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Sample records for intense isotropic turbulence

  1. Experimental study of premixed flames in intense isotropic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Bedat, B.; Cheng, R.K.

    1994-04-01

    A methodology for investigating premixed turbulent flames propagating in intense isotropic turbulence has been developed. The burner uses a turbulence generator developed by Videto and Santavicca and the flame is stabilized by weak-swirl generated by air injectors. This set-up produces stable premixed turbulent flames under a wide range of mixture conditions and turbulence intensities. The experiments are designed to investigate systematically the changes in flame structures for conditions which can be classified as wrinkled laminar flames, corrugated flames and flames with distributed reaction zones. Laser Doppler anemometry and Rayleigh scattering techniques are used to determine the turbulence and scalar statistics. In the intense turbulence, the flames are found to produce very little changes in the mean and rams velocities. Their flame speed increase linearly with turbulence intensity as for wrinkled laminar flames. The Rayleigh scattering pdfs for flames within the distributed reaction zone regime are distinctly bimodal. The probabilities of the reacting states (i.e. contributions from within the reaction zone) is not higher than those of wrinkled laminar flame. These results show that there is no drastic changes in flame structures at Karlovitz number close to unity. This suggest that the Klimov-Williams criterion under-predicts the resilience of wrinkled flamelets to intense turbulence.

  2. The structure of intense vorticity in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, J.; Wray, A. A.; Saffman, P. G.; Rogallo, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    The structure of the intense vorticity regions is studied in numerically simulated homogeneous, isotropic, equilibrium turbulent flow fields at four different Reynolds numbers in the range Re(sub lambda) = 36-171. In accordance with previous investigators, this vorticity is found to be organized in coherent, cylindrical or ribbon-like, vortices ('worms'). A statistical study suggests that they are just especially intense features of the background, O(omega'), vorticity. Their radii scale with the Kolmogorov microscale and their lengths with the integral scale of the flow. An interesting observation is that the Reynolds number based on the circulation of the intense vortices, gamma/nu, increases monotonically with Re(sub lambda), raising the question of the stability of the structures in the limit of Re(sub lambda) approaching infinity. One and two-dimensional statistics of vorticity and strain are presented; they are non-gaussian, and the behavior of their tails depends strongly on the Reynolds number. There is no evidence of convergence to a limiting distribution in our range of Re(sub lambda), even though the energy spectra and the energy dissipation rate show good asymptotic properties in the higher Reynolds number cases. Evidence is presented to show that worms are natural features of the flow and that they do not depend on the particular forcing scheme.

  3. Decay Power Law in, High Intensity, Isotropic Turbulent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koster, Timothy; Puga, Alejandro; Larue, John

    2014-11-01

    In the study reported here, isotropy is determined using the measure proposed by George (1992), where isotropy corresponds to those downstream positions where the product of the Taylor Reynolds number and the skewness of the velocity derivative is a constant. Straight forward approach can be used which is based on the observation of Batchelor (1953), that the square of the Talor micorscale is linearly related to downstream distance relative to the virtual origin. The fact that the decay of downstream velocity variance is described by a power law is shown to imply power law behavior for various other parameters such as the dissipation, the integral length scale, the Taylor microscale, the Kolmogorov microscale and the Taylor Reynolds number and that there is an algebraic relationship between the various power law exponents. Results are presented for mean velocities of 6 and 8 m/s for the downstream decay of the parameters listed in the preceding. The corresponding values of the Taylor Reynolds number at the start of the isotropic region are 290 and 400, and the variance decay exponent and virtual origin are found to be respectively -1.707 and -1.298 and -27.95 and -5.757. The exponents in the decay law for the other parameters are found to be within +/- 3% of the expected values. University of California Irvine Research Funds.

  4. Linearly Forced Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, T. S.

    2003-01-01

    Stationary isotropic turbulence is often studied numerically by adding a forcing term to the Navier-Stokes equation. This is usually done for the purpose of achieving higher Reynolds number and longer statistics than is possible for isotropic decaying turbulence. It is generally accepted that forcing the Navier-Stokes equation at low wave number does not influence the small scale statistics of the flow provided that there is wide separation between the largest and smallest scales. It will be shown, however, that the spectral width of the forcing has a noticeable effect on inertial range statistics. A case will be made here for using a broader form of forcing in order to compare computed isotropic stationary turbulence with (decaying) grid turbulence. It is shown that using a forcing function which is directly proportional to the velocity has physical meaning and gives results which are closer to both homogeneous and non-homogeneous turbulence. Section 1 presents a four part series of motivations for linear forcing. Section 2 puts linear forcing to a numerical test with a pseudospectral computation.

  5. DNS of Shock / Isotropic Turbulence Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grube, Nathan; Taylor, Ellen; Martín, Pino

    2010-11-01

    We discuss DNS of Shock / Isotropic Turbulence Interactions (SITI). We vary the incoming turbulence Mach number up to 0.8 and the convective Mach number up to 5 in order to determine their effects on the interaction. These cases are challenging due to the presence of shocklets in the incoming turbulence as well as significant motion of the main shock. Shock-capturing must be used at all points while still maintaining low enough numerical dissipation to preserve the turbulent fluctuations. We use the linearly- and nonlinearly-optimized Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (WENO) method[1,2]. Particular attention is paid to the inflow boundary condition, where we find the use of snapshots of "frozen" turbulence from decaying isotropic box simulations to be unsatisfactory. We instead use time-varying inflow data generated by a separate forced isotropic turbulence simulation with a specified convection speed. This allows us to access flow conditions where the assumptions of Taylor's Hypothesis are not met. 1.) Mart'in, M.P., Taylor, E.M., Wu, M., and Weirs, V.G., JCP 220(1) 270-89, 2006. 2.) Taylor, E.M., Wu, M., and Mart'in, M.P., JCP 223(1) 384-97, 2007.

  6. Some Basic Laws of Isotropic Turbulent Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loitsianskii, L. G.

    1945-01-01

    An Investigation is made of the diffusion of artificially produced turbulence behind screens or other turbulence producers. The method is based on the author's concept of disturbance moment as a certain theoretically well-founded measure of turbulent disturbances.

  7. The signature of initial production mechanisms in isotropic turbulence decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meldi, M.

    2016-03-01

    In the present work the quantification of the time-lasting effects of production mechanisms in homogeneous isotropic turbulence decay is addressed. The analysis is developed through the use of theoretical tools as well as numerical calculations based on the eddy damped quasinormal Markovian (EDQNM) model. In both cases a modified Lin equation is used, which accounts for production mechanisms as proposed by Meldi, Lejemble, and Sagaut ["On the emergence of non-classical decay regimes in multiscale/fractal generated isotropic turbulence," J. Fluid Mech. 756, 816-843 (2014)]. The approaches used show that an exponential decay law can be observed if the intensity of the forcing is strong enough to drive the turbulence dynamics, before a power-law decay is eventually attained. The EDQNM numerical results indicate that the exponential regime can persist for long evolution times, longer than the observation time in grid turbulence experiments. A rigorous investigation of the self-similar behavior of the pressure spectrum has been performed by a comprehensive comparison of EDQNM data with direct numerical simulation (DNS)/experiments in the literature. While DNS and free decay EDQNM simulations suggest the need of a very high Reλ threshold in order to observe a clear -7/3 slope of the pressure inertial range, experimental data and forced EDQNM calculations indicate a significantly lower value. This observation suggests that the time-lasting effects of production mechanisms, which cannot be excluded in experiments, play a role in the lack of general agreement with classical numerical approaches. These results reinforce the urge to evolve the numerical simulation state of the art towards the prediction of realistic physical states.

  8. Sudden relaminarisation and lifetimes in forced isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkmann, Moritz; Morozov, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate an unexpected connection between isotropic turbulence and wall-bounded shear flows. We perform direct numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence forced at large scales at moderate Reynolds numbers and observe sudden transitions from chaotic dynamics to a spatially simple flow, analogous to the laminar state in wall bounded shear flows. We find that the survival probabilities of turbulence are exponential and the typical lifetimes increase super-exponentially with the Reynolds number, similar to results on relaminarisation of localised turbulence in pipe and plane Couette flow. Results from simulations subjecting the observed large-scale flow to random perturbations of variable amplitude demonstrate that it is a linearly stable simple exact solution that can be destabilised by a finite-amplitude perturbation, like the Hagen-Poiseuille profile in pipe flow. Our results suggest that both isotropic turbulence and wall-bounded shear flows qualitatively share the same phase-space dynamics.

  9. The energy decay in self-preserving isotropic turbulence revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.; Bernard, Peter S.

    1992-01-01

    The assumption of self-preservation allows for an analytical determination of the energy decay in isotropic turbulence. Here, the self-preserving isotropic decay problem is analyzed, yielding a more complete picture of self-serving isotropic turbulence. It is proven rigorously that complete self-serving isotropic turbulence admits two general types of asymptotic solutions: one where the turbulent kinetic energy K approximately t (exp -1) and one where K approximately t (sup alpha) with an exponent alpha greater than 1 that is determined explicitly by the initial conditions. By a fixed point analysis and numerical integration of the exact one-point equations, it is demonstrated that the K approximately t (exp -1) and where K approximately t (sup -alpha) with an exponent alpha greater than 1 that is determined explicitly by the initial conditions. By a fixed point analysis and numerical integration of the exact one-point equations, it is demonstrated that the K approximately t (exp -1) power law decay is the asymptotically consistent high Reynolds number solution; the K approximately 1 (sup -alpha) decay law is only achieved in the limit as t yields infinity and the turbulence Reynolds number vanishes. Arguments are provided which indicate that a K approximately t (exp -1) power law decay is the asymptotic state toward which a complete self-preserving isotropic turbulence is driven at high Reynolds numbers in order to resolve the imbalance between vortex stretching and viscous diffusion.

  10. The energy decay in self-preserving isotropic turbulence revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.; Bernard, Peter S.

    1991-01-01

    The assumption of self-preservation allows for an analytical determination of the energy decay in isotropic turbulence. Here, the self-preserving isotropic decay problem is analyzed, yielding a more complete picture of self-serving isotropic turbulence. It is proven rigorously that complete self-serving isotropic turbulence admits two general types of asymptotic solutions: one where the turbulent kinetic energy K approximately t (exp -1) and one where K approximately t (sup alpha) with an exponent alpha greater than 1 that is determined explicitly by the initial conditions. By a fixed point analysis and numerical integration of the exact one-point equations, it is demonstrated that the K approximately t (exp -1) and where K approximately t (sup -alpha) with an exponent alpha greater than 1 that is determined explicitly by the initial conditions. By a fixed point analysis and numerical integration of the exact one point equations, it is demonstrated that the K approximately t (exp -1) power law decay is the asymptotically consistent high Reynolds number solution; the K approximately 1 (sup - alpha) decay law is only achieved in the limit as t yields infinity and the turbulence Reynolds number vanishes. Arguments are provided which indicate that a K approximately t (exp -1) power law decay is the asymptotic state towards which a complete self-preseving isotropic turbulence is driven at high Reynolds numbers in order to resolve the imbalance between vortex stretching and viscous diffusion.

  11. Diffusion of Heat from a Line Source in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uberoi, Mahinder S; Corrsin, Stanley

    1953-01-01

    An experimental and analytical study has been made of some features of the turbulent heat diffusion behind a line heated wire stretched perpendicular to a flowing isotropic turbulence. The mean temperature distributions have been measured with systematic variations in wind speed, size of turbulence-producing grid, and downstream location of heat source. The nature of the temperature fluctuation field has been studied. A comparison of Lagrangian and Eulerian analyses for diffusion in a nondecaying turbulence yields an expression for turbulent-heat-transfer coefficient in terms of turbulence velocity and a Lagrangian "scale." the ratio of Eulerian to Lagrangian microscale has been determined theoretically by generalization of a result of Heisenberg and with arbitrary constants taken from independent sources, shows rough agreement with experimental results. A convenient form has been deduced for the criterion of interchangeability of instantaneous space and time derivatives in a flowing turbulence.

  12. Studies of Shock Wave Interactions with Homogeneous and Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briassulis, G.; Agui, J.; Watkins, C. B.; Andreopoulos, Y.

    1998-01-01

    A nearly homogeneous nearly isotropic compressible turbulent flow interacting with a normal shock wave has been studied experimentally in a large shock tube facility. Spatial resolution of the order of 8 Kolmogorov viscous length scales was achieved in the measurements of turbulence. A variety of turbulence generating grids provide a wide range of turbulence scales. Integral length scales were found to substantially decrease through the interaction with the shock wave in all investigated cases with flow Mach numbers ranging from 0.3 to 0.7 and shock Mach numbers from 1.2 to 1.6. The outcome of the interaction depends strongly on the state of compressibility of the incoming turbulence. The length scales in the lateral direction are amplified at small Mach numbers and attenuated at large Mach numbers. Even at large Mach numbers amplification of lateral length scales has been observed in the case of fine grids. In addition to the interaction with the shock the present work has documented substantial compressibility effects in the incoming homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flow. The decay of Mach number fluctuations was found to follow a power law similar to that describing the decay of incompressible isotropic turbulence. It was found that the decay coefficient and the decay exponent decrease with increasing Mach number while the virtual origin increases with increasing Mach number. A mechanism possibly responsible for these effects appears to be the inherently low growth rate of compressible shear layers emanating from the cylindrical rods of the grid.

  13. Charge pariticle transport in the non-isotropic turbulences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, P.; Jokipii, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The scattering and diffusion of energetic charged particles is not only important for understanding phenomena such as diffusive shock acceleration but it also is a natural probe of the statistical characteristics of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. Although Parker's transport equation (Parker 1965) allows us to describe the propagation of charged particles, the transport coefficients needed in the equation must be determined. Using Quasi-Linear Theory (QLT, e.g. Jokipii (1966)), one finds that coefficients can be related to the correlation function or power spectrum of homogeneous magnetic turbulence. However, different turbulence models will generally have a different influence on particle's scattering and diffusion. Among those models developed in MHD Turbulence, such as isotropic, Slab plus 2D (Tu & Marsch 1993; Gray et al 1996; Bieber et al 1996), etc. Here, using test-particle orbit simulations to calculate the transport coefficients, we study particle transport in synthesized asymmetric turbulence using the form first proposed by Goldreich & Sridhar (1995). We developed and introduce a systematic method to synthesize scale-dependent non-isotropic magnetic turbulences. We also developed and introduce a method to synthesize the 3d turbulent magnetic field from the observed solar wind time series dataset. We present the comparison of their effects on charge particle transport with previous theories and models.

  14. Laboratory Study of Homogeneous and Isotropic Turbulence at High Reynolds Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecenak, Zachary; Dou, Zhongwang; Yang, Fan; Cao, Lujie; Liang, Zach; Meng, Hui

    2013-11-01

    To study particle dynamics modified by isotropic turbulence at high Reynolds numbers and provide experimental data for DNS validation, we have developed a soccer-ball-shaped truncated icosahedron turbulence chamber with 20 adjoining hexagon surfaces, 12 pentagon surfaces and twenty symettrically displaced fans, which form an enclosed chamber of 1m diameter. We use Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique to characterize the base turbulent flow, using different PIV set ups to capture various characteristic scales of turbulence. Results show that the stationary isotropic turbulence field is a spherical domain with diameter of 40 mm with quasi-zero mean velocities. The maximum rms velocity is ~1.5 m/s, corresponding to a Taylor microscale Re of 450. We extract from the PIV velocity field the whole set of turbulent flow parameters including: turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent intensity, kinetic energy dissipation rate, large eddy length and time scales, the Kolmogorov length, time and velocity scales, Taylor microscale and Re, which are critical to the study of inter-particle statistics modified by turbulence. This research is funded by an NSF grant CBET-0967407.

  15. Computation of the sound generated by isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkar, S.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The acoustic radiation from isotropic turbulence is computed numerically. A hybrid direct numerical simulation approach which combines direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the turbulent flow with the Lighthill acoustic analogy is utilized. It is demonstrated that the hybrid DNS method is a feasible approach to the computation of sound generated by turbulent flows. The acoustic efficiency in the simulation of isotropic turbulence appears to be substantially less than that in subsonic jet experiments. The dominant frequency of the computed acoustic pressure is found to be somewhat larger than the dominant frequency of the energy-containing scales of motion. The acoustic power in the simulations is proportional to epsilon (M(sub t))(exp 5) where epsilon is the turbulent dissipation rate and M(sub t) is the turbulent Mach number. This is in agreement with the analytical result of Proudman (1952), but the constant of proportionality is smaller than the analytical result. Two different methods of computing the acoustic power from the DNS data bases yielded consistent results.

  16. Computation of large-scale statistics in decaying isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chasnov, Jeffrey R.

    1993-01-01

    We have performed large-eddy simulations of decaying isotropic turbulence to test the prediction of self-similar decay of the energy spectrum and to compute the decay exponents of the kinetic energy. In general, good agreement between the simulation results and the assumption of self-similarity were obtained. However, the statistics of the simulations were insufficient to compute the value of gamma which corrects the decay exponent when the spectrum follows a k(exp 4) wave number behavior near k = 0. To obtain good statistics, it was found necessary to average over a large ensemble of turbulent flows.

  17. A non-isotropic multiple-scale turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.

    1990-01-01

    A newly developed non-isotropic multiple scale turbulence model (MS/ASM) is described for complex flow calculations. This model focuses on the direct modeling of Reynolds stresses and utilizes split-spectrum concepts for modeling multiple scale effects in turbulence. Validation studies on free shear flows, rotating flows and recirculating flows show that the current model perform significantly better than the single scale k-epsilon model. The present model is relatively inexpensive in terms of CPU time which makes it suitable for broad engineering flow applications.

  18. Bulk viscosity effect on freely decaying compressible homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Shaowu; Johnsen, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Despite growing interests in compressible turbulence, the effect of bulk viscosity has been long ignored. For certain gases, the bulk viscosity may be 1000 times greater than the shear viscosity and thus modify energy transfer and dissipation mechanisms. In this study, we use direct numerical simulations to investigate the role of bulk viscosity on decaying isotropic compressible turbulence. Our results show that bulk viscosity exhibits a negligible decrease on enstrophy, but moderate and significant increases on the turbulent kinetic energy and Taylor-scale Reynolds number, respectively. A Helmholtz decomposition of the velocity field indicates that the bulk viscosity has a negligible effect on the solenoidal part, but exhibits a cross-scale effect on the dilatational component.

  19. Modification of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence by solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Wontae

    2005-12-01

    Particle-laden flows are prevalent in natural and industrial environments. Dilute loadings of small, heavy particles have been observed to attenuate the turbulence levels of the carrier-phase flow, up to 80% in some cases. We attempt to increase the physical understanding of this complex phenomenon by studying the interaction of solid particles with the most fundamental type of turbulence, which is homogeneous and isotropic with no mean flow. A flow facility was developed that could create air turbulence in a nearly-spherical chamber by means of synthetic jet actuators mounted on the corners. Loudspeakers were used as the actuators. Stationary turbulence and natural decaying turbulence were investigated using two-dimensional particle image velocimetry for the base flow qualification. Results indicated that the turbulence was fairly homogeneous throughout the measurement domain and very isotropic, with small mean flow. The particle-laden flow experiments were conducted in two different environments, the lab and in micro-gravity, to examine the effects of particle wakes and flow structure distortion caused by settling particles. The laboratory experiments showed that glass particles with diameters on the order of the turbulence Kolmogorov length scale attenuated the fluid turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and dissipation rate with increasing particle mass loadings. The main source of fluid TKE production in the chamber was the speakers, but the loss of potential energy of the settling particles also resulted in a significant amount of production of extra TKE. The sink of TKE in the chamber was due to the ordinary fluid viscous dissipation and extra dissipation caused by particles. This extra dissipation could be divided into "unresolved" dissipation caused by local velocity disturbances in the vicinity of the small particles and dissipation caused by large-scale flow distortions from particle wakes and particle clusters. The micro-gravity experiments in NASA's KC-135

  20. Hindered Energy Cascade in Highly Helical Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Rodion; Golbraikh, Ephim; Frick, Peter; Shestakov, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    The conventional approach to the turbulent energy cascade, based on Richardson-Kolmogorov phenomenology, ignores the topology of emerging vortices, which is related to the helicity of the turbulent flow. It is generally believed that helicity can play a significant role in turbulent systems, e.g., supporting the generation of large-scale magnetic fields, but its impact on the energy cascade to small scales has never been observed. We suggest, for the first time, a generalized phenomenology for isotropic turbulence with an arbitrary spectral distribution of the helicity. We discuss various scenarios of direct turbulent cascades with new helicity effect, which can be interpreted as a hindering of the spectral energy transfer. Therefore, the energy is accumulated and redistributed so that the efficiency of nonlinear interactions will be sufficient to provide a constant energy flux. We confirm our phenomenology by high Reynolds number numerical simulations based on a shell model of helical turbulence. The energy in our model is injected at a certain large scale only, whereas the source of helicity is distributed over all scales. In particular, we found that the helical bottleneck effect can appear in the inertial interval of the energy spectrum.

  1. Hindered Energy Cascade in Highly Helical Isotropic Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Stepanov, Rodion; Golbraikh, Ephim; Frick, Peter; Shestakov, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    The conventional approach to the turbulent energy cascade, based on Richardson-Kolmogorov phenomenology, ignores the topology of emerging vortices, which is related to the helicity of the turbulent flow. It is generally believed that helicity can play a significant role in turbulent systems, e.g., supporting the generation of large-scale magnetic fields, but its impact on the energy cascade to small scales has never been observed. We suggest, for the first time, a generalized phenomenology for isotropic turbulence with an arbitrary spectral distribution of the helicity. We discuss various scenarios of direct turbulent cascades with new helicity effect, which can be interpreted as a hindering of the spectral energy transfer. Therefore, the energy is accumulated and redistributed so that the efficiency of nonlinear interactions will be sufficient to provide a constant energy flux. We confirm our phenomenology by high Reynolds number numerical simulations based on a shell model of helical turbulence. The energy in our model is injected at a certain large scale only, whereas the source of helicity is distributed over all scales. In particular, we found that the helical bottleneck effect can appear in the inertial interval of the energy spectrum. PMID:26684120

  2. Interaction of a converging spherical shock wave with isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagatwala, Ankit; Lele, Sanjiva K.

    2012-08-01

    Simulations of converging spherical shock waves propagating through a region of compressible isotropic turbulence are carried out. Both converging and reflected phases of the shock are studied. Effect of the reflected phase of the shock is found to be quite different from the expanding shock in the Taylor blast wave-turbulence interaction problem. Vorticity and turbulent kinetic energy are amplified due to passage of the shock. Similar to the latter problem, the vorticity-dilatation term is primarily responsible for the observed behavior. This is confirmed through Eulerian and Lagrangian statistics. Transverse vorticity amplification is compared with linear planar shock-turbulence theory. The smallest eddies, represented by the Kolmogorov scale, decrease in size after passing through the converging shock and this is shown to be related to a decrease in kinematic viscosity and increase in dissipation behind the converging shock. Distortion of the shock due to turbulence is also investigated and quantified. Turbulence also affects maximum compression achieved at the point of shock reflection, when the shock radius is at a minimum. This decrease in compression is quantified by comparing with pure shock simulations.

  3. Asymptotic behavior of curvature of surface elements in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, S. S.

    1991-01-01

    The asymptotic behavior of the curvature of material elements in turbulence is investigated using Lagrangian velocity-gradient time series obtained from direct numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence. Several material-element ensembles of different initial curvatures and shapes are studied. It is found that, at long times, the (first five) moments of the logarithm of characteristic curvature and shape factor asymptote to values that are independent of the initial curvature or shape. This evidence strongly suggests that the asymptotic pdf's of the curvature and shape of material elements are stationary and independent of initial conditions. Irrespective of initial curvature or shape, the asymptotic shape of a material surface is cylindrical with a high probability.

  4. Large Deviation Statistics of Vorticity Stretching in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-11-01

    A key feature of 3D fluid turbulence is the stretching/re-alignment of vorticity by the action of the strain-rate. It is shown using the cumulant-generating function that cumulative vorticity stretching along a Lagrangian path in isotropic turbulence behaves statistically like a sum of i.i.d. variables. The Cramer function for vorticity stretching is computed from the JHTDB isotropic DNS (Reλ = 430) and compared to those of the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE) for material deformation. As expected the mean cumulative vorticity stretching is slightly less than that of the most-stretched material line (largest FTLE), due to the vorticity's preferential alignment with the second-largest eigenvalue of strain-rate and the material line's preferential alignment with the largest eigenvalue. However, the vorticity stretching tends to be significantly larger than the second-largest FTLE, and the Cramer functions reveal that the statistics of vorticity stretching fluctuations are more similar to those of largest FTLE. A model Fokker-Planck equation is constructed by approximating the viscous destruction of vorticity with a deterministic non-linear relaxation law matching conditional statistics, while the fluctuations in vorticity stretching are modelled by stochastic noise matching the statistics encoded in the Cramer function. The model predicts a stretched-exponential tail for the vorticity magnitude PDF, with good agreement for the exponent but significant error (30-40%) in the pre-factor. Supported by NSF Graduate Fellowship (DGE-1232825) and NSF Grant CMMI-0941530.

  5. Subfilter scalar-flux vector orientation in homogeneous isotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Verma, Siddhartha; Blanquart, G

    2014-06-01

    The geometric orientation of the subfilter-scale scalar-flux vector is examined in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Vector orientation is determined using the eigenframe of the resolved strain-rate tensor. The Schmidt number is kept sufficiently large so as to leave the velocity field, and hence the strain-rate tensor, unaltered by filtering in the viscous-convective subrange. Strong preferential alignment is observed for the case of Gaussian and box filters, whereas the sharp-spectral filter leads to close to a random orientation. The orientation angle obtained with the Gaussian and box filters is largely independent of the filter width and the Schmidt number. It is shown that the alignment direction observed numerically using these two filters is predicted very well by the tensor-diffusivity model. Moreover, preferred alignment of the scalar gradient vector in the eigenframe is shown to mitigate any probable issues of negative diffusivity in the tensor-diffusivity model. Consequentially, the model might not suffer from solution instability when used for large eddy simulations of scalar transport in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Further a priori tests indicate poor alignment of the Smagorinsky and stretched vortex model predictions with the exact subfilter flux. Finally, strong filter dependence of subfilter scalar-flux orientation suggests that explicit filtering may be preferable to implicit filtering in large eddy simulations. PMID:25019887

  6. Taylor length-scale size particles in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucci, Francesco

    The present study investigates the two-way coupling effects of finite-size solid spherical particles on decaying isotropic turbulence using an immersed boundary method. The conventional point particle assumption is valid only in the case of particles with a diameter, dp, much smaller than the Kolmogorov length scale, eta. In a simulation with particles of diameter dp > eta the flow around each particle needs to be resolved. In this study, we use a method similar to that of Uhlmann(2005) [55] that adapts the Immersed Boundary(IB) Method developed by Peskin [38] to simulate the flow around suspended spherical solid particles. The main idea of the method is to distribute a number of Lagrangian points uniformly over the surface of the particle. A force is applied at each Lagrangian point to represent the momentum exchange between the particle and the surrounding fluid. An analytic three-point delta function is used to distribute the force to the Eulerian grid points saddling the spherical surface to satisfy the no-slip condition at each Lagrangian point. Decaying turbulence is simulated in a periodic box with a uniform mesh of up to (512)3 grid points and an initial microscale Reynolds number of up to Relambda0 = 110. We compare the single phase flow (SPF) with particle-laden flows with particles of different diameters. The density of the particle varies from 2.56 to 10 times that of the fluid. The effects of the particles on the temporal development of turbulence kinetic energy E(t), its dissipation rate epsilon( t), its two-way coupling rate of change Ψp( t) and frequency spectra E(o) are discussed. In this study, in contrast to particles with dp < eta [15], particles with dp > eta always increase the dissipation rate of turbulence kinetic energy, epsilon( t). In addition, Ψp(t) is always positive, whereas it can be positive or negative for particles with dp < eta. The balance between these two effects caused E(t) to be smaller than that of the single-phase flow

  7. Streamlines in stationary homogeneous isotropic turbulence and fractal-generated turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschung, J.; Peters, N.; Laizet, S.; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2016-04-01

    We compare streamline statistics in stationary homogeneous isotropic turbulence and in turbulence generated by a fractal square grid. We examine streamline segments characterised by the velocity difference {{Δ }}u and the distance l between extremum points. We find close agreement between the stationary homogeneous isotropic turbulence and the decay region of the fractal-generated turbulence as well as the production region of the fractal flow for small segments. The statistics of larger segments are very similar for the isotropic turbulence and the decay region, but differ for the production region. Specifically, we examine the first, second and third conditional mean < {[{{Δ }}u]}n| l> . Noticeably, non-vanishing < {[{{Δ }}u]}n| l> for n=1,3 are due to an asymmetry of positive and negative segments, i.e. those for which {{Δ }}u\\gt 0 and {{Δ }}u\\lt 0, respectively. This asymmetry is not only kinematic, but is also due to dissipative effects and therefore < {[{{Δ }}u]}n| l> contains cascade information.

  8. Coherent Vortex Simulations of 3D isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Daniel E.; Vasilyev, Oleg V.; Kevlahan, Nicholas K.-R.

    2006-11-01

    This is the first of three talks on the wavelet filter based dynamically adaptive eddy capturing computational methodology that unifies variable fidelity simulation approaches such as wavelet-based DNS, Coherent Vortex Simulation (CVS), and Stochastic Coherent Adaptive Large Eddy Simulation. The commonality of these approaches is their ability to identify and ``track" on an adaptive mesh energetic coherent vortical structures. In CVS the velocity field is decomposed into two orthogonal parts: a coherent, inhomogeneous, non-Gaussian component and an incoherent, homogeneous, Gaussian component. This separation of coherent and incoherent components is achieved by wavelet thresholding which can be viewed as a non-linear filter that depends on each flow realization. The essence of the CVS approach is to solve for the coherent non-Gaussian component of a turbulent flow field. It has been shown previously that second generation bi-orthogonal wavelet threshold filtering is able to decompose a turbulent velocity field such that the total resulting SGS dissipation is approximately zero. This physically allows a CVS simulation to recover low order statistics with no SGS model. In this work CVS simulations of decaying incompressible 3D isotropic turbulence are compared to DNS results. -6pt

  9. Local topology of energy transport in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschung, Jonas; Meneveau, Charles

    2012-11-01

    Similar to the velocity vector field, whose tangent (stream) lines represent how fluid volume (or mass in constant density flows) is transported in the flow, it is of interest to consider the vector field corresponding to the transport of mechanical energy (Meyers & Meneveau, 2012). The transport includes advection and viscous diffusion. In order to characterize the local topology of this vector field in turbulence, we examine statistical properties of its gradient field. This energy transport field is not divergence-free, due to dissipation and unsteady changes of kinetic energy. Therefore, the first invariant (the trace) of its gradient tensor is not zero, as in compressible flow. The three invariants PE, QE and RE of the energy transport gradient tensor are analyzed using concepts developed earlier for analysis of compressible flows. Data from DNS of isotropic turbulence is used, from the JHU database (Li et al. 2008, JoT), as well as other sources. Contracting node-like topology occurs very frequently, consistent with the dissipative nature of fluid turbulence. Further topological properties are established based on conditional PDFs of the invariants, and flow visualizations are used to develop insights into the local structure of the energy transport vector field. This work is supported by project CMMI-0941530. The authors also thank Prof. J. Meyers, Prof. N. Peters and Mr. P. Schaefer for interesting discussions on this topic.

  10. Energy transfer and constrained simulations in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, Javier

    1993-01-01

    The defining characteristic of turbulent flows is their ability to dissipate energy, even in the limit of zero viscosity. The Euler equations, if constrained in such a way that the velocity derivatives remain bounded, conserve energy. But when they arise as the limit of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations, when the Reynolds number goes to infinity, there is persuasive empirical evidence that the gradients become singular as just the right function of Re for the dissipation to remain non-zero and to approach a well defined limit. It is generally believed that this limiting value of the dissipation is a property of the Euler equations themselves, independent of the particular dissipative mechanism involved, and that it can be normalized with the large scale properties of the turbulent flow (e.g. the kinetic energy per unit volume u'(exp 2)/2, and the integral scale L) without reference to the Reynolds number or to other dissipative quantities. This is usually taken to imply that the low wave number end of the energy spectrum, far from the dissipative range, is also independent of the particular mechanism chosen to dispose of the energy transfer. In the following sections, we present some numerical experiments on the effect of substituting different dissipation models into the truncated Euler equations. We will see that the effect is mainly felt in the 'near dissipation' range of the energy spectrum, but that this range can be quite wide in some cases, contaminating a substantial range of wave numbers. In the process, we will develop a 'practical' approximation to the subgrid energy transfer in isotropic turbulence, and we will gain insight into the structure of the nonlinear interactions among turbulent scales of comparable size, and into the nature of energy backscatter. Some considerations on future research directions are offered at the end.

  11. Fully developed isotropic turbulence: Symmetries and exact identities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canet, Léonie; Delamotte, Bertrand; Wschebor, Nicolás

    2015-05-01

    We consider the regime of fully developed isotropic and homogeneous turbulence of the Navier-Stokes equation with a stochastic forcing. We present two gauge symmetries of the corresponding Navier-Stokes field theory and derive the associated general Ward identities. Furthermore, by introducing a local source bilinear in the velocity field, we show that these symmetries entail an infinite set of exact and local relations between correlation functions. They include in particular the Kármán-Howarth relation and another exact relation for a pressure-velocity correlation function recently derived in G. Falkovich, I. Fouxon, and Y. Oz [J. Fluid Mech. 644, 465 (2010)], 10.1017/S0022112009993429 that we further generalize.

  12. Dynamics of Aerosol Particles in Stationary, Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Lance R.; Meng, Hui

    2004-01-01

    A detailed study of the dynamics of sub-Kolmogorov-size aerosol particles in stationary isotropic turbulence has been performed. The study combined direct numerical simulations (DNS; directed by Prof. Collins) and high-resolution experimental measurements (directed by Prof. Meng) under conditions of nearly perfect geometric and parametric overlap. The goal was to measure the accumulation of particles in low-vorticity regions of the flow that arises from the effect commonly referred to as preferential concentration. The grant technically was initiated on June 13, 2000; however, funding was not available until July 11, 2000. The grant was originally awarded to Penn State University (numerical simulations) and SUNY-Buffalo (experiments); however, Prof. Collins effort was moved to Cornell University on January 2002 when he joined that university. He completed the study there. A list of the specific tasks that were completed under this study is presented.

  13. Non-isotropic turbulence effects on spray combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.; Chen, C. P.

    1991-01-01

    A numerical model for the prediction of local properties of statistically stationary spray-combusting flows is evaluated by comparison with experimental data. To appraise the relative performance of turbulence models, computations were carried out by the k-epsilon model and the algebraic stress model. The present numerical results show the qualitative agreement with experimental data. In terms of overall local flow properties, the algebraic stress model improves a degree of conformity to the experimental data due to its ability to introduce the nonisotropic turbulence effects. Two swirl numbers are considered to investigate the influence of swirl on the droplet evaporation and trajectories, and the effects of droplet/turbulence interactions in flow properties. It is found that the large swirl produces a higher evaporationn rate, and more intensive turbulent mixing and burning. The discrepancies observed in the results are attributed mainly to uncertainties in the initial spray size and velocity distributions, the droplet/wall impingement interaction, the combustion model with the fast chemistry and the turbulence models dealing with the strong streamline curvature and complex interactions between the dispersed droplets and the continuous gas-phase flows.

  14. Measurements of Turbulence Attenuation by a Dilute Dispersion of Solid Particles in Homogeneous Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, John; Hwang, Wontae; Cabral, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    This research addresses turbulent gas flows laden with fine solid particles at sufficiently large mass loading that strong two-way coupling occurs. By two-way coupling we mean that the particle motion is governed largely by the flow, while the particles affect the gas-phase mean flow and the turbulence properties. Our main interest is in understanding how the particles affect the turbulence. Computational techniques have been developed which can accurately predict flows carrying particles that are much smaller than the smallest scales of turbulence. Also, advanced computational techniques and burgeoning computer resources make it feasible to fully resolve very large particles moving through turbulent flows. However, flows with particle diameters of the same order as the Kolmogorov scale of the turbulence are notoriously difficult to predict. Some simple flows show strong turbulence attenuation with reductions in the turbulent kinetic energy by up to a factor of five. On the other hand, some seemingly similar flows show almost no modification. No model has been proposed that allows prediction of when the strong attenuation will occur. Unfortunately, many technological and natural two-phase flows fall into this regime, so there is a strong need for new physical understanding and modeling capability. Our objective is to study the simplest possible turbulent particle-laden flow, namely homogeneous, isotropic turbulence with a uniform dispersion of monodisperse particles. We chose such a simple flow for two reasons. First, the simplicity allows us to probe the interaction in more detail and offers analytical simplicity in interpreting the results. Secondly, this flow can be addressed by numerical simulation, and many research groups are already working on calculating the flow. Our detailed data can help guide some of these efforts. By using microgravity, we can further simplify the flow to the case of no mean velocity for either the turbulence or the particles. In fact

  15. Clustering of vertically constrained passive particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pietro, Massimo; van Hinsberg, Michel A. T.; Biferale, Luca; Clercx, Herman J. H.; Perlekar, Prasad; Toschi, Federico

    2015-05-01

    We analyze the dynamics of small particles vertically confined, by means of a linear restoring force, to move within a horizontal fluid slab in a three-dimensional (3D) homogeneous isotropic turbulent velocity field. The model that we introduce and study is possibly the simplest description for the dynamics of small aquatic organisms that, due to swimming, active regulation of their buoyancy, or any other mechanism, maintain themselves in a shallow horizontal layer below the free surface of oceans or lakes. By varying the strength of the restoring force, we are able to control the thickness of the fluid slab in which the particles can move. This allows us to analyze the statistical features of the system over a wide range of conditions going from a fully 3D incompressible flow (corresponding to the case of no confinement) to the extremely confined case corresponding to a two-dimensional slice. The background 3D turbulent velocity field is evolved by means of fully resolved direct numerical simulations. Whenever some level of vertical confinement is present, the particle trajectories deviate from that of fluid tracers and the particles experience an effectively compressible velocity field. Here, we have quantified the compressibility, the preferential concentration of the particles, and the correlation dimension by changing the strength of the restoring force. The main result is that there exists a particular value of the force constant, corresponding to a mean slab depth approximately equal to a few times the Kolmogorov length scale η , that maximizes the clustering of the particles.

  16. DNS of fully resolved spherical particles dispersed in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucci, Francesco; Ferrante, Antonino; Elghobashi, Said

    2008-11-01

    Our DNS study concerns the interactions between decaying isotropic turbulence and solid spherical particles with diameter, d, larger than the Kolmogorov length scale, η. We employ an Immersed Boundary method similar to that of Uhlmann (JCP, 2005) to resolve the flow around 6400 spherical particles with a volume fraction of φv=0.1. The monosize particles have a diameter, d = 16 ηo. Our simulations, with 256^3 mesh points and Reλ0= 75, cover a range of 38 <=τp/τKo<=149, for the ratio of the particle response time to the initial Kolmogorov time scale. A Lagrangian approach is used to compute the frequency spectrum of the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) of the fluid phase. The effects of varying τp/τKo on the spectrum and the decay rate of TKE are discussed. The effects of the formation of the particle boundary layer on the viscous dissipation rate of TKE are also discussed.

  17. Preferential concentration of heavy particles in compressible isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qingqing; Liu, Han; Ma, Zongqiang; Xiao, Zuoli

    2016-05-01

    Numerical simulations of particle-laden compressible isotropic turbulence with Taylor Reynolds number Reλ ˜ 100 are conducted by using a high-order turbulence solver, which is based on high-order compact finite difference method in the whole flow domain and localized artificial diffusivities for discontinuities. For simplicity, only one-way coupling (i.e., the influence of fluid on particles) between the carrier flow and particles is considered. The focus is on the study of the preferential concentration of heavy particles in dissipative scale of turbulence and the underlying mechanisms. Firstly, the effect of Stokes number (St) on the particle distribution in flow of Mach 1.01 (referred to as high-Mach-number case in this study) is investigated as a necessary supplementation for the previous studies in incompressible and weakly compressible flows. It turns out that heavy particles with Stokes number close to unity exhibit the strongest preferential concentration, which is in agreement with the observation in incompressible flow. All types of heavy particles have a tendency to accumulate in high-density regions of the background flow. While all kinds of particles dominantly collect in low-vorticity regions, intermediate and large particles (St = 1 and St = 5) are also found to collect in high-vorticity regions behind the randomly formed shocklets. Secondly, the impact of turbulent Mach number (Mt) (or the compressibility) of the carrier flow on the spatial distribution of the particles with St = 1 is discussed using the simulated compressible flows with Mt being 0.22, 0.68, and 1.01, respectively. In low-Mach-number flow, particles tend to concentrate in regions of low vorticity due to the centrifuge effect of vortices and particle concentration decreases monotonically with the increasing vorticity magnitude. As Mach number increases, the degree of particle clustering is slightly weakened in low-vorticity regions but is enhanced in high-vorticity regions, which

  18. The role of wall confinement on the decay rate of an initially isotropic turbulent field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, David R.; Movahed, Pooya; Johnsen, Eric

    2014-11-01

    The problem of freely decaying isotropic turbulence has been the subject of intensive research during the past few decades due to its importance for modeling purposes. While isotropy and periodic boundary conditions assumptions simplify the analysis, large-scale anisotropy (e.g., caused by rotation, shear, acceleration or walls) is in practice present in most turbulent flows and affects flow dynamics across different scales, as well as the kinetic energy decay. We investigate the role of wall confinement and viscous dissipation on the decay rate of an initially isotropic field for confining volumes of different aspect ratios. We first generate an isotropic velocity field in a cube with periodic boundary conditions. Next, using this field, we change the boundary conditions to no-slip walls on all sides. These walls restrict the initial field to a confined geometry and also provide an additional viscous dissipation mechanism. The problem is considered for confining volumes of different aspect ratios by adjusting the initial field. The change in confining volume introduces an additional length scale to the problem. Direct numerical simulation of the proposed set-up is used to verify the scaling arguments for the decay rate of kinetic energy. This work used the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE), which is supported by National Science Foundation Grant Number ACI-1053575.

  19. Symmetries and the approach to statistical equilibrium in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Timothy T.; Zemach, Charles

    1998-11-01

    The relaxation in time of an arbitrary isotropic turbulent state to a state of statistical equilibrium is identified as a transition to a state which is invariant under a symmetry group. We deduce the allowed self-similar forms and time-decay laws for equilibrium states by applying Lie-group methods (a) to a family of scaling symmetries, for the limit of high Reynolds number, as well as (b) to a unique scaling symmetry, for nonzero viscosity or nonzero hyperviscosity. This explains why a diverse collection of turbulence models, going back half a century, arrived at the same time-decay laws, either through derivations embedded in the mechanics of a particular model, or through numerical computation. Because the models treat the same dynamical variables having the same physical dimensions, they are subject to the same scaling invariances and hence to the same time-decay laws, independent of the eccentricities of their different formulations. We show in turn, by physical argument, by an explicitly solvable analytical model, and by numerical computation in more sophisticated models, that the physical mechanism which drives (this is distinct from the mathematical circumstance which allows) the relaxation to equilibrium is the cascade of turbulence energy toward higher wave numbers, with the rate of cascade approaching zero in the low wave-number limit and approaching infinity in the high wave-number limit. Only the low-wave-number properties of the initial state can influence the equilibrium state. This supplies the physical basis, beyond simple dimensional analysis, for quantitative estimates of relaxation times. These relaxation times are estimated to be as large as hundreds or more times the initial dominant-eddy cycle times, and are determined by the large-eddy cycle times. This mode of analysis, applied to a viscous turbulent system in a wind tunnel with typical initial laboratory parameters, shows that the time necessary to reach the final stage of decay is

  20. Large-deviation statistics of vorticity stretching in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry L.; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-03-01

    A key feature of three-dimensional fluid turbulence is the stretching and realignment of vorticity by the action of the strain rate. It is shown in this paper, using the cumulant-generating function, that the cumulative vorticity stretching along a Lagrangian path in isotropic turbulence obeys a large deviation principle. As a result, the relevant statistics can be described by the vorticity stretching Cramér function. This function is computed from a direct numerical simulation data set at a Taylor-scale Reynolds number of Reλ=433 and compared to those of the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE) for material deformation. As expected, the mean cumulative vorticity stretching is slightly less than that of the most-stretched material line (largest FTLE), due to the vorticity's preferential alignment with the second-largest eigenvalue of strain rate and the material line's preferential alignment with the largest eigenvalue. However, the vorticity stretching tends to be significantly larger than the second-largest FTLE, and the Cramér functions reveal that the statistics of vorticity stretching fluctuations are more similar to those of the largest FTLE. In an attempt to relate the vorticity stretching statistics to the vorticity magnitude probability density function in statistically stationary conditions, a model Kramers-Moyal equation is constructed using the statistics encoded in the Cramér function. The model predicts a stretched-exponential tail for the vorticity magnitude probability density function, with good agreement for the exponent but significant difference (35%) in the prefactor.

  1. ISOTROPICALLY DRIVEN VERSUS OUTFLOW DRIVEN TURBULENCE: OBSERVATIONAL CONSEQUENCES FOR MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Jonathan J.; Frank, Adam; Blackman, Eric G.

    2010-10-10

    Feedback from protostellar outflows can influence the nature of turbulence in star-forming regions even if they are not the primary source of velocity dispersion for all scales of molecular clouds. For the rate and power expected in star-forming regions, we previously (Carroll et al.) demonstrated that outflows could drive supersonic turbulence at levels consistent with the scaling relations from Matzner although with a steeper velocity power spectrum than expected for an isotropically driven supersonic turbulent cascade. Here, we perform higher resolution simulations and combine simulations of outflow driven turbulence with those of isotropically forced turbulence. We find that the presence of outflows within an ambient isotropically driven turbulent environment produces a knee in the velocity power spectrum at the outflow scale and a steeper slope at sub-outflow scales than for a purely isotropically forced case. We also find that the presence of outflows flattens the density spectrum at large scales effectively reducing the formation of large-scale turbulent density structures. These effects are qualitatively independent of resolution. We have also carried out Principal Component Analysis (PCA) for synthetic data from our simulations. We find that PCA as a tool for identifying the driving scale of turbulence has a misleading bias toward low amplitude large-scale velocity structures even when they are not necessarily the dominant energy containing scales. This bias is absent for isotropically forced turbulence but manifests strongly for collimated outflow driven turbulence.

  2. Statistics of pressure and pressure gradient in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotoh, T.; Rogallo, R. S.

    1994-01-01

    The statistics of pressure and pressure gradient in stationary isotropic turbulence are measured within direct numerical simulations at low to moderate Reynolds numbers. It is found that the one-point pdf of the pressure is highly skewed and that the pdf of the pressure gradient is of stretched exponential form. The power spectrum of the pressure P(k) is found to be larger than the corresponding spectrum P(sub G)(k) computed from a Gaussian velocity field having the same energy spectrum as that of the DNS field. The ratio P(k)/P(sub G)(k), a measure of the pressure-field intermittence, grows with wavenumber and Reynolds number as -R(sub lambda)(exp 1/2)log(k/k(sub d)) for k less than k(sub d)/2 where k(sub d) is the Kolmogorov wavenumber. The Lagrangian correlations of pressure gradient and velocity are compared and the Lagrangian time scale of the pressure gradient is observed to be much shorter than that of the velocity.

  3. Pressure and higher-order spectra for homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pullin, D. I.; Rogallo, R. S.

    1994-01-01

    The spectra of the pressure, and other higher-order quantities including the dissipation, the enstrophy, and the square of the longitudinal velocity derivative are computed using data obtained from direct numerical simulation of homogeneous isotropic turbulence at Taylor-Reynolds numbers R(sub lambda) in the range 38 - 170. For the pressure spectra we find reasonable collapse in the dissipation range (of the velocity spectrum) when scaled in Kolmogorov variables and some evidence, which is not conclusive, for the existence of a k(exp -7/3) inertial range where k = absolute value of K, is the modulus of the wavenumber. The power spectra of the dissipation, the enstrophy, and the square of the longitudinal velocity derivative separate in the dissipation range, but appear to converge together in the short inertial range of the simulations. A least-squares curve-fit in the dissipation range for one value of R(sub lambda) = 96 gives a form for the spectrum of the dissipation as k(exp 0)exp(-Ck eta), for k(eta) greater than 0.2, where eta is the Kolmogorov length and C is approximately equal to 2.5.

  4. Energy transfer and dissipation in forced isotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    McComb, W D; Berera, A; Yoffe, S R; Linkmann, M F

    2015-04-01

    A model for the Reynolds-number dependence of the dimensionless dissipation rate C(ɛ) was derived from the dimensionless Kármán-Howarth equation, resulting in C(ɛ)=C(ɛ,∞)+C/R(L)+O(1/R(L)(2)), where R(L) is the integral scale Reynolds number. The coefficients C and C(ɛ,∞) arise from asymptotic expansions of the dimensionless second- and third-order structure functions. This theoretical work was supplemented by direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of forced isotropic turbulence for integral scale Reynolds numbers up to R(L)=5875 (R(λ)=435), which were used to establish that the decay of dimensionless dissipation with increasing Reynolds number took the form of a power law R(L)(n) with exponent value n=-1.000±0.009 and that this decay of C(ɛ) was actually due to the increase in the Taylor surrogate U(3)/L. The model equation was fitted to data from the DNS, which resulted in the value C=18.9±1.3 and in an asymptotic value for C(ɛ) in the infinite Reynolds-number limit of C(ɛ,∞)=0.468±0.006. PMID:25974586

  5. Interacting scales and energy transfer in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, YE

    1993-01-01

    The dependence of the energy transfer process on the disparity of the interacting scales is investigated in the inertial and far-dissipation ranges of isotropic turbulence. The strategy for generating the simulated flow fields and the choice of a disparity parameter to characterize the scaling of the interactions is discussed. The inertial range is found to be dominated by relatively local interactions, in agreement with the Kolmogorov assumption. The far-dissipation is found to be dominated by relatively non-local interactions, supporting the classical notion that the far-dissipation range is slaved to the Kolmogorov scales. The measured energy transfer is compared with the classical models of Heisenberg, Obukhov, and the more detailed analysis of Tennekes and Lumley. The energy transfer statistics measured in the numerically simulated flows are found to be nearly self-similar for wave numbers in the inertial range. Using the self-similar form measured within the limited scale range of the simulation, an 'ideal' energy transfer function and the corresponding energy flux rate for an inertial range of infinite extent are constructed. From this flux rate, the Kolmogorov constant is calculated to be 1.5, in excellent agreement with experiments.

  6. Inverse energy cascade in three-dimensional isotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Biferale, Luca; Musacchio, Stefano; Toschi, Federico

    2012-04-20

    We study the statistical properties of homogeneous and isotropic three-dimensional (3D) turbulent flows. By introducing a novel way to make numerical investigations of Navier-Stokes equations, we show that all 3D flows in nature possess a subset of nonlinear evolution leading to a reverse energy transfer: from small to large scales. Up to now, such an inverse cascade was only observed in flows under strong rotation and in quasi-two-dimensional geometries under strong confinement. We show here that energy flux is always reversed when mirror symmetry is broken, leading to a distribution of helicity in the system with a well-defined sign at all wave numbers. Our findings broaden the range of flows where the inverse energy cascade may be detected and rationalize the role played by helicity in the energy transfer process, showing that both 2D and 3D properties naturally coexist in all flows in nature. The unconventional numerical methodology here proposed, based on a Galerkin decimation of helical Fourier modes, paves the road for future studies on the influence of helicity on small-scale intermittency and the nature of the nonlinear interaction in magnetohydrodynamics. PMID:22680722

  7. Testing a similarity theory for isotropic turbulence on DNS data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melander, Mogens; Fabijonas, Bruce

    2006-11-01

    Using direct numerical simulations, we consider the issue of self-similarity in 3D incompressible isotropic turbulence. The starting point for our investigation is a similarity theory we have developed on the basis of high Reynolds number shell model calculations. Like Kolmogorov's 1941 theory, our theory calls for similarity across all scales in the inertial range. Unlike K41, our theory does not fail on account of intermittency, but is developed to blossom in that environment. To observe self-similarity, it is essential that the correct variables are used, otherwise one sees only intermittency. The correct variables are reasonably easy to spot for the shell model, but they are more difficult to identify for the full Navier-Stokes equations. Moreover, one has to overcome the fact that the DNS has lower Reynolds numbers than in the shell model simulations so that the inertial range is shorter. Using the technique ESS, we clear this obstacle with only a minor modification to the theory. The DNS data then collapse on the theoretical pdf at all scales.

  8. Energy transfer and dissipation in forced isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComb, W. D.; Berera, A.; Yoffe, S. R.; Linkmann, M. F.

    2015-04-01

    A model for the Reynolds-number dependence of the dimensionless dissipation rate Cɛ was derived from the dimensionless Kármán-Howarth equation, resulting in Cɛ=Cɛ ,∞+C /RL+O (1 /RL2) , where RL is the integral scale Reynolds number. The coefficients C and Cɛ ,∞ arise from asymptotic expansions of the dimensionless second- and third-order structure functions. This theoretical work was supplemented by direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of forced isotropic turbulence for integral scale Reynolds numbers up to RL=5875 (Rλ=435 ), which were used to establish that the decay of dimensionless dissipation with increasing Reynolds number took the form of a power law RLn with exponent value n =-1.000 ±0.009 and that this decay of Cɛ was actually due to the increase in the Taylor surrogate U3/L . The model equation was fitted to data from the DNS, which resulted in the value C =18.9 ±1.3 and in an asymptotic value for Cɛ in the infinite Reynolds-number limit of Cɛ ,∞=0.468 ±0.006 .

  9. On the decay of homogeneous nearly isotropic turbulence behind active fractal grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thormann, Adrien; Meneveau, Charles

    2012-11-01

    The study of decaying isotropic turbulent flow is an important point of reference for turbulence theories and numerical simulations. For the past several decades, most experimental results appear to favor power-law decay with exponents between -1.2 and -1.4, approximately. More recently, fractal-generated turbulence (Hurst & Vassilicos, PoF 2007, and subsequent papers) using multi-scale passive grids suggest possible faster decay, and non-trivial behavior especially near the grid, where the mean velocity is spatially evolving. In order to generate spatially homogeneous flow using multi-scale injection of kinetic energy at high Reynolds numbers, we use a new type of active-grid consisting of winglets with various fractal shapes. We test space-filling fractal shaped winglets as well as Sierpisky-carpet and Apollonian packing type fractal shapes. Data are acquired using X-wire thermal anemometry. Tests of homogeneity of mean flow and turbulence intensity will be presented as well as decay of kinetic energy and spectral characteristics of the flow. This research is supported by NSF-CBET-1033942. The assistance of Ms. Imbi Salasoo and Mr. Nathan Greene in designing and building the fractal winglets is much appreciated. The authors also thank Mr. Vince Rolin for his assistance with the active grid.

  10. Numerical studies of microscopic oil droplets under intense turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Murray; Knio, Omar

    2008-11-01

    The rise of small oil droplets in water experiencing isotropic turbulence conditions is analyzed computationally under four different turbulence intensities. The computational method combines DNS of the turbulent flow with Lagrangian tracking of the slightly buoyant droplets using a dynamical equation with buoyancy, virtual mass, pressure, drag, lift and history forces. In our recent work, Snyder et al. (2008), we showed that the puzzling behavior observed by Friedman and Katz (2002), where the rise velocity of droplets smaller than 800 μm in diameter is enhanced by turbulence whereas the rise of larger droplets is retarded, could be explained by significant drop then enhancement of the droplet drag coefficient, and corresponding drop in the virtual mass coefficient. In this study we use the same technique to explain the recent experimental results of Gopalan and Katz (2008), who also showed both suppression and enhancement of droplet rise velocities. Using drag and virtual mass coefficients which vary with Reynolds number, our computations approximate the experimental behavior observed by Gopalan and Katz in isotropic turbulence with 79, 100 and 151 μm Kolmogorov length scales. Combined with close agreement with the Friedman and Katz results, with an 88 μm Kolmogorov scale, our results provide further evidence that both the quasi-steady drag and virtual mass coefficients may be heavily modified under intense turbulence.

  11. Local energy transfer and nonlocal interactions in homogeneous, isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domaradzki, J. Andrzej; Rogallo, Robert S.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed computations were made of energy transfer among the scales of motion in incompressible turbulent fields at low Reynolds numbers, generated by direct numerical simulations. It was observed that, although the transfer resulted from triad interactions that were nonlocal in k space, the energy always transferred locally. The energy transfer calculated from the eddy-damped quasi-normal Markovian (EDQNM) theory of turbulence at low Reynolds numbers is in excellent agreement with the results of the numerical simulations. At high Reynolds numbers, the EDQNM theory predicts the same transfer mechanism in the inertial range that is observed at low Reynolds numbers.

  12. Sweeping and straining effects in sound generation by high Reynolds number isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, YE; Rubinstein, Robert

    1995-01-01

    The sound radiated by isotropic turbulence is computed using inertial range scaling expressions for the relevant two time and two point correlations. The result depends on whether the decay of Eulerian time correlations is dominated by large scale sweeping or by local straining: the straining hypothesis leads to an expression for total acoustic power, whereas the sweeping hypothesis leads to a more recent result.

  13. A detailed look at turbulence intensity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of turbulence intensity on energy capture by small wind turbines has been a point of debate in the last few years. Claims of 25% de-rating of the power curve for turbines installed at sites with high turbulence are not uncommon. Over the years, many attempts have been made to model the ef...

  14. Settling of almost neutrally buoyant particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hinsberg, Michel; Clercx, Herman; Toschi, Federico

    2015-11-01

    Settling of particles in a turbulent flow occurs in various industrial and natural phenomena, examples are clouds and waste water treatment. It is well known that turbulence can enhance the settling velocity of particles. Many studies have been done, numerically and experimentally to investigate this behavior for the case of ``heavy'' particles, with particle to fluid density ratios above 100. Here we investigate the case of almost neutrally buoyant particles, i.e. density ratios between 1 and 100. In the case of light particles the Maxey-Riley equations cannot be simplified to only the Stokes drag and gravity force as pressure gradient, added mass and Basset history force are important as well. We investigate the influence of these forces on the settling velocity of particles and show that the extra forces can both increase or decrease the settling velocity, depending on the combination of the Stokes number and gravity applied.

  15. Energy transfer in isotropic turbulence at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domaradzki, J. A.; Rogallo, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Detailed measurements were made of energy transfer among the scales of motion in incompressible turbulent fields at low Reynolds numbers generated by direct numerical simulation. It was observed that although the transfer resulted from triad interactions that were non-local in k space, the energy always transferred locally. The results are consistent with the notion of non-uniform advection of small weak eddies by larger and stronger ones, similar to transfer processes in the far dissipation range at high Reynolds numbers.

  16. Grid-generated isotropic homogeneous turbulence at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, G.

    1981-01-01

    Consideration is given to an empirical formula for the longitudinal correlation function for grid-generated incompressible fluid turbulence at Reynolds numbers above 12,800. The formula, which relates the longitudinal correlation function to the inverse cube of a dimensionless geometrical ratio, is shown to minimize the global correlation integrals into which the two-point velocity correlation tensor has been substituted subject to a global constraint on the Sobolev concomitent of the longitudinal correlation function. Furthermore, the energy spectrum function associated with the empirical formula is shown to satisfy a tertiary Helmholtz-type linear condition throughout the initial period of decay.

  17. Mixing of a passive scalar in isotropic and sheared homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirani, E.; Ferziger, J. H.; Reynolds, W. C.

    1981-01-01

    In order to calculate the velocity and scalar fields, the three dimensional, time-dependent equations of motion and the diffusion equation were solved numerically. The following cases were treated: isotropic, homogeneous turbulence with decay of a passive scalar; and homogeneous turbulent shear flow with a passive scalar whose mean varies linearly in the spanwise direction. The solutions were obtained at relatively low Reynolds numbers so that all of the turbulent scales could be resolved without modeling. Turbulent statistics such as integral length scales, Taylor microscales, Kolmogorov length scale, one- and two-point correlations of velocity-velocity and velocity-scalar, turbulent Prandtl/Schmidt number, r.m.s. values of velocities, the scalar quantity and pressure, skewness, decay rates, and decay exponents were calculated. The results are compared with the available expermental results, and good agreement is obtained.

  18. Theoretical and computational studies of isotropic homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mei-Jiau

    Numerical simulations are presented for viscous incompressible homogeneous turbulent flows with periodic boundary conditions. Our numerical method is based on the spectral Fourier method. Rogallo's code is modified and extended to trace fluid particles and simulate the evolution of material line elements. The first part of the thesis is about modifying and applying the code to simulate a passive vector field convected and stretched by the so called ABC flows in the presence of viscosity. The correlation of the geometry of the physical structures of the passive vector with the external straining is investigated. It is observed that most amplifications either occur in the neighborhoods of local unstable manifolds of the stagnation points of the ABC flows, if they exist, especially those with only one positive eigenvalue, or they are confined within the chaotic regions of the ABC flows if there is no stagnation point. The second part of the thesis is an investigation of the power-law energy decay of turbulence. Two decay exponents, 1.24 and 1.54, are measured from simulations. A new similarity form for the double and triple velocity autocorrelation functions using the Taylor microscale as the scaling, consistent with the Karman-Howarth equation and a power-law energy decay, is proposed and compared with numerical results. The proposed similarity form seems applicable at small to intermediate Reynolds number. For flows with very large Reynolds number, an expansion form of energy spectrum is proposed instead. The third part of the thesis is a presentation of the Lagrangian data collected by tracking fluid particles in decaying turbulent flows. The mean growth rates of the magnitudes of material line elements, that of the vorticity due to nonlinear forces, and the mean principal rates of strain tensors are found to be proportional to the square root of the mean enstrophy. The proportional coefficients remain constant during the decay. The mean angles between material

  19. Theoretical and Computational Studies of Isotropic Homogeneous Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mei-Jiau

    Numerical simulations are presented for viscous incompressible homogeneous turbulent flows with periodic boundary conditions. Our numerical method is based on the spectral Fourier method. Rogallo's code is modified and extended to trace fluid particles and simulate the evolution of material line elements. The first part of the thesis is about modifying and applying the code to simulate a passive vector field convected and stretched by the so-called ABC flows in the presence of viscosity. The correlation of the geometry of the physical structures of the passive vector with the external straining is investigated. It is observed that most amplifications either occur in the neighborhoods of local unstable manifolds of the stagnation points of the ABC flows, if they exist, especially those with only one positive eigenvalue, or they are confined within the chaotic regions of the ABC flows if there is no stagnation point. The second part of the thesis is an investigation of the power-law energy decay of turbulence. Two decay exponents, 1.24 and 1.54, are measured from simulations. A new similarity form for the double and triple velocity autocorrelation functions using the Taylor microscale as the scaling, consistent with the Karman-Howarth equation and a power-law energy decay, is proposed and compared with numerical results. The proposed similarity form seems applicable at small to intermediate Reynolds number. For flows with very large Reynolds number, an expansion form of energy spectrum is proposed instead. The third part of the thesis is a presentation of the Lagrangian data collected by tracking fluid particles in decaying turbulent flows. The mean growth rates of the magnitudes of material line elements, that of the vorticity due to nonlinear forces, and the mean principal rates of strain tensors are found to be proportional to the square root of the mean enstrophy. The proportional coefficients remain constant during the decay. The mean angles between material

  20. The radiated noise from isotropic turbulence and heated jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilley, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    Our understanding of aerodynamic noise has its foundations in the work of Sir James Lighthill (1952), which was the first major advance in acoustics since the pioneering work of Lord Rayleigh in the last century. The combination of Lighthill's theory of aerodynamic noise as applied to turbulent flows and the experimental growing database from the early 1950's was quickly exploited by various jet propulsion engine designers in reducing the noise of jet engines at takeoff and landing to levels marginally acceptable to communities living in the neighborhoods of airports. The success in this noise containment led to the rapid growth of fast economical subsonic civil transport aircraft worldwide throughout the 1960's and has continued to the present day. One important factor in this success story has been the improvements in the engine cycle that have led to both reductions in specific fuel consumption and noise. The second is the introduction of Noise Certification, which specifies the maximum noise levels at takeoff and landing that all aircraft must meet before they can be entered on the Civil Aircraft Register. The growing interest in the development of a new supersonic civil transport to replace 'Concorde' in the early years of the next century has led to a resurgence of interest in the more challenging problem of predicting the noise of hot supersonic jets and developing means of aircraft noise reduction at takeoff and landing to meet the standards now accepted for subsonic Noise Certification. The prediction of aircraft noise to the accuracy required to meet Noise Certification requirements has necessitated reliance upon experimental measurements and empirically derived laws based on the available experimental data bases. These laws have their foundation in the results from Lighthill's theory, but in the case of jet noise, where the noise is generated in the turbulent mixing region with the external ambient fluid, the complexity of the turbulent motion has

  1. Short-time evolution of Lagrangian velocity gradient correlations in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, L.; Bos, W. J. T.; Jin, G. D.

    2015-12-01

    We show by direct numerical simulation (DNS) that the Lagrangian cross correlation of velocity gradients in homogeneous isotropic turbulence increases at short times, whereas its auto-correlation decreases. Kinematic considerations allow to show that two invariants of the turbulent velocity field determine the short-time velocity gradient correlations. In order to get a more intuitive understanding of the dynamics for longer times, heuristic models are proposed involving the combined action of local shear and rotation. These models quantitatively reproduce the effects and disentangle the different physical mechanisms leading to the observations in the DNS.

  2. How isotropic are turbulent flows generated by using periodic conditions in a cube?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Z. C.; Fang, L.; Fang, J.

