testing and structural ("white box") testing are two methods of test case design commonly used by software developers. A lesser known testing method is risk-based testing, which takes into account the probability of failure of a portion of code as determined by its complexity. For object oriented programs, a methodology is proposed for identification of risk-prone classes. Risk-based testing is a highly effective testing technique that can be used to find and fix the most important problems as quickly as possible.

  17. Object-oriented parallel polygon rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Heiland, R.W.

    1994-09-01

    Since many scientific datasets can be visualized using some polygonal representation, a polygon renderer has broad use for scientific visualization. With today`s high performance computing applications producing very large datasets, a parallel polygon renderer is a necessary tool for keeping the compute-visualize cycle at a minimum. This paper presents a DOIV on renderer that combines the shared-memory and message-passing models of parallel programming. It uses the Global Arrays library, a shared-memory programming toolkit for distributed memory machines. The experience of using an object oriented approach for software design and development is also discussed.

  18. AMR++: Object-oriented design for adaptive mesh refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, D.

    1998-12-01

    The development of object-oriented libraries for scientific computing is complicated by the wide range of applications that are targeted and the complexity and wide range of numerical methods that are used. A problem is to design a library that can be customized to handle a wide range of target applications and increasingly complex numerical methods while maintaining a sufficiently useful library for simple problems. These problems have been classically at odds with one another and have compromised the design of many object-oriented library solutions. In this paper the authors detail the mechanisms used within AMR**, and object-oriented library for Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR), to provide the level of extensibility that is required to make AMR++ easily customizable for the more obscure applications while remaining small and simple for less complex applications. The goal has been to have a complex applications. The goal has been to have a complexity that matches the complexity of the target application. These mechanisms are general and extend to other libraries as well.

  19. Object Orientated Methods in Computational Fluid Dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabor, Gavin; Weller, Henry; Jasak, Hrvoje; Fureby, Christer

    1997-11-01

    We outline the aims of the FOAM code, a Finite Volume Computational Fluid Dynamics code written in C++, and discuss the use of Object Orientated Programming (OOP) methods to achieve these aims. The intention when writing this code was to make it as easy as possible to alter the modelling : this was achieved by making the top level syntax of the code as close as possible to conventional mathematical notation for tensors and partial differential equations. Object orientation enables us to define classes for both types of objects, and the operator overloading possible in C++ allows normal symbols to be used for the basic operations. The introduction of features such as automatic dimension checking of equations helps to enforce correct coding of models. We also discuss the use of OOP techniques such as data encapsulation and code reuse. As examples of the flexibility of this approach, we discuss the implementation of turbulence modelling using RAS and LES. The code is used to simulate turbulent flow for a number of test cases, including fully developed channel flow and flow around obstacles. We also demonstrate the use of the code for solving structures calculations and magnetohydrodynamics.

  20. Object oriented studies into artificial space debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, J. M.; Marshall, G.

    1988-01-01

    A prototype simulation is being developed under contract to the Royal Aerospace Establishment (RAE), Farnborough, England, to assist in the discrimination of artificial space objects/debris. The methodology undertaken has been to link Object Oriented programming, intelligent knowledge based system (IKBS) techniques and advanced computer technology with numeric analysis to provide a graphical, symbolic simulation. The objective is to provide an additional layer of understanding on top of conventional classification methods. Use is being made of object and rule based knowledge representation, multiple reasoning, truth maintenance and uncertainty. Software tools being used include Knowledge Engineering Environment (KEE) and SymTactics for knowledge representation. Hooks are being developed within the SymTactics framework to incorporate mathematical models describing orbital motion and fragmentation. Penetration and structural analysis can also be incorporated. SymTactics is an Object Oriented discrete event simulation tool built as a domain specific extension to the KEE environment. The tool provides facilities for building, debugging and monitoring dynamic (military) simulations.

  1. Object oriented programming interfaces for accelerator control

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, L.T.

    1997-07-01

    Several years ago, the AGS controls group was given the task of developing software for the RHIC accelerator. Like the AGS, the RHIC control system needs to control and monitor equipment distributed around a relatively large geographic area. A local area network connects this equipment to a collection of UNIX workstations in a central control room. Similar software had been developed for the AGS about a decade earlier, but isn`t well suited for RHIC use for a number of reasons. Rather than adapt the AGS software for RHIC use, the controls group opted to start with a clean slate. To develop software that would address the shortcomings of the AGS software, while preserving the useful features that evolved through years of use. A current trend in control system design is to provide an object oriented programming interface for application developers. This talk will discuss important aspects and features of object oriented application programming interfaces (APIs) for accelerator control systems, and explore why such interfaces are becoming the norm.

  2. An object-oriented approach to nested data parallelism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffler, Thomas J.; Chatterjee, Siddhartha

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes an implementation technique for integrating nested data parallelism into an object-oriented language. Data-parallel programming employs sets of data called 'collections' and expresses parallelism as operations performed over the elements of a collection. When the elements of a collection are also collections, then there is the possibility for 'nested data parallelism.' Few current programming languages support nested data parallelism however. In an object-oriented framework, a collection is a single object. Its type defines the parallel operations that may be applied to it. Our goal is to design and build an object-oriented data-parallel programming environment supporting nested data parallelism. Our initial approach is built upon three fundamental additions to C++. We add new parallel base types by implementing them as classes, and add a new parallel collection type called a 'vector' that is implemented as a template. Only one new language feature is introduced: the 'foreach' construct, which is the basis for exploiting elementwise parallelism over collections. The strength of the method lies in the compilation strategy, which translates nested data-parallel C++ into ordinary C++. Extracting the potential parallelism in nested 'foreach' constructs is called 'flattening' nested parallelism. We show how to flatten 'foreach' constructs using a simple program transformation. Our prototype system produces vector code which has been successfully run on workstations, a CM-2, and a CM-5.

  3. A Taxonomy of Object-Oriented Measures Modeling the Object-Oriented Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Ralph D.; Weistroffer, H. Roland; Coppins, Richard J.

    1997-01-01

    In order to control the quality of software and the software development process, it is important to understand the measurement of software. A first step toward a better comprehension of software measurement is the categorization of software measures by some meaningful taxonomy. The most worthwhile taxonomy would capture the fundamental nature of the object-oriented (O-O) space. The principal characteristics of object-oriented software offer a starting point for such a categorization of measures. This paper introduces a taxonomy of measures based upon fourteen characteristics of object-oriented software gathered from the literature. This taxonomy allows us to easily see gaps or redundancies in the existing O-O measures. The taxonomy also clearly differentiates among taxa so that there is no ambiguity as to the taxon to which a measure belongs. The taxonomy has been populated with measures taken from the literature.

  4. A Taxonomy of Object-Oriented Measures Modeling the Object Oriented Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Ralph D.; Weistroffer, H. Roland; Coppins, Richard J.

    1997-01-01

    In order to control the quality of software and the software development process, it is important to understand the measurement of software. A first step toward a better comprehension of software measurement is the categorization of software measures by some meaningful taxonomy. The most worthwhile taxonomy would capture the fundamental nature of the object-oriented (O-O) space. The principal characteristics of object-oriented software offer a starting point for such a categorization of measures. This paper introduces a taxonomy of measures based upon fourteen characteristics of object-oriented software gathered from the literature. This taxonomy allows us to easily see gaps or redundancies in the existing O-O measures. The taxonomy also clearly differentiates among taxa so that there is no ambiguity as to the taxon to which a measure belongs. The taxonomy has been populated with measures taken from the literature.

  5. Object-oriented model-driven control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drysdale, A.; Mcroberts, M.; Sager, J.; Wheeler, R.

    1994-01-01

    A monitoring and control subsystem architecture has been developed that capitalizes on the use of modeldriven monitoring and predictive control, knowledge-based data representation, and artificial reasoning in an operator support mode. We have developed an object-oriented model of a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS). The model based on the NASA Kennedy Space Center CELSS breadboard data, tracks carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen, carbodioxide, and water. It estimates and tracks resorce-related parameters such as mass, energy, and manpower measurements such as growing area required for balance. We are developing an interface with the breadboard systems that is compatible with artificial reasoning. Initial work is being done on use of expert systems and user interface development. This paper presents an approach to defining universally applicable CELSS monitor and control issues, and implementing appropriate monitor and control capability for a particular instance: the KSC CELSS Breadboard Facility.

  6. Distributed Object Oriented Geographic Information System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1997-02-01

    This interactive, object-oriented, distributed Geographic Information System (GIS) uses the World Wibe Web (WWW) as application medium and distribution mechanism. The software provides distributed access to multiple geo-spatial databases and presents them as if they came from a single coherent database. DOOGIS distributed access comes not only in the form of multiple geo-spatial servers but can break down a single logical server into the constituent physical servers actually storing the data. The program provides formore » dynamic protocol resolution and content handling allowing unknown objects from a particular server to download their handling code. Security and access privileges are negotiated dynamically with each server contacted and each access attempt.« less

  7. Object-oriented Matlab adaptive optics toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conan, R.; Correia, C.

    2014-08-01

    Object-Oriented Matlab Adaptive Optics (OOMAO) is a Matlab toolbox dedicated to Adaptive Optics (AO) systems. OOMAO is based on a small set of classes representing the source, atmosphere, telescope, wavefront sensor, Deformable Mirror (DM) and an imager of an AO system. This simple set of classes allows simulating Natural Guide Star (NGS) and Laser Guide Star (LGS) Single Conjugate AO (SCAO) and tomography AO systems on telescopes up to the size of the Extremely Large Telescopes (ELT). The discrete phase screens that make the atmosphere model can be of infinite size, useful for modeling system performance on large time scales. OOMAO comes with its own parametric influence function model to emulate different types of DMs. The cone effect, altitude thickness and intensity profile of LGSs are also reproduced. Both modal and zonal modeling approach are implemented. OOMAO has also an extensive library of theoretical expressions to evaluate the statistical properties of turbulence wavefronts. The main design characteristics of the OOMAO toolbox are object-oriented modularity, vectorized code and transparent parallel computing. OOMAO has been used to simulate and to design the Multi-Object AO prototype Raven at the Subaru telescope and the Laser Tomography AO system of the Giant Magellan Telescope. In this paper, a Laser Tomography AO system on an ELT is simulated with OOMAO. In the first part, we set-up the class parameters and we link the instantiated objects to create the source optical path. Then we build the tomographic reconstructor and write the script for the pseudo-open-loop controller.

  8. Deploying Object Oriented Data Technology to the Planetary Data System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, S.; Crichton, D.; Hughes, J. S.

    2003-01-01

    How do you provide more than 350 scientists and researchers access to data from every instrument in Odyssey when the data is curated across half a dozen institutions and in different formats and is too big to mail on a CD-ROM anymore? The Planetary Data System (PDS) faced this exact question. The solution was to use a metadata-based middleware framework developed by the Object Oriented Data Technology task at NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Using OODT, PDS provided - for the first time ever - data from all mission instruments through a single system immediately upon data delivery.

  9. POOLkits: Applying Object Oriented Principles from Software Engineering to Physics Object Oriented Learning -- Preliminary Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassebaum, Thomas; Aubrecht, Gordon

    2012-04-01

    Object-oriented development depends upon the creation of generic pieces that can be built into more complex parts. In physics, we begin teaching basic principles and then develop more complex systems, a fertile environment to develop learning objects. Each learning object consists of observable quantities, such as the physical properties of a block of wood, and operators that act on the object, such as force. Additionally, each object can also include an assessment operator that evaluates the impact of the learning object on student comprehension. The physics object-oriented learning kits (POOLkits) will be developed to enhance student understanding of physics concepts, as well as, build a framework for developing a software object based on the physics concept. A POOLkit can be extended, similar to the concept of extending classes in object-oriented programming, as physics knowledge expands. The expectation for these POOLkits would be to provide physics students with a solid foundation in the first principles to be able to derive more complex formulae and have the understanding of the process with a secondary benefit of enhancing the object-oriented programming capabilities of physics students.

  10. Object-oriented requirements analysis: A quick tour

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berard, Edward V.

    1990-01-01

    Of all the approaches to software development, an object-oriented approach appears to be both the most beneficial and the most popular. The description of the object-oriented approach is presented in the form of the view graphs.

  11. Object-Oriented MDAO Tool with Aeroservoelastic Model Tuning Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-gi; Li, Wesley; Lung, Shun-fat

    2008-01-01

    An object-oriented multi-disciplinary analysis and optimization (MDAO) tool has been developed at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center to automate the design and analysis process and leverage existing commercial as well as in-house codes to enable true multidisciplinary optimization in the preliminary design stage of subsonic, transonic, supersonic and hypersonic aircraft. Once the structural analysis discipline is finalized and integrated completely into the MDAO process, other disciplines such as aerodynamics and flight controls will be integrated as well. Simple and efficient model tuning capabilities based on optimization problem are successfully integrated with the MDAO tool. More synchronized all phases of experimental testing (ground and flight), analytical model updating, high-fidelity simulations for model validation, and integrated design may result in reduction of uncertainties in the aeroservoelastic model and increase the flight safety.

  12. Semantic Metrics for Object Oriented Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etzkorn, Lethe

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this proposal is to research a new suite of object-oriented (OO) software metrics, called semantic metrics, that have the potential to help software engineers identify fragile, low quality code sections much earlier in the development cycle than is possible with traditional OO metrics. With earlier and better Fault detection, software maintenance will be less time consuming and expensive, and software reusability will be improved. Because it is less costly to correct faults found earlier than to correct faults found later in the software lifecycle, the overall cost of software development will be reduced. Semantic metrics can be derived from the knowledge base of a program understanding system. A program understanding system is designed to understand a software module. Once understanding is complete, the knowledge-base contains digested information about the software module. Various semantic metrics can be collected on the knowledge base. This new kind of metric measures domain complexity, or the relationship of the software to its application domain, rather than implementation complexity, which is what traditional software metrics measure. A semantic metric will thus map much more closely to qualities humans are interested in, such as cohesion and maintainability, than is possible using traditional metrics, that are calculated using only syntactic aspects of software.

  13. Object-Oriented Programming in High Schools the Turing Way.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Richard C.

    This paper proposes an approach to introducing object-oriented concepts to high school computer science students using the Object-Oriented Turing (OOT) language. Students can learn about basic object-oriented (OO) principles such as classes and inheritance by using and expanding a collection of classes that draw pictures like circles and happy…

  14. Representing object oriented specifications and designs with extended data flow notations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buser, Jon Franklin; Ward, Paul T.

    1988-01-01

    The issue of using extended data flow notations to document object oriented designs and specifications is discussed. Extended data flow notations, for the purposes here, refer to notations that are based on the rules of Yourdon/DeMarco data flow analysis. The extensions include additional notation for representing real-time systems as well as some proposed extensions specific to object oriented development. Some advantages of data flow notations are stated. How data flow diagrams are used to represent software objects are investigated. Some problem areas with regard to using data flow notations for object oriented development are noted. Some initial solutions to these problems are proposed.

  15. Medical Imaging In An Object Oriented Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geist, Daniel; Vannier, Michael W.

    1988-06-01

    A workstation has been developed to evaluate computed tomographic (CT) image data in 2 and 3 dimensions. The workstation consists of an independent image display station (Independent Viewing and Analysis Station or WAS, International Imaging Systems, Inc., Milpitas, Calif.) and a VAX host computer. The WAS has 1024 X 1024 X 24 bits of image memory plus 4 bits of graphics overlay. An independent VLSI graphics processor and 1024 X 1024 X 4 bit graphics memory, independent of the image memory, are included in the self-contained WAS unit. A local microprocessor host (Motorola 68000 microprocessor) controls the IVAS from directives obtained through a direct memory access channel to the VAX host. This facilitated the creation of an object oriented software enviroment for the IVAS under control of a VAX host program written in the C language. The workstation created has an interactive user interface consisting of a mouse and pull-down menus. The workstation enables loading multiple images, typically 256 x 256 or 512 x 512, into the 1024 X 1024 frame buffer. Once loaded, the images can be manipulated by applying gray scale transforms, editing them and performing 3-D reconstructions from serial sections. Algorithms for three dimensional (3-D) reconstructions were implemented in the VAX/VMS host computer environment and are available on the workstation through special menu functions for handling these reconstructions. The functions interactively combine depth and gradient shading of surfaces to suit specific applications in craniofacial surgical planning or orthopedics. This workstation is user friendly and is very easy to handle. A workstation of this type may become a popular tool for physicians and surgeons in evalution of medical images.

  16. An Object-Oriented Network-Centric Software Architecture for Physical Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Richard

    1997-08-01

    Recent developments in object-oriented computer languages and infrastructure such as the Internet, Web browsers, and the like provide an opportunity to define a more productive computational environment for scientific programming that is based more closely on the underlying mathematics describing physics than traditional programming languages such as FORTRAN or C++. In this talk I describe an object-oriented software architecture for representing physical problems that includes classes for such common mathematical objects as geometry, boundary conditions, partial differential and integral equations, discretization and numerical solution methods, etc. In practice, a scientific program written using this architecture looks remarkably like the mathematics used to understand the problem, is typically an order of magnitude smaller than traditional FORTRAN or C++ codes, and hence easier to understand, debug, describe, etc. All objects in this architecture are ``network-enabled,'' which means that components of a software solution to a physical problem can be transparently loaded from anywhere on the Internet or other global network. The architecture is expressed as an ``API,'' or application programmers interface specification, with reference embeddings in Java, Python, and C++. A C++ class library for an early version of this API has been implemented for machines ranging from PC's to the IBM SP2, meaning that phidentical codes run on all architectures.

  17. Tecolote: An Object-Oriented Framework for Hydrodynamics Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Holian, K.S.; Ankeny, L.A.; Clancy, S.P.; Hall, J.H.; Marshall, J.C.; McNamara, G.R.; Painter, J.W.; Zander, M.E.

    1997-12-31

    Tecolote is an object-oriented framework for both developing and accessing a variety of hydrodynamics models. It is written in C++, and is in turn built on another framework - Parallel Object-Oriented Methods and Applications (POOMA). The Tecolote framework is meant to provide modules (or building blocks) to put together hydrodynamics applications that can encompass a wide variety of physics models, numerical solution options, and underlying data storage schemes, although with only those modules activated at runtime that are necessary. Tecolote has been designed to separate physics from computer science, as much as humanly possible. The POOMA framework provides fields in C++ to Tecolote that are analogous to Fortran-9O-like arrays in the way that they are used, but that, in addition, have underlying load balancing, message passing, and a special scheme for compact data storage. The POOMA fields can also have unique meshes associated with them that can allow more options than just the normal regularly-spaced Cartesian mesh. They also permit one-, two, and three-dimensions to be immediately accessible to the code developer and code user.

  18. Reengineering legacy software to object-oriented systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitman, C.; Braley, D.; Fridge, E.; Plumb, A.; Izygon, M.; Mears, B.

    1994-01-01

    NASA has a legacy of complex software systems that are becoming increasingly expensive to maintain. Reengineering is one approach to modemizing these systems. Object-oriented technology, other modem software engineering principles, and automated tools can be used to reengineer the systems and will help to keep maintenance costs of the modemized systems down. The Software Technology Branch at the NASA/Johnson Space Center has been developing and testing reengineering methods and tools for several years. The Software Technology Branch is currently providing training and consulting support to several large reengineering projects at JSC, including the Reusable Objects Software Environment (ROSE) project, which is reengineering the flight analysis and design system (over 2 million lines of FORTRAN code) into object-oriented C++. Many important lessons have been learned during the past years; one of these is that the design must never be allowed to diverge from the code during maintenance and enhancement. Future work on open, integrated environments to support reengineering is being actively planned.

  19. Object oriented hardware-software test bench for OMTF diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drabik, Pawel; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Bunkowski, Karol; Zawistowski, Krystian; Byszuk, Adrian; Bluj, Michał; Doroba, Krzysztof; Górski, Maciej; Kalinowski, Artur; Kierzkowski, Krzysztof; Konecki, Marcin; Królikowski, Jan; Oklinski, Wojciech; Olszewski, Michał; Skala, Aleksander; Zabołotny, Wojciech M.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper the object oriented hardware-software model and its sample implementation of diagnostics for the Overlap Muon Track Finder trigger for the CMS experiment in CERN is described. It presents realization of test-bench for control and diagnosis class of multichannel, distributed measurement systems based on FPGA chips. The test-bench fulfills requirements for system's rapid changes, configurability and efficiency. This ability is very significant and desirable by expanded electronic systems. The solution described is a software model based on a method of address space management called the Component Internal Interface (CII). Establishment of stable link between hardware and software, as a purpose of designed and realized programming environment, is presented. The test-bench implementation and example of OMTF algorithm test is presented.

