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Sample records for intense alpha radiation

  1. A 3D Radiative Transfer Simulation of Lyma-alpha Backscatter Intensity Reduced From Voyager’s Ultraviolet Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayock, Brian; Zank, Gary; Heerikhuisen, Jacob

    2014-06-01

    Models of the heliosphere have evolved for the past few decades to fit observations made by a large number of spacecraft. Voyager missions have provided unique in-situ measurements that have proven to be essential for model testing. Lyman-alpha backscatter intensity has been reduced from measurements taken by the ultraviolet spectrometers on board both Voyager spacecraft. We have developed a 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer code to simulate this backscatter intensity by generating millions of photons from the sun to scatter within a neutral hydrogen distribution resulting from a state-of-the-art 3D MHD-kinetic neutral heliospheric model, both of which have been developed within the Center for Space Physics and Aeronomic Research at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. While many have attempted to simulate the Voyager observations, we are the first to achieve agreement with our results. In this presentation, we will discuss the core mechanisms driving the radiative transfer code, the statistical quantities collected, and the interpretation of the results relative to the spacecraft data.

  2. Mechanism and computational model for Lyman-{alpha}-radiation generation by high-intensity-laser four-wave mixing in Kr-Ar gas

    SciTech Connect

    Louchev, Oleg A.; Saito, Norihito; Wada, Satoshi; Bakule, Pavel; Yokoyama, Koji; Ishida, Katsuhiko; Iwasaki, Masahiko

    2011-09-15

    We present a theoretical model combined with a computational study of a laser four-wave mixing process under optical discharge in which the non-steady-state four-wave amplitude equations are integrated with the kinetic equations of initial optical discharge and electron avalanche ionization in Kr-Ar gas. The model is validated by earlier experimental data showing strong inhibition of the generation of pulsed, tunable Lyman-{alpha} (Ly-{alpha}) radiation when using sum-difference frequency mixing of 212.6 nm and tunable infrared radiation (820-850 nm). The rigorous computational approach to the problem reveals the possibility and mechanism of strong auto-oscillations in sum-difference resonant Ly-{alpha} generation due to the combined effect of (i) 212.6-nm (2+1)-photon ionization producing initial electrons, followed by (ii) the electron avalanche dominated by 843-nm radiation, and (iii) the final breakdown of the phase matching condition. The model shows that the final efficiency of Ly-{alpha} radiation generation can achieve a value of {approx}5x10{sup -4} which is restricted by the total combined absorption of the fundamental and generated radiation.

  3. Multipurpose Radiation Resistant Semiconductor Detectors for Alpha, Neutron & Low Energy Gamma Ray Measurements at High Temperatures in High-Intensity Gamma Ray

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddy, Frank H.

    2005-06-01

    Work scheduled under year two of DOE Grant DE-FG02-04ER63734 is on schedule and all year-two milestones have or will be met. Results to date demonstrate that unprecedented silicon carbide (SiC) energy resolution has been obtained, and that SiC detectors may achieve energy resolution that exceeds that obtainable with the best silicon alpha spectrometers. Fast-neutron energy spectrometry measurements indicate that recoil-ion energy spectrometry should be possible with SiC detectors. Furthermore, SiC detectors have been demonstrated to perform well even after gamma-ray exposures of 1.E09 Rad. This result and the previously demonstrated capability of SiC detectors to operate in elevated-temperature environments are very promising for potential DOE EMSP applications. A new class of multipurpose, radiation-resistant semiconductor detectors that can be used in elevated-temperature and high-radiation environments is being developed under this grant. These detectors, based on silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor are designed to have larger active volumes than previously available SiC detectors, and are being tested for their response to alpha particles, X-rays and low energy gamma rays, and fast neutrons. Specifically, SiC radiation detectors with larger areas and 100-micrometer thick active regions have been designed and manufactured according to detector-design specifications. Detectors based on a Schottky diode design were specified in order to minimize the effects of the detector entrance window on alpha particle measurements. During manufacture of the Schottky diodes, the manufacturer also provided a set of large-volume SiC p-i-n diodes for testing Extensive alpha particle measurements have been carried out to test and quantify the response of the SiC Schottky diodes. Exposures to 148-Gd, 213-Po, 217-At, 221-Fr, 225-Ac, 237-Np, 238-Pu, 240-Pu, and 242-Pu sources were used to obtain detailed alpha response data in the alpha energy range from 3182.787 keV to 8375.9 ke

  4. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, L.H.

    1994-08-16

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  5. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1995-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  6. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1994-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  7. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, L.H.

    1995-10-17

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  8. Multipurpose Radiation Resistant Semiconductor Detectors for Alpha, Neutron & Low Energy Gamma Ray Measurements at High Temperatures in High-Intensity Gamma Ray

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddy, Frank H.

    2005-06-01

    Work scheduled under year two of DOE Grant DE-FG02-04ER63734 is on schedule and all year-two milestones have or will be met. Results to date demonstrate that unprecedented silicon carbide (SiC) energy resolution has been obtained, and that SiC detectors may achieve energy resolution that exceeds that obtainable with the best silicon alpha spectrometers. Fast-neutron energy spectrometry measurements indicate that recoil-ion energy spectrometry should be possible with SiC detectors. Furthermore, SiC detectors have been demonstrated to perform well even after gamma-ray exposures of 1.E09 Rad. This result and the previously demonstrated capability of SiC detectors to operate in elevated-temperature environments are very promising for potential DOE EMSP applications. A new class of multipurpose, radiation-resistant semiconductor detectors that can be used in elevated-temperature and high-radiation environments is being developed under this grant. These detectors, based on silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor are designed to have larger active volumes than previously available SiC detectors, and are being tested for their response to alpha particles, X-rays and low energy gamma rays, and fast neutrons.

  9. Multipurpose Radiation Resistant Semiconductor Detectors for Alpha, Neutron & Low Energy Gamma Ray Measurements at High Temperatures in High-Intensity Gamma Ray

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddy, Frank H.

    2005-06-01

    Work scheduled under year two of DOE Grant DE-FG02-04ER63734 is on schedule and all year-two milestones have or will be met. Results to date demonstrate that unprecedented silicon carbide (SiC) energy resolution has been obtained, and that SiC detectors may achieve energy resolution that exceeds that obtainable with the best silicon alpha spectrometers. Fast-neutron energy spectrometry measurements indicate that recoil-ion energy spectrometry should be possible with SiC detectors. Furthermore, SiC detectors have been demonstrated to perform well even after gamma-ray exposures of 1.E09 Rad. This result and the previously demonstrated capability of SiC detectors to operate in elevated-temperature environments are very promising for potential DOE EMSP applications. A new class of multipurpose, radiation-resistant semiconductor detectors that can be used in elevated-temperature and high-radiation environments is being developed under this grant. These detectors, based on silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor are designed to have larger active volumes than previously available SiC detectors, and are being tested for their response to alpha particles, X-rays and low energy gamma rays, and fast neutrons. Specifically, SiC radiation detectors with larger areas and 100-micrometer thick active regions have been designed and manufactured according to detector-design specifications. Detectors based on a Schottky diode design were specified in order to minimize the effects of the detector entrance window on alpha particle measurements. During manufacture of the Schottky diodes, the manufacturer also provided a set of large-volume SiC p-i-n diodes for testing Extensive alpha particle measurements have been carried out to test and quantify the response of the SiC Schottky diodes. Exposures to 148-Gd, 213-Po, 217-At, 221-Fr, 225-Ac, 237-Np, 238-Pu, 240-Pu, and 242-Pu sources were used to obtain detailed alpha response data in the alpha energy range from 3182.787 keV to 8375.9 ke

  10. L-alpha intensity in coronal streamers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noci, G.; Poletto, G.; Suess, S. T.; Wang, A.-H.; Wu, S. T.

    1993-01-01

    White-light images are presently the primary source of information on physical conditions in the solar corona at distances greater than a few tenths of a solar radius above the limb. As a consequence, we still only have an incomplete description of structures extending beyond the solar limb. In particular, streamers, although observed for decades, represent a poorly known phenomenon. SOHO, to be launched in 1995, will be able to make long-term observations of these features up to heights of a few solar radii, both in white light and UV. In this paper we present simulations of L-alpha intensity in coronal streamers, based on the two-dimensional (2D) model developed by Wang et at. (1992, 1993) via a time-dependent numerical relaxation approach. Because the model is 2D, we make an a priori hypothesis about the extension of streamers in the third dimension. L-alpha data, obtained from a rocket (Kohl et al., 1983), allowed us to identify a shape which fits the observations.

  11. Lyman alpha radiation in external galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1990-01-01

    The Ly alpha line of atomic hydrogen is often a luminous component of the radiation emitted by distant galaxies. Except for those galaxies which have a substantial central source of non-stellar ionizing radiation, most of the Ly alpha radiation emitted by galaxies is generated within regions of the interstellar medium which are photoionized by starlight. Conversely, much of the energy radiated by photoionized regions is carried by the Ly alpha line. Only hot, massive stars are capable of ionizing hydrogen in the interstellar medium which surrounds them, and because such stars are necessarily short-lived, Ly alpha emission traces regions of active star formation. Researchers argue that the strength of the Ly alpha emission observed from external galaxies may be used to estimate quantitatively the dust content of the emitting region, while the Ly alpha line profile is sensitive to the presence of shock waves. Interstellar dust particles and shock waves are intimately associated with the process of star formation in two senses. First, both dust particles and shock waves owe their existence to stellar activity; second, they may both serve as agents which facilitate the formation of stars, shocks by triggering gravitational instabilities in the interstellar gas that they compress, and dust by shielding star-forming molecular clouds from the ionizing and dissociative effects of external UV radiation. By using Ly alpha observations as a probe of the dust content in diffuse gas at high redshift, we might hope to learn about the earliest epochs of star formation.

  12. Radiation reaction at ultrahigh intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Richard T.

    2010-06-15

    Intensities of 10{sup 22} W cm{sup -2} have been reached and it is expected that this will be increased by two orders of magnitude in the near future. At these intensities the radiation reaction force is important, especially in calculating the terminal velocity of an electron. The following briefly describes some of the problems of the existing most well-known equations and describes an approach based on conservation of energy. The resulting equation is compared to the Landau Lifshitz and Ford O'Connell equations, and laboratory tests are proposed.

  13. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... modulating—or controlling—the intensity of the radiation beam in multiple small volumes. IMRT also allows higher ... of multiple intensity-modulated fields coming from different beam directions produce a custom tailored radiation dose that ...

  14. Hydrogen Balmer alpha intensity distributions and line profiles from multiple scattering theory using realistic geocoronal models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. E., Jr.; Meier, R. R.; Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1987-01-01

    The H Balmer alpha nightglow is investigated by using Monte Carlo models of asymmetric geocoronal atomic hydrogen distributions as input to a radiative transfer model of solar Lyman-beta radiation in the thermosphere and atmosphere. It is shown that it is essential to include multiple scattering of Lyman-beta radiation in the interpretation of Balmer alpha airglow data. Observations of diurnal variation in the Balmer alpha airglow showing slightly greater intensities in the morning relative to evening are consistent with theory. No evidence is found for anything other than a single sinusoidal diurnal variation of exobase density. Dramatic changes in effective temperature derived from the observed Balmer alpha line profiles are expected on the basis of changing illumination conditions in the thermosphere and exosphere as different regions of the sky are scanned.

  15. Alpha-beta radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, Dale M.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Froelich, Thomas J.; Carter, Gregory L.

    1998-01-01

    The invention is based in part on the discovery that a plastic housing that is lightweight is surprisingly efficient inasmuch as background signals from any gamma radiation are significantly reduced by using a plastic housing instead of a metal housing. A further aspect of the present invention is the profile of the housing as a bi-linear approximation to a parabola resulting in full optical response from any location on the scintillation material to the photomultiplier tube. A yet further aspect of the present invention is that the survey probe is resistant to magnetic fields. A yet further aspect of the present invention is the use of a snap-fit retaining bracket that overcomes the need for multiple screws.

  16. Alpha-beta radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, D.M.; Simmons, K.L.; Froelich, T.J.; Carter, G.L.

    1998-08-18

    The invention is based in part on the discovery that a plastic housing that is lightweight is surprisingly efficient inasmuch as background signals from any gamma radiation are significantly reduced by using a plastic housing instead of a metal housing. A further aspect of the present invention is the profile of the housing as a bi-linear approximation to a parabola resulting in full optical response from any location on the scintillation material to the photomultiplier tube. A yet further aspect of the present invention is that the survey probe is resistant to magnetic fields. A yet further aspect of the present invention is the use of a snap-fit retaining bracket that overcomes the need for multiple screws. 16 figs.

  17. [Alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonists in anaesthesia and intensive care medicine].

    PubMed

    Mavropoulos, G; Minguet, G; Brichant, J F

    2014-02-01

    Alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonists have long been used in the treatment of arterial hypertension. However, in that indication they have progressively been replaced by antihypertensive drugs with a more interesting therapeutic profile. Nonetheless, pharmacological activation of alpha-2 adrenoreceptors leads to a variety of clinical effects that are of major interest for anaesthesia and intensive care practice. Indeed, the sedative and analgesic properties of alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonists allow a reduction of hypnotic and opioid needs during general anaesthesia. In addition, they induce a down-regulation of the level of consciousness comparable to that of natural slow-wave sleep during post-anaesthesia and intensive care unit stay. These drugs may also prevent some deleterious effects of the sympathetic discharge in response to surgical stress. Furthermore, alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonists are potent adjuncts for locoregional anaesthesia. In this article, we will summarize the most frequent applications of alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonists in anaesthesia and intensive care medicine. We will focus on the clinical data available for the two most representative molecules of this pharmacological class: clonidine and dexmedetomidine. PMID:24683831

  18. LOGNORMAL INTENSITY DISTRIBUTION OF THE FAR-ULTRAVIOLET CONTINUUM BACKGROUND SHORTWARD OF Ly{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Seon, Kwang-Il

    2013-07-20

    The diffuse far-ultraviolet (FUV) continuum radiation 'longward' of Ly{alpha} (1216 A) is well known to correlate with the dust emission at 100 {mu}m. However, it has been claimed that the FUV continuum background 'shortward' of Ly{alpha} shows very weak or no correlation with the 100 {mu}m emission. In this paper, the observational data of the diffuse FUV radiation by the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) are reexamined in order to investigate the correlation between the diffuse FUV radiation shortward of Ly{alpha} and the 100 {mu}m emission. Large fluctuations were confirmed in the linear-linear correlation plots, but good correlations were found in the log-log plots. The large fluctuations in the linear-linear plots, and thus poor correlations, between the FUV and 100 {mu}m intensities were attributed to the lognormal property of the FUV intensity distribution. The standard deviation of the intensity distribution of the FUV radiation shortward of Ly{alpha} was found to be {sigma}{sub logI} = 0.16-0.25. The result is consistent with that obtained not only for the FUV radiation longward of 1216 A but also with the dust column density measurements of various molecular clouds. This implies that most of the diffuse FUV radiation shortward of Ly{alpha} is dust-scattered light in the turbulent interstellar medium. The diffuse FUV data obtained from the Voyager missions were also investigated. However, much wider random fluctuations were found compared with the FUSE data, which is most likely due to the systematic difficulties in data reduction of the Voyager data.

  19. INTENSITY MAPPING OF Ly{alpha} EMISSION DURING THE EPOCH OF REIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Marta B.; Santos, Mario G.; Gong, Yan; Cooray, Asantha; Bock, James

    2013-02-15

    We calculate the absolute intensity and anisotropies of the Ly{alpha} radiation field present during the epoch of reionization. We consider emission from both galaxies and the intergalactic medium (IGM) and take into account the main contributions to the production of Ly{alpha} photons: recombinations, collisions, continuum emission from galaxies, and scattering of Lyn photons in the IGM. We find that the emission from individual galaxies dominates over the IGM with a total Ly{alpha} intensity (times frequency) of about (1.43-3.57) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} sr{sup -1} at a redshift of 7. This intensity level is low, so it is unlikely that the Ly{alpha} background during reionization can be established by an experiment aiming at an absolute background light measurement. Instead, we consider Ly{alpha} intensity mapping with the aim of measuring the anisotropy power spectrum that has rms fluctuations at the level of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -16} [erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} sr{sup -1}]{sup 2} at a few Mpc scales. These anisotropies could be measured with a spectrometer at near-IR wavelengths from 0.9 to 1.4 {mu}m with fields in the order of 0.5 to 1 deg{sup 2}. We recommend that existing ground-based programs using narrowband filters also pursue intensity fluctuations to study statistics on the spatial distribution of faint Ly{alpha} emitters. We also discuss the cross-correlation signal with 21 cm experiments that probe H I in the IGM during reionization. A dedicated sub-orbital or space-based Ly{alpha} intensity mapping experiment could provide a viable complimentary approach to probe reionization, when compared to 21 cm experiments, and is likely within experimental reach.

  20. Predicting Ly-alpha intensities in coronal streamers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noci, Giancarlo; Poletto, Giannina; Suess, Steven T.; Wang, A.-H.; Wu, S. T.

    1992-01-01

    SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) UVCS (Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer) will make long term observations of coronal streamers in UV lines, providing a new tool for the analysis of structures which have been known for decades but are still far from being adequately described. Work to evaluate the Lyman alpha brightness of coronal streamers is reported, adopting the streamer models obtained, via a time dependent numerical relaxation technique. This will yield understanding on the role of geometric versus physical factors in determining the streamer lyman alpha intensity and provide guidelines for UVCS observational operations. Future prospects along this line of research are summarized.

  1. Analysis of solar Lyman alpha radiation in the heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayock, B.; Zank, G. P.; Heerikhuisen, J.

    2013-06-01

    Various NASA spacecraft have measured ultraviolet radiation in the heliosphere at different locations over time. Much of this data corresponds to back-scattered Lyman-alpha radiation from neutral hydrogen, particularly in the context of planetary atmospheric measurements and inferred solar activity. Less attention has been devoted to using this data in the context of large-scale heliospheric simulations with complex global models. A 3D Monte Carlo simulation has been developed for analysis of Lyman-alpha scattering using global heliospheric models developed within CSPAR as a background. The simulation tracks individual photons in a sun-centered spherical coordinate system with a radial limit of 1000 AU while retaining statistics for each cell within the grid space, which is defined by the global input data. Two of the statistics collected are the number of scatters and the total distance traveled by photons within a cell. Those photons directed towards the sun provide a measure of backscatter intensity that can be compared to antisolar observations of Lyman-alpha photons by spacecraft. Preliminary results reveal a similar trend of intensity between simulation in the upwind direction and reduced Voyager data, suggesting an accurate portrayal of neutral hydrogen in the heliosphere.

  2. The L-alpha/H-alpha intensity ratio in PKS 0237-23. [quasar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyland, A. R.; Becklin, E. E.; Neugebauer, G.

    1978-01-01

    The ratio I(L-alpha)/I(H-alpha) has been measured to be 1.7 plus or minus 0.6 in the quasar PKS 0237-23. The measured ratio is similar to that measured in 3C 273 by Davidsen et al. and to that inferred by Baldwin from a study of a large number of quasars; it is a factor of 5 to 14 smaller than expected from recombination theory. If the L-alpha radiation is resonantly scattered and there are modest amounts of dust within the ionized region, the measured ratio may be interpreted in terms of recombination theory, with L-alpha being depleted by absorption by the dust.

  3. A novel nanometric DNA thin film as a sensor for alpha radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Atul; Kim, Byeonghoon; Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Joshirao, Pranav; Kim, Jang Ah; Vyas, Chirag; Manchanda, Vijay; Kim, Taesung; Park, Sung Ha

    2013-06-01

    The unexpected nuclear accidents have provided a challenge for scientists and engineers to develop sensitive detectors, especially for alpha radiation. Due to the high linear energy transfer value, sensors designed to detect such radiation require placement in close proximity to the radiation source. Here we report the morphological changes and optical responses of artificially designed DNA thin films in response to exposure to alpha radiation as observed by an atomic force microscope, a Raman and a reflectance spectroscopes. In addition, we discuss the feasibility of a DNA thin film as a radiation sensing material. The effect of alpha radiation exposure on the DNA thin film was evaluated as a function of distance from an 241Am source and exposure time. Significant reflected intensity changes of the exposed DNA thin film suggest that a thin film made of biomolecules can be one of promising candidates for the development of online radiation sensors.

  4. High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) project plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glynn, Michael S.; Blair, Jerry T.; Hintze, M. Marx

    1991-09-01

    Addressed here is the Federal Aviation Administration's approach to High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) affecting the aviation community. Near- and far-term tasks are described. Deliverables, program management, scheduling, and cost issues are discussed.

  5. Radiative trapping in intense laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, J. G.

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of electrons in counter-propagating, circularly polarized laser beams are shown to exhibit attractors whose ability to trap particles depends on the ratio of the beam intensities and a single parameter describing radiation reaction. Analytical expressions are found for the underlying limit cycles and the parameter range in which they are stable. In high-intensity optical pulses, where radiation reaction strongly modifies the trajectories, the production of collimated gamma-rays and the initiation of non-linear cascades of electron–positron pairs can be optimized by a suitable choice of the intensity ratio.

  6. High Energy K(alpha) Radiography Using High-intensity, Short-pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H; Izumi, N; Key, M H; King, J A; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Patel, P K; Price, D F; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Snavely, R A; Tabak, M; Town, R J; Wickersham, J E; Stoeckl, C; Storm, M; Theobald, W; Chambers, D M; Eagelton, R; Goldsack, T; Clarke, R J; Heathcote, R; Giraldez, E; Nikroo, A; Steinman, D A; Stephens, R B; Zhang, B B

    2005-11-16

    We have performed experiments using Callisto, the Vulcan 100 TW and the Vulcan Petawatt high intensity lasers to understand the characteristics of high energy, K{alpha} x-ray sources and to implement workable radiography solutions at 20-100 keV. Our measurements show that the K{alpha} size from a simple foil target is larger than 60 {micro}m, far larger than the experiment resolution requirement. The total K{alpha} yield is independent of target thicknesses verifying that refluxing plays a major role in photon generation. Smaller radiating volumes emit brighter K{alpha} radiation. 1-D radiography experiments using small-edge-on foils resolved 10 {micro}m features with high contrast. We tested a variety of small volume 2-D point sources such as cones, wires, and embedded wires, measuring photon yields and comparing our measurements with predictions from hybrid-PIC LSP simulations. In addition to high-energy, high-resolution backlighters, future experiments will also need imaging detectors and diagnostic tools that are workable in the 20-100 keV energy range. An initial look at some of these detector issues is also presented.

  7. Detecting radiation reaction at moderate laser intensities.

    PubMed

    Heinzl, Thomas; Harvey, Chris; Ilderton, Anton; Marklund, Mattias; Bulanov, Stepan S; Rykovanov, Sergey; Schroeder, Carl B; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim P

    2015-02-01

    We propose a new method of detecting radiation reaction effects in the motion of particles subjected to laser pulses of moderate intensity and long duration. The effect becomes sizable for particles that gain almost no energy through the interaction with the laser pulse. Hence, there are regions of parameter space in which radiation reaction is actually the dominant influence on charged particle motion. PMID:25768626

  8. Intense terahertz radiation and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafez, H. A.; Chai, X.; Ibrahim, A.; Mondal, S.; Férachou, D.; Ropagnol, X.; Ozaki, T.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we will review both past and recent progresses in the generation, detection and application of intense terahertz (THz) radiation. We will restrict the review to laser based intense few-cycle THz sources, and thus will not include sources such as synchrotron-based or narrowband sources. We will first review the various methods used for generating intense THz radiation, including photoconductive antennas (PCAs), optical rectification sources (especially the tilted-pulse-front lithium niobate source and the DAST source, but also those using other crystals), air plasma THz sources and relativistic laser–plasma sources. Next, we will give a brief introduction on the common methods for coherent THz detection techniques (namely the PCA technique and the electro-optic sampling), and point out the limitations of these techniques for measuring intense THz radiation. We will then review three techniques that are highly suited for detecting intense THz radiation, namely the air breakdown coherent detection technique, various single-shot THz detection techniques, and the spectral-domain interferometry technique. Finally, we will give an overview of the various applications that have been made possible with such intense THz sources, including nonlinear THz spectroscopy of condensed matter (optical-pump/THz-probe, THz-pump/THz-probe, THz-pump/optical-probe), nonlinear THz optics, resonant and non-resonant control of material (such as switching of superconductivity, magnetic and polarization switching) and controlling the nonlinear response of metamaterials. We will also provide a short perspective on the future of intense THz sources and their applications.

  9. 20-100 keV K(alpha) X-Ray Source Generation by Short Pulse High Intensity Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H-S; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Phillips, T W; Goldsack, T

    2003-08-22

    We are studying the feasibility of utilizing K{alpha} x-ray sources in the range of 20 to 100 keV as a backlighters for imaging various stages of implosions and high areal density planar samples driven by the NIF laser facility. The hard x-ray K{alpha} sources are created by relativistic electron plasma interactions in the target material after a radiation by short pulse high intensity lasers. In order to understand K{alpha} source characteristics such as production efficiency and brightness as a function of laser parameters, we have performed experiments using the 10 J, 100 fs JanUSP laser. We utilized single-photon counting spectroscopy and x-ray imaging diagnostics to characterize the K{alpha} source. We find that the K{alpha} conversion efficiency from the laser energy is {approx} 3 x 10{sup -4}.

  10. The NASA High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Reuben A.

    1997-01-01

    High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) are the result of a multitude of intentional and nonintentional electromagnetic sources that currently exists in the world. Many of today's digital systems are susceptible to electronic upset if subjected to certain electromagnetic environments (EME). Modern aerospace designers and manufacturers increasingly rely on sophisticated digital electronic systems to provide critical flight control in both military, commercial, and general aviation aircraft. In an effort to understand and emulate the undesired environment that high energy RF provides modern electronics, the Electromagnetics Research Branch (ERB) of the Flight Electronics and Technology Division (FETD) conducts research on RF and microwave measurement methods related to the understanding of HIRF. In the High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory, the effects of high energy radiating electromagnetic fields on avionics and electronic systems are tested and studied.

  11. Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects.

    SciTech Connect

    Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Hartman, E. Frederick; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

    2011-02-01

    This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic calculations, the

  12. Quasiclassical description of bremsstrahlung accompanying {alpha} decay including quadrupole radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jentschura, U. D.; Milstein, A. I.; Terekhov, I. S.; Boie, H.; Scheit, H.; Schwalm, D.

    2008-01-15

    We present a quasiclassical theory of {alpha} decay accompanied by bremsstrahlung with a special emphasis on the case of {sup 210}Po, with the aim of finding a unified description that incorporates both the radiation during the tunneling through the Coulomb wall and the finite energy E{sub {gamma}} of the radiated photon up to E{sub {gamma}}{approx}Q{sub {alpha}}/{radical}({eta}), where Q{sub {alpha}} is the {alpha}-decay Q-value and {eta} is the Sommerfeld parameter. The corrections with respect to previous quasiclassical investigations are found to be substantial, and excellent agreement with a full quantum mechanical treatment is achieved. Furthermore, we find that a dipole-quadrupole interference significantly changes the {alpha}-{gamma} angular correlation. We obtain good agreement between our theoretical predictions and experimental results.

  13. Detection of alpha radiation in a beta radiation field

    DOEpatents

    Mohagheghi, Amir H.; Reese, Robert P.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting alpha particles in the presence of high activities of beta particles utilizing an alpha spectrometer. The apparatus of the present invention utilizes a magnetic field applied around the sample in an alpha spectrometer to deflect the beta particles from the sample prior to reaching the detector, thus permitting detection of low concentrations of alpha particles. In the method of the invention, the strength of magnetic field required to adequately deflect the beta particles and permit alpha particle detection is given by an algorithm that controls the field strength as a function of sample beta energy and the distance of the sample to the detector.

  14. Film Dosimetry for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benites-Rengifo, J.; Martínez-Dávalos, A.; Celis, M.; Lárraga, J.

    2004-09-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is an oncology treatment technique that employs non-uniform beam intensities to deliver highly conformal radiation to the targets while minimizing doses to normal tissues and critical organs. A key element for a successful clinical implementation of IMRT is establishing a dosimetric verification process that can ensure that delivered doses are consistent with calculated ones for each patient. To this end we are developing a fast quality control procedure, based on film dosimetry techniques, to be applied to the 6 MV Novalis linear accelerator for IMRT of the Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (INNN) in Mexico City. The procedure includes measurements of individual fluence maps for a limited number of fields and dose distributions in 3D using extended dose-range radiographic film. However, the film response to radiation might depend on depth, energy and field size, and therefore compromise the accuracy of measurements. In this work we present a study of the dependence of Kodak EDR2 film's response on the depth, field size and energy, compared with those of Kodak XV2 film. The first aim is to devise a fast and accurate method to determine the calibration curve of film (optical density vs. doses) commonly called a sensitometric curve. This was accomplished by using three types of irradiation techniques: Step-and-shoot, dynamic and static fields.

  15. Apparatus for detecting alpha radiation in difficult access areas

    DOEpatents

    Steadman, Peter; MacArthur, Duncan W.

    1997-09-02

    An electrostatic alpha radiation detector for measuring alpha radiation emitted from inside an enclosure comprising an electrically conductive expandable electrode for insertion into the enclosure. After insertion, the electrically conductive expandable electrode is insulated from the enclosure and defines a decay cavity between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure so that air ions generated in the decay cavity are electrostatically captured by the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure when an electric potential is applied between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure. Indicator means are attached to the electrically conductive expandable electrode for indicating an electrical current produced by generation of the air ions generated in the decay cavity by collisions between air molecules and the alpha particles emitted from the enclosure. A voltage source is connected between the indicator means and the electrically conductive enclosure for creating an electric field between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure.

  16. Apparatus for detecting alpha radiation in difficult access areas

    DOEpatents

    Steadman, P.; MacArthur, D.W.

    1997-09-02

    An electrostatic alpha radiation detector for measuring alpha radiation emitted from inside an enclosure comprising an electrically conductive expandable electrode for insertion into the enclosure is disclosed. After insertion, the electrically conductive expandable electrode is insulated from the enclosure and defines a decay cavity between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure so that air ions generated in the decay cavity are electrostatically captured by the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure when an electric potential is applied between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure. Indicator means are attached to the electrically conductive expandable electrode for indicating an electrical current produced by generation of the air ions generated in the decay cavity by collisions between air molecules and the alpha particles emitted from the enclosure. A voltage source is connected between the indicator means and the electrically conductive enclosure for creating an electric field between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure. 4 figs.

  17. Colloquium: Nanoplasmas generated by intense radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrikov, Kostya Ken; Beg, Farhat; Ng, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Solid, liquid, and gaseous states of matter can exist and acquire unique properties when reduced in size into a nanometer domain. This Colloquium explores the approaches to produce plasmas with nanometer dimensions and the arising physical phenomena and properties associated with this extreme, nonequilibrium state of matter. Analysis of the spatial confinement, coupling, ideality, and degeneracy criteria lead to the possibilities to produce transient nanoplasma states near, in, and from solids by using ultrafast photoexcitation. These states arise through the interplay of nonequilibrium, many-body Coulomb interactions, thermal, and nonthermal effects. Examples include photoexcited electron-hole plasmas in semiconductors, transient solid-to-plasma states including warm dense matter, nanoplasmas produced by interaction of nanoclusters and nanoparticles with intense radiation, nanoplasmas in high-energy ion tracks within solids, nanoplasmas in relativistic regime, and others. Physical phenomena arising due to the localization of high-energy densities to microscales and nanoscales and their potential applications are discussed.

  18. Redistribution of radiation for the wings of Lyman-alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yelnik, J.-B.; Burnett, K.; Cooper, J.; Ballagh, R. J.; Voslamber, D.

