Science.gov

Sample records for intensity interferometry experiments

  1. Null Stellar Intensity Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, P. K.; Chia, C. M.; Han, W. D.; Chan, A. H.; Kurtsiefer, C.

    2014-04-01

    Since the discovery of the first exoplanet in 1989, though over 850 candidates have been verified (Schneider 2012), few are similar to our Earth in terms of mass and size. Hence here we would like to propose the revival and improvement of optical intensity interferometry to achieve sub-milliarcsecond resolution, which promises also to be less sensitive to weather conditions, light pollution and optomechanical alignments, yet only requiring baselines <100m.

  2. Portable intensity interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horch, Elliott P.; Camarata, Matthew A.

    2012-07-01

    A limitation of the current generation of long baseline optical interferometers is the need to make the light interfere prior to detection. This is unlike the radio regime where signals can be recorded fast enough to use electronics to accomplish the same result. This paper describes a modern optical intensity interferometer based on electronics with picosecond timing resolution. The instrument will allow for portable optical interferometry with much larger baselines than currently possible by using existing large telescopes. With modern electronics, the limiting magnitude of the technique at a 4-m aperture size becomes competitive with some amplitude-based interferometers. The instrumentation will permit a wireless mode of operation with GPS clocking technology, extending the work to extremely large baselines. We discuss the basic observing strategy, a planned observational program at the Lowell Observatory 1.8-m and 1.0-m telescopes, and the science that can realistically be done with this instrumentation.

  3. Structural influences on intensity interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maji, Arup; Harris, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Intensity interferometry (II) is an alternate form of creating images of distant objects. It is significantly less sensitive to atmospheric distortions and aberrations of telescope surfaces than conventional amplitude-based imaging. The deficiencies of II can be overcome as photodetectors' read-out rates are becoming faster and computers more powerful. In recognition of the possibility of very large space-based imaging systems, this paper investigates how the deformation of a large, thin optical surface would influence the accuracy of II. Based on the theoretical foundation of II, an optical ray-tracing algorithm was used to examine how the statistics of a photon stream changes from the source to the detector. Ray-tracing and finite element analyses of the structure were thereafter integrated to quantify how the correlation of the intensity field changes as the reflective structure deforms. Varying the positions of the detector from the focal plane and the surface profile of the mirror provided an understanding and quantification of how the various scenarios affect the statistics of the detected light and the correlation measurement. This research and analysis provide the means to quantify how structural perturbations of focal mirrors affect the statistics of photon stream detections inherent in II instrumentation.

  4. Optical intensity interferometry through atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, P. K.; Chan, A. H.; Kurtsiefer, C.

    2016-04-01

    Conventional ground-based astronomical observations suffer from image distortion due to atmospheric turbulence. This can be minimized by choosing suitable geographic locations or adaptive optical techniques, and avoided altogether by using orbital platforms outside the atmosphere. One of the promises of optical intensity interferometry is its independence from atmospherically induced phase fluctuations. By performing narrow-band spectral filtering on sunlight and conducting temporal intensity interferometry using actively quenched avalanche photodiodes, the Solar g(2)(τ) signature was directly measured. We observe an averaged photon bunching signal of g(2)(τ) = 1.693 ± 0.003 from the Sun, consistently throughout the day despite fluctuating weather conditions, cloud cover and elevation angle. This demonstrates the robustness of the intensity interferometry technique against atmospheric turbulence and opto-mechanical instabilities, and the feasibility to implement measurement schemes with both large baselines and long integration times.

  5. A novel femtosecond-gated, high-resolution, frequency-shifted shearing interferometry technique for probing pre-plasma expansion in ultra-intense laser experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Feister, S. Orban, C.; Nees, J. A.; Morrison, J. T.; Frische, K. D.; Chowdhury, E. A.; Roquemore, W. M.

    2014-11-15

    Ultra-intense laser-matter interaction experiments (>10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) with dense targets are highly sensitive to the effect of laser “noise” (in the form of pre-pulses) preceding the main ultra-intense pulse. These system-dependent pre-pulses in the nanosecond and/or picosecond regimes are often intense enough to modify the target significantly by ionizing and forming a plasma layer in front of the target before the arrival of the main pulse. Time resolved interferometry offers a robust way to characterize the expanding plasma during this period. We have developed a novel pump-probe interferometry system for an ultra-intense laser experiment that uses two short-pulse amplifiers synchronized by one ultra-fast seed oscillator to achieve 40-fs time resolution over hundreds of nanoseconds, using a variable delay line and other techniques. The first of these amplifiers acts as the pump and delivers maximal energy to the interaction region. The second amplifier is frequency shifted and then frequency doubled to generate the femtosecond probe pulse. After passing through the laser-target interaction region, the probe pulse is split and recombined in a laterally sheared Michelson interferometer. Importantly, the frequency shift in the probe allows strong plasma self-emission at the second harmonic of the pump to be filtered out, allowing plasma expansion near the critical surface and elsewhere to be clearly visible in the interferograms. To aid in the reconstruction of phase dependent imagery from fringe shifts, three separate 120° phase-shifted (temporally sheared) interferograms are acquired for each probe delay. Three-phase reconstructions of the electron densities are then inferred by Abel inversion. This interferometric system delivers precise measurements of pre-plasma expansion that can identify the condition of the target at the moment that the ultra-intense pulse arrives. Such measurements are indispensable for correlating laser pre-pulse measurements

  6. Stellar intensity interferometry: experimental steps toward long-baseline observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBohec, Stephan; Adams, Ben; Bond, Isobel; Bradbury, Stella; Dravins, Dainis; Jensen, Hannes; Kieda, David B.; Kress, Derrick; Munford, Edward; Nuñez, Paul D.; Price, Ryan; Ribak, Erez; Rose, Joachim; Simpson, Harold; Smith, Jeremy

    2010-07-01

    Experiments are in progress to prepare for intensity interferometry with arrays of air Cherenkov telescopes. At the Bonneville Seabase site, near Salt Lake City, a testbed observatory has been set up with two 3-m air Cherenkov telescopes on a 23-m baseline. Cameras are being constructed, with control electronics for either off- or online analysis of the data. At the Lund Observatory (Sweden) and in Technion (Israel) and at the University of Utah (USA), laboratory intensity interferometers simulating stellar observations have been set up and experiments are in progress, using various analog and digital correlators, reaching 1.4 ns time resolution, to analyze signals from pairs of laboratory telescopes.

  7. Virtual Reference Interferometry: Theory & Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galle, Michael Anthony

    This thesis introduces the idea that a simulated interferogram can be used as a reference for an interferometer. This new concept represents a paradigm shift from the conventional thinking, where a reference is the phase of a wavefront that traverses a known path. The simulated interferogram used as a reference is called a virtual reference. This thesis develops the theory of virtual reference interferometry and uses it for the characterization of chromatic dispersion in short length (<1m) fibers and optical components. Characterization of chromatic dispersion on short length fiber and optical components is a very difficult challenge. Accurate measurement of first and second order dispersion is important for applications from optical component design to nonlinear photonics, sensing and communications. Techniques for short-length dispersion characterization are therefore critical to the development of many photonic systems. The current generation of short-length dispersion measurement techniques are either easy to operate but lack sufficient accuracy, or have sufficient accuracy but are difficult to operate. The use of a virtual reference combines the advantages of these techniques so that it is both accurate and easy to operate. Chromatic dispersion measurements based on virtual reference interferometry have similar accuracy as the best conventional measurement techniques due to the ability to measure first and second order dispersion directly from the interference pattern. Unique capabilities of virtual reference interferometry are demonstrated, followed by a derivation of the operational constraints and system parameters. The technique is also applied to the characterization of few-mode fibers, a hot topic in telecommunications research where mode division multiplexing promises to expand network bandwidth. Also introduced is the theory of dispersive virtual reference interferometry, which can be used to overcome the bandwidth limitations associated with the

  8. Resolving microstructures in Z pinches with intensity interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Apruzese, J. P.; Kroupp, E.; Maron, Y.; Giuliani, J. L.; Thornhill, J. W.

    2014-03-15

    Nearly 60 years ago, Hanbury Brown and Twiss [R. Hanbury Brown and R. Q. Twiss, Nature 178, 1046 (1956)] succeeded in measuring the 30 nrad angular diameter of Sirius using a new type of interferometry that exploited the interference of photons independently emitted from different regions of the stellar disk. Its basis was the measurement of intensity correlations as a function of detector spacing, with no beam splitting or preservation of phase information needed. Applied to Z pinches, X pinches, or laser-produced plasmas, this method could potentially provide spatial resolution under one micron. A quantitative analysis based on the work of Purcell [E. M. Purcell, Nature 178, 1449 (1956)] reveals that obtaining adequate statistics from x-ray interferometry of a Z-pinch microstructure would require using the highest-current generators available. However, using visible light interferometry would reduce the needed photon count and could enable its use on sub-MA machines.

  9. Permafrost Active Layer Seismic Interferometry Experiment (PALSIE).

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, Robert; Knox, Hunter Anne; James, Stephanie; Lee, Rebekah; Cole, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We present findings from a novel field experiment conducted at Poker Flat Research Range in Fairbanks, Alaska that was designed to monitor changes in active layer thickness in real time. Results are derived primarily from seismic data streaming from seven Nanometric Trillium Posthole seismometers directly buried in the upper section of the permafrost. The data were evaluated using two analysis methods: Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) and ambient noise seismic interferometry. Results from the HVSR conclusively illustrated the method's effectiveness at determining the active layer's thickness with a single station. Investigations with the multi-station method (ambient noise seismic interferometry) are continuing at the University of Florida and have not yet conclusively determined active layer thickness changes. Further work continues with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine if the ground based measurements can constrain satellite imagery, which provide measurements on a much larger spatial scale.

  10. Experimental steps towards a digital revival of Stellar Intensity Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Nolan; Kieda, David; Lebohec, Stephan; Abeysekara, Udara

    2016-03-01

    Over the last decade there has been a growing interest in using Stellar intensity interferometry (sii) for high-resolution imaging of hot stars in the optical and uv. In contrast to standard amplitude interferometry, the sii technique is unaffected by atmospheric turbulence allowing for extremely large baselines (>100m) and angular resolution scales down to tens of micro-arcseconds. The technique can be applied to existing and planned observatories which employ imaging air cherenkov telescopes (iacts) due to the similar requirements of large light collection areas and nano-second time resolution capabilities. The university of utah operates the starbase-utah observatory, located in Grantsville, ut, consisting of dual three meter diameter telescopes serving as a test-bed for sii instrumentation. I will summarize the sii technique and highlight the motivation for using sii. I will also present laboratory results in the reconstruction of artificial sources using pseudo-thermal light and the development of starbase-utah.

  11. Phonon counting and intensity interferometry of a nanomechanical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Justin D.; Meenehan, Seán M.; Maccabe, Gregory S.; Gröblacher, Simon; Safavi-Naeini, Amir H.; Marsili, Francesco; Shaw, Matthew D.; Painter, Oskar

    2015-04-01

    In optics, the ability to measure individual quanta of light (photons) enables a great many applications, ranging from dynamic imaging within living organisms to secure quantum communication. Pioneering photon counting experiments, such as the intensity interferometry performed by Hanbury Brown and Twiss to measure the angular width of visible stars, have played a critical role in our understanding of the full quantum nature of light. As with matter at the atomic scale, the laws of quantum mechanics also govern the properties of macroscopic mechanical objects, providing fundamental quantum limits to the sensitivity of mechanical sensors and transducers. Current research in cavity optomechanics seeks to use light to explore the quantum properties of mechanical systems ranging in size from kilogram-mass mirrors to nanoscale membranes, as well as to develop technologies for precision sensing and quantum information processing. Here we use an optical probe and single-photon detection to study the acoustic emission and absorption processes in a silicon nanomechanical resonator, and perform a measurement similar to that used by Hanbury Brown and Twiss to measure correlations in the emitted phonons as the resonator undergoes a parametric instability formally equivalent to that of a laser. Owing to the cavity-enhanced coupling of light with mechanical motion, this effective phonon counting technique has a noise equivalent phonon sensitivity of 0.89 +/- 0.05. With straightforward improvements to this method, a variety of quantum state engineering tasks using mesoscopic mechanical resonators would be enabled, including the generation and heralding of single-phonon Fock states and the quantum entanglement of remote mechanical elements.

  12. Phonon counting and intensity interferometry of a nanomechanical resonator.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Justin D; Meenehan, Seán M; MacCabe, Gregory S; Gröblacher, Simon; Safavi-Naeini, Amir H; Marsili, Francesco; Shaw, Matthew D; Painter, Oskar

    2015-04-23

    In optics, the ability to measure individual quanta of light (photons) enables a great many applications, ranging from dynamic imaging within living organisms to secure quantum communication. Pioneering photon counting experiments, such as the intensity interferometry performed by Hanbury Brown and Twiss to measure the angular width of visible stars, have played a critical role in our understanding of the full quantum nature of light. As with matter at the atomic scale, the laws of quantum mechanics also govern the properties of macroscopic mechanical objects, providing fundamental quantum limits to the sensitivity of mechanical sensors and transducers. Current research in cavity optomechanics seeks to use light to explore the quantum properties of mechanical systems ranging in size from kilogram-mass mirrors to nanoscale membranes, as well as to develop technologies for precision sensing and quantum information processing. Here we use an optical probe and single-photon detection to study the acoustic emission and absorption processes in a silicon nanomechanical resonator, and perform a measurement similar to that used by Hanbury Brown and Twiss to measure correlations in the emitted phonons as the resonator undergoes a parametric instability formally equivalent to that of a laser. Owing to the cavity-enhanced coupling of light with mechanical motion, this effective phonon counting technique has a noise equivalent phonon sensitivity of 0.89 ± 0.05. With straightforward improvements to this method, a variety of quantum state engineering tasks using mesoscopic mechanical resonators would be enabled, including the generation and heralding of single-phonon Fock states and the quantum entanglement of remote mechanical elements. PMID:25903632

  13. Results of 1993 Repeat-Pass SAR Interferometry Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, J. D.; Hensley, S.; Madsen, S. N.; Webb, F. H.

    1994-01-01

    In this talk we present results of a repeat-pass SAR interferometry experiment performed in June 1993 near Portage, Maine. Differential GPS data accurate to +/-10cm were acquired to aid in motion compensation and geolocation of targets in the imagery. The experiment and data analysis will be discussed, and results will be shown during the presentation.

  14. Long-baseline optical intensity interferometry. Laboratory demonstration of diffraction-limited imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dravins, Dainis; Lagadec, Tiphaine; Nuñez, Paul D.

    2015-08-01

    Context. A long-held vision has been to realize diffraction-limited optical aperture synthesis over kilometer baselines. This will enable imaging of stellar surfaces and their environments, and reveal interacting gas flows in binary systems. An opportunity is now opening up with the large telescope arrays primarily erected for measuring Cherenkov light in air induced by gamma rays. With suitable software, such telescopes could be electronically connected and also used for intensity interferometry. Second-order spatial coherence of light is obtained by cross correlating intensity fluctuations measured in different pairs of telescopes. With no optical links between them, the error budget is set by the electronic time resolution of a few nanoseconds. Corresponding light-travel distances are approximately one meter, making the method practically immune to atmospheric turbulence or optical imperfections, permitting both very long baselines and observing at short optical wavelengths. Aims: Previous theoretical modeling has shown that full images should be possible to retrieve from observations with such telescope arrays. This project aims at verifying diffraction-limited imaging experimentally with groups of detached and independent optical telescopes. Methods: In a large optics laboratory, artificial stars (single and double, round and elliptic) were observed by an array of small telescopes. Using high-speed photon-counting solid-state detectors and real-time electronics, intensity fluctuations were cross-correlated over up to 180 baselines between pairs of telescopes, producing coherence maps across the interferometric Fourier-transform plane. Results: These interferometric measurements were used to extract parameters about the simulated stars, and to reconstruct their two-dimensional images. As far as we are aware, these are the first diffraction-limited images obtained from an optical array only linked by electronic software, with no optical connections between the

  15. Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ridgway, Stephen; Wilson, Robert W.; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Bender, Peter; Burke, Bernard F.; Cornwell, Tim; Drever, Ronald; Dyck, H. Melvin; Johnston, Kenneth J.; Kibblewhite, Edward

    1991-01-01

    The following recommended programs are reviewed: (1) infrared and optical interferometry (a ground-based and space programs); (2) compensation for the atmosphere with adaptive optics (a program for development and implementation of adaptive optics); and (3) gravitational waves (high frequency gravitational wave sources (LIGO), low frequency gravitational wave sources (LAGOS), a gravitational wave observatory program, laser gravitational wave observatory in space, and technology development during the 1990's). Prospects for international collaboration and related issues are also discussed.

  16. Astrometry and geodesy with radio interferometry: experiments, models, results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sovers, Ojars J.; Fanselow, John L.; Jacobs, Christopher S.

    1998-10-01

    Interferometry at radio frequencies between Earth-based receivers separated by intercontinental distances has made significant contributions to astrometry and geophysics during the past three decades. Analyses of such very long baseline interferometric (VLBI) experiments now permit measurements of relative positions of points on the Earth's surface and of angles between celestial objects at levels of better than one cm and one nanoradian, respectively. The relative angular positions of extragalactic radio sources inferred from this technique presently form the best realization of an inertial reference frame. This review summarizes the current status of radio interferometric measurements for astrometric and geodetic applications. It emphasizes the theoretical models that are required to extract results from the VLBI observables at present accuracy levels. An unusually broad cross section of physics contributes to the required modeling. Both special and general relativity need to be considered in properly formulating the geometric part of the propagation delay. While high-altitude atmospheric charged-particle (ionospheric) effects are easily calibrated for measurements employing two well-separated frequencies, the contribution of the neutral atmosphere at lower altitudes is more difficult to remove. In fact, mismodeling of the troposphere remains the dominant error source. Plate tectonic motions of the observing stations need to be taken into account, as well as the nonpointlike intensity distributions of many sources. Numerous small periodic and quasiperiodic tidal effects also make important contributions to space geodetic observables at the centimeter level, and some of these are just beginning to be characterized. Another area of current rapid advances is the specification of the orientation of the Earth's spin axis in inertial space: nutation and precession. Highlights of the achievements of very long baseline interferometry are presented in four areas

  17. Rescattering effects on intensity interferometry and initial conditions in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang

    The properties of the quark-gluon plasma are being thoroughly studied by utilizing relativistic heavy ion collisions. After its invention in astronomy in the 1950s, intensity interferometry was found to be a robust method to probe the spatial and temporal information of the nuclear collisions also. Although rescattering effects are negligible in elementary particle collisions, it may be very important for heavy ion collisions at RHIC and in the future LHC. Rescattering after production will modify the measured correlation function and make it harder to extract the dynamical information from data. To better understand the data which are dimmed by this final state process, we derive a general formula for intensity interferometry which can calculate rescattering effects easily. The formula can be used both non-relativistically and relativistically. Numerically, we found that rescattering effects on kaon interferometry for RHIC experiments can modify the measured ratio of the outward radius to the sideward radius, which is a sensitive probe to the equation of state, by as large as 15%. It is a nontrivial contribution which should be included to understand the data more accurately. The second part of this thesis is on the initial conditions in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Although relativistic hydrodynamics is successful in explaining many aspects of the data, it is only valid after some finite time after nuclear contact. The results depend on the choice of initial conditions which, so far, have been very uncertain. I describe a formula based on the McLerran-Venugopalan model to compute the initial energy density. The soft gluon fields produced immediately after the overlap of the nuclei can be expanded as a power series of the proper time t. Solving Yang-Mills equations with color current conservation can give us the analytical formulas for the fields. The local color charges on the transverse plane are stochastic variables and have to be taken care of by random

  18. Chirped pulse reflectivity and frequency domain interferometry in laser driven shock experiments.

    PubMed

    Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Koenig, M; Boudenne, J M; Hall, T A; Batani, D; Scianitti, F; Masini, A; Di Santo, D

    1999-09-01

    We show the simultaneous applicability of the frequency domain interferometry and the chirped pulse reflectometry techniques to measure shock parameters. The experiment has been realized with the laser at the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI) with a 550-ps pulse duration and an intensity on target approximately 5 x 10(13) W/cm(2) to produce a shock in a layered aluminum-fused silica target. A second low energy, partially compressed chirped probe beam was used to irradiate the target rear side and the reflected light has been analyzed with a spectrometer, achieving a temporal resolution of the order of 1 ps. PMID:11970183

  19. Chirped pulse reflectivity and frequency domain interferometry in laser driven shock experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Koenig, M.; Boudenne, J. M.; Hall, T. A.; Batani, D.; Scianitti, F.; Masini, A.; di Santo, D.

    1999-09-01

    We show the simultaneous applicability of the frequency domain interferometry and the chirped pulse reflectometry techniques to measure shock parameters. The experiment has been realized with the laser at the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI) with a 550-ps pulse duration and an intensity on target ~5×1013 W/cm2 to produce a shock in a layered aluminum-fused silica target. A second low energy, partially compressed chirped probe beam was used to irradiate the target rear side and the reflected light has been analyzed with a spectrometer, achieving a temporal resolution of the order of 1 ps.

  20. Stellar intensity interferometry over kilometer baselines: laboratory simulation of observations with the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dravins, Dainis; Lagadec, Tiphaine

    2014-07-01

    A long-held astronomical vision is to realize diffraction-limited optical aperture synthesis over kilometer baselines. This will enable imaging of stellar surfaces and their environments, show their evolution over time, and reveal interactions of stellar winds and gas flows in binary star systems. An opportunity is now opening up with the large telescope arrays primarily erected for measuring Cherenkov light in air induced by gamma rays. With suitable software, such telescopes could be electronically connected and used also for intensity interferometry. With no optical connection between the telescopes, the error budget is set by the electronic time resolution of a few nanoseconds. Corresponding light-travel distances are on the order of one meter, making the method practically insensitive to atmospheric turbulence or optical imperfections, permitting both very long baselines and observing at short optical wavelengths. Theoretical modeling has shown how stellar surface images can be retrieved from such observations and here we report on experimental simulations. In an optical laboratory, artificial stars (single and double, round and elliptic) are observed by an array of telescopes. Using high-speed photon-counting solid-state detectors and real-time electronics, intensity fluctuations are cross correlated between up to a hundred baselines between pairs of telescopes, producing maps of the second-order spatial coherence across the interferometric Fourier-transform plane. These experiments serve to verify the concepts and to optimize the instrumentation and observing procedures for future observations with (in particular) CTA, the Cherenkov Telescope Array, aiming at order-of-magnitude improvements of the angular resolution in optical astronomy.

  1. Experiments in cold atom optics towards precision atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aveline, David C.

    Atom optics has been a highly active field of research with many scientific breakthroughs over the past two decades, largely due to successful advances in laser technology, microfabrication techniques, and the development of laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms. This dissertation details several atom optics experiments with the motivation to develop tools and techniques for precision atom wave interferometry. It provides background information about atom optics and the fundamentals behind laser cooling and trapping, including basic techniques for cold gas thermometry and absorptive detection of atoms. A brief overview of magnetic trapping and guiding in tight wire-based traps is also provided before the experimental details are presented. We developed a novel laser source of 780 nm light using frequency-doubled 1560 nm fiber amplifier. This laser system provided up to a Watt of tunable frequency stabilized light for two Rb laser cooling and trapping experiments. One system generates Bose-Einstein condensates in an optical trap while the second is based on atom chip magnetic traps. The atom chip system, detailed in this thesis, was designed and built to develop the tools necessary for transport and loading large numbers of cold atoms and explore the potential for guided atom interferometry. Techniques and results from this experiment are presented, including an efficient magnetic transport and loading method to deliver cold atom to atom chip traps. We also developed a modeling tool for the magnetic fields formed by coiled wire geometries, as well as planar wire patterns. These models helped us design traps and determine adiabatic transportation of cold atoms between macro-scale traps and micro-traps formed on atom chips. Having achieved near unity transfer efficiency, we demonstrated that this approach promises to be a consistent method for loading large numbers of atoms into micro-traps. Furthermore, we discuss an in situ imaging technique to investigate

  2. Intensity Interferometry with Cherenkov Telescope Arrays: Prospects for submilliarcsecond optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dravins, D.

    2014-04-01

    Intensity interferometry measures the second-order coherence of light. Very rapid (nanosecond) fluctuations are correlated between separate telescopes, without any optical connection. This makes the method insensitive to atmospheric turbulence and optical imperfections, permitting observations over long baselines, and at short wavelengths. The required large telescopes are becoming available as those primarily erected to study gamma rays: the planned Cherenkov Telescope Array (https://www.cta-observatory.org/) envisions many tens of telescopes distributed over a few square km. Digital signal handling enables very many baselines to be simultaneously synthesized between many pairs of telescopes, while stars may be tracked across the sky with electronic time delays, synthesizing an optical interferometer in software. Simulations indicate limiting magnitudes around m(v)=8, reaching a resolution of 30 microarcseconds in the violet. Since intensity interferometry provides only the modulus (not phase) of any spatial frequency component of the source image, image reconstruction requires phase retrieval techniques. As shown in simulations, full two-dimensional images can be retrieved, provided there is an extensive coverage of the (u,v)-plane, such as will be available once the number of telescopes reaches numbers on the order of ten.

  3. Cramer-Rao lower bound and object reconstruction performance evaluation for intensity interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolne, Jean J.; Gerwe, David R.; Crabtree, Peter N.

    2014-07-01

    This paper addresses the fundamental performance limits of object reconstruction methods using intensity interferometry measurements. It shows examples of reconstructed objects obtained with the FIIRE (Forward-model Interferometry Image Reconstruction Estimator) code developed by Boeing for AFRL. It considers various issues when calculating the multidimensional Cramér-Rao lower bound (CRLB) when the Fisher information matrix (FIM) is singular. In particular, when comparing FIIRE performance, characterized as the root mean square difference between the estimated and pristine objects with the CRLB, we found that FIIRE performance improved as the singularity became worse, a result not expected. We found that for invertible FIM, FIIRE yielded lower root mean squared error than the square root of the CRLB (by a factor as large as 100). This may be due to various regularization constraints (positivity, support, sharpness, and smoothness) included in FIIRE, rendering it a biased estimator, as opposed to the unbiased CRLB framework used. Using the sieve technique to mitigate false high frequency content inherent in point-by-point object reconstruction methods, we also show further improved FIIRE performance on some generic objects. It is worth noting that since FIIRE is an iterative algorithm searching to arrive at an object estimate consistent with the collected data and various constraints, an initial object estimate is required. In our case, we used a completely random initial object guess consisting of a 2-D array of uniformly distributed random numbers, sometimes multiplied with a 2-D Gaussian function.

  4. A microchip laser source with stable intensity and frequency used for self-mixing interferometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaohui; Zhang, Shulian; Tan, Yidong; Sun, Liqun

    2016-05-01

    We present a stable 40 × 40 × 30 mm(3) Laser-diode (LD)-pumped-microchip laser (ML) laser source used for self-mixing interferometry which can measure non-cooperative targets. We simplify the coupling process of pump light in order to make its polarization and intensity robust against environmental disturbance. Thermal frequency stabilization technology is used to stabilize the laser frequency of both LD and ML. Frequency stability of about 1 × 10(-7) and short-term intensity fluctuation of 0.1% are achieved. The theoretical long-term displacement accuracy limited by frequency and intensity fluctuation is about 10 nm when the measuring range is 0.1 m. The line-width of this laser is about 25 kHz corresponding to 12 km coherent length and 6 km measurement range for self-mixing interference. The laser source has been equipped to a self-mixing interferometer, and it works very well. PMID:27250399

  5. Seismic-while-drilling data processing with seismic interferometry in the Daqing Oilfield experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongtao 1Huang, Weichuan 24Li, Yuquan

    2014-03-01

    Seismic interferometry was used to process the data collected with seismic-while-drilling (SWD) experiments at the Daqing Oilfield. The experiments simultaneously recorded the data at the drilling stem and on the ground. After conducting the frequency and the energy property analysis, the data was processed using the correlation and deconvolution method. Seismic data was then obtained from excitation of the drill bit. The result maps show that the deconvolution method can suppress the source effects and enhance the resolution of the profile, and that the vertical stacks enhance the seismic response of the subsurface. The interferometry process after band-filtering can obtain maps with very high resolution. Seismic interferometry by deconvolution shows great advantages based on the results of this experimental data. The method can also be applied to the SWD data and the ambient seismic data to obtain better processing results.

  6. Amplitude and intensity interferometry using satellite LNB receivers for innovative and low cost microwave and millimetre wave sensor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, Neil A.; Wilkinson, Peter N.; Radiven, Joel

    2012-10-01

    Satellite Low Noise Block-down convertors (LNBs) have been evaluated for use in amplitude and intensity interferometry. LNBs have been found to have a high performance to cost ratio which is beneficial for any sensor system. They are investigated here for a diversity of applications from the derisking of subsystems for next generation aperture synthesis imagers having hundreds of channels [1] to a platform for the investigation of phase recovery in intensity interferometry and experimentation in entangled photons. Measured noise temperatures of LNBs were found to lie between 170 K and 300 K which is higher than typical manufacturers' specifications. A twin channel interferometer system was developed using satellite receiver feeds and LNBs at the front-end, other amplifiers, mixers, filters and local oscillators at intermediate stages, and 8-bit USB ADCs sampling synchronously at 100 MHz and a PC for data processing. LabVIEW was used to digitally demodulate the sampled data and process it into the first and second orders of coherence. Measurements of the first order of coherence from a standard low energy discharge lamp indicated interference fringes were commensurate with range and spacing of the two receivers and the source. The relationship between the measured first and second order of coherence agrees within the experimental error. Variations of the first and second orders of coherence with range, R, follow the relationship 1/R and 1/R2. The system has the potential for investigations into phase extraction for intensity interferometry and for the study of digital demodulation schemes for aperture synthesis amplitude interferometry with hundreds of receiver channels for next generation security screening systems. A twin, triple or quadruple channel polarimetric LNB interferometer could be used as basis for high precision investigations in to entangled photons and quantum communications.

  7. Design and experiment on a multi-functioned and programmable piezoelectric ceramic power supply with high precision for speckle interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Biao; Ye, Yan; Wang, Yong-hong; Yang, En-zhen

    2016-01-01

    Speckle interferometry is a method of measuring structure's tiny deformations which requires accurate phase information of interference fringes. The phase information is acquired by micro-displacement produced by piezoelectric ceramic (PZT). In order to drive the PZT micro-displacement actuator, a multi-functioned and programmable PZT power supply with high precision is designed. Calibration experiment has been done to the PZT micro-actuator in speckle interferometry. Some experiments were also done to test its relevant characteristics. The experiment results show that it has high linearity, repeatability, stability, low ripple and can meet the requirement of the reliability and displacement accuracy in speckle interferometry.

  8. Preliminary results from an airborne experiment using along-track interferometry for ground moving target indication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapin, Elaine; Chen, Curtis W.

    2005-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) along track interferometry (ATI) has been used extensively to measure ocean surface currents. Given its ability to measure small velocities of relatively radar-dark water surfaces, there is great potential that this technique can be adapted for ground moving target indication (GMTI) applications, particularly as a method for detecting very slwo targets with small radar cross sections. In this paper we describe preliminary results from an ATI GMTI experiment.