  20. Faunus: An object oriented framework for molecular simulation

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Mikael; Trulsson, Martin; Persson, Björn

    2008-01-01

    Background We present a C++ class library for Monte Carlo simulation of molecular systems, including proteins in solution. The design is generic and highly modular, enabling multiple developers to easily implement additional features. The statistical mechanical methods are documented by extensive use of code comments that – subsequently – are collected to automatically build a web-based manual. Results We show how an object oriented design can be used to create an intuitively appealing coding framework for molecular simulation. This is exemplified in a minimalistic C++ program that can calculate protein protonation states. We further discuss performance issues related to high level coding abstraction. Conclusion C++ and the Standard Template Library (STL) provide a high-performance platform for generic molecular modeling. Automatic generation of code documentation from inline comments has proven particularly useful in that no separate manual needs to be maintained. PMID:18241331

  1. The Assignment of Scale to Object-Oriented Software Measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Ralph D.; Weistroffer, H. Roland; Coppins, Richard J.

    1997-01-01

    In order to improve productivity (and quality), measurement of specific aspects of software has become imperative. As object oriented programming languages have become more widely used, metrics designed specifically for object-oriented software are required. Recently a large number of new metrics for object- oriented software has appeared in the literature. Unfortunately, many of these proposed metrics have not been validated to measure what they purport to measure. In this paper fifty (50) of these metrics are analyzed.

  2. High Performance Object-Oriented Scientific Programming in Fortran 90

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, Charles D.; Decyk, Viktor K.; Szymanski, Boleslaw K.

    1997-01-01

    We illustrate how Fortran 90 supports object-oriented concepts by example of plasma particle computations on the IBM SP. Our experience shows that Fortran 90 and object-oriented methodology give high performance while providing a bridge from Fortran 77 legacy codes to modern programming principles. All of our object-oriented Fortran 90 codes execute more quickly thatn the equeivalent C++ versions, yet the abstraction modelling capabilities used for scentific programming are comparably powereful.

  3. Modern industrial simulation tools: Kernel-level integration of high performance parallel processing, object-oriented numerics, and adaptive finite element analysis. Final report, July 16, 1993--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Deb, M.K.; Kennon, S.R.

    1998-04-01

    A cooperative R&D effort between industry and the US government, this project, under the HPPP (High Performance Parallel Processing) initiative of the Dept. of Energy, started the investigations into parallel object-oriented (OO) numerics. The basic goal was to research and utilize the emerging technologies to create a physics-independent computational kernel for applications using adaptive finite element method. The industrial team included Computational Mechanics Co., Inc. (COMCO) of Austin, TX (as the primary contractor), Scientific Computing Associates, Inc. (SCA) of New Haven, CT, Texaco and CONVEX. Sandia National Laboratory (Albq., NM) was the technology partner from the government side. COMCO had the responsibility of the main kernel design and development, SCA had the lead in parallel solver technology and guidance on OO technologies was Sandia`s main expertise in this venture. CONVEX and Texaco supported the partnership by hardware resource and application knowledge, respectively. As such, a minimum of fifty-percent cost-sharing was provided by the industry partnership during this project. This report describes the R&D activities and provides some details about the prototype kernel and example applications.

  4. An intelligent object-oriented database system for materials information

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.J.; Krishnamurthy, M.V.; Tripathy, S.R.; Sage, P.

    1995-12-31

    Materials information systems are used normally to provide data that is input to a separate design or test system that then computes the characteristics of some item or entity being designed or examined. This paper concerns the study of an integrated system that includes both the data and design systems together; therefore, it includes not only data on the property of materials but also knowledge on the geometry of the item being designed. In addition, it includes formulas representing the laws of physical science used to carry out the calculation needed to compute the necessary characteristics of the item. This kind of system can determine the optimum materials for the design of an item, rather than simply retrieve material properties. It may replace the simple search and retrieve systems available today, and it is argued that the complexity of such a system could only be achieved using an object-oriented methodology.

  5. GOOSE, a generalized object-oriented simulation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, C.E.; March-Leuba, C. ); Guimaraes, L.; Ugolini, D. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    GOOSE, prototype software for a fully interactive, object-oriented simulation environment, is being developed as part of the Advanced Controls Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Dynamic models may easily be constructed and tested; fully interactive capabilities allow the user to alter model parameters and complexity without recompilation. This environment provides access to powerful tools, such as numerical integration packages, graphical displays, and online help. Portability has been an important design goal; the system was written in Objective-C in order to run on a wide variety of computers and operating systems, including UNIX workstations and personal computers. A detailed library of nuclear reactor components, currently under development, will also be described. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Object-oriented system building for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Ludgate, G.A.

    1989-04-01

    The concepts and terminology of object-oriented system development are presented assuming the reader is familiar with the Structured Analysis and Structured Design (SA/SD) methodology. An improvement to SA/SD, known as Object Oriented Analysis/Object Oriented Design (OOA/OOD) is described and the steps in such an undertaking explained. Object Oriented Programming (OOP) is briefly introduced before SA/SD and OOA/OOD are compared. A recommendation to the SSC Central Design Group concludes the paper.

  7. The Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment

    SciTech Connect

    2010-05-01

    MOOSE is a software framework for the development of complex multidimensional engineering analysis applications using the finite element method. It provides a clean, extensible interface for scientists to develop analysis applications by accepting weak forms (i.e., virtual work expressions) of the mathematical models that govern the behavior of the physical system being modeled. MOOSE provides spatial and temporal discretization support for these expressions and allows them to be coupled in general ways and with general boundary and initial conditions and constraints. MOOSE also provides a solution environment that allows the parallel solution of the described problem on computer systems ranging from one processor to massively parallel systems.

  8. SCOS 2: An object oriented software development approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symonds, Martin; Lynenskjold, Steen; Mueller, Christian

    1994-01-01

    The Spacecraft Control and Operations System 2 (SCOS 2), is intended to provide the generic mission control system infrastructure for future ESA missions. It represents a bold step forward in order to take advantage of state-of-the-art technology and current practices in the area of software engineering. Key features include: (1) use of object oriented analysis and design techniques; (2) use of UNIX, C++ and a distributed architecture as the enabling implementation technology; (3) goal of re-use for development, maintenance and mission specific software implementation; and (4) introduction of the concept of a spacecraft control model. This paper touches upon some of the traditional beliefs surrounding Object Oriented development and describes their relevance to SCOS 2. It gives rationale for why particular approaches were adopted and others not, and describes the impact of these decisions. The development approach followed is discussed, highlighting the evolutionary nature of the overall process and the iterative nature of the various tasks carried out. The emphasis of this paper is on the process of the development with the following being covered: (1) the three phases of the SCOS 2 project - prototyping & analysis, design & implementation and configuration / delivery of mission specific systems; (2) the close cooperation and continual interaction with the users during the development; (3) the management approach - the split between client staff, industry and some of the required project management activities; (4) the lifecycle adopted being an enhancement of the ESA PSS-05 standard with SCOS 2 specific activities and approaches defined; and (5) an examination of some of the difficulties encountered and the solutions adopted. Finally, the lessons learned from the SCOS 2 experience are highlighted, identifying those issues to be used as feedback into future developments of this nature. This paper does not intend to describe the finished product and its operation

  9. The Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-05-01

    MOOSE is a software framework for the development of complex multidimensional engineering analysis applications using the finite element method. It provides a clean, extensible interface for scientists to develop analysis applications by accepting weak forms (i.e., virtual work expressions) of the mathematical models that govern the behavior of the physical system being modeled. MOOSE provides spatial and temporal discretization support for these expressions and allows them to be coupled in general ways and with generalmore » boundary and initial conditions and constraints. MOOSE also provides a solution environment that allows the parallel solution of the described problem on computer systems ranging from one processor to massively parallel systems.« less

  10. Teaching Adaptability of Object-Oriented Programming Language Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Xiao-dong

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of object-oriented programming languages includes update of their own versions, update of development environments, and reform of new languages upon old languages. In this paper, the evolution analysis of object-oriented programming languages is presented in term of the characters and development. The notion of adaptive teaching upon…

  11. Object-Oriented Programming in the Primary Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borne, Isabelle; Girardot, Colette

    1991-01-01

    Describes the use of Smalltalk-80, a French programing language, to teach young children to program effectively using object-oriented concepts. Learning processes involving problem solving and programing are examined, the object-oriented environment is discussed, teacher training is described, and future work is suggested. (21 references) (LRW)

  12. An object-oriented approach to energy-economic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, M.A.; Fox, J.A.; Sands, R.D.

    1993-12-01

    In this paper, the authors discuss the experiences in creating an object-oriented economic model of the U.S. energy and agriculture markets. After a discussion of some central concepts, they provide an overview of the model, focusing on the methodology of designing an object-oriented class hierarchy specification based on standard microeconomic production functions. The evolution of the model from the class definition stage to programming it in C++, a standard object-oriented programming language, will be detailed. The authors then discuss the main differences between writing the object-oriented program versus a procedure-oriented program of the same model. Finally, they conclude with a discussion of the advantages and limitations of the object-oriented approach based on the experience in building energy-economic models with procedure-oriented approaches and languages.

  13. Standardization of transportation classes for object-oriented deployment simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, J. F., Jr.; Howard, D. L.; Jackson, J.; Macal, C. M.; Nevins, M. R.; Van Groningen, C. N.

    1999-07-30

    Many recent efforts to integrate transportation and deployment simulations, although beneficial, have lacked a feature vital for seamless integration: a common data class representation. It is an objective of the Department of Defense (DoD) to standardize all classes used in object-oriented deployment simulations by developing a standard class attribute representation and behavior for all deployment simulations that rely on an underlying class representation. The Extensive Hierarchy and Object Representation for Transportation Simulations (EXHORT) is a collection of three hierarchies that together will constitute a standard and consistent class attribute representation and behavior that could be used directly by a large set of deployment simulations. The first hierarchy is the Transportation Class Hierarchy (TCH), which describes a significant portion of the defense transportation system; the other two deal with infrastructure and resource classes. EXHORT will allow deployment simulations to use the same set of underlying class data, ensure transparent exchanges, reduce the effort needed to integrate simulations, and permit a detailed analysis of the defense transportation system. This paper describes EXHORT's first hierarchy, the TCH, and provides a rationale for why it is a helpful tool for modeling major portions of the defense transportation system.

  14. Object-oriented programming with mixins in Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidewitz, ED

    1992-01-01

    Recently, I wrote a paper discussing the lack of 'true' object-oriented programming language features in Ada 83, why one might desire them in Ada, and how they might be added in Ada 9X. The approach I took in this paper was to build the new object-oriented features of Ada 9X as much as possible on the basic constructs and philosophy of Ada 83. The object-oriented features proposed for Ada 9X, while different in detail, are based on the same kind of approach. Further consideration of this approach led me on a long reflection on the nature of object-oriented programming and its application to Ada. The results of this reflection, presented in this paper, show how a fairly natural object-oriented style can indeed be developed even in Ada 83. The exercise of developing this style is useful for at least three reasons: (1) it provides a useful style for programming object-oriented applications in Ada 83 until new features become available with Ada 9X; (2) it demystifies many of the mechanisms that seem to be 'magic' in most object-oriented programming languages by making them explicit; and (3) it points out areas that are and are not in need of change in Ada 83 to make object-oriented programming more natural in Ada 9X. In the next four sections I will address in turn the issues of object-oriented classes, mixins, self-reference and supertyping. The presentation is through a sequence of examples. This results in some overlap with that paper, but all the examples in the present paper are written entirely in Ada 83. I will return to considerations for Ada 9X in the last section of the paper.

  15. Gas turbine system simulation: An object-oriented approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, Colin K.; Follen, Gregory J.; Putt, Charles W.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype gas turbine engine simulation has been developed that offers a generalized framework for the simulation of engines subject to steady-state and transient operating conditions. The prototype is in preliminary form, but it successfully demonstrates the viability of an object-oriented approach for generalized simulation applications. Although object oriented programming languages are-relative to FORTRAN-somewhat austere, it is proposed that gas turbine simulations of an interdisciplinary nature will benefit significantly in terms of code reliability, maintainability, and manageability. This report elucidates specific gas turbine simulation obstacles that an object-oriented framework can overcome and describes the opportunity for interdisciplinary simulation that the approach offers.

  16. A Configurable, Object-Oriented, Transportation System Software Framework

    SciTech Connect

    KELLY,SUZANNE M.; MYRE,JOHN W.; PRICE,MARK H.; RUSSELL,ERIC D.; SCOTT,DAN W.

    2000-08-01

    The Transportation Surety Center, 6300, has been conducting continuing research into and development of information systems for the Configurable Transportation Security and Information Management System (CTSS) project, an Object-Oriented Framework approach that uses Component-Based Software Development to facilitate rapid deployment of new systems while improving software cost containment, development reliability, compatibility, and extensibility. The direction has been to develop a Fleet Management System (FMS) framework using object-oriented technology. The goal for the current development is to provide a software and hardware environment that will demonstrate and support object-oriented development commonly in the FMS Central Command Center and Vehicle domains.

  17. Adding intelligent services to an object oriented system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robideaux, Bret R.; Metzler, Theodore A.

    1994-01-01

    As today's software becomes increasingly complex, the need grows for intelligence of one sort or another to becomes part of the application, often an intelligence that does not readily fit the paradigm of one's software development. There are many methods of developing software, but at this time, the most promising is the object oriented (OO) method. This method involves an analysis to abstract the problem into separate 'objects' that are unique in the data that describe them and the behavior that they exhibit, and eventually to convert this analysis into computer code using a programming language that was designed (or retrofitted) for OO implementation. This paper discusses the creation of three different applications that are analyzed, designed, and programmed using the Shlaer/Mellor method of OO development and C++ as the programming language. All three, however, require the use of an expert system to provide an intelligence that C++ (or any other 'traditional' language) is not directly suited to supply. The flexibility of CLIPS permitted us to make modifications to it that allow seamless integration with any of our applications that require an expert system. We illustrate this integration with the following applications: (1) an after action review (AAR) station that assists a reviewer in watching a simulated tank battle and developing an AAR to critique the performance of the participants in the battle; (2) an embedded training system and over-the-shoulder coach for howitzer crewmen; and (3) a system to identify various chemical compounds from their infrared absorption spectra.

  18. A dynamic object-oriented architecture approach to ecosystem modeling and simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Dolph, J. E.; Majerus, K. A.; Sydelko, P. J.; Taxon, T. N.

    1999-04-09

    Modeling and simulation in support of adaptive ecosystem management can be better accomplished through a dynamic, integrated, and flexible approach that incorporates scientific and technological components into a comprehensive ecosystem-modeling framework. The Integrated Dynamic Landscape Analysis and Modeling System (IDLAMS) integrates ecological models and decision support techniques, through a geographic information system (GIS)-based framework. The Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) sponsored the development of IDLAMS. Initially built upon a GIS framework, IDLAMS is migrating to an object-oriented (OO) architectural framework. An object-oriented architecture is more flexible and modular. It allows disparate applications and dynamic models to be integrated in a manner that minimizes (or eliminates) the need to rework or recreate the system as new models are added to the suite. In addition, an object-oriented design makes it easier to provide run-time feedback among models, thereby making it a more dynamic tool for exploring and providing insight into the interactions among ecosystem processes. Finally, an object-oriented design encourages the reuse of existing technology because OO-IDLAMS is able to integrate disparate models, databases, or applications executed in their native languages. Reuse is also accomplished through a structured approach to building a consistent and reusable object library. This reusability can substantially reduce the time and effort needed to develop future integrated ecosystem simulations.

  19. Path-based rules in object-oriented programming

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, J.M.; Dvorak, D.; Litman, D.; Mishra, A.; Patel-Schneider, P.F.

    1996-12-31

    Object-oriented programming has recently emerged as one of the most important programming paradigms. While object-oriented programming clearly owes an intellectual debt to AI, it appears to be displacing some AI techniques, such as rule-based programming, from the marketplace. This need not be so as path-based rules-forward-chaining production rules that are restricted to follow pointers between objects-fit into the object-oriented paradigm in a clean and elegant way. The combination of path-based rules and object-oriented programming should be useful in AI applications, and in the more general problem of transferring AI techniques to the larger computer science community.

  20. An object-oriented implementation of the Xpress transfor protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, W. Timothy; Gray, Simon; Cline, Raymond E., Jr.

    Object-oriented design principles map well onto protocol implementations because protocols essentially manipulate two structures - packets and the states of the endpoints. In this paper the authors describe an implementation of the Xpress Transfer Protocol as a user space daemon written in C++. The object-oriented model forces the programmer to properly place functionality and information ownership. The model facilitates porting to various platforms and greatly eases the task of building data delivery services.

  1. An object-oriented implementation of the Xpress Transfer Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Strayer, W.T.; Gray, S.; Cline, R.E. Jr.

    1994-10-01

    Object-oriented design principles map well onto protocol implementations because protocols essentially manipulate two structures - packets and the states of the endpoints. In this paper the authors describe an implementation of the Xpress Transfer Protocol as a user space daemon written in C++. The object-oriented model forces the programmer to properly place functionality and information ownership. The model facilitates porting to various platforms and greatly eases the task of building data delivery services.

  2. Classifying forms of encapsulation in object-oriented languages

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.G.; Znayenko, Z.O.

    1995-12-31

    One of the key elements of object-oriented languages is encapsulation enforcement Encapsulation is a technique that minimizes program element dependence (coupling) by defining strict external interfaces. This paper divides the data encapsulation used by object-oriented languages into five forms. A graph grammar model is used to show how these forms can be enforced by constraining the manipulation of the object graph by the operations (methods) of an object.

  3. Etomica: an object-oriented framework for molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Andrew J; Kofke, David A

    2015-03-30

    We describe the design of an object-oriented library of software components that are suitable for constructing simulations of systems of interacting particles. The emphasis of the discussion is on the general design of the components and how they interact, and less on details of the programming interface or its implementation. Example code is provided as an aid to understanding object-oriented programming structures and to demonstrate how the framework is applied. PMID:25565378

  4. Framework for Development of Object-Oriented Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Poveda, Gus; Ciavarella, Tony; Nieten, Dan

    2004-01-01

    The Real-Time Control (RTC) Application Framework is a high-level software framework written in C++ that supports the rapid design and implementation of object-oriented application programs. This framework provides built-in functionality that solves common software development problems within distributed client-server, multi-threaded, and embedded programming environments. When using the RTC Framework to develop software for a specific domain, designers and implementers can focus entirely on the details of the domain-specific software rather than on creating custom solutions, utilities, and frameworks for the complexities of the programming environment. The RTC Framework was originally developed as part of a Space Shuttle Launch Processing System (LPS) replacement project called Checkout and Launch Control System (CLCS). As a result of the framework s development, CLCS software development time was reduced by 66 percent. The framework is generic enough for developing applications outside of the launch-processing system domain. Other applicable high-level domains include command and control systems and simulation/ training systems.

  5. ODIN-object-oriented development interface for NMR.

    PubMed

    Jochimsen, Thies H; von Mengershausen, Michael

    2004-09-01

    A cross-platform development environment for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments is presented. It allows rapid prototyping of new pulse sequences and provides a common programming interface for different system types. With this object-oriented interface implemented in C++, the programmer is capable of writing applications to control an experiment that can be executed on different measurement devices, even from different manufacturers, without the need to modify the source code. Due to the clear design of the software, new pulse sequences can be created, tested, and executed within a short time. To post-process the acquired data, an interface to well-known numerical libraries is part of the framework. This allows a transparent integration of the data processing instructions into the measurement module. The software focuses mainly on NMR imaging, but can also be used with limitations for spectroscopic experiments. To demonstrate the capabilities of the framework, results of the same experiment, carried out on two NMR imaging systems from different manufacturers are shown and compared with the results of a simulation. PMID:15324759

  6. An object-oriented class library for medical software development.

    PubMed

    O'Kane, K C; McColligan, E E

    1996-12-01

    The objective of this research is the development of a Medical Object Library (MOL) consisting of reusable, inheritable, portable, extendable C++ classes that facilitate rapid development of medical software at reduced cost and increased functionality. The result of this research is a library of class objects that range in function from string and hierarchical file handling entities to high level, procedural agents that perform increasingly complex, integrated tasks. A system built upon these classes is compatible with any other system similarly constructed with respect to data definitions, semantics, data organization and storage. As new objects are built, they can be added to the class library for subsequent use. The MOL is a toolkit of software objects intended to support a common file access methodology, a unified medical record structure, consistent message processing, standard graphical display facilities and uniform data collection procedures. This work emphasizes the relationship that potentially exists between the structure of a hierarchical medical record and procedural language components by means of a hierarchical class library and tree structured file access facility. In doing so, it attempts to establish interest in and demonstrate the practicality of the hierarchical medical record model in the modern context of object oriented programming. PMID:9019098

  7. Direct evaluation of fault trees using object-oriented programming techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson-Hine, F. A.; Koen, B. V.

