Science.gov

Sample records for intense field exposure

  1. Out-of-Field Cell Survival Following Exposure to Intensity-Modulated Radiation Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Butterworth, Karl T.; McGarry, Conor K.; Trainor, Colman; O'Sullivan, Joe M.; Hounsell, Alan R.; Prise, Kevin M.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the in-field and out-of-field cell survival of cells irradiated with either primary field or scattered radiation in the presence and absence of intercellular communication. Methods and Materials: Cell survival was determined by clonogenic assay in human prostate cancer (DU145) and primary fibroblast (AGO1552) cells following exposure to different field configurations delivered using a 6-MV photon beam produced with a Varian linear accelerator. Results: Nonuniform dose distributions were delivered using a multileaf collimator (MLC) in which half of the cell population was shielded. Clonogenic survival in the shielded region was significantly lower than that predicted from the linear quadratic model. In both cell lines, the out-of-field responses appeared to saturate at 40%-50% survival at a scattered dose of 0.70 Gy in DU-145 cells and 0.24 Gy in AGO1522 cells. There was an approximately eightfold difference in the initial slopes of the out-of-field response compared with the {alpha}-component of the uniform field response. In contrast, cells in the exposed part of the field showed increased survival. These observations were abrogated by direct physical inhibition of cellular communication and by the addition of the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine known to inhibit intercellular bystander effects. Additional studies showed the proportion of cells irradiated and dose delivered to the shielded and exposed regions of the field to impact on response. Conclusions: These data demonstrate out-of-field effects as important determinants of cell survival following exposure to modulated irradiation fields with cellular communication between differentially irradiated cell populations playing an important role. Validation of these observations in additional cell models may facilitate the refinement of existing radiobiological models and the observations considered important determinants of cell survival.

  2. Exposure of workers to intense RF electric fields that leak from plastic sealers.

    PubMed

    Bini, M; Checcucci, A; Ignesti, A; Millanta, L; Olmi, R; Rubino, N; Vanni, R

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an environmental investigation in a plastic-ware industry using RF sealers. Environmental measurements have demonstrated the presence of strong electric fields the intensity of which: reaches significant levels from the health-protection point of view only in proximity to the applicators; often exceeds the maximal levels allowed by all standards (including the most permissive) for short duration exposures, especially in the region of the hands. Results of a cross-sectional study on the health of 63 female workers are related to the observed RF exposure. A statistically significant correlation was found to exist between RF exposure and some minor health effects--eye irritation, upper limb paresthesias, and vitreous body disorganization. PMID:3635629

  3. Impact of fractionation on out-of-field survival and DNA damage responses following exposure to intensity modulated radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghita, Mihaela; Coffey, Caroline B.; Butterworth, Karl T.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Schettino, Giuseppe; Prise, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    To limit toxicity to normal tissues adjacent to the target tumour volume, radiotherapy is delivered using fractionated regimes whereby the total prescribed dose is given as a series of sequential smaller doses separated by specific time intervals. The impact of fractionation on out-of-field survival and DNA damage responses was determined in AGO-1522 primary human fibroblasts and MCF-7 breast tumour cells using uniform and modulated exposures delivered using a 225 kVp x-ray source. Responses to fractionated schedules (two equal fractions delivered with time intervals from 4 h to 48 h) were compared to those following acute exposures. Cell survival and DNA damage repair measurements indicate that cellular responses to fractionated non-uniform exposures differ from those seen in uniform exposures for the investigated cell lines. Specifically, there is a consistent lack of repair observed in the out-of-field populations during intervals between fractions, confirming the importance of cell signalling to out-of-field responses in a fractionated radiation schedule, and this needs to be confirmed for a wider range of cell lines and conditions.

  4. Multipole expansions and intense fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Howard R.

    1984-02-01

    In the context of two-body bound-state systems subjected to a plane-wave electromagnetic field, it is shown that high field intensity introduces a distinction between long-wavelength approximation and electric dipole approximation. This distinction is gauge dependent, since it is absent in Coulomb gauge, whereas in "completed" gauges of Göppert-Mayer type the presence of high field intensity makes electric quadrupole and magnetic dipole terms of importance equal to electric dipole at long wavelengths. Another consequence of high field intensity is that multipole expansions lose their utility in view of the equivalent importance of a number of low-order multipole terms and the appearance of large-magnitude terms which defy multipole categorization. This loss of the multipole expansion is gauge independent. Also gauge independent is another related consequence of high field intensity, which is the intimate coupling of center-of-mass and relative coordinate motions in a two-body system.

  5. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, L.H.

    1994-08-16

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  6. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1995-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  7. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1994-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  8. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, L.H.

    1995-10-17

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  9. Exposure guidelines for magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Miller, G

    1987-12-01

    The powerful magnetic fields produced by a controlled fusion experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) necessitated the development of personnel-exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. A literature search and conversations with active researchers showed that it is currently possible to develop preliminary exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. An overview of the results of past research into the bioeffects of magnetic fields was compiled, along with a discussion of hazards that may be encountered by people with sickle-cell anemia or medical electronic and prosthetic implants. The LLNL steady magnetic-field exposure guidelines along with a review of developments concerning the safety of time-varying fields were also presented in this compilation. Guidelines developed elsewhere for time varying fields were also given. Further research is needed to develop exposure standards for both steady or time-varying fields. PMID:3434538

  10. Exposure guidelines for magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.

    1987-12-01

    The powerful magnetic fields produced by a controlled fusion experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) necessitated the development of personnel-exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. A literature search and conversations with active researchers showed that it is currently possible to develop preliminary exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. An overview of the results of past research into the bioeffects of magnetic fields was compiled, along with a discussion of hazards that may be encountered by people with sickle-cell anemia or medical electronic and prosthetic implants. The LLNL steady magnetic-field exposure guidelines along with a review of developments concerning the safety of time-varying fields were also presented in this compilation. Guidelines developed elsewhere for time varying fields were also given. Further research is needed to develop exposure standards for both steady or time-varying fields.

  11. Thermoregulation in intense microwave fields

    SciTech Connect

    Michaelson, S.M.

    1981-10-01

    These studies clearly indicate the thermoregulatory capacity of the dog to withstand exposure to high microwave fields at specific absorption rates (SAR) of 3.7 and 6.1 W/kg. It appears that adequate thermoregulation takes place at an SAR of 3.7 W/kg but only transiently at 6.1 W/kg. These values, compared with the standardized resting metabolic rate of 3.29 W/kg (0.75), provide a basis for assessing the relationship of the thermal burden and thermo-regulatory disruption by microwaves in the dog. To elucidate the thermal potential of microwave exposure, it was helpful to conduct these exposures at various ambient temperatures in which the normal body temperature remained stable, thus permitting comparison of heat production and dissipation with our without microwaves. The zone of the thermal neutrality or thermoneutral zone of vasomotor activity, 22-26.5 deg C, where body temperature is regulated by changes in vasomotor tonus, fulfilled this requirement.

  12. Mechanism of biological effects observed in honey bees (Apis mellifera, L. ) hived under extra-high-voltage transmission lines: implications derived from bee exposure to simulated intense electric fields and shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Bindokas, V.P.; Gauger, J.R.; Greenberg, B.

    1988-01-01

    This work explores mechanisms for disturbance of honey bee colonies under a 765 kV, 60-Hz transmission line (electric (E) field = 7 kV/m) observed in previous studies. Proposed mechanisms fell into two categories: direct bee perception of enhanced in-hive E fields and perception of shock from induced currents. The adverse biological effects could be reproduced in simulations where only the worker bees were exposed to shock or to E field in elongated hive entranceways (= tunnels). We now report the results of full-scale experiments using the tunnel exposure scheme, which assesses the contribution of shock and intense E field to colony disturbance. Exposure of worker bees (1400 h) to 60-Hz E fields including 100 kV/m under moisture-free conditions within a nonconductive tunnel causes no deleterious affect on colony behavior. Exposure of bees in conductive (e.g., wet) tunnels produces bee disturbance, increased mortality, abnormal propolization, and possible impairment of colony growth. We propose that this substrate dependence of bee disturbance is the result of perception of shock from coupled body currents and enhanced current densities postulated to exist in the legs and thorax of bees on conductors. Similarly, disturbance occurs when bees are exposed to step-potential-induced currents. At 275-350 nA single bees are disturbed; at 600 nA bees begin abnormal propolization behavior; and stinging occurs at 900 nA. We conclude that biological effects seen in bee colonies under a transmission line are primarily the result of electric shock from induced hive currents. This evaluation is based on the limited effects of E-field exposure in tunnels, the observed disturbance thresholds caused by shocks in tunnels, and the ability of hives exposed under a transmission line to source currents 100-1,000 times the shock thresholds.

  13. Molecules and Clusters in Intense Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posthumus, Jan

    2009-09-01

    Preface; 1. Ultra-high intensity based on Ti:Sapphire Philip F. Taday and Andrew J. Langley; 2. Diatomic molecules in intense laser fields Jan H. Posthumus and James F. McCann; 3. Small polyatomic molecules in intense laser fields C. Cornaggia; 4. Coherent control in intense laser fields Eric Charron and Brian Sheehy; 5. Experimental studies of laser-heated rare gas clusters M. Lezius and M. Schmidt; 6. Single cluster explosions and high harmonic generation John W. G. Tisch and Emma Springate; 7. Intense laser interaction with extended cluster media Roland A. Smith and Todd Ditmire.

  14. Molecules and Clusters in Intense Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posthumus, Jan

    2001-06-01

    Preface; 1. Ultra-high intensity based on Ti:Sapphire Philip F. Taday and Andrew J. Langley; 2. Diatomic molecules in intense laser fields Jan H. Posthumus and James F. McCann; 3. Small polyatomic molecules in intense laser fields C. Cornaggia; 4. Coherent control in intense laser fields Eric Charron and Brian Sheehy; 5. Experimental studies of laser-heated rare gas clusters M. Lezius and M. Schmidt; 6. Single cluster explosions and high harmonic generation John W. G. Tisch and Emma Springate; 7. Intense laser interaction with extended cluster media Roland A. Smith and Todd Ditmire.

  15. High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) project plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glynn, Michael S.; Blair, Jerry T.; Hintze, M. Marx

    1991-09-01

    Addressed here is the Federal Aviation Administration's approach to High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) affecting the aviation community. Near- and far-term tasks are described. Deliverables, program management, scheduling, and cost issues are discussed.

  16. Gauges for intense-field electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Howard R.

    1980-08-01

    For all gauges of the Göppert-Mayer type, the two-body Schrödinger equation for charged particles in a plane-wave electromagnetic field fails to separate into center-of-mass and relative-coordinate equations when the field is sufficiently intense.

  17. Ongoing exposure versus intense periodic exposure to military conflict and terror attacks in Israel.

    PubMed

    Lahad, Mooli; Leykin, Dmitry

    2010-12-01

    The manifestation of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in two clinical samples in Israel (N = 212) was examined. Individuals suffering ongoing exposure to shelling were compared with subjects exposed to intense periodic exposure. Elevated arousal and avoidance symptoms, but not intrusion were reported in the ongoing exposure group. When compared by age, young participants in the ongoing exposure group had significantly lower PTSD scores, whereas no differences were found between participants among the intense periodic exposure age groups. No gender differences in symptoms were found among participants from intense periodic exposure, whereas in the other ongoing group the difference was in avoidance. Results are discussed in light of past research on exposure to terrorism. PMID:21171129

  18. Characterizing the intensity of changes made to reduce mechanical exposure.

    PubMed

    Wells, Richard; Laing, Andrew; Cole, Donald

    2009-01-01

    Interventions to prevent musculoskeletal disorders by reducing mechanical exposures may range from equipment adjustments, through changing workstations and equipment or implementing administrative controls, to the design and redesign of work processes. Although generally positive, the literature reports mixed results for the effects of such workplace interventions on musculoskeletal disorders. We propose that an important factor which influences these results is the change intensity. This construct includes: the body part(s) affected, the size of exposure magnitude reduction in the particular task or tasks involved in the change, the time fraction of the job to which the change applies, the coverage of the change (proportion of the workforce affected), and the adherence (if applicable) by the workforce to the change. The intensities of changes recently completed as part of a participatory ergonomics research program were characterized using this approach. Intensity scores were estimated based upon these parameters for peak and cumulative mechanical exposures. Changes affecting a production system re-design and re-configuration were judged to have medium to high intensity, while most other changes were judged to be of small intensity. Comparisons are made to the intensity of changes determined from reports in the published literature. Factors which maximize intensity as well as potential barriers to achieving higher intensities are described. PMID:20037230

  19. The NASA High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Reuben A.

    1997-01-01

    High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) are the result of a multitude of intentional and nonintentional electromagnetic sources that currently exists in the world. Many of today's digital systems are susceptible to electronic upset if subjected to certain electromagnetic environments (EME). Modern aerospace designers and manufacturers increasingly rely on sophisticated digital electronic systems to provide critical flight control in both military, commercial, and general aviation aircraft. In an effort to understand and emulate the undesired environment that high energy RF provides modern electronics, the Electromagnetics Research Branch (ERB) of the Flight Electronics and Technology Division (FETD) conducts research on RF and microwave measurement methods related to the understanding of HIRF. In the High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory, the effects of high energy radiating electromagnetic fields on avionics and electronic systems are tested and studied.

  20. [Clinical monitoring in areas of exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields].

    PubMed

    Suvorov, I M

    2013-01-01

    Clinical syndromes induced by high intensity radiofrequency electromagnetic field chronic exposure are described. Persons injured by occupational exposure have been observed central nervous system changes in diencephalic syndrome form, cardio-vascular system changes revealed in atherosclerosis, isch(a)emic heart disease and coronary insufficiency rapid progressive expansion. General public living in territory of radar station exposure zone different functional disorders have been identified: vegetative dystonia (asthenovegetative syndrome), thrombocytopenia, decrease of blood coagulation index, and thyroid gland function changes. Observed diseases clinical variability may be determined by electromagnetic exposure characteristics. PMID:23785812

  1. Orienting Paramecium with intense static magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valles, James M., Jr.; Guevorkian, Karine; Quindel, Carl

    2004-03-01

    Recent experiments on cell division suggest the application of intense static magnetic fields as a novel tool for the manipulation of biological systems [1]. The magnetic field appears to couple to the intrinsic anisotropies in the diamagnetic components of the cells. Here, we present measurements of the intrinsic average diamagnetic anisotropy of the whole single celled ciliate, Paramecium Caudatum. Magnetic fields, 2.5 T < B < 8 T were applied to immobilized (non-swimming) Paramecium Caudatum that were suspended in a density matched medium. The organisms align with their long axis parallel to the applied magnetic field. Their intrinsic diamagnetic anisotropy is 3x10-11 in cgs units. We will discuss the implications of these results for employing magnetic fields to probe the behavior of swimming Paramecium. [1] J. M. Valles, Jr. et al., Expt. Cell Res.274, 112-118 (2002).

  2. Hydrogen atom in intense magnetic field.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Kelly, D. C.

    1972-01-01

    The structure of a hydrogen atom situated in an intense magnetic field is investigaged. Three approaches are employed. An elementary Bohr picture establishes a crucial magnetic field strength, H sub a approximately equal to 5 x 10 to the 9th G. Fields in excess of H sub a are intense in that they are able to modify the characteristic atomic scales of length and binding energy. A second approach solves the Schrodinger equation by a combination of variational methods and perturbation theory. It yields analytic expressions for the wave functions and energy eigenvalues. A third approach determines the energy eigenvalues by reducing the Schrodinger equation to a one-dimensional wave equation, which is then solved numerically. Energy eigenvalues are tabulated for field strengths of 2 x 10 to the 10th G and 2 x 10 to the 12th G. It is found that at 2 x 10 to the 12th G the lowest energy eigenvalue is changed from -13.6 to about -180 eV in agreement with previous variational computations.

  3. Atomic electron correlations in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    DiMauro, L.F.; Sheehy, B.; Walker, B.; Agostini, P.A.; Kulander, K.C.

    1998-11-01

    This talk examines two distinct cases in strong optical fields where electron correlation plays an important role in the dynamics. In the first example, strong coupling in a two-electron-like system is manifested as an intensity-dependent splitting in the ionized electron energy distribution. This two-electron phenomenon (dubbed continuum-continuum Autler-Townes effect) is analogous to a strongly coupled two-level, one-electron atom but raises some intriguing questions regarding the exact nature of electron-electron correlation. The second case examines the evidence for two-electron ionization in the strong-field tunneling limit. Although their ability to describe the one-electron dynamics has obtained a quantitative level of understanding, a description of the two (multiple) electron ionization remains unclear.

  4. Atomic electron correlations in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    DiMauro, L.F.; Sheehy, B.; Walker, B. Agostini, P.A. Kulander, K.C.

    1999-06-01

    This talk examines two distinct cases in strong optical fields where electron correlation plays an important role in the dynamics. In the first example, strong coupling in a two-electron-like system is manifested as an intensity-dependent splitting in the ionized electron energy distribution. This two-electron phenomenon (dubbed continuum-continuum Autler-Townes effect) is analogous to a strongly coupled two-level, one-electron atom but raises some intriguing questions regarding the exact nature of electron-electron correlation. The second case examines the evidence for two-electron ionization in the strong-field tunneling limit. Although our ability to describe the one-electron dynamics has obtained a quantitative level of understanding, a description of the two (multiple) electron ionization remains unclear. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Atomic electron correlations in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    DiMauro, L. F.; Sheehy, B.; Walker, B.; Agostini, P. A.; Kulander, K. C.

    1999-06-11

    This talk examines two distinct cases in strong optical fields where electron correlation plays an important role in the dynamics. In the first example, strong coupling in a two-electron-like system is manifested as an intensity-dependent splitting in the ionized electron energy distribution. This two-electron phenomenon (dubbed continuum-continuum Autler-Townes effect) is analogous to a strongly coupled two-level, one-electron atom but raises some intriguing questions regarding the exact nature of electron-electron correlation. The second case examines the evidence for two-electron ionization in the strong-field tunneling limit. Although our ability to describe the one-electron dynamics has obtained a quantitative level of understanding, a description of the two (multiple) electron ionization remains unclear.

  6. Atomic electron correlations in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Agostini, P A; DiMauro, L F; Kulander, K; Sheehy, B; Walker, B

    1998-09-03

    Abstract. This talk examines two distinct cases in strong opbical fields where electron correlation plays an important role in the dynamic.s. In the first. example, strong coupling in a two-electron-like system is manifested as an intensity-dependent splitting in the ionized electron energy distribution. This two-electron phenomenon (dubbed continuum-continuum Autler-Townes effect) is analogous to a strongly coupled two- level, one-electron atom but raises some intriguing questions regarding the exact nature of electron-electron correlation. The second case examines the evidence for two-electron ionization in the strong-field tunneling limit. Although our ability to describe the one- electron dynamics has obtained a quantitative level of understanding, a description of the two (multiple) electron ionization remains unc

  7. Intense magnetic fields at 1 AU: Solar cycle 20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; King, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    Of the intense magnetic fields (greater than 13 gamma) observed at 1 AU during solar cycle 20 (1973-1975), 92% were associated with shocks, stream interfaces, or cold magnetic enhancements (CMEs). Most (52%) of the magnetic field intensity enhancements occurred at stream interfaces; 27% occurred behind shocks without interfaces; and 11% occurred in CMEs. The most intense fields (25 gamma to 37 gamma) followed shocks. Magnetic field intensities at interfaces did not exceed 25 gamma, suggesting a mechanism such as a magnetoacoustic wave limits the intensity ahead of streams. Intense magnetic fields persist longest behind shocks.

  8. Real exposure: Field measurement of chemical plumes in headwater streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, David D.

    In fluvial systems, organismic exposure to nonpoint source pollutants will fluctuate in frequency (exposure events), intensity (concentration), and duration. The reliance on lethal concentrations and static exposure in many laboratory studies does not adequately represent nor address exposure to in situ chemical plumes of fluvial habitats. In order to adequately address field exposure in a lab setting, one needs an understanding of the physics of chemical transmission within moving fluids. Because of the chaotic nature of turbulence, chemical plumes introduced to fluvial systems have a spatial and temporal microstructure with fluxes in chemical concentration. Consequently, time-averaged static exposure models are not ecologically relevant for the major reason of in situ distribution. The purpose of this study was to quantify in situ chemical distribution and dispersion within two physically different streams. Dopamine was introduced as a chemical tracer mimicking groundwater runoff. Chemical fluxes and stream hydrodynamics were simultaneously measured using a microelectrode and an acoustic doppler velocimeter (ADV), respectively, at three heights of three downstream locations at each research site. Fine-scale measurements of the dopamine plume microstructure showed organisms could be exposed to chemical fluctuations where concentrations are significantly greater than the overall time-averaged concentration. These measurements demonstrate that rather than relying on static exposure, standards for pollution need to consider the concept of exposure being interdependently linked to flow of the fluid medium. The relationship between fluid dynamics, pollution exposure and organism physiology are complex and need to be evaluated in ways to mimic natural systems.

  9. A Template for an Intensive Ecohydrology Field Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuel, R. E.; McGlynn, B. L.; Riveros-Iregui, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Many of the greatest challenges in the earth and environmental sciences are complex and interdisciplinary in nature. Ecohydrology exemplifies the type of holistic inquiry needed to address these challenges because it spans and integrates earth science, biological science and, often, social science. Ecohydrology courses can prepare the next generation of scientists, decision-makers and informed citizens to understand and address these challenges, and field courses in particular can play an important role in this preparation. Ecohydrology field course instructors have unique opportunities to convey interwoven theoretical and applied principles through a variety of modes that include lecture, discussion, immersion, and hands-on activity. In this presentation, we report on our experience co-teaching the Mountain Ecohydrology Field Course, a full-credit course taught 3 times in the past 5 years to more than 30 students representing 6 universities. The course, which has ranged from 1-2 weeks in length, has given students in-depth exposure to intensively instrumented ecohydrological field sites in the southern Appalachian and northern Rocky Mountains. Students learn fundamental principles in ecohydrology and related fields of watershed hydrology, soil biogeochemistry, micrometeorology and plant ecophysiology. They gain hands-on experience in a variety of cutting edge field techniques, tools and analyses while practicing presentation and communication of science. Students and instructors deal with real-world challenges of conducting fieldwork in remote settings. We offer our experience as one potential template for others interested in developing or refining ecohydrology field courses elsewhere.

  10. Evaluation of workers exposure to magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canova, A.; Freschi, F.; Repetto, M.

    2010-11-01

    Following ICNIRP Guidelines of 1998, European Parliament in 2004 has stated the reference levels for workers exposure to electromagnetic fields. In low frequency regime, due to the nature of the basic mechanism of short term interaction, the exposure limits are based on the values of induced eddy currents inside human body, thus electromagnetic simulation is an important tool for the assessment of electromagnetic field exposure. This paper presents a method for computing eddy currents inside human body and applies the method to the evaluation of eddy currents induced by a resistance spot welding system. A comparison between results obtained with two different models of human body and with different discretization levels is performed and results are discussed.

  11. [Phthalate exposure in the neonatal intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Fischer Fumeaux, C J; Stadelmann Diaw, C; Palmero, D; M'Madi, F; Tolsa, J-F

    2015-02-01

    There are growing concerns on long-term health consequences, notably on fertility rates, of plasticizers such as phthalates. While di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) is currently used in several medical devices, newborns in the neonatal intensive care unit are both more exposed and more vulnerable to DEHP. The objectives of this study were to identify, count, and describe possible sources of DEHP in a neonatal care unit. Our method consisted in the listing and the inspection of the information on packaging, complemented by contact with manufacturers when necessary. According to the results, 6% of all products and 10% of plastic products contained some DEHP; 71% of these involved respiratory support devices. A vast majority of the items showed no information on the content of DEHP. Further research is needed, particularly to determine the effects of such an early exposure and to study and develop safer alternatives. PMID:25554670

  12. Assessing a Pesticide Exposure Intensity Algorithm in the Agricultural Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Kent W.; Dosemeci, Mustafa; Coble, Joseph B.; Hoppin, Jane A.; Sheldon, Linda S.; Chapa, Guadalupe; Croghan, Carry W.; Jones, Paul A.; Knott, Charles E.; Lynch, Charles F.; Sandler, Dale P.; Blair, Aaron E.; Alavanja, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    The accuracy of the exposure assessment is a critical factor in epidemiological investigations of pesticide exposures and health in agricultural populations. However, few studies have been conducted to evaluate questionnaire-based exposure metrics. The Agricultural Health Study (AHS) is a prospective cohort study of pesticide applicators who provided detailed questionnaire information on their use of specific pesticides. A field study was performed for a subset of the applicators enrolled in the AHS to assess a pesticide exposure algorithm through comparison of algorithm intensity scores with measured exposures. Pre- and post-application urinary biomarker measurements were made for 2,4-D (n = 69) and chlorpyrifos (n = 17) applicators. Dermal patch, hand wipe, and personal air samples were also collected. Intensity scores were calculated using information from technician observations and an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Correlations between observer and questionnaire intensity scores were high (Spearman r = 0.92 and 0.84 for 2,4-D and chlorpyrifos, respectively). Intensity scores from questionnaires for individual applications were significantly correlated with post-application urinary concentrations for both 2,4-D (r = 0.42, p < 0.001) and chlorpyrifos (r = 0.53, p = 0.035) applicators. Significant correlations were also found between intensity scores and estimated hand loading, estimated body loading, and air concentrations for 2,4-D applicators (r-values 0.28–0.50, p-values<0.025). Across all chlorpyrifos applicators, body loading measurements were significantly correlated with intensity scores from questionnaires (r=0.50, p=0.039) but not from observations (r=0.18, p=0.482). Dermal measures for in-furrow granular applications of chlorpyrifos (n = 12) were very low and not correlated with intensity scores. A linear regression model indicated that the algorithm factors for individual applications explained 24% of the variability in post

  13. S-76 high intensity radiated fields, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Jerry

    1993-10-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Technical Center sponsored a series of High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) test on a Sikorsky S-76 rotorcraft. The project was conducted to evaluate the practicality of performing aircraft level HIRF tests, determine the effects of HIRF on a specific rotorcraft with the potential to obtain information on rotorcraft in general, and evaluate the effects of exposure to real world HIRF emitters. HIRF ground and flight tests were conducted to achieve the objective of the project. Site calibration (SCAL) measurements were made in the test area to determine the levels at which the S-76 would be irradiated when placed in the test area. Ground tests consisted of Low Level Swept Coupling (LLSC) and Low Level Swept Fields (LLSF) tests. The flight tests were flown directly into the main beam of a variety of pulsed and continuous wave (CW) transmitters including the Over the Horizon Back Scatter (OTHB), PAVE PAWS, ASR-9, FPS-65, and FPS-16 radars. Results of the S-76 tests added credibility to the existence of HIRF as a flight safety hazard. In the evaluation of the emitters, the flight tests showed repeatable instances where exposure resulted in instrumentation disruptions. It should be noted that all the observed disruptions were of a non-critical nature.

  14. S-76 high intensity radiated fields, volume 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Jerry

    1993-10-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Technical Center sponsored a series of High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) tests on a Sikorsky S-76 rotorcraft. The project was conducted to evaluate the practically of performing aircraft level HIRF tests, determine the effects of HIRF on a specific rotorcraft with the potential to obtain information on rotorcraft in general, and evaluate the effects of exposure to 'real world' HIRF emitters. HIRF ground and flight tests were conducted to achieve the objective of the project. Site calibration (SCAL) measurements were made in the test area to determine the levels at which the S-76 would be irradiated when placed in the test area. Ground tests consisted of Low Level Swept Coupling (LLSC) and Low Level Swept Fields (LLSF) tests. The flight tests were flown directly into the main beam of a variety of pulsed and continuous wave (CW) transmitters including the Over the Horizon Back Scatter (OTHB), PAVE PAWS, ASR-9, FPS-65, and FPS-16 radars. Results of the S-76 tests added credibility to the existence of HIRF as a flight safety hazard. In the evaluation of the emitters, the flight tests showed repeatable instances where exposure resulted in instrumentation disruptions. It should however be noted that all the observed disruptions were of a non-critical nature.

  15. S-76 high intensity radiated fields, volume 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Jerry

    1993-10-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Technical Center sponsored a series of High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) test on a Sikorsky S-76 rotorcraft. The project was conducted to evaluate the practically of performing aircraft level HIRF tests, determine the effects of HIRF on a specific rotorcraft with the potential to obtain information on rotorcraft in general, and evaluate the effects of exposure to real world HIRF emitters. HIRF ground and flight tests were conducted to achieve the objective of the project. Site calibration (SCAL) measurements were made in the test area to determine the levels at which the S-76 would be irradiated when placed in the test area. Ground tests consisted of Low Level Swept Coupling (LLSC) and Low Level Swept Fields (LLSF) tests. The flight tests were flown directly into the main beam of a variety of pulsed and continuous wave (CW) transmitters including the Over the Horizon Back Scatter (OTHB), PAVE PAWS, ASR-9, FPS-65, and FPS-16 radars. Results of the S-76 tests added credibility to the existence of HIRF as a flight safety hazard. In the evaluation of the emitters, the flight tests showed repeatable instances where exposure resulted in instrumentation disruptions. It should be noted that all the observed disruptions were of a non-critical nature.

  16. Cochlear nerve activity after intense sound exposure in neonatal chicks.

    PubMed

    Saunders, J C; Doan, D E; Poje, C P; Fisher, K A

    1996-08-01

    1. Single-neuron behavior in the cochlear nerve of neonatal (3-day-old) chicks was examined after exposure to a 120-dB SPL pure tone (0.9 kHz) for 48 h. Exposed animals were tested after 0 days or 12 days of recovery. Nonexposed chicks, age-matched to the exposed animals, formed two control groups. 2. Spectral response plots were obtained from each cell. These plots described the neuron discharge rates in response to 1,767 tone burst stimuli, each with a unique frequency-intensity combination. The tone bursts were presented at frequencies between 0.1 and 4.5 kHz and for intensities between 0 and 100 dB SPL. From these plots the characteristic frequency (CF), CF threshold, and sharpness of tuning (Q10 dB) were derived for each cell. Frequency response-area functions at selected stimulus levels and rate-intensity functions at the CF were also constructed from the spectral response plots. In addition, spontaneous activity was determined. Data were obtained from 903 cells. 3. Neuron activity in the control cells revealed no differences between CF thresholds, Q10 dB, or spontaneous activity in the two age groups. However, age differences at all frequencies were noted in the rate-intensity functions. 4. A frequency-dependent loss in CF threshold was observed in the 0-day recovered cells. The threshold shift (relative to age-matched control cells) was 55-65 dB between 0.8 and 1.5 kHz, but only 10-15 dB between 0.1-0.4 kHz and 2.5-3.5 kHz. The exposed cells showed no loss in frequency selectivity (Q10 dB) at < 0.5 kHz, whereas above this frequency an increasing deterioration in tuning was noted. Spontaneous activity in the 0-day cells was suppressed across the entire range of CFs. The rate-intensity function of exposed cells had a steeper growth rate than that of control cells. 5. At 12 days of recovery, CF threshold, Q10 dB, and spontaneous activity all recovered to the levels exhibited by age-matched control cells. However, the rate-intensity function for cells with CFs

  17. Exposure to traffic related air pollutants: self reported traffic intensity versus GIS modelled exposure

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, J; Gehring, U; Cyrys, J; Brauer, M; Hoek, G; Fischer, P; Bellander, T; Brunekreef, B

    2005-01-01

    Background: In epidemiological studies of the potential health effects of traffic related air pollution, self reported traffic intensity is a commonly used, but rarely validated, exposure variable. Methods: As part of a study on the impact of Traffic Related Air Pollution on Childhood Asthma (TRAPCA), data from 2633 and 673 infants from the Dutch and the German-Munich cohorts, respectively, were available. Parents subjectively assessed traffic intensity at the home address. Objective exposures were estimated by a combination of spatial air pollution measurements and geographic information system (GIS) based modelling using an identical method for both cohorts. Results: The agreement rates between self reported and GIS modelled exposure—accumulated over the three strata of self assessed traffic intensity—were 55–58% for PM2.5, filter absorbance (PM2.5 abs), and nitrogen dioxide in Munich and 39–40% in the Netherlands. Of the self reported low traffic exposed group, 71–73% in Munich and 45–47% in the Netherlands had low modelled exposure to these three air pollutants. Of the self assessed high exposed subgroups in Munich (15% of the total population) and the Netherlands (22% of the total population), only 22–33% and 30–32% respectively had high modelled exposure to the three air pollutants. The subjective assessments tend to overestimate the modelled estimates for PM2.5 and NO2 in both study areas. When analysis was restricted to the portion of the Dutch cohort living in non-urban areas, the agreement rates were even lower. Conclusions: Self reported and modelled assessment of exposure to air pollutants are only weakly associated. PMID:16046603

  18. An Updated Algorithm for Estimation of Pesticide Exposure Intensity in the Agricultural Health Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    An algorithm developed to estimate pesticide exposure intensity for use in epidemiologic analyses was revised based on data from two exposure monitoring studies. In the first study, we estimated relative exposure intensity based on the results of measurements taken during the app...