    2016-03-01

    In numerical simulations, "isotropic" turbulent flows are always generated by using periodic conditions. We show that these periodic conditions mathematically lead to large-scale anisotropy which can be about 10% of the mean values, and thus prevent existing post-processing results from being accurate. A decomposition method by employing spherical harmonics is then proposed to distinguish this scale-dependent anisotropy effect from others and to minimize the related post-processing error.

  3. New forcing scheme to sustain particle-laden homogeneous and isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallouppas, G.; George, W. K.; van Wachem, B. G. M.

    2013-08-01

    This paper evaluates the effect of forcing to sustain turbulence on the transfer function of the fluid with particles suspended in a homogeneous and isotropic flow. As mentioned by Lucci et al. ["Modulation of isotropic turbulence by particles of Taylor length-scale size," J. Fluid Mech. 650, 5-55 (2010), 10.1017/S0022112009994022], there are three limitations of forcing particle-laden homogeneous and isotropic turbulence: (a) large fluctuations on the temporal evolution of the kinetic energy are created when forcing is active at low wavenumbers, (b) the redistribution of energy is affected when forcing is performed over all wavenumbers, and (c) the nonlinear transfer function of the fluid due to the triadic interactions is affected when forcing is active over a wavenumber range. These limitations make the interpretation of the effects of particles on the energy spectrum of the fluid difficult. A new forcing scheme in physical space has been designed which avoids these limitations in wavenumber space, so the spectral effects of particles can be evaluated. The performance of this forcing scheme is tested using Direct Numerical Simulations. It is shown that the nonlinear transfer function of the fluid with the current forcing scheme is only affected at the wavenumbers it is acting, consistent with the theory. Even so, the spatial coherence and phase spectra between the two-way coupling and the fluid computed from the simulations show that the new forcing scheme is only moderately correlated even for the forced wavenumbers, with correlation coefficient typically about 10%.

  4. Experimental study of the structure of isotropic turbulence with intermediate range of Reynolds number. [sea-air interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, S. C.; Saad, A.

    1977-01-01

    The energetic isotropic turbulence generated by a waterfall of low head was found to be developed in part through the unstable two-phase flow of entrained air bubbles. The resulting turbulent field had a turbulent Reynolds number in excess of 20,000 and maintained a self-similar structure throughout the decay period studied. The present study may provide some insight into the structure of turbulence produced by breaking waves over the ocean.

  5. Fully developed isotropic turbulence: Nonperturbative renormalization group formalism and fixed-point solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canet, Léonie; Delamotte, Bertrand; Wschebor, Nicolás

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the regime of fully developed homogeneous and isotropic turbulence of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equation in the presence of a stochastic forcing, using the nonperturbative (functional) renormalization group (NPRG). Within a simple approximation based on symmetries, we obtain the fixed-point solution of the NPRG flow equations that corresponds to fully developed turbulence both in d =2 and 3 dimensions. Deviations to the dimensional scalings (Kolmogorov in d =3 or Kraichnan-Batchelor in d =2 ) are found for the two-point functions. To further analyze these deviations, we derive exact flow equations in the large wave-number limit, and show that the fixed point does not entail the usual scale invariance, thereby identifying the mechanism for the emergence of intermittency within the NPRG framework. The purpose of this work is to provide a detailed basis for NPRG studies of NS turbulence; the determination of the ensuing intermittency exponents is left for future work.

  6. Suppression of self-organized structure coarsening in homogenous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Youhei

    2014-11-01

    Self-organized structure by spinodal decomposition is often seen in quenched binary mixture. Complex network structure is formed through coarsening process of self-organized structure when the phase separation due to spinodal decomposition proceeds. The phase separation governed by the Cahn-Hilliard equation have been well investigated for stationary fluid in previous studies, however, the turbulent effect on the formation of structures was not fully discussed. In this study, we carried out a numerical simulation for homogenous isotropic turbulence with phase separation, the relation between turbulent vortex formation and self-organized structure coarsening. The governing equations are incompressible Navier-Stokes equation considering phase separation force and Cahn-Hilliard equation with the chemical potential based on the Landau-Ginzburg free energy. From the identification and visualization of turbulent structures, it was found that the local entrainment of small eddy structure suppressed the coarsening process of self-organized structure. The energy used in phase separation was related to the initial process of vortex sheet-tube transition in turbulent flow, and the energy cascade from large turbulent structure to small eddy was different from that without phase separation.

  7. Turbulence generation through intense kinetic energy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maqui, Agustin F.; Donzis, Diego A.

    2016-06-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to systematically study the development and establishment of turbulence when the flow is initialized with concentrated regions of intense kinetic energy. This resembles both active and passive grids which have been extensively used to generate and study turbulence in laboratories at different Reynolds numbers and with different characteristics, such as the degree of isotropy and homogeneity. A large DNS database was generated covering a wide range of initial conditions with a focus on perturbations with some directional preference, a condition found in active jet grids and passive grids passed through a contraction as well as a new type of active grid inspired by the experimental use of lasers to photo-excite the molecules that comprise the fluid. The DNS database is used to assert under what conditions the flow becomes turbulent and if so, the time required for this to occur. We identify a natural time scale of the problem which indicates the onset of turbulence and a single Reynolds number based exclusively on initial conditions which controls the evolution of the flow. It is found that a minimum Reynolds number is needed for the flow to evolve towards fully developed turbulence. An extensive analysis of single and two point statistics, velocity as well as spectral dynamics and anisotropy measures is presented to characterize the evolution of the flow towards realistic turbulence.

  8. Optical intensity interferometry through atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, P. K.; Chan, A. H.; Kurtsiefer, C.

    2016-04-01

    Conventional ground-based astronomical observations suffer from image distortion due to atmospheric turbulence. This can be minimized by choosing suitable geographic locations or adaptive optical techniques, and avoided altogether by using orbital platforms outside the atmosphere. One of the promises of optical intensity interferometry is its independence from atmospherically induced phase fluctuations. By performing narrow-band spectral filtering on sunlight and conducting temporal intensity interferometry using actively quenched avalanche photodiodes, the Solar g(2)(τ) signature was directly measured. We observe an averaged photon bunching signal of g(2)(τ) = 1.693 ± 0.003 from the Sun, consistently throughout the day despite fluctuating weather conditions, cloud cover and elevation angle. This demonstrates the robustness of the intensity interferometry technique against atmospheric turbulence and opto-mechanical instabilities, and the feasibility to implement measurement schemes with both large baselines and long integration times.

  9. On the dynamics of small-scale vorticity in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, Javier; Wray, A. A.

    1994-01-01

    It was previously shown that the strong vorticity in isotropic turbulence is organized into tubular vortices ('worms') whose properties were characterized through the use of full numerical simulations at several Reynolds numbers. At the time most of the observations were kinematic, and several scaling laws were discovered for which there was no theoretical explanation. In the meantime, further analysis of the same fields yielded new information on the generation of the vortices, and it was realized that even if they had to be formed by stretching, they were at any given moment actually compressed at many points of their axes. This apparent contradiction was partially explained by postulating axial inertial waves induced by the nonuniformity of the vortex cores, which helped to 'spread' the axial strain and allowed the vortices to remain compact even if not uniformly stretched. The existence of such solutions was recently proved numerically. The present report discusses a set of new numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence, and a reanalysis of the old ones, in an effort to prove or disprove the presence of these waves in actual turbulent flows and to understand the dynamics, as opposed to the kinematics, of the vortices.

  10. The isotropic nature of the background turbulence spectra in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Tu, C. Y.; He, J.; Marsch, E.; Wang, L.

    2014-12-01

    At the high-frequency end of the inertial range, the solar wind turbulence power spectrum was recently found to be anisotropic with respect to the direction of local magnetic field, as an evidence for the presence of a "critical balance" style turbulence cascade. However, we find that the spectral anisotropy seems to result from intermittent structures. The following two independent studies corroborate this statement by showing that the power spectra of the background turbulence, in which there are no intermittent structures, have an isotropic nature. In Study 1, we remove the wavelet coefficients of the local intermittency with large partial variance increment (PVI), and find the spectral indices of the magnetic field are 1.63±0.02, independent of the angle θRB between the direction of the local background magnetic field and the radial direction. In Study 2, we make a statistical study on the magnetic field spectral indices obtained by using Fast Fourier Transform on 40 time series, in which no intermittent structures appear. We find that for the time series with 0o<θRB <6o, the probability distribution of the observed spectral indices peaks at -1.7, while the -2 index predicted by the "critical balance" theory rarely appears. For the time series with 84 o <θRB <90 o, the probability distribution of the indices peaks at -1.5. Considering the uncertainty of the statistics, these results show that the background-turbulence spectra are nearly isotropic with respect to θRB, which may be consistent with some explanations based on hydrodynamic turbulence theory.

  11. Interaction of weakly compressible isotropic turbulence with planar expansion waves: Flow anisotropy and vorticity alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xanthos, Savvas; Gong, Minwei; Andreopoulos, Yiannis

    2010-01-01

    Further analysis of the experimental data of the velocity gradient tensor first published by Xanthos et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 584, 301 (2007)] has been carried out and new results are reported here to provide additional insights on the effects of expansion waves interacting with isotropic turbulence. The flow field was generated by the reflection of an incoming shock wave at the open end of a large scale shock tube facility which interacted with the induced flow behind the incident shock wave which passed through a turbulence generating grid. In the present configuration the interaction is free from streamline curvature effects, which cause additional effects on turbulence. The strength of the applied expansive straining was 240 s-1. Rectangular pattern grids of different mesh sizes were used to generate isotropic and homogeneous turbulence with turbulent Reynolds number Reλ based on Taylor's microscale between 450 and 488. Lateral vorticity fluctuations and fluctuations of enstrophy and all stretching vector components are drastically reduced during the interaction. Residual attenuation in the postinteraction flow field was found only in the lateral vorticity fluctuations and in the longitudinal stretching term S11Ω1. Helicity and the helicity angle were computed from the data and the orientation angle of the vorticity vector in reference to the velocity vector was determined. Large fluctuations of the helicity angle were observed which extend from 0° to 180° with most probable values close to 30° and 130° and a mean value of 85°. Rotational dissipation rate was found to be high at these angles. The time-dependent signals of enstrophy, vortex stretching/tilting vector, and dissipation rate were found to exhibit a rather strong intermittent behavior which is characterized by high amplitude bursts followed by low level activities. It was found that the observed strong dissipative events are mostly associated with strong activities in the longitudinal stretching

  12. Relation of the fourth-order statistical invariants of velocity gradient tensor in isotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Fang, L; Zhang, Y J; Fang, J; Zhu, Y

    2016-08-01

    We show by direct numerical simulations (DNSs) that in different types of isotropic turbulence, the fourth-order statistical invariants have approximately a linear relation, which can be represented by a straight line in the phase plane, passing two extreme states: the Gaussian state and the restricted Euler state. Also, each DNS case corresponds to an equilibrium region that is roughly Reynolds-dependent. In addition, both the time reversal and the compressibility effect lead to nonequilibrium transition processes in this phase plane. This observation adds a new restriction on the mean-field theory. PMID:27627399

  13. The upper atmosphere of Uranus - A critical test of isotropic turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, R. G.; Elliot, J. L.; Sicardy, B.; Nicholson, P.; Matthews, K.

    1982-01-01

    Observations of the August 15, 1980, Uranus occultation of KM 12, obtained from Cerro Tololo InterAmerican Observatory, European Southern Observatory, and Cerro Las Campanas Observatory, are used to compare the atmospheric structure at points separated by approximately 140 km along the planetary limb. The results reveal striking, but by no means perfect correlation of the light curves, ruling out isotropic turbulence as the cause of the light curve spikes. The atmosphere is strongly layered, and any acceptable turbulence model must accommodate the axial ratios of greater than about 60 which are observed. The mean temperature of the atmosphere is 150 plus or minus 15 K for the region near number density 10 to the 14th per cu cm. Derived temperature variations of vertical scale approximately 130 km and amplitude plus or minus 5 K are in agreement for all stations, and correlated spikes correspond to low-amplitude temperature variations with a vertical scale of several kilometers.

  14. Modulation of isotropic turbulence by deformable droplets of Taylor lengthscale size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, Michael; Ferrante, Antonino

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the effects of finite-size deformable droplets on decaying isotropic turbulence via direct numerical simulation (DNS). DNS is performed using the two-fluid pressure-correction method by Dodd and Ferrante [J. Comput. Phys. 273, 416 (2014)] coupled with the volume of fluid method by Baraldi et al. [Comput. & Fluids 96, 322 (2014)]. We fully-resolve the flow around and inside 3130 droplets of Taylor lengthscale size, resulting in a droplet volume fraction of 0.05. The initial Taylor lengthscale Reynolds number is Reλ0 = 75 , and the computational mesh has 10243 grid points. We analyze the effects on turbulence modulation of varying the droplet- to carrier-fluid viscosity ratio (1 <=μd /μc <= 100) and the droplet Weber number based on the r.m.s velocity of turbulence (0 . 1 <=Werms <= 5). We discuss how varying these parameters affects the turbulence kinetic energy budget, and explain the physical mechanisms for such modulation. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, Grant Number OCI-1054591.

  15. Model for drop coalescence in a locally isotropic turbulent flow field.

    PubMed

    Narsimhan, Ganesan

    2004-04-01

    The proposed model views drop coalescence in a turbulent flow field as a two-step process consisting of formation of a doublet due to drop collisions followed by coalescence of the individual droplets in a doublet due to the drainage of the intervening film of continuous phase under the action of colloidal (van der Waals and electrostatic) and random turbulent forces. The turbulent flow field was assumed to be locally isotropic. A first-passage-time analysis was employed for the random process of intervening continuous-phase film thickness between the two drops of a doublet in order to evaluate the first two moments of coalescence-time distribution of the doublet. The average drop coalescence time of the doublet was dependent on the barrier for coalescence due to the net repulsive force (net effect of colloidal repulsive and turbulent attractive forces). The predicted average drop coalescence time was found to be smaller for larger turbulent energy dissipation rates, smaller surface potentials, larger drop sizes, larger ionic strengths, and larger drop size ratios of unequal-sized drop pairs. The predicted average drop coalescence time was found to decrease whenever the ratio of average turbulent force to repulsive force barrier became larger. The calculated coalescence-time distribution was broader, with a higher standard deviation, at lower energy dissipation rates, higher surface potentials, smaller drop sizes, and smaller size ratios of unequal drop pairs. The model predictions of average coalescence-rate constants for tetradecane-in-water emulsions stabilized by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in a high-pressure homogenizer agreed fairly well with the inferred experimental values as reported by Narsimhan and Goel (J. Colloid Interface Sci. 238 (2001) 420-432) at different homogenizer pressures and SDS concentrations. PMID:14985038

  16. Magnetic Field Line Random Walk in Isotropic Turbulence with Varying Mean Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonsrettee, W.; Subedi, P.; Ruffolo, D.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Snodin, A. P.; Wongpan, P.; Chuychai, P.; Rowlands, G.; Vyas, S.

    2016-08-01

    In astrophysical plasmas, the magnetic field line random walk (FLRW) plays an important role in guiding particle transport. The FLRW behavior is scaled by the Kubo number R=(b/{B}0)({{\\ell }}\\parallel /{{\\ell }}\\perp ) for rms magnetic fluctuation b, large-scale mean field {{\\boldsymbol{B}}}0, and coherence scales parallel ({{\\ell }}\\parallel ) and perpendicular ({{\\ell }}\\perp ) to {{\\boldsymbol{B}}}0. Here we use a nonperturbative analytic framework based on Corrsin’s hypothesis, together with direct computer simulations, to examine the R-scaling of the FLRW for varying B 0 with finite b and isotropic fluctuations with {{\\ell }}\\parallel /{{\\ell }}\\perp =1, instead of the well-studied route of varying {{\\ell }}\\parallel /{{\\ell }}\\perp for b \\ll {B}0. The FLRW for isotropic magnetic fluctuations is also of astrophysical interest regarding transport processes in the interstellar medium. With a mean field, fluctuations may have variance anisotropy, so we consider limiting cases of isotropic variance and transverse variance (with b z = 0). We obtain analytic theories, and closed-form solutions for extreme cases. Padé approximants are provided to interpolate all versions of theory and simulations to any B 0. We demonstrate that, for isotropic turbulence, Corrsin-based theories generally work well, and with increasing R there is a transition from quasilinear to Bohm diffusion. This holds even with b z = 0, when different routes to R\\to ∞ are mathematically equivalent; in contrast with previous studies, we find that a Corrsin-based theory with random ballistic decorrelation works well even up to R = 400, where the effects of trapping are barely perceptible in simulation results.

  17. Effect of freestream isotropic turbulence on heat transfer from a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Prosenjit; Kottam, Kirit

    2008-07-01

    We consider direct numerical simulation (DNS) based on pseudospectral methods to study the heat transfer around a stationary sphere held at a constant temperature and subject to an ambient turbulent velocity and temperature condition. The sphere Reynolds number is in the range of 63-400, and the sphere diameter (d) varies from one to eight times the Kolmogorov scale (η). The ambient turbulent field is isotropic, and the Taylor microscale Reynolds number Rλ varies from 38 to 240. Results from two sets of DNS are presented. In the first set, the ambient velocity field is turbulent, but the ambient temperature is held constant. In the second set of simulations, both the ambient velocity and the temperature fields are turbulent. These two sets of simulations allow us to isolate the role of freestream velocity fluctuations and temperature fluctuations in modifying the mean and time-dependent heat transfer from the sphere. The mean Nusselt number is observed to be independent of Rλ. It is shown that the freestream turbulence does not have any significant effect on the mean Nusselt number, and the available correlations for a steady and uniform ambient can predict the mean Nusselt number under the turbulent ambient condition. The instantaneous Nusselt number, however, can differ significantly from the mean, and can be negative in case of large temperature fluctuation in the far field. The instantaneous Nusselt number obtained from the DNS is analyzed and compared with the analytical expression for the unsteady thermal response of a sphere. It is shown that the thermal added-mass effect is small for d /η≈1 but introduces spurious oscillation at higher d. The thermal history effect is shown to be insignificant for all d /η. Properties of the thermal wake in the presence of the turbulent velocity and temperature fields are studied. The mean thermal wake is observed to be shorter in streamwise direction and wider in crossflow direction in a turbulent ambient than that

  18. Coherent vortex extraction in homogeneous isotropic turbulence using wavelets: orthogonal versus biorthogonal decompositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farge, Marie; Roussel, Olivier; Schneider, Kai

    2004-11-01

    We compare the extraction of coherent vortices in 3D homogeneous isotropic turbulence computed by DNS using either orthogonal or biorthogonal wavelets. The method is based on a wavelet decomposition of the vorticity field and a subsequent thresholding of the wavelet coefficients (PRL, 87(5), 2001, Phys. Fluids 15(10), 2003). The coherent vorticity is reconstructed from few strong wavelet coefficients while the incoherent vorticity is reconstructed from the remaining weak coefficients. In the orthogonal case the choice of the threshold is motivated from statistical denoising theory and has no adjustable parameters. Using 3% of the coefficients we show that both decompositions extract the coherent vortices out of the turbulent flow. They contain 99.6% of the energy and retain 74% and 68% of the enstrophy in the orthogonal and biorthogonal case, respectively. Concerning the incoherent background flow, it is structureless and decorrelated for the orthogonal decomposition, with a Gaussian velocity PDF. In contrast, the biorthogonal decomposition yields a background flow which exhibits quasi-2D sheet-like structures with an exponetial velocity PDF instead. In conclusion, modeling the incoherent background flow might be more difficult using biorthogonal wavelets for the CVS (Coherent Vortex Simulation, cf. Flow, Turbulence and Combustion 66(4), 2001).

  19. Creating Only Isotropic Homogeneous Turbulence in Liquid Helium near Absolute Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihas, G. G.; Thompson, K. J.; Labbe, G.; McClintock, P. V. E.

    2012-02-01

    Flow through a grid is a standard method to produce isotropic, homogeneous turbulence for laboratory study. This technique has been used to generate quantum turbulence (QT) above 1 K in superfluid heliumootnotetextS. R. Stalp, L. Skrbek, and R. J. Donnelly, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 4831 (1999). where QT seems to mimic classical turbulence. Efforts have been made recentlyootnotetextG. G. Ihas, G. Labbe, S-c. Liu, and K. J. Thompson, J. Low Temp. Phys. 150, 384 (2008). to make similar measurements near absolute zero, where there is an almost total absence of normal fluid and hence classical viscosity. This presents the difficulty that most motive force devices produce heat which overwhelms the phenomena being investigated. The process of designing and implimenting a ``dissipation-free'' motor for pulling a grid through superfluid helium at millikelvin temperatures has resulted in the development of new techniques which have broad application in low temperature research. Some of these, such as Meissner-affect magnetic drives, capacitive and inductive position sensors, and magnetic centering devices will be described. Heating results for devices which can move in a controlled fashion from very low speed up to 10 cm/s will be presented. Acknowledgement: We thank W.F. Vinen for many useful discussions.

  20. Experimental Exploration of Electrostatic Charge on Particle Pair Relative Velocity in Homogeneous and Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Adam; Dou, Zhongwang; Tripathi, Anjan; Liang, Zach; Meng, Hui

    2015-11-01

    Study of droplet collision and cloud formation should consider the effects of both turbulence and electrostatic charge on particle dynamics. We present the first experimental observation of radial relative velocity (RV) of charged particles in homogeneous and isotropic turbulence (HIT). Charges on particles were generated through triboelectric effect between the inner wall of the chamber and the particles. To measure charge distribution, a particle-laden head-on impinging flow mimicking our HIT chamber conditions was built and holographic particle tracking was applied to quantify particle charges by measuring their displacements in an electric field. Particles were observed to have opposite charges. Next, in our HIT chamber, we measured particle RV by a novel 4-frame particle tracking velocimetry technique with and without charges on particles, wherein charges were neutralized by coating the interior of the HIT chamber with conductive carbon paint. We compared RV under the same turbulence conditions between charged particles and neutral particles and observed that when particles were oppositely charged, their mean inward RV increased at small separation distances. This result is consistent with recent theory and simulations (Lu and Shaw, Physics of Fluids, 2015). This work was supported by the National Science Foundation through a Collaborative Research Grant CBET-0967407.

  1. Presumed PDF Modeling of Early Flame Propagation in Moderate to Intense Turbulence Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmen, Christina; Feikema, Douglas A.

    2003-01-01

    The present paper describes the results obtained from a one-dimensional time dependent numerical technique that simulates early flame propagation in a moderate to intense turbulent environment. Attention is focused on the development of a spark-ignited, premixed, lean methane/air mixture with the unsteady spherical flame propagating in homogeneous and isotropic turbulence. A Monte-Carlo particle tracking method, based upon the method of fractional steps, is utilized to simulate the phenomena represented by a probability density function (PDF) transport equation. Gaussian distributions of fluctuating velocity and fuel concentration are prescribed. Attention is focused on three primary parameters that influence the initial flame kernel growth: the detailed ignition system characteristics, the mixture composition, and the nature of the flow field. The computational results of moderate and intense isotropic turbulence suggests that flames within the distributed reaction zone are not as vulnerable, as traditionally believed, to the adverse effects of increased turbulence intensity. It is also shown that the magnitude of the flame front thickness significantly impacts the turbulent consumption flame speed. Flame conditions studied have fuel equivalence ratio s in the range phi = 0.6 to 0.9 at standard temperature and pressure.

  2. Relative dispersion in isotropic turbulence. Part 2. A new stochastic model with Reynolds-number dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgas, Michael S.; Yeung, P. K.

    2004-03-01

    A new model for Lagrangian particle-pair separation in turbulent flows is developed and compared with data from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of isotropic turbulence. The model formulation emphasizes (i) non-Gaussian behaviour in Eulerian and Lagrangian statistics, (ii) the occurrence of large separation velocities, (iii) the role of straining and streaming flow structure as recognized in kinematic simulations of turbulence, and (iv) the role of conditionally averaged accelerations in stochastic modelling of turbulent relative dispersion. Previous stochastic models of relative dispersion have produced unrealistic behaviour, particularly in the dissipation subrange where viscous effects are important, which have led to questions on the adequacy of stochastic modelling. However, this failure can now be recognized as inadequate detail in formulation, which is explained and rectified in this paper. The model is quasi-one-dimensional in nature, and is focused on the statistics of particle-pair separation distance and its rate of change, referred to as the separation speed. Detailed comparisons are presented at several Reynolds numbers using the DNS database reported in a companion paper (Part 1). Up to fourth-order moments for these quantities are examined, as well as the separation-distance probability density function, which is discussed in the context of recent claims of Richardson scaling in the literature. The model is able to account for the spatial representation of straining regions as well as incompressibility of the flow, and is shown to reproduce strong non-Gaussianity and intermittency in the Lagrangian separation statistics observed in DNS. Comparisons with recent physical experiments are also remarkably consistent. This work demonstrates that stochastic models when properly formulated are effective and efficient representations of the dispersion process and this general class of models therefore possess great utility for calculations of both one

  3. Parametric Study of Decay of Homogeneous Isotropic Turbulence Using Large Eddy Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. C.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Rubinstein, Robert; Balakumar, Ponnampalam; Zang, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations of decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence are performed with both low-order and high-order spatial discretization schemes. The turbulent Mach and Reynolds numbers for the simulations are 0.2 and 250, respectively. For the low-order schemes we use either second-order central or third-order upwind biased differencing. For higher order approximations we apply weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) schemes, both with linear and nonlinear weights. There are two objectives in this preliminary effort to investigate possible schemes for large eddy simulation (LES). One is to explore the capability of a widely used low-order computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to perform LES computations. The other is to determine the effect of higher order accuracy (fifth, seventh, and ninth order) achieved with high-order upwind biased WENO-based schemes. Turbulence statistics, such as kinetic energy, dissipation, and skewness, along with the energy spectra from simulations of the decaying turbulence problem are used to assess and compare the various numerical schemes. In addition, results from the best performing schemes are compared with those from a spectral scheme. The effects of grid density, ranging from 32 cubed to 192 cubed, on the computations are also examined. The fifth-order WENO-based scheme is found to be too dissipative, especially on the coarser grids. However, with the seventh-order and ninth-order WENO-based schemes we observe a significant improvement in accuracy relative to the lower order LES schemes, as revealed by the computed peak in the energy dissipation and by the energy spectrum.

  4. Forward and backward in time dispersion of fluid and inertial particles in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg, Andrew D.; Ireland, Peter J.; Collins, Lance R.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate both theoretically and numerically the Forward-In-Time (FIT) and Backward-In-Time (BIT) dispersion of fluid and inertial particle-pairs in isotropic turbulence. Fluid particles are known to separate faster BIT than FIT in three-dimensional turbulence, and we find that inertial particles do the same. However, we find that the irreversibility in the inertial particle dispersion is in general much stronger than that for fluid particles. For example, the ratio of the BIT to FIT mean-square separation can be up to an order of magnitude larger for the inertial particles than for the fluid particles. We also find that for both the inertial and fluid particles, the irreversibility becomes stronger as the scale of their separation decreases. Regarding the physical mechanism for the irreversibility, we argue that whereas the irreversibility of fluid particle-pair dispersion can be understood in terms of a directional bias arising from the energy transfer process in turbulence, inertial particles experience an additional source of irreversibility arising from the non-local contribution to their velocity dynamics, a contribution that vanishes in the limit St → 0, where St is the particle Stokes number. For each given initial (final, in the BIT case) separation, r0, there is an optimum value of St for which the dispersion irreversibility is strongest, as such particles are optimally affected by both sources of irreversibility. We derive analytical expressions for the BIT, mean-square separation of inertial particles and compare the predictions with numerical data obtained from a Reλ ≈ 582 (where Reλ is the Taylor Reynolds number) Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of particle-laden isotropic turbulent flow. The small-time theory, which in the dissipation range is valid for times ≤max[Stτη, τη] (where τη is the Kolmogorov time scale), is in excellent agreement with the DNS. The theory for long-times is in good agreement with the DNS

  5. Calculations of longitudinal and transverse velocity structure functions using a vortex model of isotropic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    He, G.; Doolen, G.D.; Chen, S.

    1999-12-01

    The longitudinal structure function (LSF) and the transverse structure function (TSF) in isotropic turbulence are calculated using a vortex model. The vortex model is composed of the Rankine and Burgers vortices which have the exponential distributions in the vortex Reynolds number and vortex radii. This model exhibits a power law in the inertial range and satisfies the minimal condition of isotropy that the second-order exponent of the LSF in the inertial range is equal to that of the TSF. Also observed are differences between longitudinal and transverse structure functions caused by intermittency. These differences are related to their scaling differences which have been previously observed in experiments and numerical simulations. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Passive scalar convective-diffusive subrange for low Prandtl numbers in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briard, A.; Gomez, T.

    2015-01-01

    In this Rapid Communication, we study the behavior of a strongly diffusive passive scalar field T submitted to a freely decaying, homogeneous and isotropic turbulence with eddy-damped quasinormal Markovian simulations. We present a new subrange located between the k-17 /3 inertial-diffusive subrange and the Kolmogorov wave number kη. This subrange is generated by small-scale convection linked to kη that balances diffusion effects. Thus, we build a typical length scale kCD -1 based on convection and diffusion and give an expression for the shape of the passive scalar spectrum in this subrange ET˜√{Pr}k-11 /3 using physical arguments. This result unifies two different theories coming from Batchelor [G. K. Batchelor, J. Fluid. Mech. 5, 113 (1959), 10.1017/S002211205900009X] and Chasnov [J. Chasnov et al., Phys. Fluids A 1, 1698 (1989), 10.1063/1.857535] and explains results previously obtained experimentally.

  7. Isotropic boundary adapted wavelets for coherent vorticity extraction in turbulent channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farge, Marie; Sakurai, Teluo; Yoshimatsu, Katsunori; Schneider, Kai; Morishita, Koji; Ishihara, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    We present a construction of isotropic boundary adapted wavelets, which are orthogonal and yield a multi-resolution analysis. We analyze DNS data of turbulent channel flow computed at a friction-velocity based Reynolds number of 395 and investigate the role of coherent vorticity. Thresholding of the wavelet coefficients allows to split the flow into two parts, coherent and incoherent vorticity. The statistics of the former, i.e., energy and enstrophy spectra, are close to the ones of the total flow, and moreover the nonlinear energy budgets are well preserved. The remaining incoherent part, represented by the large majority of the weak wavelet coefficients, corresponds to a structureless, i.e., noise-like, background flow and exhibits an almost equi-distribution of energy.

  8. Passive scalar spectrum in isotropic turbulence: Prediction by the Lagrangian direct-interaction approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Susumu; Kida, Shigeo

    1999-07-01

    The Lagrangian direct-interaction approximation developed previously by the present authors [S. Kida and S. Goto, J. Fluid Mech. 345, 307 (1997)] is applied to a passive scalar field in isotropic turbulence. We examine the behavior of solutions to the resultant closure equations for the correlation function of the scalar field for arbitrary values of the Schmidt number, and show systematically that the solutions are completely consistent with the phenomenological theories on the scalar spectral function by Obukhov (1949), Corrsin (1951), Batchelor et al. (1959), and Batchelor (1959). The universal forms of the function in the statistically stationary state are obtained by solving the closure equations numerically in the whole wave number range for each case of moderate, extremely large, and small values of the Schmidt number.

  9. Universality of spectrum of passive scalar variance at very high Schmidt number in isotropic steady turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, Toshiyuki

    2012-11-01

    Spectrum of passive scalar variance at very high Schmidt number up to 1000 in isotropic steady turbulence has been studied by using very high resolution DNS. Gaussian random force and scalar source which are isotropic and white in time are applied at low wavenumber band. Since the Schmidt number is very large, the system was integrated for 72 large eddy turn over time for the system to forgot the initial state. It is found that the scalar spectrum attains the asymptotic k-1 spectrum in the viscous-convective range and the constant CB is found to be 5.7 which is larger than 4.9 obtained by DNS under the uniform mean scalar gradient. Reasons for the difference are inferred as the Reynolds number effect, anisotropy, difference in the scalar injection, duration of time average, and the universality of the constant is discussed. The constant CB is also compared with the prediction by the Lagrangian statistical theory for the passive scalar. The scalar spectrum in the far diffusive range is found to be exponential, which is consistent with the Kraichnan's spectrum. However, the Kraichnan spectrum was derived under the assumption that the velocity field is white in time, therefore theoretical explanation of the agreement needs to be explored. Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research No. 21360082, Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

  10. Large fluctuations of the nonlinearities in isotropic turbulence. Anisotropic filtering analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tordella, D.; Di Savino, S.; Sitzia, L.

    2014-09-01

    Using a Navier-Stokes isotropic turbulent field numerically simulated in a box with a discretization of 10243 (Biferale et al., 2005), we show that the probability of having a stretching-tilting larger than a few times the local enstrophy is low. By using an anisotropic kind of filter in the Fourier space, where wavenumbers that have at least one component below a threshold or inside a range are removed, we analyze these survival statistics when the large, the small inertial or the small inertial and dissipation scales are filtered out. By considering a flow obtained by randomizing the phases of the Fourier modes, and applying our filtering techniques, we identified clearly the properties attributable to turbulence. It can be observed that, in the unfiltered isotropic Navier-Stokes field, the probability of the ratio (|ωṡ∇U|/|) being higher than a given threshold is higher than in the fields where the large scales were filtered out. At the same time, it is lower than in the fields where the small inertial and dissipation range of scales is filtered out. This is basically due to the suppression of compact structures in the ranges that have been filtered in different ways. The partial removal of the background of filaments and sheets does not have a first order effect on these statistics. These results are discussed in the light of a hypothesized relation between vortical filaments, sheets and blobs in physical space and in Fourier space. The study in fact can be viewed as a kind of test for this idea and tries to highlight its limits. We conclude that a qualitative relation in physical space and in Fourier space can be supposed to exist for blobs only. That is for the near isotropic structures which are sufficiently described by a single spatial scale and do not suffer from the disambiguation problem as filaments and sheets do. Information is also given on the filtering effect on statistics concerning the inclination of the strain rate tensor eigenvectors with

  11. On the mechanism for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Lance; Bragg, Andrew; Ireland, Peter

    2014-11-01

    In this talk, we consider the physical mechanism for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of turbulence. By comparisons with DNS data we demonstrate that the mechanism in the theory of Zaichik et al. (Phys. Fluids 19, 113308, 2007) quantitatively describes the clustering of particles in the inertial range. We then analyze the theory for isotropic turbulence in the limit Reλ --> ∞ . For arbitrary St (Stokes number), there exists a separation in the inertial range beyond which Str << 1 , where Str is the Stokes number based on the eddy turnover timescale at separation r. The inertial-range clustering in this limit can be understood to be due to the preferential sampling of the coarse-grained velocity gradient tensor at that scale. At smaller separations, there may be transitions to Str ~ 1 , where a path history symmetry breaking effect dominates the clustering mechanism, and in some cases Str >> 1 , which implies ballistic behavior and a flat RDF. The scaling for each of these regimes is derived and compared to DNS, where applicable. Finally, we compare the results with the ``sweep-stick'' mechanism by Coleman and Vassilicos (Phys. Fluids 21, 113301, 2009) and discuss the similarities and differences between the two theories.

  12. Long-time behavior of material-surface curvature in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, S. S.

    1992-01-01

    The behavior at large times of the curvature of material elements in turbulence is investigated using Lagrangian velocity-gradient time series obtained from direct numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence. The main objectives are: to study the asymptotic behavior of the pdf curvature as a function of initial curvature and shape; and to establish whether the curvature of an initially plane material element goes to a stationary probability distribution. The evidence available in the literature about the asymptotic curvature-pdf of initially flat surfaces is ambiguous, and the conjecture is that it is quasi-stationary. In this work several material-element ensembles of different initial curvatures and shapes are studied. It is found that, at long times the moments of the logarithm of curvature are independent of the initial pdf of curvature. This, it is argued, supports the view that the curvature attains a stationary distribution at long times. It is also shown that, irrespective of initial shape or curvature, the shape of any material element at long times is cylindrical with a high probability.

  13. Inertial Particle Relative Velocity in a High-Reynolds-Number Homogeneous and Isotropic Turbulence Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Zhongwang; Pecenak, Zachary; Liang, Zach; Cao, Lujie; Ireland, Peter; Collins, Lance; Meng, Hui

    2015-11-01

    Particle-pair radial relative velocity (RV) in turbulence plays a critical role in droplet collision and cloud formation. Both simulations and experiments are performed to better understand RV of inertial particles in homogeneous and isotropic turbulence (HIT). However, past experimental measurement of particle RV statistics exhibited large deviations from DNS results (de Jong et al., 2010). In the current study, we identified intrinsic limitations in our previous study and devised a 4-frame particle tracking velocimetry technique to measure particle RV. In a second-generation, enclosed, fan-driven HIT chamber, both tracer and inertial particles were studied at R_ λ of 366. The experimentally measured RV statistics were compared with DNS with excellent agreement. Additionally, for both kinds of particles, the mean inward RV vs. particle separation distance r also matched very well with DNS, but at near-zero r, experimental values were slightly higher. To investigate the cause of this discrepancy, we compared DNS of both mono- and tri-dispersed particles. We found that the tri-dispersed particles exhibited higher mean inward RV at small r than any mono-dispersed particles. This suggests that the increase of mean inward RV in the experiment could be due to the Stokes number (St) distribution present in the particles, while DNS employed single St values. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation through a Collaborative Research Grant CBET-0967407.

  14. The rotation and translation of non-spherical particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byron, Margaret

    The motion of particles suspended in environmental turbulence is relevant to many scientific fields, from sediment transport to biological interactions to underwater robotics. At very small scales and simple shapes, we are able to completely mathematically describe the motion of inertial particles; however, the motion of large aspherical particles is significantly more complex, and current computational models are inadequate for large or highly-resolved domains. Therefore, we seek to experimentally investigate the coupling between freely suspended particles and ambient turbulence. A better understanding of this coupling will inform not only engineering and physics, but the interactions between small aquatic organisms and their environments. In the following pages, we explore the roles of shape and buoyancy on the motion of passive particles in turbulence, and allow these particles to serve as models for meso-scale aquatic organisms. We fabricate cylindrical and spheroidal particles and suspend them in homogeneous, isotropic turbulence that is generated via randomly-actuated jet arrays. The particles are fabricated with agarose hydrogel, which is refractive-index-matched to the surrounding fluid (water). Both the fluid and the particle are seeded with passive tracers, allowing us to perform Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) simultaneously on the particle and fluid phase. To investigate the effects of shape, particles are fabricated at varying aspect ratios; to investigate the effects of buoyancy, particles are fabricated at varying specific gravities. Each particle type is freely suspended at a volume fraction of F=0.1%, for which four-way coupling interactions are negligible. The suspended particles are imaged together with the surrounding fluid and analyzed using stereoscopic PIV, which yields three velocity components in a two-dimensional measurement plane. Using image thresholding, the results are separated into simultaneous fluid-phase and solid-phase velocity

  15. Collision statistics of inertial particles in two-dimensional homogeneous isotropic turbulence with an inverse cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onishi, Ryo; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2014-11-01

    This study investigates the collision statistics of inertial particles in inverse-cascading 2D homogeneous isotropic turbulence by means of a direct numerical simulation (DNS). A collision kernel model for particles with small Stokes number (St) in 2D flows is proposed based on the model of Saffman & Turner (1956) (ST56 model). The DNS results agree with this 2D version of the ST56 model for St < 0.1. It is then confirmed that our DNS results satisfy the 2D version of the spherical formulation of the collision kernel. The fact that the flatness factor stays around 3 in our 2D flow confirms that the present 2D turbulent flow is nearly intermittency-free. Collision statistics for St = 0.1, 0.4 and 0.6, i.e. for St <1, are obtained from the present 2D DNS and compared with those obtained from the three-dimensional (3D) DNS of Onishi et al. (2013). We have observed that the 3D radial distribution function at contact (g(R), the so-called clustering effect) decreases for St = 0.4 and 0.6 with increasing Reynolds number, while the 2D g(R) does not show a significant dependence on Reynolds number. This observation supports the view that the Reynolds-number dependence of g(R) observed in three dimensions is due to internal intermittency of the 3D turbulence. We have further investigated the local St, which is a function of the local flow strain rates, and proposed a plausible mechanism that can explain the Reynolds-number dependence of g(R).

  16. Large-deviation joint statistics of the finite-time Lyapunov spectrum in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry L.; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-08-01

    One of the hallmarks of turbulent flows is the chaotic behavior of fluid particle paths with exponentially growing separation among them while their distance does not exceed the viscous range. The maximal (positive) Lyapunov exponent represents the average strength of the exponential growth rate, while fluctuations in the rate of growth are characterized by the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLEs). In the last decade or so, the notion of Lagrangian coherent structures (which are often computed using FTLEs) has gained attention as a tool for visualizing coherent trajectory patterns in a flow and distinguishing regions of the flow with different mixing properties. A quantitative statistical characterization of FTLEs can be accomplished using the statistical theory of large deviations, based on the so-called Cramér function. To obtain the Cramér function from data, we use both the method based on measuring moments and measuring histograms and introduce a finite-size correction to the histogram-based method. We generalize the existing univariate formalism to the joint distributions of the two FTLEs needed to fully specify the Lyapunov spectrum in 3D flows. The joint Cramér function of turbulence is measured from two direct numerical simulation datasets of isotropic turbulence. Results are compared with joint statistics of FTLEs computed using only the symmetric part of the velocity gradient tensor, as well as with joint statistics of instantaneous strain-rate eigenvalues. When using only the strain contribution of the velocity gradient, the maximal FTLE nearly doubles in magnitude, highlighting the role of rotation in de-correlating the fluid deformations along particle paths. We also extend the large-deviation theory to study the statistics of the ratio of FTLEs. The most likely ratio of the FTLEs λ1 : λ2 : λ3 is shown to be about 4:1:-5, compared to about 8:3:-11 when using only the strain-rate tensor for calculating fluid volume deformations. The results

  17. Large-deviation joint statistics of the finite-time Lyapunov spectrum in isotropic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Perry L. Meneveau, Charles

    2015-08-15

    One of the hallmarks of turbulent flows is the chaotic behavior of fluid particle paths with exponentially growing separation among them while their distance does not exceed the viscous range. The maximal (positive) Lyapunov exponent represents the average strength of the exponential growth rate, while fluctuations in the rate of growth are characterized by the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLEs). In the last decade or so, the notion of Lagrangian coherent structures (which are often computed using FTLEs) has gained attention as a tool for visualizing coherent trajectory patterns in a flow and distinguishing regions of the flow with different mixing properties. A quantitative statistical characterization of FTLEs can be accomplished using the statistical theory of large deviations, based on the so-called Cramér function. To obtain the Cramér function from data, we use both the method based on measuring moments and measuring histograms and introduce a finite-size correction to the histogram-based method. We generalize the existing univariate formalism to the joint distributions of the two FTLEs needed to fully specify the Lyapunov spectrum in 3D flows. The joint Cramér function of turbulence is measured from two direct numerical simulation datasets of isotropic turbulence. Results are compared with joint statistics of FTLEs computed using only the symmetric part of the velocity gradient tensor, as well as with joint statistics of instantaneous strain-rate eigenvalues. When using only the strain contribution of the velocity gradient, the maximal FTLE nearly doubles in magnitude, highlighting the role of rotation in de-correlating the fluid deformations along particle paths. We also extend the large-deviation theory to study the statistics of the ratio of FTLEs. The most likely ratio of the FTLEs λ{sub 1} : λ{sub 2} : λ{sub 3} is shown to be about 4:1:−5, compared to about 8:3:−11 when using only the strain-rate tensor for calculating fluid volume

  18. The length distribution of streamline segments in homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, P.; Gampert, M.; Peters, N.

    2012-04-01

    by Schaefer et al. ["Fast and slow changes of the length of gradient trajectories in homogenous shear turbulence," in Advances in Turbulence XII, edited by B. Eckhardt (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 2009), pp. 565-572] we will refer to the morphological part of the evolution of streamline segments as slow changes while the topological part of the evolution is referred to as fast changes. This separation yields a transport equation for the probability density function (pdf) P(l) of the arclength l of streamline segments in which the slow changes translate into a convection and a diffusion term when terms up to second order are included and the fast changes yield integral terms. The overall temporal evolution (morphological and topological) of the arclength l of streamline segments is analyzed and associated with the motion of the above isosurface. This motion is diffusion controlled for small segments, while large segments are mainly subject to strain and pressure fluctuations. The convection velocity corresponds to the first order jump moment, while the diffusion term includes the second order jump moment. It is concluded, both theoretically and from direct numerical simulations (DNS) data of homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence at two different Reynolds numbers, that the normalized first order jump moment is quasi-universal, while the second order one is proportional to the inverse of the square root of the Taylor based Reynolds number Re_{λ }^{-1/2}. Its inclusion thus represents a small correction in the limit of large Reynolds numbers. Numerical solutions of the pdf equation yield a good agreement with the pdf obtained from the DNS data. The interplay of viscous drift acting on small segments and linear strain acting on large segments yield, as it has already been concluded for dissipation elements, that the mean length of streamline segments should scale with Taylor microscale.

  19. Photosensitivity control of an isotropic medium through polarization of light pulses with tilted intensity front.

    PubMed

    Kazansky, Peter G; Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Sakakura, Masaaki; Beresna, Martynas; Gecevičius, Mindaugas; Svirko, Yuri; Akturk, Selcuk; Qiu, Jianrong; Miura, Kiyotaka; Hirao, Kazuyuki

    2011-10-10

    We present the first experimental evidence of anisotropic photosensitivity of an isotropic homogeneous medium under uniform illumination. Our experiments reveal fundamentally new type of light induced anisotropy originated from the hidden asymmetry of pulsed light beam with a finite tilt of intensity front. We anticipate that the observed phenomenon, which enables employing mutual orientation of a light polarization plane and pulse front tilt to control interaction of matter with ultrashort light pulses, will open new opportunities in material processing. PMID:21997076

  20. MAGNETIC FIELD LINE RANDOM WALK IN ISOTROPIC TURBULENCE WITH ZERO MEAN FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Sonsrettee, W.; Ruffolo, D.; Snodin, A. P.; Wongpan, P.; Subedi, P.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Chuychai, P. E-mail: david.ruf@mahidol.ac.th E-mail: pat.wongpan@postgrad.otago.ac.nz E-mail: prasub@udel.edu

    2015-01-01

    In astrophysical plasmas, magnetic field lines often guide the motions of thermal and non-thermal particles. The field line random walk (FLRW) is typically considered to depend on the Kubo number R = (b/B {sub 0})(ℓ{sub ∥}/ℓ ) for rms magnetic fluctuation b, large-scale mean field B {sub 0}, and parallel and perpendicular coherence scales ℓ{sub ∥} and ℓ , respectively. Here we examine the FLRW when R → ∞ by taking B {sub 0} → 0 for finite b{sub z} (fluctuation component along B {sub 0}), which differs from the well-studied route with b{sub z} = 0 or b{sub z} << B {sub 0} as the turbulence becomes quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D). Fluctuations with B {sub 0} = 0 are typically isotropic, which serves as a reasonable model of interstellar turbulence. We use a non-perturbative analytic framework based on Corrsin's hypothesis to determine closed-form solutions for the asymptotic field line diffusion coefficient for three versions of the theory, which are directly related to the k {sup –1} or k {sup –2} moment of the power spectrum. We test these theories by performing computer simulations of the FLRW, obtaining the ratio of diffusion coefficients for two different parameterizations of a field line. Comparing this with theoretical ratios, the random ballistic decorrelation version of the theory agrees well with the simulations. All results exhibit an analog to Bohm diffusion. In the quasi-2D limit, previous works have shown that Corrsin-based theories deviate substantially from simulation results, but here we find that as B {sub 0} → 0, they remain in reasonable agreement. We conclude that their applicability is limited not by large R, but rather by quasi-two-dimensionality.

  1. Magnetic Field Line Random Walk in Isotropic Turbulence with Zero Mean Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonsrettee, W.; Subedi, P.; Ruffolo, D.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Snodin, A. P.; Wongpan, P.; Chuychai, P.

    2015-01-01

    In astrophysical plasmas, magnetic field lines often guide the motions of thermal and non-thermal particles. The field line random walk (FLRW) is typically considered to depend on the Kubo number R = (b/B 0)(l∥/l) for rms magnetic fluctuation b, large-scale mean field B 0, and parallel and perpendicular coherence scales l∥ and l, respectively. Here we examine the FLRW when R → ∞ by taking B 0 → 0 for finite bz (fluctuation component along B 0), which differs from the well-studied route with bz = 0 or bz Lt B 0 as the turbulence becomes quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D). Fluctuations with B 0 = 0 are typically isotropic, which serves as a reasonable model of interstellar turbulence. We use a non-perturbative analytic framework based on Corrsin's hypothesis to determine closed-form solutions for the asymptotic field line diffusion coefficient for three versions of the theory, which are directly related to the k -1 or k -2 moment of the power spectrum. We test these theories by performing computer simulations of the FLRW, obtaining the ratio of diffusion coefficients for two different parameterizations of a field line. Comparing this with theoretical ratios, the random ballistic decorrelation version of the theory agrees well with the simulations. All results exhibit an analog to Bohm diffusion. In the quasi-2D limit, previous works have shown that Corrsin-based theories deviate substantially from simulation results, but here we find that as B 0 → 0, they remain in reasonable agreement. We conclude that their applicability is limited not by large R, but rather by quasi-two-dimensionality.

  2. Power and Nonpower Laws of Passive Scalar Moments Convected by Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    The scaling behavior of the moments of two passive scalars that are excited by two different methods and simultaneously convected by the same isotropic steady turbulence at Rλ=805 and Sc=0.72 is studied by using direct numerical simulation with N =40963 grid points. The passive scalar θ is excited by a random source that is Gaussian and white in time, and the passive scalar q is excited by the mean uniform scalar gradient. In the inertial convective range, the n th-order moments of the scalar increment δ θ (r ) do not obey a simple power law, but have the local scaling exponents ξnθ+βnlog (r /r*) with βn>0 . In contrast, the local scaling exponents of q have well-developed plateaus and saturate with increasing order. The power law of passive scalar moments is not trivial. The universality of passive scalars is found not in the moments, but in the normalized moments.

  3. Power and nonpower laws of passive scalar moments convected by isotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2015-09-11

    The scaling behavior of the moments of two passive scalars that are excited by two different methods and simultaneously convected by the same isotropic steady turbulence at R_{λ}=805 and Sc=0.72 is studied by using direct numerical simulation with N=4096^{3} grid points. The passive scalar θ is excited by a random source that is Gaussian and white in time, and the passive scalar q is excited by the mean uniform scalar gradient. In the inertial convective range, the nth-order moments of the scalar increment δθ(r) do not obey a simple power law, but have the local scaling exponents ξ_{n}^{θ}+β_{n}log(r/r_{*}) with β_{n}>0. In contrast, the local scaling exponents of q have well-developed plateaus and saturate with increasing order. The power law of passive scalar moments is not trivial. The universality of passive scalars is found not in the moments, but in the normalized moments. PMID:26406833

  4. Structure transitions induced by the Hall term in homogeneous and isotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, H.; Araki, K.

    2014-07-15

    Hall effects on local structures in homogeneous, isotropic, and incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence are studied numerically. The transition of vortices from sheet-like to tubular structures induced by the Hall term is found, while the kinetic energy spectrum does not distinguish the two types of structures. It is shown by the use of the sharp low-pass filter that the transition occurs not only in the scales smaller than the ion skin depth but also in a larger scale. The transition is related with the forward energy transfer in the spectral space. Analyses by the use of the sharp low-pass filter show that the nonlinear energy transfer associated with the Hall term is dominated by the forward transfer and relatively local in the wave number space. A projection of the simulation data to a Smagorinsky-type sub-grid-scale model shows that the high wave number component of the Hall term may possibly be replaced by the model effectively.

  5. Clustering of vertically constrained passive particles in homogeneous and isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hinsberg, Michel; de Pietro, Massimo; Biferale, Luca; Clercx, Herman; Toschi, Federico

    2014-11-01

    We analyze the dynamics of small particles confined within a horizontal fluid slab in a three-dimensional (3D) homogenous isotropic turbulent velocity field. Particles can freely move horizontally as fluid tracers but are vertically confined around a given horizontal plane via a simple linear restoring force. The present model may be considered as the simplest description for the dynamics of small aquatic organisms that, due to swimming, active regulation of their buoyancy or other mechanisms, are capable to maintain themselves in a shallow horizontal layer somewhere below the free surface of oceans or lakes. In the model varying the strength of the restoring force can control the thickness of the fluid slab in which the particles can move. Whenever some confinement is present, particle trajectories deviate from fluid tracers and experience an effectively compressible velocity field. We report a quantification of this effective compressibility as well as a quantification of preferential concentration of tracer particles in terms of the correlation dimension. We found that there exists a particular value of the force constant, corresponding to a mean slab depth approximately equal to a few times the Kolmogorov length scale, that maximizes the clustering of the particles. This work is part of the research programmes 11PR2841 and FP112 of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is part of the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). The work was partially funded by ERC Grant No 339032.

  6. A Stochastic Model for the Relative Motion of High Stokes Number Particles in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhariwal, Rohit; Rani, Sarma; Koch, Donald

    2014-11-01

    In the current study, a novel analytical closure for the diffusion current in the PDF equation is presented that is applicable to high-inertia particle pairs with Stokes numbers Str >> 1 . Here Str is a Stokes number based on the time-scale τr of eddies whose size scales with pair separation r. Using this closure, Langevin equations were solved to evolve particle-pair relative velocities and separations in stationary isotropic turbulence. The Langevin equation approach enables the simulation of the full PDF of pair relative motion, instead of only the first few moments of the PDF as is the case in a moments-based approach. Accordingly, PDFs Ω (U | r) and Ω (Ur | r) are computed for various separations r, where the former is the PDF of relative velocity U and the latter is the PDF of the radial component of relative velocity Ur, both conditioned upon the separation r. Consistent with the DNS study of Sundaram & Collins, the Langevin simulations capture the transition of Ω (U | r) from being Gaussian at integral-scale separations to an exponential PDF at Kolmogorov-scale separations. The radial distribution functions (RDFs) computed from these simulations also show reasonable quantitative agreement with those from the DNS of Fevrier et al.

  7. A priori study of subgrid-scale flux of a passive scalar in isotropic homogeneous turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Chumakov, Sergei

    2008-01-01

    We perform a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of forced homogeneous isotropic turbulence with a passive scalar that is forced by mean gradient. The DNS data are used to study the properties of subgrid-scale flux of a passive scalar in the framework of large eddy simulation (LES), such as alignment trends between the flux, resolved, and subgrid-scale flow structures. It is shown that the direction of the flux is strongly coupled with the subgrid-scale stress axes rather than the resolved flow quantities such as strain, vorticity, or scalar gradient. We derive an approximate transport equation for the subgrid-scale flux of a scalar and look at the relative importance of the terms in the transport equation. A particular form of LES tensor-viscosity model for the scalar flux is investigated, which includes the subgrid-scale stress. Effect of different models for the subgrid-scale stress on the model for the subgrid-scale flux is studied.

  8. Structure transitions induced by the Hall term in homogeneous and isotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, H.; Araki, K.

    2014-07-01

    Hall effects on local structures in homogeneous, isotropic, and incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence are studied numerically. The transition of vortices from sheet-like to tubular structures induced by the Hall term is found, while the kinetic energy spectrum does not distinguish the two types of structures. It is shown by the use of the sharp low-pass filter that the transition occurs not only in the scales smaller than the ion skin depth but also in a larger scale. The transition is related with the forward energy transfer in the spectral space. Analyses by the use of the sharp low-pass filter show that the nonlinear energy transfer associated with the Hall term is dominated by the forward transfer and relatively local in the wave number space. A projection of the simulation data to a Smagorinsky-type sub-grid-scale model shows that the high wave number component of the Hall term may possibly be replaced by the model effectively.

  9. Analysis of isotropic turbulence using a public database and the Web service model, and applications to study subgrid models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneveau, Charles; Yang, Yunke; Perlman, Eric; Wan, Minpin; Burns, Randal; Szalay, Alex; Chen, Shiyi; Eyink, Gregory

    2008-11-01

    A public database system archiving a direct numerical simulation (DNS) data set of isotropic, forced turbulence is used for studying basic turbulence dynamics. The data set consists of the DNS output on 1024-cubed spatial points and 1024 time-samples spanning about one large-scale turn-over timescale. This complete space-time history of turbulence is accessible to users remotely through an interface that is based on the Web-services model (see http://turbulence.pha.jhu.edu). Users may write and execute analysis programs on their host computers, while the programs make subroutine-like calls that request desired parts of the data over the network. The architecture of the database is briefly explained, as are some of the new functions such as Lagrangian particle tracking and spatial box-filtering. These tools are used to evaluate and compare subgrid stresses and models.

  10. Absorption of intense microwaves and ion acoustic turbulence due to heat transport

    SciTech Connect

    De Groot, J.S.; Liu, J.M.; Matte, J.P.

    1994-02-04

    Measurements and calculations of the inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of intense microwaves are presented. The isotropic component of the electron distribution becomes flat-topped in agreement with detailed Fokker-Planck calculations. The plasma heating is reduced due to the flat-topped distributions in agreement with calculations. The calculations show that the heat flux at high microwave powers is very large, q{sub max} {approx} 0.3 n{sub e}v{sub e}T{sub e}. A new particle model to, calculate the heat transport inhibition due to ion acoustic turbulence in ICF plasmas is also presented. One-dimensional PIC calculations of ion acoustic turbulence excited due to heat transport are presented. The 2-D PIC code is presently being used to perform calculations of heat flux inhibition due to ion acoustic turbulence.

  11. Model experiment to study sonic boom propagation through turbulence. Part II. Effect of turbulence intensity and propagation distance through turbulence.

    PubMed

    Lipkens, B; Blackstock, D T

    1998-09-01

    A model experiment was reported to be successful in simulating the propagation of sonic booms through a turbulent atmosphere [B. Lipkens and D. T. Blackstock, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 103, 148-158 (1998)]. In this study the effect on N wave characteristics of turbulence intensity and propagation distance through turbulence are investigated. The main parameters of interest are the rise time and the peak pressure. The effect of turbulence intensity and propagation distance is to flatten the rise time and peak pressure distributions. Rise time and peak pressure distributions always have positive skewness after propagation through turbulence. Average rise time grows with turbulence intensity and propagation distance. The scattering of rise time data is one-sided, i.e., rise times are almost always increased by turbulence. Average peak pressure decreases slowly with turbulence intensity and propagation distance. For the reported data a threefold increase in average rise time is observed and a maximum decrease of about 20% in average peak pressure. Rise times more than ten times that of the no turbulence value are observed. At most, the maximum peak pressure doubles after propagation through turbulence, and the minimum peak pressure values are about one-half the no-turbulence values. Rounded waveforms are always more common than peaked waveforms. PMID:9745733

  12. PIV measurement of high-Reynolds-number homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in an enclosed flow apparatus with fan agitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Zhongwang; Pecenak, Zachary K.; Cao, Lujie; Woodward, Scott H.; Liang, Zach; Meng, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Enclosed flow apparatuses with negligible mean flow are emerging as alternatives to wind tunnels for laboratory studies of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence (HIT) with or without aerosol particles, especially in experimental validation of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS). It is desired that these flow apparatuses generate HIT at high Taylor-microscale Reynolds numbers ({{R}λ} ) and enable accurate measurement of turbulence parameters including kinetic energy dissipation rate and thereby {{R}λ} . We have designed an enclosed, fan-driven, highly symmetric truncated-icosahedron ‘soccer ball’ airflow apparatus that enables particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) and other whole-field flow measurement techniques. To minimize gravity effect on inertial particles and improve isotropy, we chose fans instead of synthetic jets as flow actuators. We developed explicit relations between {{R}λ} and physical as well as operational parameters of enclosed HIT chambers. To experimentally characterize turbulence in this near-zero-mean flow chamber, we devised a new two-scale PIV approach utilizing two independent PIV systems to obtain both high resolution and large field of view. Velocity measurement results show that turbulence in the apparatus achieved high homogeneity and isotropy in a large central region (48 mm diameter) of the chamber. From PIV-measured velocity fields, we obtained turbulence dissipation rates and thereby {{R}λ} by using the second-order velocity structure function. A maximum {{R}λ} of 384 was achieved. Furthermore, experiments confirmed that the root mean square (RMS) velocity increases linearly with fan speed, and {{R}λ} increases with the square root of fan speed. Characterizing turbulence in such apparatus paves the way for further investigation of particle dynamics in particle-laden homogeneous and isotropic turbulence.

  13. Analysis of subgrid models using direct and large-eddy simulations of isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, S.; Yeung, P. K.

    1994-12-01

    Direct and large eddy simulations of forced and decaying isotropic turbulence have been performed using a pseudospectral and a finite-difference code. Subgrid models that include a one-equation subgrid kinetic energy model with and without a stochastic backscatter forcing term and a new scale similarity model have been analyzed in both Fourier space and physical space. The Fourier space analysis showed that the energy transfer across the cutoff wavenumber k(sub c) is dominated by local interaction. The correlation between the exact and the modeled (by a spectral eddy viscosity) nonlinear terms and the subgrid energy transfer in physical space was found to be quite low. In physical space, a similar correlation analysis was carried out using top hat filtering. Results show that the subgrid stress and the energy flux predicted by the subgrid models correlates very well with the exact data. The scale similarity model showed very high correlation for reasonable grid resolution. However, with decrease in grid resolution, the scale similarity model became more uncorrelated, when compared to the kinetic energy subgrid model. The subgrid models were then used for large-eddy simulations for a range of Reynolds number. It was determined that the dissipation was modeled poorly and that the correlation with the exact results was quite low for all the models. In general, for coarse grid resolution, the scale similarity model consistently showed very low correlation while the kinetic energy model showed a relatively higher correlation. These results suggest that to use the scale similarity model relatively fine grid resolution may be required, whereas, the kinetic energy model could be used even in coarse grid.

  14. Flow structure interaction between a flexible cantilever beam and isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Andrew; Morvan, Thomas; Goushcha, Oleg; Andreopoulos, Yiannis; Elvin, Niell

    2015-11-01

    In the present experimental work we consider the degree of distortion of isotropy and homogeneity of grid turbulence caused by the presence of a thin flexible cantilever beam immersed in the flow aligned in the longitudinal direction. Beams of various rigidities and lengths were used in the experiments. Piezoelectric patches were attached to the beams which provided an output voltage proportional to the strain and therefore proportional to the beam's deflection. The experiments were carried out in a large scale wind tunnel and hot-wires were used to measure turbulence intensity in the vicinity of the beams for various values of the ratio of aerodynamic loading to beam's rigidity. It was found that the flow field distortion depends on the rigidity of the beam. For very rigid beams this distortion is of the order of the boundary layer thickness developing over the beam while for very flexible beams the distorted region is of the order of the beam's tip deflection. Analysis of the time-dependent signals indicated some correlation between the frequency of beam's vibration and flow structures detected. Supported by NSF Grant: CBET #1033117.

  15. Experimental Study of Homogeneous Isotropic Slowly-Decaying Turbulence in Giant Grid-Wind Tunnel Set Up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliseda, Alberto; Bourgoin, Mickael; Eswirp Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    We present preliminary results from a recent grid turbulence experiment conducted at the ONERA wind tunnel in Modane, France. The ESWIRP Collaboration was conceived to probe the smallest scales of a canonical turbulent flow with very high Reynolds numbers. To achieve this, the largest scales of the turbulence need to be extremely big so that, even with the large separation of scales, the smallest scales would be well above the spatial and temporal resolution of the instruments. The ONERA wind tunnel in Modane (8 m -diameter test section) was chosen as a limit of the biggest large scales achievable in a laboratory setting. A giant inflatable grid (M = 0.8 m) was conceived to induce slowly-decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence in a large region of the test section, with minimal structural risk. An international team or researchers collected hot wire anemometry, ultrasound anemometry, resonant cantilever anemometry, fast pitot tube anemometry, cold wire thermometry and high-speed particle tracking data of this canonical turbulent flow. While analysis of this large database, which will become publicly available over the next 2 years, has only started, the Taylor-scale Reynolds number is estimated to be between 400 and 800, with Kolmogorov scales as large as a few mm . The ESWIRP Collaboration is formed by an international team of scientists to investigate experimentally the smallest scales of turbulence. It was funded by the European Union to take advantage of the largest wind tunnel in Europe for fundamental research.

  16. Intensity fluctuations of ultrasonic scattering in a highly turbulent flow.

    PubMed

    Shen, C; Lemmin, U

    2000-05-01

    Aspects of ultrasound intensity fluctuations backscattered from additive microstructures in a turbulent flow have been investigated theoretically and experimentally for the conditions of a small insonified volume, a high sound frequency and strong turbulence. These conditions are typically found in high resolution Doppler sonar applications. An easily applicable expression for the auto-correlation of scattering intensity fluctuations is obtained by introducing open-channel turbulence theory, a semi-empirical scalar spectrum (including a Batchelor spectrum) and a Gaussian window function. Experiments carried out in a laboratory-clear water, open-channel flow for different turbulence levels verify the underlying assumptions. A good agreement is found with the predictions made with the above-derived expression. The feasibility of extracting flow information from the backscattered intensity fluctuations is discussed. PMID:10857575

  17. Intense sediment transport: Collisional to turbulent suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzi, Diego; Fraccarollo, Luigi

    2016-02-01

    A recent simple analytical approach to the problem of steady, uniform transport of sediment by a turbulent shearing fluid dominated by interparticle collisions is extended to the case in which the mean turbulent lift may partially or totally support the weight of the sediment. We treat the granular-fluid mixture as a continuum and make use of constitutive relations of kinetic theory of granular gases to model the particle phase and a simple mixing-length approach for the fluid. We focus on pressure-driven flows over horizontal, erodible beds and divide the flow itself into layers, each dominated by different physical mechanisms. This permits a crude analytical integration of the governing equations and to obtain analytical expressions for the distribution of particle concentration and velocity. The predictions of the theory are compared with existing laboratory measurements on the flow of glass spheres and sand particles in water. We also show how to build a regime map to distinguish between collisional, turbulent-collisional, and fully turbulent suspensions.