    1989-01-01

    Object-oriented programming techniques are used in an algorithm for the direct evaluation of fault trees. The algorithm combines a simple bottom-up procedure for trees without repeated events with a top-down recursive procedure for trees with repeated events. The object-oriented approach results in a dynamic modularization of the tree at each step in the reduction process. The algorithm reduces the number of recursive calls required to solve trees with repeated events and calculates intermediate results as well as the solution of the top event. The intermediate results can be reused if part of the tree is modified. An example is presented in which the results of the algorithm implemented with conventional techniques are compared to those of the object-oriented approach.

  8. Considerations of persistence and security in CHOICES, an object-oriented operating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Roy H.; Madany, Peter W.

    1990-01-01

    The current design of the CHOICES persistent object implementation is summarized, and research in progress is outlined. CHOICES is implemented as an object-oriented system, and persistent objects appear to simplify and unify many functions of the system. It is demonstrated that persistent data can be accessed through an object-oriented file system model as efficiently as by an existing optimized commercial file system. The object-oriented file system can be specialized to provide an object store for persistent objects. The problems that arise in building an efficient persistent object scheme in a 32-bit virtual address space that only uses paging are described. Despite its limitations, the solution presented allows quite large numbers of objects to be active simultaneously, and permits sharing and efficient method calls.

  9. Object-oriented software design for the Mt. Wilson 100-inch Hooker telescope adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Thomas G.

    2000-06-01

    The object oriented software design paradigm has been instrumented in the development of the Adoptics software used in the Hooker telescope's ADOPT adaptive optics system. The software runs on a Pentium-class PC host and eight DSP processors connected to the host's motherboard bus. C++ classes were created to implement most of the host software's functionality, with the object oriented features of inheritance, encapsulation and abstraction being the most useful. Careful class design at the inception of the project allowed for the rapid addition of features without comprising the integrity of the software. Base class implementations include the DSP system, real-time graphical displays and opto-mechanical actuator control.

  10. Object-Oriented Parallel Particle-in-Cell Code for Beam Dynamics Simulation in Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.D.; Habib, S.; Decky, V.

    1999-11-13

    In this paper, we present an object-oriented three-dimensional parallel particle-in-cell code for beam dynamics simulation in linear accelerators. A two-dimensional parallel domain decomposition approach is employed within a message passing programming paradigm along with a dynamic load balancing. Implementing object-oriented software design provides the code with better maintainability, reusability, and extensibility compared with conventional structure based code. This also helps to encapsulate the details of communications syntax. Performance tests on SGI/Cray T3E-900 and SGI Origin 2000 machines show good scalability of the object-oriented code. Some important features of this code also include employing symplectic integration with linear maps of external focusing elements and using z as the independent variable, typical in accelerators. A successful application was done to simulate beam transport through three superconducting sections in the APT linac design.

  11. An Overview of OOPS+, an Object-Oriented Database Programming Language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laenens, Els; Vermeir, Dirk

    This paper provides a brief introduction to the OOPS+ knowledge-representation language. While basically object-oriented, OOPS+ integrates database concepts as well as classical knowledge-representation techniques such as rule-based inference and demons. In addition, the language supports types as first-class objects, inheritance, imperative function definition, and query facilities based on logic programming.

  12. Enhancing Problem-Solving Capabilities Using Object-Oriented Programming Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unuakhalu, Mike F.

    2009-01-01

    This study integrated object-oriented programming instruction with transfer training activities in everyday tasks, which might provide a mechanism that can be used for efficient problem solving. Specifically, a Visual BASIC embedded with everyday tasks group was compared to another group exposed to Visual BASIC instruction only. Subjects were 40…

  13. Towards a general object-oriented software development methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidewitz, ED; Stark, Mike

    1986-01-01

    An object is an abstract software model of a problem domain entity. Objects are packages of both data and operations of that data (Goldberg 83, Booch 83). The Ada (tm) package construct is representative of this general notion of an object. Object-oriented design is the technique of using objects as the basic unit of modularity in systems design. The Software Engineering Laboratory at the Goddard Space Flight Center is currently involved in a pilot program to develop a flight dynamics simulator in Ada (approximately 40,000 statements) using object-oriented methods. Several authors have applied object-oriented concepts to Ada (e.g., Booch 83, Cherry 85). It was found that these methodologies are limited. As a result a more general approach was synthesized with allows a designer to apply powerful object-oriented principles to a wide range of applications and at all stages of design. An overview is provided of this approach. Further, how object-oriented design fits into the overall software life-cycle is considered.

  14. Yes! An object-oriented compiler compiler (YOOCC)

    SciTech Connect

    Avotins, J.; Mingins, C.; Schmidt, H.

    1995-12-31

    Grammar-based processor generation is one of the most widely studied areas in language processor construction. However, there have been very few approaches to date that reconcile object-oriented principles, processor generation, and an object-oriented language. Pertinent here also. is that currently to develop a processor using the Eiffel Parse libraries requires far too much time to be expended on tasks that can be automated. For these reasons, we have developed YOOCC (Yes! an Object-Oriented Compiler Compiler), which produces a processor framework from a grammar using an enhanced version of the Eiffel Parse libraries, incorporating the ideas hypothesized by Meyer, and Grape and Walden, as well as many others. Various essential changes have been made to the Eiffel Parse libraries. Examples are presented to illustrate the development of a processor using YOOCC, and it is concluded that the Eiffel Parse libraries are now not only an intelligent, but also a productive option for processor construction.

  15. An Improved Suite of Object Oriented Software Measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Ralph D.; Weistroffer, H. Roland; Coppins, Richard J.

    1997-01-01

    In the pursuit of ever increasing productivity, the need to be able to measure specific aspects of software is generally agreed upon. As object oriented programming languages are becoming more and more widely used, metrics specifically designed for object oriented software are required. In recent years there has been an explosion of new, object oriented software metrics proposed in the literature. Unfortunately, many or most of these proposed metrics have not been validated to measure what they claim to measure. In fact, an analysis of many of these metrics shows that they do not satisfy basic properties of measurement theory, and thus their application has to be suspect. In this paper ten improved metrics are proposed and are validated using measurement theory.

  16. Object-Oriented Programming via Fortran 90/95

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akin, Ed

    2003-01-01

    Writing technical applications in a modern object-oriented approach, using Fortran 90 or 95, can be problematic. This book teaches how to employ the principles of object-oriented programming to produce clear, highly efficient executable codes (rather than focusing on the traditional procedural abilities of Fortran). This text is an excellent harbinger to all the features of the finalized, fully object-oriented Fortran 200X. In addition to covering the OOP methodologies, the basic foundation of the language and solid programming skills are reviewed, making the book valuable also as a good migration tool for experienced Fortran programmers that want to smoothly pick up the OOP paradigm. The author highlights common themes by using comparisons with Matlab® and C++ and uses numerous cross-referenced examples to convey all concepts quickly and clearly. Complete code for the examples is included on the accompanying CD.

  17. Adopting object-oriented technology: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Trythall, S.

    1996-12-01

    Interest in object orientation has surged in the last couple of years. A considerable number of groups have evaluated the technology; some have produced prototypes, and an increasing number have developed applications. A few groups have built significant applications frameworks, most notably the SPIRIT application framework developed by Shell Services in Houston. There are now nascent attempts to define a standard for object-oriented infrastructures with the Petrotechnical Open Software Corp. (POSC) community. The Petroleum Science and Technology Inst. (PSTI) was one of the early adopters of this technology within the E and P industry. PSTI has been constructing a basin modeling toolbox using object-oriented technologies for the last 6 years. This paper introduces the techniques, describes their use of the technology within the Hedera project, and outlines their experience of the suitability of the techniques for use within the E and P industry.

  18. METASIM: object-oriented modelling of cell regulation.

    PubMed

    Stoffers, H J; Sonnhammer, E L; Blommestijn, G J; Raat, N J; Westerhoff, H V

    1992-10-01

    Enzymatic processes and substances are modelled as distinct objects, belonging to a limited number of classes. A set of class definitions in C++ is presented that constitutes an object-oriented programming platform. The latter supports 'biological' data types and functions and facilitates simulation of metabolic and regulatory pathways in living cells. To compute the time-evolution, Euler or Runge-Kutta methods are used, though the latter method compromises a strict object-oriented philosophy. As an example, histone gene expression during embryogenesis of Xenopus laevis is modelled. This object-oriented programming system forms a modelling 'language' which is readily understood by both biochemists and programmers. It allows biological problems to be programmed more easily and correctly and brings the program closer to the biological reality, hence making it more meaningful to bioscientists. Moreover, it can readily be extended to new models by class derivation. PMID:1422877

  19. Humanoid Robotics: Real-Time Object Oriented Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, Jason E.

    2005-01-01

    Programming of robots in today's world is often done in a procedural oriented fashion, where object oriented programming is not incorporated. In order to keep a robust architecture allowing for easy expansion of capabilities and a truly modular design, object oriented programming is required. However, concepts in object oriented programming are not typically applied to a real time environment. The Fujitsu HOAP-2 is the test bed for the development of a humanoid robot framework abstracting control of the robot into simple logical commands in a real time robotic system while allowing full access to all sensory data. In addition to interfacing between the motor and sensory systems, this paper discusses the software which operates multiple independently developed control systems simultaneously and the safety measures which keep the humanoid from damaging itself and its environment while running these systems. The use of this software decreases development time and costs and allows changes to be made while keeping results safe and predictable.

  20. C++, objected-oriented programming, and astronomical data models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farris, A.

    1992-01-01

    Contemporary astronomy is characterized by increasingly complex instruments and observational techniques, higher data collection rates, and large data archives, placing severe stress on software analysis systems. The object-oriented paradigm represents a significant new approach to software design and implementation that holds great promise for dealing with this increased complexity. The basic concepts of this approach will be characterized in contrast to more traditional procedure-oriented approaches. The fundamental features of objected-oriented programming will be discussed from a C++ programming language perspective, using examples familiar to astronomers. This discussion will focus on objects, classes and their relevance to the data type system; the principle of information hiding; and the use of inheritance to implement generalization/specialization relationships. Drawing on the object-oriented approach, features of a new database model to support astronomical data analysis will be presented.

  1. Guest Editor's introduction: Selected papers from the 4th USENIX Conference on Object-Oriented Technologies and Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sventek, Joe

    1998-12-01

    Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, 1501 Page Mill Road, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA Introduction The USENIX Conference on Object-Oriented Technologies and Systems (COOTS) is held annually in the late spring. The conference evolved from a set of C++ workshops that were held under the auspices of USENIX, the first of which met in 1989. Given the growing diverse interest in object-oriented technologies, the C++ focus of the workshop eventually became too narrow, with the result that the scope was widened in 1995 to include object-oriented technologies and systems. COOTS is intended to showcase advanced R&D efforts in object-oriented technologies and software systems. The conference emphasizes experimental research and experience gained by using object-oriented techniques and languages to build complex software systems that meet real-world needs. COOTS solicits papers in the following general areas: application of, and experiences with, object-oriented technologies in particular domains (e.g. financial, medical, telecommunication); the architecture and implementation of distributed object systems (e.g. CORBA, DCOM, RMI); object-oriented programming and specification languages; object-oriented design and analysis. The 4th meeting of COOTS was held 27 - 30 April 1998 at the El Dorado Hotel, Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. Several tutorials were given. The technical program proper consisted of a single track of six sessions, with three paper presentations per session. A keynote address and a provocative panel session rounded out the technical program. The program committee reviewed 56 papers, selecting the best 18 for presentation in the technical sessions. While we solicit papers across the spectrum of applications of object-oriented technologies, this year there was a predominance of distributed, object-oriented papers. The accepted papers reflected this asymmetry, with 15 papers on distributed objects and 3 papers on object-oriented languages. The papers in this special issue are

  2. Object-oriented millisecond timers for the PC.

    PubMed

    Hamm, J P

    2001-11-01

    Object-oriented programming provides a useful structure for designing reusable code. Accurate millisecond timing is essential for many areas of research. With this in mind, this paper provides a Turbo Pascal unit containing an object-oriented millisecond timer. This approach allows for multiple timers to be running independently. The timers may also be set at different levels of temporal precision, such as 10(-3) (milliseconds) or 10(-5) sec. The object also is able to store the time of a flagged event for later examination without interrupting the ongoing timing operation. PMID:11816457

  3. Object-Oriented Design for Sparse Direct Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobrian, Florin; Kumfert, Gary; Pothen, Alex

    1999-01-01

    We discuss the object-oriented design of a software package for solving sparse, symmetric systems of equations (positive definite and indefinite) by direct methods. At the highest layers, we decouple data structure classes from algorithmic classes for flexibility. We describe the important structural and algorithmic classes in our design, and discuss the trade-offs we made for high performance. The kernels at the lower layers were optimized by hand. Our results show no performance loss from our object-oriented design, while providing flexibility, case of use, and extensibility over solvers using procedural design.

  4. OPT++: An object-oriented class library for nonlinear optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Meza, J.C.

    1994-03-01

    Object-oriented programming is becoming a popular way of developing new software. The promise of this new programming paradigm is that software developed through these concepts will be more reliable and easier to re-use, thereby decreasing the time and cost of the software development cycle. This report describes the development of a C++ class library for nonlinear optimization. Using object-oriented techniques, this new library was designed so that the interface is easy to use while being general enough so that new optimization algorithms can be added easily to the existing framework.

  5. Object-oriented structures supporting remote sensing databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichmann, Keith; Cromp, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    Object-oriented databases show promise for modeling the complex interrelationships pervasive in scientific domains. To examine the utility of this approach, we have developed an Intelligent Information Fusion System based on this technology, and applied it to the problem of managing an active repository of remotely-sensed satellite scenes. The design and implementation of the system is compared and contrasted with conventional relational database techniques, followed by a presentation of the underlying object-oriented data structures used to enable fast indexing into the data holdings.

  6. Large project experiences with object-oriented methods and reuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessale, William; Reifer, Donald J.; Weller, David

    1992-01-01

    The SSVTF (Space Station Verification and Training Facility) project is completing the Preliminary Design Review of a large software development using object-oriented methods and systematic reuse. An incremental developmental lifecycle was tailored to provide early feedback and guidance on methods and products, with repeated attention to reuse. Object oriented methods were formally taught and supported by realistic examples. Reuse was readily accepted and planned by the developers. Schedule and budget issues were handled by agreements and work sharing arranged by the developers.

  7. Mentat: An object-oriented macro data flow system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimshaw, Andrew S.; Liu, Jane W. S.

    1988-01-01

    Mentat, an object-oriented macro data flow system designed to facilitate parallelism in distributed systems, is presented. The macro data flow model is a model of computation similar to the data flow model with two principal differences: the computational complexity of the actors is much greater than in traditional data flow systems, and there are persistent actors that maintain state information between executions. Mentat is a system that combines the object-oriented programming paradigm and the macro data flow model of computation. Mentat programs use a dynamic structure called a future list to represent the future of computations.

  8. XSPEC12: Object-Oriented X-Ray Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, B.; Arnaud, K. A.; Gordon, Craig A.

    2003-03-01

    XSPEC was designed to be a mission-independent general purpose X-ray data analysis program. In order for XSPEC to keep fulfilling this role well into the 21st Century we have re-implemented its code base in ANSI C++ using object oriented programming techniques. The abstract programming formulation used for XSPEC12 gives considerable advantages for the future. It will be possible to implement new data formats, table model formats, fitting and statistical techniques by loading ``add-in'' modules without the necessity of recompiling existing code. As the first examples, we have written modules that (a) read INTEGRAL/SPI data and responses and (b) implement the CERN/MINUIT optimization library. The new code can also solve problems with source confusion (multiple sources can be modeled and fit from a single spectrum). As for efficiency, the new code achieves similar performance in double precision arithmetic than XSPEC11 gives in single precision. For the cases of analysis with simple analytical models and large spectral arrays, and time series analyses (multiple spectra with the same response matrices) XSPEC12 should give a considerable speed advantage over previous versions. XSPEC12 will have a very similar, but enhanced, syntax over previous releases. It will continue to support user models in Fortran77, but will also support user models in C and C++. The I/O streams designed for XSPEC12 can support either a command line user interface or, in future, a GUI. Additionally, the plotting interface has been written to be independent of the plotting library: future releases will be able to implement newer user graphics packages. XSPEC12 should be available as an alpha release in the late Spring of 2003. We encourage readers to join the testing program that we will be announcing once the release date has been set.

  9. An object-oriented, technology-adaptive information model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anyiwo, Joshua C.

    1995-01-01

    The primary objective was to develop a computer information system for effectively presenting NASA's technologies to American industries, for appropriate commercialization. To this end a comprehensive information management model, applicable to a wide variety of situations, and immune to computer software/hardware technological gyrations, was developed. The model consists of four main elements: a DATA_STORE, a data PRODUCER/UPDATER_CLIENT and a data PRESENTATION_CLIENT, anchored to a central object-oriented SERVER engine. This server engine facilitates exchanges among the other model elements and safeguards the integrity of the DATA_STORE element. It is designed to support new technologies, as they become available, such as Object Linking and Embedding (OLE), on-demand audio-video data streaming with compression (such as is required for video conferencing), Worldwide Web (WWW) and other information services and browsing, fax-back data requests, presentation of information on CD-ROM, and regular in-house database management, regardless of the data model in place. The four components of this information model interact through a system of intelligent message agents which are customized to specific information exchange needs. This model is at the leading edge of modern information management models. It is independent of technological changes and can be implemented in a variety of ways to meet the specific needs of any communications situation. This summer a partial implementation of the model has been achieved. The structure of the DATA_STORE has been fully specified and successfully tested using Microsoft's FoxPro 2.6 database management system. Data PRODUCER/UPDATER and PRESENTATION architectures have been developed and also successfully implemented in FoxPro; and work has started on a full implementation of the SERVER engine. The model has also been successfully applied to a CD-ROM presentation of NASA's technologies in support of Langley Research Center's TAG

  10. Prototyping an Interactive Electronic Book System Using an Object-Oriented Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquier-Boltuck, Jacques; Grossman, Ed; Collaud, Gérald

    An Integrated Electronic Book (IEB) represents a complex network of integrated information and "know how" on a given subject. In the design phase of WEBS (Woven Electronic Book System), we soon realized that, because we were describing the IEB in terms of "objects" and "methods," and because we wanted WEBS to be easily expandable and to offer a consistent user interface, we should use an object-oriented development system.

  11. An NAFP Project: Use of Object Oriented Methodologies and Design Patterns to Refactor Software Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaykhian, Gholam Ali; Baggs, Rhoda

    2007-01-01

    In the early problem-solution era of software programming, functional decompositions were mainly used to design and implement software solutions. In functional decompositions, functions and data are introduced as two separate entities during the design phase, and are followed as such in the implementation phase. Functional decompositions make use of refactoring through optimizing the algorithms, grouping similar functionalities into common reusable functions, and using abstract representations of data where possible; all these are done during the implementation phase. This paper advocates the usage of object-oriented methodologies and design patterns as the centerpieces of refactoring software solutions. Refactoring software is a method of changing software design while explicitly preserving its external functionalities. The combined usage of object-oriented methodologies and design patterns to refactor should also benefit the overall software life cycle cost with improved software.

  12. A Uniform Indexing Scheme for Object-Oriented Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gudes, Ehud

    1997-01-01

    Performance is a critical factor hindering the use of object-oriented databases (OODB). This article proposes a new and uniform indexing scheme for enhancing OODBs with advantages for small range, clustered sets queries. Reviews several other indexing schemes; presents the U-index scheme; discusses its performance; and presents experimental…

  13. Object-Oriented Algorithm For Evaluation Of Fault Trees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson-Hine, F. A.; Koen, B. V.

    1992-01-01

    Algorithm for direct evaluation of fault trees incorporates techniques of object-oriented programming. Reduces number of calls needed to solve trees with repeated events. Provides significantly improved software environment for such computations as quantitative analyses of safety and reliability of complicated systems of equipment (e.g., spacecraft or factories).