  19. Magnetic field exposure and behavioral monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Thomas, A W; Drost, D J; Prato, F S

    2001-09-01

    To maximize the availability and usefulness of a small magnetic field exposure laboratory, we designed a magnetic field exposure system that has been used to test human subjects, caged or confined animals, and cell cultures. The magnetic field exposure system consists of three orthogonal pairs of coils 2 m square x 1 m separation, 1.751 m x 0.875 m separation, and 1.5 m x 0.75 m separation. Each coil consisted of ten turns of insulated 8 gauge stranded copper conductor. Each of the pairs were driven by a constant-current amplifier via digital to analog (D/A) converter. A 9 pole zero-gain active Bessel low-pass filter (1 kHz corner frequency) before the amplifier input attenuated the expected high frequencies generated by the D/A conversion. The magnetic field was monitored with a 3D fluxgate magnetometer (0-3 kHz, +/- 1 mT) through an analog to digital converter. Behavioral monitoring utilized two monochrome video cameras (viewing the coil center vertically and horizontally), both of which could be video recorded and real-time digitally Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG) encoded to CD-ROM. Human postural sway (standing balance) was monitored with a 3D forceplate mounted on the floor, connected to an analog to digital converter. Lighting was provided by 12 offset overhead dimmable fluorescent track lights and monitored using a digitally connected spectroradiometer. The dc resistance, inductance of each coil pair connected in series were 1.5 m coil (0.27 Omega, 1.2 mH), 1.75 m coil (0.32 Omega, 1.4 mH), and 2 m coil (0.38 Omega, 1.6 mH). The frequency response of the 1.5 m coil set was 500 Hz at +/- 463 microT, 1 kHz at +/- 232 microT, 150 micros rise time from -200 microT(pk) to + 200 microT(pk) (square wave) and is limited by the maximum voltage ( +/- 146 V) of the amplifier (Bessel filter bypassed). PMID:11536281

  20. FLASH requirements for the high intensity radiated field electromagnetic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdock, John K.

    1995-05-01

    The worldwide proliferation of high intensity emitting sources and the more electric aircraft increase the intensity of the Electromagnetic Environment (EME) in which aircraft must operate. A FLASH program HIRF (High Intensity Radiated Field) EME requirement is derived to cover both commercial and military fixed and rotary wing aircraft. This requirement is derived from the radiated susceptibility requirement documents of both the FAA and U.S. military. Specific test data and analysis will show that we can meet this requirement.

  1. Evaluating alternative exposure indices in epidemiologic studies on extremely low-frequency magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Juutilainen, J.; Hatfield, T.; Laeaerae, E.

    1996-05-01

    Choosing the right exposure index for epidemiological studies on 50--60 Hz magnetic fields is difficult due to the lack of knowledge about critical exposure parameters for the biological effects of magnetic fields. This paper uses data from a previously published epidemiological investigation on early pregnancy loss (EPL) to study the methods of evaluating the exposure-response relationship of 50 Hz magnetic fields. Two approaches were used. The first approach was to apply generalized additive modeling to suggest the functional form of the relationship between EPL data with eight alternative exposure indices: the 24 h average of magnetic field strength, three indices measuring the proportion of time above specified thresholds, and four indices measuring the proportion of time within specified intensity windows. Because the original exposure data included only spot measurements, estimates for the selected exposure indices were calculated indirectly form the spot measurements using empirical nonlinear equations derived from 24 h recording in 60 residences. The results did not support intensity windows, and a threshold-type dependence on field strength appeared to be more plausible than a linear relationship. In addition, the study produced data suggesting that spot measurements may be used as surrogates for other exposure indices besides the time average field strength. No final conclusions should be drawn from this study alone, but the authors hope that this exercise stimulates evaluation of alternative exposure indices in other planned and ongoing epidemiological studies.

  2. Globally strong geomagnetic field intensity circa 3000 years ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Hoabin; Yu, Yongjae; Lee, Chan Hee; Kim, Ran Hee; Park, Jingyu; Doh, Seong-Jae; Kim, Wonnyon; Sung, Hyongmi

    2013-12-01

    High-fidelity geomagnetic field intensity determination was carried out using 191 baked fragments collected from 20 kilns or hearths with ages ranging between ∼1200 BC and ∼AD 1725 in South Korea. Geomagnetic field intensity variation displayed three narrow minima at ∼800-700 BC, ∼AD 700, and ∼AD 1600 and two maxima at ∼1200-1100 BC and ∼AD 1000-1100. In most time intervals, virtual axial dipole moment (VADM) variation is confined within 20% of the present VADM. However, geomagnetic field intensity circa 3000 yr ago is nearly 40% larger than the present value. Such high VADMs circa 3000 yr ago are in phase with those in other longitudinal bands in northern hemisphere centered at 5E (France), 30E (the Middle East) and 200E (Hawaii). Although strong geomagnetic field intensity circa 3000 yr ago is globally synchronous, the highest VADM occurs at slightly different time intervals in different locations. Hence it is possible that the globally strong geomagnetic field intensity circa 3000 yr ago reflects the migration of persistent hemispheric flux in northern hemisphere or an episode of geomagnetic field hemispheric asymmetry.

  3. Fourth-order acoustic torque in intense sound fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Kanber, H.; Olli, E. E.

    1978-01-01

    The observation of a fourth-order acoustic torque in intense sound fields is reported. The torque was determined by measuring the acoustically induced angular deflection of a polished cylinder suspended by a torsion fiber. This torque was measured in a sound field of amplitude greater than that in which first-order acoustic torque has been observed.

  4. Intense electron beam propagation across a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Striffler, C.D.; Yao, R.L.; Destler, W.W.; Reiser, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper we consider the propagation of an intense electron-ion beam across an applied magnetic field. In the absence of the applied field, the beam system is in a Bennett equilibrium state that involves electrons with both large axial and thermal velocities and a cold stationary space-charge neutralizing ion species. Typical parameters under consideration are V{sub o} {approximately} 1 MV, I {approximately} 5 kA, T{sub e} {approximately} 100 keV, and beam radii {approximately} 1 cm. We find that in the intense beam regime, the propagation is limited due to space-charge depression caused by the deflection of the electron beam by the transverse field. This critical field is of the order of the peak self-magnetic field of the electron beam which is substantially higher than the single particle cut-off field. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Skin temperature changes induced by strong static magnetic field exposure.

    PubMed

    Ichioka, Shigeru; Minegishi, Masayuki; Iwasaka, Masakazu; Shibata, Masahiro; Nakatsuka, Takashi; Ando, Joji; Ueno, Shoogo

    2003-09-01

    High intensity static magnetic fields, when applied to the whole body of the anesthetized rat, have previously been reported to decrease skin temperature. The hypothesis of the present study was that in diamagnetic water, molecules in the air play significant roles in the mechanism of skin temperature decrease. We used a horizontal cylindrical superconducting magnet. The magnet produced 8 T at its center. A thermistor probe was inserted in a subcutaneous pocket of the anesthetized rats to measure skin temperature. Animals (n=10) were placed in an open plastic holder in which the ambient air was free to move in any direction (group I). Animals (n=10) were placed in a closed holder in which the air circulation toward the direction of weak magnetic field was restricted (group II). Each holder was connected to a hydrometer to measure humidity around the animal in the holder. The data acquisition phase consisted of a 5 min baseline interval, followed by inserting the animal together with the holder into the center of the magnet bore for a 5 min exposure and a 5 min postexposure period outside the bore. In group I, skin temperature and humidity around the animal significantly decreased during exposure, followed by recovery after exposure. In group II, skin temperature and humidity did not decrease during the measurement. The skin temperature decrease was closely related to the decrease in humidity around the body of the animal in the holder, and the changes were completely blocked by restricting the air circulation in the direction of the bore entrance. Possible mechanisms responsible for the decrease in skin temperature may be associated with magnetically induced movement of water vapor at the skin surface, leading to skin temperature decrease. PMID:12929156

  6. Heating of cardiovascular stents in intense radiofrequency magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Foster, K R; Goldberg, R; Bonsignore, C

    1999-01-01

    We consider the heating of a metal stent in an alternating magnetic field from an induction heating furnace. An approximate theoretical analysis is conducted to estimate the magnetic field strength needed to produce substantial temperature increases. Experiments of stent heating in industrial furnaces are reported, which confirm the model. The results show that magnetic fields inside inductance furnaces are capable of significantly heating stents. However, the fields fall off very quickly with distance and in most locations outside the heating coil, field levels are far too small to produce significant heating. The ANSI/IEEE C95.1-1992 limits for human exposure to alternating magnetic fields provide adequate protection against potential excessive heating of the stents. PMID:10029137

  7. Exposure assessment for power frequency electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Bracken, T D

    1993-04-01

    Over the past decade considerable data have been collected on electric and magnetic fields in occupational environments. These data have taken the form of area measurements, source characterizations, and personal exposure measurements. Occupational EMF levels are highly variable in space and time. Exposures associated with these fields exhibit similar large variations during a day, between days, and between individuals within a group. The distribution of exposure measures is skewed over several decades with only a few values occurring at the maximum field levels. The skewness of exposure measures implies that large sample sizes may be required for assessments and that multiple statistical descriptors are preferred to describe individual and group exposures. Except for the relatively few occupational settings where high voltage sources are prevalent, electric fields encountered in the workplace are probably similar to residential exposures. Consequently, high electric field exposures are essentially limited to utility environments and occupations. Within the electric utility industry, it is definitely possible to identify occupations with high electric field exposures relative to those of office workers or other groups. The highly exposed utility occupations are linemen, substation operators, and utility electricians. The distribution of electric field exposures in the utility worker population is very skewed even within a given occupation. As with electric fields, magnetic fields in the workplace appear to be comparable with residential levels, unless a clearly defined high-current source is present. Since high-current sources are more prevalent than high-voltage sources, environments with relatively high magnetic field exposures encompass a more diverse set of occupations than do those with high electric fields. Within the electric utility industry, it is possible to identify occupational environments with high magnetic field exposure relative to the office

  8. Investigation of uniformity field generated from freeform lens with UV LED exposure system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciou, F. Y.; Chen, Y. C.; Pan, C. T.; Lin, P. H.; Lin, P. H.; Hsu, F. T.

    2015-03-01

    In the exposure process, the intensity and uniformity of light in the exposure area directly influenced the precision of products. UV-LED (Ultraviolet Light-Emitting Diode) exposure system was established to reduce the radiation leakage and increase the energy efficiency for energy saving. It is a trend that conventional mercury lamp could be replaced with UV-LED exposure system. This study was based on the law of conservation of energy and law of refraction of optical field distributing on the target plane. With these, a freeform lens with uniform light field of main exposure area could be designed. The light outside the exposure area could be concentrated into the area to improve the intensity of light. The refraction index and UV transmittance of Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is 1.43 at 385 nm wavelength and 85-90%, respectively. The PDMS was used to fabricate the optics lens for UV-LEDs. The average illumination and the uniformity could be obtained by increasing the number of UV-LEDs and the spacing of different arrangement modes. After exposure process with PDMS lens, about 5% inaccuracy was obtained. Comparing to 10% inaccuracy of general exposure system, it shows that it is available to replace conventional exposure lamp with using UV-LEDs.

  9. Design, construction, and validation of a large capacity rodent magnetic field exposure laboratory.

    PubMed

    Gauger, J R; Johnson, T R; Stangel, J E; Patterson, R C; Williams, D A; Harder, J B; McCormick, D L

    1999-01-01

    A magnetic field exposure laboratory has been constructed to support National Toxicology Program studies for the evaluation of the toxicity and carcinogenicity of pure, linearly polarized, 60 Hz magnetic fields in rodents. This dual corridor, controlled access facility can support the simultaneous exposure of 1200 rats and 1200 mice. The facility contains fully redundant electrical and environmental control systems and was constructed using non-metallic materials to maintain low levels of background (ambient), stray, and cross-talk magnetic fields. The exposure module design provides for large uniform exposure volumes with good control of stray and cross-talk fields, while allowing the use of roll-around cage racks for simplified animal husbandry. Stray fields and cross-talk have been further reduced by the inclusion of "steering coils" in each exposure module. Ambient 60 Hz fields (less cross-talk) in all exposure rooms are <0.1 microT (1 mG), and static magnetic fields have been mapped extensively. Magnetic field strength, waveform, temperature, relative humidity, light intensity, noise level, vibration, and air flow in all animal holding areas are tightly regulated, and are monitored continuously during all studies. Field uniformity in the animal exposure volumes is better than -/+l0%; a systematic program of cage, rack, and room rotation controls for possible positional effects within the exposure system. Magnetic fields are turned on and off over multiple cycles to prevent the induction of transients associated with abrupt field level changes. Total harmonic distortion is <3% at all field strengths. The facility has been used to study magnetic field bioeffects in rodent model systems in experiments ranging in duration from 8 weeks to 2 years. PMID:9915589

  10. Tls Field Data Based Intensity Correction for Forest Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzel, J.; Huber, M. O.

    2016-06-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) is increasingly used for forestry applications. Besides the three dimensional point coordinates, the 'intensity' of the reflected signal plays an important role in forestry and vegetation studies. The benefit of the signal intensity is caused by the wavelength of the laser that is within the near infrared (NIR) for most scanners. The NIR is highly indicative for various vegetation characteristics. However, the intensity as recorded by most terrestrial scanners is distorted by both external and scanner specific factors. Since details about system internal alteration of the signal are often unknown to the user, model driven approaches are impractical. On the other hand, existing data driven calibration procedures require laborious acquisition of separate reference datasets or areas of homogenous reflection characteristics from the field data. In order to fill this gap, the present study introduces an approach to correct unwanted intensity variations directly from the point cloud of the field data. The focus is on the variation over range and sensor specific distortions. Instead of an absolute calibration of the values, a relative correction within the dataset is sufficient for most forestry applications. Finally, a method similar to time series detrending is presented with the only pre-condition of a relative equal distribution of forest objects and materials over range. Our test data covers 50 terrestrial scans captured with a FARO Focus 3D S120 scanner using a laser wavelength of 905 nm. Practical tests demonstrate that our correction method removes range and scanner based alterations of the intensity.

  11. Intense transient magnetic-field generation by laser plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, R.F.

    1981-08-18

    In a laser system, the return current of a laser generated plasma is conducted near a target to subject that target to the magnetic field thereof. In alternate embodiments the target may be either a small non-fusion object for testing under the magnetic field or a laser-fusion pellet. In the laser-fusion embodiment, the laser-fusion pellet is irradiated during the return current flow and the intense transient magnetic field is used to control the hot electrons thereof to hinder them from striking and heating the core of the irradiated laser-fusion pellet.

  12. Investigating the QED vacuum with ultra-intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, B.; Di Piazza, A.

    2014-05-01

    In view of the increasingly stronger available laser fields it is becoming feasible to employ them to probe the nonlinear dielectric properties of the vacuum as predicted by quantum electrodynamics (QED) and to test QED in the presence of intense laser beams. First, we discuss vacuum-polarization effects that arise in the collision of a high-energy proton beam with a strong laser field. In addition, we investigate the process of light-by-light diffraction mediated by the virtual electron-positrons of the vacuum. A strong laser beam "diffracts" a probe laser field due to vacuum polarization effects, and changes its polarization. This change of the polarization is shown to be in principle measurable. Also, the possibility of generating harmonics by exploiting vacuum-polarization effects in the collision in vacuum of two ultra-strong laser beams is discussed. Moreover, when two strong parallel laser beams collide with a probe electromagnetic field, each photon of the probe may interact through the "polarized" quantum vacuum with the photons of the other two fields. Analogously to "ordinary" double-slit set-ups involving matter, the vacuum-scattered probe photons produce a diffraction pattern, which is the envisaged observable to measure the quantum interaction between the probe and strong field photons. We have shown that the diffraction pattern becomes visible in a few operating hours, if the strong fields have an intensity exceeding 1024W/cm2.

  13. Zeeman degeneracy effects in collisional intense-field resonance fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, J.; Ballagh, R. J.; Burnett, K.

    1980-01-01

    Resonance fluorescence due to intense laser fields from a Zeeman degenerate atom being perturbed by collisional interactions is calculated in the impact regime by using the quantum-fluctuation-regression theorem. Various interesting effects are found. For example, the scattered intensity spectrum for a J = 0 to J = 1 transition for polarization parallel to the laser polarization is essentially an asymmetric triplet, whereas for a perpendicular polarization due to collisions the spectrum is essentially a doublet (whose frequencies do not correspond with any of those of the triplet). Further, the width of the fluorescent component (whose frequency is close to the unperturbed frequency) actually decreases with increasing laser power.

  14. Estimating storm areal average rainfall intensity in field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Wood, Eric F.

    1994-07-01

    Estimates of areal mean precipitation intensity derived from rain gages are commonly used to assess the performance of rainfall radars and satellite rainfall retrieval algorithms. Areal mean precipitation time series collected during short-duration climate field studies are also used as inputs to water and energy balance models which simulate land-atmosphere interactions during the experiments. In two recent field experiments (1987 First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE) and the Multisensor Airborne Campaign for Hydrology 1990 (MAC-HYDRO '90)) designed to investigate the climatic signatures of land-surface forcings and to test airborne sensors, rain gages were placed over the watersheds of interest. These gages provide the sole means for estimating storm precipitation over these areas, and the gage densities present during these experiments indicate that there is a large uncertainty in estimating areal mean precipitation intensity for single storm events. Using a theoretical model of time- and area-averaged space- time rainfall and a model rainfall generator, the error structure of areal mean precipitation intensity is studied for storms statistically similar to those observed in the FIFE and MAC-HYDRO field experiments. Comparisons of the error versus gage density trade-off curves to those calculated using the storm observations show that the rainfall simulator can provide good estimates of the expected measurement error given only the expected intensity, coefficient of variation, and rain cell diameter or correlation length scale, and that these errors can quickly become very large (in excess of 20%) for certain storms measured with a network whose size is below a "critical" gage density. Because the mean storm rainfall error is particularly sensitive to the correlation length, it is important that future field experiments include radar and/or dense rain gage networks capable of accurately characterizing the

  15. Assessment of occupational exposure to radiofrequency fields and radiation.

    PubMed

    Cooper, T G; Allen, S G; Blackwell, R P; Litchfield, I; Mann, S M; Pope, J M; van Tongeren, M J A

    2004-01-01

    The use of personal monitors for the assessment of exposure to radiofrequency fields and radiation in potential future epidemiological studies of occupationally exposed populations has been investigated. Data loggers have been developed for use with a commercially available personal monitor and these allowed personal exposure records consisting of time-tagged measurements of electric and magnetic field strength to be accrued over extended periods of the working day. The instrumentation was worn by workers carrying out tasks representative of some of their typical daily activities at a variety of radio sites. The results indicated significant differences in the exposures of workers in various RF environments. A number of measures of exposure have been examined with a view to assessing possible exposure metrics for epidemiological studies. There was generally a good correlation between a given measure of electric field strength and the same measure of magnetic field strength. PMID:15266067

  16. Gene and Protein Expression following Exposure to Radiofrequency Fields from Mobile Phones

    PubMed Central

    Vanderstraeten, Jacques; Verschaeve, Luc

    2008-01-01

    Background Since 1999, several articles have been published on genome-wide and/or proteome-wide response after exposure to radiofrequency (RF) fields whose signal and intensities were similar to or typical of those of currently used mobile telephones. These studies were performed using powerful high-throughput screening techniques (HTSTs) of transcriptomics and/or proteomics, which allow for the simultaneous screening of the expression of thousands of genes or proteins. Objectives We reviewed these HTST-based studies and compared the results with currently accepted concepts about the effects of RF fields on gene expression. In this article we also discuss these last in light of the recent concept of microwave-assisted chemistry. Discussion To date, the results of HTST-based studies of transcriptomics and/or proteomics after exposure to RF fields relevant to human exposure are still inconclusive, as most of the positive reports are flawed by methodologic imperfections or shortcomings. In addition, when positive findings were reported, no precise response pattern could be identified in a reproducible way. In particular, results from HTST studies tend to exclude the role of a cell stressor for exposure to RF fields at nonthermal intensities. However, on the basis of lessons from microwave-assisted chemistry, we can assume that RF fields might affect heat-sensitive gene or protein expression to an extent larger than would be predicted from temperature change only. But in all likelihood, this would concern intensities higher than those relevant to usual human exposure. Conclusions The precise role of transcriptomics and proteomics in the screening of bioeffects from exposure to RF fields from mobile phones is still uncertain in view of the lack of positively identified phenotypic change and the lack of theoretical, as well as experimental, arguments for specific gene and/or protein response patterns after this kind of exposure. PMID:18795152

  17. Electron emission and fragmentation of molecules in intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, K.; Prümper, G.; Hatamoto, T.; Okunishi, M.; Mathur, D.

    2007-06-01

    We have constructed an apparatus for high-resolution electron spectroscopy and electron-ion coincidence experiments on gas-phase molecules in intense laser fields. The apparatus comprises an electron time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer and an ion TOF spectrometer with a position detector, placed on either side of an effusive molecular beam. The ionizing radiation is either the fundamental (800 nm wavelength) of a Ti:sapphire laser or frequency doubled 400-nm light, with pulse durations of ~ 150 fs and the repetition rate of 1 kHz. We have investigated the electron emission and fragmentation of linear alcohol molecules, methanol, ethanol and 1-propanol, in laser fields with peak intensities up to ~ 1×10 14 W/cm2. Details of our apparatus are described along with an overview of some recent results.

  18. Electron Dynamics in Intense Laser Fields: A Bohmian Mechanics Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jooya, Hossein Z.; Telnov, Dmitry A.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2016-05-01

    We study the electron quantum dynamics of atomic hydrogen under intense near infrared laser fields by means of the De Broglie-Bohm's framework of Bohmian mechanics. This method is used to study the mechanism of the multiple plateau generation and the cut-off extension, as the main characteristic features of high order harmonic generation spectrum. Electron multiple recollision dynamics under intense mid-infrared laser fields is also investigated. In this case, the resulting patterns in the high-order harmonic generation and the above-threshold ionization spectra are analyzed by comprehensive picture provided by Bohmian mechanics. The time evolution of individual trajectories is closely studied to address some of the major structural features of the photoelectron angular distributions. This work is partially supported by DOE.

  19. Technical brief: Constant intense light exposure to lesion and initiate regeneration in normally pigmented zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Rajaram, Kamya; Summerbell, Emily R; Patton, James G

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish are capable of robust and spontaneous regeneration of injured retina. Constant intense light exposure to adult albino zebrafish specifically causes apoptosis of rod and cone photoreceptor cells and is an excellent model to study the molecular mechanisms underlying photoreceptor regeneration. However, this paradigm has only been applied to lesion zebrafish of the nonpigmented albino genetic background, which precludes the use of numerous transgenic reporter lines that are widely used to study regeneration. Here, we explored the effectiveness of constant intense light exposure in causing photoreceptor apoptosis and stimulating regeneration in normally pigmented zebrafish retinas. We show that constant intense light exposure causes widespread photoreceptor damage in the dorsal-central retinas of pigmented zebrafish. Photoreceptor loss triggers dedifferentiation and proliferation of Müller glia as well as progenitor cell proliferation. We also demonstrate that the timeline of regeneration response is comparable between the albino and the pigmented retinas. PMID:25324680

  20. Atoms, molecules and clusters in intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Zachary B.

    Recent advances in the technology of intense, short laser pulses have opened the possibility of investigating processes in atoms, molecules and clusters in which the normal intramolecular forces between electrons and nuclei, and between different electrons, are rivaled in strength by interactions with the driving laser, or with a cluster plasma. Experiments using rescattered electrons offer a means of probing atomic and molecular processes on ultrafast timescales. This thesis extends techniques and concepts of atomic and molecular physics to describe physics in the strong field regime. This involves investigating how electron scattering from atoms and molecules is affected by the intense and time-varying electric field of the laser, the effect of such scattering on experimental observables, and the role of intramolecular structure on strong field processes. Also investigated is the evolution of van derWaals atomic clusters when subject to intense laser pulses in the VUV regime. Here processes such as photoionization, inverse bremsstrahlung heating, and collisional ionization and recombination are affected both by the non-hydrogenic nature of the relevant atomic potentials but also by the screening of these potentials by the cluster plasma.

  1. Intensity calibration and flat-field correction for fluorescence microscopes.

    PubMed

    Model, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Standardization in fluorescence microscopy involves calibration of intensity in reproducible units and correction for spatial nonuniformity of illumination (flat-field or shading correction). Both goals can be achieved using concentrated solutions of fluorescent dyes. When a drop of a highly concentrated fluorescent dye is placed between a slide and a coverslip it produces a spatially uniform field, resistant to photobleaching and with reproducible quantum yield; it can be used as a brightness standard for wide-field and confocal microscopes. For wide-field microscopes, calibration can be further extended to absolute molecular units. This can be done by imaging a solution of known concentration and known depth; the latter can be prepared by placing a small spherical lens in a diluted solution of the same fluorophore that is used in the biological specimen. PMID:24692055

  2. How do protozoa respond to intense magnetic fields?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevorkian, Karine

    2005-03-01

    Most microorganisms such as Paramecium Caudatum, swim in helical paths in nature. In the absence of any external stimuli (e.g. obstacles, electric field, heat, etc.) the axes of these helical paths, which define the trajectories, are straight lines and are distributed in random directions. Our experiments reveal that these trajectories can be manipulated by applying intense DC magnetic fields of the order of several Tesla. Swimming paramecia, for example, align their trajectories with magnetic fields in excess of about 7 Tesla in fraction of a second. We will describe this phenomenon in fields up to 25 T. We will address whether this effect is an active or passive response to the magnetic torque exerted on the diamagnetically anisotropic structures in Paramecium. In addition we will present results for other species as they are obtained.

  3. Intense ionospheric electric and magnetic field pulses generated by lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.; Ding, J. G.; Holzworth, R. H.

    1990-01-01

    Electric and magnetic field measurements have been made in the ionosphere over an active thunderstorm and an optical detector onboard the same rocket yielded an excellent time base for the study of waves radiated into space from the discharge. In addition to detection of intense, but generally well understood whistler mode waves, very unusual electric and magnetic field pulses preceded the 1-10 kHz component of the radiated signal. These pulses lasted several ms and had a significant electric field component parallel to the magnetic field. No known propagating wave mode has this polarization nor a signal propagation velocity as high as those measured here. This study investigated and rejected an explanation based on an anomalous skin depth effect. Although only a hypothesis at this time, a more promising explanation involving the generation of the pulse via a nonlinear decay of whistler mode waves in the frequency range 10-80 kHz is being investigated.

  4. An industrial radiography exposure device based on measurement of transmitted gamma-ray intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polee, C.; Chankow, N.; Srisatit, S.; Thong-Aram, D.

    2015-05-01

    In film radiography, underexposure and overexposure may happen particularly when lacking information of specimen material and hollowness. This paper describes a method and a device for determining exposure in industrial gamma-ray radiography based on quick measurement of transmitted gamma-ray intensity with a small detector. Application software was developed for Android mobile phone to remotely control the device and to display counting data via Bluetooth communication. Prior to film exposure, the device is placed behind a specimen to measure transmitted intensity which is inversely proportional to the exposure. Unlike in using the conventional exposure curve, correction factors for source decay, source-to- film distance, specimen thickness and kind of material are not needed. The developed technique and device make radiographic process economic, convenient and more reliable.

  5. Exposure to electromagnetic fields and suicide among electric utility workers

    PubMed Central

    van Wijngaarden, Edwin; Savitz, David A; Kleckner, Robert C; Cai, Jianwen; Loomis, Dana

    2000-01-01

    Objective To examine mortality from suicide in relation to estimated exposure to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields in a cohort of138,905 male electric utility workers. Methods Case-control sampling, which included 536 deaths from suicide and 5,348 eligible controls. Exposure was classified based on work in the most common jobs with increased exposure to magnetic fields and indices of cumulative exposure to magnetic fields based on a measurement survey. Results Suicide mortality was increased relative to work in exposed jobs and with indices of exposure to magnetic fields. Increased odds ratios (ORs) were found for years of employment as an electrician (OR, 2.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.25-3.80) or line worker(OR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.18-2.14), whereas a decreased OR was found for power plant operators (OR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.33-1.40). A dose-response gradient withexposure to magnetic fields was found for exposure in the previous year, with a mortality OR of 1.70 (95% CI, 1.00-2.90) in the highest exposure category.Stronger associations, with ORs in the range of 2.12 to 3.62, were found for men younger than 50 years. Conclusions These data provide evidence for an association between occupational electromagnetic fields and suicide that warrants further evaluation. A plausible mechanism related to melatonin and depression provides a direction for additional laboratory research and epidemiologic evaluation. PMID:10924428

  6. Near-field radiofrequency electromagnetic exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Rubtsova, Nina; Perov, Sergey; Belaya, Olga; Kuster, Niels; Balzano, Quirino

    2015-09-01

    Personal wireless telecommunication devices, such as radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic field (EMF) sources operated in vicinity of human body, have possible adverse health effects. Therefore, the correct EMF assessment is necessary in their near field. According to international near-field measurement criteria, the specific absorption rate (SAR) is used for absorbed energy distribution assessment in tissue simulating liquid phantoms. The aim of this investigation is to validate the relationship between the H-field of incident EMF and absorbed energy in phantoms. Three typical wireless telecommunication system frequencies are considered (900, 1800 and 2450 MHz). The EMF source at each frequency is an appropriate half-wave dipole antenna and the absorbing medium is a flat phantom filled with the suitable tissue simulating liquid. Two methods for SAR estimation have been used: standard procedure based on E-field measured in tissue simulating medium and a proposed evaluation by measuring the incident H-field. Compared SAR estimations were performed for various distances between sources and phantom. Also, these research data were compared with simulation results, obtained by using finite-difference time-domain method. The acquired data help to determine the source near-field space characterized by the smallest deviation between SAR estimation methods. So, this region near the RF source is suitable for correct RF energy absorption assessment using the magnetic component of the RF fields. PMID:26444190

  7. Apoptotic cell death during Drosophila oogenesis is differentially increased by electromagnetic radiation depending on modulation, intensity and duration of exposure.