  9. Laser differential interferometry for supersonic blunt body receptivity experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salyer, Terry Ray

    2002-01-01

    The laser differential interferometer is a high sensitivity (lambda/13,000 minimum detectable wavelength shift), large bandwidth (6 MHz), nonintrusive instrument ideal for low-density optical flow diagnostics. Up to one half wavelength shifts are possible with active phase compensation. With feedback control, a phase modulator stabilizes the system within the linear range. Calibrated receptivity experiments are performed in a Mach 4 quiet-flow Ludwieg tube. Laser-generated thermal spots are used as repeatable, controlled perturbations to the subsonic region behind the bow shock of both a hemispherical nose and a forward-facing cavity. Thermal spot amplitudes, spatial characteristics, and repeatability are measured. Both on-axis and off axis surveys of the subsonic region indicate damped oscillations with both blunt nose configurations. With the forward-facing cavity, a characteristic frequency based on the cavity geometry is detected. The results from both configurations correlate with nose-mounted and cavity base-mounted pressure transducer measurements, and thus remove frequency ambiguity from the pressure transducer experiments. High speed synchronous schlieren images show the thermal spot evolution and impingement at the hemispherical nose. Additionally, the thermal spot in freestream is modeled based on the experimental measurements. Quantitative comparisons with CFD simulations of these experiments show similar characteristics. CFD agreement is expected to improve with future use of the advanced thermal spot model.

  10. Apparatus for fermion atomic clock, atom interferometry and quantum pumping experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivory, M. K.; Ziltz, A.; Field, J.; Aubin, S.

    2010-03-01

    We present the current state of an apparatus designed to create and manipulate ultracold bosonic and fermionic Rb and K isotopes for a fermion atomic clock, atom interferometry, microwave trapping, and quantum pumping experiments. Quantum pumping is a phenomenon which can precisely control bias-less flow of single electrons in a circuit. Using ultracold atoms on atom chips, we can test theoretical predictions which have not yet been verified due to experimental difficulties in solid state systems. The apparatus design consists of a magneto-optical trap, magnetic transport system, atom chip, and optical dipole trap. We have demonstrated basic laser cooling and trapping and are working towards transport of the collected atoms to the atom chip for cooling to quantum degeneracy. Once quantum degeneracy is achieved at the chip, micro-magnetic reservoirs of ultracold atoms connected by a 1D ``wire'' create a circuit for various quantum pumping schemes. These schemes are also more broadly applicable to atomtronics experiments.

  11. Phasemeter core for intersatellite laser heterodyne interferometry: modelling, simulations and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerberding, Oliver; Sheard, Benjamin; Bykov, Iouri; Kullmann, Joachim; Esteban Delgado, Juan Jose; Danzmann, Karsten; Heinzel, Gerhard

    2013-12-01

    Intersatellite laser interferometry is a central component of future space-borne gravity instruments like Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), evolved LISA, NGO and future geodesy missions. The inherently small laser wavelength allows us to measure distance variations with extremely high precision by interfering a reference beam with a measurement beam. The readout of such interferometers is often based on tracking phasemeters, which are able to measure the phase of an incoming beatnote with high precision over a wide range of frequencies. The implementation of such phasemeters is based on all digital phase-locked loops (ADPLL), hosted in FPGAs. Here, we present a precise model of an ADPLL that allows us to design such a readout algorithm and we support our analysis by numerical performance measurements and experiments with analogue signals.

  12. Simultaneous Immersion Mirau Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyulko, Oleksandra

    acquisition challenging. This problem was resolved by integration of polarization optics into the optics of the attachment to enable simultaneous creation and spatial separation of two interferograms, which, combined with the background image, are used to reconstruct the intensity map of the specimen. Giving the name Simultaneous Immersion Mirau Interferometry to this approach, simultaneous acquisition of all interferograms per image has eliminated the issue of vibrations. The designed compound microscope attachment has been manufactured and tested; the system produces images of quality, sufficient to perform targeted cellular irradiation experiments.

  13. On Using Intensity Interferometry for Feature Identification and Imaging of Remote Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erkmen, Baris I.; Strekalov, Dmitry V.; Yu, Nan

    2013-01-01

    We derive an approximation to the intensity covariance function of two scanning pinhole detectors, facing a distant source (e.g., a star) being occluded partially by an absorptive object (e.g., a planet). We focus on using this technique to identify or image an object that is in the line-of-sight between a well-characterized source and the detectors. We derive the observed perturbation to the intensity covariance map due to the object, showing that under some reasonable approximations it is proportional to the real part of the Fourier transform of the source's photon-flux density times the Fourier transform of the object's intensity absorption. We highlight the key parameters impacting its visibility and discuss the requirements for estimating object-related parameters, e.g., its size, velocity or shape. We consider an application of this result to determining the orbit inclination of an exoplanet orbiting a distant star. Finally, motivated by the intrinsically weak nature of the signature, we study its signal-to-noise ratio and determine the impact of system parameters.

  14. The Combined Radio Interferometry and COSMIC Experiment in Tomography (CRICKET) Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymond, Kenneth; Coker, Clayton; Bernhardt, Paul; Cohen, Aaron; Crane, Patrick; Kassim, Namir; Lazio, Joseph; Weiler, Kurt; Watts, Christopher; Rickard, Lee J.; Taylor, Greg; Schinzel, Frank; Philstrom, Ylva; Close, Sigrid; Colestock, Patrick; Myers, Steve; Datta, Abirhup

    We report on the Combined Radio Interferometry and COSMIC Experiment in Tomography Campaign (CRICKET) held on September 15 and 17, 2007. The experiment used the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC also known as FORMOSAT-3) in conjunction with the Very Large Array radio telescope, located near Socorro, NM, to study the ionosphere from the global scale down to the regional scale. Each COSMIC satellite includes three instruments capable of measuring the ionosphere: the Tiny Ionospheric Photometer (TIP), a UV radiometer; the GPS Occultation experiment (GOX), a dual-frequency GPS occultation receiver; and the Tri-band Beacon (TBB), a three frequency coherently radiating radio beacon. These three instruments have been demonstrated to be a powerful means for characterizing the global-scale ionosphere. The VLA when deployed at its largest extent and while operating at 73.8 MHz is incredibly sensitive to relative total electron content variations of the regional ionosphere over about a 30-100 km diameter area. In this work, we concentrate on the first set of observations on September 15, 2007 at approximately 0830 UT. We have successfully married these heterogeneous data sets, using a tomographic data fusion approach, to produce a consistent ionospheric specification from the global scale down to the regional scale.

  15. Interferometry based technique for intensity profile measurements of far IR beams.

    PubMed

    Soloviev, Alexander A; Khazanov, Efim A; Kozhevatov, Ilya E; Palashov, Oleg V

    2007-06-20

    We present a novel, to the best of our knowledge, method for measuring the intensity profile of far-IR beams. The method is based on the measurements of nonstationary variation in optical thickness of a fused-silica plate heated by the studied radiation. The optical thickness is observed by means of a reflecting interferometer. Purpose-made experimental setup allows one to measure beams with an aperture of up to 60 mm with a spatial resolution of 1 mm. The accessibility of the utilized technologies and the possibility to easily increase the aperture are the major advantages of this approach. The probable area of application for the method is measurements of beams produced by powerful industrial far-IR lasers. PMID:17538679

  16. Review of Astrophysics Experiments on Intense Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A; Drake, R P; Takabe, H; Arnett, D

    2000-01-19

    Astrophysics has traditionally been pursued at astronomical observatories and on theorists' computers. Observations record images from space, and theoretical models are developed to explain the observations. A component often missing has been the ability to test theories and models in an experimental setting where the initial and final states are well characterized. Intense lasers are now being used to recreate aspects of astrophysical phenomena in the laboratory, allowing the creation of experimental testbeds where theory and modeling can be quantitatively tested against data. We describe here several areas of astrophysics--supernovae, supernova remnants, gamma-ray bursts, and giant planets--where laser experiments are under development to test our understanding of these phenomena.

  17. Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) for the JUICE mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurvits, L. I.; Bocanegra Bahamon, T. M.; Cimò, G.; Duev, D. A.; Molera Calvés, G.; Pogrebenko, S. V.; de Pater, I.; Vermeersen, L. L. A.; Rosenblatt, P.; Oberst, J.; Charlot, P.; Frey, S.; Tudose, V.

    2013-09-01

    The Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) is a multi-disciplinary enhancement of the scientific suite of the Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer (JUICE). PRIDE will exploit the technique of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations of spacecraft and natural celestial radio sources by a network of Earth-based radio telescopes (Fig. 1, see [1,2]). The main "measured deliverables" of PRIDE are lateral coordinates of spacecraft in the celestial reference frame. In addition to the lateral coordinates, a by-product of PRIDE is the measurement of the line-ofsight velocity of spacecraft. It is worth to notice the synergistic nature of PRIDE measurements to other key experiments of the JUICE mission, in particular addressing the quest of Icy Moons interior and Jovian system ephemerides. In addition of providing consistency checks of a number of experiments, PRIDE is highly synergistic to a number of other JUICE experiments, in particular radio science and laser ranging ones. Tracking of the spacecraft in the gravity field of Jupiter and its satellites will allow us to not only provide valuable inputs into the determination of the spacecraft trajectory, but also to improve the ephemerides of Jupiter and the Galilean Satellites. VLBI tracking of the spacecraft, in combination with routine observations of background radio sources of the celestial reference frame, will also allow us to firmly tie the Jupiter system into the celestial reference frame. This would represent a major contribution to the Solar System celestial mechanics and the definition of the Solar System reference system. Furthermore, PRIDE will contribute to various aspects of Ganymede's, Callisto's and Europa's science. VLBI positioning and radio occultation data may represent an important and independent reference for the GALA laser altimeter data. The trajectory data during the multiple satellite flybys will help to further constrain the low order gravity field parameters. In

  18. Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) for the JUICE mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurvits, L. I.; Bocanegra Bahamon, T. M.; Cimò, G.; Duev, D. A.; Molera Calvés, G.; Pogrebenko, S. V.; de Pater, I.; Vermeersen, L. L. A.; Rosenblatt, P.; Oberst, J.; Charlot, P.; Frey, S.; Tudose, V.

    2013-09-01

    The Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) is a multi-disciplinary enhancement of the scientific suite of the Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer (JUICE). PRIDE will exploit the technique of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations of spacecraft and natural celestial radio sources by a network of Earth-based radio telescopes (Fig. 1, see [1,2]). The main "measured deliverables" of PRIDE are lateral coordinates of spacecraft in the celestial reference frame. In addition to the lateral coordinates, a by-product of PRIDE is the measurement of the line-ofsight velocity of spacecraft. It is worth to notice the synergistic nature of PRIDE measurements to other key experiments of the JUICE mission, in particular addressing the quest of Icy Moons interior and Jovian system ephemerides. In addition of providing consistency checks of a number of experiments, PRIDE is highly synergistic to a number of other JUICE experiments, in particular radio science and laser ranging ones. Tracking of the spacecraft in the gravity field of Jupiter and its satellites will allow us to not only provide valuable inputs into the determination of the spacecraft trajectory, but also to improve the ephemerides of Jupiter and the Galilean Satellites. VLBI tracking of the spacecraft, in combination with routine observations of background radio sources of the celestial reference frame, will also allow us to firmly tie the Jupiter system into the celestial reference frame. This would represent a major contribution to the Solar System celestial mechanics and the definition of the Solar System reference system. Furthermore, PRIDE will contribute to various aspects of Ganymede's, Callisto's and Europa's science. VLBI positioning and radio occultation data may represent an important and independent reference for the GALA laser altimeter data. The trajectory data during the multiple satellite flybys will help to further constrain the low order gravity field parameters. In

  19. Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) for Planetary Atmospheric Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocanegra Bahamon, Tatiana; Cimo, Giuseppe; Duev, Dmitry; Gurvits, Leonid; Molera Calves, Guifre; Pogrebenko, Sergei

    2015-04-01

    The Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) is a technique that allows the determination of the radial velocity and lateral coordinates of planetary spacecraft with very high accuracy (Duev, 2012). The setup of the experiment consists of several ground stations from the European VLBI Network (EVN) located around the globe, which simultaneously perform Doppler tracking of a spacecraft carrier radio signal, and are subsequently processed in a VLBI-style in phase referencing mode. Because of the accurate examination of the changes in phase and amplitude of the radio signal propagating from the spacecraft to the multiple stations on Earth, the PRIDE technique can be used for several fields of planetary research, among which planetary atmospheric studies, gravimetry and ultra-precise celestial mechanics of planetary systems. In the study at hand the application of this technique for planetary atmospheric investigations is demonstrated. As a test case, radio occultation experiments were conducted with PRIDE having as target ESA's Venus Express, during different observing sessions with multiple ground stations in April 2012 and March 2014. Once each of the stations conducts the observation, the raw data is delivered to the correlation center at the Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe (JIVE) located in the Netherlands. The signals are processed with a high spectral resolution and phase detection software package from which Doppler observables of each station are derived. Subsequently the Doppler corrected signals are correlated to derive the VLBI observables. These two sets of observables are used for precise orbit determination. The reconstructed orbit along with the Doppler observables are used as input for the radio occultation processing software, which consists of mainly two modules, the geometrical optics module and the ray tracing inversion module, from which vertical density profiles, and subsequently, temperature and pressure profiles of Venus

  20. Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) technique: A test case of the Mars Express Phobos fly-by

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duev, D. A.; Pogrebenko, S. V.; Cimò, G.; Molera Calvés, G.; Bocanegra Bahamón, T. M.; Gurvits, L. I.; Kettenis, M. M.; Kania, J.; Tudose, V.; Rosenblatt, P.; Marty, J.-C.; Lainey, V.; de Vicente, P.; Quick, J.; Nickola, M.; Neidhardt, A.; Kronschnabl, G.; Ploetz, C.; Haas, R.; Lindqvist, M.; Orlati, A.; Ipatov, A. V.; Kharinov, M. A.; Mikhailov, A. G.; Lovell, J. E. J.; McCallum, J. N.; Stevens, J.; Gulyaev, S. A.; Natush, T.; Weston, S.; Wang, W. H.; Xia, B.; Yang, W. J.; Hao, L.-F.; Kallunki, J.; Witasse, O.

    2016-09-01

    Context. The closest ever fly-by of the Martian moon Phobos, performed by the European Space Agency's Mars Express spacecraft, gives a unique opportunity to sharpen and test the Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiments (PRIDE) technique in the interest of studying planet-satellite systems. Aims: The aim of this work is to demonstrate a technique of providing high precision positional and Doppler measurements of planetary spacecraft using the Mars Express spacecraft. The technique will be used in the framework of Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiments in various planetary missions, in particular in fly-by mode. Methods: We advanced a novel approach to spacecraft data processing using the techniques of Doppler and phase-referenced very long baseline interferometry spacecraft tracking. Results: We achieved, on average, mHz precision (30 μm/s at a 10 s integration time) for radial three-way Doppler estimates and sub-nanoradian precision for lateral position measurements, which in a linear measure (at a distance of 1.4 AU) corresponds to ~50 m.

  1. White light interferometry for quantitative surface characterization in ion sputtering experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Baryshev, S. V.; Zinovev, A. V.; Tripa, C. E.; Erck, R. A.; Veryovkin, I. V.

    2012-07-01

    White light interferometry (WLI) can be used to obtain surface morphology information on dimensional scale of millimeters with lateral resolution as good as {approx}1 {micro}m and depth resolution down to 1 nm. By performing true three-dimensional imaging of sample surfaces, the WLI technique enables accurate quantitative characterization of the geometry of surface features and compares favorably to scanning electron and atomic force microscopies by avoiding some of their drawbacks. In this paper, results of using the WLI imaging technique to characterize the products of ion sputtering experiments are reported. With a few figures, several example applications of the WLI method are illustrated when used for (i) sputtering yield measurements and time-to-depth conversion, (ii) optimizing ion beam current density profiles, the shapes of sputtered craters, and multiple ion beam superposition and (iii) quantitative characterization of surfaces processed with ions. In particular, for sputter depth profiling experiments of {sup 25}Mg, {sup 44}Ca and {sup 53}Cr ion implants in Si (implantation energy of 1 keV per nucleon), the depth calibration of the measured depth profile curves determined by the WLI method appeared to be self-consistent with TRIM simulations for such projectile-matrix systems. In addition, high depth resolution of the WLI method is demonstrated for a case of a Genesis solar wind Si collector surface processed by gas cluster ion beam: a 12.5 nm layer was removed from the processed surface, while the transition length between the processed and untreated areas was 150 {micro}m.

  2. Studying Venus' atmosphere and ionosphere with Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocanegra-Bahamon, T. M.; Cimo, G.; Duev, D. A.; Gurvits, L. I.; Marty, J. Ch.; Pogrebenko, S. V.; Rosenblatt, P.

    2014-04-01

    The Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) is a technique that can provide a multi-disciplinary enhancement of the science return of planetary missions. By performing precise Doppler tracking of a spacecraft carrier radio signal, at Earth-based radio telescopes, and VLBI-style processing of these signals in phase-referencing mode, the technique allows the determination of the radial velocity and lateral coordinates of the spacecraft with very high accuracy[1]. Because of the accurate examination of the changes in phase and amplitude of the radio signal propagating from the spacecraft to the multiple stations on Earth, the PRIDE technique can be used for several fields of planetary research. The application of this technique for atmospheric studies has been assessed by observing ESA's Venus Express (VEX) during Venus occultation events in 2012 and 2014, and by participating in one of the Venus Express Atmospheric Drag Experiment (VExADE) campaigns in 2012. Both studies are contributing to the characterization efforts of the atmosphere and ionosphere of Venus. During the Venus Express Atmospheric Drag Experiment (VExADE) campaigns VEX's orbit pericenter was lowered into an altitude range of approximately 165 to 175 km in order to probe Venus upper atmosphere above its north pole. The first VExADE campaigns were carried out between 2009-2010 using Doppler tracking data acquired by the VEX radio science experiment (VeRa), which provided the first in situ measurements of the density of Venus' polar thermosphere at solar minimum conditions [2]. In the December 2012 campaign the PRIDE-team participated by tracking VEX with several radio telescopes from the European VLBI Network (EVN) during pericenter passage. A Doppler frequency drop of ∼40 mHz was detected as VEX reached the lowest altitudes at around 170 km. The tracking data for each pericenter pass is fitted for precise orbit determination, from which drag acceleration estimates and the

  3. Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandura, Kevin; Addison, Graeme E.; Amiri, Mandana; Bond, J. Richard; Campbell-Wilson, Duncan; Connor, Liam; Cliche, Jean-François; Davis, Greg; Deng, Meiling; Denman, Nolan; Dobbs, Matt; Fandino, Mateus; Gibbs, Kenneth; Gilbert, Adam; Halpern, Mark; Hanna, David; Hincks, Adam D.; Hinshaw, Gary; Höfer, Carolin; Klages, Peter; Landecker, Tom L.; Masui, Kiyoshi; Mena Parra, Juan; Newburgh, Laura B.; Pen, Ue-li; Peterson, Jeffrey B.; Recnik, Andre; Shaw, J. Richard; Sigurdson, Kris; Sitwell, Mike; Smecher, Graeme; Smegal, Rick; Vanderlinde, Keith; Wiebe, Don

    2014-07-01

    A pathfinder version of CHIME (the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment) is currently being commissioned at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory (DRAO) in Penticton, BC. The instrument is a hybrid cylindrical interferometer designed to measure the large scale neutral hydrogen power spectrum across the redshift range 0.8 to 2.5. The power spectrum will be used to measure the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale across this poorly probed redshift range where dark energy becomes a significant contributor to the evolution of the Universe. The instrument revives the cylinder design in radio astronomy with a wide field survey as a primary goal. Modern low-noise amplifiers and digital processing remove the necessity for the analog beam forming that characterized previous designs. The Pathfinder consists of two cylinders 37m long by 20m wide oriented north-south for a total collecting area of 1,500 square meters. The cylinders are stationary with no moving parts, and form a transit instrument with an instantaneous field of view of ~100 degrees by 1-2 degrees. Each CHIME Pathfinder cylinder has a feedline with 64 dual polarization feeds placed every ~30 cm which Nyquist sample the north-south sky over much of the frequency band. The signals from each dual-polarization feed are independently amplified, filtered to 400-800 MHz, and directly sampled at 800 MSps using 8 bits. The correlator is an FX design, where the Fourier transform channelization is performed in FPGAs, which are interfaced to a set of GPUs that compute the correlation matrix. The CHIME Pathfinder is a 1/10th scale prototype version of CHIME and is designed to detect the BAO feature and constrain the distance-redshift relation. The lessons learned from its implementation will be used to inform and improve the final CHIME design.

  4. Seismic Interferometry and the Spatial Auto-Correlation Method on the Regional Coda of the Non-Proliferation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ridder, S.; Prieto, G. A.

    2008-12-01

    A seismic recording of the non-proliferation experiment (NPE), made by a petroleum-exploration company in Railroad Valley (Nevada), contains the first break of the regional P phases followed by a three minute long coda. The transverse orientation and sign-bit recording of the array, renders distinguishing phase arrival times difficult. This motivates the use of seismic interferometry. The geometry does not permit recovering the Green's function from the first break arrival times using the stationary phase theorem, however the coda contains sufficiently equipartitioned energy. We study the result of seismic interferometry in the frequency-domain. This procedure is analogous to the spatial auto-correlation (SPAC) method, devised for studying microtremors by Aki in 1957. Cross-correlating two receiver stations retrieves, under favorable circumstances, an approximation of the Green's function between these two stations. To first order, this Green's function consists of a direct event traveling between the receivers. In the frequency domain, the lowest mode in the Green's function is a weighted and scaled zero-order Bessel function of the first kind, J0. We fit the frequency-domain of the recovered Green's functions to damped J0 functions. to recover phase velocity and estimates of the attenuation coefficients. Only energy between 1-4 Hz can be fitted unambiguously with J0 functions, because higher frequencies contain too much spurious energy. This result shows the equivalence of the SPAC method and seismic interferometry for the lowest mode in the Green's function. This study also shows how the coda of a regional event, seemingly unfavorably positioned, can contains energy useful for seismic interferometry.

  5. Holograph and Interferometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altman, Thomas C.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a method to create holograms for use in different interferometry techniques. Students utilize these techniques in experiments to study the structural integrity of a clarinet reed and the effects of temperature on objects. (MDH)

  6. Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) for studying the thermosphere of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocanegra Bahamón, T. M.; Cimò, G.; Duev, D. A.; Gurvits, L. I.; Marty, J. C.; Molera Calvés, G.; Pogrebenko, S. V.; Rosenblatt, P.

    2013-09-01

    Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) is a generic experimental setup of on-board and Earth-based radio devices and facilities, which serves as an enhancement of the science return of planetary missions. The main goal of this technique is to provide precise estimates of the spacecraft state vectors, by performing precise Doppler tracking of the spacecraft carrier signal, at one or more Earth-based radio telescopes, and VLBI-style correlation of these signals in phase referencing mode [1]. By allowing an accurate examination of the changes in phase and amplitude of the radio signal propagating from the spacecraft to the multiple stations on Earth, the PRIDE technique can be used for several fields of research, among them: atmospheric and ionospheric structure of planets and their satellites, planetary gravity fields, planets' shapes, masses and ephemerides, solar plasma and different aspects of the theory of general relativity. The PRIDE-team is participating in the so-called Venus Express Atmospheric Drag Experiment (VEx-ADE) campaigns by tracking ESA's Venus Express with multiple radio telescopes on Earth. During each campaign, VEX's orbit pericenter is lowered into an altitude range of approximately 165 to 175 km in order to probe Venus upper atmosphere above its north pole. The first VExADE campaigns were carried out between 2009-2010 using Doppler tracking data acquired by the VEX radio science experiment (VeRa), which provided the first in situ measurements of the density of Venus' polar thermosphere at solar minimum conditions [2]. The last campaign was conducted in December 2012, in which the PRIDE-team participated by tracking VEX with several radio telescopes from the European VLBI Network (EVN) during pericenter passage. A Doppler frequency drop of ∼40 mHz was detected as VEX reached the lowest altitudes at around 170 km. The tracking data for each pericenter pass is fitted for precise orbit determination, from which drag

  7. EPR experiment and 2-photon interferometry: Report of a 2-photon interference experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Y. H.; Rubin, M. H.; Sergienko, A. V.

    1992-01-01

    After a very brief review of the historical Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen (EPR) experiments, a new two-photon interference type EPR experiment is reported. A two-photon state was generated by optical parametric down conversion. Pairs of light quanta with degenerate frequency but divergent directions of propagation were sent to two independent Michelson interferometers. First and second order interference effectors were studied. Different than other reports, we observed that the second order interference visibility vanished when the optical path difference of the interferometers were much less than the coherence length of the pumping laser beam. However, we also observed that the second order interference behaved differently depending on whether the interferometers were set at equal or different optical path differences.

  8. Very Long Baseline Interferometry Experiment on Giant Radio Pulses of Crab Pulsar toward Fast Radio Burst Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takefuji, K.; Terasawa, T.; Kondo, T.; Mikami, R.; Takeuchi, H.; Misawa, H.; Tsuchiya, F.; Kita, H.; Sekido, M.

    2016-08-01

    We report on a very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) experiment on giant radio pulses (GPs) from the Crab pulsar in the radio 1.4–1.7 GHz range to demonstrate a VLBI technique for searching for fast radio bursts (FRBs). We carried out the experiment on 2014 July 26 using the Kashima 34 m and Usuda 64 m radio telescopes of the Japanese VLBI Network (JVN) with a baseline of about 200 km. During the approximately 1 hr observation, we could detect 35 GPs by high-time-resolution VLBI. Moreover, we determined the dispersion measure (DM) to be 56.7585 ± 0.0025 on the basis of the mean DM of the 35 GPs detected by VLBI. We confirmed that the sensitivity of a detection of GPs using our technique is superior to that of a single-dish mode detection using the same telescope.

  9. A small-scale experiment using microwave interferometry to investigate detonation and shock-to-detonation transition in pressed TATB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renslow, Peter John

    A small-scale characterization test utilizing microwave interferometry was developed to dynamically measure detonation and run to detonation distance in explosives. The technique was demonstrated by conducting two experimental series on the well-characterized explosive triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB). In the first experiment series, the detonation velocity was observed at varying porosity. The velocity during TATB detonation matched well with predictions made using CHEETAH and an empirical relation from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The microwave interferometer also captured unsteady propagation of the reaction when a low density charge was near the failure diameter. In the second experiment series, Pop-plots were produced using data obtained from shock initiation of the TATB through a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) attenuator. The results compared well to wedge test data from LANL despite the microwave interferometer test being of substantially smaller scale. The results showed the test method is attractive for rapid characterization of new and improvised explosive materials.

  10. The Palomar kernel-phase experiment: testing kernel phase interferometry for ground-based astronomical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Benjamin; Tuthill, Peter; Hinkley, Sasha; Ireland, Michael J.; Greenbaum, Alexandra; Latyshev, Alexey; Monnier, John D.; Martinache, Frantz

    2016-01-01

    At present, the principal limitation on the resolution and contrast of astronomical imaging instruments comes from aberrations in the optical path, which may be imposed by the Earth's turbulent atmosphere or by variations in the alignment and shape of the telescope optics. These errors can be corrected physically, with active and adaptive optics, and in post-processing of the resulting image. A recently developed adaptive optics post-processing technique, called kernel-phase interferometry, uses linear combinations of phases that are self-calibrating with respect to small errors, with the goal of constructing observables that are robust against the residual optical aberrations in otherwise well-corrected imaging systems. Here, we present a direct comparison between kernel phase and the more established competing techniques, aperture masking interferometry, point spread function (PSF) fitting and bispectral analysis. We resolve the α Ophiuchi binary system near periastron, using the Palomar 200-Inch Telescope. This is the first case in which kernel phase has been used with a full aperture to resolve a system close to the diffraction limit with ground-based extreme adaptive optics observations. Excellent agreement in astrometric quantities is found between kernel phase and masking, and kernel phase significantly outperforms PSF fitting and bispectral analysis, demonstrating its viability as an alternative to conventional non-redundant masking under appropriate conditions.

  11. Time Delay Interferometry Experiments at the University of Florida Interferometric Simulator.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitryk, Shawn

    2010-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a joint NASA/ESA space mission proposed to directly measure gravitational waves in the frequency range from 30 uHz to 1 Hz. To accomplish this LISA will utilize a modified Michelson interferometer to measure the spatial changes between three drag-free proof masses in a heliocentric orbit separated by a distance of 5 Gm. In order to accurately measure the distance between the proof masses, LISA requires ultra-stable laser signals to reduce the noise in the measurement. Any additional laser noise must be recorded and extracted from the final measurement through a method known as time-delay interferometry (TDI). The University of Florida LISA Interferometry Simulator (UFLIS) has the ability to perform a hardware-in-the-loop simulation of the LISA Constellation in order to verify laser noise stabilization and extraction techniques. We present the UFLISs' capability to replicate the expected pre-stabilized laser noise, measure and delay the laser signals due to the light-travel time along the LISA arm, and inject mock gravitational wave signals. The resulting laser beatnotes are then recorded and combined based on TDI theory to extract the laser noise and recover the injected gravitational wave signals to within the requirement proposed by the LISA mission science team. This work is supported by NASA through grants BEFS 04-0019-0019 and 07 ATFP 07-0116.

  12. The TIME-Pilot intensity mapping experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crites, A. T.; Bock, J. J.; Bradford, C. M.; Chang, T. C.; Cooray, A. R.; Duband, L.; Gong, Y.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Hunacek, J.; Koch, P. M.; Li, C. T.; O'Brient, R. C.; Prouve, T.; Shirokoff, E.; Silva, M. B.; Staniszewski, Z.; Uzgil, B.; Zemcov, M.

    2014-08-01

    TIME-Pilot is designed to make measurements from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR), when the first stars and galaxies formed and ionized the intergalactic medium. This will be done via measurements of the redshifted 157.7 um line of singly ionized carbon ([CII]). In particular, TIME-Pilot will produce the first detection of [CII] clustering fluctuations, a signal proportional to the integrated [CII] intensity, summed over all EoR galaxies. TIME-Pilot is thus sensitive to the emission from dwarf galaxies, thought to be responsible for the balance of ionizing UV photons, that will be difficult to detect individually with JWST and ALMA. A detection of [CII] clustering fluctuations would validate current theoretical estimates of the [CII] line as a new cosmological observable, opening the door for a new generation of instruments with advanced technology spectroscopic array focal planes that will map [CII] fluctuations to probe the EoR history of star formation, bubble size, and ionization state. Additionally, TIME-Pilot will produce high signal-to-noise measurements of CO clustering fluctuations, which trace the role of molecular gas in star-forming galaxies at redshifts 0 < z < 2. With its unique atmospheric noise mitigation, TIME-Pilot also significantly improves sensitivity for measuring the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect in galaxy clusters. TIME-Pilot will employ a linear array of spectrometers, each consisting of a parallel-plate diffraction grating. The spectrometer bandwidth covers 185-323 GHz to both probe the entire redshift range of interest and to include channels at the edges of the band for atmospheric noise mitigation. We illuminate the telescope with f/3 horns, which balances the desire to both couple to the sky with the best efficiency per beam, and to pack a large number of horns into the fixed field of view. Feedhorns couple radiation to the waveguide spectrometer gratings. Each spectrometer grating has 190 facets and provides resolving power

  13. Beam experiments towards high-intensity beams in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Montag C.; Ahrens, L.; Brennan, J.M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Mernick, K.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Smith, K.; Than, R.; Thieberger, P.; Yip, K.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2012-05-20

    Proton bunch intensities in RHIC are planned to be increased from 2 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} to 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch to increase the luminosity, together with head-on beam-beam compensation using electron lenses. To study the feasibility of the intensity increase, beam experiments are being performed. Recent experimental results are presented.

  14. Experience from geodetic very long baseline interferometry observations at Onsala using a digital backend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kareinen, N.; Haas, R.

    2015-04-01

    The Onsala Space Observatory has installed a modern digital backend for geodetic and astronomical Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). This system consists of a Digital Base-Band Converter (DBBC) and a Mark 5B+ recorder. From 2011 until late 2014 this new system was run for geodetic VLBI observations in parallel with the old system consisting of a Mark 4 rack and Mark 5A recording system. Several of these observed sessions were correlated at the correlator in Bonn including both data sets. We present results from the analysis and comparison of these sessions. Both the original observed delays and corresponding geodetic parameters are compared. No significant differences are detected, for either the raw observations or for the geodetic parameters. This shows that the digital backend can be used operationally for geodetic VLBI observations.