  14. Strategies for Teaching Object-Oriented Concepts with Java

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sicilia, Miguel-Angel

    2006-01-01

    A considerable amount of experiences in teaching object-oriented concepts using the Java language have been reported to date, some of which describe language pitfalls and concrete learning difficulties. In this paper, a number of additional issues that have been experienced as difficult for students to master, along with approaches intended to…

  15. How Reuse Influences Productivity in Object-Oriented Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basili, Victor R.; Briand, Lionel C.; Melo, Walcelio L.

    1997-01-01

    Although reuse is assumed to be especially valuable in building high quality software as well as in Object Oriented (OO) development, limited empirical evidence connects reuse with productivity and quality gains. The author's eight system study begins to define such benefits in an OO framework, most notably in terms of reduce defect density and rework as well as in increased productivity.

  16. Quick Prototyping of Educational Software: An Object-Oriented Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Simon C-H

    1994-01-01

    Introduces and demonstrates a quick-prototyping model for educational software development that can be used by teachers developing their own courseware using an object-oriented programming system. Development of a courseware package called "The Match-Maker" is explained as an example that uses HyperCard for quick prototyping. (Contains 21…

  17. Advanced characterization of hysteretic materials by object-oriented software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita, V.; Gavrila, H.

    2002-04-01

    A new object-oriented software, which is dedicated for the characterization of magnetic materials, including the hysteresis effect, is presented. The product allows the development and utilization of an information base, containing experimental and numerical data related to the magnetic material behaviour. The materials may be modelled with different hysteresis models (Preisach, Jiles-Atherton, etc.).

  18. Object-Oriented Scientific Programming with Fortran 90

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, C.

    1998-01-01

    Fortran 90 is a modern language that introduces many important new features beneficial for scientific programming. We discuss our experiences in plasma particle simulation and unstructured adaptive mesh refinement on supercomputers, illustrating the features of Fortran 90 that support the object-oriented methodology.

  19. Object-oriented fault tree evaluation program for quantitative analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson-Hine, F. A.; Koen, B. V.

    1988-01-01

    Object-oriented programming can be combined with fault free techniques to give a significantly improved environment for evaluating the safety and reliability of large complex systems for space missions. Deep knowledge about system components and interactions, available from reliability studies and other sources, can be described using objects that make up a knowledge base. This knowledge base can be interrogated throughout the design process, during system testing, and during operation, and can be easily modified to reflect design changes in order to maintain a consistent information source. An object-oriented environment for reliability assessment has been developed on a Texas Instrument (TI) Explorer LISP workstation. The program, which directly evaluates system fault trees, utilizes the object-oriented extension to LISP called Flavors that is available on the Explorer. The object representation of a fault tree facilitates the storage and retrieval of information associated with each event in the tree, including tree structural information and intermediate results obtained during the tree reduction process. Reliability data associated with each basic event are stored in the fault tree objects. The object-oriented environment on the Explorer also includes a graphical tree editor which was modified to display and edit the fault trees.

  20. Instructional Design Paradigms: Is Object-Oriented Design Next?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, John Minor

    1996-01-01

    Proposes that object-oriented (OO) analysis, design, and programming methods, currently having a major impact on computing, will play an increasing role in shaping the paradigms of performance technology--particularly in instructional design (ID). Ties this crossover of OO from computing to ID to design trends and ongoing research in ID. (AEF)

  1. Experiences Building an Object-Oriented System in C++

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madany, Peter W.; Campbell, Roy H.; Kougiouris, Panagiotis

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes tools that we built to support the construction of an object-oriented operating system in C++. The tools provide the automatic deletion of unwanted objects, first-class classes, dynamically loadable classes, and class-oriented debugging. As a consequence of our experience building Choices, we advocate these features as useful, simplifying and unifying many aspects of system programming.

  2. Data management in an object-oriented distributed aircraft conceptual design environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhijie

    distributed object-oriented framework. By overcoming the shortcomings of the traditional approach of modeling aircraft conceptual design data, this data model makes it possible to capture specific detailed information of aircraft conceptual design without sacrificing generality, which is one of the most desired features of a data model for aircraft conceptual design. Based upon this data model, a prototype of the data management system, which is one of the fundamental building blocks of the NextADE, is implemented utilizing the state of the art information technologies. Using a general-purpose integration software package to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed framework and the data management system, the NextADE is initially implemented by integrating the prototype of the data management system with other building blocks of the design environment, such as disciplinary analyses programs and mission analyses programs. As experiments, two case studies are conducted in the integrated design environments. One is based upon a simplified conceptual design of a notional conventional aircraft; the other is a simplified conceptual design of an unconventional aircraft. As a result of the experiments, the proposed framework and the data management approach are shown to be feasible solutions to the research problems.

  3. Flexibility on storage-release based distributed hydrologic modeling with object-oriented approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kwangmin; Merwade, Venkatesh; Chun, Jong Ahn; Timlin, Dennis

    2016-09-01

    With the availability of advanced hydrologic data in public domain such as remote sensed and climate change scenario data, there is a need for a modeling framework that is capable of using these data to simulate and extend hydrologic processes with multidisciplinary approaches for sustainable water resources management. To address this need, a storage-release based distributed hydrologic model (STORE DHM) is developed based on an object-oriented approach. The model is tested for demonstrating model flexibility and extensibility to know how to well integrate object-oriented approach to further hydrologic research issues, e.g., reconstructing missing precipitation in this study, without changing its main frame. Moreover, the STORE DHM is applied to simulate hydrological processes with multiple classes in the Nanticoke watershed. This study also describes a conceptual and structural framework of object-oriented inheritance and aggregation characteristics under the STORE DHM. In addition, NearestMP (missing value estimation based on nearest neighborhood regression) and KernelMP (missing value estimation based on Kernel Function) are proposed for evaluating STORE DHM flexibility. And then, STORE DHM runoff hydrographs compared with NearestMP and KernelMP runoff hydrographs. Overall results from these comparisons show promising hydrograph outputs generated by the proposed two classes. Consequently, this study suggests that STORE DHM with an object-oriented approach will be a comprehensive water resources modeling tools by adding additional classes for toward developing through its flexibility and extensibility.

  4. Extension of an Object-Oriented Optimization Tool: User's Reference Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi; Truong, Samson S.

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Armstrong Flight Research Center has developed a cost-effective and flexible object-oriented optimization (O (sup 3)) tool that leverages existing tools and practices and allows easy integration and adoption of new state-of-the-art software. This object-oriented framework can integrate the analysis codes for multiple disciplines, as opposed to relying on one code to perform analysis for all disciplines. Optimization can thus take place within each discipline module, or in a loop between the O (sup 3) tool and the discipline modules, or both. Six different sample mathematical problems are presented to demonstrate the performance of the O (sup 3) tool. Instructions for preparing input data for the O (sup 3) tool are detailed in this user's manual.

  5. Object-oriented simulation for the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jiasheng; Chung, Moon-Jung

    1992-10-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of an object-oriented simulation environment called OZ for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The design applies object-oriented technology to data visualization, behavior modelling, dynamic simulation and version control. A meta class structure is proposed to model different types of objects in large systems by their functionality. OZ provides a direct-manipulation user interface which allows the user to visualize the data as an object in the database and interactively model the component of the system. Modelling can be exercised at different levels of the class hierarchy and then can be dynamically bound into a system for simulation. Inheritance is used to derive new configurations of the system or subsystem from the existing one, and specify an object`s behavior. Delegation is used to construct a system by instantiating existing objects and ``stealing`` their methods by delegators.

  6. Object-oriented biomedical system modelling--the language.

    PubMed

    Hakman, M; Groth, T

    1999-11-01

    The paper describes a new object-oriented biomedical continuous system modelling language (OOBSML). It is fully object-oriented and supports model inheritance, encapsulation, and model component instantiation and behaviour polymorphism. Besides the traditional differential and algebraic equation expressions the language includes also formal expressions for documenting models and defining model quantity types and quantity units. It supports explicit definition of model input-, output- and state quantities, model components and component connections. The OOBSML model compiler produces self-contained, independent, executable model components that can be instantiated and used within other OOBSML models and/or stored within model and model component libraries. In this way complex models can be structured as multilevel, multi-component model hierarchies. Technically the model components produced by the OOBSML compiler are executable computer code objects based on distributed object and object request broker technology. This paper includes both the language tutorial and the formal language syntax and semantic description. PMID:10579511

  7. An object-oriented approach to simulator postprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, B.F.; Scherer, P.W.; Starley, G.P.

    1994-08-01

    An interactive, graphical software package provides the ability to view production well data generated by reservoir simulation. The program (KEYPLOT-X) includes several novel concepts, such as use of object-oriented technology for graphical software and a direct-access database structure. The entire application is constructed from a library of elemental objects. Inheritance of properties between objects produces extremely modular code, which greatly enhances maintenance and extendibility. The database has a direct-access hierarchical structure that is object-oriented, simplifying the data access protocol to provide rapid interactivity between the database, applications, and user interface. The overall approach has provided a high degree of functionality and flexibility to engineering applications and a manageable software structure for maintenance and development.

  8. An object-oriented multidimensional model for data warehouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosain, Anjana; Mann, Suman

    2011-12-01

    Organizations, to have a competitive edge upon each other, resort to business intelligence which refers to information available for enterprise to make strategic decisions. Data warehouse being the repository of data provides the backend for achieving business intelligence. The design of data warehouse, thereby, forms the key, to extract and obtain the relevant information facilitating to make strategic decisions. The initial focus for the design had been upon the conceptual models but now object oriented multidimensional modelling has emerged as the foundation for the designing of data warehouse. Several proposals have been put forth for object oriented multidimensional modelling, each incorporating some or other features, but not all. This paper consolidates all the features previously introduced and the new introduced, thus, proposing a new model having features to be incorporated while designing the data warehouse.

  9. Generic, Type-Safe and Object Oriented Computer Algebra Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kredel, Heinz; Jolly, Raphael

    Advances in computer science, in particular object oriented programming, and software engineering have had little practical impact on computer algebra systems in the last 30 years. The software design of existing systems is still dominated by ad-hoc memory management, weakly typed algorithm libraries and proprietary domain specific interactive expression interpreters. We discuss a modular approach to computer algebra software: usage of state-of-the-art memory management and run-time systems (e.g. JVM) usage of strongly typed, generic, object oriented programming languages (e.g. Java) and usage of general purpose, dynamic interactive expression interpreters (e.g. Python) To illustrate the workability of this approach, we have implemented and studied computer algebra systems in Java and Scala. In this paper we report on the current state of this work by presenting new examples.

  10. Modeling the Object-Oriented Space Through Validated Measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Ralph D.

    1996-01-01

    In order to truly understand software and the software development process, software measurement must be better understood. A beginning step toward a better understanding of software measurement is the categorization of the measurements by some meaningful taxonomy. The most meaningful taxonomy would capture the basic nature of the subject oriented (O-O) space. The interesting characteristics of object oriented software offer a starting point for such a categorization of measures. A taxonomy has been developed based on fourteen characteristics of object-oriented software gathered from the literature This taxonomy allows us to easily see gaps and redundancies in the O-O measures. The taxonomy also clearly differentiates among taxa so that there is no ambiguity as to the taxon to which a measure belongs. The taxonomy has been populated with thirty-two measures that have been validated in the narrow sense of Fenton, using measurement theory with Zuse's augmentation.

  11. Multi-point objective-oriented sequential sampling strategy for constrained robust design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ping; Zhang, Siliang; Chen, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Metamodelling techniques are widely used to approximate system responses of expensive simulation models. In association with the use of metamodels, objective-oriented sequential sampling methods have been demonstrated to be effective in balancing the need for searching an optimal solution versus reducing the metamodelling uncertainty. However, existing infilling criteria are developed for deterministic problems and restricted to one sampling point in one iteration. To exploit the use of multiple samples and identify the true robust solution in fewer iterations, a multi-point objective-oriented sequential sampling strategy is proposed for constrained robust design problems. In this article, earlier development of objective-oriented sequential sampling strategy for unconstrained robust design is first extended to constrained problems. Next, a double-loop multi-point sequential sampling strategy is developed. The proposed methods are validated using two mathematical examples followed by a highly nonlinear automotive crashworthiness design example. The results show that the proposed method can mitigate the effect of both metamodelling uncertainty and design uncertainty, and identify the robust design solution more efficiently than the single-point sequential sampling approach.

  12. Guide to object-oriented analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Harry C.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide Marshall Space Flight Center personnel with guidelines for the use of object-oriented analysis and design and to describe how it can be accomplished within the framework of existing development directives, including the Software Development Plan. It is not intended as a detailed tutorial. The reader is referred to the Coad and Yourdon texts in the References.

  13. An Object-Oriented Approach to Writing Computational Electromagnetics Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Martin; Mallasch, Paul G.

    1996-01-01

    Presently, most computer software development in the Computational Electromagnetics (CEM) community employs the structured programming paradigm, particularly using the Fortran language. Other segments of the software community began switching to an Object-Oriented Programming (OOP) paradigm in recent years to help ease design and development of highly complex codes. This paper examines design of a time-domain numerical analysis CEM code using the OOP paradigm, comparing OOP code and structured programming code in terms of software maintenance, portability, flexibility, and speed.

  14. Development of an object oriented lattice QCD code "Bridge++"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, S.; Aoki, S.; Aoyama, T.; Kanaya, K.; Matsufuru, H.; Motoki, S.; Namekawa, Y.; Nemura, H.; Taniguchi, Y.; Ukita, N.

    2014-06-01

    We are developing a new lattice QCD code set "Bridge++" aiming at extensible, readable, and portable workbench for QCD simulations, while keeping a high performance at the same time. Bridge++ covers conventional lattice actions and numerical algorithms. The code set is constructed in C++ with an object oriented programming. In this paper we describe fundamental ingredients of the code and the current status of development.

  15. Objects as closures - Abstract semantics of object oriented languages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, Uday S.

    1988-01-01

    The denotational semantics of object-oriented languages is discussed using the concept of closure widely used in (semi) functional programming to encapsulate side effects. It is shown that this denotational framework is adequate to explain classes, instantiation, and inheritance in the style of Simula as well as SMALLTALK-80. This framework is then compared with that of Kamin (1988), in his recent denotational definition of SMALLTALK-80, and the implications of the differences between the two approaches are discussed.

  16. Objects as closures: Abstract semantics of object oriented languages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, Uday S.

    1989-01-01

    We discuss denotational semantics of object-oriented languages, using the concept of closure widely used in (semi) functional programming to encapsulate side effects. It is shown that this denotational framework is adequate to explain classes, instantiation, and inheritance in the style of Simula as well as SMALLTALK-80. This framework is then compared with that of Kamin, in his recent denotational definition of SMALLTALK-80, and the implications of the differences between the two approaches are discussed.

  17. Knowledge-based simulation using object-oriented programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidoran, Karen M.

    1993-01-01

    Simulations have become a powerful mechanism for understanding and modeling complex phenomena. Their results have had substantial impact on a broad range of decisions in the military, government, and industry. Because of this, new techniques are continually being explored and developed to make them even more useful, understandable, extendable, and efficient. One such area of research is the application of the knowledge-based methods of artificial intelligence (AI) to the computer simulation field. The goal of knowledge-based simulation is to facilitate building simulations of greatly increased power and comprehensibility by making use of deeper knowledge about the behavior of the simulated world. One technique for representing and manipulating knowledge that has been enhanced by the AI community is object-oriented programming. Using this technique, the entities of a discrete-event simulation can be viewed as objects in an object-oriented formulation. Knowledge can be factual (i.e., attributes of an entity) or behavioral (i.e., how the entity is to behave in certain circumstances). Rome Laboratory's Advanced Simulation Environment (RASE) was developed as a research vehicle to provide an enhanced simulation development environment for building more intelligent, interactive, flexible, and realistic simulations. This capability will support current and future battle management research and provide a test of the object-oriented paradigm for use in large scale military applications.

  18. Interface between object-oriented systems. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Crowl, L.A.

    1987-04-01

    The Chrysalis operating system for the Butterfly Parallel Processor presents an object-oriented programming environment based on shared memory. However, because of Chrysalis's low-level orientation and its use of type-unsafe features of the C programming language, programs using the environment are difficult to program and highly error-prone. Using C as the primary programming language for the Butterfly does not fully realize the benefit of Chrysalis's object orientation. An object-oriented programming language is natural candidate for improving the Chrysalis environment. The C ++ programming language provides a number of advantages in developing such an interface. This paper reports the successes and problems encountered in the development of Chrysalis ++, a C ++ interface to Chrysalis ++ uncovered many strengths and weakness in C ++. Some apply to C ++ in general, others apply only to its adaptation to a parallel programming environment. It is important to note that C++ is a sequential language; it is use in a parallel programming environment is therefore outside the bounds of its design.

  19. EMEN2: An Object Oriented Database and Electronic Lab Notebook

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Ian; Langley, Ed; Chiu, Wah; Ludtke, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and associated methods such as single particle analysis, 2-D crystallography, helical reconstruction and tomography, are highly data-intensive experimental sciences, which also have substantial variability in experimental technique. Object-oriented databases present an attractive alternative to traditional relational databases for situations where the experiments themselves are continually evolving. We present EMEN2, an easy to use object-oriented database with a highly flexible infrastructure originally targeted for transmission electron microscopy and tomography, which has been extended to be adaptable for use in virtually any experimental science. It is a pure object-oriented database designed for easy adoption in diverse laboratory environments, and does not require professional database administration. It includes a full featured, dynamic web interface in addition to APIs for programmatic access. EMEN2 installations currently support roughly 800 scientists worldwide with over 1/2 million experimental records and over 20 TB of experimental data. The software is freely available with complete source. PMID:23360752

  20. Object-Oriented Multi-Disciplinary Design, Analysis, and Optimization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-gi

    2011-01-01

    An Object-Oriented Optimization (O3) tool was developed that leverages existing tools and practices, and allows the easy integration and adoption of new state-of-the-art software. At the heart of the O3 tool is the Central Executive Module (CEM), which can integrate disparate software packages in a cross platform network environment so as to quickly perform optimization and design tasks in a cohesive, streamlined manner. This object-oriented framework can integrate the analysis codes for multiple disciplines instead of relying on one code to perform the analysis for all disciplines. The CEM was written in FORTRAN and the script commands for each performance index were submitted through the use of the FORTRAN Call System command. In this CEM, the user chooses an optimization methodology, defines objective and constraint functions from performance indices, and provides starting and side constraints for continuous as well as discrete design variables. The structural analysis modules such as computations of the structural weight, stress, deflection, buckling, and flutter and divergence speeds have been developed and incorporated into the O3 tool to build an object-oriented Multidisciplinary Design, Analysis, and Optimization (MDAO) tool.

  1. An application of object-oriented knowledge representation to engineering expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logie, D. S.; Kamil, H.; Umaretiya, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    The paper describes an object-oriented knowledge representation and its application to engineering expert systems. The object-oriented approach promotes efficient handling of the problem data by allowing knowledge to be encapsulated in objects and organized by defining relationships between the objects. An Object Representation Language (ORL) was implemented as a tool for building and manipulating the object base. Rule-based knowledge representation is then used to simulate engineering design reasoning. Using a common object base, very large expert systems can be developed, comprised of small, individually processed, rule sets. The integration of these two schemes makes it easier to develop practical engineering expert systems. The general approach to applying this technology to the domain of the finite element analysis, design, and optimization of aerospace structures is discussed.

  2. Challenges and Opportunities in Using Automatic Differentiation with Object-Oriented Toolkits for Scientific Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Hovland, P; Lee, S; McInnes, L; Norris, B; Smith, B

    2001-04-17

    The increased use of object-oriented toolkits in large-scale scientific simulation presents new opportunities and challenges for the use of automatic (or algorithmic) differentiation (AD) techniques, especially in the context of optimization. Because object-oriented toolkits use well-defined interfaces and data structures, there is potential for simplifying the AD process. Furthermore, derivative computation can be improved by exploiting high-level information about numerical and computational abstractions. However, challenges to the successful use of AD with these toolkits also exist. Among the greatest challenges is balancing the desire to limit the scope of the AD process with the desire to minimize the work required of a user. They discuss their experiences in integrating AD with the PETSc, PVODE, and TAO toolkits and the plans for future research and development in this area.