    PubMed

    Sagioglou, Niki E; Manta, Areti K; Giannarakis, Ioannis K; Skouroliakou, Aikaterini S; Margaritis, Lukas H

    2016-01-01

    Present generations are being repeatedly exposed to different types and doses of non-ionizing radiation (NIR) from wireless technologies (FM radio, TETRA and TV stations, GSM and UMTS phones/base stations, Wi-Fi networks, DECT phones). Although there is controversy on the published data regarding the non-thermal effects of NIR, studies have convincingly demonstrated bioeffects. Their results indicate that modulation, intensity, exposure duration and model system are important factors determining the biological response to irradiation. Attempting to address the dependence of NIR bioeffectiveness on these factors, apoptosis in the model biological system Drosophila melanogaster was studied under different exposure protocols. A signal generator was used operating alternatively under Continuous Wave (CW) or Frequency Modulation (FM) emission modes, at three power output values (10 dB, 0, -10 dB), under four carrier frequencies (100, 395, 682, 900 MHz). Newly emerged flies were exposed either acutely (6 min or 60 min on the 6th day), or repeatedly (6 min or 60 min daily for the first 6 days of their life). All exposure protocols resulted in an increase of apoptotic cell death (ACD) observed in egg chambers, even at very low electric field strengths. FM waves seem to have a stronger effect in ACD than continuous waves. Regarding intensity and temporal exposure pattern, EMF-biological tissue interaction is not linear in response. Intensity threshold for the induction of biological effects depends on frequency, modulation and temporal exposure pattern with unknown so far mechanisms. Given this complexity, translating such experimental data into possible human exposure guidelines is yet arbitrary. PMID:25333897

  8. Ionospheric Processes Associated with Intense Sub-Auroral Electric Fields.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Providakes, James Fred

    1990-01-01

    Observations of ionospheric parameters were obtained near the equatorward edge of the auroral oval with a clustered set of instrumentation that included the Millstone Hill Incoherent Scatter Radar, the Boston University Mobile Ionospheric Observatory, and the HILAT, DMSP F6 and DMSP F7 satellites. On the evenings of April 20 and 21, 1985, during an intense magnetic storm (DST > 150 nT), large ionospheric electric fields (E > 80 mV/m) were detected along the edge of the auroral oval with the Millstone Hill Incoherent Scatter Radar. In this thesis, using both the experimental data and theory, we will discuss the ionospheric response to such substorm related intense localized electric fields at sub-auroral latitudes. A deep depletion in the ionospheric electron density was found to be colocated with these large electric fields at magnetic latitudes as low as 53^circ . We show that the associated fields aligned currents are very weak in this region and that it is the F region structure which dominates the conductivity gradient rather than the E region. The experimental data also indicate that the trough develops much more quickly than present theories predict, at least near the F peak. By developing a numerical model that includes Pedersen transport, enhanced recombination, a localized electric field, and F layer maintenance equatorward (by southward directed neutral winds) and poleward (by particle precipitation) of the trough, we were able to explain many trough features. We also show that when a sheared or turbulent velocity field is present within a scattering volume, the ISR spectra will be distorted. We study two different cases (large scale velocity shear and small scale turbulent velocity fluctuations) and compare the theory with observed distorted spectra obtained in scattering volumes known from in situ data to contain perpendicular velocity fluctuations. For both cases, we show that when standard ISR fitting programs were used to estimate the plasma

  9. Formation of osteoclast-like cells is suppressed by low frequency, low intensity electric fields.

    PubMed

    Rubin, J; McLeod, K J; Titus, L; Nanes, M S; Catherwood, B D; Rubin, C T

    1996-01-01

    With use of a solenoid to generate uniform time-varying electric fields, the effect of extremely low frequency electric fields on osteoclast-like cell formation stimulated by 1,25(OH)2D3 was studied in primary murine marrow culture. Recruitment of osteoclast-like cells was assessed by counting multinuclear, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase positive cells on day 8 of culture. A solenoid was used to impose uniform time-varying electric fields on cells; sham exposures were performed with an identical solenoid with a null net electric field. During the experiments, both solenoids heated interiorly to approximately 1.5 degrees C above ambient incubator temperature. As a result of the heating, cultures in the sham solenoid formed more osteoclast-like cells than those on the incubator shelf (132 +/- 12%). For this reason, cells exposed to the sham solenoid were used for comparison with cultures exposed to the active coil. Marrow cells were plated at 1.4 x 10(6)/cm2 in square chamber dishes and exposed to 60 Hz electric fields at 9.6 muV/cm from days 1 to 8. Field exposure inhibited osteoclast-like cell recruitment by 17 +/- 3% as compared with sham exposure (p < 0.0001). Several variables, including initial cell plating density, addition of prostaglandin E2 to enhance osteoclast-like cell recruitment, and field parameters, were also assessed. In this secondary series, extremely low frequency fields inhibited osteoclast-like cell formation by 24 +/- 4% (p < 0.0001), with their inhibitory effect consistent throughout all variations in protocol. These experiments demonstrate that extremely low intensity, low frequency sinusoidal electric fields suppress the formation of osteoclast-like cells in marrow culture. The in vitro results support in vivo findings that demonstrate that electric fields inhibit the onset of osteopenia and the progression of osteonecrosis; this suggests that extremely low frequency fields may inhibit osteoclast recruitment in vivo. PMID:8618169

  10. Assessment of complex EMF exposure situations including inhomogeneous field distribution.

    PubMed

    Jokela, Kari

    2007-06-01

    Assessment of exposure to time varying electric and magnetic fields is difficult when the fields are non-uniform or very localized. Restriction of the local spatial peak value below the reference level may be too restrictive. Additional problems arise when the fields are not sinusoidal. The objective of this review is to present practical measurement procedures for realistic and not too conservative exposure assessment for verification of compliance with the exposure guidelines of ICNIRP. In most exposure situations above 10 MHz the electric field (E) is more important than the magnetic field (B). At frequencies above 500 MHz the equivalent electric field power density averaged over the body is the most relevant indicator of exposure. Assessment of specific absorption rate (SAR) is not needed when the spatial peak value does not exceed by 6 dB the average value. Below 50 MHz down to 50 Hz, the electric field induces currents flowing along the limbs and torso. The current is roughly directly proportional to the electric field strength averaged over the body. A convenient way to restrict current concentration and hot spots in the neck, ankle and wrist, is to measure the current induced in the body. This is not possible for magnetic fields. Instead, for a non-uniform magnetic field below 100 kHz the average magnetic flux density over the whole body and head are valid exposure indicators to protect the central nervous system. The first alternative to analyze exposure to non-sinusoidal magnetic fields below 100 kHz is based on the spectral comparison of each component to the corresponding reference level. In the second alternative the waveform of B or dB/dt is filtered in the time domain with a simple filter, where the attenuation varies proportionally to the reference level as a function of frequency, and the filtered peak value is compared to the peak reference level derived from the ICNIRP reference levels. PMID:17495653

  11. Exposure chamber for determining the biological effects of electric and magnetic fields on dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc Hai; Richard, Louis; Burchard, Javier F

    2005-02-01

    An exposure chamber was designed to study the effects of electric and magnetic fields (EMF) on oestrous cycles, hormonal profile during gestation, pineal function, quantity and quality of milk production, feed intake, and central nervous system of dairy cattle. The chamber was 15 x 10 x 3 m; and the control system was fully computerized so that the field intensities can be varied and monitored continuously, on site or remotely. During exposure to EMF, milk production, feed consumption, and health were monitored closely and blood and cerebral spinal fluid were continuously sampled. The chamber characteristics allow use of a wide range of exposure such as electric fields (0-30 kV/m) and magnetic fields (0-100 microT) at frequencies ranging from 45 to 3000 Hz. PMID:15672371

  12. Optical properties of a multibarrier structure under intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina, D. A.; Akimov, V.; Mora-Ramos, M. E.; Morales, A. L.; Tulupenko, V.; Duque, C. A.

    2015-11-01

    Using the diagonalization method and within the effective mass and parabolic band approximations, the energy spectrum and the wave functions are investigated in biased multibarrier structure taking into account the effects of nonresonant intense laser fields. We calculated the optical properties from the susceptibility using a nonperturbative formalism recently reported. We study the changes in the intersubband optical absorption coefficients and refraction index for several values of the dressing laser parameter and for some specific values of the electric field applied along the growth direction of the heterostructure. It is concluded from our study that the peaks in the optical absorption spectrum have redshifts or blueshifts as a function of the laser parameter and the electric field. These parameters could be suitable tools for tuning the electronic and optical properties of the multibarrier structure.

  13. Intense magnetic field generation by solidification and crustal delamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, J. A.; Bryson, J. F. J.; Nimmo, F.

    2015-12-01

    Recent paleomagnetic measurements of meteorites suggest that asteroidal magnetic fields are a common feature of the early solar system [1,2]. The iron cores of different asteroids may solidify in different ways [3]. For the IVA iron meteorite parent body the rapid cooling rates and correlation with Ni concentrations further suggest that their parent body was entirely metal, and that solidification of their parent asteroid proceeded from the top down. Here we present model constraints on the thermo-chemical evolution of such rapidly cooled iron asteroids. We show that the temperature of the liquid is rapidly well mixed, and equal to the composition-dependent freezing point, and that thermal convection contributes only at early times to generation of intense magnetic fields and is therefore not sufficient to explain the generation of a dynamo. Instead, we propose that viscous delamination [4] at the base of the solidifying, dense crust provides a sufficient buoyancy flux to generate a magnetic field with properties consistent with those inferred from paleomagnetic measurements of the two IVA meteorites [5]. A model that captures the aggregate effect of episodic delamination events predicts the evolution of the crust and the formation and growth of the asteroid core, the intensity and directional evolution of the magnetic field through time, and the times at which magnetic field generation ceases and total asteroid solidification occur. These predictions can be compared directly with recent measurements of IVA iron meteorites [5] with implications for top-down solidification, the solid structure of the IVA parent core, and magnetic field generation both on the IVA parent body, and wider implications for top-down core solidification generally. [1] Weiss et al. Space Sci. Rev. 152, 341-390 (2010). [2] Tarduno et al. Science. 338, 939-942 (2012). [3] Williams Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 284, 564-569 (2009) [4] Molnar et al. Geophys. J. Int. 133, 568-584 (1998) [5] Bryson et

  14. Absence of acute ocular damage in humans after prolonged exposure to intense RF EMF.

    PubMed

    Adibzadeh, F; van Rhoon, G C; Verduijn, G M; Naus-Postema, N C; Paulides, M M

    2016-01-21

    The eye is considered to be a critical organ when determining safety standards for radio frequency (RF) radiation. Experimental data obtained using animals showed that RF heating of the eye, particularly over a specific threshold, can induce cataracts. During the treatment of cancer in the head and neck by hyperthermia, the eyes receive a considerable dose of RF radiation due to stray radiation from the prolonged (60 min) and intense exposure at 434 MHz of this region. In the current study, we verified the exposure guidelines for humans by determining the association between the electromagnetic and thermal dose in the eyes with the reported ocular effects. We performed a simulation study to retrospectively assess the specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature increase in the eyes of 16 selected patients (encompassing a total of 74 treatment sessions) whose treatment involved high power delivery as well as a minimal distance between the tumor site and the eye. Our results show that the basic restrictions on the peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (10 W kg(-1)) and peak tissue temperature increase (1 °C) are exceeded by up to 10.4 and 4.6 times, on average, and by at least 6.2 and 1.8 times when considering the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval. Evaluation of the acute effects according to patients' feedback (all patients), the common toxicity criteria scores (all patients) and an ophthalmology investigation (one patient with the highest exposure) revealed no indication of any serious acute ocular effect, even though the eyes were exposed to high electromagnetic fields, leading to a high thermal dose. We also found that, although there is a strong correlation (R (2) =  0.88) between the predicted induced SAR and temperature in the eye, there are large uncertainties regarding the temperature-SAR relationship. Given this large uncertainty (129%) compared with the uncertainty of 3D temperature simulations (61%), we recommend using temperature simulations as a

  15. Absence of acute ocular damage in humans after prolonged exposure to intense RF EMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adibzadeh, F.; van Rhoon, G. C.; Verduijn, G. M.; Naus-Postema, N. C.; Paulides, M. M.

    2016-01-01

    The eye is considered to be a critical organ when determining safety standards for radio frequency (RF) radiation. Experimental data obtained using animals showed that RF heating of the eye, particularly over a specific threshold, can induce cataracts. During the treatment of cancer in the head and neck by hyperthermia, the eyes receive a considerable dose of RF radiation due to stray radiation from the prolonged (60 min) and intense exposure at 434 MHz of this region. In the current study, we verified the exposure guidelines for humans by determining the association between the electromagnetic and thermal dose in the eyes with the reported ocular effects. We performed a simulation study to retrospectively assess the specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature increase in the eyes of 16 selected patients (encompassing a total of 74 treatment sessions) whose treatment involved high power delivery as well as a minimal distance between the tumor site and the eye. Our results show that the basic restrictions on the peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (10 W kg-1) and peak tissue temperature increase (1 °C) are exceeded by up to 10.4 and 4.6 times, on average, and by at least 6.2 and 1.8 times when considering the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval. Evaluation of the acute effects according to patients’ feedback (all patients), the common toxicity criteria scores (all patients) and an ophthalmology investigation (one patient with the highest exposure) revealed no indication of any serious acute ocular effect, even though the eyes were exposed to high electromagnetic fields, leading to a high thermal dose. We also found that, although there is a strong correlation (R 2  =  0.88) between the predicted induced SAR and temperature in the eye, there are large uncertainties regarding the temperature-SAR relationship. Given this large uncertainty (129%) compared with the uncertainty of 3D temperature simulations (61%), we recommend using temperature

  16. Exposure scheme separates effects of electric shock and electric field for honey bees, Apis mellifera L

    SciTech Connect

    Bindokas, V.P.; Gauger, J.R.; Greenberg, B.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanisms to explain disturbance of honey bee colonies under a 765-kV, 60-Hz transmission line (electric (E) field = 7 kV/m) fall into two categories: direct bee perception of enhanced in-hive E fields, and perception of shock from induced currents. The same adverse biological effects previously observed in honey bee colonies exposed under a 765-kV transmission line can be reproduced by exposing worker bees to shock or E field within elongated hive entranceways (= tunnels). Exposure to intense E field caused disturbance only if bees were in contact with a conductive substrate. E-field and shock exposure can be separated and precisely defined within tunnels, eliminating dosimetric vagaries that occur when entire hives are exposed to E field.

  17. Office worker exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hiebert, D.G.

    1994-05-01

    A study of office worker exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF MF) was conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The main purpose of this study was to quantitatively assess ELF MF exposures. A secondary objective was to determine whether or not exposures to ELF MF can be reduced by implementing administrative controls and educating workers on the sources of such fields. EMDEX dosimeters were used to determine full shift personal exposures for 12 volunteers from two personnel sections and one training section. In addition, using the EMDEX meter in survey mode, office area evaluations were conducted. Administrative controls and training were implemented in an attempt to reduce exposures. Post control monitoring was conducted to determine if a reduction in ELF MF occurred among the workers. On average, baseline office worker exposures to ELF MF were 2.3 mG, ranging from 0.6 to 9.7 mG. The post control exposures averaged 1.1 mG with a range from 0.5 to 2.2 mG. A reduction of 53% overall was seen after implementation of administrative controls and training. The office area survey indicated that many sources of ELF MF influence exposure and that magnetic field strengths vary not only from one type of equipment to another, but also vary between two similar pieces of equipment.

  18. [Human behavior in the solar radiation field with reference to ultraviolet exposure].

    PubMed

    Schauberger, G; Keck, G; Cabaj, A

    1992-09-01

    There is a causal relation between solar ultraviolet radiation and skin cancer. For epidemiological investigations, quantification of the UV exposure is essential. To set up a risk assessment for the whole population, a representative survey was performed in Austria. The questionnaire refers to three sectors of everyday life: work, recreation and holidays; in addition the use of solaria is asked about for a further investigation. The UV exposure caused by humans' behaviour in the field of solar radiation was analysed from various demographic aspects. For some subpopulations the UV exposure sustained during work, recreation and holidays was compared. Groups with high occupational UV exposure show a weaker tendency to stay outdoors during leisure time and holidays than groups characterized by high UV exposure in their leisure time, who also prefer sun-intensive activities during holidays. PMID:1399598

  19. Palaeomagnetic field intensity variations suggest Mesoproterozoic inner-core nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggin, A. J.; Piispa, E. J.; Pesonen, L. J.; Holme, R.; Paterson, G. A.; Veikkolainen, T.; Tauxe, L.

    2015-10-01

    The Earth's inner core grows by the freezing of liquid iron at its surface. The point in history at which this process initiated marks a step-change in the thermal evolution of the planet. Recent computational and experimental studies have presented radically differing estimates of the thermal conductivity of the Earth's core, resulting in estimates of the timing of inner-core nucleation ranging from less than half a billion to nearly two billion years ago. Recent inner-core nucleation (high thermal conductivity) requires high outer-core temperatures in the early Earth that complicate models of thermal evolution. The nucleation of the core leads to a different convective regime and potentially different magnetic field structures that produce an observable signal in the palaeomagnetic record and allow the date of inner-core nucleation to be estimated directly. Previous studies searching for this signature have been hampered by the paucity of palaeomagnetic intensity measurements, by the lack of an effective means of assessing their reliability, and by shorter-timescale geomagnetic variations. Here we examine results from an expanded Precambrian database of palaeomagnetic intensity measurements selected using a new set of reliability criteria. Our analysis provides intensity-based support for the dominant dipolarity of the time-averaged Precambrian field, a crucial requirement for palaeomagnetic reconstructions of continents. We also present firm evidence for the existence of very long-term variations in geomagnetic strength. The most prominent and robust transition in the record is an increase in both average field strength and variability that is observed to occur between a billion and 1.5 billion years ago. This observation is most readily explained by the nucleation of the inner core occurring during this interval; the timing would tend to favour a modest value of core thermal conductivity and supports a simple thermal evolution model for the Earth.

  20. Palaeomagnetic field intensity variations suggest Mesoproterozoic inner-core nucleation.

    PubMed

    Biggin, A J; Piispa, E J; Pesonen, L J; Holme, R; Paterson, G A; Veikkolainen, T; Tauxe, L

    2015-10-01

    The Earth's inner core grows by the freezing of liquid iron at its surface. The point in history at which this process initiated marks a step-change in the thermal evolution of the planet. Recent computational and experimental studies have presented radically differing estimates of the thermal conductivity of the Earth's core, resulting in estimates of the timing of inner-core nucleation ranging from less than half a billion to nearly two billion years ago. Recent inner-core nucleation (high thermal conductivity) requires high outer-core temperatures in the early Earth that complicate models of thermal evolution. The nucleation of the core leads to a different convective regime and potentially different magnetic field structures that produce an observable signal in the palaeomagnetic record and allow the date of inner-core nucleation to be estimated directly. Previous studies searching for this signature have been hampered by the paucity of palaeomagnetic intensity measurements, by the lack of an effective means of assessing their reliability, and by shorter-timescale geomagnetic variations. Here we examine results from an expanded Precambrian database of palaeomagnetic intensity measurements selected using a new set of reliability criteria. Our analysis provides intensity-based support for the dominant dipolarity of the time-averaged Precambrian field, a crucial requirement for palaeomagnetic reconstructions of continents. We also present firm evidence for the existence of very long-term variations in geomagnetic strength. The most prominent and robust transition in the record is an increase in both average field strength and variability that is observed to occur between a billion and 1.5 billion years ago. This observation is most readily explained by the nucleation of the inner core occurring during this interval; the timing would tend to favour a modest value of core thermal conductivity and supports a simple thermal evolution model for the Earth. PMID:26450058

  1. Chronic exposure to ELF fields may induce depression

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    Exposure to extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electric or magnetic fields has been postulated as a potentially contributing factor in depression. Epidemiologic studies have yielded positive correlations between magnetic- and/or electric-field strengths in local environments and the incidence of depression-related suicide. Chronic exposure to ELF electric or magnetic fields can disrupt normal circadian rhythms in rat pineal serotonin-N-acetyltransferase activity as well as in serotonin and melatonin concentrations. Such disruptions in the circadian rhythmicity of pineal melatonin secretion have been associated with certain depressive disorders in human beings. In the rat, ELF fields may interfere with tonic aspects of neuronal input to the pineal gland, giving rise to what may be termed functional pinealectomy. If long-term exposure to ELF fields causes pineal dysfunction in human beings as it does in the rat, such dysfunction may contribute to the onset of depression or may exacerbate existing depressive disorders. 85 references.

  2. Complex geology spurs intensive development in Zhongyuan fields

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, R.W. )

    1990-04-01

    The Zhongyuan producing region of Eastern China is located some 310 mi south of Beijing and 60 mi southeast of the city of Anyang in Henan Province. An intensive infill drilling program utilizing 78 rigs is underway in the area to maximize production. Continuing development drilling in the 10 oil fields scattered over the area is required because reservoirs are highly faulted. The resulting small fault blocks also have a high water content (water production appears quickly in a new well), resulting in a relatively short producing life. This article presents details of the Zhongyuan complex.

  3. Field assessment of an aluminum intensive passenger car

    SciTech Connect

    Cuenca, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    Ford Motor Co. has made a small batch of ``aluminum intensive vehicles`` (AIV), consisting of mid-size cars (Taurus/Sable) with all-aluminum bodies. The first twenty vehicles were made for internal evaluation at Ford, but the second batch of twenty has been placed on the hands of selected independent users, primarily automotive suppliers, for long term field assessment. The mass reduction achieved in the body of an AIV is shown, and compared with an equivalent standard steel body. Argonne obtained one of these vehicles last October; this is an assessment of the fuel consumption and other operational characteristics of this type of car to date.

  4. Cancer link to magnetic field exposure: a hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Easterly, C.E.

    1981-08-01

    The hypothesis is presented for a relationship between exposure to magnetic fields and the induction of cancer: alterations in the mitotic processes caused by exposure to magnetic fields can provide a proliferative stimulus to latent tumor cells, thereby leading to the expression of malignant neoplasia. In a review of the literature, it was found that most of the magnetic field data cited were taken in connection with static field conditions. Neither 0 or 60 Hz fields interact with biological tissue in a manner analogous to the resonant energy absorption found with microwave exposure. Some evidence, however, indicates similar biologic effects for both frequencies with those at 60 Hz being somewhat more pronounced. While there is no data relating magnetic field exposure to any parameter directly related to cellular toxicity or cellular death, there is a growing data base indicating increases or decreases in cellular reproductive rate and function consequent to magnetic field exposure. Therefore, it appears that mathematical development of the hypothesis discussed is possible utilizing available information. (JMT)

  5. DC response of hot carriers under circularly polarized intense microwave fields and intense magnetic fields in quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Norihisa

    2013-12-04

    Hot carrier dynamics under intense microwave and crossed magnetic fields are investigated theoretically for the case that the dominant scattering process is inelastic collision, especially intersubband and intrasubband transition in Quantum wells. If the applied electric fields are circularly polarized, the equation of motion forms symmetric on the x-y plane. But the carrier motions are complicated to accumulate because of acceleration and emission process. This situation makes possible to create a variation of the carrier motion, typically the carrier bunching is occurred. This state is a sort of population inversion. The DC response of this system attains strongly negative at appropriate field conditions. Through the simulation for the real case described below, it may include a type of induced emission.

  6. Evidence for the initiation of decompression sickness by exposure to intense underwater sound.

    PubMed

    Tal, Dror; Shachar-Bener, Hofit; Hershkovitz, Dov; Arieli, Yehuda; Shupak, Avi

    2015-09-01

    Mass stranding of cetaceans (whales and dolphins), in close association with the activity of naval sonar systems, has been reported on numerous occasions. Necropsy showed bubble-associated lesions similar to those described in human decompression sickness (DCS). We examined the hypothesis that exposure to underwater sound may potentiate DCS. Rats were subjected to immersion and simulated dives with and without simultaneous acoustic transmissions at pressure levels and frequencies of 204 dB/8 kHz and 183.3 dB/15 kHz. DCS severity was assessed using the rotating wheel method. Recording of somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) was employed under general anesthesia as an electrophysiological measure of neurologic insult. A significantly higher rate of decompression sickness was found among animals exposed to the 204-dB/8-kHz sound field. Significantly higher pathological SSEPs scores were noted for both underwater sound protocols. Pathological SSEPs scores in animals immersed during the acoustic transmissions, but without changes in ambient pressure, were comparable to those observed in animals exposed to the dive profile. The results demonstrate induction of neurological damage by intense underwater sound during immersion, with a further deleterious effect when this was combined with decompression stress. The study outcome has potential implications for human diving safety and may provide an explanation for the mass stranding of cetaceans purportedly associated with sonar activity. PMID:26133802

  7. Evidence for the initiation of decompression sickness by exposure to intense underwater sound

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Dror; Shachar-Bener, Hofit; Hershkovitz, Dov; Arieli, Yehuda

    2015-01-01

    Mass stranding of cetaceans (whales and dolphins), in close association with the activity of naval sonar systems, has been reported on numerous occasions. Necropsy showed bubble-associated lesions similar to those described in human decompression sickness (DCS). We examined the hypothesis that exposure to underwater sound may potentiate DCS. Rats were subjected to immersion and simulated dives with and without simultaneous acoustic transmissions at pressure levels and frequencies of 204 dB/8 kHz and 183.3 dB/15 kHz. DCS severity was assessed using the rotating wheel method. Recording of somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) was employed under general anesthesia as an electrophysiological measure of neurologic insult. A significantly higher rate of decompression sickness was found among animals exposed to the 204-dB/8-kHz sound field. Significantly higher pathological SSEPs scores were noted for both underwater sound protocols. Pathological SSEPs scores in animals immersed during the acoustic transmissions, but without changes in ambient pressure, were comparable to those observed in animals exposed to the dive profile. The results demonstrate induction of neurological damage by intense underwater sound during immersion, with a further deleterious effect when this was combined with decompression stress. The study outcome has potential implications for human diving safety and may provide an explanation for the mass stranding of cetaceans purportedly associated with sonar activity. PMID:26133802

  8. Fetal exposure to low frequency electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cech, R.; Leitgeb, N.; Pediaditis, M.

    2007-02-01

    To investigate the interaction of low frequency electric and magnetic fields with pregnant women and in particular with the fetus, an anatomical voxel model of an 89 kg woman at week 30 of pregnancy was developed. Intracorporal electric current density distributions due to exposure to homogeneous 50 Hz electric and magnetic fields were calculated and results were compared with basic restrictions recommended by ICNIRP guidelines. It could be shown that the basic restriction is met within the central nervous system (CNS) of the mother at exposure to reference level of either electric or magnetic fields. However, within the fetus the basic restriction is considerably exceeded. Revision of reference levels might be necessary.

  9. Total electron content and magnetic field intensity over Ilorin, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolaji, O. S.; Adeniyi, J. O.; Adimula, I. A.; Radicella, S. M.; Doherty, P. H.

    2013-06-01

    Simultaneous 10 quiet days records of slant total electron content (STEC) and the horizontal magnetic field intensity (H-field) from each month of the year 2009 are employed for this work. The STEC and the H-field are measured from Global Positioning System (GPS) and the Magnetic Data Acquisition System (MAGDAS), respectively at Ilorin, Nigeria. The vertical total electron content (VTEC) and solar quiet of H-component (SqH) values are estimated from the STEC and H-field data respectively. Daily maximum value of SqH (DSqH) in October is 87nT and the minimum value in January is 18nT around 1000-1200 LT. With the exclusions of months with pre-noon peaks, maximum daily value of VTEC (DTEC) was observed at 1500 LT in October with a value of 34TECU and with a minimum value of 24TECU in February. During the pre-sunrise towards the sunrise period at the equatorial-trough, prominent westward electric field associated with increasing DSqH variations were due to probable late reversal of the westward nighttime to eastward daytime electric field, which plays significant role of generating equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) at the equatorial-trough. The maximum peak time of DSqH closely determines the time of pre-noon peak on the DTEC variability when there is no prominent CEJ during the rising flank. On the decaying flanks, CEJ were observed to impede plasma deposition on DTEC variation. The estimates of correlation coefficient (cc) of DTEC and DSqH are also investigated. Seasonal variations investigated show that there exist a relationship between DTEC and DSqH, which is an evidence of EIA.

  10. Electric and magnetic field exposures for people living near a 735-kilovolt power line.

    PubMed Central

    Levallois, P; Gauvin, D; St-Laurent, J; Gingras, S; Deadman, J E

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a 735-kV transmission line on the electric and magnetic field exposures of people living at the edge of the line's right of way. Exposure of 18 adults, mostly white-collar workers, living in different bungalows located 190-240 feet from the line (exposed subjects) was compared to that of 17 adults living in similar residences far away from any transmission line. Each subject carried a Positron meter for 24 hr during 1 workday, which measured 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields every minute. All measurements were carried out in parallel for exposed and unexposed subjects during the same weeks between September and December. During measurements the average loading on the line varied between 600 and 1100 A. The average magnetic field intensity while at home was 4.4 times higher among exposed subjects than unexposed (7.1 versus 1.6 mG, p = 0.0001) and 6.2 times higher when considering only the sleeping period (6.8 versus 1.1 mG, p = 0.0001). Based on the 24-hr measurement, average magnetic field exposure was three times higher among the exposed. Electric field intensity was also higher among the exposed while at home (26.3 versus 14.0 V/m, p = 0.03). Magnetic field intensity among the exposed was positively correlated with the loading on the line (r = 0.8, p = 0.001). Percentage of time above a magnetic field threshold (2 mG or 7.8 mG) was a good indicator to distinguish the two types of exposure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1. PMID:7498095

  11. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Davanipour, Z.; Sobel, E.; Bowman, J.D.; Qian, Z.; Will, A.D.

    1997-03-01

    In an hypothesis-generating case-control study of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, lifetime occupational histories were obtained. The patients (n = 28) were clinic based. The occupational exposure of interest in this report is electromagnetic fields (EMFs). This is the first and so far the only exposure analyzed in this study. Occupational exposure up to 2 years prior to estimated disease symptom onset was used for construction of exposure indices for cases. Controls (n = 32) were blood and nonblood relatives of cases. Occupational exposure for controls was through the same age as exposure for the corresponding cases. Twenty (71%) cases and 28 (88%) controls had at least 20 years of work experience covering the exposure period. The occupational history and task data were used to classify blindly each occupation for each subject as having high, medium/high, medium, medium/low, or low EMF exposure, based primarily on data from an earlier and unrelated study designed to obtain occupational EMF exposure information on workers in ``electrical`` and ``nonelectrical`` jobs. By using the length of time each subject spent in each occupation through the exposure period, two indices of exposure were constructed: total occupational exposure (E{sub 1}) and average occupational exposure (E{sub 2}). For cases and controls with at least 20 years of work experience, the odds ratio (OR) for exposure at the 75th percentile of the E{sub 1} case exposure data relative to minimum exposure was 7.5 (P < 0.02; 95% CI, 1.4--38.1) and the corresponding OR for E{sub 2} was 5.5 (P < 0.02; 95% CI, 1.3--22.5). For all cases and controls, the ORs were 2.5 (P < 0.1; 95% CI, 0.9--8.1) for E{sub 1} and 2.3 (P = 0.12; 95% CI, 0.8--6.6) for E{sub 2}. This study should be considered an hypothesis-generating study. Larger studies, using incident cases and improved exposure assessment, should be undertaken.

  12. Magnetic field exposure and arrythmic risk: evaluation in railway drivers.

    PubMed

    Santangelo, L; Di Grazia, M; Liotti, F; De Maria, E; Calabró, R; Sannolo, N

    2005-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that professional exposure to Extremely Low Frequency-Electro Magnetic Field (ELF-EMF) can increase the risk of sudden cardiac death. Aim of our work was to find predictive parameters of arrhythmic risk in a population of 28 railways drivers exposed to ELF-EMF. Our findings were that the exposure did not reduce HRV and did not increase the risk of arrhythmias. PMID:15750820

  13. Dissociation dynamics of diatomic molecules in intense fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrakvelidze, Maia

    We study the dynamics of diatomic molecules (dimers) in intense IR and XUV laser fields theoretically and compare the results with measured data in collaboration with different experimental groups worldwide. The first three chapters of the thesis cover the introduction and the background on solving time-independent and time-dependent Schrodinger equation. The numerical results in this thesis are presented in four chapters, three of which are focused on diatomic molecules in IR fields. The last one concentrates on diatomic molecules in XUV pulses. The study of nuclear dynamics of H2 or D2 molecules in IR pulses is given in Chapter 4. First, we investigate the optimal laser parameters for observing field-induced bond softening and bond hardening in D2+. Next, the nuclear dynamics of H2 + molecular ions in intense laser fields are investigated by analyzing their fragment kinetic-energy release (KER) spectra as a function of the pump-probe delay τ Lastly, the electron localization is studied for long circularly polarized laser pulses. Chapter 5 covers the dissociation dynamics of O2+ in an IR laser field. The fragment KER spectra are analyzed as a function of the pump-probe delay τ Within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, we calculate ab-initio adiabatic potential-energy curves and their electric dipole couplings, using the quantum chemistry code GAMESS. In Chapter 6, the dissociation dynamics of the noble gas dimer ions He 2+, Ne2+, Ar2 +, Kr2+, and Xe2 + is investigated in ultrashort pump and probe laser pulses of different wavelengths. We observe a striking "delay gap" in the pump-probe-delay-dependent KER spectrum only if the probe-pulse wavelength exceeds the pump-pulse wavelength. Comparing pump-probe-pulse-delay dependent KER spectra for different noble gas dimer cations, we quantitatively discuss quantum-mechanical versus classical aspects of the nuclear vibrational motion as a function of the nuclear mass. Chapter 7 focuses on diatomic molecules in XUV

  14. Optoelectrofluidic field separation based on light-intensity gradients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sanghyun; Park, Hyun Jin; Yoon, Jin Sung; Kang, Kwan Hyoung

    2010-01-01

    Optoelectrofluidic field separation (OEFS) of particles under light -intensity gradient (LIG) is reported, where the LIG illumination on the photoconductive layer converts the short-ranged dielectrophoresis (DEP) force to the long-ranged one. The long-ranged DEP force can compete with the hydrodynamic force by alternating current electro-osmosis (ACEO) over the entire illumination area for realizing effective field separation of particles. In the OEFS system, the codirectional illumination and observation induce the levitation effect, compensating the attenuation of the DEP force under LIG illumination by slightly floating particles from the surface. Results of the field separation and concentration of diverse particle pairs (0.82–16 μm) are well demonstrated, and conditions determining the critical radius and effective particle manipulation are discussed. The OEFS with codirectional LIG strategy could be a promising particle manipulation method in many applications where a rapid manipulation of biological cells and particles over the entire working area are of interest. PMID:20697461

  15. Evaluation of recommended REACH exposure modeling tools and near-field, far-field model in assessing occupational exposure to toluene from spray paint.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, Elizabeth; Spencer, John W; Hiteshew, Kathleen; Coutu, Michelle; Nealley, Mark

    2013-03-01

    Predictive modeling is an available tool to assess worker exposures to a variety of chemicals in different industries and product-use scenarios. The European Chemical Agency (ECHA)'s guidelines for manufacturers to fulfill the European Union's legal requirements pursuant to the Registration, Evaluation, Authorization, and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) initiative include recommendations for the use of modeling to predict worker exposures. ECHA recommends different models for different target populations (i.e. workers, consumers, environment) and routes of exposure (i.e. skin absorption, ingestion, inhalation), and presents them hierarchically, with Tier 1 models presented as the most simplistic, conservative models and Tier 2 models recommended for further intensive evaluation of substances or preparations. In order to assess these models for one exposure (product-use) scenario, a simulation of the scenario was completed in a controlled environment and the measured results were compared with the modeling outputs. The authors predicted, based on the design of the modeling tools, that all models would overestimate worker exposures under the simulated product-use scenario, with the lower-tiered model producing the most conservative estimate of exposure. In this study, a Tier 1 model and a Tier 2 model were evaluated for comparison with the near-field, far-field (NF-FF) deterministic model and measured experimental results in a real-time worker inhalation exposure assessment. Modeling was conducted prior to actual air monitoring. The exposure scenario that was evaluated involved the application of a toluene-containing spray paint to a work surface. Air samples were collected to evaluate short-term (15-min) and long-term (240-min) exposures. Eight-hour time-weighted averages (8-h TWAs) were calculated and compared with the modeling outputs from the recommended REACH modeling tools and the NF-FF model. A comparison of each of the modeling tools with measured

  16. EXPOSURE OF MAN IN THE NEAR-FIELD OF A RESONANT DIPOLE: COMPARISON BETWEEN THEORY AND MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of the radiofrequency energy deposition in a model of the human body exposed in the near-field of a resonant dipole at 350 MHz was calculated using the moment method. Detailed maps of the electric field intensity in a similar model under the same exposure conditions were...