    1981-01-01

    Earlier work on redistribution of radiation by collisions for isolated lines is extended to overlapping lines, and an explicit expression for the frequency redistribution is given for Lyman-alpha. This expression is valid, even when the emitted photon is in the (non-impact) line wings. A simple physical explanation of the result is possible.

  19. Intense alpha-particle emitting crystallites in uranium mill wastes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landa, E.R.; Stieff, L.R.; Germani, M.S.; Tanner, A.B.; Evans, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear emulsion microscopy has demonstrated the presence of small, intense ??-particle emitting crystallites in laboratory-produced tailings derived from the sulfuric acid milling of uranium ores. The ??-particle activity is associated with the isotope pair 210Pb 210Po, and the host mineral appears to be PbSO4 occurring as inclusions in gypsum laths. These particles represent potential inhalation hazards at uranium mill tailings disposal areas. ?? 1994.

  20. SOLAR H{alpha} OSCILLATIONS FROM INTENSITY AND DOPPLER OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Jackiewicz, Jason; Balasubramaniam, K. S.

    2013-03-01

    Chromospheric wave activity around flares and filaments has been a research focus for years, and could provide indirect measurements of local conditions that are not otherwise accessible. One interesting observed phenomenon is oscillations in filaments, activated by distant flares and the large-scale waves they produce. Characteristics of these oscillations, such as periods, amplitudes, and lifetimes, can provide unique information about the filament. We measure oscillation properties in flares and filaments from H{alpha} chromospheric data using a new method that provides important spatial and frequency content of the dynamics. We apply the method to two flare events where filaments are observed to oscillate and determine their properties. We find strong oscillatory signal in flaring active regions in the chromosphere over a range of frequencies. Two filaments are found to oscillate without any detectable chromospheric wave acting as an activation mechanism. We find that filaments oscillate with periods of tens of minutes, but variations are significant at small spatial scales along the filamentary region. The results suggest that there is a frequency dependence of the oscillation amplitude, as well as a spatial dependence along single filaments that is more difficult to quantify. It also appears that the strength of the oscillations does not necessarily depend on the strength of the trigger, although there are other possible effects that make this conclusion preliminary. Applications of this technique to other events and different data sets will provide important new insights into the local energy densities and magnetic fields associated with dynamic chromospheric structures.

  1. FLASH requirements for the high intensity radiated field electromagnetic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdock, John K.

    1995-05-01

    The worldwide proliferation of high intensity emitting sources and the more electric aircraft increase the intensity of the Electromagnetic Environment (EME) in which aircraft must operate. A FLASH program HIRF (High Intensity Radiated Field) EME requirement is derived to cover both commercial and military fixed and rotary wing aircraft. This requirement is derived from the radiated susceptibility requirement documents of both the FAA and U.S. military. Specific test data and analysis will show that we can meet this requirement.

  2. Resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization of ions by Lyman alpha radiation in gaseous nebulae.

    PubMed

    Johansson, S; Letokhov, V

    2001-01-26

    One of the mysteries of nebulae in the vicinity of bright stars is the appearance of bright emission spectral lines of ions, which imply fairly high excitation temperatures. We suggest that an ion formation mechanism, based on resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization (RETPI) by intense H Lyman alpha radiation (wavelength of 1215 angstroms) trapped inside optically thick nebulae, can produce these spectral lines. The rate of such an ionization process is high enough for rarefied gaseous media where the recombination rate of the ions formed can be 10(-6) to 10(-8) per second for an electron density of 10(3) to 10(5) per cubic centimeter in the nebula. Under such conditions, the photo-ions formed may subsequently undergo further RETPI, catalyzed by intense He i and He ii radiation, which also gets enhanced in optically thick nebulae that contain enough helium. PMID:11158669

  3. Shorter, Intensive Radiation Works for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... April 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A slightly higher dose of radiation therapy for early stage prostate cancer may reduce treatment time without compromising effectiveness, researchers report. The ...

  4. Intensity clamping in the filament of femtosecond laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kandidov, V P; Fedorov, V Yu; Tverskoi, O V; Kosareva, O G; Chin, S L

    2011-04-30

    We have studied numerically the evolution of the light field intensity and induced refractive index of a medium upon filamentation of femtosecond laser radiation in air. It is shown that the intensity clamping results from the dynamic balance of optical powers of nonlinear lenses, induced by radiation due to the Kerr nonlinearity of air, and laser plasma produced during photoionisation. We have found the relation between the peak values of the light field intensity and the electron density in laser-produced plasma, as well as the transverse sizes of the filament and the plasma channel. (effects of laser radiation on matter)

  5. Measurement of the Relative Intensity of the Ly-(alpha) Lines in Fe 25+

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, K L; Beiersdorfer, P; Reed, K J; Osterheld, A L

    2002-06-18

    The intensity of the polarized Ly-{alpha}{sub 1} (2p{sub 3/2} {yields} 1s{sub 1/2}) transition has been measured relative to that of the unpolarized Ly-{alpha}{sub 2} (2p{sub 1/2} {yields} 1s{sub 1/2}) transition in Fe{sup 25+}. The measurements were made with the Livermore electron beam ion trap EBIT-II for beam energies from threshold to 2.5 times threshold. The results are compared to the corresponding intensity ratio predicted using excitation cross sections from distorted-wave calculations, which includes polarization, the M1(2s{sub 1/2} {yields} 1s{sub 1/2}) transition, and cascade contributions. Discrepancies are found that tend to confirm a recent report of a measurement of the Ly-{alpha} lines in Ti{sup 21+} performed on the Tokyo electron beam ion trap.

  6. Supersonic intensity and non-negative intensity for prediction of radiated sound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Daipei; Peters, Herwig; Marburg, Steffen; Kessissoglou, Nicole

    2016-05-01

    Two numerical methods to identify the surface areas of a vibrating structure that radiate sound are presented. The supersonic intensity identifies only the supersonic wave components of the sound field contributing to far-field radiated sound. The supersonic intensity is calculated using a two-dimensional convolution between a spatial radiation filter and the sound field. To compute the spatial radiation filter, the shortest surface distance between two points on the structure is calculated using the geodesic distance method. The non-negative intensity is based on acoustic radiation modes and identifies the radiated sound power from a vibrating structure. Numerical models of a baffled plate, a cylinder and an engine crankcase are presented. The supersonic intensity is shown to be difficult to implement at low frequencies due to the size of the spatial radiation filter and accuracy of the surface distances. A cut-off coefficient associated with the acoustic wavenumber of the spatial radiation filter is used to reduce the aperture error. A comparison of the two intensity-based techniques both in terms of a sound power ratio and the modal assurance criterion is introduced to identify the optimal values of the cut-off coefficients that result in better convergence between the intensity techniques. PMID:27250172

  7. An Alpha and Theta Intensive and Short Neurofeedback Protocol for Healthy Aging Working-Memory Training

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Joana; Portugal, Ana Maria; Fernandes, Luís; Afonso, Nuno; Pereira, Mariana; Sousa, Nuno; Dias, Nuno S.

    2016-01-01

    The present study tested the effects of an intensive and short alpha and theta neurofeedback (NF) protocol in working memory (WM) performance in a healthy elder population and explored the effects of a multimodal approach, by supplementing NF with cognitive tasks. Participants were allocated to four groups: NF (N = 9); neurofeedback supplemented with cognitive training (NFCT) (N = 8); cognitive training (CT) (N = 7) and sham neurofeedback (Sham-NF) (N = 6). The intervention consisted in 30-min sessions for 8 days. The NF group presented post intervention increases of alpha and theta relative power as well as performance in the matrix rotation task. In addition, a successful up training of frontal theta showed positive correlation with an improvement of post-training alpha and a better performance in the matrix rotation task. The results presented herein suggest that an intensive and short NF protocol enables elders to learn alpha and theta self-modulation and already presents moderate improvements in cognition and basal EEG. Also, CT group showed moderate performance gains on the cognitive tasks used during the training sessions but no clear improvements on neurophysiology and behavioral measurements were observed. This study represents a first attempt to study the effects of an intensive and short NF protocol in WM performance of elders. The evidence presented here suggests that an intensive and short NF intervention could be a valid alternative for introduction of older populations to NF methodologies. PMID:27458369

  8. An Alpha and Theta Intensive and Short Neurofeedback Protocol for Healthy Aging Working-Memory Training.

    PubMed

    Reis, Joana; Portugal, Ana Maria; Fernandes, Luís; Afonso, Nuno; Pereira, Mariana; Sousa, Nuno; Dias, Nuno S

    2016-01-01

    The present study tested the effects of an intensive and short alpha and theta neurofeedback (NF) protocol in working memory (WM) performance in a healthy elder population and explored the effects of a multimodal approach, by supplementing NF with cognitive tasks. Participants were allocated to four groups: NF (N = 9); neurofeedback supplemented with cognitive training (NFCT) (N = 8); cognitive training (CT) (N = 7) and sham neurofeedback (Sham-NF) (N = 6). The intervention consisted in 30-min sessions for 8 days. The NF group presented post intervention increases of alpha and theta relative power as well as performance in the matrix rotation task. In addition, a successful up training of frontal theta showed positive correlation with an improvement of post-training alpha and a better performance in the matrix rotation task. The results presented herein suggest that an intensive and short NF protocol enables elders to learn alpha and theta self-modulation and already presents moderate improvements in cognition and basal EEG. Also, CT group showed moderate performance gains on the cognitive tasks used during the training sessions but no clear improvements on neurophysiology and behavioral measurements were observed. This study represents a first attempt to study the effects of an intensive and short NF protocol in WM performance of elders. The evidence presented here suggests that an intensive and short NF intervention could be a valid alternative for introduction of older populations to NF methodologies. PMID:27458369

  9. Radiation intensity of lignite-fired oxy-fuel flames

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Klas; Johansson, Robert; Hjaertstam, Stefan; Johnsson, Filip; Leckner, Bo

    2008-10-15

    The radiative heat transfer in oxy-fuel flames is compared to corresponding conditions in air-fuel flames during combustion of lignite in the Chalmers 100 kW oxy-fuel test facility. In the oxy-fuel cases the flue-gas recycle rate was varied, so that, in principle, the same stoichiometry was kept in all cases, whereas the oxygen fraction in the recycled flue-gas mixture ranged from 25 to 29 vol.%. Radial profiles of gas concentration, temperature and total radiation intensity were measured in the furnace. The temperature, and thereby the total radiation intensity of the oxy-fuel flames, increases with decreasing flue-gas recycle rate. The ratio of gas and total radiation intensities increases under oxy-fuel conditions compared to air-firing. However, when radiation overlap between gas and particles is considered the ratios for air-firing and oxy-fuel conditions become more similar, since the gas-particle overlap is increased in the CO{sub 2}-rich atmosphere. A large fraction of the radiation in these lignite flames is emitted by particles whose radiation was not significantly influenced by oxy-fuel operation. Therefore, an increment of gas radiation due to higher CO{sub 2} concentration is not evident because of the background of particle radiation, and, the total radiation intensities are similar during oxy-fuel and air-fuel operation as long as the temperature distributions are similar. (author)

  10. RADIATIVE TRANSFER MODELING OF Ly{alpha} EMITTERS. I. STATISTICS OF SPECTRA AND LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Zheng; Cen Renyue; Trac, Hy; Miralda-Escude, Jordi

    2010-06-10

    We combine a cosmological reionization simulation with box size of 100 h {sup -1} Mpc on a side and a Monte Carlo Ly{alpha} radiative transfer code to model Ly{alpha} Emitters (LAEs) at z {approx} 5.7. The model introduces Ly{alpha} radiative transfer as the single factor for transforming the intrinsic Ly{alpha} emission properties into the observed ones. Spatial diffusion of Ly{alpha} photons from radiative transfer results in extended Ly{alpha} emission and only the central part with high surface brightness can be observed. Because of radiative transfer, the appearance of LAEs depends on density and velocity structures in circumgalactic and intergalactic media as well as the viewing angle, which leads to a broad distribution of apparent (observed) Ly{alpha} luminosity for a given intrinsic Ly{alpha} luminosity. Radiative transfer also causes frequency diffusion of Ly{alpha} photons. The resultant Ly{alpha} line is asymmetric with a red tail. The peak of the Ly{alpha} line shifts toward longer wavelength and the shift is anti-correlated with the apparent-to-intrinsic Ly{alpha} luminosity ratio. The simple radiative transfer model provides a new framework for studying LAEs. It is able to explain an array of observed properties of z {approx} 5.7 LAEs in Ouchi et al., producing Ly{alpha} spectra, morphology, and apparent Ly{alpha} luminosity function (LF) similar to those seen in observation. The broad distribution of apparent Ly{alpha} luminosity at fixed UV luminosity provides a natural explanation for the observed UV LF, especially the turnover toward the low luminosity end. The model also reproduces the observed distribution of Ly{alpha} equivalent width (EW) and explains the deficit of UV bright, high EW sources. Because of the broad distribution of the apparent-to-intrinsic Ly{alpha} luminosity ratio, the model predicts effective duty cycles and Ly{alpha} escape fractions for LAEs.

  11. Intense and energetic radiation from crystalline undulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uggerhøj, U. I.; Wistisen, T. N.

    2015-07-01

    With the recent experimental confirmation of the existence of energetic radiation from a Small Amplitude, Small Period (SASP) crystalline undulator (Wistisen et al., 2014), the field of specially manufactured crystals, from which specific radiation characteristics can be obtained, has evolved substantially. In the present paper we show how the radiation spectra can be tuned, using electrons and positrons of energies from 100 MeV up to 20 GeV. The latter energy is relevant for possible experiments at the FACET facility at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), whereas 100 MeV has been chosen to show the potentialities connected to using crystalline undulators as radiation targets for Nuclear Waste Transmutation (NWT). Energies in the few hundred MeV range are relevant for the facilities at the MAinzer MIcrotron (MAMI). For the 20 GeV case we show explicitly that quantum corrections to the emission spectrum become very significant, an effect that may be observed in the near future using the FACET beam at SLAC.

  12. Enhanced homologous recombination is induced by alpha-particle radiation in somatic cells of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Po; Liu, Ping; Wu, Yuejin

    Almost 9 percent of cosmic rays which strike the earth's atmosphere are alpha particles. As one of the ionizing radiations (IR), its biological effects have been widely studied. However, the plant genomic instability induced by alpha-particle radiation was not largely known. In this research, the Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic for GUS recombination substrate was used to evaluate the genomic instability induced by alpha-particle radiation (3.3MeV). The pronounced effects of systemic exposure to alpha-particle radiation on the somatic homologous recombination frequency (HRF) were found at different doses. The 10Gy dose of radiation induced the maximal HRF which was 1.9-fold higher than the control. The local radiation of alpha-particle (10Gy) on root also resulted in a 2.5-fold increase of somatic HRF in non-radiated aerial plant, indicating that the signal(s) of genomic instability was transferred to non-radiated parts and initiated their genomic instability. Concurrent treatment of seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana with alpha-particle and DMSO(ROS scavenger) both in systemic and local radiation signifi- cantly suppressed the somatic HR, indicating that the free radicals produced by alpha-particle radiation took part in the production of signal of genomic instability rather than the signal transfer. Key words: alpha-particle radiation, somatic homologous recombination, genomic instability

  13. Coupling the emission of ionizing radiation and Lyman alpha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarlata, Claudia; Hayes, Matthew; Miller, Brendan P.; Pushnig, Johannes; Jansson, Gustav

    2016-01-01

    The class of objects that reionized the intergalactic hydrogen remains an observational and theoretical challenge. Recently, the shape of the Lyman-alpha (Lya) emission line profile has been proposed as a way to pre-select Lyman Continuum (LyC) leaking galaxies. We present results of deep spectroscopic observations obtained with the Cosmic Origin Spectrograph on the HST of a sample of 4 Lya-emitting galaxies at z~0.3, chosen to be candidate LyC leaking galaxies, on the grounds of blueshifted peaks of Lya emission/symmetric extended Lya wings. We do not detect ionizing radiation escaping from these objects, with upper 3sigma limits on the absolute escape fraction of LyC photons between 14 and 2%.

  14. Compton interaction of free electrons with intense low frequency radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Illarionov, A. F.; Kompaneyets, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    Electron behavior in an intense low frequency radiation field, with induced Compton scattering as the primary mechanism of interaction, is investigated. Evolution of the electron energy spectrum is studied, and the equilibrium spectrum of relativistic electrons in a radiation field with high brightness temperature is found. The induced radiation pressure and heating rate of an electron gas are calculated. The direction of the induced pressure depends on the radiation spectrum. The form of spectrum, under the induced force can accelerate electrons to superrelativistic energies is found.

  15. Investigation of the Frohlich hypothesis with high intensity terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weightman, Peter

    2014-03-01

    This article provides an update to recent reviews of the Frohlich hypothesis that biological organisation is facilitated by the creation of coherent excited states driven by a flow of free energy provided by metabolic processes and mediated by molecular motions in the terahertz range. Sources of intense terahertz radiation have the potential to test this hypothesis since if it is true the growth and development of sensitive systems such as stem cells should be influenced by irradiation with intense terahertz radiation. A brief survey of recent work shows that it is not yet possible to make an assessment of the validity of the Frohlich hypothesis. Under some conditions a variety of cell types respond to irradiation with intense THz radiation in ways that involve changes in the activity of their DNA. In other experiments very intense and prolonged THz radiation has no measureable effect on the behavior of very sensitive systems such as stem cells. The wide variation in experimental conditions makes it impossible to draw any conclusions as to characteristics of THz radiation that will induce a response in living cells. It is possible that in environments suitable for their maintenance and growth cells are capable of compensating for any effects caused by exposure to THz radiation up to some currently unknown level of THz peak power.

  16. Radiation cross-linking of ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer functionalized with m-isopropenyl-[alpha],[alpha]-dimethyl benzyl isocyanate

    SciTech Connect

    Ekman, K.B.; Naesman, J.H. . Lab. of Polymer Technology)

    1993-10-10

    An ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer was functionalized with m-isopropenyl-[alpha],[alpha]-dimethyl benzyl isocyanate using reactive processing in a mixer. The functionalization introduces pendant unsaturation to the polymer, which allows radiation cross-linked to gel contents >70% at radiation doses below 100 kGy. Unfunctionalized ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer, on the other hand, forms no gel upon irradiation. The functionalization was completed within a few minutes of reactive mixing, which was confirmed with both FTIR and [sup 13]C-NMR measurements. The oxygen permeability of ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer increased with increasing degree of functionalization, and irradiation of the samples formed trapped radicals, which act as oxygen scavengers. Consequently no oxygen permeability was detected. However, radical activity was inhibited by annealing the samples at 110 C resulting in a 24% higher oxygen permeability value for the irradiated unfunctionalized copolymer. The oxygen permeability values of the irradiated functionalized samples were approximately 13% lower. Laminates of m-isopropenyl-[alpha],[alpha]-dimethyl benzyl isocyanate functionalized ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer and m-isopropenyl-[alpha],[alpha]-dimethyl benzyl isocyanate functionalized ethylene hydroxyethyl methacrylate copolymer acquired improved adhesive strength both at dry and wet conditions as well as at elevated temperature upon exposure to radiation.

  17. A capillary discharge plasma source of intense VUV radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sobel'man, Igor I; Shevelko, A P; Yakushev, O F; Knight, L V; Turley, R S

    2003-01-31

    The results of investigation of a capillary discharge plasma, used as a source of intense VUV radiation and soft X-rays, are presented. The plasma was generated during the discharge of low-inductance condensers in a gas-filled ceramic capillary. Intense line radiation was observed in a broad spectral range (30-400 A) in various gases (CO{sub 2}, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe). The absolute radiation yield for the xenon discharge was {approx}5 mJ (2{pi} sr){sup -1} pulse{sup -1} within a spectral band of width 9 A at 135 A. Such a radiation source can be used for various practical applications, such as EUV projection lithography, microscopy of biological objects in a 'water window', reflectometry, etc. (special issue devoted to the 80th anniversary of academician n g basov's birth)

  18. Scatter radiation intensities around full-field digital mammography units.

    PubMed

    Judge, M A; Keavey, E; Phelan, N

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the scatter radiation intensity around digital mammography systems and apply these data to standard shielding calculations to reveal whether shielding design of existing breast screening rooms is adequate for the use of digital mammography systems. Three digital mammography systems from GE Healthcare, Hologic and Philips were employed in the study. A breast-equivalent phantom was imaged under clinical workload conditions and scatter radiation intensities around the digital mammography systems were measured for a range of angles in three planes using an ionisation chamber. The results were compared with those from previous studies of film-screen systems. It may be deduced from the results that scattering in the backward direction is significant for all three systems, while scattering in the forward direction can be significant for some planes around the GE and Hologic systems. Measurements at typical clinical settings on each system revealed the Philips system to have markedly lower scatter radiation intensities than the other systems. Substituting the measured scattered radiation intensity into shielding calculations yielded barrier requirements similar to those already in place at the screening centres operating these systems. Current radiation protection requirements based on film-screen technology remain sufficient when applied to rooms with digital mammography installations and no alteration is required to the structural shielding. PMID:23239693

  19. A Device for Search of Gamma-Radiation Intensive Sources at the Radiation Accident Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Batiy, Valeriy; Klyuchnykov, A; Kochnev, N; Rudko, Vladimir; shcherbin, vladimir; Yegorov, V; Schmieman, Eric A.

    2005-08-08

    The procedure designed for measuring angular distributions of gamma radiation and for search of gamma radiation intensive sources is described. It is based on application of the original multidetector device ShD-1, for measuring an angular distribution in a complete solid angle (4 pi). The calibration results and data on the angular distributions of intensity of gamma radiation at the roof of Chornobyl NPP ''Shelter'' are presented.

  20. Observations of Geocoronal H-alpha Emission Intensities Over Changing Solar Geophysical Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nossal, S. M.; Roesler, F. L.; Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Reynolds, R. J.; Bishop, J.; Madsen, G.

    2002-05-01

    We will present observations of thermospheric + exospheric hydrogen H-alpha emissions taken by the Wisconsin H-alpha Mapper Fabry-Perot (WHAM) during the time period of 1997 through 2001. WHAM has acquired more than 37,000 spectra to date over about 100 nights. These observations span from near solar minimum through solar maximum conditions. The WHAM Fabry-Perot is located at the Kitt Peak Observatory near Tucson, Arizona and is remotely operable from Wisconsin. WHAM's resolving power is sufficient for the retrieval of the geocoronal H-alpha emission intensity, but not for the resolution of the line profile. The resolution, precision and high signal-to-noise of the WHAM Fabry-Perot facilitate the separation of the terrestrial emission from the galactic emission. Variability in the WHAM geocoronal H-alpha observations over the rise of the solar cycle is limited to within about 35% with higher emissions observed during solar maximum conditions. This result is consistent with observed limits to the variability over the past solar cycle made using similarly designed Fabry-Perot instruments, but with photomultiplier detection, from midlatitude Wisconsin and Haleakala observing sites. These data are also consistent with comparisons made between winter solstice zenith observations taken during the early 1990's from Wisconsin (NSF-CHARM campaign) and WHAM zenith observations.

  1. Energy dispersive spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation: Intensity considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skelton, E. F.; Elam, W. T.; Qadri, S. B.; Webb, A. W.; Schiferl, D.

    Detailed considerations are given to the reliability of energy dependent integrated intensity data collected from the pressure cavity of a diamond-anvil pressure cell illuminated with heterochromatic radiation from a synchrotron storage ring. It is demonstrated that at least in one run, the electron beam current cannot be used to correct for energy-intensity variations of the incident beam. Rather there appears to be an additional linear relationship between the decay of the synchrotron beam and the magnitude of the background intensity.

  2. Energy dispersive spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation: Intensity considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skelton, E. F.; Elam, W. T.; Qadri, S. B.; Webb, A. W.; Schiferl, D.

    1986-05-01

    Detailed considerations are given to the reliability of energy dependent integrated intensity data collected from the pressure cavity of a diamond-anvil pressure cell illuminated with heterochromatic radiation from a synchrotron storage ring. It is demonstrated that, at least in one run, the electron beam current cannot be used to correct for energy-intensity variations of the incident beam. Rather, there appears to be an additional linear relationship between the decay of the synchrotron beam and the magnitude of the background intensity.

  3. Conversion efficiency and spectral broadening of the K-{alpha} line emitted from planar titanium targets irradiated with ultra-short laser pulses of high intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, V.; Singhal, H.; Naik, P. A.; Gupta, P. D.

    2011-10-15

    A study of the conversion efficiency and line shape of the K-{alpha} x-ray line radiation from a planar titanium target irradiated by an ultra-short laser pulse is performed. The conversion efficiency and spectral broadening are studied as a function of laser intensity (5 x 10{sup 16}-10{sup 18} W cm{sup -2}), laser pulse duration (45 fs-800 fs), and laser fluence (2 x 10{sup 3}-4.2 x 10{sup 4} J cm{sup -2}). The K-{alpha}{sub 1} line (4510 eV) is observed to be broadened (up to {approx}9 eV), predominantly towards the higher energy side and strongly depends on the laser fluence rather than on laser intensity. The reason for the spectral broadening is attributed to K-{alpha} emission in warm dense plasma. The role of hot electrons and direct laser heating on spectral broadening is outlined. In addition to this, our observations indicates that the presence of pre-plasma strongly contribute to the observed broadening through the inner-shell transitions in multiply charged titanium ions in the pre-plasma. The appropriate laser irradiation parameters to achieve high conversion efficiency and minimum spectral width of the K-{alpha} radiation are identified. The study is important, since the control of the spectral profile is of general interest for diffraction or scattering experiments in view of its potential in increasing temporal resolution.

  4. Response of two-phase droplets to intense electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F.; Maloney, Daniel J.; Lawson, William F.; Casleton, Kent H.

    1993-01-01

    The behavior of two-phase droplets subjected to high intensity radiation pulses is studied. Droplets are highly absorbing solids in weakly absorbing liquid medium. The objective of the study was to define heating thresholds required for causing explosive boiling and secondary atomization of the fuel droplet. The results point to mechanisms for energy storage and transport in two-phase systems.

  5. Wake Measurements at alpha ventus - Dependency on Stability and Turbulence Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerhellweg, Annette; Cañadillas, Beatriz; Kinder, Friederike; Neumann, Tom

    2014-12-01

    Wind and power deficit in the wake are assessed for the offshore wind farm Alpha Ventus. Operational data are evaluated for the power deficit in the wake of a single wind turbine and in a row of wind turbines. The wake of a single wind turbine is described by the maximum power deficit and expansion width of the wake. The impact of atmospheric stability in respect to vertical wind shear and turbulence intensity is assessed showing that wake effects are more pronounced under stable conditions.

  6. Interpreting the Unresolved Intensity of Cosmologically Redshifted Line Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switzer, E. R.; Chang, T.-C.; Masui, K. W.; Pen, U.-L.; Voytek, T. C.

    2015-12-01

    Intensity mapping experiments survey the spectrum of diffuse line radiation rather than detect individual objects at high signal-to-noise ratio. Spectral maps of unresolved atomic and molecular line radiation contain three-dimensional information about the density and environments of emitting gas and efficiently probe cosmological volumes out to high redshift. Intensity mapping survey volumes also contain all other sources of radiation at the frequencies of interest. Continuum foregrounds are typically ~102-103 times brighter than the cosmological signal. The instrumental response to bright foregrounds will produce new spectral degrees of freedom that are not known in advance, nor necessarily spectrally smooth. The intrinsic spectra of foregrounds may also not be well known in advance. We describe a general class of quadratic estimators to analyze data from single-dish intensity mapping experiments and determine contaminated spectral modes from the data themselves. The key attribute of foregrounds is not that they are spectrally smooth, but instead that they have fewer bright spectral degrees of freedom than the cosmological signal. Spurious correlations between the signal and foregrounds produce additional bias. Compensation for signal attenuation must estimate and correct this bias. A successful intensity mapping experiment will control instrumental systematics that spread variance into new modes, and it must observe a large enough volume that contaminant modes can be determined independently from the signal on scales of interest.

  7. Interpreting The Unresolved Intensity Of Cosmologically Redshifted Line Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Switzer, E. R.; Chang, T.-C.; Masui, K. W.; Pen, U.-L.; Voytek, T. C.

    2016-01-01

    Intensity mapping experiments survey the spectrum of diffuse line radiation rather than detect individual objects at high signal-to-noise ratio. Spectral maps of unresolved atomic and molecular line radiation contain three-dimensional information about the density and environments of emitting gas and efficiently probe cosmological volumes out to high redshift. Intensity mapping survey volumes also contain all other sources of radiation at the frequencies of interest. Continuum foregrounds are typically approximately 10(sup 2)-10(Sup 3) times brighter than the cosmological signal. The instrumental response to bright foregrounds will produce new spectral degrees of freedom that are not known in advance, nor necessarily spectrally smooth. The intrinsic spectra of fore-grounds may also not be well known in advance. We describe a general class of quadratic estimators to analyze data from single-dish intensity mapping experiments and determine contaminated spectral modes from the data themselves. The key attribute of foregrounds is not that they are spectrally smooth, but instead that they have fewer bright spectral degrees of freedom than the cosmological signal. Spurious correlations between the signal and foregrounds produce additional bias. Compensation for signal attenuation must estimate and correct this bias. A successful intensity mapping experiment will control instrumental systematics that spread variance into new modes, and it must observe a large enough volume that contaminant modes can be determined independently from the signal on scales of interest.

  8. Coherent Cherenkov radiation as an intense THz source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleko, V.; Karataev, P.; Konkov, A.; Kruchinin, K.; Naumenko, G.; Potylitsyn, A.; Vaughan, T.

    2016-07-01

    Diffraction and Cherenkov radiation of relativistic electrons from a dielectric target has been proposed as mechanism for production of intense terahertz (THz) radiation. The use of an extremely short high-energy electron beam of a 4th generation light source (X-ray free electron laser) appears to be very promising. A moderate power from the electron beam can be extracted and converted into THz radiation with nearly zero absorption losses. The initial experiment on THz observation will be performed at CLARA/VELA FEL test facility in the UK to demonstrate the principle to a wider community and to develop the radiator prototype. In this paper, we present our theoretical predictions (based on the approach of polarization currents), which provides the basis for interpreting the future experimental measurements. We will also present our hardware design and discuss a plan of the future experiment.

  9. Modal analysis and intensity of acoustic radiation of the kettledrum.

    PubMed

    Tronchin, Lamberto

    2005-02-01

    The acoustical features of kettledrums have been analyzed by means of modal analysis and acoustic radiation (p/v ratio) measurements. Modal analysis of two different kettledrums was undertaken, exciting the system both by a hammer and a shaker. Up to 15 vibrational modes were clearly identified. Acoustic radiation was studied using two ways. Based on previous experiments of other researchers, a new parameter, called intensity of acoustic radiation (IAR), has been defined and measured. Results show a strict relationship between IAR and the frequency response function (FRF, which is the v/F ratio), and IAR also strongly relates the modal pattern to acoustic radiation. Finally, IAR is proposed for vibro-acoustical characterization of kettledrums and other musical instruments such as strings, pianos, and harpsichords. PMID:15759711

  10. Alpha radiation effects on weapons-grade plutonium encapsulating materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saglam, Mehmet

    The scientific understanding of material problems in the long-term storage of plutonium pits is investigated using experimental and theoretical models. The durability of the plutonium pit depends on the integrity of the metal cladding that encapsulates the plutonium. Given sufficient time, the energetic alpha particles (helium nuclei) produced by nuclear decay of the plutonium would degrade the mechanical strength of the metal cladding which could lead to cladding failure and dispersion of plutonium. It is shown that the long-term behavior of the encapsulating materials can be simulated by beam implantation and subsequent analysis using experimental techniques of Electron Microscopy and Neutron Depth Profiling (NDP). In addition computer simulations using the TRIM code were made in order to correlate the measurements to cladding damage. The Neutron Depth Profiling measurements done with samples that had 10 16 cm-2 3He beam implant dose showed no helium redistribution, indicating no microcracking between bubbles, for both beryllium and stainless steel, the pit cladding materials of interest. However, helium redistribution and significant helium loss were observed for samples with a beam implant dose of 1018 cm-2 , indicating microstructural damage. The SEM observations were consistent with the NDP measurements. The proper interpretation of the results rests on the realization that (i)the deleterious effects are related to helium concentration, not implant dose, and (ii)a specified maximum concentration of helium is achieved with a much smaller dose when monoenergetic ions are implanted using beam geometry than for the situation where Pu alphas stop in the pit cladding. Helium is distributed over a much smaller depth interval for beam implantation of monoenergetic ions as compared to the pit cladding implanted ions. Taking this effect into account and using the calculated pit implant dose gives a pit storage time for the 1016 cm-2 beam implant dose results equal to

  11. Determination of molecular size of alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptors in rat mesenteric artery by radiation inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, D.K.; Grover, A.K.; Daniel, E.E.; Jung, C.Y.

