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Sample records for intensive lipid-lowering therapy

  1. Lipid-lowering therapy in older persons

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Numerous randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies and observational studies have shown that statins reduce mortality and major cardiovascular events in older high-risk persons with hypercholesterolemia. The Heart Protection Study showed that statins reduced mortality and major cardiovascular events in high-risk persons regardless of the initial level of serum lipids, age, or gender. The updated National Cholesterol Education Program III guidelines state that in very high-risk persons, a serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol level of < 70 mg/dl (1.8 mmol/l) is a reasonable clinical strategy for moderately high-risk persons (2 or more risk factors and a 10-year risk for coronary artery disease of 10% to 20%), and the serum LDL cholesterol should be reduced to < 100 mg/dl (2.6 mmol/l). When LDL cholesterol-lowering drug therapy is used to treat high-risk persons or moderately high-risk persons, the serum LDL cholesterol should be reduced by at least 30% to 40%. The serum LDL cholesterol should be decreased to less than 160 mg/dl in persons at low risk for cardiovascular disease. Addition of other lipid-lowering drugs to statin therapy has not been demonstrated to further reduce cardiovascular events and mortality. PMID:25861289

  2. Intensive lipid-lowering therapy for slowing progression as well as inducing regression of atherosclerosis in Japanese patients: subanalysis of the JART study.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Nohara, Ryuji; Daida, Hiroyuki; Hata, Mitsumasa; Kaku, Kohei; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Kishimoto, Junji; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Masuda, Izuru; Sakuma, Ichiro; Yokoi, Hiroyoshi; Yoshida, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a subanalysis of the JART Study comparing rosuvastatin and pravastatin treatment. A total of 314 subjects were analyzed in this subanalysis, 282 of whom were eligible for evaluation of the relationship between LDL-C and carotid mean-IMT change. In the subanalysis, we evaluated the extent to which intensive lipid-lowering therapy slowed the mean-IMT progression by a correlation analysis between LDL-C and mean-IMT change after 12 months of statin treatment. Nearly half were male (49.4%) and elderly (49.7%). The majority (84.4%) were treated for primary prevention. Patients with hypertension and diabetes mellitus accounted for 65.3% and 44.0%, respectively. At the 12-month measurement point, mean-IMT change was correlated with LDL-C (R = 0.187; P = 0.0016), LDL-C/ HDL-C ratio (R = 0.152; P = 0.0105), and non-HDL-C (R = 0.132; P = 0.0259). Mean-IMT after 12 months was divided into 4 subgroups by LDL-C at 12 months; < 80, ≥ 80 to < 100, ≥ 100 to < 120, and ≥ 120 mg/dL. A trend analysis using the Jonckheere-Terpstra test showed statistical signifi cance (P = 0.0002). Even for prevention in Japanese patients who have lower risk of atherosclerotic disease than Western patients, lowering the LDL-C level to below the therapeutic target prevented mean-IMT progression after 12 months more strongly. These findings suggest that more intensive control of LDL-C to levels lower than those in current JAS guidelines should be required to achieve slowing of progression as well as induction of regression of atherosclerosis. PMID:23428922

  3. A review of trials evaluating nonstatin lipid-lowering therapies.

    PubMed

    Ansell, Benjamin J

    2009-01-01

    Recently reported clinical trials raise doubts on the effectiveness of nonstatin lipid-lowering therapies in reducing the residual risk of cardiovascular events after statin monotherapy. Addition of -torcetrapib to statin therapy increased overall mortality in coronary patients despite a marked increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Combining ezetimibe with statin therapy neither further reduces carotid atherosclerosis nor slows aortic stenosis, and it has not been shown to be superior to statin monotherapy in reducing cardiovascular events. Clinical trials currently in progress will more clearly delineate the cardiovascular effects of adding either ezetimibe or extended-release niacin/laropiprant to statin therapy. PMID:19080730

  4. Current and future trends in the lipid lowering therapy.

    PubMed

    Okopień, Bogusław; Bułdak, Łukasz; Bołdys, Aleksandra

    2016-08-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease that affects arterial wall. It leads to wall thickening and its instability. As a result a reduction in lumen diameter and blood flow is observed. This manifests predominantly as the affectation of vascular bed of coronary (myocardial infarction), cerebral, carotid (ischemic stroke) or peripheral arteries (limb amputation). One of the most important factors that accelerate atherosclerosis is hyperlipidemia. According to current guidelines the main attention should be focused on the treatment of hyperlipidemia (beside the prevention, which includes proper diet, physical activity and risk factors avoidance). Major attention is given to LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol (LDL-C) level as primary, and triglyceride level as secondary targets of therapy. As a result of recent clinical findings and continuous research in the field of hypolipidemic drugs it seems practical to review recent data and show potential new pathways that may be useful in the treatment of hyperlipidemia. The review is divided into several parts presenting the widely used and well-known hypolipidemic drugs. In the first part a brief review of contemporary drugs affecting LDL cholesterol is shown. The second part contains information regarding currently available drugs reducing triglycerides level. The third part describes several novel and promising groups of drugs that are still on various steps of clinical development. In the last part drugs affecting HDL (high-density lipoprotein) level were presented. PMID:27180022

  5. Update on lipid-lowering therapy and LDL-cholesterol targets.

    PubMed

    Wiviott, Stephen D; Cannon, Christopher P

    2006-08-01

    Serum cholesterol has long been recognized as an important risk factor for the development and progression of atherosclerotic vascular disease. For more than 30 years, improved outcomes with lipid lowering have been demonstrated. As a result of these data, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) convened the National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel I (NCEP ATP I). This panel and similar ones around the world have served to set the standards for lipid lowering in clinical practice. Subsequent revisions of these standards (NCEP ATP II and III) have led to greater focus being placed on LDL, and targets for lowering LDL levels being based on patients' risk of subsequent coronary disease events. Since the publication of the NCEP ATP III guidelines, several large-scale clinical trials of cholesterol lowering have been conducted, the findings of which have the potential to impact on clinical practice standards. In this article we focus on current guidelines for lipid-lowering therapy, review the results and implications of important completed clinical trials, and consider the utility of additional targets for preventive therapy, such as C-reactive protein and HDL. We also consider the prospects for treatments in development and future goals. PMID:16874355

  6. Comparison of Intensive Versus Moderate Lipid-Lowering Therapy on Fibrous Cap and Atheroma Volume of Coronary Lipid-Rich Plaque Using Serial Optical Coherence Tomography and Intravascular Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jingbo; Xing, Lei; Jia, Haibo; Vergallo, Rocco; Soeda, Tsunerari; Minami, Yoshiyasu; Hu, Sining; Yang, Shuang; Zhang, Shaosong; Lee, Hang; Yu, Bo; Jang, Ik-Kyung