  17. Light field creating and imaging with different order intensity derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Jiang, Huan

    2014-10-01

    Microscopic image restoration and reconstruction is a challenging topic in the image processing and computer vision, which can be widely applied to life science, biology and medicine etc. A microscopic light field creating and three dimensional (3D) reconstruction method is proposed for transparent or partially transparent microscopic samples, which is based on the Taylor expansion theorem and polynomial fitting. Firstly the image stack of the specimen is divided into several groups in an overlapping or non-overlapping way along the optical axis, and the first image of every group is regarded as reference image. Then different order intensity derivatives are calculated using all the images of every group and polynomial fitting method based on the assumption that the structure of the specimen contained by the image stack in a small range along the optical axis are possessed of smooth and linear property. Subsequently, new images located any position from which to reference image the distance is Δz along the optical axis can be generated by means of Taylor expansion theorem and the calculated different order intensity derivatives. Finally, the microscopic specimen can be reconstructed in 3D form using deconvolution technology and all the images including both the observed images and the generated images. The experimental results show the effectiveness and feasibility of our method.

  18. S-76 rotorcraft high intensity radiated fields. Test plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Jerry T.; Brooks, Steve M.; Barnes, Ken A.

    1991-07-01

    Concern over the effects of High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) on civil and military aircraft has increased over the past 10 years. The increase is due to several factors which affect the safe flight of all fixed-wing and rotorcraft. Previous flight-critical mechanical controls are being replaced by electronic computer-driven controls; manufacturers are increasing the use of composite materials in the fabrication of new aircraft; and frequency ranges and output power levels of commercial and military transmitters have significantly increased. While much HIRF susceptibility information has been collected, the data are proprietary and have not been released. To address the HIRF concerns and begin development of a releasable HIRF data base, the FAA Technical Center, has implemented a HIRF research program. As part of that program, a HIRF test was performed on a Sikorsky S-76 Helicopter. The purpose, approach, and initial findings of the S-76 HIRF test are addressed.

  19. Relationship Between Exposure, Clinical Malaria, and Age in an Area of Changing Transmission Intensity

    PubMed Central

    O’Meara, Wendy P.; Mwangi, Tabitha W.; Williams, Thomas N.; McKenzie, F. Ellis; Snow, Robert W.; Marsh, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between malaria transmission intensity and clinical disease is important for predicting the outcome of control measures that reduce transmission. Comparisons of hospital data between areas of differing transmission intensity suggest that the mean age of hospitalized clinical malaria is higher under relatively lower transmission, but the total number of episodes is similar until transmission drops below a threshold, where the risks of hospitalized malaria decline. These observations have rarely been examined longitudinally in a single community where transmission declines over time. We reconstructed 16 years (1991–2006) of pediatric hospital surveillance data and infection prevalence surveys from a circumscribed geographic area on the Kenyan coast. The incidence of clinical malaria remained high, despite sustained reductions in exposure to infection. However, the age group experiencing the clinical attacks of malaria increased steadily as exposure declined and may precede changes in the number of episodes in an area with declining transmission. PMID:18689622

  20. Early exposure of rotating magnetic fields promotes central nervous regeneration in planarian Girardia sinensis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Lin, Gui-Miao; Wu, Nan; Tang, Sheng-Wei; Zheng, Zhi-Jia; Lin, Marie Chia-Mi; Xu, Gai-Xia; Liu, Hao; Deng, Yue-Yue; Zhang, Xiao-Yun; Chen, Si-Ping; Wang, Xiao-Mei; Niu, Han-Ben

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic field exposure is an accepted safe and effective modality for nerve injury. However, it is clinically used only as a supplement or salvage therapy at the later stage of treatment. Here, we used a planarian Girardia sinensis decapitated model to investigate beneficial effects of early rotary non-uniform magnetic fields (RMFs) exposure on central nervous regeneration. Our results clearly indicated that magnetic stimulation induced from early RMFs exposure significantly promoted neural regeneration of planarians. This stimulating effect is frequency and intensity dependent. Optimum effects were obtained when decapitated planarians were cultured at 20 °C, starved for 3 days before head-cutting, and treated with 6 Hz 0.02 T RMFs. At early regeneration stage, RMFs exposure eliminated edema around the wound and facilitated subsequent formation of blastema. It also accelerated cell proliferation and recovery of neuron functionality. Early RMFs exposure up-regulated expression of neural regeneration related proteins, EGR4 and Netrin 2, and mature nerve cell marker proteins, NSE and NPY. These results suggest that RMFs therapy produced early and significant benefit in central nervous regeneration, and should be clinically used at the early stage of neural regeneration, with appropriate optimal frequency and intensity. Bioelectromagnetics. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:244-255, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27061713

  1. The WMO Field Intercomparison of Rain Intensity Gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza, Luca G.; Vuerich, E.

    2009-12-01

    The first Field Intercomparison of Rainfall Intensity (RI) gauges was organised by WMO (the World Meteorological Organisation) from October 2007 to April 2009 in Vigna di Valle, Rome (Italy). The campaign is held at the Centre of Meteorological Experimentations (ReSMA) of the Italian Meteorological Service. A group of 30 previously selected rain gauges based on different measuring principles are involved in the Intercomparison. Installation of the instruments in the field was preceded by the laboratory calibration of all submitted catching-type rain gauges at the University of Genoa. Additional meteorological sensors (ancillary information) and the observations and measurements performed by the Global Climate Observing System/Global Atmosphere Watch (GCOS/GAW) meteorological station of Vigna di Valle were analyzed as metadata. All catching-type gauges were tested after installation using a portable calibration device specifically developed at the University of Genoa, simulating an ordinary calibration inspection in the field. This paper is dedicated to the summary of preliminary results of the Intercomparison measurements. It offers a view on the main achievements expected from the Intercomparison in evaluating the performance of the instruments in field conditions. Comparison of several rain gauges demonstrated the possibility to evaluate the performance of RI gauges at one-minute resolution in time, as recommended by the WMO Commission for Instruments and Methods of Observations (WMO-CIMO). Results indicate that synchronised tipping-bucket rain gauges (TBR), using internal correction algorithms, and weighing gauges (WG) with improved dynamic stability and short step response are the most accurate gauges for one-minute RI measurements, since providing the lowest measurement uncertainty with respect to the assumed working reference.

  2. Compliance with High-Intensity Radiated Fields Regulations - Emitter's Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statman, Joseph; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Nguyen, Lee

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) uses high-power transmitters on its large antennas to communicate with spacecraft of NASA and its partner agencies. The prime reflectors of the DSN antennas are parabolic, at 34m and 70m in diameter. The DSN transmitters radiate Continuous Wave (CW) signals at 20 kW - 500 kW at X-band and S-band frequencies. The combination of antenna reflector size and high frequency results in a very narrow beam with extensive oscillating near-field pattern. Another unique feature of the DSN antennas is that they (and the radiated beam) move mostly at very slow sidereal rate, essentially identical in magnitude and at the opposite direction of Earth rotation.The DSN is in the process of revamping its documentation to provide analysis of the High Intensity Radiation Fields (HIRF) environment resulting from radio frequency radiation from DSN antennas for comparison to FAA regulations regarding certification of HIRF protection as outlined in the FAA regulations on HIRF protection for aircraft electrical and electronic systems (Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) [section sign][section sign] 23.1308, 25.1317, 27.1317, and 29.1317).This paper presents work done at JPL, in consultation with the FAA. The work includes analysis of the radiated field structure created by the unique DSN emitters (combination of transmitters and antennas) and comparing it to the fields defined in the environments in the FAA regulations. The paper identifies areas that required special attention, including the implications of the very narrow beam of the DSN emitters and the sidereal rate motion. The paper derives the maximum emitter power allowed without mitigation and the mitigation zones, where required.Finally, the paper presents summary of the results of the analyses of the DSN emitters and the resulting DSN process documentation.

  3. Effects of varying argon ion laser intensity and exposure time on the ablation of atherosclerotic plaque.

    PubMed

    Strikwerda, S; Bott-Silverman, C; Ratliff, N B; Goormastic, M; Cothren, R M; Costello, B; Kittrell, C; Feld, M S; Kramer, J R

    1988-01-01

    Using continuous wave (CW) argon ion laser light, a total of 253 laser exposures of varying power (1.5, 3, 5, 8 or 10 W) and duration (20-1,333 ms) were delivered to four segments of human atheromatous aorta obtained at autopsy. Exposure conditions were controlled by using an optically shielded laser catheter that provided a 500 micron spot of light of known power. Two thresholds for consistently reproducible ablation could be defined-an intensity threshold at 25.5 W/mm2 and a fluence threshold at 3.2 J/mm2. Above threshold, a fluence of 5.1 J/mm2 was found to produce the most efficient ablation, ie, removed the greatest volume (mm3) per energy delivered (J) compared to other fluence levels employed (p less than 0.0001). Between aortic segments, however, considerable variability in efficiency (mm3/J) was observed, possibly owing to different optical properties and/or plaque composition. Low-intensity laser radiation produced inconsistent ablation and extensive coagulation effects to surrounding tissue. When a fluence of 5.1 J/mm2 was constructed with a high-intensity laser beam and a short exposure time, consistent and efficient tissue removal resulted without histologic evidence of coagulation necrosis. PMID:2965289

  4. Laser cooling at low intensity in a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Straten, P.; Shang, S.-Q.; Sheehy, B.; Metcalf, H.; Nienhuis, G.

    1993-05-01

    We have studied theoretically and experimentally the effect of a relatively strong magnetic field on sub-Doppler laser cooling in a one-dimensional optical molasses. We used the operator description of laser cooling with the Larmor precession frequency ωZ being much higher than the optical pumping rate. We found velocity-selective resonances (VSR) in the force at velocities vr=nωZ, with n=0,+/-1,+/-2 for both the scattering and redistribution force operators. These depend on the relative direction of the magnetic field and the polarization vectors of the light beams. Analytical results for the force on the atom are obtained in two cases that illustrate the effect of the VSR on the force. These formulas are compared with numerical calculations of the force. We also discovered a redistribution mechanism that relies on the gradient of the eigenstates of the light-shift operator, with eigenvalues that are independent of position so that a ``Sisyphus cooling'' picture does not apply. The theory is compared with many experimental results and excellent agreement is found. We believe that all essential features of laser cooling at low intensity are well described by this operator theory.

  5. Cationic Peptide Exposure Enhances Pulsed-Electric-Field-Mediated Membrane Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Stephen M.; Aiken, Erik J.; Beres, Kaytlyn A.; Hahn, Adam R.; Kamin, Samantha J.; Hagness, Susan C.; Booske, John H.; Murphy, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of pulsed electric fields (PEFs) to irreversibly electroporate cells is a promising approach for destroying undesirable cells. This approach may gain enhanced applicability if the intensity of the PEF required to electrically disrupt cell membranes can be reduced via exposure to a molecular deliverable. This will be particularly impactful if that reduced PEF minimally influences cells that are not exposed to the deliverable. We hypothesized that the introduction of charged molecules to the cell surfaces would create regions of enhanced transmembrane electric potential in the vicinity of each charged molecule, thereby lowering the PEF intensity required to disrupt the plasma membranes. This study will therefore examine if exposure to cationic peptides can enhance a PEF’s ability to disrupt plasma membranes. Methodology/Principal Findings We exposed leukemia cells to 40 μs PEFs in media containing varying concentrations of a cationic peptide, polyarginine. We observed the internalization of a membrane integrity indicator, propidium iodide (PI), in real time. Based on an individual cell’s PI fluorescence versus time signature, we were able to determine the relative degree of membrane disruption. When using 1–2 kV/cm, exposure to >50 μg/ml of polyarginine resulted in immediate and high levels of PI uptake, indicating severe membrane disruption, whereas in the absence of peptide, cells predominantly exhibited signatures indicative of no membrane disruption. Additionally, PI entered cells through the anode-facing membrane when exposed to cationic peptide, which was theoretically expected. Conclusions/Significance Exposure to cationic peptides reduced the PEF intensity required to induce rapid and irreversible membrane disruption. Critically, peptide exposure reduced the PEF intensities required to elicit irreversible membrane disruption at normally sub-electroporation intensities. We believe that these cationic peptides, when coupled with

  6. Early pregnancy loss and exposure to 50-Hz magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Juutilainen, J.; Matilainen, P.; Saarikoski, S.; Laeaerae Esuo; Suonio, S. )

    1993-01-01

    The possibility of an association of early pregnancy loss (EPL) with residential exposure to ELF magnetic fields was investigated in a case-control study. Eighty-nine cases and 102 controls were obtained from the data of an earlier study aimed at investigating the occurrence of EPL in a group of women attempting to get pregnant. Magnetic-field exposure was characterized by measurements in residences. Strong magnetic fields were measured more often in case than in control residences. In an analysis based on fields measured at the front door, a cutoff score of 0.5 A/m (0.63 microT) resulted in an odds ratio of 5.1 (95% confidence interval 1.0-25). The results should be interpreted cautiously due to the small number of highly exposed subjects and other limitations of the data.

  7. Neonatal lead exposure impairs development of rodent barrel field cortex

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Mary Ann; Johnston, Michael V.; Goldstein, Gary W.; Blue, Mary E.

    2000-01-01

    Childhood exposure to low-level lead can permanently reduce intelligence, but the neurobiologic mechanism for this effect is unknown. We examined the impact of lead exposure on the development of cortical columns, using the rodent barrel field as a model. In all areas of mammalian neocortex, cortical columns constitute a fundamental structural unit subserving information processing. Barrel field cortex contains columnar processing units with distinct clusters of layer IV neurons that receive sensory input from individual whiskers. In this study, rat pups were exposed to 0, 0.2, 1, 1.5, or 2 g/liter lead acetate in their dam's drinking water from birth through postnatal day 10. This treatment, which coincides with the development of segregated columns in the barrel field, produced blood lead concentrations from 1 to 31 μg/dl. On postnatal day 10, the area of the barrel field and of individual barrels was measured. A dose-related reduction in barrel field area was observed (Pearson correlation = −0.740; P < 0.001); mean barrel field area in the highest exposure group was decreased 12% versus controls. Individual barrels in the physiologically more active caudoventral group were affected preferentially. Total cortical area measured in the same sections was not altered significantly by lead exposure. These data support the hypothesis that lead exposure may impair the development of columnar processing units in immature neocortex. We demonstrate that low levels of blood lead, in the range seen in many impoverished inner-city children, cause structural alterations in a neocortical somatosensory map. PMID:10805810

  8. DIETARY EXPOSURES OF YOUNG CHILDREN, PART II: FIELD STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A small, pilot field study was conducted to determine the adequacy of protocols for dietary exposure measurements. Samples were collected to estimate the amount of pesticides transferred from contaminated surfaces or hands to foods of young children and to validate a dietary mod...

  9. Slope stability improvement using low intensity field electrosmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armillotta, Pasquale

    2014-05-01

    The electrosmosis technique has been introduced in the past for slope stabilization. However, its application to real cases has been scarce due to several drawbacks mostly related to the high intensity electric field needed (1.0 V/cm or higher): the rapid degradation of the electrodes, the high system management cost, the heating and cracking of the soil and the reduction of its colloidal fraction. Thanks to the introduction of new materials, the technique is currently applied to decrease the consolidation time of saturated clay soils (forcing the elimination of water), consequently improving its mechanical strength. In clay soils, the volume variation is influenced by the presence of smectites. The clay compressibility decreases with the increasing of electrolytes concentration. Soil containing smectites that have interacted with calcium showed a reduction or the absence of swelling during hydration with distilled water and a positive increase of their shear strength. The different values of pH between the anode (acid) and the cathode (basic), induced by the electrosmosis create the conditions for the precipitation of CaCO3 near the cathode. The injection of solutions containing calcium in soils and their diffusion induced by the electrosmosis, lead to calcium precipitation and consequential increase of the shear strength. The material technological advances and the laboratory experiences described in this paper, demonstrate that the use low electric field (0.1 V/cm or lower) intensity electrosmosis (LEFE in acronym) can be effective for soil dewatering and shear strength increase while reducing its adverse effect. The LEFE can be used to: reduce the potential for swelling of active clay minerals through the introduction of ions and the precipitation of hardening substances; induce the "dewatering" in cohesive soils. Several Lab activities were carried out, using custom made electrosmosis equipment. These activities can be divided in two phases: Phase 1

  10. Development of reading ability is facilitated by intensive exposure to a digital children's picture book.

    PubMed

    Masataka, Nobuo

    2014-01-01

    Here the author presents preliminary evidence supporting the possibility that the reading ability of 4-year-old children can be improved as a consequence of intensive exposure to the narrative in a digital picture book over a consecutive 5-day period. When creating the digital version used here, two additional functions were provided with it. First, the entire story was voice-recorded by a professional narrator and programmed so that it was played as narration from the speaker of an iPad. Next, as the narration of each digitized page proceeded, the character exactly corresponding to that pronounced by the narrator at that moment became highlighted in red. When the subjects' literacy capability with respect to the syllabic script of the Japanese language (kana) was evaluated before and after the exposure, their performance score was found to increase after the exposure to the digital book, whereas such a change was not recorded in children who experienced exposure to the printed version of the same picture book read to them by their mother. These effects were confirmed when the children were retested 4 weeks later. Although preliminary, the current study represents the first experimental evidence for a positive effect of exposure to digital books upon any aspect of child development. PMID:24822051

  11. Children's exposures to farm worksite hazards on management-intensive grazing operations.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Regina M; Berg, Richard L; Marlenga, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Agricultural injuries continue to be an important source of childhood mortality and morbidity. There is an agreement within the injury prevention community that environmental modification is the most effective strategy for injury prevention. A growing trend among dairy farmers in the upper Midwest and Northeast regions of the United States is the adoption of management-intensive grazing (MIG) as a new technique for dairy management that actually encompasses environmental modification, decreasing the reliance on and use of tractors and machinery (major sources of fatal and nonfatal injuries to children). The purpose of this study was to explore how restructuring the work and the work environment through the use of MIG may affect children's exposure to farm worksite hazards. The study specifically focused on the most hazardous farm worksite exposures for children based on injury surveillance data (tractors, machinery, large animals, heights, and water sources). An online survey was sent to 68 Wisconsin agricultural extension agents knowledgeable about dairy operations in their counties to collect data regarding their perceptions of potential childhood farm safety hazards on MIG operations. A total of 31 surveys were returned using the online survey system, resulting in a 46% response rate. Survey results suggest that children on MIG operations do in fact have decreased exposure to farm machinery. However, there was a perceived increase in children's overall worksite exposure, in addition to specific increases in exposure to all-terrain vehicles and animals. Adoption of a MIG system clearly involves changes in exposures for children, and understanding the full impact of these changes will require further study of the effects of these exposure tradeoffs on the risks for injuries of varying nature and severity. PMID:19437277

  12. Electromagnetic field exposure assessment in Europe radiofrequency fields (10 MHz-6 GHz).

    PubMed

    Gajšek, Peter; Ravazzani, Paolo; Wiart, Joe; Grellier, James; Samaras, Theodoros; Thuróczy, György

    2015-01-01

    Average levels of exposure to radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMFs) of the general public in Europe are difficult to summarize, as exposure levels have been reported differently in those studies in which they have been measured, and a large proportion of reported measurements were very low, sometimes falling below detection limits of the equipment used. The goal of this paper is to present an overview of the scientific literature on RF EMF exposure in Europe and to characterize exposure within the European population. A comparative analysis of the results of spot or long-term RF EMF measurements in the EU indicated that mean electric field strengths were between 0.08 V/m and 1.8 V/m. The overwhelming majority of measured mean electric field strengths were <1 V/m. It is estimated that <1% were above 6 V/m and <0.1% were above 20 V/m. No exposure levels exceeding European Council recommendations were identified in these surveys. Most population exposures from signals of radio and television broadcast towers were observed to be weak because these transmitters are usually far away from exposed individuals and are spatially sparsely distributed. On the other hand, the contribution made to RF exposure from wireless telecommunications technology is continuously increasing and its contribution was above 60% of the total exposure. According to the European exposure assessment studies identified, three population exposure categories (intermittent variable partial body exposure, intermittent variable low-level whole-body (WB) exposure and continuous low-level WB exposure) were recognized by the authors as informative for possible future risk assessment. PMID:23942394

  13. Low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic field exposure can alter neuroprocessing in humans

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, John A.; Théberge, Jean; Weller, Julie; Drost, Dick J.; Prato, Frank S.; Thomas, Alex W.

    2010-01-01

    Extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (from DC to 300 Hz) have been shown to affect pain sensitivity in snails, rodents and humans. Here, a functional magnetic resonance imaging study demonstrates how the neuromodulation effect of these magnetic fields influences the processing of acute thermal pain in normal volunteers. Significant interactions were found between pre- and post-exposure activation between the sham and exposed groups for the ipsilateral (right) insula, anterior cingulate and bilateral hippocampus/caudate areas. These results show, for the first time, that the neuromodulation induced by exposure to low-intensity low-frequency magnetic fields can be observed in humans using functional brain imaging and that the detection mechanism for these effects may be different from those used by animals for orientation and navigation. Magnetoreception may be more common than presently thought. PMID:19656823

  14. Exposure to oscillating magnetic fields influences sensitivity to electrical stimuli. 2: Experiments on humans

    SciTech Connect

    Papi, F.; Del Seppia, C.; Luschi, P.; Ghione, S.; Rosa, C.

    1995-12-01

    To assess the effect of a magnetic treatment on pain perception, the authors compared the sensory threshold in 18 healthy volunteers. They determined the threshold by noninvasive electrical stimulation of the tooth pulp and skin before and after exposure to an altered magnetic field of low intensity and to a sham treatment. Five different parameters were recorded: the sensory and pain thresholds for the tooth and the sensory, pain, and tolerance thresholds for the skin. Two hours of exposure to a weak, oscillating magnetic field induced a significant decrease in three parameters (dental sensory and cutaneous pain and tolerance thresholds), whereas the other two parameters showed a similar tendency. When the same subjects were exposed to a sham treatment, only marginal, nonsignificant variations in all parameters were observed. These results represent the first piece of evidence that weak alterations of the magnetic field may induce hyperalgesia in humans.

  15. Exposure to movie smoking, antismoking ads and smoking intensity: an experimental study with a factorial design

    PubMed Central

    Harakeh, Zeena; Engels, Rutger C M E; Vohs, Kathleen; van Baaren, Rick B; Sargent, James

    2013-01-01

    Background This study examines whether smoking portrayal in movies or antismoking advertisements affect smoking intensity among young adults. Methods We conducted an experimental study in which 84 smokers were randomly assigned using a two (no-smoking versus smoking portrayal in the movie) by three (two prosocial ads, two antismoking ads or one of each) factorial design. Participants viewed a 60-minute movie with two commercial breaks and afterwards completed a questionnaire. Smoking during the session was allowed and observed. Results Exposure to the movie with smoking had no effect on smoking intensity. Those who viewed two antismoking ads had significantly lower smoking intensity compared with those who viewed two prosocial ads. There was no interaction between movie smoking and antismoking ads. Baseline CO (carbon monoxide) level had the largest effect on smoking intensity. Conclusion These findings provide further evidence to support antismoking ads placed with movies because of their possible effect on young adult smoking behaviour. However, caution is warranted, because nicotine dependence appears to be the primary predictor of smoking intensity among young adult smokers in this study. PMID:20008155

  16. Magnetic field exposure from electric appliances and childhood cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Savitz, D.A.; John, E.M.; Kleckner, R.C. )

    1990-05-01

    The effect on childhood cancer of prolonged exposure to 60-H magnetic fields from electric appliances was examined using interview data from a recently completed case-control study. Exposures of children aged 0-14 years whose incident cancers were diagnosed between 1976 and 1983 and who resided in the Denver, Colorado, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area were compared with those of controls selected by random digit dialing, matched on age, sex, and telephone exchange area. Parents of 252 cases and 222 controls were interviewed at home about the use of electric appliances by the mother during pregnancy (prenatal exposure) and by the child (postnatal exposure). After adjustment for income, prenatal electric blanket exposure was associated with a small increase in the incidence of childhood cancers (odds ratio (OR) = 1.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.7-2.2) that was more pronounced for leukemia (OR = 1.7, 95% CI 0.8-3.6) and brain cancer (OR = 2.5, 95% CI 1.1-5.5). Postnatal exposure to electric blankets was also weakly associated with childhood cancer (OR = 1.5, 95% CI 0.6-3.4), with a larger but imprecise association with acute lymphocytic leukemia (OR = 1.9, 95% CI 0.6-6.5). Water beds and bedside electric clocks were unrelated to childhood cancer incidence. Results are limited by nonresponse and imprecision resulting from the rarity of appliance use, especially for subgroups of cases. Nonetheless, electric blankets, one of the principal sources of prolonged magnetic field exposure, were weakly associated with childhood cancer and warrant a more thorough evaluation.

  17. Setting prudent public health policy for electromagnetic field exposures.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, David O; Sage, Cindy

    2008-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields (EMF) permeate our environment, coming both from such natural sources as the sun and from manmade sources like electricity, communication technologies and medical devices. Although life on earth would not be possible without sunlight, increasing evidence indicates that exposures to the magnetic fields associated with electricity and to communication frequencies associated with radio, television, WiFi technology, and mobile cellular phones pose significant hazards to human health. The evidence is strongest for leukemia from electricity-frequency fields and for brain tumors from communication-frequency fields, yet evidence is emerging for an association with other diseases as well, including neurodegenerative diseases. Some uncertainty remains as to the mechanism(s) responsible for these biological effects, and as to which components of the fields are of greatest importance. Nevertheless, regardless of whether the associations are causal, the strengths of the associations are sufficiently strong that in the opinion of the authors, taking action to reduce exposures is imperative, especially for the fetus and children. Inaction is not compatible with the Precautionary Principle, as enunciated by the Rio Declaration. Because of ubiquitous exposure, the rapidly expanding development of new EMF technologies and the long latency for the development of such serious diseases as brain cancers, the failure to take immediate action risks epidemics of potentially fatal diseases in the future. PMID:18763539

  18. Charging dynamics of metal clusters in intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döppner, T.; Teuber, S.; Schumacher, M.; Tiggesbäumker, J.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.

    2000-09-01

    Clusters of heavy metal atoms in strong femtosecond laser-light fields undergo multi-ionization with the loss of hundreds of electrons. The cross section largely exceeds that of corresponding isolated atoms, which leads in the case of PbN to a complete ionization of the 4f shell with a light intensity of 1.2×1015 W/cm2. Experimental investigations on Pb and Pt clusters with variable pulse widths and, for the first time, with the pump&probe technique give insight into the dynamics of the coupling of electromagnetic radiation into the clusters. Both approaches support the picture according to which, after an initial charging, the clusters expand due to Coulomb forces. This expansion is accompanied by a reduction of the electron density and at the same time by an increase of the optical sensitivity. Once the plasmon energy of the diluted nanoplasma approaches the photon energy, the charging efficiency increases significantly. The experimental observations are confirmed by random-phase approximation (RPA) calculations of the optical response, including molecular-dynamics simulations of the expanding systems.

  19. Fragmentation dynamics of Ar2^+ dimers in intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrakvelidze, M.; Wu, J.; Dörner, R.; Thumm, U.

    2012-06-01

    We studied the fragmentation dynamics of the Ar2 dimers in 790 nm pump and 1400 nm probe pulses with intensities of 10^14 W/cm^2 by analyzing kinetic energy release (KER) spectra as a function of the pump probe delay. The KER spectra are measured by detecting Ar-ion fragments in a COLTRIMS [1] setup and are compared with model calculations based on the numerical propagations of the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation [2]. The measured spectra are best reproduced by two-state calculations that include the adiabatic electronic states I(1/2)u and II(1/2)g of Ar2^+, dipole coupled in the pump- and probe-laser electric fields. [4pt] [1] J. Wu, A. Vredenborg, B. Ulrich, L. Ph. H. Schmidt, M. Meckel, S. Voss, H. Sann, H. Kim, T. Jahnke, and R. D"orner, PRA 83, 061403(R) (2011) [0pt] [2] M. Magrakvelidze, F. He, Th. Niederhausen, I. V. Litvinyuk, and U. Thumm, PRA 79, 033410 (2009).