  18. Large-eddy simulation of very large kinetic and magnetic Reynolds number isotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence using a spectral subgrid model

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, T; Sagaut, P; Schilling, O; Zhou, Y

    2006-07-05

    A spectral subggrid-scale eddy viscosity and magnetic resisitivity model based on the eddy-damped quasi-normal Markovian (EDQNM) spectral kinetic and magnetic energy transfer presented in [12] is used in large-eddy simulation (LES) of large kinetic and magnetic Reynold number magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. The proposed model is assessed via a posteri tests on three-dimensional, incompressible, isotropic, non-helical, freely-decaying MHD turbulence at asymptotically large Reynolds numbers. Using LES with an initial condition characterized by an Alfv{acute e}n ratio of kinetic to magnetic energy {tau}{sub A} equal to unity, it is shown that at the kinetic energy spectrum E{sub K}(k) and magnetic energy spectrum E{sub M}(k) exhibit Kolmogorov -5/3 inertial subrange scalings in the LES, consistent with the EDQNM model.

  19. Turbulence intensity and turbulent kinetic energy parameters over a heterogeneous terrain of Loess Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Ping; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Runyuan; Li, Yaohui; Wang, Sheng

    2015-09-01

    A deep understanding of turbulence structure is important for investigating the characteristics of the atmospheric boundary layer, especially over heterogeneous terrain. In the present study, turbulence intensity and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) parameters are analyzed for different conditions with respect to stability, wind direction and wind speed over a valley region of the Loess Plateau of China during December 2003 and January 2004. The purpose of the study is to examine whether the observed turbulence intensity and TKE parameters satisfy Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST), and analyze the wind shear effect on, and thermal buoyancy function of, the TKE, despite the terrain heterogeneity. The results demonstrate that the normalized intensity of turbulence follows MOST for all stability in the horizontal and vertical directions, as well as the normalized TKE in the horizontal direction. The shear effect of the wind speed in the Loess Plateau region is strong in winter and could enhance turbulence for all stability conditions. During daytime, the buoyancy and shear effect together constitute the generation of TKE under unstable conditions. At night, the contribution of buoyancy to TKE is relatively small, and mechanical shearing is the main production form of turbulence.

  20. Power Law Decay in High Intensity Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koster, Timothy; Puga, Alejandro; Nguyen, Baolong; Larue, John

    2015-11-01

    In the study reported herein, the region where the power decay law is applicable for active grid generated turbulence is found by an iterative approach which determines the largest range where the ratio of the dissipation from the power law and the dissipation from the temporal velocity derivative are unity. The square of the Taylor microscale, as noted by Batchelor (1953), is linearly related to downstream distance relative to the virtual origin and can be used in a straightforward manner to find the virtual origin. The fact that the decay of downstream velocity variance is described by a power law is shown to imply power law behavior for various other parameters such as the dissipation, the integral length scale, the Taylor microscale, the Kolmogorov microscale and the Taylor Reynolds number and that there is an algebraic relationship between the various power law exponents. Results are presented for various mean velocities to show the decay exponent as a function of the Taylor Reynolds number.

  1. Comparison of hot wire/laser velocimeter turbulence intensity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, J. F.; Wilkinson, S. P.

    1982-01-01

    The question of whether a random measure of particle velocities yields a good statistical estimate of the stationary condition of the turbulence flow field was investigated by comparing hot-wire and laser velocimeter turbulence intensity measurements. Great care was taken to insure that the instrument precision of both the laser velocimeter and hot wire was maximized. In this attempt to reduce the measurement uncertainties in the hot wire, direct digitization of the analog output signal was performed with point-by-point conversion to velocity through a spline fit calibration curve and the turbulence intensity function was calculated statistically. Frequent calibrations of the hot wire were performed using the laser velocimeter as the velocity standard to account for the presence of the small seed particles in the air flow and signal drift in the hot wire.

  2. Diffusion in grid turbulence of isotropic macro-particles using a Lagrangian stochastic method: Theory and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joly, A.; Moulin, F.; Violeau, D.; Astruc, D.

    2012-10-01

    The prediction of solid bodies transport (such as algae, debris, sediment grains, or corrosion deposits) is a necessary requirement in many industrial or environmental processes. The physical processes involved cover a wide range of processes, from tidal flow to turbulent eddies and particle drag. A stochastic model was therefore developed to link the different scales of the physical processes where it was assumed that the particles are dilute enough that they do not affect the flow or the motion of other particles while being large enough that each particle does not follow exactly the fluid motions (i.e., macro-particles). The stochastic model is built in such a way that it uses Reynolds-averaged fluid properties to predict trajectories of individual particles. This model was then tested using experimental measurements obtained for isotropic particles released in semi-homogeneous turbulence. The turbulent flow was generated using a pair of oscillating grids and was characterized using particle image velocimetry measurements. The trajectories of the particles were measured using a pair of high resolution cameras. The comparison between the experimental data and different numerical models gives satisfactory results.

  3. LATERAL TURBULENCE INTENSITY AND PLUME MEANDERING DURING STABLE CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is much evidence in the literature for the presence of mesoscale lateral meanders in the stable nighttime boundary layer. These meanders result in relatively high lateral turbulence intensities and diffusion rates when averaged over an hour. Anemometer data from 17 overnigh...

  4. Constant-energetics physical-space forcing methods for improved convergence to homogeneous-isotropic turbulence with application to particle-laden flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassenne, Maxime; Urzay, Javier; Park, George I.; Moin, Parviz

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates control-based forcing methods for incompressible homogeneous-isotropic turbulence forced linearly in physical space which result in constant turbulent kinetic energy, constant turbulent dissipation (also constant enstrophy), or a combination of the two based on a least-squares error minimization. The methods consist of proportional controllers embedded in the forcing coefficients. During the transient, the controllers adjust the forcing coefficients such that the controlled quantity achieves very early a minimal relative error with respect to its target stationary value. Comparisons of these forcing methods are made with the non-controlled approaches of Rosales and Meneveau ["Linear forcing in numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence: Physical space implementations and convergence properties," Phys. Fluids 17, 095106 (2005)] and Carroll and Blanquart ["A proposed modification to Lundgren's physical space velocity forcing method for isotropic turbulence," Phys. Fluids 25, 105114 (2013)], using direct numerical simulations (DNS) and large-eddy simulations (LES). The results indicate that the proposed constant-energetics forcing methods shorten the transient period from a user-defined artificial flow field to Navier-Stokes turbulence while maintaining steadier statistics. Additionally, the proposed method of constant kinetic-energy forcing behaves more robustly in coarse LES when initial conditions are employed that favor the occurrence of subgrid-scale backscatter, whereas the other approaches fail to provide physical turbulent flow fields. For illustration, the proposed forcing methods are applied to dilute particle-laden homogeneous-isotropic turbulent flows; the results serve to highlight the influences of the forcing strategies on the disperse-phase statistics.

  5. Evaluation of Several Approximate Methods for Calculating the Symmetrical Bending-Moment Response of Flexible Airplanes to Isotropic Atmospheric Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Floyd V.; Yntema, Robert T.

    1959-01-01

    Several approximate procedures for calculating the bending-moment response of flexible airplanes to continuous isotropic turbulence are presented and evaluated. The modal methods (the mode-displacement and force-summation methods) and a matrix method (segmented-wing method) are considered. These approximate procedures are applied to a simplified airplane for which an exact solution to the equation of motion can be obtained. The simplified airplane consists of a uniform beam with a concentrated fuselage mass at the center. Airplane motions are limited to vertical rigid-body translation and symmetrical wing bending deflections. Output power spectra of wing bending moments based on the exact transfer-function solutions are used as a basis for the evaluation of the approximate methods. It is shown that the force-summation and the matrix methods give satisfactory accuracy and that the mode-displacement method gives unsatisfactory accuracy.

  6. Turbulence generation through intense localized sources of energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maqui, Agustin; Donzis, Diego

    2015-11-01

    Mechanisms to generate turbulence in controlled conditions have been studied for nearly a century. Most common methods include passive and active grids with a focus on incompressible turbulence. However, little attention has been given to compressible flows, and even less to hypersonic flows, where phenomena such as thermal non-equilibrium can be present. Using intense energy from lasers, extreme molecule velocities can be generated from photo-dissociation. This creates strong localized changes in both the hydrodynamics and thermodynamics of the flow, which may perturb the flow in a way similar to an active grid to generate turbulence in hypersonic flows. A large database of direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to study the feasibility of such an approach. An extensive analysis of single and two point statistics, as well as spectral dynamics is used to characterize the evolution of the flow towards realistic turbulence. Local measures of enstrophy and dissipation are studied to diagnose the main mechanisms for energy exchange. As commonly done in compressible flows, dilatational and solenoidal components are separated to understand the effect of acoustics on the development of turbulence. Further results for cases that assimilate laboratory conditions will be discussed. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of AFOSR.

  7. Conductive and dielectric defects, and anisotropic and isotropic turbulence in liquid crystals: Electric power fluctuation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth-Katona, Tibor; Gleeson, James T.

    2004-01-01

    Fluctuations of the injected electric power during electroconvection (EHC) of liquid crystals are reported in both the conductive and the dielectric regime of convection. The amplitude and the frequency of the fluctuations, as well as the probability density functions have been compared in these two regimes and substantial differences have been found both in defect turbulence of EHC and at the DSM1→DSM2 transition.

  8. Validating under-resolved turbulence intensities for PIV experiments in canonical wall-bounded turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Kevin; Monty, J. P.; Hutchins, N.

    2016-08-01

    The discrepancy between measured turbulence intensity obtained from experiments in wall-bounded turbulence and the fully resolved reference results (usually from DNS datasets) are often attributed to spatial resolution issues, especially in PIV measurements due to the presence of spatial averaging within the interrogation region/volume. In many cases, in particular at high Reynolds numbers (where there is a lack of DNS data), there is no attempt to verify that this is the case. There is a risk that attributing unexpected PIV statistics to spatial resolution, without careful checks, could mask wider problems with the experimental setup or test facility. Here, we propose a robust technique to validate the under-resolved PIV obtained turbulence intensity profiles for canonical wall-bounded turbulence. This validation scheme is independent of Reynolds number and does not rely on empirical functions. It is based on arguments that (1) the viscous-scaled small-scale turbulence energy is invariant with Reynolds number and that (2) the spatially under-resolved measurement is sufficient to capture the large-scale energy. This then suggests that we can estimate the missing energy from volume-filtered DNS data at much lower Reynolds numbers. Good agreement is found between the experimental results and estimation profiles for all three velocity components, demonstrating that the estimation tool successfully computes the missing energy for given spatial resolutions over a wide range of Reynolds numbers. A database for a canonical turbulent boundary layer and associated MATLAB function are provided that enable this missing energy to be calculated across a range of interrogation volume sizes, so that users do not require access to raw DNS data. This methodology and tool will provide PIV practitioners, investigating canonical wall-bounded turbulent flow with a convenient check of the effects of spatial resolution on a given experiment.

  9. A unified sweep-stick mechanism to explain particle clustering in two- and three-dimensional homogeneous, isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, S. W.; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2009-11-01

    Our work focuses on the sweep-stick mechanism of particle clustering in turbulent flows introduced by Chen et al. [L. Chen, S. Goto, and J. C. Vassilicos, "Turbulent clustering of stagnation points and inertial particles," J. Fluid Mech. 553, 143 (2006)] for two-dimensional (2D) inverse cascading homogeneous, isotropic turbulence (HIT), whereby heavy particles cluster in a way that mimics the clustering of zero-acceleration points. We extend this phenomenology to three-dimensional (3D) HIT, where it was previously reported that zero-acceleration points were extremely rare. Having obtained a unified mechanism we quantify the Stokes number dependency of the probability of the heavy particles to be at zero-acceleration points and show that in the inertial range of Stokes numbers, the sweep-stick mechanism is dominant over the conventionally proposed mechanism of heavy particles being centrifuged from high vorticity regions to high strain regions. Finally, having a clustering coincidence between particles and zero-acceleration points, both in 2D and 3D HIT, motivates us to demonstrate the sweep and stick parts of the mechanism in both dimensions. The sweeping of regions of low acceleration regions by the local fluid velocity in both flows is demonstrated by introducing a velocity of the acceleration field. Finally, the stick part is demonstrated by showing that heavy particles statistically move with the same velocity as zero-acceleration points, while moving away from any nonzero-acceleration region, irrespective of their Stokes number. These results explain the clustering of inertial particles given the clustering of zero-acceleration points.

  10. Estimating Overwater Turbulence Intensity from Routine Gust-Factor Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, S. A.; Blanchard, Brian W.

    2004-12-01

    For overwater diffusion estimates the Offshore and Coastal Dispersion (OCD) model is preferred by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The U.S. Minerals Management Service has recommended that the OCD model be used for emissions located on the outer continental shelf. During southerly winds over the Gulf of Mexico, for example, the pollutants from hundreds of offshore platforms may affect the gulf coasts. In the OCD model, the overwater plume is described by the Gaussian equation, which requires the computation of σy and σz, which are, in turn, related to the turbulence intensity, overwater trajectory, and atmospheric stability. On the basis of several air sea interaction experiments [the Barbados Oceanographic and Meteorological Experiment (BOMEX), the Air-Mass Transformation Experiment (AMTEX), and, most recently, the Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE)] and the extensive datasets from the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC), it is shown that under neutral and stable conditions the overwater turbulence intensities are linearly proportional to the gust factor (G), which is the ratio of the wind gust and mean wind speed at height z (Uz) as reported hourly by the NDBC buoys. Under unstable conditions, it is first shown that the popular formula relating the horizontal turbulence intensity (σu,/u, where u is the friction velocity) to the ratio of the mixing height (h) and the buoyancy length (L) (i.e., h/L) suffers from a self-correlation problem and cannot be used in the marine environment. Then, alternative formulas to estimate the horizontal turbulence intensities (σu,/Uz) using G are proposed for practical applications. Furthermore, formulas to estimate u and z/L are fundamentally needed in air sea interaction studies, in addition to dispersion meteorology.


  11. Universality at low Reynolds numbers and the emergence of intermittent behavior in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donzis, Diego; Yakhot, Victor; Sreenivasan, K. R.

    2015-11-01

    Most approaches to understand turbulence have sought universal behavior believed to manifest at high Reynolds numbers (Rλ). However, recent theory and simulations suggest that universal characteristics, such as the non-trivial anomalous scaling exponents of moments of velocity gradients, emerge even at very low Rλ at which no inertial range exists. Furthermore, with decreasing Reynolds numbers, a transition occurs from fully intermittent turbulence to (approximately) Gaussian behavior at an apparently universal critical Rλ. A potential implication of these observations is that significant information concerning the inertial range (e.g. scaling exponents) is already manifest in the dissipation range at very low Rλ. Thus, high Rλ properties can be studied with well-resolved low-Rλ simulations instead of marginally resolved high-Reynolds flows. The focus of this talk is to explore signatures of universality at high-Reynolds numbers in the dissipation range of highly resolved DNS (kmax η ~ O (20)) for Rλ up to 90, and decaying simulations close to the critical Rλ. In addition to statistics of velocity gradients and dissipation we explore evidence of Beltramization as suggested in past theoretical work.

  12. The effect of Reynolds number on inertial particle dynamics in isotropic turbulence. Part 2. Simulations with gravitational effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Peter J.; Bragg, Andrew D.; Collins, Lance R.

    2016-06-01

    In Part I of this study, we analyzed the motion of inertial particles in isotropic turbulence in the absence of gravity using direct numerical simulation (DNS). Here, in Part II, we introduce gravity and study its effect over a wide range of flow Reynolds numbers, Froude numbers, and particle Stokes numbers. We see that gravity causes particles to sample the flow more uniformly and reduces the time particles can spend interacting with the underlying turbulence. We also find that gravity tends to increase inertial particle accelerations, and we introduce a model to explain that effect. We then analyze the particle relative velocities and radial distribution functions (RDFs), which are generally seen to be independent of Reynolds number for low and moderate Kolmogorov-scale Stokes numbers $St$. We see that gravity causes particle relative velocities to decrease, and that the relative velocities have higher scaling exponents with gravity. We observe that gravity has a non-trivial effect on clustering, acting to decrease clustering at low $St$ and to increase clustering at high $St$. By considering the effect of gravity on the clustering mechanisms described in the theory of Zaichik & Alipchenkov (New J. Phys., 11:103018, 2009), we provide an explanation for this non-trivial effect of gravity. We also show that when the effects of gravity are accounted for in the theory of Zaichik & Alipchenkov, the results compare favorably with DNS. The relative velocities and RDFs exhibit considerable anisotropy at small separations, and this anisotropy is quantified using spherical harmonic functions. We use the relative velocities and the RDFs to compute the particle collision kernels, and find that the collision kernel remains as it was for the case without gravity, namely nearly independent of Reynolds number for low and moderate $St$.

  13. Two-color correlation between intensity fluctuations in atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Meilan; Zhao, Daomu

    2016-06-01

    The correlation between intensity fluctuations generated by two varying wavelengths through a turbulent medium is investigated, where the influences arising from source correlation and perturbation of atmosphere are mainly emphasized. It is demonstrated that the correlation between intensity fluctuations can be enhanced or reduced by modulating the difference of two incident wavelengths. For shorter wavelength, the correlation between intensity fluctuations is stronger at the far field. In addition, in the case of single wavelength, a relationship λ1z1 =λ2z2 =λnzn holding in free space could be found, from which the distance where the peak value occurs may be inferred. However, it can be destroyed by increasing the strength of atmosphere.

  14. Rotational motion of elongated particles in isotropic turbulent flow: statistical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lihao; Andersson, Helge; Variano, Evan

    2014-11-01

    We consider the rotational motion of non-spherical particles in turbulent flow, comparing the statistics of particles' angular velocity to the corresponding quantities computed in the fluid phase. We use numerical (DNS) and laboratory measurements for particles that are both larger and smaller than the Kolmogorov lengthscale. The particles are spheroids or rods, with aspect ratios between 1 and 10. We will discuss the subtleties of defining a meaningful Stokes number for these particles, focusing on the effect of asphericity and the fact that our interest is in rotation and not translation. Comparing the probability density function of angular velocity between fluid and particle phase indicates that the angular velocity of particles has a narrower distribution than that of the fluid phase, and that. particles do respond to extreme events in the fluid phase. The first four moments of the PDFs are analyzed, and these show that the ``filtering'' effect is very similar between DNS and lab experiments, despite differences in particle sizes and mass. We propose a nondimensional curve for predicting the magnitude of the filtering effect, and discuss the implications of this curve for the definition of Stokes number, as discussed earlier. This work has been supported by grants from the Peder Sather Center for Advanced Study at UC Berkeley and from the Research Council of Norway (Contract No. 213917/F20).

  15. Clustering and relative velocity of heavy particles under gravitational settling in isotropic turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Guodong; He, Guo-Wei

    2015-11-01

    Clustering and intermittency in radial relative velocity (RRV) of heavy particles of same size settling in turbulent flows can be remarkably changed due to gravity. Clustering is monotonically reduced at Stokes number less than 1 under gravity due to the disability of the centrifugal mechanism, however it is non-monotonically enhanced at Stokes number greater than 1 due to the multiplicative amplification in the case that the proposed effective Kubo number is less than 1. Although gravity causes monotonical reduction in the rms of RRV of particles at a given Stokes number with decreasing Froude number, the variation tendency in the tails of standardized PDF of RRV versus Froude number is obviously different: the tails become narrower at a small Stokes number, while they become broader at a large Stokes number. The mechanism of this variation stems from the compromise between the following two competing factors. The mitigation of correlation of particle positions and the regions of high strain rate which are more intermittent reduces the intermittency in RRV at small Stokes numbers, while the significant reduction in the backward-in-time relative separations will make particle pairs see small-scale structures, leading to a higher intermittency in RRV at large Stokes numbers. NSAF of China (grant number U1230126); NSFC (grant numbers 11072247 and 11232011).

  16. The structure of partially premixed methane flames in high-intensity turbulent flows

    SciTech Connect

    Yaldizli, Murat; Mehravaran, Kian; Mohammad, Hyderuddin; Jaberi, Farhad A.

    2008-09-15

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are conducted to study the structure of partially premixed and non-premixed methane flames in high-intensity two-dimensional isotropic turbulent flows. The results obtained via ''flame normal analysis'' show local extinction and reignition for both non-premixed and partially premixed flames. Dynamical analysis of the flame with a Lagrangian method indicates that the time integrated strain rate characterizes the finite-rate chemistry effects and the flame extinction better than the strain rate. It is observed that the flame behavior is affected by the ''pressure-dilatation'' and ''viscous-dissipation'' in addition to strain rate. Consistent with previous studies, high vorticity values are detected close to the reaction zone, where the vorticity generation by the ''baroclinic torque'' was found to be significant. The influences of (initial) Reynolds and Damkoehler numbers, and various air-fuel premixing levels on flame and turbulence variables are also studied. It is observed that the flame extinction occurs similarly in flames with different fuel-air premixing. Our simulations also indicate that the CO emission increases as the partial premixing of the fuel with air increases. Higher values of the temperature, the OH mass fraction and the CO mass fraction are observed within the flame zone at higher Reynolds numbers. (author)

  17. The effect of Reynolds number on inertial particle dynamics in isotropic turbulence. Part 1. Simulations without gravitational effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Peter J.; Bragg, Andrew D.; Collins, Lance R.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we analyze the statistics of both individual inertial particles and inertial particle pairs in direct numerical simulations of homogeneous isotropic turbulence in the absence of gravity. The effect of the Taylor microscale Reynolds number $R_\\lambda$ on the particle statistics is examined over the largest range to date (from $R_\\lambda = 88-597$). We first explore the effect of preferential sampling on the single-particle statistics, and use our understanding of preferential sampling to provide a physical explanation for many of the trends in the particle velocity gradients, kinetic energies, and accelerations at low $St$. As $St$ increases, inertial filtering effects become more important, causing the particle kinetic energies and accelerations to decrease. We then consider particle-pair statistics, and focus our attention on the relative velocities and radial distribution functions (RDFs) of the particles. The relative velocity statistics indicate that preferential-sampling effects are important for $St \\lesssim 0.1$ and that path-history/non-local effects become increasingly important for $St \\gtrsim 0.2$. The lower-order relative velocity statistics are only weakly sensitive to changes in Reynolds number at low $St$. We find that the RDFs peak near $St$ of order unity, that they exhibit power-law scaling for low and intermediate $St$, and that they are largely independent of Reynolds number for low and intermediate $St$. We also observe that at large $St$, changes in the RDF are related to changes the scaling exponents of the relative velocity variances. The particle collision kernel is found to be largely insensitive to the flow Reynolds number, suggesting that relatively low-Reynolds-number simulations may be able to capture much of the relevant physics of droplet collisions and growth in the adiabatic cores of atmospheric clouds.

  18. Intensity and angle-of-arrival spectra of laser light propagating through axially homogeneous buoyancy-driven turbulence.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Shashikant S; Arakeri, Jaywant H

    2016-08-01

    Frequency spectra obtained from the measurements of light intensity and angle of arrival (AOA) of parallel laser light propagating through the axially homogeneous, axisymmetric buoyancy-driven turbulent flow at high Rayleigh numbers in a long (length-to-diameter ratio of about 10) vertical tube are reported. The flow is driven by an unstable density difference created across the tube ends using brine and fresh water. The highest Rayleigh number is about 8×109. The aim of the present work is to find whether the conventional Obukhov-Corrsin scaling or Bolgiano-Obukhov (BO) scaling is obtained for the intensity and AOA spectra in the case of light propagation in a buoyancy-driven turbulent medium. Theoretical relations for the frequency spectra of log amplitude and AOA fluctuations developed for homogeneous isotropic turbulent media are modified for the buoyancy-driven flow in the present case to obtain the asymptotic scalings for the high and low frequency ranges. For low frequencies, the spectra of intensity and vertical AOA fluctuations obtained from measurements follow BO scaling, while scaling for the spectra of horizontal AOA fluctuations shows a small departure from BO scaling. PMID:27505375

  19. Experimental study of turbulence intensity influence for turbulent cross flow in staggered tube bundle using grooved cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahli, Ouissem; Adjlout, Lahouari; Ladjedel, Omar; Amine Ghazi, Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    The present work is an experimental investigation on the effect of the turbulence intensity variation in a staggered tube bundle equipped with grooves at 90° and 270°.The experiments were carried out in a subsonic wind tunnel. Three Reynolds numbers and three turbulence levels were tested. The pressure distributions and drag forces were measured. Surface visualizations were also performed. The obtained results show that the turbulence intensity for different Reynolds number has an influence on the reduction of the drag coefficient.

  20. Effects of free-stream turbulence intensity on a boundary layer recovering from concave curvature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kestoras, M. D.; Simon, T. W.

    1995-04-01

    In an attempt to characterize the turbulence characteristics of the high free-stream turbulence (TI approximately 8%) flow, several experiments are conducted on a flat recovery wall downstream of sustained concave curvature in the presence of such flow. A turbulent boundary layer that grows from the leading edge of a concave wall, then passes onto a downstream flat wall is considered. The results indicate that turbulence intensities increase profoundly in the outer region of the boundary layer over the recovery wall. The recovery wall is found to be lifted off by near-wall turbulent eddies while a 'stabilized' region forms near the wall. Contrary to the low-free-stream turbulence intensity flow, turbulent eddies penetrate the outer parts of the 'stabilized' region. The behavior of the Stanton numbers as well as the velocity distribution on the core of the flow are also accounted for.

  1. Estimation of turbulent parameters based on the intensity scintillations of the laser beam propagated through a turbulent water layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, Victor A.

    2016-03-01

    The inner scale and the refractive-index structure parameter Cn2 are estimated by the intensity scintillations of the laser beam propagated through the turbulent water layer. The laser beam scintillations caused by underwater propagation can be described in the framework of a turbulence model with accounting of the inner scale. An intensity field has been observed at a 2 m distance when the laser beam passed through a water convective cell with a characteristic Rayleigh number of about 108. Similar intensity fields were simulated by using the split-step method. Characteristics of the experimentally obtained and numerically simulated intensity fields are compared and analyzed. A simple method of the turbulent parameter estimation is proposed.

  2. Intensity of thunderstorm-generated turbulence revealed by large-eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Todd P.; Sharman, Robert D.

    2014-03-01

    Thunderstorms are characterized by turbulent processes that constitute an important aviation hazard and cause vertical transport of atmospheric constituents. Turbulence occurs within cloud and in the surrounding clear air, but, despite its importance, the characteristics of thunderstorm-generated turbulence and its spatial distribution are poorly understood, especially outside of cloud. Here we use large-eddy simulation to characterize turbulence generated by a canonical thunderstorm. The simulation identifies regions of notable three-dimensional anisotropic turbulence more than 5 km above the storm, in a shallow layer above the storm's anvil, and a horizontally asymmetric pattern of weaker turbulence that extends more than 50 km horizontally away from the cloud. Our results provide the first continuous estimate of turbulence intensity in and around thunderstorms and represent a major step toward improved turbulence avoidance methods. The results have broader implications for understanding the fundamental aspects of how thunderstorms affect their environment through vertical exchange processes.

  3. Covariance statistics of turbulence velocity components for wind-energy-conversion system design-homogeneous, isotropic case

    SciTech Connect

    Fichtl, G.H.

    1983-09-01

    When designing a wind energy converison system (WECS), it may be necessary to take into account the distribution of wind across the disc of rotation. The specific engineering applications include structural strength, fatigue, and control. This wind distribution consists of two parts, namely that associated with the mean wind profile and that associated with the turbulence velocity fluctuation field. The work reported herein is aimed at the latter, namely the distribution of turbulence velocity fluctuations across the WECS disk of rotation. A theory is developed for the two-time covariance matrix for turbulence velocity vector components for wind energy conversion system (WECS) design. The theory is developed for homogeneous and iotropic turbulance with the assumption that Taylor's hypothesis is valid. The Eulerian turbulence velocity vector field is expanded about the hub of the WECS. Formulae are developed for the turbulence velocity vector component covariance matrix following the WECS blade elements. It is shown that upon specification of the turbulence energy spectrum function and the WECS rotation rate, the two-point, two-time covariance matrix of the turbulent flow relative to the WECS bladed elements is determined. This covariance matrix is represented as the sum of nonstationary and stationary contributions. Generalized power spectral methods are used to obtain two-point, double frequency power spectral density functions for the turbulent flow following the blade elements. The Dryden turbulence model is used to demonstrate the theory. A discussion of linear system response analysis is provided to show how the double frequency turbulence spectra might be used to calculate response spectra of a WECS to turbulent flow. Finally the spectrum of the component of turbulence normal to the WECS disc of rotation, following the blade elements, is compared with experimental results.

  4. How is turbulence intensity determined by macroscopic variables in a toroidal plasma?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, S.; Tokuzawa, T.; Tamura, N.; Itoh, S.-I.; Kobayashi, T.; Ida, K.; Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Tanaka, K.; Ido, T.; Shimizu, A.; Tsuchiya, H.; Kasuya, N.; Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K.; Sudo, S.; Yamada, H.; Fujisawa, A.; Itoh, K.; the LHD Experiment Group

    2013-11-01

    We report observations of the dynamic response of micro-fluctuations and turbulent flux to a low-frequency heating power modulation in the Large Helical Device. The responses of heat flux and micro-fluctuation intensity differ from that of the change in temperature gradient. This result violates the local transport model, where turbulence is determined by the local temperature gradient. A new relationship between flux, gradient and turbulence is found. In addition to the temperature gradient, the heating rate is proposed as a new, direct controlling parameter of turbulence to explain the fast response of turbulence against periodic modulation of heating power.

  5. Calculation of stress intensity factors in an isotropic multicracked plate: Part 2: Symbolic/numeric implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S. M.; Binienda, W. K.; Tan, H. Q.; Xu, M. H.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical derivations of stress intensity factors (SIF's) of a multicracked plate can be complex and tedious. Recent advances, however, in intelligent application of symbolic computation can overcome these difficulties and provide the means to rigorously and efficiently analyze this class of problems. Here, the symbolic algorithm required to implement the methodology described in Part 1 is presented. The special problem-oriented symbolic functions to derive the fundamental kernels are described, and the associated automatically generated FORTRAN subroutines are given. As a result, a symbolic/FORTRAN package named SYMFRAC, capable of providing accurate SIF's at each crack tip, was developed and validated. Simple illustrative examples using SYMFRAC show the potential of the present approach for predicting the macrocrack propagation path due to existing microcracks in the vicinity of a macrocrack tip, when the influence of the microcrack's location, orientation, size, and interaction are taken into account.

  6. Calculation of stress intensity factors in an isotropic multicracked plate. Part 1: Theoretical development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binienda, W. K.; Arnold, S. M.; Tan, H. Q.

    1992-01-01

    An essential part of describing the damage state and predicting the damage growth in a multicracked plate is the accurate calculation of stress intensity factors (SIF's). Here, a methodology and rigorous solution formulation for SIF's of a multicracked plate, with fully interacting cracks, subjected to a far-field arbitrary stress state is presented. The fundamental perturbation problem is derived, and the steps needed to formulate the system of singular integral equations whose solution gives rise to the evaluation of the SIF's are identified. This analytical derivation and numerical solution are obtained by using intelligent application of symbolic computations and automatic FORTRAN generation capabilities (described in the second part of this paper). As a result, a symbolic/FORTRAN package, named SYMFRAC, that is capable of providing accurate SIF's at each crack tip was developed and validated.

  7. Mean velocity, turbulence intensity, and scale in a subsonic turbulent jet impinging normal to a large flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldman, D. R.; Brinich, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    To explain the increase in noise when a jet impinges on a large flat plate, mean velocity, turbulence intensity, and scale were measured at nominal nozzle-exit velocities of 61, 138, and 192 meters per second with the plate located 7.1 nozzle-exit diameters from the nozzle. The maximum turbulence intensities in free and impinging jets were about the same; however, the integral length scale near the plate surface was only about one-half the free jet scale. The measured intensities and length scales, in conjunction with a contemporary theory of aerodynamic noise, provided a good explanation for the observed increase in noise associated with the impinging jet. An increase in the volume of highly turbulent flow could be the principal reason for the increase in noise.

  8. Effect of secondary convective cells on turbulence intensity profiles, flow generation, and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, S.; Kwon, J. M.; Rhee, T.; Diamond, P. H.

    2012-11-15

    This paper reports the results of gyrokinetic simulation studies of ion temperature gradient driven turbulence which investigate the role of non-resonant modes in turbulence spreading, turbulence regulation, and self-generated plasma rotation. Non-resonant modes, which are those without a rational surface within the simulation domain, are identified as nonlinearly driven, radially extended convective cells. Even though the amplitudes of such convective cells are much smaller than that of the resonant, localized turbulence eddies, we find from bicoherence analysis that the mode-mode interactions in the presence of such convective cells increase the efficiency of turbulence spreading associated with nonlocality phenomena. Artificial suppression of the convective cells shows that turbulence spreading is reduced, and that the turbulence intensity profile is more localized. The more localized turbulence intensity profile produces stronger Reynolds stress and E Multiplication-Sign B shear flows, which in turn results in more effective turbulence self-regulation. This suggests that models without non-resonant modes may significantly underestimate turbulent fluctuation levels and transport.

  9. Anisotropic enhancement of turbulence in large-scale, low-intensity turbulent premixed propane air flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Junichi; Noguchi, Yoshiki; Hirano, Toshisuke; Williams, Forman A.

    2002-07-01

    The density change across premixed flames propagating in turbulent flows modifies the turbulence. The nature of that modification depends on the regime of turbulent combustion, the burner design, the orientation of the turbulent flame and the position within the flame. The present study addresses statistically stationary turbulent combustion in the flame-sheet regime, in which the laminar-flame thickness is less than the Kolmogorov scale, for flames stabilized on a vertically oriented cylindrical burner having fully developed upward turbulent pipe flow upstream from the exit. Under these conditions, rapidly moving wrinkled laminar flamelets form the axisymmetric turbulent flame brush that is attached to the burner exit. Predictions have been made of changes in turbulence properties across laminar flamelets in such situations, but very few measurements have been performed to test the predictions. The present work measures individual velocity changes and changes in turbulence across flamelets at different positions in the turbulent flame brush for three different equivalence ratios, for comparison with theory.

  10. Effects of free-stream turbulence intensity on a boundary layer recovering from concave curvature effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kestoras, M.D.; Simon, T.W.

    1995-04-01

    Experiments are conducted on a flat recovery wall downstream of sustained concave curvature in the presence of high free-stream turbulence (TI {approximately} 8%). This flow simulates some of the features of the flow on the latter parts of the pressure surface of a gas turbine airfoil. The combined effects of concave curvature and TI, both present in the flow over a turbine airfoil, have so far been little studied. Computation of such flows with standard turbulence closure models has not been particularly successful. This experiment attempts to characterize the turbulence characteristics of this flow. In the present study, a turbulent boundary layer grows from the leading edge of a concave wall, then passes onto a downstream flat wall. Results show that turbulence intensities increase profoundly in the outer region of the boundary layer over the recovery wall. Near-wall turbulent eddies appear to lift off the recovery wall and a stabilized region forms near the wall. In contrast to a low-free-stream turbulence intensity flow, turbulent eddies penetrate the outer parts of the stabilized region where sharp velocity and temperature gradients exist. These eddies can more readily transfer momentum and heat. As a result, skin friction coefficients and Stanton numbers on the recovery wall are 20 and 10%, respectively, above their values in the low-free-stream turbulence intensity case. Stanton numbers do not undershoot flat-wall expectations at the same Re{sub {Delta}2} values as seen in the low-TI case. Remarkably, the velocity distribution in the core of the flow over the recovery wall exhibits a negative gradient normal to the wall under high-free-stream turbulence intensity conditions. This velocity distribution appears to be the result of two effects: (1) cross transport of kinetic energy by boundary work in the upstream curved flow and (2) readjustment of static pressure profiles in response to the removal of concave curvature.

  11. Gaussian Multiplicative Chaos for Symmetric Isotropic Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevillard, Laurent; Rhodes, Rémi; Vargas, Vincent

    2013-02-01

    Motivated by isotropic fully developed turbulence, we define a theory of symmetric matrix valued isotropic Gaussian multiplicative chaos. Our construction extends the scalar theory developed by J.P. Kahane in 1985.

  12. Measurements in film cooling flows: Hole L/D and turbulence intensity effects

    SciTech Connect

    Burd, S.W.; Kaszeta, R.W.; Simon, T.W.

    1996-12-31

    Hot-wire anemometry of simulated film cooling was used to study the influence of freestream turbulence intensity and film cooling hole length-to-diameter ratio on mean velocity and turbulence intensity. Measurements were made in the zone where the coolant and freestream flows mix. Flow from one row of film cooling holes with a streamwise injection of 35{degree} and no lateral injection and with a coolant- to-freestream flow velocity ratio of 1.0 was investigated under freestream turbulence levels of 0.5 and 12%. Coolant-to-freestream density ratio was unity. Two length-to-diameter ratios for the film cooling holes, 2.3 and 7.0, are tested. Results show that under low freestream turbulence conditions, pronounced differences exist in the flowfield between L/D=7.0 and 2.3; the differences are less prominent at high freestream turbulence intensities. Generally, short-L/D injection results in ``jetting`` of the coolant further into the freestream flow and enhanced mixing. Other changes in the flowfield attributable to a rise in freestream turbulence intensity to engine- representative conditions are documented. 15 figs, 2 tabs, refs.

  13. Free-Stream Turbulence Intensity in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuhart, Dan H.; McGinley, Catherine B.

    2004-01-01

    An investigation was conducted using hot-wire anemometry to determine the turbulence intensity levels in the test section of the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel in the closed or walls-down configuration. This study was one component of the three-dimensional High-Lift Flow Physics experiment designed to provide code validation data. Turbulence intensities were measured during two stages of the study. In the first stage, the free-stream turbulence levels were measured before and after a change was made to the floor suction surface of the wind tunnel s boundary layer removal system. The results indicated that the new suction surface at the entrance to the test section had little impact on the turbulence intensities. The second stage was an overall flow quality survey of the empty tunnel including measurements of the turbulence levels at several vertical and streamwise locations. Results indicated that the turbulence intensity is a function of tunnel dynamic pressure and the location in the test section. The general shape of the frequency spectrum is fairly consistent throughout the wind tunnel, changing mostly in amplitude (also slightly with frequency) with change in condition and location.

  14. Probe systems for measuring static pressure and turbulence intensity in fluid streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for measuring time-averaged static or ambient pressure and turbulence intensity in a turbulent stream are discussed. The procedure involves placing a plurality of probes in the stream. Each probe responds in a different manner to characteristics of the fluid stream, preferably as a result of having varying cross sections. The responses from the probes are used to eliminate unwanted components in the measured quantities for accurate determination of selected characteristics.

  15. Effect of turbulent atmosphere on the on-axis average intensity of Pearcey–Gaussian beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    F, Boufalah; L, Dalil-Essakali; H, Nebdi; A, Belafhal

    2016-06-01

    The propagation characteristics of the Pearcey–Gaussian (PG) beam in turbulent atmosphere are investigated in this paper. The Pearcey beam is a new kind of paraxial beam, based on the Pearcey function of catastrophe theory, which describes diffraction about a cusp caustic. By using the extended Huygens–Fresnel integral formula in the paraxial approximation and the Rytov theory, an analytical expression of axial intensity for the considered beam family is derived. Some numerical results for PG beam propagating in atmospheric turbulence are given by studying the influences of some factors, including incident beam parameters and turbulence strengths.

  16. Higher-order derivative correlations and the alignment of small-scale structures in isotropic numerical turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    In a three dimensional simulation higher order derivative correlations, including skewness and flatness factors, are calculated for velocity and passive scalar fields and are compared with structures in the flow. The equations are forced to maintain steady state turbulence and collect statistics. It is found that the scalar derivative flatness increases much faster with Reynolds number than the velocity derivative flatness, and the velocity and mixed derivative skewness do not increase with Reynolds number. Separate exponents are found for the various fourth order velocity derivative correlations, with the vorticity flatness exponent the largest. Three dimensional graphics show strong alignment between the vorticity, rate of strain, and scalar-gradient fields. The vorticity is concentrated in tubes with the scalar gradient and the largest principal rate of strain aligned perpendicular to the tubes. Velocity spectra, in Kolmogorov variables, collapse to a single curve and a short minus 5/3 spectral regime is observed.

  17. A new statistical tool to study the geometry of intense vorticity clusters in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vela-Martin, Alberto; Ishihara, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    Recent large-scale direct numerical simulations (DNS) of high-Reynolds number (high-Re) turbulence, suggest that strong micro-scale tube-like vortices form clusters in localized thin regions of space. However, to this date no thorough quantitative and statistical analysis of the geometry of such vortical clusters has been conducted. This study is intended to generate new statistical tools to study the shape and dynamics of these intense vorticity and strain regions. We first propose a new method for locating and analysing the geometrical properties of thresholded vortical clusters contained inside boxes of a given size. Second, we use this new tool to investigate the natural presence of intense shear layers and their relevance as geometrical features of high-Re homogeneous turbulence. This new method is applied to the DNS of homogeneous incompressible turbulence with up to 40963 grid points, showing that the geometry of high vorticity regions varies strongly depending on the threshold and on the size of the clusters. In particular for sizes in the inertial range of scales and high thresholds, approximately layer-like structures of vortices are extracted and visualized. Agreement of results with previous observations and known features of turbulence supports the validity of the proposed method to characterize the geometry of intense vorticity and strain regions in high-Re turbulence.

  18. Sectoral Analysis of Wind Speed and Turbulence Intensity over Forest and Open Land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Elisabeth

    2015-04-01

    More and more wind turbines are built onshore and reduce the available areas for wind energy. Forests are an additional potential for wind energy priority areas. But the high roughness of wooden areas and the resulting turbulences make it difficult to assess sites in forests. In order to cope with this problem some measurements, using Lidar and met masts were done inside and outside wooden areas. Therefore, two posters were created, dealing with the dependence of turbulence intensity on wind speed and wind direction. This poster summarises the existing results, concentrating on the sectoral analysis of wind speed and turbulence intensity. Furthermore it investigates the differences of inflow over landcover with low and high surface roughnesses.

  19. Analysis and Comparison with DNS of a Stochastic Model for the Relative Motion of High-Stokes-Number Particles in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhariwal, Rohit; Rani, Sarma; Koch, Donald

    2015-11-01

    In an earlier work, Rani, Dhariwal, and Koch (JFM, Vol. 756, 2014) developed an analytical closure for the diffusion current in the PDF transport equation describing the relative motion of high-Stokes-number particle pairs in isotropic turbulence. In this study, an improved closure was developed for the diffusion coefficient, such that the motion of the particle-pair center of mass is taken into account. Using the earlier and the new analytical closures, Langevin simulations of pair relative motion were performed for four particle Stokes numbers, Stη = 10 , 20 , 40 , 80 and at two Taylor micro-scale Reynolds numbers Reλ = 76 , 131 . Detailed comparisons of the analytical model predictions with those of DNS were undertaken. It is seen that the pair relative motion statistics obtained from the improved theory show excellent agreement with the DNS statistics. The radial distribution functions (RDFs), and relative velocity PDFs obtained from the improved-closure-based Langevin simulations are found to be in very good agreement with those from DNS. It was found that the RDFs and relative velocity RMS increased with Reλ for all Stη . The collision kernel also increased strongly with Reλ , since it depended on the RDF and the radial relative velocities.

  20. Scale-wise coherent vorticity extraction for conditional statistical modeling of homogeneous isotropic two-dimensional turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen van yen, Romain; Farge, Marie; Schneider, Kai

    2012-02-01

    Classical statistical theories of turbulence have shown their limitations, in that they cannot predict much more than the energy spectrum in an idealized setting of statistical homogeneity and stationarity. We explore the applicability of a conditional statistical modeling approach: can we sort out what part of the information should be kept, and what part should be modeled statistically, or, in other words, “dissipated”? Our mathematical framework is the initial value problem for the two-dimensional (2D) Euler equations, which we approximate numerically by solving the 2D Navier-Stokes equations in the vanishing viscosity limit. In order to obtain a good approximation of the inviscid dynamics, we use a spectral method and a resolution going up to 8192 2. We introduce a macroscopic concept of dissipation, relying on a split of the flow between coherent and incoherent contributions: the coherent flow is constructed from the large wavelet coefficients of the vorticity field, and the incoherent flow from the small ones. In previous work, a unique threshold was applied to all wavelet coefficients, while here we also consider the effect of a scale by scale thresholding algorithm, called scale-wise coherent vorticity extraction. We study the statistical properties of the coherent and incoherent vorticity fields, and the transfers of enstrophy between them, and then use these results to propose, within a maximum entropy framework, a simple model for the incoherent vorticity. In the framework of this model, we show that the flow velocity can be predicted accurately in the L2 norm for about 10 eddy turnover times.

  1. Bumblebee Flight in Heavy Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, T.; Kolomenskiy, D.; Schneider, K.; Lehmann, F.-O.; Sesterhenn, J.

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution numerical simulations of a tethered model bumblebee in forward flight are performed superimposing homogeneous isotropic turbulent fluctuations to the uniform inflow. Despite tremendous variation in turbulence intensity, between 17% and 99% with respect to the mean flow, we do not find significant changes in cycle-averaged aerodynamic forces, moments, or flight power when averaged over realizations, compared to laminar inflow conditions. The variance of aerodynamic measures, however, significantly increases with increasing turbulence intensity, which may explain flight instabilities observed in freely flying bees.

  2. Effects of q-profile structure on turbulence spreading: A fluctuation intensity transport analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, S.; Kwon, J. M.; Diamond, P. H.; Hahm, T. S.

    2014-09-15

    This paper studies effects of q-profile structure on turbulence spreading. It reports results of numerical experiments using global gyrokinetic simulations. We examine propagation of turbulence, triggered by an identical linear instability in a source region, into an adjacent, linearly stable region with variable q-profile. The numerical experiments are designed so as to separate the physics of turbulence spreading from that of linear stability. The strength of turbulence spreading is measured by the penetration depth of turbulence. Dynamics of spreading are elucidated by fluctuation intensity balance analysis, using a model intensity evolution equation which retains nonlinear diffusion and damping, and linear growth. It is found that turbulence spreading is strongly affected by magnetic shear s, but is hardly altered by the safety factor q itself. There is an optimal range of modest magnetic shear which maximizes turbulence spreading. For high to modest shear values, the spreading is enhanced by the increase of the mode correlation length with decreasing magnetic shear. However, the efficiency of spreading drops for sufficiently low magnetic shear even though the mode correlation length is comparable to that for the case of optimal magnetic shear. The reduction of spreading is attributed to the increase in time required for the requisite nonlinear mode-mode interactions. The effect of increased interaction time dominates that of increased mode correlation length. Our findings of the reduction of spreading and the increase in interaction time at weak magnetic shear are consistent with the well-known benefit of weak or reversed magnetic shear for core confinement enhancement. Weak shear is shown to promote locality, as well as stability.

  3. Turbulence in planetary occultations. IV - Power spectra of phase and intensity fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haugstad, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Power spectra of phase and intensity scintillations during occultation by turbulent planetary atmospheres are significantly affected by the inhomogeneous background upon which the turbulence is superimposed. Such coupling is particularly pronounced in the intensity, where there is also a marked difference in spectral shape between a central and grazing occultation. While the former has its structural features smoothed by coupling to the inhomogeneous background, such features are enhanced in the latter. Indeed, the latter power spectrum peaks around the characteristic frequency that is determined by the size of the free-space Fresnel zone and the ray velocity in the atmosphere; at higher frequencies strong fringes develop in the power spectrum. A confrontation between the theoretical scintillation spectra computed here and those calculated from the Mariner 5 Venus mission by Woo et al. (1974) is inconclusive, mainly because of insufficient statistical resolution. Phase and/or intensity power spectra computed from occultation data may be used to deduce characteristics of the turbulence and to distinguish turbulence from other perturbations in the refractive index. Such determinations are facilitated if observations are made at two or more frequencies (radio occultation) or in two or more colors (stellar occultation).

  4. Slant path average intensity of finite optical beam propagating in turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yixin; Wang, Gaogang

    2006-10-01

    The average intensity of finite laser beam propagating through turbulent atmosphere is calculated from the extended Huygens Fresnel principle. Formulas are presented for the slant path average intensity from an arbitrarily truncated Gaussian beam. The new expressions are derived from the modified von Karman spectrum for refractive-index fluctuations, quadratic approximation of the structure function, and Gaussian approximation for the product of Gaussian function and Bessel function. It is shown that the form of average intensity is not a Gaussian function but a polynomial of the power of the binomial function, Gaussian function, and the incomplete gamma function. The results also show that the mean irradiance of a finite optical beam propagating in slant path turbulent atmosphere not only depends on the effective beam radius at the transmitting aperture plane, propagation distance, and long-term lateral coherence length of spherical wave, but also on the radius of emit aperture.

  5. Height of layer of intense turbulent heat exchange under conditions of stable atmospheric stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamardin, A. P.; Nevzorova, I. V.; Odintsov, S. L.

    2015-11-01

    In the work, we consider estimates of the height of layer of intense turbulent heat exchange in stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer, made with the use of meteorological acoustic radar (sodar). Dependence of this height on temperature gradient is analyzed. Current temperature stratification of the atmosphere in the layer with height up to 1 000 m was determined with the help of MTP-5 meteorological temperature profiler.

  6. Measurements of Intensity and Scale of Wind-Tunnel Turbulence and Their Relation to the Critical Reynolds Number of Spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryden, Hugh L; Schubauer, G B; Mock, W C , Jr; Skramstad, H K

    1937-01-01

    The investigation of wind-tunnel turbulence, conducted at the National Bureau of Standards with the cooperation of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, has been extended to include a new variable, namely, the scale of the turbulence. This report presents the results of a study of this new variable together with the intensity of the turbulence, and the effect of both on the critical Reynolds number of spheres.

  7. Response of flame thickness and propagation speed under intense turbulence in spatially developing lean premixed methane–air jet flames

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Yoo, Chun Sang; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-06-22

    Direct numerical simulations of three-dimensional spatially-developing turbulent Bunsen flames were performed at three different turbulence intensities. We performed these simulations using a reduced methane–air chemical mechanism which was specifically tailored for the lean premixed conditions simulated here. A planar-jet turbulent Bunsen flame configuration was used in which turbulent preheated methane–air mixture at 0.7 equivalence ratio issued through a central jet and was surrounded by a hot laminar coflow of burned products. The turbulence characteristics at the jet inflow were selected such that combustion occured in the thin reaction zones (TRZ) regime. At the lowest turbulence intensity, the conditions fall on the boundary between the TRZ regime and the corrugated flamelet regime, and progressively moved further into the TRZ regime by increasing the turbulent intensity. The data from the three simulations was analyzed to understand the effect of turbulent stirring on the flame structure and thickness. Furthermore, statistical analysis of the data showed that the thermal preheat layer of the flame was thickened due to the action of turbulence, but the reaction zone was not significantly affected. A global and local analysis of the burning velocity of the flame was performed to compare the different flames. Detailed statistical averages of the flame speed were also obtained to study the spatial dependence of displacement speed and its correlation to strain rate and curvature.

  8. Response of flame thickness and propagation speed under intense turbulence in spatially developing lean premixed methane–air jet flames

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Yoo, Chun Sang; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-06-22

    Direct numerical simulations of three-dimensional spatially-developing turbulent Bunsen flames were performed at three different turbulence intensities. We performed these simulations using a reduced methane–air chemical mechanism which was specifically tailored for the lean premixed conditions simulated here. A planar-jet turbulent Bunsen flame configuration was used in which turbulent preheated methane–air mixture at 0.7 equivalence ratio issued through a central jet and was surrounded by a hot laminar coflow of burned products. The turbulence characteristics at the jet inflow were selected such that combustion occured in the thin reaction zones (TRZ) regime. At the lowest turbulence intensity, the conditions fall onmore » the boundary between the TRZ regime and the corrugated flamelet regime, and progressively moved further into the TRZ regime by increasing the turbulent intensity. The data from the three simulations was analyzed to understand the effect of turbulent stirring on the flame structure and thickness. Furthermore, statistical analysis of the data showed that the thermal preheat layer of the flame was thickened due to the action of turbulence, but the reaction zone was not significantly affected. A global and local analysis of the burning velocity of the flame was performed to compare the different flames. Detailed statistical averages of the flame speed were also obtained to study the spatial dependence of displacement speed and its correlation to strain rate and curvature.« less

  9. Formulation of stability-dependent empirical relations for turbulent intensities from surface layer turbulence measurements for dispersion parameterization in a lagrangian particle dispersion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hari Prasad, K. B. R. R.; Srinivas, C. V.; Satyanarayana, A. N. V.; Naidu, C. V.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2015-08-01

    Season- and stability-dependent turbulence intensity ( σ u / u *, σ v / u *, σ w / u *) relationships are derived from experimental turbulence measurements following surface layer scaling and local stability at the tropical coastal site Kalpakkam, India for atmospheric dispersion parameterization. Turbulence wind components ( u', v', w') measured with fast response UltraSonic Anemometers during an intense observation campaign for wind field modeling called Round Robin Exercise are used to formulate the flux-profile relationships using surface layer similarity theory and Fast Fourier Transform technique. The new relationships (modified Hanna scheme) are incorporated in a Lagrangian Particle Dispersion model FLEXPART-WRF and tested by conducting simulations for a field tracer dispersion experiment at Kalpakkam. Plume dispersion analysis of a ground level hypothetical release indicated that the new turbulent intensity formulations provide slightly higher diffusivity across the plume relative to the original Hanna scheme. The new formulations for σ u , σ v , σ w are found to give better agreement with observed turbulent intensities during both stable and unstable conditions under various seasonal meteorological conditions. The simulated concentrations using the two methods are compared with those obtained from a classical Gaussian model and the observed SF6 concentration. It has been found that the new relationships provide comparatively higher diffusion across the plume relative to the model default Hanna scheme and provide downwind concentration results in better agreement with observations.

  10. Gross separation approaching a blunt trailing edge as the turbulence intensity increases.

    PubMed

    Scheichl, B

    2014-07-28

    A novel rational description of incompressible two-dimensional time-mean turbulent boundary layer (BL) flow separating from a bluff body at an arbitrarily large globally formed Reynolds number, Re, is devised. Partly in contrast to and partly complementing previous approaches, it predicts a pronounced delay of massive separation as the turbulence intensity level increases. This is bounded from above by a weakly decaying Re-dependent gauge function (hence, the BL approximation stays intact locally), and thus the finite intensity level characterizing fully developed turbulence. However, it by far exceeds the moderate level found in a preceding study which copes with the associated moderate delay of separation. Thus, the present analysis bridges this self-consistent and another forerunner theory, proposing extremely retarded separation by anticipating a fully attached external potential flow. Specifically, it is shown upon formulation of a respective distinguished limit at which rate the separation point and the attached-flow trailing edge collapse as [Formula: see text] and how on a short streamwise scale the typical small velocity deficit in the core region of the incident BL evolves to a large one. Hence, at its base, the separating velocity profile varies generically with the one-third power of the wall distance, and the classical triple-deck problem describing local viscous-inviscid interaction crucial for moderately retarded separation is superseded by a Rayleigh problem, governing separation of that core layer. Its targeted solution proves vital for understanding the separation process more close to the wall. Most importantly, the analysis does not resort to any specific turbulence closure. A first comparison with the available experimentally found positions of separation for the canonical flow past a circular cylinder is encouraging. PMID:24936020

  11. Wake Measurements at alpha ventus - Dependency on Stability and Turbulence Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerhellweg, Annette; Cañadillas, Beatriz; Kinder, Friederike; Neumann, Tom

    2014-12-01

    Wind and power deficit in the wake are assessed for the offshore wind farm Alpha Ventus. Operational data are evaluated for the power deficit in the wake of a single wind turbine and in a row of wind turbines. The wake of a single wind turbine is described by the maximum power deficit and expansion width of the wake. The impact of atmospheric stability in respect to vertical wind shear and turbulence intensity is assessed showing that wake effects are more pronounced under stable conditions.

  12. MIMO Free-Space Optical Communication Employing Subcarrier Intensity Modulation in Atmospheric Turbulence Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassemlooy, Zabih; Popoola, Wasiu O.; Ahmadi, Vahid; Leitgeb, Erich

    In this paper, we analyse the error performance of transmitter/receiver array free-space optical (FSO) communication system employing binary phase shift keying (BPSK) subcarrier intensity modulation (SIM) in clear but turbulent atmospheric channel. Subcarrier modulation is employed to eliminate the need for adaptive threshold detector. Direct detection is employed at the receiver and each subcarrier is subsequently demodulated coherently. The effect of irradiance fading is mitigated with an array of lasers and photodetectors. The received signals are linearly combined using the optimal maximum ratio combining (MRC), the equal gain combining (EGC) and the selection combining (SelC). The bit error rate (BER) equations are derived considering additive white Gaussian noise and log normal intensity fluctuations. This work is part of the EU COST actions and EU projects.

  13. Average intensity and directionality of partially coherent model beams propagating in turbulent ocean.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuqian; Zhang, Yixin; Zhu, Yun

    2016-08-01

    We studied Gaussian beams with three different partially coherent models, including the Gaussian-Schell model (GSM), Laguerre-Gaussian Schell model (LGSM), and Bessel-Gaussian Schell model (BGSM), propagating through oceanic turbulence. The expressions of average intensity, beam spreading, and beam wander for GSM, LGSM, and BGSM beams in the paraxial channel are derived. We make a contrast for the three models in numerical simulations and find that the GSM beam has smaller spreading than the others, and the LGSM beam needs longer propagation distance to transform into a well-like profile of average intensity than the BGSM beam in the same conditions. The salinity fluctuation has a greater contribution to the wander of LGSM and BGSM beams than that of the temperature fluctuation. Our results can be helpful in the design of an optical wireless communication link operating in oceanic environment. PMID:27505642

  14. Mean Velocity, Turbulence Intensity and Turbulence Convection Velocity Measurements for a Convergent Nozzle in a Free Jet Wind Tunnel. Comprehensive Data Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccolgan, C. J.; Larson, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of flight on the mean flow and turbulence properties of a 0.056m circular jet were determined in a free jet wind tunnel. The nozzle exit velocity was 122 m/sec, and the wind tunnel velocity was set at 0, 12, 37, and 61 m/sec. Measurements of flow properties including mean velocity, turbulence intensity and spectra, and eddy convection velocity were carried out using two linearized hot wire anemometers. This report contains the raw data and graphical presentations. The final technical report includes a description of the test facilities, test hardware, along with significant test results and conclusions.

  15. Experimental characterization of the effects of freestream turbulence intensity on the SD7003 airfoil at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, David M.

    The effect of freestream turbulence intensities ranging from Tu = 1.26% to Tu = 3.2% is studied. Skin friction measurements made on the surface of the airfoil using oil film interferometry (OFI) show that, in general, the effect of the increased Tu is to inhibit separation of the laminar boundary layer. With increased Tu, the near-wall flow experiences strong deceleration in the adverse pressure gradient, but does not reverse as it does in the baseline case where Tu = 0.05%. The Cp distribution resulting from this decelerated fluid is similar in appearance to that of a laminar separation bubble. OFI results also show that laminar separation initiates a more rapid transition process than does higher turbulence intensity: transition of the boundary layer occurs over a shorter distance with Tu = 1.26% than it does with Tu = 2.19% due to the presence of a LSB at the lower turbulence intensity.

  16. Using the coupled wake boundary layer model to evaluate the effect of turbulence intensity on wind farm performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Richard J. A. M.; Gayme, Dennice; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-06-01

    We use the recently introduced coupled wake boundary layer (CWBL) model to predict the effect of turbulence intensity on the performance of a wind farm. The CWBL model combines a standard wake model with a “top-down” approach to get improved predictions for the power output compared to a stand-alone wake model. Here we compare the CWBL model results for different turbulence intensities with the Horns Rev field measurements by Hansen et al., Wind Energy 15, 183196 (2012). We show that the main trends as function of the turbulence intensity are captured very well by the model and discuss differences between the field measurements and model results based on comparisons with LES results from Wu and Porté-Agel, Renewable Energy 75, 945-955 (2015).

  17. Numerical research of measurements of Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor according to the parameters of its optical parts and the intensity of turbulent distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goleneva, N. V.; Lavrinov, V.; Lavrinova, L. N.

    2015-11-01

    The wavefront sensor of Hartmann type consists of two parts: the optical and algorithmic. The parameters of the optical part of the sensor may vary. Since the time of "frozen" turbulence due to the Fried's length and to the cross wind transport turbulent distortion speed, the measurement Shack-Hartmann sensor depend on the intensity of turbulent distortions. In this paper are presented the results of the analysis of the measurements of the sensor according to the size of lens array and to the intensity of turbulent distortions. The analysis is performed on basis of a numerical model of the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and on Kolmogorov's turbulence model.

  18. Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Uriel

    1996-01-01

    Written five centuries after the first studies of Leonardo da Vinci and half a century after A.N. Kolmogorov's first attempt to predict the properties of flow, this textbook presents a modern account of turbulence, one of the greatest challenges in physics. "Fully developed turbulence" is ubiquitous in both cosmic and natural environments, in engineering applications and in everyday life. Elementary presentations of dynamical systems ideas, probabilistic methods (including the theory of large deviations) and fractal geometry make this a self-contained textbook. This is the first book on turbulence to use modern ideas from chaos and symmetry breaking. The book will appeal to first-year graduate students in mathematics, physics, astrophysics, geosciences and engineering, as well as professional scientists and engineers.

  19. Contribution to the numerical study of turbulence in high intensity discharge lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Kaziz, S.; Ben Ahmed, R.; Helali, H.; Gazzah, H.; Charrada, K.

    2011-07-15

    We present in this paper a comparison between results obtained with a laminar and turbulent models for high-pressure mercury arc. The two models are based on the resolution of bidimensional time-dependent equations by a semi-implicit finite-element code. The numerical computation of turbulent model is solved with large eddy simulation model; this approach takes into account the various scales of turbulence by a filtering method on each scale. The results show the quantitative influence of turbulence on the flow fields and also the difference between laminar and turbulent effects on the dynamic thermal behaviour and on the characteristics of the discharge.

  20. Effects of free-stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with mild adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, J. A.; Kassir, S. M.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of near isotropic free-stream turbulence on the shape factors and skin friction coefficients of turbulent boundary layers is presented for the cases of zero and mild adverse pressure gradients. With free-stream turbulence, improved fluid mixing occurs in boundary layers with adverse pressure gradients relative to the zero pressure gradient condition, with the same free-stream turbulence intensity and length scale. Stronger boundary layers with lower shape factors occur as a result of a lower ratio of the integral scale of turbulence to the boundary layer thickness, and to vortex stretching of the turbulent eddies in the free-stream, both of which act to improve the transmission of momentum from the free-stream to the boundary layers.

  1. The influence of free-stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with mild adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, Jon A.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of near isotropic free-stream turbulence on the shape factors and skin friction coefficients of turbulent bounday layers is presented for the cases of zero and mild adverse pressure gradients. With free-stream turbulence, improved fluid mixing occurs in boundary layers with adverse pressure gradients relative to the zero pressure gradient condition, with the same free-stream turbulence intensity and length scale. Stronger boundary layers with lower shape factors occur as a result of a lower ratio of the integral scale of turbulence to the boundary layer thickness, and to vortex stretching of the turbulent eddies in the free stream, both of which act to improve the transmission of momentum from the free stream to the boundary layers.

  2. The influence of free-stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with mild adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, J. A.; Kassir, S. M.; Larwood, S. M.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of near isotropic free-stream turbulence on the shape factors and skin friction coefficients of turbulent boundary layers is presented for the cases of zero and mild adverse pressure gradients. With free-stream turbulence, improved fluid mixing occurs in boundary layers with adverse pressure gradients relative to the zero pressure gradient condition, with the same free-stream turbulence intensity and length scale. Stronger boundary layers with lower shape factors occur as a result of a lower ratio of the integral scale of turbulence to the boundary layer thickness, and to vortex stretching of the turbulent eddies in the free-stream, both of which act to improve the transmission of momentum from the free-stream to the boundary layers.

  3. Probability density of intensity fluctuations for laser beams disturbed by turbulent aero-engine exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, I. V.; Dmitriev, D. I.; Sirazetdinov, V. S.

    2007-02-01

    In this paper we analyze some results of natural and numerical experiments on probability density of intensity fluctuations on an axis for 1,06 microns and 0,53 microns laser beams in comparison with theoretical dependences (lognormal, exponential and K-distribution). Beams were propagated in aviation engine exhaust at various angles between the jet and beam axes. It has been shown that for a beam with a wavelength of 0,53 microns experimental data can be approximated as exponential and K-distribution, while for radiation with a wavelength of 1,06 microns good conformity to K-distribution has been observed. Optimum conditions for image registration with CCD-cameras of laser beams distorted by turbulence have been chosen. For this purpose transfer characteristics of several same type samples of CCD-cameras have been studied at various irradiation modes and registration tunings. It has been shown that the dynamic range of the cameras is used to maximum capacity for image recording when gamma-correction is applied.

  4. Experiments on the interaction between hydrodynamic turbulence and surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamin, Timothee; Berhanu, Michael; Falcon, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Different regimes of interaction between hydrodynamic turbulence and a free surface are investigated in a meter scale basin. A homogeneous and isotropic turbulence is generated by an 8×8 array of jets pointing upwards at the bottom of the tank. The 64 jets are driven individually to reach a random spatiotemporal forcing pattern and produce an intense turbulence. Using fluid velocity measurements, we characterize the turbulence obtained with this setup, then we investigate free-surface deformations induced by hydrodynamic turbulence. In a second stage an electromechanical shaker will generate gravity-capillary waves at the free surface. We aim to study reduction or amplification of surface waves and then measure energy exchange between hydrodynamic turbulence and wave turbulence. This work was supported by the DGA-CNRS Ph.D program and ANR Turbulon 12-BS04-0005.