    2016-03-01

    Despite marked clinical benefit, reduction in atheroma volume with statin therapy is minimal. Changes in plaque composition may explain this discrepancy. We aimed in the present study to assess the effect of statin therapy on coronary plaque composition and plaque volume using serial multimodality imaging. From an open-label, single-blinded study, patients with angiographically mild-to-moderate lesion were randomized to receive atorvastatin 60 (AT 60) mg or atorvastatin 20 (AT 20) mg for 12 months. Optical coherence tomography was used to assess fibrous cap thickness (FCT) and intravascular ultrasound to assess atheroma burden at 3 time points: baseline, at 6 months, and at 12 months. Thirty-six lipid-rich plaques in 27 patients with AT 60 mg and 30 lipid-rich plaques in 19 patients with AT 20 mg were enrolled in this study. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level was significantly decreased at 6 months without further reduction at 12 months. AT 60 mg induced greater reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol compared with AT 20 mg. Optical coherence tomography revealed continuous increase in FCT from baseline to 6 months and to 12 months in both groups. AT 60 mg induced greater increase in FCT compared with AT 20 mg at both follow-up points. The prevalence of thin-cap fibroatheroma and the presence of macrophage at 6 months were significantly lower in AT 60 mg compared with AT 20 mg. Plaque burden did not change significantly in both groups. In conclusion, both intensive and moderate statin therapy stabilizes coronary plaques, with a greater benefit in the intensive statin group. However, no significant changes in plaque volume were observed over time regardless of the intensity of statin therapy. PMID:26778524

  7. Lipid-lowering therapies, glucose control and incident diabetes: evidence, mechanisms and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Zafrir, Barak; Jain, Mohit

    2014-08-01

    Lipid-lowering therapies constitute an essential part in the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular diseases and are consistently shown to reduce adverse cardiovascular outcomes in wide-scale populations. Recently, there is increased awareness of the possibility that lipid-lowering drugs may affect glucose control and insulin resistance. This phenomenon is reported in all classes of lipid-modifying agents, with differential effects of distinct drugs. Since the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and diabetes is rising, and lipid-modifying therapies are widely used to reduce the cardiovascular burden in these populations, it is of importance to examine the relationship between lipid-lowering drugs, glycemic control and incident diabetes. In the current review we discuss the evidence, ranging from experimental studies to randomized controlled clinical trials and meta-analyses, of how lipid-modifying therapies affect glycemic control and insulin sensitivity. Cumulative data suggest that both statins and niacin are associated with increased risk of impaired glucose control and development of new-onset diabetes, as opposed to bile-acid sequestrants which display concomitant moderate lipid and glucose lowering effects, and fibrates (particularly the pan-PPAR agonist bezafibrate) which may produce beneficial effects on glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Ezetimibe is implied to ameliorate metabolic markers such as hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance, with yet little support from clinical trials, while fish oils which in experimental studies produce favorable effects on insulin sensitivity, although studied extensively, continue to show inconclusive effects on glucose homeostasis in patients with diabetes. Suggested mechanisms of how lipid-modifying agents affect glucose control and their clinical implications in this context, are summarized. PMID:24952127

  8. Early Effects of Intensive Lipid-Lowering Treatment on Plaque Characteristics Assessed by Virtual Histology Intravascular Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Hee; Shin, Dong-Ho; Kim, Byeong-Keuk; Ko, Young-Guk; Choi, Donghoon; Jang, Yangsoo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The effects of short-term intensive lipid-lowering treatment on coronary plaque composition have not yet been sufficiently evaluated. We investigated the influence of short-term intensive lipid-lowering treatment on quantitative and qualitative changes in plaque components of non-culprit lesions in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Materials and Methods This was a prospective, randomized, open-label, single-center trial. Seventy patients who underwent both baseline and three-month follow-up virtual histology intravascular ultrasound were randomly assigned to either an intensive lipid-lowering treatment group (ezetimibe/simvastatin 10/40 mg, n=34) or a control statin treatment group (pravastatin 20 mg, n=36). Using virtual histology intravascular ultrasound, plaque was characterized as fibrous, fibro-fatty, dense calcium, or necrotic core. Changes in plaque components during the three-month lipid-lowering treatment were compared between the two groups. Results Compared with the control statin treatment group, there was a significant reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in the intensive lipid-lowering treatment group (-20.4±17.1 mg/dL vs. -36.8±17.4 mg/dL, respectively; p<0.001). There were no statistically significant differences in baseline, three-month follow-up, or serial changes of gray-scale intravascular ultrasound parameters between the two groups. The absolute volume of fibro-fatty plaque was significantly reduced in the intensive lipid-lowering treatment group compared with the control group (-1.5±3.4 mm3 vs. 0.8±4.7 mm3, respectively; p=0.024). A linear correlation was found between changes in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and changes in the absolute volumes of fibro-fatty plaque (p<0.001, R2=0.209). Conclusion Modification of coronary plaque may be attainable after only three months of intensive lipid-lowering treatment. PMID:27401638

  9. Comparative Effects of Diet-Induced Lipid Lowering Versus Lipid Lowering Along With Apo A-I Milano Gene Therapy on Regression of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lai; Tian, Fang; Arias, Ana; Yang, Mingjie; Sharifi, Behrooz G; Shah, Prediman K

    2016-05-01

    Apolipoprotein A-1 (Apo A-I) Milano, a naturally occurring Arg173to Cys mutant of Apo A-1, has been shown to reduce atherosclerosis in animal models and in a small phase 2 human trial. We have shown the superior atheroprotective effects of Apo A-I Milano (Apo A-IM) gene compared to wild-type Apo A-I gene using transplantation of retrovirally transduced bone marrow in Apo A-I/Apo E null mice. In this study, we compared the effect of dietary lipid lowering versus lipid lowering plus Apo A-IM gene transfer using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) 8 as vectors on atherosclerosis regression in Apo A-I/Apo E null mice. All mice were fed a high-cholesterol diet from age of 6 weeks until week 20, and at 20 weeks, 10 mice were euthanized to determine the extent of atherosclerosis. After 20 weeks, an additional 20 mice were placed on either a low-cholesterol diet plus empty rAAV (n = 10) to serve as controls or low-cholesterol diet plus 1 single intravenous injection of 1.2 × 10(12)vector genomes of adeno-associated virus (AAV) 8 vectors expressing Apo A-IM (n = 10). At the 40 week time point, intravenous AAV8 Apo A-IM recipients showed a significant regression of atherosclerosis in the whole aorta (P< .01), aortic sinuses (P< .05), and brachiocephalic arteries (P< .05) compared to 20-week-old mice, whereas low-cholesterol diet plus empty vector control group showed no significant regression in lesion size. Immunostaining showed that compared to the 20-week-old mice, there was a significantly reduced macrophage content in the brachiocephalic (P< .05) and aortic sinus plaques (P< .05) of AAV8 Apo A-IM recipients. These data show that although dietary-mediated cholesterol lowering halts progression of atherosclerosis, it does not induce regression, whereas combination of low-cholesterol diet and AAV8 mediated Apo A-I Milano gene therapy induces rapid and significant regression of atherosclerosis in mice. These data provide support for the potential feasibility of this