  20. Tooth analyses of sources and intensity of lead exposure in children.

    PubMed Central

    Gulson, B L

    1996-01-01

    The sources and intensity of lead exposure in utero and in early childhood were determined using stable lead isotopic ratios and lead concentrations of incisal and cervical sections of deciduous teeth from 30 exposed and nonexposed children from the Broken Hill lead mining community in Australia. Incisal sections, consisting mostly of enamel, generally have low amounts of lead and isotopic compositions consistent with those expected in the mother during pregnancy. Cervical sections, consisting mostly of dentine with secondary dentine removed by resorption and reaming, generally have higher amounts of lead than the enamel and isotopic compositions consistent with the source of postnatal exposure. There are statistically significant differences in lead concentrations between incisal and cervical sections, representing within-tooth variation, for children with low and high lead exposure (p = 0.0007, 2 x 10(-6), respectively) and for those who have ingested leaded paint (p = 0.009). Statistically significant differences between incisal and cervical sections in these three exposure groups are also exhibited by the three sets of lead isotope ratios (e.g., p = 0.001 for 206Pb/204Pb ratio in the low exposure group). There are statistically significant differences between the low and high lead exposure groups for lead concentrations and isotopic ratios in incisal (p = 0.005 for lead concentration and 6 x 10(-6) for 206Pb/204Pb ratio) and cervical sections (p = 5 x 10(-5) for lead concentration and 6 x 10(-6) for 206Pb/204Pb ratio). The dentine results reflect an increased exposure to lead from the lead-zinc-silver mineral deposit (orebody lead) during early childhood, probably associated with hand-to-mouth activity. Leaded paint was identified as the source of elevated tooth lead in at least two cases. Increased exposure to lead from orebody and paint sources in utero was implicated in two cases, but there was no indication of previous exposure from the mothers' current

  1. Low intensity, long term exposure to tobacco smoke inhibits hippocampal neurogenesis in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Csabai, Dávid; Csekő, Kata; Szaiff, Lilla; Varga, Zsófia; Miseta, Attila; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Czéh, Boldizsár

    2016-04-01

    Previous data have shown that high dose of nicotine administration or tobacco smoke exposure can reduce cell formation and the survival rate of adult-born neurons in the dentate gyrus. Here, we subjected adult mice to low intensity cigarette smoke exposure over long time periods. We did a 2×30min/day smoke exposure with two cigarettes per occasion over 1- or 2-months. Subsequently, we carried out a systematic quantitative histopathological analysis to assess the number of newborn neurons in the dentate gyrus. To investigate cell proliferation, the exogenous marker 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) was administered on the last experimental day and animals were sacrificed 2h later. To investigate the effect of tobacco smoke on the population of immature neurons, we quantified the number of doublecortin-positive (DCX+) neurons in the same animals. We found that exposing animals to cigarette smoke for 1- or 2-months had no influence on cell proliferation rate, but significantly reduced the number of DCX-positive immature neurons. Our tobacco smoke exposure regimen caused no substantial changes in respiratory functions, but histopathological analysis of the pulmonary tissue revealed a marked perivascular/peribronchial edema formation after 1-month and signs of chronic pulmonary inflammation after 2-months of cigarette smoke exposure. These data demonstrate that even mild exposure to cigarette smoke, without significantly affecting respiratory functions, can have a negative effect on adult-born neurons in the dentate gyrus, when applied over longer time periods. Our data indicate that besides nicotine other factors, such as inflammatory mediators, may also contribute to this effect. PMID:26792108

  2. Radiation exposure among medical professionals working in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Suhail S.; Jha, Ashish; Konar, Nambiraj; Ranganathan, Priya; Deshpande, Deepak D.; Divatia, Jigeeshu V.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: With the expanding use of diagnostic and therapeutic radiological modalities in critically ill patients, doctors working in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) are increasingly exposed to ionizing radiation. This risk of radiation exposure occurs not only during bedside radiologic procedures, but also when ICU physicians accompany patients to radiology suites. The aim of this study was to quantify levels of radiation exposure among medical professionals working in the ICU. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out prospectively over 6 months in the ICU of a tertiary-referral cancer hospital. Two teams consisting of 4 ICU resident doctors each were instructed to wear thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) during their duty shifts. Standard radiation protection precautions were used throughout the study period. TLDs were also placed in selected areas of the ICU to measure the amount of scattered radiation. TLDs were analyzed at the end of every 3 months. Results: The readings recorded on TLDs placed in the ICU were almost immeasurable. The mean value of residents' radiation exposure was 0.059 mSv, though the highest individual reading approached 0.1 mSv. The projected maximum yearly radiation exposure was 0.4 mSv. Conclusions: If standard radiation safety precautions are followed, the cumulative radiation exposure to ICU resident doctors is well within permissible limits and is not a cause of concern. However, with the increasing use of radiological procedures in the management of critically ill patients, there is a need to repeat such audits periodically to monitor radiation exposure. PMID:25249743

  3. Low intensity exercise does not impact cognitive function during exposure to normobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chul-Ho; Ryan, Edward J; Seo, Yongsuk; Peacock, Corey; Gunstad, John; Muller, Matthew D; Ridgel, Angela L; Glickman, Ellen L

    2015-11-01

    Exposure to hypoxia is associated with cognitive impairment, mediated by cerebral deoxygenation. This can be problematic for individuals who perform mental tasks at high altitude. Eight healthy men completed two experimental trials consisting of 5h of exposure to normobaric hypoxia (12.5% O2). In one of the experimental trials (Hypoxia) subjects remained resting in a seated position the entire 5h; in the other experimental trial (Hypoxia and Exercise) subjects rested 2h, cycled for 1h at constant wattage (workload equivalent to 50% of altitude adjusted VO2max), then rested the last 2h. Cerebral oxygenation was measured continuously via near-infrared spectroscopy and cognitive performance was assessed by Trail Making Test A and B. Cerebral oxygenation and cognitive performance both were impaired during exposure to hypoxia. In the Hypoxia and Exercise trial, subjects experienced further declinations in cerebral oxygenation without concomitant decreases in cognitive function. These data demonstrate that cognitive function declines during exposure to normobaric hypoxia and this decline is not exacerbated by low intensity exercise. PMID:26160408

  4. Electron acceleration in combined intense laser fields and self-consistent quasistatic fields in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao Bin; He, X.T.; Zhu Shaoping; Zheng, C.Y.

    2005-08-15

    The acceleration of plasma electron in intense laser-plasma interaction is investigated analytically and numerically, where the conjunct effect of laser fields and self-consistent spontaneous fields (including quasistatic electric field E{sub s}{sup l}, azimuthal quasistatic magnetic field B{sub s{theta}} and the axial one B{sub sz}) is completely considered for the first time. An analytical relativistic electron fluid model using test-particle method has been developed to give an explicit analysis about the effects of each quasistatic fields. The ponderomotive accelerating and scattering effects on electrons are partly offset by E{sub s}{sup l}, furthermore, B{sub s{theta}} pinches and B{sub sz} collimates electrons along the laser axis. The dependences of energy gain and scattering angle of electron on its initial radial position, plasma density, and laser intensity are, respectively, studied. The qualities of the relativistic electron beam (REB), such as energy spread, beam divergence, and emitting (scattering) angle, generated by both circularly polarized (CP) and linearly polarized (LP) lasers are studied. Results show CP laser is of clear advantage comparing to LP laser for it can generate a better REB in collimation and stabilization.

  5. Experimental study of the effects of highly intense laser exposure on hepatic tissue.

    PubMed

    Bondarevsky, I Ya; Astahova, L V

    2012-08-01

    Irreversible changes in the liver tissue after high-intensity laser exposure develop at a depth of no more than 200 μ. Inflammatory reaction in the wounds does not depend on laser source and is characterized by predominance of proliferative processes leading by day 15 after surgery to the formation of a fine cicatrix. Hermetic sealing of the parenchymatous hepatic wound by laser welding to xenogenous peritoneum is no less effective than TahoComb and Beriplast P drugs and deserves further studies and clinical use. PMID:22977861

  6. Cloud atlas for the FIRE Cirrus Intensive Field Observation (IFO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arking, Albert; Childs, Jeffrey D.; Merritt, John H.; Williams, Sharen L.

    1990-01-01

    An Intensive Field Observation (IFO) of cirrus clouds was conducted over the mid-western U.S. during the period October 13 to November 2, 1986. This activity, part of the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE), included measurements made from specially deployed instruments on the ground, balloons, and aircraft as well as observations from existing operational and experimental satellites. One of the sets of satellite observations was the radiance measurements made with the 5-channel AVHRR radiometer on the NOAA 9 polar orbiting meteorological satellite. The ground resolution of the measurements at nadir is approx. 1 km. It is these measurements, made once each day at approximately 2:30 p.m. local time, that were used in determining the present cloud atlas. The area covered by the atlas is slightly larger than the area specified for the IFO, in order to be in alignment with the grid that will be used in a forthcoming atlas for the larger, ETO region. The atlas contains four pages of information for each satellite pass. The 1st page of each group shows the distribution of measured radiances in channel 1 (normalized to the incoming solar flux multiplied by the cosine of the solar zenith angle) and in channel 4 for the area as a whole and for each analysis box. The 2nd page shows the images in: channels 1 and 2, channel 3R; and channel 4. The 3rd page shows the retrieved parameters in graphical form for the region as a whole and for each analysis box, where cloud fraction appears as a contour plot with respect to optical thickness and cloudtop temperature. The 4th page provides a statistical summary of the retrieved parameters in numerical form for each analysis box.

  7. DNA Electrophoretic Migration Patterns Change after Exposure of Jurkat Cells to a Single Intense Nanosecond Electric Pulse

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Stefania; Zeni, Luigi; Sarti, Maurizio; Sannino, Anna; Scarfì, Maria Rosaria; Vernier, P. Thomas; Zeni, Olga

    2011-01-01

    Intense nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) interact with cellular membranes and intracellular structures. Investigating how cells respond to nanosecond pulses is essential for a) development of biomedical applications of nsPEFs, including cancer therapy, and b) better understanding of the mechanisms underlying such bioelectrical effects. In this work, we explored relatively mild exposure conditions to provide insight into weak, reversible effects, laying a foundation for a better understanding of the interaction mechanisms and kinetics underlying nsPEF bio-effects. In particular, we report changes in the nucleus of Jurkat cells (human lymphoblastoid T cells) exposed to single pulses of 60 ns duration and 1.0, 1.5 and 2.5 MV/m amplitudes, which do not affect cell growth and viability. A dose-dependent reduction in alkaline comet-assayed DNA migration is observed immediately after nsPEF exposure, accompanied by permeabilization of the plasma membrane (YO-PRO-1 uptake). Comet assay profiles return to normal within 60 minutes after pulse delivery at the highest pulse amplitude tested, indicating that our exposure protocol affects the nucleus, modifying DNA electrophoretic migration patterns. PMID:22164287

  8. Observations of an intense field-aligned thermal ion flow and associated intense narrow band electric field oscillations. [at auroral arc edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bering, E. A.; Kelley, M. C.; Mozer, F. S.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation is conducted concerning the conditions encountered during a Javelin sounding rocket experiment conducted on Apr. 3, 1970 at Fort Churchill, Canada. Evidence is presented that near the equatorward edge of the auroral arc an intense beam of cold plasma ions was flowing parallel to the earth's magnetic field. The beam was associated with intense narrow band electric field oscillations near the local ion gyrofrequency. The data support the hypothesis that intense electrostatic ion cyclotron waves were driven unstable by field-aligned currents.

  9. Opinion on potential health effects of exposure to electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    2015-09-01

    In January 2015, the Scientific Committee on Emerging and Newly Identified Health Risks (SCENIHR) published its final opinion on "Potential health effects of exposure to electromagnetic fields." The purpose of this document was to update previous SCENIHR opinions in the light of recently available information since then, and to give special consideration to areas that had not been dealt with in the previous opinions or in which important knowledge gaps had been identified. PMID:26179386

  10. Cell membrane potentials induced during exposure to EMP fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gailey, P.C.; Easterly, C.E.

    1994-09-01

    Internal current densities and electric fields induced in the human body during exposure to EMP fields are reviewed and used to predict resulting cell membrane potentials. Using several different approaches, membrane potentials of about 100 mV are predicted. These values are comparable to the static membrane potentials maintained by cells as a part of normal physiological function, but the EMP-induced potentials persist for only about 10 ns. Possible biological implications of EMP-induced membrane potentials including conformational changes and electroporation are discussed.

  11. Lysis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by high-intensity focused ultrasound as a function of exposure time.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, Timothy A; Xu, Jin; Stessman, Dan J; Yao, Linxing; Spalding, Martin H; Wang, Tong

    2014-05-01

    Efficient lysis of microalgae for lipid extraction is an important concern when processing biofuels. Historically, ultrasound frequencies in the range of 10-40 kHz have been utilized for this task. However, greater efficiencies might be achievable if higher frequencies could be used. In our study, we evaluated the potential of using 1.1 MHz ultrasound to lyse microalgae for biofuel production while using Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model organism. The ultrasound was generated using a spherically focused transducer with a focal length of 6.34 cm and an active diameter of 6.36 cm driven by 20 cycle sine-wave tone bursts at a pulse repetition frequency of 2 kHz (3.6% duty cycle). The time-average acoustic power output was 26.2 W while the spatial-peak-pulse-average intensity (ISPPA) for each tone burst was 41 kW/cm(2). The peak compressional and rarefactional pressures at the focus were 102 and 17 MPa, respectively. The exposure time was varied for the different cases in the experiments from 5s to 9 min and cell lysis was assessed by quantifying the percentage of protein and chlorophyll release into the supernate as well as the lipid extractability. Free radical generation and lipid oxidation for the different ultrasound exposures were also determined. We found that there was a statistically significant increase in lipid extractability for all of the exposures compared to the control. The longer exposures also completely fragmented the cells releasing almost all of the protein and chlorophyll into the supernate. The cavitation activity did not significantly increase lipid oxidation while there was a minor trend of increased free radical production with increased ultrasound exposure. PMID:24355286

  12. Evaluation of pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound exposures on metastasis in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Hilary; Dreher, Matthew R; Crawford, Nigel; Pollock, Claire B; Shih, Jennifer; Wood, Bradford J; Hunter, Kent; Frenkel, Victor

    2009-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) may be employed in two ways: continuous exposures for thermal ablation of tissue (> 60 degrees C), and pulsed-exposures for non-ablative effects, including low temperature hyperthermia (37-45 degrees C), and non thermal effects (e.g. acoustic cavitation and radiation forces). Pulsed-HIFU effects may enhance the tissue's permeability for improved delivery of drugs and genes, for example, by opening up gaps between cells in the vasculature and parenchyma. Inducing these effects may improve local targeting of therapeutic agents, however; concerns exist that pulsed exposures could theoretically also facilitate dissemination of tumor cells and exacerbate metastases. In the present study, the influence of pulsed-HIFU exposures on increasing metastatic burden was evaluated in a murine model with metastatic breast cancer. A preliminary study was carried out to validate the model and determine optimal timing for treatment and growth of lung metastases. Next, the effect of pulsed-HIFU on the metastatic burden was evaluated using quantitative image processing of whole-lung histological sections. Compared to untreated controls (2/15), a greater number of mice treated with pulsed-HIFU were found to have lungs "overgrown" with metastases (7/15), where individual metastases grew together such that they could not accurately be counted. Furthermore, area fraction of lung metastases (area of metastases/area of lungs) was approximately 30% greater in mice treated with pulsed-HIFU; however, these differences were not statistically significant. The present study details the development of an animal model for investigating the influence of interventional techniques or exposures (such as pulsed HIFU) on metastatic burden. PMID:19517258

  13. Individual estimation of exposures to extremely low frequency magnetic fields in jobs commonly held by women.

    PubMed

    Deadman, J E; Infante-Rivard, C

    2002-02-15

    Exposures to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields have not been documented extensively in occupations besides the work environments of electric or telephone utilities. A 1980-1993 study of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in Québec, Canada, gathered detailed information about the occupations of 491 mothers of ALL cases and mothers of a similar number of healthy controls. This information was combined with published data on the intensities of ELF magnetic fields associated with sources or work environments to estimate ELF magnetic field exposures for a wide range of jobs commonly held by women. Estimated exposures for 61 job categories ranged from 0.03 to 0.68 microT; the 25th, 50th, and 75th percentiles were 0.135, 0.17, and 0.23 microT, respectively. By job category, the most highly exposed jobs (>0.23 microT) included bakery worker, cashier, cook and kitchen worker, electronics worker, residential and industrial sewing machine operator, and textile machine operator. By work environment, the most highly exposed job categories were electronics worker in an assembly plant (0.70 microT) and sewing machine operators in a textile factory (0.68 microT) and shoe factory (0.66 microT). These results provide new information on expected levels of exposure in a wide range of jobs commonly held by women. PMID:11836202

  14. A Serial-Exposure Type of High Intensity Flash X-ray Generator Having Variable Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Isobe, Hiroshi; Yanagisawa, Toru; Hoshino, Fumihiko

    1986-12-01

    The construction of a serial (triple) exposure type of high intensity flash x-ray (FX) generator having variable energies for biomedical radiography is described. This generator consisted of the following components: two high voltage generators (positive and negative), a voltage divider unit, two types of high and low voltage pulsers with maximum output voltages ranging from 50 to 200kV, small-sized trigger devices, a trigger delay unit, a high power gas diode, one turbo molecular pump, and two evacuated remote FX tubes, each of a different type. In the case of using a single FX tube, the pulser were charged to the same or different energies from -100kV to +100kV by using a two voltage divider unit and were connected to the FX tube through a high power gas diode. On the other hand, when using multiple tubes, the pulsers were connected directly to the tubes without a diode. These FX's have many possible diagnostic applications as follows: (1) high intensity stroboscopic radiography; (2) double exposure subtraction and energy subtraction; (3) superposition of spectra; (4) radiation sources for the ultra high speed computed tomography and stereography; and (5) various kinds of imaging using pulsed electron beams and FX.

  15. Electromagnetic field exposure dosimeter. Final report, September 1992-May 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Feaga, A.C.; Hilliard, M.P.; Link, R.

    1994-07-28

    The growing concern about adverse health effects caused by electromagnetic radiation prompted the ideas for this dosimeter. Data have been presented that link prolonged exposure to electromagnetic radiation from power lines to leukemia and some types of cancer. At present, though, there is a lack of recording instrumentation to measure the prolonged exposure of an individual; thus, it is not possible to correlate properly the amount of exposure or dose to health effects. With the recent advances in small, low-power devices, a small measuring device can be developed. Once this is built, a large data base can be obtained to help correlate electromagnetic field exposure to health conditions. The objective of this project is to develop an instrument which can measure electromagnetic fields over a prolonged period of time. The instrument would be small, say about the size of a radio Walkman, and would be worn throughout the day while taking data, as the individual goes about normal activities. A PC would be used to retrieve the data from the instrument at the end of the day. The dosimeter comprises a triaxial ferrite-loaded coil sensor, a set of amplifiers and filters, analog-to-digital converters, a microcontroller, and random access data memory. The signals from the sensor are filtered into three frequency ranges: one to measure 60-Hz exposure and two harmonics, another to measure high-energy pulsed energy, and a third frequency range to record the activity level of the individual. The signals from the filters are digitized and read into a microcontroller. The microcontroller performs a few calculations and controls the flow of the data to either random access memory or to a computer. A computer is used to retrieve the data from the dosimeter, and can store and display the measured data.

  16. Effect Modification of the Association of Cumulative Exposure and Cancer Risk by Intensity of Exposure and Time Since Exposure Cessation: A Flexible Method Applied to Cigarette Smoking and Lung Cancer in the SYNERGY Study

    PubMed Central

    Vlaanderen, Jelle; Portengen, Lützen; Schüz, Joachim; Olsson, Ann; Pesch, Beate; Kendzia, Benjamin; Stücker, Isabelle; Guida, Florence; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Consonni, Dario; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Siemiatycki, Jack; Merletti, Franco; Mirabelli, Dario; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Gustavsson, Per; Plato, Nils; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Tardón, Adonina; Zaridze, David; Field, John K.; 't Mannetje, Andrea; Pearce, Neil; McLaughlin, John; Demers, Paul; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Stanescu Dumitru, Rodica; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Boffetta, Paolo; Forastiere, Francesco; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Peters, Susan; Brüning, Thomas; Kromhout, Hans; Straif, Kurt; Vermeulen, Roel

    2014-01-01

    The indiscriminate use of the cumulative exposure metric (the product of intensity and duration of exposure) might bias reported associations between exposure to hazardous agents and cancer risk. To assess the independent effects of duration and intensity of exposure on cancer risk, we explored effect modification of the association of cumulative exposure and cancer risk by intensity of exposure. We applied a flexible excess odds ratio model that is linear in cumulative exposure but potentially nonlinear in intensity of exposure to 15 case-control studies of cigarette smoking and lung cancer (1985–2009). Our model accommodated modification of the excess odds ratio per pack-year of cigarette smoking by time since smoking cessation among former smokers. We observed negative effect modification of the association of pack-years of cigarette smoking and lung cancer by intensity of cigarette smoke for persons who smoked more than 20–30 cigarettes per day. Patterns of effect modification were similar across individual studies and across major lung cancer subtypes. We observed strong negative effect modification by time since smoking cessation. Application of our method in this example of cigarette smoking and lung cancer demonstrated that reducing a complex exposure history to a metric such as cumulative exposure is too restrictive. PMID:24355332

  17. Behavioral and Neural Discrimination of Speech Sounds After Moderate or Intense Noise Exposure in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Amanda C.; Centanni, Tracy M.; Borland, Michael S.; Matney, Chanel J.; Engineer, Crystal T.; Kilgard, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Hearing loss is a commonly experienced disability in a variety of populations including veterans and the elderly and can often cause significant impairment in the ability to understand spoken language. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that neural and behavioral responses to speech will be differentially impaired in an animal model after two forms of hearing loss. Design Sixteen female Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to one of two types of broadband noise which was either moderate or intense. In nine of these rats, auditory cortex recordings were taken 4 weeks after noise exposure (NE). The other seven were pretrained on a speech sound discrimination task prior to NE and were then tested on the same task after hearing loss. Results Following intense NE, rats had few neural responses to speech stimuli. These rats were able to detect speech sounds but were no longer able to discriminate between speech sounds. Following moderate NE, rats had reorganized cortical maps and altered neural responses to speech stimuli but were still able to accurately discriminate between similar speech sounds during behavioral testing. Conclusions These results suggest that rats are able to adjust to the neural changes after moderate NE and discriminate speech sounds, but they are not able to recover behavioral abilities after intense NE. Animal models could help clarify the adaptive and pathological neural changes that contribute to speech processing in hearing-impaired populations and could be used to test potential behavioral and pharmacological therapies. PMID:25072238

  18. Electric and magnetic field exposures for people living near a 735-Kilovolt power line

    SciTech Connect

    Levallois, P.; Gauvin, D.; St. Laurent, J.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a 735-kV transmission line on the electric and magnetic field exposures of people living at the edge of the line`s right of way. Exposure of 18 adults, mostly white-collar workers, living in different bungalows located 190-240 feet from the line (exposed subjects) was compared to that of 17 adults living in similar residences far away from any transmission line. Each subject carried a Positron meter for 24 hr during 1 workday, which measured 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields every minute. All measurements were carried out in parallel for exposed and unexposed subjects during the same weeks between September and December. During measurements the average loading on the line varied between 600 and 1100 A. The average magnetic field intensity while at home was 4.4 times higher among exposed subjects than unexposed (7.1 versus 1.6 Mg, p=0.0001) and 6.2 times higher when considering only the sleeping period (6.8 versus 1.1 mG, p=0.0001). Based on the 24-hr measurement, average magnetic field exposure was three times higher among the exposed was positively correlated with the loading on the line (r=0.8, p+0.001). Percentage of time above a magnetic field threshold F(2 mG or 7.8 mG) was a good indicator to distinguish the two types of exposure. Percentage of time above 20 V/m was significantly different, but percentage of time above 78 V/m was rare and comparable for the two groups. Variability of exposure was very low. This study demonstrates that a 735-kV line contributes significantly to residential 60-Hz magnetic field exposure and, to a lesser extent, electric fields for people living at the edge of the right way. Because of the limited size of our sample, caution is recommended before generalizing these results. Nevertheless, due to the uncertainty on the risks associated with such an unusual high residential exposure, research is needed on its possible effects. 30 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  19. Exposure to low levels of jet-propulsion fuel impairs brainstem encoding of stimulus intensity.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, O'neil W; Xu, Helen; Wong, Brian A; McInturf, Shawn M; Reboulet, Jim E; Ortiz, Pedro A; Mattie, David R

    2014-01-01

    Jet propulsion fuel-8 (JP-8) is a kerosene-based fuel that is used in military jets. The U.S. Armed Services and North Atlantic Treaty Organization countries adopted JP-8 as a standard fuel source and the U.S. military alone consumes more than 2.5 billion gallons annually. Preliminary epidemiologic data suggested that JP-8 may interact with noise to induce hearing loss, and animal studies revealed damage to presynaptic sensory cells in the cochlea. In the current study, Long-Evans rats were divided into four experimental groups: control, noise only, JP-8 only, and JP-8 + noise. A subototoxic level of JP-8 was used alone or in combination with a nondamaging level of noise. Functional and structural assays of the presynaptic sensory cells combined with neurophysiologic studies of the cochlear nerve revealed that peripheral auditory function was not affected by individual exposures and there was no effect when the exposures were combined. However, the central auditory nervous system exhibited impaired brainstem encoding of stimulus intensity. These findings may represent important and major shifts in the theoretical framework that governs current understanding of jet fuel and/or jet fuel + noise-induced ototoxicity. From an epidemiologic perspective, results indicate that jet fuel exposure may exert consequences on auditory function that may be more widespread and insidious than what was previously shown. It is possible that a large population of military personnel who are suffering from the effects of jet fuel exposure may be misidentified because they would exhibit normal hearing thresholds but harbor a "hidden" brainstem dysfunction. PMID:24588226

  20. Biological effects and exposure criteria for radiofrequency electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This report, which begins with a discussion of fundamental studies at the molecular level, presents a review of the subject matter covered in NCRP Report No. 67 on mechanisms of interaction of radiofrequency electromagnetic (RFEM) fields with tissue. The discussion continues to progressively larger scales of interaction, beginning with macromolecular and cellular effects, chromosomal and mutagenic effects, and carcinogenic effects. The scope of the subject matter is then expanded to include systemic effects such as those on reproduction, growth, and development, hematopoiesis and immunology, endocrinology and autonomic nervous function, cardiovascular effects and cerebrovascular effects. The interaction of electromagnetic fields with the central nervous system and special senses is also discussed. Also included are epidemiological studies, a discussion of thermoregulation, and a history of therapeutic applications of RFEM fields. The report concludes with human exposure criteria and rationale.

  1. Personal UV exposure on a ski-field at an alpine site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siani, A. M.; Casale, G. R.; Diémoz, H.; Agnesod, G.; Kimlin, M. G.; Lang, C. A.; Colosimo, A.

    2008-02-01

    Mountain sites experience enhanced ambient UV radiation levels due to the concurrent effects of shorter radiation path-length, low aerosol load and high reflectivity of the snow surfaces. This study was encouraged by the possibility to collect data of personal UV exposure in the mountainous areas of Italy, for the first time. Personal UV exposure (expressed in terms of Exposure Ratio, ER) of two groups of volunteers (ski instructors and skiers) at the Alpine site of La Thuile (Valle d'Aosta region, Italy) was assessed using polysulphone dosimetry which was tested in a mountainous snow-covered environment. In addition measurements of biological markers of individual response to UV exposure such as skin colorimetric parameters were carried out. It was found that snow and altitude of study site affect calibration curves of polysulphone dosimeters in comparison to a situation without snow. The median ER, taking into account the whole sample, is 0.60 in winter, with a range of 0.29 to 1.46, and 1.02 in spring, ranging from 0.46 to 1.72. There are no differences in exposures across skiers and instructors in spring while in winter skiers experience lower values. UV exposures are not sensitive to the use of sunscreen across instructor/skier group by day or by seasons or by photo-type. With regard to colorimetric parameters, the main result was that both skiers and instructors had on average significantly lower values of L* and b* after exposure i.e. becoming darker but the inappropriate sunscreen use did not reveal any changes in skin colorimetric parameters except in one spring day. In conclusions UV intensities on the ski-fields are often significantly higher than those on horizontal surfaces. Given the high levels of exposure observed in the present study, dedicated public heath messages on the correct sunscreen use should be adopted.

  2. Paternal occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields and neuroblastoma in offspring

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, J.R. 3d.; Hundley, V.D. )

    1990-06-01

    Investigators in Texas have reported an association between paternal employment in jobs linked with exposure to electromagnetic fields and risk of neuroblastoma in offspring. In an attempt to replicate this finding, the authors conducted a case-control study in Ohio. A total of 101 incident cases of neuroblastoma were identified through the Columbus (Ohio) Children's Hospital Tumor Registry. All cases were born sometime during the period 1942-1967. From a statewide roster of birth certificates, four controls were selected for each case, with individual matching on the case's year of birth, race, and sex, and the mother's county of residence at the time of the (index) child's birth. Multiple definitions were employed to infer the potential for paternal occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields from the industry/occupation statements on the birth certificates. Case-control comparisons revealed adjusted odds ratios ranging in magnitude from 0.5 to 1.9. For two of the exposure definitions employed--both of which are similar to one used by the Texas investigators--the corresponding odds ratios were modestly elevated (odds ratios = 1.6 and 1.9). Notably, the magnitude of these odds ratios is not inconsistent with the Texas findings, where the exposure definition referred to yielded an odds ratio of 2.1. Because the point estimates in this study are imprecise, and because the biologic plausibility of the association is uncertain, the results reported here must be interpreted cautiously. However, the apparent consistency between two independent studies suggests that future evaluation of the association is warranted.

  3. Scatter radiation intensities around full-field digital mammography units.

    PubMed

    Judge, M A; Keavey, E; Phelan, N

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the scatter radiation intensity around digital mammography systems and apply these data to standard shielding calculations to reveal whether shielding design of existing breast screening rooms is adequate for the use of digital mammography systems. Three digital mammography systems from GE Healthcare, Hologic and Philips were employed in the study. A breast-equivalent phantom was imaged under clinical workload conditions and scatter radiation intensities around the digital mammography systems were measured for a range of angles in three planes using an ionisation chamber. The results were compared with those from previous studies of film-screen systems. It may be deduced from the results that scattering in the backward direction is significant for all three systems, while scattering in the forward direction can be significant for some planes around the GE and Hologic systems. Measurements at typical clinical settings on each system revealed the Philips system to have markedly lower scatter radiation intensities than the other systems. Substituting the measured scattered radiation intensity into shielding calculations yielded barrier requirements similar to those already in place at the screening centres operating these systems. Current radiation protection requirements based on film-screen technology remain sufficient when applied to rooms with digital mammography installations and no alteration is required to the structural shielding. PMID:23239693

  4. Histologic study of the internal organs of rats chronically exposed to a high-intensity electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Seto, Y.J.; Majeau-Chargois, D.; Lymangrover, J.R.; Dunlap, W.P.; Hsieh, S.T.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of 120-day exposure to a high-intensity (80 kV/m), 60-Hz electric field on histology of selected internal organs of Sprague-Dawley rats was investigated. The organs examined were the pituitary, thymus, heart, lungs, liver, spleen, right and left adrenals, right and left kidneys, and right and left testes. Histological examination of 10-micron tissue sections from randomly selected animals revealed no specific evidence of histopathologic differences between field-exposed and sham-exposed animals at the light microscopic level.

  5. Exposure assessment of extremely low frequency electric fields in Tehran, Iran, 2010.

    PubMed

    Nassiri, Parvin; Esmaeilpour, Mohammad Reza Monazzam; Gharachahi, Ehsan; Haghighat, Gholamali; Yunesian, Masoud; Zaredar, Narges

    2013-01-01

    Extremely Low-Frequency (ELF) electric and magnetic fields belonging to the nonionizing electromagnetic radiation spectrum have a frequency of 50 - 60 Hz. All people are exposed to a complex set of electric and magnetic fields that spread throughout the environment. The current study was carried out to assess people's exposure to an ELF electric field in the Tehran metropolitan area in 2010. The measurement of the electronic fields was performed using an HI-3604 power frequency field strength measurement device. A total number of 2,753 measurements were performed. Afterward, the data obtained were transferred to the base map using Arc View Version 3.2 and Arc Map Version 9.3. Finally, an interpolation method was applied to expand the intensity of the electric field to the entire city. Based on the results obtained, the electric field was divided into three parts with various intensities including 0-5 V m, 5-15 V m, and >15 V m. It should be noted that the status of high voltage transmission lines, electric substations, and specific points including schools and hospitals were also marked on the map. Minimum and maximum electric field intensities were measured tantamount to 0.31 V m and 19.80 V m, respectively. In all measurements, the electric field was much less than the amount provided in the ICNIRP Guide. The results revealed that 141 hospitals and 6,905 schools are situated in an area with electric field intensity equal to 0-5 V m, while 15 hospitals and 95 schools are located in zones of 5-15 V m and more than 15 V m. Examining high voltage transmission lines and electric substations in Tehran and its suburbs suggested that the impact of the lines on the background electric field of the city was low. Accordingly, 0.97 km of Tehran located on the city border adjacent to the high voltage transmission lines have an electric field in the range of 5 to 15 V m. The noted range is much lower than the available standards. In summary, it can be concluded that the public

  6. Effects of exposure to a 60-kV/m, 60-Hz electric field on the social behavior of baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Easley, S.P.; Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Rogers, W.R. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors found in a previously reported study that exposure to a 30-kV/m, 60-Hz electric field had significant effects on the social behavior of baboons. However, it was not established whether or not the effects were related specifically to the 30-kV/m intensity of the field. A new experiment was conducted to determine whether or not exposure to a 60-Hz electric field at 60 kV/m would produce like changes in the baboons' social behavior. They exposed one group of eight male baboons to an electric field 12 hours a day, 7 days a week, for 6 weeks. A second group of eight animals was maintained under sham-exposure (control) conditions. Rates of performing on each of six categories of social behavior and on four categories of nonsocial behavior were used as criteria for comparing exposed with unexposed subjects and for within-group comparisons during three six-week experimental periods: Pre-Exposure, Exposure, and Post-Exposure. The results indicate that (1) during the exposure period, exposed animals exhibited statistically significant differences from controls in means of performance rates based on several behavioral categories; (2) across all three periods, within-group comparisons revealed that behaviors of exposed baboons were significantly affected by exposure to the electric field; (3) changes in performance levels probably reflect a stress response to the electric field; and (4) the means of response rates of animals exposed at 60 kV/m were higher, but not double, those of animals exposed at 30 kV/m. As in the 30-kV/m experiment, animals exposed at 60 kV/m exhibited significant differences in performances of Passive Affinity, Tension, and Stereotypy. Mean rates of performing these categories were 122% (Passive Affinity), 48% (Tension), and 40% (Stereotypy) higher in the exposed group than in the control group during exposure to the 60-kV/m field.