  15. Time-delayed intensity-interferometry of the emission from ultracold atoms in a steady-state magneto-optical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammed Shafi, K.; Pandey, Deepak; Suryabrahmam, Buti; Girish, B. S.; Ramachandran, Hema

    2016-01-01

    Time-delayed intensity-interferometry (TDII) measurements of the fluorescent emission from an ultracold ensemble of thermal 87Rb atoms in a steady-state magneto-optical trap are presented, which reveal the underlying coherent and incoherent dynamics of the atoms. Measurements carried out with a 5 ns time resolution yielded a second-order intensity correlation function with the theoretically predicted value of 2 at zero delay. In addition coherent Rabi oscillations were seen for up to five full periods—much longer than the spontaneous emission lifetime of the excited state of Rb. The oscillations were damped out by ˜150 ns, and thereafter an exponential decay observed, from which the mean velocity of atoms and thus, the temperature of the ensemble was estimated. The values so obtained compare well with those determined by standard techniques. It is seen that TDII permits a quantitative study of the coherent and incoherent processes, even in a large ensemble of independent atomic emitters in random thermal motion. This measurement of second-order correlation powerful technique can reveal hidden periodicities such as coherent Rabi oscillations that are not directly seen in the emission from a large collection of atoms. In addition it can also reveal information about the mean velocity of the thermal ensemble of emitters, even though the Doppler broadening of emission due to the motion of atoms is smaller than the natural linewidth and is not directly measureable.

  16. How we remember the emotional intensity of past musical experiences

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Thomas; Zimmermann, Doreen; Sedlmeier, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Listening to music usually elicits emotions that can vary considerably in their intensity over the course of listening. Yet, after listening to a piece of music, people are easily able to evaluate the music's overall emotional intensity. There are two different hypotheses about how affective experiences are temporally processed and integrated: (1) all moments' intensities are integrated, resulting in an averaged value; (2) the overall evaluation is built from specific single moments, such as the moments of highest emotional intensity (peaks), the end, or a combination of these. Here we investigated what listeners do when building an overall evaluation of a musical experience. Participants listened to unknown songs and provided moment-to-moment ratings of experienced intensity of emotions. Subsequently, they evaluated the overall emotional intensity of each song. Results indicate that participants' evaluations were predominantly influenced by their average impression but that, in addition, the peaks and end emotional intensities contributed substantially. These results indicate that both types of processes play a role: All moments are integrated into an averaged value but single moments might be assigned a higher value in the calculation of this average. PMID:25177311

  17. Intense Muon Beams for Experiments at Project X

    SciTech Connect

    C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, C. Y. Yoshikawa, V.S. Kashikhin, D.V. Neuffer, J. Miller, R.A. Rimmer

    2011-03-01

    A coherent approach for providing muon beams to several experiments for the intensity-frontier program at Project X is described. Concepts developed for the front end of a muon collider/neutrino factory facility, such as phase rotation and ionization cooling, are applied, but with significant differences. High-intensity experiments typically require high-duty-factor beams pulsed at a time interval commensurate with the muon lifetime. It is challenging to provide large RF voltages at high duty factor, especially in the presence of intense radiation and strong magnetic fields, which may preclude the use of superconducting RF cavities. As an alternative, cavities made of materials such as ultra-pure Al and Be, which become very good –but not super– conductors at cryogenic temperatures, can be used.

  18. An Intensive Cultural Experience in a Rural Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Mary Durand; Olivares, Sergio A.; Kim, Hyun Jung; Beilke, Cheryle

    2003-01-01

    Discusses how, following an intensive 2-day clinical experience for nursing students in a rural, culturally diverse region, student evaluations and papers showed evidence of cultural learning and increased knowledge of rural health care systems. Includes reflections by a teaching associate and two students. (Contains 33 references.) (SK)

  19. Lessons learned from past experience with intensive livestock management systems.

    PubMed

    Cronin, G M; Rault, J L; Glatz, P C

    2014-04-01

    The main impetus for 'modern' intensive animal production occurred after the Second World War, when Western governments developed policies to increase the availability of cheap, safe food for their populations. Livestock benefit under intensive husbandry by protection from environmental extremes and predators, and better nutritional and health management. Nevertheless, there are costs to the animal, such as impaired social behaviour, limited choice of living environment or pen mates, poor environmental stimulation and behavioural restrictions. The rapid progress in genetic selection of production traits has also, in some cases, adversely affected welfare by creating anatomical and metabolic problems. Above all, the intensively housed animal is heavily reliant on the stockperson and, therefore, inadequate care and husbandry practices by the stockperson may be the largest welfare risk. In a future in which the food supply may be limited as the world's population grows and land availability shrinks, intensive animal production is likely to expand. At the same time, ethical considerations surrounding intensive farming practices may also become more prominent. Novel technologies provide the opportunity to enhance both the productivity and welfare of intensively kept animals. Developing countries are also establishing more intensive commercial systems to meet their growing need for animal protein. Intensive livestock production in such countries has the potential for major expansion, particularly if such developments address the key constraints of poor welfare, inadequate nutrition, poor reproduction, poor housing, and high mortality often seen with traditional systems, and if farmer access to emerging market opportunities is improved. However, as shown by previous experience, inadequate regulation and staff who lack the appropriate training to care for the welfare of intensively housed livestock can be major challenges to overcome. PMID:25000786

  20. Estimating storm areal average rainfall intensity in field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Wood, Eric F.

    1994-07-01

    Estimates of areal mean precipitation intensity derived from rain gages are commonly used to assess the performance of rainfall radars and satellite rainfall retrieval algorithms. Areal mean precipitation time series collected during short-duration climate field studies are also used as inputs to water and energy balance models which simulate land-atmosphere interactions during the experiments. In two recent field experiments (1987 First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE) and the Multisensor Airborne Campaign for Hydrology 1990 (MAC-HYDRO '90)) designed to investigate the climatic signatures of land-surface forcings and to test airborne sensors, rain gages were placed over the watersheds of interest. These gages provide the sole means for estimating storm precipitation over these areas, and the gage densities present during these experiments indicate that there is a large uncertainty in estimating areal mean precipitation intensity for single storm events. Using a theoretical model of time- and area-averaged space- time rainfall and a model rainfall generator, the error structure of areal mean precipitation intensity is studied for storms statistically similar to those observed in the FIFE and MAC-HYDRO field experiments. Comparisons of the error versus gage density trade-off curves to those calculated using the storm observations show that the rainfall simulator can provide good estimates of the expected measurement error given only the expected intensity, coefficient of variation, and rain cell diameter or correlation length scale, and that these errors can quickly become very large (in excess of 20%) for certain storms measured with a network whose size is below a "critical" gage density. Because the mean storm rainfall error is particularly sensitive to the correlation length, it is important that future field experiments include radar and/or dense rain gage networks capable of accurately characterizing the

  1. More Intense Experiences, Less Intense Forecasts: Why People Overweight Probability Specifications in Affective Forecasts

    PubMed Central

    Buechel, Eva C.; Zhang, Jiao; Morewedge, Carey K.; Vosgerau, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    We propose that affective forecasters overestimate the extent to which experienced hedonic responses to an outcome are influenced by the probability of its occurrence. The experience of an outcome (e.g., winning a gamble) is typically more affectively intense than the simulation of that outcome (e.g., imagining winning a gamble) upon which the affective forecast for it is based. We suggest that, as a result, experiencers allocate a larger share of their attention toward the outcome (e.g., winning the gamble) and less to its probability specifications than do affective forecasters. Consequently, hedonic responses to an outcome are less sensitive to its probability specifications than are affective forecasts for that outcome. The results of 6 experiments provide support for our theory. Affective forecasters overestimated how sensitive experiencers would be to the probability of positive and negative outcomes (Experiments 1 and 2). Consistent with our attentional account, differences in sensitivity to probability specifications disappeared when the attention of forecasters was diverted from probability specifications (Experiment 3) or when the attention of experiencers was drawn toward probability specifications (Experiment 4). Finally, differences in sensitivity to probability specifications between forecasters and experiencers were diminished when the forecasted outcome was more affectively intense (Experiments 5 and 6). PMID:24128184

  2. Optical Interferometry Motivation and History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter

    2006-01-01

    A history and motivation of stellar interferometry is presented. The topics include: 1) On Tides, Organ Pipes, and Soap Bubbles; 2) Armand Hippolyte Fizeau (1819-1896); 3) Fizeau Suggests Stellar Interferometry 1867; 4) Edouard Stephan (1837-1923); 5) Foucault Refractor; 6) Albert A. Michelson (1852-1931); 7) On the Application of Interference Methods to Astronomy (1890); 8) Moons of Jupiter (1891); 9) Other Applications in 19th Century; 10) Timeline of Interferometry to 1938; 11) 30 years goes by; 12) Mount Wilson Observatory; 13) Michelson's 20 ft Interferometer; 14) Was Michelson Influenced by Fizeau? 15) Work Continues in the 1920s and 30s; 16) 50 ft Interferometer (1931-1938); 17) Light Paths in the 50 ft Interferometer; 18) Ground-level at the 50 ft; 19) F.G. Pease (1881-1938); 20) Timeline of Optical Interferometry to 1970; 21) A New Type of Stellar Interferometer (1956); 22) Intensity Interferometer (1963- 1976; 23) Robert Hanbury Brown; 24) Interest in Optical Interferometry in the 1960s; 25) Interferometry in the Early 1970s; and 26) A New Frontier is Opened up in 1974.

  3. A Review of Astrophysics Experiments on Intense Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B.A.; Arnett, D.; Drake, R.P.; Takabe, H.

    1999-03-03

    Astrophysics traditionally has been the domain of large astronomical observatories and theorists' computers, the former producing images from deep space, and the latter constructing intricate models to explain the observations. A component often missing has been the ability to quantitatively test the theories and models in an experimental setting where the initial and final states are well characterized. In a new development, intense lasers are being used to recreate aspects of astrophysical phenomena in the laboratory, allowing the creation of experimental testbeds where theory and modeling can be quantitatively compared with data. We summarize here several areas of astrophysics: supernovae, supernova remnants, gamma-ray bursts, and giant planets. In each of these areas, experiments are under development at intense laser facilities to test and refine our understanding of these phenomena.

  4. Design of experiment for earth rotation and baseline parameter determination from very long baseline interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermanis, A.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of recovering earth rotation and network geometry (baseline) parameters are emphasized. The numerical simulated experiments performed are set up in an environment where station coordinates vary with respect to inertial space according to a simulated earth rotation model similar to the actual but unknown rotation of the earth. The basic technique of VLBI and its mathematical model are presented. The parametrization of earth rotation chosen is described and the resulting model is linearized. A simple analysis of the geometry of the observations leads to some useful hints on achieving maximum sensitivity of the observations with respect to the parameters considered. The basic philosophy for the simulation of data and their analysis through standard least squares adjustment techniques is presented. A number of characteristic network designs based on present and candidate station locations are chosen. The results of the simulations for each design are presented together with a summary of the conclusions.

  5. Meson interferometry in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: Recent HBT results form CERN experiment NA44; interferometry results from E802/E859/E866; recent results on two particle correlations from E814; source sizes from CERN data; intermittency and interferometry; Bose-Einstein correlations in 200A GeV S+Au collisions; HBT correlations at STAR; HBT interferometry with PHENIX; HBT calculations from ARC; three pion correlations; and pion correlations in proton-induced reactions.

  6. High intensity positron beam and angular correlation experiments at Livermore

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Rosenberg, I.J.; Meyer, P.; Fluss, M.J.

    1985-03-01

    A positron beam apparatus that produces a variable energy positron beam with sufficient intensity to perform new positron experiments in an ultrahigh vacuum environment has been installed at the Lawrence Livermore 100 MeV electron linac. We have installed two large area position sensitive gamma-ray detectors to measure angular correlations in two dimensions and a separate highly collimated detector to measure positronium energy distributions by time-of-flight velocity determination. Data from measurements on single crystals of Cu will be described.

  7. Expressing death risk as condensed life experience and death intensity.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, John P A

    2013-08-01

    Some risk exposures, including many medical and surgical procedures, typically carry hazards of death that are difficult to convey and appreciate in absolute terms. I propose presenting the death risk as a condensed life experience (i.e., the equivalent amount of life T that would carry the same cumulative mortality hazard for a person of the same age and sex based on life tables). For example, if the risk of death during an elective 1-hour procedure is 0.01%, and same-age and same-sex people have a 0.01% death risk over 1 month, one can inform the patient that "this procedure carries the same death risk as living 1 month of normal life." Comparative standards from other risky activities or from a person with the same disease at the same stage and same predictive profile could also be used. A complementary metric that may be useful to consider is the death intensity. The death intensity λ is the hazard function that shows the fold-risk estimate of dying compared with the reference person. The death intensity can vary substantially for different phases of the event, operation, or procedure (e.g., intraoperative, early postoperative, late postoperative), and this variability may also be useful to convey. T will vary depending on the time window for which it is computed. I present examples for calculating T and λ using literature data on accidents, ascent to Mount Everest, and medical and surgical procedures. PMID:23579043

  8. Observational Strategies of Cosmic Microwave Background Temperature and Polarization Interferometry Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chan-Gyung; Ng, Kin-Wang; Park, Changbom; Liu, Guo-Chin; Umetsu, Keiichi

    2003-05-01

    We have simulated the interferometric observation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization fluctuations. We have constructed data pipelines from the time-ordered raw visibility samples to the CMB power spectra that utilize the methods of data compression, maximum likelihood analysis, and optimal subspace filtering. They are customized for three observational strategies: the single pointing, the mosaicking, and the drift-scanning. For each strategy, derived are the optimal strategy parameters that yield band power estimates with minimum uncertainty. The results are general and can be applied to any close-packed array on a single platform such as the CBI and the forthcoming AMiBA experiments. We have also studied the effect of rotation of the array platform on the band power correlation by simulating the CBI single-pointing observation. It is found that the band power anticorrelations can be reduced by rotating the platform and thus densely sampling the visibility plane. This enables us to increase the resolution of the power spectrum in the l-space down to the limit of the sampling theorem (Δl=226~π/θ), which is narrower by a factor of about sqrt(2) than the resolution limit (Δl~300) used in the recent CBI single-pointing observation. The validity of this idea is demonstrated for a two-element interferometer that samples visibilities uniformly in the uv-annulus. From the fact that the visibilities are the Fourier modes of the CMB field convolved with the beam, a fast unbiased estimator (FUE) of the CMB power spectra is developed and tested. It is shown that the FUE gives results very close to those from the quadratic estimator method without requiring large computer resources even though uncertainties in the results increase.

  9. Two-Proton Intensity Interferometry for Impact - Selected ARGON-36 + SCANDIUM-45 Collisions at E/a = 80, 120 and 160 Mev.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handzy, Damian Orest

    1995-01-01

    Impact-parameter selected two-proton intensity interferometry is used to study the space-time characteristics of emitting sources formed in medium-energy heavy-ion collisions. Building on a previous study for the same system at a lower energy, a high-resolution 56-element Si-CsI(Tl) hodoscope was used to collect single- and two-proton yields, for collisions of ^{36}Ar + ^{45}Sc at E/A = 120 MeV and 160 MeV. Coincident measurements of other charged particles emitted in the reaction were made with the MSU 4pi Array, providing information about the impact-parameter of the collision. The Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) equation is used to predict the emission of protons from the reaction zone created in heavy-ion collisions. The Koonin-Pratt formalism is then used to calculate theoretical correlation functions from the predicted single-particle phase space probability density. Dependencies of predicted longitudinal and transverse correlation functions on source velocity are examined for central and peripheral ^ {36}A + ^{45} Sc collisions at E/A = 80 MeV, and are compared to previously measured values. The usefulness of the correlation function to distinguish exotically shaped sources, predicted by microscopic transport models at this energy, is investigated. Consistent with previous measurements, proton correlations are shown to have larger peaks for more energetic protons, regardless of impact-parameter. However, the measured correlations are shown to decrease as beam energy increases from E/A = 80 to 160 MeV, indicating that proton -emitting sources formed in more energetic collisions appear to have larger space-time extents. For central collisions at E/A = 160 MeV, the correlation function shows no dependence on the momentum of the proton pair, suggesting that the source emits fast and slow protons on similar time scales. The BUU theory is shown to over predict the magnitude of the measured correlations for the reactions at E/A = 120 and 160 MeV, possibly because

  10. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2010-03-16

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  11. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-08-01

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  12. Family experience survey in the surgical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Twohig, Bridget; Manasia, Anthony; Bassily-Marcus, Adel; Oropello, John; Gayton, Matthew; Gaffney, Christine; Kohli-Seth, Roopa

    2015-11-01

    The experience of critical care is stressful for both patients and their families. This is especially true when patients are not able to make their own care decisions. This article details the creation of a Family Experience Survey in a surgical intensive care unit (SICU) to capture and improve overall experience. Kolcaba's "Enhanced Comfort Theory" provided the theoretical basis for question formation, specifically in regards to the four aspects of comfort: "physical," "psycho-spiritual," "sociocultural" and "environmental." Survey results were analyzed in real-time to identify and implement interventions needed for issues raised. Overall, there was a high level of satisfaction reported especially with quality of care provided to patients, communication and availability of nurses and doctors, explanations from staff, inclusion in decision making, the needs of patients being met, quality of care provided to patients and cleanliness of the unit. It was noted that 'N/A' was indicated for cultural needs and spiritual needs, a chaplain now rounds on all patients daily to ensure these services are more consistently offered. In addition, protocols for doctor communication with families, palliative care consults, daily bleach cleaning of high touch areas in patient rooms and nurse-led progressive mobility have been implemented. Enhanced comfort theory enabled the opportunity to identify and provide a more 'broad' approach to care for patients and families. PMID:26608426

  13. High-intensity cyclotron for the IsoDAR experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, D.; IsoDAR Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    The IsoDAR experiment is the MIT proposal to investigate about several neutrino properties, in order to explain some anomalies experimentally observed. It requires 10mA of proton beam at the energy of 60MeV to produce a high-intensity electron antineutrino flux from the production and the decay of 8Li: it is an ambitious goal for the accelerator design, due also to the fact that the machine has to be placed near a neutrino detector, like KAMLAND or WATCHMAN, located in underground sites. A compact cyclotron able to accelerate H2+ molecule beam up to energy of 60MeV/amu is under study. The critical issues of this machine concern the beam injection due to the effects of space charge, the efficiency of the beam extraction and the technical solutions needed to the machine assembly. Here, the innovative solutions and the preliminary results achieved by the IsoDAR team are discussed.

  14. Forest Inventory Attribute Estimation Using Airborne Laser Scanning, Aerial Stereo Imagery, Radargrammetry and Interferometry-Finnish Experiences of the 3d Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holopainen, M.; Vastaranta, M.; Karjalainen, M.; Karila, K.; Kaasalainen, S.; Honkavaara, E.; Hyyppä, J.

    2015-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) remote sensing has enabled detailed mapping of terrain and vegetation heights. Consequently, forest inventory attributes are estimated more and more using point clouds and normalized surface models. In practical applications, mainly airborne laser scanning (ALS) has been used in forest resource mapping. The current status is that ALS-based forest inventories are widespread, and the popularity of ALS has also raised interest toward alternative 3D techniques, including airborne and spaceborne techniques. Point clouds can be generated using photogrammetry, radargrammetry and interferometry. Airborne stereo imagery can be used in deriving photogrammetric point clouds, as very-high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data are used in radargrammetry and interferometry. ALS is capable of mapping both the terrain and tree heights in mixed forest conditions, which is an advantage over aerial images or SAR data. However, in many jurisdictions, a detailed ALS-based digital terrain model is already available, and that enables linking photogrammetric or SAR-derived heights to heights above the ground. In other words, in forest conditions, the height of single trees, height of the canopy and/or density of the canopy can be measured and used in estimation of forest inventory attributes. In this paper, first we review experiences of the use of digital stereo imagery and spaceborne SAR in estimation of forest inventory attributes in Finland, and we compare techniques to ALS. In addition, we aim to present new implications based on our experiences.

  15. Atom Interferometry on Sounding Rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, S. T.; Lachmann, M. D.; Becker, D.; Grosse, J.; Popp, M. A.; Wang, J. B.; Wendrich, T.; Rasel, E. M.; Quantus Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Atom interferometry in microgravity offers the possibility to perform high precision measurements of inertial forces complementary to experiments based on classical test masses. The ultimate goal is to perform these quantum measurements in space on board dedicated satellite missions. To reach this, a series of pathfinder microgravity experiments with cold atoms were build. The latest installment of these are conducted on sounding rockets. Here we give a short motivation of atom interferometry in space, an overview of the techniques used, and an introduction of the current mission MAIUS- 1.

  16. Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kasevich, Mark

    2008-05-08

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton's constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gyroscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be used to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  17. Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Kasevich

    2008-05-07

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton’s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  18. Atom Interferometry

    ScienceCinema

    Mark Kasevich

    2010-01-08

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton?s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  19. Data System Architectures: Recent Experiences from Data Intensive Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanisamy, G.; Frame, M. T.; Boden, T.; Devarakonda, R.; Zolly, L.; Hutchison, V.; Latysh, N.; Krassovski, M.; Killeffer, T.; Hook, L.

    2014-12-01

    U.S. Federal agencies are frequently trying to address new data intensive projects that require next generation of data system architectures. This presentation will focus on two new such architectures: USGS's Science Data Catalog (SDC) and DOE's Next Generation Ecological Experiments - Arctic Data System. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed a Science Data Catalog (data.usgs.gov) to include records describing datasets, data collections, and observational or remotely-sensed data. The system was built using service oriented architecture and allows USGS scientists and data providers to create and register their data using either a standards-based metadata creation form or simply to register their already-created metadata records with the USGS SDC Dashboard. This dashboard then compiles the harvested metadata records and sends them to the post processing and indexing service using the JSON format. The post processing service, with the help of various ontologies and other geo-spatial validation services, auto-enhances these harvested metadata records and creates a Lucene index using the Solr enterprise search platform. Ultimately, metadata is made available via the SDC search interface. DOE's Next Generation Ecological Experiments (NGEE) Arctic project deployed a data system that allows scientists to prepare, publish, archive, and distribute data from field collections, lab experiments, sensors, and simulated modal outputs. This architecture includes a metadata registration form, data uploading and sharing tool, a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) tool, a Drupal based content management tool (http://ngee-arctic.ornl.gov), and a data search and access tool based on ORNL's Mercury software (http://mercury.ornl.gov). The team also developed Web-metric tools and a data ingest service to visualize geo-spatial and temporal observations.

  20. Dual-wavelength in-line phase-shifting interferometry based on two dc-term-suppressed intensities with a special phase shift for quantitative phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoqing; Wang, Yawei; Xu, Yuanyuan; Jin, Weifeng

    2016-06-01

    To efficiently promote the phase retrieval in quantitative phase imaging, a new approach of quantitative phase extraction is proposed based on two intensities with dual wavelength after filtering the corresponding dc terms for each wavelength, in which a special phase shift is used. In this approach, only the combination of the phase-shifting technique and subtraction procedures is needed, and no additional algorithms are required. The thickness of the phase object can be achieved from the phase image, which is related to the synthetic beat wavelength. The feasibility of this method is verified by the simulated experiments of the optically transparent objects. PMID:27244381

  1. Latinos and Anglos: Cultural Experiences of Grief Intensity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabowski, Jo-Anne; Frantz, Thomas T.

    1993-01-01

    Examined grief intensity among 50 Latino and 50 Anglo Americans. Latinos grieving sudden death had significantly greater grief intensity than Latinos grieving expected death and Anglos grieving either sudden or expected death. Funeral attendance, time since death, closeness of relationships had no significant effect on grief intensity, nor did…

  2. An in situ method for diagnosing phase shifting interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, J.; Ma, D.; Zhang, H.; Xie, Y.

    2016-05-01

    Current diagnosing phase shifting interferometry is a time and funds consuming process. Hence a brief and effective method is necessary to satisfy the real-time testing. In this paper, mathematical solutions for errors were deduced from the difference of intensity patterns. Based on the diversity of error distributions, an effective method for distinguishing and diagnosing the error sources is proposed and verified by an elaborative designed simulation. In the actual comparison experiment, vibration, phase-shift error and intensity fluctuation were imposed to demonstrate this method. The results showed that this method can be applied into the real-time measurement and provide an in situ diagnosing technique.

  3. Characterization of Surface Modifications by White Light Interferometry: Applications in Ion Sputtering, Laser Ablation, and Tribology Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Baryshev, Sergey V.; Erck, Robert A.; Moore, Jerry F.; Zinovev, Alexander V.; Tripa, C. Emil; Veryovkin, Igor V.

    2013-01-01

    In materials science and engineering it is often necessary to obtain quantitative measurements of surface topography with micrometer lateral resolution. From the measured surface, 3D topographic maps can be subsequently analyzed using a variety of software packages to extract the information that is needed. In this article we describe how white light interferometry, and optical profilometry (OP) in general, combined with generic surface analysis software, can be used for materials science and engineering tasks. In this article, a number of applications of white light interferometry for investigation of surface modifications in mass spectrometry, and wear phenomena in tribology and lubrication are demonstrated. We characterize the products of the interaction of semiconductors and metals with energetic ions (sputtering), and laser irradiation (ablation), as well as ex situ measurements of wear of tribological test specimens. Specifically, we will discuss: Aspects of traditional ion sputtering-based mass spectrometry such as sputtering rates/yields measurements on Si and Cu and subsequent time-to-depth conversion. Results of quantitative characterization of the interaction of femtosecond laser irradiation with a semiconductor surface. These results are important for applications such as ablation mass spectrometry, where the quantities of evaporated material can be studied and controlled via pulse duration and energy per pulse. Thus, by determining the crater geometry one can define depth and lateral resolution versus experimental setup conditions. Measurements of surface roughness parameters in two dimensions, and quantitative measurements of the surface wear that occur as a result of friction and wear tests. Some inherent drawbacks, possible artifacts, and uncertainty assessments of the white light interferometry approach will be discussed and explained. PMID:23486006

  4. High frequency intensity fluctuations: Comparison of theory with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Steven D.; Bradley, David L.; Culver, R. Lee

    2003-10-01

    Amplitude fluctuations were measured during August 2002 near San Diego using 20 and 40 kHz cw and fm signals. Source-receiver separation was 1 km; source depths were 10 m to 67 m; receiver hydrophone depths were 44 m to 217 m. A 15-element chain of CTD sensors was towed to measure horizontal temperature and salinity variation with 1m resolution. Theory exists explaining the relationship between amplitude fluctuations and acoustic frequency, source-receiver separation, and index of refraction patch size in the ocean [e.g., Flatte et al., Sound Transmission Through a Fluctuating Ocean (Cambridge Press, 1979); Uscinsky et al., ``Intensity Fluctuations. Part 1: Theory,'' J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 74 (1983)]. However, the amplitude fluctuations we observe are much lower than that predicted by theory [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 113, 2333 (2003)]. Our frequencies are 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than those used in the experiments upon which the theory is based and our propagation ranges are considerable shorter 1 km versus many km. Results will be discussed from a more detailed analysis of the ray path locations within the water column activity (Langmuir cell formation and internal wave passage).

  5. Quantum Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2000-01-01

    Recently, several researchers, including yours truly, have been able to demonstrate theoretically that quantum photon entanglement has the potential to also revolutionize the entire field of optical interferometry, by providing many orders of magnitude improvement in interferometer sensitivity. The quantum entangled photon interferometer approach is very general and applies to many types of interferometers. In particular, without nonlocal entanglement, a generic classical interferometer has a statistical-sampling shot-noise limited sensitivity that scales like 1/Sqrt[N], where N is the number of particles (photons, electrons, atoms, neutrons) passing through the interferometer per unit time. However, if carefully prepared quantum correlations are engineered between the particles, then the interferometer sensitivity improves by a factor of Sqrt[N] (square root of N) to scale like 1/N, which is the limit imposed by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. For optical (laser) interferometers operating at milliwatts of optical power, this quantum sensitivity boost corresponds to an eight-order-of-magnitude improvement of signal to noise. Applications are to tests of General Relativity such as ground and orbiting optical interferometers for gravity wave detection, Laser Interferometer Gravity Observatory (LIGO) and the European Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), respectively.

  6. Investigating the Mercalli Intensity Scale through "Lived Experience"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The modified Mercalli (MM) intensity scale is composed of 12 increasing levels of intensity that range from imperceptible shaking to catastrophic destruction and is designated by Roman numerals I through XII. Although qualitative in nature, it can provide a more concrete model for middle and high school students striving to understand the dynamics…

  7. Intense convection over West Africa during AMMA SOP3 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenouo, André; Sall, Saïdou Moustapha; Badiane, Daouda; Gaye, Amadou Thierno; Kamga Mkankam, F.

    2016-11-01

    ERA-Interim product from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) assimilation of African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) resources, Meteosat satellite images, and synoptic observations were used to study local- and regional-scale environments associated with intense convective systems during the AMMA-SOP3 experiment over West Africa in the Northern Hemisphere of summer 2006. The convective system, from the 21st to 23rd of August 2006, was more active at 0000 and 1800 UTC showing diurnal cycle of deep convection over West Africa where the African easterly waves (AEWs) are developed downstream. Downstream barotropic and baroclinic energy conversions associated with strong AEWs are important for the maintenance of AEW activity in West Africa. Barotropic energy conversions dominate south of the African easterly jet (AEJ), while baroclinic energy conversions are most important north of the AEJ. From a dynamical viewpoint, the low-level vorticity presents strong positive values over the sea and Sahara zone, indicating that exists on the cyclonic shear side of the African easterly jet, which is consistent with baroclinic growth. The 925-hPa equivalent potential temperature structure show a maximum over the Sahara which corresponds to the depression observed in this region. A mosaic of three hourly infrared (IR) satellite images, depicts a very distinct signal from an initial region of convection, developing through several stages and moving off the African coast. These observations, along with those available from the World Weather Watch, provide an opportunity to carry out numerical weather prediction (NWP) studies over West Africa utilizing high resolution limited area models.

  8. Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokberg, Ole J.

    1988-01-01

    The basic principles of electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) are described, stressing its close similarity to hologram interferometry. The technique's applications for vibration and deformation testing within industrial and medical research are outlined. Future developments are discussed.

  9. History of Stellar Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter R.

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the history of stellar interferometry from the suggestion of Fizeau that stellar interferometry was possible,to the use of the Mark I, II and III for astrometry. Photographs, and parts of original articles are presented.

  10. Precision Selenodesy via Differential Very-Long-Baseline Interferometry. Ph.D. Thesis; [Apollo lunar surface experiments package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The technique of differential very-long baseline interferometry was used to measure the relative positions of the ALSEP transmitters at the Apollo 12, 14, 15, 16, and 17 lunar landing sites with uncertainties less than 0.005 of geocentric arc. These measurements yielded improved determinations of the selenodetic coordinates of the Apollo landing sites, and of the physical libration of the moon. By means of a new device, the differential Doppler receiver (DDR), instrumental errors were reduced to less than the equivalent of 0.001. DDRs were installed in six stations of the NASA spaceflight tracking and data network and used in an extensive program of observations beginning in March 1973.

  11. Analysis of the feasibility of an experiment to measure carbon monoxide in the atmosphere. [using remote platform interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bortner, M. H.; Alyea, F. N.; Grenda, R. N.; Liebling, G. R.; Levy, G. M.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility of measuring atmospheric carbon monoxide from a remote platform using the correlation interferometry technique was considered. It has been determined that CO data can be obtained with an accuracy of 10 percent using this technique on the first overtone band of CO at 2.3 mu. That band has been found to be much more suitable than the stronger fundamental band at 4.6 mu. Calculations for both wavelengths are presented which illustrate the effects of atmospheric temperature profiles, inversion layers, ground temperature and emissivity, CO profile, reflectivity, and atmospheric pressure. The applicable radiative transfer theory on which these calculations are based is described together with the principles of the technique.