    1986-03-01

    Radiation inactivation of alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptors in the purified plasma membranes of rat mesenteric artery has been performed with high energy electrons at -45 to -55 degrees C. Alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptor inactivation was monitored with (3H) prazosin and (3H)yohimbine binding, respectively. Internal endogenous and external standards of known molecular weight were used in these studies to determine the molecular size. The average value of D37 for the (3H)prazosin binding site was 6.75 +/- 0.62 Mrad (n = 4) with an estimated molecular size of 122,921 +/- 11,329 Daltons. However, the average value of D37 for the (3H) yohimbine binding site was higher (D37 = 10.05 +/- 0.91 Mrad) and accordingly the molecular size of this binding site was less than the (3H)prazosin binding sites (molecular weight = 82,540 +/- 7478 Daltons; n = 4). Irradiation did not change the dissociation constant of either radioligand, suggesting that the loss of the radioligand binding sites after radiation is due to receptor protein inactivation. These results confirm our earlier finding that (3H)prazosin and (3H)yohimbine bind to two distinct sites in the plasma membranes of rat mesenteric artery. Whether both of these sites are the subunits of a common macromolecule of alpha adrenoceptor on vascular smooth muscle in rat mesenteric artery cannot be concluded from these results. This report is the first one in the literature on the molecular size of alpha-1 and alpha-2 binding sites in vascular smooth muscle.

  12. Fire Intensity Data for Validation of the Radiative Transfer Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchat, Thomas K.; Jernigan, Dann A.

    2016-01-01

    A set of experiments and test data are outlined in this report that provides radiation intensity data for the validation of models for the radiative transfer equation. The experiments were performed with lightly-sooting liquid hydrocarbon fuels that yielded fully turbulent fires 2 m diameter). In addition, supplemental measurements of air flow and temperature, fuel temperature and burn rate, and flame surface emissive power, wall heat, and flame height and width provide a complete set of boundary condition data needed for validation of models used in fire simulations.

  13. Mutagenesis and repair by low doses of alpha radiation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Puck, Theodore T; Johnson, Robert; Webb, Patricia; Cui, Helen; Valdez, Joseph G; Crissman, Harry

    2002-09-17

    Low doses of alpha radiation in basements have been causally implicated in lung cancer. Previous studies have concentrated on high dose effects, for which no significant repair was found. In the present study, the methodology for measuring mutation by quantitating mitotic breaks and gaps was found to be applicable to G2-phase Chinese hamster ovary cells irradiated with 10-50 cGy of alpha radiation. The mutation yield in such cells closely resembles that of gamma irradiation. Caffeine, which inhibits repair, produces the same straight line increase of alpha and gamma mutation yields plotted against the dose. In the absence of caffeine, the repair of alpha radiation lesions is almost twice as great as for gamma radiation. Mitotic index changes substantiate these interpretations. It is proposed that the higher ion density associated with alpha radiation may result in fewer lesions being missed by the repair processes. The quantitation of chromosomal lesions for G2 cells exposed to low doses of alpha radiation, gamma radiation, or chemical mutagens in the presence and absence of caffeine is a rapid and reproducible methodology. Protection from mutational disease in a fashion similar to the use of sanitation for infectious disease appears practical. PMID:12198179

  14. RadICalc. A program for estimating radiation intensity of radionuclide mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, John W.; Dion, Michael P.; Eiden, Gregory C.; Farmer, Orville T.; Liezers, Martin

    2014-09-24

    RadICalc is a cross-platform program designed to calculate the intensity of radiation released by the decay of arbitrary isotopic mixtures. It was developed to address the need for a program that could calculate the composition, activity, and measurable radiation of a sample over time without significant effort from end-users. RadICalc uses Bateman's solutions for radioactive decay to determine activity over time. Radiation intensities are subsequently calculated using a database containing information about alpha particles, beta electrons, gamma- rays, conversion and Auger electrons, and X-rays. The user interface accepts input for isotopic mixture, initial number of atoms, and time passed since sample composition was known. Results are plotted graphically, and there is a search interface provided to and isotopes of interest. RadICalc can determine activity and radiation expected at specific masses with user-defined molecules in addition to atomic species; the latter is useful in mass based isotope separations for radiometric counting applications, a novel method under development at PNNL.

  15. Absolute intensity of radiation emitted by uranium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.; Lee, J. H.; Mcfarland, D. R.

    1975-01-01

    The absolute intensity of radiation emitted by fissioning and nonfissioning uranium plasmas in the spectral range from 350 nm to 1000 nm was measured. The plasma was produced in a plasma-focus apparatus and the plasma properties are simular to those anticipated for plasma-core nuclear reactors. The results are expected to contribute to the establishment of design criteria for the development of plasma-core reactors.

  16. The Effect of Intense Laser Radiation on Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stephen Michael Radley

    1991-02-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. We have carried out theoretical and experimental studies into the effect of intense laser radiation on atomic collisions. The first experiment used neon. Excitation by electron impact in a gas discharge demanded a pressure of at least 0.075 Torr. Measurement of the intensity of 3^1S_0to 3^1P_1 fluorescence has been made for the case where high intensity ASE wings in the laser profile and background laser scatter are unimportant, with the laser tuned to resonance. The field intensity required to produce strong field fluorescence (exemplified by the Mollow triplet) was found to give rise to complications capable of screening the effects sought. Our theoretical model has suggested that at finite detunings, line-centre fluorescence will dominate Rayleigh scatter and omega_3 fluorescence. Our measurements provide information on the saturation of neon fluorescence but not of the variation of the intense field collision rate. Absorption of weak field 253.7 nm laser photons by ground state mercury atoms yielded a high 6 ^3P_1 population at a lower pressure of 0.02 Torr. The Mollow triplet has been observed in the self-broadened mercury system. Dressing of the upper transition (6^3P_1rightarrow 7^3S_1) by an intense laser close to 435.8 nm yielded the strong field signal. Polarisation studies were made possible by the 3-level mercury system (radiation trapping in a 2-level system would depolarise fluorescence) perturbed by argon. The studies yielded results that were explainable in terms of the selective population of Stark shifted dressed states by a detuned, weak probe field. Use has been made of the electric-dipole radiation selection rule m_{J}=0 rightarrow m_{J^' } = 0 unless J=J^' to devise a 'Stark shift collision switch'. The competition between collision and radiation induced transitions within the mercury atom has then been studied. The resonant, strong lambda 435.8 nm field was used

  17. Radiation protection for an ultra-high intensity laser.

    PubMed

    Borne, F; Delacroix, D; Gelé, J M; Massé, D; Amiranoff, F

    2002-01-01

    Radiological characterisation of an experimental chamber and other areas of an ultra-high intensity laser facility (-terawatt) revealed significant levels of X ray, gamma and neutron radiation. Different techniques were used to detect and measure this radiation: TLD. photographic film, bubble detectors and germanium spectrometry. A test series of radiological measurements was made for 150 laser shots (300 femtoseconds) with energies in the 1 to 20 J range and a target illuminance of 10(19) W.cm2. Gamma dose equivalents in the vicinity of the chamber varied between 0.7 and 73 mSv. The dose equivalent due to the neutron component was evaluated to be 1% of the gamma dose equivalent. The amount of radiation generated depends on the laser energy and the nature of the target. No activation or contamination of the chamber or target holder were observed. Ultra-high intensity lasers are being extensively developed at the present time and the investigations performed demonstrate that it is necessary to take radiological risks into consideration in the design of ultra-high intensity laser facilities and to define personnel access conditions. PMID:12212903

  18. Evaluation of pGL1-TNF-alpha therapy in combination with radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, J.; Andres, M. L.; Fodor, I.; Nelson, G. A.; Gridley, D. S.

    1998-01-01

    Long-term control of high-grade brain tumors is rarely achieved with current therapeutic regimens. In this study a new plasmid-based human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) expression vector was synthesized (pGL1-TNF-alpha) and evaluated together with radiation in the aggressive, rapidly growing C6 rat glioma model. pGL1-TNF-alpha was successfully transfected into C6 cells in vitro using a cationic polyamine method. Expression was detected up to 7 days and averaged 0.4 ng of TNF-alpha in the culture medium from 1x10(5) cells. The expressed protein was biologically functional, as evidenced by growth inhibition of L929, a TNF-alpha-susceptible cell line. Using fluorescence-labeled monoclonal antibodies and laser scanning cytometry, we confirmed that both the P55 and P75 receptors for TNF-alpha were present on the C6 cell membrane. However, the receptors were present at low density and P55 was expressed more than the P75 receptor. These findings were in contrast to results obtained with TNF-alpha-susceptible L929 cells. Tests in athymic mice showed that pGL1-TNF-alpha administered intratumorally 16-18 h before radiation (each modality given three times) significantly inhibited C6 tumor progression (P<0.05). This effect was more than additive, because pGL1-TNF-alpha alone did not slow tumor growth and radiation alone had little effect on tumor growth. These results indicate that pGL1-TNF-alpha has potential to augment the antitumor effects of radiation against a tumor type that is virtually incurable.

  19. Monte Carlo treatment of Lyman-alpha radiation in a plane-parallel atmosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Modali, S. B.; Brandt, J. C.; Kastner, S. O.

    1972-01-01

    A Monte Carlo technique involving Stokes vectors is used to obtain the state of polarization and intensity of solar Lyman-alpha photons as they diffuse through a plane-parallel homogeneous model of earth's hydrogen envelope. Fine structure of Lyman-alpha and Doppler redistribution of frequencies are taken into account. Comparison of the results with Heath's observed upper limit for polarization of 1.5 per cent implies an optical thickness tau greater than 7 and intensities of 8-10 kilorayleighs for a solar Lyman-alpha flux of 5.8 ergs per sq cm per sec.

  20. Development of an alpha/beta/gamma detector for radiation monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Hatazawa, Jun

    2011-11-15

    For radiation monitoring at the site of nuclear power plant accidents such as Fukushima Daiichi, radiation detectors not only for gamma photons but also for alpha and beta particles are needed because some nuclear fission products emit beta particles and gamma photons and some nuclear fuels contain plutonium that emits alpha particles. We developed a radiation detector that can simultaneously monitor alpha and beta particles and gamma photons for radiation monitoring. The detector consists of three-layered scintillators optically coupled to each other and coupled to a photomultiplier tube. The first layer, which is made of a thin plastic scintillator (decay time: 2.4 ns), detects alpha particles. The second layer, which is made of a thin Gd{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} (GSO) scintillator with 1.5 mol.% Ce (decay time: 35 ns), detects beta particles. The third layer made of a thin GSO scintillator with 0.4 mol.% Ce (decay time: 70 ns) detects gamma photons. By using pulse shape discrimination, the count rates of these layers can be separated. With individual irradiation of alpha and beta particles and gamma photons, the count rate of the first layer represented the alpha particles, the second layer represented the beta particles, and the third layer represented the gamma photons. Even with simultaneous irradiation of the alpha and beta particles and the gamma photons, these three types of radiation can be individually monitored using correction for the gamma detection efficiency of the second and third layers. Our developed alpha, beta, and gamma detector is simple and will be useful for radiation monitoring, especially at nuclear power plant accident sites or other applications where the simultaneous measurements of alpha and beta particles and gamma photons are required.

  1. Ly{alpha} DOMINANCE OF THE CLASSICAL T TAURI FAR-ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Schindhelm, Eric; France, Kevin; Brown, Alexander; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Bergin, Edwin; Yang Hao; Brown, Joanna M.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Valenti, Jeff

    2012-09-01

    Far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation plays an important role in determining chemical abundances in protoplanetary disks. H I Lyman {alpha} (Ly{alpha}) is suspected to be the dominant component of the FUV emission from Classical T Tauri Stars (CTTSs), but is difficult to measure directly due to circumstellar and interstellar H I absorption. To better characterize the intrinsic Ly{alpha} radiation, we present FUV spectra of 14 CTTSs taken with the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph instruments. H{sub 2} fluorescence, commonly seen in the spectra of CTTSs, is excited by Ly{alpha} photons, providing an indirect measure of the Ly{alpha} flux incident upon the warm disk surface. We use observed H{sub 2} progression fluxes to reconstruct the CTTS Ly{alpha} profiles. The Ly{alpha} flux correlates with total measured FUV flux, in agreement with an accretion-related source of FUV emission. With a geometry-independent analysis, we confirm that in accreting T Tauri systems Ly{alpha} radiation dominates the FUV flux ({approx}1150 A -1700 A). In the systems surveyed this one line comprises 70%-90% of the total FUV flux.

  2. Approaching oxygen-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Epel, Boris; Redler, Gage; Pelizzari, Charles; Tormyshev, Victor M.; Halpern, Howard J.

    2016-01-01

    The outcome of cancer radiation treatment is strongly correlated with tumor oxygenation. The aim of this study is to use oxygen tension distributions in tumors obtained using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) imaging to devise better tumor radiation treatment. The proposed radiation plan is delivered in two steps. In the first step, a uniform 50% tumor control dose (TCD50) is delivered to the whole tumor. For the second step an additional dose boost is delivered to radioresistant, hypoxic tumor regions. FSa fibrosarcomas grown in the gastrocnemius of the legs of C3H mice were used. Oxygen tension images were obtained using a 250 MHz pulse imager and injectable partially deuterated trityl OX63 (OX71) spin probe. Radiation was delivered with a novel animal intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) XRAD225Cx microCT/radiation therapy delivery system. In a simplified scheme for boost dose delivery, the boost area is approximated by a sphere, whose radius and position are determined using an EPR O2 image. The sphere that irradiates the largest fraction of hypoxic voxels in the tumor was chosen using an algorithm based on Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) analysis. We used the fraction of irradiated hypoxic volume as the true positive determinant and the fraction of irradiated normoxic volume as the false positive determinant in the terms of that analysis. The most efficient treatment is the one that demonstrates the shortest distance from the ROC curve to the upper left corner of the ROC plot. The boost dose corresponds to the difference between TCD90 and TCD50 values. For the control experiment an identical radiation dose to the normoxic tumor area is delivered. PMID:26782211

  3. Correlations between solar wind parameters and auroral kilometric radiation intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Dangelo, N.

    1981-01-01

    The relationship between solar wind properties and the influx of energy into the nightside auroral region as indicated by the intensity of auroral kilometric radiation is investigated. Smoothed Hawkeye satellite observations of auroral radiation at 178, 100 and 56.2 kHz for days 160 through 365 of 1974 are compared with solar wind data from the composite Solar Wind Plasma Data Set, most of which was supplied by the IMP-8 spacecraft. Correlations are made between smoothed daily averages of solar wind ion density, bulk flow speed, total IMF strength, electric field, solar wind speed in the southward direction, solar wind speed multiplied by total IMF strength, the substorm parameter epsilon and the Kp index. The greatest correlation is found between solar wind bulk flow speed and auroral radiation intensity, with a linear correlation coefficient of 0.78 for the 203 daily averages examined. A possible mechanism for the relationship may be related to the propagation into the nightside magnetosphere of low-frequency long-wavelength electrostatic waves produced in the magnetosheath by the solar wind.

  4. Radiation control in the intensive care unit for high intensity iridium-192 brain implants

    SciTech Connect

    Sewchand, W.; Drzymala, R.E.; Amin, P.P.; Salcman, M.; Salazar, O.M.

    1987-04-01

    A bedside lead cubicle was designed to minimize the radiation exposure of intensive care unit staff during routine interstitial brain irradiation by removable, high intensity iridium-192. The cubicle shields the patient without restricting intensive care routines. The design specifications were confirmed by exposure measurements around the shield with an implanted anthropomorphic phantom simulating the patient situation. The cubicle reduces the exposure rate around an implant patient by as much as 90%, with the exposure level not exceeding 0.1 mR/hour/mg of radium-equivalent /sup 192/Ir. Evaluation of data accumulated for the past 3 years has shown that the exposure levels of individual attending nurses are 0.12 to 0.36 mR/mg of radium-equivalent /sup 192/Ir per 12-hour shift. The corresponding range for entire nursing teams varies between 0.18 and 0.26. A radiation control index (exposure per mg of radium-equivalent /sup 192/Ir per nurse-hour) is thus defined for individual nurses and nursing teams; this index is a significant guide to the planning of nurse rotations for brain implant patients with various /sup 192/Ir loads. The bedside shield reduces exposure from /sup 192/Ir implants by a factor of about 20, as expected, and the exposure from the lower energy radioisotope iodine-125 is barely detectable.

  5. A Novel Microsensor for Measuring Angular Distribution of Radiative Intensity.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Thomas E; Pilorz, Stuart; Prufert-Bebout, Leslie; Bebout, Brad

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the design, construction and characterization of a novel type of light probe for measuring the angular radiance distribution of light fields. The differential acceptance angle (DAA) probe can resolve the directionality of a light field in environments with steep light gradients, such as microbial mats, without the need to remove, reorient, and reinsert the probe, a clear advantage over prior techniques. The probe consists of an inner irradiance sensor inside a concentric, moveable light-absorbing sheath. The radiative intensity in a specific zenith direction can be calculated by comparing the irradiance onto the sensor at different acceptance angles. We used this probe to measure the angular radiance distribution of two sample light fields, and observed good agreement with a conventional radiance probe. The DAA probe will aid researchers in understanding light transfer physics in dense microbial communities and expedite validation of numerical radiative transfer models for these environments. PMID:25763775

  6. RADIATIVE TRANSFER MODELING OF Ly{alpha} EMITTERS. II. NEW EFFECTS ON GALAXY CLUSTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Zheng; Cen Renyue; Trac, Hy; Miralda-Escude, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    We study the clustering properties of z {approx} 5.7 Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) in a cosmological reionization simulation with a full Ly{alpha} radiative transfer calculation. Ly{alpha} radiative transfer substantially modifies the intrinsic Ly{alpha} emission properties, compared to observed ones, depending on the density and velocity structure environment around the Ly{alpha}-emitting galaxy. This environment-dependent Ly{alpha} selection introduces new features in LAE clustering, suppressing (enhancing) the line-of-sight (transverse) density fluctuations and giving rise to scale-dependent galaxy bias. In real space, the contours of the three-dimensional two-point correlation function of LAEs appear to be prominently elongated along the line of sight on large scales, an effect that is opposite to and much stronger than the linear redshift-space distortion effect. The projected two-point correlation function is greatly enhanced in amplitude by a factor of up to a few, compared to the case without the environment-dependent selection effect. The new features in LAE clustering can be understood with a simple, physically motivated model, where Ly{alpha} selection depends on matter density, velocity, and their gradients. We discuss the implications and consequences of the effects on galaxy clustering from Ly{alpha} selection in interpreting clustering measurements and in constraining cosmology and reionization from LAEs.

  7. Direct Radiative Effect of Intense Dust Outbreaks in the Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkikas, A.; Obiso, V.; Basart, S.; Jorba, O.; Pérez García-Pando, C.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Gassó, S.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The broader Mediterranean basin is affected by intense desert dust outbreaks in spring. In the present study, we make use of satellite observations and modelling to investigate dust radiative impacts during three consecutive dust outbreaks occurred over the Mediterranean in the period 9/4-15/4/2008. The direct radiative effect (DRE) is estimated by using two simulations run with the NMMB/BSC-Dust model, where the interaction between dust aerosols and radiation is activated and deactivated, respectively. The simulation domain covers the North Africa, the Middle East and Europe at 0.25ºx0.25° and 40σ-layers. The first outbreak took place over the central and eastern Mediterranean on the 9th reaching aerosol optical depths (AODs) close to 1. The second one, with AODs up to 2, lasted from 10th to 14th affecting mainly the central Mediterranean. The third one, with AODs up to 5, affected the Iberian Peninsula on the 15th. DREs are computed for the outgoing radiation at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), the absorbed radiation into the atmosphere (ATMAB), for the downwelling (SURF) and the absorbed (NETSURF) radiation at surface, for the shortwave (SW), longwave (LW) and NET (SW+LW) radiation. According to our results, it is evident that DREs' spatial patterns are driven by those of AOD. Negative (cooling) instantaneous DRETOA, DRESURF and DRENETSURF values up to -500W/m2, -700W/m2 and -600W/m2, respectively, and positive (warming) instantaneous DREATMAB up to 340W/m2 are found for the SW spectrum, during daytime. Opposite but less pronounced effects are encountered for the LW radiation and during nightime. Due to these perturbations on the radiation field, the surface temperature is reduced locally by up to 8°C during daytime and increased by up to 4°C during nightime. It is found that the regional average NET DREs can be as large as -12W/m2, -45W/m2, -30W/m2 and 27W/m2 for TOA, SURF, NETSURF and ATMAB, respectively. Impacts on atmospheric stability and dust

  8. Salivary nitric oxide and alpha-amylase as indexes of training intensity and load.

    PubMed

    Diaz, M M; Bocanegra, O L; Teixeira, R R; Soares, S S; Espindola, F S

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the variation in salivary nitric oxide (NO), alpha-amylase (sAA) and serum markers of muscle injury during 21 weeks of training in elite swimmers. Samples of saliva and blood were collected once a month during 5 months from 11 male professional athletes during their regular training season. The variation in each marker throughout the 21 weeks was compared with the dynamics of training volume, intensity and load. Unstimulated whole saliva was assessed for NO and sAA whereas venous blood was assessed for lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, and γ-glutamyltransferase. Nitric oxide and sAA showed a proportional response to the intensity of training. However, whereas the concentration of NO increased across the 21 weeks, the activity of sAA decreased. Similar variations in the concentration of NO and the markers of muscle injury were also observed. The higher concentration of NO might be attributed to changes in haemodynamics and muscle regenerative processes. On the other hand, autonomic regulation towards parasympathetic predominance might have been responsible for the decrease in sAA activity. These findings provide appealing evidence for the utilization of salivary constituents in sports medicine to monitor training programmes. PMID:22960992

  9. The radiation techniques of tomotherapy & intensity-modulated radiation therapy applied to lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhengfei

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) plays an important role in the management of lung cancer. Development of radiation techniques is a possible way to improve the effect of RT by reducing toxicities through better sparing the surrounding normal tissues. This article will review the application of two forms of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), fixed-field IMRT and helical tomotherapy (HT) in lung cancer, including dosimetric and clinical studies. The advantages and potential disadvantages of these two techniques are also discussed. PMID:26207214

  10. Compliance with High-Intensity Radiated Fields Regulations - Emitter's Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statman, Joseph; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Nguyen, Lee

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) uses high-power transmitters on its large antennas to communicate with spacecraft of NASA and its partner agencies. The prime reflectors of the DSN antennas are parabolic, at 34m and 70m in diameter. The DSN transmitters radiate Continuous Wave (CW) signals at 20 kW - 500 kW at X-band and S-band frequencies. The combination of antenna reflector size and high frequency results in a very narrow beam with extensive oscillating near-field pattern. Another unique feature of the DSN antennas is that they (and the radiated beam) move mostly at very slow sidereal rate, essentially identical in magnitude and at the opposite direction of Earth rotation.The DSN is in the process of revamping its documentation to provide analysis of the High Intensity Radiation Fields (HIRF) environment resulting from radio frequency radiation from DSN antennas for comparison to FAA regulations regarding certification of HIRF protection as outlined in the FAA regulations on HIRF protection for aircraft electrical and electronic systems (Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) [section sign][section sign] 23.1308, 25.1317, 27.1317, and 29.1317).This paper presents work done at JPL, in consultation with the FAA. The work includes analysis of the radiated field structure created by the unique DSN emitters (combination of transmitters and antennas) and comparing it to the fields defined in the environments in the FAA regulations. The paper identifies areas that required special attention, including the implications of the very narrow beam of the DSN emitters and the sidereal rate motion. The paper derives the maximum emitter power allowed without mitigation and the mitigation zones, where required.Finally, the paper presents summary of the results of the analyses of the DSN emitters and the resulting DSN process documentation.

  11. IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy): progress in technology and reimbursement.

    PubMed

    Young, R; Snyder, B

    2001-01-01

    For a new treatment technology to become widely accepted in today's healthcare environment, the technology must not only be effective but also financially viable. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), a technology that enables radiation oncologists to precisely target and attack cancerous tumors with higher doses of radiation using strategically positioned beams while minimizing collateral damage to healthy cells, now meets both criteria. With IMRT, radiation oncologists for the first time have obtained the ability to divide the treatment field covered by each beam angle into hundreds of segments as small as 2.5 mm by 5 mm. Using the adjustable leaves of an MLC to shape the beam and by controlling exposure times, physicians can deliver a different dose to each segment and therefore modulate dose intensity across the entire treatment field. Development of optimal IMRT plans using conventional manual treatment planning methods would take days. To be clinically practical, IMRT required the development of "inverse treatment planning" software. With this software, a radiation oncologist can prescribe the ideal radiation dose for a specific tumor as well as maximum dose limits for surrounding healthy tissue. These numbers are entered into the treatment planning program which then calculates the optimal delivery approach that will best fit the oncologist's requirements. The radiation oncologist then reviews and approves the proposed treatment plan before it is initiated. The most recent advance in IMRT technology offers a "dynamic" mode or "sliding window" technique. In this more rapid delivery method, the beam remains on while the leaves of the collimator continually re-shape and move the beam aperture over the planned treatment area. This creates a moving beam that saturates the tumor volume with the desired radiation dose while leaving the surrounding healthy tissue in a protective shadow created by the leaves of the collimator. In the dynamic mode, an IMRT

  12. Prone Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: 5-Year Results

    SciTech Connect

    Osa, Etin-Osa O.; DeWyngaert, Keith; Roses, Daniel; Speyer, James; Guth, Amber; Axelrod, Deborah; Fenton Kerimian, Maria; Goldberg, Judith D.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a technique of prone breast radiation therapy delivered by a regimen of accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concurrent boost to the tumor bed. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2006, 404 patients with stage I-II breast cancer were prospectively enrolled into 2 consecutive protocols, institutional trials 03-30 and 05-181, that used the same regimen of 40.5 Gy/15 fractions delivered to the index breast over 3 weeks, with a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy (total dose 48 Gy). All patients were treated after segmental mastectomy and had negative margins and nodal assessment. Patients were set up prone: only if lung or heart volumes were in the field was a supine setup attempted and chosen if found to better spare these organs. Results: Ninety-two percent of patients were treated prone, 8% supine. Seventy-two percent had stage I, 28% stage II invasive breast cancer. In-field lung volume ranged from 0 to 228.27 cm{sup 3}, mean 19.65 cm{sup 3}. In-field heart volume for left breast cancer patients ranged from 0 to 21.24 cm{sup 3}, mean 1.59 cm{sup 3}. There was no heart in the field for right breast cancer patients. At a median follow-up of 5 years, the 5-year cumulative incidence of isolated ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was 0.82% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.65%-1.04%). The 5-year cumulative incidence of regional recurrence was 0.53% (95% CI 0.41%-0.69%), and the 5-year overall cumulative death rate was 1.28% (95% CI 0.48%-3.38%). Eighty-two percent (95% CI 77%-85%) of patients judged their final cosmetic result as excellent/good. Conclusions: Prone accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concomitant boost results in excellent local control and optimal sparing of heart and lung, with good cosmesis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 1005, a phase 3, multi-institutional, randomized trial is ongoing and is evaluating the equivalence of a similar dose and

  13. Development and characterization of an in vitro alpha radiation exposure system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaton, Lindsay A.; Burn, Trevor A.; Stocki, Trevor J.; Chauhan, Vinita; Wilkins, Ruth C.

    2011-06-01

    A simple in vitro alpha radiation exposure system (ARES) was designed to study the biological effects of alpha particle radiation. The ARES consists of six 241Am electroplated stainless steel discs with activities averaging 66 kBq and Mylar-based culture dishes to allow the transmission of alpha particles. The dosimetry of the exposure system was calculated using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit with the source code adapted from the open-source Microbeam example. The average dose rate and linear energy transfer of the system was simulated to be 0.98 ± 0.01 (statistical)+0.18 - 0.00 (systematic) Gy h-1 and 127.4 ± 0.4 (statistical)+23 - 0 (systematic) keV µm-1, respectively. The system was characterized by a comparison of the survival curves of gamma and alpha irradiated cell lines which showed a relative biological effectiveness of 6.3. This is in good agreement with values obtained using other published alpha particle exposure systems. Results show that the ARES provides a simple, cost-effective exposure platform for research into the biological effects of alpha particle radiation using in vitro modelling of cell cultures.

  14. Development and characterization of an in vitro alpha radiation exposure system.

    PubMed

    Beaton, Lindsay A; Burn, Trevor A; Stocki, Trevor J; Chauhan, Vinita; Wilkins, Ruth C

    2011-06-21

    A simple in vitro alpha radiation exposure system (ARES) was designed to study the biological effects of alpha particle radiation. The ARES consists of six (241)Am electroplated stainless steel discs with activities averaging 66 kBq and Mylar-based culture dishes to allow the transmission of alpha particles. The dosimetry of the exposure system was calculated using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit with the source code adapted from the open-source Microbeam example. The average dose rate and linear energy transfer of the system was simulated to be 0.98 ± 0.01 (statistical)(+0.18)( - 0.00) (systematic) Gy h(-1) and 127.4 ± 0.4 (statistical)(+23)( - 0) (systematic) keV µm(-1), respectively. The system was characterized by a comparison of the survival curves of gamma and alpha irradiated cell lines which showed a relative biological effectiveness of 6.3. This is in good agreement with values obtained using other published alpha particle exposure systems. Results show that the ARES provides a simple, cost-effective exposure platform for research into the biological effects of alpha particle radiation using in vitro modelling of cell cultures. PMID:21610295

  15. CHEMISTRY OF A PROTOPLANETARY DISK WITH GRAIN SETTLING AND Ly{alpha} RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Fogel, Jeffrey K. J.; Bethell, Thomas J.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Calvet, Nuria; Semenov, Dmitry E-mail: tbethell@umich.edu E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu

    2011-01-01

    We present results from a model of the chemical evolution of protoplanetary disks. In our models, we directly calculate the changing propagation and penetration of a high energy radiation field with Ly{alpha} radiation included. We also explore the effect on our models of including dust grain settling. We find that, in agreement with earlier studies, the evolution of dust grains plays a large role in determining how deep the UV radiation penetrates into the disk. Significant grain settling at the midplane leads to much smaller freeze-out regions and a correspondingly larger molecular layer, which leads to an increase in column density for molecular species such as CO, CN, and SO. The inclusion of Ly{alpha} radiation impacts the disk chemistry through specific species that have large photodissociation cross sections at 1216 A. These include HCN, NH{sub 3}, and CH{sub 4}, for which the column densities are decreased by an order of magnitude or more due to the presence of Ly{alpha} radiation in the UV spectrum. A few species, such as CO{sub 2} and SO, are enhanced by the presence of Ly{alpha} radiation, but rarely by more than a factor of a few.