  7. Effects of maglev-spectrum magnetic field exposure on CEM T-lymphoblastoid human cell growth and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Groh, K.R.; Chubb, C.B.; Collart, F.R.; Huberman, E.

    1992-01-01

    Exposure to magnetic fields similar to those produced by maglev vehicles (combined ac and dc components) was studied for the ability to alter cell growth and chemically induced cellular differentiation processes in cultured human CEM Tlymphoblastoid leukemia cells. A series of continuous and intermittent magnetic field (MF) exposures for varying lengths of time were tested at intensities up to 7-fold greater than that produced by the German TR07 maglev vehicle. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or mycophenolic acid were used to induce cell differentiation. Changes in cell number, morphology, and fluorescence expression of antigenic markers of differentiation were monitored. The results indicated that maglev-spectrum magnetic field exposures up to 2 gauss had little effect on culture growth or chemically induced cellular differentiation when exposed to maglev-spectrum magnetic fields compared to chemically treated but MF-unexposed controls.

  8. Magnetic Cloud Field Intensities and Solar Wind Velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Walter D.; Clau de Gonzalez, Alicia D.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Arballo, John K.

    1997-01-01

    For the sets of magnetic clouds studied in this work we have shown that there is a general relationship between their magnetic fields strength and velocities. With a clear tendency that the faster the speed of the cloud the higher the magnetic field.

  9. Attosecond Dynamics of Electron Wave Packets in Intense Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varjú, K.; Johnsson, P.; Mauritsson, J.; López-Martens, R.; Gustafsson, E.; Remetter, T.; L'huillier, A.

    The continuous progress in the performances of light sources as well as detection techniques allows us to investigate and control the states of matter in even finer details. Light sources, ranging from the infrared (IR) to the extreme ultraviolet (XUV), are becoming increasingly coherent, intense, well characterized, and controlled. The shortest available light pulses are now significantly shorter than 1 fs [1]-[4], thus offering unique promise for studies of ultrafast electron dynamics.

  10. Computer Analysis of Electromagnetic Field Exposure Hazard for Space Station Astronauts during Extravehicular Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwu, Shian U.; Kelley, James S.; Panneton, Robert B.; Arndt, G. Dickey

    1995-01-01

    In order to estimate the RF radiation hazards to astronauts and electronics equipment due to various Space Station transmitters, the electric fields around the various Space Station antennas are computed using the rigorous Computational Electromagnetics (CEM) techniques. The Method of Moments (MoM) was applied to the UHF and S-band low gain antennas. The Aperture Integration (AI) method and the Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) method were used to compute the electric field intensities for the S- and Ku-band high gain antennas. As a result of this study, The regions in which the electric fields exceed the specified exposure levels for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) electronics equipment and Extravehicular Activity (EVA) astronaut are identified for various Space Station transmitters.

  11. Carcinogenesis related to intense pulsed light and UV exposure: an experimental animal study.

    PubMed

    Hedelund, L; Lerche, C; Wulf, H C; Haedersdal, M

    2006-12-01

    This study examines whether intense pulsed light (IPL) treatment has a carcinogenic potential itself or may influence ultraviolet (UV)-induced carcinogenesis. Secondly, it evaluates whether UV exposure may influence IPL-induced side effects. Hairless, lightly pigmented mice (n=144) received three IPL treatments at 2-week intervals. Simulated solar radiation was administered preoperatively [six standard erythema doses (SED) four times weekly for 11 weeks] as well as pre- and postoperatively (six SED four times weekly up to 26 weeks). Skin tumors were assessed weekly during a 12-month observation period. Side effects were evaluated clinically. No tumors appeared in untreated control mice or in just IPL-treated mice. Skin tumors developed in UV-exposed mice independently of IPL treatments. The time it took for 50% of the mice to first develop skin tumor ranged from 47 to 49 weeks in preoperative UV-exposed mice (p=0.94) and from 22 to 23 weeks in pre- and postoperative UV-exposed mice (p=0.11). IPL rejuvenation of lightly pigmented skin did not induce pigmentary changes (p=1.00). IPL rejuvenation of UV-pigmented skin resulted in an immediate increased skin pigmentation and a subsequent short-term reduced skin pigmentation (p<0.002). Postoperative UV radiation resulted in re-pigmentation of IPL-induced pigment reduction (p=0.12). No texture changes were observed. Postoperative edema and erythema were increased by preoperative UV exposure (p<0.002). IPL rejuvenation has no carcinogenic potential itself and does not influence UV-induced carcinogenesis. UV exposure influences the occurrence of side effects after IPL rejuvenation in an animal model. PMID:16964439

  12. Controversies related to electromagnetic field exposure on peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Say, Ferhat; Altunkaynak, Berrin Zuhal; Coşkun, Sina; Deniz, Ömür Gülsüm; Yıldız, Çağrı; Altun, Gamze; Kaplan, Arife Ahsen; Kaya, Sefa Ersan; Pişkin, Ahmet

    2016-09-01

    Electromagnetic field (EMF) is a pervasive environmental presence in modern society. In recent years, mobile phone usage has increased rapidly throughout the world. As mobile phones are generally held close to the head while talking, studies have mostly focused on the central and peripheral nervous system. There is a need for further research to ascertain the real effect of EMF exposure on the nervous system. Several studies have clearly demonstrated that EMF emitted by cell phones could affect the systems of the body as well as functions. However, the adverse effects of EMF emitted by mobile phones on the peripheral nerves are still controversial. Therefore, this review summarizes current knowledge on the possible positive or negative effects of electromagnetic field on peripheral nerves. PMID:26718608

  13. High-time resolution and size-segregated elemental composition in high-intensity pyrotechnic exposures.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Javier; Yubero, Eduardo; Nicolás, Jose F; Lucarelli, Franco; Nava, Silvia; Chiari, Massimo; Calzolai, Giulia

    2012-11-30

    Typical of festivals in Eastern Spain, mascletàs are high-intensity pyrotechnic events where thousands of firecrackers are burnt in an intense, rapid episode that generates short-lived heavy aerosol clouds. High temporal resolution and size distribution characterisation of aerosol components were performed to evaluate the effects of the brief (<30 min) and acute exposure on the spectators present. Very high concentrations of firework specific elements, especially in the fine fraction, were reached during mascletàs, with values of about 500 μg/m(3) for K and 300 μg/m(3) for Cl. Sr, Al, Mg, Ba, Cu, Co, Zn, and Pb concentration increase factors of more than 100 (1000 for Sr and Ba) were observed in the fine fraction with respect to background levels. Crustal origin elements, like Ca, Fe, Si, Ti, also showed an important concentration rise (~10 times above background levels) but this is due to dust resuspension by pyrotechnic explosions. The crustal components are mainly in the coarse mode (>90% elemental mass), between 2 and 3 μm. Most firework related metals are concentrated in the submicrometric region (>80%) with a trimodal size distribution. This may be interesting to epidemiologists given the toxic effects that such fine, metal-rich particles can have on human health. PMID:23026448

  14. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 25.1317 Section 25.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 25.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  15. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 25.1317 Section 25.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 25.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  16. 14 CFR 27.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 27.1317 Section 27.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 27.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  17. 14 CFR 27.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 27.1317 Section 27.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 27.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  18. 14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317 Section 29.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 29.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  19. 14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317 Section 29.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 29.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  20. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 25.1317 Section 25.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 25.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  1. 14 CFR 27.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 27.1317 Section 27.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 27.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  2. 14 CFR 27.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 27.1317 Section 27.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 27.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  3. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 25.1317 Section 25.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 25.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  4. 14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317 Section 29.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 29.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  5. 14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317 Section 29.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 29.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  6. 14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317 Section 29.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 29.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  7. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 25.1317 Section 25.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 25.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  8. 14 CFR 27.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 27.1317 Section 27.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 27.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  9. Lagrangian Formulation of Relativistic Particle Average Motion in a Laser Field of Arbitrary Intensity

    SciTech Connect

    I.Y. Dodin; N.J. Fisch; G.M. Fraiman

    2003-02-06

    The Lagrangian and Hamiltonian functions describing average motion of a relativistic particle under the action of intensive high-frequency electromagnetic radiation are obtained. In weak, low-frequency background fields, such a particle on average drifts with an effective, relativistically invariant mass, which depends on the intensity of the electromagnetic field.

  10. Aquatic Exposure Predictions of Insecticide Field Concentrations Using a Multimedia Mass-Balance Model.

    PubMed

    Knäbel, Anja; Scheringer, Martin; Stehle, Sebastian; Schulz, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    Highly complex process-driven mechanistic fate and transport models and multimedia mass balance models can be used for the exposure prediction of pesticides in different environmental compartments. Generally, both types of models differ in spatial and temporal resolution. Process-driven mechanistic fate models are very complex, and calculations are time-intensive. This type of model is currently used within the European regulatory pesticide registration (FOCUS). Multimedia mass-balance models require fewer input parameters to calculate concentration ranges and the partitioning between different environmental media. In this study, we used the fugacity-based small-region model (SRM) to calculate predicted environmental concentrations (PEC) for 466 cases of insecticide field concentrations measured in European surface waters. We were able to show that the PECs of the multimedia model are more protective in comparison to FOCUS. In addition, our results show that the multimedia model results have a higher predictive power to simulate varying field concentrations at a higher level of field relevance. The adaptation of the model scenario to actual field conditions suggests that the performance of the SRM increases when worst-case conditions are replaced by real field data. Therefore, this study shows that a less complex modeling approach than that used in the regulatory risk assessment exhibits a higher level of protectiveness and predictiveness and that there is a need to develop and evaluate new ecologically relevant scenarios in the context of pesticide exposure modeling. PMID:26889709

  11. Light-front time evolution in intense fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guangyao; Zhao, Xingbo; Li, Yang; Maris, Pieter; Tuchin, Kirill; Vary, James

    2016-03-01

    We report on the influence of strong electromagnetic fields generated by an ultra-relativistic heavy ion on the quantized field of a charged fermion particle using the time-dependent basis light-front quantization (tBLFQ) approach. We calculate transitions of the charged fermion and find agreement with light-front perturbation theory at small coupling. We then present non-perturbative effects, such as the real-time evolution of the momentum distribution and the helicity configuration of the fermion in strong fields. We will discuss prospects for applying the tBLFQ formalism to time-dependent QED and QCD fields in heavy ion collisions and electron-ion collisions. This work is supported by DOE Grants DE-FG02-87ER40371 & DESC0008485.

  12. Coupled near-field and far-field exposure assessment framework for chemicals in consumer products.

    PubMed

    Fantke, Peter; Ernstoff, Alexi S; Huang, Lei; Csiszar, Susan A; Jolliet, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Humans can be exposed to chemicals in consumer products through product use and environmental emissions over the product life cycle. Exposure pathways are often complex, where chemicals can transfer directly from products to humans during use or exchange between various indoor and outdoor compartments until sub-fractions reach humans. To consistently evaluate exposure pathways along product life cycles, a flexible mass balance-based assessment framework is presented structuring multimedia chemical transfers in a matrix of direct inter-compartmental transfer fractions. By matrix inversion, we quantify cumulative multimedia transfer fractions and exposure pathway-specific product intake fractions defined as chemical mass taken in by humans per unit mass of chemical in a product. Combining product intake fractions with chemical mass in the product yields intake estimates for use in life cycle impact assessment and chemical alternatives assessment, or daily intake doses for use in risk-based assessment and high-throughput screening. Two illustrative examples of chemicals used in personal care products and flooring materials demonstrate how this matrix-based framework offers a consistent and efficient way to rapidly compare exposure pathways for adult and child users and for the general population. This framework constitutes a user-friendly approach to develop, compare and interpret multiple human exposure scenarios in a coupled system of near-field ('user' environment), far-field and human intake compartments, and helps understand the contribution of individual pathways to overall human exposure in various product application contexts to inform decisions in different science-policy fields for which exposure quantification is relevant. PMID:27318619

  13. Near field light intensity distribution analysis in bimodal polymer waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, T.; Gut, K.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents analysis of light intensity distribution and sensitivity in differential interferometer based on bimodal polymer waveguide. Key part is analysis of optimal waveguide layer thickness in structure SiO2/SU-8/H2O for maximum bulk refractive index sensitivity. The paper presents new approach to detecting phase difference between modes through registrations only part of energy propagating in the waveguide. Additionally in this paper the analysis of changes in light distribution when energy in modes is not equal were performed.

  14. Free-field propagation of high intensity noise. [supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdaniel, O. H.; Roth, S. D.; Welz, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    Research on high intensity (finite amplitude) acoustic waves shows that nonlinear distortion effects generally result in a shift of energy to higher frequencies. The higher intensities associated with supersonic jets would therefore indicate that high frequency enhancement of the spectrum should occur, resulting in the differences observed between subsonic and supersonic jets. A 10,000 acoustic watt source installed in an anechoic chamber generates sound levels such that acoustic shocks are readily observable. Dual frequency excitation of the source produces a strong parametric effect with a difference frequency comparable in level to the primary frequency. The test set up and recording equipment being used to determine the finite amplitude noise representative of an actual supersonic jet are described as well as the development of a computer program based on Burger's equation. The spectra of 1/2 octave band, 1 kHz sine wave, and dual frequency input and output are presented in graphs along with waveforms at Z = .025, 0.1, and 1.0.

  15. Free-field propagation of high intensity noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welz, Joseph P.; Mcdaniel, Oliver H.

    1990-01-01

    Observed spectral data from supersonic jet aircraft are known to contain much more high frequency energy than can be explained by linear acoustic propagation theory. It is believed that the high frequency energy is an effect of nonlinear distortion due to the extremely high acoustic levels generated by the jet engines. The objective, to measure acoustic waveform distortion for spherically diverging high intensity noise, was reached by using an electropneumatic acoustic source capable of generating sound pressure levels in the range of 140 to 160 decibels (re 20 micro Pa). The noise spectrum was shaped to represent the spectra generated by jet engines. Two microphones were used to capture the acoustic pressure waveform at different points along the propagation path in order to provide a direct measure of the waveform distortion as well as spectral distortion. A secondary objective was to determine that the observed distortion is an acoustic effect. To do this an existing computer prediction code that deals with nonlinear acoustic propagation was used on data representative of the measured data. The results clearly demonstrate that high intensity jet noise does shift the energy in the spectrum to the higher frequencies along the propagation path. In addition, the data from the computer model are in good agreement with the measurements, thus demonstrating that the waveform distortion can be accounted for with nonlinear acoustic theory.

  16. Findings suggest possible link between geomagnetic reversals and field intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Kenneth A.

    For the past 2000 years the Earth's magnetic field has been weakening. At the going rate of decay, the field's dipole—generated within the convecting metallic fluid of the outer core—would totally vanish, perhaps passing through zero and reversing polarity, in the coming millennia. This scenario of a coming attempt by Earth's dynamo to reverse its polarity is suggested by direct observation of the field since the 19th century and laboratory investigation of historic lavas and other fired materials that record the ambient field while cooling.The ongoing weakening of the field does not insure that a reversal will occur. After all, the north-south axial dipole changes to the opposite direction only on occasion; it currently reverses a few times each million years. How the dynamo actually approaches an attempted change of polarity and, moreover, the degree to which such a process can be predicted, are unclear. Nonetheless, a major step toward such an understanding may have been made through recently reported paleomagnetic findings obtained from the long, quasi-continuous records derived from Ocean Drilling Project (ODP) marine sediment cores.

  17. Archaeomagnetic determination of the ancient intensity of the geomagnetic field in Tamilnadu, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, K.; Dheenathayalu, M.; Bharathan, S.

    1985-10-01

    A detailed study of the ancient intensity of the Earth's magnetic field in Tamilnadu, India is presented using pottery, bricks, tiles etc., obtained from the excavations that have been carried out at some of the important places of historical and archaeological interest. An attempt is made to reconstruct the secular variation of the geomagnetic field intensity. The results reported here reveal considerable changes in the Earth's magnetic field in this region during the past 2400 y. It is observed that the intensity of the geomagnetic field has been previously 57% greater than at present.

  18. [Patient exposure to electromagnetic fields in magnetic resonance scanners: a review].

    PubMed

    Guibelalde del Castillo, E

    2013-12-01

    The use of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields in the low frequency end of the electromagnetic spectrum and static fields, radiofrequencies (RF), and microwaves is fundamental both in modern communication systems and in diagnostic medical imaging techniques like magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The proliferation of these applications in recent decades has led to intense activity in developing regulations to guarantee their safety and to the establishment of guidelines and legal recommendations for the public, workers, and patients. In April 2012 it was foreseen that the European Parliament and Council would approve and publish a directive on the minimum health and safety requirements regarding the exposure of workers to the risks arising from electromagnetic fields, which would modify Directive 2004/40/EC. New studies related to the exposure to electromagnetic radiation and its impact on health published in recent years have led to a new postponement, and it is now foreseen that the directive will come into effect in October 2013. One of the most noteworthy aspects of the new version of the directive is the exclusion of the limits of occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields in the clinical use of MRI. In exchange for this exception, physicians and experts in protection against non-ionizing radiation are asked to make additional efforts to train workers exposed to non-ionizing radiation and to establish mechanisms to guarantee the correct application of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields in patients, along similar lines to the principles of justification and optimization established for ionizing radiation. On the basis of the most recently published studies, this article reviews some safety-related aspects to take into account when examining patients with MRI with high magnetic fields. PMID:24246885

  19. Chronic exposure of primates to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields: II. Neurochemical effects

    SciTech Connect

    Seegal, R.F.; Wolpaw, J.R.; Dowman, R.

    1989-01-01

    We exposed Macaca nemestrina (pig-tailed macaques) to electric (E) and magnetic (B) fields ranging in intensity from 3 kV/m and 0.1 G to 30 kV/m and 0.9 G for three 21-day (d) periods. Experimental animals were exposed to sham E and B fields for two 21-d periods, one prior to and one following actual exposure to E and B fields, resulting in a total of five 21-d periods. Control animals were exposed to sham E and B fields for the entire 105-d interval. At the end of each 21-d period cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was obtained by lumbar puncture and analyzed for concentrations of homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), metabolites of dopamine and serotonin neurotransmitters, respectively, by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD). Results are based on an examination of six experimental and four control animals. Exposure to E and B fields at all strengths was associated with a significant decline in CSF concentrations of both HVA and 5-HIAA when statistical comparisons were made against values obtained at the end of the preexposure interval. However, HVA returned to preexposure levels during the postexposure period, while 5-HIAA did not. No significant change in the concentrations of HVA or 5-HIAA was noted in the control animals. These results strongly suggest that exposure of the nonhuman primate to E and B fields can significantly affect specific biochemical estimates of nervous system function. These effects may involve alterations either in neuronal activity or in the activity of enzymes that catabolize the neurotransmitters.

  20. Quantum processes in short and intensive electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, A. I.; Kämpfer, Burkhard; Hosaka, Atsushi; Takabe, Hideaki

    2016-05-01

    This work provides an overview of our recent results in studying two most important and widely discussed quantum processes: electron-positron pairs production off a probe photon propagating through a polarized short-pulsed electromagnetic (e.g. laser) wave field or generalized Breit-Wheeler process, and a single a photon emission off an electron interacting with the laser pules, so-called non-linear Compton scattering. We show that the probabilities of particle production in both processes are determined by interplay of two dynamical effects, where the first one is related to the shape and duration of the pulse and the second one is non-linear dynamics of the interaction of charged fermions with a strong electromagnetic field. We elaborate suitable expressions for the production probabilities and cross sections, convenient for studying evolution of the plasma in presence of strong electromagnetic fields.

  1. Field energy and RMS emittance in intense particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Crandall, K.R.; Mills, R.S.; Reiser, M.

    1986-04-25

    An equation is presented for continuous beam with azimuthal symmetry and continuous linear focusing; the equation expresses a relationship between the rate of change for squared rms emittance and the rate of change for a quantity we call the nonlinear field energy. The nonlinear field energy depends on the shape of the charge distribution and corresponds to the residual field energy possessed by beams with nonuniform charge distributions. The equation can be integrated for the case of an rms matched beam to yield a formula for space-charge-induced emittance growth that we have tested numerically for a variety of initial distributions. The results provide a framework for discussing the scaling of rms emittance growth and an explanation for the well-established lower limit on output emittance.

  2. Electron Production and Collective Field Generation in Intense Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Vay, J; Cohen, R; Friedman, A; Lee, E; Verboncoeur, J; Covo, M K

    2006-02-09

    Electron cloud effects (ECEs) are increasingly recognized as important, but incompletely understood, dynamical phenomena, which can severely limit the performance of present electron colliders, the next generation of high-intensity rings, such as PEP-II upgrade, LHC, and the SNS, the SIS 100/200, or future high-intensity heavy ion accelerators such as envisioned in Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion (HIF). Deleterious effects include ion-electron instabilities, emittance growth, particle loss, increase in vacuum pressure, added heat load at the vacuum chamber walls, and interference with certain beam diagnostics. Extrapolation of present experience to significantly higher beam intensities is uncertain given the present level of understanding. With coordinated LDRD projects at LLNL and LBNL, we undertook a comprehensive R&D program including experiments, theory and simulations to better understand the phenomena, establish the essential parameters, and develop mitigating mechanisms. This LDRD project laid the essential groundwork for such a program. We developed insights into the essential processes, modeled the relevant physics, and implemented these models in computational production tools that can be used for self-consistent study of the effect on ion beams. We validated the models and tools through comparison with experimental data, including data from new diagnostics that we developed as part of this work and validated on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL. We applied these models to High-Energy Physics (HEP) and other advanced accelerators. This project was highly successful, as evidenced by the two paragraphs above, and six paragraphs following that are taken from our 2003 proposal with minor editing that mostly consisted of changing the tense. Further benchmarks of outstanding performance are: we had 13 publications with 8 of them in refereed journals, our work was recognized by the accelerator and plasma physics communities by 8 invited papers and we have 5

  3. Assessment of a Pesticide Exposure Intensity Algorithm in the Agricultural Health Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    The accuracy of the exposure assessment is a critical factor in epidemiological investigations of pesticide exposures and health in agricultural populations. However, few studies have been conducted to evaluate questionnaire-based exposure metrics. The Agricultural Health Study...

  4. Optimization of exposure parameters in full field digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Mark B.; Raghunathan, Priya; More, Mitali J.; Seibert, J. Anthony; Kwan, Alexander; Lo, Joseph Y.; Samei, Ehsan; Ranger, Nicole T.; Fajardo, Laurie L.; McGruder, Allen; McGruder, Sandra M.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Yaffe, Martin J.; Bloomquist, Aili; Mawdsley, Gordon E.

    2008-06-15

    Optimization of exposure parameters (target, filter, and kVp) in digital mammography necessitates maximization of the image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), while simultaneously minimizing patient dose. The goal of this study is to compare, for each of the major commercially available full field digital mammography (FFDM) systems, the impact of the selection of technique factors on image SNR and radiation dose for a range of breast thickness and tissue types. This phantom study is an update of a previous investigation and includes measurements on recent versions of two of the FFDM systems discussed in that article, as well as on three FFDM systems not available at that time. The five commercial FFDM systems tested, the Senographe 2000D from GE Healthcare, the Mammomat Novation DR from Siemens, the Selenia from Hologic, the Fischer Senoscan, and Fuji's 5000MA used with a Lorad M-IV mammography unit, are located at five different university test sites. Performance was assessed using all available x-ray target and filter combinations and nine different phantom types (three compressed thicknesses and three tissue composition types). Each phantom type was also imaged using the automatic exposure control (AEC) of each system to identify the exposure parameters used under automated image acquisition. The figure of merit (FOM) used to compare technique factors is the ratio of the square of the image SNR to the mean glandular dose. The results show that, for a given target/filter combination, in general FOM is a slowly changing function of kVp, with stronger dependence on the choice of target/filter combination. In all cases the FOM was a decreasing function of kVp at the top of the available range of kVp settings, indicating that higher tube voltages would produce no further performance improvement. For a given phantom type, the exposure parameter set resulting in the highest FOM value was system specific, depending on both the set of available target/filter combinations, and

  5. Geometry- and diffraction-independent ionization probabilities in intense laser fields: Probing atomic ionization mechanisms with effective intensity matching

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, W. A.; Stebbings, S. L.; English, E. M. L.; Goodworth, T. R. J.; Newell, W. R.; McKenna, J.; Suresh, M.; Srigengan, B.; Williams, I. D.; Turcu, I. C. E.; Smith, J. M.; Divall, E. J.; Hooker, C. J.; Langley, A. J.

    2006-01-15

    We report an experimental technique for the comparison of ionization processes in ultrafast laser pulses irrespective of pulse ellipticity. Multiple ionization of xenon by 50 fs 790 nm, linearly and circularly polarized laser pulses is observed over the intensity range 10 TW/cm{sup 2} to 10 PW/cm{sup 2} using effective intensity matching (EIM), which is coupled with intensity selective scanning (ISS) to recover the geometry-independent probability of ionization. Such measurements, made possible by quantifying diffraction effects in the laser focus, are compared directly to theoretical predictions of multiphoton, tunnel and field ionization, and a remarkable agreement demonstrated. EIM-ISS allows the straightforward quantification of the probability of recollision ionization in a linearly polarized laser pulse. Furthermore, the probability of ionization is discussed in terms of the Keldysh adiabaticity parameter {gamma}, and the influence of the precursor ionic states present in recollision ionization is observed.

  6. Ultra-High Intensity Magnetic Field Generation in Dense Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, Nathaniel J

    2014-01-08

    I. Grant Objective The main objective of this grant proposal was to explore the efficient generation of intense currents. Whereasthefficient generation of electric current in low-­energy-­density plasma has occupied the attention of the magnetic fusion community for several decades, scant attention has been paid to carrying over to high-­energy-­density plasma the ideas for steady-­state current drive developed for low-­energy-­density plasma, or, for that matter, to inventing new methodologies for generating electric current in high-­energy-­density plasma. What we proposed to do was to identify new mechanisms to accomplish current generation, and to assess the operation, physics, and engineering basis of new forms of current drive in regimes appropriate for new fusion concepts.

  7. Insights into Contaminant Leaching Through An Intensive Field Monitoring Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keim, D.; Ireson, A. M.; Ali, M.; Steele, C.; Penrod, D.

    2014-12-01

    Risks to groundwater quality from mobile contaminants in the unsaturated zone associated with active or legacy mines present significant challenges for land managers and policy makers worldwide. Unsaturated zone flow processes are a dominant control on contaminant loading. However, the presence of unsaturated zone heterogeneity results in spatially and temporally variable flow pathways, due to capillary breaks and hydraulic barriers forming in various locations. This can result in the development of focused flow paths from where rapid contaminant transport to the water table may occur. In this study we designed an intensive monitoring program to attempt to characterise time-varying flow paths through a highly heterogeneous unsaturated zone through a dense network of combined soil moisture, electric conductivity and temperature probes. Estimations of surface fluxes and soil drainage along with observed water table response at a waste management site in Chalk River, Canada are presented providing insights into flow and transport processes.

  8. OLD-FIELD SUCCESSIONAL DYNAMICS FOLLOWING INTENSIVE HERBIVORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Community composition and successional patterns can be altered by disturbance and exotic species invasions. Our objective was to describe vegetation dynamics following cessation of severe disturbance, which was heavy grazing by cattle, in an old-field grassland subject to invasi...

  9. Generation of superhot electrons by intense field structures

    SciTech Connect

    Salomaa, R. R. E.; Karttunen, S. J.; Paettikangas, T. J. H.; Mulser, P.; Schneider, W.

    1998-02-20

    Strong, localized electrostatic fields created in laser plasma interactions act as a source of hot electrons. We have derived analytical formulas based on adiabatic invariants for explaining of the main characteristics of the electron spectra found in test particle calculations and in full wave-particle simulations. The electrons are treated relativistically. Simple models for phenomenological description of nonlinear wave damping are discussed.

  10. Inactivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae suspended in orange juice using high-intensity pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Elez-Martínez, Pedro; Escolà-Hernández, Joan; Soliva-Fortuny, Robert C; Martín-Belloso, Olga

    2004-11-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is often associated with the spoilage of fruit juices. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of high-intensity pulsed electric field (HIPEF) treatment on the survival of S. cerevisiae suspended in orange juice. Commercial heat-sterilized orange juice was inoculated with S. cerevisiae (CECT 1319) (10(8) CFU/ml) and then treated by HIPEFs. The effects of HIPEF parameters (electric field strength, treatment time, pulse polarity, frequency, and pulse width) were evaluated and compared to those of heat pasteurization (90 degrees C/min). In all of the HIPEF experiments, the temperature was kept below 39 degrees C. S. cerevisiae cell damage induced by HIPEF treatment was observed by electron microscopy. HIPEF treatment was effective for the inactivation of S. cerevisiae in orange juice at pasteurization levels. A maximum inactivation of a 5.1-log (CFU per milliliter) reduction was achieved after exposure of S. cerevisiae to HIPEFs for 1,000 micros (4-micros pulse width) at 35 kV/cm and 200 Hz in bipolar mode. Inactivation increased as both the field strength and treatment time increased. For the same electric field strength and treatment time, inactivation decreased when the frequency and pulse width were increased. Electric pulses applied in the bipolar mode were more effective than those in the monopolar mode for destroying S. cerevisiae. HIPEF processing inactivated S. cerevisiae in orange juice, and the extent of inactivation was similar to that obtained during thermal pasteurization. HIPEF treatments caused membrane damage and had a profound effect on the intracellular organization of S. cerevisiae. PMID:15553647

  11. Quality assurance for clinical high intensity focused ultrasound fields.

    PubMed

    Civale, John; Rivens, Ian; ter Haar, Gail

    2015-03-01

    As the use of HIFU in the clinic becomes more widespread there is an ever increasing need to standardise quality assurance protocols, an important step in facilitating the wider acceptance of HIFU as a therapeutic modality. This article reviews pertinent aspects of HIFU treatment delivery, encompassing the closely related aspects of quality assurance and calibration. Particular attention is given to the description and characterisation of relevant acoustic field parameters and the measurement of acoustic power. Where appropriate, recommendations are made. PMID:25677839

  12. Dissociation of acetaldehyde in intense laser field: Coulomb explosion or field-assisted dissociation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshakre, Mohamed E.; Gao, Lirong; Tang, Xiaoping; Wang, Sufan; Shu, Yafei; Kong, Fanao

    2003-09-01

    Dissociation of acetaldehyde in moderate strong laser field of 1013-1014W/cm2 was investigated. Singly charged parent ion CH3CHO+ and fragmental ions CH3+, CHO+, C2H4+, O+, CH2CHO+, and H+ were produced by 800 nm laser of 100 fs pulse duration and recorded by time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The CH3+ fragment further dissociated to CH2+, CH+, and C+ ions at higher intensity. Ab initio calculated results show that the singly-, doubly-, and triply charged parent ions are stable. So, the dissociation mechanism was not due to Coulomb explosion of multicharged ion. A field-assisted dissociation (FAD) theory, which assumes that only one bond undergoes dissociation while the rest of the molecular geometry stays unchanged, was employed to treat the dissociation dynamics. Accordingly, the dressed potential energy surfaces of the ground state for the parent and the fragment ions were calculated. Corresponding quasiclassical trajectory calculations show that the bond ruptures take place in the order of C-C, C-O, and C-H, agreeing with the observation. The observed angular dependence and charge distribution of the product ions can also be interpreted by the FAD theory.