  12. Time-Delay Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhurandhar, Sanjeev V.; Tinto, Massimo

    2005-07-01

    Equal-arm interferometric detectors of gravitational radiation allow phase measurements many orders of magnitude below the intrinsic phase stability of the laser injecting light into their arms. This is because the noise in the laser light is common to both arms, experiencing exactly the same delay, and thus cancels when it is differenced at the photo detector. In this situation, much lower level secondary noises then set the overall performance. If, however, the two arms have different lengths (as will necessarily be the case with space-borne interferometers), the laser noise experiences different delays in the two arms and will hence not directly cancel at the detector. In order to solve this problem, a technique involving heterodyne interferometry with unequal arm lengths and independent phase-difference readouts has been proposed. It relies on properly time-shifting and linearly combining independent Doppler measurements, and for this reason it has been called Time-Delay Interferometry (TDI). This article provides an overview of the theory and mathematical foundations of TDI as it will be implemented by the forthcoming space-based interferometers such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission. We have purposely left out from this first version of our "Living Review" article on TDI all the results of more practical and experimental nature, as well as all the aspects of TDI that the data analysts will need to account for when analyzing the LISA TDI data combinations. Our forthcoming "second edition" of this review paper will include these topics.

  13. High intensity muon beam source for neutrino beam experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal Sayed, Hisham

    2015-09-01

    High intensity muon beams are essential for Muon accelerators like Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders. In this study we report on a global optimization of the muon beam production and capture based on end-to-end simulations of the Muon Front End. The study includes the pion beam production target geometry, capture field profile, and forming muon beam into microbunches for further acceleration. The interplay between the transverse and longitudinal beam dynamics during the capture and transport of muon beam is evaluated and discussed. The goal of the optimization is to provide a set of design parameters that delivers high intensity muon beam that could be fit within the acceptance of a muon beam accelerator.

  14. The Experience of Pedagogic Intensity in Outdoor Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foran, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    This paper is a phenomenological examination of Nova Scotian teachers leading children outside the normal school environment for instructional purposes. Phenomenology can examine the everyday, taken-for-granted phenomena in human experiences. Absent in experiential research is the focus on teachers' experience in outside programs. In addressing…

  15. Precision Geodesy via Radio Interferometry.

    PubMed

    Hinteregger, H F; Shapiro, I I; Robertson, D S; Knight, C A; Ergas, R A; Whitney, A R; Rogers, A E; Moran, J M; Clark, T A; Burke, B F

    1972-10-27

    Very-long-baseline interferometry experiments, involving observations of extragalactic radio sources, were performed in 1969 to determine the vector separations between antenna sites in Massachusetts and West Virginia. The 845.130-kilometer baseline was estimated from two separate experiments. The results agreed with each other to within 2 meters in all three components and with a special geodetic survey to within 2 meters in length; the differences in baseline direction as determined by the survey and by interferometry corresponded to discrepancies of about 5 meters. The experiments also yielded positions for nine extragalactic radio sources, most to within 1 arc second, and allowed the hydrogen maser clocks at the two sites to be synchronized a posteriori with an uncertainty of only a few nanoseconds. PMID:17815361

  16. Two-center interferometry and decoherence effects

    SciTech Connect

    Feagin, James M.

    2006-02-15

    We analyze reduced fringe visibilities and decoherence effects in two-center interference experiments involving photon scattering and trapped-ion and atom interferometry. We introduce an impulse approximation to analyze the resulting photon-atom momentum entanglement. We find that the simple decoherence due to photon scattering of double-humped center-of-mass states of a single trapped ion strongly resembles that observed in atom interferometry.

  17. Incidence of Near-Death and Intense Spiritual Experiences in an Intergenerational Sample: An Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, L. Eugene; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Determined incidence of near-death and intense spiritual experiences for a sample of 305 persons from ages 17-85. Found incidence of near-death reports did not vary significantly by age of respondents, but elderly respondents were significantly less likely to report intense spiritual experiences. (Author)

  18. Correlating Sampling and Intensity Statistics in Nanoparticle Diffraction Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ozturk, Hande; Yan, Hanfei; Hill, John P.; Noyan, I. Cevdet

    2015-08-01

    In this article, [Öztürk, Yan, Hill & Noyan (2014). J. Appl. Cryst. 47, 1016-1025] it was shown that the sampling statistics of diffracting particle populations within a polycrystalline ensemble depended on the size of the constituent crystallites: broad X-ray peak breadths enabled some nano-sized particles to contribute more than one diffraction spot to Debye-Scherrer rings. Here it is shown that the equations proposed by Alexander, Klug & Kummer [J. Appl. Phys. (1948), 19, 742-753] (AKK) to link diffracting particle and diffracted intensity statistics are not applicable if the constituent crystallites of the powder are below 10 nm. In this size range, (i) the one-to-one correspondence between diffracting particles and Laue spots assumed in the AKK analysis is not satisfied, and (ii) the crystallographic correlation between Laue spots originating from the same grain invalidates the assumption that all diffracting plane normals are randomly oriented and uncorrelated. Such correlation produces unexpected results in the selection of diffracting grains. Three or more Laue spots from a given grain for a particular reflection can only be observed at certain wavelengths. In addition, correcting the diffracted intensity values by the traditional Lorentz term, 1/cos [theta], to compensate for the variation of particles sampled within a reflection band does not maintain fidelity to the number of poles contributing to the diffracted signal. A new term, cos [theta]B/cos [theta], corrects this problem.

  19. Correlating sampling and intensity statistics in nanoparticle diffraction experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Öztürk, Hande; Yan, Hanfei; Hill, John P.; Noyan, I. Cevdet

    2015-07-28

    It is shown in a previous article [Öztürk, Yan, Hill & Noyan (2014).J. Appl. Cryst.47, 1016–1025] that the sampling statistics of diffracting particle populations within a polycrystalline ensemble depended on the size of the constituent crystallites: broad X-ray peak breadths enabled some nano-sized particles to contribute more than one diffraction spot to Debye–Scherrer rings. Here it is shown that the equations proposed by Alexander, Klug & Kummer [J. Appl. Phys.(1948),19, 742–753] (AKK) to link diffracting particle and diffracted intensity statistics are not applicable if the constituent crystallites of the powder are below 10 nm. In this size range, (i) themore » one-to-one correspondence between diffracting particles and Laue spots assumed in the AKK analysis is not satisfied, and (ii) the crystallographic correlation between Laue spots originating from the same grain invalidates the assumption that all diffracting plane normals are randomly oriented and uncorrelated. Such correlation produces unexpected results in the selection of diffracting grains. For example, three or more Laue spots from a given grain for a particular reflection can only be observed at certain wavelengths. In addition, correcting the diffracted intensity values by the traditional Lorentz term, 1/cos θ, to compensate for the variation of particles sampled within a reflection band does not maintain fidelity to the number of poles contributing to the diffracted signal. A new term, cos θB/cos θ, corrects this problem.« less

  20. Deep frequency modulation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Gerberding, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Laser interferometry with pm/Hz precision and multi-fringe dynamic range at low frequencies is a core technology to measure the motion of various objects (test masses) in space and ground based experiments for gravitational wave detection and geodesy. Even though available interferometer schemes are well understood, their construction remains complex, often involving, for example, the need to build quasi-monolithic optical benches with dozens of components. In recent years techniques have been investigated that aim to reduce this complexity by combining phase modulation techniques with sophisticated digital readout algorithms. This article presents a new scheme that uses strong laser frequency modulations in combination with the deep phase modulation readout algorithm to construct simpler and easily scalable interferometers. PMID:26072834

  1. Correlating sampling and intensity statistics in nanoparticle diffraction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Öztürk, Hande; Yan, Hanfei; Hill, John P.; Noyan, I. Cevdet

    2015-07-28

    It is shown in a previous article [Öztürk, Yan, Hill & Noyan (2014).J. Appl. Cryst.47, 1016–1025] that the sampling statistics of diffracting particle populations within a polycrystalline ensemble depended on the size of the constituent crystallites: broad X-ray peak breadths enabled some nano-sized particles to contribute more than one diffraction spot to Debye–Scherrer rings. Here it is shown that the equations proposed by Alexander, Klug & Kummer [J. Appl. Phys.(1948),19, 742–753] (AKK) to link diffracting particle and diffracted intensity statistics are not applicable if the constituent crystallites of the powder are below 10 nm. In this size range, (i) the one-to-one correspondence between diffracting particles and Laue spots assumed in the AKK analysis is not satisfied, and (ii) the crystallographic correlation between Laue spots originating from the same grain invalidates the assumption that all diffracting plane normals are randomly oriented and uncorrelated. Such correlation produces unexpected results in the selection of diffracting grains. For example, three or more Laue spots from a given grain for a particular reflection can only be observed at certain wavelengths. In addition, correcting the diffracted intensity values by the traditional Lorentz term, 1/cos θ, to compensate for the variation of particles sampled within a reflection band does not maintain fidelity to the number of poles contributing to the diffracted signal. A new term, cos θB/cos θ, corrects this problem.

  2. Soft x-ray interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of the soft x-ray interferometry workshop held at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory was to discuss with the scientific community the proposed technical design of the soft x-ray Fourier-transform spectrometer being developed at the ALS. Different design strategies for the instrument`s components were discussed, as well as detection methods, signal processing issues, and how to meet the manufacturing tolerances that are necessary for the instrument to achieve the desired levels of performance. Workshop participants were encouraged to report on their experiences in the field of Fourier transform spectroscopy. The ALS is developing a Fourier transform spectrometer that is intended to operate up to 100 eV. The motivation is solely improved resolution and not the throughput (Jaquinot) or multiplex (Fellgett) advantage, neither of which apply for the sources and detectors used in this spectral range. The proposed implementation of this is via a Mach-Zehnder geometry that has been (1) distorted from a square to a rhombus to get grazing incidence of a suitable angle for 100 eV and (2) provided with a mirror-motion system to make the path difference between the interfering beams tunable. The experiment consists of measuring the emergent light intensity (I(x)) as a function of the path difference (x). The resolving power of the system is limited by the amount of path difference obtainable that is 1 cm (one million half-waves at 200{angstrom} wavelength) in the design thus allowing a resolving power of one million. The free spectral range of the system is limited by the closeness with which the function I(x) is sampled. It is proposed to illuminate a helium absorption cell with roughly 1%-band-width light from a monochromator thus allowing one hundred aliases without spectral overlap even for sampling of I(x) at one hundredth of the Nyquist frequency.

  3. Simulations for single-dish intensity mapping experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigot-Sazy, M.-A.; Dickinson, C.; Battye, R. A.; Browne, I. W. A.; Ma, Y.-Z.; Maffei, B.; Noviello, F.; Remazeilles, M.; Wilkinson, P. N.

    2015-12-01

    H I intensity mapping is an emerging tool to probe dark energy. Observations of the redshifted H I signal will be contaminated by instrumental noise, atmospheric and Galactic foregrounds. The latter is expected to be four orders of magnitude brighter than the H I emission we wish to detect. We present a simulation of single-dish observations including an instrumental noise model with 1/f and white noise, and sky emission with a diffuse Galactic foreground and H I emission. We consider two foreground cleaning methods: spectral parametric fitting and principal component analysis. For a smooth frequency spectrum of the foreground and instrumental effects, we find that the parametric fitting method provides residuals that are still contaminated by foreground and 1/f noise, but the principal component analysis can remove this contamination down to the thermal noise level. This method is robust for a range of different models of foreground and noise, and so constitutes a promising way to recover the H I signal from the data. However, it induces a leakage of the cosmological signal into the subtracted foreground of around 5 per cent. The efficiency of the component separation methods depends heavily on the smoothness of the frequency spectrum of the foreground and the 1/f noise. We find that as long as the spectral variations over the band are slow compared to the channel width, the foreground cleaning method still works.

  4. Scanning beam switch experiment for intense rf power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, Stanley, Jr.; Babcock, Steven R.; Wilson, J. M.; Adler, Richard J.

    1991-04-01

    1407_57The SBS_1 experiment at Sandia National Laboratories is designed to demonstrate the feasibility of the Scanning Beam Switch for high-power rf generation. The primary application is to pulsed rf linacs and high-frequency induction accelerators. It is expected that the apparatus will generate rf output power exceeding 100 MW at 50 MHz over a 5 microsecond(s) pulse. The device can operate as an oscillator or high gain amplifier. To achieve the capability for long-macropulse and high-duty-cycle operation, SBS_1 uses a large dispenser cathode and vacuum triode input driver.

  5. Variable rainfall intensity during soil erosion experiments at the laboratory rainfall simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laburda, Tomas; Schwarzova, Pavla; Krasa, Josef

    2016-04-01

    Experimental research of soil erosion at the laboratory rainfall simulator at the CTU in Prague continued with 11th soil set Trebesice III in 2014/2015. Standard simulations with constant rainfall intensity were complemented by additional simulations with variable rainfall intensity with two different patterns. The main objective was to determine the feasibility of these experiments and the effect on erosion characteristics compared to those with constant rainfall intensity. This measurement consist of 60 minute simulations (change in intensity in 20. and 40. minute of simulation) with increasing rainfall intensity with pattern of 20-40-60 mm/hr ("inc") and decreasing intensity with pattern of 60-40-20 mm/hr ("dec") which have been compared with experiments with constant rainfall intensity of 40 mm/hr ("c40"). All experiments thus reaching the same total precipitation during entire simulation. This comparison was done on soil sample with dimensions of 4x0,9x0,15 meters and slope adjusted at 4° and 8°. Final evaluation consists of comparison of development and cumulative values of surface runoff and soil loss. In case of steady soil conditions (in this case, the experiments on the slope 4°) results show there is no significant difference in surface runoff in term of cumulative values and development (in the middle period of simulations with rainfall intensity of 40 mm/hr, i.e. 20-40. minute of every experiment) between "c40", "inc" and "dec". On the other hand, results of soil loss from the same experiments differ according to rainfall intensity pattern in both development and cumulative values. While "inc" experiment has slightly lower (up to 10 %) soil loss than "c40", development of soil loss (in the middle period of simulations with 40 mm/hr) of "dec" experiment is almost two times lower compare to "c40". Experiments with longitudinal soil surface of 8° differ in soil moisture that affects results more than variable rainfall intensity pattern. Experimental

  6. Recent High-Intensity Experiments at the Trident Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobble, James; Palaniyappan, Sasikumar; Gautier, Cort; Kim, Yongho; Huang, Chengkun

    2014-10-01

    With near-diffraction-limited irradiance of 2 × 1020 W/cm2 on target and prelase contrast better than 10-8, we have accessed the regime of relativistic transparency (RT) at the Trident Laser. The goal was to assess electron debris emitted from the target rear surface with phase-contrast imaging (PCI) and current density measurements (hence, the total electron current). Companion diagnostics show whether the experiments are in the target-normal-sheath-acceleration mode or in the RT regime. The superb laser contrast allows us to shoot targets as thin as 50 nm. PCI at 527 nm is temporally resolved to 600 fs. It has shown the evolution of electron behavior over tens of ps, including thermal electrons accompanying the ion jet, accelerated to many tens of MeV earlier in time. Faraday-cup measurements indicate the transfer of many microC of charge during the laser drive. As a ride-along experiment using a gas Cherenkov detector (GCD), we have detected gamma rays of energy >5 MeV. This radiation has a prompt component and a lesser source, driven by accelerated ions, that is time resolved by the GCD. The ion time of flight is compared to Thomson parabola data. Electron energy spectra are also collected. This work is supported by US DOE/NNSA, performed at LANL, operated by LANS LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  7. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Resected Mesothelioma: The Duke Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Edward F. Larrier, Nicole A.; Kelsey, Christopher R.; Hubbs, Jessica L.; Ma Jinli; Yoo, Sua; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) after extrapleural pneumonectomy for malignant pleural mesothelioma. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients underwent IMRT after extrapleural pneumonectomy between July 2005 and February 2007 at Duke University Medical Center. The clinical target volume was defined as the entire ipsilateral hemithorax, chest wall incisions, including drain sites, and involved nodal stations. The dose prescribed to the planning target volume was 40-55 Gy (median, 45). Toxicity was graded using the modified Common Toxicity Criteria, and the lung dosimetric parameters from the subgroups with and without pneumonitis were compared. Local control and survival were assessed. Results: The median follow-up after IMRT was 9.5 months. Of the 13 patients, 3 (23%) developed Grade 2 or greater acute pulmonary toxicity (during or within 30 days of IMRT). The median dosimetric parameters for those with and without symptomatic pneumonitis were a mean lung dose (MLD) of 7.9 vs. 7.5 Gy (p = 0.40), percentage of lung volume receiving 20 Gy (V{sub 20}) of 0.2% vs. 2.3% (p = 0.51), and percentage of lung volume receiving 5 Gy (V{sub 20}) of 92% vs. 66% (p = 0.36). One patient died of fatal pulmonary toxicity. This patient received a greater MLD (11.4 vs. 7.6 Gy) and had a greater V{sub 20} (6.9% vs. 1.9%), and V{sub 5} (92% vs. 66%) compared with the median of those without fatal pulmonary toxicity. Local and/or distant failure occurred in 6 patients (46%), and 6 patients (46%) were alive without evidence of recurrence at last follow-up. Conclusions: With limited follow-up, 45-Gy IMRT provides reasonable local control for mesothelioma after extrapleural pneumonectomy. However, treatment-related pulmonary toxicity remains a significant concern. Care should be taken to minimize the dose to the remaining lung to achieve an acceptable therapeutic ratio.

  8. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Hensley, S.; Joughin, I. R.; Li, F.; Madsen, S. N.; Rodriguez, E.; Goldstein, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar interferometry is an imaging technique for measuring the topography of a surface, its changes over time, and other changes in the detailed characteristics of the surface. This paper reviews the techniques of interferometry, systems and limitations, and applications in a rapidly growing area of science and engineering.

  9. Extreme ultraviolet interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, K A

    1997-12-01

    EUV lithography is a promising and viable candidate for circuit fabrication with 0.1-micron critical dimension and smaller. In order to achieve diffraction-limited performance, all-reflective multilayer-coated lithographic imaging systems operating near 13-nm wavelength and 0.1 NA have system wavefront tolerances of 0.27 nm, or 0.02 waves RMS. Owing to the highly-sensitive resonant reflective properties of multilayer mirrors and extraordinarily tight tolerances set forth for their fabrication, EUV optical systems require at-wavelength EUV interferometry for final alignment and qualification. This dissertation discusses the development and successful implementation of high-accuracy EUV interferometric techniques. Proof-of-principle experiments with a prototype EUV point-diffraction interferometer for the measurement of Fresnel zoneplate lenses first demonstrated sub-wavelength EUV interferometric capability. These experiments spurred the development of the superior phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI), which has been implemented for the testing of an all-reflective lithographic-quality EUV optical system. Both systems rely on pinhole diffraction to produce spherical reference wavefronts in a common-path geometry. Extensive experiments demonstrate EUV wavefront-measuring precision beyond 0.02 waves RMS. EUV imaging experiments provide verification of the high-accuracy of the point-diffraction principle, and demonstrate the utility of the measurements in successfully predicting imaging performance. Complementary to the experimental research, several areas of theoretical investigation related to the novel PS/PDI system are presented. First-principles electromagnetic field simulations of pinhole diffraction are conducted to ascertain the upper limits of measurement accuracy and to guide selection of the pinhole diameter. Investigations of the relative merits of different PS/PDI configurations accompany a general study of the most significant sources

  10. Spectral modulation interferometry for quantitative phase imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Ruibo; Chen, Shichao; Li, Chengshuai; Zhu, Yizheng

    2015-01-01

    We propose a spectral-domain interferometric technique, termed spectral modulation interferometry (SMI), and present its application to high-sensitivity, high-speed, and speckle-free quantitative phase imaging. In SMI, one-dimensional complex field of an object is interferometrically modulated onto a broadband spectrum. Full-field phase and intensity images are obtained by scanning along the orthogonal direction. SMI integrates the high sensitivity of spectral-domain interferometry with the high speed of spectral modulation to quantify fast phase dynamics, and its dispersive and confocal nature eliminates laser speckles. The principle and implementation of SMI are discussed. Its performance is evaluated using static and dynamic objects. PMID:25780737

  11. Phase-Shift Interferometry with a Digital Photocamera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannoni, Maurizio; Trivi, Marcelo; Molesini, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    A phase-shift interferometry experiment is proposed, working on a Twyman-Green optical configuration with additional polarization components. A guideline is provided to modern phase-shift interferometry, using concepts and laboratory equipment at the level of undergraduate optics courses. (Contains 5 figures.)

  12. Preview of Blackbeard interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, M.J.

    1992-09-01

    Blackbeard is a broadband VHF measurements satellite experiment designed and built by the Space Science and Technology division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Blackbeard is a piggy-back experiment on the ALEXIS satellite to be launched into a 70 degree inclination orbit at an altitude of 750 km. The satellite experimental operation and data retrieval are controlled through a telemetry link from the Satellite Operations Center (SOC) located at Los Alamos, NM. The primary experimental objectives of Blackbeard are three-fold: (1) Study the dispersion of broad-band impulsive electromagnetic signals -- in particular, the higher-order amplitude and phase distortion due to propagation through the ionosphere. These depend on ionospheric conditions and irregularities. (2) Utilize RF interferometry and scintillation techniques in the low VHF-band to determine the size and extent of ionospheric irregularities and wave structure -- both natural and artificially induced. This narrow-band data will be used to categorize the ionospheric media as undisturbed, oscillatory, or turbulent. These parameters will then be input into transfer function simulations for broad-band propagation and compared with broad-band propagation data from Blackbeard. (3) Survey and characterize background noise in the VHF-band-consisting of (1) cataloging broadcast amplitudes and signatures and mapping their global pattern, and (2) cataloging the signatures of lightning events. Also, correlate emissions in the visible and VHF bands in an attempt to confirm broad-band RF emissions assumed to be associated with lightning.

  13. Preview of Blackbeard interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    Blackbeard is a broadband VHF measurements satellite experiment designed and built by the Space Science and Technology division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Blackbeard is a piggy-back experiment on the ALEXIS satellite to be launched into a 70 degree inclination orbit at an altitude of 750 km. The satellite experimental operation and data retrieval are controlled through a telemetry link from the Satellite Operations Center (SOC) located at Los Alamos, NM. The primary experimental objectives of Blackbeard are three-fold: (1) Study the dispersion of broad-band impulsive electromagnetic signals -- in particular, the higher-order amplitude and phase distortion due to propagation through the ionosphere. These depend on ionospheric conditions and irregularities. (2) Utilize RF interferometry and scintillation techniques in the low VHF-band to determine the size and extent of ionospheric irregularities and wave structure -- both natural and artificially induced. This narrow-band data will be used to categorize the ionospheric media as undisturbed, oscillatory, or turbulent. These parameters will then be input into transfer function simulations for broad-band propagation and compared with broad-band propagation data from Blackbeard. (3) Survey and characterize background noise in the VHF-band-consisting of (1) cataloging broadcast amplitudes and signatures and mapping their global pattern, and (2) cataloging the signatures of lightning events. Also, correlate emissions in the visible and VHF bands in an attempt to confirm broad-band RF emissions assumed to be associated with lightning.

  14. Neutron interferometry in a temperature controlled vacuum environment for the search of dark energy and other precision experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saggu, Parminder; Cory, D.; Pushin, D.; Nsofini, J.; Sarenac, D.; Huber, M.; Arif, M.; Shahi, C.; Haun, R.; Snow, M.; Li, K.; Skavysh, V.; Heacock, B.; Young, A.; iNDEX Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The neutron interferometer is a sensitive tool to study neutron interactions in materials. Vibrations, acoustic waves, and temperature gradients can introduce phase shifts and reduce the SNR. Low neutron flux and an interest in measuring increasingly smaller phases makes it necessary for experiments to run over long periods of time. Hence, the interferometer needs to have excellent phase stability. It has been shown that by using Quantum Information Algorithms, one can make the interferometer insensitive to vibrations. In this work, we are trying to remove phase instability due to T variations. At the NCNR, the interferometer has been placed inside a vacuum chamber to decouple it from the environment and increase overall temperature stability. An Al vacuum chamber was machined and assembled to test the concept of an interferometer in vacuum and measure phase stability with the ultimate goal of using an interferometer in vacuum in an experiment searching for dark energy.

  15. Measurement of the electric polarizability of lithium by atom interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Miffre, A.; Jacquey, M.; Buechner, M.; Trenec, G.; Vigue, J.

    2006-01-15

    We have built an atom interferometer and, by applying an electric field on one of the two interfering beams, we have measured the static electric polarizability of lithium {alpha}=(24.33{+-}0.16)x10{sup -30} m{sup 3} with a 0.66% uncertainty. Our experiment is similar to an experiment done on sodium in 1995 by Pritchard and co-workers, with several improvements: the electric field can be calculated analytically and the interference signals have a large intensity and a high visibility, resulting in accurate phase measurements. This experiment illustrates the extreme sensitivity of atom interferometry: when the atom enters the electric field, its velocity increases and the fractional change, equal to 4x10{sup -9} for our largest field, is measured with a 10{sup -3} accuracy.

  16. PALSAR SCANSAR SCANSAR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Masanobu

    2008-11-01

    We have examined the capability of the PALSAR SCANSAR SCANSAR interferometry by observing the African forest and Sahara desert, both of which are separated 46 days in March and April of 2008. These two paths are well tuned for the orbital tube of 200m and the beam synchronization of the transmission positions in 200m to 500m, we have succeeded the PALSAR SCANSAR SCANSAR interferometry and achieved the detection of the height information. We will report the results in this paper.

  17. Quantitative comparison of experiment and theory for intense ultrashort laser-induced dissociation of H2^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayler, A. M.; Anis, F.; McKenna, J.; Gaire, B.; Johnson, Nora G.; Carnes, K. D.; Esry, B. D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.

    2008-05-01

    Experimental measurements and theoretical calculations for intense ultrashort pulse laser-induced dissociation of H2^+ were performed under near identical conditions producing results for quantitative comparison. The 3D momentum distribution was measured for the fragments of an H2^+ beam after interaction with 10 fs, 790 nm pulses at intensities of 10^14, 10^13, and 10^12 W/cm^2. In parallel, the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation was solved in the Born-Oppenheimer representation including nuclear, rotational, and electronic excitation. To obtain angularly-resolved kinetic energy release distributions necessary to compare to measurements, the final wavefunctions, projected onto the scattering states, are averaged over the vibrational state, intensity volume, and thermal distribution appropriate to the experiment. The results of these measurements and calculations are contrasted, testing the quantitative agreement of theory and experiment for ultrashort pulses at these intensities.

  18. An evaluation of water vapor radiometer data for calibration of the wet path delay in very long baseline interferometry experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuehn, C. E.; Himwich, W. E.; Clark, T. A.; Ma, C.

    1991-01-01

    The internal consistency of the baseline-length measurements derived from analysis of several independent VLBI experiments is an estimate of the measurement precision. The paper investigates whether the inclusion of water vapor radiometer (WVR) data as an absolute calibration of the propagation delay due to water vapor improves the precision of VLBI baseline-length measurements. The paper analyzes 28 International Radio Interferometric Surveying runs between June 1988 and January 1989; WVR measurements were made during each session. The addition of WVR data decreased the scatter of the length measurements of the baselines by 5-10 percent. The observed reduction in the scatter of the baseline lengths is less than what is expected from the behavior of the formal errors, which suggest that the baseline-length measurement precision should improve 10-20 percent if WVR data are included in the analysis. The discrepancy between the formal errors and the baseline-length results can be explained as the consequence of systematic errors in the dry-mapping function parameters, instrumental biases in the WVR and the barometer, or both.

  19. Highspeed multiplexed heterodyne interferometry.

    PubMed

    Isleif, Katharina-S; Gerberding, Oliver; Köhlenbeck, Sina; Sutton, Andrew; Sheard, Benjamin; Goßler, Stefan; Shaddock, Daniel; Heinzel, Gerhard; Danzmann, Karsten

    2014-10-01

    Digitally enhanced heterodyne interferometry is a metrology technique that uses pseudo-random noise codes for modulating the phase of the laser light. Multiple interferometric signals from the same beam path can thereby be isolated based on their propagation delay, allowing one to use advantageous optical layouts in comparison to classic laser interferometers. We present here a high speed version of this technique for measuring multiple targets spatially separated by only a few centimetres. This allows measurements of multiplexed signals using free beams, making the technique attractive for several applications requiring compact optical set-ups like for example space-based interferometers. In an experiment using a modulation and sampling rate of 1.25 GHz we are able to demonstrate multiplexing between targets only separated by 36 cm and we achieve a displacement measurement noise floor of <3 pm/√Hz at 10 Hz between them. We identify a limiting excess noise at low frequencies which is unique to this technique and is probably caused by the finite bandwidth in our measurement set-up. Utilising an active clock jitter correction scheme we are also able to reduce this noise in a null measurement configuration by one order of magnitude. PMID:25322043

  20. Depth-resolved whole-field displacement measurement using wavelength scanning interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Pablo D.; Zhou, Yanzhou; Huntley, Jonathan M.; Wildman, Ricky D.

    2004-07-01

    We describe a technique for measuring depth-resolved displacement fields within a three-dimensional (3D) scattering medium based on wavelength scanning interferometry. Sequences of two-dimensional interferograms are recorded whilst the wavelength of the laser is tuned at a constant rate. Fourier transformation of the resulting 3D intensity distribution along the time axis reconstructs the scattering potential within the medium, and changes in the 3D phase distribution measured between two separate scans provide one component of the 3D displacement field. The technique is illustrated with a proof-of-principle experiment involving two independently controlled reflecting surfaces. Advantages over the corresponding method based on low-coherence interferometry include a depth range unlimited by mechanical scanning devices, and immunity from fringe contrast reduction when imaging through dispersive media.

  1. Depth-resolved whole-field displacement measurement by wavelength-scanning electronic speckle pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Pablo D.; Huntley, Jonathan M.; Wildman, Ricky D.

    2005-07-01

    We show, for the first time to our knowledge, how wavelength-scanning interferometry can be used to measure depth-resolved displacement fields through semitransparent scattering surfaces. Temporal sequences of speckle interferograms are recorded while the wavelength of the laser is tuned at a constant rate. Fourier transformation of the resultant three-dimensional (3-D) intensity distribution along the time axis reconstructs the scattering potential within the medium, and changes in the 3-D phase distribution measured between two separate scans provide the out-of-plane component of the 3-D displacement field. The principle of the technique is explained in detail and illustrated with a proof-of-principle experiment involving two independently tilted semitransparent scattering surfaces. Results are validated by standard two-beam electronic speckle pattern interferometry.

  2. The MERIT (nTOF-11) High Intensity Liquid Mercury Target Experiment at the CERN PS

    SciTech Connect

    Efthymiopoulos, Ilias; Fabich, A.; Grudiev, A.; Haug, F.; Lettry, J.; Palm, M.; Pernegger, Heinz; Steerenberg, R.R.; Bennett, J.R.J.; Caretta, O.; Loveridge, P.; /Rutherford /Oak Ridge /Brookhaven /Princeton U. /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    The MERIT(nTOF-11) experiment is a proof-of-principle test of a target system for a high power proton beam to be used as front-end for a neutrino factory or a muon collider. The experiment took data in autumn 2007 with the fast-extracted beam from the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) to a maximum intensity of 30 x 10{sup 12} per pulse. The target system, based on a free mercury jet, is capable of intercepting a 4-MW proton beam inside a 15-T magnetic field required to capture the low energy secondary pions as the source for intense muon beams. Particle detectors installed around the target setup measure the secondary particle flux out of the target and can probe cavitation effects in the mercury jet when excited by an intense proton beam.Preliminary results of the data analysis will be presented here.