  3. Object oriented Simulation of Maintenance and Operations for Space Systems (OSMOSSYS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doran, Linda; Nguyen, Vien; Nguyen, Judy; Blumentritt, Will

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the NASA/JSC Research Technology Opportunity Program (RTOP) activity to assess the supportability of space systems throughout their life cycles. Supportability analyses for space systems present unique attributes and problems. The OSMOSSYS (Object oriented Simulation of Maintenance and Operations for Space Systems) was developed using object-oriented design concepts to provide NASA an analysis tool which addresses the question `Will a proposed space facility be able to successfully perform the missions for which it is designed?' This model integrates the complete configuration of the system including the reliability and maintainability characteristics of each component, the logistics support, and the mission operations of the facility to assess the success rate of the planned mission(s). Two parallel design processes are being utilized; developing core modules utilizing C++, and incorporating as much code and ideas as possible from existing NASA models. The space station was used as a test case to demonstrate the applicability of the model.

  4. Enhancing Interactivity and Productivity through Object-Oriented Authoring: An Instructional Designer's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Bryan L.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the effect of object-oriented programming on the evolution of authoring systems. Topics include the definition of an object; examples of object-oriented authoring interfaces; what object-orientation means to an instructional developer; how object orientation increases productivity and enhances interactivity; and the future of courseware…

  5. Reviews of computing technology: Object-oriented technology

    SciTech Connect

    Skeen, D.C.

    1993-03-01

    A useful metaphor in introducing object-oriented concepts is the idea of a computer hardware manufacturer assembling products from an existing stock of electronic parts. In this analogy, think of the parts as pieces of computer software and of the finished products as computer applications. Like its counterpart, the object is capable of performing its specific function in a wide variety of different applications. The advantages to assembling hardware using a set of prebuilt parts are obvious. The design process is greatly simplified in this scenario, since the designer needs only to carry the design down to the chip level, rather than to the transistor level. As a result, the designer is free to develop a more reliable and feature rich product. Also, since the component parts are reused in several different products, the parts can be made more robust and subjected to more rigorous testing than would be economically feasible for a part used in only one piece of equipment. Additionally, maintenance on the resulting systems is simplified because of the part-level consistency from one type of equipment to another. The remainder of this document introduces the techniques used to develop objects, the benefits of the technology, outstanding issues that remain with the technology, industry direction for the technology, and the impact that object-oriented technology is likely to have on the organization. While going through this material, the reader will find it useful to remember the parts analogy and to keep in mind that the overall purpose of object-oriented technology is to create software parts and to construct applications using those parts.

  6. APPLICATION OF OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING TECHNIQUES IN FRONT END COMPUTERS.

    SciTech Connect

    SKELLY,J.F.

    1997-11-03

    The Front End Computer (FEC) environment imposes special demands on software, beyond real time performance and robustness. FEC software must manage a diverse inventory of devices with individualistic timing requirements and hardware interfaces. It must implement network services which export device access to the control system at large, interpreting a uniform network communications protocol into the specific control requirements of the individual devices. Object oriented languages provide programming techniques which neatly address these challenges, and also offer benefits in terms of maintainability and flexibility. Applications are discussed which exhibit the use of inheritance, multiple inheritance and inheritance trees, and polymorphism to address the needs of FEC software.

  7. XJava: Exploiting Parallelism with Object-Oriented Stream Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Frank; Pankratius, Victor; Tichy, Walter F.

    This paper presents the XJava compiler for parallel programs. It exploits parallelism based on an object-oriented stream programming paradigm. XJava extends Java with new parallel constructs that do not expose programmers to low-level details of parallel programming on shared memory machines. Tasks define composable parallel activities, and new operators allow an easier expression of parallel patterns, such as pipelines, divide and conquer, or master/worker. We also present an automatic run-time mechanism that extends our previous work to automatically map tasks and parallel statements to threads.

  8. Overture: object-oriented tools for overset grid applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D L; Henshaw, W D; Quinlan, D J

    1999-04-28

    The Overture framework is an object-oriented environment for solving partial differential equations in two and three space dimensions. It is a collection of C++ libraries that enables the use of finite difference and finite volume methods at a level that hides the details of the associated data structures. Overture can be used to solve problems in complicated, moving geometries using the method of overlapping grids. It has support for grid generation, difference operators, boundary conditions, data-base access and graphics. Short sample code segments are presented to show the power of this approach.

  9. Overture: Object-Oriented Tools for Application with Complex Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.; Henshaw, B.; Quinlan, D.

    1999-05-31

    The Overture framework is an object-oriented environment for solving partial differential equations in two and three space dimensions. It is a collection of C++ libraries that enables the use of finite difference and finite volume methods at a level that hides the details of the associated data structures. Overture can be used to solve problems in complicated, moving geometries using the method of overlapping grids. It has support for grid generation, difference operators, boundary conditions, data-base access and graphics. Short sample code segments are presented to show the power of this approach.

  10. Mapper: A distributed object-oriented database application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Younger, Herbert; O'Reilly, John; Frogner, Bjorn

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) project. The initial application involved decomposition of a large database across multiple processors to improve the speed of processing compound queries. The commercial outcome was a tourist information system with a point-to-point driving direction program called MAPPER. A distributed, object-oriented approach was used for the general design, while a spatial decomposition was used to divide the database into computationally manageable pieces. The resulting system is highly flexible with respect to both modifications and reuse.

  11. An Object-oriented Taxonomy of Medical Data Presentations

    PubMed Central

    Starren, Justin; Johnson, Stephen B.

    2000-01-01

    A variety of methods have been proposed for presenting medical data visually on computers. Discussion of and comparison among these methods have been hindered by a lack of consistent terminology. A taxonomy of medical data presentations based on object-oriented user interface principles is presented. Presentations are divided into five major classes—list, table, graph, icon, and generated text. These are subdivided into eight subclasses with simple inheritance and four subclasses with multiple inheritance. The various subclasses are reviewed and examples are provided. Issues critical to the development and evaluation of presentations are also discussed. PMID:10641959

  12. Simulating complex intracellular processes using object-oriented computational modelling.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Colin G; Goldman, Jacki P; Gullick, William J

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of computer modelling and simulation in cellular biology, in particular as applied to complex biochemical processes within the cell. This is illustrated by the use of the techniques of object-oriented modelling, where the computer is used to construct abstractions of objects in the domain being modelled, and these objects then interact within the computer to simulate the system and allow emergent properties to be observed. The paper also discusses the role of computer simulation in understanding complexity in biological systems, and the kinds of information which can be obtained about biology via simulation. PMID:15302205

  13. Object-oriented algorithmic laboratory for ordering sparse matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Kumfert, G K

    2000-05-01

    We focus on two known NP-hard problems that have applications in sparse matrix computations: the envelope/wavefront reduction problem and the fill reduction problem. Envelope/wavefront reducing orderings have a wide range of applications including profile and frontal solvers, incomplete factorization preconditioning, graph reordering for cache performance, gene sequencing, and spatial databases. Fill reducing orderings are generally limited to--but an inextricable part of--sparse matrix factorization. Our major contribution to this field is the design of new and improved heuristics for these NP-hard problems and their efficient implementation in a robust, cross-platform, object-oriented software package. In this body of research, we (1) examine current ordering algorithms, analyze their asymptotic complexity, and characterize their behavior in model problems, (2) introduce new and improved algorithms that address deficiencies found in previous heuristics, (3) implement an object-oriented library of these algorithms in a robust, modular fashion without significant loss of efficiency, and (4) extend our algorithms and software to address both generalized and constrained problems. We stress that the major contribution is the algorithms and the implementation; the whole being greater than the sum of its parts. The initial motivation for implementing our algorithms in object-oriented software was to manage the inherent complexity. During our research came the realization that the object-oriented implementation enabled new possibilities augmented algorithms that would not have been as natural to generalize from a procedural implementation. Some extensions are constructed from a family of related algorithmic components, thereby creating a poly-algorithm that can adapt its strategy to the properties of the specific problem instance dynamically. Other algorithms are tailored for special constraints by aggregating algorithmic components and having them collaboratively

  14. Object-oriented programming applied to the evaluation of reliability fault trees

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson-Hine, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    Object-oriented programming techniques are used to implement an algorithm for the direct evaluation of fault trees. A simple bottom-up procedure evaluates independent branches. The identification of dependencies within a branch results in the application of a top-down recursive procedure. A unique approach to modularization enables dynamic modularization of the tree at each step in the reduction process. The algorithm reduces the number of recursive calls required to solve trees with repeated events and calculates intermediate results as well as the solution of the top event. The intermediate results can be reused if part of the tree is modified. The algorithm is implemented on a Texas Instruments Explorer LISP workstation which offers an environment that incorporates an object-oriented system called Flavors with Common LISP. Several example fault trees from the literature are evaluated with the object-oriented algorithm, and the results are compared with conventional reduction techniques. The program includes a graphical tree editor to display the fault tree objects. The graphical display of the tree enables a visual check of the input tree structure.

  15. Using object-oriented analysis techniques to support system testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucconi, Lin

    1990-03-01

    Testing of real-time control systems can be greatly facilitated by use of object-oriented and structured analysis modeling techniques. This report describes a project where behavior, process and information models built for a real-time control system were used to augment and aid traditional system testing. The modeling techniques used were an adaptation of the Ward/Mellor method for real-time systems analysis and design (Ward85) for object-oriented development. The models were used to simulate system behavior by means of hand execution of the behavior or state model and the associated process (data and control flow) and information (data) models. The information model, which uses an extended entity-relationship modeling technique, is used to identify application domain objects and their attributes (instance variables). The behavioral model uses state-transition diagrams to describe the state-dependent behavior of the object. The process model uses a transformation schema to describe the operations performed on or by the object. Together, these models provide a means of analyzing and specifying a system in terms of the static and dynamic properties of the objects which it manipulates. The various models were used to simultaneously capture knowledge about both the objects in the application domain and the system implementation. Models were constructed, verified against the software as-built and validated through informal reviews with the developer. These models were then hand-executed.

  16. Object-orientation for fusion of corrosion data

    SciTech Connect

    Roberge, P.R.; Trethewey, K.R.

    1997-12-31

    The complexity of many materials engineering problems can be drastically reduced by regrouping concepts and facts into a natural human representation provided by object-oriented models. One of the main advantages of using the principles of object orientation (OO) to structure a knowledge based system (KBS) is the compatibility of OO with natural cognitive operations such as classifying, instantiating, and measuring. But knowledge representation goes much beyond conventional data representation and must rely on facts that often possess a halo of fuzziness. In this project, the OO structure was used to organize the complex world of materials degradation and lifetime prediction. A system developed with this principle was found to be able to incorporate the fundamental knowledge derived from failure analysis or from other fields of materials engineering. Such a framework could also constitute the crucible to achieve the data fusion necessary to blend various sources of expertise. This paper describes the key elements of the framework and illustrates its flexibility by providing a guiding structure during the analysis of the results of a computerized search of modern engineering literature.

  17. An object-oriented data reduction system in Fortran

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, J.

    1992-01-01

    A data reduction system for the AAO two-degree field project is being developed using an object-oriented approach. Rather than use an object-oriented language (such as C++) the system is written in Fortran and makes extensive use of existing subroutine libraries provided by the UK Starlink project. Objects are created using the extensible N-dimensional Data Format (NDF) which itself is based on the Hierarchical Data System (HDS). The software consists of a class library, with each class corresponding to a Fortran subroutine with a standard calling sequence. The methods of the classes provide operations on NDF objects at a similar level of functionality to the applications of conventional data reduction systems. However, because they are provided as callable subroutines, they can be used as building blocks for more specialist applications. The class library is not dependent on a particular software environment thought it can be used effectively in ADAM applications. It can also be used from standalone Fortran programs. It is intended to develop a graphical user interface for use with the class library to form the 2dF data reduction system.

  18. Basic concept of a holonically object-oriented system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Shigeki

    1999-08-01

    Here introduces a concept of Holonically Object Oriented System. Nowadays there are many much more complicated things than before in this world, waited to be controlled intelligently for getting a goods' production rate better at a factory or getting things clearer in a complex system or getting a help in a sense of analyzing a system, etc. For having these things accomplished, we have tried to understand the target system to be controlled clearly, accurately, and precisely. After having got these information, it is ready to control for many purposes. But usually this method gives us further complexed problems, more time consuming because of the size of a system, gives us comparatively lower robustness. These can be caused by a lack of a flexibility against a sudden change of a system's behavior, giving too much redundant attention to a system, and lack of intelligence. So in order to overcome these problems, here introduces the concept of Holonically Object Oriented System which consists of a holarchy which behaves as a whole as well as a subordinate. And this behavior helps to interpret a huge organization into a system which is flexible, raising a production rate, and high adaptability to changes.

  19. Cellular automata with object-oriented features for parallel molecular network modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hao; Wu, Yinghui; Huang, Sui; Sun, Yan; Dhar, Pawan

    2005-06-01

    Cellular automata are an important modeling paradigm for studying the dynamics of large, parallel systems composed of multiple, interacting components. However, to model biological systems, cellular automata need to be extended beyond the large-scale parallelism and intensive communication in order to capture two fundamental properties characteristic of complex biological systems: hierarchy and heterogeneity. This paper proposes extensions to a cellular automata language, Cellang, to meet this purpose. The extended language, with object-oriented features, can be used to describe the structure and activity of parallel molecular networks within cells. Capabilities of this new programming language include object structure to define molecular programs within a cell, floating-point data type and mathematical functions to perform quantitative computation, message passing capability to describe molecular interactions, as well as new operators, statements, and built-in functions. We discuss relevant programming issues of these features, including the object-oriented description of molecular interactions with molecule encapsulation, message passing, and the description of heterogeneity and anisotropy at the cell and molecule levels. By enabling the integration of modeling at the molecular level with system behavior at cell, tissue, organ, or even organism levels, the program will help improve our understanding of how complex and dynamic biological activities are generated and controlled by parallel functioning of molecular networks. Index Terms-Cellular automata, modeling, molecular network, object-oriented. PMID:16117022

  20. Implementation of schema management in STEP-based object-oriented engineering database management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Ke; Zhao, Zhige; Sun, Jiaguang

    1996-03-01

    Engineering database management system (EDBMS) is the kernel of CAD/CAM system integration, and object-oriented EDBMS (OOEDBMS) is the best implementation. While STEP is becoming the standard of product data exchange and representation, supporting STEP in engineering database becomes more and more important. In this paper we introduce the architecture of STEP based OOEDBMS in our CAD/CAM integrated system GHCAD. We focus on schema management and three-grade database management in OOEDBMS. Topics such as DDL compiler, transformation from EXPRESS to DDL, DDL tools are discussed. Finally further research directions of schema management in OOEDBMS are present.

  1. Methodology for object-oriented real-time systems analysis and design: Software engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeffler, James D.

    1991-01-01

    Successful application of software engineering methodologies requires an integrated analysis and design life-cycle in which the various phases flow smoothly 'seamlessly' from analysis through design to implementation. Furthermore, different analysis methodologies often lead to different structuring of the system so that the transition from analysis to design may be awkward depending on the design methodology to be used. This is especially important when object-oriented programming is to be used for implementation when the original specification and perhaps high-level design is non-object oriented. Two approaches to real-time systems analysis which can lead to an object-oriented design are contrasted: (1) modeling the system using structured analysis with real-time extensions which emphasizes data and control flows followed by the abstraction of objects where the operations or methods of the objects correspond to processes in the data flow diagrams and then design in terms of these objects; and (2) modeling the system from the beginning as a set of naturally occurring concurrent entities (objects) each having its own time-behavior defined by a set of states and state-transition rules and seamlessly transforming the analysis models into high-level design models. A new concept of a 'real-time systems-analysis object' is introduced and becomes the basic building block of a series of seamlessly-connected models which progress from the object-oriented real-time systems analysis and design system analysis logical models through the physical architectural models and the high-level design stages. The methodology is appropriate to the overall specification including hardware and software modules. In software modules, the systems analysis objects are transformed into software objects.

  2. An Object-oriented Computer Code for Aircraft Engine Weight Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, Michael T.; Naylor, Bret A.

    2008-01-01

    Reliable engine-weight estimation at the conceptual design stage is critical to the development of new aircraft engines. It helps to identify the best engine concept amongst several candidates. At NASA Glenn (GRC), the Weight Analysis of Turbine Engines (WATE) computer code, originally developed by Boeing Aircraft, has been used to estimate the engine weight of various conceptual engine designs. The code, written in FORTRAN, was originally developed for NASA in 1979. Since then, substantial improvements have been made to the code to improve the weight calculations for most of the engine components. Most recently, to improve the maintainability and extensibility of WATE, the FORTRAN code has been converted into an object-oriented version. The conversion was done within the NASA s NPSS (Numerical Propulsion System Simulation) framework. This enables WATE to interact seamlessly with the thermodynamic cycle model which provides component flow data such as airflows, temperatures, and pressures, etc. that are required for sizing the components and weight calculations. The tighter integration between the NPSS and WATE would greatly enhance system-level analysis and optimization capabilities. It also would facilitate the enhancement of the WATE code for next-generation aircraft and space propulsion systems. In this paper, the architecture of the object-oriented WATE code (or WATE++) is described. Both the FORTRAN and object-oriented versions of the code are employed to compute the dimensions and weight of a 300- passenger aircraft engine (GE90 class). Both versions of the code produce essentially identical results as should be the case. Keywords: NASA, aircraft engine, weight, object-oriented

  3. Semantic framework for mapping object-oriented model to semantic web languages.

    PubMed

    Ježek, Petr; Mouček, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The article deals with and discusses two main approaches in building semantic structures for electrophysiological metadata. It is the use of conventional data structures, repositories, and programming languages on one hand and the use of formal representations of ontologies, known from knowledge representation, such as description logics or semantic web languages on the other hand. Although knowledge engineering offers languages supporting richer semantic means of expression and technological advanced approaches, conventional data structures and repositories are still popular among developers, administrators and users because of their simplicity, overall intelligibility, and lower demands on technical equipment. The choice of conventional data resources and repositories, however, raises the question of how and where to add semantics that cannot be naturally expressed using them. As one of the possible solutions, this semantics can be added into the structures of the programming language that accesses and processes the underlying data. To support this idea we introduced a software prototype that enables its users to add semantically richer expressions into a Java object-oriented code. This approach does not burden users with additional demands on programming environment since reflective Java annotations were used as an entry for these expressions. Moreover, additional semantics need not to be written by the programmer directly to the code, but it can be collected from non-programmers using a graphic user interface. The mapping that allows the transformation of the semantically enriched Java code into the Semantic Web language OWL was proposed and implemented in a library named the Semantic Framework. This approach was validated by the integration of the Semantic Framework in the EEG/ERP Portal and by the subsequent registration of the EEG/ERP Portal in the Neuroscience Information Framework. PMID:25762923

  4. Semantic framework for mapping object-oriented model to semantic web languages

    PubMed Central

    Ježek, Petr; Mouček, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The article deals with and discusses two main approaches in building semantic structures for electrophysiological metadata. It is the use of conventional data structures, repositories, and programming languages on one hand and the use of formal representations of ontologies, known from knowledge representation, such as description logics or semantic web languages on the other hand. Although knowledge engineering offers languages supporting richer semantic means of expression and technological advanced approaches, conventional data structures and repositories are still popular among developers, administrators and users because of their simplicity, overall intelligibility, and lower demands on technical equipment. The choice of conventional data resources and repositories, however, raises the question of how and where to add semantics that cannot be naturally expressed using them. As one of the possible solutions, this semantics can be added into the structures of the programming language that accesses and processes the underlying data. To support this idea we introduced a software prototype that enables its users to add semantically richer expressions into a Java object-oriented code. This approach does not burden users with additional demands on programming environment since reflective Java annotations were used as an entry for these expressions. Moreover, additional semantics need not to be written by the programmer directly to the code, but it can be collected from non-programmers using a graphic user interface. The mapping that allows the transformation of the semantically enriched Java code into the Semantic Web language OWL was proposed and implemented in a library named the Semantic Framework. This approach was validated by the integration of the Semantic Framework in the EEG/ERP Portal and by the subsequent registration of the EEG/ERP Portal in the Neuroscience Information Framework. PMID:25762923

  5. An Object-oriented minimization package for HEP

    SciTech Connect

    Mark S Fischler and David Sachs

    2003-07-02

    A portion of the HEP community has perceived the need for a minimization package written in C++ and taking advantage of the Object-Oriented nature of that language. To be acceptable for HEP, such a package must at least encompass all the capabilities of Minuit. Aside from the slight plus of not relying on outside Fortran compilation, the advantages that a C++ package based on O-O design would confer over the multitude of available C++ Minuit-wrappers include: Easier extensibility to different algorithms and forms of constraints; and usage modes which would not be available in the global-common-based Minuit design. An example of the latter is a job pursuing two ongoing minimization problems simultaneously. We discuss the design and implementation of such a package, which extends Minuit only in minor ways but which greatly diminishes the programming effort (if not the algorithm thought) needed to make more significant extensions.