  13. Radiation Exposure to Premature Infants in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Onal, Esra; Bor, Dogan; Okumus, Nurullah; Atalay, Yildiz; Turkyilmaz, Canan; Ergenekon, Ebru; Koc, Esin

    2008-01-01

    Objective The aim of this work was to determine the radiation dose received by infants from radiographic exposure and the contribution from scatter radiation due to radiographic exposure of other infants in the same room. Materials and Methods We retrospectively evaluated the entrance skin doses (ESDs) and effective doses of 23 infants with a gestational age as low as 28 weeks. ESDs were determined from tube output measurements (ESDTO) (n = 23) and from the use of thermoluminescent dosimetry (ESDTLD) (n = 16). Scattered radiation was evaluated using a 5 cm Perspex phantom. Effective doses were estimated from ESDTO by Monte Carlo computed software and radiation risks were estimated from the effective dose. ESDTO and ESDTLD were correlated using linear regression analysis. Results The mean ESDTO for the chest and abdomen were 67 µGy and 65 µGy per procedure, respectively. The mean ESDTLD per radiograph was 70 µGy. The measured scattered radiation range at a 2 m distance from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) was (11-17 µGy) per radiograph. Mean effective doses were 16 and 27 µSv per procedure for the chest and abdomen, respectively. ESDTLD was well correlated with ESDTO obtained from the total chest and abdomen radiographs for each infant (R2 = 0.86). The radiation risks for childhood cancer estimated from the effective dose were 0.4 × 10-6 to 2 × 10-6 and 0.6 × 10-6 to 2.9 × 10-6 for chest and abdomen radiographs, respectively. Conclusion The results of our study show that neonates received acceptable doses from common radiological examinations. Although the contribution of scatter radiation to the neonatal dose is low, considering the sensitivity of the neonates to radiation, further protective action was performed by increasing the distance of the infants from each other. PMID:18838850

  14. Take home lead exposure in children of oil field workers.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fahad

    2011-06-01

    Childhood lead poisoning is a major, preventable environmental health problem. While residential lead-based paint and lead contaminated dust and soil are the most common sources of childhood lead poisoning, children can also be at risk if they live with an adult with a job or hobby that involves exposure to lead. Currently, the Oklahoma Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program (OCLPPP) has a small number of cases of "take home" lead exposure in children of oil field workers. These workers may come in contact with a threading compound, "pipe dope" that can contain large amounts of lead. Workers handling this product may be exposed to lead by not following safety instructions. Additionally workers may not be provided the facilities to shower and change out of the contaminated clothing before leaving the work location. The OCLPPP recommends employers and worksites should consider effective alternative options like lead free biodegradable pipe dopes or dope free connections to prevent workers and their families from adverse health effects associated with lead. PMID:21888039

  15. Magnetic field generation during intense laser channelling in underdense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, A. G.; Sarri, G.; Vranic, M.; Amano, Y.; Doria, D.; Guillaume, E.; Habara, H.; Heathcote, R.; Hicks, G.; Najmudin, Z.; Nakamura, H.; Norreys, P. A.; Kar, S.; Silva, L. O.; Tanaka, K. A.; Vieira, J.; Borghesi, M.

    2016-06-01

    Channel formation during the propagation of a high-energy (120 J) and long duration (30 ps) laser pulse through an underdense deuterium plasma has been spatially and temporally resolved via means of a proton imaging technique, with intrinsic resolutions of a few μm and a few ps, respectively. Conclusive proof is provided that strong azimuthally symmetric magnetic fields with a strength of around 0.5 MG are created inside the channel, consistent with the generation of a collimated beam of relativistic electrons. The inferred electron beam characteristics may have implications for the cone-free fast-ignition scheme of inertial confinement fusion.

  16. Histological evaluation of high-intensity focused ultrasound with lower-intensity focused ultrasound pre-exposure on the treatment of rabbit VX2 liver tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Zou Hairong; Zou Jianzhong; Wang Yan; Ou Xia

    2012-10-03

    This study was to evaluate the effect of pre-exposure lower-intensity focused ultrasound(US), or LIFU, in high-intensity focused ultrasound(HIFU) ablation of rabbit VX2 liver tumors . Liver VX2 tumor models were established in 30 rabbits, which were divided randomly into two groups. The liver tumors of rabbits in Group A underwent single HIFU ablation; those in Group B were given LIFU exposure before HIFU treatment. Five rabbits from each of the two groups were sacrificed at 0 hours, 3 days, and 7 days after HIFU ablation. Tissue samples that included targeted and short-range sounding (s-RS, within 5 mm of the targeted) and far-range sounding (f-RS, more than 5 mm of the targeted) tissues were observed using light microscope and transmission electron microscopy. The histological examination indicated that not only the targeted tumor cells became irreversible damage, but also the short-range sounding tumors were severely damaged by the HIFU with LIFU pre-exposure in group B. It is concluded that LIFU pre-exposure can enhance the effects of HIFU ablation on the destruction of cell ultrastructures and can enlarge the region of HIFU ablation.

  17. Theory and computation of atoms in intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, Edward Stuart

    This thesis has involved performing various modifications to the HELIUM program and using the HELIUM program to study the dynamics of laser-atom interactions. The HELIUM program is a portable code for the numerical solution of the full 5-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger Equation for 2 electron atoms in a very intense, linearly polarized, laser pulse. A finite-difference grid is used to model the two radial co-ordinates and a basis set of coupled spherical harmonics handles the three angular variables of the system. The HELIUM program was modified to incorporate a new propagator based on Krylov-subspace techniques, thus allowing a substantial increase in performance. A modular structure was implemented within the HELIUM program, separating the source code into 5 layers. This allows the program to be optimized for particular computer architectures while remaining portable across a wide variety of massively-parallel and vector supercomputers. It also greatly aids the task of program testing and verification. The breadth of output from the code was greatly extended. Numerous runs were performed for a wide variety of laser pulse parameters, enabling various observables such as ionization rates and harmonic generation to be studied. Comparisons with the results of other models have been performed and a new single active electron model has been developed. The full five-dimensional wavefunction can now be output to disk using an efficient parallel I/O strategy for subsequent analysis using the latest graphical visualization techniques. The study of magnesium, a quasi two electron system, was started using a time-independent screening potential to model the effect of the inner closed electron shells.

  18. Evidence for abrupt geomagnetic field intensity changes in Europe between 200 and 1400 AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Paccard, M.; Chauvin, A.; Lanos, P.

    2013-05-01

    Available archaeomagnetic data indicate that during the past 2500 yr there have been periods of rapid geomagnetic field intensity fluctuations interspersed with periods of almost constant field strength. Despite Europe being the most widely covered region in terms of archaeomagnetic data the occurrence and the behaviour of these rapid geomagnetic field intensity changes is under discussion and the challenge now is to precisely describe them. Here we present an improved description of the sharp intensity change that took place in Europe around 800 AD. For this purpose 13 precisely dated early medieval Spanish pottery fragments, four archaeological French kilns and three collections of bricks used for the construction of different French historical buildings with ages ranging between 335 and 1260 AD have been studied. Classical Thellier experiments performed on 164 specimens, and including anisotropy of thermoremanent magnetisation and cooling rate corrections, gave 119 reliable results. The 10 new high-quality mean archaeointensities obtained confirm the existence of an intensity maximum of about 85 μT (at the latitude of Paris) centred at ~800 AD and suggest that a previous abrupt intensity change occurred around 600 AD. Western European data also suggest the occurrence of abrupt geomagnetic field intensity changes during the 12th century AD and around the second half of the 13th century AD. Reliable selected eastern European data show a similar variation of geomagnetic field intensity with the occurrence of two intensity bumps (up to 75 μT at the latitude of Sofia) at ages around 650 and 950 AD and two periods of rapid intensity changes during the 12th century AD and 1300 AD. The results suggest that the described features of the geomagnetic field are observed at a continental scale and that very rapid intensity changes (of at least of 20 μT/century) took place in the recent history of the Earth's magnetic field.

  19. Chronic exposure to pulsed low-intensity microwaves is carcinogenic and tumorogenic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2004-03-01

    To study health effects of lifetime exposure to low-intensity pulsed radiation >890 MHz, one controlled laboratory study of SPF* rats[1-3] and two of mice[4,5] were conducted, but only one[4] reported that its data showed an association between irradiation and cancer; reports of the other two studies minimized or denied such association. Critical review of these identified data evaluation errors; their correction enables a conclusion of microwave carcinogenicity from each study (the rat study also shows an association with endocrine-system primary malignancies and with a benign tumor of the adrenal medulla), enhancing the credibility of an epidemiological study[6] reporting a brain cancer risk for users of both analog and digital cellular phones. [1] J. Raloff. Science News 126(7):103(1984). [2] K. R. Foster & A. W. Guy. Sci Am 255(3):32-39(1986). [3] C.-K. Chou et al. Bioelectromagnetics 13:469-496(1992). [4] M. H. Repacholi et al. Radiat Res 147:631-640(1990)SPF\\. [5] T. D. Utteridge et al. Radiat Res 158:357-364(2002)non-SPF\\. [6] L. Hardell et al. Int J Oncol 22:399-407(2003). * SPF = specific-pathogen-free

  20. Optimizing direct intense-field laser acceleration of ions

    SciTech Connect

    Harman, Zoltan; Salamin, Yousef I.; Galow, Benjamin J.; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2011-11-15

    The dynamics of ion acceleration in tightly focused laser beams is investigated in relativistic simulations. Studies are performed to find the optimal parameters which maximize the energy gain, beam quality, and flux. The exit ionic kinetic energy and its uncertainty are improved and the number of accelerated particles is increased by orders of magnitude over our earlier results, especially when working with a longer laser wavelength. Laser beams of powers of 0.1-10 petawatts and focused to subwavelength spot radii are shown to directly accelerate protons and bare nuclei of helium, carbon, and oxygen from a few to several hundred MeV/nucleon. Variation of the volume of the initial ionic ensemble, as well as the introduction of a pulse shape on the laser fields, have been investigated and are shown to influence the exit particle kinetic energies only slightly.

  1. Short perturbations of cosmic ray intensity and electric field in atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexeyenko, V. V.; Chudakov, A. E.; Sborshikov, V. G.; Tizengauzen, V. A.

    1985-01-01

    Short perturbations of cosmic ray intensity were found to be a common phenomenon. Its meteorological origin and correlation with electric field is established. The phenomenon can be explained by the electric field if the strength of this field at high altitudes is much bigger than the measured one at surface.

  2. High-order harmonic generation on atoms and ions with laser fields of relativistic intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Avetissian, H. K.; Markossian, A. G.; Mkrtchian, G. F.

    2011-07-15

    High-order harmonic generation (HHG) by hydrogenlike atoms or ions in the field of counterpropagating laser beams of standing-wave configuration, with linear polarizations and relativistic intensities, is studied. The relativistic quantum theory of HHG in such field configurations (homogeneous), at which the impeding factor of relativistic magnetic drift of superstrong laser fields can be eliminated, is presented.

  3. Assessing human exposure to power-frequency electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed Central

    Kaune, W T

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews published literature and current problems relating to the assessment of occupational and residential human exposures to power-frequency electric and magnetic fields. Available occupational exposure data suggest that the class of job titles known as electrical workers may be an effective surrogate for time-weighted-average (TWA) magnetic-field (but not electric-field) exposure. Current research in occupational-exposure assessment is directed to the construction of job-exposure matrices based on electric- and magnetic-field measurements and estimates of worker exposures to chemicals and other factors of interest. Recent work has identified five principal sources of residential magnetic fields: electric power transmission lines, electric power distribution lines, ground currents, home wiring, and home appliances. Existing residential-exposure assessments have used one or more of the following techniques: questionnaires, wiring configuration coding, theoretical field calculations, spot electric- and magnetic-field measurements, fixed-site magnetic-field recordings, personal- exposure measurements, and geomagnetic-field measurements. Available normal-power magnetic-field data for residences differ substantially between studies. It is not known if these differences are due to geographical differences, differences in measurement protocols, or instrumentation differences. Wiring codes and measured magnetic fields (but not electric fields) are associated weakly. Available data suggest, but are far from proving, that spot measurements may be more effective than wire codes as predictors of long-term historical magnetic-field exposure. Two studies find that away-from-home TWA magnetic-field exposures are less variable than at-home exposures. The importance of home appliances as contributors to total residential magnetic-field exposure is not known at this time. It also is not known what characteristics (if any) of residential electric and magnetic fields are

  4. Assessment of multiple frequency ELF electric and magnetic field exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitgeb, N.

    2008-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields both in daily life and at workplaces exhibit increasingly complex frequency spectra. Present spectral assessment rules proved to be too conservative for health risk assessment. This is because they are based on the assumption that cells would react like linear systems in terms of responding to a sum of frequencies by a sum of independent responses to each individual frequency. Based on numerical investigations with the Hodgkin-Huxley and the Frankenhaeuser-Huxley nerve cell models, it could be shown that accounting for the nonlinear behaviour of cellular excitation processes avoids considerable overestimation of simultaneous exposures to multiple frequency ELF electric and magnetic fields. Besides this, it could be shown that the role of phase relationships is less important than that assumed so far. The present assessment rules lead to non-compliances of marketed electric appliances. For general application, a nonlinear biology-based assessment (NBBA) rule has been proposed, validated and proven advantageous compared with ICNIRP's rule. While staying conservative it avoids unnecessary overestimation and demonstrates compliance even in cases of suspected non-conformities. It is up to responsible bodies to decide upon the adoption of this proposal and the potential need for implementing additional or reducing the already incorporated safety factors.

  5. Evaluation of nonuniform field exposures with coupling factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunohara, Tetsu; Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; De Santis, Valerio; Onishi, Teruo

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the safety compliance for nonuniform field exposures is discussed using coupling factor concepts. The coupling factor, which is defined in the International Electrotechnical Commission 62311 standard, is extended to consider the effects of harmonics and also to apply to the specific absorption rate (for frequencies up to 30 MHz). The proposed compliance procedure is applied to and demonstrated for a prototype wireless power transfer (WPT) system with induction coupling operating at the fundamental frequency in 140 kHz band. First, measurements confirm that the perturbation of the external magnetic field strength and S11 parameter of a one-loop antenna by a human-equivalent phantom are sufficiently small, suggesting the applicability of the magneto-quasi-static approximation to frequencies up to 30 MHz. Then, the frequency characteristics of the coupling factor are derived for the WPT system. For the prototype system that is not optimized for commercial usage, the maximum allowable transmitting power is relaxed by a factor of 23 with the proposed procedure. The contribution of the harmonics decreased the allowable transmitting power by 39%, indicating their importance for safety compliance.

  6. Evaluation of nonuniform field exposures with coupling factors.

    PubMed

    Sunohara, Tetsu; Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; De Santis, Valerio; Onishi, Teruo

    2015-10-21

    In this study, the safety compliance for nonuniform field exposures is discussed using coupling factor concepts. The coupling factor, which is defined in the International Electrotechnical Commission 62311 standard, is extended to consider the effects of harmonics and also to apply to the specific absorption rate (for frequencies up to 30 MHz). The proposed compliance procedure is applied to and demonstrated for a prototype wireless power transfer (WPT) system with induction coupling operating at the fundamental frequency in 140 kHz band. First, measurements confirm that the perturbation of the external magnetic field strength and S11 parameter of a one-loop antenna by a human-equivalent phantom are sufficiently small, suggesting the applicability of the magneto-quasi-static approximation to frequencies up to 30 MHz. Then, the frequency characteristics of the coupling factor are derived for the WPT system. For the prototype system that is not optimized for commercial usage, the maximum allowable transmitting power is relaxed by a factor of 23 with the proposed procedure. The contribution of the harmonics decreased the allowable transmitting power by 39%, indicating their importance for safety compliance. PMID:26439390

  7. Effects of Mass Media Campaign Exposure Intensity and Durability on Quit Attempts in a Population-Based Cohort Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakefield, M. A.; Spittal, M. J.; Yong, H-H.; Durkin, S. J.; Borland, R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the extent to which intensity and timing of televised anti-smoking advertising emphasizing the serious harms of smoking influences quit attempts. Methods: Using advertising gross rating points (GRPs), we estimated exposure to tobacco control and nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) advertising in the 3, 4-6, 7-9 and 10-12 months…

  8. Continuum Intensity and Magnetic Field Relationship in Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Trevor W.; Choudhary, D. P.

    2007-05-01

    The brightness (I) and magnetic field (B) distributions (I-B relationship) of sunspots are closely related. Several previous studies show that the relationship depends on the spot size, disk position, life time, and phase of the solar cycle in which it appears. The I-B relationship might also change from cycle to cycle. Many of the previous studies were conducted by single position measurements over the spot. Here, we present the results of a study of the I-B relationship using a uniform set of imaging observations of about 272 sunspots over the last two solar cycles at the San Fernando Observatory. The corresponding full disk magnetograms are from MDI-SOHO. The first result to be presented is the I-B relationship of sunspots. The second result is from an examination of the linear part of the I-B relationship, which shows that larger spots have a stiffer dependency compared to small spots. Another such dependency is more pronounced for the spots with a large umbra-penumbra ratio. Furthermore, the spots closer to the disk center have a stiffer I-B slope compared to the spots situated towards the limb. Finally, we explore the I-B properties of spots in relation to their corresponding solar hemispheres, as a function of their evolution history, dependence on their magnetic polarity, and any dependency on solar cycle. This work was partially supported by Cottrell College Science Award CC6496.

  9. Study on cavitation behavior during high-intensity focused ultrasound exposure by using optical and ultrasonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Kei; Takagi, Ryo; Yasuda, Jun; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Cavitation bubbles are known to enhance the heating effect of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). In our previous study, the use of a “triggered HIFU” sequence consisting of a high-intensity pulse and a relatively low-intensity burst was proposed as an effective method to utilize the effect of cavitation bubbles. However, the duration of each component in the sequence has not been optimized. In this study, optical imaging was carried out to observe the behavior of cavitation bubbles in a gel phantom during the triggered HIFU exposure. Ultrasound imaging using the pulse inversion method was also conducted to detect the behavior of the bubbles. The results suggest that the oscillation of cavitation bubbles become inactive as the duration of HIFU burst exposure increases to the order of 10 ms. It was also suggested that ultrasonic imaging has potential use for detecting a change in the oscillation of cavitation bubbles for optimizing a triggered HIFU sequence.

  10. Does head-only exposure to GSM-900 electromagnetic fields affect the performance of rats in spatial learning tasks?

    PubMed

    Dubreuil, Diane; Jay, Thérèse; Edeline, Jean-Marc

    2002-02-01

    The rapid expansion of mobile communication has generated intense interest, but has also fuelled ongoing concerns. In both humans and animals, radiofrequency radiations are suspected to affect cognitive functions. More specifically, several studies performed in rodents have suggested that spatial learning can be impaired by electromagnetic field exposure. However, none of these previous studies have simulated the common conditions of GSM mobile phones use. This study is the first using a head-only exposure system emitting a 900-MHz GSM electromagnetic field (pulsed at 217 Hz). The two behavioural tasks that were evaluated here have been used previously to demonstrate performance deficits in spatial learning after electromagnetic field exposure: a classical radial maze elimination task and a spatial navigation task in an open-field arena (dry-land version of the Morris water maze). The performances of rats exposed for 45 min to a 900-MHz electromagnetic field (1 and 3.5 W/kg) were compared to those of sham-exposed and cage-control rats. There were no differences among exposed, sham, and cage-control rats in the two spatial learning tasks. The discussion focuses on the potential reasons that led previous studies to conclude that learning deficits do occur after electromagnetic field exposure. PMID:11809512

  11. Dynamic intensity normalization using eigen flat fields in X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Van Nieuwenhove, Vincent; De Beenhouwer, Jan; De Carlo, Francesco; Mancini, Lucia; Marone, Federica; Sijbers, Jan

    2015-10-19

    In X-ray imaging, it is common practice to normalize the acquired projection data with averaged flat fields taken prior to the scan. Unfortunately, due to source instabilities, vibrating beamline components such as the monochromator, time varying detector properties, or other confounding factors, flat fields are often far from stationary, resulting in significant systematic errors in intensity normalization. In this work, a simple and efficient method is proposed to account for dynamically varying flat fields. Through principal component analysis of a set of flat fields, eigen flat fields are computed. A linear combination of the most important eigen flat fields is then used to individually normalize each X-ray projection. Experiments show that the proposed dynamic flat field correction leads to a substantial reduction of systematic errors in projection intensity normalization compared to conventional flat field correction. PMID:26480456

  12. Repeated exposure to immobilization or two different footshock intensities reveals differential adaptation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    PubMed

    Rabasa, Cristina; Muñoz-Abellán, Cristina; Daviu, Núria; Nadal, Roser; Armario, Antonio

    2011-05-01

    Factors involved in adaptation to repeated stress are not well-characterized. For instance, acute footshock (FS) of high intensity appears to be less severe than immobilization (IMO) in light of the speed of post-stress recovery of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and other physiological variables. However, repeated exposure to IMO consistently resulted in reduction of the HPA response to the same stressor (adaptation), whereas failure to adapt has been usually reported after FS. Thus, in the present work we directly compared the activation of HPA axis and other physiological changes in response to both acute and repeated exposure to IMO and two intensities of FS (medium and high) in adult male rats. Control rats were exposed to the FS boxes but they did not receive shocks. Daily repeated exposure to IMO resulted in significant adaptation of the overall ACTH and corticosterone responses to the stressor. Such a reduction was also observed with repeated exposure to FS boxes and FS-medium, whereas repeated exposure to FS-high only resulted in a small reduction of the corticosterone response during the post-stress period. This suggests that some properties of FS-high make adaptation to it difficult. Interestingly, overall changes in food intake and body weight gain throughout the week of exposure to the stressors reveal a greater impact of IMO than FS-high, indicating that factors other than the intensity of a stressor, at least when evaluated in function of the above physiological variables, can influence HPA adaptation. Since FS exposure is likely to cause more pain than IMO, activation of nociceptive signals above a certain level may negatively affect HPA adaptation to repeated stressors. PMID:21352836

  13. Cholinergic transmission underlies modulation of frustration by open field exposure.

    PubMed

    Psyrdellis, Mariana; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Mustaca, Alba; Justel, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Frustration can be defined as an emotional state generated by the omission or devaluation in the quantity or quality of an expected appetitive reward. Thus, reactivity to a reward is affected by prior experience with the different reinforcer values of that reward. This phenomenon is known as incentive relativity, and can be studied by different paradigms. Although methodologically simple, the exploration of a novel open field (OF) is a complex situation that involves several behavioral processes, including stress induction and novelty detection. OF exposure can enhance or block the acquisition of associative and non-associative memories. These experiments evaluated the effect of OF exploration on frustration and the role played by the cholinergic system in this phenomenon. OF exploration before first or second trial of incentive downshift modulated the expression of frustration. This effect of OF was blocked by the administration of scopolamine either before or after OF exploration. These results indicate that the cholinergic system is involved in the acquisition and consolidation of OF information. PMID:26546747

  14. Variability and consistency of electric and magnetic field occupational exposure measurements.

    PubMed

    Bracken, T D; Patterson, R M

    1996-01-01

    There is widespread scientific and public interest in possible health effects from exposure to electric and magnetic fields at frequencies associated with electricity use. Electric and magnetic field exposure assessment presents specific problems, among which are the inherent variability in exposure, the lack of robust statistical summary measures, and the lack of an accepted metric based on biological response. These pose challenges in defining distinct exposure groups, a basic goal for exposure assessments used in epidemiological studies. This paper explores the extent to which distinct electric and magnetic field exposure groups can be defined, by examining the variability and consistency of occupational electric and magnetic field exposure measurements among studies and within individual studies. Principal analyses are made by job titles because they are the most frequently used descriptors for stratifying occupational exposures to electric and magnetic fields. Methodological issues affecting the degree of consistency in measured electric and magnetic field exposures among occupational environments are also examined. Exposures by job title reported from electric and magnetic field measurement studies are summarized by general job category and industry. Analyses are performed both within and between job categories. Distributions of daily measured exposures for job categories taken from three large studies in the U.S. electric utility industry are compared to investigate consistency of exposures at a more detailed level. Analyses of reported personal exposure measurements from many studies and countries are consistent with less rigorous observations made heretofore on the basis of individual studies. In these studies, significantly elevated electric and magnetic field exposures are found in the electrician, lineworker, and substation worker categories; significantly elevated magnetic field exposures are also noted in the generation worker category; and magnetic

  15. Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Craniospinal Irradiation: Organ-at-Risk Exposure and a Low-Gradient Junctioning Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Stoker, Joshua B.; Grant, Jonathan; Zhu, X. Ronald; Pidikiti, Rajesh; Mahajan, Anita; Grosshans, David R.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To compare field junction robustness and sparing of organs at risk (OARs) during craniospinal irradiation (CSI) using intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) to conventional passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT). Methods and Materials: Ten patients, 5 adult and 5 pediatric patients, previously treated with PSPT-based CSI were selected for comparison. Anterior oblique cranial fields, using a superior couch rotation, and posterior spinal fields were used for IMPT planning. To facilitate low-gradient field junctioning along the spine, the inverse-planning IMPT technique was divided into 3 stages. Dose indices describing target coverage and normal tissue dose, in silico error modeling, and film dosimetry were used to assess plan quality. Results: Field junction robustness along the spine was improved using the staged IMPT planning technique, reducing the worst case impact of a 4-mm setup error from 25% in PSPT to <5% of prescription dose. This was verified by film dosimetry for clinical delivery. Exclusive of thyroid dose in adult patients, IMPT plans demonstrated sparing of organs at risk as good or better than PSPT. Coverage of the cribriform plate for pediatric (V95% [percentage of volume of the target receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose]; 87 ± 11 vs 92 ± 7) and adult (V95%; 94 ± 7 vs 100 ± 1) patients and the clinical target in pediatric (V95%; 98 ± 2 vs 100 ± 1) and adult (V95%; 100 ± 1 vs 100 ± 1) patients for PSPT and IMPT plans, respectively, were comparable or improved. For adult patients, IMPT target dose inhomogeneity was increased, as determined by heterogeneity index (HI) and inhomogeneity coefficient (IC). IMPT lowered maximum spinal cord dose, improved spinal dose homogeneity, and reduced exposure to other OARs. Conclusions: IMPT has the potential to improve CSI plan quality and the homogeneity of intrafractional dose at match lines. The IMPT approach developed may also simplify treatments and reduce

  16. Net effect of many gravitational fields on the intensity of celestial light sources. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cipperly, G.E.

    1982-12-01

    This thesis investigates the lens-like action of the gravitational fields of celestial bodies, which can alter the apparent intensity of more distant sources. Previous work in this area has shown that the chance of an individual body being sufficiently well aligned with a source to cause a very large gravitational intensity change is small. The issue addressed in this study is the possibility of there being a significant total change in the intensity of a source due to the combined effects of the gravitational fields of all celestial bodies, and in particular, the potential impact on intensity distance measurements, that is, determination of the distances of celestial light sources by means of intensity comparisons. It is first shown that the problem can be treated in flat space by associating an appropriate index of refraction with gravitational fields. A wave approach is taken in deriving the total deflection of a ray by the field of a single point mass. A statistical analysis is then performed to determine the expression for the mean total change in the intensity of celestial light sources due to the combined fields of all intervening bodies.

  17. Short-term effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields after physical exercise are dependent on autonomic tone before exposure.

    PubMed

    Grote, V; Lackner, H; Kelz, C; Trapp, M; Aichinger, F; Puff, H; Moser, M

    2007-11-01

    The therapeutic application of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) can accelerate healing after bone fractures and also alleviate pain according to several studies. However, no objective criteria have been available to ensure appropriate magnetic field strength or type of electromagnetic field. Moreover, few studies so far have investigated the physical principles responsible for the impact of electromagnetic fields on the human body. Existing studies have shown that PEMFs influence cell activity, the autonomic nervous system and the blood flow. The aim of this study is to examine the instantaneous and short-term effects of a PEMF therapy and to measure the impact of different electromagnetic field strengths on a range of physiological parameters, especially the autonomic nervous systems, determined by heart rate variability (HRV) as well as their influence on subjects' general feeling of well-being. The study comprised experimental, double-blind laboratory tests during which 32 healthy male adults (age: 38.4+/-6.5 years) underwent four physical stress tests at standardised times followed by exposure to pulsed magnetic fields of varying intensity [HPM, High Performance magnetic field; Leotec; pulsed signal; mean intensity increase: zero (placebo), 0.005, 0.03 and 0.09 T/s]. Exposure to electromagnetic fields after standardised physical effort significantly affected the very low frequency power spectral components of HRV (VLF; an indicator for sympathetically controlled blood flow rhythms). Compared to placebo treatment, exposure to 0.005 T/s resulted in accelerated recovery after physical strain. Subjects with lower baseline VLF power recovered more quickly than subjects with higher VLF when exposed to higher magnetic field strengths. The application of electromagnetic fields had no effect on subjects' general feeling of well-being. Once the magnetic field exposure was stopped, the described effects quickly subsided. PEMF exposure has a short-term dosage

  18. Intensity-based magnetic field measurement employing tilted long-period fiber gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yinping; Ma, Xixi; Lin, Jichao; Song, Binbin; Lin, Wei; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Bo; Yao, Jianquan

    2015-10-01

    An intensity-interrogated fiber magnetic field sensor based on magnetic fluid (MF) and tilted long-period fiber grating (TLPFG) has been proposed. The sensor is constructed by a TLPFG immersed in the MF. The TLPFGs supported the coupling between the LP01 core mode and the forward-propagating cladding modes with different azimuthal order l = 0, 1, 2,…, which shows different spectral response behaviors with normal long-period fiber gratings. The experimental results and theoretical analysis show that resonance wavelengths of TLPFG present different characteristics by tuning the applied magnetic field intensity. The transmission loss of the TLPFG increases for some dips, while they reduce for the others with the increment of the applied magnetic field intensity. Taking advantage of the optical power difference for various wavelength regions, a magnetic field intensity sensitivity of 0.05 dB Oe-1 could be achieved for a magnetic intensity range from 75 Oe to 300 Oe. Due to its low cost and compactness, the proposed sensor is expected to find potential applications in the field of magnetic field measurement and photonic devices.

  19. EQUALIZING THE ELECTRIC FIELD INTENSITY WITHIN CHICK BRAIN IMMERSED IN BUFFER SOLUTION AT DIFFERENT CARRIER FREQUENCIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presented here are the numerical relationships between incident power densities that produce the same average electric field intensity within a chick brain half immersed in buffered saline solution and exposed to a uniform electromagnetic field at carrier frequencies of 50, 147, ...

  20. Tiled-grating compressor with uncompensated dispersion for near-field-intensity smoothing.

    PubMed

    Huang, H; Kessler, Terrance

    2007-07-01

    A tiled-grating compressor, in which the spatial dispersion is not completely compensated, reduces the near-field-intensity modulation caused by tiling gaps and provides near-field spatial filtering of the input laser beam, thus reducing the laser damage to the final optics. PMID:17603592

  1. Intensity and spin effects in electron-ion scattering in the presence of an intense laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Shahid

    1989-04-01

    In the 1970s the experiments of Weingartshofer et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 39, 269 (1977) and Phys. Rev. A 19, 2371 (1979)] have shown that the Kroll-Watson cross section for Rutherford scattering in the presence of an intense laser field is correct. In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. A 38, 2525 (1988)], by using the Volkov solution to the minimally coupled Dirac equation, we had shown that the spin of the electron would give a contribution to the heating rate of a plasma in the intense laser light. We had also developed the concept of the quasifree states of the electron from a kinematical point of view. Using these concepts, we show that the Rutherford cross section has to be modified due to the spin of the electron and also due to the high intensity of the laser radiation at the region of interaction. A new coupling (decoupling) scheme is presented separating the kinematical factors from the dynamical ones. When the electron's momenta are perpendicular to the polarization plane of the laser field (small-angle scattering), it is discovered that the net number of photons absorbed or emitted in a single scattering process is limited to less than or equal to 2. We develop a mathematical transformation in the Appendix to reduce the infinite sum over products of Bessel functions into a single finite integral so that the ratio of our cross section to that of Rutherford can easily be computed and the results are plotted for various ranges of the parameters involved.

  2. Leukemia following occupational exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields among Ontario electric utility workers.