  3. The MERIT(nTOF-11) High Intensity Liquid Mercury Target Experiment at the CERN PS

    SciTech Connect

    Ethymiopoulos,I.; Fabich, A.; Palm, M.; Lettry, J.; Haug, F.; Pernegger, H.; Steerenberg, R.; Grudiev, A.; Kirk, H.G.; Tsang, T.; Mokhov, N.; Striganov, S.; Carroll, A.J.; Graves, V.B.; Spampinato, P.T.; McDonald, K.T.; Bennett, J.R.J.; Caretta, O.; Loveridge, P.; Park, H.

    2008-06-23

    The MERIT(nTOF-11) experiment is a proof-of-principle test of a target system for a high power proton beam to be used as front-end for a neutrino factory or a muon collider. The experiment took data in autumn 2007 with the fast-extracted beam from the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) to a maximum intensity of 30 x 10{sup 12} per pulse. The target system, based on a free mercury jet, is capable of intercepting a 4-MW proton beam inside a 15-T magnetic field required to capture the low energy secondary pions as the source for intense muon beams. Particle detectors installed around the target setup measure the secondary particle flux out of the target and can probe cavitation effects in the mercury jet when excited by an intense proton beam.Preliminary results of the data analysis will be presented here.

  4. The MERIT(nTOF-11) High Intensity Liquid Mercury Target Experiment at the CERN PS

    SciTech Connect

    Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Palm, M.; Lettry, J.; Haug, F.; Pernegger, H.; Steerenberg, R.; Grudiev, A.; Kirk, H.g.; Tsang, t.; Mokbov, N.; /Fermilab /Oak Ridge /Princeton U. /Rutherford /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2008-06-01

    The MERIT(nTOF-11) experiment is a proof-of-principle test of a target system for a high power proton beam to be used as front-end for a neutrino factory or a muon collider. The experiment took data in autumn 2007 with the fast-extracted beam from the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) to a maximum intensity of 30 x 10{sup 12} per pulse. The target system, based on a free mercury jet, is capable of intercepting a 4-MW proton beam inside a 15-T magnetic field required to capture the low energy secondary pions as the source for intense muon beams. Particle detectors installed around the target setup measure the secondary particle flux out of the target and can probe cavitation effects in the mercury jet when excited by an intense proton beam. Preliminary results of the data analysis will be presented here.

  5. Parents' Experiences during Their Infant's Transition from Neonatal Intensive Care Unit to Home: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Sharon W.; Spillet, Marydee A.; Cronin, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Limited literature exists which examines how parents of infants hospitalized in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) transition from their infant's NICU hospital stay to home. This study examines the question, "What are the experiences of parents during their infant's transition from the NICU to home?" Grounded theory methods served as the…

  6. Using Infant Massage Following a Mother's Unfavorable Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Experiences: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lappin, Grace

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to explore the synchronous behaviors enacted by mother and infant with blindness. In the study, a mother's less than optimal experience with the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) had a profound effect not only on her and her infant son, who was born 3 months prematurely and was visually impaired, but also on…

  7. LISA Long-Arm Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, James I.

    2009-01-01

    An overview of LISA Long-Arm Interferometry is presented. The contents include: 1) LISA Interferometry; 2) Constellation Design; 3) Telescope Design; 4) Constellation Acquisition; 5) Mechanisms; 6) Optical Bench Design; 7) Phase Measurement Subsystem; 8) Phasemeter Demonstration; 9) Time Delay Interferometry; 10) TDI Limitations; 11) Active Frequency Stabilization; 12) Spacecraft Level Stabilization; 13) Arm-Locking; and 14) Embarassment of Riches.

  8. Hidden observables in neutron quantum interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, Helmut; Baron, Matthias; Filipp, Stefan; Hasegawa, Yuji; Lemmel, Hartmut; Loidl, Rudolf

    2006-11-01

    Neutron interferometry using monolithic perfect single crystals has become an important tool for fundamental, nuclear, and solid-state physics research. New features of quantum mechanics become measurable by means of neutron interferometry. Such features are quantum phases, which provide a more direct access to properties of wave functions and permit wave function reconstruction, and wave function engineering. Most recently, new experiments concerning off-diagonal and non-cyclic geometrical phases, confinement induced phases, and contextuality related experiments have been performed. These experiments show an intrinsic entanglement of different degrees of freedom of a single particle. Proper post-selection experiments yield to more quantum complete experiments and may help to make quantum mechanics less mystic. Unavoidable quantum losses may play an important role to explain the transition from the quantum to the classical world. All these investigations concern the heart of quantum mechanics and demonstrate the non-local feature of this theory.

  9. Phase-Shifted Laser Feedback Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ovryn, Benjie

    1999-01-01

    Phase-shifted, laser feedback interferometry is a new diagnostic tool developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center under the Advanced Technology Development (ATD) Program directed by NASA Headquarters Microgravity Research Division. It combines the principles of phase-shifting interferometry (PSI) and laser-feedback interferometry (LFI) to produce an instrument that can quantify both optical path length changes and sample reflectivity variations. In a homogenous medium, the optical path length between two points is the product of the index of refraction and the geometric distance between the two points. LFI differs from other forms of interferometry by using the laser as both the source and the phase detector. In LFI, coherent feedback of the incident light either reflected directly from a surface or reflected after transmission through a region of interest will modulate the output intensity of the laser. The combination of PSI and LFI has produced a robust instrument, based on a low-power helium-neon (HeNe) gas laser, with a high dynamic range that can be used to measure either static or oscillatory changes of the optical path length. Small changes in optical path length are limited by the fraction of a fringe that can be measured; we can measure nonoscillatory changes with a root mean square (rms) error of the wavelength/1000 without averaging.

  10. Interferometry science center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, A. I.

    2002-01-01

    The Interferometry Science Center (ISC) is operated jointly by Caltech and JPL and is part of NASA's Navigator Program. The ISC has been created to facilitate the timely and successful execution of scientific investigations within the Navigator program, particularly those that rely on observations from NASA's interferometer projects. Currently, ISC is expected to provide full life cycle support for the Keck Interferometer, the Starlight mission, the Space Interferometry Mission, and the Terrestrial Planet Finder Mission. The nature and goals of ISc will be described.

  11. Correction of dephasing oscillations in matter-wave interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rembold, A.; Schütz, G.; Chang, W. T.; Stefanov, A.; Pooch, A.; Hwang, I. S.; Günther, A.; Stibor, A.

    2014-03-01

    Vibrations, electromagnetic oscillations, and temperature drifts are among the main reasons for dephasing in matter-wave interferometry. Sophisticated interferometry experiments, e.g., with ions or heavy molecules, often require integration times of several minutes due to the low source intensity or the high velocity selection. Here we present a scheme to suppress the influence of such dephasing mechanisms—especially in the low-frequency regime—by analyzing temporal and spatial particle correlations available in modern detectors. Such correlations can reveal interference properties that would otherwise be washed out due to dephasing by external oscillating signals. The method is shown experimentally in a biprism electron interferometer where a perturbing oscillation is artificially introduced by a periodically varying magnetic field. We provide a full theoretical description of the particle correlations where the perturbing frequency and amplitude can be revealed from the disturbed interferogram. The original spatial fringe pattern without the perturbation can thereby be restored. The technique can be applied to lower the general noise requirements in matter-wave interferometers. It allows for the optimization of electromagnetic shielding and decreases the efforts for vibrational or temperature stabilization.

  12. Complex interferometry potential in case of sufficiently stable diagnostic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalal, M.

    2016-06-01

    Classical interferometry is one of the key methods among active optical diagnostics. Its more advanced version, which allows recording and subsequent reconstruction of up to three sets of data using just one data object —a complex interferogram—was developed in the past and became known as complex interferometry. Employing this diagnostics, not only the usual phase shift, but also the amplitude of the probing beam as well as the fringe contrast (leading directly to the phase shift time derivative) can be reconstructed simultaneously from such a complex interferogram. In this paper it will be demonstrated that even in the case of a not particularly good diagnostic beam quality these three quantities can be reconstructed with a high degree of accuracy provided both the diagnostic beam as well as the corresponding optical line feature a reasonable stability. Such stability requirement is important as in an ideal case four shots need to be gradually recorded (one by one): the signal complex interferogram, the reference interferogram as well as the intensity structures of the signal and reference part of the diagnostic beam. Two examples of complex interferograms obtained in experiments will be analyzed: the laser produced plasma (spark in the air) and the high pressure gas jet. A general ray-tracing based iterative algorithm will be outlined in order to increase a precision of the index of refraction spatial profile taking into account refraction effects (omitted in the Abel inversion) and employing the original reconstructed phase shift and amplitude.

  13. Sex differences in intensity of emotional experience: a social role interpretation.

    PubMed

    Grossman, M; Wood, W

    1993-11-01

    According to gender role theory, women's greater emotional intensity than men's stems from normative expectations for sex differences that arise as a result of men's and women's social roles. In the 1st experiment, endorsement of normative expectations for sex differences was associated with sex differences in Ss' own emotions: To the extent that they endorsed stereotypical differences between men and women, female Ss reported personally experiencing emotions of greater intensity and male Ss reported experiencing emotions of lesser intensity. The 2nd study manipulated expectations for responsiveness while Ss viewed a series of emotion-inducing slides. When instructions rendered normative expectations comparable for men and women, no sex differences were obtained in emotion self-reports. Furthermore, women evidenced more extreme electromyograph physiological responding than men, suggesting general sex differences in emotion that are not limited to self-report. PMID:8246109

  14. How do patients with exacerbated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease experience care in the intensive care unit?

    PubMed Central

    Torheim, Henny; Kvangarsnes, Marit

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to gain insight into how patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) experience care in the acute phase. The study has a qualitative design with a phenomenological approach. The empirics consist of qualitative in-depth interviews with ten patients admitted to the intensive care units in two Norwegian hospitals. The interviews were carried out from November 2009 to June 2011. The data have been analysed through meaning condensation, in accordance with Amadeo Giorgi's four-step method. Kari Martinsen's phenomenological philosophy of nursing has inspired the study. An essential structure of the patients' experiences of care in the intensive care unit by acute COPD-exacerbation may be described as: Feelings of being trapped in a life-threatening situation in which the care system assumes control over their lives. This experience is conditioned not only by the medical treatment, but also by the entire interaction with the caregivers. The essence of the phenomenon is presented through three themes which describe the patient's lived experience: preserving the breath of life, vulnerable interactions and opportunities for better health. Acute COPD-exacerbation is a traumatic experience and the patients become particularly vulnerable when they depend on others for breathing support. The phenomenological analysis shows that the patients experience good care during breath of life preservation when the care is performed in a way that gives patients more insight into their illness and gives new opportunities for the future. PMID:24313779

  15. FIFE-Jobsub: a grid submission system for intensity frontier experiments at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Box, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    The Fermilab Intensity Frontier Experiments use an integrated submission system known as FIFE-jobsub, part of the FIFE (Fabric for Frontier Experiments) initiative, to submit batch jobs to the Open Science Grid. FIFE-jobsub eases the burden on experimenters by integrating data transfer and site selection details in an easy to use and well-documented format. FIFE-jobsub automates tedious details of maintaining grid proxies for the lifetime of the grid job. Data transfer is handled using the Intensity Frontier Data Handling Client (IFDHC) [1] tool suite, which facilitates selecting the appropriate data transfer method from many possibilities while protecting shared resources from overload. Chaining of job dependencies into Directed Acyclic Graphs (Condor DAGS) is well supported and made easier through the use of input flags and parameters.

  16. Managing Hardware Configurations and Data Products for the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hincks, A. D.; Shaw, J. R.; Chime Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) is an ambitious new radio telescope project for measuring cosmic expansion and investigating dark energy. Keeping good records of both physical configuration of its 1280 antennas and their analogue signal chains as well as the ˜100 TB of data produced daily from its correlator will be essential to the success of CHIME. In these proceedings we describe the database-driven software we have developed to manage this complexity.

  17. Three-dimensional profiling with binary fringes using phase-shifting interferometry algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Ayubi, Gaston A.; Di Martino, J. Matias; Alonso, Julia R.; Fernandez, Ariel; Perciante, Cesar D.; Ferrari, Jose A.

    2011-01-10

    Three-dimensional shape measurements by sinusoidal fringe projection using phase-shifting interferometry algorithms are distorted by the nonlinear response in intensity of commercial video projectors and digital cameras. To solve the problem, we present a method that consists in projecting and acquiring a temporal sequence of strictly binary patterns, whose (adequately weighted) average leads to a sinusoidal fringe pattern with the required number of bits. Since binary patterns consist of ''ones'' and ''zeros'' - and no half-tones are involved - the nonlinear response of the projector and the camera will not play a role, and a nearly unit contrast gray-level sinusoidal fringe pattern is obtained. Validation experiments are presented.

  18. Applications of whole field interferometry in mechanics and acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molin, Nils-Erik

    1999-07-01

    A description is given of fringe formation in holographic interferometry, in electronic speckle pattern interferometry, in electro-optic or TV holography and for a newly developed system for pulsed TV-holography. A numerical example, which simulates the equations describing the different techniques, is included. A strain measuring system using defocused digital speckle photography is described. Experiments showing mode shapes of musical instruments, transient bending wave propagation in beams and plates as well as sound pressure fields in air are included.

  19. The acute psychobiological impact of the intensive care experience on relatives

    PubMed Central

    Turner-Cobb, J.M.; Smith, P.C.; Ramchandani, P.; Begen, F.M.; Padkin, A.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing awareness amongst critical care practitioners that the impact of intensive care medicine extends beyond the patient to include the psychological impact on close family members. Several studies have addressed the needs of relatives within the intensive care context but the psychobiological impact of the experience has largely been ignored. Such impact is important in respect to health and well-being of the relative, with potential to influence patient recovery. The current feasibility study aimed to examine the acute psychobiological impact of the intensive care experience on relatives. Using a mixed methods approach, quantitative and qualitative data were collected simultaneously. Six relatives of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) of a District General Hospital, were assessed within 48 h of admission. Qualitative data were provided from semi-structured interviews analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Quantitative data were collected using a range of standardised self-report questionnaires measuring coping responses, emotion, trauma symptoms and social support, and through sampling of diurnal salivary cortisol as a biomarker of stress. Four themes were identified from interview: the ICU environment, emotional responses, family relationships and support. Questionnaires identified high levels of anxiety, depression and trauma symptoms; the most commonly utilised coping techniques were acceptance, seeking support through advice and information, and substance use. Social support emerged as a key factor with focused inner circle support relating to family and ICU staff. Depressed mood and avoidance were linked to greater mean cortisol levels across the day. Greater social network and coping via self-distraction were related to lower evening cortisol, indicating them as protective factors in the ICU context. The experience of ICU has a psychological and physiological impact on relatives, suggesting the importance of

  20. The acute psychobiological impact of the intensive care experience on relatives.

    PubMed

    Turner-Cobb, J M; Smith, P C; Ramchandani, P; Begen, F M; Padkin, A

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing awareness amongst critical care practitioners that the impact of intensive care medicine extends beyond the patient to include the psychological impact on close family members. Several studies have addressed the needs of relatives within the intensive care context but the psychobiological impact of the experience has largely been ignored. Such impact is important in respect to health and well-being of the relative, with potential to influence patient recovery. The current feasibility study aimed to examine the acute psychobiological impact of the intensive care experience on relatives. Using a mixed methods approach, quantitative and qualitative data were collected simultaneously. Six relatives of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) of a District General Hospital, were assessed within 48 h of admission. Qualitative data were provided from semi-structured interviews analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Quantitative data were collected using a range of standardised self-report questionnaires measuring coping responses, emotion, trauma symptoms and social support, and through sampling of diurnal salivary cortisol as a biomarker of stress. Four themes were identified from interview: the ICU environment, emotional responses, family relationships and support. Questionnaires identified high levels of anxiety, depression and trauma symptoms; the most commonly utilised coping techniques were acceptance, seeking support through advice and information, and substance use. Social support emerged as a key factor with focused inner circle support relating to family and ICU staff. Depressed mood and avoidance were linked to greater mean cortisol levels across the day. Greater social network and coping via self-distraction were related to lower evening cortisol, indicating them as protective factors in the ICU context. The experience of ICU has a psychological and physiological impact on relatives, suggesting the importance of

  1. Coherence and interferometry through optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froehly, C.

    Attention is given to the way in which the insertion of optical fibers on the arms of a stellar interferometer modifies the conditions of interference and the intensity patterns in the observation plane. This modification is compared with the usual situation, where the light propagates in the free space between the foci of the telescopes and the detection plane. This problem is considered for both single-mode and multimode fibers and for monochromatic and polychromatic radiation, that is, in 'partially coherent' light. A Fourier analysis is made of the spatiotemporal distortions of the scalar optical field propagating along the fibers; this makes it possible to calculate the complex correlations of the field introduced by the guide. The analysis is begun by considering interferometry through single-mode fibers. Orders of magnitude are given for practical fiber length limitations for white light interferometry, with an allowance made for the usual losses and performances of the fibers and spectroscopic devices commercially available today.

  2. A nested parallel experiment demonstrates differences in intensity-dependence between RNA-seq and microarrays.

    PubMed

    Robinson, David G; Wang, Jean Y; Storey, John D

    2015-11-16

    Understanding the differences between microarray and RNA-Seq technologies for measuring gene expression is necessary for informed design of experiments and choice of data analysis methods. Previous comparisons have come to sometimes contradictory conclusions, which we suggest result from a lack of attention to the intensity-dependent nature of variation generated by the technologies. To examine this trend, we carried out a parallel nested experiment performed simultaneously on the two technologies that systematically split variation into four stages (treatment, biological variation, library preparation and chip/lane noise), allowing a separation and comparison of the sources of variation in a well-controlled cellular system, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. With this novel dataset, we demonstrate that power and accuracy are more dependent on per-gene read depth in RNA-Seq than they are on fluorescence intensity in microarrays. However, we carried out quantitative PCR validations which indicate that microarrays may demonstrate greater systematic bias in low-intensity genes than in RNA-seq. PMID:26130709

  3. Digitally Enhanced Heterodyne Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaddock, Daniel; Ware, Brent; Lay, Oliver; Dubovitsky, Serge

    2010-01-01

    Spurious interference limits the performance of many interferometric measurements. Digitally enhanced interferometry (DEI) improves measurement sensitivity by augmenting conventional heterodyne interferometry with pseudo-random noise (PRN) code phase modulation. DEI effectively changes the measurement problem from one of hardware (optics, electronics), which may deteriorate over time, to one of software (modulation, digital signal processing), which does not. DEI isolates interferometric signals based on their delay. Interferometric signals are effectively time-tagged by phase-modulating the laser source with a PRN code. DEI improves measurement sensitivity by exploiting the autocorrelation properties of the PRN to isolate only the signal of interest and reject spurious interference. The properties of the PRN code determine the degree of isolation.

  4. A LISA Interferometry Primer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, James Ira

    2010-01-01

    A key challenge for all gravitational wave detectors in the detection of changes in the fractional difference between pairs of test masses with sufficient precision to measure astrophysical strains with amplitudes on the order of approx.10(exp -21). ln the case of the five million km arms of LISA, this equates to distance measurements on the ten picometer level. LISA interferometry utilizes a decentralized topology, in which each of the sciencecraft houses its own light sources, detectors, and electronics. The measurements made at each of the sciencecraft are then telemetered to ground and combined to extract the strain experienced by the constellation as a whole. I will present an overview of LISA interferometry and highlight some of the key components and technologies that make it possible.

  5. Intensive care nurses' experiences of caring for brain dead organ donor patients.

    PubMed

    Pearson, A; Robertson-Malt, S; Walsh, K; Fitzgerald, M

    2001-01-01

    This study was designed to identify the feelings and experiences of critical care nurses who have been involved in nursing brain dead patients prior to organ donation. The purpose of the study was to generate knowledge which informs the discipline of nursing. A number of themes relating to nurses' experiences of caring for brain dead organ donor patients were uncovered in this interpretative study. Overall, caring for patients who are diagnosed as brain dead is a challenging experience for nurses and they are intensely involved in a search for meaning in each event. The interpretative analysis in this study has revealed a range of meanings articulated by the nurses involved. However, the primary focus of care--as identified by the participating nurses--was the donor family. PMID:11820230

  6. Software tools for optical interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thureau, Nathalie D.; Ireland, Michael; Monnier, John D.; Pedretti, Ettore

    2006-06-01

    We describe a set of general purpose utilities for visualizing and manipulating optical interferometry data stored in the FITS-based OIFITS data format. This class of routines contains code like the OiPlot navigation/visualization tool which allows the user to extract visibility, closure phase and UV-coverage information from the OIFITS files and to display the information in various ways. OiPlot also has basic data model fitting capabilities which can be used for a rapid first analysis of the scientific data. More advanced image reconstruction techniques are part of a dedicated utility. In addition, these routines allow data from multiple interferometers to be combined and used together. Part of our work also aims at developing software specific to the Michigan InfraRed Combiner (MIRC). Our experience designing a flexible and robust graphical user interfaced based on sockets using python libraries has wide applicability and this paper will discuss practicalities.

  7. Paul Trap Simulator Experiment to Model Intense Beam Propagation in Alternating-gradient Transport Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Erik P. Gilson; Ronald C. Davidson; Philip C. Efthimion; Richard Majeski

    2004-01-29

    The results presented here demonstrate that the Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) simulates the propagation of intense charged particle beams over distances of many kilometers through magnetic alternating-gradient (AG) transport systems by making use of the similarity between the transverse dynamics of particles in the two systems. Plasmas have been trapped that correspond to normalized intensity parameters s = wp2 (0)/2wq2 * 0.8, where wp(r) is the plasmas frequency and wq is the average transverse focusing frequency in the smooth-focusing approximation. The measured root-mean-squared (RMS) radius of the beam is consistent with a model, equally applicable to both PTSX and AG systems that balances the average inward confining force against the outward pressure-gradient and space-charge forces. The PTSX device confines one-component cesium ion plasmas for hundreds of milliseconds, which is equivalent to over 10 km of beam propagation.

  8. Two color holographic interferometry for microgravity application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trolinger, James D.

    1993-01-01

    Holographic interferometry is a primary candidate for the measurement of temperature and concentration in various crystal growth experiments destined for space. The method measures refractive index changes in the experiment test cell. A refractive index change can be caused by concentration changes, temperature changes, or a combination of temperature and concentration changes. If the refractive index changes are caused by temperature and concentration changes occurring simultaneously in the experiment test cell, the contributions by the two effects cannot be separated by conventional measurement methods. By using two wavelengths, two independent interferograms can be produced from the reconstruction of the hologram. The two interferograms will be different due to dispersion properties of fluid materials. These differences provide the additional information that allows the separation of simultaneously occurring temperature and concentration gradients. There is no other technique available that can provide this type of information. The primary objectives of this effort are to experimentally verify the mathematical theory of two color holographic interferometry and to determine the practical value of this technique for space application. To achieve these objectives, the accuracy and sensitivity of the technique must be determined for geometry's and materials that are relevant to the Materials Processing in the Space program of NASA. This will be achieved through the use of a specially designed two-color holographic interferometry breadboard optical system. In addition to experiments to achieve the primary goals, the breadboard will also provide inputs to the design of an optimum space flight system.

  9. Shot-Peening Intensities VS. Eddy Current Signals as Seen in Iterative Treatment-Measurement Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, N.; Frishman, A. M.; Shen, Y.; Lo, C. C. H.

    2009-03-01

    We report on progress in a swept high frequency eddy current (SHFEC) technique for characterization of surface residual stress on shot-peened superalloy surfaces. Our aim here is to demonstrate the sensitivity of our measurement for practical shot peening intensities, i.e. at 4˜6 A. First, we present our improved probe and instrumentation being sufficiently sensitive to resolve the surface conditions at these low Almen intensities, where our earlier measurements encountered noise problems. The previous coil was also larger (18 mm in diameter) than desirable. Our new probe integrates smaller coils (12 mm in diameter, forming an AC bridge) and on-board electronics on a common printed circuit board, mutually connected at the shortest possible distance. The operational-amplifier-based electronics acts as impedance buffers, and maintains the cabling impedance at the characteristic 50 Ω between the probe board and the instruments. We have thus reduced the instrumentation noises. Second, we present the result of an iterative treatment-measurement experiment, performed on a 2"-by-3" Inconel 718 block specimen, initially polished to a mirror finish. After an initial baseline SHFEC measurement, we performed shot peening, an Almen strip deflection measurement, and a SHFEC measurement as one iteration cycle, and repeated the cycles multiple times at predetermined intervals. We will show the resulting SHFEC signals (i.e. lift-off normalized vertical-component signals) plotted against the Almen intensities. We then draw several conclusions from the experimental data, including a) the SHFEC signals increase monotonically in correlation with the Almen intensity increase, and b) the SHFEC signals exhibit sufficient deviations to resolve 4˜6 A intensities, while c) the SHFEC signals indicate saturation of the Inconel 718 response against peening, but the saturation occurs later in the iteration than indicated by the A-series Almen strip.

  10. Kaon decay interferometry as meson dynamics probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'ambrosio, G.; Paver, N.

    1994-05-01

    We discuss the time-dependent interferences between KL and KS in the decays in 3π and ππγ, to be studied at interferometry machines such as the φ factory and CERN LEAR. We emphasize the possibilities and the advantages of using interferences, in comparision with width measurements, to obtain information both on CP-conserving and CP-violating amplitudes. Comparision with present data and suggestions for future experiments are made.

  11. Precision surveying using very long baseline interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. W.; Clark, T. A.; Coates, R.; Ma, C.; Robertson, D. S.; Corey, B. E.; Counselman, C. C.; Shapiro, I. I.; Wittels, J. J.; Hinteregger, H. F.

    1977-01-01

    Radio interferometry measurements were used to measure the vector baselines between large microwave radio antennas. A 1.24 km baseline in Massachusetts between the 36 meter Haystack Observatory antenna and the 18 meter Westford antenna of Lincoln Laboratory was measured with 5 mm repeatability in 12 separate experiments. Preliminary results from measurements of the 3,928 km baseline between the Haystack antenna and the 40 meter antenna at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory in California are presented.

  12. Recent experiment on fast electron transport in ultra-high intensity laser interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batani, D.; Baton, S.; Koenig, M.; Guillou, P.; Loupias, B.; Vinci, T.; Rousseaux, C.; Gremillet, L.; Morace, A.; Redaelli, R.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Kodama, R.; Ozaki, N.; Norimatsu, T.; Rassuchine, J.; Cowan, T.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Santos, J. J.

    2008-05-01

    We performed an experiment with cone targets in planar geometry devoted to the study of fast electron generation, propagation, and target heating. This was done at LULI with the 100 TW laser at intensities up to 1019 W/cm2. Fast electrons penetration, with and without cones, was studied with different diagnostics (Kα imaging, Kα spectroscopy, visible emission) for ω or 2ω irradiation. At ω, the pre-plasma generated by the laser pedestal fills the cone and prevents the beam from reaching the tip.

  13. Atom Interferometry on a Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Dennis; Seidel, Stephan; Lachmann, Maike; Rasel, Ernst; Quantus Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    The universality of free fall is one of the fundamental postulates of our description of nature. The comparison of the free fall of two ultra-cold clouds of different atomic species via atom interferometry comprises a method to precisely test this assumption. By performing the experiments in a microgravity environment the sensitivity of such an atom interferometric measurement can be increased. In order to fully utilize the potential of these experiments the usage of a Bose-Einstein condensate as the initial state of the atom interferometer is necessary. As a step towards the transfer of such a system in space an atom optical experiment is currently being prepared as the scientific payload for a sounding rocket mission. This mission is aiming at the first demonstration of a Bose-Einstein condensate in space and using this quantum degenerate matter as a source for atom interferometry. The launch of the rocket is planned for 2015 from ESRANGE. This first mission will be followed by two more that extend the scientific goals to the creation of degenerate mixtures in space and simultaneous atom interferometry with two atomic species. Their success would mark a major advancement towards a precise measurement of the universality of free fall with a space-born atom interferometer. This research is funded by the German Space Agency DLR under grant number DLR 50 1131-37.

  14. [Patients with liver transplantation: their experience in the intensive care unit. Phenomenological study].

    PubMed

    Del Barrio, M; Lacunza, M M; Armendáriz, A C; Margall, M A; Asiain, M C

    2001-01-01

    Nurses' knowledge of patients' experiences undoubtedly contributes to a greater understanding of the health process and provides a better basis for nursing acts. The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of patients with liver transplantation in the intensive care unit (ICU). The design of this qualitative study was phenomenological and descriptive. The study was performed in a sample of 10 patients who were interviewed in detail. A tape recording was made of the interview. The recordings were transcribed verbatim and were analyzed using the method of Giorgi (1985), modified by Baker in 1994. The data were analyzed and a general description was made, which included five aspects reflecting the essence of the patients' experiences: the patients arrived at the hospital with certain attitudes and beliefs; certain impressions of the atmosphere in the ICU and sensations experienced were notable; the patients experienced that they were receiving scientific and humanistic "care"; they found support in the social environment (family) and in religious beliefs, and their preconceived idea af the ICU contrasted with their experience. This study provides detailed information of the experiences of patients with liver transplantation in the ICU. The results can be used to optimize certain acts included in these patients' nursing care plans. PMID:11674949

  15. Simulation of Experiments Generating Collisionless Shocks With Intense Lasers Using the CRASH Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosskopf, M. J.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Rutter, E. M.; Park, H. S.; Kugland, N. L.; Pollaine, S.; Ross, J. S.; Remington, B. A.; Ryutov, D.; Spitkovsky, A.; Gargate, L.; Gregori, G.; Bell, A.; Murphy, C.; Sakawa, Y.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Takabe, H.; Froula, D. H.; Fiksel, G.; Miniati, F.; Koenig, M.; Ravasio, A.; Liang, E.; Woosley, N.

    2011-10-01

    Collisionless shocks, shocks generated by plasma wave interactions in regions where the collisional mean-free-path for particles is long compared to the length scale for shock interaction, are found ubiquitously in astrophysics. Experiments to investigate collisionless shocks in a laboratory-scale system are being carried out on intense lasers; measuring the density, temperature, magnetic field, and velocity of counter-streaming flows generated by laser ablation. This poster reports hydrodynamic simulations modeling the ablative flow of plasma generated in order to assess potential designs and infer properties of collected data from previous single foil experiments. This work is funded by the Predictive Sciences Academic Alliances Program in NNSA-ASC via grant DEFC52-08NA28616.

  16. ALBOREX: an intensive multi-platform and multidisciplinary experiment in the Alboran Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Simón; Pascual, Ananda; Allen, John; Olita, Antonio; Tovar, Antonio; Oguz, Temel; Mahadevan, Amala; Poulain, Pierre; Tintoré, Joaquín

    2015-04-01

    An intensive multi-platform and multidisciplinary experiment was completed in May 2014 as part of PERSEUS EU Project. 25 drifters, 2 gliders, 3 Argo floats and one ship were dedicated to sample an area of about 50x50 km in the eastern Alboran Sea during one week. The experiment, which also includes 66 CTD stations and 500 water samples (salinity, chlorophyll and nutrients), was designed to capture the intense but transient vertical exchanges associated with mesoscale and submesoscale features. The vertical motion associated with mesoscale and submesoscale features such as ocean eddies, filaments and fronts plays a major role in determining ocean productivity, due to the exchange of properties between the surface and the ocean interior. Understanding the relationship between these physical and biological processes is crucial for predicting the marine ecosystems response to changes in the climate system and to sustainable marine resource management. However, to understand the links between mesoscale and submesoscale features and ecosystem responses, it is necessary to collect data at a range of temporal and spatial scales, and then combine these data with coupled physical and biochemical models. Data from thermosalinograph revealed a sharp surface salinity front with values ranging from 36.6 (Atlantic Waters) to 38.2 (Mediterranean Waters) in conjunction with a filament in temperature. Drifters followed a massive anticyclonic gyre. Near real time data from ADCP showed coherent patterns with currents up to 1m/s. Gliders detected a subduction of chlorophyll located in areas adjacent to the front. We also present results on the horizontal strain rate, relative vorticity and quasi-geostrophic vertical motion to understand the dynamics of this intense ocean front.