  16. ZrCo as a new H2 storage and getter for Lyman alpha radiation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woyke, Thomas; Schiller, Cornelius; Schmidt, Ulrich; Schober, Tilman; Zöger, Martin

    1995-01-01

    In the past, in sealed-off Lyman- alpha radiation sources (121.57 nm), uranium hydride was used as the hydrogen reservoir. We found that the zirconium-cobalt alloy ZrCo, which has similar thermodynamic properties, can also be used for hydrogen storage in such lamps. Like uranium, ZrCo acts as a getter for atmospheric contaminants. The advantage of the use of ZrCo lies in much easier and safer handling during production and disposal of the lamps. Using ZrCo, we succeeded in producing radiation sources with a large Lyman- alpha radiation output and high spectral purity, which were successfully applied in a Lyman- alpha fluorescence hygrometer for stratospheric observations.

  17. Monte Carlo treatment of Lyman-alpha. II - Radiation in a spherical atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Modali, S. B.; Brandt, J. C.; Kastner, S. O.

    1975-01-01

    Intensity and state of polarization of solar L-alpha photons as they diffuse through an inhomogeneous, spherically symmetric, isothermal geocorona are theoretically determined. The fine structure of L-alpha and Doppler redistribution of frequencies are taken into account. The calculation use the Monte Carlo technique involving Stokes vectors. Comparison of the results with OGO-4 and OSO-4 observed intensities at an altitude of 650 km shows good agreement. Calculations of the polarization versus solar zenith angle show a residual polarization at large zenith angles which is mainly due to multiply scattered photons.

  18. Preoperative Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Retroperitoneal Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    El-Bared, Nancy; Taussky, Daniel; Mehiri, Selma; Patocskai, Erika; Roberge, David; Donath, David

    2014-01-01

    The use of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has allowed for the administration of high doses to retroperitoneal sarcomas (RSTS) while limiting toxicity to adjacent organs. The purpose of our study is to assess the outcome and toxicities of patients with RSTS treated with neo-adjuvant external beam radiation (EBRT) therapy using IMRT. This is a retrospective study of 21 patients treated with preoperative IMRT for primary or recurrent RSTS between 2005 and 2011. Overall survival (OS) and local recurrence free survival (LRFS) were computed using the Kaplan-Meier method (log-rank test). Acute and chronic toxicities were assessed using the CTCAE v. 3 criteria. The actuarial 2 and 3-year OS was 66% for both and the 5-year OS was 51%. As for LRFS it was 57% at 2 and 3-year and 51% for the 5-year LRFS. Factors predictive for local control were microscopically negative margins (p = 0.022), a median tumor diameter <5 cm (p = 0.007) and pathology of liposarcoma (p = 0.021). Furthermore, patients treated for recurrent disease fared worse (p = 0.04) in local control than patients treated for primary disease. As for OS, patients treated for Grade 1 histology had a better outcome (p = 0.05). EBRT was generally well tolerated. Acute gastrointestinal (GI) Grade 1 or 2 toxicities occurred in 33% of patients and one patient had unexplained post-radiation Grade 2 fever that resolved after tumor resection. As for chronic toxicities 24% of our patients presented Grade 1 GI toxicity and one patient presented Grade 3 small bowel stenosis not clearly due to radiation toxicity. Despite the location and volume of the tumors treated, preoperative IMRT was very well tolerated in our patients with retroperitoneal sarcoma. Unfortunately local recurrences remain common and dose escalation is to be considered. PMID:23919397

  19. Preoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy for retroperitoneal sarcoma.

    PubMed

    El-Bared, Nancy; Taussky, Daniel; Mehiri, Selma; Patocskai, Erika; Roberge, David; Donath, David

    2014-06-01

    The use of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has allowed for the administration of high doses to retroperitoneal sarcomas (RSTS) while limiting toxicity to adjacent organs. The purpose of our study is to assess the outcome and toxicities of patients with RSTS treated with neo-adjuvant external beam radiation (EBRT) therapy using IMRT. This is a retrospective study of 21 patients treated with preoperative IMRT for primary or recurrent RSTS between 2005 and 2011. Overall survival (OS) and local recurrence free survival (LRFS) were computed using the Kaplan-Meier method (log-rank test). Acute and chronic toxicities were assessed using the CTCAE v. 3 criteria. The actuarial 2 and 3-year OS was 66% for both and the 5-year OS was 51%. As for LRFS it was 57% at 2 and 3-year and 51% for the 5-year LRFS. Factors predictive for local control were microscopically negative margins (p = 0.022), a median tumor diameter <15 cm (p = 0.007) and pathology of liposarcoma (p = 0.021). Furthermore, patients treated for recurrent disease fared worse (p = 0.04) in local control than patients treated for primary disease. As for OS, patients treated for Grade 1 histology had a better outcome (p 5 0.05). EBRT was generally well tolerated. Acute gastrointestinal (GI) Grade 1 or 2 toxicities occurred in 33% of patients and one patient had unexplained post-radiation Grade 2 fever that resolved after tumor resection. As for chronic toxicities 24% of our patients presented Grade 1 GI toxicity and one patient presented Grade 3 small bowel stenosis not clearly due to radiation toxicity. Despite the location and volume of the tumors treated, preoperative IMRT was very well tolerated in our patients with retroperitoneal sarcoma. Unfortunately local recurrences remain common and dose escalation is to be considered. PMID:23919397

  20. Study of silver K{alpha} and bremsstrahlung radiation from short-pulse laser-matter interactions with applications for x-ray radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Westover, B.; Beg, F. N.; MacPhee, A.; Chen, C.; Hey, D.; Maddox, B.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B.; Ma, T.

    2010-08-15

    Measurements of K{alpha} radiation yield and x-ray bremsstrahlung emission from thin-foil silver targets are presented. The targets were irradiated by a short pulse laser with intensities from 5x10{sup 16} to 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} at 40 ps. Single hit charge-coupled device detectors, differential filter-stack detectors, and a crystal spectrometer were used to investigate the angular distribution of the K{alpha} and bremsstrahlung x-rays. This study is the first to use a broadband detector to estimate the absolute numbers of K{alpha} photons and to determine K{alpha} to bremsstrahlung ratios. The relevance of this work in the context of x-ray diffraction and x-ray radiography is discussed.

  1. Solar Cycle Variations of O VI and H I Lyman Alpha Intensities in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralles, M. P.; Panasyuk, A. V.; Strachan, L.; Gardner, L. D.; Suleiman, R. M.; Smith, P. L.; Kohl, J. L.

    2000-05-01

    UVCS/SOHO measurements of O VI (103.2 and 103.7 nm) and H I Lyman alpha intensities in the solar corona have been made from 1996 to the present spanning the rising phase of cycle 23. During solar minimum the corona consisted of large coronal holes at the poles and quiescent streamers at the equator. During the ascending phase of the cycle, the corona presented high latitude streamers and finally polar streamers as the Sun approached solar maximum. Recent observations of the solar corona show the presence of coronal holes at the equator and streamers at the poles. Our observations provide descriptions of these structures over the rising phase of the solar cycle. We compare the properties of quiescent equatorial streamers which occurred at solar minimum to high latitude and polar streamers observed toward solar maximum. We also compare solar minimum polar coronal holes to equatorial coronal holes present at solar maximum. We discuss how these results are related to the plasma properties. This work is supported by NASA under Grant NAG5-7822 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, by the Italian Space Agency and by PRODEX (Swiss contribution).

  2. Interplanetary Lyman-alpha spectral profiles and intensities for both repulsive and attractive solar force fields Predicted absorption pattern by a hydrogen cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallement, R.; Bertaux, J. L.; Dalaudier, F.

    1985-09-01

    The velocity of H atoms in the vicinity of the sun can be modified through ionization by solar-wind charge exchange and solar EUV photoionization, and through solar gravity. A computer-code model was developed to study these effects in detail; the model includes line profile computation in the repulsive case when the solar Lyman-alpha radiation pressure exceeds solar gravity. The model also predicts the distributions of the intensity I(phi) and reduction factor R(phi) of the intensity when the H cell is activated to observation planes perpendicular to the sun-earth line as a function of angle phi. This particular geometry applies to the space experiment flown on the Prognoz 5 and 6 spacecraft. The basic findings of the parametric study are presented.

  3. Rock Burst Intensity Classification Based on the Radiated Energy with Damage Intensity at Jinping II Hydropower Station, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bing-Rui; Feng, Xia-Ting; Li, Qing-Peng; Luo, Ru-Zhou; Li, Shaojun

    2015-01-01

    Based on the radiated energy of 133 rock bursts monitored by a microseismic technique at the Jinping II hydropower station, in Sichuan province, China, we analyzed the advantages and disadvantages of qualitative classification methods for the rock burst intensity. Then, we investigated the characteristics, magnitude, and laws of the radiated energy, as well as the relationship between the rock burst radiated energy and intensity. Then, we selected the energy as an evaluation index for the rock burst intensity classification, and proposed a new rock burst intensity quantitative classification method, which utilized the hierarchical clustering analysis technique with the complete-linkage method. Next, we created a new set of criteria for the quantitative classification of the rock burst intensity based on radiated energy and surrounding rock damage severity. The new criteria classified the rock burst intensity into five levels: extremely intense, intense, moderate, weak, and none, and the common logarithms of the radiated energy of each level were >7 lg( E/J), >4 lg( E/J) and <7 lg( E/J), >2 lg( E/J) and <4 lg( E/J), >1 lg( E/J) and <2 lg( E/J), and <1 lg( E/J), respectively. Finally, we investigated the factors influencing the classification, and verified its feasibility and applicability via several practical rock burst examples.

  4. S-76 rotorcraft high intensity radiated fields. Test plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Jerry T.; Brooks, Steve M.; Barnes, Ken A.

    1991-07-01

    Concern over the effects of High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) on civil and military aircraft has increased over the past 10 years. The increase is due to several factors which affect the safe flight of all fixed-wing and rotorcraft. Previous flight-critical mechanical controls are being replaced by electronic computer-driven controls; manufacturers are increasing the use of composite materials in the fabrication of new aircraft; and frequency ranges and output power levels of commercial and military transmitters have significantly increased. While much HIRF susceptibility information has been collected, the data are proprietary and have not been released. To address the HIRF concerns and begin development of a releasable HIRF data base, the FAA Technical Center, has implemented a HIRF research program. As part of that program, a HIRF test was performed on a Sikorsky S-76 Helicopter. The purpose, approach, and initial findings of the S-76 HIRF test are addressed.

  5. Intense terahertz pulses from SPARC_LAB coherent radiation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgianni, F.; Bellaveglia, M.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Daniele, M.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Lupi, S.; Mostacci, A.; Petrarca, M.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.; Villa, F.

    2015-05-01

    The linac-based Terahertz source at the SPARC_LAB test facility is able to generate highly intense Terahertz broadband pulses via coherent transition radiation (CTR) from high brightness electron beams. The THz pulse duration is typically down to 100 fs RMS and can be tuned through the electron bunch duration and shaping. The measured stored energy in a single THz pulse has reached 40 μJ, which corresponds to a peak electric field of 1.6 MV/cm at the THz focus. Here we present the main features, in particular spatial and spectral distributions and energy characterizations of the SPARC_LAB THz source, which is very competitive for investigations in Condensed Matter, as well as a valid tool for electron beam longitudinal diagnostics.

  6. The solar O III spectrum. II - Longer wavelengths, line widths, and the He II Lyman alpha radiation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kastner, S. O.; Behring, W. E.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    The solar O III spectrum above 900 A is analyzed, including several visible and infrared lines which are important in nebular studies. The dependence of the line intensities on the rate of photoexcitation by He Ly-alpha is determined, and the observability of these lines in the solar spectrum is studied. The impact approximation is employed to calculate the expected line widths of the stronger solar O III lines. The photoexciting field at 304 A calculated from the observed intensities of the O III lines below 900 A (Bhatia et al., 1982) is compared with the field predicted by a recent model (Avrett et al., 1976). It is shown that additional radiation trapping must be present beyond that given by this model.

  7. Whistler mode wave intensities in the radiation belts

    SciTech Connect

    Helliwell, R.A.; Walworth, K.F.

    1996-07-01

    A critical factor in the equilibrium of the Earth{close_quote}s radiation belts is the intensity of the whistler mode waves that scatter trapped electrons into the loss cone. Whistler-mode waves include whistlers (from lightning), signals from ground based VLF stations, chorus, hiss and impulses. Those signals that are not trapped in magnetospheric ducts are observed with rockets or satellites, both inside and outside the plasmapause. Ducted signals, occurring mostly inside the plasmapause, have been difficult to observe {ital in} {ital situ}, but are commonly observed at ground stations from which equatorial wave intensities can be estimated only crudely. Models of the process of coherent wave growth based on interaction with gyro resonant counter streaming electrons in an interaction region near the equator, fall into two classes depending on whether the wave field is less or greater than that required for trapping of resonant electrons in the wave{close_quote}s potential wall. Data on the estimated {ital B}{sub in} and {ital B}{sub out} of ducted signals at the input and output of the interaction region, respectively, together with associated total growth (20{endash}35 dB) appear to support the small-signal model. Since the ratios between predictions of the small-signal and large-signal models are of the order of 20 dB, it is critically important to test both models with measurements of appropriate wave fields and associated particle fluxes. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Reshapable physical modulator for intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tong; Shikhaliev, Polad M; Al-Ghazi, Muthana; Molloi, Sabee

    2002-10-01

    A new method of generating beam intensity modulation filters for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is presented. The modulator was based on a reshapable material, which is not compressible but can be deformed under pressure. A two-dimensional (2D) piston array was used to repeatedly shape the attenuating material. The material is a mixture of tungsten powder and a silicon-based binder. The linear attenuation coefficient of the material was measured to be 0.409 cm(-1) for a 6 MV x-ray beam. The maximum thickness of the physical modulator is 10.2 cm, allowing a transmission of 1.5%. A 16 x 16 square piston array was used to generate a depth pattern in the deformable attenuating material. Each piston has a cross section of 6.37 x 6.37 mm2. The modulator was placed 65 cm from the radiation source of the linear accelerator in the position of the shielding tray. At this position, each piston projects to a 1.0 x 1.0 cm2 area at the isocenter, giving a treatment field of 16 x 16 cm2. The percent depth dose curve and output factor measurement show a slight beam hardening and a 1%-4% increase in scatter fraction when 2.2-4.4 cm uniform thickness filters are in the beam. The surface dose was decreased with the filter in the beam. Ion chamber and verification films were used to verify the entrance dose. The measured absolute and relative doses were compared with the calculated dose. The agreement of measurements and calculations is within 3%. In order to verify the spatial modulation of dose, 1-D dose profiles were obtained using dose calculations. Calculated and measured profiles were compared. The 20%-80% penumbra of the modulator was measured to be 5.5-10 mm. The results show that a physical modulator formed using a 16 x 16 piston array and a deformable attenuation material can provide intensity modulation for IMRT comparable with those provided by currently available commercial MLC techniques. PMID:12408295

  9. Nanodosimetry and nanodosimetric-based models of radiation action for radon alpha particles

    SciTech Connect

    Zaider, M.

    1992-01-01

    We report on a theory for describing the biological effects of ionizing radiation in particular radon [alpha] particles. Behind this approach is the recognition that biological effects such as chromosome aberrations, cellular transformation, cellular inactivation, etc, are the result of a hierarchic sequence of radiation effects. We indicate how to treat each of the individual processes in this sequence, and also how to relate one effect to the hierarchically superior one.

  10. Survey of resident education in intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Malik, Renuka; Oh, Julia L; Roeske, John C; Mundt, Arno J

    2005-06-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been gaining increasing popularity among practicing physicians in the U.S., but the extent to which radiation oncology residents are taught the principles of this technology and are trained to use IMRT remains unknown. In this paper, we assessed the current level of resident education in IMRT in the United States. Chief residents at all 77 accredited radiation oncology programs were sent a 13-question survey addressing formal didactics and hands-on experience in IMRT. The survey assessed the frequency, subject, and format of IMRT didactics. Questions also addressed the number of IMRT patients and anatomical sites treated, resident involvement in the IMRT process, and the intent of IMRT use. Finally, residents were asked for their opinions on their IMRT education. Sixty-one surveys (79%) were completed. Overall, forty-three respondents (71%) reported receiving formal IMRT didactics, with nearly one-third reporting extensive didactics (> or = 3 lectures/seminars et cetera per year). The most common didactic formats were lectures (95%) and journal clubs (63%), most commonly supervised by physicists (98%). Involvement by physicians and radiobiologists were reported by 63% and 7% of respondents, respectively. Overall, 87% of respondents had hands-on IMRT training, with nearly one-half having treated > 25 patients. The most common sites treated were head and neck (94%) and prostate (81%). Involvement in all aspects of the IMRT process was common, particularly target and tissue delineation (98%) and plan evaluation (93%). Most respondents (79%) with hands-on experience reported receiving formal didactics. However, nearly one-third received no or only minimal formal didactics. The percentage of respondents desiring increased IMRT didactics and hands-on experience were 70% and 47%, respectively. Our results suggest that the great majority of radiation oncology residents in the United States are currently exposed to didactics

  11. American Society of Radiation Oncology recommendations for documenting intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatments.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Timothy; Das, Rupak; Low, Daniel; Yin, Fang-Fang; Balter, James; Palta, Jatinder; Eifel, Patricia

    2009-08-01

    Despite the widespread use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for approximately a decade, a lack of adequate guidelines for documenting these treatments persists. Proper IMRT treatment documentation is necessary for accurate reconstruction of prior treatments when a patient presents with a marginal recurrence. This is especially crucial when the follow-up care is managed at a second treatment facility not involved in the initial IMRT treatment. To address this issue, an American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) workgroup within the American ASTRO Radiation Physics Committee was formed at the request of the ASTRO Research Council to develop a set of recommendations for documenting IMRT treatments. This document provides a set of comprehensive recommendations for documenting IMRT treatments, as well as image-guidance procedures, with example forms provided. PMID:19616738

  12. American Society of Radiation Oncology Recommendations for Documenting Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Timothy Das, Rupak; Low, Daniel; Yin Fangfang; Balter, James; Palta, Jatinder; Eifel, Patricia

    2009-08-01

    Despite the widespread use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for approximately a decade, a lack of adequate guidelines for documenting these treatments persists. Proper IMRT treatment documentation is necessary for accurate reconstruction of prior treatments when a patient presents with a marginal recurrence. This is especially crucial when the follow-up care is managed at a second treatment facility not involved in the initial IMRT treatment. To address this issue, an American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) workgroup within the American ASTRO Radiation Physics Committee was formed at the request of the ASTRO Research Council to develop a set of recommendations for documenting IMRT treatments. This document provides a set of comprehensive recommendations for documenting IMRT treatments, as well as image-guidance procedures, with example forms provided.

  13. Precise Determination of the Intensity of 226Ra Alpha Decay to the 186 keV Excited State

    SciTech Connect

    S.P. LaMont; R.J. Gehrke; S.E. Glover; R.H. Filby

    2001-04-01

    There is a significant discrepancy in the reported values for the emission probability of the 186 keV gamma-ray resulting from the alpha decay of 226 Ra to 186 keV excited state of 222 Rn. Published values fall in the range of 3.28 to 3.59 gamma-rays per 100 alpha-decays. An interesting observation is that the lower value, 3.28, is based on measuring the 186 keV gamma-ray intensity relative to the 226 Ra alpha-branch to the 186 keV level. The higher values, which are close to 3.59, are based on measuring the gamma-ray intensity from mass standards of 226 Ra that are traceable to the mass standards prepared by HÓNIGSCHMID in the early 1930''s. This discrepancy was resolved in this work by carefully measuring the 226 Ra alpha-branch intensities, then applying the theoretical E2 multipolarity internal conversion coefficient of 0.692±0.007 to calculate the 186 keV gamma-ray emission probability. The measured value for the alpha branch to the 186 keV excited state was (6.16±0.03)%, which gives a 186 keV gamma-ray emission probability of (3.64±0.04)%. This value is in excellent agreement with the most recently reported 186 keV gamma-ray emission probabilities determined using 226 Ra mass standards.

  14. Ultrasound-based guidance of intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, Albert Y.C. . E-mail: afung@unmc.edu; Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Djajaputra, David; Nehru, Ramasamy M.; Enke, Charles A.

    2006-04-01

    In ultrasound-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of prostate cancer, ultrasound imaging ascertains the anatomical position of patients during x-ray therapy delivery. The ultrasound transducers are made of piezoelectric ceramics. The same crystal is used for both ultrasound production and reception. Three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound devices capture and correlate series of 2-dimensional (2D) B-mode images. The transducers are often arranged in a convex array for focusing. Lower frequency reaches greater depth, but results in low resolution. For clear image, some gel is usually applied between the probe and the skin contact surface. For prostate positioning, axial and sagittal scans are performed, and the volume contours from computed tomography (CT) planning are superimposed on the ultrasound images obtained before radiation delivery at the linear accelerator. The planning volumes are then overlaid on the ultrasound images and adjusted until they match. The computer automatically deduces the offset necessary to move the patient so that the treatment area is in the correct location. The couch is translated as needed. The currently available commercial equipment can attain a positional accuracy of 1-2 mm. Commercial manufacturer designs differ in the detection of probe coordinates relative to the isocenter. Some use a position-sensing robotic arm, while others have infrared light-emitting diodes or pattern-recognition software with charge-couple-device cameras. Commissioning includes testing of image quality and positional accuracy. Ultrasound is mainly used in prostate positioning. Data for 7825 daily fractions of 234 prostate patients indicated average 3D inter-fractional displacement of about 7.8 mm. There was no perceivable trend of shift over time. Scatter plots showed slight prevalence toward superior-posterior directions. Uncertainties of ultrasound guidance included tissue inhomogeneities, speckle noise, probe pressure, and inter

  15. Dosimetrically Triggered Adaptive Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Karen; Stewart, James; Kelly, Valerie; Xie, Jason; Brock, Kristy K.; Moseley, Joanne; Cho, Young-Bin; Fyles, Anthony; Lundin, Anna; Rehbinder, Henrik; Löf, Johan; Jaffray, David A.; Milosevic, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: The widespread use of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for cervical cancer has been limited by internal target and normal tissue motion. Such motion increases the risk of underdosing the target, especially as planning margins are reduced in an effort to reduce toxicity. This study explored 2 adaptive strategies to mitigate this risk and proposes a new, automated method that minimizes replanning workload. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with cervical cancer participated in a prospective clinical study and underwent pretreatment and weekly magnetic resonance (MR) scans over a 5-week course of daily external beam radiation therapy. Target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) were contoured on each of the scans. Deformable image registration was used to model the accumulated dose (the real dose delivered to the target and OARs) for 2 adaptive replanning scenarios that assumed a very small PTV margin of only 3 mm to account for setup and internal interfractional motion: (1) a preprogrammed, anatomy-driven midtreatment replan (A-IMRT); and (2) a dosimetry-triggered replan driven by target dose accumulation over time (D-IMRT). Results: Across all 30 patients, clinically relevant target dose thresholds failed for 8 patients (27%) if 3-mm margins were used without replanning. A-IMRT failed in only 3 patients and also yielded an additional small reduction in OAR doses at the cost of 30 replans. D-IMRT assured adequate target coverage in all patients, with only 23 replans in 16 patients. Conclusions: A novel, dosimetry-triggered adaptive IMRT strategy for patients with cervical cancer can minimize the risk of target underdosing in the setting of very small margins and substantial interfractional motion while minimizing programmatic workload and cost.

  16. Mapping of laser diode radiation intensity by atomic-force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, P. A.; Dunaevskii, M. S.; Slipchenko, S. O.; Podoskin, A. A.; Tarasov, I. S.

    2015-09-01

    The distribution of the intensity of laser diode radiation has been studied using an original method based on atomic-force microscopy (AFM). It is shown that the laser radiation intensity in both the near field and transition zone of a high-power semiconductor laser under room-temperature conditions can be mapped by AFM at a subwavelength resolution. The obtained patterns of radiation intensity distribution agree with the data of modeling and the results of near-field optical microscopy measurements.

  17. Chemical Environment Effects on K[beta]/K[alpha] Intensity Ratio: An X-Ray Fluorescence Experiment on Periodic Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durham, Chaney R.; Chase, Jeffery M.; Nivens, Delana A.; Baird, William H.; Padgett, Clifford W.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) data from an energy-dispersive XRF instrument were used to investigate the chlorine K[alpha] and K[beta] peaks in several group 1 salts. The ratio of the peak intensity is sensitive to the local chemical environment of the chlorine atoms studied in this experiment and it shows a periodic trend for these salts. (Contains 1…

  18. Alpha-2 agonists for sedation of mechanically ventilated adults in intensive care units: a systematic review.

    PubMed Central

    Cruickshank, Moira; Henderson, Lorna; MacLennan, Graeme; Fraser, Cynthia; Campbell, Marion; Blackwood, Bronagh; Gordon, Anthony; Brazzelli, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Care of critically ill patients in intensive care units (ICUs) often requires potentially invasive or uncomfortable procedures, such as mechanical ventilation (MV). Sedation can alleviate pain and discomfort, provide protection from stressful or harmful events, prevent anxiety and promote sleep. Various sedative agents are available for use in ICUs. In the UK, the most commonly used sedatives are propofol (Diprivan(®), AstraZeneca), benzodiazepines [e.g. midazolam (Hypnovel(®), Roche) and lorazepam (Ativan(®), Pfizer)] and alpha-2 adrenergic receptor agonists [e.g. dexmedetomidine (Dexdor(®), Orion Corporation) and clonidine (Catapres(®), Boehringer Ingelheim)]. Sedative agents vary in onset/duration of effects and in their side effects. The pattern of sedation of alpha-2 agonists is quite different from that of other sedatives in that patients can be aroused readily and their cognitive performance on psychometric tests is usually preserved. Moreover, respiratory depression is less frequent after alpha-2 agonists than after other sedative agents. OBJECTIVES To conduct a systematic review to evaluate the comparative effects of alpha-2 agonists (dexmedetomidine and clonidine) and propofol or benzodiazepines (midazolam and lorazepam) in mechanically ventilated adults admitted to ICUs. DATA SOURCES We searched major electronic databases (e.g. MEDLINE without revisions, MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) from 1999 to 2014. METHODS Evidence was considered from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing dexmedetomidine with clonidine or dexmedetomidine or clonidine with propofol or benzodiazepines such as midazolam, lorazepam and diazepam (Diazemuls(®), Actavis UK Limited). Primary outcomes included mortality, duration of MV, length of ICU stay and adverse events. One reviewer extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of included trials. A second reviewer cross-checked all the

  19. Alpha particle response study of polycrstalline diamond radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Amit; Topkar, Anita

    2016-05-01

    Chemical vapor deposition has opened the possibility to grow high purity synthetic diamond at relatively low cost. This has opened up uses of diamond based detectors for wide range of applications. These detectors are most suitable for harsh environments where standard semiconductor detectors cannot work. In this paper, we present the fabrication details and performance study of polycrystalline diamond based radiation detector. Effect of different operating parameters such as bias voltage and shaping time for charge collection on the performance of detector has been studied.

  20. S-76 high intensity radiated fields, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Jerry

    1993-10-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Technical Center sponsored a series of High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) test on a Sikorsky S-76 rotorcraft. The project was conducted to evaluate the practicality of performing aircraft level HIRF tests, determine the effects of HIRF on a specific rotorcraft with the potential to obtain information on rotorcraft in general, and evaluate the effects of exposure to real world HIRF emitters. HIRF ground and flight tests were conducted to achieve the objective of the project. Site calibration (SCAL) measurements were made in the test area to determine the levels at which the S-76 would be irradiated when placed in the test area. Ground tests consisted of Low Level Swept Coupling (LLSC) and Low Level Swept Fields (LLSF) tests. The flight tests were flown directly into the main beam of a variety of pulsed and continuous wave (CW) transmitters including the Over the Horizon Back Scatter (OTHB), PAVE PAWS, ASR-9, FPS-65, and FPS-16 radars. Results of the S-76 tests added credibility to the existence of HIRF as a flight safety hazard. In the evaluation of the emitters, the flight tests showed repeatable instances where exposure resulted in instrumentation disruptions. It should be noted that all the observed disruptions were of a non-critical nature.

  1. S-76 high intensity radiated fields, volume 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Jerry

    1993-10-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Technical Center sponsored a series of High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) tests on a Sikorsky S-76 rotorcraft. The project was conducted to evaluate the practically of performing aircraft level HIRF tests, determine the effects of HIRF on a specific rotorcraft with the potential to obtain information on rotorcraft in general, and evaluate the effects of exposure to 'real world' HIRF emitters. HIRF ground and flight tests were conducted to achieve the objective of the project. Site calibration (SCAL) measurements were made in the test area to determine the levels at which the S-76 would be irradiated when placed in the test area. Ground tests consisted of Low Level Swept Coupling (LLSC) and Low Level Swept Fields (LLSF) tests. The flight tests were flown directly into the main beam of a variety of pulsed and continuous wave (CW) transmitters including the Over the Horizon Back Scatter (OTHB), PAVE PAWS, ASR-9, FPS-65, and FPS-16 radars. Results of the S-76 tests added credibility to the existence of HIRF as a flight safety hazard. In the evaluation of the emitters, the flight tests showed repeatable instances where exposure resulted in instrumentation disruptions. It should however be noted that all the observed disruptions were of a non-critical nature.

  2. S-76 high intensity radiated fields, volume 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Jerry

    1993-10-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Technical Center sponsored a series of High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) test on a Sikorsky S-76 rotorcraft. The project was conducted to evaluate the practically of performing aircraft level HIRF tests, determine the effects of HIRF on a specific rotorcraft with the potential to obtain information on rotorcraft in general, and evaluate the effects of exposure to real world HIRF emitters. HIRF ground and flight tests were conducted to achieve the objective of the project. Site calibration (SCAL) measurements were made in the test area to determine the levels at which the S-76 would be irradiated when placed in the test area. Ground tests consisted of Low Level Swept Coupling (LLSC) and Low Level Swept Fields (LLSF) tests. The flight tests were flown directly into the main beam of a variety of pulsed and continuous wave (CW) transmitters including the Over the Horizon Back Scatter (OTHB), PAVE PAWS, ASR-9, FPS-65, and FPS-16 radars. Results of the S-76 tests added credibility to the existence of HIRF as a flight safety hazard. In the evaluation of the emitters, the flight tests showed repeatable instances where exposure resulted in instrumentation disruptions. It should be noted that all the observed disruptions were of a non-critical nature.

  3. New evaluation of the alpha and gamma emission intensities in the decay of (244)Cm.

    PubMed

    Badikov, Sergey A; Chechev, Valery P

    2016-03-01

    A method for self-consistent evaluation of the absolute emission probabilities for particles and photons accompanying radionuclide decays was applied to the evaluation of the (244)Cm alpha decay data. The absolute emission probabilities evaluated by the method meet the accurate balance relationships. The self-consistency of the results was reached through an iterative scheme of calculations, using the DDEP recommended probabilities for alpha transitions to the five (240)Pu highly excited levels as an initial approximation. PMID:26712410

  4. Low-intensity contraction activates the alpha1-isoform of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Taro; Tanaka, Satsuki; Ebihara, Ken; Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Hosoda, Kiminori; Sato, Kenji; Fushiki, Tohru; Nakao, Kazuwa; Hayashi, Tatsuya

    2006-03-01

    Skeletal muscle expresses two catalytic subunits, alpha1 and alpha2, of the 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which has been implicated in contraction-stimulated glucose transport and fatty acid oxidation. Muscle contraction activates the alpha2-containing AMPK complex (AMPKalpha2), but this activation may occur with or without activation of the alpha1-containing AMPK complex (AMPKalpha1), suggesting that AMPKalpha2 is the major isoform responsible for contraction-induced metabolic events in skeletal muscle. We report for the first time that AMPKalpha1, but not AMPKalpha2, can be activated in contracting skeletal muscle. Rat epitrochlearis muscles were isolated and incubated in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer containing pyruvate. In muscles stimulated to contract at a frequency of 1 and 2 Hz during the last 2 min of incubation, AMPKalpha1 activity increased twofold and AMPKalpha2 activity remained unchanged. Muscle stimulation did not change the muscle AMP concentration or the AMP-to-ATP ratio. AMPK activation was associated with increased phosphorylation of Thr(172) of the alpha-subunit, the primary activation site. Muscle stimulation increased the phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), a downstream target of AMPK, and the rate of 3-O-methyl-d-glucose transport. In contrast, increasing the frequency (>or=5 Hz) or duration (>or=5 min) of contraction activated AMPKalpha1 and AMPKalpha2 and increased AMP concentration and the AMP/ATP ratio. These results suggest that 1) AMPKalpha1 is the predominant isoform activated by AMP-independent phosphorylation in low-intensity contracting muscle, 2) AMPKalpha2 is activated by an AMP-dependent mechanism in high-intensity contracting muscle, and 3) activation of each isoform enhances glucose transport and ACC phosphorylation in skeletal muscle. PMID:16249251

  5. Remote diagnostic of the hydrogen wall through measurements of the backscattered solar Lyman alpha radiation by Voyager 1/UVS in 1993-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katushkina, O. A.; Quémerais, E.; Izmodenov, V. V.; Alexashov, D. B.; Sandel, B. R.