  6. An object-oriented extension for debugging the virtual machine

    SciTech Connect

    Pizzi, R.G. Jr.

    1994-12-01

    A computer is nothing more then a virtual machine programmed by source code to perform a task. The program`s source code expresses abstract constructs which are compiled into some lower level target language. When a virtual machine breaks, it can be very difficult to debug because typical debuggers provide only low-level target implementation information to the software engineer. We believe that the debugging task can be simplified by introducing aspects of the abstract design and data into the source code. We introduce OODIE, an object-oriented extension to programming languages that allows programmers to specify a virtual environment by describing the meaning of the design and data of a virtual machine. This specification is translated into symbolic information such that an augmented debugger can present engineers with a programmable debugging environment specifically tailored for the virtual machine that is to be debugged.

  7. Overture: An Object-Oriented Framework for Overlapping Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W.D.

    2002-04-04

    The Overture framework is an object-oriented environment for solving partial differential equations on over-lapping grids. We describe some of the tools in Overture that can be used to generate grids and solve partial differential equations (PDEs). Overture contains a collection of C++ classes that can be used to write PDE solvers either at a high level or at a lower level for efficiency. There are also a number of tools provided with Overture that can be used with no programming effort. These tools include capabilities to: repair computer-aided-design (CAD) geometries and build global surface triangulations; generate surface and volume grids with hyperbolic grid generation; generate composite overlapping grids; generate hybrid (unstructured) grids; and solve particular PDEs such as the incompressible and compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  8. Object-oriented data model for skeletal development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Ricky K.; Cardenas, Alfonso F.; Chu, Wesley W.; Breant, Claudine M.; Dionisio, John D.; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Ieong, I. T.

    1994-05-01

    This paper describes our research toward the development of an intelligent database management system that supports queries based on image content, queries based on evolutionary processes, and queries that use imprecise medical terms. We use an extended object-oriented data model that includes novel temporal and evolutionary modeling constructs. Our initial clinical application concentrates on characterizing the development of the human hand. Our data model demonstrates the need for medical scientific databases to include the concepts of object life spans, object creation (e.g., bone ossification centers), the fusion of objects (e.g., metaphysis and epiphysis), the fission of an object, the gross transformation of object properties, and object inheritance involving entities that exist in various time- space domains.

  9. An automated quality assessor for Ada object-oriented designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailin, Sidney C.

    1988-01-01

    A tool for evaluating object-oriented designs (OODs) for Ada software is described. The tool assumes a design expressed as a hierarchy of object diagrams. A design of this type identifies the objects of a system, an interface to each object, and the usage relationships between objects. When such a design is implemented in Ada, objects become packages, interfaces become package specifications, and usage relationships become Ada `with' clauses and package references. An automated quality assessor has been developed that is based on flagging undesirable design constructs. For convenience, distinctions are made among three levels of severity: questionable, undesirable, and hazardous. A questionable construct is one that may well be appropriate. An undesirable construct is one that should be changed because it is potentially harmful to the reliability, maintainability, or reusability of the software. A hazardous construct is one that is undesirable and that introduces a high level of risk.

  10. An Object Oriented Framework for Customizable Physics Education Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslan, Hürol

    2007-04-01

    The learning improvements resulting from employing computers in physics education may be insufficient to convince many instructors to follow the trend leading to learner-centered education models. The instructors who are not willing to invest time and resources to create their own educational software will be able to contribute to the digital learning environment of future if they can easily produce interactive simulations accompanied by their own explanations. Software developers should design according to the needs of the instructors in order to help more students to benefit from the educational potential of computers. This paper describes how the capabilities of object-oriented languages can be utilized to produce customizable educational applets that can reach across language barriers and can be modified without writing additional code. The methods outlined here forms the framework of an ongoing programming project intended to help instructors create interactive educational materials with still graphics and animations.

  11. An object-oriented toolbox for studying optimization problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, H. Lydia; Gouveia, Wences; Scales, John

    The CWP Object-Oriented Optimization Library (COOOL) is a collection of C++ classes for studying and solving optimization problems. It was developed using the freely available GNU compiler gcc. The library contains the basic building blocks for the efficient design of numerical linear algebra and optimization software; it also comes with a variety of unconstrained optimization algorithms and test objective functions drawn from our own research. The only requirement for using one of the optimization methods is that a simple model of communication be followed. This allows us to use exactly the same code to optimize functions tailored for a variety of hardware, no matter what programming language is used. Further, since we have provided class libraries containing building blocks for general purpose optimization and numerical linear algebra software, the development of new algorithms should be greatly aided. COOOL is now freely available via anonymous ftp at

  12. Cosmo++: An object-oriented C++ library for cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslanyan, Grigor

    2014-12-01

    This paper introduces a new publicly available numerical library for cosmology, Cosmo++. The library has been designed using object-oriented programming techniques, and fully implemented in C++. Cosmo++ introduces a unified interface for using most of the frequently used numerical methods in cosmology. Most of the features are implemented in Cosmo++ itself, while a part of the functionality is implemented by linking to other publicly available libraries. The most important features of the library are Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies power spectrum and transfer function calculations, likelihood calculations, parameter space sampling tools, sky map simulations, and mask apodization. Cosmo++ also includes a few mathematical tools that are frequently used in numerical research in cosmology and beyond. A few simple examples are included in Cosmo++ to help the user understand the key features. The library has been fully tested, and we describe some of the important tests in this paper. Cosmo++ is publicly available at http://cosmo.grigoraslanyan.com.

  13. StrateGene: object-oriented programming in molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Carhart, R E; Cash, H D; Moore, J F

    1988-03-01

    This paper describes some of the ways that object-oriented programming methodologies have been used to represent and manipulate biological information in a working application. When running on a Xerox 1100 series computer, StrateGene functions as a genetic engineering workstation for the management of information about cloning experiments. It represents biological molecules, enzymes, fragments, and methods as classes, subclasses, and members in a hierarchy of objects. These objects may have various attributes, which themselves can be defined and classified. The attributes and their values can be passed from the classes of objects down to the subclasses and members. The user can modify the objects and their attributes while using them. New knowledge and changes to the system can be incorporated relatively easily. The operations on the biological objects are associated with the objects themselves. This makes it easier to invoke them correctly and allows generic operations to be customized for the particular object. PMID:3164229

  14. An Object Oriented, Finite Element Framework for Linear Wave Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, J M

    2004-08-12

    This dissertation documents an object oriented framework which can be used to solve any linear wave equation. The linear wave equations are expressed in the differential forms language. This differential forms expression allows a strict discrete interpretation of the system. The framework is implemented using the Galerkin Finite Element Method to define the discrete differential forms and operators. Finite element basis functions including standard scalar Nodal and vector Nedelec basis functions are used to implement the discrete differential forms resulting in a mixed finite element system. Discretizations of scalar and vector wave equations in the time and frequency domains will be demonstrated in both differential forms and vector calculi. This framework conserves energy, maintains physical continuity, is valid on unstructured grids, conditionally stable and second order accurate. Examples including linear electrodynamics, acoustics, elasticity and magnetohydrodynamics are demonstrated.

  15. Design of object-oriented distributed simulation classes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeffler, James D. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Distributed simulation of aircraft engines as part of a computer aided design package is being developed by NASA Lewis Research Center for the aircraft industry. The project is called NPSS, an acronym for 'Numerical Propulsion Simulation System'. NPSS is a flexible object-oriented simulation of aircraft engines requiring high computing speed. It is desirable to run the simulation on a distributed computer system with multiple processors executing portions of the simulation in parallel. The purpose of this research was to investigate object-oriented structures such that individual objects could be distributed. The set of classes used in the simulation must be designed to facilitate parallel computation. Since the portions of the simulation carried out in parallel are not independent of one another, there is the need for communication among the parallel executing processors which in turn implies need for their synchronization. Communication and synchronization can lead to decreased throughput as parallel processors wait for data or synchronization signals from other processors. As a result of this research, the following have been accomplished. The design and implementation of a set of simulation classes which result in a distributed simulation control program have been completed. The design is based upon MIT 'Actor' model of a concurrent object and uses 'connectors' to structure dynamic connections between simulation components. Connectors may be dynamically created according to the distribution of objects among machines at execution time without any programming changes. Measurements of the basic performance have been carried out with the result that communication overhead of the distributed design is swamped by the computation time of modules unless modules have very short execution times per iteration or time step. An analytical performance model based upon queuing network theory has been designed and implemented. Its application to realistic configurations has

  16. Design of Object-Oriented Distributed Simulation Classes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeffler, James D.

    1995-01-01

    Distributed simulation of aircraft engines as part of a computer aided design package being developed by NASA Lewis Research Center for the aircraft industry. The project is called NPSS, an acronym for "Numerical Propulsion Simulation System". NPSS is a flexible object-oriented simulation of aircraft engines requiring high computing speed. It is desirable to run the simulation on a distributed computer system with multiple processors executing portions of the simulation in parallel. The purpose of this research was to investigate object-oriented structures such that individual objects could be distributed. The set of classes used in the simulation must be designed to facilitate parallel computation. Since the portions of the simulation carried out in parallel are not independent of one another, there is the need for communication among the parallel executing processors which in turn implies need for their synchronization. Communication and synchronization can lead to decreased throughput as parallel processors wait for data or synchronization signals from other processors. As a result of this research, the following have been accomplished. The design and implementation of a set of simulation classes which result in a distributed simulation control program have been completed. The design is based upon MIT "Actor" model of a concurrent object and uses "connectors" to structure dynamic connections between simulation components. Connectors may be dynamically created according to the distribution of objects among machines at execution time without any programming changes. Measurements of the basic performance have been carried out with the result that communication overhead of the distributed design is swamped by the computation time of modules unless modules have very short execution times per iteration or time step. An analytical performance model based upon queuing network theory has been designed and implemented. Its application to realistic configurations has not

  17. Object-oriented vision for a behavior-based robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, Rainer; Graefe, Volker; Wershofen, Klaus P.

    1996-10-01

    As one realization out of the class of behavior-based robot architectures a specific concept of situation-oriented behavior-based navigation has been proposed. Its main characteristic is that the selection of the behaviors to be executed in each moment is based on a continuous recognition and evaluation of the dynamically changing situation in which the robot is finding itself. An important prerequisite for such as approach is a timely and comprehensive perception of the robot's dynamically changing environment. Object-oriented vision as proposed and successfully applied, e.g., in freeway traffic scenes is a particularly well suited sensing modality for robot control. Our work concentrated on modeling the physical objects which are relevant for indoor navigation, i.e. walls, intersections of corridors, and landmarks. In the interest of efficiency these models include only those necessary features for allowing the robot to reliably recognize different situations in real time. According to the concept of object- oriented vision recognizing such objects is largely reduced to a knowledge-based verification of objects or features that may be expected to be visible in the current situation. The following results have been achieved: 1) By using its vision system and a knowledge base in the form of an attributed topological map the robot could orient itself and navigate autonomously in a known environment. 2) In an unknown environment the robot was able to build, by means of supervised learning, an attributed topological map as a basis for subsequent autonomous navigation. 3) The experiments could be performed both under unmodified artificial light and under natural light shining through the glass walls of the building.

  18. A survey of commercial object-oriented database management systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, John

    1992-01-01

    The object-oriented data model is the culmination of over thirty years of database research. Initially, database research focused on the need to provide information in a consistent and efficient manner to the business community. Early data models such as the hierarchical model and the network model met the goal of consistent and efficient access to data and were substantial improvements over simple file mechanisms for storing and accessing data. However, these models required highly skilled programmers to provide access to the data. Consequently, in the early 70's E.F. Codd, an IBM research computer scientists, proposed a new data model based on the simple mathematical notion of the relation. This model is known as the Relational Model. In the relational model, data is represented in flat tables (or relations) which have no physical or internal links between them. The simplicity of this model fostered the development of powerful but relatively simple query languages that now made data directly accessible to the general database user. Except for large, multi-user database systems, a database professional was in general no longer necessary. Database professionals found that traditional data in the form of character data, dates, and numeric data were easily represented and managed via the relational model. Commercial relational database management systems proliferated and performance of relational databases improved dramatically. However, there was a growing community of potential database users whose needs were not met by the relational model. These users needed to store data with data types not available in the relational model and who required a far richer modelling environment than that provided by the relational model. Indeed, the complexity of the objects to be represented in the model mandated a new approach to database technology. The Object-Oriented Model was the result.

  19. Object-oriented data handling system for an automated chemistry laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Medvick, P.A.; Mniszewski, S.M.; Beugelsdijk, T.J.

    1991-01-01

    The environmental-remediation efforts at DOE complexes require characterizing problems at each site before cleanup action. Characterization will require the chemical analysis of millions of samples at a significant cost. Automation of the required chemical analyses methods provides a cost-effective solution. An object-oriented approach was deemed necessary to allow for modularization, maintainability, reusability, and flexibility of the software and hardware. Each chemical analysis method is implemented as a Standard Analysis Method or SAM. A SAM is, in essence, a black box'' into which a sample enters at one end and chemical or physical information exits'' at the other. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Development of a Dynamically Configurable, Object-Oriented Framework for Distributed, Multi-modal Computational Aerospace Systems Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afjeh, Abdollah A.; Reed, John A.

    2003-01-01

    The following reports are presented on this project:A first year progress report on: Development of a Dynamically Configurable,Object-Oriented Framework for Distributed, Multi-modal Computational Aerospace Systems Simulation; A second year progress report on: Development of a Dynamically Configurable, Object-Oriented Framework for Distributed, Multi-modal Computational Aerospace Systems Simulation; An Extensible, Interchangeable and Sharable Database Model for Improving Multidisciplinary Aircraft Design; Interactive, Secure Web-enabled Aircraft Engine Simulation Using XML Databinding Integration; and Improving the Aircraft Design Process Using Web-based Modeling and Simulation.

  1. Design and implementation of distributed multimedia surveillance system based on object-oriented middleware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xuesong; Jiang, Ling; Hu, Ruimin

    2006-10-01

    Currently, the applications of surveillance system have been increasingly widespread. But there are few surveillance platforms that can meet the requirement of large-scale, cross-regional, and flexible surveillance business. In the paper, we present a distributed surveillance system platform to improve safety and security of the society. The system is constructed by an object-oriented middleware called as Internet Communications Engine (ICE). This middleware helps our platform to integrate a lot of surveillance resource of the society and accommodate diverse range of surveillance industry requirements. In the follow sections, we will describe in detail the design concepts of system and introduce traits of ICE.

  2. Object-oriented design patterns for multiphysics modeling in Fortran 2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Adalsteinsson, Helgi; Rouson, Damian; Xia, Jim

    2008-04-01

    The objectives of this presentation are to: catalog object-oriented software design patterns for multiphysics modeling; demonstrate them in Fortran 2003 and C++; and compare the capabilities of the two languages. The conclusions are: the presented patterns integrate multiple abstractions, allowing much of the numerics and physics to be determined at compile-time or runtime; negligible lines of Fortran emulate the required C++ features; and C++ requires considerable effort (or considerable reliance on libraries to relive that effort) to emulate the required Fortran 2003 features.

  3. A diagnosis system using object-oriented fault tree models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iverson, David L.; Patterson-Hine, F. A.

    1990-01-01

    Spaceborne computing systems must provide reliable, continuous operation for extended periods. Due to weight, power, and volume constraints, these systems must manage resources very effectively. A fault diagnosis algorithm is described which enables fast and flexible diagnoses in the dynamic distributed computing environments planned for future space missions. The algorithm uses a knowledge base that is easily changed and updated to reflect current system status. Augmented fault trees represented in an object-oriented form provide deep system knowledge that is easy to access and revise as a system changes. Given such a fault tree, a set of failure events that have occurred, and a set of failure events that have not occurred, this diagnosis system uses forward and backward chaining to propagate causal and temporal information about other failure events in the system being diagnosed. Once the system has established temporal and causal constraints, it reasons backward from heuristically selected failure events to find a set of basic failure events which are a likely cause of the occurrence of the top failure event in the fault tree. The diagnosis system has been implemented in common LISP using Flavors.

  4. Object-Oriented Fast Multipole Simulation: Magnetic Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visscher, Pieter; Günal, Yüksel

    1997-08-01

    In simulating a system of N particles, if the interaction is long-ranged all pair interactions must be calculated, requiring CPU time of order N^2. Recently-developed ``fast multipole'' methods (FMM) can reduce this time to order N, at the cost of considerable programming complexity. We have developed an object-oriented approach which uses similar ideas but is conceptually much simpler. The system is represented by a hierarchical tree whose root is the entire system and whose lowest nodes are the particles. The entire calculation of the particle interactions consists of a single call to a recursive function CalculateInteractions(A,B) with A=B=root, which uses a simple opening-angle criterion to choose between multipole expansion and calling itself (subdividing A and B.) The resulting algorithm is essentially equivalent to the FMM, but the choice of when to subdivide (which is laboriously hard-wired in FMM) is made automatically. We will discuss the implementation of periodic BCs and the application of the method to continuum systems (cylindrical magnetic particles).

  5. Parallelization of an Object-Oriented Unstructured Aeroacoustics Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baggag, Abdelkader; Atkins, Harold; Oezturan, Can; Keyes, David

    1999-01-01

    A computational aeroacoustics code based on the discontinuous Galerkin method is ported to several parallel platforms using MPI. The discontinuous Galerkin method is a compact high-order method that retains its accuracy and robustness on non-smooth unstructured meshes. In its semi-discrete form, the discontinuous Galerkin method can be combined with explicit time marching methods making it well suited to time accurate computations. The compact nature of the discontinuous Galerkin method also makes it well suited for distributed memory parallel platforms. The original serial code was written using an object-oriented approach and was previously optimized for cache-based machines. The port to parallel platforms was achieved simply by treating partition boundaries as a type of boundary condition. Code modifications were minimal because boundary conditions were abstractions in the original program. Scalability results are presented for the SCI Origin, IBM SP2, and clusters of SGI and Sun workstations. Slightly superlinear speedup is achieved on a fixed-size problem on the Origin, due to cache effects.

  6. An Object Oriented Extensible Architecture for Affordable Aerospace Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Follen, Gregory J.; Lytle, John K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Driven by a need to explore and develop propulsion systems that exceeded current computing capabilities, NASA Glenn embarked on a novel strategy leading to the development of an architecture that enables propulsion simulations never thought possible before. Full engine 3 Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamic propulsion system simulations were deemed impossible due to the impracticality of the hardware and software computing systems required. However, with a software paradigm shift and an embracing of parallel and distributed processing, an architecture was designed to meet the needs of future propulsion system modeling. The author suggests that the architecture designed at the NASA Glenn Research Center for propulsion system modeling has potential for impacting the direction of development of affordable weapons systems currently under consideration by the Applied Vehicle Technology Panel (AVT). This paper discusses the salient features of the NPSS Architecture including its interface layer, object layer, implementation for accessing legacy codes, numerical zooming infrastructure and its computing layer. The computing layer focuses on the use and deployment of these propulsion simulations on parallel and distributed computing platforms which has been the focus of NASA Ames. Additional features of the object oriented architecture that support MultiDisciplinary (MD) Coupling, computer aided design (CAD) access and MD coupling objects will be discussed. Included will be a discussion of the successes, challenges and benefits of implementing this architecture.

  7. Object oriented post-classification of change images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeyer, Irmgard; Canty, Morton J.

    2002-01-01

    Commercial satellite images have long been used for environmental monitoring. The improvements in spatial and spectral resolution bring with them new applications in different fields. We have already investigated the use of medium-resolution LANDSAT TM5 images for the routine nuclear verification, based on recently published visualization and change detection algorithms: canonical correlation analysis to enhance the change information in the difference images and Bayesian techniques for the automatic determination of significant thresholds. Now, the high spatial ground resolution of IKONOS and other future satellites provides a good basis for recognizing and monitoring of small-scale structural changes and for planning of routine and/or challenge inspections of nuclear sites. Aside from the advantages of the improved spatial resolution some problems due to sensor and solar conditions exist: Shadow formation and off-nadir images make it more difficult to interpret the complex changes. In order to solve these problems, we supplement the pixel-based change detection analysis with a supervised, object-oriented post-classification of change images carried out with the image analysis system eCognition. Defining of different object classes of the change pixels helps to distinguish between the different man-made, vegetation and other changes. By means of semantic relations between the object classes of changes and other classes it is possible to exclude shadow affected regions and to concentrate on specific areas of interest.