  10. Pharmacogenetics of apolipoprotein E gene during lipid-lowering therapy: lipid levels and prevention of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Tuomo; Kähönen, Mika; Viiri, Leena E; Grönroos, Paula; Lehtimäki, Terho

    2008-10-01

    A non-optimal plasma concentration of lipids is among the major modifiable risk factors of atherosclerosis. Therefore, the prevention of cardiovascular disease by means of lipid-lowering therapy with statins and other agents is of great importance for patient groups where a lifestyle change, for example, diet modification, does not lead to adequately reduced lipid levels. The response of low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels to statin therapy is highly variable. This is partly attributed to hereditary variation in genes involved in pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and lipid metabolism. The pharmacogenetics of lipid-lowering therapy have been investigated for more than 40 different genes. The gene for apolipoprotein E (APOE) has been the most frequently studied, particularly regarding the epsilon2/epsilon3/epsilon4 polymorphism. Those with the epsilon4 allele seem to have the poorest and those with the epsilon2 allele the strongest response to statins with regards to LDL-C levels. In addition, the epsilon2 carriers may reach the LDL-C treatment goals more frequently than epsilon4 carriers. Few studies have investigated the interaction of the APOE epsilon2/epsilon3/epsilon4 polymorphism and lipid-lowering therapy in relation to the course of coronary heart disease; the results are contradictory and so far inconclusive. This review summarizes the pharmacogenetic findings related to the influence of APOE gene variation on lipid responses and the prevention of coronary heart disease during lipid-lowering therapy. PMID:18855536

  11. High dose simvastatin exhibits enhanced lipid lowering effects relative to simvastatin/ezetimibe combination therapy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical Abstract: Background: Statins are the frontline in cholesterol reduction therapies; however use in combination with agents that possess complimentary mechanisms of action may achieve further reduce in LDL-C. Methods and Results: Thirty-nine patients were treated with either 80mg simvasta...

  12. High Dose Simvastatin Exhibits Enhanced Lipid Lowering Effects Relative to Simvastatin/Ezetimibe Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Settergren, Magnus; D'Alexandri, Fabio Luiz; Haeggström, Jesper Z.; Fiehn, Oliver; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Pedersen, Theresa L.; Newman, John W.; Orešič, Matej; Pernow, John; Wheelock, Craig E.

    2014-01-01

    Statins are the frontline in cholesterol reduction therapies; however use in combination with agents that possess complimentary mechanisms of action may achieve further reductions in LDL-C. Thirty-nine patients were treated with either 80mg simvastatin (n=20) or 10mg simvastatin plus 10mg ezetimibe (n=19) for 6 weeks. Dosing was designed to produce comparable LDL-C reductions, while enabling assessment of potential simvastatin-associated pleiotropic effects. Baseline and post-treatment plasma were analyzed for lipid mediators (e.g., eicosanoids, endocannabinoids) and structural lipids by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Following statistical analysis and orthogonal projections to latent structures (OPLS) multivariate modeling, no changes were observed in lipid mediator levels, while global structural lipids were reduced in response to both mono- (R2Y=0.74, Q2=0.66, CV-ANOVA p=7.0×10-8) and combination therapy (R2Y=0.67, Q2=0.54, CV-ANOVA p=2.6×10−5). OPLS modeling identified a subset of 12 lipids that classified the two treatment groups after 6 weeks (R2Y=0.65, Q2=0.61, CV-ANOVA p=5.4×10−8). Decreases in the lipid species PC(15:0/18:2) and HexCer(d18:1/24:0) were the strongest discriminators of LDL-C reductions for both treatment groups (q<0.00005), while PE(36:3e) contributed most to distinguishing treatment groups (q=0.017). Shifts in lipid composition were similar for high-dose simvastatin and simvastatin/ezetimibe combination therapy, but the magnitude of the reduction was linked to simvastatin dosage. Simvastatin therapy did not affect circulating levels of lipid mediators, suggesting that pleiotropic effects are not associated with eicosanoid production. Only high-dose simvastatin reduced the relative proportion of sphingomyelin and ceramide to phosphatidylcholine (q=0.008), suggesting a pleiotropic effect previously associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. PMID:25516625

  13. Are women discriminated against for lipid lowering therapy? Results from a prospective cohort of women with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, G; Cooper, A; McGing, E; Chia, H; Jackson, G

    2000-05-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the lipid management of men and women with documented coronary artery disease in 587 patients (433 men and 154 women) undergoing coronary angiography between 1991 and 1995. A fasting total cholesterol (TC) was measured in all patients on the morning of angiography. A postal/telephone follow-up was carried out one year after angiography in a subpopulation of 278 patients (194 men and 84 women) who were not taking lipid-lowering therapy (LLT) or whose TC was > 5.2 mmol/l at the time of angiography. At baseline, mean TC was 5.89 mmol/l (SE 0.06) in the men and 6.47 mmol/l (SE 0.09) in the women (p = < 0.0001). Action or recommendation to institute LLT was taken in 141 (32.7%) men and 62 (40.3%) women (p = 0.09). In the follow-up population, comparing men with women, 74 (38.3%) vs 39 (46.4%) were taking LLT (p = 0.21); 56 (28.9%) vs 26 (31.0%) had not undergone repeat TC testing (p = 0.73); when performed, repeat TC was 5.75 (0.09) mmol/l vs 5.64 (0.16) mmol/l (p = 0.53); mean decrease in TC between baseline and follow-up was 0.86 (0.10) mmol/l vs 1.01 (0.21) mmol/l (p = 0.51). There was no significant gender difference in lipid management either at the time of coronary angiography or subsequent follow-up, although the level of lipid-lowering drug use remained inadequate in both sexes. PMID:10912308