  5. Experimental assessment of helicopter rotor turbulence ingestion noise in hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1989-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to assess the accuracy of a theory for non-isotropic turbulence ingestion. In order to generate non-isotropic turbulence in a controlled environment, a scale model rotor in a closed chamber was used so that the turbulence generated by the rotor was reingested by the recirculating flow. Simultaneous measurements of turbulence inflow properties and far field acoustics were acquired. Measurements confirmed that the inflow turbulence was highly non-isotropic. The measured aerodynamic properties were used as inputs for the noise prediction procedure. The general agreement between the non-isotropic noise prediction procedure and the experiment was good, although the procedure generally overpredicts the quasi-tonal low to mid range frequencies and underpredicts the higher broadband signals. The predicted sound power level as a function of polar angle was in close agreement with measurements, except near the rotor plane, which is not modeled by the present analysis. It is determined that the most sensitive parameter influencing the predicted noise was the turbulence intensity.

  6. A region of intense plasma wave turbulence on auroral field lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Frank, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    This report presents a detailed study of the plasma wave turbulence observed by HAWKEYE-1 and IMP-6 on high latitude auroral field lines and investigates the relationship of this turbulence to magnetic field and plasma measurements obtained in the same region.

  7. Measurement of width and intensity of particle streaks in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Håkansson, Karl M. O.; Kvick, Mathias; Lundell, Fredrik; Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; Söderberg, L. Daniel

    2013-06-01

    Fibre streaks are observed in experiments with fibre suspensions in a turbulent half-channel flow. The preferential concentration methods, most commonly used to quantify preferential particle concentration, are in one dimension found to be concentration dependent. Two different new streak quantification methods are evaluated, one based on Voronoi analysis and the other based on artificial particles with an assigned fixed width. The width of the particle streaks and a measure of the intensity of the streaks, i.e. streakiness, are sought. Both methods are based on the auto-correlation of a signal, generated by summing images in the direction of the streaks. Common for both methods is a severe concentration dependency, verified in experiments keeping the flow conditions constant while the (very dilute) concentration of fibres is altered. The fixed width method is shown to be the most suitable method, being more robust and less computationally expensive. By assuming the concentration dependence to be related to random noise, an expression is derived, which is shown to make the streak width and the streakiness independent of the concentration even at as low concentrations as 0.05 particles per pixel column in an image. The streakiness is obtained by applying an artificial particle width equal to 20 % of the streak width. This artificial particle width is in this study found to be large enough to smoothen the correlation without altering the streakiness nor the streak width. It is concluded that in order to make quantitative comparisons between different experiments or simulations, the evaluation has to be performed with care and be very well documented.

  8. Active control for turbulent premixed flame simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2004-03-26

    Many turbulent premixed flames of practical interest are statistically stationary. They occur in combustors that have anchoring mechanisms to prevent blow-off and flashback. The stabilization devices often introduce a level of geometric complexity that is prohibitive for detailed computational studies of turbulent flame dynamics. As a result, typical detailed simulations are performed in simplified model configurations such as decaying isotropic turbulence or inflowing turbulence. In these configurations, the turbulence seen by the flame either decays or, in the latter case, increases as the flame accelerates toward the turbulent inflow. This limits the duration of the eddy evolutions experienced by the flame at a given level of turbulent intensity, so that statistically valid observations cannot be made. In this paper, we apply a feedback control to computationally stabilize an otherwise unstable turbulent premixed flame in two dimensions. For the simulations, we specify turbulent in flow conditions and dynamically adjust the integrated fueling rate to control the mean location of the flame in the domain. We outline the numerical procedure, and illustrate the behavior of the control algorithm. We use the simulations to study the propagation and the local chemical variability of turbulent flame chemistry.

  9. Hierarchical structures in a turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Zhen-Su; Zou, Zhengping; Zhu, Yuanjie; Zhou, Mingde

    2003-11-01

    Statistical structures of a series of longitudinal velocity fluctuation signals at different distances (10intensities and the similarity property of the most intense structures. It is shown that at all locations the velocity fluctuations satisfy the She-Leveque hierarchical symmetry (She and Leveque, 1994). The measured HS parameters, beta and gamma, are interpreted in a fluid structure dynamics context. For instance, intense anisotropic fluid structures generated near the wall show smaller gamma and beta. As turbulence migrates into the logarithmic region, small-scale motions are generated by an energy cascade and large-scale organized structures emerge with a less singular character than the most intermittent structures of isotropic turbulence. At the center, turbulence is nearly isotropic, and beta and gamma are close to the 1994 She-Leveque predictions. A transition is observed from the logarithmic region to the center in which gamma drops and the large-scale organized structures break down. We speculate that it is due to the growing eddy viscosity effects of widely spread turbulent fluctuations. Similar effects are observed in the breakdown of the Taylor vortices in a turbulent Couette-Taylor flow at moderately high Reynolds numbers.

  10. Mixing and chemical reaction in sheared and nonsheared homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Andy D.; Hill, James C.

    1992-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations were made to examine the local structure of the reaction zone for a moderately fast reaction between unmixed species in decaying, homogeneous turbulence and in a homogeneous turbulent shear flow. Pseudospectral techniques were used in domains of 64 exp 3 and higher wavenumbers. A finite-rate, single step reaction between non-premixed reactants was considered, and in one case temperature-dependent Arrhenius kinetics was assumed. Locally intense reaction rates that tend to persist throughout the simulations occur in locations where the reactant concentration gradients are large and are amplified by the local rate of strain. The reaction zones are more organized in the case of a uniform mean shear than in isotropic turbulence, and regions of intense reaction rate appear to be associated with vortex structures such as horseshoe vortices and fingers seen in mixing layers. Concentration gradients tend to align with the direction of the most compressive principal strain rate, more so in the isotropic case.

  11. Influence of high-intensity turbulence on laminar boundary layer development on a cylindrical leading edge: Enhancement to eddy diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Juli K.

    The growing demand for increased efficiency in turbine engine designs has sparked a growing interest for research of air flow around curved surfaces. The turbine's operating conditions result in material property constraints, especially in the first stage turbine vanes and blades. These turbine vane components experience extreme loading conditions of both high temperature and high turbulence intensities exiting the combustor. The surface of the turbine blades has cylindrical leading edges that promote stabilizing flow accelerations. These convex surfaces can cause a reduced eddy diffusivity across the boundary layer. This thesis reviews measurements of velocity and turbulence intensities taken just shy of the thirty degrees offset from the stagnation line of a two-dimensional cylindrical leading edge under a wide range of turbulence and flow conditions flow conditions. Flow conditions and velocity measurements were gathered with respect to the distance to the surface. The length of the measurements extended from the surface to beyond the boundary layer's edge. The instrumentation used to collect data was a single wire driven by a constant temperature anemometer bridge. The hot wire is specially modified to measure data near the cylindrical leading edges curved surface. The traversing system allowed the acquisition of high-resolution boundary layer data. The traversing system was installed internally to the cylindrical leading edge to reduce probe blockage.

  12. Hierarchical structures in a turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Zhengping; Zhu, Yuanjie; Zhou, Mingde; She, Zhen-Su

    2003-12-01

    A hierarchical structure (HS) analysis ( β-test and γ-test) is applied to a fully developed turbulent pipe flow. Velocity signals are measured at two cross sections in the pipe and at a series of radial locations from the pipe wall. Particular attention is paid to the variation of turbulent statistics at wall units 10< y+<3000. It is shown that at all locations the velocity fluctuations satisfy the She-Leveque hierarchical symmetry (Phys. Rev. Lett. 72 (1994) 336). The measured HS parameters, β and γ, are interpreted in terms of the variation of fluid structures. Intense anisotropic fluid structures generated near the wall appear to be more singular than the most intermittent structures in isotropic turbulence and appear to be more outstanding compared to the background fluctuations; this yields a more intermittent velocity signal with smaller γ and β. As turbulence migrates into the logarithmic region, small-scale motions are generated by an energy cascade and large-scale organized structures emerge which are also less singular than the most intermittent structures of isotropic turbulence. At the center, turbulence is nearly isotropic, and β and γ are close to the 1994 She-Leveque predictions. A transition is observed from the logarithmic region to the center in which γ drops and the large-scale organized structures break down. We speculate that it is due to the growing eddy viscosity effects of widely spread turbulent fluctuations in a similar way as in the breakdown of the Taylor vortices in a turbulent Couette-Taylor flow at high Reynolds numbers.

  13. Turbulent intensity and Reynolds number effects on an airfoil at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Zhou, Y.; Alam, Md. Mahbub; Yang, H.

    2014-11-01

    This work investigates the aerodynamics of a NACA 0012 airfoil at the chord-based Reynolds numbers (Rec) from 5.3 × 103 to 2.0 × 104. The lift and drag coefficients, CL and CD, of the airfoil, along with the flow structure, were measured as the turbulent intensity Tu of oncoming flow varies from 0.6% to 6.0%. The analysis of the present data and those in the literature unveils a total of eight distinct flow structures around the suction side of the airfoil. Four Rec regimes, i.e., the ultra-low (<1.0 × 104), low (1.0 × 104-3.0 × 105), moderate (3.0 × 105-5.0 × 106), and high Rec (>5.0 × 106), are proposed based on their characteristics of the CL-Rec relationship and the flow structure. It has been observed that Tu has a more pronounced effect at lower Rec than at higher Rec on the shear layer separation, reattachment, transition, and formation of the separation bubble. As a result, CL, CD, CL/CD and their dependence on the airfoil angle of attack all vary with Tu. So does the critical Reynolds number Rec,cr that divides the ultra-low and low Rec regimes. It is further noted that the effect of increasing Tu bears similarity in many aspects to that of increasing Rec, albeit with differences. The concept of the effective Reynolds number Rec,eff advocated for the moderate and high Rec regimes is re-evaluated for the low and ultra-low Rec regimes. The Rec,eff treats the non-zero Tu effect as an addition of Rec and is determined based on the presently defined Rec,cr. It has been found that all the maximum lift data from both present measurements and previous reports collapse into a single curve in the low and ultra-low Rec regimes if scaled with Rec,eff.

  14. Turbulence generation in homogeneous dilute particle- laden flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jeng-Horng

    Homogeneous turbulence generated by the motion of particles in dispersed multiphase flows was studied both theoretically and experimentally, motivated by applications to sprays, particle-laden jets, bubble plumes and rainstorms, among others. The experiments involved uniform fluxes of monodisperse spherical particles falling through a slow upflow of air. Particle fluxes and phase velocities were measured by sampling and phase-discriminating laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV), respectively. Measured particle velocities included mean and fluctuating streamwise and cross-stream velocities and probability density functions (PDF's). Measured continuous-phase velocities included mean and fluctuating streamwise and cross-stream velocities, PDF's and the higher moments of velocity fluctuations such as skewness and kurtosis, energy spectra of velocity fluctuations and integral length scales based on streamwise velocity fluctuations. Continuous-phase velocity measurements included conditional averages for particle wake disturbances and the turbulent inter-wake region surrounding these disturbances as well as overall flow properties. Present and earlier results in the literature provided particle Reynolds numbers of 38-990, particle volume fractions less than 0.01% and turbulence intensities (normalized by mean particle relative velocities) of 0.1-10.0%. Theory included characterization of particle wake disturbances as laminar-like turbulent wakes observed for intermediate particle Reynolds numbers in turbulent environments, characterization of the turbulent inter-wake region by analogy to grid-generated isotropic turbulence, and estimation of overall flow properties by conditional averaging of the properties of the wake disturbances and the turbulent inter-wake region. Present measurements showed that particle wake disturbances during turbulence generation were properly characterized by the properties of laminar-like turbulent wakes. The turbulent inter-wake region was

  15. Probe shapes that measure time-averaged streamwise momentum and cross-stream turbulence intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for directly measuring the time-averaged streamwise momentum in a turbulent stream use a probe which has total head response which varies as the cosine-squared of the angle of incidence. The probe has a nose with a slight indentation on its front face for providing the desired response. The method of making the probe incorporates unique design features. Another probe may be positioned in a side-by-side relationship to the first probe to provide a direct measurement of the total pressure. The difference between the two pressures yields the sum of the squares of the cross-stream components of the turbulence level.

  16. Effect of turbulence intensity on cross-injection film cooling at a stepped or smooth endwall of a gas turbine vane passage.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pey-Shey; Tsai, Shen-Ta; Jhuo, Yue-Hua

    2014-01-01

    This study is concerned with a film cooling technique applicable to the protection of the endwalls of a gas turbine vane. In the experiments, cross-injection coolant flow from two-row, paired, inclined holes with nonintersecting centerlines was utilized. The test model is a scaled two-half vane. The levels of turbulence intensity used in the experiments are T.I. = 1.8%, 7%, and 12%. Other parameters considered in the film cooling experiments include three inlet Reynolds numbers (9.20 × 10(4), 1.24 × 10(5), and 1.50 × 10(5)), three blowing ratios (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0), and three endwall conditions (smooth endwall and stepped endwall with forward-facing or backward-facing step). Thermochromic liquid crystal (TLC) technique with steady-state heat transfer experiments was used to obtain the whole-field film cooling effectiveness. Results show that, at low turbulence intensity, increasing Reynolds number decreases the effectiveness in most of the vane passage. There is no monotonic trend of influence by Reynolds number at high turbulence intensity. The effect of blowing ratio on the effectiveness has opposite trends at low and high turbulence levels. Increasing turbulent intensity decreases the effectiveness, especially near the inlet of the vane passage. With a stepped endwall, turbulence intensity has only mild effect on the film cooling effectiveness. PMID:24592153

  17. Effect of Turbulence Intensity on Cross-Injection Film Cooling at a Stepped or Smooth Endwall of a Gas Turbine Vane Passage

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shen-Ta; Jhuo, Yue-Hua

    2014-01-01

    This study is concerned with a film cooling technique applicable to the protection of the endwalls of a gas turbine vane. In the experiments, cross-injection coolant flow from two-row, paired, inclined holes with nonintersecting centerlines was utilized. The test model is a scaled two-half vane. The levels of turbulence intensity used in the experiments are T.I. = 1.8%, 7%, and 12%. Other parameters considered in the film cooling experiments include three inlet Reynolds numbers (9.20 × 104, 1.24 × 105, and 1.50 × 105), three blowing ratios (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0), and three endwall conditions (smooth endwall and stepped endwall with forward-facing or backward-facing step). Thermochromic liquid crystal (TLC) technique with steady-state heat transfer experiments was used to obtain the whole-field film cooling effectiveness. Results show that, at low turbulence intensity, increasing Reynolds number decreases the effectiveness in most of the vane passage. There is no monotonic trend of influence by Reynolds number at high turbulence intensity. The effect of blowing ratio on the effectiveness has opposite trends at low and high turbulence levels. Increasing turbulent intensity decreases the effectiveness, especially near the inlet of the vane passage. With a stepped endwall, turbulence intensity has only mild effect on the film cooling effectiveness. PMID:24592153

  18. Wind profile recovery from intensity fluctuations of a laser beam reflected in a turbulent atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Banakh, V A; Marakasov, D A

    2008-04-30

    An algorithm for the wind profile recovery from spatiotemporal spectra of a laser beam reflected in a turbulent atmosphere is presented. The cases of a spherical wave incident on a diffuse reflector of finite size and a spatially limited beam reflected from an infinite random surface are considered. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  19. On the relationship between image intensity and velocity in a turbulent boundary layer seeded with smoke particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnick, M. Blake; Thurow, Brian S.

    2014-02-01

    Simultaneous particle image velocimetry (PIV) and flow visualization measurements were performed in a turbulent boundary layer in an effort to better quantify the relationship between the velocity field and the image intensity typically observed in a classical flow visualization experiment. The freestream flow was lightly seeded with smoke particles to facilitate PIV measurements, whereas the boundary layer was densely seeded with smoke through an upstream slit in the wall to facilitate both PIV and classical flow visualization measurements at Reynolds numbers, Re θ , ranging from 2,100 to 8,600. Measurements were taken with and without the slit covered as well as with and without smoke injection. The addition of a narrow slit in the wall produces a minor modification of the nominal turbulent boundary layer profile whose effect is reduced with downstream distance. The presence of dense smoke in the boundary layer had a minimal effect on the observed velocity field and the associated proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) modes. Analysis of instantaneous images shows that the edge of the turbulent boundary layer identified from flow visualization images generally matches the edge of the boundary layer determined from velocity and vorticity. The correlation between velocity deficit and smoke intensity was determined to be positive and relatively large (>0.7) indicating a moderate-to-strong relationship between the two. This notion was extended further through the use of a direct correlation approach and a complementary POD/linear stochastic estimation (LSE) approach to estimate the velocity field directly from flow visualization images. This exercise showed that, in many cases, velocity fields estimated from smoke intensity were similar to the actual velocity fields. The complementary POD/LSE approach proved better for these estimations, but not enough to suggest using this technique to approximate velocity measurements from a smoke intensity image. Instead, the

  20. Effects of axisymmetric contractions on turbulence of various scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan-Atichat, J.; Nagib, H. M.; Drubka, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    Digitally acquired and processed results from an experimental investigation of grid generated turbulence of various scales through and downstream of nine matched cubic contour contractions ranging in area ratio from 2 to 36, and in length to inlet diameter ratio from 0.25 to 1.50 are reported. An additional contraction with a fifth order contour was also utilized for studying the shape effect. Thirteen homogeneous and nearly isotropic test flow conditions with a range of turbulence intensities, length scales and Reynolds numbers were generated and used to examine the sensitivity of the contractions to upstream turbulence. The extent to which the turbulence is altered by the contraction depends on the incoming turbulence scales, the total strain experienced by the fluid, as well as the contraction ratio and the strain rate. Varying the turbulence integral scale influences the transverse turbulence components more than the streamwise component. In general, the larger the turbulence scale, the lesser the reduction in the turbulence intensity of the transverse components. Best agreement with rapid distortion theory was obtained for large scale turbulence, where viscous decay over the contraction length was negligible, or when a first order correction for viscous decay was applied to the results.

  1. Measurement of the turbulence intensity behind a two-dimensional cascade and in a three-stage axial blower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiock, R.

    1978-01-01

    Turbulence intensity (Tu) measurements were made in two-dimensional and rotating cascades of blades in a low-speed cascade wind tunnel using hot-wire probes as sensors. The local Tu at Re = 1.6x100000 was determined in the wake zone behind a two-dimensional cascade. Then the values were recomputed for a rotating cascade, giving a mean turbulence intensity of 6.5% at 1/10 chord downstream and 2.9% at one chord. Fans were used for measurements on the rotating cascade. Re was equal to 7x100000. Frequency analysis was employed to separate the actual Tu of the entry flow from the effects caused by interaction with the rotor blades, showing that the true Tu increased from a few tenths of a percent to 6.6% in the 1st rotor, and from 7.2 to 9.3% in the 2d rotor. The Tu behind the 3d rotor was equal to 8.9%.

  2. Ultrafine-Grain and Isotropic Cu/SAC305/Cu Solder Interconnects Fabricated by High-Intensity Ultrasound-Assisted Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Hongjun; Wang, Qiang; Li, Mingyu; Wang, Chunqing

    2014-07-01

    With the miniaturization of portable electronic devices, the size of solder joint interconnects is decreasing to micrometer levels. These joints possess only several or even one or two grains, resulting in anisotropy and failure issues. Direct ultrasound-assisted solidification of Cu/SAC305/Cu interconnects for grain refinement and fabrication of isotropic solder joints is presented herein. These joints consist of many β-Sn grains. The average cross-sectional area of the Sn-rich phase is significantly reduced by up to 99% when compared with conventional as-reflowed samples. The ultrasonic power density exhibits a threshold value for affecting the microstructures. Below 200 W cm-2, the β-Sn grains were refined and had circular shape. The Ag3Sn phase grew in a manner similar to branched coral to sizes reaching 30 μm, or as rods aggregated together with Cu6Sn5 tube fragments. Above 200 W cm-2, the microstructures were coarsened and Ag3Sn had plate-like shape. The thickness of Cu6Sn5 intermetallic layers at the Cu/solder interfaces was reduced by more than 26%. The relationships among the ultrasonic power, nucleation rate, local temperature drop, and pressure were identified. At the highest power density of 267 W cm-2, the nucleation rate was about 4.05 × 1014 m-3 s-1, the local temperature drop was 248 K, and the local pressure was on the order of several GPa.

  3. Noise of a model helicopter rotor due to ingestion of turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paterson, R. W.; Amiet, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation of the noise of a model helicoper rotor due to ingestion of turbulence was conducted. Experiments were performed with a 0.76 m dia, articulated model rotor for a range of inflow turbulence and rotor operating conditions. Inflow turbulence levels varied from approximately 2 to 19 percent and tip Mach number was varied from 0.3 to 0.52. Test conditions included ingestion of a atmospheric turbulence in outdoor hover as well as ingestion of grid generated isotropic turbulence in the wind tunnel airstream. In wind tunnel testing, both forward flight and vertical ascent (climb) were simulated. Far field noise spectra and directivity were measured in addition to incident turbulence intensities, length scales, and spectra. Results indicate that ingestion of atmospheric turbulence is the dominant helicopter rotor hover noise mechanism at the moderate to high frequencies which determine perceived noise level.

  4. A Jet-Stirred Apparatus for Turbulent Combustion Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davani, Abbasali; Ronney, Paul

    2015-11-01

    A novel jet-stirred combustion chamber is designed to study turbulent premixed flames. In the new approach, multiple impinging turbulent jets are used to stir the mixture. It is well known that pair of counterflowing turbulent jets produces nearly a constant intensity (u') along the jet axes. In this study, different numbers of impinging jets in various configurations are used to produce isotropic turbulence intensity. FLUENT simulations have been conducted to assess the viability of the proposed chamber. In order to be able to compare different configurations, three different non dimensional indices are introduces. Mean flow index; Homogeneity index, and Isotropicity index. Using these indices one can compare various chambers including conventional Fan-stirred Reactors. Results show that a concentric inlet/outlet chamber (CAIO) with 8 inlets and 8 outlets with inlet velocity of 20 m/s and initial intensity of 15% produces near zero mean flow and 2.5 m/s turbulence intensity which is much more higher than reported values for Fan-stirred chamber. This research was sponsored by National Science Foundation.

  5. Turbulence Intensity at Inlet of 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel Caused by Upwind Blockage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Denise; Yuricich, Jillian

    2014-01-01

    In order to estimate the magnitude of turbulence in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel (80 x 120) caused by buildings located upwind from the 80 x 120 inlet, a 150th-scale study was performed that utilized a nominal two-dimensional blockage placed ahead of the inlet. The distance of the blockage ahead of the inlet was varied. This report describes velocity measurements made in the plane of the 80 x 120 model inlet for the case of zero ambient (atmospheric) wind.

  6. Relation of anomalous resistivity and current intensity in turbulent collisionless plasma cascades in the geospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Kemel, Koen; Henri, Pierre; Califano, Francesco; Markidis, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    Using the full kinetic implicit PIC code, iPiC3D, we studied the properties of plasma kinetic turbulence, such as would be found at the interface between the solar wind and the Earth magnetosphere at low latitude during northwards periods. In this case, in the presence of a magnetic field oriented mostly perpendicular to the velocity shear, turbulence is fed by the disruption of a Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex chain via secondary instabilities, vortex pairing and non-linear interactions. We found that the magnetic energy spectral cascade between ion and electron inertial scales is in agreement with satellite observations and previous numerical simulations; however, in our case the spectrum ends with a peak beyond de due to the occurrence of the lower hybrid drift instability. The electric energy spectrum is influenced by secondary instabilities: anomalous resistivity, fed by the development of the lower hybrid drift instability, steepens the spectral decay and, depending on the alignment of B and the shear vorticity, peaks due to ion-Bernstein waves may dominate the spectrum around di. A key conclusion of the study is that the anomalous resistivity produced by these complex wave and instabilities can indeed very accurately be described in terms of a proportionality with the current. This research used resources of NERSC, a DOE Office of Science User Facility supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  7. Analysis of two-equation turbulence models for recirculating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thangam, S.

    1991-01-01

    The two-equation kappa-epsilon model is used to analyze turbulent separated flow past a backward-facing step. It is shown that if the model constraints are modified to be consistent with the accepted energy decay rate for isotropic turbulence, the dominant features of the flow field, namely the size of the separation bubble and the streamwise component of the mean velocity, can be accurately predicted. In addition, except in the vicinity of the step, very good predictions for the turbulent shear stress, the wall pressure, and the wall shear stress are obtained. The model is also shown to provide good predictions for the turbulence intensity in the region downstream of the reattachment point. Estimated long time growth rates for the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate of homogeneous shear flow are utilized to develop an optimal set of constants for the two equation kappa-epsilon model. The physical implications of the model performance are also discussed.

  8. Time-Average Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Technique for Measurement of Velocity, Denisty, Temperature, and Turbulence Intensity in High Speed Nozzle Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Seasholtz, Richard G.; Elam, Kristie A.; Panda, Jayanta

    2004-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering based flow diagnostic is developed to measure time average velocity, density, temperature, and turbulence intensity in a 25.4-mm diameter nozzle free jet facility. The spectrum of the Rayleigh scattered light is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer operated in the static imaging mode. The resulting fringe pattern containing spectral information of the scattered light is recorded using a low noise CCD camera. Nonlinear least squares analysis of the fringe pattern using a kinetic theory model of the Rayleigh scattered light provides estimates of density, velocity, temperature, and turbulence intensity of the gas flow. Resulting flow parameter estimates are presented for an axial scan of subsonic flow at Mach 0.95 for comparison with previously acquired pitot tube data, and axial scans of supersonic flow in an underexpanded screeching jet. The issues related to obtaining accurate turbulence intensity measurements using this technique are discussed.

  9. Extreme events in computational turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, P. K.; Zhai, X. M.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2015-01-01

    We have performed direct numerical simulations of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in a periodic box with 8,1923 grid points. These are the largest simulations performed, to date, aimed at improving our understanding of turbulence small-scale structure. We present some basic statistical results and focus on “extreme” events (whose magnitudes are several tens of thousands the mean value). The structure of these extreme events is quite different from that of moderately large events (of the order of 10 times the mean value). In particular, intense vorticity occurs primarily in the form of tubes for moderately large events whereas it is much more “chunky” for extreme events (though probably overlaid on the traditional vortex tubes). We track the temporal evolution of extreme events and find that they are generally short-lived. Extreme magnitudes of energy dissipation rate and enstrophy occur simultaneously in space and remain nearly colocated during their evolution. PMID:26424452

  10. Structure of wind-shear turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, G.; Laituri, T. R.

    1988-01-01

    The statistical characteristics of wind-shear turbulence are modelled. Isotropic turbulence serves as the basis of comparison for the anisotropic turbulence which exists in wind shear. The question of how turbulence scales in a wind shear is addressed from the perspective of power spectral density.

  11. Structure of wind-shear turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, G.; Laituri, T. R.

    1989-01-01

    The statistical characteristics of wind shear turbulence are modelled. Isotropic turbulence serves as the basis of comparison for the anisotropic turbulence which exists in wind shear. The question of turbulence scales in wind shear is addressed from the perspective of power spectral density.

  12. Aerodynamic Effects of High Turbulence Intensity on a Variable-Speed Power-Turbine Blade with Large Incidence and Reynolds Number Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flegel, Ashlie B.; Giel, Paul W.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of high inlet turbulence intensity on the aerodynamic performance of a variable speed power turbine blade are examined over large incidence and Reynolds number ranges. These results are compared to previous measurements made in a low turbulence environment. Both high and low turbulence studies were conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility. The purpose of the low inlet turbulence study was to examine the transitional flow effects that are anticipated at cruise Reynolds numbers. The current study extends this to LPT-relevant turbulence levels while perhaps sacrificing transitional flow effects. Assessing the effects of turbulence at these large incidence and Reynolds number variations complements the existing database. Downstream total pressure and exit angle data were acquired for 10 incidence angles ranging from +15.8deg to -51.0deg. For each incidence angle, data were obtained at five flow conditions with the exit Reynolds number ranging from 2.12×10(exp 5) to 2.12×10(exp 6) and at a design exit Mach number of 0.72. In order to achieve the lowest Reynolds number, the exit Mach number was reduced to 0.35 due to facility constraints. The inlet turbulence intensity, Tu, was measured using a single-wire hotwire located 0.415 axial-chord upstream of the blade row. The inlet turbulence levels ranged from 8 to 15 percent for the current study. Tu measurements were also made farther upstream so that turbulence decay rates could be calculated as needed for computational inlet boundary conditions. Downstream flow field measurements were obtained using a pneumatic five-hole pitch/yaw probe located in a survey plane 7 percent axial chord aft of the blade trailing edge and covering three blade passages. Blade and endwall static pressures were acquired for each flow condition as well. The blade loading data show that the suction surface separation that was evident at many of the low Tu conditions has been eliminated. At

  13. Aerodynamic Effects of High Turbulence Intensity on a Variable-Speed Power-Turbine Blade With Large Incidence and Reynolds Number Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flegel, Ashlie B.; Giel, Paul W.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of high inlet turbulence intensity on the aerodynamic performance of a variable speed power turbine blade are examined over large incidence and Reynolds number ranges. These results are compared to previous measurements made in a low turbulence environment. Both high and low turbulence studies were conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility. The purpose of the low inlet turbulence study was to examine the transitional flow effects that are anticipated at cruise Reynolds numbers. The current study extends this to LPT-relevant turbulence levels while perhaps sacrificing transitional flow effects. Assessing the effects of turbulence at these large incidence and Reynolds number variations complements the existing database. Downstream total pressure and exit angle data were acquired for 10 incidence angles ranging from +15.8deg to -51.0deg. For each incidence angle, data were obtained at five flow conditions with the exit Reynolds number ranging from 2.12×10(exp 5) to 2.12×10(exp 6) and at a design exit Mach number of 0.72. In order to achieve the lowest Reynolds number, the exit Mach number was reduced to 0.35 due to facility constraints. The inlet turbulence intensity, Tu, was measured using a single-wire hotwire located 0.415 axial-chord upstream of the blade row. The inlet turbulence levels ranged from 8 to 15 percent for the current study. Tu measurements were also made farther upstream so that turbulence decay rates could be calculated as needed for computational inlet boundary conditions. Downstream flow field measurements were obtained using a pneumatic five-hole pitch/yaw probe located in a survey plane 7 percent axial chord aft of the blade trailing edge and covering three blade passages. Blade and endwall static pressures were acquired for each flow condition as well. The blade loading data show that the suction surface separation that was evident at many of the low Tu conditions has been eliminated. At

  14. The effects of anisotropic free-stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layer behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang-Wei, F.; Hoffman, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of near-isotropic and highly anisotropic free-stream turbulence on mean flow properties of the turbulence structure of turbulent boundary layers in a near zero pressure gradient flow has been experimentally evaluated. Turbulence levels vary from 0.5% to 8.0% and the momentum thickness Reynolds number varies from 800 to 1100. The results indicate that the effects of free-stream turbulence on the classical boundary layer properties for near-isotropic turbulence which have been published by other investigators are similar to the case of highly anisotropic turbulence fields, while the effects of free-stream turbulence on the properties of the turbulent structure within the boundary layer for the case of near-isotropic turbulence are quite different compared to the highly anisotropic case.

  15. Direct simulation of compressible turbulence in a shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkar, S.; Erlebacher, G.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1991-01-01

    Compressibility effects on the turbulence in homogeneous shear flow are investigated. The growth of the turbulent kinetic energy was found to decrease with increasing Mach number: a phenomenon which is similar to the reduction of turbulent velocity intensities observed in experiments on supersonic free shear layers. An examination of the turbulent energy budget shows that both the compressible dissipation and the pressure-dilatation contribute to the decrease in the growth of kinetic energy. The pressure-dilatation is predominantly negative in homogeneous shear flow, in contrast to its predominantly positive behavior in isotropic turbulence. The different signs of the pressure-dilatation are explained by theoretical consideration of the equations for the pressure variance and density variance. Previously, the following results were obtained for isotropic turbulence: (1) the normalized compressible dissipation is of O(M(sub t)(exp 2)); and (2) there is approximate equipartition between the kinetic and potential energies associated with the fluctuating compressible mode. Both of these results were substantiated in the case of homogeneous shear. The dilatation field is significantly more skewed and intermittent than the vorticity field. Strong compressions seem to be more likely than strong expansions.

  16. Coherence in Turbulence: New Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levich, Eugene

    2009-07-01

    It is claimed that turbulence in fluids is inherently coherent phenomenon. The coherence shows up clearly as strongly correlated helicity fluctuations of opposite sign. The helicity fluctuations have cellular structure forming clusters that are actually observed as vorticity bands and coherent structures in laboratory turbulence, direct numerical simulations and most obviously in atmospheric turbulence. The clusters are named BCC - Beltrami Cellular Clusters - because of the observed nearly total alignment of the velocity and vorticity fields in each particular cell, and hence nearly maximal possible helicity in each cell; although when averaged over all the cells the residual mean helicity in general is small and does not play active dynamical role. The Beltrami like fluctuations are short-lived and stabilize only in small and generally contiguous sub-domains that are tending to a (multi)fractal in the asymptotic limit of large Reynolds numbers, Re → ∞. For the model of homogeneous isotropic turbulence the theory predicts the leading fractal dimension of BCC to be: DF = 2.5. This particular BCC is responsible for generating the Kolmogorov -5/3 power law energy spectrum. The most obvious role that BCC play dynamically is that the nonlinear interactions in them are relatively reduced, due to strong spatial alignment between the velocity field v(r, t) and the vorticity field ω(r, t) = curlv(r, t), while the physical quantities typically best characterizing turbulence intermittency, such as entrophy, vorticity stretching and generation, and energy dissipation are maximized in and near them. The theory quantitatively relates the reduction of nonlinear inter-actions to the BCC fractal dimension DF and subsequent turbulence intermittency. It is further asserted that BCC is a fundamental feature of all turbulent flows, e.g., wall bounded turbulent flows, atmospheric and oceanic flows, and their leading fractal dimension remains invariant and universal in these flows

  17. Aerodynamic Effects of Turbulence Intensity on a Variable-Speed Power-Turbine Blade with Large Incidence and Reynolds Number Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flegel, Ashlie Brynn; Giel, Paul W.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of inlet turbulence intensity on the aerodynamic performance of a variable speed power turbine blade are examined over large incidence and Reynolds number ranges. Both high and low turbulence studies were conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility. The purpose of the low inlet turbulence study was to examine the transitional flow effects that are anticipated at cruise Reynolds numbers. The high turbulence study extends this to LPT-relevant turbulence levels while perhaps sacrificing transitional flow effects. Downstream total pressure and exit angle data were acquired for ten incidence angles ranging from +15.8 to 51.0. For each incidence angle, data were obtained at five flow conditions with the exit Reynolds number ranging from 2.12105 to 2.12106 and at a design exit Mach number of 0.72. In order to achieve the lowest Reynolds number, the exit Mach number was reduced to 0.35 due to facility constraints. The inlet turbulence intensity, Tu, was measured using a single-wire hotwire located 0.415 axial-chord upstream of the blade row. The inlet turbulence levels ranged from 0.25 - 0.4 for the low Tu tests and 8- 15 for the high Tu study. Tu measurements were also made farther upstream so that turbulence decay rates could be calculated as needed for computational inlet boundary conditions. Downstream flow field measurements were obtained using a pneumatic five-hole pitchyaw probe located in a survey plane 7 axial chord aft of the blade trailing edge and covering three blade passages. Blade and endwall static pressures were acquired for each flow condition as well. The blade loading data show that the suction surface separation that was evident at many of the low Tu conditions has been eliminated. At the extreme positive and negative incidence angles, the data show substantial differences in the exit flow field. These differences are attributable to both the higher inlet Tu directly and to the thinner inlet endwall

  18. Turbulence in planetary occultations. II - Effects on atmospheric profiles derived from Doppler measurements. III - Effects on atmospheric profiles derived from intensity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haugstad, B. S.

    1978-01-01

    The nature and magnitude of turbulence-induced errors in atmospheric profiles derived from Doppler measurements made during radio occultations are investigated. It is found that turbulence in planetary atmospheres induces both fluctuating and systematic errors in derived profiles, but the errors of both types are very small. Consideration of the occultation of Mariner 10 by Venus and of the Pioneer occultations by Jupiter shows that the rms fractional errors in the atmospheric profiles derived from these observations were less than 0.01 in both temperature and pressure, while the fractional systematic errors were typically of the order of 1 millionth. The extent to which atmospheric profiles derived from radio and optical intensity measurements are affected by turbulence is also examined. The results indicate that turbulence in planetary atmospheres has only a marginal effect on derived profiles in the weak-scattering limit and that the turbulence-induced errors in this case are always much larger than the corresponding errors in profiles derived from radio Doppler measurements.

  19. Simulation of atmospheric dispersion of NOX over complex terrain region of Ranchi with FLEXPART-WRF by incorporation of improved turbulence intensity relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madala, Srikanth; Satyanarayana, A. N. V.; Srinivas, C. V.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate representation of air pollutant dispersion is essential for environmental management and planning purposes. In this study, semi-empirical relationships of turbulence intensity (σu/u*, σv/u* and σw/u*) as a function of surface layer scaling and local stability are developed following boundary layer similarity concepts at Ranchi, a complex terrain in Jharkhand, Eastern India for various seasons. The impact of the new turbulence parameterization for air pollution dispersion simulation is studied by incorporating the same in the Hanna scheme of FLEXPART-WRF Lagrangian Particle dispersion model over study region. The model is used to estimate the ground level concentrations of nitrogen oxides (NOx) due to industrial and vehicular sources in study region. The meteorological parameters needed in air-quality simulation are simulated using the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) mesoscale model at high resolution (3 km). Three turbulence schemes (YSU, MYNN2 and ACM2) in ARW are alternatively tested in dispersion simulation and comparisons are made with available air quality data for eight days in different seasons (winter, pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon). Simulations with FLEXPART revealed distinct seasonal variation of dispersion patterns. It has been found that the new turbulence intensity relationships in FLEXPART improved the NOx concentration estimates by reducing the negative bias seen with default Hanna scheme. Further, the ARW simulated meteorological parameters using ACM2 and MYNN2 significantly reduced the bias in modeled pollutant concentrations. The study demonstrates the utility of high quality seasonal turbulence measurements in pollution dispersion model for better diffusion parameterization needed in air quality modeling.

  20. Scaling of turbulent flame speed for expanding flames with Markstein diffusion considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Wu, Fujia; Law, Chung K.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper we clarify the role of Markstein diffusivity, which is the product of the planar laminar flame speed and the Markstein length, on the turbulent flame speed and its scaling, based on experimental measurements on constant-pressure expanding turbulent flames. Turbulent flame propagation data are presented for premixed flames of mixtures of hydrogen, methane, ethylene, n-butane, and dimethyl ether with air, in near-isotropic turbulence in a dual-chamber, fan-stirred vessel. For each individual fuel-air mixture presented in this work and the recently published iso-octane data from Leeds, normalized turbulent flame speed data of individual fuel-air mixtures approximately follow a ReT,f0.5 scaling, for which the average radius is the length scale and thermal diffusivity is the transport property of the turbulence Reynolds number. At a given ReT,f, it is experimentally observed that the normalized turbulent flame speed decreases with increasing Markstein number, which could be explained by considering Markstein diffusivity as the leading dissipation mechanism for the large wave number flame surface fluctuations. Consequently, by replacing thermal diffusivity with the Markstein diffusivity in the turbulence Reynolds number definition above, it is found that normalized turbulent flame speeds could be scaled by ReT,M0.5 irrespective of the fuel, equivalence ratio, pressure, and turbulence intensity for positive Markstein number flames.

  1. Scaling of turbulent flame speed for expanding flames with Markstein diffusion considerations.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Wu, Fujia; Law, Chung K

    2013-09-01

    In this paper we clarify the role of Markstein diffusivity, which is the product of the planar laminar flame speed and the Markstein length, on the turbulent flame speed and its scaling, based on experimental measurements on constant-pressure expanding turbulent flames. Turbulent flame propagation data are presented for premixed flames of mixtures of hydrogen, methane, ethylene, n-butane, and dimethyl ether with air, in near-isotropic turbulence in a dual-chamber, fan-stirred vessel. For each individual fuel-air mixture presented in this work and the recently published iso-octane data from Leeds, normalized turbulent flame speed data of individual fuel-air mixtures approximately follow a Re_{T,f}^{0.5} scaling, for which the average radius is the length scale and thermal diffusivity is the transport property of the turbulence Reynolds number. At a given Re_{T,f}^{}, it is experimentally observed that the normalized turbulent flame speed decreases with increasing Markstein number, which could be explained by considering Markstein diffusivity as the leading dissipation mechanism for the large wave number flame surface fluctuations. Consequently, by replacing thermal diffusivity with the Markstein diffusivity in the turbulence Reynolds number definition above, it is found that normalized turbulent flame speeds could be scaled by Re_{T,M}^{0.5} irrespective of the fuel, equivalence ratio, pressure, and turbulence intensity for positive Markstein number flames. PMID:24125342

  2. Isotropic sequence order learning.

    PubMed

    Porr, Bernd; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2003-04-01

    In this article, we present an isotropic unsupervised algorithm for temporal sequence learning. No special reward signal is used such that all inputs are completely isotropic. All input signals are bandpass filtered before converging onto a linear output neuron. All synaptic weights change according to the correlation of bandpass-filtered inputs with the derivative of the output. We investigate the algorithm in an open- and a closed-loop condition, the latter being defined by embedding the learning system into a behavioral feedback loop. In the open-loop condition, we find that the linear structure of the algorithm allows analytically calculating the shape of the weight change, which is strictly heterosynaptic and follows the shape of the weight change curves found in spike-time-dependent plasticity. Furthermore, we show that synaptic weights stabilize automatically when no more temporal differences exist between the inputs without additional normalizing measures. In the second part of this study, the algorithm is is placed in an environment that leads to closed sensor-motor loop. To this end, a robot is programmed with a prewired retraction reflex reaction in response to collisions. Through isotropic sequence order (ISO) learning, the robot achieves collision avoidance by learning the correlation between his early range-finder signals and the later occurring collision signal. Synaptic weights stabilize at the end of learning as theoretically predicted. Finally, we discuss the relation of ISO learning with other drive reinforcement models and with the commonly used temporal difference learning algorithm. This study is followed up by a mathematical analysis of the closed-loop situation in the companion article in this issue, "ISO Learning Approximates a Solution to the Inverse-Controller Problem in an Unsupervised Behavioral Paradigm" (pp. 865-884). PMID:12689389

  3. Inlet free-stream turbulence effects on diffuser performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. A.; Gonzales, G.

    1983-01-01

    The performance of a subsonic two dimensional diffuser was experimentally evaluated as a function of inlet free-stream turbulence parameters. Anisotropic inlet free-stream turbulence with the eddy axis perpendicular to the flow and parallel to the diverging walls of the diffuser appears to be more effective at transmitting energy to the diverging walls of the diffuser, thereby improving diffuser performance, as compared to isotropic turbulence or anisotropic turbulence with the eddy axis perpendicular to the diverging walls of the diffuser. The pressure recovery of the diffuser was found to be strongly dependent upon the inlet free-stream total turbulence intensity, was independent of eddy size for large eddy dimensions, and was dependent upon eddy size for small eddy dimensions. The improvement in the diffuser's static pressure recovery coefficient at a total included divergence angle of 20 deg, compared to the low inlet turbulence case, was found to be as much as 21 times larger than the pressure loss across the turbulence generators.

  4. Simulation of Atmospheric Pollution Dispersion over Complex Terrain Region of Jharkhand with FLEXPART-WRF with incorporation of improved Turbulence Intensity relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madala, Srikanth; Satyanarayana A. N., V.; Srinivas C., V.; Boadh, Rahul; Pinaka Pani V. V. S., N.; Kumar, Manoj

    2015-04-01

    The complex terrain region of Patratu, Jharkhand in southern Chota Nagpur of eastern India has high air pollution problems besides complex mesoscale flow and meteorology. The FLEXPART-WRF mesoscale Lagrangian Particle dispersion model is used to simulate the dispersion of elevated effluent releases of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and suspended particulate matter (SPM) from Patratu thermal power plant over Patratu at a high resolution of 1 km. The WRF is integrated with nested domains (27, 9, 3 km resolutions, 51 vertical levels). The relationships for turbulent intensities in the default diffusion parameterization of the Hanna scheme of FLEXPART is modified with new empirical relationships derived as a function of atmospheric stability from one year fast response turbulence measurements from a nearby observational site at Ranchi. The pollutant dispersion simulated by FLEXPART is evaluated with modified version of the model and using the WRF simulated atmospheric flow field and thermodynamical structure with three alternative PBL schemes [Yonsei University (YSU), Asymmetric Convective Model version 2 (ACM2) and Mellor- Yamada Nakanishi and Niino Level 2.5 PBL (MYNN2]. Results indicate that the new turbulence intensity relationships in FLEXPART provide better comparisons for concentrations of NO2 and SPM with available observations relative to the default relationships. Further, the meteorological parameters simulated using YSU significantly reduces the bias in modeled pollutant concentrations in terms of lesser mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE), normalized mean square error (NMSE), fractional bias (FB) and FAC2 (Factor of 2). These parametric tests enabled to fine tune and validate the FLEXPART-WRF dispersion model with YSU PBL physics and improved Hanna relationships to realistically simulate pollution dispersion over complex terrain of the study region. The study demonstrates the utility of high quality turbulence measurements in pollution

  5. Aerodynamic performance of transonic and subsonic airfoils: Effects of surface roughness, turbulence intensity, Mach number, and streamline curvature-airfoil shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang

    The effects of surface roughness, turbulence intensity, Mach number, and streamline curvature-airfoil shape on the aerodynamic performance of turbine airfoils are investigated in compressible, high speed flows. The University of Utah Transonic Wind Tunnel is employed for the experimental part of the study. Two different test sections are designed to produce Mach numbers, Reynolds numbers, passage mass flow rates, and physical dimensions, which match values along turbine blades in operating engines: (i) a nonturning test section with a symmetric airfoil, and (ii) a cascade test section with a cambered turbine vane. The nonuniform, irregular, three-dimensional surface roughness is characterized using the equivalent sand grain roughness size. Changing the airfoil surface roughness condition has a substantial effect on wake profiles of total pressure loss coefficients, normalized Mach number, normalized kinetic energy, and on the normalized and dimensional magnitudes of Integrated Aerodynamic Losses produced by the airfoils. Comparisons with results for a symmetric airfoil and a cambered vane show that roughness has more substantial effects on losses produced by the symmetric airfoil than the cambered vane. Data are also provided that illustrate the larger loss magnitudes are generally present with flow turning and cambered airfoils, than with symmetric airfoils. Wake turbulence structure of symmetric airfoils and cambered vanes are also studied experimentally. The effects of surface roughness and freestream turbulence levels on wake distributions of mean velocity, turbulence intensity, and power spectral density profiles and vortex shedding frequencies are quantified one axial chord length downstream of the test airfoils. As the level of surface roughness increases, all wake profile quantities broaden significantly and nondimensional vortex shedding frequencies decrease. Wake profiles produced by the symmetric airfoil are more sensitive to variations of surface

  6. Turbulent Sediment Suspension and Induced Ripple Dynamics Absent Mean Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. A.; Cowen, E.

    2014-12-01

    The uprush and backwash phases in the swash zone, the region of the beach that is alternately covered and uncovered by wave run-up, are fundamentally different events. Backwash is dominated by a growing boundary layer where the turbulence is set by the bed shear stress. In this phase traditional boundary layer turbulence models and Shields-type critical stress pickup functions work well. However, the uprush phase, while often viewed in the context of traditional boundary layer turbulence models, has little in common with the backwash phase. During uprush, the entire water column is turbulent, as it rapidly advects well-stirred highly turbulent flow generated offshore from breaking waves or collapsing bores. Turbulence levels in the uprush are several times higher than turbulent boundary layer theory would predict and hence the use of a boundary layer model to predict turbulence levels during uprush grossly under predicts the turbulence and subsequent sediment suspension in the swash zone. To study the importance of this advected turbulence to sediment suspension we conduct experiments in a water tank designed to generate horizontally homogeneous isotropic turbulence absent mean shear using randomly actuated synthetic jet arrays suspended above both a solid glass plate and a narrowly graded sediment bed. Using jet arrays with different jet spacings allows the generation of high Reynolds number turbulence with variable integral length scales, which we hypothesize control the characteristic length scales in the induced ripple field. Particle image velocimetry and acoustic Doppler velocimetry measurements are used to characterize the near-bed flow and this unique turbulent boundary layer. Metrics include the mean flow and turbulence intensities and stresses, temporal and spatial spectra, dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy, and integral length scales of the turbulence. We leverage our unique dataset to compare the flows over impermeable fixed and permeable mobile

  7. Laser anemometer using a Fabry-Perot interferometer for measuring mean velocity and turbulence intensity along the optical axis in turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, R. G.; Goldman, L. J.

    1982-01-01

    A technique for measuring a small optical axis velocity component in a flow with a large transverse velocity component is presented. Experimental results are given for a subsonic free jet operating in a laboratory environment, and for a 0.508 meter diameter turbine stator cascade. Satisfactory operation of the instrument was demonstrated in the stator cascade facility with an ambient acoustic noise level during operation of about 105 dB. In addition, the turbulence intensity measured with the interferometer was consistent with previous measurements taken with a fringe type laser anemometer.

  8. The effects of wellbore storage, skin, and turbulence intensity on early-time transient flow of real gas through porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Oren, P.E.; Lee, R.L.; Tek, M.R.

    1988-09-01

    This paper represents the first contribution in qualifying the effects of wellbore storage along with those of skin and turbulence intensity on deliverability from gas wells. A decay factor, W/sub D/, has been introduced to account for the contribution of sandface flow rate to early-time transient production from the gas wells. Generalized charts for type-curve studies on gas wells, based on pseudopressure and pseudotime concepts, along with wellbore storage, are presented with applications and support from field data.

  9. Turbulent coagulation of particles smaller than the length scales of turbulence and equilibrium sorption of phenanthrene to clay: Implications for pollutant transport in the estuarine water column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunk, Brett Kenneth

    1997-11-01

    Pollutant and particle transport in estuaries is affected by a multitude of physical, chemical and biological processes. In this research the importance of equilibrium sorption and turbulent coagulation were studied. Sorption in estuaries was modeled using phenanthrene, bacterial extracellular polymer and kaolinite clay as surrogates for a hydrophobic organic pollutant, dissolved organic matter and inorganic suspended sediment, respectively. Experiments over a range of estuarine salinities showed that ionic strength had the largest effect on the extent of sorption, while the effect of extracellular polymer coatings on the mineral surfaces was insignificant. Further calculations using typical estuarine suspended sediment concentrations indicated that equilibrium sorption could not fully account for the solid/solution phase distribution of hydrophobic organic compounds in the estuarine water column. For particles that are small compared to the length scales of turbulence, the rate of coagulation is related to the dynamics of the smallest turbulent eddies since they have the highest shear rate. Experimental and theoretical effort focused on determining the coagulation rate of spherical particles in isotropic turbulence. A pair diffusion approximation valid for rapidly fluctuating flows was used to calculate the rate of coagulation in a randomly varying isotropic linear flow field. Dynamic simulations of particle coagulation in Gaussian turbulence were computed over a range of representative values of particle-particle interactions (i.e, hydrodynamic interactions and van der Waals attraction) and total strain (i.e., the product of the strain rate and its time scale). The computed coagulation rates for isotropic turbulence differed from analytical approximations valid at large and small total strain. As expected, particle interactions were found to be significant. Experimental measurements of coagulation in grid-generated turbulence were obtained by measuring the loss

  10. TURBOGEN: Computer-controlled vertically oscillating grid system for small-scale turbulence studies on plankton.

    PubMed

    Amato, Alberto; Fortini, Stefania; Watteaux, Romain; Diano, Marcello; Espa, Stefania; Esposito, Serena; Ferrante, Maria I; Peters, Francesc; Iudicone, Daniele; Ribera d'Alcalà, Maurizio

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there has been a renewed interest in the impact of turbulence on aquatic organisms. In response to this interest, a novel instrument has been constructed, TURBOGEN, that generates turbulence in water volumes up to 13 l. TURBOGEN is fully computer controlled, thus, allowing for a high level of reproducibility and for variations of the intensity and characteristics of turbulence during the experiment. The calibration tests, carried out by particle image velocimetry, showed TURBOGEN to be successful in generating isotropic turbulence at the typical relatively low levels of the marine environment. TURBOGEN and its sizing have been devised with the long-term scope of analyzing in detail the molecular responses of plankton to different mixing regimes, which is of great importance in both environmental and biotechnological processes. PMID:27036831

  11. TURBOGEN: Computer-controlled vertically oscillating grid system for small-scale turbulence studies on plankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Alberto; Fortini, Stefania; Watteaux, Romain; Diano, Marcello; Espa, Stefania; Esposito, Serena; Ferrante, Maria I.; Peters, Francesc; Iudicone, Daniele; Ribera d'Alcalà, Maurizio

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there has been a renewed interest in the impact of turbulence on aquatic organisms. In response to this interest, a novel instrument has been constructed, TURBOGEN, that generates turbulence in water volumes up to 13 l. TURBOGEN is fully computer controlled, thus, allowing for a high level of reproducibility and for variations of the intensity and characteristics of turbulence during the experiment. The calibration tests, carried out by particle image velocimetry, showed TURBOGEN to be successful in generating isotropic turbulence at the typical relatively low levels of the marine environment. TURBOGEN and its sizing have been devised with the long-term scope of analyzing in detail the molecular responses of plankton to different mixing regimes, which is of great importance in both environmental and biotechnological processes.

  12. Suppression of turbulent resistivity in turbulent Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Jiahe; Colgate, Stirling A.; Sonnenfeld, Richard G.; Nornberg, Mark D.; Li, Hui; Colgate, Arthur S.; Westpfahl, David J.; Romero, Van D.; Martinic, Joe

    2015-07-01

    Turbulent transport in rapidly rotating shear flow very efficiently transports angular momentum, a critical feature of instabilities responsible both for the dynamics of accretion disks and the turbulent power dissipation in a centrifuge. Turbulent mixing can efficiently transport other quantities like heat and even magnetic flux by enhanced diffusion. This enhancement is particularly evident in homogeneous, isotropic turbulent flows of liquid metals. In the New Mexico dynamo experiment, the effective resistivity is measured using both differential rotation and pulsed magnetic field decay to demonstrate that at very high Reynolds number rotating shear flow can be described entirely by mean flow induction with very little contribution from correlated velocity fluctuations.

  13. Suppression of turbulent resistivity in turbulent Couette flow

    SciTech Connect

    Si, Jiahe Sonnenfeld, Richard G.; Colgate, Arthur S.; Westpfahl, David J.; Romero, Van D.; Martinic, Joe; Colgate, Stirling A.; Li, Hui; Nornberg, Mark D.

    2015-07-15

    Turbulent transport in rapidly rotating shear flow very efficiently transports angular momentum, a critical feature of instabilities responsible both for the dynamics of accretion disks and the turbulent power dissipation in a centrifuge. Turbulent mixing can efficiently transport other quantities like heat and even magnetic flux by enhanced diffusion. This enhancement is particularly evident in homogeneous, isotropic turbulent flows of liquid metals. In the New Mexico dynamo experiment, the effective resistivity is measured using both differential rotation and pulsed magnetic field decay to demonstrate that at very high Reynolds number rotating shear flow can be described entirely by mean flow induction with very little contribution from correlated velocity fluctuations.

  14. Orientation statistics and settling velocity of ellipsoids in decaying turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewert, C.; Kunnen, R. P. J.; Meinke, M.; Schröder, W.

    2014-06-01

    Motivated by applications in technology as well as in other disciplines where the motion of particles in a turbulent flow field is important, the orientation and settling velocity of ellipsoidal particles in a spatially decaying isotropic turbulent flow are numerically investigated. With respect to cloud microphysics ellipsoidal particles of various shapes are interpreted as archetypes of regular ice crystals, i.e., plates and columns approximated by oblate and prolate ellipsoids. The motion of 19 million small and heavy ellipsoidal particles is tracked by a Lagrangian point-particle model based on Stokes flow conditions. Five types of ellipsoids of revolution such as prolates, spheres, and oblates are considered. The orientation and settling velocity statistics are gathered at six turbulence intensities characterized by the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate ranging from 30 to 250 cm2s- 3. It is shown that the preferential orientation of ellipsoids is disturbed by the turbulent fluctuations of the fluid forces and moments. As the turbulence intensity increases the orientation probability distribution becomes more and more uniform. That is, the settling velocity of the ellipsoids is influenced by the turbulence level since the drag force is dependent on the orientation. The effect is more pronounced, the longer the prolate or the flatter the oblate is. The theoretical settling velocity based on the orientation probability of the non-spherical particles is smaller than that found in the simulation. The results show the existence of the preferential sweeping phenomenon also for non-spherical particles. These two effects of turbulence on the motion of ellipsoids change the settling velocity and as such the swept volume, that is expected to result in modified collision probabilities of ellipsoid-shaped particles.

  15. Pulsating instability and self-acceleration of fast turbulent flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poludnenko, Alexei Y.

    2015-01-01

    A series of three-dimensional numerical simulations is used to study the intrinsic stability of high-speed turbulent flames. Calculations model the interaction of a fully resolved premixed flame with a highly subsonic, statistically steady, homogeneous, isotropic turbulence. The computational domain is unconfined to prevent the onset of thermoacoustic instabilities. We consider a wide range of turbulent intensities and system sizes, corresponding to the Damköhler numbers Da = 0.1 - 6.0. These calculations show that turbulent flames in the regimes considered are intrinsically unstable. In particular, we find three effects. (1) Turbulent flame speed, ST, develops pulsations with the observed peak-to-peak amplitude ST max / ST min > 10 and a characteristic time scale close to a large-scale eddy turnover time. Such variability is caused by the interplay between turbulence, which continuously creates the flame surface, and highly intermittent flame collisions, which consume the flame surface. (2) Unstable burning results in the periodic pressure build-up and the formation of pressure waves or shocks, when ST approaches or exceeds the speed of a Chapman-Jouguet deflagration. (3) Coupling of pressure gradients formed during pulsations with density gradients across the flame leads to the anisotropic amplification of turbulence inside the flame volume and flame acceleration. Such process, which is driven by the baroclinic term in the vorticity transport equation, is a reacting-flow analog of the mechanism underlying the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. With the increase in turbulent intensity, the limit-cycle instability discussed here transitions to the regime described in our previous work, in which the growth of ST becomes unbounded and produces a detonation.

  16. The influence of free-stream turbulence intensity on the performance of Gurney-flap equipped wind-turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Kentfield, J.A.C.

    1996-10-01

    A study is presented of apparent drag anomalies based on the results of measurements made by many workers. In some cases the addition, to an airfoil, of a Gurney flap adds little or nothing to the airfoil drag coefficient; yet in other cases, for a prescribed Gurney-flap height-to-chord ratio, the addition of the Gurney flap can increase the airfoil drag coefficient,m at low lift coefficients, by a factor as large as three. The lift increment obtained is essentially independent of the drag level recorded and is, to a first approximation, proportional to the height-to-chord ratio of the Gurney flap. It is, as a consequence of the study, shown that the major adverse influence on the drag coefficient of Gurney-flap equipped airfoils is the thinness of the pressure-surface boundary layer at the airfoil trailing edge. It has been shown by other workers that provided the height of a Gurney flap is less than the boundary layer thickness, the drag penalty due to the Gurney flap is small or can be essentially zero. The influence of the chord-based Reynolds number on the pressure-surface boundary layer thickness appears to parallel that associated with a turbulent flow over a flat plate. Hence the boundary layer thickness diminishes with increasing chord-based Reynolds number. A factor that is shown to have a major impact on the boundary layer thickness is the inherent turbulence level of the approaching flow. Generally, the higher the turbulence level and the lower the Reynolds number, the thicker, for a prescribed airfoil chord, the boundary layer.

  17. Development of a hybrid k-epsilon turbulence model for swirling recirculating flows under moderate to strong swirl intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Keh-Chin; Chen, Ching-Shun

    1993-03-01

    A hybrid k-epsilon turbulence model, based on the concept that the modification of anisotropic effects should not be made in the flow regions inherent to small streamline curvatures, has been developed and examined with the swirling recirculating flows, with the swirl levels ranging from 0.6 to 1.23 in an abrupt pipe expansion. A fairly satisfactory agreement of model predictions with the experimental data shows that this hybrid k-epsilon model can perform better simulation of swirling recirculating flows as compared to the standard k-epsilon model and the modified k-epsilon model proposed by Abujelala and Lilley (1984).

  18. Characteristics of the motions, turbulence intensity, diffusivity, flux of momentum and sensible heat in the upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, S. K.; Lordi, N. J.

    1977-01-01

    Analyses of the meteorological rocket data obtained from an experiment conducted at 3-hour intervals at 8 western meridional rocket stations are presented. Large variations in the meridional wind contribute substantially to overall turbulence in the tropical stratosphere. The solar semidiurnal component of wind oscillations in the tropics was observed to be much higher than predicted by theory, often exceeding the magnitude of the diurnal amplitude throughout the stratosphere. The observed value of the solar diurnal amplitude in the stratosphere was in line with theoretical prediction. The solar terdiurnal amplitudes for temperature, meridional and zonal winds were non-negligible and must be considered in any harmonic analysis. Phase angle variation with height was rapid for all harmonics; however, there was general agreement between predicted and observed phase angles. Because of large changes in the mean winds in the mesosphere with season, harmonic determinations are difficult. There appear to be large zonal wind changes even within the same season as mentioned previously. Turbulence diffusivity in the upper stratosphere is greater near the equator than in the mid-latitudes.

  19. Isotropic Monte Carlo Grain Growth

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-04-25

    IMCGG performs Monte Carlo simulations of normal grain growth in metals on a hexagonal grid in two dimensions with periodic boundary conditions. This may be performed with either an isotropic or a misorientation - and incliantion-dependent grain boundary energy.

  20. In situ observations of the influence of a large onshore wind farm on near-surface temperature, turbulence intensity and wind speed profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Craig M.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Pryor, S. C.

    2013-09-01

    Observations of wakes from individual wind turbines and a multi-megawatt wind energy installation in the Midwestern US indicate that directly downstream of a turbine (at a distance of 190 m, or 2.4 rotor diameters (D)), there is a clear impact on wind speed and turbulence intensity (TI) throughout the rotor swept area. However, at a downwind distance of 2.1 km (26 D downstream of the closest wind turbine) the wake of the whole wind farm is not evident. There is no significant reduction of hub-height wind speed or increase in TI especially during daytime. Thus, in high turbulence regimes even very large wind installations may have only a modest impact on downstream flow fields. No impact is observable in daytime vertical potential temperature gradients at downwind distances of >2 km, but at night the presence of the wind farm does significantly decrease the vertical gradients of potential temperature (though the profile remains stably stratified), largely by increasing the temperature at 2 m.

  1. Stochastic equations for continuum and determination of hydraulic drag coefficients for smooth flat plate and smooth round tube with taking into account intensity and scale of turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrenko, Artur V.

    2016-07-01

    The stochastic equations of continuum are used for determining the hydraulic drag coefficients. As a result, the formulas for the hydraulic drag coefficients dependent on the turbulence intensity and scale instead of only on the Reynolds number are proposed for the classic flows of an incompressible fluid along a smooth flat plate and a round smooth tube. It is shown that the new expressions for the classical drag coefficients, which depend only on the Reynolds number, should be obtained from these new general formulas if to use the well-known experimental data for the initial turbulence. It is found that the limitations of classical empirical and semiempirical formulas for the hydraulic drag coefficients and their deviation from the experimental data depend on different parameters of initial fluctuations in the flow for different experiments in a wide range of Reynolds numbers. On the basis of these new dependencies, it is possible to explain that the differences between the experimental results for the fixed Reynolds number are caused by the difference in the values of flow fluctuations for each experiment instead of only due to the systematic error in the processing of experiments. Accordingly, the obtained general dependencies for the smooth flat plate and the smooth round tube can serve as the basis for clarifying the results of experiments and the experimental formulas, which used for continuum flows in different devices.

  2. Laser Doppler velocimeter measurements of boundary layer velocity and turbulent intensities in Mach 2.5 flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sewell, Jesse; Chew, Larry

    1994-01-01

    In recent years, the interest in developing a high-speed civil transport has increased. This has led to an increase in research activity on compressible supersonic flows, in particular the boundary layer. The structure of subsonic boundary layers has been extensively documented using conditional sampling techniques which exploit the knowledge of both u and v velocities. Researchers using these techniques have been able to explore some of the complex three-dimensional motions which are responsible for Reynolds stress production and transport in the boundary layer. As interest in turbulent structure has grown to include supersonic flows, a need for simultaneous multicomponent velocity measurements in these flows has developed. The success of conditional analysis in determining the characteristics of coherent motions and structures in the boundary layer relies on accurate, simultaneous measurement of two instantaneous velocity components.

  3. Transversely isotropic poroelasticity arising from thin isotropic layers

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J.G.

    1996-11-01

    Percolation phenomena play central roles in the field of poroelasticity, where two distinct sets of percolating continua intertwine. A connected solid frame forms the basis of the elastic behavior of a poroelastic medium in the presence of confining forces, while connected pores permit a percolating fluid (if present) to influence the mechanical response of the system from within. The present paper discusses isotropic and anisotropic poroelastic media and establishes general formulas for the behavior of transversely isotropic poroelasticity arising from laminations of isotropic components. The Backus averaging method is shown to provide elementary means of constructing general formulas. The results for confined fluids are then compared with the more general Gassmann formulas that must be satisfied by any anisotropic poroelastic medium and found to be in complete agreement.

  4. Charged Particle Diffusion in Isotropic Random Static Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, P.; Sonsrettee, W.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Ruffolo, D. J.; Wan, M.; Montgomery, D.