    2016-01-01

    We perform a new analysis of the Lyman alpha data obtained by Voyager 1 during the spatial scans in 1993-2003 while Voyager 1 was at 53-88 AU from the Sun. These data are the important source of information on the hydrogen distribution in the outer heliosphere. A sophisticated global kinetic-MHD model of the heliospheric interface and a radiative transfer model are used for the analysis. It is shown for the first time that the ratio of the Lyman alpha intensities detected in the downwind and upwind lines of sight in the outer heliosphere is sensitive to the configuration (peak value and location) of the hydrogen wall. The hydrogen wall is a source of Doppler-shifted backscattered Lyman alpha photons, so it can be seen from inside the heliosphere. Therefore, Voyager 1/ultraviolet spectrometer (UVS) Lyman alpha data can be used for remote sensing of the hydrogen wall. We show that our current global model of the outer heliosphere, which is consistent with many other measurements including Lyman alpha data from both Voyager 1 and 2 in 1980-1993, provides a systematically larger downwind to upwind intensity ratio compared with the UVS data in 1993-2003. In order to decrease the ratio, a higher and/or closer hydrogen wall is needed.

  6. Influence of reactor radiation on {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in electrically insulating ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Astapova, E.S.; Kostyukov, N.S.

    1995-11-01

    Under the action of radiation, structural changes occur in ceramic materials; these changes influence its mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Neutron resistance has the strongest effect, inducing a number of complex processes. Most ceramic materials consist of one or more crystalline phases cemented by glass phases. Neutron radiation produces opposite density changes in the crystalline and glass phase. The conflict between these processes in the ceramic leads to increase in radiation resistance, which is the essence of the compensation effect. Thus, on irradiation, the density of crystalline quartz in the free state decreases by 15%, while the density of quartz glass increase by 3%, with corresponding changes in the volume of the phases. In porcelain, such changes facilitate an increase in strength. The radiational strength of ceramic materials was investigated - in particular, the structural changes in the irradiation of the ceramic by fast neutrons in a flux of no more than 2{center_dot}10{sup 20} cm{sup -2}. The main effects noticed after irradiation of the ceramic by fast distance and decrease in intensity of the diffractional maxima in the crystalline phases of the ceramic, for example, in the {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase of the ceramics microlite, GB-7, ultraporcelain, and 22KhS. In the initial state, GB-7 ceramic has a homogeneous, analogous, but the {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystals are smaller. According to chemical analysis, the mass fraction of aluminum oxide in GB-7 and 22KhS is 97.09% and 95.14%, respectively.

  7. The role of protein kinase C alpha translocation in radiation-induced bystander effect

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zihui; Xu, An; Wu, Lijun; Hei, Tom K.; Hong, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a well known human carcinogen. Evidence accumulated over the past decade suggested that extranuclear/extracellular targets and events may also play a critical role in modulating biological responses to ionizing radiation. However, the underlying mechanism(s) of radiation-induced bystander effect is still unclear. In the current study, AL cells were irradiated with alpha particles and responses of bystander cells were investigated. We found out that in bystander AL cells, protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) translocated from cytosol to membrane fraction. Pre-treatment of cells with PKC translocation inhibitor chelerythrine chloride suppressed the induced extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) activity and the increased cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) expression as well as the mutagenic effect in bystander cells. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) was elevated in directly irradiated but not bystander cells; while TNFα receptor 1 (TNFR1) increased in the membrane fraction of bystander cells. Further analysis revealed that PKC activation caused accelerated internalization and recycling of TNFR1. Our data suggested that PKCα translocation may occur as an early event in radiation-induced bystander responses and mediate TNFα-induced signaling pathways that lead to the activation of ERK and up-regulation of COX-2. PMID:27165942

  8. Radiation Transport of Heliospheric Lyman-alpha from Combined Cassini and Voyager Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pryor, W.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Sandel, B.; Forrester, T.; Quemerais, E.; Moebius, E.; Esposito, L.; Stewart, I.; McClintock, W.; Jouchoux, A.; Colwell, J.; Izmodenov, V.; Malama, Y.; Shemansky, D.; Ajello, J.; Hansen, C.; Bzowski, M.

    2008-01-01

    Heliospheric neutral hydrogen scatters solar Lyman-alpha radiation from the Sun with '27-day' intensity modulations observed near Earth due to the Sun's rotation combined with Earth's orbital motion. These modulations are increasingly damped in amplitude at larger distances from the Sun due to multiple scattering in the heliosphere, providing a diagnostic of the interplanetary neutral hydrogen density independent of instrument calibration. This paper presents Cassini data from 2003-2004 obtained downwind near Saturn at approximately 10 AU that at times show undamped '27-day' waves in good agreement with the single-scattering models of Pryor et al., 1992. Simultaneous Voyager 1 data from 2003- 2004 obtained upwind at a distance of 88.8-92.6 AU from the Sun show waves damped by a factor of -0.21. The observed degree of damping is interpreted in terms of Monte Carlo multiple-scattering calculations (e.g., Keller et al., 1981) applied to two heliospheric hydrogen two-shock density distributions (discussed in Gangopadhyay et al., 2006) calculated in the frame of the Baranov-Malama model of the solar wind interaction with the two-component (neutral hydrogen and plasma) interstellar wind (Baranov and Malama 1993, Izmodenov et al., 2001, Baranov and Izmodenov, 2006). We conclude that multiple scattering is definitely occurring in the outer heliosphere. Both models compare favorably to the data, using heliospheric neutral H densities at the termination shock of 0.085 cm(exp -3) and 0.095 cm(exp -3). This work generally agrees with earlier discussions of Voyager data in Quemerais et al., 1996 showing the importance of multiple scattering but is based on Voyager data obtained at larger distances from the Sun (with larger damping) simultaneously with Cassini data obtained closer to the Sun.

  9. Coupling the emission of ionizing radiation and Lyman alpha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Matthew

    2013-10-01

    The class of objects that reionized intergalactic hydrogen remains an observational and theoretical problem that is in contention for being the most prominent puzzle piece in contemporary astrophysics. The current consensus - determined almost entirely by ruling out bright active galaxies - is that the process was possibly begun and almost certainly finished by faint, lower-mass galaxies forming their early generations of stars. Recent observations of z 3 galaxies may even have identified the analog populations.However understanding how the emitted ionizing power of galaxies is causally related to their {robustly determined} physical properties is not a study that can be performed at high-z: neither the spatial information nor the standard multi-wavelength diagnostics are available. Moreover, on a case-by-case basis, the intervening IGM absorption is impossible to determine. These considerations have spawned a number of detailed studies with UV space telescopes, the synthesis of which however is that a characteristic population of Lyman continuum {LyC} emitting objects has not yet been identified. We show in this proposal that we have identified a characteristic trait in galaxy spectra that is highly indicative of LyC emission, by combining {a} high-z phenomenological studies, {b} new high-resolution UV spectra of local galaxies, and {c} sophisticated models of radiation transport. Believing that we have determined the signature, we propose to test the new hypothesis with deep spectroscopic observations with HST/COS under the Cycle 21 UV initiative.

  10. Intense attosecond radiation from an X-ray FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Zholents, Alexander A.; Fawley, William M.

    2003-11-21

    We propose the use of a ultra-relativistic electron beam interacting with a few-cycle, intense laser pulse and an intense pulse of the coherent x-rays to produce a multi-MW intensity, x-ray pulses {approx} 100 attoseconds in duration. Due to a naturally-occurring frequency chirp, these pulses can be further temporally compressed.

  11. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Dose Painting to Treat Rhabdomyosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Joanna C.; Dharmarajan, Kavita V.; Wexler, Leonard H.; La Quaglia, Michael P.; Happersett, Laura; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To examine local control and patterns of failure in rhabdomyosarcoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (RT) with dose painting (DP-IMRT). Patients and Methods: A total of 41 patients underwent DP-IMRT with chemotherapy for definitive treatment. Nineteen also underwent surgery with or without intraoperative RT. Fifty-six percent had alveolar histologic features. The median interval from beginning chemotherapy to RT was 17 weeks (range, 4-25). Very young children who underwent second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT received reduced doses of 24-36 Gy in 1.4-1.8-Gy fractions. Young adults received 50.4 Gy to the primary tumor and lower doses of 36 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to at-risk lymph node chains. Results: With 22 months of median follow-up, the actuarial local control rate was 90%. Patients aged {<=}7 years who received reduced overall and fractional doses had 100% local control, and young adults had 79% (P=.07) local control. Three local failures were identified in young adults whose primary target volumes had received 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions. Conclusions: DP-IMRT with lower fractional and cumulative doses is feasible for very young children after second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT. DP-IMRT is also feasible in adolescents and young adults with aggressive disease who would benefit from prophylactic RT to high-risk lymph node chains, although dose escalation might be warranted for improved local control. With limited follow-up, it appears that DP-IMRT produces local control rates comparable to those of sequential IMRT in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma.

  12. Gamma scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    We give a progress report for the work which has been carried out in the last three years with DOE support. A facility for high-intensity Moessbauer scattering is now fully operational at the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) as well as a facility at Purdue, using special isotopes produced at MURR. High precision, fundamental Moessbauer effect studies have been carried out using scattering to filter the unwanted radiation. These have led to a new Fourier transform method for describing Moessbauer effect (ME) lineshape and a direct method of fitting ME data to the convolution integral. These methods allow complete correction for source resonance self absorption (SRSA) and the accurate representation of interference effects that add an asymmetric component to the ME lines. We have begun applying these techniques to attenuated ME sources whose central peak has been attenuated by stationary resonant absorbers, to more precisely determine interference parameters and line-shape behavior in the resonance asymptotic region. This analysis is important to both the fundamental ME studies and to scattering studies for which a deconvolution is essential for extracting the correct recoilless fractions and interference parameters. A number of scattering studies have been successfully carried out including a study of the thermal diffuse scattering in Si, which led to an analysis of the resolution function for gamma-ray scattering. Also studied was the anharmonic motion in Na and the satellite reflection Debye-Waller factor in TaS{sub 2}, which indicate phason rather than phonon behavior. We have begun quasielastic diffusion studies in viscous liquids and current results are summarized. These advances, coupled to our improvements in MIcrofoil Conversion Electron spectroscopy lay the foundation for the proposed research outlined in this request for a three-year renewal of DOE support.

  13. Inelastic scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yelon, W.B.; Schupp, G.

    1990-10-01

    We give a progress report for the work which has been carried out in the last three years with DOE support. A facility for high-intensity Moessbauer scattering is now fully operational at the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) as well as facility at Purdue, using special isotopes produced at MURR. High precision, fundamental Moessbauer effect studies have been carried out using scattering to filter the unwanted radiation. These have led to a new Fourier transform method for describing Moessbauer effect (ME) lineshape and a direct method of fitting ME data to the convolution integral. These methods allow complete correction for source resonance self absorption (SRSA) and the accurate representation of interference effects that add an asymmetric component to the ME lines. We have begun applying these techniques to attenuated ME sources whose central peak has been attenuated by stationary resonant absorbers, to more precisely determine interference parameters and line-shape behavior in the resonance asymptotic region. This analysis is important to both the fundamental ME studies and to scattering studies for which a deconvolution is essential for extracting the correct recoilless fractions and interference parameters. A number of scattering studies have been successfully carried out including a study of the thermal diffuse scattering in Si, which led to an analysis of the resolution function for gamma-ray scattering. Also studied was the anharmonic motion in Na and the satellite reflection Debye-Waller factor in TaS{sub 2}, which indicate phason rather than phonon behavior. We have begun quasielastic diffusion studies in viscous liquids and current results are summarized. These advances, coupled to our improvements in MIcrofoil Conversion Electron spectroscopy lay the foundation for the proposed research outlined in this request for a three-year renewal of DOE support.

  14. Radiation efficacy and biological risk from whole-breast irradiation via intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desantis, David M.

    Radiotherapy is an established modality for women with breast cancer. During the delivery of external beam radiation to the breast, leakage, scattered x-rays from the patient and the linear accelerator also expose healthy tissues and organs outside of the breast, thereby increasing the patient's whole-body dose, which then increases the chance of developing a secondary, radiation-induced cancer. Generally, there are three IntensityModulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) delivery techniques from a conventional linear accelerator; forward planned (FMLC), inverse planned 'sliding window' (DMLC), and inverse planned 'step-and-shoot' (SMLC). The goal of this study was to determine which of these three techniques delivers an optimal dose to the breast with the least chance of causing a fatal, secondary, radiation-induced cancer. A conventional, non-IMRT, 'Wedge' plan also was compared. Computerized Tomography (CT) data sets for both a large and small sized patient were used in this study. With Varian's Eclipse AAA algorithm, the organ doses specified in the revised ICRP 60 publication were used to calculate the whole-body dose. Also, an anthropomorphic phantom was irradiated with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) at each organ site for measured doses. The risk coefficient from the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII report of 4.69 x 10-2 deaths per Gy was used to convert whole-body dose to risk of a fatal, secondary, radiation-induced cancer. The FMLC IMRT delivered superior tumor coverage over the 3D conventional plan and the inverse DMLC or SMLC treatment plans delivered clinically equivalent tumor coverage. However, the FMLC plan had the least likelihood of inadvertently causing a fatal, secondary, radiation-induced cancer compared to the inverse DMLC, SMLC, and Wedge plans.

  15. Fluorescence Quenching of Alpha-Fetoprotein by Gold Nanoparticles: Effect of Dielectric Shell on Non-Radiative Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian; Li, Jian-Jun; Wang, A.-Qing; Chen, Yu; Zhao, Jun-Wu

    2010-09-01

    Fluorescence quenching spectrometry was applied to study the interactions between gold colloidal nanoparticles and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Experimental results show that the gold nanoparticles can quench the fluorescence emission of adsorbed AFP effectively. Furthermore, the intensity of fluorescence emission peak decreases monotonously with the increasing gold nanoparticles content. A mechanism based on surface plasmon resonance-induced non-radiative decay was investigated to illuminate the effect of a dielectric shell on the fluorescence quenching ability of gold nanoparticles. The calculation results show that the increasing dielectric shell thickness may improve the monochromaticity of fluorescence quenching. However, high energy transfer efficiency can be obtained within a wide wavelength band by coating a thinner dielectric shell.

  16. Bile Acid Malabsorption After Pelvic and Prostate Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: An Uncommon but Treatable Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Victoria; Benton, Barbara; Sohaib, Aslam; Dearnaley, David; Andreyev, H. Jervoise N.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a significant therapeutic advance in prostate cancer, allowing increased tumor dose delivery and increased sparing of normal tissues. IMRT planning uses strict dose constraints to nearby organs to limit toxicity. Bile acid malabsorption (BAM) is a treatable disorder of the terminal ileum (TI) that presents with symptoms similar to radiation therapy toxicity. It has not been described in patients receiving RT for prostate cancer in the contemporary era. We describe new-onset BAM in men after IMRT for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Diagnosis of new-onset BAM was established after typical symptoms developed, selenium-75 homocholic acid taurine (SeHCAT) scanning showed 7-day retention of <15%, and patients' symptoms unequivocally responded to a bile acid sequestrant. The TI was identified on the original radiation therapy plan, and the radiation dose delivered was calculated and compared with accepted dose-volume constraints. Results: Five of 423 men treated in a prospective series of high-dose prostate and pelvic IMRT were identified with new onset BAM (median age, 65 years old). All reported having normal bowel habits before RT. The volume of TI ranged from 26-141 cc. The radiation dose received by the TI varied between 11.4 Gy and 62.1 Gy (uncorrected). Three of 5 patients had TI treated in excess of 45 Gy (equivalent dose calculated in 2-Gy fractions, using an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 3) with volumes ranging from 1.6 cc-49.0 cc. One patient had mild BAM (SeHCAT retention, 10%-15%), 2 had moderate BAM (SeHCAT retention, 5%-10%), and 2 had severe BAM (SeHCAT retention, <5%). The 3 patients whose TI received {>=}45 Gy developed moderate to severe BAM, whereas those whose TI received <45 Gy had only mild to moderate BAM. Conclusions: Radiation delivered to the TI during IMRT may cause BAM. Identification of the TI from unenhanced RT planning computed tomography scans is difficult and may impede accurate

  17. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 25.1317 Section 25.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 25.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  18. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 25.1317 Section 25.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 25.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  19. 14 CFR 27.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 27.1317 Section 27.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 27.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  20. 14 CFR 27.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 27.1317 Section 27.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 27.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  1. 14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317 Section 29.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 29.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  2. 14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317 Section 29.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 29.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  3. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 25.1317 Section 25.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 25.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  4. 14 CFR 27.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 27.1317 Section 27.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 27.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  5. 14 CFR 27.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 27.1317 Section 27.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 27.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  6. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 25.1317 Section 25.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 25.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  7. 14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317 Section 29.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 29.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  8. 14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317 Section 29.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 29.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  9. 14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317 Section 29.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 29.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  10. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 25.1317 Section 25.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 25.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  11. 14 CFR 27.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 27.1317 Section 27.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 27.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  12. QUANTIFICATION OF ACTINIDE ALPHA-RADIATION DAMAGE IN MINERALS AND CERAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Farnan, Ian E.; Cho, Herman M.; Weber, William J.

    2007-01-11

    There are large amounts of heavy alpha-emitters in nuclear waste and nuclear materials inventories stored in various sites around the world. These include plutonium and minor actinides such as americium and curium. In preparation for geological disposal there is a consensus that actinides that have been separated from spent nuclear fuel should be immobilised within mineral-based ceramics rather than glass. Over the long-term, the alpha-decay taking place in these ceramics will severely disrupt their crystalline structure and reduce their durability. A fundamental property in predicting cumulative radiation damage is the number of atoms permanently displaced per alpha–decay. Currently, this number is estimated as 1000-2000 atoms/alpha decay event. Here, we report nuclear magnetic resonance, spin-counting experiments that measure close to 5000 atoms/alpha decay event in radiation damaged natural zircons. New radiological NMR measurements on highly radioactive, 239Pu zircon show damage similar to that created by 238U and 232Th in mineral zircons at the same dose, indicating no significant effect of dose rate. Based on these measurements, the initially crystalline structure of a 10 wt% 239Pu zircon would be amorphous after only 1400 years in a geological repository. These measurements establish a basis for assessing the long-term structural durability of actinide-containing ceramics based on an atomistic understanding of the fundamental damage event.

  13. Addition Laws for Intensities of Radiation Emerging from Scattering Atmospheres Containing Energy Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikoghossian, A. G.; Kapanadze, N. G.

    2016-03-01

    A group theoretical approach is developed for solving astrophysical radiative transfer problems described in a previous series of papers. Addition laws for observed radiative intensities are derived for the case in which atmospheres not only absorb and scatter radiation incident on them, but radiate themselves because of energy sources contained within them. As an illustration of the application of these laws, several special radiative transfer problems which we believe are of practical interest are discussed.

  14. Enhancement of K{sub {alpha}} emission through efficient hot electron generation in carbon nanotubes on intense laser pulse irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarty, U.; Arora, V.; Naik, P. A.; Chakera, J. A.; Srivastava, H.; Srivastava, A.; Kumbhare, S. R.; Gupta, P. D.; Varma, G. D.

    2012-09-01

    Near complete absorption of the energy of intense ultra-short laser pulses (45 fs, intensity {approx}1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} to 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}) is observed in carbon nanotubes deposited on a planar molybdenum substrate. The hollow structure of the nanotube plasma facilitates resonant electric field enhancement during its ionization phase. This resonantly enhanced localized field at a density much larger than the critical density n{sub c} leads to efficient hot electron generation, which results in enhanced K{sub {alpha}} emission of Mo at 17.5 keV. It is observed that for nanotubes, depending on the degree of hollowness, there is an optimum laser intensity for maximum x-ray enhancement compared to a planar uncoated target.

  15. Ly{alpha} RADIATIVE TRANSFER IN COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS USING ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Laursen, Peter; Razoumov, Alexei O.; Sommer-Larsen, Jesper E-mail: razoumov@ap.smu.ca

    2009-05-01

    A numerical code for solving various Ly{alpha} radiative transfer (RT) problems is presented. The code is suitable for an arbitrary, three-dimensional distribution of Ly{alpha} emissivity, gas temperature, density, and velocity field. Capable of handling Ly{alpha} RT in an adaptively refined grid-based structure, it enables detailed investigation of the effects of clumpiness of the interstellar (or intergalactic) medium. The code is tested against various geometrically and physically idealized configurations for which analytical solutions exist, and subsequently applied to three different simulated high-resolution 'Lyman-break galaxies', extracted from high-resolution cosmological simulations at redshift z = 3.6. Proper treatment of the Ly{alpha} scattering reveals a diversity of surface brightness (SB) and line profiles. Specifically, for a given galaxy the maximum observed SB can vary by an order of magnitude, and the total flux by a factor of 3-6, depending on the viewing angle. This may provide an explanation for differences in observed properties of high-redshift galaxies, and in particular a possible physical link between Lyman-break galaxies and regular Ly{alpha} emitters.

  16. Art, alpha-1-antitrypsin polymorphisms and intense creative energy: blessing or curse?

    PubMed

    Schmechel, Donald Everett

    2007-09-01

    Persons heterozygous for Z, S and rare alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT, SERPIN1A) polymorphisms (ca. 9% of population) are often considered 'silent' carriers with increased vulnerability to environmentally modulated liver and lung disease. They may have significantly more anxiety and bipolar spectrum disorders, nutritional compromise, and white matter disease [Schmechel DE, Browndyke J, Ghio A. Strategies for the dissection of genetic-environmental interactions in neurodegenerative disorders. Neurotoxicology 2006;27:637-57]. Given association of art and mood disorders, we examined occupation and artistic vocation from this same series. One thousand five hundred and thirty-seven consecutive persons aged 16-90 years old received comprehensive work-up including testing for AAT 'phenotype' and level, nutritional factors, and inflammatory, iron and copper indices. Occupations were grouped by Bureau of Labor Standards classification and information gathered on artistic activities. Proportion of reactive airway disease, obstructive pulmonary disease, and pre-existing anxiety disorder or bipolar disorder were significantly increased in persons carrying AAT non-M polymorphisms compared to normal MM genotype (respectively, 10, 20, 21, and 33% compared to 8, 12, 11, and 9%; contingency table, pulmonary: chi2 37, p=0.0001; affective disorder: chi2=171, p=0.0001). In persons with artistic avocation (n=189) or occupation (n=57), AAT non-M polymorphisms are significantly increased (respectively, proportions of 44 and 40% compared to background rate of 9%; contingency table, avocation: chi2=172, p=0.0001; occupation: chi2=57, p=0.0007). Artistic ability and 'anxiety/bipolar spectrum' mood disorders may represent phenotypic attributes that had selective advantage during recent human evolution, an 'intensive creative energy' (ICE) behavioral phenotype. Background proportion of ICE of 7% consists of 49 of 1312 persons with AAT MM genotype (4%), and 58 of 225 persons with non-MM genotypes

  17. Comparative analysis of 60Co intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Fox, Christopher; Romeijn, H Edwin; Lynch, Bart; Men, Chunhua; Aleman, Dionne M; Dempsey, James F

    2008-06-21

    In this study, we perform a scientific comparative analysis of using (60)Co beams in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). In particular, we evaluate the treatment plan quality obtained with (i) 6 MV, 18 MV and (60)Co IMRT; (ii) different numbers of static multileaf collimator (MLC) delivered (60)Co beams and (iii) a helical tomotherapy (60)Co beam geometry. We employ a convex fluence map optimization (FMO) model, which allows for the comparison of plan quality between different beam energies and configurations for a given case. A total of 25 clinical patient cases that each contain volumetric CT studies, primary and secondary delineated targets, and contoured structures were studied: 5 head-and-neck (H&N), 5 prostate, 5 central nervous system (CNS), 5 breast and 5 lung cases. The DICOM plan data were anonymized and exported to the University of Florida optimized radiation therapy (UFORT) treatment planning system. The FMO problem was solved for each case for 5-71 equidistant beams as well as a helical geometry for H&N, prostate, CNS and lung cases, and for 3-7 equidistant beams in the upper hemisphere for breast cases, all with 6 MV, 18 MV and (60)Co dose models. In all cases, 95% of the target volumes received at least the prescribed dose with clinical sparing criteria for critical organs being met for all structures that were not wholly or partially contained within the target volume. Improvements in critical organ sparing were found with an increasing number of equidistant (60)Co beams, yet were marginal above 9 beams for H&N, prostate, CNS and lung. Breast cases produced similar plans for 3-7 beams. A helical (60)Co beam geometry achieved similar plan quality as static plans with 11 equidistant (60)Co beams. Furthermore, 18 MV plans were initially found not to provide the same target coverage as 6 MV and (60)Co plans; however, adjusting the trade-offs in the optimization model allowed equivalent target coverage for 18 MV. For plans with comparable

  18. Comparative analysis of 60Co intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Christopher; Romeijn, H. Edwin; Lynch, Bart; Men, Chunhua; Aleman, Dionne M.; Dempsey, James F.

    2008-06-01

    In this study, we perform a scientific comparative analysis of using 60Co beams in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). In particular, we evaluate the treatment plan quality obtained with (i) 6 MV, 18 MV and 60Co IMRT; (ii) different numbers of static multileaf collimator (MLC) delivered 60Co beams and (iii) a helical tomotherapy 60Co beam geometry. We employ a convex fluence map optimization (FMO) model, which allows for the comparison of plan quality between different beam energies and configurations for a given case. A total of 25 clinical patient cases that each contain volumetric CT studies, primary and secondary delineated targets, and contoured structures were studied: 5 head-and-neck (H&N), 5 prostate, 5 central nervous system (CNS), 5 breast and 5 lung cases. The DICOM plan data were anonymized and exported to the University of Florida optimized radiation therapy (UFORT) treatment planning system. The FMO problem was solved for each case for 5-71 equidistant beams as well as a helical geometry for H&N, prostate, CNS and lung cases, and for 3-7 equidistant beams in the upper hemisphere for breast cases, all with 6 MV, 18 MV and 60Co dose models. In all cases, 95% of the target volumes received at least the prescribed dose with clinical sparing criteria for critical organs being met for all structures that were not wholly or partially contained within the target volume. Improvements in critical organ sparing were found with an increasing number of equidistant 60Co beams, yet were marginal above 9 beams for H&N, prostate, CNS and lung. Breast cases produced similar plans for 3-7 beams. A helical 60Co beam geometry achieved similar plan quality as static plans with 11 equidistant 60Co beams. Furthermore, 18 MV plans were initially found not to provide the same target coverage as 6 MV and 60Co plans; however, adjusting the trade-offs in the optimization model allowed equivalent target coverage for 18 MV. For plans with comparable target coverage

  19. Inverse planning optimization method for intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yihua; Ren, Haozheng; Li, Cunhua; Min, Zhifang; Wan, Jinxin; Ma, Jianxin; Hung, Chih-Cheng

    2013-10-01

    In order to facilitate the leaf sequencing process in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and design of a practical leaf sequencing algorithm, it is an important issue to smooth the planned fluence maps. The objective is to achieve both high-efficiency and high-precision dose delivering by considering characteristics of leaf sequencing process. The key factor which affects total number of monitor units for the leaf sequencing optimization process is the max flow value of the digraph which formulated from the fluence maps. Therefore, we believe that one strategy for compromising dose conformity and total number of monitor units in dose delivery is to balance the dose distribution function and the max flow value mentioned above. However, there are too many paths in the digraph, and we don't know the flow value of which path is the maximum. The maximum flow value among the horizontal paths was selected and used in the objective function of the fluence map optimization to formulate the model. The model is a traditional linear constrained quadratic optimization model which can be solved by interior point method easily. We believe that the smoothed maps from this model are more suitable for leaf sequencing optimization process than other smoothing models. A clinical head-neck case and a prostate case were tested and compared using our proposed model and the smoothing model which is based on the minimization of total variance. The optimization results with the same level of total number of monitor units (TNMU) show that the fluence maps obtained from our model have much better dose performance for the target/non-target region than the maps from total variance based on the smoothing model. This indicates that our model achieves better dose distribution when the algorithm suppresses the TNMU at the same level. Although we have just used the max flow value of the horizontal paths in the diagraph in the objective function, a good balance has been achieved between

  20. Quantification of actinide alpha-radiation damage in minerals and ceramics.

    PubMed

    Farnan, Ian; Cho, Herman; Weber, William J

    2007-01-11

    There are large amounts of heavy alpha-emitters in nuclear waste and nuclear materials inventories stored in various sites around the world. These include plutonium and minor actinides such as americium and curium. In preparation for geological disposal there is consensus that actinides that have been separated from spent nuclear fuel should be immobilized within mineral-based ceramics rather than glass because of their superior aqueous durability and lower risk of accidental criticality. However, in the long term, the alpha-decay taking place in these ceramics will severely disrupt their crystalline structure and reduce their durability. A fundamental property in predicting cumulative radiation damage is the number of atoms permanently displaced per alpha-decay. At present, this number is estimated to be 1,000-2,000 atoms/alpha in zircon. Here we report nuclear magnetic resonance, spin-counting experiments that measure close to 5,000 atoms/alpha in radiation-damaged natural zircons. New radiological nuclear magnetic resonance measurements on highly radioactive, 239Pu zircon show damage similar to that caused by 238U and 232Th in mineral zircons at the same dose, indicating no significant effect of half-life or loading levels (dose rate). On the basis of these measurements, the initially crystalline structure of a 10 weight per cent 239Pu zircon would be amorphous after only 1,400 years in a geological repository (desired immobilization timescales are of the order of 250,000 years). These measurements establish a basis for assessing the long-term structural durability of actinide-containing ceramics in terms of an atomistic understanding of the fundamental damage event. PMID:17215840

  1. Effects of radiation reaction in the interaction between cluster media and high intensity lasers in the radiation dominant regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Natsumi; Nagatomo, Hideo; Fukuda, Yuji; Matsui, Ryutaro; Kishimoto, Yasuaki

    2016-06-01

    Interaction between media composed of clusters and high intensity lasers in the radiation dominant regime, i.e., intensity of 10 22 - 23 W / cm 2 , is studied based on the particle-in-cell simulation that includes the radiation reaction. By introducing target materials that have the same total mass but different internal structures, i.e., uniform plasma and cluster media with different cluster radii, we investigate the effect of the internal structure on the interaction dynamics, high energy radiation emission, and its reaction. Intense radiation emission is found in the cluster media where electrons exhibit non-ballistic motions suffering from strong accelerations by both the penetrated laser field and charge separation field of clusters. As a result, the clustered structure increases the energy conversion into high energy radiations significantly at the expense of the conversion into particles, while the total absorption rate into radiation and particles remains unchanged from the absorption rate into particles in the case without radiation reaction. The maximum ion energy achieved in the interaction with cluster media is found to be decreased through the radiation reaction to electrons into the same level with that achieved in the interaction with the uniform plasma. The clustered structure thus enhances high energy radiation emission rather than the ion acceleration in the considered intensity regime.