  14. Lipid-Lowering Drug Therapy for CVD Prevention: Looking into the Future.

    PubMed

    Stein, Evan A; Raal, Frederick J

    2015-11-01

    Over the past three decades, statins have become first-line treatment for reducing LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). They have provided a clear, robust, and reproducible relationship between the absolute LDL-C reduction and the decrease in CVD; every 1 mmol/L (~40 mg/dL) in LDL-C reduction results in a 22 % decrease in CVD events. This relationship has recently been extended to reduction in LDL-C with a non-statin, ezetimibe, on top of statin therapy, further consolidating LDL-C as the cornerstone in CVD risk reduction. Despite these two effective and safe LDL-C-lowering drugs, there remains a need for additional drugs to reduce LDL-C, the focus of this review which covers agents which produce sufficient LDL-C reduction to potentially help address this unmet need and are either recently approved or currently in clinical trials. PMID:26385394

  15. Expert commentary: the safety of fibrates in lipid-lowering therapy.

    PubMed

    Brown, W Virgil

    2007-03-19

    The use of fibrates in the management of lipoprotein disorders has a history dating back to the mid-1960s. This group of drugs has now been tested in several large long-term trials with cardiovascular end points. Overall, there is good evidence for the reduction of cardiovascular disease in primary prevention studies and in those of subjects with manifest disease. More recent trials have suffered from high interference due to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor (statin) introduction, particularly in their placebo control groups. However, there is very good evidence for overall safety from a combined study of >20,000 patients in these controlled clinical trials lasting approximately 5 years. Abdominal pain has been observed more frequently in the statin vs placebo group. Myopathy, liver enzyme elevations, and cholecystitis have been potential adverse reactions of interest. However, these have occurred at a very low rate and are rarely found to be statistically more frequent in the active-treatment group compared with the subjects taking placebo. The recent Fenofibrate Intervention and Event Lowering in Diabetes (FIELD) study found a slightly higher incidence of pancreatitis, deep venous thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism. Small creatinine and homocysteine elevations are observed in many patients taking fibrates, and the effect of this on long-term outcomes is under study. The FIELD study also described a significant reduction in the rates of progression of proteinuria and vascular retinopathy with fibrate therapy. To date, there has been no study exclusive to patients with elevated triglycerides, raising the question of the potential benefit of these drugs in patients with the lipid abnormalities most effectively treated with fibrates. PMID:17368273

  16. Relation of fish oil supplementation to markers of atherothrombotic risk in patients with cardiovascular disease not receiving lipid-lowering therapy.

    PubMed

    Franzese, Christopher J; Bliden, Kevin P; Gesheff, Martin G; Pandya, Shachi; Guyer, Kirk E; Singla, Anand; Tantry, Udaya S; Toth, Peter P; Gurbel, Paul A

    2015-05-01

    Fish oil supplementation (FOS) is known to have cardiovascular benefits. However, the effects of FOS on thrombosis are incompletely understood. We sought to determine if the use of FOS is associated with lower indices of atherothrombotic risk in patients with suspected coronary artery disease (sCAD). This is a subgroup analysis of consecutive patients with sCAD (n=600) enrolled in the Multi-Analyte, Thrombogenic, and Genetic Markers of Atherosclerosis study. Patients on FOS were compared with patients not on FOS. Lipid profile was determined by vertical density gradient ultracentrifugation (n=520), eicosapentaenoic acid+docosahexaenoic acid was measured by gas chromatography (n=437), and AtherOx testing was performed by immunoassay (n=343). Thromboelastography (n=419), ADP- and collagen-induced platelet aggregation (n=137), and urinary 11-dehydrothromboxane B2 levels (n=259) were performed immediately before elective coronary angiography. In the total population, FOS was associated with higher eicosapentaenoic acid+docosahexaenoic acid content (p<0.001), lower triglycerides (p=0.04), total very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p=0.002), intermediate-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p=0.02), and AtherOx levels (p=0.02) but not in patients on lipid-lowering therapy. Patients not on lipid-lowering therapy taking FOS had lower very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, intermediate-density lipoprotein cholesterol, remnant lipoproteins, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, AtherOx levels, collagen-induced platelet aggregation, thrombin-induced platelet-fibrin clot strength, and shear elasticity (p<0.03 for all). In clopidogrel-treated patients, there was no difference in ADP-induced aggregation between FOS groups. Patients on FOS had lower urinary 11-dehydrothromboxane B2 levels regardless of lipid-lowering therapy (p<0.04). In conclusion, the findings of this study support the potential benefit of FOS for atherothrombotic risk reduction in sCAD with

  17. [ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME AND LIPID-LOWERING THERAPY. DOES THE IMPROVE-IT STUDY MAKE ANY DIFFERENCE?].

    PubMed

    Lancellotti, P; Pierard, L A; Scheen, A J

    2015-09-01

    Statins reduce both LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) levels and the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with and without cardiovascular disease. Intensive statin therapy, compared with moderate-dose statin therapy, incrementally lowers LDL-C levels and rates of cardiovascular events in patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome. Ezetimibe, by diminishing the absorption of cholesterol from the intestine, additionally reduces LDL-C when added to statins. In this article, we discuss the potential benefits of the combination of simvastatin and ezetimibe for the long-term management of patients with acute coronary syndrome through an analysis of the IMPROVE-IT results (IMProved Reduction of Outcomes: Vytorin Efficacy International Trial). This randomised double blind trial included 18,144 patients with a LDL-C of 50 to 100 (with statin) or 125 (without statin) mg/dl and had a median follow-up of 6 years. The objective of the study was to test the efficacy of simvastatin 40 mg versus simvastatin 40 mg and 10 mg ezetimibe. The primary endpoint included cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke, hospitalization for unstable angina and coronary revascularization. The addition of ezetimibe to simvastatin resulted in an incremental lowering of LDL-C (reached value 53.2 versus 69.9 mg/dl, p < 0.001) and a further improvement of the patient prognosis (relative reduction of primary endpoint: -6.4%, p = 0.016). In addition, the combined therapy showed no significant adverse effects, particularly regarding the risk of cancers, which confirms the safety of ezetimibe. In acute coronary syndrome, the prescription of ezetimibe should be considered (class HA, level of evidence B) in patients with a LDL-C a 70 mg/dl despite maximally tolerated dose of statin. PMID:26638446

  18. Pharmacogenetics of Lipid-Lowering Agents: Precision or Indecision Medicine?

    PubMed

    Alfonsi, Jeffrey E; Hegele, Robert A; Gryn, Steven E

    2016-05-01

    Lipid-lowering medications, particularly statins, have been a popular target for pharmacogenetic studies. A handful of genes have shown promise for predicting response to therapy from the perspective of lipid lowering, as well as myopathy. A number of genes have been implicated and have biological plausibility based on their involvement with the pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics of statins or other lipid-lowering medications. The level of confidence and replication of these findings varies, although several associations are likely true. Novel classes of lipid-lowering therapy have opened up new possibilities in the treatment of severe inherited forms of dyslipidemia, making the identification of such mutations an important pharmacogenetic predictor of failure of standard therapy, with potential response to novel therapy. Advances in next-generation sequencing technology bring the application of pharmacogenetics even closer to routine clinical practice. PMID:26993470

  19. Serial Optical Coherence Tomography and Intravascular Ultrasound Analysis of Gender Difference in Changes of Plaque Phenotype in Response to Lipid-Lowering Therapy.