    2013-12-01

    Study of the transport and diffusion of charged particles in a turbulent magnetic field remains a subject of considerable interest. Research has most frequently concentrated on determining the diffusion coefficient in the presence of a mean magnetic field. Here we consider Diffusion of charged particles in fully three dimensional statistically isotropic magnetic field turbulence with no mean field which is pertinent to many astrophysical situations. We classify different regions of particle energy depending upon the ratio of Larmor radius of the charged particle to the characteristic outer length scale of turbulence. We propose three different theoretical models to calculate the diffusion coefficient each applicable to a distinct range of particle energies. The theoretical results are compared with those from computer simulations, showing very good agreement.

  5. Turbulent solutions of equations of fluid motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    Some turbulent solutions of the unaveraged Navier-Stokes equations (equations of fluid motion) are reviewed. Those equations are solved numerically in order to study the nonlinear physics of incompressible turbulent flow. The three components of the mean-square velocity fluctuations are initially equal for the conditions chosen. The resulting solutions show characteristics of turbulence, such as the linear and nonlinear excitation of small-scale fluctuations. For the stronger fluctuations the initially nonrandom flow develops into an apparently random turbulence. The cases considered include turbulence that is statistically homogeneous or inhomogeneous and isotropic or anisotropic. A statistically steady-state turbulence is obtained by using a spatially periodic body force. Various turbulence processes, including the transfer of energy between eddy sizes and between directional components and the production, dissipation, and spatial diffusion of turbulence, are considered. It is concluded that the physical processes occurring in turbulence can be profitably studied numerically.

  6. Turbulence generation by waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kaftori, D.; Nan, X.S.; Banerjee, S.

    1995-12-31

    The interaction between two-dimensional mechanically generated waves, and a turbulent stream was investigated experimentally in a horizontal channel, using a 3-D LDA synchronized with a surface position measuring device and a micro-bubble tracers flow visualization with high speed video. Results show that although the wave induced orbital motion reached all the way to the wall, the characteristics of the turbulence wall structures and the turbulence intensity close to the wall were not altered. Nor was the streaky nature of the wall layer. On the other hand, the mean velocity profile became more uniform and the mean friction velocity was increased. Close to the free surface, the turbulence intensity was substantially increased as well. Even in predominantly laminar flows, the introduction of 2-D waves causes three dimensional turbulence. The turbulence enhancement is found to be proportional to the wave strength.

  7. Turbulence modelling of flow fields in thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.

    1993-01-01

    Following the consensus of a workshop in Turbulence Modelling for Liquid Rocket Thrust Chambers, the current effort was undertaken to study the effects of second-order closure on the predictions of thermochemical flow fields. To reduce the instability and computational intensity of the full second-order Reynolds Stress Model, an Algebraic Stress Model (ASM) coupled with a two-layer near wall treatment was developed. Various test problems, including the compressible boundary layer with adiabatic and cooled walls, recirculating flows, swirling flows, and the entire SSME nozzle flow were studied to assess the performance of the current model. Detailed calculations for the SSME exit wall flow around the nozzle manifold were executed. As to the overall flow predictions, the ASM removes another assumption for appropriate comparison with experimental data to account for the non-isotropic turbulence effects.

  8. Turbulence modelling of flow fields in thrust chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.

    1993-02-01

    Following the consensus of a workshop in Turbulence Modelling for Liquid Rocket Thrust Chambers, the current effort was undertaken to study the effects of second-order closure on the predictions of thermochemical flow fields. To reduce the instability and computational intensity of the full second-order Reynolds Stress Model, an Algebraic Stress Model (ASM) coupled with a two-layer near wall treatment was developed. Various test problems, including the compressible boundary layer with adiabatic and cooled walls, recirculating flows, swirling flows, and the entire SSME nozzle flow were studied to assess the performance of the current model. Detailed calculations for the SSME exit wall flow around the nozzle manifold were executed. As to the overall flow predictions, the ASM removes another assumption for appropriate comparison with experimental data to account for the non-isotropic turbulence effects.

  9. Interaction of a free flame front with a turbulence field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Maurice

    1956-01-01

    Small-perturbation spectral-analysis techniques are used to obtain the root-mean-square flame-generated turbulence velocities and the attenuating pressure fluctuations stemming from interaction of a constant-pressure flame front with a field of isotropic turbulence in the absence of turbulence decay processes.

  10. Subtraction threshold for an isotropic fluorescence emission difference microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nan; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2015-12-01

    Isotropic fluorescence emission difference microscopy proposed recently provides a simple method to enhance the spatial resolution in three-dimensions (3D) for fluorescence imaging. However, the subtraction threshold to achieve the condition for appropriately resolving the sample in 3D have not been studied. Then the subtraction factors used in this type of microscopes are still experientially chosen. Based on vector diffraction theory and a 3D numerical model developed here, the subtraction threshold is numerically investigated for the isotropic fluorescence subtraction microscopy. The subtraction factors and peak intensities at the threshold are obtained and comparied both in lateral and axial planes for achieving most appropriate subtraction and inspecting the isotropic characteristic. The effects of radius ratios of implemented 0-π annular phase plate for generating three dimensional donut spot on the subtracted resolution, peak intensity and negative sidebands are also discussed.

  11. The Surface Pressure Response of a NACA 0015 Airfoil Immersed in Grid Turbulence. Volume 1; Characteristics of the Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bereketab, Semere; Wang, Hong-Wei; Mish, Patrick; Devenport, William J.

    2000-01-01

    Two grids have been developed for the Virginia Tech 6 ft x 6 ft Stability wind tunnel for the purpose of generating homogeneous isotropic turbulent flows for the study of unsteady airfoil response. The first, a square bi-planar grid with a 12" mesh size and an open area ratio of 69.4%, was mounted in the wind tunnel contraction. The second grid, a metal weave with a 1.2 in. mesh size and an open area ratio of 68.2% was mounted in the tunnel test section. Detailed statistical and spectral measurements of the turbulence generated by the two grids are presented for wind tunnel free stream speeds of 10, 20, 30 and 40 m/s. These measurements show the flows to be closely homogeneous and isotropic. Both grids produce flows with a turbulence intensity of about 4% at the location planned for the airfoil leading edge. Turbulence produced by the large grid has an integral scale of some 3.2 inches here. Turbulence produced by the small grid is an order of magnitude smaller. For wavenumbers below the upper limit of the inertial subrange, the spectra and correlations measured with both grids at all speeds can be represented using the von Karman interpolation formula with a single velocity and length scale. The spectra maybe accurately represented over the entire wavenumber range by a modification of the von Karman interpolation formula that includes the effects of dissipation. These models are most accurate at the higher speeds (30 and 40 m/s).

  12. Investigation of the tip clearance flow inside and at the exit of a compressor rotor passage. II - Turbulence properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, A.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1983-01-01

    The flow in the tip clearance region of a compressor rotor is highly turbulent due to the strong interaction of the leakage flow with the annulus wall boundary layer. This paper deals with the turbulence properties of the flow in the tip clearance region of a moderately loaded compressor rotor. The experimental results reported in this paper were obtained using a two-sensor hot-wire probe in combination with an ensemble averaging technique. Blade-to-blade distribution of the axial and tangential turbulence intensities at various radial locations and ten axial locations (four inside the blade passage and the remaining six outside the passage) were derived from this data. Isointensity contours in the clearance region at various radial locations were also obtained from the experimental data. A region of very high turbulence intensities was indicated at the half-chord location from these results. The turbulence intensity profiles also indicated that the leakage flow travels toward the midpassage before rolling up. The turbulence is almost isotropic beyond three-quarter chord downstream of the trailing edge.

  13. Large Eddy Simulation of Aircraft Wake Vortices in a Homogeneous Atmospheric Turbulence: Vortex Decay and Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jongil; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Arya, S. Pal; Proctor, Fred H.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of ambient turbulence on decay and descent of aircraft wake vortices are studied using a validated, three-dimensional: large-eddy simulation model. Numerical simulations are performed in order to isolate the effect of ambient turbulence on the wake vortex decay rate within a neutrally-stratified atmosphere. Simulations are conducted for a range of turbulence intensities, by injecting wake vortex pairs into an approximately homogeneous and isotropic turbulence field. The decay rate of the vortex circulation increases clearly with increasing ambient turbulence level, which is consistent with field observations. Based on the results from the numerical simulations, simple decay models are proposed as functions of dimensionless ambient turbulence intensity (eta) and dimensionless time (T) for the circulation averaged over a range of radial distances. With good agreement with the numerical results, a Gaussian type of vortex decay model is proposed for weak turbulence: while an exponential type of Tortex decay model can be applied for strong turbulence. A relationship for the vortex descent based on above vortex decay model is also proposed. Although the proposed models are based on simulations assuming neutral stratification, the model predictions are compared to Lidar vortex measurements observed during stable, neutral, and unstable atmospheric conditions. In the neutral and unstable atmosphere, the model predictions appear to be in reasonable agreement with the observational data, while in the stably-stratified atmosphere, they largely underestimate the observed circulation decay with consistent overestimation of the observed vortex descent. The underestimation of vortex decay during stably-stratified conditions suggests that stratification has an important influence on vortex decay when ambient levels of turbulence are weak.

  14. The numerical analysis of a turbulent compressible jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debonis, James Raymond

    2000-10-01

    A numerical method to simulate high Reynolds number jet flows was formulated and applied to gain a better understanding of the flow physics. Large-eddy simulation was chosen as the most promising approach to model the turbulent structures due to its compromise between accuracy and computational expense. The filtered Navier-Stokes equations were developed including a total energy form of the energy equation. Sub-grid scale models for the momentum and energy equations were adapted from compressible forms of Smagorinsky's original model. The effect of using disparate temporal and spatial accuracy in a numerical scheme was discovered through one-dimensional model problems and a new uniformly fourth-order accurate numerical method was developed. Results from two and three dimensional validation exercises show that the code accurately reproduces both viscous and inviscid flows. Numerous axisymmetric jet simulations were performed to investigate the effect of grid resolution, numerical scheme, exit boundary conditions and sub-grid scale modeling on the solution and the results were used to guide the three-dimensional calculations. Three-dimensional calculations of a Mach 1.4 jet showed that this LES simulation accurately captures the physics of the turbulent flow. The agreement with experimental data relatively good and is much better than results in the current literature. Turbulent intensities indicate that the turbulent structures at this level of modeling are not isotropic and this information could lend itself to the development of improved sub-grid scale models for LES and turbulence models for RANS simulations. A two point correlation technique was used to quantify the turbulent structures. Two point space correlations were used to obtain a measure of the integral length scale, which proved to be approximately ½Dj. Two point space-time correlations were used to obtain the convection velocity for the turbulent structures. This velocity ranged from 0.57 to 0.71 Uj.

  15. Particle Settling in Low Energy Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Rachel; MacVean, Lissa; Tse, Ian; Mazzaro, Laura; Stacey, Mark; Variano, Evan

    2014-11-01

    Particle settling velocities can be altered by turbulence. In turbulence, dense particles may get trapped in convergent flow regions, and falling particles may be swept towards the downward side of turbulent eddies, resulting in enhanced settling velocities. The degree of velocity enhancement may depend on the Stokes number, the Rouse number, and the turbulent Reynolds number. In a homogeneous, isotropic turbulence tank, we tested the effects of particle size and type, suspended sediment concentration, and level of turbulence on the settling velocities of particles typically found in muddy estuaries. Two Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs), separated vertically, measured turbulent velocities and suspended sediment concentrations, which yield condition dependent settling velocities, via ∂/á C ñ ∂ t = -∂/∂ z (ws á C ñ + á w ' C ' ñ) . These results are pertinent to fine sediment transport in estuaries, where high concentrations of suspended material are transported and impacted by low energy turbulence.

  16. Effect of turbulence on the drag and lift of a particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, P.; Balachandar, S.

    2003-11-01

    A direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used to study the effect of a freestream isotropic turbulent flow on the drag and lift forces on a spherical particle. The particle diameter is about 1.5-10 times the Kolmogorov scale, the particle Reynolds number is about 60-600, and the freestream turbulence intensity is about 10%-25%. The isotropic turbulent field considered here is stationary, i.e., frozen in time. It is shown that the freestream turbulence does not have a substantial and systematic effect on the time-averaged mean drag. The standard drag correlation based on the instantaneous or mean relative velocity results in a reasonably accurate prediction of the mean drag obtained from the DNS. However, the accuracy of prediction of the instantaneous drag decreases with increasing particle size. For the smaller particles, the low frequency oscillations in the DNS drag are well captured by the standard drag, but for the larger particles significant differences exist even for the low frequency components. Inclusion of the added-mass and history forces, computed based on the fluid velocity at the center of the particle, does not improve the prediction. Different estimates of the fluid velocity seen by the particle are examined. It is shown that the mean drag is insensitive to the fluid velocity measured at the particle center, or obtained by averaging over a fluid volume of the order of the particle size. The fluctuations diminish as the size of the averaging volume increases. The effect of increasing freestream turbulence intensity for the same particle size is studied. Fluctuations in the drag and lift forces are shown to scale with the mean drag and freestream intensity. The standard drag without the added-mass and history forces provides the best approximation to the DNS result.

  17. Cascade modeling of single and two-phase turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotnov, Igor A.

    The analysis of turbulent two-phase flows requires closure models in order to perform reliable computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CFMD) analyses. A turbulence cascade model, which tracks the evolution of the turbulent kinetic energy between the various eddy sizes, has been developed for the analysis of the single and bubbly two-phase turbulence. Various flows are considered including the decay of isotropic grid-induced turbulence, uniform shear flow and turbulent channel flow. The model has been developed using a "building block" approach by moving from modeling of simpler turbulent flows (i.e., homogeneous, isotropic decay) to more involved turbulent flows (i.e., non-homogeneous channel flow). The spectral cascade-transport model's performance has been assessed against a number of experimental and direct numerical simulation (DNS) results.

  18. One-dimensional turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Kerstein, A.R.

    1996-12-31

    One-Dimensional Turbulence is a new turbulence modeling strategy involving an unsteady simulation implemented in one spatial dimension. In one dimension, fine scale viscous and molecular-diffusive processes can be resolved affordably in simulations at high turbulence intensity. The mechanistic distinction between advective and molecular processes is thereby preserved, in contrast to turbulence models presently employed. A stochastic process consisting of mapping {open_quote}events{close_quote} applied to a one-dimensional velocity profile represents turbulent advection. The local event rate for given eddy size is proportional to the velocity difference across the eddy. These properties cause an imposed shear to induce an eddy cascade analogous in many respects to the eddy cascade in turbulent flow. Many scaling and fluctuation properties of self-preserving flows, and of passive scalars introduced into these flows, are reproduced.

  19. Estimating three-demensional energy transfer in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, K. S.; Helland, K. N.; Rosenblatt, M.

    1980-01-01

    To obtain an estimate of the spectral transfer function that indicates the rate of decay of energy, an x-wire probe was set at a fixed position, and two single wire probes were set at a number of locations in the same plane perpendicular to the mean flow in the wind tunnel. The locations of the single wire probes are determined by pseudo-random numbers (Monte Carlo). Second order spectra and cross spectra are estimated. The assumption of isotropy relative to second order spectra is examined. Third order spectra are also estimated corresponding to the positions specified. A Monte Carlo Fourier transformation of the downstream bispectra corresponding to integration across the plane perpendicular to the flow is carried out assuming isotropy. Further integration is carried out over spherical energy shells.

  20. Early isotropization of the Glasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epelbaum, T.

    2014-11-01

    A first principle treatment of the early stages of a heavy ion collision within the Color Glass Condensate framework seems to indicate an early hydrodynamization of the initially out of equilibrium Quark Gluon Plasma. Contrasting with the leading order CGC result, the improved calculation presented here provides evidence for a fast isotropization of the pressure tensor, as well as an anomalously small shear viscosity over entropy ratio.

  1. Turbulence kinetic energy budget during the afternoon transition - Part 1: Observed surface TKE budget and boundary layer description for 10 intensive observation period days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Erik; Lohou, Fabienne; Lothon, Marie; Pardyjak, Eric; Mahrt, Larry; Darbieu, Clara

    2016-07-01

    The decay of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and its budget in the afternoon period from midday until zero-buoyancy flux at the surface is studied in a two-part paper by means of measurements from the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) field campaign for 10 intensive observation period days. Here, in Part 1, near-surface measurements from a small tower are used to estimate a TKE budget. The overall boundary layer characteristics and mesoscale situation at the site are also described based upon taller tower measurements, radiosoundings and remote sensing instrumentation. Analysis of the TKE budget during the afternoon transition reveals a variety of different surface layer dynamics in terms of TKE and TKE decay. This is largely attributed to variations in the 8 m wind speed, which is responsible for different amounts of near-surface shear production on different afternoons and variations within some of the afternoon periods. The partitioning of near-surface production into local dissipation and transport in neutral and unstably stratified conditions was investigated. Although variations exist both between and within afternoons, as a rule of thumb, our results suggest that about 50 % of the near-surface production of TKE is compensated for by local dissipation near the surface, leaving about 50 % available for transport. This result indicates that it is important to also consider TKE transport as a factor influencing the near-surface TKE decay rate, which in many earlier studies has mainly been linked with the production terms of TKE by buoyancy and wind shear. We also conclude that the TKE tendency is smaller than the other budget terms, indicating a quasi-stationary evolution of TKE in the afternoon transition. Even though the TKE tendency was observed to be small, a strong correlation to mean buoyancy production of -0.69 was found for the afternoon period. For comparison with previous results, the TKE budget terms are normalized with

  2. Turbulence Kinetic Energy budget during the afternoon transition - Part 1: Observed surface TKE budget and boundary layer description for 10 intensive observation period days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, E.; Lohou, F.; Lothon, M.; Pardyjak, E.; Mahrt, L.; Darbieu, C.

    2015-11-01

    The decay of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and its budget in the afternoon period from mid-day until zero buoyancy flux at the surface is studied in a two-part paper by means of measurements from the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) field campaign for 10 Intensive Observation Period days. Here, in Part 1, near-surface measurements from a small tower are used to estimate a TKE budget. The overall boundary layer characteristics and meso-scale situation at the site are also described based upon taller tower measurements, radiosoundings and remote sensing instrumentation. Analysis of the TKE budget during the afternoon transition reveals a variety of different surface layer dynamics in terms of TKE and TKE decay. This is largely attributed to variations in the 8 m wind speed, which is responsible for different amounts of near-surface shear production on different afternoons and variations within some of the afternoon periods. The partitioning of near surface production into local dissipation and transport in neutral and unstably stratified conditions was investigated. Although variations exist both between and within afternoons, as a rule of thumb, our results suggest that about 50 % of the near surface production of TKE is compensated by local dissipation near the surface, leaving about 50 % available for transport. This result indicates that it is important to also consider TKE transport as a factor influencing the near-surface TKE decay rate, which in many earlier studies has mainly been linked with the production terms of TKE by buoyancy and wind shear. We also conclude that the TKE tendency is smaller than the other budget terms, indicating a quasi-stationary evolution of TKE in the afternoon transition. Even though the TKE tendency was observed to be small, a strong correlation to mean buoyancy production of -0.69 was found for the afternoon period. For comparison with previous results, the TKE budget terms are normalized with

  3. Multifractality and the effect of turbulence on the chaotic dynamics of a HeNe laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulich, Damián.; Zunino, Luciano; Pérez, Darío.; Garavaglia, Mario

    2013-09-01

    We propose the use of multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) to measure the influence of atmospheric turbulence on the chaotic dynamics of a HeNe laser. Fit ranges for MF-DFA are obtained with goodness of linear fit (GoLF) criterion. The chaotic behavior is generated by means of a simple interferometric setup with a feedback to the cavity of the gas laser. Such dynamics have been studied in the past and modeled as a function of the feedback level. Different intensities of isotropic turbulence have been generated with a turbulator device, allowing a structure constant for the index of refraction of air adjustable by means of a temperature difference parameter in the unit. Considering the recent interest in message encryption with this kind of setups, the study of atmospheric turbulence effects plays a key role in the field of secure laser communication through the atmosphere. In principle, different intensities of turbulence may be interpreted as different levels of white noise on the original chaotic series. These results can be of utility for performance optimization in chaotic free-space laser communication systems.

  4. Anisotropic turbulence in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Bieber, J. W.; Zank, G. P.

    1995-01-01

    Solar wind turbulence has been viewed traditionally as composed of parallel propagating ('slab' fluctuations) or otherwise as isotropic turbulence. A variety of recent investigations, reviewed here, indicate that the spectrum may contain a significant admixture of two dimensional fluctuations, having variations mainly perpendicular to the local magnetic field. These indications come from simulations, from the theory of nearly incompressible MHD, from cosmic ray transport studies and from transport theory for solar wind turbulence, as well as from interpretations of direct observations. Thus, solar wind turbulence may be more like bundles of spaghetti than like parallel phase fronts.

  5. Stirring turbulence with turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cekli, Hakki Ergun; Joosten, René; van de Water, Willem

    2015-12-01

    We stir wind-tunnel turbulence with an active grid that consists of rods with attached vanes. The time-varying angle of these rods is controlled by random numbers. We study the response of turbulence on the statistical properties of these random numbers. The random numbers are generated by the Gledzer-Ohkitani-Yamada shell model, which is a simple dynamical model of turbulence that produces a velocity field displaying inertial-range scaling behavior. The range of scales can be adjusted by selection of shells. We find that the largest energy input and the smallest anisotropy are reached when the time scale of the random numbers matches that of the largest eddies of the wind-tunnel turbulence. A large mismatch of these times creates a highly intermittent random flow with interesting but quite anomalous statistics.

  6. A Transversely Isotropic Thermoelastic Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S. M.

    1989-01-01

    A continuum theory is presented for representing the thermoelastic behavior of composites that can be idealized as transversely isotropic. This theory is consistent with anisotropic viscoplastic theories being developed presently at NASA Lewis Research Center. A multiaxial statement of the theory is presented, as well as plane stress and plane strain reductions. Experimental determination of the required material parameters and their theoretical constraints are discussed. Simple homogeneously stressed elements are examined to illustrate the effect of fiber orientation on the resulting strain distribution. Finally, the multiaxial stress-strain relations are expressed in matrix form to simplify and accelerate implementation of the theory into structural analysis codes.

  7. Induced piezoelectricity in isotropic biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, R L

    1976-12-01

    Isotropic material can be made to exhibit piezoelectric effects by the application of a constant electric field. For insulators, the piezoelectric strain constant is proportional to the applied electric field and for semiconductors, an additional out-of-phase component of piezoelectricity is proportional to the electric current density in the sample. The two induced coefficients are proportional to the strain-dependent dielectric constant (depsilon/dS + epsilon) and resistivity (drho/dS - rho), respectively. The latter is more important at frequencies such that rhoepsilonomega less than 1, often the case in biopolymers. Signals from induced piezoelectricity in nature may be larger than those from true piezoelectricity. PMID:990389

  8. Turbulence-Flame Interactions in Type Ia Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 50A-1148, Berkeley, CA 94720; Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064; Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794; Aspden, Andrew J; Aspden, Andrew J.; Bell, John B.; Day, Marc S.; Woosley, Stan E.; Zingale, Mike

    2008-05-27

    The large range of time and length scales involved in type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) requires the use of flame models. As a prelude to exploring various options for flame models, we consider, in this paper, high-resolution three-dimensional simulations of the small-scale dynamics of nuclear flames in the supernova environment in which the details of the flame structure are fully resolved. The range of densities examined, 1 to 8 x 107 g cm-3, spans the transition from the laminar flamelet regime to the distributed burning regime where small scale turbulence disrupts the flame. The use of a low Mach number algorithm facilitates the accurate resolution of the thermal structure of the flame and the inviscid turbulent kinetic energy cascade, while implicitly incorporating kinetic energy dissipation at the grid-scale cutoff. For an assumed background of isotropic Kolmogorov turbulence with an energy characteristic of SN Ia, we find a transition density between 1 and 3 x 107 g cm-3 where the nature of the burning changes ualitatively. By 1 x 107 g cm-3, energy diffusion by conduction and radiation is exceeded, on the flame scale, by turbulent advection. As a result, the effective Lewis Number approaches unity. That is, the flame resembles a laminar flame, but is turbulently broadened with an effective diffusion coefficient, D_T \\sim u' l, where u' is the turbulent intensity and l is the integral scale. For the larger integral scales characteristic of a real supernova, the flame structure is predicted to become complex and unsteady. Implications for a possible transition to detonation are discussed.

  9. Isotropic Negative Thermal Expansion Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lingling; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji

    2016-07-13

    Negative thermal expansion materials are important and desirable in science and engineering applications. However, natural materials with isotropic negative thermal expansion are rare and usually unsatisfied in performance. Here, we propose a novel method to achieve two- and three-dimensional negative thermal expansion metamaterials via antichiral structures. The two-dimensional metamaterial is constructed with unit cells that combine bimaterial strips and antichiral structures, while the three-dimensional metamaterial is fabricated by a multimaterial 3D printing process. Both experimental and simulation results display isotropic negative thermal expansion property of the samples. The effective coefficient of negative thermal expansion of the proposed models is demonstrated to be dependent on the difference between the thermal expansion coefficient of the component materials, as well as on the circular node radius and the ligament length in the antichiral structures. The measured value of the linear negative thermal expansion coefficient of the three-dimensional sample is among the largest achieved in experiments to date. Our findings provide an easy and practical approach to obtaining materials with tunable negative thermal expansion on any scale. PMID:27333052

  10. Spherical cloaking with homogeneous isotropic multilayered structures.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Hu, Li; Xu, Xiaofei; Feng, Yijun

    2009-04-01

    We propose a practical realization of electromagnetic spherical cloaking by layered structure of homogeneous isotropic materials. By mimicking the classic anisotropic cloak by many alternating thin layers of isotropic dielectrics, the permittivity and permeability in each isotropic layer can be properly determined by effective medium theory in order to achieve invisibility. The model greatly facilitates modeling by Mie theory and realization by multilayer coating of dielectrics. Eigenmode analysis is also presented to provide insights of the discretization in multilayers. PMID:19518392

  11. ANISOTROPY LENGTHENS THE DECAY TIME OF TURBULENCE IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Charles E.; McKee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.

    2011-09-01

    The decay of isothermal turbulence with velocity anisotropy is investigated using computational simulations and synthetic observations. We decompose the turbulence into isotropic and anisotropic components with total velocity dispersions {sigma}{sub iso} and {sigma}{sub ani}, respectively. We find that the decay rate of the turbulence depends on the crossing time of the isotropic component only. A cloud of size L with significant anisotropy in its turbulence has a dissipation time, t{sub diss} = L/(2{sigma}{sub iso}). This translates into turbulent energy decay rates on the cloud scale that can be much lower for anisotropic turbulence than for isotropic turbulence. To help future observations determine whether observed molecular clouds have the level of anisotropy required to maintain the observed level of turbulence over their lifetimes, we performed a principal component analysis on our simulated clouds. Even with projection effects washing out the anisotropic signal, there is a measurable difference in the axis-constrained principal component analysis performed in directions parallel and perpendicular to the direction of maximum velocity dispersion. When this relative difference, {psi}, is 0.1, there is enough anisotropy for the dissipation time to triple the expected isotropic value. We provide a fit for converting {psi} into an estimate for the dissipation time, t{sub diss}.

  12. Helicopter rotor noise due to ingestion of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.; Greitzer, E. M.

    1986-05-01

    A theoretical study was conducted to develop an analytical prediction method for helicopter main rotor noise due to the ingestion of atmospheric turbulence. This study incorporates an atmospheric turbulence model, a rotor mean flow contraction model and a rapid distortion turbulence model which together determine the statistics of the non-isotropic turbulence at the rotor plane. Inputs to the combined mean inflow and turbulence models are controlled by atmospheric wind characteristics and helicopter operating conditions. A generalized acoustic source model was used to predict the far field noise generated by the non-isotropic flow incident on the rotor. Absolute levels for acoustic spectra and directivity patterns were calculated for full scale helicopters, without the use of empirical or adjustable constants. Comparisons between isotropic and non-isotropic turbulence at the rotor face demonstrated pronounced differences in acoustic spectra. Turning and contraction of the flow for hover and low speed vertical ascent cases result in a 3 dB increase in the acoustic spectrum energy and a 10 dB increase in tone levels. Compared to trailing edge noise, turbulence ingestion noise is the dominant noise mechanism below approximately 30 rotor harmonics, while above 100 harmonics, trailing edge noise levels exceed turbulence ingestion noise by 25 dB.

  13. Helicopter rotor noise due to ingestion of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.; Greitzer, E. M.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical study was conducted to develop an analytical prediction method for helicopter main rotor noise due to the ingestion of atmospheric turbulence. This study incorporates an atmospheric turbulence model, a rotor mean flow contraction model and a rapid distortion turbulence model which together determine the statistics of the non-isotropic turbulence at the rotor plane. Inputs to the combined mean inflow and turbulence models are controlled by atmospheric wind characteristics and helicopter operating conditions. A generalized acoustic source model was used to predict the far field noise generated by the non-isotropic flow incident on the rotor. Absolute levels for acoustic spectra and directivity patterns were calculated for full scale helicopters, without the use of empirical or adjustable constants. Comparisons between isotropic and non-isotropic turbulence at the rotor face demonstrated pronounced differences in acoustic spectra. Turning and contraction of the flow for hover and low speed vertical ascent cases result in a 3 dB increase in the acoustic spectrum energy and a 10 dB increase in tone levels. Compared to trailing edge noise, turbulence ingestion noise is the dominant noise mechanism below approximately 30 rotor harmonics, while above 100 harmonics, trailing edge noise levels exceed turbulence ingestion noise by 25 dB.

  14. Macroscopic simulation of isotropic permanent magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruckner, Florian; Abert, Claas; Vogler, Christoph; Heinrichs, Frank; Satz, Armin; Ausserlechner, Udo; Binder, Gernot; Koeck, Helmut; Suess, Dieter

    2016-03-01

    Accurate simulations of isotropic permanent magnets require to take the magnetization process into account and consider the anisotropic, nonlinear, and hysteretic material behaviour near the saturation configuration. An efficient method for the solution of the magnetostatic Maxwell equations including the description of isotropic permanent magnets is presented. The algorithm can easily be implemented on top of existing finite element methods and does not require a full characterization of the hysteresis of the magnetic material. Strayfield measurements of an isotropic permanent magnet and simulation results are in good agreement and highlight the importance of a proper description of the isotropic material.

  15. Gradient and counter-gradient scalar transport in turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veynante, D.; Trouvé, A.; Bray, K. N. C.; Mantel, T.

    1997-02-01

    In premixed turbulent combustion, the modelling of the turbulent flux of the mean reaction progress variable c˜, rho;u[double prime or second]ic[double prime or second], remains, remains somewhat controversial. Classical gradient transport assumptions based on the eddy viscosity concept are often used while both experimental data and theoretical analysis have pointed out the existence of counter-gradient turbulent diffusion. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used in this paper to provide basic information on the turbulent flux of c˜ and study the occurrence of counter-gradient transport. The numerical configuration corresponds to two- or three-dimensional premixed flames in isotropic turbulent flow. The simulations correspond to various flame and flow conditions that are representative of flamelet combustion. They reveal that different flames will feature different turbulent transport properties and that these differences can be related to basic dynamical differences in the flame flow interactions: counter-gradient diffusion occurs when the flow field near the flame is dominated by thermal dilatation due to chemical reaction, whereas gradient diffusion occurs when the flow field near the flame is dominated by the turbulent motions. The DNS-based analysis leads to a simple expression to describe the turbulent flux of c˜, which in turn leads to a simple criterion to delineate between the gradient and counter-gradient turbulent diffusion regimes. This criterion suggests that the occurrence of one regime or the other is determined primarily by the ratio of turbulence intensity divided by the laminar flame speed, u[prime prime or minute]/sL, and by the flame heat release factor, [tau] [identical with] (Tb [minus sign] Tu)/Tu, where Tu and Tb are respectively the temperature within unburnt and burnt gas. Consistent with the Bray Moss Libby theory, counter-gradient (gradient) diffusion is promoted by low (high) values of u[prime prime or minute]/sL and high (low

  16. Numerical study of the motion of microscopic oil droplets under high turbulence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Murray; Knio, Omar; Katz, Joseph; Le Maître, Olivier

    2007-11-01

    The rise of small oil droplets in water undergoing isotropic turbulence is analyzed computationally to explain the observations of Friedman and Katz (2002), where the rise velocity of droplets smaller than 800 μm diameter is enhanced by turbulence whereas rise of larger droplets is retarded. The study explores whether these effects can be explained using a one-way coupling model combining DNS of the field with Lagrangian tracking of droplets using a dynamical equation with buoyancy, virtual mass, pressure, drag, lift and history forces. Results indicate that using empirically-determined drag and lift coefficients, the observed droplet behavior is not reproduced. Lift and history forces are shown to not to account for the observed mean droplet rise. From correlations for settling of heavy particles under intense turbulence, suppression of drag and virtual mass for droplet diameters near ten times the Kolmogorov lengthscale was postulated. Analysis indicate that the model then recovers observed small droplet rise enhancement and large droplet rise retardation. Results underscore difficulties in modeling the motion of small particles under high turbulence, especially when the particle size is near the turbulence microscale.

  17. Acoustic radiation and surface pressure characteristics of an airfoil due to incident turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paterson, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation of the noise and unsteady surface pressure characteristics of an isolated airfoil in a uniform mean velocity, homogeneous, nearly-isotropic turbulence field was conducted. Wind tunnel experiments were performed with a 23 cm chord, two dimensional NACA 0012 airfoil over a free stream Mach number range of 0.1 to 0.5. Far-field noise spectra and directivity were measured in an anechoic chamber that surrounded the tunnel open jet test section. Spanwise and chordwise distribution of unsteady airfoil surface pressure spectra and surface pressure cross-spectra were obtained. Incident turbulence intensities, length scales, spectra, and spanwise cross-spectra, required in the calculation of far-field noise and surface pressure characteristics were also measured.

  18. Kinematics of velocity and vorticity correlations in turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, P. S.

    1983-01-01

    The kinematic problem of calculating second-order velocity moments from given values of the vorticity covariance is examined. Integral representation formulas for second-order velocity moments in terms of the two-point vorticity correlation tensor are derived. The special relationships existing between velocity moments in isotropic turbulence are expressed in terms of the integral formulas yielding several kinematic constraints on the two-point vorticity correlation tensor in isotropic turbulence. Numerical evaluation of these constraints suggests that a Gaussian curve may be the only form of the longitudinal velocity correlation coefficient which is consistent with the requirement of isotropy. It is shown that if this is the case, then a family of exact solutions to the decay of isotropic turbulence may be obtained which contains Batchelor's final period solution as a special case. In addition, the computed results suggest a method of approximating the integral representation formulas in general turbulent shear flows.

  19. Rotor noise due to atmospheric turbulence ingestion. I - Fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.; Greitzer, E. M.

    1986-01-01

    In the present analytical procedure for the prediction of helicopter rotor noise generation due to the ingestion of atmospheric turbulence, different models for turbulence fluid mechanics and the ingestion process are combined. The mean flow and turbulence statistics associated with the atmospheric boundary layer are modeled with attention to the effects of atmospheric stability length, windspeed, and altitude. The turbulence field can be modeled as isotropic, locally stationary, and homogeneous. For large mean flow contraction ratios, accurate predictions of turbulence vorticity components at the rotor face requires the incorporation of the differential drift of fluid particles on adjacent streamlines.

  20. Multipolar polarizations of methane from isotropic and anisotropic collision-induced light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bancewicz, T.; Nowicka, K.; Godet, J.-L.; Le Duff, Y.

    2004-06-01

    The anisotropic and isotropic binary collision-induced spectra scattered by gaseous methane have been measured in absolute units up to 900 cm{sup -1} from the Rayleigh line. Corresponding theoretical intensities taking into account multipolar polarizabilities have been calculated using a semiclassical procedure. From the analysis of, mainly, our isotropic scattering data, values of the dipole-quadrupole and dipole-octopole polarizabilities are deduced. They are found to be in good agreement with recent ab initio calculations.

  1. Constitutive modeling for isotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, Ulric S.; Chan, Kwai S.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of the program is to evaluate and develop existing constitutive models for use in finite-element structural analysis of turbine engine hot section components. The class of constitutive equation studied is considered unified in that all inelastic deformation including plasticity, creep, and stress relaxation are treated in a single term rather than a classical separation of plasticity (time independent) and creep (time dependent) behavior. The unified theories employed also do not utilize the classical yield surface or plastic potential concept. The models are constructed from an appropriate flow law, a scalar kinetic relation between strain rate, temperature and stress, and evolutionary equations for internal variables describing strain or work hardening, both isotropic and directional (kinematic). This and other studies have shown that the unified approach is particularly suited for determining the cyclic behavior of superalloy type blade and vane materials and is entirely compatible with three-dimensional inelastic finite-element formulations. The behavior was examined of a second nickel-base alloy, MAR-M247, and compared it with the Bodner-Partom model, further examined procedures for determining the material-specific constants in the models, and exercised the MARC code for a turbine blade under simulated flight spectrum loading. Results are summarized.

  2. Constitutive modeling for isotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, K. S.; Lindholm, U. S.; Bodner, S. R.

    1988-01-01

    The third and fourth years of a 4-year research program, part of the NASA HOST Program, are described. The program goals were: (1) to develop and validate unified constitutive models for isotropic materials, and (2) to demonstrate their usefulness for structural analysis of hot section components of gas turbine engines. The unified models selected for development and evaluation were those of Bodner-Partom and of Walker. The unified approach for elastic-viscoplastic constitutive equations is a viable method for representing and predicting material response characteristics in the range where strain rate and temperature dependent inelastic deformations are experienced. This conclusion is reached by extensive comparison of model calculations against the experimental results of a test program of two high temperature Ni-base alloys, B1900+Hf and Mar-M247, over a wide temperature range for a variety of deformation and thermal histories including uniaxial, multiaxial, and thermomechanical loading paths. The applicability of the Bodner-Partom and the Walker models for structural applications has been demonstrated by implementing these models into the MARC finite element code and by performing a number of analyses including thermomechanical histories on components of hot sections of gas turbine engines and benchmark notch tensile specimens. The results of the 4-year program have been published in four annual reports. The results of the base program are summarized in this report. The tasks covered include: (1) development of material test procedures, (2) thermal history effects, and (3) verification of the constitutive model for an alternative material.

  3. Modeling turbulent flame propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Ashurst, W.T.

    1994-08-01

    Laser diagnostics and flow simulation techniques axe now providing information that if available fifty years ago, would have allowed Damkoehler to show how turbulence generates flame area. In the absence of this information, many turbulent flame speed models have been created, most based on Kolmogorov concepts which ignore the turbulence vortical structure, Over the last twenty years, the vorticity structure in mixing layers and jets has been shown to determine the entrainment and mixing behavior and these effects need to be duplicated by combustion models. Turbulence simulations reveal the intense vorticity structure as filaments and simulations of passive flamelet propagation show how this vorticity Creates flame area and defines the shape of the expected chemical reaction surface. Understanding how volume expansion interacts with flow structure should improve experimental methods for determining turbulent flame speed. Since the last decade has given us such powerful new tools to create and see turbulent combustion microscopic behavior, it seems that a solution of turbulent combustion within the next decade would not be surprising in the hindsight of 2004.

  4. Characterizing inertial and convective optical turbulence by detrended fluctuation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funes, Gustavo; Figueroa, Eduardo; Gulich, Damián.; Zunino, Luciano; Pérez, Darío. G.

    2013-10-01

    Atmospheric turbulence is usually simulated at the laboratory by generating convective free flows with hot surfaces, or heaters. It is tacitly assumed that propagation experiments in this environment are comparable to those usually found outdoors. Nevertheless, it is unclear under which conditions the analogy between convective and isotropic turbulence is valid; that is, obeying Kolmogorov isotropic models. For instance, near-ground-level turbulence often is driven by shear ratchets deviating from established inertial models. In this case, a value for the structure constant can be obtained but it would be unable to distinguish between both classes of turbulence. We have performed a conceptually simple experiment of laser beam propagation through two types of artificial turbulence: isotropic turbulence generated by a turbulator [Proc. SPIE 8535, 853508 (2012)], and convective turbulence by controlling the temperature of electric heaters. In both cases, a thin laser beam propagates across the turbulent path, and its wandering is registered by a position sensor detector. The strength of the optical turbulence, in terms of the structure constant, is obtained from the wandering variance. It is expressed as a function of the temperature difference between cold and hot sources in each setup. We compare the time series behaviour for each turbulence with increasing turbulence strength by estimating the Hurst exponent, H, through detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). Refractive index fluctuations are inherently fractal; this characteristic is reflected in their spectra power-law dependence—in the inertial range. This fractal behaviour is inherited by time series of optical quantities, such as the wandering, by the occurrence of long-range correlations. By analyzing the wandering time series with this technique, we are able to correlate the turbulence strength to the value of the Hurt exponent. Ultimately, we characterize both types of turbulence.

  5. Broken symmetry in ideal magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical study of the long-time evolution of a number of cases of inviscid, isotropic, incompressible, three-dimensional fluid, and magneto-fluid turbulence has been completed. The results confirm that ideal magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is non-ergodic if there is no external magnetic field present. This is due essentially to a canonical symmetry being broken in an arbitrary dynamical representation. The broken symmetry manifests itself as a coherent structure, i.e., a non-zero time-averaged part of the turbulent magnetic field. The coherent structure is observed, in one case, to contain about eighteen percent of the total energy.

  6. Local structures of homogeneous Hall MHD turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, H.; Araki, K.

    2011-12-01

    Local structures of decaying homogeneous and isotropic Hall MHD turbulence are studied by means of direct numerical simulations. Regions of strong vorticity and strong current density in Hall MHD turbulence are compared to those of single-fluid MHD turbulence. An analysis by the use of a low-pass filter reveals that the introduction of the Hall term can modify not only small-scale structures of the current density but also structures of the vorticity field, especially at the scales smaller than the ion skin depth.

  7. Outflow Driven Turbulence in Star Forming Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Adam

    Setting young stellar object jets and outflows in their broadest context requires an understanding of outflows as “feedback” in the development of molecular cloud turbulence and the determination of star formation efficiencies. In this contribution I review our group’s recent studies exploring relationships between protostellar outflows and turbulence in molecular clouds. We first present studies of turbulence and fossil cavities driven by YSO outflows using numerical simulations which track the evolution of single transient jets driven into a turbulent medium. Our simulations show both the effect of turbulence on outflow structures and, conversely, the effect of outflows on the ambient turbulence. These studies demonstrate that individual transient outflows have the capacity to re-energize decaying turbulence. Next we present simulations of multiple interacting jets. We show that turbulence can readily be sustained by these interactions and show that it is possible to broadly characterize an effective driving scale of the outflows. Comparing the velocity spectrum obtained in our studies to that of an isotropically forced control we show that in outflow driven turbulence a power law of the form E(k) ∝ k - β is indeed achieved. However we find a steeper spectrum β ˜ 3 is obtained in outflow driven turbulence models than in isotropically forced simulations β ˜ 2. 0. Taken together both studies provide broad support for the conclusion that fossil cavities driven by decaying jets can provide a source of turbulence and feedback which mediate star formation processes in molecular clouds. Whether this does obtain in real clouds remains a point which must be demonstrated

  8. Turbulent energy flux generated by shock/homogeneous-turbulence interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Krishnendu; Quadros, Russell; Larsson, Johan

    2015-11-01

    High-speed turbulent flows with shock waves are characterized by high localized surface heat transfer rates. Computational predictions are often inaccurate due to the limitations in modeling of the unclosed turbulent energy flux in the highly non-equilibrium regions of shock interaction. In this paper, we investigate the turbulent energy flux generated when homogeneous isotropic turbulence passes through a nominally normal shock wave. We use linear interaction analysis where the incoming turbulence is idealized as being composed of a collection of two-dimensional planar vorticity waves, and the shock wave is taken to be a discontinuity. The nature of the post-shock turbulent energy flux is predicted to be strongly dependent on the incidence angle of the incoming waves. The energy flux correlation is also decomposed into its vortical, entropy and acoustic contributions to understand its rapid non-monotonic variation behind the shock. Three-dimensional statistics, calculated by integrating two-dimensional results over a prescribed upstream energy spectrum, are compared with available direct numerical simulation data. A detailed budget of the governing equation is also considered in order to gain insight into the underlying physics.

  9. Tunable dynamics of microtubule-based active isotropic gels

    PubMed Central

    Henkin, Gil; DeCamp, Stephen J.; Chen, Daniel T. N.; Sanchez, Tim; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of an active gel of bundled microtubules (MTs) that is driven by clusters of kinesin molecular motors. Upon the addition of ATP, the coordinated action of thousands of molecular motors drives the gel to a highly dynamical turbulent-like state that persists for hours and is only limited by the stability of constituent proteins and the availability of the chemical fuel. We characterize how enhanced transport and emergent macroscopic flows of active gels depend on relevant molecular parameters, including ATP, kinesin motor and depletant concentrations, MT volume fraction, as well as the stoichiometry of the constituent motor clusters. Our results show that the dynamical and structural properties of MT-based active gels are highly tunable. They also indicate existence of an optimal concentration of molecular motors that maximize far-from-equilibrium activity of active isotropic MT gels. PMID:25332391

  10. Two-dimensional convective turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Gruzinov, A.V.; Kukharkin, N.; Sudan, R.N.

    1996-02-01

    We show that 2D {bold E{times}B} ionospheric turbulence of the electron density in the equatorial electrojet is isomorphic to the viscous convection of an ordinary fluid in a porous medium due to temperature gradients. Numerical simulations reveal the strong anisotropy in the turbulence, which consists of rising hot bubbles and falling cool bubbles. These bubbles break up into fingers leading to the formation of stable shear flows. After reaching a quasisteady state, the omnidirectional energy spectrum approaches a {ital k}{sup {minus}2} behavior, rather than {ital k}{sup {minus}5/3} as expected from isotropic turbulence. Physical mechanisms that lead to anisotropy are analyzed. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  11. Turbulent Distortion of Condensate Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazoume, R.; Orou Chabi, J.; Johnson, J. A., III

    1997-01-01

    When a simple model for the relationship between the density-temperature fluctuation correlation and mean values is used, we determine that the rate of change of turbulent intensity can influence directly the accretion rate of droplets. Considerable interest exists in the accretion rate for condensates in nonequilibrium flow with icing and the potential role which reactant accretion can play in nonequilibrium exothermic reactant processes. Turbulence is thought to play an important role in such flows. It has already been experimentally determined that turbulence influences the sizes of droplets in the heterogeneous nucleation of supersaturated vapors. This paper addresses the issue of the possible influence of turbulence on the accretion rate of droplets.

  12. The Numerical Analysis of a Turbulent Compressible Jet. Degree awarded by Ohio State Univ., 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeBonis, James R.

    2001-01-01

    A numerical method to simulate high Reynolds number jet flows was formulated and applied to gain a better understanding of the flow physics. Large-eddy simulation was chosen as the most promising approach to model the turbulent structures due to its compromise between accuracy and computational expense. The filtered Navier-Stokes equations were developed including a total energy form of the energy equation. Subgrid scale models for the momentum and energy equations were adapted from compressible forms of Smagorinsky's original model. The effect of using disparate temporal and spatial accuracy in a numerical scheme was discovered through one-dimensional model problems and a new uniformly fourth-order accurate numerical method was developed. Results from two- and three-dimensional validation exercises show that the code accurately reproduces both viscous and inviscid flows. Numerous axisymmetric jet simulations were performed to investigate the effect of grid resolution, numerical scheme, exit boundary conditions and subgrid scale modeling on the solution and the results were used to guide the three-dimensional calculations. Three-dimensional calculations of a Mach 1.4 jet showed that this LES simulation accurately captures the physics of the turbulent flow. The agreement with experimental data was relatively good and is much better than results in the current literature. Turbulent intensities indicate that the turbulent structures at this level of modeling are not isotropic and this information could lend itself to the development of improved subgrid scale models for LES and turbulence models for RANS simulations. A two point correlation technique was used to quantify the turbulent structures. Two point space correlations were used to obtain a measure of the integral length scale, which proved to be approximately 1/2 D(sub j). Two point space-time correlations were used to obtain the convection velocity for the turbulent structures. This velocity ranged from 0.57 to

  13. Measurement of the Noise Resulting from the Interaction of Turbulence with a Lifting Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Burley, Casey L.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental study of the noise resulting from the interaction of an airfoil with incident turbulence is presented. The test models include NACA0015 airfoils of different chord lengths, a flat plate with a sharp leading edge, and an airfoil of same section as a reference Fowler flap. The airfoils are immersed in nearly isotropic turbulence. Two approaches for performing the noise measurements are used and compared. The effects that turbulence intensity and scales, airfoil geometry, velocity and angle of attack have on the incident turbulence interaction noise are examined. Detailed directivity measurements are presented. It is found that noise spectral levels beyond the peak frequency decrease more with decreasing airfoil leading edge sharpness, and that spectral peak level (at 0 deg. angle of attack) appears to be mostly controlled by the airfoil fs thickness and chord. Increase in turbulence scale and intensity are observed to lead to a uniform increase of the noise spectral levels with an LI(sup 2) dependence (where L is the turbulence longitudinal integral scale and I is the turbulence intensity). Noise levels are found to scale with the 6th power of velocity and the 2nd power of the airfoil chord. Sensitivity to changes in angle of attack appears to have a turbulence longitudinal integral scale to chord (C) ratio dependence, with large effects on noise for L/C greater than or equal to 1 and decreased effects as L/C becomes smaller than 1. For all L/C values, the directivity pattern of the noise resulting from the incident turbulence is seen to remain symmetric with respect to the direction of the mean flow until stall, at which point, the directivity becomes symmetric with respect to the airfoil chord. It is also observed that sensitivity to angle of attack changes is more pronounced on the model suction side than on the model pressure side, and in the higher frequency range of the spectra for the largest airfoils tested (L/C less than 0.24).

  14. Observations of velocity shear driven plasma turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kintner, P. M., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Electrostatic and magnetic turbulence observations from HAWKEYE-1 during the low altitude portion of its elliptical orbit over the Southern Hemisphere are presented. The magnetic turbulence is confined near the auroral zone and is similar to that seen at higher altitudes by HEOS-2 in the polar cusp. The electrostatic turbulence is composed of a background component with a power spectral index of 1.89 + or - .26 and an intense component with a power spectral index of 2.80 + or - .34. The intense electrostatic turbulence and the magnetic turbulence correlate with velocity shears in the convective plasma flow. Since velocity shear instabilities are most unstable to wave vectors perpendicular to the magnetic field, the shear correlated turbulence is anticipated to be two dimensional in character and to have a power spectral index of 3 which agrees with that observed in the intense electrostatic turbulence.

  15. Invariant imbedding theory of wave propagation in arbitrarily inhomogeneous stratified bi-isotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seulong; Kim, Kihong

    2016-06-01

    Bi-isotropic media, which include isotropic chiral media and Tellegen media as special cases, are the most general form of linear isotropic media where the electric displacement and the magnetic induction are related to both the electric field and the magnetic intensity. In inhomogeneous bi-isotropic media, electromagnetic waves of two different polarizations are coupled to each other. In this paper, we develop a generalized version of the invariant imbedding method for the study of wave propagation in arbitrarily inhomogeneous stratified bi-isotropic media, which can be used to solve the coupled wave propagation problem accurately and efficiently. We verify the validity and usefulness of the method by applying it to several examples, including the wave propagation in a uniform chiral slab, the surface wave excitation in a bilayer system made of a layer of Tellegen medium and a metal layer, and the mode conversion of transverse electromagnetic waves into longitudinal plasma oscillations in inhomogeneous Tellegen media. In contrast to the case of ordinary isotropic media, we find that the surface wave excitation and the mode conversion occur for both s and p waves in bi-isotropic media.

  16. Simulation and Modeling of Homogeneous, Compressed Turbulence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chung-Teh

    Low Reynolds number homogeneous turbulence undergoing low Mach number isotropic and one-dimensional compression has been simulated by numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical simulations were carried out on a CYBER 205 computer using a 64 x 64 x 64 mesh. A spectral method was used for spatial differencing and the second -order Runge-Kutta method for time advancement. A variety of statistical information was extracted from the computed flow fields. These include three-dimensional energy and dissipation spectra, two-point velocity correlations, one -dimensional energy spectra, turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate, integral length scales, Taylor microscales, and Kolmogorov length scale. It was found that the ratio of the turbulence time scale to the mean-flow time scale is an important parameter in these flows. When this ratio is large, the flow is immediately affected by the mean strain in a manner similar to that predicted by rapid distortion theory. When this ratio is small, the flow retains the character of decaying isotropic turbulence initially; only after the strain has been applied for a long period does the flow accumulate a significant reflection of the effect of mean strain. In these flows, the Kolmogorov length scale decreases rapidly with increasing total strain, due to the density increase that accompanies compression. Results from the simulated flow fields were used to test one-point-closure, two-equation turbulence models. The two-equation models perform well only when the compression rate is small compared to the eddy turn-over rate. A new one-point-closure, three-equation turbulence model which accounts for the effect of compression is proposed. The new model accurately calculates four types of flows (isotropic decay, isotropic compression, one-dimensional compression, and axisymmetric expansion flows) for a wide range of strain rates.

  17. Turbulent transport and dynamo in sheared magnetohydrodynamics turbulence with a nonuniform magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Leprovost, Nicolas; Kim, Eun-Jin

    2009-08-01

    We investigate three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics turbulence in the presence of velocity and magnetic shear (i.e., with both a large-scale shear flow and a nonuniform magnetic field). By assuming a turbulence driven by an external forcing with both helical and nonhelical spectra, we investigate the combined effect of these two shears on turbulence intensity and turbulent transport represented by turbulent diffusivities (turbulent viscosity, alpha and beta effect) in Reynolds-averaged equations. We show that turbulent transport (turbulent viscosity and diffusivity) is quenched by a strong flow shear and a strong magnetic field. For a weak flow shear, we further show that the magnetic shear increases the turbulence intensity while decreasing the turbulent transport. In the presence of a strong flow shear, the effect of the magnetic shear is found to oppose the effect of flow shear (which reduces turbulence due to shear stabilization) by enhancing turbulence and transport, thereby weakening the strong quenching by flow shear stabilization. In the case of a strong magnetic field (compared to flow shear), magnetic shear increases turbulence intensity and quenches turbulent transport. PMID:19792244

  18. The Isotropic Radio Background and Annihilating Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; Belikov, Alexander V.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Linden, Tim; Profumo, Stefano; Slatyer, Tracy R.

    2012-11-01

    Observations by ARCADE-2 and other telescopes sensitive to low frequency radiation have revealed the presence of an isotropic radio background with a hard spectral index. The intensity of this observed background is found to exceed the flux predicted from astrophysical sources by a factor of approximately 5-6. In this article, we consider the possibility that annihilating dark matter particles provide the primary contribution to the observed isotropic radio background through the emission of synchrotron radiation from electron and positron annihilation products. For reasonable estimates of the magnetic fields present in clusters and galaxies, we find that dark matter could potentially account for the observed radio excess, but only if it annihilates mostly to electrons and/or muons, and only if it possesses a mass in the range of approximately 5-50 GeV. For such models, the annihilation cross section required to normalize the synchrotron signal to the observed excess is sigma v ~ (0.4-30) x 10^-26 cm^3/s, similar to the value predicted for a simple thermal relic (sigma v ~ 3 x 10^-26 cm^3/s). We find that in any scenario in which dark matter annihilations are responsible for the observed excess radio emission, a significant fraction of the isotropic gamma ray background observed by Fermi must result from dark matter as well.

  19. Emission of sound from axisymmetric turbulence convected by a mean flow with application to jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Rosenbaum, B. M.

    1972-01-01

    A model, based on Lighthill's theory, for predicting aerodynamic noise from a turbulent shear flow is developed. This model is a generalization of the one developed by Ribner. Unlike Ribner's model, it does not require that the turbulent correlations factor into space and time-dependent parts. It replaces his assumption of isotropic. turbulence by the more realistic one of axisymmetric turbulence. The implications of the model for jet noise are discussed.

  20. Laws for third-order moments in homogeneous anisotropic incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podesta, J. J.

    It is known that Kolmogorov's four-fifths law for statistically homogeneous and isotropic turbulence can be generalized to anisotropic turbulence. This fundamental result for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence says that in the inertial range the divergence of the vector third-order moment |v(r) is constant and is equal to -4, where is the dissipation rate of the turbulence. This law can be extended to incompressible magnetohydrodyamic (MHD) turbulence where statistical isotropy is often not valid due, for example, to the presence of a large-scale magnetic field. Laws for anisotropic incompressible MHD turbulence were first derived by Politano and Pouquet. In this paper, the laws for vector third-order moments in homogeneous non-isotropic incompressible MHD turbulence are derived by a technique due to Frisch that clarifies the relationship between the energy flux in Fourier space and the vector third-order moments in physical space. This derivation is different from the original derivation of Politano and Pouquet which is based on the Kn-Howarth equation, and provides some new physical insights. Separate laws are derived for the cascades of energy, cross-helicity and magnetic-helicity, the three ideal invariants of incompressible MHD for flows in three dimensions. These laws are of fundamental importance in the theory of MHD turbulence where non-isotropic turbulence is much more prevalent than isotropic turbulence.

  1. Prospects of turbulence studies in high-energy density laser-generated plasma: Numerical investigations in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handy, Timothy; Plewa, Tomasz; Drake, R. Paul; Zhiglo, Andrey

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the possibility of generating and studying turbulence in plasma by means of high-energy density laser-driven experiments. Our focus is to create supersonic, self-magnetized turbulence with characteristics that resemble those found in the interstellar medium (ISM). We consider a target made of a spherical core surrounded by a shell made of denser material. The shell is irradiated by a sequence of laser pulses sending inward-propagating shocks that convert the inner core into plasma and create turbulence. In the context of the evolution of the ISM, the shocks play the role of supernova remnant shocks and the core represents the ionized interstellar medium. We consider the effects of both pre-existing and self-generating magnetic fields and study the evolution of the system by means of two-dimensional numerical simulations. We find that the evolution of the turbulent core is generally, subsonic with rms-Mach number Mrms ≈ 0.2. We observe an isotropic, turbulent velocity field with an inertial range power spectra of P(k) ∝ k-2.3. We account for the effects of self-magnetization and find that the resulting magnetic field has characteristic strength ≈3 × 104 G. The corresponding plasma β is about 1 × 104-1 × 105, indicating that the magnetic field does not play an important role in the dynamical evolution of the system. The natural extension of this work is to study the system evolution in three-dimensions, with various laser drive configurations, and targets with shells and cores of different masses. The latter modification may help to increase the turbulent intensity and possibly create transonic turbulence. One of the key challenges is to obtain transonic turbulent conditions in a quasi-steady state environment.

  2. Turbulence spreading in gyro-kinetic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliano, P.; Buchholz, R.; Grosshauser, S. R.; Hornsby, W. A.; Peeters, A. G.; Stauffert, O.

    2016-01-01

    In this letter a new operative definition for the turbulence intensity in connection with magnetized plasmas is given. In contrast to previous definitions the new definition satisfies a Fisher-Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskunov type equation. Furthermore, explicit expressions for the turbulence intensity and the turbulence intensity flux, that allow for the first time direct numerical evaluation, are derived. A carefully designed numerical experiment for the case of a tokamak is performed to study the impact of turbulence spreading. The effective turbulence diffusion coefficient is measured to be smaller than the heat conduction coefficient and the turbulence spreading length is found to be of the order of the turbulence correlation length. The results show that turbulence spreading can play a role in the non-local flux gradient relation, or in the scaling of transport coefficients with the normalized Larmor radius, only over lengths scale of the order of the turbulence correlation length. A new turbulence convection mechanism, due to the drift connected with the magnetic field inhomogeneities, is described. The convective flux integrates to zero under the flux surface average unless there is an up-down asymmetry in the tubulence intensity. The latter asymmetry can be generated through a radial inhomogeneity or plasma rotation. It is shown that the turbulence convection can lead to a spreading of the order of the correlation length.

  3. The spatio-temporal spectrum of turbulent flows.

    PubMed

    Clark di Leoni, P; Cobelli, P J; Mininni, P D

    2015-12-01

    Identification and extraction of vortical structures and of waves in a disorganised flow is a mayor challenge in the study of turbulence. We present a study of the spatio-temporal behavior of turbulent flows in the presence of different restitutive forces. We show how to compute and analyse the spatio-temporal spectrum from data stemming from numerical simulations and from laboratory experiments. Four cases are considered: homogeneous and isotropic turbulence, rotating turbulence, stratified turbulence, and water wave turbulence. For homogeneous and isotropic turbulence, the spectrum allows identification of sweeping by the large-scale flow. For rotating and for stratified turbulence, the spectrum allows identification of the waves, precise quantification of the energy in the waves and in the turbulent eddies, and identification of physical mechanisms such as Doppler shift and wave absorption in critical layers. Finally, in water wave turbulence the spectrum shows a transition from gravity-capillary waves to bound waves as the amplitude of the forcing is increased. PMID:26701711

  4. Structure and scales in turbulence modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, W. C.; Langer, C. A.; Kassinos, S. C.

    2002-07-01

    The enstrophy of the large-scale energy-containing turbulence is proposed as the second turbulence scale for use, in conjunction with the turbulence energy, in two-scale one-point engineering turbulence models. Its transport equation is developed in general and modeled for homogeneous turbulence in terms of the two scales and our new one-point structure tensors. The model produces the correct behavior of the scales for both two- and three-dimensional turbulence. Constants in the high Reynolds number model are evaluated only by reference to asymptotic analysis for decaying turbulence in stationary and rotating frames, and this model is then shown to provide an excellent prediction of homogeneous turbulent shear flow when used with the structure tensors for that flow. The low Reynolds number constant in the model is evaluated using the asymptotic decay rate for isotropic turbulence at zero Reynolds number, and numerical simulations of decay for intermediate Reynolds numbers are used to establish one remaining constant, the value of which does not affect high Reynolds number predictions.

  5. Modélisation du bruit des jets turbulents libres et subsoniques à température ambiante

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béchara, W.; Lafon, P.; Candel, S. M.

    1993-03-01

    Based on the theoretical model of Goldstein for a round free jet, we establish analytical expressions (G_a model) for the noise radiation from a turbulent jet, depending on the local statistical properties of the flow. These characteristics are calculated by solving the Reynolds average Navier-Stokes equations with a numerical code based on a K - \\varepsilon turbulence closure model. A comparison between the numerical results and the experimental data for a simple jet and two coaxial jets shows that this model correctly predicts the evolution of the acoustic radiation. The G_a model developed in the case of axisymmetric turbulence superimposed over a mean flow is found to be more suitable than the Ribner model associated to an isotropic turbulence. A comparison between differents models issued from Lighthill theory, shows that the G_a model yields the best directivity of the acoustic intensity at high jet exit velocities. À partir du modèle théorique proposé initialement par Goldstein pour un jet libre turbulent circulaire, on établit des expressions analytiques (modèle G_a) permettant le calcul du bruit émis à partir des grandeurs statistiques locales du jet turbulent. Ces grandeurs sont estimées par résolution des équations de Navier-Stokes moyennées à l'aide d'un code numérique de turbulence utilisant un modèle de fermeture de type K - \\varepsilon. La comparaison entre les résultats numériques obtenus et les données expérimentales, pour un jet simple et deux jets coaxiaux, montre que ce modèle estime correctement l'évolution des grandeurs acoustiques étudiées. Les calculs indiquent que le modèle G_a développé pour une turbulence axisymétrique convectée par un écoulement moyen est mieux adapté que celui de Ribner associé à une turbulence isotrope. De plus, une comparaison entre différents modèles basés sur la théorie de Lighthill indique que le modèle G_a donne la meilleure directivité de l'intensité acoustique aux

  6. Shock-turbulence interaction and the generation of noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribner, H S

    1954-01-01

    Interaction of convected field of turbulence with shock wave is analyzed to yield modified turbulence, entropy spottiness, and noise generated downstream of the shock. Analysis is generalization of single-spectrum-wave treatment of NACA-TN-2864. Formulas for spectra and correlations are obtained. Numerical calculations yield curves of rms velocity components, temperature, pressure, and noise in db against Mach number for m = 1 to infinity; both isotropic and strongly axisymmetric (lateral/longitudinal = 36/1) initial turbulence are treated. In either case, turbulence of 0.1 percent longitudinal component generates about 120 dbs of noise.

  7. Consistent Initial Conditions for the DNS of Compressible Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ristorcelli, J. R.; Blaisdell, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    Relationships between diverse thermodynamic quantities appropriate to weakly compressible turbulence are derived. It is shown that for turbulence of a finite turbulent Mach number there is a finite element of compressibility. A methodology for generating initial conditions for the fluctuating pressure, density and dilatational velocity is given which is consistent with finite Mach number effects. Use of these initial conditions gives rise to a smooth development of the flow, in contrast to cases in which these fields are specified arbitrarily or set to zero. Comparisons of the effect of different types of initial conditions are made using direct numerical simulation of decaying isotropic turbulence.

  8. Premixed Turbulent Flame Propagation in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Suresh

    1999-01-01

    A combined numerical-experimental study has been carried out to investigate the structure and propagation characteristics of turbulent premixed flames with and without the influence of buoyancy. Experimentally, the premixed flame characteristics are studied in the wrinkled regime using a Couette flow facility and an isotropic flow facility in order to resolve the scale of flame wrinkling. Both facilities were chosen for their ability to achieve sustained turbulence at low Reynolds number. This implies that conventional diagnostics can be employed to resolve the smallest scales of wrinkling. The Couette facility was also built keeping in mind the constraints imposed by the drop tower requirements. Results showed that the flow in this Couette flow facility achieves full-developed turbulence at low Re and all turbulence statistics are in good agreement with past measurements on large-scale facilities. Premixed flame propagation studies were then carried out both using the isotropic box and the Couette facility. Flame imaging showed that fine scales of wrinkling occurs during flame propagation. Both cases in Ig showed significant buoyancy effect. To demonstrate that micro-g can remove this buoyancy effect, a small drop tower was built and drop experiments were conducted using the isotropic box. Results using the Couette facility confirmed the ability to carry out these unique reacting flow experiments at least in 1g. Drop experiments at NASA GRC were planned but were not completed due to termination of this project.