  2. Generation of radiation by intense plasma and electromagnetic undulators

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, C.

    1991-10-01

    We examine the characteristics of the classical radiation emission resulting from the interaction of a relativistic electron beam that propagates perpendicularly through a large amplitude relativistic plasma wave. Such a study is useful for evaluating the feasibility of using relativistic plasma waves as extremely short wavelength undulators for generating short wavelength radiation. The electron trajectories in a plasma wave undulator and in an ac FEL undulator are obtained using perturbation techniques. The spontaneous radiation frequency spectrum and angular distribution emitted by a single electron oscillating in these two undulators are then calculated. The radiation gain of a copropagating electromagnetic wave is calculated. The approximate analytic results for the trajectories, spontaneous radiation and gain are compared with 3-D simulation results. The characteristics of the plasma wave undulator are compared with the ac FEL undulator and linearly polarized magnetic undulator. 50 refs., 26 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Semi-Automatic Segmentation of Optic Radiations and LGN, and Their Relationship to EEG Alpha Waves

    PubMed Central

    Descoteaux, Maxime; Bernier, Michaël; Garyfallidis, Eleftherios; Whittingstall, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    At rest, healthy human brain activity is characterized by large electroencephalography (EEG) fluctuations in the 8-13 Hz range, commonly referred to as the alpha band. Although it is well known that EEG alpha activity varies across individuals, few studies have investigated how this may be related to underlying morphological variations in brain structure. Specifically, it is generally believed that the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and its efferent fibres (optic radiation, OR) play a key role in alpha activity, yet it is unclear whether their shape or size variations contribute to its inter-subject variability. Given the widespread use of EEG alpha in basic and clinical research, addressing this is important, though difficult given the problems associated with reliably segmenting the LGN and OR. For this, we employed a multi-modal approach and combined diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and EEG in 20 healthy subjects to measure structure and function, respectively. For the former, we developed a new, semi-automated approach for segmenting the OR and LGN, from which we extracted several structural metrics such as volume, position and diffusivity. Although these measures corresponded well with known morphology based on previous post-mortem studies, we nonetheless found that their inter-subject variability was not significantly correlated to alpha power or peak frequency (p >0.05). Our results therefore suggest that alpha variability may be mediated by an alternative structural source and our proposed methodology may in general help in better understanding the influence of anatomy on function such as measured by EEG or fMRI. PMID:27383146

  4. Semi-Automatic Segmentation of Optic Radiations and LGN, and Their Relationship to EEG Alpha Waves.

    PubMed

    Renauld, Emmanuelle; Descoteaux, Maxime; Bernier, Michaël; Garyfallidis, Eleftherios; Whittingstall, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    At rest, healthy human brain activity is characterized by large electroencephalography (EEG) fluctuations in the 8-13 Hz range, commonly referred to as the alpha band. Although it is well known that EEG alpha activity varies across individuals, few studies have investigated how this may be related to underlying morphological variations in brain structure. Specifically, it is generally believed that the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and its efferent fibres (optic radiation, OR) play a key role in alpha activity, yet it is unclear whether their shape or size variations contribute to its inter-subject variability. Given the widespread use of EEG alpha in basic and clinical research, addressing this is important, though difficult given the problems associated with reliably segmenting the LGN and OR. For this, we employed a multi-modal approach and combined diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and EEG in 20 healthy subjects to measure structure and function, respectively. For the former, we developed a new, semi-automated approach for segmenting the OR and LGN, from which we extracted several structural metrics such as volume, position and diffusivity. Although these measures corresponded well with known morphology based on previous post-mortem studies, we nonetheless found that their inter-subject variability was not significantly correlated to alpha power or peak frequency (p >0.05). Our results therefore suggest that alpha variability may be mediated by an alternative structural source and our proposed methodology may in general help in better understanding the influence of anatomy on function such as measured by EEG or fMRI. PMID:27383146

  5. Alpha-radiation tests on the transmission of cryogenically cooled infrared filter materials used in ISOPHOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Josef; Lemke, Dietrich; Kraetschmer, Wolfgang; Mampel, K.

    1995-09-01

    We have studied potential effects of the ISO spacecraft orbital radiation environment on the transmission of infrared interference filters and filter materials. To simulate the critical proton radiation within the earth radiation belts and its influence on the materials at cryogenic temperatures the samples were cooled to LHe temperature and subjected to an Am-241 (alpha) -radiation source (approximately 4.1 MeV) mounted inside a cryostat. The dose per hour absorbed in a 20 micron thick layer, the mean penetration depth for the (alpha) particles, was about 25 krad (Si). The substrates Ge, ZnSe, and CaF2 and three tested ISOPHOT interference bandpass filters (3.21-3.37 micrometers and 2-50 micrometers even after a total dose of approximately 0.5 Mrad (Si), which is more than 100 times the expected total dose for ISOPHOT. The multilayer interference blocking coating on sapphire used on all ISOPHOT far infrared filters to block the wavelength range 1.7-6.7 micrometers showed no degeneration either. The organic far infrared antireflex coating materials polyethylene deposited on a quartz substrate, and a 15 micrometers thick parylene foil used as field lens coating, were investigated in the wavelength range of 16-300 micrometers . Our data suggests a slightly reduced transmission < 6% after 350 krad (Si) exposure.

  6. Two-stream cyclotron radiative instabilities due to the marginally mirror-trapped fraction for fustion alphas in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Arunasalam, V.

    1995-07-01

    It is shown here that the marginally mirror-trapped fraction of the newly-born fusion alpha particles in the deuterium-tritium (DT) reaction dominated tokamak plasmas can induce a two-stream cyclotron radiative instability for the fast Alfven waves propagating near the harmonics of the alpha particle cyclotron frequency {omega}{sub c{alpha}}. This can explain both the experimentally observed time behavior and the spatially localized origin of the fusion product ion cyclotron emission (ICE) in TFTR at frequencies {omega} {approx} m{omega}{sub c{alpha}}.

  7. Epigenetic regulation of diacylglycerol kinase alpha promotes radiation-induced fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Weigel, Christoph; Veldwijk, Marlon R; Oakes, Christopher C; Seibold, Petra; Slynko, Alla; Liesenfeld, David B; Rabionet, Mariona; Hanke, Sabrina A; Wenz, Frederik; Sperk, Elena; Benner, Axel; Rösli, Christoph; Sandhoff, Roger; Assenov, Yassen; Plass, Christoph; Herskind, Carsten; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Schmezer, Peter; Popanda, Odilia

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a fundamental part of cancer treatment but its use is limited by the onset of late adverse effects in the normal tissue, especially radiation-induced fibrosis. Since the molecular causes for fibrosis are largely unknown, we analyse if epigenetic regulation might explain inter-individual differences in fibrosis risk. DNA methylation profiling of dermal fibroblasts obtained from breast cancer patients prior to irradiation identifies differences associated with fibrosis. One region is characterized as a differentially methylated enhancer of diacylglycerol kinase alpha (DGKA). Decreased DNA methylation at this enhancer enables recruitment of the profibrotic transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR1) and facilitates radiation-induced DGKA transcription in cells from patients later developing fibrosis. Conversely, inhibition of DGKA has pronounced effects on diacylglycerol-mediated lipid homeostasis and reduces profibrotic fibroblast activation. Collectively, DGKA is an epigenetically deregulated kinase involved in radiation response and may serve as a marker and therapeutic target for personalized radiotherapy. PMID:26964756

  8. Epigenetic regulation of diacylglycerol kinase alpha promotes radiation-induced fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, Christoph; Veldwijk, Marlon R.; Oakes, Christopher C.; Seibold, Petra; Slynko, Alla; Liesenfeld, David B.; Rabionet, Mariona; Hanke, Sabrina A.; Wenz, Frederik; Sperk, Elena; Benner, Axel; Rösli, Christoph; Sandhoff, Roger; Assenov, Yassen; Plass, Christoph; Herskind, Carsten; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Schmezer, Peter; Popanda, Odilia

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a fundamental part of cancer treatment but its use is limited by the onset of late adverse effects in the normal tissue, especially radiation-induced fibrosis. Since the molecular causes for fibrosis are largely unknown, we analyse if epigenetic regulation might explain inter-individual differences in fibrosis risk. DNA methylation profiling of dermal fibroblasts obtained from breast cancer patients prior to irradiation identifies differences associated with fibrosis. One region is characterized as a differentially methylated enhancer of diacylglycerol kinase alpha (DGKA). Decreased DNA methylation at this enhancer enables recruitment of the profibrotic transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR1) and facilitates radiation-induced DGKA transcription in cells from patients later developing fibrosis. Conversely, inhibition of DGKA has pronounced effects on diacylglycerol-mediated lipid homeostasis and reduces profibrotic fibroblast activation. Collectively, DGKA is an epigenetically deregulated kinase involved in radiation response and may serve as a marker and therapeutic target for personalized radiotherapy. PMID:26964756

  9. Radiation risk to low fluences of alpha particles may be greater than we thought.

    PubMed

    Zhou, H; Suzuki, M; Randers-Pehrson, G; Vannais, D; Chen, G; Trosko, J E; Waldren, C A; Hei, T K

    2001-12-01

    Based principally on the cancer incidence found in survivors of the atomic bombs dropped in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) and the United States National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) have recommended that estimates of cancer risk for low dose exposure be extrapolated from higher doses by using a linear, no-threshold model. This recommendation is based on the dogma that the DNA of the nucleus is the main target for radiation-induced genotoxicity and, as fewer cells are directly damaged, the deleterious effects of radiation proportionally decline. In this paper, we used a precision microbeam to target an exact fraction (either 100% or < or =20%) of the cells in a confluent population and irradiated their nuclei with exactly one alpha particle each. We found that the frequencies of induced mutations and chromosomal changes in populations where some known fractions of nuclei were hit are consistent with non-hit cells contributing significantly to the response. In fact, irradiation of 10% of a confluent mammalian cell population with a single alpha particle per cell results in a mutant yield similar to that observed when all of the cells in the population are irradiated. This effect was significantly eliminated in cells pretreated with a 1 mM dose of octanol, which inhibits gap junction-mediated intercellular communication, or in cells carrying a dominant negative connexin 43 vector. The data imply that the relevant target for radiation mutagenesis is larger than an individual cell and suggest a need to reconsider the validity of the linear extrapolation in making risk estimates for low dose, high linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation exposure. PMID:11734643

  10. Monitoring Alpha Oscillations and Pupil Dilation across a Performance-Intensity Function

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Catherine M.; Boisvert, Isabelle; de Lissa, Peter; Granger, Louise; Ibrahim, Ronny; Lo, Chi Yhun; Miles, Kelly; Graham, Petra L.

    2016-01-01

    Listening to degraded speech can be challenging and requires a continuous investment of cognitive resources, which is more challenging for those with hearing loss. However, while alpha power (8–12 Hz) and pupil dilation have been suggested as objective correlates of listening effort, it is not clear whether they assess the same cognitive processes involved, or other sensory and/or neurophysiological mechanisms that are associated with the task. Therefore, the aim of this study is to compare alpha power and pupil dilation during a sentence recognition task in 15 randomized levels of noise (-7 to +7 dB SNR) using highly intelligible (16 channel vocoded) and moderately intelligible (6 channel vocoded) speech. Twenty young normal-hearing adults participated in the study, however, due to extraneous noise, data from only 16 (10 females, 6 males; aged 19–28 years) was used in the Electroencephalography (EEG) analysis and 10 in the pupil analysis. Behavioral testing of perceived effort and speech performance was assessed at 3 fixed SNRs per participant and was comparable to sentence recognition performance assessed in the physiological test session for both 16- and 6-channel vocoded sentences. Results showed a significant interaction between channel vocoding for both the alpha power and the pupil size changes. While both measures significantly decreased with more positive SNRs for the 16-channel vocoding, this was not observed with the 6-channel vocoding. The results of this study suggest that these measures may encode different processes involved in speech perception, which show similar trends for highly intelligible speech, but diverge for more spectrally degraded speech. The results to date suggest that these objective correlates of listening effort, and the cognitive processes involved in listening effort, are not yet sufficiently well understood to be used within a clinical setting. PMID:27252671

  11. Application of Histogram Analysis in Radiation Therapy (HART) in Intensity Modulation Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyakuryal, Anil

    2009-03-01

    A carcinoma is a malignant cancer that emerges from epithelial cells in structures through out the body.It invades the critical organs, could metastasize or spread to lymph nodes.IMRT is an advanced mode of radiation therapy treatment for cancer. It delivers more conformal doses to malignant tumors sparing the critical organs by modulating the intensity of radiation beam.An automated software, HART (S. Jang et al.,2008,Med Phys 35,p.2812) was used for efficient analysis of dose volume histograms (DVH) for multiple targets and critical organs in four IMRT treatment plans for each patient. IMRT data for ten head and neck cancer patients were exported as AAPM/RTOG format files from a commercial treatment planning system at Northwestern Memorial Hospital (NMH).HART extracted DVH statistics were used to evaluate plan indices and to analyze dose tolerance of critical structures at prescription dose (PD) for each patient. Mean plan indices (n=10) were found to be in good agreement with published results for Linac based plans. The least irradiated volume at tolerance dose (TD50) was observed for brainstem and the highest volume for larynx in SIB treatment techniques. Thus HART, an open source platform, has extensive clinical implications in IMRT treatments.

  12. Polar solar wind and interstellar wind properties from interplanetary Lyman-alpha radiation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, N.; Blum, P. W.; Ajello, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis of Mariner 10 observations of Lyman-alpha resonance radiation shows an increase of interplanetary neutral hydrogen densities above the solar poles. This increase is caused by a latitudinal variation of the solar wind velocity and/or flux. Using both the Mariner 10 results and other solar wind observations, the values of the solar wind flux and velocity with latitude are determined for several cases of interest. The latitudinal variation of interplanetary hydrogen gas, arising from the solar wind latitudinal variation, is shown to be most pronounced in the inner solar system. From this result it is shown that spacecraft Lyman-alpha observations are more sensitive to the latitudinal anisotropy for a spacecraft location in the inner solar system near the downwind axis.

  13. Growth and Characterization of alpha-PbO for Room Temperature Radiation Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Erin Leigh

    A global trading structure and high throughput of shipping containers into ports around the world increases the chance of nuclear terrorism via cargo containers. Harmless radioactive sources confuse and impede detection of the materials that pose a real threat, making spectroscopy difficult and requiring detectors with high resolution. The current methods that are used to check containers in ports have security flaws, and only 5% of all shipping containers are checked. The development of semiconductor gamma-ray detectors is one of the protocols being advanced to alleviate this risk because they can function at room temperature and they are cost effective, easily produced, and have high resolution. This dissertation has addressed the current lack of "perfect" room temperature detector materials by investigating alpha-PbO, a novel material in this field. This includes the development of a growth process for alpha-PbO thin films, as well as its structural and performance characterization as a detector material. Because we intend alpha-PbO to be a photoconductive detector, it should have certain properties. A photoconductive detector consists of a highly resistive material with a voltage bias across it. It absorbs incident gamma-rays, creating electron-hole pairs that provide a signal. To function well, it must have a high atomic number and a high density in order to absorb high-energy photons via the photoelectric effect. It should also have a large resistivity and a wide band gap to avoid large leakage currents at room temperature. Finally, it must have good charge carrier transport properties and detector resolution in order to be able to determine the characteristic energy peaks of the radiation-emitting source. We chose alpha-PbO because it has a very high Z and a very high density and a band gap in the correct range. It also has a rich history of use as a photoconductor that reaches back to the 1950s. Numerous methods have been used to grow thin films of alpha

  14. Identification of gene-based responses in human blood cells exposed to alpha particle radiation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The threat of a terrorist-precipitated nuclear event places humans at danger for radiological exposures. Isotopes which emit alpha (α)-particle radiation pose the highest risk. Currently, gene expression signatures are being developed for radiation biodosimetry and triage with respect to ionizing photon radiation. This study was designed to determine if similar gene expression profiles are obtained after exposures involving α-particles. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used to identify sensitive and robust gene-based biomarkers of α-particle radiation exposure. Cells were isolated from healthy individuals and were irradiated at doses ranging from 0-1.5 Gy. Microarray technology was employed to identify transcripts that were differentially expressed relative to unirradiated cells 24 hours post-exposure. Statistical analysis identified modulated genes at each of the individual doses. Results Twenty-nine genes were common to all doses with expression levels ranging from 2-10 fold relative to control treatment group. This subset of genes was further assessed in independent complete white blood cell (WBC) populations exposed to either α-particles or X-rays using quantitative real-time PCR. This 29 gene panel was responsive in the α-particle exposed WBCs and was shown to exhibit differential fold-changes compared to X-irradiated cells, though no α-particle specific transcripts were identified. Conclusion Current gene panels for photon radiation may also be applicable for use in α-particle radiation biodosimetry. PMID:25017500

  15. Sound radiation from an infinite elastic cylinder with dual-wave propagation-intensity distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    The radiation of sound from an elastic cylindrical shell filled with fluid and supporting multiwave propagation is studied analytically. Combinations of supersonic and subsonic shell waves are considered. The radiated field is mapped by using acoustic intensity vectors evaluated at various locations. Both time averaged and instantaneous intensity are investigated. The acoustic intensity is seen to vary markedly with axial distance down the cylinder. The effect is shown to be associated with cross terms in the intensity relations, and its magnitude and location to depend upon the relative phase and amplitudes of individual waves. Subsonic shell waves are demonstrated to interact strongly with supersonic shell waves to cause a large modification in the radiated intensity distributions near the shell surface.

  16. Energetic response of Chlorella vulgaris to alpha radiation and PCB stress

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    This research project has evaluated the bioenergetic response of the green alga Chlorella vulgaris following acute exposure to either the physical stress of radiation or the chemical stress of PCBs. After exposure, changes in survival or growth, adenylate pools (ATP, ADP, and AMP), CO/sub 2/ fixation and oxygen evolution and uptake were measured. By employing anaerobic conditions, or the electron transport inhibitor DCMU or dark conditions separately and in specific combinations, this study evaluated the response of three separate algal ATP producing mechanisms (respiration, total and cyclic photophosphorylation) to alpha radiation or PCB. The use of the adenylate energy charge ratio as an indicator of stress was also evaluated. The results of the radiation experiments indicated that alpha particle exposure between 25 to 275 rads caused a one-hour latent demand for ATP due to radioinduced DNA repair. In order to compensate for this ATP demand, nonessential utilization of ATP was decreased by slowing the rate of carbon fixation. The results also suggest that use of radiation as a tool to study algal physiology. The data obtained from the PCB experiments again showed each phosphorylation mechanism to be insensitive to 10, 100 and 200 ppm Aroclor 1254 exposures. Data suggest, however, that PCBs caused an increased photosynthetic rate, and total adenylate pool with decreased growth. The use of the adenylate energy charge ratio as a stress indicator was assessed. Because this ratio did not fluctuate at doses of radiation or PCBs that caused reduced survival and growth rates, this study concluded that for Chlorella the adenylate energy charge ration was a poor indicator of sublethal stress.

  17. Scintillator assembly for alpha radiation detection and an associated method of making

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; McElhaney, Stephanie A.; Bates, John B.

    1994-01-01

    A scintillator assembly for use in conjunction with a photomultiplier or the like in the detection of alpha radiation utilizes a substrate or transparent yttrium aluminum garnet and a relatively thin film of cerium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet coated upon the substrate. The film material is applied to the substrate in a sputtering process, and the applied film and substrate are annealed to effect crystallization of the film upon the substrate. The resultant assembly provides relatively high energy resolution during use in a detection instrument and is sufficiently rugged for use in field environments.

  18. Scintillator assembly for alpha radiation detection and an associated method of making

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; McElhaney, S.A.; Bates, J.B.

    1994-07-26

    A scintillator assembly for use in conjunction with a photomultiplier or the like in the detection of alpha radiation utilizes a substrate or transparent yttrium aluminum garnet and a relatively thin film of cerium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet coated upon the substrate. The film material is applied to the substrate in a sputtering process, and the applied film and substrate are annealed to effect crystallization of the film upon the substrate. The resultant assembly provides relatively high energy resolution during use in a detection instrument and is sufficiently rugged for use in field environments. 4 figs.

  19. High spatial resolution photographs of the sun in L alpha radiation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinz, D. K.

    1973-01-01

    Photographs of the sun in predominantly L alpha radiation (centered at 1215.67 A) with 3-sec spatial resolution were taken from an Aerobee rocket shortly after fourth contact by the moon on the eclipse day of July 10, 1972. This preliminary reporting of the results describes the instrument and shows two of the photographs taken. The supergranulation is manifest, and active regions and filaments are well resolved over the entire disk. Densitometer traces across the disk are presented, giving the flux incident on the earth from active regions, cell boundaries, and filaments.

  20. Effects of PGF{sub 2{alpha}} on human melanocytes and regulation of the FP receptor by ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Glynis . E-mail: Glynis_Scott@urmc.rochester.edu; Jacobs, Stacey; Leopardi, Sonya; Anthony, Frank A.; Learn, Doug; Malaviya, Rama; Pentland, Alice

    2005-04-01

    Prostaglandins are potent lipid hormones that activate multiple signaling pathways resulting in regulation of cellular growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. In the skin, prostaglandins are rapidly released by keratinocytes following ultraviolet radiation and are chronically present in inflammatory skin lesions. We have shown previously that melanocytes, which provide photoprotection to keratinocytes through the production of melanin, express several receptors for prostaglandins, including the PGE{sub 2} receptors EP{sub 1} and EP{sub 3} and the PGF{sub 2{alpha}} receptor FP, and that PGF{sub 2{alpha}} stimulates melanocyte dendricity. We now show that PGF{sub 2{alpha}} stimulates the activity and expression of tyrosinase, the rate-limiting enzyme in melanin synthesis. Analysis of FP receptor regulation showed that the FP receptor is regulated by ultraviolet radiation in melanocytes in vitro and in human skin in vivo. We also show that ultraviolet irradiation stimulates production of PGF{sub 2{alpha}} by melanocytes. These results show that PGF{sub 2{alpha}} binding to the FP receptor activates signals that stimulate a differentiated phenotype (dendricity and pigmentation) in melanocytes. The regulation of the FP receptor and the stimulation of production of PGF{sub 2{alpha}} in melanocytes in response to ultraviolet radiation suggest that PGF{sub 2{alpha}} could act as an autocrine factor for melanocyte differentiation.

  1. Silicone rubber curing by high intensity infrared radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, T.; Tsai, J.; Cherng, C.; Chen, J.

    1994-08-10

    A high-intensity (12 kW) and compact (80 cm) infrared heating oven for fast curing (12 seconds) of tube-like silicone rubber curing studies is reported. Quality inspection by DSC and DMA and results from pilot-scale curing oven all suggest that infrared heating provides a better way of vulcanization regarding to curing time, quality, cost, and spacing over conventional hot air heating. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  2. Cosmic Ray Intensity Variation in Lunar Radiation Environments during Luna and LRO missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Jongdae; Oh, Suyeon; Yi, Yu

    The RV-2N-series instruments onboard Luna missions and the CRaTER instrument onboard LRO satellite were designed to monitor in lunar radiation environment by measuring cosmic ray (CR) intensity. In order to examine the origins and the characteristics of the CR intensity variation in lunar radiation environment, we use proton intensity measured by RV-2N-series onboard Luna missions out of the Russian space Zond program for exploration of the Moon and CR intensity observed by the CRaTER on the Moon. We compare the CR intensity on the Moon with that observed by neutron monitors (Climax, McMurdo, Thule) on the Earth. To find the correlation between the solar activity and the CR intensity on the Moon, we also use the sunspot number supplied by NOAA National Geophysical Data Center. We present the result in this time.

  3. Effect of alpha-lipoic acid on radiation-induced small intestine injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Bae Kwon; Song, Jin Ho; Jeong, Hojin; Choi, Hoon Sik; Jung, Jung Hwa; Hahm, Jong Ryeal; Woo, Seung Hoon; Jung, Myeong Hee; Choi, Bong-Hoi; Kim, Jin Hyun; Kang, Ki Mun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Radiation therapy is a highly effective treatment for patients with solid tumors. However, it can cause damage and inflammation in normal tissues. Here, we investigated the effects of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) as radioprotection agent for the small intestine in a mouse model. Materials and Methods Whole abdomen was evenly irradiated with total a dose of 15 Gy. Mice were treated with either ALA (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection [i.p.]) or saline (equal volume, i.p.) the prior to radiation as 100 mg/kg/day for 3 days. Body weight, food intake, histopathology, and biochemical parameters were evaluated. Results Significant differences in body weight and food intake were observed between the radiation (RT) and ALA + RT groups. Moreover, the number of crypt cells was higher in the ALA + RT group. Inflammation was decreased and recovery time was shortened in the ALA + RT group compared with the RT group. The levels of inflammation-related factors (i.e., phosphorylated nuclear factor kappa B and matrix metalloproteinase-9) and mitogen-activated protein kinases were significantly decreased in the ALA + RT group compared with those in the RT group. Conclusions ALA treatment prior to radiation decreases the severity and duration of radiation-induced enteritis by reducing inflammation, oxidative stress, and cell death. PMID:26943777

  4. Differential Effects of Alpha-Particle Radiation and X-Irradiation on Genes Associated with Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Vinita; Howland, Matthew; Chen, Jeremy; Kutzner, Barbara; Wilkins, Ruth C.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined differential effects of alpha-(α-) particle radiation and X-rays on apoptosis and associated changes in gene expression. Human monocytic cells were exposed to α-particle radiation and X-rays from 0 to 1.5 Gy. Four days postexposure, cell death was measured by flow cytometry and 84 genes related to apoptosis were analyzed using real-time PCR. On average, 33% of the cells were apoptotic at 1.5 Gy of α-particle radiation. Transcript profiling showed statistical expression of 15 genes at all three doses tested. Cells exposed to X-rays were <5% apoptotic at ~1.5 Gy and induced less than a 2-fold expression in 6 apoptotic genes at the higher doses of radiation. Among these 6 genes, Fas and TNF-α were common to the α-irradiated cells. This data suggests that α-particle radiation initiates cell death by TNF-α and Fas activation and through intermediate signalling mediators that are distinct from X-irradiated cells. PMID:22091383

  5. Effect of annealing treatment on K{beta}-to-K{alpha} x-ray intensity ratios of 3d transition-metal alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Han, I.; Demir, L.

    2010-06-15

    The influence of heat annealing treatment on the K{beta}-to-K{alpha} x-ray intensity ratios of 3d transition metal was carried out by x-ray fluorescence studies of various alloy compositions. K{beta}-to-K{alpha} x-ray intensity ratios of Fe, Ni, Ti, Co, and Cu in Fe{sub x}Ni{sub 1-x}, Ti{sub x}Ni{sub 1-x}, and Co{sub x}Cu{sub 1-x} alloys unannealed and thermally annealed at different temperatures have been measured following excitation by 22.69-keV x rays from a 10-mCi {sup 109}Cd radioactive point source. The experimental data obtained after annealing treatment indicate deviations of K{beta}-to-K{alpha} x-ray intensity ratios for 3d transition metals in different alloy compositions from the corresponding ratios for unannealed samples. The present investigation makes it possible to perform reliable interpretation of experimental K{beta}-to-K{alpha} x-ray intensity ratios for various 3d transition metals in their alloys and can also provide quantitative information about the changes of the K{beta}-to-K{alpha} x-ray intensity ratios of these metals with annealing treatment in considered systems.

  6. Means of Intensity Modulation of Radiation in External Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajusová, Alica; Králik, Gabriel; Miglierini, Marcel

    2010-01-01

    The paper deals with the main means of the beam intensity modifications that are used in radio therapeutic praxis. Physical principles and the main characteristics of the physical wedges and the enhanced dynamic wedges (EDW) are described. The main advantages and the disadvantages of the EDW over the conventional physical wedges are listed. The paper describes also a process of dosimetry verification of the application of the EDW that was applied on The Saint Elizabeth Cancer Institute in Bratislava and it details the experiment of the verification of an isodose distribution within this implementation of the EDW.

  7. Means of Intensity Modulation of Radiation in External Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bajusova, Alica; Kralik, Gabriel; Miglierini, Marcel

    2010-01-05

    The paper deals with the main means of the beam intensity modifications that are used in radio therapeutic praxis. Physical principles and the main characteristics of the physical wedges and the enhanced dynamic wedges (EDW) are described. The main advantages and the disadvantages of the EDW over the conventional physical wedges are listed. The paper describes also a process of dosimetry verification of the application of the EDW that was applied on The Saint Elizabeth Cancer Institute in Bratislava and it details the experiment of the verification of an isodose distribution within this implementation of the EDW.

  8. Effect of long-term exposure to mobile phone radiation on alpha-Int1 gene sequence of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Shahin-jafari, Ariyo; Bayat, Mansour; Shahhosseiny, Mohammad Hassan; Tajik, Parviz; Roudbar-mohammadi, Shahla

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, communication industries have witnessed a tremendous expansion, while, the biological effects of electromagnetic waves have not been fully elucidated. Current study aimed at evaluating the mutagenic effect of long-term exposure to 900-MHz radiation on alpha-Int1 gene sequences of Candida albicans. A standard 900 MHz radiation generator was used for radiation. 10 ml volumes from a stock suspension of C. albicans were transferred into 10 polystyrene tubes. Five tubes were exposed at 4 °C to a fixed magnitude of radiation with different time periods of 10, 70, 210, 350 and 490 h. The other 5 tubes were kept far enough from radiation. The samples underwent genomic DNA extraction. PCR amplification of alpha-Int1 gene sequence was done using one set of primers. PCR products were resolved using agarose gel electrophoresis and the nucleotide sequences were determined. All samples showed a clear electrophoretic band around 441 bp and further sequencing revealed the amplified DNA segments are related to alpha-Int1 gene of the yeast. No mutations in the gene were seen in radiation exposed samples. Long-term exposure of the yeast to mobile phone radiation under the above mentioned conditions had no mutagenic effect on alpha-Int1 gene sequence. PMID:27081370

  9. Effect of long-term exposure to mobile phone radiation on alpha-Int1 gene sequence of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Shahin-Jafari, Ariyo; Bayat, Mansour; Shahhosseiny, Mohammad Hassan; Tajik, Parviz; Roudbar-Mohammadi, Shahla

    2016-05-01

    Over the last decade, communication industries have witnessed a tremendous expansion, while, the biological effects of electromagnetic waves have not been fully elucidated. Current study aimed at evaluating the mutagenic effect of long-term exposure to 900-MHz radiation on alpha-Int1 gene sequences of Candida albicans. A standard 900 MHz radiation generator was used for radiation. 10 ml volumes from a stock suspension of C. albicans were transferred into 10 polystyrene tubes. Five tubes were exposed at 4 °C to a fixed magnitude of radiation with different time periods of 10, 70, 210, 350 and 490 h. The other 5 tubes were kept far enough from radiation. The samples underwent genomic DNA extraction. PCR amplification of alpha-Int1 gene sequence was done using one set of primers. PCR products were resolved using agarose gel electrophoresis and the nucleotide sequences were determined. All samples showed a clear electrophoretic band around 441 bp and further sequencing revealed the amplified DNA segments are related to alpha-Int1 gene of the yeast. No mutations in the gene were seen in radiation exposed samples. Long-term exposure of the yeast to mobile phone radiation under the above mentioned conditions had no mutagenic effect on alpha-Int1 gene sequence. PMID:27081370

  10. Terahertz radiation from a wire target irradiated by an ultra-intense laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhichao; Zheng Jian

    2007-05-15

    When an ultra-intense laser pulse impacts the tip of a wire whose other end is grounded, a strong return current can be driven along the wire because some energetic electrons generated in ultra-intense laser matter interaction can escape from the target and an electric field builds up. The wire then behaves like a current-carrying antenna that can emit electromagnetic radiations. If the duration of the driving pulse is several tens of femtoseconds, the radiation spectrum reaches a maximum at terahertz region, and the radiation power per solid angle could be as high as 10{sup 9} W/rad.