  17. Spatial interferometry in optical astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.; Roddier, Francois; Roddier, Claude

    1990-01-01

    A bibliographic guide is presented to publications of spatial interferometry techniques applied to optical astronomy. Listings appear in alphabetical order, by first author, as well as in specific subject categories listed in chronological order, including imaging theory and speckle interferometry, experimental techniques, and observational results of astronomical studies of stars, the Sun, and the solar system.

  18. Dynamic speckle interferometry of microscopic processes in solid state and thin biological objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, A. P.

    2015-08-01

    Modernized theory of dynamic speckle interferometry is considered. It is shown that the time-average radiation intensity has the parameters characterizing the wave phase changes. It also brings forward an expression for time autocorrelation function of the radiation intensity. It is shown that with the vanishing averaging time value the formulas transform to the prior expressions. The results of experiments with high-cycle material fatigue and cell metabolism analysis conducted using the time-averaging technique are discussed. Good reproducibility of the results is demonstrated. It is specified that the upgraded technique allows analyzing accumulation of fatigue damage, detecting the crack start moment and determining its growth velocity with uninterrupted cyclic load. It is also demonstrated that in the experiments with a cell monolayer the technique allows studying metabolism change both in an individual cell and in a group of cells.

  19. The critical angle in seismic interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Wijk, K.; Calvert, A.; Haney, M.; Mikesell, D.; Snieder, R.

    2008-01-01

    Limitations with respect to the characteristics and distribution of sources are inherent to any field seismic experiment, but in seismic interferometry these lead to spurious waves. Instead of trying to eliminate, filter or otherwise suppress spurious waves, crosscorrelation of receivers in a refraction experiment indicate we can take advantage of spurious events for near-surface parameter extraction for static corrections or near-surface imaging. We illustrate this with numerical examples and a field experiment from the CSM/Boise State University Geophysics Field Camp.

  20. Deflectometry vs. interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häusler, Gerd; Faber, Christian; Olesch, Evelyn; Ettl, Svenja

    2013-04-01

    Quantitative deflectometry is a new tool to measure specular surfaces. The spectrum of measurable surfaces ranges from flat to freeform surfaces with steep slopes, with a size ranging from millimeters to several meters. We illustrate this by several applications: eye glass measurements, measurements of big mirrors, and in-line measurements in ultra-precision manufacturing without unclamping of the sample. We describe important properties of deflectometry and compare its potentials and limitations with interferometry. We discuss which method is superior for which application and how the potential of deflectometry may be developing in the future.

  1. Haze in the Grand Canyon: An evaluation of the Winter Haze Intensive Tracer Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    The Grand Canyon is one of the most spectacular natural sights on earth. Approximately 4 million visitors travel to Grand Canyon National Park (GCNP) each year to enjoy its majestic geological formations and intensely colored views. However, visibility in GCNP can be impaired by small increases in concentrations of fine suspended particles that scatter and absorb light; the resulting visibility degradation is perceived as haze. Sulfate particles are a major factor in visibility impairment at Grand Canyon in summer and winter. Many wintertime hazes at GCNP are believed to result from the accumulation of emissions from local sources during conditions of air stagnation, which occur more frequently in winter than in summer. In January and February 1987, the National Park Service (NPS) carried out a large-scale experiment known as the Winter Haze Intensive Tracer Experiment (WHITEX) to investigate the causes of wintertime haze in the region of GCNP and Canyonlands National Park. The overall objective of WHITEX was to assess the feasibility of attributing visibility impairment in specific geographic regions to emissions from a single point source. The experiment called for the injection of a tracer, deuterated methane (CD{sub 4}), into one of the stacks of the Navajo Generating Station (NGS), a major coal-fired power plant located 25 km from the GCNP boundary and 110 km northeast of Grand Canyon Village. A network of field stations was established in the vicinity -- mostly to the northeast of GCNP and NGS -- to measure CD{sub 4} concentrations, atmospheric aerosol and optical properties, and other chemical and physical attributes. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Validating Laser-Induced Birefringence Theory with Plasma Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Cecilia

    2015-09-02

    Intense laser beams crossing paths in plasma is theorized to induce birefringence in the medium, resulting from density and refractive index modulations that affect the polarization of incoming light. The goal of the associated experiment, conducted on Janus at Lawrence Livermore’s Jupiter Laser Facility, was to create a tunable laser-plasma waveplate to verify the relationship between dephasing angle and beam intensity, plasma density, plasma temperature, and interaction length. Interferometry analysis of the plasma channel was performed to obtain a density map and to constrain temperature measured from Thomson scattering. Various analysis techniques, including Fast Fourier transform (FFT) and two variations of fringe-counting, were tried because interferograms captured in this experiment contained unusual features such as fringe discontinuity at channel edges, saddle points, and islands. The chosen method is flexible, semi-automated, and uses a fringe tracking algorithm on a reduced image of pre-traced synthetic fringes. Ultimately, a maximum dephasing angle of 49.6° was achieved using a 1200 μm interaction length, and the experimental results appear to agree with predictions.

  3. Bain linguistique contre douche ecossaise: une experience de sejour intensif a l'etranger (Linguistic Immersion versus Hot-and-Cold Shower: An Experience of Intensive Overseas Stay).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sheila; Verguet, Patrick

    1979-01-01

    Describes the elaboration, over a period of three years, of a French language and civilization program consisting of linguistic and cultural preparation in England, followed by a one-week intensive linguistic and cultural experience in France. (AM)

  4. Complex master slave interferometry.

    PubMed

    Rivet, Sylvain; Maria, Michael; Bradu, Adrian; Feuchter, Thomas; Leick, Lasse; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    A general theoretical model is developed to improve the novel Spectral Domain Interferometry method denoted as Master/Slave (MS) Interferometry. In this model, two functions, g and h are introduced to describe the modulation chirp of the channeled spectrum signal due to nonlinearities in the decoding process from wavenumber to time and due to dispersion in the interferometer. The utilization of these two functions brings two major improvements to previous implementations of the MS method. A first improvement consists in reducing the number of channeled spectra necessary to be collected at Master stage. In previous MSI implementation, the number of channeled spectra at the Master stage equated the number of depths where information was selected from at the Slave stage. The paper demonstrates that two experimental channeled spectra only acquired at Master stage suffice to produce A-scans from any number of resolved depths at the Slave stage. A second improvement is the utilization of complex signal processing. Previous MSI implementations discarded the phase. Complex processing of the electrical signal determined by the channeled spectrum allows phase processing that opens several novel avenues. A first consequence of such signal processing is reduction in the random component of the phase without affecting the axial resolution. In previous MSI implementations, phase instabilities were reduced by an average over the wavenumber that led to reduction in the axial resolution. PMID:26906857

  5. Intense antineutrino source based on a lithium converter. Proposal for a promising experiment for studying oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyashuk, V. I.; Lutostansky, Yu. S.

    2016-03-01

    An intense electron-antineutrino source with a hard spectrum (E_{{{tilde v}_e}}^{max} = 13 MeV and < {{E_{{{tilde v}_e}}}} rangle = 6.5MeV) can be created on the basis of the short-lived isotope 8Li (β--decay, T 1/2 = 0.84 s) formed via the ( n, γ) activation of 7Li. In contrast to a reactor antineutrino spectrum whose uncertainty is large, particularly in the high-energy region {E_{{{tilde v}_e}}} > 6 MeV, which is experimentally relevant, the lithium {tilde v_e} spectrum is accurately determined. The proposed accelerator-driven experimental scheme with a neutron-producing target and a lithium converter as an intense {tilde v_e} source is an alternative to a nuclear reactor. The required amount of high-purity 7Li will be reduced in many times by using the suggested heavy-water LiOD solutions. A possible experiment involving the lithium source on search for sterile neutrinos in the mass region Δ m 2 ≥ 0.2 eV2 with a very high sensitivity to mixing-angle values down to sin2(2Θ) ≈ (7-10) × 10-4 at the 95% C.L. has been considered.

  6. Time Integrated Soft X-ray Imaging in High Intensity Laser Experiments (thesis)

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, David

    2009-01-01

    2009 marks a significant achievement and the dawn of a new era in high intensity laser research with the final commissioning of all 192 beams at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). NIF is a department of energy (DOE) funded project more than 10 years in the making located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The following research was done as one of many preliminary experiments done to prepare for these historic events. The primary focus of the experimental campaign this paper addresses is to test and develop a thermal x-radiation source using a short pulse laser. This data is hoped to provide information about the thermal transport mechanisms important in the development of prediction models in High Energy Density (HED) science. One of several diagnostics fielded was a soft x-ray imager (SXRI) which is detailed in this paper. The SXRI will be used to measure the relative size of the heated region and also the relative level of specific x-ray emissions among several shot and target configurations. The laser system used was the Titan laser located in the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Titan uses the JLF Janus Nd:glass laser west frontend system with a Optical Parametric Chirped Pulse Amplification (OPCPA) in place of the nanosecond oscillator. The system is capable of producing laser intensities of over a petawatt with several tens of joules delivered in the beam.

  7. Synoptic meteorology and transport during the North Atlantic Regional Experiment (NARE) intensive: Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, John T.; Moody, Jennie L.

    1996-12-01

    Analyses of meteorological conditions during the North Atlantic Regional Experiment (NARE) intensive period, defined here as August 1 through September 13, 1993, indicate that transport in the study region in Nova Scotia was influenced by several well-defined synoptic disturbances (weak frontal passages or troughs) and by intervening periods of slowly varying transport conditions. Using trajectory analysis, synoptic charts, and other meteorological products, we have characterized these conditions and indicated the transitions in transport in relation to the synoptic scale meteorological situation. The ideal meteorological scenario for delivering pollution plumes from the U.S. East Coast urban areas over the Gulf of Maine to the Maritime Provinces of Canada is shown to be warm sector flow ahead of an advancing cold front. In addition, for two of these frontal passages we have discussed some of the smaller-scale effects which appear to have influenced the transport and or the composition of air masses reaching the NARE intensive region. Finally, we compare the conditions actually encountered during the field campaign with our idealized conceptual model of warm sector transport.

  8. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas: The preliminary report of Cleveland Clinic experience

    SciTech Connect

    Mackley, Heath B. . E-mail: hmackley@alumni.upenn.edu; Reddy, Chandana A. M.S.; Lee, S.-Y.; Harnisch, Gayle A.; Mayberg, Marc R.; Hamrahian, Amir H.; Suh, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is being increasingly used for the treatment of pituitary adenomas. However, there have been few published data on the short- and long-term outcomes of this treatment. This is the initial report of Cleveland Clinic's experience. Methods and Materials: Between February 1998 and December 2003, 34 patients with pituitary adenomas were treated with IMRT. A retrospective chart review was conducted for data analysis. Results: With a median follow-up of 42.5 months, the treatment has proven to be well tolerated, with performance status remaining stable in 90% of patients. Radiographic local control was 89%, and among patients with secretory tumors, 100% had a biochemical response. Only 1 patient required salvage surgery for progressive disease, giving a clinical progression free survival of 97%. The only patient who received more than 46 Gy experienced optic neuropathy 8 months after radiation. Smaller tumor volume significantly correlated with subjective improvements in nonvisual neurologic complaints (p = 0.03), and larger tumor volume significantly correlated with subjective worsening of visual symptoms (p = 0.05). New hormonal supplementation was required for 40% of patients. Younger patients were significantly more likely to require hormonal supplementation (p 0.03). Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy is a safe and effective treatment for pituitary adenomas over the short term. Longer follow-up is necessary to determine if IMRT confers any advantage with respect to either tumor control or toxicity over conventional radiation modalities.

  9. Target diagnostics for intense lithium ion hohlraum experiments on PBFA II

    SciTech Connect

    Leeper, R.J.; Bailey, J.E.; Carlson, A.L.

    1994-12-31

    A review of the diagnostics used at Sandia National Laboratories to measure the parameters of intense lithium ion-beam hohlraum target experiments on PBFA II will be presented. This diagnostic package contains an extensive suite of x-ray spectral and imaging diagnostics that enable measurements of target temperature and x-ray output. The x-ray diagnostics include time-integrated and time-resolved pinhole cameras, energy-resolved I-D streaked imaging, diagnostics, time-integrated and time-resolved grazing, incidence spectrographs, a transmission grating spectrograph, an elliptical crystal spectrograph, a bolometer array, an eleven-element x-ray diode (XRD) array, and an eleven-element PIN diode detector array. The incident Li beam symmetry and an estimate of incident Li beam power density can be measured from ion beam-induced characteristic x-ray line emission and neutron emission.

  10. Experience in teaching intensive course of thermal physics for undergraduate physics students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Farkhad

    2009-03-01

    This talk of non-technical nature describes experience of the author in teaching the intensive course of thermal physics for the undergraduate physics students at the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Spain. After brief introduction to the program, description of the WEB support of the course, I shall describe practical classes ( home-works, visits to the Laboratories, experimental demonstrations, typical problems and typical topics for presentations on the advanced thermodynamics, etc. ). I shall further discuss different possible actions to wake up an interest of the students to the thermal physics and ways to simulate their active participation in the class discussions. I also describe different schemes employed in the last few years to evaluate effectively and clearly the students work and knowledge. Finally, I will analyze the efficiency of our methodic in improving teaching of thermal physics at University level.

  11. Validating under-resolved turbulence intensities for PIV experiments in canonical wall-bounded turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Kevin; Monty, J. P.; Hutchins, N.

    2016-08-01

    The discrepancy between measured turbulence intensity obtained from experiments in wall-bounded turbulence and the fully resolved reference results (usually from DNS datasets) are often attributed to spatial resolution issues, especially in PIV measurements due to the presence of spatial averaging within the interrogation region/volume. In many cases, in particular at high Reynolds numbers (where there is a lack of DNS data), there is no attempt to verify that this is the case. There is a risk that attributing unexpected PIV statistics to spatial resolution, without careful checks, could mask wider problems with the experimental setup or test facility. Here, we propose a robust technique to validate the under-resolved PIV obtained turbulence intensity profiles for canonical wall-bounded turbulence. This validation scheme is independent of Reynolds number and does not rely on empirical functions. It is based on arguments that (1) the viscous-scaled small-scale turbulence energy is invariant with Reynolds number and that (2) the spatially under-resolved measurement is sufficient to capture the large-scale energy. This then suggests that we can estimate the missing energy from volume-filtered DNS data at much lower Reynolds numbers. Good agreement is found between the experimental results and estimation profiles for all three velocity components, demonstrating that the estimation tool successfully computes the missing energy for given spatial resolutions over a wide range of Reynolds numbers. A database for a canonical turbulent boundary layer and associated MATLAB function are provided that enable this missing energy to be calculated across a range of interrogation volume sizes, so that users do not require access to raw DNS data. This methodology and tool will provide PIV practitioners, investigating canonical wall-bounded turbulent flow with a convenient check of the effects of spatial resolution on a given experiment.

  12. Special topics in infrared interferometry. [Michelson interferometer development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanel, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Topics in IR interferometry related to the development of a Michelson interferometer are treated. The selection and reading of the signal from the detector to the analog to digital converter is explained. The requirements for the Michelson interferometer advance speed are deduced. The effects of intensity modulation on the interferogram are discussed. Wavelength and intensity calibration of the interferometer are explained. Noise sources (Nyquist or Johnson noise, phonon noise), definitions of measuring methods of noise, and noise measurements are presented.

  13. Two color holographic interferometry for microgravity application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trolinger, James D.; Weber, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Holographic interferometry is a primary candidate for determining temperature and concentration in crystal growth experiments designed for space. The method measures refractive index changes within the fluid of an experimental test cell resulting from temperature and/or concentration changes. When the refractive index changes are caused by simultaneous temperature and concentration changes, the contributions of the two effects cannot be separated by single wavelength interferometry. By using two wavelengths, however, two independent interferograms can provide the additional independent equation required to determine the two unknowns. There is no other technique available that provides this type of information. The primary objectives of this effort were to experimentally verify the mathematical theory of two color holographic interferometry (TCHI) and to determine the practical value of this technique for space application. In the foregoing study, the theory of TCHI has been tested experimentally over a range of interest for materials processing in space where measurements of temperature and concentration in a solution are required. New techniques were developed and applied to stretch the limits beyond what could be done with existing procedures. The study resulted in the production of one of the most advanced, enhanced sensitivity holographic interferometers in existence. The interferometric measurements made at MSFC represent what is believed to be the most accurate holographic interferometric measurements made in a fluid to date. The tests have provided an understanding of the limitations of the technique in practical use.

  14. Intellectual property in holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reingand, Nadya; Hunt, David

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents an overview of patents and patent applications on holographic interferometry, and highlights the possibilities offered by patent searching and analysis. Thousands of patent documents relevant to holographic interferometry were uncovered by the study. The search was performed in the following databases: U.S. Patent Office, European Patent Office, Japanese Patent Office and Korean Patent Office for the time frame from 1971 through May 2006. The patent analysis unveils trends in patent temporal distribution, patent families formation, significant technological coverage within the market of system that employ holographic interferometry and other interesting insights.

  15. Parasitic interference in nulling interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matter, A.; Defrère, D.; Danchi, W. C.; Lopez, B.; Absil, O.

    2013-05-01

    Nulling interferometry aims to detect faint objects close to bright stars. Its principle is to produce a destructive interference along the line of sight so that the stellar flux is rejected, while the flux of the off-axis source can be transmitted. In practice, various instrumental perturbations can degrade the nulling performance. Any imperfection in phase, amplitude or polarization produces a spurious flux that leaks to the interferometer output and corrupts the transmitted off-axis flux. One of these instrumental perturbations is the crosstalk phenomenon, which occurs because of multiple parasitic reflections inside transmitting optics, and/or diffraction effects related to beam propagation along finite size optics. It can include a crosstalk of a beam with itself, and a mutual crosstalk between different beams. This can create a parasitic interference pattern, which degrades the intrinsic transmission map - or intensity response - of the interferometer. In this context, we describe how this instrumental effect impairs the performance of a Bracewell interferometer. A simple formalism is developed to derive the corresponding modified intensity response of the interferometer, as a function of the two parameters of interest: the crosstalk level (or contamination rate) and the phase shift between the primary and secondary - parasitic - beams. We then apply our mathematical approach to a few scientific cases, both analytically and using the GENIESIM simulation software, adapted to handle coherent crosstalk. Our results show that a coherent crosstalk level of about 1 per cent implies a 20 per cent drop of the signal-to-noise ratio at most. Careful attention should thus be paid to reduce the crosstalk level inside an interferometric instrument and ensure an instrumental stability that provides the necessary sensitivity through calibration procedures.

  16. Spectroscopic Analysis of High Intensity Laser Beam Jets Interaction Experiments on the Leopard Laser at UNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkov, E. E.; Weller, M. E.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Moschella, J. J.; Shrestha, I.; Shlyapsteva, V. V.; Stafford, A.; Keim, S. F.; University of Nevada Reno Team

    2013-10-01

    Results of Ar gas-puff experiments performed on the high power Leopard laser at UNR are presented. Flux density of laser radiation in focal spot was up to 2 × 1016 W/cm2 (pulse duration was 0.8 ns and laser wavelength was 1.057 μm). Specifically, spectroscopic analysis of K-shell Ar spectra are investigated and compared as functions of the orientation of the laser beam to linear gas jet. The laser beam axis was positioned either along the jet plane or orthogonal to it at a distance of 1 mm from the nozzle output. The diagnostics used included a time-integrated x-ray spectrometer along with a set of filtered Si diodes with various cutoff energies. In order to identify lines, a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) kinetic model was utilized and was also used to determine plasma parameters such as electron temperature and density. The importance of the spectroscopic study of high intensity laser beam-jets interaction experiments is discussed. This work was supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Basic Research Award # HDTRA1-13-1-0033, to University of Nevada, Reno, and in part by the DOE/NNSA Cooperative agreements DE-NA0001984 and DE-FC52-06NA27616.

  17. Radiation-Hydrodynamic Simulation of Experiments With Intense Lasers Generating Collisionless Interpenetrating Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosskopf, Michael; Drake, R.; Kuranz, C.; Park, H.; Kugland, N.; Pollaine, S.; Ross, J.; Remington, B.; Spitkovsky, A.; Gargate, L.; Gregori, G.; Bell, A.; Murphy, C.; Meinecke, J.; Reville, B.; Sakawa, Y.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Takabe, H.; Froula, D.; Fiksel, G.; Miniati, F.; Koenig, M.; Ravasio, A.; Liang, E.; Woolsey, N.

    2012-05-01

    Collisionless shocks, shocks generated by plasma wave interactions in regions where the collisional mean-free-path for ions is long compared to the length scale for instabilities that generate magnetic fields, are found in many astrophysical systems such as supernova remnants and planetary bow shocks. Generating conditions to investigate collisionless shock physics is difficult to achieve in a laboratory setting; however, high-energy-density physics facilities have made this a possibility. Experiments whose goal is to investigate the production and growth of magnetic fields in collisionless shocks in laboratory-scale systems are being carried out on intense lasers, several of which are measuring the plasma properties and magnetic field strength in counter-streaming, collisionless flows generated by laser ablation. This poster reports radiation-hydrodynamic simulations using the CRASH code to model the ablative flow of plasma generated in order to assess potential designs, as well as infer properties of collected data from previous experiments. This work is funded by the Predictive Sciences Academic Alliances Program in NNSA-ASC via grant DEFC52- 08NA28616, by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-FG52-09NA29548, and by the National Laser User Facility Program, grant number DE-NA0000850.

  18. Nurses’ Experiences of Futile Care at Intensive Care Units: A Phenomenological Study

    PubMed Central

    Yekefallah, Leili; Ashktorab, Tahereh; Manoochehri, Houman; Hamid, Alavi Majd

    2015-01-01

    The concept and meaning of futile care depends on the existing culture, values, religion, beliefs, medical achievements and emotional status of a country. We aimed to define the concept of futile care in the viewpoints of nurses working in intensive care units (ICUs). In this phenomenological study, the experiences of 25 nurses were explored in 11 teaching hospitals affiliated to Social Security Organization in Ghazvin province in the northwest of Iran. Personal interviews and observations were used for data collection. All interviews were recorded as well as transcribed and codes, subthemes and themes were extracted using Van Manen’s analysis method. Initially, 191 codes were extracted. During data analysis and comparison, the codes were reduced to 178. Ultimately, 9 sub-themes and four themes emerged: uselessness, waste of resources, torment, and aspects of futility. Nurses defined futile care as “useless, ineffective care giving with wastage of resources and torment of both patients and nurses having nursing and medical aspects” As nurses play a key role in managing futile care, being aware of their experiences in this regard could be the initial operational step for providing useful care as well as educational programs in ICUs. Moreover, the results of this study could help nursing managers adopt supportive approaches to reduce the amount of futile care which could in turn resolve some of the complications nurses face at these wards such as burnout, ethical conflicts, and leave. PMID:25946928

  19. "It's intense, you know." Nurses' experiences in caring for patients requesting euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Denier, Yvonne; Dierckx de Casterlé, Bernadette; De Bal, Nele; Gastmans, Chris

    2010-02-01

    The Belgian Act on Euthanasia came into force on 23 September 2002, making Belgium the second country--after the Netherlands--to decriminalize euthanasia under certain due-care conditions. Since then, Belgian nurses have been increasingly involved in euthanasia care. In this paper, we report a qualitative study based on in-depth interviews with 18 nurses from Flanders (the Dutch-speaking part of Belgium) who have had experience in caring for patients requesting euthanasia since May 2002 (the approval of the Act). We found that the care process for patients requesting euthanasia is a complex and dynamic process, consisting of several stages, starting from the period preceding the euthanasia request and ending with the aftercare stage. When asked after the way in which they experience their involvement in the euthanasia care process, all nurses described it as a grave and difficult process, not only on an organizational and practical level, but also on an emotional level. "Intense" is the dominant feeling experienced by nurses. This is compounded by the presence of other feelings such as great concern and responsibility on the one hand, being content in truly helping the patient to die serenely, and doing everything in one's power to contribute to this; but also feeling unreal and ambivalent on the other hand, because death is arranged. Nurses feel a discrepancy, because although it is a nice death, which happens in dignity and with respect, it is also an unnatural death. The clinical ethical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:19381871

  20. Nurses' experiences of futile care at intensive care units: a phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Yekefallah, Leili; Ashktorab, Tahereh; Manoochehri, Houman; Hamid, Alavi Majd

    2015-01-01

    The concept and meaning of futile care depends on the existing culture, values, religion, beliefs, medical achievements and emotional status of a country. We aimed to define the concept of futile care in the viewpoints of nurses working in intensive care units (ICUs). In this phenomenological study, the experiences of 25 nurses were explored in 11 teaching hospitals affiliated to Social Security Organization in Ghazvin province in the northwest of Iran. Personal interviews and observations were used for data collection. All interviews were recorded as well as transcribed and codes, subthemes and themes were extracted using Van Manen's analysis method. Initially, 191 codes were extracted. During data analysis and comparison, the codes were reduced to 178. Ultimately, 9 sub-themes and four themes emerged: uselessness, waste of resources, torment, and aspects of futility.Nurses defined futile care as "useless, ineffective care giving with wastage of resources and torment of both patients and nurses having nursing and medical aspects" As nurses play a key role in managing futile care, being aware of their experiences in this regard could be the initial operational step for providing useful care as well as educational programs in ICUs. Moreover, the results of this study could help nursing managers adopt supportive approaches to reduce the amount of futile care which could in turn resolve some of the complications nurses face at these wards such as burnout, ethical conflicts, and leave. PMID:25946928

  1. Shaken lattice interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, Carrie; Yu, Hoon; Anderson, Dana

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we report on progress towards performing interferometry using atoms trapped in an optical lattice. That is, we start with atoms in the ground state of an optical lattice potential V(x) =V0cos [ 2 kx + ϕ(t) ] , and by a prescribed phase function ϕ(t) , transform from one atomic wavefunction to another. In this way, we implement the standard interferometric sequence of beam splitting, propagation, reflection, reverse propagation, and recombination. Through the use of optimal control techniques, we have computationally demonstrated a scalable accelerometer that provides information on the sign of the applied acceleration. Extension of this idea to a two-dimensional shaken-lattice-based gyroscope is discussed. In addition, we report on the experimental implementation of the shaken lattice system.

  2. Spectroscopic Low Coherence Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Aalders, Maurice C.; Hermann, Boris; Drexler, Wolfgang; Faber, Dirk J.

    Low-coherence interferometry (LCI) allows high-resolution volumetric imaging of tissue morphology and provides localized optical properties that can be related to the physiological status of tissue. This chapter discusses the combination of spatial and spectroscopic information by means of spectroscopic OCT (sOCT) and low-coherence spectroscopy (LCS). We describe the theory behind these modalities for the assessment of spatially resolved optical absorption and (back)scattering coefficient spectra. These spectra can be used for the highly localized quantification of chromophore concentrations and assessment of tissue organization on (sub)cellular scales. This leads to a wealth of potential clinical applications, ranging from neonatology for the determination of billibrubin concentrations, to oncology for the optical assessment of the aggressiveness of a cancerous lesion.

  3. Interferometry for rotating sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velle, S.; Mehrabi Pari, S.; Csernai, L. P.

    2016-06-01

    The two particle interferometry method to determine the size of the emitting source after a heavy ion collision is extended. Following the extension of the method to spherical expansion dynamics, here we extend the method to rotating systems. It is shown that rotation of a cylindrically symmetric system leads to modifications, which can be perceived as spatial asymmetry by the "azimuthal HBT" method. We study an exact rotating and expanding solution of the fluid dynamical model of heavy ion reactions. We consider a source that is azimuthally symmetric in space around the axis of rotation, and discuss the features of the resulting two particle correlation function. This shows the azimuthal asymmetry arising from the rotation. We show that this asymmetry leads to results similar to those given by spatially asymmetric sources.

  4. Experiences of fathering a baby admitted to neonatal intensive care: a critical gender analysis.

    PubMed

    Deeney, Kathleen; Lohan, Maria; Spence, Dale; Parkes, Jackie

    2012-09-01

    More fathers than ever before attend at the birth of their child and, internationally, there is a palpable pressure on maternity and neonatal services to include and engage with fathers. It is, thus, more important than ever to understand how fathers experience reproductive and neonatal health services and to understand how fathers can be successfully accommodated in these environments alongside their partners. In this paper we advance a theoretical framework for re-thinking fatherhood and health services approaches to fatherhood based on Critical Studies on Men (CSM). We illustrate the importance of this feminist informed theoretical approach to understanding the gendered experiences of fathers in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) setting in Northern Ireland. Using a longitudinal follow-up research design, with two data collection points, a total of 39 in-depth semi-structured interviews was conducted with 21 fathers of infants admitted to the NICU between August 2008 and December 2009. The findings demonstrate: (i) how men are forging new gendered identities around the birth of their baby but, over time, acknowledge women as the primary caregivers; (ii) how social class is a key determinant of men's ability to enact hegemonic forms of 'involved fatherhood' in the NICU, and; (iii) how men also encounter resistance from their partners and health professionals in challenging a gender order which associates women with the competent care of infants. An understanding of these gendered experiences operating at both individual and structural levels is critical to leading change for the inclusion of fathers as equal parents in healthcare settings. PMID:22694990

  5. Infrasonic interferometry of stratospherically refracted microbaroms--a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Julius T; El Allouche, Nihed; Simons, Dick G; Ruigrok, Elmer N; Wapenaar, Kees; Evers, Läslo G

    2013-10-01

    The atmospheric wind and temperature can be estimated through the traveltimes of infrasound between pairs of receivers. The traveltimes can be obtained by infrasonic interferometry. In this study, the theory of infrasonic interferometry is verified and applied to modeled stratospherically refracted waves. Synthetic barograms are generated using a raytracing model and taking into account atmospheric attenuation, geometrical spreading, and phase shifts due to caustics. Two types of source wavelets are implemented for the experiments: blast waves and microbaroms. In both numerical experiments, the traveltimes between the receivers are accurately retrieved by applying interferometry to the synthetic barograms. It is shown that microbaroms can be used in practice to obtain the traveltimes of infrasound through the stratosphere, which forms the basis for retrieving the wind and temperature profiles. PMID:24116404

  6. Ensemble experiments using a nested LETKF system to reproduce intense vortices associated with tornadoes of 6 May 2012 in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seko, Hiromu; Kunii, Masaru; Yokota, Sho; Tsuyuki, Tadashi; Miyoshi, Takemasa

    2015-12-01

    Experiments simulating intense vortices associated with tornadoes that occurred on 6 May 2012 on the Kanto Plain, Japan, were performed with a nested local ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF) system. Intense vortices were reproduced by downscale experiments with a 12-member ensemble in which the initial conditions were obtained from the nested LETKF system analyses. The downscale experiments successfully generated intense vortices in three regions similar to the observed vortices, whereas only one tornado was reproduced by a deterministic forecast. The intense vorticity of the strongest tornado, which was observed in the southernmost region, was successfully reproduced by 10 of the 12 ensemble members. An examination of the results of the ensemble downscale experiments showed that the duration of intense vorticities tended to be longer when the vertical shear of the horizontal wind was larger and the lower airflow was more humid. Overall, the study results show that ensemble forecasts have the following merits: (1) probabilistic forecasts of the outbreak of intense vortices associated with tornadoes are possible; (2) the miss rate of outbreaks should decrease; and (3) environmental factors favoring outbreaks can be obtained by comparing the multiple possible scenarios of the ensemble forecasts.