    PubMed

    Minami, Yoshiyasu; Hou, Jingbo; Xing, Lei; Jia, Haibo; Hu, Sining; Vergallo, Rocco; Soeda, Tsunenari; Lee, Hang; Zhang, Shaosong; Yu, Bo; Jang, Ik-Kyung

    2016-06-15

    Although the clinical benefit of statins have been demonstrated in both genders, gender differences in the response to statin therapy on plaque morphologic changes have not been reported. A total of 66 nonculprit plaques from 46 patients who had serial image acquisition at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months by both optical coherence tomography and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) were included. Patients were treated with atorvastatin 60 mg (AT60) or 20 mg (AT20). The baseline characteristics were similar between women (n = 16) and men (n = 30) except for age (59.3 ± 6.8 vs 52.5 ± 10.6 years, p = 0.027) and smoking status (12.5% vs 70.0%, p <0.001). The change in fibrous cap thickness (FCT) at 12 months was significant in both groups (108.8 ± 87.4 μm, p <0.001, 91.3 ± 70.1 μm, p <0.001, respectively) without significant difference between the groups (p = 0.437). The percent change in mean lipid arc at 6 months was significantly greater in women than that in men (-12.8 ± 18.8% vs -1.56 ± 21.8%, p = 0.040). In women, the percent change of FCT in the AT20 group was similar to that in the AT60 group (182.5 ± 199.5% vs 192.9 ± 149.7%, p = 0.886). However, in men, the percent change of FCT in the AT20 group was significantly smaller than that in the AT60 group (92.2 ± 90.5% vs 225.9 ± 104.3%, p <0.001). No significant change in percent atheroma volume by IVUS was seen at 12 months in both women and men. In conclusion, statin therapy was effective in both genders for plaque stabilization at 12-month follow-up. High-intensity statin therapy may be particularly important in men. PMID:27138187

  20. Intensity modulated proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Kooy, H M; Grassberger, C

    2015-07-01

    Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) implies the electromagnetic spatial control of well-circumscribed "pencil beams" of protons of variable energy and intensity. Proton pencil beams take advantage of the charged-particle Bragg peak-the characteristic peak of dose at the end of range-combined with the modulation of pencil beam variables to create target-local modulations in dose that achieves the dose objectives. IMPT improves on X-ray intensity modulated beams (intensity modulated radiotherapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy) with dose modulation along the beam axis as well as lateral, in-field, dose modulation. The clinical practice of IMPT further improves the healthy tissue vs target dose differential in comparison with X-rays and thus allows increased target dose with dose reduction elsewhere. In addition, heavy-charged-particle beams allow for the modulation of biological effects, which is of active interest in combination with dose "painting" within a target. The clinical utilization of IMPT is actively pursued but technical, physical and clinical questions remain. Technical questions pertain to control processes for manipulating pencil beams from the creation of the proton beam to delivery within the patient within the accuracy requirement. Physical questions pertain to the interplay between the proton penetration and variations between planned and actual patient anatomical representation and the intrinsic uncertainty in tissue stopping powers (the measure of energy loss per unit distance). Clinical questions remain concerning the impact and management of the technical and physical questions within the context of the daily treatment delivery, the clinical benefit of IMPT and the biological response differential compared with X-rays against which clinical benefit will be judged. It is expected that IMPT will replace other modes of proton field delivery. Proton radiotherapy, since its first practice 50 years ago, always required the highest level of

  1. Intensity modulated proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Grassberger, C

    2015-01-01

    Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) implies the electromagnetic spatial control of well-circumscribed “pencil beams” of protons of variable energy and intensity. Proton pencil beams take advantage of the charged-particle Bragg peak—the characteristic peak of dose at the end of range—combined with the modulation of pencil beam variables to create target-local modulations in dose that achieves the dose objectives. IMPT improves on X-ray intensity modulated beams (intensity modulated radiotherapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy) with dose modulation along the beam axis as well as lateral, in-field, dose modulation. The clinical practice of IMPT further improves the healthy tissue vs target dose differential in comparison with X-rays and thus allows increased target dose with dose reduction elsewhere. In addition, heavy-charged-particle beams allow for the modulation of biological effects, which is of active interest in combination with dose “painting” within a target. The clinical utilization of IMPT is actively pursued but technical, physical and clinical questions remain. Technical questions pertain to control processes for manipulating pencil beams from the creation of the proton beam to delivery within the patient within the accuracy requirement. Physical questions pertain to the interplay between the proton penetration and variations between planned and actual patient anatomical representation and the intrinsic uncertainty in tissue stopping powers (the measure of energy loss per unit distance). Clinical questions remain concerning the impact and management of the technical and physical questions within the context of the daily treatment delivery, the clinical benefit of IMPT and the biological response differential compared with X-rays against which clinical benefit will be judged. It is expected that IMPT will replace other modes of proton field delivery. Proton radiotherapy, since its first practice 50 years ago, always required the

  2. Comparison of the Effect of Rosuvastatin 2.5 mg vs 20 mg on Coronary Plaque Determined by Angioscopy and Intravascular Ultrasound in Japanese With Stable Angina Pectoris (from the Aggressive Lipid-Lowering Treatment Approach Using Intensive Rosuvastatin for Vulnerable Coronary Artery Plaque [ALTAIR] Randomized Trial).