  9. Studying Turbulence Using Numerical Simulation Databases, 2. Proceedings of the 1988 Summer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The focus of the program was on the use of direct numerical simulations of turbulent flow for study of turbulence physics and modeling. A special interest was placed on turbulent mixing layers. The required data for these investigations were generated from four newly developed codes for simulation of time and spatially developing incompressible and compressible mixing layers. Also of interest were the structure of wall bounded turbulent and transitional flows, evaluation of diagnostic techniques for detection of organized motions, energy transfer in isotropic turbulence, optical propagation through turbulent media, and detailed analysis of the interaction of vortical structures.

  10. PDF turbulence modeling and DNS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, A. T.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of time discontinuity (or jump condition) in the coalescence/dispersion (C/D) mixing model is addressed in probability density function (pdf). A C/D mixing model continuous in time is introduced. With the continuous mixing model, the process of chemical reaction can be fully coupled with mixing. In the case of homogeneous turbulence decay, the new model predicts a pdf very close to a Gaussian distribution, with finite higher moments also close to that of a Gaussian distribution. Results from the continuous mixing model are compared with both experimental data and numerical results from conventional C/D models. The effect of Coriolis forces on compressible homogeneous turbulence is studied using direct numerical simulation (DNS). The numerical method used in this study is an eight order compact difference scheme. Contrary to the conclusions reached by previous DNS studies on incompressible isotropic turbulence, the present results show that the Coriolis force increases the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy, and that anisotropy develops as the Coriolis force increases. The Taylor-Proudman theory does apply since the derivatives in the direction of the rotation axis vanishes rapidly. A closer analysis reveals that the dissipation rate of the incompressible component of the turbulent kinetic energy indeed decreases with a higher rotation rate, consistent with incompressible flow simulations (Bardina), while the dissipation rate of the compressible part increases; the net gain is positive. Inertial waves are observed in the simulation results.

  11. Isotropic Growth of Graphene toward Smoothing Stitching.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Mengqi; Tan, Lifang; Wang, Lingxiang; Mendes, Rafael G; Qin, Zhihui; Huang, Yaxin; Zhang, Tao; Fang, Liwen; Zhang, Yanfeng; Yue, Shuanglin; Rümmeli, Mark H; Peng, Lianmao; Liu, Zhongfan; Chen, Shengli; Fu, Lei

    2016-07-26

    The quality of graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition still has very great disparity with its theoretical property due to the inevitable formation of grain boundaries. The design of single-crystal substrate with an anisotropic twofold symmetry for the unidirectional alignment of graphene seeds would be a promising way for eliminating the grain boundaries at the wafer scale. However, such a delicate process will be easily terminated by the obstruction of defects or impurities. Here we investigated the isotropic growth behavior of graphene single crystals via melting the growth substrate to obtain an amorphous isotropic surface, which will not offer any specific grain orientation induction or preponderant growth rate toward a certain direction in the graphene growth process. The as-obtained graphene grains are isotropically round with mixed edges that exhibit high activity. The orientation of adjacent grains can be easily self-adjusted to smoothly match each other over a liquid catalyst with facile atom delocalization due to the low rotation steric hindrance of the isotropic grains, thus achieving the smoothing stitching of the adjacent graphene. Therefore, the adverse effects of grain boundaries will be eliminated and the excellent transport performance of graphene will be more guaranteed. What is more, such an isotropic growth mode can be extended to other types of layered nanomaterials such as hexagonal boron nitride and transition metal chalcogenides for obtaining large-size intrinsic film with low defect. PMID:27403842

  12. Measurement of the Turbulence Kinetic Energy Budget of a Turbulent Planar Wake Flow in Pressure Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xiao-Feng; Thomas, Flint O.; Nelson, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) is a very important quantity for turbulence modeling and the budget of this quantity in its transport equation can provide insight into the flow physics. Turbulence kinetic energy budget measurements were conducted for a symmetric turbulent wake flow subjected to constant zero, favorable and adverse pressure gradients in year-three of research effort. The purpose of this study is to clarify the flow physics issues underlying the demonstrated influence of pressure gradient on wake development and provide experimental support for turbulence modeling. To ensure the reliability of these notoriously difficult measurements, the experimental procedure was carefully designed on the basis of an uncertainty analysis. Four different approaches, based on an isotropic turbulence assumption, a locally axisymmetric homogeneous turbulence assumption, a semi-isotropy assumption and a forced balance of the TKE equation, were applied for the estimate of the dissipation term. The pressure transport term is obtained from a forced balance of the turbulence kinetic energy equation. This report will present the results of the turbulence kinetic energy budget measurement and discuss their implication on the development of strained turbulent wakes.

  13. Solar wind turbulent cascade between ion and electron scales and quasi-parallel whistler waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrova, Olga; Lacombe, Catherine; Mangeney, Andre; Grappin, Roland; Maksimovic, Milan

    2014-05-01

    The solar wind is probably the best laboratory to study turbulence in astrophysical plasmas. In addition to the presence of a magnetic field, the differences with neutral fluid isotropic turbulence are: (i) weakness of collisional dissipation and (ii) presence of several characteristic space and time scales. Here we focus on the observational properties of the solar wind magnetic field turbulence around ion and electron characteristic scales. Around ion scales, magnetic spectra are variable and ion instabilities occur as a function of the local plasma parameters. Between ion and electron scales, a small scale turbulent cascade seems to be established, with wave vectors k⊥ mainly perpendicular to the average B field. It is characterised by a well defined power-law spectrum in magnetic and density fluctuations with a spectral index close to -2.8. Approaching electron scales, the fluctuations are no more self-similar: an exponential cut-off is usually observed indicating an onset of dissipation. The small scale inertial range between ion and electron scales and the electron dissipation range can be together described by ~ k⊥-α exp(-k⊥ℓd), with α ≃ 8/3 and the dissipation scale ℓd close to the electron Larmor radius ℓd ≃ ρe. The nature of this small scale cascade and a possible dissipation mechanism are still under debate. Different spectra are however observed in some regions of the solar wind, with quasi-parallel whistlers between the lower hybrid frequency and about half the electron cyclotron frequency. Such whistler waves may have variable intensity with respect to the background turbulence. Consequently, the total magnetic spectra may present a break, a knee or a more or less intense bump around frequencies at which whistlers propagate. We discuss a possible generation mechanism of quasi-parallel whistler waves in the solar wind.

  14. Plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.; Hu, G.

    1998-07-01

    The origin of plasma turbulence from currents and spatial gradients in plasmas is described and shown to lead to the dominant transport mechanism in many plasma regimes. A wide variety of turbulent transport mechanism exists in plasmas. In this survey the authors summarize some of the universally observed plasma transport rates.

  15. Static spherically symmetric wormholes with isotropic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldo, Mauricio; Liempi, Luis; Rodríguez, Pablo

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we study static spherically symmetric wormhole solutions sustained by matter sources with isotropic pressure. We show that such spherical wormholes do not exist in the framework of zero-tidal-force wormholes. On the other hand, it is shown that for the often used power-law shape function there are no spherically symmetric traversable wormholes sustained by sources with a linear equation of state p = ωρ for the isotropic pressure, independently of the form of the redshift function ϕ (r). We consider a solution obtained by Tolman at 1939 for describing static spheres of isotropic fluids, and show that it also may describe wormhole spacetimes with a power-law redshift function, which leads to a polynomial shape function, generalizing a power-law shape function, and inducing a solid angle deficit.

  16. Magnetosheath electrostatic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, P.

    1977-01-01

    The spectrum of electrostatic plasma waves in the terrestrial magnetosheath was studied using the plasma wave experiment on the IMP-6 satellite. Electrostatic plasma wave turbulence is almost continuously present throughout the magnetosheath with broadband (20 Hz- 70 kHz) r.m.s. field intensities typically 0.01 - 1.0 millivolts/m. Peak intensities of about 1.0 millivolts/m near the electron plasma frequency (30 - 60 kHz) were detected occasionally. The components usually identified in the spectrum of magnetosheath electrostatic turbulence include a high frequency ( or = 30 kHz) component peaking at the electron plasma frequency f sub pe, a low frequency component with a broad intensity maximum below the nominal ion plasma frequency f sub pi (approximately f sub pe/43), and a less well defined intermediate component in the range f sub pi f f sub pe. The intensity distribution of magnetosheath electrostatic turbulence clearly shows that the low frequency component is associated with the bow shock, suggesting that the ion heating begun at the shock continues into the downstream magnetosheath.

  17. Negative Poisson's ratio materials via isotropic interactions.

    PubMed

    Rechtsman, Mikael C; Stillinger, Frank H; Torquato, Salvatore

    2008-08-22

    We show that under tension a classical many-body system with only isotropic pair interactions in a crystalline state can, counterintuitively, have a negative Poisson's ratio, or auxetic behavior. We derive the conditions under which the triangular lattice in two dimensions and lattices with cubic symmetry in three dimensions exhibit a negative Poisson's ratio. In the former case, the simple Lennard-Jones potential can give rise to auxetic behavior. In the latter case, a negative Poisson's ratio can be exhibited even when the material is constrained to be elastically isotropic. PMID:18764632

  18. Negative Poisson's Ratio Materials via Isotropic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechtsman, Mikael C.; Stillinger, Frank H.; Torquato, Salvatore

    2008-08-01

    We show that under tension a classical many-body system with only isotropic pair interactions in a crystalline state can, counterintuitively, have a negative Poisson’s ratio, or auxetic behavior. We derive the conditions under which the triangular lattice in two dimensions and lattices with cubic symmetry in three dimensions exhibit a negative Poisson’s ratio. In the former case, the simple Lennard-Jones potential can give rise to auxetic behavior. In the latter case, a negative Poisson’s ratio can be exhibited even when the material is constrained to be elastically isotropic.

  19. Turbulent flows near flat plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambe, R.; Imamura, T.; Doi, M.

    1980-08-01

    The method to study the effect of the plate moving in the homogeneous or isotropic turbulence is presented. The crucial point of this method is to solve the Orr-Sommerfeld like equation, which is satisfied by the kernel of the Wiener-Hermite expansion of the velocity field, under the inhomogeneous boundary condition. In the special case of constant mean flow, our method gives the same result as that of Hunt and Graham and succeeds in explaining the experimental results of Thomas and Hancock. The method is also applied to the case of nonuniform mean flow, where the shear effect comes up.

  20. Estimation of crystallinity in isotropic isotactic polypropylene with Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Minogianni, Chrysa; Gatos, Konstantinos G; Galiotis, Costas

    2005-09-01

    The Raman spectrum of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) has been found to exhibit vibrational peaks in the region of 750 to 880 cm(-1) that are sensitive to the degree of crystallinity. These features are broadly assigned to various modes of methyl group rocking, rho(CH2), and there have been various attempts to assess crystallinity based on the integrated intensities of these bands. Various vibrational analyses performed in the past in combination with experimental studies have concluded that the presence of crystalline order with trans-gauche conformation gives rise to a peak at 809 cm(-1), which is assigned to a rho(CH2) mode coupled with the skeletal stretching mode. However, the presence of additional peaks at 830 cm(-1), 841 cm(-1), and 854 cm(-1), within the same envelope, have been the subject of controversy. In this work isotropic films of iPP derived from the same precursor of identical tacticity have been subjected to various degrees of annealing and the integrated intensities of the Raman bands were measured. The results showed that true 3d crystallinity in isotropic iPP can only be expressed by the 809 cm(-1) band whereas the band at 841 cm(-1) corresponds to an uncoupled rho(CH2) fundamental mode and thus is a measure of the amorphous content. The less intense satellite bands at 830 cm(-1) and 854 cm(-1) of solid iPP cannot be distinguished from the 841 cm(-1) band in the melt and are generally considered as intermediate phases possibly related to non-crystalline components with 3(1)-helical conformations. Independent differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) crystallinity measurements were in broad agreement with the Raman measurements based on the normalized intensity of the 809 cm(-1) Raman band. By comparing the Raman with the DSC data a new value for the theoretical heat of fusion for the 100% crystalline iPP has been proposed. PMID:18028610

  1. A Quadratic Closure for Compressible Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Futterman, J A

    2008-09-16

    We have investigated a one-point closure model for compressible turbulence based on third- and higher order cumulant discard for systems undergoing rapid deformation, such as might occur downstream of a shock or other discontinuity. In so doing, we find the lowest order contributions of turbulence to the mean flow, which lead to criteria for Adaptive Mesh Refinement. Rapid distortion theory (RDT) as originally applied by Herring closes the turbulence hierarchy of moment equations by discarding third order and higher cumulants. This is similar to the fourth-order cumulant discard hypothesis of Millionshchikov, except that the Millionshchikov hypothesis was taken to apply to incompressible homogeneous isotropic turbulence generally, whereas RDT is applied only to fluids undergoing a distortion that is 'rapid' in the sense that the interaction of the mean flow with the turbulence overwhelms the interaction of the turbulence with itself. It is also similar to Gaussian closure, in which both second and fourth-order cumulants are retained. Motivated by RDT, we develop a quadratic one-point closure for rapidly distorting compressible turbulence, without regard to homogeneity or isotropy, and make contact with two equation turbulence models, especially the K-{var_epsilon} and K-L models, and with linear instability growth. In the end, we arrive at criteria for Adaptive Mesh Refinement in Finite Volume simulations.

  2. Small-scale universality in fluid turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Jörg; Scheel, Janet D.; Krasnov, Dmitry; Donzis, Diego A.; Yakhot, Victor; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2014-01-01

    Turbulent flows in nature and technology possess a range of scales. The largest scales carry the memory of the physical system in which a flow is embedded. One challenge is to unravel the universal statistical properties that all turbulent flows share despite their different large-scale driving mechanisms or their particular flow geometries. In the present work, we study three turbulent flows of systematically increasing complexity. These are homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in a periodic box, turbulent shear flow between two parallel walls, and thermal convection in a closed cylindrical container. They are computed by highly resolved direct numerical simulations of the governing dynamical equations. We use these simulation data to establish two fundamental results: (i) at Reynolds numbers Re ∼ 102 the fluctuations of the velocity derivatives pass through a transition from nearly Gaussian (or slightly sub-Gaussian) to intermittent behavior that is characteristic of fully developed high Reynolds number turbulence, and (ii) beyond the transition point, the statistics of the rate of energy dissipation in all three flows obey the same Reynolds number power laws derived for homogeneous turbulence. These results allow us to claim universality of small scales even at low Reynolds numbers. Our results shed new light on the notion of when the turbulence is fully developed at the small scales without relying on the existence of an extended inertial range. PMID:25024175

  3. Numerical experiments in homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogallo, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    The direct simulation methods developed by Orszag and Patternson (1972) for isotropic turbulence were extended to homogeneous turbulence in an incompressible fluid subjected to uniform deformation or rotation. The results of simulations for irrotational strain (plane and axisymmetric), shear, rotation, and relaxation toward isotropy following axisymmetric strain are compared with linear theory and experimental data. Emphasis is placed on the shear flow because of its importance and because of the availability of accurate and detailed experimental data. The computed results are used to assess the accuracy of two popular models used in the closure of the Reynolds-stress equations. Data from a variety of the computed fields and the details of the numerical methods used in the simulation are also presented.

  4. Biomimetic Isotropic Nanostructures for Structural Coloration

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, Jason D.; Noh, Heeso; Liew, Seng Fatt; Saranathan, Vinodkumar; Schreck, Carl F.; Yang, Lin; Park, Jin-Gyu; Prum, Richard O.; Mochrie, Simon G.J.; O'Hern, Corey S.; Cao, Hui; Dufresne, Eric R.

    2010-08-09

    The self-assembly of films that mimic color-producing nanostructures in bird feathers is described. These structures are isotropic and have a characteristic length-scale comparable to the wavelength of visible light. Structural colors are produced when wavelength-independent scattering is suppressed by limiting the optical path length through geometry or absorption.

  5. Rotating turbulence under "precession-like" perturbation.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Kartik P; Mazzitelli, Irene; Bonaccorso, Fabio; Pouquet, Annick; Biferale, Luca

    2015-12-01

    The effects of changing the orientation of the rotation axis on homogeneous turbulence is considered. We perform direct numerical simulations on a periodic box of 1024(3) grid points, where the orientation of the rotation axis is changed (a) at a fixed time instant (b) regularly at time intervals commensurate with the rotation time scale. The former is characterized by a dominant inverse energy cascade whereas in the latter, the inverse cascade is stymied due to the recurrent changes in the rotation axis resulting in a strong forward energy transfer and large-scale structures that resemble those of isotropic turbulence. PMID:26637337

  6. Transversely isotropic elasticity imaging of cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Shore, Spencer W; Barbone, Paul E; Oberai, Assad A; Morgan, Elise F

    2011-06-01

    To measure spatial variations in mechanical properties of biological materials, prior studies have typically performed mechanical tests on excised specimens of tissue. Less invasive measurements, however, are preferable in many applications, such as patient-specific modeling, disease diagnosis, and tracking of age- or damage-related degradation of mechanical properties. Elasticity imaging (elastography) is a nondestructive imaging method in which the distribution of elastic properties throughout a specimen can be reconstructed from measured strain or displacement fields. To date, most work in elasticity imaging has concerned incompressible, isotropic materials. This study presents an extension of elasticity imaging to three-dimensional, compressible, transversely isotropic materials. The formulation and solution of an inverse problem for an anisotropic tissue subjected to a combination of quasi-static loads is described, and an optimization and regularization strategy that indirectly obtains the solution to the inverse problem is presented. Several applications of transversely isotropic elasticity imaging to cancellous bone from the human vertebra are then considered. The feasibility of using isotropic elasticity imaging to obtain meaningful reconstructions of the distribution of material properties for vertebral cancellous bone from experiment is established. However, using simulation, it is shown that an isotropic reconstruction is not appropriate for anisotropic materials. It is further shown that the transversely isotropic method identifies a solution that predicts the measured displacements, reveals regions of low stiffness, and recovers all five elastic parameters with approximately 10% error. The recovery of a given elastic parameter is found to require the presence of its corresponding strain (e.g., a deformation that generates ɛ₁₂ is necessary to reconstruct C₁₂₁₂), and the application of regularization is shown to improve accuracy. Finally

  7. Turbulence modeling and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shabbir, Aamir

    1992-01-01

    The best way of verifying turbulence is to do a direct comparison between the various terms and their models. The success of this approach depends upon the availability of the data for the exact correlations (both experimental and DNS). The other approach involves numerically solving the differential equations and then comparing the results with the data. The results of such a computation will depend upon the accuracy of all the modeled terms and constants. Because of this it is sometimes difficult to find the cause of a poor performance by a model. However, such a calculation is still meaningful in other ways as it shows how a complete Reynolds stress model performs. Thirteen homogeneous flows are numerically computed using the second order closure models. We concentrate only on those models which use a linear (or quasi-linear) model for the rapid term. This, therefore, includes the Launder, Reece and Rodi (LRR) model; the isotropization of production (IP) model; and the Speziale, Sarkar, and Gatski (SSG) model. Which of the three models performs better is examined along with what are their weaknesses, if any. The other work reported deal with the experimental balances of the second moment equations for a buoyant plume. Despite the tremendous amount of activity toward the second order closure modeling of turbulence, very little experimental information is available about the budgets of the second moment equations. Part of the problem stems from our inability to measure the pressure correlations. However, if everything else appearing in these equations is known from the experiment, pressure correlations can be obtained as the closing terms. This is the closest we can come to in obtaining these terms from experiment, and despite the measurement errors which might be present in such balances, the resulting information will be extremely useful for the turbulence modelers. The purpose of this part of the work was to provide such balances of the Reynolds stress and heat

  8. Quenching and Anisotropy of Hydromagnetic Turbulent Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Rheinhardt, Matthias; Brandenburg, Axel; Käpylä, Petri J.; Käpylä, Maarit J.

    2014-11-01

    Hydromagnetic turbulence affects the evolution of large-scale magnetic fields through mean-field effects like turbulent diffusion and the α effect. For stronger fields, these effects are usually suppressed or quenched, and additional anisotropies are introduced. Using different variants of the test-field method, we determine the quenching of the turbulent transport coefficients for the forced Roberts flow, isotropically forced non-helical turbulence, and rotating thermal convection. We see significant quenching only when the mean magnetic field is larger than the equipartition value of the turbulence. Expressing the magnetic field in terms of the equipartition value of the quenched flows, we obtain for the quenching exponents of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity about 1.3, 1.1, and 1.3 for Roberts flow, forced turbulence, and convection, respectively. However, when the magnetic field is expressed in terms of the equipartition value of the unquenched flows, these quenching exponents become about 4, 1.5, and 2.3, respectively. For the α effect, the exponent is about 1.3 for the Roberts flow and 2 for convection in the first case, but 4 and 3, respectively, in the second. In convection, the quenching of turbulent pumping follows the same power law as turbulent diffusion, while for the coefficient describing the {\\boldsymbolΩ} × \\boldsymbol {{J}} effect nearly the same quenching exponent is obtained as for α. For forced turbulence, turbulent diffusion proportional to the second derivative along the mean magnetic field is quenched much less, especially for larger values of the magnetic Reynolds number. However, we find that in corresponding axisymmetric mean-field dynamos with dominant toroidal field the quenched diffusion coefficients are the same for the poloidal and toroidal field constituents.

  9. Quenching and anisotropy of hydromagnetic turbulent transport

    SciTech Connect

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Brandenburg, Axel; Rheinhardt, Matthias; Käpylä, Petri J.; Käpylä, Maarit J.

    2014-11-01

    Hydromagnetic turbulence affects the evolution of large-scale magnetic fields through mean-field effects like turbulent diffusion and the α effect. For stronger fields, these effects are usually suppressed or quenched, and additional anisotropies are introduced. Using different variants of the test-field method, we determine the quenching of the turbulent transport coefficients for the forced Roberts flow, isotropically forced non-helical turbulence, and rotating thermal convection. We see significant quenching only when the mean magnetic field is larger than the equipartition value of the turbulence. Expressing the magnetic field in terms of the equipartition value of the quenched flows, we obtain for the quenching exponents of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity about 1.3, 1.1, and 1.3 for Roberts flow, forced turbulence, and convection, respectively. However, when the magnetic field is expressed in terms of the equipartition value of the unquenched flows, these quenching exponents become about 4, 1.5, and 2.3, respectively. For the α effect, the exponent is about 1.3 for the Roberts flow and 2 for convection in the first case, but 4 and 3, respectively, in the second. In convection, the quenching of turbulent pumping follows the same power law as turbulent diffusion, while for the coefficient describing the Ω×J effect nearly the same quenching exponent is obtained as for α. For forced turbulence, turbulent diffusion proportional to the second derivative along the mean magnetic field is quenched much less, especially for larger values of the magnetic Reynolds number. However, we find that in corresponding axisymmetric mean-field dynamos with dominant toroidal field the quenched diffusion coefficients are the same for the poloidal and toroidal field constituents.

  10. Stress state of transversally isotropic body with elliptical crack in the presence of a uniform heat flux at its surface

    SciTech Connect

    Podil`chuk, Yu.N.

    1995-09-01

    An explicit solution of the state thermoelasticity problem is constructed for an infinite transversally isotropic body containing an internal elliptical crack in the isotropy plane. It is assumed that a uniform heat flux is specified at the crack surface and the body is free of external loads. Values of the stress-intensity coefficients depending on the heat flux, the crack dimensions, and the thermoelastic properties of the material are obtained. Note that the analogous problem was considered for an isotropic body. The static thermoelasticity problem for a transversally isotropic body with an internal elliptical crack at whose surface linear temperature variation is specified was solved.

  11. Wall Turbulence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  12. Wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, Sergey

    2015-07-01

    Wave turbulence is the statistical mechanics of random waves with a broadband spectrum interacting via non-linearity. To understand its difference from non-random well-tuned coherent waves, one could compare the sound of thunder to a piece of classical music. Wave turbulence is surprisingly common and important in a great variety of physical settings, starting with the most familiar ocean waves to waves at quantum scales or to much longer waves in astrophysics. We will provide a basic overview of the wave turbulence ideas, approaches and main results emphasising the physics of the phenomena and using qualitative descriptions avoiding, whenever possible, involved mathematical derivations. In particular, dimensional analysis will be used for obtaining the key scaling solutions in wave turbulence - Kolmogorov-Zakharov (KZ) spectra.

  13. Power fluctuations, large deviations and turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Bandi, Mahesh M; Chumakov, Sergei; Connaughton, Colm P

    2008-01-01

    We study local power fluctuations in numerical simulations of stationary, homogenous, isotropic turbulence in two and three dimensions with Gaussian forcing. Due to the near-Gaussianity of the one-point velocity distribution, the probability distribution function (pdf) of the local power is well modeled by the pdf of the product of two joint normally distributed variables. In appropriate units, this distribution is calculated exactly and shown to satisfy a Fluctuation Relation (FR) with a coefficient which depends on {epsilon}.

  14. Simulation and modeling of homogeneous, compressed turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. T.; Ferziger, J. H.; Chapman, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    Low Reynolds number homogeneous turbulence undergoing low Mach number isotropic and one-dimensional compression was simulated by numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical simulations were performed on a CYBER 205 computer using a 64 x 64 x 64 mesh. A spectral method was used for spatial differencing and the second-order Runge-Kutta method for time advancement. A variety of statistical information was extracted from the computed flow fields. These include three-dimensional energy and dissipation spectra, two-point velocity correlations, one-dimensional energy spectra, turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate, integral length scales, Taylor microscales, and Kolmogorov length scale. Results from the simulated flow fields were used to test one-point closure, two-equation models. A new one-point-closure, three-equation turbulence model which accounts for the effect of compression is proposed. The new model accurately calculates four types of flows (isotropic decay, isotropic compression, one-dimensional compression, and axisymmetric expansion flows) for a wide range of strain rates.

  15. Simulation and modeling of homogeneous, compressed turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. T.; Ferziger, J. H.; Chapman, D. R.

    1985-05-01

    Low Reynolds number homogeneous turbulence undergoing low Mach number isotropic and one-dimensional compression was simulated by numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical simulations were performed on a CYBER 205 computer using a 64 x 64 x 64 mesh. A spectral method was used for spatial differencing and the second-order Runge-Kutta method for time advancement. A variety of statistical information was extracted from the computed flow fields. These include three-dimensional energy and dissipation spectra, two-point velocity correlations, one-dimensional energy spectra, turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate, integral length scales, Taylor microscales, and Kolmogorov length scale. Results from the simulated flow fields were used to test one-point closure, two-equation models. A new one-point-closure, three-equation turbulence model which accounts for the effect of compression is proposed. The new model accurately calculates four types of flows (isotropic decay, isotropic compression, one-dimensional compression, and axisymmetric expansion flows) for a wide range of strain rates.

  16. Even harmonic generation in isotropic media of dissociating homonuclear molecules.

    PubMed

    Silva, R E F; Rivière, P; Morales, F; Smirnova, O; Ivanov, M; Martín, F

    2016-01-01

    Isotropic gases irradiated by long pulses of intense IR light can generate very high harmonics of the incident field. It is generally accepted that, due to the symmetry of the generating medium, be it an atomic or an isotropic molecular gas, only odd harmonics of the driving field can be produced. Here we show how the interplay of electronic and nuclear dynamics can lead to a marked breakdown of this standard picture: a substantial part of the harmonic spectrum can consist of even rather than odd harmonics. We demonstrate the effect using ab-initio solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for and its isotopes in full dimensionality. By means of a simple analytical model, we identify its physical origin, which is the appearance of a permanent dipole moment in dissociating homonuclear molecules, caused by light-induced localization of the electric charge during dissociation. The effect arises for sufficiently long laser pulses and the region of the spectrum where even harmonics are produced is controlled by pulse duration. Our results (i) show how the interplay of femtosecond nuclear and attosecond electronic dynamics, which affects the charge flow inside the dissociating molecule, is reflected in the nonlinear response, and (ii) force one to augment standard selection rules found in nonlinear optics textbooks by considering light-induced modifications of the medium during the generation process. PMID:27596609

  17. Even harmonic generation in isotropic media of dissociating homonuclear molecules

    PubMed Central

    Silva, R. E. F.; Rivière, P.; Morales, F.; Smirnova, O.; Ivanov, M.; Martín, F.

    2016-01-01

    Isotropic gases irradiated by long pulses of intense IR light can generate very high harmonics of the incident field. It is generally accepted that, due to the symmetry of the generating medium, be it an atomic or an isotropic molecular gas, only odd harmonics of the driving field can be produced. Here we show how the interplay of electronic and nuclear dynamics can lead to a marked breakdown of this standard picture: a substantial part of the harmonic spectrum can consist of even rather than odd harmonics. We demonstrate the effect using ab-initio solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for and its isotopes in full dimensionality. By means of a simple analytical model, we identify its physical origin, which is the appearance of a permanent dipole moment in dissociating homonuclear molecules, caused by light-induced localization of the electric charge during dissociation. The effect arises for sufficiently long laser pulses and the region of the spectrum where even harmonics are produced is controlled by pulse duration. Our results (i) show how the interplay of femtosecond nuclear and attosecond electronic dynamics, which affects the charge flow inside the dissociating molecule, is reflected in the nonlinear response, and (ii) force one to augment standard selection rules found in nonlinear optics textbooks by considering light-induced modifications of the medium during the generation process. PMID:27596609

  18. Penetrative phototactic bioconvection in an isotropic scattering suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, M. K.; Ghorai, S.

    2013-07-01

    Phototaxis is a directed swimming response dependent upon the light intensity sensed by micro-organisms. Positive (negative) phototaxis denotes the motion directed towards (away from) the source of light. Using the phototaxis model of Ghorai, Panda, and Hill ["Bioconvection in a suspension of isotropically scattering phototactic algae," Phys. Fluids 22, 071901 (2010)], 10.1063/1.3457163, we investigate two-dimensional phototactic bioconvection in an absorbing and isotropic scattering suspension in the nonlinear regime. The suspension is confined by a rigid bottom boundary, and stress-free top and lateral boundaries. The governing equations for phototactic bioconvection consist of Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible fluid coupled with a conservation equation for micro-organisms and the radiative transfer equation for light transport. The governing system is solved efficiently using a semi-implicit second-order accurate conservative finite-difference method. The radiative transfer equation is solved by the finite volume method using a suitable step scheme. The resulting bioconvective patterns differ qualitatively from those found by Ghorai and Hill ["Penetrative phototactic bioconvection," Phys. Fluids 17, 074101 (2005)], 10.1063/1.1947807 at a higher critical wavelength due to the effects of scattering. The solutions show transition from steady state to periodic oscillations as the governing parameters are varied. Also, we notice the accumulation of micro-organisms in two horizontal layers at two different depths via their mean swimming orientation profile for some governing parameters at a higher scattering albedo.

  19. Effect of Contraction on Turbulence and Temperature Fluctuations Generated by a Warm Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, Robert R., Jr.; Corrsin, Stanley

    1959-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometer measurements were made of several statistical properties of approximately homogeneous and isotropic fields of turbulence and temperature fluctuations generated by a warm grid in a uniform airstream sent through a 4-to-1 contraction. These measurements were made both in the contraction and in the axisymmetric domain farther downstream. In addition to confirming the well-known turbulence anisotropy induced by strain, the data show effects on the skewnesses of both longitudinal velocity fluctuation (which has zero skewness in isotropic turbulence) and its derivative. The concomitant anisotropy in the temperature field accelerates the decay of temperature fluctuations.

  20. Rapid Distortion Theory in astrophysical turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonov, Sergey; Petrosyan, Arakel

    2016-04-01

    In this report, we study statistical properties of astrophysical turbulent plasma flows using Rapid Distortion Theory (RDT). The core assumption is that the turbulence responds to the external distortion so fast, that inertial and viscous forces result in a negligible change in velocity distribution. Thus it is assumed that the response to the external effect takes place in the time interval much smaller than turbulence decay time. This allows to linearize equations and to derive equations for second moments of turbulence. We apply RDT to incompressible turbulent MHD flows distorted with external magnetic field and linear velocity shear in cases of rotating and non-rotating plasma. It is shown that even with a strong nonlinearity many properties of turbulence can be qualitatively studied using a linear theory. A closed system of linear equations for velocity and magnetic field fluctuations is derived. Development of initially isotropic turbulence and transition to anisotropy are studied. Equations for fluid, current and cross helicity are derived. Differences in cases of rotating and non-rotating flows are discussed. Changes introduced by considering Hall effect are discussed.

  1. Anisotropy in turbulent flows and in turbulent transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biferale, Luca; Procaccia, Itamar

    2005-07-01

    The problem of anisotropy and its effects on the statistical theory of high Reynolds number (Re) turbulence (and turbulent transport) is intimately related and intermingled with the problem of the universality of the (anomalous) scaling exponents of structure functions. Both problems had seen tremendous progress in the last 5 years. In this review we present a detailed description of the new tools that allow effective data analysis and systematic theoretical studies such as to separate isotropic from anisotropic aspects of turbulent statistical fluctuations. Employing the invariance of the equations of fluid mechanics to all rotations, we show how to decompose the (tensorial) statistical objects in terms of the irreducible representation of the SO(d) symmetry group (with d being the dimension, d=2 or 3). This device allows a discussion of the scaling properties of the statistical objects in well-defined sectors of the symmetry group, each of which is determined by the “angular momenta” sector numbers (j,m). For the case of turbulent advection of passive scalar or vector fields, this decomposition allows rigorous statements to be made: (i) the scaling exponents are universal, (ii) the isotropic scaling exponents are always leading, (iii) the anisotropic scaling exponents form a discrete spectrum which is strictly increasing as a function of j. This emerging picture offers a complete understanding of the decay of anisotropy upon going to smaller and smaller scales. Next, we explain how to apply the SO(3) decomposition to the statistical Navier-Stokes theory. We show how to extract information about the scaling behavior in the isotropic sector. Doing so furnishes a systematic way to assess the universality of the scaling exponents in this sector, clarifying the anisotropic origin of the many measurements that claimed the opposite. A systematic analysis of direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the Navier-Stokes equations and of experiments provides a strong support

  2. Monte-Carlo computation of turbulent premixed methane/air ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmen, Christina Lieselotte

    The present work describes the results obtained by a time dependent numerical technique that simulates the early flame development of a spark-ignited premixed, lean, gaseous methane/air mixture with the unsteady spherical flame propagating in homogeneous and isotropic turbulence. The algorithm described is based upon a sub-model developed by an international automobile research and manufacturing corporation in order to analyze turbulence conditions within internal combustion engines. Several developments and modifications to the original algorithm have been implemented including a revised chemical reaction scheme and the evaluation and calculation of various turbulent flame properties. Solution of the complete set of Navier-Stokes governing equations for a turbulent reactive flow is avoided by reducing the equations to a single transport equation. The transport equation is derived from the Navier-Stokes equations for a joint probability density function, thus requiring no closure assumptions for the Reynolds stresses. A Monte-Carlo method is also utilized to simulate phenomena represented by the probability density function transport equation by use of the method of fractional steps. Gaussian distributions of fluctuating velocity and fuel concentration are prescribed. Attention is focused on the evaluation of the three primary parameters that influence the initial flame kernel growth-the ignition system characteristics, the mixture composition, and the nature of the flow field. Efforts are concentrated on the effects of moderate to intense turbulence on flames within the distributed reaction zone. Results are presented for lean conditions with the fuel equivalence ratio varying from 0.6 to 0.9. The present computational results, including flame regime analysis and the calculation of various flame speeds, provide excellent agreement with results obtained by other experimental and numerical researchers.

  3. Turbulent mixing of a passive scalar in grid turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Y.; Watanabe, T.; Nagata, K.; Sakai, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Fractal grids have attracted attention as a new-type of turbulence-generating grid due to their unique characteristics. Recent studies have revealed that such uniqueness appears in the near field of regular grid-generated turbulence. Scalar transport in those flows is also of great interest as it is not yet fully understood. In this study, we investigate the scalar mixing in the near field of regular grid-generated turbulence with various grid configurations. Experiments have been carried out in liquid mixing layers with a Reynolds number of 5000 based on the mesh size of the grid and uniform velocity. Simultaneous measurements of two-component velocities and concentration have been performed by particle image velocimetry and a planar laser-induced fluorescence technique, respectively. The results show that the scaling law using the wake-interaction length scale is applicable for the turbulence intensity in the grid turbulence with different mesh sizes and the same thickness of the grid bar. The turbulence intensity increases as the thickness of the grid bar increases; thus, consequently increasing the scalar diffusion. The streamwise development of the scalar mixing layer thickness collapses onto a single curve by normalization based on the thickness of the grid bar.

  4. A study of local anisotropy in globally isotropic incompressible MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milano, L. J.; Dmitruk, P.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Montgomery, D.

    2000-10-01

    It is a well known fact that in presence of a DC applied field, MHD turbulence develops spectral anisotropy from an isotropic initial condition [1]. Typically, the reduced spectrum is steeper in the direction of the magnetic field than it is in any transverse direction. Theoretical insight into the origin of this effect has been derived from simulations in which there is a uniform DC magnetic field, but suggestions of a similar anisotropy is seen in various laboratory devices and also in the solar wind [2,3]. One might expect that a DC field is not essential, and it is the local mean field that is responsible. Here we investigate the occurence of local anisotropy in 3 dimensional MHD, i.e. we search for a local version of the spectral anisotropy effect. We perform 3D MHD pseudo-spectral incompressible relaxation simulations, and compute structure functions accumulated according to whether the separation is parallel to, or transverse to, the local magnetic field. Preliminary results show that correlations decay slower in the locally averaged magnetic field direction. [1] J. Shebalin, W. Matthaeus and D. Montgomery, J. Plasma Phys. 29, 525 (1983) [2] W.H. Matthaeus, M.L. Goldsteon and D.A. Roberts, J. Geophys. Res. 95, 20 673 (1990) [3] J. Armstrong, W. Coles, M. Kojima and B. Rickett, Ap. J. 358, 685 (1990)

  5. Applications of direct numerical simulation of turbulence in second order closures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Lumley, John L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses two methods of developing models for the rapid pressure-strain correlation term in the Reynolds stress transport equation using direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. One is a perturbation about isotropic turbulence, the other is a perturbation about two-component turbulence -- an extremely anisotropic turbulence. A model based on the latter method is proposed and is found to be very promising when compared with DNS data and other models.

  6. Statistical Properties of the T-Exponential of Isotropically Distributed Random Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'yn, A. S.; Sirota, V. A.; Zybin, K. P.

    2016-05-01

    A functional method for calculating averages of the time-ordered exponential of a continuous isotropic random N× N matrix process is presented. The process is not assumed to be Gaussian. In particular, the Lyapunov exponents and higher correlation functions of the T-exponent are derived from the statistical properties of the process. The approach may be of use in a wide range of physical problems. For example, in theory of turbulence the account of non-gaussian statistics is very important since the non-Gaussian behavior is responsible for the time asymmetry of the energy flow.

  7. Anisotropy in MHD turbulence due to a mean magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, J. V.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Montgomery, D.

    1982-01-01

    The development of anisotropy in an initially isotropic spectrum is studied numerically for two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The anisotropy develops due to the combined effects of an externally imposed dc magnetic field and viscous and resistive dissipation at high wave numbers. The effect is most pronounced at high mechanical and magnetic Reynolds numbers. The anisotropy is greater at the higher wave numbers.

  8. On curve and surface stretching in turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etemadi, Nassrollah

    1989-01-01

    Cocke (1969) proved that in incompressible, isotropic turbulence the average material line (material surface) elements increase in comparison with their initial values. Good estimates of how much they increase in terms of the eigenvalues of the Green deformation tensor were rigorously obtained.

  9. Soliton turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical works in atmospheric turbulence have used the Navier-Stokes fluid equations exclusively for describing large-scale motions. Controversy over the existence of an average temperature gradient for the very large eddies in the atmosphere suggested that a new theoretical basis for describing large-scale turbulence was necessary. A new soliton formalism as a fluid analogue that generalizes the Schrodinger equation and the Zakharov equations has been developed. This formalism, processing all the nonlinearities including those from modulation provided by the density fluctuations and from convection due to the emission of finite sound waves by velocity fluctuations, treats large-scale turbulence as coalescing and colliding solitons. The new soliton system describes large-scale instabilities more explicitly than the Navier-Stokes system because it has a nonlinearity of the gradient type, while the Navier-Stokes has a nonlinearity of the non-gradient type. The forced Schrodinger equation for strong fluctuations describes the micro-hydrodynamical state of soliton turbulence and is valid for large-scale turbulence in fluids and plasmas where internal waves can interact with velocity fluctuations.

  10. Zonal flow generation and its feedback on turbulence production in drift wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkarev, Andrey V.; Bos, Wouter J. T.; Nazarenko, Sergey V.

    2013-04-01

    Plasma turbulence described by the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations is simulated numerically for different models and values of the adiabaticity parameter C. It is found that for low values of C turbulence remains isotropic, zonal flows are not generated and there is no suppression of the meridional drift waves and particle transport. For high values of C, turbulence evolves towards highly anisotropic states with a dominant contribution of the zonal sector to the kinetic energy. This anisotropic flow leads to a decrease of turbulence production in the meridional sector and limits the particle transport across the mean isopycnal surfaces. This behavior allows to consider the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations a minimal PDE model, which contains the drift-wave/zonal-flow feedback loop mechanism.

  11. Zonal flow generation and its feedback on turbulence production in drift wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Pushkarev, Andrey V.; Bos, Wouter J. T.; Nazarenko, Sergey V.

    2013-04-15

    Plasma turbulence described by the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations is simulated numerically for different models and values of the adiabaticity parameter C. It is found that for low values of C turbulence remains isotropic, zonal flows are not generated and there is no suppression of the meridional drift waves and particle transport. For high values of C, turbulence evolves towards highly anisotropic states with a dominant contribution of the zonal sector to the kinetic energy. This anisotropic flow leads to a decrease of turbulence production in the meridional sector and limits the particle transport across the mean isopycnal surfaces. This behavior allows to consider the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations a minimal PDE model, which contains the drift-wave/zonal-flow feedback loop mechanism.

  12. ODTLES : a model for 3D turbulent flow based on one-dimensional turbulence modeling concepts.

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Randy; Kerstein, Alan R.; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon

    2005-01-01

    This report describes an approach for extending the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model of Kerstein [6] to treat turbulent flow in three-dimensional (3D) domains. This model, here called ODTLES, can also be viewed as a new LES model. In ODTLES, 3D aspects of the flow are captured by embedding three, mutually orthogonal, one-dimensional ODT domain arrays within a coarser 3D mesh. The ODTLES model is obtained by developing a consistent approach for dynamically coupling the different ODT line sets to each other and to the large scale processes that are resolved on the 3D mesh. The model is implemented computationally and its performance is tested and evaluated by performing simulations of decaying isotropic turbulence, a standard turbulent flow benchmarking problem.

  13. Neutral surface layer turbulence over complex terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, B.M.

    1995-09-01

    Accurate turbulence estimates are important input to atmospheric dispersion models since they characterize downwind dispersion and hence, potential pollutant concentrations. When only basic wind information is available, an atmospheric modeler must first estimate roughness length (z{sub 0},) at the location of interest, ({mu}*) from similarity theory using average wind speed ({mu}) and z{sub 0}, and finally apply experimentally derived relationships to determine the turbulence intensities. Even when turbulence coefficients are measured, the turbulence profile must be estimated in the surface layer, using, for example, the power law recommended in a US Environmental Protection Agency guidance document. In this study, turbulent intensities and wind profiles are analyzed in eight direction sectors during near neutral stability. ``Local`` and ``regional`` roughness lengths are calculated from wind speed profiles and from longitudinal turbulence intensities ({sigma}{sub {mu}}) at both sites. With ``regional`` roughness length, complex terrain features are in effect the roughness elements. Profiles of median, 15-minute averaged turbulence intensities {sigma}{sub {mu}}, {sigma}{sub {nu}} and {sigma}{sub w} are calculated at both sites. Profiles of median {sigma}{sub {theta}} and {sigma}{sub {phi}} are also calculated using four mean values of regional z{sub 0} at both sites. Finally, differences between widely-used turbulence relationships and the relationships determined in this study, and their possible effect on model results, are discussed.

  14. Optical Third Harmonic Generation from Isotropic Multilayer Media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaatz, Philip Gerald

    Optical third harmonic generation, THG, has been used to characterize the nonlinear optical response in several types of isotropic multilayer media at fundamental wavelengths of 1064, 1542, and 1907 nm. The boundary conditions and the interaction of the optical waves produced by intense electromagnetic fields are presented and solved for the case of an isotropic slab, a polymeric film deposited onto an optical flat, and an optical glass cuvette filled with an organic liquid. The third harmonic from fused silica and BK7 optical glasses has been measured on optically flat samples of these glasses. The relative nonlinear susceptibility, chi^{(3)} , of BK7 optical glass to fused silica as measured by the intensity of the THG interference pattern and known refractive index data for these glasses varies from 1.28 at 1907 nm to 1.33 at 1542 nm and 1.42 at 1064 nm. The nonlinear wave interactions in bilayer media were analyzed and characterized for two polymeric materials deposited by spin casting from solutions onto fused silica optical flats. Poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA films were used for the THG measurement. Refractive indices were measured by quasiwaveguiding onto PMMA films deposited onto heavy flint glass prisms for the visible wavelengths and by UV-VIS-NIR spectroscopy in the infrared. Poly(di-n-hexylsilylene) films of thicknesses ranging from.37 to 1.44 mu were also characterized by the preceding methods. These films exhibit a reversible thermochromism at 42^circ C, where the wavelength at the absorption maximum increases by ~60 nm to 374 nm below the thermochromic transition temperature. The third order nonlinear susceptibility, chi^{(3) }, relative to fused silica ranges from ~11 at 50^circC to ~55 below the thermochromic transition at 23^circC. An empirical relationship for chi^{(3) } as a function of the wavelength at maximum absorption was proposed and applied to polymeric media. The nonlinear optical response of several organic liquids was characterized

  15. On the subgrid-scale modeling of compressible turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, C. G.; Erlebacher, G.; Zang, T. A.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    A subgrid-scale model recently derived for use in the large-eddy simulation of compressible turbulent flows is examined from a fundamental theoretical and computational standpoint. It is demonstrated that this model, which is applicable only to compressible turbulent flows in the limit of small density fluctuations, correlates somewhat poorly with the results of direct numerical simulations of compressible isotropic turbulence at low Mach numbers. An alternative model, based on Favre-filtered fields, is suggested which appears to reduce these limitations.

  16. The subgrid-scale modeling of compressible turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, C. G.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Erlebacher, G.; Zang, T. A.

    1988-01-01

    A subgrid-scale model recently derived for use in the large-eddy simulation of compressible turbulent flows is examined from a fundamental theoretical and computational standpoint. It is demonstrated that this model, which is applicable only to compressible turbulent flows in the limit of small density fluctuations, correlates somewhat poorly with the results of direct numerical simulations of compressible isotropic turbulence at low Mach numbers. An alternative model, based on Favre-filtered fields, is suggested which appears to reduce these limitations.

  17. Large-eddy simulation of a turbulent mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, N. N.; Ferziger, J. H.; Reynolds, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    The three dimensional, time dependent (incompressible) vorticity equations were used to simulate numerically the decay of isotropic box turbulence and time developing mixing layers. The vorticity equations were spatially filtered to define the large scale turbulence field, and the subgrid scale turbulence was modeled. A general method was developed to show numerical conservation of momentum, vorticity, and energy. The terms that arise from filtering the equations were treated (for both periodic boundary conditions and no stress boundary conditions) in a fast and accurate way by using fast Fourier transforms. Use of vorticity as the principal variable is shown to produce results equivalent to those obtained by use of the primitive variable equations.

  18. PDF methods for combustion in high-speed turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, Stephen B.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the research performed during the second year of this three-year project. The ultimate objective of the project is extend the applicability of probability density function (pdf) methods from incompressible to compressible turbulent reactive flows. As described in subsequent sections, progress has been made on: (1) formulation and modelling of pdf equations for compressible turbulence, in both homogeneous and inhomogeneous inert flows; and (2) implementation of the compressible model in various flow configurations, namely decaying isotropic turbulence, homogeneous shear flow and plane mixing layer.

  19. Holographic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Adams, Allan; Chesler, Paul M; Liu, Hong

    2014-04-18

    We construct turbulent black holes in asymptotically AdS4 spacetime by numerically solving Einstein's equations. Using the AdS/CFT correspondence we find that both the dual holographic fluid and bulk geometry display signatures of an inverse cascade with the bulk geometry being well approximated by the fluid-gravity gradient expansion. We argue that statistically steady-state black holes dual to d dimensional turbulent flows have horizons whose area growth has a fractal-like structure with fractal dimension D=d+4/3. PMID:24785028

  20. Turbulence in Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lecture notes for the AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel (FDP) Special Course on 'Turbulence in Compressible Flows' have been assembled in this report. The following topics were covered: Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layers, Compressible Turbulent Free Shear Layers, Turbulent Combustion, DNS/LES and RANS Simulations of Compressible Turbulent Flows, and Case Studies of Applications of Turbulence Models in Aerospace.

  1. Driver gas flow with fluctuations. [shock tube turbulent bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. A., III; Jones, W. R.; Santiago, J.

    1980-01-01

    A shock tube's driver gas can apparently provide flow with turbulent bursts. The fluctuations are interpreted using a boundary layer model of contact surface flow and results form a kinetic theory of turbulence. With this, a lower limit of 4 on the ratio of maximum to minimum turbulent intensities in contact surface instabilities has been estimated.

  2. The marine atmospheric boundary layer during the HyMeX-ASICS-MED campaign: characterization of coherent structures and impact on turbulent flux estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brilouet, Pierre-Etienne; Canut, Guylaine; Durand, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    During winter, the North Western Mediterranean Sea is characterised by intense air-sea exchanges linked to regional strong winds (Mistral or Tramontana) which bring cold and dry continental air over a warmer sea. The HyMeX-ASICS-MED field campaign, devoted to intense sea-atmosphere exchange and deep oceanic convection analysis took place in the Gulf of Lion during winter 2013. The French ATR42 aircraft was operated to document the mean and turbulent structure of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) during strong wind conditions. The aircraft was equipped to measure turbulence fluctuations, thus allowing the computation of turbulence parameters. The flight strategy consisted of stacked horizontal legs oriented along and across the wind direction, in order to obtain information about the isotropy of the turbulent field and about coherent structures. Strong wind events were documented with 11 flights during which latent heat flux up to 600 W.m-2 were observed. The structure of the turbulent field is analysed through the integral length scale and the wavelength of the spectrum peak of the vertical velocity which represent the size of the large and the most energetic eddies, respectively. It reveals a stretching of turbulent eddies along the mean wind. This kind of organized structures plays a major role by modulating the transfers inside the ABL. In particular, this non-isotropic behaviour alters the flux estimates from along-wind samples. This last point is critical because surface and entrainment fluxes, deduced from extrapolation of the flux profiles, are essential parameters to characterise the coupling between air-sea exchanges and the ABL structure.

  3. A one-equation turbulence model for recirculating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Bai, JunQiang; Xu, JingLei; Li, Yi

    2016-06-01

    A one-equation turbulence model which relies on the turbulent kinetic energy transport equation has been developed to predict the flow properties of the recirculating flows. The turbulent eddy-viscosity coefficient is computed from a recalibrated Bradshaw's assumption that the constant a 1 = 0.31 is recalibrated to a function based on a set of direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. The values of dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy consist of the near-wall part and isotropic part, and the isotropic part involves the von Karman length scale as the turbulent length scale. The performance of the new model is evaluated by the results from DNS for fully developed turbulence channel flow with a wide range of Reynolds numbers. However, the computed result of the recirculating flow at the separated bubble of NACA4412 demonstrates that an increase is needed on the turbulent dissipation, and this leads to an advanced tuning on the self-adjusted function. The improved model predicts better results in both the non-equilibrium and equilibrium flows, e.g. channel flows, backward-facing step flow and hump in a channel.

  4. Some Results Relevant to Statistical Closures for Compressible Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ristorcelli, J. R.

    1998-01-01

    For weakly compressible turbulent fluctuations there exists a small parameter, the square of the fluctuating Mach number, that allows an investigation using a perturbative treatment. The consequences of such a perturbative analysis in three different subject areas are described: 1) initial conditions in direct numerical simulations, 2) an explanation for the oscillations seen in the compressible pressure in the direct numerical simulations of homogeneous shear, and 3) for turbulence closures accounting for the compressibility of velocity fluctuations. Initial conditions consistent with small turbulent Mach number asymptotics are constructed. The importance of consistent initial conditions in the direct numerical simulation of compressible turbulence is dramatically illustrated: spurious oscillations associated with inconsistent initial conditions are avoided, and the fluctuating dilatational field is some two orders of magnitude smaller for a compressible isotropic turbulence. For the isotropic decay it is shown that the choice of initial conditions can change the scaling law for the compressible dissipation. A two-time expansion of the Navier-Stokes equations is used to distinguish compressible acoustic and compressible advective modes. A simple conceptual model for weakly compressible turbulence - a forced linear oscillator is described. It is shown that the evolution equations for the compressible portions of turbulence can be understood as a forced wave equation with refraction. Acoustic modes of the flow can be amplified by refraction and are able to manifest themselves in large fluctuations of the compressible pressure.

  5. Turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, Jorge E.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop, verify, and incorporate the baseline two-equation turbulence models which account for the effects of compressibility into the three-dimensional Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code and to provide documented descriptions of the models and their numerical procedures so that they can be implemented into 3-D CFD codes for engineering applications.

  6. Turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Talbot, L.; Cheng, R.K.

    1993-12-01

    Turbulent combustion is the dominant process in heat and power generating systems. Its most significant aspect is to enhance the burning rate and volumetric power density. Turbulent mixing, however, also influences the chemical rates and has a direct effect on the formation of pollutants, flame ignition and extinction. Therefore, research and development of modern combustion systems for power generation, waste incineration and material synthesis must rely on a fundamental understanding of the physical effect of turbulence on combustion to develop theoretical models that can be used as design tools. The overall objective of this program is to investigate, primarily experimentally, the interaction and coupling between turbulence and combustion. These processes are complex and are characterized by scalar and velocity fluctuations with time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. They are also influenced by the so-called {open_quotes}field{close_quotes} effects associated with the characteristics of the flow and burner geometries. The authors` approach is to gain a fundamental understanding by investigating idealized laboratory flames. Laboratory flames are amenable to detailed interrogation by laser diagnostics and their flow geometries are chosen to simplify numerical modeling and simulations and to facilitate comparison between experiments and theory.

  7. Scaling laws in magnetized plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Boldyrev, Stanislav

    2015-06-28

    Interactions of plasma motion with magnetic fields occur in nature and in the laboratory in an impressively broad range of scales, from megaparsecs in astrophysical systems to centimeters in fusion devices. The fact that such an enormous array of phenomena can be effectively studied lies in the existence of fundamental scaling laws in plasma turbulence, which allow one to scale the results of analytic and numerical modeling to the sized of galaxies, velocities of supernovae explosions, or magnetic fields in fusion devices. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) provides the simplest framework for describing magnetic plasma turbulence. Recently, a number of new features of MHD turbulence have been discovered and an impressive array of thought-provoking phenomenological theories have been put forward. However, these theories have conflicting predictions, and the currently available numerical simulations are not able to resolve the contradictions. MHD turbulence exhibits a variety of regimes unusual in regular hydrodynamic turbulence. Depending on the strength of the guide magnetic field it can be dominated by weakly interacting Alfv\\'en waves or strongly interacting wave packets. At small scales such turbulence is locally anisotropic and imbalanced (cross-helical). In a stark contrast with hydrodynamic turbulence, which tends to ``forget'' global constrains and become uniform and isotropic at small scales, MHD turbulence becomes progressively more anisotropic and unbalanced at small scales. Magnetic field plays a fundamental role in turbulent dynamics. Even when such a field is not imposed by external sources, it is self-consistently generated by the magnetic dynamo action. This project aims at a comprehensive study of universal regimes of magnetic plasma turbulence, combining the modern analytic approaches with the state of the art numerical simulations. The proposed study focuses on the three topics: weak MHD turbulence, which is relevant for laboratory devices, the solar

  8. Isotropic homogeneous universe with viscous fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, N.O.; Dias, R.S.; Banerjee, A.

    1985-04-01

    Exact solutions are obtained for the isotropic homogeneous cosmological model with viscous fluid. The fluid has only bulk viscosity and the viscosity coefficient is taken to be a power function of the mass density. The equation of state assumed obeys a linear relation between mass density and pressure. The models satisfying Hawking's energy conditions are discussed. Murphy's model is only a special case of this general set of solutions and it is shown that Murphy's conclusion that the introduciton of bulk viscosity can avoid the occurrence of space-time singularity at finite past is not, in general, valid.

  9. Lagrangian statistics of light particles in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado, Julián Martínez; Prakash, Vivek N.; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; (International CollaborationTurbulence Research)

    2012-05-01

    We study the Lagrangian velocity and acceleration statistics of light particles (micro-bubbles in water) in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Micro-bubbles with a diameter db = 340 μm and Stokes number from 0.02 to 0.09 are dispersed in a turbulent water tunnel operated at Taylor-Reynolds numbers (Reλ) ranging from 160 to 265. We reconstruct the bubble trajectories by employing three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry. It is found that the probability density functions (PDFs) of the micro-bubble acceleration show a highly non-Gaussian behavior with flatness values in the range 23 to 30. The acceleration flatness values show an increasing trend with Reλ, consistent with previous experiments [G. Voth, A. La Porta, A. M. Crawford, J. Alexander, and E. Bodenschatz, "Measurement of particle accelerations in fully developed turbulence," J. Fluid Mech. 469, 121 (2002)], 10.1017/S0022112002001842 and numerics [T. Ishihara, Y. Kaneda, M. Yokokawa, K. Itakura, and A. Uno, "Small-scale statistics in highresolution direct numerical simulation of turbulence: Reynolds number dependence of one-point velocity gradient statistics," J. Fluid Mech. 592, 335 (2007)], 10.1017/S0022112007008531. These acceleration PDFs show a higher intermittency compared to tracers [S. Ayyalasomayajula, Z. Warhaft, and L. R. Collins, "Modeling inertial particle acceleration statistics in isotropic turbulence," Phys. Fluids. 20, 095104 (2008)], 10.1063/1.2976174 and heavy particles [S. Ayyalasomayajula, A. Gylfason, L. R. Collins, E. Bodenschatz, and Z. Warhaft, "Lagrangian measurements of inertial particle accelerations in grid generated wind tunnel turbulence," Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 144507 (2006)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.144507 in wind tunnel experiments. In addition, the micro-bubble acceleration autocorrelation function decorrelates slower with increasing Reλ. We also compare our results with experiments in von Kármán flows and point-particle direct numerical simulations with periodic

  10. The dynamics of variable-density turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    The dynamics of variable-density turbulent fluids are studied by direct numerical simulation. The flow is incompressible so that acoustic waves are decoupled from the problem, and implying that density is not a thermodynamic variable. Changes in density occur due to molecular mixing. The velocity field, is in general, divergent. A pseudo-spectral numerical technique is used to solve the equations of motion. Three-dimensional simulations are performed using a grid size of 128{sup 3} grid points. Two types of problems are studied: (1) the decay of isotropic, variable-density turbulence, and (2) buoyancy-generated turbulence in a fluid with large density fluctuations. In the case of isotropic, variable-density turbulence, the overall statistical decay behavior, for the cases studied, is relatively unaffected by the presence of density variations when the initial density and velocity fields are statistically independent. The results for this case are in quantitative agreement with previous numerical and laboratory results. In this case, the initial density field has a bimodal probability density function (pdf) which evolves in time towards a Gaussian distribution. The pdf of the density field is symmetric about its mean value throughout its evolution. If the initial velocity and density fields are statistically dependent, however, the decay process is significantly affected by the density fluctuations. For the case of buoyancy-generated turbulence, variable-density departures from the Boussinesq approximation are studied. The results of the buoyancy-generated turbulence are compared with variable-density model predictions. Both a one-point (engineering) model and a two-point (spectral) model are tested against the numerical data. Some deficiencies in these variable-density models are discussed and modifications are suggested.

  11. Structure in turbulent thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandar, S.

    1992-12-01

    Small-scale features of vorticity, strain rate, and temperature gradients are considered in a Rayleigh-Bénard convection. The results reported are from a direct numerical simulation of turbulent convection performed in a rectangular box of aspect ratio 2√2 at a Rayleigh number of 6.5×106 and a Prandtl number of 0.72. In agreement with earlier results [Ashurst et al., Phys. Fluids 30, 2343 (1987) and Ruetsch and Maxey, Phys. Fluids A 3, 1587 (1991)], the intermediate strain rate is on an average positive, but the ratio of alpha, beta, and gamma strain rates are measured to be 5.3:1.0:-6.3. This result differs from the earlier result of 3:1:-4 obtained in homogeneous isotropic and shear turbulences. Buoyancy-induced vorticity production makes significant contribution to the overall enstrophy balance, especially close to the boundaries. Vorticity production by buoyancy is exclusively in the horizontal direction and is balanced by preferred production by stretching and tilting in the vertical direction, due to the preferred alignment of extensional alpha strain rate with the vertical direction. Such directional alignment of vorticity, strain rate, and scalar gradient is explained on the basis of preferred spatial orientation of coherent structures in thermal turbulence.

  12. Transitional Boundary Layers Under the Influence of High Free Stream Turbulence, Intensive Wall Cooling and High Pressure Gradients in Hot Gas Circulation. Ph.D. Thesis - Technische Hochschule, Karlsruhe, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rued, Klaus

    1987-01-01

    The requirements for fundamental experimental studies of the influence of free stream turbulence, pressure gradients and wall cooling are discussed. Under turbine-like free stream conditions, comprehensive tests of transitional boundary layers with laminar, reversing and turbulent flow increments were performed to decouple the effects of the parameters and to determine the effects during mutual interaction.

  13. Second-order closure models for supersonic turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.; Sarkar, Sutanu

    1991-01-01

    Recent work on the development of a second-order closure model for high-speed compressible flows is reviewed. This turbulent closure is based on the solution of modeled transport equations for the Favre-averaged Reynolds stress tensor and the solenoidal part of the turbulent dissipation rate. A new model for the compressible dissipation is used along with traditional gradient transport models for the Reynolds heat flux and mass flux terms. Consistent with simple asymptotic analyses, the deviatoric part of the remaining higher-order correlations in the Reynolds stress transport equations are modeled by a variable density extension of the newest incompressible models. The resulting second-order closure model is tested in a variety of compressible turbulent flows which include the decay of isotropic turbulence, homogeneous shear flow, the supersonic mixing layer, and the supersonic flat-plate turbulent boundary layer. Comparisons between the model predictions and the results of physical and numerical experiments are quite encouraging.

  14. On observing acoustic backscattering from salinity turbulence.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Louis; Sastre-Cordova, Marcos M

    2011-08-01

    It has been hypothesized that at sufficiently high levels of oceanic salinity turbulence it should be possible to observe acoustic backscattering. However, there have been limited in situ measurements to confirm this hypothesis. Using an autonomous underwater vehicle equipped with upward and downward looking 1.2 MHz acoustic Doppler current profilers and with turbulence and fine scale sensors, measurements were performed in a region of intense turbulence and a strong salinity gradient. The approach taken was to correlate variations in the backscattered acoustic intensity, I, with a theoretical acoustic backscattering cross section per volume for salinity turbulence, σ(s), to obtain an estimated scattering cross section per volume, σ(e). Results indicated that of order 50% of the observed region was characterized by salinity turbulence induced backscattering. PMID:21877785

  15. Quantifying Turbulence for Tidal Power Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Jim; Richmond, Marshall C.; Polagye, Brian; Durgesh, Vibhav

    2010-08-01

    Using newly collected data from a tidal power site in Puget Sound, WA, metrics for turbulence quantification are assessed and discussed. The quality of raw ping Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data for turbulence studies is evaluated against Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) data at a point. Removal of Doppler noise from the raw ping data is shown to be a crucial step in turbulence quantification. Excluding periods of slack tide, the turbulent intensity estimates at a height of 4.6 m above the seabed are 8% and 11% from the ADCP and ADV, respectively. Estimates of the turbulent dissipation rate are more variable, from 10e-3 to 10e-1 W/m^3. An example analysis of coherent Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE) is presented.

  16. Analysis of temporal power spectra for optical waves propagating through weak anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cui, Linyan

    2015-06-01

    Analytic expressions for the temporal power spectra of irradiance fluctuations and angle of arrival (AOA) fluctuations are derived for optical waves propagating through weak anisotropic non-Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence. In the derivation, the anisotropic non-Kolmogorov spectrum is adopted, which adopts the assumption of circular symmetry in the orthogonal plane throughout the path and the same degree of anisotropy along the propagation direction for all the turbulence cells. The final expressions consider simultaneously the anisotropic factor and general spectral power law values. When the anisotropic factor equals one (corresponding to the isotropic turbulence), the derived temporal power spectral models have good consistency with the known results for the isotropic turbulence. Numerical calculations show that the increased anisotropic factor alleviates the atmospheric turbulence's influence on the final expressions. PMID:26367055

  17. Isotropization of nematic liquid crystals by TMDSC

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei; Dadmun, M.; Zhang, Ge; Boller, A.; Wunderlich, B. |

    1997-12-01

    Temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC) and traditional DSC are used to study the transition between the nematic liquid crystalline state and the isotropic liquid for two small molecules [4,4{prime}-azoxyanisole and N,N`-bis(4-n-octyloxybenzal)-1,4-phenylenediamine] and one macromolecule (4,4{prime}-dihydroxy-{alpha}-methylstilbene copolymerized with a 1:1 molar mixture of 1,7-dibromoheptane and 1,9-dibromononane). The DSC measurements with 4,4{prime}-azoxyanisole were used for temperature calibration with varying heating and cooling rates. Quasi-isothermal TMDSC with small temperature amplitude and standard TMDSC with underlying heating and cooling rates were utilized to analyze the breadth of the transitions. It could be verified that the isotropization transition of a nematic liquid crystal is, indeed, reversible for all three molecules. The nature of the transition changes, however, from relatively sharp, for small, rigid molecules, to about three kelvins wide for the small molecule with flexible ends, to as broad as 20 K for the macromolecule. It was also demonstrated that quantitative heats of fusion of sharp transitions can be extracted from TMDSC, but only from the time-domain heat-flow signal.