  7. Seismic interferometry for temporal monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Norimitsu

    Seismic interferometry, where one computes coherency of waves between two or more receivers and averages over many sources, is a technique of signal processing to reconstruct wavefields. This technique is used in geophysics, especially exploration geophysics and seismology. After more than a half century from the first study related to seismic interferometry (although the name of seismic interferometry has been used for approximately the last 15 years), researchers have developed this technique for many aspects: using multiples for increasing illuminations, enhancement of survey areas, ambient-noise analysis, and removal of the imprint of a complicated overburden. In this dissertation, I focus on the advantages of seismic interferometry for time-lapse measurements. Measurements of temporal changes yield beneficial information of fluid flow, crustal deformation, temperature, and/or stress. Estimation of temporal changes using active sources is, however, technically and economically challenging. Because seismic interferometry reconstruct waves that would have been recorded with a repeatable active sources using only receivers, this technique is appropriate for temporal monitoring. With seismic interferometry, one obtains some advantages that include canceling the complexity of wave propagation to a virtual source, creating virtual shear-wave (S-wave) sources (active S sources are expensive), and using waves that are not usable for active sources (e.g., ambient noise and multiples). I seek applications of seismic interferometry in a variety of topics (i.e., seismology, structural engineering, and exploration geophysics), and develop and/or modify several techniques of seismic interferometry for each application. Some chapters focus on developing techniques of seismic interferometry, and other chapters aim to estimate and interpret temporal changes with the developed techniques. For passive seismic sources, deconvolution-based seismic interferometry has better

  8. Optical Long Baseline Interferometry News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, P. R.; Malbet, F.

    2005-12-01

    The Optical Long Baseline Interferometry News is a website and forum for scientists, engineers, and students who share an interest in long baseline stellar interferometry. It was established in 1995 and is the focus of activity of the IAU Working Group on Optical/Infrared Interferometry. Here you will find links to projects devoted to stellar interferometry, news items, recent papers and preprints, and resources for further research. The email news forum was established in 2001 to complement the website and to facilitate exchanges and collaborations. The forum includes an email exploder and an archived list of discussions. You are invited to explore the forum and website at http://olbin.jpl.nasa.gov. Work by PRL was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  9. Inside the research incubator: a case study of an intensive undergraduate research experience for nursing a midwifery students.

    PubMed

    Kain, Victoria J; Hepworth, Julie; Bogossian, Fiona; McTaggart, Lya

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduate research experiences are an increasing component of nursing and midwifery degrees. The Summer Research Scholarship Programme (SRSP) is a tertiary education initiative in Australia to provide an intensive undergraduate research experience. Between 2009 and 2010, six students and four academic faculty mentors in School of Nursing and Midwifery participated in an inaugural SRSP. This study explores the experiences of both students and faculty mentors to determine how this undergraduate research experience impacted student learning and interest in research. A qualitative case study approach was used to explore the research experiences of undergraduate student and faculty participants in an inaugural undergraduate research programme. Based on the results of two surveys four main themes were identified: (1) acquisition of research skills, (2) expectations, (3) academic engagement, and (4) continued interest in research. An intensive undergraduate research experience is a valuable component of student learning that has the capacity to contribute to immediate and longer-term learning and research outcomes. PMID:25632716

  10. Neutron interferometry with cold stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineeva, Taisiya; Arif, M.; Huber, M. G.; Shahi, C. B.; Clark, C. W.; Cory, D. G.; Nsofini, J.; Sarenac, D.; Pushin, D. A.

    Neutron interferometry (NI) is amongst the most precise methods for characterizing neutron interactions by measuring the relative difference between two neutron paths, one of which contains a sample-of-interest. Because neutrons carry magnetic moment and are deeply penetrating, they are excellent probes to investigate properties of magnetic materials. The advantage of NI is its unique sensitivity which allows to directly measure magnetic and structural transitions in materials. Up to now NI has been sparingly used in material research due to its sensitivity to environmental noise. However, recent successes in implementing Quantum Error Correction principles lead to an improved NI design making it robust against mechanical vibrations. Following these advances, a new user facility at the National Institute for Standards and Technology was built to study condensed matter applications, biology and quantum physics. Incorporating cold sample stage inside NI is the first of its kind experiment which can be carried out on large range of temperatures down to 4K. Upon successful realization, it will open new frontiers to characterize magnetic domains, phase transitions and spin properties in a variety of materials such as, for example, iron-based superconductors and spintronic materials. Supported in part by CERC, CIFAR, NSERC and CREATE.

  11. Swiss Experiment: Design, implemention and use of a cross-disciplinary infrastructure for data intensive science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawes, N.; Salehi, A.; Clifton, A.; Bavay, M.; Aberer, K.; Parlange, M. B.; Lehning, M.

    2010-12-01

    It has long been known that environmental processes are cross-disciplinary, but data has continued to be acquired and held for a single purpose. Swiss Experiment is a rapidly evolving cross-disciplinary, distributed sensor data infrastructure, where tools for the environmental science community stem directly from computer science research. The platform uses the bleeding edge of computer science to acquire, store and distribute data and metadata from all environmental science disciplines at a variety of temporal and spatial resolutions. SwissEx is simultaneously developing new technologies to allow low cost, high spatial and temporal resolution measurements such that small areas can be intensely monitored. This data is then combined with existing widespread, low density measurements in the cross-disciplinary platform to provide well documented datasets, which are of use to multiple research disciplines. We present a flexible, generic infrastructure at an advanced stage of development. The infrastructure makes the most of Web 2.0 technologies for a collaborative working environment and as a user interface for a metadata database. This environment is already closely integrated with GSN, an open-source database middleware developed under Swiss Experiment for acquisition and storage of generic time-series data (2D and 3D). GSN can be queried directly by common data processing packages and makes data available in real-time to models and 3rd party software interfaces via its web service interface. It also provides real-time push or pull data exchange between instances, a user management system which leaves data owners in charge of their data, advanced real-time processing and much more. The SwissEx interface is increasingly gaining users and supporting environmental science in Switzerland. It is also an integral part of environmental education projects ClimAtscope and O3E, where the technologies can provide rapid feedback of results for children of all ages and where the

  12. Clinical implementation of dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy: Dosimetric aspects and initial experience

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, S. S.; Krishnamurthy, K.; Davis, C. A.; Ravichandran, R.; Kannadhasan, S.; Biunkumar, J. P.; El Ghamrawy, Kamal

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the initial experience of quality assurance (QA) tests performed on the millennium multi-leaf collimator (mMLC) for clinical implementation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using sliding window technique. The various QA tests verified the mechanical and dosimetric stability of the mMLC of linear accelerator when operated in dynamic mode (dMLC). The mechanical QA tests also verified the positional accuracy and kinetic properties of the dMLC. The stability of dMLC was analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively using radiographic film and Omnipro IMRT software. The output stability, variation in output for different sweeping gap widths, and dosimetric leaf separation were measured. Dose delivery with IMRT was verified against the dose computed by the treatment planning system (TPS). Monitor units (MUs) calculated by the planning system for the IMRT were cross-checked with independent commercial dose management software. Visual inspection and qualitative analysis showed that the leaf positioning accuracy was well within the acceptable limits. Dosimetric QA tests confirmed the dosimetric stability of the mMLC in dynamic mode. The verification of MUs using commercial software confirmed the reliability of the IMRT planning system for dose computation. The dosimetric measurements validated the fractional dose delivery. PMID:19893693

  13. [Mothers' experiences and perspectives regarding their premature infant's stay at the neonatal intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Bárbara Bertolossi Marta; Rodrigues, Benedita Maria Rêgo Deusdará

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to learn the reason why mothers remain at the hospital throughout the stay of their premature infant at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The study was performed with twelve mothers to premature newborns at a municipal maternity hospital in Rio de Janeiro, in 2007. The methodological support used in the study was the Sociological Phenomenology of Alfred Schütz. The phenomenological interview was used to capture the mothers' discourse, whose intentional action was unveiled through the following categories: Taking care of the child--dealing with the challenge of having a small baby; Staying near the premature child--the mother's presence helps the child's recovery to be faster; Reciprocal help among mothers--reinforcing hope every day. Rooming-in care stands out as an innovative and relevant initiative during the hospital stay of preterm infants, and it is considered an environment for living together, sharing experiences, and giving mutual support throughout the long and difficult stay at the hospital. PMID:21337767

  14. Demeter/ICE Experiment: Study of low frequency transmitter intensity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjada, M. Y.; Moldovan, I.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Al-Haddad, E.; Biagi, P. F.; Parrot, M.

    2012-04-01

    We report on low frequency (LF) transmitter signal recorded by the 'Instrument Capteur Electrique' (ICE) experiment onboard the DEMETER micro-satellite. We mainly consider the signal emitted by the Brasov broadcasting station (25.60E, 45.75N) at frequency of about 153 kHz. We analyze the reception conditions of this transmitter several weeks before the occurrence of the Vrancea earthquakes, on October, 27th, 2004. Ground-based observations revealed the presence of sudden decrease of the Y-component of the magnetic field at Muntele Rosu Observatory (Romania), at about 68 km from the epicenter, as reported by Moldovan et al. (Rom. Journ. Phys., Vol. 54, Nos. 1-2, p. 249-261, Bucharest, 2009). In this contribution we attempt to check if the LF Brasov signal was also subject to similar disturbances as observed by the ground-station. We focus on the variation of the LF transmitter intensity levels, several weeks before and after the Vrancea earthquake occurrence. We discuss the physical parameters which may disturb the signal reception in particular the geomagnetic activity and the signal to noise ratios.

  15. Treatment of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy-The National Cancer Centre Singapore Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Tham, Ivan Weng-Keong; Hee, Siew Wan; Yeo, Richard Ming-Chert; Salleh, Patemah; Lee, James; Tan, Terence Wee-Kiat; Fong, Kam Weng; Chua, Eu Tiong; Wee, Joseph Tien-Seng

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and acute toxicity of our early experience with treating nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and materials: A review was conducted on case records of 195 patients with histologically proven, nonmetastatic NPC treated with IMRT between 2002 and 2005. MRI of the head and neck was fused with CT simulation images. All plans had target volumes at three dose levels, with a prescribed dose of 70 Gy to the gross disease, in 2.0-2.12 Gy/fraction over 33-35 fractions. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy was offered to Stage III/IV patients. Results: Median patient age was 52 years, and 69% were male. Median follow-up was 36.5 months. One hundred and twenty-three patients had Stage III/IV disease (63%); 50 (26%) had T4 disease. One hundred and eighty-eight (96%) had complete response; 7 (4%) had partial response. Of the complete responders, 10 (5.3%) had local recurrence, giving a 3-year local recurrence-free survival estimate of 93.1% and a 3-year disease-free survival of 82.1%. Fifty-one patients (26%) had at least one Grade 3 toxicity. Conclusions: Results from our series are comparable to those reported by other centers. Acute toxicity is common. Local failure or persistent disease, especially in patients with bulky T4 disease, are issues that must be addressed in future trials.

  16. Local Scale Radiobrightness Modelling during Intensive Observing Period-4 of the Cold Land Processes Experiment-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward J.; Tedesco, Marco; deRoo, Roger; England, Anthony W.; Gu, Haoyu; Pham, Hanh; Boprie, David; Graf, Tobias; Koike, Toshio; Armstrong, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Cold Land Processes Field Experiment (CLPX-1) was designed to provide microwave remote sensing observations and ground truth for studies of snow and frozen ground remote sensing, particularly issues related to scaling. CLPX-1 was conducted in the spring of 2003 in Colorado, USA. Initial forward model validation work is concentrating on the Local-Scale Observation Site (LSOS), a 0.8 ha study site consisting of open meadows separated by trees where the most detailed measurements were made of snow depth and temperature, density, and grain size profiles. This paper will focus on the ability of forward Dense Medium Radiative Transfer (DMRT) modelling, combined with snowpack measurements to reproduce the radiobrightness signatures observed by the University of Michigan s Truck-Mounted Radiometer System at 19 and 37 GHz during the 4th Intensive Observing Period (IOP4) in March, 2003. Unlike the earlier IOP3, conditions during IOP4 include both wet and dry periods, providing a valuable test of DMRT model performance. Observations of upwelling and downwelling tree radiobrightness will be used to formulate a simple model for the effect of trees within the field of view. In addition, a comparison will be made for the one day of coincident observations by the University of Tokyo s Ground- Based Microwave Radiometer-7 (GBMR-7). These analyses will help guide the choice of future snow retrieval algorithms and the design of future Cold Lands observing systems.

  17. Probing dark energy with atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrage, Clare; Copeland, Edmund J.; Hinds, E. A.

    2015-03-01

    Theories of dark energy require a screening mechanism to explain why the associated scalar fields do not mediate observable long range fifth forces. The archetype of this is the chameleon field. Here we show that individual atoms are too small to screen the chameleon field inside a large high-vacuum chamber, and therefore can detect the field with high sensitivity. We derive new limits on the chameleon parameters from existing experiments, and show that most of the remaining chameleon parameter space is readily accessible using atom interferometry.

  18. Analytical model for calibrating laser intensity in strong-field-ionization experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Song-Feng; Le, Anh-Thu; Jin, Cheng; Wang, Xu; Lin, C. D.

    2016-02-01

    The interaction of an intense laser pulse with atoms and molecules depends extremely nonlinearly on the laser intensity. Yet experimentally there still exists no simple reliable methods for determining the peak laser intensity within the focused volume. Here we present a simple method, based on an improved Perelomov-Popov-Terent'ev model, that would allow the calibration of laser intensities from the measured ionization signals of atoms or molecules. The model is first examined by comparing ionization probabilities (or signals) of atoms and several simple diatomic molecules with those from solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. We then show the possibility of using this method to calibrate laser intensities for atoms, diatomic molecules as well as large polyatomic molecules, for laser intensities from the multiphoton ionization to tunneling ionization regimes.

  19. Capabilities of Imaging Interferometry for Plasma Diagnostics in Open Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vyacheslavov, L.N.; Sanin, A.L.; Tanaka, K.; Kawahata, K.

    2005-01-15

    Two modifications of imaging interferometry: heterodyne (HI) and phase contrast interferometers (PCI) are designed for observation of plasma density profiles and density fluctuations respectively. Besides, spatial distributions of plasma velocities, velocities fluctuations and related electrical fields can be obtained from the analysis of HI and PCI data. New sensitive phase counters, developed at Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, enable HI to include some capabilities of the PCI. In addition to well recognized transversal spatial resolution of imaging technique, progress in deconvolution of line-of-sight-integrated data was recently made. Computer simulation, bench-test experiments and recent experimental results from the Large Helical Device illustrate the potentials of the imaging interferometry for investigation of plasma. Application of the imaging interferometry with spatial resolution along the viewing line to mirror machines is finally considered.

  20. Shaken Lattice Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, Carrie; Yu, Hoon; Anderson, Dana

    2015-05-01

    This work introduces a method to perform interferometry using atoms trapped in an optical lattice. Starting at t = 0 with atoms in the ground state of a lattice potential V(x) =V0cos [ 2 kx + ϕ(t) ] , we show that it is possible to transform from one atomic wavefunction to another by a prescribed shaking of the lattice, i.e., by an appropriately tailored time-dependent phase shift ϕ(t) . In particular, the standard interferometer sequence of beam splitting, propagation, reflection, reverse propagation, and recombination can be achieved via a set of phase modulation operations {ϕj(t) } . Each ϕj(t) is determined using a learning algorithm, and the split-step method calculates the wavefunction dynamics. We have numerically demonstrated an interferometer in which the shaken wavefunctions match the target states to better than 1 % . We carried out learning using a genetic algorithm and optimal control techniques. The atoms remain trapped in the lattice throughout the full interferometer sequence. Thus, the approach may be suitable for use in an dynamic environment. In addition to the general principles, we discuss aspects of the experimental implementation. Supported by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and Northrop Grumman.

  1. Distinguishing between Dirac and Majorana neutrinos withtwo-particle interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, Thomas D.

    2006-03-02

    Two-particle interferometry, a second-order interferenceeffect, is explored as another possible tool to distinguish betweenmassive Dirac and Majorana neutrinos. A simple theoretical framework isdiscussed in the context of several gedanken experiments. The method canin principle provide both the mass scale and the quantum nature of theneutrino for a certain class of incoherent left-handed sourcecurrents.

  2. How to Test Atom and Neutron Neutrality with Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Dimopoulos, Savas; Geraci, Andrew A.; Hogan, Jason; Kasevich, Mark

    2008-03-28

    We propose an atom-interferometry experiment based on the scalar Aharonov-Bohm effect which detects an atom charge at the 10{sup -28}e level, and improves the current laboratory limits by 8 orders of magnitude. This setup independently probes neutron charges down to 10{sup -28}e, 7 orders of magnitude below current bounds.

  3. How to test atom and neutron neutrality with atom interferometry.

    PubMed

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Dimopoulos, Savas; Geraci, Andrew A; Hogan, Jason; Kasevich, Mark

    2008-03-28

    We propose an atom-interferometry experiment based on the scalar Aharonov-Bohm effect which detects an atom charge at the 10{-28}e level, and improves the current laboratory limits by 8 orders of magnitude. This setup independently probes neutron charges down to 10{-28}e, 7 orders of magnitude below current bounds. PMID:18517846

  4. Probing Non-Abelian Statistics with Quasiparticle Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bonderson, Parsa; Shtengel, Kirill; Slingerland, J.K.

    2006-07-07

    We examine interferometric experiments in systems that exhibit non-Abelian braiding statistics, expressing outcomes in terms of the modular S-matrix. In particular, this result applies to fractional quantum Hall interferometry, and we give a detailed treatment of the Read-Rezayi states, providing explicit predictions for the recently observed {nu}=12/5 plateau.

  5. Testing Atom and Neutron Neutrality with Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Dimopoulos, Savas; Geraci, Andrew A.; Hogan, Jason; Kasevich, Mark; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2008-01-07

    We propose an atom-interferometry experiment based on the scalar Aharonov-Bohm effect which detects an atom charge at the 10{sup -28} e level, and improves the current laboratory limits by 8 orders of magnitude. This setup independently probes neutron charges down to 10{sup 28} e, 7 orders of magnitude below current bounds.

  6. The Narrabri Stellar Intensity Interferometer: a 50th birthday tribute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuthill, Peter G.

    2014-07-01

    This year marks the 50th anniversary since the first scientific measurements were produced with the Narrabri Stellar Intensity Interferometer, which was constructed in the early 1960's by Robert Hanbury Brown and Richard Twiss. A collaboration between the Universities of Sydney and Manchester, the interferometer was the culmination of a series of experiments which pioneered the technique of intensity interferometry. The immediate controversy surrounding the quantum implications of the technique enveloped some of the most eminent physicists of the day, sparking a debate about nonlocal effects and optical coherence. A full explanation of the workings of the intensity interferometer in a quantum context was finally put forward by Roy Glauber, ultimately earning him the 2005 Nobel Prize in Physics. The intensity interferometer rekindled the field of high resolution stellar imaging, which had been extinguished for a half century (following the failure of Pease's 50-foot beam on Mt Wilson), while delivering the first ever measurements of the sizes of normal stars - establishing an effective temperature scaling relationship which has underpinned stellar astronomy for 50 years. This directly paved the way for the next generation of Michelson Stellar Interferometers. Intensity interferometry itself has found application in several fields (notably particle physics), and plans are in active development for modern reprises within stellar interferometry. However undoubtedly the greatest legacy lies in the Hanbury Brown Twiss (HBT) effect being the foundational experiment for what is now known as Quantum Optics - a field which underpins a huge sector of the technology which enables our modern world. This invited review discuses the development of the interferometer, including the controversy that its underlying principles generated within the contemporary physics community. The core scientific output generated by the instrument is presented, together with the impact of the

  7. Monitoring grazing intensity: an experiment with canopy spectra applied to satellite remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fei; Zhao, Ying; Zheng, Jiajia; Luo, Juhua; Zhang, Xiaoqiang

    2016-04-01

    The quantification of grassland grazing intensity (GI) and its detailed spatial distribution are important for grassland management and ecological protection. Remote sensing has great potential in these areas, but its use is still limited. This study analyzed the impacts of grazing on biophysical properties of vegetation and suggested using biomass to quantify GI because of its stability and interpretability. In comparison to a single spectral index, such as the red edge index (REI), combining REI and a cellulose absorption ratio index calculated from hyperspectral data performs better for biomass estimation. Further, an auxiliary spectral index, called the grazing monitoring index (GMI), was developed based on differences in spectral reflectance in the infrared range. Experiments in a grazing area of the Inner Mongolia grassland indicated that GMI can identify GI, with three range intervals (GMI <0, 0-1, and ≥1) used to describe the biomass distribution. The results showed that combining GMI and biomass was more successful than existing approaches for identifying the grassland variability resulting from the spatial heterogeneity of grazing behavior. The thresholds of biomass for four GI levels (ungrazed, lightly grazed, moderately grazed, and heavily grazed) could be determined by the intersections of biomass distributions. In addition, the approach developed at the on-ground canopy scale was extended to remotely sensed Hyperion data. The results showed that the approach could successfully identify the grazing treatments of blocks in the experimental grazing area. Overall, our study provides inspiration and ideas for using satellite remote sensing for evaluating plant production, standing biomass, and livestock impacts.

  8. Use of AIRS-derived Products in Tropical Cyclone Intensity Analysis During the HS3 Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garms, E.; Knuteson, R. O.; Plokhenko, Y.; Smith, W.; Weisz, E.; Revercomb, H. E.; Ackerman, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    The high-resolution data collected during a field experiment is extremely valuable, but it is equally valuable to have observations that provide context for such in situ measurements. For this reason, satellite data coincident with observations taken from the Global Hawk UAVs during the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) field experiment are vital to a gaining a more complete understanding of tropical cyclone (TC) processes. The primary data used in this study are calibrated hyperspectral infrared radiances obtained from the NASA Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), onboard the Aqua satellite. AIRS measures upwelling Earth-emitted infrared spectra using more than 2300 IR channels between 3.7 and 15.4 microns. Several products derived from this high-spectral resolution data are used in this study. These products include a 3-D cloud amount vertical profile (CAVP) product as well as temperature and water vapor profiles retrieved using a Dual-Regression algorithm (DR), both of which were developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC) Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS). The CAVP product will be used to measure the slope of the cloud tops of rainbands in a tropical cyclone. Observations from the UW Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS), NASA Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL), and NCAR dropsondes taken during the 2012 Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) field experiment will be used to validate the rainband slope analysis and the DR retrievals. The methodology behind the TC rainband slope analysis, which is hypothesized to correlate with TC intensity, will be discussed. This product will then be used to obtain a TC intensity estimate, which will be compared to other accepted intensity estimates like the Advanced Dvorak Technique (ADT), Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), and Satellite Consensus (SATCON) estimates. Additionally, the DR product will be used to

  9. SAINTq: Scoring protein-protein interactions in affinity purification - mass spectrometry experiments with fragment or peptide intensity data.

    PubMed

    Teo, Guoci; Koh, Hiromi; Fermin, Damian; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Knight, James D R; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Choi, Hyungwon

    2016-08-01

    SAINT (Significance Analysis of INTeractome) is a probabilistic method for scoring bait-prey interactions against negative controls in affinity purification - mass spectrometry (AP-MS) experiments. Our published SAINT algorithms use spectral counts or protein intensities as the input for calculating the probability of true interaction, which enables objective selection of high-confidence interactions with false discovery control. With the advent of new protein quantification methods such as Data Independent Acquisition (DIA), we redeveloped the scoring method to utilize the reproducibility information embedded in the peptide or fragment intensity data as a key scoring criterion, bypassing protein intensity summarization required in the previous SAINT workflow. The new software package, SAINTq, addresses key issues in the interaction scoring based on intensity data, including treatment of missing values and selection of peptides and fragments for scoring each prey protein. We applied SAINTq to two independent DIA AP-MS data sets profiling the interactome of MEPCE and EIF4A2 and that of 14-3-3β, and benchmarked the performance in terms of recovering previously reported literature interactions in the iRefIndex database. In both data sets, the SAINTq analysis using the fragment-level intensity data led to the most sensitive detection of literature interactions at the same level of specificity. This analysis outperforms the analysis using protein intensity data summed from fragment intensity data that is equivalent to the model in SAINTexpress. PMID:27119218

  10. Model experiment of cosmic ray acceleration due to an incoherent wakefield induced by an intense laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Kuramitsu, Y.; Sakawa, Y.; Takeda, K.; Tampo, M.; Takabe, H.; Nakanii, N.; Kondo, K.; Tsuji, K.; Kimura, K.; Fukumochi, S.; Kashihara, M.; Tanimoto, T.; Nakamura, H.; Ishikura, T.; Kodama, R.; Mima, K.; Tanaka, K. A.; Mori, Y.; Miura, E.; Kitagawa, Y.

    2011-01-15

    The first report on a model experiment of cosmic ray acceleration by using intense laser pulses is presented. Large amplitude light waves are considered to be excited in the upstream regions of relativistic astrophysical shocks and the wakefield acceleration of cosmic rays can take place. By substituting an intense laser pulse for the large amplitude light waves, such shock environments were modeled in a laboratory plasma. A plasma tube, which is created by imploding a hollow polystyrene cylinder, was irradiated by an intense laser pulse. Nonthermal electrons were generated by the wakefield acceleration and the energy distribution functions of the electrons have a power-law component with an index of {approx}2. The maximum attainable energy of the electrons in the experiment is discussed by a simple analytic model. In the incoherent wakefield the maximum energy can be much larger than one in the coherent field due to the momentum space diffusion or the energy diffusion of electrons.

  11. A qualitative study exploring the experiences of parents of children admitted to seven Dutch pediatric intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Schuurman, Beatrix Elink; Albers, Marcel J. I. J.; van Dam, Nicolette A. M.; Dullaart, Eugenie; van Heerde, Marc; Verlaat, Carin W. M.; van Vught, Elise M.; Hazelzet, Jan A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To explore parents' experiences during the admission of their children to a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Method Qualitative method using in-depth interviews. Thematic analysis was applied to capture parents’ experiences. Thirty-nine mothers and 25 fathers of 41 children admitted to seven of the eight PICUs in university medical centers in The Netherlands were interviewed. Results Parents were interviewed within 1 month after their child’s discharge from a PICU. Thematic analysis identified 1,514 quotations that were coded into 63 subthemes. The subthemes were categorized into six major themes: attitude of the professionals; coordination of care; emotional intensity; information management; environmental factors; parent participation. Most themes had an overarching relationship representing the array of experiences encountered by parents when their child was staying in a PICU. The theme of emotional intensity was in particular associated with all the other themes. Conclusions The findings provided a range of themes and subthemes describing the complexity of the parental experiences of a PICU admission. The subthemes present a systematic and thematic basis for the development of a quantitative instrument to measure parental experiences and satisfaction with care. The findings of this study have important clinical implications related to the deeper understanding of parental experiences and improving family-centered care. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00134-010-2074-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:21063674

  12. Hanbury Brown and Twiss interferometry with interacting photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromberg, Y.; Lahini, Y.; Small, E.; Silberberg, Y.

    2010-10-01

    Five decades ago, Hanbury Brown and Twiss (HBT) demonstrated that the angular size of stars can be measured by correlating the intensity fluctuations measured by two detectors at two different locations. Since then, non-local correlation measurements have become ubiquitous in many areas of physics and have also been applied, beyond photons, to electrons, matter waves and subatomic particles. An important assumption in HBT interferometry is that the particles do not interact on their way from the source to the detectors. However, this assumption is not always valid. Here, we study the effects of interactions on HBT interferometry by considering the propagation of light fields in a nonlinear medium that induces interactions between the photons. We show that interactions affect multipath interference, limiting the ability to extract information on the source. Nevertheless, we find that proper analysis of the intensity fluctuations can recover the size of the source, even in the presence of interactions.

  13. 100-Picometer Interferometry for EUVL

    SciTech Connect

    Sommargren, G E; Phillion, D W; Johnson, M A; Nguyen, N O; Barty, A; Snell, F J; Dillon, D R; Bradsher, L S

    2002-03-18

    Future extreme ultraviolet lithography (EWL) steppers will, in all likelihood, have six-mirror projection cameras. To operate at the diffraction limit over an acceptable depth of focus each aspheric mirror will have to be fabricated with an absolute figure accuracy approaching 100 pm rms. We are currently developing visible light interferometry to meet this need based on modifications of our present phase shifting diffraction interferometry (PSDI) methodology where we achieved an absolute accuracy of 250pm. The basic PSDI approach has been further simplified, using lensless imaging based on computational diffractive back-propagation, to eliminate auxiliary optics that typically limit measurement accuracy. Small remaining error sources, related to geometric positioning, CCD camera pixel spacing and laser wavelength, have been modeled and measured. Using these results we have estimated the total system error for measuring off-axis aspheric EUVL mirrors with this new approach to interferometry.

  14. Three-color differential interferometry.

    PubMed

    Desse, J M

    1997-10-01

    It is shown that differential interferometry using a Wollaston prism and a three-color laser source is an optical technique that has all the advantages of differential interferometry in polarized white light and of classical monochromatic interferometry. The interference fringe pattern obtained is very large and colored and presents a central white fringe that enables easy identification of the zero order of the interferogram. The three-color source is obtained by filtering the unwanted lines of the ionized laser (mixed argon and krypton) and balancing the three red, green, and blue lines by a technique that involves placing birefringent plates between the polarizer and the analyzer, the thickness of which has been calculated to create a natural filter. The unsteady aerodynamic flow downstream of a diamond shape airfoil has been visualized with this technique, which shows that the power of the light source is sufficient to record the interferograms at a high rate. PMID:18264221

  15. Coarse frequency comb interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwider, J.

    2008-08-01

    Real wedge interferometers of the Fizeau-type do not allow for fringes in case of a spectral broad band source - or in short: for white light fringes. Here, the use of a suitable frequency comb source will help to overcome this limitation on the one hand and on the other will offer the capability for enhanced phase sensitivity in high precision measurements of surface deviations. Frequency combs can be produced either by using a pulse train from a fs-laser or by passive filtering of the light emitted by a broad band source as a superlum-diode or a fs-laser. The frequency comb produced by a common fs-laser is extremely fine, i.e., the frequency difference of consecutive peaks is very small or the distance of consecutive pulses of the pulse train might be of the order of 1m. Therefore, the coarse pulse train produced by passive filtering of a broad band source is better adapted to the needs of surface testing interferometers. White light fringes are either applied for the profiling of discontinuous surfaces and/or can serve as an indication for the correct choice of multiplication factors in superposition interferometry. During the last decennium it became more and more clear that spatially incoherent sources provide better measuring accuracy in surface measurements due to the reduced influence of dust diffraction patterns. The advantage of laser illumination can nevertheless be maintained if the laser light is made spatially incoherent through moving scatterers in the light path. Here, we will discuss the application of spatially incoherent broad band light frequency filtered through a Fabry-Perot filter. The main applications are in the following fields: (1) surface profiling applications using two-beam Fizeau interferometers, (2) selection of single cavities out of a series of interlaced cavities, and (3) sensitivity enhancement for multi-beam interferometers for planeness or sphericity measurements. Some of the discussed possibilities will be experimentally

  16. Techniques in Broadband Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D J

    2004-01-04

    This is a compilation of my patents issued from 1997 to 2002, generally describing interferometer techniques that modify the coherence properties of broad-bandwidth light and other waves, with applications to Doppler velocimetry, range finding, imaging and spectroscopy. Patents are tedious to read in their original form. In an effort to improve their readability I have embedded the Figures throughout the manuscript, put the Figure captions underneath the Figures, and added section headings. Otherwise I have resisted the temptation to modify the words, though I found many places which could use healthy editing. There may be minor differences with the official versions issued by the US Patent and Trademark Office, particularly in the claims sections. In my shock physics work I measured the velocities of targets impacted by flyer plates by illuminating them with laser light and analyzing the reflected light with an interferometer. Small wavelength changes caused by the target motion (Doppler effect) were converted into fringe shifts by the interferometer. Lasers having long coherence lengths were required for the illumination. While lasers are certainly bright sources, and their collimated beams are convenient to work with, they are expensive. Particularly if one needs to illuminate a wide surface area, then large amounts of power are needed. Orders of magnitude more power per dollar can be obtained from a simple flashlamp, or for that matter, a 50 cent light bulb. Yet these inexpensive sources cannot practically be used for Doppler velocimetry because their coherence length is extremely short, i.e. their bandwidth is much too wide. Hence the motivation for patents 1 & 2 is a method (White Light Velocimetry) for allowing use of these powerful but incoherent lamps for interferometry. The coherence of the illumination is modified by passing it through a preparatory interferometer.