  11. Development of a strongly focusing high-intensity He(+) ion source for a confined alpha particle measurement at ITER.

    PubMed

    Kisaki, M; Shinto, K; Kobuchi, T; Okamoto, A; Kitajima, S; Sasao, M; Tsumori, K; Nishiura, M; Kaneko, O; Matsuda, Y; Wada, M; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Hirano, Y

    2008-02-01

    A strongly focusing high-intensity He(+) ion source has been designed and constructed as a beam source for a high-energy He(0) beam probe system for diagnosis of fusion produced alpha particles in the thermonuclear fusion plasmas. The He(+) beam was extracted from the ion source at an acceleration voltage of 18-35 kV. Temperature distributions of the beam target were observed with an IR camera. The 1/e-holding beam profile half-width was about 15 mm at optimum perveance (Perv) of 0.03 (I(beam)=2.4 A). A beam current about 3 A was achieved at an acceleration voltage of 26.7 kV with an arc power of 10 kW (Perv=0.023). PMID:18315239

  12. Temperature dependence of decay time and intensity of alpha pulses in pure and thallium-activated cesium iodide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Martinez, P.; Alekna, V.P.

    1962-01-01

    The intensity and decay time of Po210 ?? particle scintillations produced in pure and thallium-activated cesium iodide have been measured with a fast electronic system as a function of temperature down to 77??K. Three modes of decay due to alpha excitation have been observed for CsI(Tl), and two for CsI. Other than the 7- and 0.55-??sec modes (at room temperature) reported in the literature for CsI(Tl), an additional temperature-independent mode of about 1.3 ??sec has been detected between 77 and 150??K. In CsI a fast temperature-dependent mode of decay (???100 nsec) was observed between 100-200??K in addition to the known principal mode. ?? 1962 The American Institute of Physics.

  13. Intense XUV radiation driven explosions of Xe clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, B.; Hoffmann, K.; Belolipetski, A.; Bernstein, A.; Keto, J.; Ditmire, T.; Artyukov, I.

    2008-04-01

    We have investigated the explosions of large xenon clusters subject to irradiation by high intensity extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light with wavelength near 38 nm. To do this we generated high order harmonics by focusing the output of the 20 TW, 40 fs, 800nm wavelength THOR laser into a jet of argon gas. To select a single harmonic we then employed a Sc/Si short focal length multilayer mirror optimized for the 21st harmonic at 38.1 nm at near normal incidence. This harmonic is focused onto a jet of xenon gas. We characterized the XUV focal spot by scanning a knife edge across an XUV photodiode and determined that our peak XUV intensity was 2x10^10 Wcm-2. Fast ion time-of-flight spectra reveal high ion charge states well above single photon ionization thresholds. These ions exhibit low kinetic energies consistent with hydrodynamic cluster expansion rather than Coulomb explosion. We also measured the electron spectra from these Xe cluster explosions and have observed moderate energy electrons ejected from the clusters.

  14. Detailed 8-transistor SRAM cell analysis for improved alpha particle radiation hardening in nanometer technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bota, Sebastià A.; Torrens, Gabriel; Verd, Jaume; Segura, Jaume

    2015-09-01

    Eight-transistor (8T) cells were introduced to improve variability tolerance, cell stability and low-voltage operation in high-speed SRAM caches by decoupling the read and write design requirements. Altogether, 8T-SRAM can be designed without significant area penalty over 6T-SRAM. Ionizing radiation effects are nowadays a major concern for reliability and dependability of emerging electronic SRAM devices, even for sea-level applications. In this paper we demonstrate from experimental results that the 8T-SRAM also exhibits an enhanced overall intrinsic tolerance to alpha particle radiation even though its critical charge values are smaller than conventional 6T cells. We have experimentally found that the soft error rate measured in accelerated experiments with alpha particles in SRAM devices implemented in a 65 nm CMOS is 56% better for 8T cells with respect to standard 6T-cells. Even more, we show that this value can be increased up to a 200% through transistor sizing optimization.

  15. Synchronous flowering of the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) induced by high solar radiation intensity.

    PubMed

    Yeang, Hoong-Yeet

    2007-01-01

    How tropical trees flower synchronously near the equator in the absence of significant day length variation or other meteorological cues has long been a puzzle. The rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) is used as a model to investigate this phenomenon. The annual cycle of solar radiation intensity is shown to correspond closely with the flowering of the rubber tree planted near the equator and in the subtropics. Unlike in temperate regions, where incoming solar radiation (insolation) is dependent on both day length and radiation intensity, insolation at the equator is due entirely to the latter. Insolation at the upper atmosphere peaks twice a year during the spring and autumn equinoxes, but the actual solar radiation that reaches the ground is attenuated to varying extents in different localities. The rubber tree shows one or two flowering seasons a year (with major and minor seasons in the latter) in accordance with the solar radiation intensity received. High solar radiation intensity, and in particular bright sunshine (as distinct from prolonged diffuse radiation), induces synchronous anthesis and blooming in Hevea around the time of the equinoxes. The same mechanism may be operational in other tropical tree species. PMID:17587376

  16. Response of two-phase droplets to intense electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Spann, J F; Maloney, D J; Lawson, W F; Casleton, K H

    1993-04-20

    The response of two-phase droplets to intense radiant heating is studied to determine the incident power that is required for causing explosive boiling in the liquid phase. The droplets studied consist of strongly absorbing coal particles dispersed in a weakly absorbing water medium. Experiments are performed by confining droplets (radii = 37, 55, and 80 microm) electrodynamically and irradiating them from two sides with pulsed laser beams. Emphasis is placed on the transition region from accelerated droplet vaporization to droplet superheating and explosive boiling. The time scale observed for explosive boiling is more than 2 orders of magnitude longer than published values for pure liquids. The delayed response is the result of energy transfer limitations between the absorbing solid phase and the surrounding liquid. PMID:20820360

  17. Response of two-phase droplets to intense electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F.; Maloney, Daniel J.; Lawson, William F.; Casleton, Kent H.

    1993-01-01

    The response of two-phase droplets to intense radiant heating is studied to determine the incident power that is required for causing explosive boiling in the liquid phase. The droplets studied consist of strongly absorbing coal particles dispersed in a weakly absorbing water medium. Experiments are performed by confining droplets (radii of 37, 55, and 80 microns) electrodynamically and irradiating them from two sides with pulsed laser beams. Emphasis is placed on the transition region from accelerated droplet vaporization to droplet superheating and explosive boiling. The time scale observed for explosive boiling is more than 2 orders of magnitude longer than published values for pure liquids. The delayed response is the result of energy transfer limitations between the absorbing solid phase and the surrounding liquid.

  18. X-radiation /E greater than 10 keV/, H-alpha and microwave emission during the impulsive phase of solar flares.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorpahl, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    A study has been made of the variation in hard (E greater than 10 keV) X-radiation, H-alpha and microwave emission during the impulsive phase of solar flares. Analysis shows that the rise-time in the 20-30-keV X-ray spike depends on the electron hardness. The impulsive phase is also marked by an abrupt, very intense increase in H-alpha emission in one or more knots of the flare. Properties of these H-alpha kernels include: (1) a luminosity several times greater than the surrounding flare, (2) an intensity rise starting about 20-30 sec before, peaking about 20-25 sec after, and lasting about twice as long as the hard spike, (3) a location lower in the chromosphere than the remaining flare, (4) essentially no expansion prior to the hard spike, and (5) a position within 6000 km of the boundary separating polarities, usually forming on both sides of the neutral line near both feet of the same tube of force. Correspondingly, impulsive microwave events are characterized by: (1) great similarity in burst structure with 20-32 keV X-rays but only above 5000 MHz, (2) typical low frequency burst cutoff between 1400-3800 MHz, and (3) maximum emission above 7500 MHz.

  19. Inelastic scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yelon, W.B.; Schupp, G.

    1993-02-01

    The QUEGS facility at MURR has produced a number of new results and demonstrated the range of potential applications of high resolution, high intensity Moessbauer scattering. This work has been carried out by both MU and Purdue researchers and includes published results on Na, W, pentadecane, polydimethylsiloxane and other systems, manuscripts submitted on alkali halides (Phys. Rev. B) and accurate Moessbauer lineshape measurements (Phys. Rev. C), and manuscripts in preparation on glycerol, NiAl and Moessbauer spectra obtained by modulating a scattering crystal. Recently, new collaborations have been initiated which will substantially enhance our efforts. These are with W. Steiner (Vienna), G. Coddens (Saclay), and R. D. Taylor (Los Alamos). Steiner is experienced with Fe-57 Moessbauer scattering, while Coddens specializes in quasielastic neutron scattering; both of these areas naturally complement our work. R. D. Taylor has pioneered Moessbauer spectroscopy from the time of its discovery and has already made important contributions to our study of lattice dynamics and superconductivity for lead alloyed with small quantities of tin. At the same time, a significant instrument upgrade is underway, funded in part by the DOE-URIP program.

  20. Interaction of intense vuv radiation with large xenon clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, Zachary B.; Greene, Chris H.; Santra, Robin

    2006-10-15

    The interaction of atomic clusters with short, intense pulses of laser light to form extremely hot, dense plasmas has attracted extensive experimental and theoretical interest. The high density of atoms within the cluster greatly enhances the atom-laser interaction, while the finite size of the cluster prevents energy from escaping the interaction region. Recent technological advances have allowed experiments to probe the laser-cluster interaction at very high photon energies, with interactions much stronger than suggested by theories for lower photon energies. We present a model of the laser-cluster interaction that uses nonperturbative R-matrix techniques to calculate inverse bremsstrahlung and photoionization cross sections for Herman-Skillman atomic potentials. We describe the evolution of the cluster under the influence of the processes of inverse bremsstrahlung heating, photoionization, collisional ionization and recombination, and expansion of the cluster. We compare total energy absorbed with the Hamburg experiment of Wabnitz et al. [Nature 420, 482 (2002)] and ejected electron spectra with Laarmann et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 063402 (2005)].

  1. Prevention and Treatment of Functional and Structural Radiation Injury in the Rat Heart by Pentoxifylline and Alpha-Tocopherol

    SciTech Connect

    Boerma, Marjan Roberto, Kerrey A.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a severe side effect of thoracic radiotherapy. This study examined the effects of pentoxifylline (PTX) and {alpha}-tocopherol on cardiac injury in a rat model of RIHD. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats received fractionated local heart irradiation with a daily dose of 9 Gy for 5 days and were observed for 6 months after irradiation. Rats were treated with a combination of PTX, 100 mg/kg/day, and {alpha}-tocopherol (20 IU/kg/day) and received these compounds either from 1 week before until 6 months after irradiation or starting 3 months after irradiation, a time point at which histopathologic changes become apparent in our model of RIHD. Results: Radiation-induced increases in left ventricular diastolic pressure (in mm Hg: 35 {+-} 6 after sham-irradiation, 82 {+-} 11 after irradiation) were significantly reduced by PTX and {alpha}-tocopherol (early treatment: 48 {+-} 7; late treatment: 53 {+-} 6). PTX and {alpha}-tocopherol significantly reduced deposition of collagen types I (radiation only: 3.5 {+-} 0.2 {mu}m{sup 2} per 100 {mu}m{sup 2}; early treatment: 2.7 {+-} 0.8; late treatment: 2.2 {+-} 0.2) and III (radiation only: 13.9 {+-} 0.8; early treatment: 11.0 {+-} 1.2; late treatment: 10.6 {+-} 0.8). On the other hand, radiation-induced alterations in heart/body weight ratios, myocardial degeneration, left ventricular mast cell densities, and most echocardiographic parameters were not significantly altered by PTX and {alpha}-tocopherol. Conclusions: Treatment with PTX and {alpha}-tocopherol may have beneficial effects on radiation-induced myocardial fibrosis and left ventricular function, both when started before irradiation and when started later during the process of RIHD.

  2. Reverberation Chamber Uniformity Validation and Radiated Susceptibility Test Procedures for the NASA High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppen, Sandra V.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Mielnik, John J.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center's High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory has developed a capability based on the RTCA/DO-160F Section 20 guidelines for radiated electromagnetic susceptibility testing in reverberation chambers. Phase 1 of the test procedure utilizes mode-tuned stirrer techniques and E-field probe measurements to validate chamber uniformity, determines chamber loading effects, and defines a radiated susceptibility test process. The test procedure is segmented into numbered operations that are largely software controlled. This document is intended as a laboratory test reference and includes diagrams of test setups, equipment lists, as well as test results and analysis. Phase 2 of development is discussed.

  3. Cooling of relativistic electron beams in intense laser pulses: Chirps and radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoffe, S. R.; Noble, A.; Macleod, A. J.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2016-09-01

    Next-generation high-power laser facilities (such as the Extreme Light Infrastructure) will provide unprecedented field intensities, and will allow us to probe qualitatively new physical regimes for the first time. One of the important fundamental questions which will be addressed is particle dynamics when radiation reaction and quantum effects play a significant role. Classical theories of radiation reaction predict beam cooling in the interaction of a relativistic electron bunch and a high-intensity laser pulse, with final-state properties only dependent on the laser fluence. The observed quantum suppression of this cooling instead exhibits a dependence on the laser intensity directly. This offers the potential for final-state properties to be modified or even controlled by tailoring the intensity profile of the laser pulse. In addition to beam properties, quantum effects will be manifest in the emitted radiation spectra, which could be manipulated for use as radiation sources. We compare predictions made by classical, quasi-classical and stochastic theories of radiation reaction, and investigate the influence of chirped laser pulses on the observed radiation spectra.

  4. Growth and Characterization of alpha-PbO for Room Temperature Radiation Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Erin Leigh

    A global trading structure and high throughput of shipping containers into ports around the world increases the chance of nuclear terrorism via cargo containers. Harmless radioactive sources confuse and impede detection of the materials that pose a real threat, making spectroscopy difficult and requiring detectors with high resolution. The current methods that are used to check containers in ports have security flaws, and only 5% of all shipping containers are checked. The development of semiconductor gamma-ray detectors is one of the protocols being advanced to alleviate this risk because they can function at room temperature and they are cost effective, easily produced, and have high resolution. This dissertation has addressed the current lack of "perfect" room temperature detector materials by investigating alpha-PbO, a novel material in this field. This includes the development of a growth process for alpha-PbO thin films, as well as its structural and performance characterization as a detector material. Because we intend alpha-PbO to be a photoconductive detector, it should have certain properties. A photoconductive detector consists of a highly resistive material with a voltage bias across it. It absorbs incident gamma-rays, creating electron-hole pairs that provide a signal. To function well, it must have a high atomic number and a high density in order to absorb high-energy photons via the photoelectric effect. It should also have a large resistivity and a wide band gap to avoid large leakage currents at room temperature. Finally, it must have good charge carrier transport properties and detector resolution in order to be able to determine the characteristic energy peaks of the radiation-emitting source. We chose alpha-PbO because it has a very high Z and a very high density and a band gap in the correct range. It also has a rich history of use as a photoconductor that reaches back to the 1950s. Numerous methods have been used to grow thin films of alpha

  5. Intensive Care Nurses’ Knowledge of Radiation Safety and Their Behaviors Towards Portable Radiological Examinations

    PubMed Central

    Dianati, Mansoor; Zaheri, Azita; Talari, Hamid Reza; Deris, Fateme; Rezaei, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Background: Radiological examinations for patients who are hospitalized at intensive care units are usually performed using portable radiography devices. However they may require knowledge and safety precautions of nurses. Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate ICU nurses’ knowledge of radiation safety and their behaviors towards portable radiological examinations. Materials and Methods: In total, 44 intensive care nurses were recruited for this cross-sectional descriptive study using census sampling during April and May 2014. The study setting was at intensive care units of Shahid Beheshti Hospital of Kashan, Iran. An eleven-item questionnaire and a five-item checklist were used for evaluating nurses’ radiation protection knowledge and behaviors, respectively. An expert panel consisting of ten nursing and radiology faculty members confirmed the content validity of the questionnaire and the checklist. Moreover, a Geiger-Müller counter was used for measuring ionizing radiation during portable radiological examinations. Study data were analyzed using the SPSS software version 13.0. Mean, standard deviation, frequency and one-sample t test were used for description of the data. The level of significance was set at below 0.05. Results: The mean of participants’ radiation protection knowledge was 4.77 ± 1.38. The most prevalent radiation protection behavior of nurses was leaving the intensive care unit during portable radiological examinations. Only 6.8% of nurses stayed at the nursing station during radiological examinations. The highest dose of radiation was 0.11 micro Sievert per hour (μSv/h), which was much lower than the highest permitted level of radiation exposure i.e. 0.25 μSv/h. Conclusions: Portable radiological examinations did not expose healthcare providers to high doses of ionizing radiation. Nurses’ radiation protection knowledge was limited and hence, they require in-service education programs. PMID:25741515

  6. Alpha-tocopherol succinate- and AMD3100-mobilized progenitors mitigate radiation combined injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vijay K.; Wise, Stephen Y.; Fatanmi, Oluseyi O.; Beattie, Lindsay A.; Ducey, Elizabeth J.; Seed, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the role of alpha-tocopherol succinate (TS)- and AMD3100-mobilized progenitors in mitigating combined injury associated with acute radiation exposure in combination with secondary physical wounding. CD2F1 mice were exposed to high doses of cobalt-60 gamma-radiation and then transfused intravenously with 5 million peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from TS- and AMD3100-injected mice after irradiation. Within 1 h after irradiation, mice were exposed to secondary wounding. Mice were observed for 30 d after irradiation and cytokine analysis was conducted by multiplex Luminex assay at various time-points after irradiation and wounding. Our results initially demonstrated that transfusion of TS-mobilized progenitors from normal mice enhanced survival of acutely irradiated mice exposed 24 h prior to transfusion to supralethal doses (11.5–12.5 Gy) of 60Co gamma-radiation. Subsequently, comparable transfusions of TS-mobilized progenitors were shown to significantly mitigate severe combined injuries in acutely irradiated mice. TS administered 24 h before irradiation was able to protect mice against combined injury as well. Cytokine results demonstrated that wounding modulates irradiation-induced cytokines. This study further supports the conclusion that the infusion of TS-mobilized progenitor-containing PBMCs acts as a bridging therapy in radiation-combined-injury mice. We suggest that this novel bridging therapeutic approach involving the infusion of TS-mobilized hematopoietic progenitors following acute radiation exposure or combined injury might be applicable to humans. PMID:23814114

  7. Radiation-induced cationic polymerization of limonene oxide,. cap alpha. -pinene oxide, and. beta. -pinene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Aikins, J.A.; Williams, F.

    1984-01-01

    After suitable drying, the subject monomers in the form of neat liquids undergo radiation-induced polymerization with no apparent side reactions and high conversions to precipitatable polymers of low molecular weight. A cationic mechanism is evidenced by the strongly retarding effect of tri-n-propylamine on the polymerization rate. At 25/sup 0/C, limonene oxide gives the highest polymerization rates, an average conversion of 36% per Mrad being obtained in comparison with values of 5.7 and 7.3% per Mrad for the ..cap alpha..-pinene and ..beta..-pinene oxides, respectively. Similarly, the average anti DP/sub n/ decreases from 11.8 for the limonene oxide polymer to 5.6 and 4.0 for the ..cap alpha..-pinene oxide and ..beta..-pinene oxide polymers, respectively. A high frequency of chain transfer to monomer is indicated in each case by the fact that the kinetic chain lengths are estimated to be on the order of a hundred times larger than the anti DP/sub n/ values. Structural characterization of the limonene oxide polymer by /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy provides conclusive evidence that the polymerization proceeds by the opening of the epoxide ring to yield a 1,2-trans polyether. Similar NMR studies on the polymers formed from the ..cap alpha..-pinene and ..beta..-pinene oxides show that in the polymerization of these monomers, the opening of the epoxide ring is generally accompanied by the concomitant ring opening of the cyclobutane ring structure to yield a gem-dimethyl group in the main chain. The detection of isopropenyl end groups in the pinene oxide polymers is also consistent with this mode of propagation being followed by chain (proton) transfer to monomer.

  8. SU-E-J-267: Change in Mean CT Intensity of Lung Tumors During Radiation Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Mahon, R; Tennyson, N; Weiss, E; Hugo, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate CT intensity change of lung tumors during radiation therapy. Methods: Repeated 4D CT images were acquired on a CT simulator during the course of therapy for 27 lung cancer patients on IRB approved protocols. All subjects received definitive radiation treatment ± chemotherapy. CT scans were completed prior to treatment, and 2–7 times during the treatment course. Primary tumor was delineated by an experienced Radiation Oncologist. Contours were thresholded between −100 HU and 200 HU to remove airways and bone. Correlations between the change in the mean tumor intensity and initial tumor intensity, SUVmax, and tumor volume change rate were investigated. Reproducibility was assessed by evaluating the variation in mean intensity over all phases in 4DCT, for a subgroup of 19 subjects. Results: Reproducibility of tumor intensity between phases as characterized by the root mean square of standard deviation across 19 subjects was 1.8 HU. Subjects had a mean initial tumor intensity of 16.5 ± 11.6 HU and an overall reduction in HU by 10.3 ± 8.5 HU. Evaluation of the changes in tumor intensity during treatment showed a decrease of 0.3 ± 0.3 HU/day for all subjects, except three. No significant correlation was found between change in HU/day and initial HU intensity (p=0.53), initial PET SUVmax (p=0.69), or initial tumor volume (p=0.70). The rate of tumor volume change was weakly correlated (R{sup 2}=0.05) with HU change (p=0.01). Conclusion: Most lung cancer subjects showed a marked trend of decreasing mean tumor CT intensity throughout radiotherapy, including early in the treatment course. Change in HU/day is not correlated with other potential early predictors for response, such as SUV and tumor volume change. This Result supports future studies to evaluate change in tumor intensity on CT as an early predictor of response.

  9. Behavior of uranium oxides and oxyfluorides exposed to moisture and Cm-244 alpha radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Icenhour, A. S.; Toth, L. M.

    2004-05-01

    Alpha radiolysis studies have been performed on uranium oxides and oxyfluorides (UO3, U3O8, and UO2F2) to evaluate the long-term storage characteristics of U-233. These uranium compounds (using U-238 as the surrogate for U-233) were subjected to relatively high alpha radiation doses (235-634 MGy) by doping with Cm-244. The typical irradiation time for these samples was about 1.5 years, which would be equivalent to more than 50 years irradiation by a U-233 sample. Both dry and wet (up to 10 wt% water) samples were examined in an effort to identify the gas pressure and composition changes that occurred as a result of radiolysis. This study shows that several competing reactions occur during radiolysis with the net effect of generating only very low pressures of hydrogen, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide from water, nitrate, and carbon impurities, respectively. In the absence of nitrate impurities, no pressures greater than 1000 Torr are generated. Usually, however, the oxygen in the air atmosphere over the oxides is consumed with the corresponding oxidation of the uranium oxide. In the presence of up to 10 wt% water, the oxides first show a small pressure rise followed by a net decrease due to the oxygen consumption and the attainment of a steady-state pressure at which the rate of generation of gaseous components is balanced by their recombination and/or consumption in the oxide phase.

  10. Scaling of Ion Acceleration in Super Intense Laser Matter Interaction in Radiative Damping Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, Rishi; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Ackad, Edward

    2015-11-01

    We had derived the radiation reaction terms including the higher orders and implemented in PICLS codes [R. Pandit and Y. Sentoku, Phys. Plasmas 19, 073304 (2012)]. It was found that higher order terms of radiation reaction reduce the ponderomotive force as well as the photon pressure. The ponderomotive scaling, in super intense laser matter interactions, changes due to the decrease of the ponderomotive force on the electron and ion's accelerations. A new scaling of ion acceleration has been derived which depends on the laser intensity and oscillatory energy of electron. At 1023 W/cm2 almost half of the ponderomotive force is damped due to higher order terms. We will show how the theoretical result compares with PICLS simulations by varying laser intensities to understand the effect of the reduced ponderomotive force in super intense laser matter interaction.

  11. Nonadiabatic behavior of the polarization of electric-field-induced Lyman-. alpha. radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Plotzke, O.; Wille, U.; Hippler, R.; Lutz, H.O. Bereich Schwerionenphysik, Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Berlin )

    1990-12-10

    The linear polarization of Lyman-{alpha} radiation emitted when hydrogen atoms in the metastable 2{ital s}{sub 1/2} state traverse an external electric field is studied as a function of the effective rise time of the field for field strengths extending from very small values up to 6 keV/cm. With decreasing rise time, the measured polarization exhibits a transition from {ital adiabatic} to {ital sudden} behavior. The transition region is centered at a rise time which is approximately equal to the characteristic time associated with the 2{ital s}{sub 1/2-}2{ital p}{sub 1/2} Lamb splitting in the unperturbed hydrogen system. The experimental data are well described by the results of a time-dependent theory.

  12. Scintillator assembly for alpha radiation detection and method of making the assembly

    DOEpatents

    McElhaney, S.A.; Bauer, M.L.; Chiles, M.M.

    1992-09-22

    A scintillator assembly for use in the detection of alpha radiation includes a body of optically-transparent epoxy and an amount of phosphor particles embedded within the body adjacent one surface thereof. When making the body, the phosphor particles are mixed with the epoxy when in an uncured condition and permitted to settle to the bottom surface of a mold within which the epoxy/phosphor mixture is contained. When the mixture subsequently cures to form a hardened body, the one surface of the body which cured against the bottom surface of the mold is coated with a thin layer of opaque material for preventing ambient light form entering the body through the one surface. The layer of opaque material is thereafter coated with a layer of protective material to provide the assembly with a damage-resistant entrance window. 6 figs.

  13. Scintillator assembly for alpha radiation detection and method of making the assembly

    DOEpatents

    McElhaney, Stephanie A.; Bauer, Martin L.; Chiles, Marion M.

    1992-01-01

    A scintillator assembly for use in the detection of alpha radiation includes a body of optically-transparent epoxy and an amount of phosphor particles embedded within the body adjacent one surface thereof. When making the body, the phosphor particles are mixed with the epoxy when in an uncured condition and permitted to settle to the bottom surface of a mold within which the epoxy/phosphor mixture is contained. When the mixture subsequently cures to form a hardened body, the one surface of the body which cured against the bottom surface of the mold is coated with a thin layer of opaque material for preventing ambient light form entering the body through the one surface. The layer of opaque material is thereafter coated with a layer of protective material to provide the assembly with a damage-resistant entrance window.

  14. Mitigation of radiation nephropathy after internal {alpha}-particle irradiation of kidneys

    SciTech Connect

    Jaggi, Jaspreet Singh; Seshan, Surya V.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Sgouros, George; Hyjek, Elizabeth; Scheinberg, David A. . E-mail: d-scheinberg@ski.mskcc.org

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: Internal irradiation of kidneys as a consequence of radioimmunotherapy, radiation accidents, or nuclear terrorism can result in radiation nephropathy. We attempted to modify pharmacologically, the functional and morphologic changes in mouse kidneys after injection with the actinium ({sup 225}Ac) nanogenerator, an in vivo generator of {alpha}- and {beta}-particle emitting elements. Methods and Materials: The animals were injected with 0.35 {mu}Ci of the {sup 225}Ac nanogenerator, which delivers a dose of 27.6 Gy to the kidneys. Then, they were randomized to receive captopril (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor), L-158,809 (angiotensin II receptor-1 blocker), spironolactone (aldosterone receptor antagonist), or a placebo. Results: Forty weeks after the {sup 225}Ac injection, the placebo-control mice showed a significant increase in blood urea nitrogen (BUN) (87.6 {+-} 6.9 mg/dL), dilated Bowman spaces, and tubulolysis with basement membrane thickening. Captopril treatment accentuated the functional (BUN 119.0 {+-} 4.0 mg/dL; p <0.01 vs. placebo controls) and histopathologic damage. In contrast, L-158,809 offered moderate protection (BUN 66.6 {+-} 3.9 mg/dL; p = 0.02 vs. placebo controls). Spironolactone treatment, however, significantly prevented the development of histopathologic and functional changes (BUN 31.2 {+-} 2.5 mg/dL; p <0.001 vs. placebo controls). Conclusions: Low-dose spironolactone and, to a lesser extent, angiotensin receptor-1 blockade can offer renal protection in a mouse model of internal {alpha}-particle irradiation.

  15. Characteristics of a high-intensity plasma flash x-ray generator having a double-target radiation tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Sagae, Michiaki; Takahashi, Kei; Oizumi, Teiji; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Yanagisawa, Toru

    1995-05-01

    The radiographic characteristics of a high-intensity plasma flash x-ray generator having a solid-target (anode) radiation tube are described. This generator consisted of the following essential components; a high- voltage power supply, a low-impedance coaxial transmission line, a coaxial oil condenser of 0.2 (mu) F, a turbo-molecular pump, a thyratron pulser as a trigger device, and a flash x-ray triode having a rod-shaped long double anode; a 2.0 mm inner tungsten anode was embedded in 3.0 mm copper anode. The high-voltage condenser was charged from 40 to 60 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser were discharged to the tube after triggering the cathode electrode. The maximum tube voltage was equivalent to the charged voltage of the main condenser, and the voltage decreased after the triggering. Both the tube voltage and the current displayed damped oscillations, and the maximum tube current was less than 20 kA. The pulse height of the flash x rays substantially increased according to increases in the charged voltage, and the x-ray durations had values of a few microseconds. The plasma x- ray source substantially grew when the charged voltage was increased. The flash x-ray spectra from the plasma x-ray source were measured by a transmission-type spectrometer having a LiF curved crystal of 0.5 mm in thickness. Compared to the intensities of copper K(alpha) 1 and K(alpha) 2 including nondiagram lines increased by using the double target.

  16. SU-C-303-02: Correlating Metabolic Response to Radiation Therapy with HIF-1alpha Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, D; Peeters, W; Nickel, K; Eliceiri, K; Kimple, R; Van Der Kogel, A; Kissick, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To understand radiation induced alterations in cellular metabolism which could be used to assess treatment or normal tissue response to aid in patient-specific adaptive radiotherapy. This work aims to compare the metabolic response of two head and neck cell lines, one malignant (UM-SCC-22B) and one benign (Normal Oral Keratinocyte), to ionizing radiation. Responses are compared to alterations in HIF-1alpha expression. These dynamics can potentially serve as biomarkers in assessing treatment response allowing for patient-specific adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Measurements of metabolism and HIF-1alpha expression were taken before and X minutes after a 10 Gy dose of radiation delivered via an orthovoltage x-ray source. In vitro changes in metabolic activity were measured via fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) to assess the mean lifetime of NADH autofluorescence following a dose of 10 Gy. HIF-1alpha expression was measured via immunohistochemical staining of in vitro treated cells and expression was quantified using the FIJI software package. Results: FLIM demonstrated a decrease in the mean fluorescence lifetime of NADH by 100 ps following 10 Gy indicating a shift towards glycolytic pathways for malignant cells; whereas this benign cell line showed little change in metabolic signature. Immunohistochemical analysis showed significant changes in HIF-1alpha expression in response to 10 Gy of radiation that correlate to metabolic profiles. Conclusion: Radiation induces significant changes in metabolic activity and HIF-1alpha expression. These alterations occur on time scales approximating the duration of common radiation treatments (approximately tens of minutes). Further understanding these dynamics has important implications with regard to improvement of therapy and biomarkers of treatment response.

  17. Thermal conditions on the International Space Station: Effects of operations of the station Main Radiators on the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Min; Burger, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    A thermal model of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station (ISS) has been developed, and Thermal Desktop® (with RadCAD®) and SINDA/FLUINT software have been used to calculate the effects of the operations of the ISS Main Radiators on AMS temperatures. We find that the ISS Starboard Main Radiator has significant influence on temperatures on the port side of AMS. The simulation results are used in AMS thermal control operations.