    PubMed

    Miller, A B; To, T; Agnew, D A; Wall, C; Green, L M

    1996-07-15

    In a nested case-control study of 1,484 cancer cases and 2,179 matched controls from a cohort of 31,543 Ontario Hydro male employees, the authors evaluated associations of cancer risk with electric field exposure and reevaluated the previously reported findings for magnetic fields. Pensioners were followed from January 1, 1970, and active workers (including those who left the corporation) from January 1, 1973, with both groups followed through December 31, 1988. Exposures to electric and magnetic fields and to potential occupational confounders were estimated through job exposure matrices. Odds ratios were elevated for hematopoietic malignancies with cumulative electric field exposure. After adjustment, the odds ratio for leukemia in the upper tertile was 4.45 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-19.7). Odds ratios were also elevated for acute nonlymphoid leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, and chronic lymphoid leukemia. For cumulative magnetic field exposure, there were similar elevations that fell with adjustment. Evaluation of the combined effect of electric and magnetic fields for leukemia showed significant elevations of risk for high exposure to both, with a dose-response relation for increasing exposure to electric fields and an inconsistent effect for magnetic fields. There was some evidence of a nonsignificant association for brain cancer and benign brain tumors with magnetic fields. For lung cancer, the odds ratio for high exposure to electric and magnetic fields was 1.84 (95% CI 0.69-4.94). PMID:8678046

  3. Magnetic field exposure in relation to leukemia and brain cancer mortality among electric utility workers.

    PubMed

    Savitz, D A; Loomis, D P

    1995-01-15

    Reports of leukemia and brain cancer among men in electrical occupations suggest a small increase in risk, but most previous studies have failed to classify magnetic field exposure accurately or to consider potential confounders. The authors conducted an historical cohort mortality study of 138,905 men employed at five large electric power companies in the United States between 1950 and 1986 with at least 6 months of work experience. Exposure was estimated by linking individual work histories to data from 2,842 workshift magnetic field measurements. Mortality follow-up identified 20,733 deaths based on 2,656,436 person-years of experience. Death rates were analyzed in relation to magnetic field exposure history with Poisson regression. Total mortality and cancer mortality rose slightly with increasing magnetic field exposure. Leukemia mortality, however, was not associated with indices of magnetic field exposure except for work as an electrician. Brain cancer mortality was modestly elevated in relation to duration of work in exposed jobs and much more strongly associated with magnetic field exposure indices. Brain cancer risk increased by an estimated factor of 1.94 per microtesla-year of magnetic field exposure in the previous 2-10 years, with a mortality rate ratio of 2.6 in the highest exposure category. In contrast to other studies, these data do not support an association between occupational magnetic field exposure and leukemia but do suggest a link to brain cancer. PMID:7817968

  4. 78 FR 33633 - Human Exposure to Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ..., including labeling and other requirements for occupational exposure classification, clarification of... approval. 3. Pinna (Outer Ear) Classification as an Extremity 11. In the NPRM, the Commission requested... classification, and it amends Sec. 1.1310 of its rules to subject the pinnae to the same RF exposure...

  5. Controllable near-field intensity and spot size of hybrid terahertz metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Meng, Dejia; Hoque, M N F; Wang, Wei; Fan, Zhaoyang; Wang, Kejia; Lai, Jianjun; Chen, Changhong

    2015-04-15

    We report controllable near fields around split-ring resonator (SRR) gaps of an active terahertz metamaterial. As extension of parallel-plate capacitors, patterned VO2 is integrated into the metallic SRRs to manipulate the near-field intensity and hot spot size through its metal-insulator transition. This design enhances the device reliability by preventing VO2 dielectric breakdown at a strongly enhanced near field. The near-field intensity and spot size are tunable in broad ranges, and the device is demonstrated to be capable of compensating resonant frequency drift arisen from different interactions due to near-field coupling. It provides an effective method to actively manipulate the light-matter interaction through the strongly enhanced and tunable near fields. PMID:25872063

  6. Simulation of Intense Isolated Attosecond Pulse Generation with a Two-color Laser Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilanlou, Abdolreza Amani; Ishikawa, Kenichi L.; Nabekawa, Yasuo; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    A numerical analysis by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation on a neon atom within the single-active electron approximation shows that a two-color laser field synthesized from a sub-12-fs fundamental field and a detuned second harmonic field with a wavelength shorter than 380nm is suitable for generating an intense isolated attosecond pulse (IAP). We have also investigated the effects of carrier-envelope phase variation on the obtained IAP and have compared the results to those obtained from a 5-fs fundamental field alone with the same peak field amplitude to show that a more intense IAP can be generated by the two-color laser field which is useful for nonlinear experiments in the extreme ultraviolet spectral range.

  7. Cumulative radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging in intensive care unit patients

    PubMed Central

    Moloney, Fiachra; Fama, Daniel; Twomey, Maria; O’Leary, Ruth; Houlihane, Conor; Murphy, Kevin P; O’Neill, Siobhan B; O’Connor, Owen J; Breen, Dorothy; Maher, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To quantify cumulative effective dose of intensive care unit (ICU) patients attributable to diagnostic imaging. METHODS: This was a prospective, interdisciplinary study conducted in the ICU of a large tertiary referral and level 1 trauma center. Demographic and clinical data including age, gender, date of ICU admission, primary reason for ICU admission, APACHE II score, length of stay, number of days intubated, date of death or discharge, and re-admission data was collected on all patients admitted over a 1-year period. The overall radiation exposure was quantified by the cumulative effective radiation dose (CED) in millisieverts (mSv) and calculated using reference effective doses published by the United Kingdom National Radiation Protection Board. Pediatric patients were selected for subgroup-analysis. RESULTS: A total of 2737 studies were performed in 421 patients. The total CED was 1704 mSv with a median CED of 1.5 mSv (IQR 0.04-6.6 mSv). Total CED in pediatric patients was 74.6 mSv with a median CED of 0.07 mSv (IQR 0.01-4.7 mSv). Chest radiography was the most commonly performed examination accounting for 83% of all studies but only 2.7% of total CED. Computed tomography (CT) accounted for 16% of all studies performed and contributed 97% of total CED. Trauma patients received a statistically significant higher dose [median CED 7.7 mSv (IQR 3.5-13.8 mSv)] than medical [median CED 1.4 mSv (IQR 0.05-5.4 mSv)] and surgical [median CED 1.6 mSv (IQR 0.04-7.5 mSv)] patients. Length of stay in ICU [OR = 1.12 (95%CI: 1.079-1.157)] was identified as an independent predictor of receiving a CED greater than 15 mSv. CONCLUSION: Trauma patients and patients with extended ICU admission times are at increased risk of higher CEDs. CED should be minimized where feasible, especially in young patients. PMID:27158429

  8. Exposure of surgeons to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields during laparoscopic and robotic surgeries.

    PubMed

    Park, Jee Soo; Chung, Jai Won; Kim, Nam Kyu; Cho, Min Soo; Kang, Chang Moo; Choi, Soo Beom; Kim, Deok Won

    2015-02-01

    The development of new medical electronic devices and equipment has increased the use of electrical apparatuses in surgery. Many studies have reported the association of long-term exposure to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs) with diseases or cancer. Robotic surgery has emerged as an alternative tool to overcome the disadvantages of conventional laparoscopic surgery. However, there has been no report regarding how much ELF-MF surgeons are exposed to during laparoscopic and robotic surgeries. In this observational study, we aimed to measure and compare the ELF-MFs that surgeons are exposed to during laparoscopic and robotic surgery.The intensities of the ELF-MFs surgeons are exposed to were measured every 4 seconds for 20 cases of laparoscopic surgery and 20 cases of robotic surgery using portable ELF-MF measuring devices with logging capability.The mean ELF-MF exposures were 0.6 ± 0.1 mG for laparoscopic surgeries and 0.3 ± 0.0 mG for robotic surgeries (significantly lower with P < 0.001 by Mann-Whitney U test).Our results show that the ELF-MF exposure levels of surgeons in both robotic and conventional laparoscopic surgery were lower than 2 mG, which is the most stringent level considered safe in many studies. However, we should not overlook the effects of long-term ELF-MF exposure during many surgeries in the course of a surgeon's career. PMID:25674758

  9. Development and application of integrated optical sensors for intense E-field measurement.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Rong; Wang, Bo; Niu, Ben; Yu, Zhanqing

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of intense E-fields is a fundamental need in various research areas. Integrated optical E-field sensors (IOESs) have important advantages and are potentially suitable for intense E-field detection. This paper comprehensively reviews the development and applications of several types of IOESs over the last 30 years, including the Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI), coupler interferometer (CI) and common path interferometer (CPI). The features of the different types of IOESs are compared, showing that the MZI has higher sensitivity, the CI has a controllable optical bias, and the CPI has better temperature stability. More specifically, the improvement work of applying IOESs to intense E-field measurement is illustrated. Finally, typical uses of IOESs in the measurement of intense E-fields are demonstrated, including application areas such as E-fields with different frequency ranges in high-voltage engineering, simulated nuclear electromagnetic pulse in high-power electromagnetic pulses, and ion-accelerating field in high-energy physics. PMID:23112663

  10. Development and Application of Integrated Optical Sensors for Intense E-Field Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Rong; Wang, Bo; Niu, Ben; Yu, Zhanqing

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of intense E-fields is a fundamental need in various research areas. Integrated optical E-field sensors (IOESs) have important advantages and are potentially suitable for intense E-field detection. This paper comprehensively reviews the development and applications of several types of IOESs over the last 30 years, including the Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI), coupler interferometer (CI) and common path interferometer (CPI). The features of the different types of IOESs are compared, showing that the MZI has higher sensitivity, the CI has a controllable optical bias, and the CPI has better temperature stability. More specifically, the improvement work of applying IOESs to intense E-field measurement is illustrated. Finally, typical uses of IOESs in the measurement of intense E-fields are demonstrated, including application areas such as E-fields with different frequency ranges in high-voltage engineering, simulated nuclear electromagnetic pulse in high-power electromagnetic pulses, and ion-accelerating field in high-energy physics. PMID:23112663

  11. Repeated exposure attenuates the behavioral response of rats to static high magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Houpt, Thomas A; Cassell, Jennifer A; Hood, Alison; DenBleyker, Megan; Janowitz, Ilana; Mueller, Kathleen; Ortega, Breyda; Smith, James C

    2010-03-30

    Exposure of rats to high strength static magnetic fields of 7 T or above has behavioral effects such as the induction of locomotor circling, the suppression of rearing, and the acquisition of conditioned taste aversion (CTA). To determine if habituation occurs across magnetic field exposures, rats were pre-exposed two times to a 14 T static magnetic field for 30 min on two consecutive days; on the third day, rats were given access to a novel 0.125% saccharin prior to a third 30-min exposure to the 14 T magnetic field. Compared to sham-exposed rats, pre-exposed rats showed less locomotor circling and an attenuated CTA. Rearing was suppressed in all magnet-exposed groups regardless of pre-exposure, suggesting that the suppression of rearing is more sensitive than other behavioral responses to magnet exposure. Habituation was also observed when rats underwent pre-exposures at 2-3h intervals on a single day. Components of the habituation were also long-lasting; a diminished circling response was observed when rats were exposed to magnetic field 36 days after 2 pre-exposures. To control for possible effects of unconditioned stimulus pre-exposure, rats were also tested in a similar experimental design with two injections of LiCl prior to the pairing of saccharin with a third injection of LiCl. Pre-exposure to LiCl did not attenuate the LiCl-induced CTA, suggesting that 2 pre-exposures to an unconditioned stimulus are not sufficient to explain the habituation to magnet exposure. Because the effects of magnetic field exposure are dependent on an intact vestibular apparatus, and because the vestibular system can habituate to many forms of perturbation, habituation to magnetic field exposure is consistent with mediation of magnetic field effects by the vestibular system. PMID:20045422

  12. Repeated exposure attenuates the behavioral response of rats to static high magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Houpt, Thomas A.; Cassell, Jennifer A.; Hood, Alison; DenBleyker, Megan; Janowitz, Ilana; Mueller, Kathleen; Ortega, Breyda; Smith, James C.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure of rats to high strength static magnetic fields of 7 T or above has behavioral effects such as the induction of locomotor circling, the suppression of rearing, and the acquisition of conditioned taste aversion (CTA). To determine if habituation occurs across magnetic field exposures, rats were pre-exposed two times to a 14 T static magnetic field for 30 min on two consecutive days; on the third day, rats were given access to a novel 0.125% saccharin prior to a third 30-min exposure to the 14 T magnetic field. Compared to sham-exposed rats, pre-exposed rats showed less locomotor circling and an attenuated CTA. Rearing was suppressed in all magnet-exposed groups regardless of pre-exposure, suggesting that the suppression of rearing is more sensitive than other behavioral responses to magnet exposure. Habituation was also observed when rats under went pre-exposures at 2–3 hour intervals on a single day. Components of the habituation were also long lasting; a diminished circling response was observed when rats were exposed to magnetic field 36 days after 2 pre-exposures. To control for possible effects of unconditioned stimulus pre-exposure, rats were also tested in a similar experimental design with two injections of LiCl prior to the pairing of saccharin with a third injection of LiCl. Pre-exposure to LiCl did not attenuate the LiCl-induced CTA, suggesting that 2 pre-exposures to an unconditioned stimulus are not sufficient to explain the habituation to magnet exposure. Because the effects of magnetic field exposure are dependent on an intact vestibular apparatus, and because the vestibular system can habituate to many forms of perturbation, habituation to magnetic field exposure is consistent with mediation of magnetic field effects by the vestibular system. PMID:20045422

  13. The Steens Mountain (Oregon) geomagnetic polarity transition: 2. Field intensity variations and discussion of reversal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PréVot, Michel; Mankinen, Edward A.; Coe, Robert S.; Grommé, C. Sherman

    1985-10-01

    We carried out an extensive paleointensity study of the 15.5±0.3 m.y. Miocene reversed-to-normal polarity transition recorded in lava flows from Steens Mountain (south central Oregon). One hundred eighty-five samples from the collection whose paleodirectional study is reported by Mankinen et al. (this issue) were chosen for paleointensity investigations because of their low viscosity index, high Curie point and reversibility, or near reversibility, of the strong field magnetization curve versus temperature. Application of the Thellier stepwise double heating method was very successful, yielding 157 usable paleointensity estimates corresponding to 73 distinct lava flows. After grouping successive lava flows that did not differ significantly in direction and intensity, we obtained 51 distinguishable, complete field vectors of which 10 are reversed, 28 are transitional, and 13 are normal. The record is complex, quite unlike that predicted by simple flooding or standing nondipole field models. It begins with an estimated several thousand years of reversed polarity with an average intensity of 31.5±8.5 μT, about one third lower than the expected Miocene intensity. This difference is interpreted as a long-term reduction of the dipole moment prior to the reversal. When site directions and intensities are considered, truly transitional directions and intensities appear almost at the same time at the beginning of the transition, and they disappear simultaneously at the end of the reversal. Large deviations in declination occur during this approximately 4500±1000 year transition period that are compatible with roughly similar average magnitudes of zonal and nonzonal field components at the site. The transitional intensity is generally low, with an average of 10.9±4.9 μT for directions more than 45° away from the dipole field and a minimum of about 5 μT. The root-mean-square of the three field components X, Y, and Z are of the same order of magnitude for the

  14. Effects function analysis of ELF magnetic field exposure in the electric utility work environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Nair, I; Sahl, J

    1997-01-01

    The incomplete understanding of the relation between power-frequency fields and biological responses raises problems in defining an appropriate metric for exposure assessment and epidemiological studies. Based on evidence from biological experiments, one can define alternative metrics or effects functions that embody the relationship between field exposure patterns and hypothetical health effects. In this paper, we explore the application of the "effects function" approach to occupational exposure data. Our analysis provides examples of exposure assessments based on a range of plausible effects functions. An EMDEX time series data set of ELF frequency (40-800 Hz) magnetic field exposure measurements for electric utility workers was analyzed with several statistical measures and effects functions: average field strength, combination of threshold and exposure duration, and field strength changes. Results were compared for eight job categories: electrician, substation operator, machinist, welder, plant operator, lineman/splicer, meter reader, and clerical. Average field strength yields a different ranking for these job categories than the ranks obtained using other biologically plausible effects functions. Whereas the group of electricians has the highest exposure by average field strength, the group of substation operators has the highest ranking for most of the other effects functions. Plant operators rank highest in the total number of field strength changes greater than 1 microT per hour. The clerical group remains at the lowest end for all of these effects functions. Our analysis suggests that, although average field strength could be used as a surrogate of field exposure for simply classifying exposure into "low" and "high," this summary measure may be misleading in the relative ranking of job categories in which workers are in "high" fields. These results indicate the relevance of metrics other than average field strength in occupational exposure assessment and

  15. Assessing personal exposures to environmental radiofrequency electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Simon

    2010-11-01

    Recent advances in the capability of body-worn instruments for measuring the strengths of environmental radiofrequency signals have opened up a range of exciting new research possibilities. The readings from these instruments can be used in health related studies, but they have to be considered carefully when developing exposure metrics, as does the physical dosimetry concerning interactions between radio waves and the body. Several studies have distributed the instruments to large groups of people and analysed the gathered data in relation to possible determinants of exposure. This article reviews the state of the art in personal exposure measurements at radiofrequencies.

  16. Infrared mapping of ultrasound fields generated by medical transducers: Feasibility of determining absolute intensity levels

    PubMed Central

    Khokhlova, Vera A.; Shmeleva, Svetlana M.; Gavrilov, Leonid R.; Martin, Eleanor; Sadhoo, Neelaksh; Shaw, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Considerable progress has been achieved in the use of infrared (IR) techniques for qualitative mapping of acoustic fields of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducers. The authors have previously developed and demonstrated a method based on IR camera measurement of the temperature rise induced in an absorber less than 2 mm thick by ultrasonic bursts of less than 1 s duration. The goal of this paper was to make the method more quantitative and estimate the absolute intensity distributions by determining an overall calibration factor for the absorber and camera system. The implemented approach involved correlating the temperature rise measured in an absorber using an IR camera with the pressure distribution measured in water using a hydrophone. The measurements were conducted for two HIFU transducers and a flat physiotherapy transducer of 1 MHz frequency. Corresponding correction factors between the free field intensity and temperature were obtained and allowed the conversion of temperature images to intensity distributions. The system described here was able to map in good detail focused and unfocused ultrasound fields with sub-millimeter structure and with local time average intensity from below 0.1 W/cm2 to at least 50 W/cm2. Significantly higher intensities could be measured simply by reducing the duty cycle. PMID:23927199

  17. Infrared mapping of ultrasound fields generated by medical transducers: feasibility of determining absolute intensity levels.

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, Vera A; Shmeleva, Svetlana M; Gavrilov, Leonid R; Martin, Eleanor; Sadhoo, Neelaksh; Shaw, Adam

    2013-08-01

    Considerable progress has been achieved in the use of infrared (IR) techniques for qualitative mapping of acoustic fields of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducers. The authors have previously developed and demonstrated a method based on IR camera measurement of the temperature rise induced in an absorber less than 2 mm thick by ultrasonic bursts of less than 1 s duration. The goal of this paper was to make the method more quantitative and estimate the absolute intensity distributions by determining an overall calibration factor for the absorber and camera system. The implemented approach involved correlating the temperature rise measured in an absorber using an IR camera with the pressure distribution measured in water using a hydrophone. The measurements were conducted for two HIFU transducers and a flat physiotherapy transducer of 1 MHz frequency. Corresponding correction factors between the free field intensity and temperature were obtained and allowed the conversion of temperature images to intensity distributions. The system described here was able to map in good detail focused and unfocused ultrasound fields with sub-millimeter structure and with local time average intensity from below 0.1 W/cm(2) to at least 50 W/cm(2). Significantly higher intensities could be measured simply by reducing the duty cycle. PMID:23927199

  18. Eight thousand years of geomagnetic field intensity variations in the eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genevey, AgnèS.; Gallet, Yves; Margueron, Jean-Claude

    2003-05-01

    Twenty new intensity determinations of the ancient geomagnetic field have been obtained from groups of potsherds and brick fragments from Syria. These artifacts, archeologically well dated from ˜6000 B.C. to approximately A.D. 1200, have been analyzed using the [1959] method as modified by [1967]. Intensity values have been corrected for the effects of anisotropy of thermal remanent magnetization and cooling rate. Our results indicate that field intensities were moderate in Syria from ˜6000 B.C. to ˜3500 B.C., with values of ˜30-40 μT. There was a significant increase in intensity by a factor of 2 from ˜3500 B.C. to ˜700 B.C., which was interrupted by a moderate decrease between ˜2550 B.C. and ˜1750 B.C. During more recent periods, our results show an intensity minimum approximately A.D. 200 and a maximum around the tenth century. Comparison with different data sets from the eastern Mediterranean and central Asia shows that geomagnetic field intensity variations were consistent at this large regional scale, at least over the last 5 millennia.

  19. DATA COLLECTED IN THE EPA'S NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY'S FIELD MEASUREMENT STUDIES TO EVALUATE AGGREGATE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Food Quality Protection Act of 1996 requires children's risk assessments to be conducted using high quality and high quantity data. Currently, data on children's exposures and exposure factors are limited and insufficient to address risk assessments that do not rely heavil...

  20. Attosecond-magnetic-field-pulse generation by intense few-cycle circularly polarized UV laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Kai-Jun; Bandrauk, André D.

    2013-07-01

    Intense attosecond-magnetic-field pulses are predicted to be produced by intense few-cycle attosecond circularly polarized UV pulses. Numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for H2+ are used to study the electronic dynamical process. Spinning attosecond circular electron wave packets are created on subnanometer molecular dimensions, thus generating attosecond magnetic fields of several tens of Teslas (105 G). Simulations show that the induced magnetic field is critically dependent on the pulse wavelength λ and pulse duration nτ (n is number of cycles) as predicted by a classical model. For ultrashort few-cycle circularly polarized attosecond pulses, molecular orientation influences the generation of the induced magnetic fields as a result of preferential ionization perpendicular to the molecular axis. The nonspherical asymmetry of molecules allows for efficient attosecond-magnetic-field-pulse generation.

  1. Surface area generation and droplet size control in solvent extraction systems utilizing high intensity electric fields

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Timothy C.; Wham, Robert M.

    1988-01-01

    A method and system for solvent extraction where droplets are shattered by a high intensity electric field. These shattered droplets form a plurality of smaller droplets which have a greater combined surface area than the original droplet. Dispersion, coalescence and phase separation are accomplished in one vessel through the use of the single pulsing high intensity electric field. Electric field conditions are chosen so that simultaneous dispersion and coalescence are taking place in the emulsion formed in the electric field. The electric field creates a large amount of interfacial surface area for solvent extraction when the droplet is disintegrated and is capable of controlling droplet size and thus droplet stability. These operations take place in the presence of a counter current flow of the continuous phase.

  2. Specific Intensity Direct Current (DC) Electric Field Improves Neural Stem Cell Migration and Enhances Differentiation towards βIII-Tubulin+ Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huiping; Steiger, Amanda; Nohner, Mitch; Ye, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Control of stem cell migration and differentiation is vital for efficient stem cell therapy. Literature reporting electric field–guided migration and differentiation is emerging. However, it is unknown if a field that causes cell migration is also capable of guiding cell differentiation—and the mechanisms for these processes remain unclear. Here, we report that a 115 V/m direct current (DC) electric field can induce directional migration of neural precursor cells (NPCs). Whole cell patching revealed that the cell membrane depolarized in the electric field, and buffering of extracellular calcium via EGTA prevented cell migration under these conditions. Immunocytochemical staining indicated that the same electric intensity could also be used to enhance differentiation and increase the percentage of cell differentiation into neurons, but not astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. The results indicate that DC electric field of this specific intensity is capable of promoting cell directional migration and orchestrating functional differentiation, suggestively mediated by calcium influx during DC field exposure. PMID:26068466

  3. High intensity induced photocurrent polarity switching in lead sulfide nanowire field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yiming; Peng, Xingyue; Yu, Dong

    2014-05-16

    We report an optoelectronic investigation of lead sulfide nanowires (NWs) by scanning photocurrent microscopy. The photocurrent in p-type lead sulfide NW field effect transistors has demonstrated unusually nonlinear dependence on the intensity of local excitation. Surprisingly, the photocurrent polarity can be reversed under high illumination intensity on the order of 100 W cm(-2). The origin of this photocurrent polarity switching is that the photo-injected carriers flip the direction of the electric field near the contact. These observations shed light on the nonlinear optoelectronic characteristics in semiconductor nanostructures and may provide an innovative method for optically tailoring local band structures. PMID:24763392

  4. Factors modifying the response of large animals to low-intensity radiation exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, N. P.; Still, E. T.

    1972-01-01

    In assessing the biological response to space radiation, two of the most important modifying factors are dose protraction and dose distribution to the body. Studies are reported in which sheep and swine were used to compare the hematology and lethality response resulting from radiation exposure encountered in a variety of forms, including acute (high dose-rate), chronic (low dose-rate), combinations of acute and chronic, and whether received as a continuous or as fractionated exposure. While sheep and swine are basically similar in response to acute radiation, their sensitivity to chronic irradiation is markedly different. Sheep remain relatively sensitive as the radiation exposure is protracted while swine are more resistant and capable of surviving extremely large doses of chronic irradiation. This response to chronic irradiation correlated well with changes in radiosensitivity and recovery following an acute, sublethal exposure.

  5. The Energy Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans under The Extremely Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhenhua; Yu, Hui; Sun, Yongyan; Yang, Chuanjun; Lian, Huiyong; Cai, Peng

    2015-02-01

    A literal mountain of documentation generated in the past five decades showing unmistakable health hazards associated with extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) exposure. However, the relation between energy mechanism and ELF-EMF exposure is poorly understood. In this study, Caenorhabditis elegans was exposed to 50 Hz ELF-EMF at intensities of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 mT, respectively. Their metabolite variations were analyzed by GC-TOF/MS-based metabolomics. Although minimal metabolic variations and no regular pattern were observed, the contents of energy metabolism-related metabolites such as pyruvic acid, fumaric acid, and L-malic acid were elevated in all the treatments. The expressions of nineteen related genes that encode glycolytic enzymes were analyzed by using quantitative real-time PCR. Only genes encoding GAPDH were significantly upregulated (P < 0.01), and this result was further confirmed by western blot analysis. The enzyme activity of GAPDH was increased (P < 0.01), whereas the total intracellular ATP level was decreased. While no significant difference in lifespan, hatching rate and reproduction, worms exposed to ELF-EMF exhibited less food consumption compared with that of the control (P < 0.01). In conclusion, C. elegans exposed to ELF-EMF have enhanced energy metabolism and restricted dietary, which might contribute to the resistance against exogenous ELF-EMF stress.

  6. Does Exposure to a Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Field Modify Thermal Preference in Juvenile Rats?

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Amandine; Delanaud, Stéphane; de Seze, René; Bach, Véronique; Libert, Jean-Pierre; Loos, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Some studies have shown that people living near a mobile phone base station may report sleep disturbances and discomfort. Using a rat model, we have previously shown that chronic exposure to a low-intensity radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) was associated with paradoxical sleep (PS) fragmentation and greater vasomotor tone in the tail. Here, we sought to establish whether sleep disturbances might result from the disturbance of thermoregulatory processes by a RF-EMF. We recorded thermal preference and sleep stage distribution in 18 young male Wistar rats. Nine animals were exposed to a low-intensity RF-EMF (900 MHz, 1 V.m−1) for five weeks and nine served as non-exposed controls. Thermal preference was assessed in an experimental chamber comprising three interconnected compartments, in which the air temperatures (Ta) were set to 24°C, 28°C and 31°C. Sleep and tail skin temperature were also recorded. Our results indicated that relative to control group, exposure to RF-EMF at 31°C was associated with a significantly lower tail skin temperature (−1.6°C) which confirmed previous data. During the light period, the exposed group preferred to sleep at Ta = 31°C and the controls preferred Ta = 28°C. The mean sleep duration in exposed group was significantly greater (by 15.5%) than in control group (due in turn to a significantly greater amount of slow wave sleep (SWS, +14.6%). Similarly, frequency of SWS was greater in exposed group (by 4.9 episodes.h−1). The PS did not differ significantly between the two groups. During the dark period, there were no significant intergroup differences. We conclude that RF-EMF exposure induced a shift in thermal preference towards higher temperatures. The shift in preferred temperature might result from a cold thermal sensation. The change in sleep stage distribution may involve signals from thermoreceptors in the skin. Modulation of SWS may be a protective adaptation in response to RF-EMF exposure. PMID

  7. Effect of exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields on melatonin levels in calves is seasonally dependent

    PubMed Central

    Kolbabová, Tereza; Pascal Malkemper, E.; Bartoš, Luděk; Vanderstraeten, Jacques; Turčáni, Marek; Burda, Hynek

    2015-01-01

    The question of health effects of extremely low frequency (50/60 Hz) magnetic fields (ELFMF) has been widely discussed, but the mechanisms of interaction of these fields with biological systems for intensities relevant to human and animal exposure are still under question. The melatonin (MLT) hypothesis suggests that exposure to ELFMF might decrease MLT production thereby promoting cancerogenesis. So far, most studies of MLT secretion under exposure to ELFMF reported negative or inconsistent results. Here, we measured salivary MLT in 1–2 months old cattle calves exposed to 50 Hz-MF in the hundreds of nT-range. We found an inhibitory effect of the ELFMF upon MLT secretion in winter (in accordance with the MLT hypothesis). In contrast, in summer, MLT concentration was increased by ELFMF exposure (contrary to the MLT hypothesis). The inhibitory effect in winter was much stronger than the positive effect in summer. We hypothesize that this season-dependent effect upon MLT synthesis might by mediated by an effect of ELFMF upon the serotonin metabolism and conclude that future tests of ELFMF effects should also measure serotonin levels and consider association with the seasonal effects (photoperiod or temperature) during the exposure. PMID:26381579

  8. Effect of exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields on melatonin levels in calves is seasonally dependent.

    PubMed

    Kolbabová, Tereza; Pascal Malkemper, E; Bartoš, Luděk; Vanderstraeten, Jacques; Turčáni, Marek; Burda, Hynek

    2015-01-01

    The question of health effects of extremely low frequency (50/60 Hz) magnetic fields (ELFMF) has been widely discussed, but the mechanisms of interaction of these fields with biological systems for intensities relevant to human and animal exposure are still under question. The melatonin (MLT) hypothesis suggests that exposure to ELFMF might decrease MLT production thereby promoting cancerogenesis. So far, most studies of MLT secretion under exposure to ELFMF reported negative or inconsistent results. Here, we measured salivary MLT in 1-2 months old cattle calves exposed to 50 Hz-MF in the hundreds of nT-range. We found an inhibitory effect of the ELFMF upon MLT secretion in winter (in accordance with the MLT hypothesis). In contrast, in summer, MLT concentration was increased by ELFMF exposure (contrary to the MLT hypothesis). The inhibitory effect in winter was much stronger than the positive effect in summer. We hypothesize that this season-dependent effect upon MLT synthesis might by mediated by an effect of ELFMF upon the serotonin metabolism and conclude that future tests of ELFMF effects should also measure serotonin levels and consider association with the seasonal effects (photoperiod or temperature) during the exposure. PMID:26381579

  9. Temporal Evolution of Magnetic Field and Intensity Properties of Photospheric Pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorotovič, I.; Rybanský, M.; Sobotka, M.; Lorenc, M.; Barandas, M.; Fonseca, J. M.

    2016-04-01

    We describe conditions of pore formation in relation to the configuration and intensity of magnetic field, using observations of the SDO/HMI instrument, which observes the photosphere in the visible continuum and simultaneously the magnetic field with a spatial resolution of better than 1''. An area with a diameter of 35'' containing 6 pores during the period from October 10, 2013, 22:01:30 UT to October 11, 2013, 20:01:30 UT is selected from the HMI full-disk images. We analyze the temporal evolution of the area and brightness of the pores (time step 15 minutes), their statistics, and in parallel a time-sequence of the line-of-sight magnetic field intensity and its correlation with the area and brightness. We find that the pores become visible when their intensity decreases below 0.85 of the photospheric surrounding intensity and the magnetic field increases to 650 G in the HMI measurements. We determine the mean synodical rotational speed of the pores to be 14.44°/24 hours, which is 1° more than the tabular value. Positions of maximum magnetic field precede the positions of the pores in the direction of rotation for the positive polarity and lag behind it for the negative polarity.

  10. Energetic electron propagation in solid targets driven by the intense electric fields of femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, J. F.; Szabo, C. I.; Audebert, P.; Brambrink, E.

    2011-06-15

    An analytical model is used to interpret experimental data on the propagation of energetic electrons perpendicular to and parallel to the propagation direction of intense femtosecond laser pulses that are incident on solid targets. The pulses with {approx_equal}10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2} intensity are incident normal onto a gadolinium or tungsten wire embedded in an aluminum substrate, and MeV electrons generated in the focal spot propagate along the laser direction into the irradiated wire. Electrons also propagate laterally from the focal spot through the aluminum substrate and into a dysprosium or hafnium spectator wire at a distance up to 1 mm from the irradiated wire. The ratio of the K shell emission from the spectator and irradiated wires is a measure of the numbers and energies of the MeV electrons propagating parallel to and perpendicular to the intense oscillating electric field of the laser pulse. It is found that the angular distribution of electrons from the focal spot is highly non-isotropic, and approximately twice as many electrons are driven by the electric field toward the spectator wire as into the irradiated wire. This quantitative result is consistent with the qualitative experimental observation that the oscillating electric field of an intense femtosecond laser pulse, when interacting with a heavy metal target, preferentially drives energetic electrons in the electric field direction as compared to perpendicular to the field.