  17. Using atom interferometry to detect dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrage, Clare; Copeland, Edmund J.

    2016-04-01

    We review the tantalising prospect that the first evidence for the dark energy driving the observed acceleration of the universe on giga-parsec scales may be found through metre scale laboratory-based atom interferometry experiments. To do that, we first introduce the idea that scalar fields could be responsible for dark energy and show that in order to be compatible with fifth force constraints, these fields must have a screening mechanism which hides their effects from us within the solar system. Particular emphasis is placed on one such screening mechanism known as the chameleon effect where the field's mass becomes dependent on the environment. The way the field behaves in the presence of a spherical source is determined and we then go on to show how in the presence of the kind of high vacuum associated with atom interferometry experiments, and when the test particle is an atom, it is possible to use the associated interference pattern to place constraints on the acceleration due to the fifth force of the chameleon field - this has already been used to rule out large regions of the chameleon parameter space and maybe one day will be able to detect the force due to the dark energy field in the laboratory.

  18. High-Speed Digital Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Vine, Glenn; Shaddock, Daniel A.; Ware, Brent; Spero, Robert E.; Wuchenich, Danielle M.; Klipstein, William M.; McKenzie, Kirk

    2012-01-01

    Digitally enhanced heterodyne interferometry (DI) is a laser metrology technique employing pseudo-random noise (PRN) codes phase-modulated onto an optical carrier. Combined with heterodyne interferometry, the PRN code is used to select individual signals, returning the inherent interferometric sensitivity determined by the optical wavelength. The signal isolation arises from the autocorrelation properties of the PRN code, enabling both rejection of spurious signals (e.g., from scattered light) and multiplexing capability using a single metrology system. The minimum separation of optical components is determined by the wavelength of the PRN code.

  19. Experience-Based Quality Control of Clinical Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Kevin L.; Brame, R. Scott; Low, Daniel A.; Mutic, Sasa

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To incorporate a quality control tool, according to previous planning experience and patient-specific anatomic information, into the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan generation process and to determine whether the tool improved treatment plan quality. Methods and Materials: A retrospective study of 42 IMRT plans demonstrated a correlation between the fraction of organs at risk (OARs) overlapping the planning target volume and the mean dose. This yielded a model, predicted dose = prescription dose (0.2 + 0.8 [1 - exp(-3 overlapping planning target volume/volume of OAR)]), that predicted the achievable mean doses according to the planning target volume overlap/volume of OAR and the prescription dose. The model was incorporated into the planning process by way of a user-executable script that reported the predicted dose for any OAR. The script was introduced to clinicians engaged in IMRT planning and deployed thereafter. The script's effect was evaluated by tracking {delta} = (mean dose-predicted dose)/predicted dose, the fraction by which the mean dose exceeded the model. Results: All OARs under investigation (rectum and bladder in prostate cancer; parotid glands, esophagus, and larynx in head-and-neck cancer) exhibited both smaller {delta} and reduced variability after script implementation. These effects were substantial for the parotid glands, for which the previous {delta} = 0.28 {+-} 0.24 was reduced to {delta} = 0.13 {+-} 0.10. The clinical relevance was most evident in the subset of cases in which the parotid glands were potentially salvageable (predicted dose <30 Gy). Before script implementation, an average of 30.1 Gy was delivered to the salvageable cases, with an average predicted dose of 20.3 Gy. After implementation, an average of 18.7 Gy was delivered to salvageable cases, with an average predicted dose of 17.2 Gy. In the prostate cases, the rectum model excess was reduced from {delta} = 0.28 {+-} 0.20 to {delta} = 0.07 {+-} 0

  20. Speckle interferometry: refining the methods for taming disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquot, Pierre

    2006-05-01

    In a two-beam interference experiment involving at least one speckle wave, intensity and phase are rapidly fluctuating distributions. There is no way to make a prediction of the evolution of the interference pattern aver distances greater than the correlation volume - as small as 3×3×100 μm 3 for visible wavelengths and usual apertures. Most of the difficulties associated with a correct understanding and a good practice of speckle interferometry (SI) arise from this observation. It also explains why a technique simply ruled by the elementary two-beam interference or triangle formula raises nonetheless many problems. This contribution reviews some of the fundamentals of SI, mainly those concerned with the consequences of the random nature of the speckle phenomenon. It discusses what is thought to be the most interesting optical arrangements, modi operandi and phase extraction schemes, and finally presents selected applications. Constantly kept in mind is the idea to try to cope with the apparent disorder of the analyzed speckle distributions.

  1. An algorithm based on carrier squeezing interferometry for multi-beam phase extraction in Fizeau interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jinlong; Gao, Zhishan; Wang, Kailiang; Yang, Zhongming; Wang, Shuai; Yuan, Qun

    2015-10-01

    Multi-beam interference will exist in the cavity of Fizeau interferometer due to the high reflectivity of test optics. The random phase shift error will be generated by some factors such as the environmental vibration, air turbulence, etc. Both these will cause phase retrieving error. We proposed a non-iterative approach called Carrier Squeezing Multi-beam Interferometry (CSMI) algorithm, which is based on the Carrier squeezing interferometry (CSI) technique to retrieve the phase distribution from multiple-beam interferograms with random phase shift errors. The intensity of multiple-beam interference was decomposed into fundamental wave and high-order harmonics, by using the Fourier series expansion. Multi-beam phase shifting interferograms with linear carrier were rearranged by row or column, to fuse one frame of spatial-temporal fringes. The lobe of the fundamental component related to the phase and the lobes of high-order harmonics and phase shift errors were separated in the frequency domain, so the correct phase was extracted by filtering out the fundamental component. Suppression of the influence from high-order harmonic components, as well as random phase shift error is validated by numerical simulations. Experiments were also executed by using the proposed CSMI algorithm for mirror with high reflection coefficient, showing its advantage comparing with normal phase retrieving algorithms.

  2. The Space Interferometry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unwin, Stephen C.

    1998-01-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) is the next major space mission in NASA's Origins program after SIRTF. The SIM architecture uses three Michelson interferometers in low-earth orbit to provide 4 microarcsecond precision absolute astrometric measurements on approx. 40,000 stars. SIM will also provide synthesis imaging in the visible waveband to a resolution of 10 milliarcsecond, and interferometric nulling to a depth of 10(exp -4). A near-IR (1-2 micron) capability is being considered. Many key technologies will be demonstrated by SIM that will be carried over directly or can be readily scaled to future Origins missions such as TPF. The SIM spacecraft will carry a triple Michelson interferometer with baselines in the 10 meter range. Two interferometers act as high precision trackers, providing attitude information at all time, while the third one conducts the science observations. Ultra-accurate laser metrology and active systems monitor the systematic errors and to control the instrument vibrations in order to reach the 4 microarcsecond level on wide-angle measurements. SIM will produce a wealth of new astronomical data. With an absolute positional precision of 4 microarcsecond, SIM will improve on the best currently available measures (the Hipparcos catalog) by 2 or 3 orders of magnitude, providing parallaxes accurate to 10% and transverse velocities to 0.2 km/s anywhere in the Galaxy, to stars as faint as 20th magnitude. With the addition of radial velocities, knowledge of the 6-dimension phase space for objects of interest will allow us to attack a wide array of previously inaccessible problems such as: search for planets down to few earth masses; calibration of stellar luminosities and by means of standard candles, calibration of the cosmic distance scale; detecting perturbations due to spiral arms, disk warps and central bar in our galaxy; probe of the gravitational potential of the Galaxy, several kiloparsecs out of the galactic plane; synthesis imaging

  3. Meteorology Gauges for Spatial Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gursel, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Heterodyne interferometers have been commercially available for many years. In addition, many versions have been built at JPL for various projects. This activity is aimed at improving the accuracy of such interferometers from the 1-30 nanometer level to the picometer level for use in the proposes Stellar Interferometry Mission (SIM) as metrology gauges.

  4. Direct Measurement of Aerosol Absorption Using Photothermal Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlacek, A. J.; Lee, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    Efforts to bound the contribution of light absorption in aerosol radiative forcing is still very much an active area of research in large part because aerosol extinction is dominated by light scattering. In response to this and other technical issues, the aerosol community has actively pursued the development of new instruments to measure aerosol absorption (e.g., photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) and multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP)). In this poster, we introduce the technique of photothermal interferometry (PTI), which combines the direct measurement capabilities of photothermal spectroscopy (PTS) with high-sensitivity detection of the localized heating brought about by the PT process through interferometry. At its most fundamental level, the PTI technique measures the optical pathlength change that one arm of an interferometer (referred to as the 'probe' arm) experiences relative to the other arm of the interferometer (called the 'reference' arm). When the two arms are recombined at a beamsplitter, an interference pattern is created. If the optical pathlength in one arm of the interferometer changes, a commensurate shift in the interference pattern will take place. For the specific application of measuring light absorption, the heating of air surrounding the light- absorbing aerosol following laser illumination induces the optical pathlength change. This localized heating creates a refractive index gradient causing the probe arm of the interferometer to take a slightly different optical pathlength relative to the unperturbed reference arm. This effect is analogous to solar heating of a road causing mirages. As discussed above, this altered optical pathlength results in a shift in the interference pattern that is then detected as a change in the signal intensity by a single element detector. The current optical arrangement utilizes a folded Jamin interferometer design (Sedlacek, 2006) that provides a platform that is robust with respect to sensitivity

  5. Housestaff Experience, Workload, and Test Ordering in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Charles H., III; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A study of the workload of nine medical interns and seven residents in a neonatal intensive care nursery investigated the number of X-rays, arterial blood gas analyses (ABGs), and electrolyte determinations ordered for 321 infants over 5 months. Results show that as the workload increased, interns ordered ABGs more often than residents, especially…

  6. Effects of an Intensive Disability-Focused Training Experience on University Faculty Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Christopher; Lombardi, Allison; Seely, John R.; Gerdes, Hilary

    2014-01-01

    The current study evaluates the short-term effects of a disability-focused training on the disability-related self-efficacy of university faculty. Three consecutive cohorts of faculty (N = 102) participated in an intensive four-day training institute focused on understanding and supporting university students with disabilities. Self-efficacy for…

  7. The Structure and Intensity of Emotional Experiences: Method and Context Convergence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mano, Haim

    1991-01-01

    Structure and intensity of naturally occurring and induced affect were studied with 244 university students and 1 employee in 2 studies using 2 methodological paradigms (dimensionality and classification) and 2 everyday contexts (lecture and television advertising). A circular structure of feeling was experienced during the lecture (naturally…

  8. Saying It "More Intensely": Using Sensory Experience To Teach Poetry Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baart, Nicole

    2002-01-01

    Suggests the best way to help high school students write poetry is to bring them to memories that would stimulate the expression of everything more intensely. Describes four workshops that appeal to the senses: scent writing, taste writing, music writing, and sight writing. (RS)

  9. An Intensive Programme on Education for Sustainable Development: The Participants' Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biasutti, Michele

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the framework of an intensive programme (IP) organised by UNESCO and addressed to young graduate professionals to prepare them for a career in fields related to sustainability. The aims of the IP were to address participants' environmental awareness and to develop attitudes and skills related to environmental planning and…

  10. Intense ion beams accelerated by ultra-intense laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Markus; Cowan, T. E.; Gauthier, J. C.; Vehn, J. Meyer-Ter; Allen, M.; Audebert, P.; Blazevic, A.; Fuchs, J.; Geissel, M.; Hegelich, M.; Karsch, S.; Pukhov, A.; Schlegel, T.

    2002-04-01

    The discovery of intense ion beams off solid targets irradiated by ultra-intense laser pulses has become the subject of extensive international interest. These highly collimated, energetic beams of protons and heavy ions are strongly depending on the laser parameters as well as on the properties of the irradiated targets. Therefore we have studied the influence of the target conditions on laser-accelerated ion beams generated by multi-terawatt lasers. The experiments were performed using the 100 TW laser facility at Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Laser Intense (LULI). The targets were irradiated by pulses up to 5×1019 W/cm2 (~300 fs,λ=1.05 μm) at normal incidence. A strong dependence on the surface conditions, conductivity, shape and purity was observed. The plasma density on the front and rear surface was determined by laser interferometry. We characterized the ion beam by means of magnetic spectrometers, radiochromic film, nuclear activation and Thompson parabolas. The strong dependence of the ion beam acceleration on the conditions on the target back surface was confirmed in agreement with predictions based on the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) mechanism. Finally shaping of the ion beam has been demonstrated by the appropriate tailoring of the target. .

  11. Non-Abelian Anyons and Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonderson, Parsa Hassan

    This thesis is primarily a study of the measurement theory of non-Abelian anyons through interference experiments. We give an introduction to the theory of anyon models, providing all the formalism necessary to apply standard quantum measurement theory to such systems. This formalism is then applied to give a detailed analysis of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer for arbitrary anyon models. In this treatment, we find that the collapse behavior exhibited by a target anyon in a superposition of states is determined by the monodromy of the probe anyons with the target. Such measurements may also be used to gain knowledge that would help to properly identify the anyon model describing an unknown system. The techniques used and results obtained from this model interferometer have general applicability, and we use them to also describe the interferometry measurements in a two point-contact interferometer proposed for non-Abelian fractional quantum Hall states. Additionally, we give the complete description of a number of important examples of anyon models, as well as their corresponding quantities that are relevant for interferometry. Finally, we give a partial classification of anyon models with small numbers of particle types.

  12. Novel characterization of the nonlinear refractive response of materials using spatially and spectrally resolved interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Amanda; Adams, Daniel; Squier, Jeff; Durfee, Charles

    2010-10-01

    Characterization of the nonlinear refractive index of a material is important in order to fully understand the nonlinear propagation of femtosecond laser pulses. The most common method to obtaining the nonlinear refractive index is Z-scan. However, since it averages over pulse duration and beam profile, Z-scan is not reliable when there is time- and intensity-dependence of the nonlinear response. The new method we are exploring to make these nonlinear refractive index measurements is spatially and spectrally resolved interferometry (SSRI). SSRI is a method that can give a simultaneous measurement of the spatial wave-front across the frequency or temporal profile of the pulse. The SSRI method proves better in measuring response at specific y and t, allowing it to measure both delayed response and saturation effects. The ability to make a measurement in both dimensions enables understanding of spatiotemporal dynamics in other experiments as cross-wave polarization and filamentation.

  13. High-energy electron, positron, ion and nuclear spectroscopy in ultra-intense laser-solid experiments on the petawatt

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C; Christl, M; Cowan, T E; Fakahashi, Y; Fountain, W; Hatchett, S; Henry, E A; Hunt, A W; Johnson, J; Key, M; Kuehl, T; Moody, J; Moran, M; Patterson, W S; Pennington, D M; Perry, M D; Phillips, T C; Roth, M; Sefcik, J; Singh, M; Snavely, R; Syoyer, M; Wilks, S C; Young, P

    1999-09-16

    The LLNL Petawatt Laser has achieved focused intensities up to 6 x 20 W/cm{sup 2}, which has opened a new, higher energy regime of relativistic laser-plasma interactions in which the quiver energies of the target electrons exceed the energy thresholds for many nuclear phenomena. We will describe recent experiments in which we have observed electrons accelerated to 100 MeV, photo-nuclear fission, and positron-electron pair creation.

  14. Chemical Environment Effects on K[beta]/K[alpha] Intensity Ratio: An X-Ray Fluorescence Experiment on Periodic Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durham, Chaney R.; Chase, Jeffery M.; Nivens, Delana A.; Baird, William H.; Padgett, Clifford W.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) data from an energy-dispersive XRF instrument were used to investigate the chlorine K[alpha] and K[beta] peaks in several group 1 salts. The ratio of the peak intensity is sensitive to the local chemical environment of the chlorine atoms studied in this experiment and it shows a periodic trend for these salts. (Contains 1…

  15. Experiment and simulation of novel liquid crystal plasma mirrors for high contrast, intense laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Poole, P. L.; Krygier, A.; Cochran, G. E.; Foster, P. S.; Scott, G. G.; Wilson, L. A.; Bailey, J.; Bourgeois, N.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Neely, D.; Rajeev, P. P.; Freeman, R. R.; Schumacher, D. W.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the first demonstration of plasma mirrors made using freely suspended, ultra-thin films formed dynamically and in-situ. We also present novel particle-in-cell simulations that for the first time incorporate multiphoton ionization and dielectric models that are necessary for describing plasma mirrors. Dielectric plasma mirrors are a crucial component for high intensity laser applications such as ion acceleration and solid target high harmonic generation because they greatly improve pulse contrast. We use the liquid crystal 8CB and introduce an innovative dynamic film formation device that can tune the film thickness so that it acts as its own antireflection coating. Films can be formed at a prolonged, high repetition rate without the need for subsequent realignment. High intensity reflectance above 75% and low-field reflectance below 0.2% are demonstrated, as well as initial ion acceleration experimental results that demonstrate increased ion energy and yield on shots cleaned with these plasma mirrors. PMID:27557592

  16. Experiment and simulation of novel liquid crystal plasma mirrors for high contrast, intense laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Poole, P L; Krygier, A; Cochran, G E; Foster, P S; Scott, G G; Wilson, L A; Bailey, J; Bourgeois, N; Hernandez-Gomez, C; Neely, D; Rajeev, P P; Freeman, R R; Schumacher, D W

    2016-01-01

    We describe the first demonstration of plasma mirrors made using freely suspended, ultra-thin films formed dynamically and in-situ. We also present novel particle-in-cell simulations that for the first time incorporate multiphoton ionization and dielectric models that are necessary for describing plasma mirrors. Dielectric plasma mirrors are a crucial component for high intensity laser applications such as ion acceleration and solid target high harmonic generation because they greatly improve pulse contrast. We use the liquid crystal 8CB and introduce an innovative dynamic film formation device that can tune the film thickness so that it acts as its own antireflection coating. Films can be formed at a prolonged, high repetition rate without the need for subsequent realignment. High intensity reflectance above 75% and low-field reflectance below 0.2% are demonstrated, as well as initial ion acceleration experimental results that demonstrate increased ion energy and yield on shots cleaned with these plasma mirrors. PMID:27557592

  17. Academics' Perceptions of the Purpose of Undergraduate Research Experiences in a Research-Intensive Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Anna; Howitt, Susan; Wilson, Kate; Roberts, Pam

    2012-01-01

    The inclusion of research experiences as core components of undergraduate curricula implies that students will be exposed to and situated within the research activities of their university. Such experiences thus provide a new prism through which to view the relations between teaching, research and learning. The intentions and actions of academics…

  18. Monitoring in situ stress changes in a mining environment with coda wave interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grêt, Alexandre; Snieder, Roel; Özbay, Uḡur

    2006-11-01

    Coda waves are highly sensitive to changes in the subsurface; we use this sensitivity to monitor small stress changes in an underground mine. We apply coda wave interferometry to seismic data excited by a hammer source, collected at an experimental hard rock mine in Idaho Springs, CO. We carried out a controlled stress-change experiment in a mine pillar and we show how coda wave interferometry can be used to monitor the in situ stress change with modest hardware requirements.

  19. Quantum Key Distribution Based on Interferometry and Interaction-Free Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-Bing; Xu, Sheng-Wei; Wang, Qing-Le; Liu, Fang; Wan, Zong-Jie

    2016-01-01

    We propose a quantum key distribution based on Mach-Zehnder (MZ) interferometry and interaction-free measurement on single photon. The raw key comes from the photons on which MZ interferometry happened. And the interaction-free measurements are used to detect eavesdroppers. The analysis indicates that the protocol is secure, and can prevent some familiar attacks, such as photon number splitting (PNS) attack. This scheme is easy to be realized in current experiments.

  20. Ethical challenges in the neonatal intensive care units: perceptions of physicians and nurses; an Iranian experience.

    PubMed

    Kadivar, Maliheh; Mosayebi, Ziba; Asghari, Fariba; Zarrini, Pari

    2015-01-01

    The challenging nature of neonatal medicine today is intensified by modern advances in intensive care and treatment of sicker neonates. These developments have caused numerous ethical issues and conflicts in ethical decision-making. The present study surveyed the challenges and dilemmas from the viewpoint of the neonatal intensive care personnel in the teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) in the capital of Iran. In this comparative cross-sectional study conducted between March 2013 and February 2014, the physicians' and nurses' perceptions of the ethical issues in neonatal intensive care units were compared. The physicians and nurses of the study hospitals were requested to complete a 36-item questionnaire after initial accommodations. The study samples consisted of 284 physicians (36%) and nurses (64%). Content validity and internal consistency calculations were used to examine the psychometric properties of the questionnaire. Data were analyzed by Pearson's correlation, t-test, ANOVA, and linear regression using SPSS v. 22. Respecting patients' rights and interactions with parents were perceived as the most challenging aspects of neonatal care. There were significant differences between sexes in the domains of the perceived challenges. According to the linear regression model, the perceived score would be reduced 0.33 per each year on the job. The results of our study showed that the most challenging issues were related to patients' rights, interactions with parents, communication and cooperation, and end of life considerations respectively. It can be concluded, therefore, that more attention should be paid to these issues in educational programs and ethics committees of hospitals. PMID:26839675

  1. Communication: Visible line intensities of the triatomic hydrogen ion from experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrignani, Annemieke; Berg, Max H.; Grussie, Florian; Wolf, Andreas; Mizus, Irina I.; Polyansky, Oleg L.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Zobov, Nikolai F.; Pavanello, Michele; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2014-12-01

    The visible spectrum of H3 + is studied using high-sensitivity action spectroscopy in a cryogenic radiofrequency multipole trap. Advances are made to measure the weak ro-vibrational transitions from the lowest rotational states of H3 + up to high excitation energies providing visible line intensities and, after normalisation to an infrared calibration line, the corresponding Einstein B coefficients. Ab initio predictions for the Einstein B coefficients are obtained from a highly precise dipole moment surface of H3 + and found to be in excellent agreement, even in the region where states have been classified as chaotic.

  2. Communication: Visible line intensities of the triatomic hydrogen ion from experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Petrignani, Annemieke; Berg, Max H.; Grussie, Florian; Wolf, Andreas; Mizus, Irina I.; Zobov, Nikolai F.; Polyansky, Oleg L.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Pavanello, Michele; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2014-12-28

    The visible spectrum of H{sub 3}{sup +} is studied using high-sensitivity action spectroscopy in a cryogenic radiofrequency multipole trap. Advances are made to measure the weak ro-vibrational transitions from the lowest rotational states of H{sub 3}{sup +} up to high excitation energies providing visible line intensities and, after normalisation to an infrared calibration line, the corresponding Einstein B coefficients. Ab initio predictions for the Einstein B coefficients are obtained from a highly precise dipole moment surface of H{sub 3}{sup +} and found to be in excellent agreement, even in the region where states have been classified as chaotic.

  3. Model experiment to study sonic boom propagation through turbulence. Part II. Effect of turbulence intensity and propagation distance through turbulence.

    PubMed

    Lipkens, B; Blackstock, D T

    1998-09-01

    A model experiment was reported to be successful in simulating the propagation of sonic booms through a turbulent atmosphere [B. Lipkens and D. T. Blackstock, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 103, 148-158 (1998)]. In this study the effect on N wave characteristics of turbulence intensity and propagation distance through turbulence are investigated. The main parameters of interest are the rise time and the peak pressure. The effect of turbulence intensity and propagation distance is to flatten the rise time and peak pressure distributions. Rise time and peak pressure distributions always have positive skewness after propagation through turbulence. Average rise time grows with turbulence intensity and propagation distance. The scattering of rise time data is one-sided, i.e., rise times are almost always increased by turbulence. Average peak pressure decreases slowly with turbulence intensity and propagation distance. For the reported data a threefold increase in average rise time is observed and a maximum decrease of about 20% in average peak pressure. Rise times more than ten times that of the no turbulence value are observed. At most, the maximum peak pressure doubles after propagation through turbulence, and the minimum peak pressure values are about one-half the no-turbulence values. Rounded waveforms are always more common than peaked waveforms. PMID:9745733

  4. An in-vacuo optical levitation trap for high-intensity laser interaction experiments with isolated microtargets.

    PubMed

    Price, C J; Donnelly, T D; Giltrap, S; Stuart, N H; Parker, S; Patankar, S; Lowe, H F; Drew, D; Gumbrell, E T; Smith, R A

    2015-03-01

    We report on the design, construction, and characterisation of a new class of in-vacuo optical levitation trap optimised for use in high-intensity, high-energy laser interaction experiments. The system uses a focused, vertically propagating continuous wave laser beam to capture and manipulate micro-targets by photon momentum transfer at much longer working distances than commonly used by optical tweezer systems. A high speed (10 kHz) optical imaging and signal acquisition system was implemented for tracking the levitated droplets position and dynamic behaviour under atmospheric and vacuum conditions, with ±5 μm spatial resolution. Optical trapping of 10 ± 4 μm oil droplets in vacuum was demonstrated, over timescales of >1 h at extended distances of ∼40 mm from the final focusing optic. The stability of the levitated droplet was such that it would stay in alignment with a ∼7 μm irradiating beam focal spot for up to 5 min without the need for re-adjustment. The performance of the trap was assessed in a series of high-intensity (10(17) W cm(-2)) laser experiments that measured the X-ray source size and inferred free-electron temperature of a single isolated droplet target, along with a measurement of the emitted radio-frequency pulse. These initial tests demonstrated the use of optically levitated microdroplets as a robust target platform for further high-intensity laser interaction and point source studies. PMID:25832224

  5. An in-vacuo optical levitation trap for high-intensity laser interaction experiments with isolated microtargets

    SciTech Connect

    Price, C. J. Giltrap, S.; Stuart, N. H.; Parker, S.; Patankar, S.; Lowe, H. F.; Smith, R. A.; Donnelly, T. D.; Drew, D.; Gumbrell, E. T.

    2015-03-15

    We report on the design, construction, and characterisation of a new class of in-vacuo optical levitation trap optimised for use in high-intensity, high-energy laser interaction experiments. The system uses a focused, vertically propagating continuous wave laser beam to capture and manipulate micro-targets by photon momentum transfer at much longer working distances than commonly used by optical tweezer systems. A high speed (10 kHz) optical imaging and signal acquisition system was implemented for tracking the levitated droplets position and dynamic behaviour under atmospheric and vacuum conditions, with ±5 μm spatial resolution. Optical trapping of 10 ± 4 μm oil droplets in vacuum was demonstrated, over timescales of >1 h at extended distances of ∼40 mm from the final focusing optic. The stability of the levitated droplet was such that it would stay in alignment with a ∼7 μm irradiating beam focal spot for up to 5 min without the need for re-adjustment. The performance of the trap was assessed in a series of high-intensity (10{sup 17} W cm{sup −2}) laser experiments that measured the X-ray source size and inferred free-electron temperature of a single isolated droplet target, along with a measurement of the emitted radio-frequency pulse. These initial tests demonstrated the use of optically levitated microdroplets as a robust target platform for further high-intensity laser interaction and point source studies.

  6. Simple Carotid-Sparing Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Technique and Preliminary Experience for T1-2 Glottic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, David I.; Fuller, Clifton D.; Barker, Jerry L.; Mason, Bryan M.S.; Garcia, John A. C.; Lewin, Jan S.; Holsinger, F. Christopher; Stasney, C. Richard; Frank, Steven J.; Schwartz, David L.; Morrison, William H.; Garden, Adam S.; Ang, K. Kian

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetry and feasibility of carotid-sparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for early glottic cancer and to report preliminary clinical experience. Methods and Materials: Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine radiotherapy (DICOM-RT) datasets from 6 T1-2 conventionally treated glottic cancer patients were used to create both conventional IMRT plans. We developed a simplified IMRT planning algorithm with three fields and limited segments. Conventional and IMRT plans were compared using generalized equivalent uniform dose and dose-volume parameters for in-field carotid arteries, target volumes, and organs at risk. We have treated 11 patients with this simplified IMRT technique. Results: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy consistently reduced radiation dose to the carotid arteries (p < 0.05) while maintaining the clinical target volume coverage. With conventional planning, median carotid V35, V50, and V63 were 100%, 100%, and 69.0%, respectively. With IMRT planning these decreased to 2%, 0%, and 0%, respectively (p < 0.01). Radiation planning and treatment times were similar for conventional radiotherapy and IMRT. Treatment results have been excellent thus far. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy significantly reduced unnecessary radiation dose to the carotid arteries compared with conventional lateral fields while maintaining clinical target volume coverage. Further experience and longer follow-up will be required to demonstrate outcomes for cancer control and carotid artery effects.

  7. Optical and Infrared Interferometry IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Jayadev K.; Creech-Eakman, Michelle J.; Malbet, Fabien

    2014-08-01

    Optical and IR Interferometry IV at the SPIE 2014 symposium in Montreal had a strong and vibrant program. After initial fears about budget cuts and travel-funding constraints, the Program Committee had to work hard to accommodate as many quality submissions as possible. Innovative, creative and visionary work ensured that the field has progressed well, despite the bleak funding climate felt in the US, Europe and elsewhere. Montreal proved an excellent venue for this, the largest of Interferometry conferences and the only one that brings together practitioners from the world over. Let us summarize a few highlights to convey a glimpse of the excitement that is detailed in the rest of these Proceedings.

  8. Virtually calibrated projection moire interferometry.

    PubMed

    Kimber, Mark; Blotter, Jonathan

    2005-05-01

    Projection moire interferometry (PMI) is an out-of-plane displacement measurement technique that consists of differencing reference and deformed images of a grid pattern projected onto the test object. In conventional PMI, a tedious process of computing the fringe sensitivity coefficient (FSC), which requires moving the test object or the reference plane to known displacements, is used. We present a new technique for computing the FSC values that is called virtually calibrated projection moire interferometry (VCPMI). VCPMI is based on computer simulations of the conventional PMI process and does not require moving the actual test object or reference plane. We validate the VCPMI approach by comparing results for a flat plate and an airfoil with those made by use of other measurement methods. PMID:15881060

  9. Geometric Landau-Zener interferometry.

    PubMed

    Gasparinetti, S; Solinas, P; Pekola, J P

    2011-11-11

    We propose a new type of interferometry, based on geometric phases accumulated by a periodically driven two-level system undergoing multiple Landau-Zener transitions. As a specific example, we study its implementation in a superconducting charge pump. We find that interference patterns appear as a function of the pumping frequency and the phase bias, and clearly manifest themselves in the pumped charge. We also show that the effects described should persist in the presence of realistic decoherence. PMID:22181761

  10. Edge effects in composites by moire interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czarnek, R.; Post, D.; Herakovich, C.

    1983-01-01

    The very high sensitivity of moire interferometry has permitted the present edge effect experiments to be conducted at a low average stress and strain level, assuring linear and elastic behavior in the composite material samples tested. Sensitivity corresponding to 2450 line/mm moire was achieved with a 0.408 micron/fringe. Simultaneous observations of the specimen face and edge displacement fields showed good fringe definition despite the 1-mm thickness of the specimens and the high gradients, and it is noted that the use of a carrier pattern and optical filtering was effective in even these conditions. Edge effects and dramatic displacement gradients were confirmed in angle-ply composite laminates.