  18. Depletion induced isotropic-isotropic phase separation in suspensions of rod-like colloids.

    PubMed

    Jungblut, S; Tuinier, R; Binder, K; Schilling, T

    2007-12-28

    When non-adsorbing polymers are added to an isotropic suspension of rod-like colloids, the colloids effectively attract each other via depletion forces. We performed Monte Carlo simulations to study the phase diagram of such rod-polymer mixture. The colloidal rods were modeled as hard spherocylinders; the polymers were described as spheres of the same diameter as the rods. The polymers may overlap with no energy cost, while the overlap of polymers and rods is forbidden. Large amounts of depletant cause phase separation of the mixture. We estimated the phase boundaries of isotropic-isotropic coexistence both in the bulk and in confinement. To determine the phase boundaries we applied the grand canonical ensemble using successive umbrella sampling [J. Chem. Phys. 120, 10925 (2004)], and we performed a finite size scaling analysis to estimate the location of the critical point. The results are compared with predictions of the free volume theory developed by Lekkerkerker and Stroobants [Nuovo Cimento D 16, 949 (1994)]. We also give estimates for the interfacial tension between the coexisting isotropic phases and analyze its power-law behavior on the approach of the critical point. PMID:18163708

  19. Turbulent Plumes in Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Andrew W.

    2010-01-01

    This review describes a range of natural processes leading to the formation of turbulent buoyant plumes, largely relating to volcanic processes, in which there are localized, intense releases of energy. Phenomena include volcanic eruption columns, bubble plumes in lakes, hydrothermal plumes, and plumes beneath the ice in polar oceans. We assess how the dynamics is affected by heat transfer, particle fallout and recycling, and Earth's rotation, as well as explore some of the mixing of the ambient fluid produced by plumes in a confined geometry.

  20. Mountain Wave-Induced Turbulence - "Lower Turbulent Zones" Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, Lukas; Grubišić, Vanda; Serafin, Stefano; Mühlgassner, Rita

    2014-05-01

    In their seminal 1974 paper on "Lower Turbulent Zones Associated with Mountain Lee Waves" P. F. Lester and W. A. Fingerhut attempted to characterize regions of low-level turbulence in the lee of mountain ranges that are commonly associated with large-amplitude mountain waves aloft. For their study, they made extensive use of airborne measurements with small research aircraft that penetrated into the "lower turbulent zone" (LTZ). The Lester and Fingerhut study complemented previous work on wave-induced LTZs by J. P. Kuettner and others in the 1950s who were among the first to employ sailplanes as scientific measurement platforms. Given the limitations of scientific instrumentation on research aircraft in the 1970s (e.g., no GPS) and, in particular, on sailplanes in the 1950s, credit has to be given to these authors for their remarkably detailed account and classification of LTZs. Ever since then, scientists have been trying to refine the conceptual model of the LTZ and shed more light on the origin of turbulence therein. The Terrain-Induced Rotor Experiment (T-REX, Sierra Nevada, California, 2006) is the most recent, major effort organized to investigate the characteristics of LTZs by studying the coupled mountain-wave, rotor, and boundary-layer system. During T-REX, comprehensive ground-based and airborne, in situ and remote sensing measurements were collected during 15 Intensive Observation Periods (IOPs). In this study, we make use of the extensive T-REX datasets to revisit the LTZ concept. During T-REX IOPs, the University of Wyoming King Air (UWKA) research aircraft flew straight-and-level legs aligned with the mean wind direction to document the variation of flow and turbulence over and downwind of the Sierra Nevada. In order to characterize the structure and intensity of turbulence within the LTZ, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and eddy-dissipation rate (EDR) were computed from UWKA research flights. In contrast to the rough average values of TKE and EDR

  1. MHD Turbulence through the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veltri, P.

    Velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in a wide range of space and time scales have been directly detected in the interplanetary medium In the solar corona the presence of MHD turbulence is naturally generated by the mechanical and magnetic energy input from the photosphere and it could be related to coronal heating as well as to energy release events like micro and nanoflares A certain amount of fluctuations from the solar corona arrives in the solar wind mainly as Alfvénic turbulence i e strongly correlated velocity and magnetic field fluctuations with a very low level of compressible density magnetic field intensity temperature fluctuations The whole system formed by the solar corona and the solar wind represents a sort of wind tunnel extremely useful to study the MHD turbulence properties The presence of magnetic turbulence in the heliosphere is identified as the source of charged particle collisionless diffusion which according the values of parameters like the energy level on magnetic fluctuations or the turbulence correlation length can display both a normal gaussian random walk and an anomalous subdiffusive or super diffusive behavior The former case is obtained in a situation of global stochasticity high level of fluctuation energy while the latter in a situation of weak chaos low level of fluctuation energy The talk will discuss turbulence generation at photospheric level its propagation and its interaction with heliospheric structures and its effects on anomalous transport processes of charged

  2. Turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubesin, Morris W.

    1987-01-01

    Recent developments at several levels of statistical turbulence modeling applicable to aerodynamics are briefly surveyed. Emphasis is on examples of model improvements for transonic, two-dimensional flows. Experience with the development of these improved models is cited to suggest methods of accelerating the modeling process necessary to keep abreast of the rapid movement of computational fluid dynamics into the computation of complex three-dimensional flows.

  3. Controlling turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnen, Jakob; Hof, Björn

    2015-11-01

    We show that a simple modification of the velocity profile in a pipe can lead to a complete collapse of turbulence and the flow fully relaminarises. The annihilation of turbulence is achieved by a steady manipulation of the streamwise velocity component alone, greatly reducing control efforts. Several different control techniques are presented: one with a local modification of the flow profile by means of a stationary obstacle, one employing a nozzle injecting fluid through a small gap at the pipe wall and one with a moving wall, where a part of the pipe is shifted in the streamwise direction. All control techniques act on the flow such that the streamwise velocity profile becomes more flat and turbulence gradually grows faint and disappears. In a smooth straight pipe the flow remains laminar downstream of the control. Hence a reduction in skin friction by a factor of 8 and more can be accomplished. Stereoscopic PIV-measurements and movies of the development of the flow during relaminarisation are presented.

  4. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.H.

    1993-12-01

    The development of turbulent combustion models that reflect some of the most important characteristics of turbulent reacting flows requires knowledge about the behavior of key quantities in well defined combustion regimes. In turbulent flames, the coupling between the turbulence and the chemistry is so strong in certain regimes that is is very difficult to isolate the role played by one individual phenomenon. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is an extremely useful tool to study in detail the turbulence-chemistry interactions in certain well defined regimes. Globally, non-premixed flames are controlled by two limiting cases: the fast chemistry limit, where the turbulent fluctuations. In between these two limits, finite-rate chemical effects are important and the turbulence interacts strongly with the chemical processes. This regime is important because industrial burners operate in regimes in which, locally the flame undergoes extinction, or is at least in some nonequilibrium condition. Furthermore, these nonequilibrium conditions strongly influence the production of pollutants. To quantify the finite-rate chemistry effect, direct numerical simulations are performed to study the interaction between an initially laminar non-premixed flame and a three-dimensional field of homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence. Emphasis is placed on the dynamics of extinction and on transient effects on the fine scale mixing process. Differential molecular diffusion among species is also examined with this approach, both for nonreacting and reacting situations. To address the problem of large-scale mixing and to examine the effects of mean shear, efforts are underway to perform large eddy simulations of round three-dimensional jets.

  5. Evolution of the shock front and turbulence structures in the shock/turbulence interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kevlahan, N.; Mahesh, K.; Lee, S.

    1992-01-01

    The interaction of a weak shock front with isotropic turbulence has been investigated using Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS). Two problems were considered: the ability of the field equation (the equation for a propagating surface) to model the shock; and a quantitative study of the evolution of turbulence structure using the database generated by Lee et al. Field equation model predictions for front shape have been compared with DNS results; good agreement is found for shock wave interaction with 2D turbulence and for a single steady vorticity wave. In the interaction of 3D isotropic turbulence with a normal shock, strong alignment of vorticity with the intermediate eigenvector of the rate of strain tensor (S(sup *)(sub ij) = S(sub ij) - (1/3)(delta(sub ij))(S(sub kk))) is seen to develop upstream of the shock and to be further amplified on passage through the shock. Vorticity tends to align at 90 deg to the largest eigenvector, but there is no preferred alignment with the smallest eigenvector. Upstream of the shock, the alignments continue to develop even after the velocity derivative skewness saturates. There is a significant tendency, which increases with time throughout the computational domain, for velocity to align with vorticity. The alignment between velocity and vorticity is strongest in eddy regions and weakest in convergence regions.

  6. Study on Turbulent Premixed Flame Regimes with Ignition Using a Reactor Assisted Turbulent Slot Burner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Sang Hee; Reuter, Christopher; Windom, Bret; Ju, Yiguang

    2015-11-01

    Turbulent premixed flames of n-heptane/air and toluene/air mixtures affected by ignition have been experimentally investigated by using a reactor-assisted turbulent slot (RATS) burner at two burner temperatures, 450 K and 700 K. Turbulent burning velocities (ST) and flame structures have been measured by the simultaneous OH and CH2O planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging at various equivalence ratios and turbulent Reynolds numbers. Three distinct turbulent premixed flame regimes are identified for n-heptane/air mixture; chemical frozen (CF) regime at low temperature, low temperature ignition (LTI) regime, and high temperature ignition (HTI) regime for respectively lean and rich conditions at 700 K. For CF regime, the measured turbulent burning velocities of n-heptane and toluene at 450 K follow a conventional correlation of turbulent intensity (defined as u'/SL). In LTI regime, substantial changes in chemical composition alter the laminar flame speed and transport property, leading to rapid increase of turbulent burning velocity. In HTI regime, it is found that the turbulent premixed flame structure is significantly modified by the appearance of volumetric ignition kernel structures associated with the transition from LTI to HTI. The turbulent premixed flame regime in HTI is no longer represented by the thin reaction zone regime. The measured turbulent burning velocities in HTI regime increase substantially as increasing ignition Damkőhler number over those in LTI regime.

  7. Measuring turbulent fluid dispersion using laser induced phosphorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Voort, Dennis; Dam, Nico; van de Water, Willem; Kunnen, Rudie; Clercx, Herman; van Heijst, Gertjan

    2015-11-01

    Fluid dispersion due to turbulence is an important subject in both natural and engineering processes, from cloud formation to turbulent mixing and liquid spray combustion. The combination of small scales and often high velocities results in few experimental techniques that can follow the course of events. We introduce a novel technique, which measures the dispersion of ``tagged'' fluid particles by means of laser-induced phosphorescence, using a solution containing a europium-based molecular complex with a relatively long phosphorescence half-life. This technique is used to measure transport processes in both the dispersion of droplets in homogeneous isotropic turbulence and the dispersion of fluid of near-nozzle spray breakup processes. By tagging a small amount of droplets/fluid via laser excitation, the tagged droplets can be tracked in a Lagrangian way. The absolute dispersion of the droplets can be measured in a variety of turbulent flows. Using this technique it is shows that droplets around St =τp /τη ~ 1 (Stokes number) disperse faster than true fluid tracers in homogeneous isotropic turbulence, as well as differences between longitudinal and radial dispersion in turbulent sprays. This work is part of the research programme of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is part of the Dutch Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

  8. Recalculation of the Isotropic H Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroi, Takahiro

    1994-06-01

    The isotropic H functions defined in radiative transfer theory by Chandrasekhar (Radiative Transfer, Dover, New York, 1960) have been numerically recalculated for a larger number of single scattering albedo (w) values. The obtained H functions should be accurate to five decimal places at least. The H function values become highly nonlinear as w approaches 1, where calculations were performed with many more points than in Chandrasekhar (1960). A simple linear interpolation of Chandrasekhar's H function table could result in as much as 8% error in the H function values and 16% in the H2 values that appear in multiple scattering terms such as in Hapke (J. Geophys. Res. 86, 3039-3054, 1981). On the other hand, Hapke's approximations (J. Geophys. Res. 86, 3039-3054, 1981; Theory of Reflectance and Emittance Spectroscopy, Cambridge Univ. Press, New York, 1993) give H values within 4.1% and 0.8% error, respectively.

  9. Isotropic MD simulations of dynamic brittle fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Espanol, P.; Rubio, M.A.; Zuniga, I.

    1996-12-01

    The authors present results obtained by molecular dynamics simulations on the propagation of fast cracks in triangular 2D lattices. Their aim is to simulate Mode 1 fracture of brittle isotropic materials. They propose a force law that respects the isotropy of the material. The code yields the correct imposed sound c{sub {parallel}}, shear c{sub {perpendicular}} and surface V{sub R} wave speeds. Different notch lengths are systematically studied. They observed that initially the cracks are linear and always branch at a particular critical velocity c* {approx} 0.8V{sub R} and that this occurs when the crack tip reaches the position of a front emitted from the initial crack tip and propagating at a speed c = 0.68V{sub R}.

  10. Isotropic expansion of an inhomogeneous universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Wei-Jian; Lü, H.

    2014-10-01

    We propose a cosmological model that describes isotropic expansion of an inhomogeneous universe. The energy-momentum tensor that creates the spatial inhomogeneity may not affect the uniform expansion scaling factor a(t) in the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker-like metrics. Such an energy-momentum tensor may not be exotic; in fact any linear or nonlinear σ model has this feature. We show that the classical spatial inhomogeneity can be embedded in both inflation models and the traditional cosmological expansion by perfect fluid. The spatial inhomogeneity resembles the primordial quantum perturbation that was frozen in the comoving frame. We obtain some exact inhomogeneous solutions with spherical or axial symmetries. We also show that some of our cosmological models can be viewed as the dynamical black hole formation.

  11. New bounds on isotropic Lorentz violation

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Carone; Marc Sher; Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2006-09-19

    Violations of Lorentz invariance that appear via operators of dimension four or less are completely parameterized in the Standard Model Extension (SME). In the pure photonic sector of the SME, there are nineteen dimensionless, Lorentz-violating parameters. Eighteen of these have experimental upper bounds ranging between 10{sup -11} and 10{sup -32}; the remaining parameter, ktr, is isotropic and has a much weaker bound of order 10{sup -4}. In this Brief Report, we point out that ktr gives a significant contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron and find a new upper bound of order 10{sup -8}. With reasonable assumptions, we further show that this bound may be improved to 10{sup -14} by considering the renormalization of other Lorentz-violating parameters that are more tightly constrained. Using similar renormalization arguments, we also estimate bounds on Lorentz violating parameters in the pure gluonic sector of QCD.

  12. Isotropic and anisotropic surface wave cloaking techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McManus, T. M.; La Spada, L.; Hao, Y.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we compare two different approaches for surface waves cloaking. The first technique is a unique application of Fermat’s principle and requires isotropic material properties, but owing to its derivation is limited in its applicability. The second technique utilises a geometrical optics approximation for dealing with rays bound to a two dimensional surface and requires anisotropic material properties, though it can be used to cloak any smooth surface. We analytically derive the surface wave scattering behaviour for both cloak techniques when applied to a rotationally symmetric surface deformation. Furthermore, we simulate both using a commercially available full-wave electromagnetic solver and demonstrate a good level of agreement with their analytically derived solutions. Our analytical solutions and simulations provide a complete and concise overview of two different surface wave cloaking techniques.

  13. Quantization ambiguities in isotropic quantum geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojowald, Martin

    2002-10-01

    Some typical quantization ambiguities of quantum geometry are studied within isotropic models. Since this allows explicit computations of operators and their spectra, one can investigate the effects of ambiguities in a quantitative manner. It is shown that these ambiguities do not affect the fate of the classical singularity, demonstrating that the absence of a singularity in loop quantum cosmology is a robust implication of the general quantization scheme. The calculations also allow conclusions about modified operators in the full theory. In particular, using holonomies in a non-fundamental representation of SU(2) to quantize connection components turns out to lead to significant corrections to classical behaviour at macroscopic volume for large values of the spin of the chosen representation.

  14. Elastic constants of layers in isotropic laminates.

    PubMed

    Heyliger, Paul R; Ledbetter, Hassel; Kim, Sudook; Reimanis, Ivar

    2003-11-01

    The individual laminae elastic constants in multilayer laminates composed of dissimilar isotropic layers were determined using ultrasonic-resonance spectroscopy and the linear theory of elasticity. Ultrasonic resonance allows one to measure the free-vibration response spectrum of a traction-free solid under periodic vibration. These frequencies depend on pointwise density, laminate dimensions, layer thickness, and layer elastic constants. Given a material with known mass but unknown constitution, this method allows one to extract the elastic constants and density of the constituent layers. This is accomplished by measuring the frequencies and then minimizing the differences between these and those calculated using the theory of elasticity for layered media to select the constants that best replicate the frequency-response spectrum. This approach is applied to a three-layer, unsymmetric laminate of WpCu, and very good agreement is found with the elastic constants of the two constituent materials. PMID:14649998

  15. Electron magnetohydrodynamics: dynamics and turbulence.

    PubMed

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2013-11-01

    We consider dynamics and turbulent interaction of whistler modes within the framework of inertialess electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD). We argue that there is no energy principle in EMHD: any stationary closed configuration is neutrally stable. On the other hand, the relaxation principle, the long term evolution of a weakly dissipative system towards Taylor-Beltrami state, remains valid in EMHD. We consider the turbulent cascade of whistler modes. We show that (i) harmonic whistlers are exact nonlinear solutions; (ii) collinear whistlers do not interact (including counterpropagating); (iii) waves with the same value of the wave vector k(1)=k(2) do not interact; (iv) whistler modes have a dispersion that allows a three-wave decay, including into a zero frequency mode; (v) the three-wave interaction effectively couples modes with highly different wave numbers and propagation angles. In addition, linear interaction of a whistler with a single zero mode can lead to spatially divergent structures via parametric instability. All these properties are drastically different from MHD, so that the qualitative properties of the Alfvén turbulence can not be transferred to the EMHD turbulence. We derive the Hamiltonian formulation of EMHD, and using Bogoliubov transformation reduce it to the canonical form; we calculate the matrix elements for the three-wave interaction of whistlers. We solve numerically the kinetic equation and show that, generally, the EMHD cascade develops within a broad range of angles, while transiently it may show anisotropic, nearly two-dimensional structures. Development of a cascade depends on the forcing (nonuniversal) and often fails to reach a steady state. Analytical estimates predict the spectrum of magnetic fluctuations for the quasi-isotropic cascade [proportionality]k(-2). The cascade remains weak (not critically balanced). The cascade is UV local, while the infrared locality is weakly (logarithmically) violated. PMID:24329368

  16. Turbulence in homogeneous shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumir, Alain

    1996-11-01

    Homogeneous shear flows with an imposed mean velocity U=Syx̂ are studied in a period box of size Lx×Ly×Lz, in the statistically stationary turbulent state. In contrast with unbounded shear flows, the finite size of the system constrains the large-scale dynamics. The Reynolds number, defined by Re≡SL2y/ν varies in the range 2600⩽Re⩽11300. The total kinetic energy and enstrophy in the volume of numerical integration have large peaks, resulting in fluctuations of kinetic energy of order 30%-50%. The mechanism leading to these fluctuations is very reminiscent of the ``streaks'' responsible for the violent bursts observed in turbulent boundary layers. The large scale anisotropy of the flow, characterized by the two-point correlation tensor depends on the aspect ratio of the system. The probability distribution functions (PDF) of the components of the velocity are found to be close to Gaussian. The physics of the Reynolds stress tensor, uv, is very similar to what is found experimentally in wall bounded shear flows. The study of the two-point correlation tensor of the vorticity <ωiωj> suggests that the small scales become isotropic when the Reynolds number increases, as observed in high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers. However, the skewness of the z component of vorticity is independent of the Reynolds number in this range, suggesting that some small scale anisotropy remains even at very high Reynolds numbers. An analogy is drawn with the problem of turbulent mixing, where a similar anisotropy is observed.

  17. Electron magnetohydrodynamics: Dynamics and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2013-11-01

    We consider dynamics and turbulent interaction of whistler modes within the framework of inertialess electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD). We argue that there is no energy principle in EMHD: any stationary closed configuration is neutrally stable. On the other hand, the relaxation principle, the long term evolution of a weakly dissipative system towards Taylor-Beltrami state, remains valid in EMHD. We consider the turbulent cascade of whistler modes. We show that (i) harmonic whistlers are exact nonlinear solutions; (ii) collinear whistlers do not interact (including counterpropagating); (iii) waves with the same value of the wave vector k1=k2 do not interact; (iv) whistler modes have a dispersion that allows a three-wave decay, including into a zero frequency mode; (v) the three-wave interaction effectively couples modes with highly different wave numbers and propagation angles. In addition, linear interaction of a whistler with a single zero mode can lead to spatially divergent structures via parametric instability. All these properties are drastically different from MHD, so that the qualitative properties of the Alfvén turbulence can not be transferred to the EMHD turbulence. We derive the Hamiltonian formulation of EMHD, and using Bogoliubov transformation reduce it to the canonical form; we calculate the matrix elements for the three-wave interaction of whistlers. We solve numerically the kinetic equation and show that, generally, the EMHD cascade develops within a broad range of angles, while transiently it may show anisotropic, nearly two-dimensional structures. Development of a cascade depends on the forcing (nonuniversal) and often fails to reach a steady state. Analytical estimates predict the spectrum of magnetic fluctuations for the quasi-isotropic cascade ∝k-2. The cascade remains weak (not critically balanced). The cascade is UV local, while the infrared locality is weakly (logarithmically) violated.

  18. Modified anisotropic turbulence refractive-index fluctuations spectral model and its application in moderate-to-strong anisotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cui, Linyan; Xue, Bindang; Zhou, Fugen

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the modified anisotropic turbulence refractive-index fluctuations spectral model is derived based on the extended Rytov approximation theory for the theoretical investigations of optical plane and spherical waves propagating through moderate-to-strong anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence. The anisotropic factor which parameterizes the asymmetry of turbulence cells or eddies in the horizontal and vertical directions is introduced. The general spectral power law in the range of 3-4 is also considered compared with the conventional classic value of 11/3 for Kolmogorov turbulence. Based on the modified anisotropic turbulence refractive-index fluctuations spectrum, the analytic expressions of the irradiance scintillation index are also derived for optical plane and spherical waves propagating through moderate-to-strong anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence. They are applicable in a wide range of turbulence strengths and can reduce correctly to the previously published results in the special cases of weak anisotropic turbulence and moderate-to-strong isotropic turbulence. Calculations are performed to analyze the derived models. PMID:27140754

  19. Swimming in turbulent flow - profitable or costly ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enders, E. C.; Roy, A. G.

    2004-05-01

    Fish swimming performance has long been of interest to researchers. Experiments on swimming performance are generally performed under conditions which minimise flow heterogeneity. However, fish live in environments were intense fluctuations of flow velocity and pressure occur. Only recently, studies emerged that consider the effect of turbulence on the swimming performance of fish. Research has shown that fish may benefit from turbulence. For example, rainbow trout swimming behind an obstacle which produced stable vortex shedding, profited from the energy of these vortices. Fish adjusted their swimming patterns to slalom between the vortices which resulted in a reduction in muscle activity suggesting that fish reduced energy expenditure of swimming. Similarly, sockeye salmon exploited recirculation zones during upriver spawning migration to minimise energy expenditure. In contrast to these investigations showing that fish may actually profit from turbulence, several studies suggested that turbulence increases energy expenditure of swimming. Sustained swimming speed of fish decreased with increasing turbulence intensity suggesting an increase in swimming costs. Similarly, Atlantic salmon swimming in turbulent flow have 2- to 4-fold increased energy expenditure in comparison to estimates obtained under minimised flow heterogeneity. We will give an overview of recent studies and of new experimental evidence showing how turbulence affects fish behaviour, energetics and distribution and we discuss the relevant scales at which turbulent flow structures affect fish depending on its size. These results are from special interest not only for fisheries management, habitat restoration and biodiversity conservation but also for conceptualisation and construction of migratory fish pathways.

  20. Subgrid or Reynolds stress-modeling for three-dimensional turbulence computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubesin, M. W.

    1975-01-01

    A review is given of recent advances in two distinct computational methods for evaluating turbulence fields, namely, statistical Reynolds stress modeling and turbulence simulation, where large eddies are followed in time. It is shown that evaluation of the mean Reynolds stresses, rather than use of a scalar eddy viscosity, permits an explanation of streamline curvature effects found in several experiments. Turbulence simulation, with a new volume averaging technique and third-order accurate finite-difference computing is shown to predict the decay of isotropic turbulence in incompressible flow with rather modest computer storage requirements, even at Reynolds numbers of aerodynamic interest.

  1. Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, David C.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence theory is modeled on neutral fluid (Navier-Stokes) turbulence theory, but with some important differences. There have been essentially no repeatable laboratory MHD experiments wherein the boundary conditions could be controlled or varied and a full set of diagnostics implemented. The equations of MHD are convincingly derivable only in the limit of small ratio of collision mean-free-paths to macroscopic length scales, an inequality that often goes the other way for magnetofluids of interest. Finally, accurate information on the MHD transport coefficients-and thus, the Reynolds-like numbers that order magnetofluid behavior-is largely lacking; indeed, the algebraic expressions used for such ingredients as the viscous stress tensor are often little more than wishful borrowing from fluid mechanics. The one accurate thing that has been done extensively and well is to solve the (strongly nonlinear) MHD equations numerically, usually in the presence of rectangular periodic boundary conditions, and then hope for the best when drawing inferences from the computations for those astrophysical and geophysical MHD systems for which some indisputably turbulent detailed data are available, such as the solar wind or solar prominences. This has led to what is perhaps the first field of physics for which computer simulations are regarded as more central to validating conclusions than is any kind of measurement. Things have evolved in this way due to a mixture of the inevitable and the bureaucratic, but that is the way it is, and those of us who want to work on the subject have to live with it. It is the only game in town, and theories that have promised more-often on the basis of some alleged ``instability''-have turned out to be illusory.

  2. Towed-Grid Studies of Quantum Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shu-Chen; Labbe, Greg; Ihas, Gary G.

    2006-11-01

    We produce Homogeneous Isotropic Quantum Turbulence (HIQT) in liquid helium at 20 mK to compare with classical experiments and theories. Specifically, in the absence of viscosity, through what path does the turbulence decay? To produce HIQT we must quickly accelerate a grid to about 1 m/s in a channel of superfluid helium, tow it for 1 cm at a nearly constant speed, and then stop it equally quickly. To avoid joule and eddy current heating of the liquid helium, a magnetically shielded superconducting linear motor has been built, guided by simulations, along with the current pulses control program written in LabView with an embedded C compiler. The simulations, design process, and the experimental data demonstrating the functioning motor will be presented. We measure the HIQT energy decay mechanism using a calorimetric technique. Recent theory suggests the decay occurs through a Kelvin-wave cascade on the vortex lines which couples the initially large turbulent eddies to the short wavelength phonon spectrum of the liquid, yielding a characteristic rate of temperature rise. Doped germanium thermometers less than 300 μm diameter immersed in the turbulent helium allow fast calorimetric measurements to be made. The decay of turbulence is detected by the rate of temperature rise in the isolated cell after the grid is pulled.

  3. Langmuir turbulence in the auroral ionosphere 1: Linear theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, D. L.; Goldman, M. V.; Ergun, R. E.; Boehm, M. H.

    1994-01-01

    Intense bursts of Langmuir waves with electric fields of 50 to 500 mV / m have been frequently observed at altitudes greater than 500 km in the auroral ionosphere. These bursts are driven by 20 eV to 4 keV field-aligned electrons, which are embedded in an approximately isotropic nonthermal tail of scattered electrons. The Langmuir bursts are often observed at altitudes where the ionosphere is moderately magnetized (OMEGA (sub e) approximately equals omega (sub pe)). Both the moderate magnetization and the scattered electrons have a major influence on the linear dispersion and damping of Langmuir waves. In particular, the linear dispersion is topologically different depending on whether the magnetic field is subcritical (OMEGA (sub e) less than omega (sub pe)) or supercritical (OMEGA (sub e) greater than omega (sub pe)). The correct dispersion and damping can account for the observed polarization of the Langmuir waves, which is very nearly parallel to the geomagnetic field. Inferred properties of the linear instability driven by the field-aligned electrons are discussed. The linear dispersion and damping derived here provide the basis for a nonlinear turbulence study described in a companion paper (Newman et al., this issue).

  4. Recent developments in plasma turbulence and turbulent transport

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P.W.

    1997-09-22

    This report contains viewgraphs of recent developments in plasma turbulence and turbulent transport. Localized nonlinear structures occur under a variety of circumstances in turbulent, magnetically confined plasmas, arising in both kinetic and fluid descriptions, i.e., in either wave-particle or three-wave coupling interactions. These structures are non wavelike. They cannot be incorporated in the collective wave response, but interact with collective modes through their shielding by the plasma dielectric. These structures are predicted to modify turbulence-driven transport in a way that in consistent with, or in some cases are confirmed by recent experimental observations. In kinetic theory, non wavelike structures are localized perturbations of phase space density. There are two types of structures. Holes are self-trapped, while clumps have a self-potential that is too weak to resist deformation and mixing by ambient potential fluctuations. Clumps remain correlated in turbulence if their spatial extent is smaller than the correlation length of the scattering fields. In magnetic turbulence, clumps travel along stochastic magnetic fields, shielded by the plasma dielectric. A drag on the clump macro-particle is exerted by the shielding, inducing emission into the collective response. The emission in turn damps back on the particle distribution via Landau dampling. The exchange of energy between clumps and particles, as mediated by the collective mode, imposes constraints on transport. For a turbulent spectrum whose mean wavenumber along the equilibrium magnetic field is nonzero, the electron thermal flux is proportional to the ion thermal velocity. Conventional predictions (which account only for collective modes) are larger by the square root of the ion to electron mass ratio. Recent measurements are consistent with the small flux. In fluid plasma,s localized coherent structures can occur as intense vortices.

  5. Distribution of Ionized Carbon during Simulated Plasma Disruption for the Isotropic Graphite Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukegawa, Toshio; Okamoto, Koji; Madarame, Haruki

    The behavior of ionized carbon during the simulated plasma disruption is investigated with the Magneto-Plasma-Dynamic (MPD) Arc Jet. The temporal and spatial distributions of the ionized carbon were measured by emission spectroscopy. Distributions of CII and CIII were obtained. For the isotropic graphite target, the emission intensity increased as the target is exposed by the heat flux from plasma. Two consecutive peaks of intensity were observed at the point near the target surface. A simple model of redeposition and surface roughness could explain these phenomena.

  6. Explosive turbulent magnetic reconnection.

    PubMed

    Higashimori, K; Yokoi, N; Hoshino, M

    2013-06-21

    We report simulation results for turbulent magnetic reconnection obtained using a newly developed Reynolds-averaged magnetohydrodynamics model. We find that the initial Harris current sheet develops in three ways, depending on the strength of turbulence: laminar reconnection, turbulent reconnection, and turbulent diffusion. The turbulent reconnection explosively converts the magnetic field energy into both kinetic and thermal energy of plasmas, and generates open fast reconnection jets. This fast turbulent reconnection is achieved by the localization of turbulent diffusion. Additionally, localized structure forms through the interaction of the mean field and turbulence. PMID:23829741

  7. Investigating source processes of isotropic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Andrea

    explosion. In contrast, recovering the announced explosive yield using seismic moment estimates from moment tensor inversion remains challenging but we can begin to put error bounds on our moment estimates using the NSS technique. The estimation of seismic source parameters is dependent upon having a well-calibrated velocity model to compute the Green's functions for the inverse problem. Ideally, seismic velocity models are calibrated through broadband waveform modeling, however in regions of low seismicity velocity models derived from body or surface wave tomography may be employed. Whether a velocity model is 1D or 3D, or based on broadband seismic waveform modeling or the various tomographic techniques, the uncertainty in the velocity model can be the greatest source of error in moment tensor inversion. These errors have not been fully investigated for the nuclear discrimination problem. To study the effects of unmodeled structures on the moment tensor inversion, we set up a synthetic experiment where we produce synthetic seismograms for a 3D model (Moschetti et al., 2010) and invert these data using Green's functions computed with a 1D velocity mode (Song et al., 1996) to evaluate the recoverability of input solutions, paying particular attention to biases in the isotropic component. The synthetic experiment results indicate that the 1D model assumption is valid for moment tensor inversions at periods as short as 10 seconds for the 1D western U.S. model (Song et al., 1996). The correct earthquake mechanisms and source depth are recovered with statistically insignificant isotropic components as determined by the F-test. Shallow explosions are biased by the theoretical ISO-CLVD tradeoff but the tectonic release component remains low, and the tradeoff can be eliminated with constraints from P wave first motion. Path-calibration to the 1D model can reduce non-double-couple components in earthquakes, non-isotropic components in explosions and composite sources and improve

  8. Optical turbulence in confined media: part I, the indoor turbulence sensor instrument.

    PubMed

    Chabé, Julien; Blary, Flavien; Ziad, Aziz; Borgnino, Julien; Fanteï-Caujolle, Yan; Liotard, Arnaud; Falzon, Frédéric

    2016-09-01

    Optical system performances can be affected by local optical turbulence created by its surrounding environment (telescope dome, clean room, atmospheric surface layer). We present our new instrument INdoor TurbulENce SEnsor (INTENSE) dedicated to this local optical turbulence characterization. INTENSE consists of using several parallel laser beams separated by non-redundant baselines between 0.05 and 2.5 m and measuring the angle of arrival fluctuations from spot displacements on a CCD. After introducing the theoretical background, we give a description of the instrument including a detailed characterization of instrumental noise and, finally, give the first results for the characterization of the turbulence inside clean rooms for optical systems studies. PMID:27607283

  9. An investigation of turbulence structure in a low-Reynolds-number incompressible turbulent boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, B. R.; Strataridakis, C. J.

    1987-01-01

    An existing high turbulence intensity level (5%) atmospheric boundary-layer wind tunnel has been successfully converted to a relatively low level turbulence (0.3%) wind tunnel through extensive modification, testing, and calibration. A splitter plate was designed, built, and installed into the wind-tunnel facility to create thick, mature, two-dimensional turbulent boundary layer flow at zero pressure gradient. Single and cross hot-wire measurements show turbulent boundary layer characteristics of good quality with unusually large physical size, i.e., viscous sublayer of the order of 1 mm high. These confirm the potential ability of the tunnel to be utilized for future high-quality near-wall turbulent boundary layer measurements. It compares very favorably with many low turbulence research tunnels.

  10. Ignition in laminar and turbulent nonpremixed counterflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blouch, John Dewey

    2002-01-01

    Investigations into nonpremixed ignition were conducted to examine the influence of complex chemistry and flow turbulence as found in practical combustion systems. The counterflow configuration, where a hot air jet ignited a cold (298K) fuel jet, was adopted in experiments and calculations. The study of the ignition of large alkane hydrocarbons focused on the effects of fuel structure by investigating the reference fuels n-heptane and iso-octane. The ignition response of these fuels was similar to smaller fuels with similar molecular structures. This conclusion was reinforced by showing that the ignition temperature became nearly insensitive to fuel molecule size above C4, but continued to depend on whether the structure was linear or branched. The effects of turbulence were studied by adding perforated plates to the burner to generate controlled levels of turbulence. This configuration was examined in detail experimentally and computationally without reaction, and subsequently the effects of turbulence on ignition were studied with hydrogen as the fuel. The results indicated that at low turbulence intensities, ignition is enhanced relative to laminar ignition, but as the turbulence intensity increases the ignition temperature also increases, demonstrating that optimal conditions for ignition exist at low turbulence intensities. At high pressures, where HO2 chemistry is important, all turbulent ignition temperatures were higher than laminar ones, and the increasing temperature trend with turbulence intensity was still observed. At low fuel concentrations, a different ignition mode was observed where the transition from a weakly reacting state to a flame occurred over a range of temperatures where the flame was repeatedly ignited and extinguished. Turbulent ignition was modeled by solving a joint scalar PDF equation using a Monte Carlo technique. The absence of significant heat release prior to ignition enabled the use of a frozen flow solution, solved separately

  11. Rotational surfaces in isotropic spaces satisfying weingarten conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öğrenmiş, Alper Osman

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we study the rotational surfaces in the isotropic 3-space 𝕀3 satisfying Weingarten conditions in terms of the relative curvature K (analogue of the Gaussian curvature) and the isotropic mean curvature H. In particular, we classify such surfaces of linear Weingarten type in 𝕀3.

  12. Philosophies and fallacies in turbulence modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalart, Philippe R.

    2015-04-01

    We present a set of positions, likely to be controversial, on turbulence modeling for the Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) equations. The paper has three themes. First is what we call the "fundamental paradox" of turbulence modeling, between the local character of the Partial Differential Equations strongly favored by CFD methods and the nonlocal physical nature of turbulence. Second, we oppose two philosophies. The "Systematic" philosophy attempts to model the exact transport equations for the Reynolds stresses or possibly higher moments term by term, gradually relegating the Closure Problem to higher moments and invoking the "Principle of Receding Influence" (although rarely formulating it). In contrast, the "Openly Empirical" philosophy produces models which satisfy strict constraints such as Galilean invariance, but lack an explicit connection with terms in the exact turbulence equations. The prime example is the eddy-viscosity assumption. Third, we explain a series of what we perceive as fallacies, many of them widely held and by senior observers, in turbulence knowledge, leading to turbulence models. We divide them into "hard" fallacies for which a short mathematical argument demonstrates that a particular statement is wrong or meaningless, and "soft" fallacies for which approximate physical arguments can be opposed, but we contend that a clear debate is overdue and wishful thinking has been involved. Some fallacies appear to be "intermediate." An example in the hard class is the supposed isotropy of the diagonal Reynolds stresses. Examples in the soft class are the need to match the decay rate of isotropic turbulence, and the value of realizability in a model. Our hope is to help the direct effort in this field away from simplistic and hopeless lines of work, and to foster debates.

  13. Breaking waves, turbulence and bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmrich, Johannes; Vagle, Svein; Thomson, Jim

    2014-05-01

    The air-sea fluxes of heat, momentum, and gases are to a large extent affected by wave-induced turbulence in the near-surface ocean layer, and are generally increased over the fluxes in a law-of-the-wall type boundary layer. However, air-bubbles generated during the wave breaking process may affect the density stratification and in turn reduce turbulence intensity in the near-surface layer. The turbulence field beneath surface waves is rather complex and provides great challenges for detailed observations. We obtained high resolution near-surface velocity profiles, bubble cloud measurements and video recordings of the breaking activity in a coastal strait. Conditions ranged from moderate to strong wind forcing with wind speed ranging from 5 m/s to 20 m/s. Estimates of the dissipation rates of turbulence kinetic energy are calculated from the in-situ velocity measurements. We find dissipation rates, fluctuating by more than two orders of magnitude, are closely linked to the air-fraction associated with micro-bubbles. Combining these turbulence estimates and the bubble cloud characteristics we infer differences in the strength of wave breaking and its effect on wave-induced mixing and air-sea exchange processes.

  14. DYNAMO EFFICIENCY WITH SHEAR IN HELICAL TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Leprovost, Nicolas; Kim, Eun-jin

    2009-05-10

    To elucidate the influence of shear flow on the generation of magnetic fields through the modification of turbulence property, we consider the case where a large-scale magnetic field is parallel to a large-scale shear flow without direct interaction between the two in the kinematic limit where the magnetic field does not backreact on the velocity. By nonperturbatively incorporating the effect of shear in a helically forced turbulence, we show that turbulence intensity and turbulent transport coefficients (turbulent viscosity, {alpha} and {beta} effect) are enhanced by a weak shear, while strongly suppressed for strong shear. In particular, {beta} is shown to be much more strongly suppressed than {alpha} effect. We discuss its important implications for dynamo efficiency, i.e., on the scaling of the dynamo number with differential rotation.

  15. Numerical Simulation of a Convective Turbulence Encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Hamilton, David W.; Bowles, Roland L.

    2002-01-01

    A numerical simulation of a convective turbulence event is investigated and compared with observational data. The numerical results show severe turbulence of similar scale and intensity to that encountered during the test flight. This turbulence is associated with buoyant plumes that penetrate the upper-level thunderstorm outflow. The simulated radar reflectivity compares well with that obtained from the aircraft's onboard radar. Resolved scales of motion as small as 50 m are needed in order to accurately diagnose aircraft normal load accelerations. Given this requirement, realistic turbulence fields may be created by merging subgrid-scales of turbulence to a convective-cloud simulation. A hazard algorithm for use with model data sets is demonstrated. The algorithm diagnoses the RMS normal loads from second moments of the vertical velocity field and is independent of aircraft motion.

  16. ULF turbulence in the Neptunian polar cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Lepping, R. P.; Smith, C. W.

    1993-03-01

    Results of a spectral analysis of the ULF wave turbulence in the Neptunian polar cusp are presented. The activity is characterized as broadbanded, extending up to a maximum frequency of about 0.5 Hz, and having maximum wave amplitudes as large as 6 percent of the dc magnetic field. Activity in the cusp region was particularly intense at its frontside and backside, associated with the magnetopause and cusp/magnetosphere boundaries, respectively. The turbulence, particularly that above f(ci), is tentatively identified as whistler mode. It is argued that such whistler mode turbulence should resonate with electrons having energies in the tens of kiloelectron volts. Observations indicate a very strong correlation of the ULF turbulence with the energetic electrons between 22 and 35 keV measured by Voyager's low-energy charged particle experiment. A vigorous interaction between the two is inferred. ULF wave turbulence in the cusp may represent a significant but not complete power source for the magnetosphere.

  17. Component separation of a isotropic Gravitational Wave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parida, Abhishek; Mitra, Sanjit; Jhingan, Sanjay

    2016-04-01

    A Gravitational Wave Background (GWB) is expected in the universe from the superposition of a large number of unresolved astrophysical sources and phenomena in the early universe. Each component of the background (e.g., from primordial metric perturbations, binary neutron stars, milli-second pulsars etc.) has its own spectral shape. Many ongoing experiments aim to probe GWB at a variety of frequency bands. In the last two decades, using data from ground-based laser interferometric gravitational wave (GW) observatories, upper limits on GWB were placed in the frequency range of 0~ 50‑100 Hz, considering one spectral shape at a time. However, one strong component can significantly enhance the estimated strength of another component. Hence, estimation of the amplitudes of the components with different spectral shapes should be done jointly. Here we propose a method for "component separation" of a statistically isotropic background, that can, for the first time, jointly estimate the amplitudes of many components and place upper limits. The method is rather straightforward and needs negligible amount of computation. It utilises the linear relationship between the measurements and the amplitudes of the actual components, alleviating the need for a sampling based method, e.g., Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) or matched filtering, which are computationally intensive and cumbersome in a multi-dimensional parameter space. Using this formalism we could also study how many independent components can be separated using a given dataset from a network of current and upcoming ground based interferometric detectors.

  18. Methods of separation of variables in turbulence theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuge, S.

    1978-01-01

    Two schemes of closing turbulent moment equations are proposed both of which make double correlation equations separated into single-point equations. The first is based on neglected triple correlation, leading to an equation differing from small perturbed gasdynamic equations where the separation constant appears as the frequency. Grid-produced turbulence is described in this light as time-independent, cylindrically-isotropic turbulence. Application to wall turbulence guided by a new asymptotic method for the Orr-Sommerfeld equation reveals a neutrally stable mode of essentially three dimensional nature. The second closure scheme is based on an assumption of identity of the separated variables through which triple and quadruple correlations are formed. The resulting equation adds, to its equivalent of the first scheme, an integral of nonlinear convolution in the frequency describing a role due to triple correlation of direct energy-cascading.

  19. Anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in a strong external magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.; Turner, L.

    1981-01-01

    A strong external dc magnetic field introduces a basic anisotropy in incompressible MHD turbulence. The modifications that this is likely to produce in the properties of the turbulence are investigated for high Reynolds numbers. It is found that the turbulent spectrum splits into two parts: (1) an essentially two-dimensional spectrum with both the velocity field and the magnetic fluctuations perpendicular to the dc magnetic field, and (2) a generally weaker and more nearly isotropic spectrum of Alfven waves. These results are discussed in relation to measurements from the Culham-Harwell Zeta pinch device and the UCLA Macrorotor tokamak, as well as in relation to measurements of MHD turbulence in the solar wind.

  20. Anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in a strong external magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.; Turner, L.

    1981-01-01

    A strong external dc magnetic field introduces a basic anisotropy into incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The modifications that this is likely to produce in the properties of the turbulence are explored for the high Reynolds number case. The conclusion is reached that the turbulent spectrum splits into two parts: an essentially two dimensional spectrum with both the velocity field and magnetic fluctuations perpendicular to the dc magnetic field, and a generally weaker and more nearly isotropic spectrum of Alfven waves. A minimal characterization of the spectral density tensors is given. Similarities to measurements from the Culham-Harwell Zeta pinch device and the UCLA Macrotor Tokamak are remarked upon, as are certain implications for the Belcher and Davis measurements of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the solar wind.

  1. Numerical simulation of turbulence in the presence of shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaanan, S.; Ferziger, J. H.; Reynolds, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    The numerical calculations are presented of the large eddy structure of turbulent flows, by use of the averaged Navier-Stokes equations, where averages are taken over spatial regions small compared to the size of the computational grid. The subgrid components of motion are modeled by a local eddy-viscosity model. A new finite-difference scheme is proposed to represent the nonlinear average advective term which has fourth-order accuracy. This scheme exhibits several advantages over existing schemes with regard to the following: (1) the scheme is compact as it extends only one point away in each direction from the point to which it is applied; (2) it gives better resolution for high wave-number waves in the solution of Poisson equation, and (3) it reduces programming complexity and computation time. Examples worked out in detail are the decay of isotropic turbulence, homogeneous turbulent shear flow, and homogeneous turbulent shear flow with system rotation.

  2. Single particle measurements of material line stretching in turbulence: Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramel, Stefan; Tympel, Saskia; Toschi, Federico; Voth, Greg

    2015-11-01

    We find that particles in the shape of chiral dipoles display a preferential rotation direction in three dimensional isotropic turbulence. The particles consist of two helical ends with opposite chirality that are connected by a straight rod. They are fabricated using 3D printing and have an aspect ratio of 10 and a length in the inertial range of our flow between oscillating grids. Due to their high aspect ratio, they move like material lines. Because material lines align with the extentional eigenvectors of the velocity gradient tensor they experience a mean stretching in turbulence. The stretching of a chiral dipole produces a rotation about the dipole axis and so chiral dipoles experience a non-zero mean spinning rate in turbulence. These results provide a first direct experimental measurement of the rate of material line stretching in turbulence.

  3. Accumulation of motile elongated micro-organisms in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Caijuan; Sardina, Gaetano; Lushi, Enkeleida; Brandt, Luca

    2014-01-01

    We study the effect of turbulence on marine life by performing numerical simulations of motile microorganisms, modelled as prolate spheroids, in isotropic homogeneous turbulence. We show that the clustering and patchiness observed in laminar flows, linear shear and vortex flows, are significantly reduced in a three-dimensional turbulent flow mainly because of the complex topology; elongated micro-orgamisms show some level of clustering in the case of swimmers without any preferential alignment whereas spherical swimmers remain uniformly distributed. Micro-organisms with one preferential swimming direction (e.g. gyrotaxis) still show significant clustering if spherical in shape, whereas prolate swimmers remain more uniformly distributed. Due to their large sensitivity to the local shear, these elongated swimmers react slower to the action of vorticity and gravity and therefore do not have time to accumulate in a turbulent flow. These results show how purely hydrodynamic effects can alter the ecology of microorganisms that can vary their shape and their preferential orientation.

  4. Isotropic microscale mechanical properties of coral skeletons

    PubMed Central

    Pasquini, Luca; Molinari, Alan; Fantazzini, Paola; Dauphen, Yannicke; Cuif, Jean-Pierre; Levy, Oren; Dubinsky, Zvy; Caroselli, Erik; Prada, Fiorella; Goffredo, Stefano; Di Giosia, Matteo; Reggi, Michela; Falini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Scleractinian corals are a major source of biogenic calcium carbonate, yet the relationship between their skeletal microstructure and mechanical properties has been scarcely studied. In this work, the skeletons of two coral species: solitary Balanophyllia europaea and colonial Stylophora pistillata, were investigated by nanoindentation. The hardness HIT and Young's modulus EIT were determined from the analysis of several load–depth data on two perpendicular sections of the skeletons: longitudinal (parallel to the main growth axis) and transverse. Within the experimental and statistical uncertainty, the average values of the mechanical parameters are independent on the section's orientation. The hydration state of the skeletons did not affect the mechanical properties. The measured values, EIT in the 76–77 GPa range, and HIT in the 4.9–5.1 GPa range, are close to the ones expected for polycrystalline pure aragonite. Notably, a small difference in HIT is observed between the species. Different from corals, single-crystal aragonite and the nacreous layer of the seashell Atrina rigida exhibit clearly orientation-dependent mechanical properties. The homogeneous and isotropic mechanical behaviour of the coral skeletons at the microscale is correlated with the microstructure, observed by electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, and with the X-ray diffraction patterns of the longitudinal and transverse sections. PMID:25977958

  5. Crossover from isotropic to directed percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zongzheng; Yang, Ji; Ziff, Robert M.; Deng, Youjin

    2012-08-01

    We generalize the directed percolation (DP) model by relaxing the strict directionality of DP such that propagation can occur in either direction but with anisotropic probabilities. We denote the probabilities as p↓=ppd and p↑=p(1-pd), with p representing the average occupation probability and pd controlling the anisotropy. The Leath-Alexandrowicz method is used to grow a cluster from an active seed site. We call this model with two main growth directions biased directed percolation (BDP). Standard isotropic percolation (IP) and DP are the two limiting cases of the BDP model, corresponding to pd=1/2 and pd=0,1 respectively. In this work, besides IP and DP, we also consider the 1/2

  6. Crossover from isotropic to directed percolation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zongzheng; Yang, Ji; Ziff, Robert M; Deng, Youjin

    2012-08-01

    We generalize the directed percolation (DP) model by relaxing the strict directionality of DP such that propagation can occur in either direction but with anisotropic probabilities. We denote the probabilities as p(↓) = pp(d) and p(↑) = p(1-p(d)), with p representing the average occupation probability and p(d) controlling the anisotropy. The Leath-Alexandrowicz method is used to grow a cluster from an active seed site. We call this model with two main growth directions biased directed percolation (BDP). Standard isotropic percolation (IP) and DP are the two limiting cases of the BDP model, corresponding to p(d) =1/2 and p(d) = 0,1 respectively. In this work, besides IP and DP, we also consider the 1/2 < p(d) <1 region. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations are carried out on the square and the simple-cubic lattices, and the numerical data are analyzed by finite-size scaling. We locate the percolation thresholds of the BDP model for p(d) = 0.6 and 0.8, and determine various critical exponents. These exponents are found to be consistent with those for standard DP. We also determine the renormalization exponent associated with the asymmetric perturbation due to p(d)-1/2 ≠ 0 near IP, and confirm that such an asymmetric scaling field is relevant at IP. PMID:23005718

  7. Constitutive modeling for isotropic materials (HOST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, Ulric S.; Chan, Kwai S.; Bodner, S. R.; Weber, R. M.; Walker, K. P.; Cassenti, B. N.

    1984-01-01

    The results of the first year of work on a program to validate unified constitutive models for isotropic materials utilized in high temperature regions of gas turbine engines and to demonstrate their usefulness in computing stress-strain-time-temperature histories in complex three-dimensional structural components. The unified theories combine all inelastic strain-rate components in a single term avoiding, for example, treating plasticity and creep as separate response phenomena. An extensive review of existing unified theories is given and numerical methods for integrating these stiff time-temperature-dependent constitutive equations are discussed. Two particular models, those developed by Bodner and Partom and by Walker, were selected for more detailed development and evaluation against experimental tensile, creep and cyclic strain tests on specimens of a cast nickel base alloy, B19000+Hf. Initial results comparing computed and test results for tensile and cyclic straining for temperature from ambient to 982 C and strain rates from 10(exp-7) 10(exp-3) s(exp-1) are given. Some preliminary date correlations are presented also for highly non-proportional biaxial loading which demonstrate an increase in biaxial cyclic hardening rate over uniaxial or proportional loading conditions. Initial work has begun on the implementation of both constitutive models in the MARC finite element computer code.

  8. Constitutive modeling for isotropic materials (HOST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, U. S.; Chan, K. S.; Bodner, S. R.; Weber, R. M.; Walker, K. P.; Cassenti, B. N.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents the results of the second year of work on a problem which is part of the NASA HOST Program. Its goals are: (1) to develop and validate unified constitutive models for isotropic materials, and (2) to demonstrate their usefulness for structural analyses of hot section components of gas turbine engines. The unified models selected for development and evaluation are that of Bodner-Partom and Walker. For model evaluation purposes, a large constitutive data base is generated for a B1900 + Hf alloy by performing uniaxial tensile, creep, cyclic, stress relation, and thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) tests as well as biaxial (tension/torsion) tests under proportional and nonproportional loading over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures. Systematic approaches for evaluating material constants from a small subset of the data base are developed. Correlations of the uniaxial and biaxial tests data with the theories of Bodner-Partom and Walker are performed to establish the accuracy, range of applicability, and integability of the models. Both models are implemented in the MARC finite element computer code and used for TMF analyses. Benchmark notch round experiments are conducted and the results compared with finite-element analyses using the MARC code and the Walker model.

  9. Limits to Poisson's ratio in isotropic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mott, P. H.; Roland, C. M.

    2009-10-01

    A long-standing question is why Poisson’s ratio ν nearly always exceeds 0.2 for isotropic materials, whereas classical elasticity predicts ν to be between -1 to (1)/(2) . We show that the roots of quadratic relations from classical elasticity divide ν into three possible ranges: -1<ν≤0 , 0≤ν≤(1)/(5) , and (1)/(5)≤ν<(1)/(2) . Since elastic properties are unique there can be only one valid set of roots, which must be (1)/(5)≤ν<(1)/(2) for consistency with the behavior of real materials. Materials with Poisson’s ratio outside of this range are rare, and tend to be either very hard (e.g., diamond, beryllium etc.) or porous (e.g., auxetic foams); such substances have more complex behavior than can be described by classical elasticity. Thus, classical elasticity is inapplicable whenever ν<(1)/(5) , and the use of the equations from classical elasticity for such materials is inappropriate.

  10. Isotropic thaw subsidence in undisturbed permafrost landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiklomanov, Nikolay I.; Streletskiy, Dmitry A.; Little, Jonathon D.; Nelson, Frederick E.

    2013-12-01

    in undisturbed terrain within some regions of the Arctic reveal limited correlation between increasing air temperature and the thickness of the seasonally thawed layer above ice-rich permafrost. Here we describe landscape-scale, thaw-induced subsidence lacking the topographic contrasts associated with thermokarst terrain. A high-resolution, 11 year record of temperature and vertical movement at the ground surface from contrasting physiographic regions of northern Alaska, obtained with differential global positioning systems technology, indicates that thaw of an ice-rich layer at the top of permafrost has produced decimeter-scale subsidence extending over the entire landscapes. Without specialized observation techniques the subsidence is not apparent to observers at the surface. This "isotropic thaw subsidence" explains the apparent stability of active layer thickness records from some landscapes of northern Alaska, despite warming near-surface air temperatures. Integrated over extensive regions, it may be responsible for thawing large volumes of carbon-rich substrate and could have negative impacts on infrastructure.

  11. The Spectral and Statistical Properties of Turbulence Generated by a Vortex/Blade-Tip Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devenport, William J.; Wittmer, Kenneth S.; Wenger, Christian W.

    1997-01-01

    The perpendicular interaction of a streamwise vortex with the tip of a lifting blade was studied in incompressible flow to provide information useful to the accurate prediction of helicopter rotor noise and the understanding of vortex dominated turbulent flows. The vortex passed 0.3 chord lengths to the suction side of the blade tip, providing a weak interaction. Single and two-point turbulence measurements were made using sub-miniature four sensor hot-wire probes 15 chord lengths downstream of the blade trailing edge; revealing the mean velocity and Reynolds stress tensor distributions of the turbulence, as well as its spanwise length scales as a function of frequency. The single point measurements show the flow downstream of the blade to be dominated by the interaction of the original tip vortex and the vortex shed by the blade. These vortices rotate about each other under their mutual induction, winding up the turbulent wakes of the blades. This interaction between the vortices appears to be the source of new turbulence in their cores and in the region between them. This turbulence appears to be responsible for some decay in the core of the original vortex, not seen when the blade is removed. The region between the vortices is not only a region of comparatively large stresses, but also one of intense turbulence production. Velocity autospectra measured near its center suggests the presence quasi-periodic large eddies with axes roughly parallel to a line joining the vortex cores. Detailed two-point measurements were made on a series of spanwise cuts through the flow so as to reveal the turbulence scales as they would be seen along the span of an intersecting airfoil. The measurements were made over a range of probe separations that enabled them to be analyzed not only in terms of coherence and phase spectra but also in terms of wave-number frequency (kappa-omega) spectra, computed by transforming the measured cross-spectra with respect to the spanwise separation

  12. Field Measurements to Characterize Turbulent Inflow for Marine Hydrokinetic Devices - Marrowstone Island, WA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, M. C.; Thomson, J. M.; Durgesh, V.; Polagye, B. L.

    2011-12-01

    Field measurements are essential for developing an improved understanding of turbulent inflow conditions that affect the design and operation of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. The Marrowstone Island site in Puget Sound, Washington State is a potential location for installing MHK devices, as it experiences strong tides and associated currents. Here, field measurements from Nodule Point on the eastern side of Marrowstone Island are used to characterize the turbulence in terms of velocity variance as a function of length and time scales. The field measurements were performed using Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV) and Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) instruments. Both were deployed on a bottom-mounted tripod at the site by the Applied Physics Lab at the University of Washington (APL-UW). The ADV acquired single point, temporally resolved velocity data from 17-21 Feb 2011, at a height of 4.6 m above the seabed at a sampling frequency of 32 Hz. The ADCP measured the velocity profile over the water column from a height of 2.6 m above the seabed up to the sea-surface in 36 bins, with each bin of 0.5 m size. The ADCP acquired data from 11-27 Feb 2011 at a sampling frequency of 2 Hz. Analysis of the ADV measurements shows distinct dynamic regions by scale: anisotropic eddies at large scales, an isotropic turbulent cascade (-5/3 slope in frequency spectra) at mesoscales, and contamination by Doppler noise at small scales. While Doppler noise is an order of magnitude greater for the ADCP measurements, the turbulence bulk statistics are consistent between the two instruments. There are significant variations in turbulence statistics with stage of the tidal currents (i.e., from slack to non-slack tidal conditions), however an average turbulent intensity of 10% is a robust, canonical value for this site. The ADCP velocity profiles are useful in quantifying the variability in velocity along the water column, and the ensemble averaged velocity profiles may be

  13. Turbulent magnetized plasmas from ionizing shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zuohua

    Turbulent argon plasmas produced behind hypersonic shock waves (10 less than M less than 60) are studied in the presence of weak magnetic fields at various strengths between 0 and 600 gauss, parallel and antiparallel to the shock tube's axis. The experiment is performed in a cylindrical arc discharge shock tube of 5 cm diameter and 210 cm overall length. Laser induced fluorescence and an electric probe are used as diagnostics of the ion density. Turbulent fluctuations behind the shock front are observed which persist for a time in the order of 10 msec. Using standard turbulent and chaotic analytical procedures, the influence of the magnetic field on the characterizing parameters is determined under circumstances of changing Mach number and pressure. These parameters include spectral index, correlation time scales, turbulent intensity and chaotic dimensionality. The parameters of turbulence obtained from the two diagnostics are quite consistent. Fluctuation power spectra follow a P approx. f(sup -n) behavior with 1.3 less than n less than 2.8; this agrees with theoretical predictions as well as the results of other investigators. An increasing magnetic field increases the characterizing correlation time, the turbulent intensity, and the chaotic dimension but decreases the small correlation time. Therefore the magnetic field decreases the order (increases the dimensionality) in the turbulent plasma, independent of the direction of the field parallel or antiparallel to the direction of the shock wave. A turbulent velocity-field-coupling model is proposed. A dispersion relation shows that, in the presence of an external magnetic field, varieties of new modes in a turbulent plasma are generated. The model predicts an increasing complexity of the turbulent system with increasing strength of the field and is in very good qualitative agreement with our experiment results.

  14. Turbulent magnetized plasmas from ionizing shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Zuohua.

    1992-01-01

    Turbulent argon plasmas produced behind hypersonic shock waves (10 less than M less than 60) are studied in the presence of weak magnetic fields at various strengths between 0 and 600 gauss, parallel and antiparallel to the shock tube's axis. The experiment is performed in a cylindrical arc discharge shock tube of 5 cm diameter and 210 cm overall length. Laser induced fluorescence and an electric probe are used as diagnostics of the ion density. Turbulent fluctuations behind the shock front are observed which persist for a time in the order of 10 msec. Using standard turbulent and chaotic analytical procedures, the influence of the magnetic field on the characterizing parameters is determined under circumstances of changing Mach number and pressure. These parameters include spectral index, correlation time scales, turbulent intensity and chaotic dimensionality. The parameters of turbulence obtained from the two diagnostics are quite consistent. Fluctuation power spectra follow a P approx. f(sup -n) behavior with 1.3 less than n less than 2.8; this agrees with theoretical predictions as well as the results of other investigators. An increasing magnetic field increases the characterizing correlation time, the turbulent intensity, and the chaotic dimension but decreases the small correlation time. Therefore the magnetic field decreases the order (increases the dimensionality) in the turbulent plasma, independent of the direction of the field parallel or antiparallel to the direction of the shock wave. A turbulent velocity-field-coupling model is proposed. A dispersion relation shows that, in the presence of an external magnetic field, varieties of new modes in a turbulent plasma are generated. The model predicts an increasing complexity of the turbulent system with increasing strength of the field and is in very good qualitative agreement with our experiment results.

  15. Statistical turbulence theory and turbulence phenomenology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The application of deductive turbulence theory for validity determination of turbulence phenomenology at the level of second-order, single-point moments is considered. Particular emphasis is placed on the phenomenological formula relating the dissipation to the turbulence energy and the Rotta-type formula for the return to isotropy. Methods which deal directly with most or all the scales of motion explicitly are reviewed briefly. The statistical theory of turbulence is presented as an expansion about randomness. Two concepts are involved: (1) a modeling of the turbulence as nearly multipoint Gaussian, and (2) a simultaneous introduction of a generalized eddy viscosity operator.

  16. Simulations of transition and turbulence on the Navier-Stokes computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krist, S. E.; Zang, T. A.

    1987-01-01

    The Navier-Stokes Computer (NSC) consists of multiple local memory parallel processors interconnected in a hypercube network. Efficient implementation of algorithms on the NSC thus requires the effective utilization of both the coarse and fine grain paralelism inherent in the architectural design. The basic approach to implementing an algorithm on the NSC is presented herein. The particular finite-difference algorithm considered was developed for performing transition and turbulence simulations by direct solution of the time-dependent incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The suitability of this algorithm for performing simulations of the isotropic turbulence problem is verified from computations performed on a Cray 2. Projected timing results for the algorithm on the NSC itself are presented for both the isotropic turbulence and laminar turbulent transition problems.

  17. Experimental determination of turbulent buffeting effects in tube bundles: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.E.; Simonis, J.C.

    1988-05-01

    Dynamic lift and drag force correlations for the first and second row of tubes of a square pitch tube array (P/D=1.44) are presented for upstream turbulence intensity and integral scale lengths. These correlations were developed from experimental testing of full scale heat exchanger tubes in water under controlled and measured turbulent flow conditions. Turbulent buffeting effects for upstream turbulence intensities up to 15% and scale lengths of /1/2/ to 1 tube diameter are discussed.

  18. Stochastic modeling of turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, R. O.; Hill, J. C.; Gao, F.; Moser, R. D.; Rogers, M. M.

    1992-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of a single-step irreversible chemical reaction with non-premixed reactants in forced isotropic turbulence at R(sub lambda) = 63, Da = 4.0, and Sc = 0.7 were made using 128 Fourier modes to obtain joint probability density functions (pdfs) and other statistical information to parameterize and test a Fokker-Planck turbulent mixing model. Preliminary results indicate that the modeled gradient stretching term for an inert scalar is independent of the initial conditions of the scalar field. The conditional pdf of scalar gradient magnitudes is found to be a function of the scalar until the reaction is largely completed. Alignment of concentration gradients with local strain rate and other features of the flow were also investigated.

  19. Energy spectra in elasto-inertial turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, P. C.; da Silva, C. B.; Pinho, F. T.

    2016-07-01

    Direct numerical simulations of statistically steady homogeneous isotropic turbulence in viscoelastic fluids described by the FENE-P model are presented. Emphasis is given to large polymer relaxation times compared to the eddy turnover time, which is a regime recently termed elasto-inertial turbulence. In this regime the polymers are ineffective in dissipating kinetic energy but they play a lead role in transferring kinetic energy to the small solvent scales which turns out to be concomitant with the depletion of the usual non-linear energy cascade. However, we show that the non-linear interactions are still highly active, but they lead to no net downscale energy transfer because the forward and reversed energy cascades are nearly balanced. Finally, we show that the tendency for a steeper elasto-inertial power-law spectra is reversed for large polymer relaxation times and the spectra tend towards the usual k-5/3 functional form.