    PubMed

    Takayama, Tadateru; Komatsu, Sei; Ueda, Yasunori; Fukushima, Seiji; Hiro, Takafumi; Hirayama, Atsushi; Saito, Satoshi

    2016-04-15

    Diminishing yellow color, evaluated by coronary angioscopy, is associated with plaque stabilization and regression. Our aim was to assess the effect of aggressive lipid-lowering therapy with rosuvastatin on plaque regression and instability. Thirty-seven patients with stable angina or silent myocardial ischemia who planned to undergo elective percutaneous coronary intervention and had angioscopic yellow plaques of grade 2 or more were randomized to high-dose (group H, 20 mg/day, n = 18) or low-dose (group L, 2.5 mg/day, n = 19) rosuvastatin therapy for 48 weeks. Yellow plaque was graded on a 4-point scale of 0 (white) to 3 (bright yellow) by angioscopy, and plaque volume was determined by intravascular ultrasound for plaques with a length of 5 to 15 mm. Color and volume were assessed at baseline and after 48 weeks by the investigators blinded to the rosuvastatin dosage, and were compared between the 2 dosing groups. The level of low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol decreased from 130.3 ± 25.5 mg/dl to 61.7 ± 16.5 mg/dl (-50 ± 19%: high intensity) in group H (p <0.001) and from 130.9 ± 28.5 mg/dl to 89.7 ± 29.0 mg/dl (-30 ± 22%: moderate intensity) in group L (mean ± SD, p <0.001). The average color grade of yellow plaques decreased from 2.0 to 1.5 in group H (p <0.001) and from 2.0 to 1.6 in group L (p <0.001) after 48 weeks. Plaque volume decreased significantly in group H but not in group L. The percent change in plaque volume was significantly larger in group H than in group L (p = 0.005). In conclusion, both high-dose and low-dose rosuvastatin increased plaque stability. However, high-dose rosuvastatin was more effective than low-dose rosuvastatin in inducing plaque volume regression. Clinical Trial Registration No: UMIN-CTR, UMIN000003276. PMID:26879069

  3. Lipid-lowering medications for children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Miller, Melissa L; Wright, Chanin C; Browne, Barry

    2015-01-01

    As demonstrated by the 2011 publication of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Integrated Guidelines for Cardiovascular Health and Risk Reduction in Children and Adolescents, the information available regarding the treatment of pediatric lipid disorders has greatly expanded. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, or statin, therapy is now considered a first-line pharmacologic intervention for pediatric patients with severe dyslipidemias failing treatment with diet and exercise alone. Despite their ability to effectively reduce cholesterol levels, bile acid sequestrants continue to pose challenges for pediatric patients because of their unpalatability and are typically used as adjunctive therapy or for patients not able to tolerate statins. Fibric acid derivatives, as a class of medications, not only lack a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved agent, but also continue to lack significant pediatric safety and efficacy data. Niacin, a potential adjunct therapy, lacks FDA approval for pediatric patients and is plagued by significant adverse effects making it an unlikely therapy option for pediatric patients. Ezetimibe provides clinicians with an alternative adjunct therapy option when synergistically paired with an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor or it can be used as monotherapy for patients intolerant to statins and bile acid sequestrants. Finally, despite several marketed formulations, omega-3 fish oils currently lack FDA approval in pediatric patients and have failed to demonstrate statistically significant lipid lowering in pediatric and adolescent patients. Although recent years have witnessed a dramatic increase in data available for the use of lipid-lowering medications for pediatric patients, long-term study data are still generally lacking and continues to present an active focus of research. PMID:26343214

  4. Lipid-lowering update 2001. Aggressive new goals.

    PubMed Central

    Fenske, T. K.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the central role of cholesterol in coronary artery disease (CAD), underscore the need for identifying patients at high risk of CAD, and discuss treatment of dyslipidemias. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Current literature (1995-2000) was searched via MEDLINE using the MeSH headings "cholesterol," "risk reduction," and "statins." Recommendations in this paper are based mainly on the results of large randomized controlled trials. Preference was given to more recent articles, clinically relevant articles, and landmark clinical trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Lipid lowering, and specifically low-density lipoprotein lowering, has been repeatedly shown in large clinical trials to improve survival dramatically and reduce cardiac events in both primary and secondary prevention. Identifying those at highest risk for future cardiac events is critical because these patients will benefit most from aggressive modification of risk factors. The definition of high risk has been expanded to include patients with diabetes mellitus and peripheral vascular disease, as well as those with established CAD. A full lipid profile is required for these patients to assess risk and develop a lipid-lowering strategy with proven effectiveness. CONCLUSION: With the advent of powerful, efficacious, and well tolerated cholesterol-modifying therapies, lipid normalization should be a mandate for all physicians caring for patients with established CAD and patients at risk of developing CAD. PMID:11228031

  5. Unresolved issues in lipid-lowering treatment.

    PubMed

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos

    2016-06-01

    Elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels are a major modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). In addition, treatment with statins reduces cardiovascular morbidity and mortality both in patients without and with established CVD. However, there still exist unresolved issues in the management of dyslipidemia. First, which are the optimal LDL-C levels? Second, do low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and should they also represent treatment targets? In the present review, we discuss these two pertinent questions. Accumulating data, both from observational studies and from interventional studies with statins and other lipid-lowering agents, suggest that lowering LDL-C levels considerably below the currently recommended targets is both safe and further reduces cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. These benefits are particularly relevant for patients at very high cardiovascular risk, i.e. those with established CVD. On the other hand, it is questionable whether HDL-C is causally related to atherosclerosis and whether increasing HDL-C levels will translate into reduced cardiovascular risk. This uncertainty is even more pronounced in patients who achieve very low LDL-C levels with statin treatment. PMID:27035401

  6. New Era of Lipid-Lowering Drugs.

    PubMed

    Barter, Philip J; Rye, Kerry-Anne

    2016-04-01

    There are several established lipid-modifying agents, including statins, fibrates, niacin, and ezetimibe, that have been shown in randomized clinical outcome trials to reduce the risk of having an atherosclerotic cardiovascular event. However, in many people, the risk of having an event remains unacceptably high despite treatment with these established agents. This has stimulated the search for new therapies designed to reduce residual cardiovascular risk. New approaches that target atherogenic lipoproteins include: 1) inhibition of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 to increase removal of atherogenic lipoproteins from plasma; 2) inhibition of the synthesis of apolipoprotein (apo) B, the main protein component of atherogenic lipoproteins; 3) inhibition of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein to block the formation of atherogenic lipoproteins; 4) inhibition of adenosine triphosphate citrate lyase to inhibit the synthesis of cholesterol; 5) inhibition of the synthesis of lipoprotein(a), a factor known to cause atherosclerosis; 6) inhibition of apoC-III to reduce triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and to enhance high-density lipoprotein (HDL) functionality; and 7) inhibition of cholesteryl ester transfer protein, which not only reduces the concentration of atherogenic lipoproteins but also increases the level and function of the potentially antiatherogenic HDL fraction. Other new therapies that specifically target HDLs include infusions of reconstituted HDLs, HDL delipidation, and infusions of apoA-I mimetic peptides that mimic some of the functions of HDLs. This review describes the scientific basis and rationale for developing these new therapies and provides a brief summary of established therapies. PMID:26983688