  18. Nanodosimetry and nanodosimetric-based models of radiation action for radon alpha particles. Progress report, July 1990--June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Zaider, M.

    1992-12-31

    We report on a theory for describing the biological effects of ionizing radiation in particular radon {alpha} particles. Behind this approach is the recognition that biological effects such as chromosome aberrations, cellular transformation, cellular inactivation, etc, are the result of a hierarchic sequence of radiation effects. We indicate how to treat each of the individual processes in this sequence, and also how to relate one effect to the hierarchically superior one.

  19. The Lyman alpha coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, J. L.; Reeves, E. M.; Kirkham, B.

    1977-01-01

    The rocket-borne Lyman alpha coronagraph (RLAC) is to be used in the absence of a natural solar eclipse to determine coronal temperatures from measurements of the line width of Lyman-alpha and to determine neutral hydrogen densities of coronal material from the absolute intensity. The coronagraph consists of a 75-cm Fastie-Ebert scanning spectrometer with an AMR 641 photoelectric detection system, an off-axis parabolic primary mirror, and an occulting system. A special optical arrangement achieves rejection of radiation from the solar disk.

  20. Transverse beam shape measurements of intense proton beams using optical transition radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpine, Victor E.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    A number of particle physics experiments are being proposed as part of the Department of Energy HEP Intensity Frontier. Many of these experiments will utilize megawatt level proton beams onto targets to form secondary beams of muons, kaons and neutrinos. These experiments require transverse size measurements of the incident proton beam onto target for each beam spill. Because of the high power levels, most beam intercepting profiling techniques will not work at full beam intensity. The possibility of utilizing optical transition radiation (OTR) for high intensity proton beam profiling is discussed. In addition, previous measurements of OTR beam profiles from the NuMI beamline are presented.

  1. In vitro study of cell survival following dynamic MLC intensity-modulated radiation therapy dose delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Moiseenko, Vitali; Duzenli, Cheryl; Durand, Ralph E.

    2007-04-15

    The possibility of reduced cell kill following intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) compared to conventional radiation therapy has been debated in the literature. This potential reduction in cell kill relates to prolonged treatment times typical of IMRT dose delivery and consequently increased repair of sublethal lesions. While there is some theoretical support to this reduction in cell kill published in the literature, direct experimental evidence specific to IMRT dose delivery patterns is lacking. In this study we present cell survival data for three cell lines: Chinese hamster V79 fibroblasts, human cervical carcinoma, SiHa and colon adenocarcinoma, WiDr. Cell survival was obtained for 2.1 Gy delivered as acute dose with parallel-opposed pair (POP), irradiation time 75 s, which served as a reference; regular seven-field IMRT, irradiation time 5 min; and IMRT with a break for multiple leaf collimator (MLC) re-initialization after three fields were delivered, irradiation time 10 min. An actual seven-field dynamic MLC IMRT plan for a head and neck patient was used. The IMRT plan was generated for a Varian EX or iX linear accelerator with 120 leaf Millenium MLC. Survival data were also collected for doses 1x, 2x, 3x, 4x, and 5x 2.1 Gy to establish parameters of the linear-quadratic equation describing survival following acute dose delivery. Cells were irradiated inside an acrylic cylindrical phantom specifically designed for this study. Doses from both IMRT and POP were validated using ion chamber measurements. A reproducible increase in cell survival was observed following IMRT dose delivery. This increase varied from small for V79, with a surviving fraction of 0.8326 following POP vs 0.8420 following uninterrupted IMRT, to very pronounced for SiHa, with a surviving fraction of 0.3903 following POP vs 0.5330 for uninterrupted IMRT. When compared to IMRT or IMRT with a break for MLC initialization, cell survival following acute dose delivery was

  2. High-intensity coherent FIR radiation from sub-picosecond electron bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, P.H.; Lihn, Hung-chi; Wiedemann, H.; Bocek, D.

    1994-01-01

    A facility to generate high-intensity, ultra-short pulses of broad-band far-infrared radiation has been assembled and tested at Stanford. The device uses sub-picosecond relativistic electron bunches to generate coherent radiation through transition or synchrotron radiation in the far-infrared (FIR) regime between millimeter waves and wavelengths of about 100 {mu}m and less. Experimental results show a peak radiation power of greater than 0.33 MW within a micro-bunch and an average FIR radiation power of 4 mW. The average bunch length of 2856 micro-bunches within a 1 {mu}sec macro-pulse is estimated to be about 480 sec. Simulations experimental setup and results will be discussed.

  3. Primary radiation damage of protein crystals by an intense synchrotron X-ray beam.

    PubMed

    Teng, T Y; Moffat, K

    2000-09-01

    X-ray radiation damage of a lysozyme single crystal by an intense monochromatic beam from a third-generation radiation source at the Advanced Photon Source has been studied. The results show that primary radiation damage is linearly dependent on the X-ray dose even when the crystal is at cryogenic temperatures. The existence of an upper limit for the primary radiation damage was observed. Above the threshold of approximately 1 x 10(7) Gy, excessive damage of the crystal develops which is interpreted as the onset of secondary and/or tertiary radiation damage. This upper limit of X-ray dose is compared with Henderson's limit [Henderson (1990). Proc. R. Soc. London, B241, 6-8], and its implication for the amount of useful X-ray diffraction data that can be obtained for crystals of a given scattering power is also discussed. PMID:16609214

  4. 14 CFR 23.1308 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 23.1308 Section 23.1308 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General §...

  5. 14 CFR 23.1308 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 23.1308 Section 23.1308 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General §...

  6. 14 CFR 23.1308 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 23.1308 Section 23.1308 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General §...

  7. 14 CFR 23.1308 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 23.1308 Section 23.1308 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General §...

  8. Evaluation of a low-intensity ultraviolet-C radiation device for decontamination of computer keyboards.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Aaron A; Ely, Dylan; Cadnum, Jennifer L; Koganti, Sreelatha; Alhmidi, Heba; Sankar C, Thriveen; Jencson, Annette L; Kundrapu, Sirisha; Donskey, Curtis J

    2016-06-01

    Computer keyboards are a potential source for dissemination of pathogenic microorganisms. We demonstrated that a low-intensity ultraviolet-C (UV-C) radiation device was effective in reducing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli, and Clostridium difficile spores on steel carriers and significantly reduced bacterial counts on in-use keyboards. PMID:26781219

  9. 14 CFR 23.1308 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 23.1308 Section 23.1308 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General §...

  10. Quantum mechanical theory of collisional ionization in the presence of intense laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellum, J. C.; George, T. F.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents a quantum mechanical formalism for treating ionizing collisions occurring in the presence of an intense laser field. Both the intense laser radiation and the internal electronic continuum states associated with the emitted electrons are rigorously taken into account by combining discretization techniques with expansions in terms of electronic-field representations for the quasi-molecule-plus-photon system. The procedure leads to a coupled-channel description of the heavy-particle dynamics which involves effective electronic-field potential surfaces and continua. It is suggested that laser-influenced ionizing collisions can be studied to verify the effects of intense laser radiation on inelastic collisional processes. Calculation procedures for electronic transition dipole matrix elements between discrete and continuum electronic states are outlined.

  11. Thermal conditions on the International Space Station: Heat flux and temperature investigation of main radiators for the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Min; Gao, Jianmin; Wu, Shaohua; Qin, Yukun

    2016-09-01

    The investigation on heat flux can clarify the thermal condition and explain temperature behavior on the main radiators of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS). In this paper, a detailed investigation of heat flux on the AMS main radiators is proposed. The heat transfer process of the AMS main radiators is theoretically analyzed. An updated thermal model of the AMS on the International Space Station (ISS) is developed to calculate the external heat flux density on the AMS main radiators. We conclude the ISS components and operations affect on the solar flux density of the AMS main radiators by reflecting or shading solar illumination. According to the energy conservation on the AMS main radiators, the temperature variation mainly depends on the solar flux change. The investigations are conducive to reference for the long-duration thermal control of the AMS, and knowledge for the thermal conditions on the ISS.

  12. Radiation Dose Measurement for High-Intensity Laser Interactions with Solid Targets at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Taiee

    2015-09-25

    A systematic study of photon and neutron radiation doses generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions is underway at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We found that these laser-solid experiments are being performed using a 25 TW (up to 1 J in 40 fs) femtosecond pulsed Ti:sapphire laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source’s (LCLS) Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) facility. Additionally, radiation measurements were performed with passive and active detectors deployed at various locations inside and outside the target chamber. Results from radiation dose measurements for laser-solid experiments at SLAC MEC in 2014 with peak intensity between 1018 to 7.1x1019 W/cm2 are presented.

  13. Four-Week Course of Radiation for Breast Cancer Using Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With an Incorporated Boost

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Gary M. . E-mail: Gary.Freedman@FCCC.edu; Anderson, Penny R.; Goldstein, Lori J.; Ma Changming; Li Jinsheng; Swaby, Ramona F.; Litwin, Samuel; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Morrow, Monica

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: Standard radiation for early breast cancer requires daily treatment for 6 to 7 weeks. This is an inconvenience to many women, and for some a barrier for breast conservation. We present the acute toxicity of a 4-week course of hypofractionated radiation. Methods and Materials: A total of 75 patients completed radiation on a Phase II trial approved by the hospital institutional review board. Eligibility criteria were broad to include any patient normally eligible for standard radiation: age {>=}18 years, invasive or in situ cancer, American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage 0 to II, breast-conserving surgery, and any systemic therapy not given concurrently. The median age was 52 years (range, 31-81 years). Of the patients, 15% had ductal carcinoma in situ, 67% T1, and 19% T2; 71% were N0, 17% N1, and 12% NX. Chemotherapy was given before radiation in 44%. Using photon intensity-modulated radiation therapy and incorporated electron beam boost, the whole breast received 45 Gy and the lumpectomy bed 56 Gy in 20 treatments over 4 weeks. Results: The maximum acute skin toxicity by the end of treatment was Grade 0 in 9 patients (12%), Grade 1 in 49 (65%) and Grade 2 in 17 (23%). There was no Grade 3 or higher skin toxicity. After radiation, all Grade 2 toxicity had resolved by 6 weeks. Hematologic toxicity was Grade 0 in most patients except for Grade 1 neutropenia in 2 patients, and Grade 1 anemia in 11 patients. There were no significant differences in baseline vs. 6-week posttreatment patient-reported or physician-reported cosmetic scores. Conclusions: This 4-week course of postoperative radiation using intensity-modulated radiation therapy is feasible and is associated with acceptable acute skin toxicity and quality of life. Long-term follow-up data are needed. This radiation schedule may represent an alternative both to longer 6-week to 7-week standard whole-breast radiation and more radically shortened 1-week, partial-breast treatment schedules.

  14. Calculation of the electronic parameters of an Al/DNA/p-Si Schottky barrier diode influenced by alpha radiation.

    PubMed

    Al-Ta'ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Mohd Amin, Yusoff; Periasamy, Vengadesh

    2015-01-01

    Many types of materials such as inorganic semiconductors have been employed as detectors for nuclear radiation, the importance of which has increased significantly due to recent nuclear catastrophes. Despite the many advantages of this type of materials, the ability to measure direct cellular or biological responses to radiation might improve detector sensitivity. In this context, semiconducting organic materials such as deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA have been studied in recent years. This was established by studying the varying electronic properties of DNA-metal or semiconductor junctions when exposed to radiation. In this work, we investigated the electronics of aluminium (Al)/DNA/silicon (Si) rectifying junctions using their current-voltage (I-V) characteristics when exposed to alpha radiation. Diode parameters such as ideality factor, barrier height and series resistance were determined for different irradiation times. The observed results show significant changes with exposure time or total dosage received. An increased deviation from ideal diode conditions (7.2 to 18.0) was observed when they were bombarded with alpha particles for up to 40 min. Using the conventional technique, barrier height values were observed to generally increase after 2, 6, 10, 20 and 30 min of radiation. The same trend was seen in the values of the series resistance (0.5889-1.423 Ω for 2-8 min). These changes in the electronic properties of the DNA/Si junctions could therefore be utilized in the construction of sensitive alpha particle detectors. PMID:25730484

  15. Calculation of the Electronic Parameters of an Al/DNA/p-Si Schottky Barrier Diode Influenced by Alpha Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ta’ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Amin, Yusoff Mohd; Periasamy, Vengadesh

    2015-01-01

    Many types of materials such as inorganic semiconductors have been employed as detectors for nuclear radiation, the importance of which has increased significantly due to recent nuclear catastrophes. Despite the many advantages of this type of materials, the ability to measure direct cellular or biological responses to radiation might improve detector sensitivity. In this context, semiconducting organic materials such as deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA have been studied in recent years. This was established by studying the varying electronic properties of DNA-metal or semiconductor junctions when exposed to radiation. In this work, we investigated the electronics of aluminium (Al)/DNA/silicon (Si) rectifying junctions using their current-voltage (I-V) characteristics when exposed to alpha radiation. Diode parameters such as ideality factor, barrier height and series resistance were determined for different irradiation times. The observed results show significant changes with exposure time or total dosage received. An increased deviation from ideal diode conditions (7.2 to 18.0) was observed when they were bombarded with alpha particles for up to 40 min. Using the conventional technique, barrier height values were observed to generally increase after 2, 6, 10, 20 and 30 min of radiation. The same trend was seen in the values of the series resistance (0.5889–1.423 Ω for 2–8 min). These changes in the electronic properties of the DNA/Si junctions could therefore be utilized in the construction of sensitive alpha particle detectors. PMID:25730484

  16. Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Reduces Time Spent With Acute Dermatitis for Women of All Breast Sizes During Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Gary M. Li Tianyu; Nicolaou, Nicos; Chen Yan; Ma, Charlie C.-M.; Anderson, Penny R.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To study the time spent with radiation-induced dermatitis during a course of radiation therapy for breast cancer in women treated with conventional or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 804 consecutive women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation from 2001 to 2006. All patients were treated with whole-breast radiation followed by a boost to the tumor bed. Whole-breast radiation consisted of conventional wedged photon tangents (n = 405) earlier in the study period and mostly of photon IMRT (n = 399) in later years. All patients had acute dermatitis graded each week of treatment. Results: The breakdown of the cases of maximum acute dermatitis by grade was as follows: 3%, Grade 0; 34%, Grade 1; 61%, Grade 2; and 2%, Grade 3. The breakdown of cases of maximum toxicity by technique was as follows: 48%, Grade 0/1, and 52%, Grade 2/3, for IMRT; and 25%, Grade 0/1, and 75%, Grade 2/3, for conventional radiation therapy (p < 0.0001). The IMRT patients spent 82% of weeks during treatment with Grade 0/1 dermatitis and 18% with Grade 2/3 dermatitis, compared with 29% and 71% of patients, respectively, treated with conventional radiation (p < 0.0001). Furthermore, the time spent with Grade 2/3 toxicity was decreased in IMRT patients with small (p = 0.0015), medium (p < 0.0001), and large (p < 0.0001) breasts. Conclusions: Breast IMRT is associated with a significant decrease both in the time spent during treatment with Grade 2/3 dermatitis and in the maximum severity of dermatitis compared with that associated with conventional radiation, regardless of breast size.

  17. Predictive factors for acute radiation pneumonitis in postoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy of esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yaqin; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Shu; Wu, Qiang; Jiang, Xiaoqin; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Jin; Li, Zhiping; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Ying Jie; Bai, Sen; Xu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background Radiation pneumonitis (RP) is a common side reaction in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. There are few reports about RP in esophageal cancer patients receiving postoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). This study aims to analyze clinical or dosimetric factors associated with RP, and provides data for radiotherapy planning. Methods We reviewed 68 postoperative esophageal cancer patients who were treated with radiotherapy at the West China Hospital from October 2010 to November 2012 to identify any correlation between the clinical or dosimetric parameters and acute radiation pneumonitis (ARP) or severe acute radiation pneumonitis (SARP) by t-test, chi-square test, and logistic regression analysis. Results Of the 68 patients, 33 patients (48.5%) developed ARP, 13 of which (19.1%) developed SARP. Of these 33 patients, 8 (11.8%), 12 (17.6%), 11 (16.2%), and 2 (2.9%) patients were grade 1, 2, 3, and 4 ARP, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that lung infection during radiotherapy, use of VMAT, mean lung dose (MLD), and dosimetric parameters (e.g. V20, V30) are significantly correlated with RP. Multivariate analysis found that lung infection during radiotherapy, MLD ≥ 12 Gy, and V30 ≥ 13% are significantly correlated with an increased risk of RP. Conclusion Lung infection during radiotherapy and low radiation dose volume distribution were predictive factors associated with RP and should be accounted for during radiation planning. PMID:26273335

  18. Photochemical decomposition of N2O by Lyman-alpha radiation: scientific basis for a chemical actinometer.

    PubMed

    Rajappan, Mahesh; Büttner, Michael; Cox, Charlie; Yates, John T

    2010-03-18

    A novel IR method for measuring the kinetics of N(2)O photodecomposition has been devised and used to calibrate the flux of Lyman-alpha (10.2 eV) radiation from a H(2)/Ar microwave discharge lamp. The photodecomposition of N(2)O occurs with a weak pressure dependence due to the operation of a wall effect consuming some photogenerated active oxygen species. This effect is removed by working at high N(2)O pressures. The Lyman-alpha flux from the lamp is 1.28 +/- 0.36 x 10(15) photons cm(-2) s(-1). PMID:20155946

  19. On the excitation of Lyman beta and Balmer alpha radiation by electron-impact dissociation of methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, R. W.; Zipf, E. C.

    1978-01-01

    The cross sections for the excitation of Ly-beta and H-alpha when methane is dissociated by electron impact have values of 17.1 by 10 to the -19th power sq cm and 26.0 by 10 to the -19th power sq cm, respectively, at an electron impact energy of 100 eV. These results are in disagreement with the implications of recent polarization measurements of H-alpha radiation that suggest negligible H(3p) excitation in the dissociation of CH4 by electron impact.

  20. Gas-Monitor Detector for Intense and Pulsed VUV/EUV Free-Electron Laser Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, A. A.; Bobashev, S. V.; Feldhaus, J.; Gerth, Ch.; Gottwald, A.; Hahn, U.; Kroth, U.; Richter, M.; Shmaenok, L. A.; Steeg, B.; Tiedtke, K.; Treusch, R.

    2004-05-01

    In the framework of current developments of new powerful VUV and EUV radiation sources, like VUV free-electron-lasers or EUV plasma sources for 13-nm lithography, we developed a gas-monitor detector in order to measure the photon flux of highly intense and extremely pulsed VUV and EUV radiation in absolute terms. The device is based on atomic photoionization of a rare gas at low particle density. Therefore, it is free of degradation and almost transparent, which allows the detector to be used as a continuously working beam-intensity monitor. The extended dynamic range of the detector allowed its calibration with relative standard uncertainties of 4% in the Radiometry Laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt at the electron-storage ring BESSY II in Berlin using spectrally dispersed synchrotron radiation at low photon intensities and its utilization for absolute photon flux measurements of high power sources. In the present contribution, we describe the design of the detector and its application for the characterization of VUV free-electron-laser radiation at the TESLA test facility in Hamburg. By first pulse resolved measurements, a peak power of more than 100 MW at a wavelength of 87 nm was detected.

  1. Predictors of Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients Receiving Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Smith, Grace L.; Milgrom, Sarah; Osborne, Eleanor M.; Reddy, Jay P.; Akhtari, Mani; Reed, Valerie; Arzu, Isidora; Allen, Pamela K.; Wogan, Christine F.; Fanale, Michele A.; Oki, Yasuhiro; Turturro, Francesco; Romaguera, Jorge; Fayad, Luis; Fowler, Nathan; Westin, Jason; Nastoupil, Loretta; Hagemeister, Fredrick B.; Rodriguez, Alma; Ahmed, Sairah; Nieto, Yago; Dabaja, Bouthaina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Few studies to date have evaluated factors associated with the development of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), especially in patients treated with contemporary radiation techniques. These patients represent a unique group owing to the often large radiation target volumes within the mediastinum and to the potential to receive several lines of chemotherapy that add to pulmonary toxicity for relapsed or refractory disease. Our objective was to determine the incidence and clinical and dosimetric risk factors associated with RP in lymphoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) at a single institution. Methods We retrospectively reviewed clinical charts and radiation records of 150 consecutive patients who received mediastinal IMRT for HL and NHL from 2009 through 2013. Clinical and dosimetric predictors associated with RP per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) acute toxicity criteria were identified in univariate analysis using the Pearson χ2 test and logistic multivariate regression. Results Mediastinal radiation was administered as consolidation therapy in 110 patients with newly diagnosed HL or NHL and in 40 patients with relapsed or refractory disease. The overall incidence of RP (RTOG grade 1–3) was 14% in the entire cohort. Risk of RP was increased for patients who received radiation for relapsed or refractory disease (25%) versus those who received consolidation (10%, P=0.019). Several dosimetric parameters predicted RP, including mean lung dose (MLD) >13.5 Gy, V20 >30%, V15 >35%, V10 >40% and V5>55%. The likelihood ratio (LR) χ2 value was highest for V5< 55% (LR χ2=19.37). Conclusions In using IMRT to treat mediastinal lymphoma, all dosimetric parameters predicted RP, although small doses to large volumes of lung had the greatest influence. Patients with relapsed or refractory lymphoma who received salvage chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell

  2. Oxidative mechanisms of biological activity of low-intensity radiofrequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Yakymenko, Igor; Tsybulin, Olexandr; Sidorik, Evgeniy; Henshel, Diane; Kyrylenko, Olga; Kyrylenko, Sergiy

    2016-01-01

    This review aims to cover experimental data on oxidative effects of low-intensity radiofrequency radiation (RFR) in living cells. Analysis of the currently available peer-reviewed scientific literature reveals molecular effects induced by low-intensity RFR in living cells; this includes significant activation of key pathways generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), activation of peroxidation, oxidative damage of DNA and changes in the activity of antioxidant enzymes. It indicates that among 100 currently available peer-reviewed studies dealing with oxidative effects of low-intensity RFR, in general, 93 confirmed that RFR induces oxidative effects in biological systems. A wide pathogenic potential of the induced ROS and their involvement in cell signaling pathways explains a range of biological/health effects of low-intensity RFR, which include both cancer and non-cancer pathologies. In conclusion, our analysis demonstrates that low-intensity RFR is an expressive oxidative agent for living cells with a high pathogenic potential and that the oxidative stress induced by RFR exposure should be recognized as one of the primary mechanisms of the biological activity of this kind of radiation. PMID:26151230

  3. Transcriptional and Secretomic Profiling of Epidermal Cells Exposed to Alpha Particle Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Vinita; Howland, Matthew; Greene, Hillary Boulay; Wilkins, Ruth C

    2012-01-01

    Alpha (α)-particle emitters are probable isotopes to be used in a terrorist attack. The development of biological assessment tools to identify those who have handled these difficult to detect materials would be an asset to our current forensic capacity. In this study, for the purposes of biomarker discovery, human keratinocytes were exposed to α-particle and X-radiation (0.98 Gy/h at 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 Gy) and assessed for differential gene and protein expression using microarray and Bio-Plex technology, respectively. Secretomic analysis of supernatants showed expression of two pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-13 and PDGF-bb) to be exclusively affected in α-particle exposed cells. The highest dose of α-particle radiation modulated a total of 67 transcripts (fold change>|1.5|, (False discovery rate) FDR<0.05) in exposed cells. Several genes which responded with high expression levels (>2 fold) included KIF20A, NEFM, C7orf10, HIST1H2BD, BMP6, and HIST1H2AC. Among the high expressing genes, five (CCNB2, BUB1, NEK2, CDC20, AURKA) were also differentially expressed at the medium (1.0 Gy) dose however, these genes were unmodulated following exposure to X-irradiation. Networks of these genes clustered around tumor protein-53 and transforming growth factor-beta signaling. This study has identified some potential gene /protein responses and networks that may be validated further to confirm their specificity and potential to be signature biomarkers of α-particle exposure. PMID:23002402

  4. Diffuse gamma radiation. [intensity, energy spectrum and spatial distribution from SAS 2 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Simpson, G. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Results are reported for an investigation of the intensity, energy spectrum, and spatial distribution of the diffuse gamma radiation detected by SAS 2 away from the galactic plane in the energy range above 35 MeV. The gamma-ray data are compared with relevant data obtained at other wavelengths, including 21-cm emission, radio continuum radiation, and the limited UV and radio information on local molecular hydrogen. It is found that there are two quite distinct components to the diffuse radiation, one of which shows a good correlation with the galactic matter distribution and continuum radiation, while the other has a much steeper energy spectrum and appears to be isotropic at least on a coarse scale. The galactic component is interpreted in terms of its implications for both local and more distant regions of the Galaxy. The apparently isotropic radiation is discussed partly with regard to the constraints placed on possible models by the steep energy spectrum, the observed intensity, and an upper limit on the anisotropy.

  5. Ablation and transmission of thin solid targets irradiated by intense extreme ultraviolet laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslanyan, V.; Kuznetsov, I.; Bravo, H.; Woolston, M. R.; Rossall, A. K.; Menoni, C. S.; Rocca, J. J.; Tallents, G. J.

    2016-09-01

    The interaction of an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) laser beam with a parylene foil was studied by experiments and simulation. A single EUV laser pulse of nanosecond duration focused to an intensity of 3 × 1010 W cm-2 perforated micrometer thick targets. The same laser pulse was simultaneously used to diagnose the interaction by a transmission measurement. A combination of 2-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic and diffraction calculations was used to model the ablation, leading to good agreement with experiment. This theoretical approach allows predictive modelling of the interaction with matter of intense EUV beams over a broad range of parameters.

  6. Telomere Length in Aged Mayak PA Nuclear Workers Chronically Exposed to Internal Alpha and External Gamma Radiation.

    PubMed

    Scherthan, Harry; Sotnik, Natalia; Peper, Michel; Schrock, Gerrit; Azizova, Tamara; Abend, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Telomeres consist of GC-rich DNA repeats and the "shelterin" protein complex that together protect chromosome ends from fusion and degradation. Telomeres shorten with age due to incomplete end replication and upon exposure to environmental and intrinsic stressors. Exposure to ionizing radiation is known to modulate telomere length. However, the response of telomere length in humans chronically exposed to radiation is poorly understood. Here, we studied relative telomere length (RTL) by IQ-FISH to leukocyte nuclei in a group of 100 workers from the plutonium production facility at the Mayak Production Association (PA) who were chronically exposed to alpha-emitting ((239)Pu) radiation and/or gamma (photon) radiation, and 51 local residents serving as controls, with a similar mean age of about 80 years. We applied generalized linear statistical models adjusted for age at biosampling and the second exposure type on a linear scale and observed an age-dependent telomere length reduction. In those individuals with the lowest exposure, a significant reduction of about 20% RTL was observed, both for external gamma radiation (≤1 Gy) and internal alpha radiation (≤0.05-0.1 Gy to the red bone marrow). In highly exposed individuals (>0.1 Gy alpha, 1-1.5 Gy gamma), the RTL was similar to control. Stratification by gender revealed a significant (∼30%) telomere reduction in low-dose-exposed males, which was absent in females. While the gender differences in RTL may reflect different working conditions, lifestyle and/or telomere biology, absence of a dose response in the highly exposed individuals may reflect selection against cells with short telomeres or induction of telomere-protective effects. Our observations suggest that chronic systemic exposure to radiation leads to variable dose-dependent effects on telomere length. PMID:27340887

  7. CHO cell repair of single-strand and double-strand DNA breaks induced by gamma- and alpha-radiations.

    PubMed

    Cole, A; Shonka, F; Corry, P; Cooper, W G

    1975-01-01

    Neutral and alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis was used to measure double- and single-strand breaks in the DNA of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells exposed to either gamma- or alpha-radiation. After irradiation, cells were incubated for 15-180 min to test the ability of the cell to rejoin the DNA breaks. Essentially complete rejoining was observed for single-strand breaks induced by gamma- or alpha-doses below 20 krad and for double-strand breaks induced by gamma doses below 60 krad. Approximately 80% rejoining was observed for double-strand breaks induced by alpha doses below 40 krad. At higher doses, the repair system appeared to saturate in such a way that essentially no additional breaks were rejoined. PMID:1191188

  8. Radiation-induced cationic polymerization of limonene oxide,. cap alpha. -pinene oxide, and. beta. -pinene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Aikins, J.A.; Williams, F.

    1985-01-01

    After suitable drying, the subject monomers in the form of neat liquids undergo radiation-induced polymerization with no apparent side reactions and high conversions to precipitatable polymers of low molecular weights. A high frequency of chain (proton) transfer to monomer is indicated by the fact that the kinetic chain lengths are estimated to be several hundred times larger than the range of DP/sub n/ values (12-4). Structural characterization of the limonene oxide polymer by /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy provides conclusive evidence that the polymerization proceeds by the opening of the epoxide ring to yield a 1,2-trans polyether. Similar NMR studies on the polymers formed from the ..cap alpha..-pinene and ..beta..-pinene oxides show that the opening of the epoxide ring for these monomers is generally accompanied by the concomitant ring opening of the cyclobutane ring structure to yield a gem-di-methyl group in the main chain.

  9. Radiation damage induced by MeV alpha particles in polycrystalline diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonon, P.; Prawer, S.; Nugent, K. W.; Jamieson, D. N.

    1996-11-01

    Radiation damage induced by 2 MeV alpha particles in polycrystalline diamond films has been studied as a function of the irradiation dose D (1012≤D≤1017 cm-2). The films were characterized using Raman/photoluminescence spectroscopy and I(V,T) measurements. The results can be summarized as follows. In undoped samples the H3 luminescent center (N-V-N) is observed for D≥1014 cm-2. The Raman diamond peak is broadened and shifted to lower frequencies for D≳1015 cm-2. No new graphitic component is detected after irradiation. On the contrary graphitic sp2 defects are annealed by irradiation. For D=3×1016 cm-2 new Raman defect peaks are detected at 1496 and 1635 cm-1. I(V,T) characteristics remain unaffected for D≤1016 cm-2. An increase in the conductivity is observed for D=3×1016 cm-2. At this dose we observe an activation energy of 0.4 eV and thermally stimulated currents related to defect levels at about 0.3 eV. A boron-doped sample (100 Ω cm) has been irradiated at 1017 cm-2 for comparison. After irradiation the conductivity of this sample is reduced and the activation energy of the conductivity is also reduced. Less damage is detected by Raman spectroscopy in the B-doped material.

  10. Radiation exposure among medical professionals working in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Suhail S.; Jha, Ashish; Konar, Nambiraj; Ranganathan, Priya; Deshpande, Deepak D.; Divatia, Jigeeshu V.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: With the expanding use of diagnostic and therapeutic radiological modalities in critically ill patients, doctors working in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) are increasingly exposed to ionizing radiation. This risk of radiation exposure occurs not only during bedside radiologic procedures, but also when ICU physicians accompany patients to radiology suites. The aim of this study was to quantify levels of radiation exposure among medical professionals working in the ICU. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out prospectively over 6 months in the ICU of a tertiary-referral cancer hospital. Two teams consisting of 4 ICU resident doctors each were instructed to wear thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) during their duty shifts. Standard radiation protection precautions were used throughout the study period. TLDs were also placed in selected areas of the ICU to measure the amount of scattered radiation. TLDs were analyzed at the end of every 3 months. Results: The readings recorded on TLDs placed in the ICU were almost immeasurable. The mean value of residents' radiation exposure was 0.059 mSv, though the highest individual reading approached 0.1 mSv. The projected maximum yearly radiation exposure was 0.4 mSv. Conclusions: If standard radiation safety precautions are followed, the cumulative radiation exposure to ICU resident doctors is well within permissible limits and is not a cause of concern. However, with the increasing use of radiological procedures in the management of critically ill patients, there is a need to repeat such audits periodically to monitor radiation exposure. PMID:25249743