  20. Spatial and spectral evolution of turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Guercan, O. D.; Diamond, P. H.; Hahm, T. S.

    2007-05-15

    Spreading of turbulence as a result of nonlinear mode couplings and the associated spectral energy transfer is studied. A derivation of a simple two-field model is presented using the weak turbulence limit of the two-scale direct interaction approximation. This approach enables the approximate overall effect of nonlinear interactions to be written in the form of Fick's law and leads to a coupled reaction-diffusion system for turbulence intensity. For this purpose, various classes of triad interactions are examined, and the effects that do not lead to spreading are neglected. It is seen that, within this framework, large scale, radially extended eddies are the most effective structures in promoting spreading of turbulence. Thus, spectral evolution that tends toward such eddies facilitates spatial spreading. Self-consistent evolution of the background profile is also considered, and it is concluded that the profile is essentially slaved to the turbulence in this phase of rapid evolution, as opposed to the case of avalanches, where it is the turbulence intensity that would be slaved to the evolving profile. The characteristic quantity describing the evolving background profile is found to be the mean ''potential vorticity'' (PV). It is shown that the two-field model with self-consistent mean PV evolution can be reduced to a single Fisher-like turbulence intensity transport equation. In addition to the usual nonlinear diffusion term, this equation also contains a 'pinch' of turbulence intensity. It is also noted that internal energy spreads faster than kinetic energy because of the respective spectral tendencies of these two quantities.

  1. The analysis and modeling of dilatational terms in compressible turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkar, S.; Erlebacher, G.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Kreiss, H. O.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that the dilatational terms that need to be modeled in compressible turbulence include not only the pressure-dilatation term but also another term - the compressible dissipation. The nature of these dilatational terms in homogeneous turbulence is explored by asymptotic analysis of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A non-dimensional parameter which characterizes some compressible effects in moderate Mach number, homogeneous turbulence is identified. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of isotropic, compressible turbulence are performed, and their results are found to be in agreement with the theoretical analysis. A model for the compressible dissipation is proposed; the model is based on the asymptotic analysis and the direct numerical simulations. This model is calibrated with reference to the DNS results regarding the influence of compressibility on the decay rate of isotropic turbulence. An application of the proposed model to the compressible mixing layer has shown that the model is able to predict the dramatically reduced growth rate of the compressible mixing layer.

  2. MEASUREMENTS AND COMPUTATIONS OF FUEL DROPLET TRANSPORT IN TURBULENT FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Katz and Omar Knio

    2007-01-10

    The objective of this project is to study the dynamics of fuel droplets in turbulent water flows. The results are essential for development of models capable of predicting the dispersion of slightly light/heavy droplets in isotropic turbulence. Since we presently do not have any experimental data on turbulent diffusion of droplets, existing mixing models have no physical foundations. Such fundamental knowledge is essential for understanding/modeling the environmental problems associated with water-fuel mixing, and/or industrial processes involving mixing of immiscible fluids. The project has had experimental and numerical components: 1. The experimental part of the project has had two components. The first involves measurements of the lift and drag forces acting on a droplet being entrained by a vortex. The experiments and data analysis associated with this phase are still in progress, and the facility, constructed specifically for this project is described in Section 3. In the second and main part, measurements of fuel droplet dispersion rates have been performed in a special facility with controlled isotropic turbulence. As discussed in detail in Section 2, quantifying and modeling the of droplet dispersion rate requires measurements of their three dimensional trajectories in turbulent flows. To obtain the required data, we have introduced a new technique - high-speed, digital Holographic Particle Image Velocimetry (HPIV). The technique, experimental setup and results are presented in Section 2. Further information is available in Gopalan et al. (2005, 2006). 2. The objectives of the numerical part are: (1) to develop a computational code that combines DNS of isotropic turbulence with Lagrangian tracking of particles based on integration of a dynamical equation of motion that accounts for pressure, added mass, lift and drag forces, (2) to perform extensive computations of both buoyant (bubbles) and slightly buoyant (droplets) particles in turbulence conditions

  3. Determining the alpha dynamo parameter in incompressible homogeneous magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Goldstein, M. L.; Lantz, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    Alpha, an important parameter in dynamo theory, is proportional to either the kinetic, current, magnetic, or velocity helicity of the fluctuating magnetic field and fluctuating velocity field. The particular helicity to which alpha is proportional depends on the assumptions used in deriving the first order smoothed equations that describe the alpha effect. In two cases, when alpha is proportional to either the magnetic helicity or velocity helicity, alpha is determined experimentally from two point measurements of the fluctuating fields in incompressible, homogeneous turbulence having arbitrary symmetry. For the other two possibilities, alpha is determined if the turbulence is isotropic.

  4. Grid superfluid turbulence and intermittency at very low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstulovic, Giorgio

    2016-06-01

    Low-temperature grid-generated turbulence is investigated by using numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. The statistics of regularized velocity increments are studied. Increments of the incompressible velocity are found to be skewed for turbulent states. Results are later confronted with the (quasi) homogeneous and isotropic Taylor-Green flow, revealing the universality of the statistics. For this flow, the statistics are found to be intermittent and a Kolmogorov constant close to the one of classical fluid is found for the second-order structure function.

  5. The dynamics of variable-density turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    The dynamics of variable-density turbulent fluids are studied by direct numerical simulation. The flow is incompressible so that acoustic waves are decoupled from the problem, and implying that density is not a thermodynamic variable. Changes in density occur due to molecular mixing. The velocity field is, in general, divergent. A pseudo-spectral numerical technique is used to solve the equations of motion. Three-dimensional simulations are performed using a grid size of 128{sup 3} grid points. Two types of problems are studied: (1) the decay of isotropic, variable-density turbulence, and (2) buoyancy-generated turbulence in a fluid with large density fluctuations (such that the Boussinesq approximation is not valid). In the case of isotropic, variable-density turbulence, the overall statistical decay behavior, for the cases studied, is relatively unaffected by the presence of density variations when the initial density and velocity fields are statistically independent. The results for this case are in quantitative agreement with previous numerical and laboratory results. In this case, the initial density field has a bimodal probability density function (pdf) which evolves in time towards a Gaussian distribution. The pdf of the density field is symmetric about its mean value throughout its evolution. If the initial velocity and density fields are statistically dependent, however, the decay process is significantly affected by the density fluctuations. For this case, the pdf of the density becomes asymmetric about its mean value during the early stages of its evolution. It is argued that these asymmetries in the pdf of the density field are due to different entrainment rates, into the mixing region, that favor the high speed fluid.

  6. Application of a new K-tau model to near wall turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thangam, S.; Abid, R.; Speziale, Charles G.

    1991-01-01

    A recently developed K-tau model for near wall turbulent flows is applied to two severe test cases. The turbulent flows considered include the incompressible flat plate boundary layer with the adverse pressure gradients and incompressible flow past a backward facing step. Calculations are performed for this two-equation model using an anisotropic as well as isotropic eddy-viscosity. The model predictions are shown to compare quite favorably with experimental data.

  7. Turbulence spectra in the noise source regions of the flow around complex surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, W. A.; Boldman, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The complex turbulent flow around three complex surfaces was measured in detail with a hot wire. The measured data include extensive spatial surveys of the mean velocity and turbulence intensity and measurements of the turbulence spectra and scale length at many locations. The publication of the turbulence data is completed by reporting a summary of the turbulence spectra that were measured within the noise source locations of the flow. The results suggest some useful simplifications in modeling the very complex turbulent flow around complex surfaces for aeroacoustic predictive models. The turbulence spectra also show that noise data from scale models of moderate size can be accurately scaled up to full size.

  8. Energy Transfer in Rotating Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambon, Claude; Mansour, Nagi N.; Godeferd, Fabien S.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The influence or rotation on the spectral energy transfer of homogeneous turbulence is investigated in this paper. Given the fact that linear dynamics, e.g. the inertial waves regime tackled in an RDT (Rapid Distortion Theory) fashion, cannot Affect st homogeneous isotropic turbulent flow, the study of nonlinear dynamics is of prime importance in the case of rotating flows. Previous theoretical (including both weakly nonlinear and EDQNM theories), experimental and DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation) results are gathered here and compared in order to give a self-consistent picture of the nonlinear effects of rotation on tile turbulence. The inhibition of the energy cascade, which is linked to a reduction of the dissipation rate, is shown to be related to a damping due to rotation of the energy transfer. A model for this effect is quantified by a model equation for the derivative-skewness factor, which only involves a micro-Rossby number Ro(sup omega) = omega'/(2(OMEGA))-ratio of rms vorticity and background vorticity as the relevant rotation parameter, in accordance with DNS and EDQNM results fit addition, anisotropy is shown also to develop through nonlinear interactions modified by rotation, in an intermediate range of Rossby numbers (Ro(omega) = (omega)' and Ro(omega)w greater than 1), which is characterized by a marco-Rossby number Ro(sup L) less than 1 and Ro(omega) greater than 1 which is characterized by a macro-Rossby number based on an integral lengthscale L and the micro-Rossby number previously defined. This anisotropy is mainly an angular drain of spectral energy which tends to concentrate energy in tile wave-plane normal to the rotation axis, which is exactly both the slow and the two-dimensional manifold. In Addition, a polarization of the energy distribution in this slow 2D manifold enhances horizontal (normal to the rotation axis) velocity components, and underlies the anisotropic structure of the integral lengthscales. Finally is demonstrated the

  9. Computational investigation of the effects of turbulence, inertia, and gravity on particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Peter John

    In this work, we examine the motion of particles which are subjected to varying levels of turbulence, inertia, and gravity, in both homogeneous and inhomogeneous turbulence. These investigations are performed through direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the Eulerian fluid velocity field combined with Lagrangian particle tracking. The primary motivation of these investigations is to better understand and model the dynamics and growth of water droplets in warm, cumulus clouds. In the first part of this work, we discuss the code we developed for these simulations, Highly Parallel Particle-laden flow Solver for Turbulence Research (HiPPSTR). HiPPSTR uses efficient parallelization strategies, time-integration techniques, and interpolation methods to enable massively parallel simulations of three-dimensional, particle-laden turbulence. In the second, third, and fourth sections of this work, we analyze simulations of particle-laden flows which are representative of those at the edges and cores of clouds. In the second section, we consider the mixing of droplets near interfaces with varying turbulence intensities and gravitational orientations, to provide insight into the dynamics near cloud edges. The simulations are parameterized to match wind-tunnel experiments of particle mixing which were conducted at Cornell, and the DNS and experimental results are compared and contrasted. Mixing is suppressed when turbulence intensities differ across the interface, and in all cases, the particle concentrations are subject to large fluctuations. In the third and fourth sections, we use HiPPSTR to analyze droplet motion in isotropic turbulence, which we take to be representative of adiabatic cloud cores. The third section examines the Reynolds-number scaling of single-particle and particle-pair statistics without gravity, while the fourth section shows results when gravity is included. While weakly inertial particles preferentially sample certain regions of the flow, gravity reduces

  10. Coupling Turbulence in Hybrid LES-RANS Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, Stephen L.

    2011-01-01

    A formulation is proposed for hybrid LES-RANS computations that permits accurate computations during resolution changes, so that resolution may be changed at will in order to employ only as much resolution in each subdomain as is required by the physics. The two components of this formulation, establishing the accuracy of a hybrid model at constant resolutions throughout the RANS-to-LES range and maintaining that accuracy when resolution is varied, are demonstrated for decaying, homogeneous, isotropic turbulence.

  11. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent, chemically reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doom, Jeffrey Joseph

    ratios greater than the formation number, ignition initially occurs behind the leading vortex ring, then occurs along the length of the trailing column and propagates towards the ring. Lewis number is seen to affect both the initial ignition as well as subsequent flame evolution significantly. Non-uniform Lewis number simulations provide faster ignition and burnout time but a lower maximum temperature. The fuel rich reacting vortex ring provides the highest maximum temperature and the higher oxidizer temperature provides the fastest ignition time. The fuel lean reacting vortex ring has little effect on the flow and behaves similar to a non--reacting vortex ring. We then study auto-ignition of turbulent H2/air diffusion flames using the Mueller et al. [37] mechanism. Isotropic turbulence is superimposed on an unstrained diffusion flame where diluted H 2 at ambient temperature interacts with hot air. Both, unity and non-unity Lewis number are studied. The results are contrasted to the homogeneous mixture problem and laminar diffusion flames. Results show that auto-ignition occurs in fuel lean, low vorticity, high temperature regions with low scalar dissipation around a most reactive mixture fraction, zetaMR (Mastorakos et al. [32]). However, unlike the laminar flame where auto-ignition occurs at zetaMR, the turbulent flame auto-ignites over a very broad range of zeta around zetaMR, which cannot completely predict the onset of ignition. The simulations also study the effects of three-dimensionality. Past two--dimensional simulations (Mastorakos et al. [32]) show that when flame fronts collide, extinction occurs. However, our three dimensional results show that when flame fronts collide; they can either increase in intensity, combine without any appreciable change in intensity or extinguish. This behavior is due to the three--dimensionality of the flow.

  12. Adaptive waveguide bends with homogeneous, nonmagnetic, and isotropic materials.

    PubMed

    Han, Tiancheng; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Tang, Xiaohong

    2011-01-15

    We propose a method for adaptive waveguide bends using homogeneous, nonmagnetic, and isotropic materials, which simplifies the parameters of the bends to the utmost extent. The proposed bend has an adaptive and compact shape because of all the flat boundaries. The nonmagnetic property is realized by selecting OB'/OC = 0.5. Only two nonmagnetic isotropic dielectrics are needed throughout, and the transmission is not sensitive to nonmagnetic isotropic dielectrics. Results validate and illustrate these functionalities, which make the bend much easier to fabricate and apply, owing to its simple parameters, compact shape, and versatility in connecting different waveguides. PMID:21263493

  13. Mountain wave-induced turbulence: Elevated turbulence zones over a double mountain ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, Lukas; Grubišić, Vanda; Serafin, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    In their seminal 1974 paper on "Lower Turbulent Zones Associated with Mountain Lee Waves", P. F. Lester and W. A. Fingerhut attempted to characterize regions of low-level turbulence in the lee of mountain ranges, using in situ measurements by research aircraft. Their "Lower Turbulent Zones" (LTZs), associated with large-amplitude mountain waves and ensuing atmospheric rotors, encompass the turbulent flow on the lee side of an obstacle that reaches all the way to the ground. This work is based on aircraft measurements collected during the Terrain-Induced Rotor Experiment (T-REX, Sierra Nevada, California, 2006) that was focused on the investigation of the coupled mountain-wave, rotor, and boundary-layer system. The analysis of airflow during several T-REX Intensive Observation Periods (IOPs) reveals a variety of mountain-flow scenarios, underlining the influence of the secondary orographic obstacle (the White and Inyo Mountains east of the Sierra Nevada) on the formation of wave-induced turbulence zones. In the present contribution, we focus on a scenario characterized by an inversion-capped valley atmosphere documented during T-REX IOPs 1 and 2. The valley inversion imposes an additional positive buoyancy force on the downslope flow in the lee of the primary ridge and prevents it from penetrating deep into the valley. Consequently, the flow separates higher up along the lee slope, forming an elevated turbulence zone that resides above the "virtual valley floor", represented by the inversion. The elevated turbulence zone shares some characteristics of the well-known low-level turbulence zone such as turbulence intensity being highest below the ascending part of the lee wave. However, clear indication of flow reversal at the bottom of the turbulent region, suggestive of a rotor circulation, is missing. For sufficiently short wavelength of the lee wave, multiple wave crests can fit between the primary and secondary mountain ridge and can give rise to several elevated

  14. A phenomenological treatment of rotating turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, YE

    1995-01-01

    The strong similarity between the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and initially isotropic turbulence subject to rotation is noted. We then apply the MHD phenomenologies of Kraichnan and Matthaeus & Zhou to rotating turbulence. When the turbulence is subject to a strong rotation, the energy spectrum is found to scale as E(k) = C(sub Omega)(Omega(sub epsilon))(sup 1/2)k(sup -2), where Omega is the rotation rate, k is the wavenumber, and epsilon is the dissipation rate. This spectral form is consistent with a recent letter by Zeman. However, here the constant C(sub Omega) is found to be related to the Kolmogorov constant and is estimated in the range 1.22 - 1.87 for the typical values of the latter constant. A 'rule' that relates spectral transfer times to the eddy turnover time and the time scale for decay of the triple correlations is deduced. A hypothesis for the triple correlation decay rate leads to the spectral law which varies between the '-5/3' (without rotation) and '-2' laws (with strong rotation). For intermediate rotation rates, the spectrum varies according to the value of a dimensionless parameter that measures the strength of the rotation wavenumber k(sub Omega) = (Omega(sup 3)/epsiolon)(sup 1/2) relative to the wavenumber k. An eddy viscosity is derived with an explicit dependence on the rotation rate.

  15. A Monte Carlo simulation technique for low-altitude, wind-shear turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Roland L.; Laituri, Tony R.; Trevino, George

    1990-01-01

    A case is made for including anisotropy in a Monte Carlo flight simulation scheme of low-altitude wind-shear turbulence by means of power spectral density. This study attempts to eliminate all flight simulation-induced deficiencies in the basic turbulence model. A full-scale low-altitude wind-shear turbulence simulation scheme is proposed with particular emphasis on low cost and practicality for near-ground flight. The power spectral density statistic is used to highlight the need for realistic estimates of energy transfer associated with low-altitude wind-shear turbulence. The simulation of a particular anisotropic turbulence model is shown to be a relatively simple extension from that of traditional isotropic (Dryden) turbulence.

  16. On the dynamics of magnetorotational turbulent stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvie, G. I.

    2003-04-01

    The turbulent stresses that lead to angular momentum transport in accretion discs have often been treated as resulting from an isotropic effective viscosity, related to the pressure through the alpha parametrization of Shakura and Sunyaev. This simple approach may be adequate for the simplest aspects of accretion disc theory, and was necessitated historically by an incomplete understanding of the origin of the turbulence. More recently, Balbus and Hawley have shown that the magnetorotational instability provides a robust mechanism of generating turbulent Reynolds and Maxwell stresses in sufficiently ionized discs. The alpha viscosity model fails to describe numerous aspects of this process. The present paper introduces a new analytical model that aims to represent more faithfully the dynamics of magnetorotational turbulent stresses and bridge the gap between analytical studies and numerical simulations. Covariant evolutionary equations for the mean Reynolds and Maxwell tensors are presented, which correctly include the linear interaction with the mean flow. Non-linear and dissipative effects, in the absence of an imposed magnetic flux and in the limit of large Reynolds number and magnetic Reynolds number, are modelled through five non-linear terms that represent known physical processes and are strongly constrained by symmetry properties and dimensional considerations. The resulting model explains the development of statistically steady, anisotropic turbulent stresses in the shearing sheet, a local representation of a differentially rotating disc, in agreement with numerical simulations. It also predicts that purely hydrodynamic turbulence is not sustained in a flow that adequately satisfies Rayleigh's stability criterion. The model is usually formally hyperbolic and therefore `causal', and guarantees the realizability of the stress tensors. It should be particularly useful in understanding the dynamics of warped, eccentric and tidally distorted discs, non

  17. Transport of magnetic turbulence in supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brose, R.; Telezhinsky, I.; Pohl, M.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Supernova remnants are known as sources of Galactic cosmic rays for their nonthermal emission of radio waves, X-rays, and gamma rays. However, the observed soft broken power-law spectra are hard to reproduce within standard acceleration theory based on the assumption of Bohm diffusion and steady-state calculations. Aims: We point out that a time-dependent treatment of the acceleration process together with a self-consistent treatment of the scattering turbulence amplification is necessary. Methods: We numerically solve the coupled system of transport equations for cosmic rays and isotropic Alfvénic turbulence. The equations are coupled through the growth rate of turbulence determined by the cosmic-ray gradient and the spatial diffusion coefficient of cosmic rays determined by the energy density of the turbulence. The system is solved on a comoving expanding grid extending upstream for dozens of shock radii, allowing for the self-consistent study of cosmic-ray diffusion in the vicinity of their acceleration site. The transport equation for cosmic rays is solved in a test-particle approach. Results: We demonstrate that the system is typically not in a steady state. In fact, even after several thousand years of evolution, no equilibrium situation is reached. The resulting time-dependent particle spectra strongly differ from those derived assuming a steady state and Bohm diffusion. Our results indicate that proper accounting for the evolution of the scattering turbulence and hence the particle diffusion coefficient is crucial for the formation of the observed soft spectra. In any case, the need to continuously develop magnetic turbulence upstream of the shock introduces nonlinearity in addition to that imposed by cosmic-ray feedback.

  18. Constitutive modeling for isotropic materials (HOST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Kwai S.; Lindholm, Ulric S.; Bodner, S. R.; Hill, Jeff T.; Weber, R. M.; Meyer, T. G.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the third year of work on a program which is part of the NASA Hot Section Technology program (HOST) are presented. The goals of this program are: (1) the development of unified constitutive models for rate dependent isotropic materials; and (2) the demonstration of the use of unified models in structural analyses of hot section components of gas turbine engines. The unified models selected for development and evaluation are those of Bodner-Partom and of Walker. A test procedure was developed for assisting the generation of a data base for the Bodner-Partom model using a relatively small number of specimens. This test procedure involved performing a tensile test at a temperature of interest that involves a succession of strain-rate changes. The results for B1900+Hf indicate that material constants related to hardening and thermal recovery can be obtained on the basis of such a procedure. Strain aging, thermal recovery, and unexpected material variations, however, preluded an accurate determination of the strain-rate sensitivity parameter is this exercise. The effects of casting grain size on the constitutive behavior of B1900+Hf were studied and no particular grain size effect was observed. A systematic procedure was also developed for determining the material constants in the Bodner-Partom model. Both the new test procedure and the method for determining material constants were applied to the alternate material, Mar-M247 . Test data including tensile, creep, cyclic and nonproportional biaxial (tension/torsion) loading were collected. Good correlations were obtained between the Bodner-Partom model and experiments. A literature survey was conducted to assess the effects of thermal history on the constitutive behavior of metals. Thermal history effects are expected to be present at temperature regimes where strain aging and change of microstructure are important. Possible modifications to the Bodner-Partom model to account for these effects are outlined

  19. Inverse Energy Cascades in Rotating Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, D. L.; Marino, R.; Mininni, P.; Pouquet, A.

    2013-12-01

    We present the results of direct numerical simulations (DNS) of rapidly rotating turbulent flows on grids of 20483 grid points that are forced at intermediate scales. Injection of energy at such scales at small Rossby numbers (~0.04) leads to a direct cascade toward small scales and an inverse cascade toward large scales. These results essentially validate those obtained using large eddy simulation (LES) (Sen et al., PRE 86:036319 (2012)): for a (helical) forcing that injects energy largely in 2D modes, the large scale energy spectrum scales as kperp-5/3, consistent with Kolmogorov-Kraichnan-Batchelor-Leith phenomenology; for a nonhelical isotropic forcing, the large scale energy spectrum scales as kperp-3. The (helical) anisotropic forcing DNS solution, like that of the LES models, shows a k-1 isotropic energy spectrum, which Sen et al. attribute to a large scale shear. The higher resolution of the DNS runs allows us to carry out probability distribution and conditional analyses that show that this interpretation may, in fact, be consistent with wall-bounded turbulent shear flow.

  20. DNS and LIA analysis of the shock turbulence interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livescu, Daniel; Ryu, Jaiyoung

    2014-11-01

    The interaction between isotropic turbulence and a normal shock wave is studied using Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS), with all flow scales (including the shock width) accurately solved, and the Linear Interaction Analysis (LIA). The turbulence quantities from DNS converge to the LIA solutions as the turbulent Mach number, Mt, becomes small, even at low upstream Reynolds numbers. This reconciles a long time open question about the role of LIA and establishes it as a reliable prediction tool for turbulence-shock interaction problems when there is a significant separation between the shock width and turbulence scales and Mt is low, which is encountered in many practical applications. The final LIA formulas are extended to investigate detailed turbulence physics. The extended LIA relations are used to show consistency with the DNS results and study the interaction at high Ms, where the resolution requirements make DNS studies unfeasible. The results show that the shock wave significantly changes the topology of the turbulent structures, with a symmetrization of the third invariant of the velocity gradient tensor and (Ms mediated) of the PDF of the longitudinal velocity derivatives, and an Ms dependent increase in the correlation between strain and rotation.

  1. Aerodynamic Performance and Turbulence Measurements in a Turbine Vane Cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Robert J.; Lucci, Barbara L.; Senyitko, Richard G.

    2002-01-01

    Turbine vane aerodynamics were measured in a three vane linear cascade. Surface pressures and blade row losses were obtained over a range of Reynolds and Mach number for three levels of turbulence. Comparisons are made with predictions using a quasi-3D Navier-Stokes analysis. Turbulence intensity measurement were made upstream and downstream of the vane. The purpose of the downstream measurements was to determine how the turbulence was affected by the strong contraction through 75 deg turning.

  2. Spectral analysis of structure functions and their scaling exponents in forced isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkmann, Moritz; McComb, W. David; Yoffe, Samuel; Berera, Arjun

    2014-11-01

    The pseudospectral method, in conjunction with a new technique for obtaining scaling exponents ζn from the structure functions Sn (r) , is presented as an alternative to the extended self-similarity (ESS) method and the use of generalized structure functions. We propose plotting the ratio | Sn (r) /S3 (r) | against the separation r in accordance with a standard technique for analysing experimental data. This method differs from the ESS technique, which plots the generalized structure functions Gn (r) against G3 (r) , where G3 (r) ~ r . Using our method for the particular case of S2 (r) we obtain the new result that the exponent ζ2 decreases as the Taylor-Reynolds number increases, with ζ2 --> 0 . 679 +/- 0 . 013 as Rλ --> ∞ . This supports the idea of finite-viscosity corrections to the K41 prediction for S2, and is the opposite of the result obtained by ESS. The pseudospectral method permits the forcing to be taken into account exactly through the calculation of the energy input in real space from the work spectrum of the stirring forces. The combination of the viscous and the forcing corrections as calculated by the pseudospectral method is shown to account for the deviation of S3 from Kolmogorov's ``four-fifths''-law at all scales. This work has made use of the resources provided by the UK supercomputing service HECToR, made available through the Edinburgh Compute and Data Facility (ECDF). A. B. is supported by STFC, S. R. Y. and M. F. L. are funded by EPSRC.

  3. Spectral analysis of structure functions and their scaling exponents in forced isotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    McComb, W D; Yoffe, S R; Linkmann, M F; Berera, A

    2014-11-01

    The pseudospectral method, in conjunction with a technique for obtaining scaling exponents ζ_{n} from the structure functions S_{n}(r), is presented as an alternative to the extended self-similarity (ESS) method and the use of generalized structure functions. We propose plotting the ratio |S_{n}(r)/S_{3}(r)| against the separation r in accordance with a standard technique for analyzing experimental data. This method differs from the ESS technique, which plots S_{n}(r) against S_{3}(r), with the assumption S_{3}(r)∼r. Using our method for the particular case of S_{2}(r) we obtain the result that the exponent ζ_{2} decreases as the Taylor-Reynolds number increases, with ζ_{2}→0.679±0.013 as R_{λ}→∞. This supports the idea of finite-viscosity corrections to the K41 prediction for S_{2}, and is the opposite of the result obtained by ESS. The pseudospectral method also permits the forcing to be taken into account exactly through the calculation of the energy input in real space from the work spectrum of the stirring forces. PMID:25493884

  4. Infrared properties of the energy spectrum in freely decaying isotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    McComb, W D

    2016-01-01

    The low wave number expansion of the energy spectrum takes the well known form E(k,t)=E_{2}(t)k^{2}+E_{4}(t)k^{4}+⋯, where the coefficients are weighted integrals against the correlation function C(r,t). We show that expressing E(k,t) in terms of the longitudinal correlation function f(r,t) immediately yields E_{2}(t)=0 by cancellation. We verify that the same result is obtained using the correlation function C(r,t), provided only that f(r,t) falls off faster than r^{-3} at large values of r. As power-law forms are widely studied for the purpose of establishing bounds, we consider the family of model correlations f(r,t)=α_{n}(t)r^{-n}, for positive integer n, at large values of the separation r. We find that for the special case n=3, the relationship connecting f(r,t) and C(r,t) becomes indeterminate, and (exceptionally) E_{2}≠0, but that this solution is unphysical in that the viscous term in the Kármán-Howarth equation vanishes. Lastly, we show that E_{4}(t) is independent of time, without needing to assume the exponential decrease of correlation functions at large distances. PMID:26871151

  5. Spectral approach to finite Reynolds number effects on Kolmogorov's 4/5 law in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchoufag, J.; Sagaut, P.; Cambon, C.

    2012-01-01

    The Kolmogorov's 4/5 law is often considered as the sole exact relationship of inertial range statistics. Its asymptotic character, however, has been evidenced, investigating the finite Reynolds number (FRN) effect for the third-order structure function S3(r) (e.g., for longitudinal velocity increments with r separation length) using variants of the Kármán-Howarth equation in physical space. Similar semi-empirical fits were proposed for the maximum of the normalized structure function, C3 = -maxrS3(r)/(ɛr), expressing C3 - 4/5 as a power law of the Taylor-based Reynolds number. One of the most complete studies in this domain is by Antonia and Burratini [J. Fluid Mech. 550, 175 (2006)]. Considering that these studies are based on a model for the unsteady second-order structure function S2(r,t), with no explicit model for the third-order structure function itself, we propose to revisit the FRN effect by a spectral approach, in the line of Qian [Phys. Rev. E 55, 337 (1997), Phys. Rev. E 60, 3409 (1999)]. The spectral transfer term T(k,t), from which S3(r,t) is derived by an exact quadrature, is directly calculated by solving the Lin equation for the energy spectrum E(k,t), closed by a standard triadic (or three-point) theory, here Eddy Damped Quasi Normal Markovian. We show that the best spectral approach to the FRN effect is found by separately investigating the negative (largest scales) and positive (smaller scales) bumps of the transfer term, and not only by looking at the maximum of the spectral flux or maxk ∫k∞T(p ,t)dp→ɛ. In the forced case, previous results are well reproduced, with Reynolds numbers as high as Reλ = 5 000 to nearly recover the 4/5 value. In the free decay case, the general trend is recovered as well, with an even higher value of Reλ = 50 000, but the EDQNM plots are systematically below those in Antonia and Burattini [J. Fluid Mech. 550, 175 (2006)]. This is explained by the sensitivity to initial data for E(k) in solving the Lin equation at moderate Reynolds numbers. Accordingly, an ad hoc initialization yields results consistent with the experimental spectrum measurements of Comte-Bellot and Corrsin [J. Fluid Mech. 48(2), 273 (1971)], from which S3(r) are recalculated. Present results show that the dispersion observed in existing data at low Reynolds number may be due to sensitivity to initial spectrum shape, a feature of the flow which is not under control in most of laboratory experiments.

  6. Scalar properties of transversely isotropic tuff from images of orthogonal cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, P.A.; Berryman, J.G.; Blair, S.C.; Pena, C.

    1997-01-01

    Image processing methods have been used very effectively to estimate physical properties of isotropic porous earth materials such as sandstones. Anisotropic materials can also be analyzed in order to estimate their physical properties, but additional care and a larger number of well-chosen images of cross sections are required to obtain correct results. Although low-symmetry anisotropic media present difficulties for two-dimensional image processing methods, geologic materials are often transversely isotropic. Scalar properties of porous materials such as porosity and specific surface area can be determined with only minor changes in the analysis when the medium is transversely isotropic rather than isotropic. For example, in a rock that is transitively isotropic due to thin layers or beds, the overall porosity may be obtained by analyzing images of cross sections taken orthogonal to the bedding planes, whereas cross sections lying within the bedding planes will determine only the local porosity of the bed itself. It is known for translationally invariant anisotropic media that the overall specific surface area can be obtained from radial averages of the two-point correlation function in the full three-dimensional volume. Layered materials are not translationally invariant in the direction of the layering, but we show nevertheless how averages of cross sections may be used to obtain the specific surface area for a transversely isotropic rock. We report values of specific surface area obtained for thin sections of Topopah Spring Tuff from Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This formation is being evaluated as a potential host rock for geologic disposal of nuclear waste. Although the present work has made use of thin sections of tuff for the images, the same methods of analysis could also be used to simplify quantitative analysis of three-dimensional volumes of pore structure data obtained by means of x-ray microtomography or other methods, using only a few representative cross

  7. TURBULENT SHEAR ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2013-04-10

    We consider particle acceleration by large-scale incompressible turbulence with a length scale larger than the particle mean free path. We derive an ensemble-averaged transport equation of energetic charged particles from an extended transport equation that contains the shear acceleration. The ensemble-averaged transport equation describes particle acceleration by incompressible turbulence (turbulent shear acceleration). We find that for Kolmogorov turbulence, the turbulent shear acceleration becomes important on small scales. Moreover, using Monte Carlo simulations, we confirm that the ensemble-averaged transport equation describes the turbulent shear acceleration.

  8. Geophysical and astrophysical turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffatt, H. K.

    Spiral structures in two-dimensional turbulence are studied and a theory (Moffatt, 1985, 1986) which regards fully three-dimensional turbulence as an agglomeration of 'random vortex sheets and coherent helical structures' is reviewed. Consideration is given to the process by which current-sheet discontinuities may appear during magnetic relaxation. Within the framework of dynamo theory, the determination of the generation coefficient and the turbulent diffusivity in mean-field electrodynamics for turbulence with helicity in the limit of a large magnetic Reynolds number is discussed. Certain features of 'chromospheric turbulence' (i.e., turbulence in the solar atmosphere outside the photosphere) are also examined.

  9. The Negative Effective Magnetic Pressure in Stratified Forced Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Kemel, Koen; Kleeorin, Nathan; Rogachevskii, Igor

    2012-04-01

    To understand the basic mechanism of the formation of magnetic flux concentrations, we determine by direct numerical simulations the turbulence contributions to the mean magnetic pressure in a strongly stratified isothermal layer with large plasma beta, where a weak uniform horizontal mean magnetic field is applied. The negative contribution of turbulence to the effective mean magnetic pressure is determined for strongly stratified forced turbulence over a range of values of magnetic Reynolds and Prandtl numbers. Small-scale dynamo action is shown to reduce the negative effect of turbulence on the effective mean magnetic pressure. However, the turbulence coefficients describing the negative effective magnetic pressure phenomenon are found to converge for magnetic Reynolds numbers between 60 and 600, which is the largest value considered here. In all these models, the turbulent intensity is arranged to be nearly independent of height, so the kinetic energy density decreases with height due to the decrease in density. In a second series of numerical experiments, the turbulent intensity increases with height such that the turbulent kinetic energy density is nearly independent of height. Turbulent magnetic diffusivity and turbulent pumping velocity are determined with the test-field method for both cases. The vertical profile of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity is found to agree with what is expected based on simple mixing length expressions. Turbulent pumping is shown to be down the gradient of turbulent magnetic diffusivity, but it is twice as large as expected. Corresponding numerical mean-field models are used to show that a large-scale instability can occur in both cases, provided the degree of scale separation is large enough and hence the turbulent magnetic diffusivity small enough.

  10. Turbulent Premixed Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Suresh

    1996-01-01

    The experimental cold-flow facility is now full operational and is currently being used to obtain baseline turbulence data in a Couette flow. The baseline turbulence data is necessary to confirm the capability of the chosen device to generate and maintain the required turbulence intensity. Subsequent reacting flow studies will assume that a similar turbulent flow field exists ahead of the premixed flame. Some modifications and refinements had to be made to enable accurate measurements. It consists of two rollers, one (driven by a motor) which drives a continuous belt and four smaller rollers used to set the belt spacing and tension to minimize belt flutter. The entire assemble is enclosed in a structure that has the dimensions to enable future drop tower experiments of the hot facility. All critical dimensions are the same as the original plans except for the pulley ratio which has been changed to enable a wider operating regime in terms of the Reynolds number. With the current setup, Reynolds numbers as low as 100 and as high as 14,000 can be achieved. This is because the in-between belt spacing can be varied from 1 cm to 7.6 cm, and the belt speed can be accurately varied from .15 m/sec to 3.1 m/sec.

  11. Flexible fibers in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhille, Gautier; Brouzet, Christophe; Le Gal, Patrice; Irphe Team

    2014-11-01

    We describe, for the first time, an experiment devoted to the study of the spatial conformation of a flexible fiber in a turbulent flow. We propose a model for the transition from rigid to flexible regimes as the intensity of turbulence is increased or the elastic energy of the fiber is decreased. This transition occurs for a fiber typical length which is observed experimentally and recovered by our analysis. We also demonstrate that the conformations of flexible fibers in a turbulent flow are analog to conformations of flexible polymers in a good solvent. This last result opens some new and creative ways to model flexible fiber distortions in turbulent flows while addressing fundamental problems in polymer dynamics. This work has been carried out in the framework of the Labex MEC Project (No. ANR-10-LABX-0092) and of the A*MIDEX Project (No. ANR-11-IDEX-0001-02), funded by the `Investissements d'Avenir' French Government program managed by the French National Research.

  12. Influence of free-stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layer heat transfer and mean profile development. I - Experimental data. II - Analysis of results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, M. F.

    1983-02-01

    The effect of free stream turbulence on the heat transfer in the boundary layer flow was examined in a zero pressure gradient, two-dimensional channel. A heated flat plate was instrumented for turbulence intensity measurements. The free stream turbulence intensity distributions, turbulence length scale distributions, and power spectral density distributions were quantified. The two dimensionality of the test boundary layers was verified in various test conditions and the Stanton number distributions were measured for five free stream turbulence levels as a function of Re. The skin friction number was also determined as a function of the momentum thickness Re at specific locations. The test data were found to agree well with two-dimensional, incompressible analytical predictions and correlations. The free stream turbulence was determined to have significant effect on the skin friction and heat transfer, e.g., up to a 20% increase in friction for a turbulence intensity of 6%.

  13. Incompressible Turbulent Wing-Body Junction Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, R.; Cagle, Corey D.; Chandra, S.

    1998-01-01

    -stream flow. The lateral curvature of the wing/strat causes the oncoming turbulent layer to skew about am axis (x-axis) parallel to the plane (xz-plane) of the mean shear. This is the principle mechanism for the generation of secondary flow. Such skew-induced secondary flows are slow to be attenuated by Reynolds stresses. Additional contribution to the generation of secondary flow comes from anisotropies in Reynolds stresses. Upstream of the strut, the mean-vorticity is directed span wise (along the y-direction). The presence of secondary flow in the vicinity of the strut causes the vorticity to stretch around the obstacle in a horse-shoe shape, with each leg having a vorticity of the opposite sense. The blockage effect of the strut imposes a severe adverse pressure gradient on the oncoming turbulent shear layer, causing boundary layer separation ahead of the leading edge, resulting in a vortex that rolls up and flows downstream into the juncture region. The separation vortices trailing in the wake of the wing can alter the lift or drag characteristics of the surfaces downstream of the wing-body juncture. Likewise, on submarines, the wake flow behind the appendage can degrade the performance of the propeller located downstream. The complex nature of this flow is caused by the presence of all six components of Reynolds stresses. Devenport and Simpson report that in the vicinity of the horse-shoe vortex there is intense recirculation with turbulent stresses being much larger than those normally observed in turbulent flows. These features contribute to making this flow a challenge to predict numerically. Some of the past studies provide useful insights into this flow that would guide our numerical efforts. In measurements reported by Shabaka and Bradshaw, the eddy viscosity tensor is seen to be non-isotropic and has negative components in certain regions. In an effort to evaluate the closure assumptions of various turbulence models, Devenport and Simpson used their own extensive

  14. Fracture analysis of a transversely isotropic high temperature superconductor strip based on real fundamental solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhiwen; Zhou, Youhe

    2015-04-01

    Real fundamental solution for fracture problem of transversely isotropic high temperature superconductor (HTS) strip is obtained. The superconductor E-J constitutive law is characterized by the Bean model where the critical current density is independent of the flux density. Fracture analysis is performed by the methods of singular integral equations which are solved numerically by Gauss-Lobatto-Chybeshev (GSL) collocation method. To guarantee a satisfactory accuracy, the convergence behavior of the kernel function is investigated. Numerical results of fracture parameters are obtained and the effects of the geometric characteristics, applied magnetic field and critical current density on the stress intensity factors (SIF) are discussed.

  15. Isotropic collision-induced light scattering by gaseous CF{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Elliasmine, A.; Godet, J.L.; Le Duff, Y.,; Bancewicz, T.

    1997-06-01

    The binary isotropic collision-induced scattering spectra of the gaseous tetrafluoromethane has been measured in absolute units in the 50{endash}150cm{sup {minus}1} frequency range. Corresponding theoretical intensities taking into account multipolar polarizabilities have been calculated in a semiclassical way. From a comparison with experiment, the independent components of dipole-quadrupole and dipole-octupole polarizability tensors have been estimated. They have been compared with those previously deduced from depolarized spectrum and with recent theoretical {ital ab initio} calculations. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Laser beam propagation in atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murty, S. S. R.

    1979-01-01

    The optical effects of atmospheric turbulence on the propagation of low power laser beams are reviewed in this paper. The optical effects are produced by the temperature fluctuations which result in fluctuations of the refractive index of air. The commonly-used models of index-of-refraction fluctuations are presented. Laser beams experience fluctuations of beam size, beam position, and intensity distribution within the beam due to refractive turbulence. Some of the observed effects are qualitatively explained by treating the turbulent atmosphere as a collection of moving gaseous lenses of various sizes. Analytical results and experimental verifications of the variance, covariance and probability distribution of intensity fluctuations in weak turbulence are presented. For stronger turbulence, a saturation of the optical scintillations is observed. The saturation of scintillations involves a progressive break-up of the beam into multiple patches; the beam loses some of its lateral coherence. Heterodyne systems operating in a turbulent atmosphere experience a loss of heterodyne signal due to the destruction of coherence.

  17. Investigations of turbulent motions and particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakimiec, J.; Fludra, A.; Lemen, J. R.; Dennis, B. R.; Sylwester, J.

    1986-01-01

    Investigations of X-raya spectra of solar flares show that intense random (turbulent) motions are present in hot flare plasma. Here it is argued that the turbulent motions are of great importance for flare development. They can efficiently enhance flare energy release and accelerate particles to high energies.

  18. Wind turbulence characterization for wind energy development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendell, L. L.; Gower, G. L.; Morris, V. R.; Tomich, S. D.

    1991-09-01

    As part of its support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Wind Energy Program, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has initiated an effort to work jointly with the wind energy community to characterize wind turbulence in a variety of complex terrains at existing or potential sites of wind turbine installation. Five turbulence characterization systems were assembled and installed at four sites in the Tehachapi Pass in California, and one in the Green Mountains near Manchester, Vermont. Data processing and analyses techniques were developed to allow observational analyses of the turbulent structure; this analysis complements the more traditional statistical and spectral analyses. Preliminary results of the observational analyses, in the rotating framework or a wind turbine blade, show that the turbulence at a site can have two major components: (1) engulfing eddies larger than the rotor, and (2) fluctuating shear due to eddies smaller than the rotor disk. Comparison of the time series depicting these quantities at two sites showed that the turbulence intensity (the commonly used descriptor of turbulence) did not adequately characterize the turbulence at these sites.

  19. Numerical simulation of premixed turbulent methane combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.

    2001-12-14

    In this paper we study the behavior of a premixed turbulent methane flame in three dimensions using numerical simulation. The simulations are performed using an adaptive time-dependent low Mach number combustion algorithm based on a second-order projection formulation that conserves both species mass and total enthalpy. The species and enthalpy equations are treated using an operator-split approach that incorporates stiff integration techniques for modeling detailed chemical kinetics. The methodology also incorporates a mixture model for differential diffusion. For the simulations presented here, methane chemistry and transport are modeled using the DRM-19 (19-species, 84-reaction) mechanism derived from the GRIMech-1.2 mechanism along with its associated thermodynamics and transport databases. We consider a lean flame with equivalence ratio 0.8 for two different levels of turbulent intensity. For each case we examine the basic structure of the flame including turbulent flame speed and flame surface area. The results indicate that flame wrinkling is the dominant factor leading to the increased turbulent flame speed. Joint probability distributions are computed to establish a correlation between heat release and curvature. We also investigate the effect of turbulent flame interaction on the flame chemistry. We identify specific flame intermediates that are sensitive to turbulence and explore various correlations between these species and local flame curvature. We identify different mechanisms by which turbulence modulates the chemistry of the flame.

  20. Modification of Spalart-Allmaras model with consideration of turbulence energy backscatter using velocity helicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yangwei; Lu, Lipeng; Fang, Le; Gao, Feng

    2011-06-01

    The correlation between the velocity helicity and the energy backscatter is proved in a DNS case of 256 3-grid homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence. The helicity is then proposed to be employed to improve turbulence models and SGS models. Then Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model (SA) is modified with the helicity to take account of the energy backscatter, which is significant in the region of corner separation in compressors. By comparing the numerical results with experiments, it can be concluded that the modification for SA model with helicity can appropriately represent the energy backscatter, and greatly improves the predictive accuracy for simulating the corner separation flow in compressors.

  1. Fluidic harvesters in free stream turbulence undergoing flow-induced vibrations or flutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Joan; Azadeh Ranjbar, Vahid; Goushcha, Oleg; Andreopoulos, Yiannis; Elvin, Niell

    2015-11-01

    In the present experimental work we investigated the performance of fluidic harvesters consisting of cylindrical body mounted of the tip of a flexible beam in the presence of nearly homogeneous and isotropic turbulence. Circular, semi-circular and square shapes have been tested. It was found that turbulence interferes with resonance conditions between the flow and the structure in the case of vortex induced vibrations and has absolutely no effect in flutter dominated case. As a result, turbulence increases the power output of non-linear harvesters subjected to vortex induces vibration and it has no effect in harvester under flutter conditions. Supported by NSF Grant: CBET #1033117.

  2. Turbulent Size Selection and Concentration of Chondrule-Sized Objects: Reynolds Number Invariance and Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.; Hogan, R.; Dobrovolskis, A.; Paque, J.

    2006-01-01

    It is generally agreed that individual chondrules formed as entities in a gaseous nebula prior to being accumulated into a meteorite parent body, within which they incur various forms of modification before arriving in our labs. While there are major unanswered questions about the properties of the nebula environment in which chondrules formed, the process by which the most primitive meteorites are formed overwhelmingly from chondrules must then be an aspect of "nebula processing". Textures in certain fragments of primitive meteorites might be summarized as being primarily chondrules and clastic, chondrule-sized, fragments of other minerals, each covered with a rim of fine dust with physical and chemical properties which are essentially independent of the composition and mineralogy of the underlying chondrule. This (unfortunately rather rare) texture was called "primary accretionary texture" to reflect their belief that it precedes subsequent stages in which fragmentation, comminution, mixing, heating, and other forms of alteration occur on the parent body(-ies). The size distribution of these chondrules and fragments, and the properties of their dusty rims, are key clues regarding the primary nebula accretion process. Even in the much more abundant meteorites which have clearly suffered internal mixing, abrasion, grinding, and even mineralogical alteration or replacement (due presumably to the collisional growth and heating process itself), key chondrule properties such as mean size and density remain relatively well defined, and well defined rims persist in many cases. It has been our goal to infer the key nebula processes indirectly from the properties of these very earliest primitive meteorites by making use of a theoretical framework in which the nebula possesses a plausible level of isotropic turbulence. We have shown that turbulence has the property of concentrating one particular particle size by orders of magnitude, where the preferentially concentrated

  3. Distinguishing ichthyogenic turbulence from geophysical turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujiana, Kandaga; Moum, James N.; Smyth, William D.; Warner, Sally J.

    2015-05-01

    Measurements of currents and turbulence beneath a geostationary ship in the equatorial Indian Ocean during a period of weak surface forcing revealed unexpectedly strong turbulence beneath the surface mixed layer. Coincident with the turbulence was a marked reduction of the current speeds registered by shipboard Doppler current profilers, and an increase in their variability. At a mooring 1 km away, measurements of turbulence and currents showed no such anomalies. Correlation with the shipboard echo sounder measurements indicate that these nighttime anomalies were associated with fish aggregations beneath the ship. The fish created turbulence by swimming against the strong zonal current in order to remain beneath the ship, and their presence affected the Doppler speed measurements. The principal characteristics of the resultant ichthyogenic turbulence are (i) low wave number roll-off of shear spectra in the inertial subrange relative to geophysical turbulence, (ii) Thorpe overturning scales that are small compared with the Ozmidov scale, and (iii) low mixing efficiency. These factors extend previous findings by Gregg and Horne (2009) to a very different biophysical regime and support the general conclusion that the biological contribution to mixing the ocean via turbulence is negligible.

  4. Laminar Turbulent Transition in a Boundary Layer Subjected to Weak Free Stream Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenchi, Toshiaki; Matsubara, Masaharu; Ikeda, Toshihiko

    For revealing the transition process in a flat plate boundary layer subjected to a weak free stream turbulence, flow visualization and hot-wire measurements were performed. A weak free stream turbulence was generated by a turbulence grid mounted upstream of the contraction. The flow visualization clearly displayed a transition scenario in which a local two-dimensional wave packet rapidly forms a Λ shape structure and then breaks down to turbulence, resulting in the generation of a turbulent spot. Quantitative measurements performed by using a hot-wire anemometer also confirmed the existence of local Tollmien-Schlichting waves that agreed with the parallel linear theory in terms of their frequency, phase velocity, and the wall-normal distribution of band-pass-filtered fluctuations. For comparison, a boundary layer subjected to a moderate-intensity free stream turbulence was investigated. This investigation showed that streaky structures play an important role in the boundary layer transition, as shown by Matsubara et al. [J. Fluid Mech., 430, (2001), 149-168.] A drastic change occurred in the transition process and this change could be sensitively determined by employing the intensity and/or spectra of the free stream turbulence.

  5. On the Space-Time Structure of Sheared Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Maré, Martin; Mann, Jakob

    2016-04-01

    We develop a model that predicts all two-point correlations in high Reynolds number turbulent flow, in both space and time. This is accomplished by combining the design philosophies behind two existing models, the Mann spectral velocity tensor, in which isotropic turbulence is distorted according to rapid distortion theory, and Kristensen's longitudinal coherence model, in which eddies are simultaneously advected by larger eddies as well as decaying. The model is compared with data from both observations and large-eddy simulations and is found to predict spatial correlations comparable to the Mann spectral tensor and temporal coherence better than any known model. Within the developed framework, Lagrangian two-point correlations in space and time are also predicted, and the predictions are compared with measurements of isotropic turbulence. The required input to the models, which are formulated as spectral velocity tensors, can be estimated from measured spectra or be derived from the rate of dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy, the friction velocity and the mean shear of the flow. The developed models can, for example, be used in wind-turbine engineering, in applications such as lidar-assisted feed forward control and wind-turbine wake modelling.

  6. Rayleigh Light Scattering for Concentration Measurements in Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, William M.

    1996-01-01

    Despite intensive research over a number of years, an understanding of scalar mixing in turbulent flows remains elusive. An understanding is required because turbulent mixing has a pivotal role in a wide variety of natural and technologically important processes. As an example, the mixing and transport of pollutants in the atmosphere and in bodies of water are often dependent on turbulent mixing processes. Turbulent mixing is also central to turbulent combustion which underlies most hydrocarbon energy use in modern societies as well as in unwanted fire behavior. Development of models for combusting flows is therefore crucial, however, an understanding of scalar mixing is required before useful models of turbulent mixing and, ultimately, turbulent combustion can be developed. An important subset of turbulent flows is axisymmetric turbulent jets and plumes because they are relatively simple to generate, and because the provide an appropriate test bed for the development of general theories of turbulent mixing which can be applied to more complex geometries and flows. This paper focuses on a number of experimental techniques which have been developed at the National Institute of Standards and Development for measuring concentration in binary axisymmetric turbulent jets. In order to demonstrate the value of these diagnostics, some of the more important results from earlier and on-going investigations are summarized. Topics addressed include the similarity behavior of variable density axisymmetric jets, the behavior of absolutely unstable axisymmetric helium jets, and the role of large scale structures and scalar dissipation in these flows.

  7. The influence of free-stream turbulence on separation of turbulent boundary layers in incompressible, two-dimensional flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. Leith; Barnett, R. Joel; Fisher, Carl E.; Koukousakis, Costas E.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine if free-stream turbulence scale affects separation of turbulent boundary layers. In consideration of possible interrelation between scale and intensity of turbulence, the latter characteristic also was varied and its role was evaluated. Flow over a 2-dimensional airfoil in a subsonic wind tunnel was studied with the aid of hot-wire anemometry, liquid-film flow visualization, a Preston tube, and static pressure measurements. Profiles of velocity, relative turbulence intensity, and integral scale in the boundary layer were measured. Detachment boundary was determined for various angles of attack and free-stream turbulence. The free-stream turbulence intensity and scale were found to spread into the entire turbulent boundary layer, but the effect decreased as the airfoil surface was approached. When the changes in stream turbulence were such that the boundary layer velocity profiles were unchanged, detachment location was not significantly affected by the variations of intensity and scale. Pressure distribution remained the key factor in determining detachment location.

  8. Characterization of Turbulent Flows for Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, W. C.; Haire, S. L.

    1998-11-01

    A diagram for the characterization of turbulent flows using the invariants of the mean velocity gradient tensor is introduced. All mean flows, from irrotationally strained flows to shearing flows, to purely rotational flows, can be identified on this diagram. Different flow fields which occupy the same region on the diagram are said to be comprised of the same topological features. The current state of turbulence modeling can be identified on the diagram based on the type of mean flow fields which can be accurately computed. Regions on the diagram can be shown for which current capabilities in turbulence modeling fail to accurately resolve the turbulent structures. Relevant mean field topology is identified for future work in turbulence modeling. Using this analysis, we suggest a number of flows to be computed by DNS or LES and used as testing cases for new models.

  9. Is 2-D turbulence relevant in the atmosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovejoy, Shaun; Schertzer, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Starting with (Taylor, 1935), the paradigm of isotropic (and scaling!) turbulence was developed initially for laboratory applications, but following (Kolmogorov, 1941), three dimensional isotropic turbulence was progressively applied to the atmosphere. Since the atmosphere is strongly stratified, a single wide scale range model which is both isotropic and scaling is not possible so that theorists had to immediately choose between the two symmetries: isotropy or scale invariance. Following the development of models of two dimensional isotropic turbulence ((Fjortoft, 1953), but especially (Kraichnan, 1967) and (Charney, 1971)), the mainstream choice was to first make the convenient assumption of isotropy and to drop wide range scale invariance. Starting at the end of the 1970's this "isotropy primary" (IP) paradigm has lead to a series of increasingly complex isotropic 2D/isotropic 3D models of atmospheric dynamics which continue to dominate the theoretical landscape. Justifications for IP approaches have focused almost exclusively on the horizontal statistics of the horizontal wind in both numerical models and analyses and from aircraft campaigns, especially the highly cited GASP (Nastrom and Gage, 1983), (Gage and Nastrom, 1986; Nastrom and Gage, 1985) and MOZAIC (Cho and Lindborg, 2001) experiments. Since understanding the anisotropy clearly requires comparisons between horizontal and vertical statistics/structures this focus has been unfortunate. Over the same thirty year period that 2D/3D isotropic models were being elaborated, evidence slowly accumulated in favour of the opposite theoretical choice: to drop the isotropy assumption but to retain wide range scaling. The models in the alternative paradigm are scaling but strongly anisotropic with vertical sections of structures becoming increasingly stratified at larger and larger scales albeit in a power law manner; we collectively refer to these as "SP" for "scaling primary" approaches. Early authors explicitly

  10. Tailoring turbulence with an active grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cekli, Hakki Ergun; van de Water, Willem

    2010-08-01

    Using an active grid in a wind tunnel, we generate homogeneous shear turbulence and initiate turbulent boundary layers with adjustable properties. Homogeneous shear turbulence is characterized by a constant gradient of the mean velocity and a constant turbulence intensity. It is the simplest anisotropic turbulent flow thinkable, and it is generated traditionally by equipping a wind tunnel with screens which have a varying transparency and flow straighteners. This is not done easily, and the reachable turbulence levels are modest. We describe a new technique for generating homogeneous shear turbulence using an active grid only. Our active grid consists of a grid of rods with attached vanes which can be rotated by servo motors. We control the grid by prescribing the time-dependent angle of each axis. We tune the vertical transparency profile of the grid by setting appropriate angles of each rod such as to generate a uniform velocity gradient, and set the rods in flapping motion around these angles to tailor the turbulence intensity. The Taylor Reynolds number reached was R λ = 870, the shear rate S = ∂ U/∂ y = 9.2 s-1, the nondimensional shear parameter S *≡ Sq 2/ɛ = 12 and u = 1.4 ms-1. As a further application of this idea we demonstrate the generation of a simulated atmospheric boundary layer in a wind tunnel which has tunable properties. This method offers a great advantage over the traditional one, in which vortex-generating structures need to be placed in the wind tunnel to initiate a fat boundary layer.

  11. Review on atmospheric turbulence monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, Gianluca; Navarrete, Julio; Sarazin, Marc

    2014-07-01

    In the past years, intensive Site Characterization campaigns have been performed to chose the sites for the future giant ELTs. Various atmospheric turbulence profilers with different resolution and sensed altitude ranges have been used, as well as climatological tools and satellite data analysis. Mixing long term statistics at low altitude resolution with high resolution data collected during short term campaigns allows to produce the reference profiles as input to the Adaptive Optics instrument performance estimators. In this paper I will perform a brief review of the principal and most used instruments and tools in order to give to the reader a panorama of the work and the efforts to monitor the atmospheric turbulence for astronomical purposes.

  12. Spectra of noise and amplified turbulence emanating from shock-turbulence interaction: Two scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribner, H. S.

    1986-01-01

    This work is a small extension of NACA studies of the early fifties that predicted amplification of turbulence on passing through a shock wave (observed for turbulent boundary layers), as well as the generation of intense noise (observed for supersonic jets). The first solved the basic gasdynamics problem of the interaction of an infinite planar shock with a single three-dimensional spectrum component of turbulence (an oblique sinusoidal shear wave). The second developed the comprehensive 3D spectrum analysis necessary to generalize the scenario to the interaction of a shock wave with convected homogeneous turbulence. Numerical calculations were carried out to yield curves (vs. Mach number) of rms sound pressure, temperature fluctuation, and two components of turbulent velocity downstream of the shock, for two cases of preshock turbulence. The present numerical study reproduces these for one case and provides in addition their one-dimensional power spectra (vs. wavenumber or frequency). Ratios of the several postshock spectra to the longitudinal preshock turbulence spectrum (1D) have been computed for a wide range of Mach numbers; curves vs. wavenumber are presented for two scenarios of preshock turbulence: isotropy and axisymmetry, both based on the von Karman 3D spectrum.

  13. The Spectrum of the Isotropic Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission Derived From First-Year Fermi Large Area Telescope Data

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.

    2011-08-19

    We report on the first Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) measurements of the so-called 'extra-galactic' diffuse {gamma}-ray emission (EGB). This component of the diffuse {gamma}-ray emission is generally considered to have an isotropic or nearly isotropic distribution on the sky with diverse contributions discussed in the literature. The derivation of the EGB is based on detailed modelling of the bright foreground diffuse Galactic {gamma}-ray emission (DGE), the detected LAT sources and the solar {gamma}-ray emission. We find the spectrum of the EGB is consistent with a power law with differential spectral index {gamma} = 2.41 {+-} 0.05 and intensity, I(> 100 MeV) = (1.03 {+-} 0.17) x 10{sup -5} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1}, where the error is systematics dominated. Our EGB spectrum is featureless, less intense, and softer than that derived from EGRET data.

  14. Spectrum of the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray emission derived from first-year Fermi Large Area Telescope data.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cavazzuti, E; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Di Bernardo, G; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Frailis, M; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gaggero, D; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Gustafsson, M; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hughes, R E; Itoh, R; Jackson, M S; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Kuehn, F; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Mazziotta, M N; McConville, W; McEnery, J E; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Sellerholm, A; Sgrò, C; Shaw, M S; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Strickman, M S; Strong, A W; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Vasileiou, V; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wang, P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2010-03-12

    We report on the first Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) measurements of the so-called "extragalactic" diffuse gamma-ray emission (EGB). This component of the diffuse gamma-ray emission is generally considered to have an isotropic or nearly isotropic distribution on the sky with diverse contributions discussed in the literature. The derivation of the EGB is based on detailed modeling of the bright foreground diffuse Galactic gamma-ray emission, the detected LAT sources, and the solar gamma-ray emission. We find the spectrum of the EGB is consistent with a power law with a differential spectral index gamma = 2.41 +/- 0.05 and intensity I(>100 MeV) = (1.03 +/- 0.17) x 10(-5) cm(-2) s(-1) sr(-1), where the error is systematics dominated. Our EGB spectrum is featureless, less intense, and softer than that derived from EGRET data. PMID:20366411

  15. An integral turbulent kinetic energy analysis of free shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, C. E.; Phares, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Mixing of coaxial streams is analyzed by application of integral techniques. An integrated turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) equation is solved simultaneously with the integral equations for the mean flow. Normalized TKE profile shapes are obtained from incompressible jet and shear layer experiments and are assumed to be applicable to all free turbulent flows. The shear stress at the midpoint of the mixing zone is assumed to be directly proportional to the local TKE, and dissipation is treated with a generalization of the model developed for isotropic turbulence. Although the analysis was developed for ducted flows, constant-pressure flows were approximated with the duct much larger than the jet. The axisymmetric flows under consideration were predicted with reasonable accuracy. Fairly good results were also obtained for the fully developed two-dimensional shear layers, which were computed as thin layers at the boundary of a large circular jet.

  16. Diffusion of Sound Waves in a Turbulent Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard H.

    1960-01-01

    The directional and frequency diffusion of a plane monochromatic 2 sound wave in statistically homogeneous, isotropic, and stationary turbulence is analyzed theoretically. The treatment is based on the diffusion equation for the energy density of sound waves, using the scattering cross section derived by Kraichnan for the type of turbulence assumed here. A form for the frequency-wave number spectrum of the turbulence is adopted which contains the pertinent parameters of the flow and is adapted to ease of calculation. A new approach to the evaluation of the characteristic period of the flow is suggested. This spectrum is then related to the scattering cross section. Finally, a diffusion equation is derived as a small-angle scattering approximation to the rigorous transport equation. The rate of spread of the incident wave in frequency and direction is calculated, as well as the power spectrum and autocorrelation for the wave.

  17. Symmetry Breaking Drift of Particles Settling in Homogeneous Shear Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hinsberg, M. A. T.; Clercx, H. J. H.; Toschi, Federico

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the influence of shear on the gravitational settling of heavy inertial particles in homogeneous shear turbulence (HST). In addition to the well-known enhanced settling velocity, observed for heavy inertial particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence (HIT), a horizontal drift velocity is also observed in the shearing direction due to the presence of a nonzero mean vorticity (introducing symmetry breaking due to the mean shear). This drift velocity is due to the combination of shear, gravity, and turbulence, and all three of these elements are needed for this effect to occur. We extend the mechanism responsible for the enhanced settling velocity in HIT to the case of HST. Two separate regimes are observed, characterized by positive or negative drift velocity, depending on the particle settling velocity.

  18. Fluid Dynamics Prize Otto Laporte Lecture:Turbulence and Aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comte-Bellot, Genevieve

    2014-11-01

    Some significant advances obtained over the years for two closely related fields, Turbulence and Aeroacoustics, are presented. Particular focus is placed on experimental results and on physical mechanisms. For example, for a 2D channel flow, skewness factors of velocity fluctuations are discussed. The study of isotropic turbulence generated by grids in the «Velvet wind tunnel» of Stanley Corrsin, constitutes a masterpiece. Of particular note are the Eulerian memory times, analysed for all wavenumbers. Concerning hot-wire anemometry, the potential of the new constant voltage technique is presented. Some results obtained with Particule Image Velocimetry are also reported. Two flow control examples are illustrated: lift generation for a circular cylinder, and noise reduction for a high speed jet. Finally, the propagation of acoustic waves through turbulence is considered. Experimental data are here completed by numerical simulations showing the possible occurrence of caustics.

  19. Symmetry Breaking Drift of Particles Settling in Homogeneous Shear Turbulence.

    PubMed

    van Hinsberg, M A T; Clercx, H J H; Toschi, Federico

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the influence of shear on the gravitational settling of heavy inertial particles in homogeneous shear turbulence (HST). In addition to the well-known enhanced settling velocity, observed for heavy inertial particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence (HIT), a horizontal drift velocity is also observed in the shearing direction due to the presence of a nonzero mean vorticity (introducing symmetry breaking due to the mean shear). This drift velocity is due to the combination of shear, gravity, and turbulence, and all three of these elements are needed for this effect to occur. We extend the mechanism responsible for the enhanced settling velocity in HIT to the case of HST. Two separate regimes are observed, characterized by positive or negative drift velocity, depending on the particle settling velocity. PMID:27541467

  20. COSMIC RAY TRANSPORT THROUGH GYRORESONANCE INSTABILITY IN COMPRESSIBLE TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Huirong; Lazarian, A. E-mail: alazarian@wisc.edu

    2011-04-10

    We study the nonlinear growth of kinetic gyroresonance instability of cosmic rays (CRs) induced by large-scale compressible turbulence. This feedback of CRs on turbulence was shown to induce an important scattering mechanism in addition to direct interaction with the compressible turbulence. The linear growth is bound to saturate due to the wave-particle interactions. By balancing the increase of CR anisotropy via the large-scale compression and its decrease via the wave-particle scattering, we find the steady-state solutions. The nonlinear suppression due to the wave-particle scattering limits the energy range of CRs that can excite the instabilities and be scattered by the induced slab waves. The direct interaction with large-scale compressible modes still appears to be the dominant mechanism for isotropization of high-energy CRs (>100 GeV).