  8. A Validation of Object-Oriented Design Metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basili, Victor R.; Briand, Lionel; Melo, Walcelio L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study conducted at the University of Maryland in which we experimentally investigated the suite of Object-Oriented (00) design metrics introduced by [Chidamber and Kemerer, 1994]. In order to do this, we assessed these metrics as predictors of fault-prone classes. This study is complementary to [Lieand Henry, 1993] where the same suite of metrics had been used to assess frequencies of maintenance changes to classes. To perform our validation accurately, we collected data on the development of eight medium-sized information management systems based on identical requirements. All eight projects were developed using a sequential life cycle model, a well-known 00 analysis/design method and the C++ programming language. Based on experimental results, the advantages and drawbacks of these 00 metrics are discussed and suggestions for improvement are provided. Several of Chidamber and Kemerer's 00 metrics appear to be adequate to predict class fault-proneness during the early phases of the life-cycle. We also showed that they are, on our data set, better predictors than "traditional" code metrics, which can only be collected at a later phase of the software development processes.

  9. Object-oriented approach for gas turbine engine simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlett, Brian P.; Felder, James L.

    1995-01-01

    An object-oriented gas turbine engine simulation program was developed. This program is a prototype for a more complete, commercial grade engine performance program now being proposed as part of the Numerical Propulsion System Simulator (NPSS). This report discusses architectural issues of this complex software system and the lessons learned from developing the prototype code. The prototype code is a fully functional, general purpose engine simulation program, however, only the component models necessary to model a transient compressor test rig have been written. The production system will be capable of steady state and transient modeling of almost any turbine engine configuration. Chief among the architectural considerations for this code was the framework in which the various software modules will interact. These modules include the equation solver, simulation code, data model, event handler, and user interface. Also documented in this report is the component based design of the simulation module and the inter-component communication paradigm. Object class hierarchies for some of the code modules are given.

  10. Quantity, Revisited: An Object-Oriented Reusable Class

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funston, Monica Gayle; Gerstle, Walter; Panthaki, Malcolm

    1998-01-01

    "Quantity", a prototype implementation of an object-oriented class, was developed for two reasons: to help engineers and scientists manipulate the many types of quantities encountered during routine analysis, and to create a reusable software component to for large domain-specific applications. From being used as a stand-alone application to being incorporated into an existing computational mechanics toolkit, "Quantity" appears to be a useful and powerful object. "Quantity" has been designed to maintain the full engineering meaning of values with respect to units and coordinate systems. A value is a scalar, vector, tensor, or matrix, each of which is composed of Value Components, each of which may be an integer, floating point number, fuzzy number, etc., and its associated physical unit. Operations such as coordinate transformation and arithmetic operations are handled by member functions of "Quantity". The prototype has successfully tested such characteristics as maintaining a numeric value, an associated unit, and an annotation. In this paper we further explore the design of "Quantity", with particular attention to coordinate systems.

  11. Object Oriented Design and the Standard Model of particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipovaca, Samir

    2007-04-01

    Inspired by the computer as both tool and metaphor, a new path emerges toward understanding life, physics, and existence. The path leads throughout all of nature, from the interior of cells to inside black holes. This view of science is based on the idea that information is the ultimate ``substance'' from which all things are made. Exploring this view, we will focus on Object - Oriented (OO) design as one of the most important designs in software development. The OO design views the world as composed of objects with well defined properties. The dynamics is pictured as interactions among objects. Interactions are mediated by messages that objects exchange with each other. This description closely resembles the view of the elementary particles world created by the Standard Model of particle physics. The object model (OM) provides a theoretical foundation upon which the OO design is built. The OM is based on the principles of abstraction, encapsulation, modularity and hierarchy. We will show that the Standard Model of particle physics follows the OM principles.

  12. Field Model: An Object-Oriented Data Model for Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Patrick J.

    2001-01-01

    We present an extensible, object-oriented data model designed for field data entitled Field Model (FM). FM objects can represent a wide variety of fields, including fields of arbitrary dimension and node type. FM can also handle time-series data. FM achieves generality through carefully selected topological primitives and through an implementation that leverages the potential of templated C++. FM supports fields where the nodes values are paired with any cell type. Thus FM can represent data where the field nodes are paired with the vertices ("vertex-centered" data), fields where the nodes are paired with the D-dimensional cells in R(sup D) (often called "cell-centered" data), as well as fields where nodes are paired with edges or other cell types. FM is designed to effectively handle very large data sets; in particular FM employs a demand-driven evaluation strategy that works especially well with large field data. Finally, the interfaces developed for FM have the potential to effectively abstract field data based on adaptive meshes. We present initial results with a triangular adaptive grid in R(sup 2) and discuss how the same design abstractions would work equally well with other adaptive-grid variations, including meshes in R(sup 3).

  13. Object oriented design of the Liverpool Telescope Robotic Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Stephen N.; Steele, Iain A.

    2002-12-01

    In the traditional, manned observatory, an astronomer must continually be weighing together many factors during the course of an observing run in order to make an appropriate decision on the course of action at that time. Weather conditions may force suspension of the observing program to protect the telescope, later to be resumed when conditions improve. Power outages may force controlled shutdown of computers and other hardware. Changes in sky condition may require on-the-fly changes to the scheduled program. For the Liverpool Telescope (LT), the Robotic Control System (RCS) is designed to act as a replacement for the duty astronomer. The system is required to be robust, reliable and adaptable e.g. to future instrument configurations and varying operational objectives. Consequently, object-oriented techniques which promote modularity and code re-use have been employed throughout the design of this system to facilitate maintainance and future upgrading. This paper describes the task management architecture (TMA) - a configurable, pattern based object model defining the cognitive functionality of the RCS, the environment monitoring architecture (EMA) - a configurable, rule-based decision making paradigm and the use of our proprietary Java message system (JMS) communications architecture to control the telescope and associated instrumentation.

  14. An Object-Oriented Computer Code for Aircraft Engine Weight Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, Michael T.; Naylor, Bret A.

    2009-01-01

    Reliable engine-weight estimation at the conceptual design stage is critical to the development of new aircraft engines. It helps to identify the best engine concept amongst several candidates. At NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), the Weight Analysis of Turbine Engines (WATE) computer code, originally developed by Boeing Aircraft, has been used to estimate the engine weight of various conceptual engine designs. The code, written in FORTRAN, was originally developed for NASA in 1979. Since then, substantial improvements have been made to the code to improve the weight calculations for most of the engine components. Most recently, to improve the maintainability and extensibility of WATE, the FORTRAN code has been converted into an object-oriented version. The conversion was done within the NASA's NPSS (Numerical Propulsion System Simulation) framework. This enables WATE to interact seamlessly with the thermodynamic cycle model which provides component flow data such as airflows, temperatures, and pressures, etc., that are required for sizing the components and weight calculations. The tighter integration between the NPSS and WATE would greatly enhance system-level analysis and optimization capabilities. It also would facilitate the enhancement of the WATE code for next-generation aircraft and space propulsion systems. In this paper, the architecture of the object-oriented WATE code (or WATE++) is described. Both the FORTRAN and object-oriented versions of the code are employed to compute the dimensions and weight of a 300-passenger aircraft engine (GE90 class). Both versions of the code produce essentially identical results as should be the case.

  15. Handling Emergency Management in [an] Object Oriented Modeling Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokgoz, Berna Eren; Cakir, Volkan; Gheorghe, Adrian V.

    2010-01-01

    It has been understood that protection of a nation from extreme disasters is a challenging task. Impacts of extreme disasters on a nation's critical infrastructures, economy and society could be devastating. A protection plan itself would not be sufficient when a disaster strikes. Hence, there is a need for a holistic approach to establish more resilient infrastructures to withstand extreme disasters. A resilient infrastructure can be defined as a system or facility that is able to withstand damage, but if affected, can be readily and cost-effectively restored. The key issue to establish resilient infrastructures is to incorporate existing protection plans with comprehensive preparedness actions to respond, recover and restore as quickly as possible, and to minimize extreme disaster impacts. Although national organizations will respond to a disaster, extreme disasters need to be handled mostly by local emergency management departments. Since emergency management departments have to deal with complex systems, they have to have a manageable plan and efficient organizational structures to coordinate all these systems. A strong organizational structure is the key in responding fast before and during disasters, and recovering quickly after disasters. In this study, the entire emergency management is viewed as an enterprise and modelled through enterprise management approach. Managing an enterprise or a large complex system is a very challenging task. It is critical for an enterprise to respond to challenges in a timely manner with quick decision making. This study addresses the problem of handling emergency management at regional level in an object oriented modelling environment developed by use of TopEase software. Emergency Operation Plan of the City of Hampton, Virginia, has been incorporated into TopEase for analysis. The methodology used in this study has been supported by a case study on critical infrastructure resiliency in Hampton Roads.

  16. An object-oriented implementation of a parallel Monte Carlo code for radiation transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Pedro Duarte; Lani, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes the main features of a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solver for radiation transport which has been implemented within COOLFluiD, a world-class open source object-oriented platform for scientific simulations. The Monte Carlo code makes use of efficient ray tracing algorithms (for 2D, axisymmetric and 3D arbitrary unstructured meshes) which are described in detail. The solver accuracy is first verified in testcases for which analytical solutions are available, then validated for a space re-entry flight experiment (i.e. FIRE II) for which comparisons against both experiments and reference numerical solutions are provided. Through the flexible design of the physical models, ray tracing and parallelization strategy (fully reusing the mesh decomposition inherited by the fluid simulator), the implementation was made efficient and reusable.

  17. GOOSE Version 1. 4: A powerful object-oriented simulation environment for developing reactor models

    SciTech Connect

    Nypaver, D.J.; March-Leuba, C. ); Abdalla, M.A.; Guimaraes, L. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Ford, C.E. )

    1992-01-01

    A prototype software package for a fully interactive Generalized Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (GOOSE) is being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Dynamic models are easily constructed and tested; fully interactive capabilities allow the user to alter model parameters and complexity without recompilation. This environment provides assess to powerful tools such as numerical integration packages, graphical displays, and online help. In GOOSE, portability has been achieved by creating the environment in Objective-C{sup 1}, which is supported by a variety of platforms including UNIX and DOS. GOOSE Version 1.4 introduces new enhancements like the capability of creating initial,'' dynamic,'' and digital'' methods. The object-oriented approach to simulation used in GOOSE combines the concept of modularity with the additional features of allowing precompilation, optimization, testing, and validation of individual modules. Once a library of classes has been defined and compiled, models can be built and modified without recompilation. GOOSE Version 1.4 is primarily command-line driven.

  18. A First Course in Computational Physics and Object-Oriented Programming with C++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevick, David

    2005-03-01

    Part I. Basic C++ Programming: 1. Introduction; 2. Installing and running the Dev-C++ programming environment; 3. Introduction to computer and software architecture; 4. Fundamental concepts; 5. Writing a first program; 6. An introduction to object-oriented analysis; 7. C++ object-oriented programming syntax; 8. Control logic and iteration; 9. Basic function properties; 10. Arrays and matrices; 11. Input and output streams; Part II. Numerical Analysis: 12. Numerical error analysis - derivatives; 13. Integration; 14. Root finding procedures; 15. Differential equations; 16. Linear algebra; Part III. Pointers, References and Dynamic Memory Allocation: 17. References; 18. Pointers and dynamic memory allocation; 19. Advanced memory management; 20. The static keyword, multiple and virtual inheritance, templates and the STL library; 21. Program optimization in C++; Part IV. Advanced Numerical Examples: 22. Monte-Carlo methods; 23. Parabolic partial differential equation solvers; Part V. Appendices: Appendix A. Overview of MATLAB; Appendix B. The Borland C++ compiler; Appendix C. The Linux/Windows g++ compiler and profiler; Appendix D. Calling FORTRAN programs from C++; Appendix E. C++ coding standard; References.

  19. 3-D object-oriented image analysis of geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadel, I.; Kerle, N.; van der Meijde, M.

    2014-07-01

    Geophysical data are the main source of information about the subsurface. Geophysical techniques are, however, highly non-unique in determining specific physical parameters and boundaries of subsurface objects. To obtain actual physical information, an inversion process is often applied, in which measurements at or above the Earth surface are inverted into a 2- or 3-D subsurface spatial distribution of the physical property. Interpreting these models into structural objects, related to physical processes, requires a priori knowledge and expert analysis which is susceptible to subjective choices and is therefore often non-repeatable. In this research, we implemented a recently introduced object-based approach to interpret the 3-D inversion results of a single geophysical technique using the available a priori information and the physical and geometrical characteristics of the interpreted objects. The introduced methodology is semi-automatic and repeatable, and allows the extraction of subsurface structures using 3-D object-oriented image analysis (3-D OOA) in an objective knowledge-based classification scheme. The approach allows for a semi-objective setting of thresholds that can be tested and, if necessary, changed in a very fast and efficient way. These changes require only changing the thresholds used in a so-called ruleset, which is composed of algorithms that extract objects from a 3-D data cube. The approach is tested on a synthetic model, which is based on a priori knowledge on objects present in the study area (Tanzania). Object characteristics and thresholds were well defined in a 3-D histogram of velocity versus depth, and objects were fully retrieved. The real model results showed how 3-D OOA can deal with realistic 3-D subsurface conditions in which the boundaries become fuzzy, the object extensions become unclear and the model characteristics vary with depth due to the different physical conditions. As expected, the 3-D histogram of the real data was

  20. Analyzing and designing object-oriented missile simulations with concurrency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randorf, Jeffrey Allen

    2000-11-01

    A software object model for the six degree-of-freedom missile modeling domain is presented. As a precursor, a domain analysis of the missile modeling domain was started, based on the Feature-Oriented Domain Analysis (FODA) technique described by the Software Engineering Institute (SEI). It was subsequently determined the FODA methodology is functionally equivalent to the Object Modeling Technique. The analysis used legacy software documentation and code from the ENDOSIM, KDEC, and TFrames 6-DOF modeling tools, including other technical literature. The SEI Object Connection Architecture (OCA) was the template for designing the object model. Three variants of the OCA were considered---a reference structure, a recursive structure, and a reference structure with augmentation for flight vehicle modeling. The reference OCA design option was chosen for maintaining simplicity while not compromising the expressive power of the OMT model. The missile architecture was then analyzed for potential areas of concurrent computing. It was shown how protected objects could be used for data passing between OCA object managers, allowing concurrent access without changing the OCA reference design intent or structure. The implementation language was the 1995 release of Ada. OCA software components were shown how to be expressed as Ada child packages. While acceleration of several low level and other high operations level are possible on proper hardware, there was a 33% degradation of 4th order Runge-Kutta integrator performance of two simultaneous ordinary differential equations using Ada tasking on a single processor machine. The Defense Department's High Level Architecture was introduced and explained in context with the OCA. It was shown the HLA and OCA were not mutually exclusive architectures, but complimentary. HLA was shown as an interoperability solution, with the OCA as an architectural vehicle for software reuse. Further directions for implementing a 6-DOF missile modeling

  1. An Object-Oriented Interface to the CCSDS Ground Telecommand Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Timothy Joseph; Condron, Jeffrey Todd

    1998-01-01

    The Telecommand Data Routing and Channel Services defined by the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) are flexible enough to support a myriad of commanding models. Because the standard is so broad, the traditional approach has been to implement only the portion of the standard needed by the particular spacecraft being tested/operated. Tasked with providing Telecommand Services for an entire class of spacecraft, where each spacecraft may choose any valid CCSDS commanding model, NASA Code 584 designed a common architecture capable of handling the full CCSDS protocol. The solution uses another CCSDS standard - the Standard Formatted Data Unit (SFDU) as the interface to the Telecommand Services. SFDUs provide a consistent way of labelling data objects, as well as allowing data objects to encapsulate other data objects. The resulting interface is: - Flexible: The full Data Routing and Channel Services are available via a single interface. The client (i.e. the command source) may enter commands at any layer within the protocol stack, specify any of the data aggregation or segmentation methods, and dynamically set any configuration parameter defined in the standard. - Object-oriented: Each object specifies both the data and the actions to be performed with the data. An object may contain other objects. - Expandable: New capabilities are added by defining new objects. Objects pass thru the protocol layers until they reach the applicable layer. The resulting design is: - Modular: The logic for each protocol layer is contained in a separate Application Program Interface (API). The objects used for the external interface are also used for communication between layers. - Distributable: The design can be split along any layer boundary for distribution across multiple machines. The objects ensure data consistency across platforms. This paper describes the SFDU-based interface and the resulting protocol implementation. The implementation is currently used by NASA

  2. OOM - OBJECT ORIENTATION MANIPULATOR, VERSION 6.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goza, S. P.

    1994-01-01

    The Object Orientation Manipulator (OOM) is an application program for creating, rendering, and recording three-dimensional computer-generated still and animated images. This is done using geometrically defined 3D models, cameras, and light sources, referred to collectively as animation elements. OOM does not provide the tools necessary to construct 3D models; instead, it imports binary format model files generated by the Solid Surface Modeler (SSM). Model files stored in other formats must be converted to the SSM binary format before they can be used in OOM. SSM is available as MSC-21914 or as part of the SSM/OOM bundle, COS-10047. Among OOM's features are collision detection (with visual and audio feedback), the capability to define and manipulate hierarchical relationships between animation elements, stereographic display, and ray-traced rendering. OOM uses Euler angle transformations for calculating the results of translation and rotation operations. OOM provides an interactive environment for the manipulation and animation of models, cameras, and light sources. Models are the basic entity upon which OOM operates and are therefore considered the primary animation elements. Cameras and light sources are considered secondary animation elements. A camera, in OOM, is simply a location within the three-space environment from which the contents of the environment are observed. OOM supports the creation and full animation of cameras. Light sources can be defined, positioned and linked to models, but they cannot be animated independently. OOM can simultaneously accommodate as many animation elements as the host computer's memory permits. Once the required animation elements are present, the user may position them, orient them, and define any initial relationships between them. Once the initial relationships are defined, the user can display individual still views for rendering and output, or define motion for the animation elements by using the Interp Animation Editor

  3. GPU-accelerated object-oriented Monte Carlo modeling of photon migration in turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doronin, Alex; Meglinski, Igor

    2010-10-01

    Due to the recent intense developments in lasers and optical technologies a number of novel revolutionary imaging and photonic-based diagnostic modalities have arisen. Utilizing various features of light these techniques provide new practical solutions in a range of biomedical, environmental and industrial applications. Conceptual engineering design of new optical diagnostic systems requires a clear understanding of the light-tissue interaction and the peculiarities of optical radiation propagation therein. Description of photon migration within the random media is based on the radiative transfer that forms a basis of Monte Carlo modelling of light propagation in complex turbid media like biological tissues. In current presentation with a further development of the Monte Carlo technique we introduce a novel Object-Oriented Programming (OOP) paradigm accelerated by Graphics Processing Unit that provide an opportunity to escalate the performance of standard Monte Carlo simulation over 100 times.

  4. GPU-accelerated object-oriented Monte Carlo modeling of photon migration in turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doronin, Alex; Meglinski, Igor

    2011-03-01

    Due to the recent intense developments in lasers and optical technologies a number of novel revolutionary imaging and photonic-based diagnostic modalities have arisen. Utilizing various features of light these techniques provide new practical solutions in a range of biomedical, environmental and industrial applications. Conceptual engineering design of new optical diagnostic systems requires a clear understanding of the light-tissue interaction and the peculiarities of optical radiation propagation therein. Description of photon migration within the random media is based on the radiative transfer that forms a basis of Monte Carlo modelling of light propagation in complex turbid media like biological tissues. In current presentation with a further development of the Monte Carlo technique we introduce a novel Object-Oriented Programming (OOP) paradigm accelerated by Graphics Processing Unit that provide an opportunity to escalate the performance of standard Monte Carlo simulation over 100 times.

  5. Toward Fortran 77 performance from object-oriented C++ scientific frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Bassetti, F.; Davis, K.; Quinlan, D.

    1998-12-01

    The use of object-oriented C{sup 2} frameworks has significantly simplified the development of numerous complex parallel scientific applications at Los Alamos National Laboratory and elsewhere. In spite of considerable use of, and commitment to, these frameworks, concerns about performance are nonetheless a significant issue; performance very close to that of FORTRAN 77 with message passing must be realized before the acceptance and use of such frameworks will be truly widespread. This paper identifies the primary source of inefficiency in using C or C{sup 2} for numerical codes with stencil- or stencil-like operations, and demonstrates two solutions--one portable, one not--to give genuine FORTRAN 77 performance.

  6. On the Design of a Parallel Object-Oriented Data Mining Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, C.; Cantu-Paz, E.