  7. Interventions to improve adherence to lipid lowering medication

    PubMed Central

    Schedlbauer, Angela; Schroeder, Knut; Peters, Tim; Fahey, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Background Lipid lowering drugs are still widely underused, despite compelling evidence about their effectiveness in the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease. Poor patient adherence to medication regimen is a major factor in the lack of success in treating hyperlipidaemia. In this review we focus on interventions, which encourage patients at risk of heart disease or stroke to take lipid lowering medication regularly. Objectives To assess the effect of interventions aiming at improved adherence to lipid lowering drugs, focusing on measures of adherence and clinical outcomes. Search strategy We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycInfo and CINAHL. Date of most recent search was in February 2003. No language restrictions were applied. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of adherence-enhancing interventions to lipid lowering medication in adults for both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in an ambulatory setting. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers extracted data independently and assessed studies according to criteria outlined by the Cochrane Reviewers’ Handbook. Main results The eight studies found contained data on 5943 patients. Interventions could be stratified into four categories: 1. simplification of drug regimen, 2. patient information/education, 3. intensified patient care such as reminding and 4. complex behavioural interventions such as group sessions. Change in adherence ranged from −3% to 25% (decrease in adherence by 3% to increase in adherence by 25%). Three studies reported significantly improved adherence through simplification of drug regimen (category 1), improved patient information/education (category 2) and reminding (category 3). The fact that the successful interventions were evenly spread across the categories, does not suggest any advantage of one particular type of intervention. The methodological and analytical quality was

  8. Replanning of an intensive therapy unit

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, D W; Copeland, P F; Miller, J; Freeman, R

    1982-01-01

    Considerable effort is needed when replanning an intensive therapy unit to avoid repeating mistakes in design, such as lack of windows and an impractical working area. Early consultation with the nursing and medical staff primarily responsible for such a unit is essential. The considerable technological innovations in intensive care will require flexibility in the future if they are to be incorporated into existing facilities. ImagesFIG 2FIG 4 PMID:6814684

  9. Problems of intensive therapy in childhood cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Skelton, J.; Pizzo, P.A.

    1986-07-15

    Tremendous progress has been made in the treatment of childhood cancers. Certain hematologic malignancies have an impressive cure rate with the current intensive antineoplastic treatment regimens. There is optimism that the treatment of children who have advanced stage solid tumors with intensive, multimodality therapy may improve their chances for long-term survival. These treatment programs, though potentially curative, are highly toxic, with severe myelosuppression and damage to other organ systems. An awareness of these potential toxicities, an understanding of how to prevent or minimize certain problems, and the ability to treat those complications which do arise are all essential to the successful management of childhood cancer. 206 references.

  10. Formulation and Evaluation of Nanocrystals of a Lipid Lowering Agent

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Dina

    2016-01-01

    Atorvastatin calcium, the lipid lowering agent, is taken as a model drug characterized by poor water solubility and bioavailability. In this study an attempt was made for preparation of nanocrystals using high pressure homogenization. A number of stabilizers were included as well as polymers at different concentrations, and the formulations were homogenized for ten cycles at a pressure of 1000 bars. The obtained nano crystals were evaluated by determining their size, zeta potential, saturated solubility and dissolution rate. Results revealed that Formulation 3, containing (10: 1) drug to sodium lauryl sulphate ratio, possessed the highest saturated solubility and dissolution rate, and hence was analyzed by X-ray diffraction analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourrier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. An in-vivo study was carried out on the successful formulation in comparison to drug powder using rats as experimental animals. A significant increase in the area under the concentration-time curve Cpmax and MRT for nanocrystals was observed in comparison to the untreated atorvastatin calcium. PMID:27610148

  11. Formulation and Evaluation of Nanocrystals of a Lipid Lowering Agent.

    PubMed

    Louis, Dina

    2016-01-01

    Atorvastatin calcium, the lipid lowering agent, is taken as a model drug characterized by poor water solubility and bioavailability. In this study an attempt was made for preparation of nanocrystals using high pressure homogenization. A number of stabilizers were included as well as polymers at different concentrations, and the formulations were homogenized for ten cycles at a pressure of 1000 bars. The obtained nano crystals were evaluated by determining their size, zeta potential, saturated solubility and dissolution rate. Results revealed that Formulation 3, containing (10: 1) drug to sodium lauryl sulphate ratio, possessed the highest saturated solubility and dissolution rate, and hence was analyzed by X-ray diffraction analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourrier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. An in-vivo study was carried out on the successful formulation in comparison to drug powder using rats as experimental animals. A significant increase in the area under the concentration-time curve Cpmax and MRT for nanocrystals was observed in comparison to the untreated atorvastatin calcium. PMID:27610148

  12. Antimicrobial therapy in neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Tzialla, Chryssoula; Borghesi, Alessandro; Serra, Gregorio; Stronati, Mauro; Corsello, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Severe infections represent the main cause of neonatal mortality accounting for more than one million neonatal deaths worldwide every year. Antibiotics are the most commonly prescribed medications in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and in industrialized countries about 1% of neonates are exposed to antibiotic therapy. Sepsis has often nonspecific signs and symptoms and empiric antimicrobial therapy is promptly initiated in high risk of sepsis or symptomatic infants. However continued use of empiric broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment in the setting of negative cultures especially in preterm infants may not be harmless.The benefits of antibiotic therapy when indicated are clearly enormous, but the continued use of antibiotics without any microbiological justification is dangerous and only leads to adverse events. The purpose of this review is to highlight the inappropriate use of antibiotics in the NICUs, to exam the impact of antibiotic treatment in preterm infants with negative cultures and to summarize existing knowledge regarding the appropriate choice of antimicrobial agents and optimal duration of therapy in neonates with suspected or culture-proven sepsis in order to prevent serious consequences. PMID:25887621

  13. Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Patrick; Westerly, David; Mackie, Thomas