    2000-05-17

    As data mining techniques are applied to ever larger data sets, it is becoming clear that parallel processors will play an important role in reducing the turn around time for data analysis. In this paper, we describe the design of a parallel object-oriented toolkit for mining scientific data sets. After a brief discussion of our design goals, we describe our overall system design that uses data mining to find useful information in raw data in an iterative and interactive manner. Using decision trees as an example, we illustrate how the need to support flexibility and extensibility can make the parallel implementation of our algorithms very challenging. As this is work in progress, we also describe the solution approaches we are considering to address these challenges.

  7. Development of a Dynamically Configurable,Object-Oriented Framework for Distributed, Multi-modal Computational Aerospace Systems Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afjeh, Abdollah A.; Reed, John A.

    2003-01-01

    This research is aimed at developing a neiv and advanced simulation framework that will significantly improve the overall efficiency of aerospace systems design and development. This objective will be accomplished through an innovative integration of object-oriented and Web-based technologies ivith both new and proven simulation methodologies. The basic approach involves Ihree major areas of research: Aerospace system and component representation using a hierarchical object-oriented component model which enables the use of multimodels and enforces component interoperability. Collaborative software environment that streamlines the process of developing, sharing and integrating aerospace design and analysis models. . Development of a distributed infrastructure which enables Web-based exchange of models to simplify the collaborative design process, and to support computationally intensive aerospace design and analysis processes. Research for the first year dealt with the design of the basic architecture and supporting infrastructure, an initial implementation of that design, and a demonstration of its application to an example aircraft engine system simulation.

  8. An object-oriented spatial data model for virtual geographical environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongjun; Che, Weitao; Cao, Rui; Shen, Jingwei

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents a spatial data model used for modeling geospatial data in virtual geographical environment. Most traditional spatial data modeling approach in geographical information system abstracts physical world with spatial entity and relationship between each other, put emphases on representing spatial feature and their topologies, whilst virtual reality system focus on capacity of keeping vivid rendering, i.e. high fidelity. Taking into account both topological characteristic of spatial data model in GIS and spaghetti characteristic of in VR, We introduce here an integrated spatial data model which could represent both topological and non-topological spatial data and underpin both various spatial analysis functions and real-time rending visualization effectively. This object-oriented method model topological feature separately from geometrical data and links them by a couple link, by which user can access different aspect of spatial data in specific application context. A virtual geographical scene management framework based on above spatial data model is introduced at the last.

  9. An object-oriented approach to risk and reliability analysis : methodology and aviation safety applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Dandini, Vincent John; Duran, Felicia Angelica; Wyss, Gregory Dane

    2003-09-01

    This article describes how features of event tree analysis and Monte Carlo-based discrete event simulation can be combined with concepts from object-oriented analysis to develop a new risk assessment methodology, with some of the best features of each. The resultant object-based event scenario tree (OBEST) methodology enables an analyst to rapidly construct realistic models for scenarios for which an a priori discovery of event ordering is either cumbersome or impossible. Each scenario produced by OBEST is automatically associated with a likelihood estimate because probabilistic branching is integral to the object model definition. The OBEST methodology is then applied to an aviation safety problem that considers mechanisms by which an aircraft might become involved in a runway incursion incident. The resulting OBEST model demonstrates how a close link between human reliability analysis and probabilistic risk assessment methods can provide important insights into aviation safety phenomenology.

  10. Using object-oriented analysis to design a multi-mission ground data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shames, Peter

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes an analytical approach and descriptive methodology that is adapted from Object-Oriented Analysis (OOA) techniques. The technique is described and then used to communicate key issues of system logical architecture. The essence of the approach is to limit the analysis to only service objects, with the idea of providing a direct mapping from the design to a client-server implementation. Key perspectives on the system, such as user interaction, data flow and management, service interfaces, hardware configuration, and system and data integrity are covered. A significant advantage of this service-oriented approach is that it permits mapping all of these different perspectives on the system onto a single common substrate. This services substrate is readily represented diagramatically, thus making details of the overall design much more accessible.

  11. Object-oriented image coding scheme based on DWT and Markov random field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lei; Wu, Hsien-Hsun S.; Liu, Jyh-Charn S.; Chan, Andrew K.

    1998-12-01

    In this paper, we introduce an object-oriented image coding algorithm to differentiate regions of interest (ROI) in visual communications. Our scheme is motivated by the fact that in visual communications, image contents (objects) are not equally important. For a given network bandwidth budget, one should give the highest transmission priority to the most interesting object, and serve the remaining ones at lower priorities. We propose a DWT based Multiresolution Markov Random Field technique to segment image objects according to their textures. We show that this technique can effectively distinguish visual objects and assign them different priorities. This scheme can be integrated with our ROI compression coder, the Generalized Self-Similarity Tress codex, for networking applications.

  12. OOM - OBJECT ORIENTATION MANIPULATOR, VERSION 6.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goza, S. P.

    1994-01-01

    The Object Orientation Manipulator (OOM) is an application program for creating, rendering, and recording three-dimensional computer-generated still and animated images. This is done using geometrically defined 3D models, cameras, and light sources, referred to collectively as animation elements. OOM does not provide the tools necessary to construct 3D models; instead, it imports binary format model files generated by the Solid Surface Modeler (SSM). Model files stored in other formats must be converted to the SSM binary format before they can be used in OOM. SSM is available as MSC-21914 or as part of the SSM/OOM bundle, COS-10047. Among OOM's features are collision detection (with visual and audio feedback), the capability to define and manipulate hierarchical relationships between animation elements, stereographic display, and ray-traced rendering. OOM uses Euler angle transformations for calculating the results of translation and rotation operations. OOM provides an interactive environment for the manipulation and animation of models, cameras, and light sources. Models are the basic entity upon which OOM operates and are therefore considered the primary animation elements. Cameras and light sources are considered secondary animation elements. A camera, in OOM, is simply a location within the three-space environment from which the contents of the environment are observed. OOM supports the creation and full animation of cameras. Light sources can be defined, positioned and linked to models, but they cannot be animated independently. OOM can simultaneously accommodate as many animation elements as the host computer's memory permits. Once the required animation elements are present, the user may position them, orient them, and define any initial relationships between them. Once the initial relationships are defined, the user can display individual still views for rendering and output, or define motion for the animation elements by using the Interp Animation Editor

  13. Real-time physiological monitoring with distributed networks of sensors and object-oriented programming techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesmann, William P.; Pranger, L. Alex; Bogucki, Mary S.

    1998-05-01

    Remote monitoring of physiologic data from individual high- risk workers distributed over time and space is a considerable challenge. This is often due to an inadequate capability to accurately integrate large amounts of data into usable information in real time. In this report, we have used the vertical and horizontal organization of the 'fireground' as a framework to design a distributed network of sensors. In this system, sensor output is linked through a hierarchical object oriented programing process to accurately interpret physiological data, incorporate these data into a synchronous model and relay processed data, trends and predictions to members of the fire incident command structure. There are several unique aspects to this approach. The first includes a process to account for variability in vital parameter values for each individual's normal physiologic response by including an adaptive network in each data process. This information is used by the model in an iterative process to baseline a 'normal' physiologic response to a given stress for each individual and to detect deviations that indicate dysfunction or a significant insult. The second unique capability of the system orders the information for each user including the subject, local company officers, medical personnel and the incident commanders. Information can be retrieved and used for training exercises and after action analysis. Finally this system can easily be adapted to existing communication and processing links along with incorporating the best parts of current models through the use of object oriented programming techniques. These modern software techniques are well suited to handling multiple data processes independently over time in a distributed network.

  14. Advanced software development workstation: Object-oriented methodologies and applications for flight planning and mission operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izygon, Michel

    1993-01-01

    The work accomplished during the past nine months in order to help three different organizations involved in Flight Planning and in Mission Operations systems, to transition to Object-Oriented Technology, by adopting one of the currently most widely used Object-Oriented analysis and Design Methodology is summarized.

  15. Postural and Object-Oriented Experiences Advance Early Reaching, Object Exploration, and Means-End Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, Michele A.; Galloway, James C.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of 3 weeks of social (control), postural, or object-oriented experiences on 9- to 21-week-old infants' (N = 42) reaching, exploration, and means-end behaviors were assessed. Coders recorded object contacts, mouthing, fingering, attention, and affect from video. Postural and object-oriented experiences advanced reaching, haptic…

  16. Towards an Object-Oriented Model for the Design and Development of Learning Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chrysostomou, Chrysostomos; Papadopoulos, George

    2008-01-01

    This work introduces the concept of an Object-Oriented Learning Object (OOLO) that is developed in a manner similar to the one that software objects are developed through Object-Oriented Software Engineering (OO SWE) techniques. In order to make the application of the OOLO feasible and efficient, an OOLO model needs to be developed based on…

  17. Aspects of Applying AN Object Oriented Design to a Small Satellite Flight Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Ulrich; Baetz, Bastian; Klinkner, Sabine; Eickhoff, Jens

    2015-09-01

    As part of the small satellite program at the Institute of Space Systems at the University of Stuttgart, an object oriented flight software was developed. This paper details aspects encountered during the development and experiences gained. It shows that object orientation might be a valuable tool in the development of future complex and autonomous flight software.

  18. Electronic Publication of Health Information in an Object-Oriented Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prettyman, Maureen; Antonucci, Robert; Lynch, Paul; Mericle, Lee

    1999-01-01

    The National Library of Medicine is supporting a research project on full-text search and retrieval. The project includes a fully deployed system, HSTAT, to provide access to government-supported health information. The retrieval system is an object-oriented client-server model and the data is stored in an object-oriented database management…

  19. Teleradiology--an integrated solution.

    PubMed

    Batty, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    Successful and clinically relevant teleradiology requires robust technology coupled with expert specialist opinion. It also places significant demands on ships' medical personnel to produce images of diagnostic quality. There is the corresponding need for crew training and continuous quality management to ensure that the benefits of an innovative service are maintained and maximised. In the context of services provided by the Telemedical partnership, this paper will discuss: * Maritime Radiography and Information Technology (IT) * Crew Training--shore and computer based * Radiation Protection--recent legislation * Quality Standards--medical audit and clinical governance. It will demonstrate how a high quality clinical service can be developed and sustained by applying an integrated approach to these essential components. (This subject was presented to the 6th International Symposium on Maritime Health in Manila, Philippines, in November 2001). PMID:12608595

  20. Tecolote: An object-oriented framework for physics development

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, J.; Ankeny, L.; Clancy, S.

    1998-12-31

    The authors describe a C++ physics development environment, called the Tecolote Framework, which allows model developers to work more efficiently and accurately. This Framework contains a variety of meshes, operators, and parallel fields, as well as an input/output (I/O) subsystem and graphics capabilities. Model developers can inherit Tecolote`s generic model interface and use the Framework`s high-level field and operator components to write parallel physics equations. New Tecolote models are easily registered with the Framework, and they can be built and called directly from the input file, which greatly expedites model installation. In the process of developing an extensible and robust framework, they have found appealing solutions to some of the serious problems they encounter when parallelizing and extending the older codes. They also discuss memory and performance issues for a large hydrodynamics application built in this Framework.

  1. Project Integration Architecture as a Foundation for Autonomous Solution Systems: The Postulation of a Meaningful "SolveYourself" Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William Henry

    2005-01-01

    The Project Integration Architecture (PIA) uses object-oriented technology to implement self-revelation and semantic infusion through class derivation. That is, the kind of an object can be discovered through program inquiry and the well-known, well-defined meaning of that object can be utilized as a result of that discovery. This technology has already been demonstrated by the PIA effort in its parameter object classes. It is proposed that, by building on this technology, an autonomous, automatic, goal-seeking, solution system may be devised.

  2. Kirkwood-Buff integrals for ideal solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploetz, Elizabeth A.; Bentenitis, Nikolaos; Smith, Paul E.

    2010-04-01

    The Kirkwood-Buff (KB) theory of solutions is a rigorous theory of solution mixtures which relates the molecular distributions between the solution components to the thermodynamic properties of the mixture. Ideal solutions represent a useful reference for understanding the properties of real solutions. Here, we derive expressions for the KB integrals, the central components of KB theory, in ideal solutions of any number of components corresponding to the three main concentration scales. The results are illustrated by use of molecular dynamics simulations for two binary solutions mixtures, benzene with toluene, and methanethiol with dimethylsulfide, which closely approach ideal behavior, and a binary mixture of benzene and methanol which is nonideal. Simulations of a quaternary mixture containing benzene, toluene, methanethiol, and dimethylsulfide suggest this system displays ideal behavior and that ideal behavior is not limited to mixtures containing a small number of components.

  3. Dependency-tracking object-oriented multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) formulation on a large-scale system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlqvist, Maria Alexandra

    2001-12-01

    Advances in computer technology and analysis software are making optimization of engineering systems more attractive and affordable than ever before. Optimization is becoming a necessary tool in order for companies to stay competitive. While the concept of optimization has been known almost as long as mankind, specific procedures on how to optimize engineering systems are younger. Currently, efforts are being made to reduce the computational time and simplify the organizational complexity involved with solving multidisciplinary systems. The work presented in this dissertation deals with how an object-oriented, dependency-tracking, demand-driven language can be used in reducing the computational time in performing multidisciplinary design optimizations. The work also discusses how the object-oriented language was used in integrating optimization functionality with a missile design system. The object-oriented dependency-tracking demand-driven language is applied to a large-scale multidisciplinary missile system involving disciplines such as a geometry engine, weight analysis, propulsion, aerodynamics, trajectory analysis, and cost analysis. Also discussed is the need for using approximations in optimizing a large-scale system. Designed experiments and response surface techniques were employed in creating approximation models for the problem at hand. Using these approximations to evaluate the responses was found to be useful at points in the design space where one or more responses could not otherwise be evaluated. Different optimization schemes were studied including response surface analysis of different resolutions in conjunction with higher fidelity optimization and higher fidelity optimization without approximation models. The contributions of this work are the application of MDO capabilities to a large-scale missile design system modeled in an object-oriented dependency-tracking environment, the use of response surface approximations to fit areas in the design

  4. Object-Oriented/Data-Oriented Design of a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been much progress towards improved phenomenological modeling and algorithmic updates for the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, which provides a probabilistic physical simulation of gas Rows. These improvements have largely been based on the work of the originator of the DSMC method, Graeme Bird. Of primary importance are improved chemistry, internal energy, and physics modeling and a reduction in time to solution. These allow for an expanded range of possible solutions In altitude and velocity space. NASA's current production code, the DSMC Analysis Code (DAC), is well-established and based on Bird's 1994 algorithms written in Fortran 77 and has proven difficult to upgrade. A new DSMC code is being developed in the C++ programming language using object-oriented and data-oriented design paradigms to facilitate the inclusion of the recent improvements and future development activities. The development efforts on the new code, the Multiphysics Algorithm with Particles (MAP), are described, and performance comparisons are made with DAC.

  5. Intelligent Object-Oriented GIS Engine W/dynamic Coupling to Modeled Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Lurie, Gordon; Korp, Peter

    1997-02-12

    The GEOVIEWER is an intelligent object-oriented Geographic Information System (GIS) engine that provides not only a spatially-optimized object representation, but also direct linkage to the underlying object, its data and behaviors. Tools are incorporated to perform tasks involving typical GIS functionality, data ingestion, linkage to external models, and integration with other application frameworks. The GOEVIEWER module was designed to provide GIS functionality to create, query, view, and manipulate software objects within a selected area under investigation in a simulation system. Many of these objects are not stored in a format conductive to efficient GIS usage. Their dynamic nature, complexity, and the sheer number of possible entity classes preclude effective integration with traditional GIS technologies due to the loosely coupled nature of their data representations. The primary difference between GEOVIEWER and standard GIS packages is that standard GIS packages offer static views of geospatial data while GEOVIEWER can be dynamically coupled to models and/or applications producing data and, therefore, display changes in geometry, attributes or behavior as they occur in the simulation.

  6. Intelligent Object-Oriented GIS Engine W/dynamic Coupling to Modeled Objects

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1997-02-12

    The GEOVIEWER is an intelligent object-oriented Geographic Information System (GIS) engine that provides not only a spatially-optimized object representation, but also direct linkage to the underlying object, its data and behaviors. Tools are incorporated to perform tasks involving typical GIS functionality, data ingestion, linkage to external models, and integration with other application frameworks. The GOEVIEWER module was designed to provide GIS functionality to create, query, view, and manipulate software objects within a selected area undermore » investigation in a simulation system. Many of these objects are not stored in a format conductive to efficient GIS usage. Their dynamic nature, complexity, and the sheer number of possible entity classes preclude effective integration with traditional GIS technologies due to the loosely coupled nature of their data representations. The primary difference between GEOVIEWER and standard GIS packages is that standard GIS packages offer static views of geospatial data while GEOVIEWER can be dynamically coupled to models and/or applications producing data and, therefore, display changes in geometry, attributes or behavior as they occur in the simulation.« less

  7. Object-oriented technologies in a multi-mission data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Susan C.; Miller, Kevin J.; Louie, John J.

    1993-01-01

    The Operations Engineering Laboratory (OEL) at JPL is developing new technologies that can provide more efficient and productive ways of doing business in flight operations. Over the past three years, we have worked closely with the Multi-Mission Control Team to develop automation tools, providing technology transfer into operations and resulting in substantial cost savings and error reduction. The OEL development philosophy is characterized by object-oriented design, extensive reusability of code, and an iterative development model with active participation of the end users. Through our work, the benefits of object-oriented design became apparent for use in mission control data systems. Object-oriented technologies and how they can be used in a mission control center to improve efficiency and productivity are explained. The current research and development efforts in the JPL Operations Engineering Laboratory are also discussed to architect and prototype a new paradigm for mission control operations based on object-oriented concepts.

  8. Monte Carlo and detector simulation in OOP (Object-Oriented Programming)

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, W.B.; Blankenbecler, R.; Kunz, P. ); Burnett, T.; Storr, K.M. . ECP Div.)

    1990-10-01

    Object-Oriented Programming techniques are explored with an eye toward applications in High Energy Physics codes. Two prototype examples are given: McOOP (a particle Monte Carlo generator) and GISMO (a detector simulation/analysis package).

  9. ARACHNID: A prototype object-oriented database tool for distributed systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Younger, Herbert; Oreilly, John; Frogner, Bjorn

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of a Phase 2 SBIR project sponsored by NASA and performed by MIMD Systems, Inc. A major objective of this project was to develop specific concepts for improved performance in accessing large databases. An object-oriented and distributed approach was used for the general design, while a geographical decomposition was used as a specific solution. The resulting software framework is called ARACHNID. The Faint Source Catalog developed by NASA was the initial database testbed. This is a database of many giga-bytes, where an order of magnitude improvement in query speed is being sought. This database contains faint infrared point sources obtained from telescope measurements of the sky. A geographical decomposition of this database is an attractive approach to dividing it into pieces. Each piece can then be searched on individual processors with only a weak data linkage between the processors being required. As a further demonstration of the concepts implemented in ARACHNID, a tourist information system is discussed. This version of ARACHNID is the commercial result of the project. It is a distributed, networked, database application where speed, maintenance, and reliability are important considerations. This paper focuses on the design concepts and technologies that form the basis for ARACHNID.

  10. Object-Oriented Plant Species Classification for Estimating Energy Balance of Evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotto, I.; Gutschick, V. P.

    2012-12-01

    Remote-sensing (RS) measurements of evapotranspiration (ET) require accurate estimates of surface roughness, hence, of plant cover and height. RS imagery at spatial resolutions coarser than that of individual plants (trees, shrubs, grass patches) yields low accuracy in such roughness estimates in heterogeneous terrain, even with inverse modeling of multiangle and multispectral imagery (which imagery is also commonly costly and of low temporal and spatial coverage). A solution is imagery with high spatial resolution, such as from low-altitude photography obtained with, e.g., unmanned aerial systems. While these measurements must be performed in campaigns that are inherently limited in total area covered, they offer excellent ground-truthing. In such a campaign, we have performed ground identifications of all major species, including height and crown area, on a 300 m by 300 m area of desert grassland (Jornada Experimental Range near Las Cruces, NM, USA). We obtained aerial imagery which was then processed to species identifications, via object-oriented classification using an automated feature extraction software (Feature Analyst in ArcGIS). Plant species were classified with an overall accuracy of 80.4%. Linear regressions of plant height on plant diameter for each major species yielded mean canopy height over an arbitrary image pixel. Over and above the utility of improving the accuracy of ET estimates, the study offers ecological information on community structure and, moreover, on its possible relation to spatial distributions of ET and total water availability.