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: This paper presents a concept for a proton therapy system capable of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy using a fan beam of protons. This system would allow present and future gantry-based facilities to deliver state-of-the-art proton therapy with the greater normal tissue sparing made possible by intensity modulation techniques.Methods: A method for producing a divergent fan beam of protons using a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles is described and particle transport through the quadrupole doublet is simulated using a commercially available software package. To manipulate the fan beam of protons, a modulation device is developed. This modulator inserts or retracts acrylic leaves of varying thickness from subsections of the fan beam. Each subsection, or beam channel, creates what effectively becomes a beam spot within the fan area. Each channel is able to provide 0–255 mm of range shift for its associated beam spot, or stop the beam and act as an intensity modulator. Results of particle transport simulations through the quadrupole system are incorporated into the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code along with a model of the range and intensity modulation device. Several design parameters were investigated and optimized, culminating in the ability to create topotherapy treatment plans using distal-edge tracking on both phantom and patient datasets.Results: Beam transport calculations show that a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles can be used to create a divergent fan beam of 200 MeV protons over a distance of 2.1 m. The quadrupole lengths were 30 and 48 cm, respectively, with transverse field gradients less than 20 T/m, which is within the range of water-cooled magnets for the quadrupole radii used. MCNPX simulations of topotherapy treatment plans suggest that, when using the distal edge tracking delivery method, many delivery angles are more important than insisting on narrow beam channel widths in order to obtain conformal target coverage

  14. Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Patrick; Westerly, David; Mackie, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This paper presents a concept for a proton therapy system capable of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy using a fan beam of protons. This system would allow present and future gantry-based facilities to deliver state-of-the-art proton therapy with the greater normal tissue sparing made possible by intensity modulation techniques. Methods: A method for producing a divergent fan beam of protons using a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles is described and particle transport through the quadrupole doublet is simulated using a commercially available software package. To manipulate the fan beam of protons, a modulation device is developed. This modulator inserts or retracts acrylic leaves of varying thickness from subsections of the fan beam. Each subsection, or beam channel, creates what effectively becomes a beam spot within the fan area. Each channel is able to provide 0–255 mm of range shift for its associated beam spot, or stop the beam and act as an intensity modulator. Results of particle transport simulations through the quadrupole system are incorporated into the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code along with a model of the range and intensity modulation device. Several design parameters were investigated and optimized, culminating in the ability to create topotherapy treatment plans using distal-edge tracking on both phantom and patient datasets. Results: Beam transport calculations show that a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles can be used to create a divergent fan beam of 200 MeV protons over a distance of 2.1 m. The quadrupole lengths were 30 and 48 cm, respectively, with transverse field gradients less than 20 T/m, which is within the range of water-cooled magnets for the quadrupole radii used. MCNPX simulations of topotherapy treatment plans suggest that, when using the distal edge tracking delivery method, many delivery angles are more important than insisting on narrow beam channel widths in order to obtain conformal target coverage

  15. Single-energy intensity modulated proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Cianchetti, Marco

    2015-09-01

    In this note, an intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) technique, based on the use of high single-energy (SE-IMPT) pencil beams, is described. The method uses only the highest system energy (226 MeV) and only lateral penumbra to produce dose gradient, as in photon therapy. In the study, after a preliminary analysis of the width of proton pencil beam penumbras at different depths, SE-IMPT was compared with conventional IMPT in a phantom containing titanium inserts and in a patient, affected by a spinal chordoma with fixation rods. It was shown that SE-IMPT has the potential to produce a sharp dose gradient and that it is not affected by the uncertainties produced by metal implants crossed by the proton beams. Moreover, in the chordoma patient, target coverage and organ at risk sparing of the SE-IMPT plan resulted comparable to that of the less reliable conventional IMPT technique. Robustness analysis confirmed that SE-IMPT was not affected by range errors, which can drastically affect the IMPT plan. When accepting a low-dose spread as in modern photon techniques, SE-IMPT could be an option for the treatment of lesions (e.g. cervical bone tumours) where steep dose gradient could improve curability, and where range uncertainty, due for example to the presence of metal implants, hampers conventional IMPT.

  16. Single-energy intensity modulated proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Cianchetti, Marco

    2015-10-01

    In this note, an intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) technique, based on the use of high single-energy (SE-IMPT) pencil beams, is described.The method uses only the highest system energy (226 MeV) and only lateral penumbra to produce dose gradient, as in photon therapy. In the study, after a preliminary analysis of the width of proton pencil beam penumbras at different depths, SE-IMPT was compared with conventional IMPT in a phantom containing titanium inserts and in a patient, affected by a spinal chordoma with fixation rods.It was shown that SE-IMPT has the potential to produce a sharp dose gradient and that it is not affected by the uncertainties produced by metal implants crossed by the proton beams. Moreover, in the chordoma patient, target coverage and organ at risk sparing of the SE-IMPT plan resulted comparable to that of the less reliable conventional IMPT technique. Robustness analysis confirmed that SE-IMPT was not affected by range errors, which can drastically affect the IMPT plan.When accepting a low-dose spread as in modern photon techniques, SE-IMPT could be an option for the treatment of lesions (e.g. cervical bone tumours) where steep dose gradient could improve curability, and where range uncertainty, due for example to the presence of metal implants, hampers conventional IMPT. PMID:26352616

  17. Intensity of Therapy Services: What Are the Considerations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palisano, Robert J.; Murr, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Research on intensity of therapy services is limited and perspectives often vary considerably among families, therapists, administrators, policy makers, and health insurers. In this commentary, the authors share their perspectives on intensity of physical therapy and/or occupational therapy services for children with developmental conditions. Five…

  18. Film Dosimetry for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benites-Rengifo, J.; Martínez-Dávalos, A.; Celis, M.; Lárraga, J.

    2004-09-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is an oncology treatment technique that employs non-uniform beam intensities to deliver highly conformal radiation to the targets while minimizing doses to normal tissues and critical organs. A key element for a successful clinical implementation of IMRT is establishing a dosimetric verification process that can ensure that delivered doses are consistent with calculated ones for each patient. To this end we are developing a fast quality control procedure, based on film dosimetry techniques, to be applied to the 6 MV Novalis linear accelerator for IMRT of the Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (INNN) in Mexico City. The procedure includes measurements of individual fluence maps for a limited number of fields and dose distributions in 3D using extended dose-range radiographic film. However, the film response to radiation might depend on depth, energy and field size, and therefore compromise the accuracy of measurements. In this work we present a study of the dependence of Kodak EDR2 film's response on the depth, field size and energy, compared with those of Kodak XV2 film. The first aim is to devise a fast and accurate method to determine the calibration curve of film (optical density vs. doses) commonly called a sensitometric curve. This was accomplished by using three types of irradiation techniques: Step-and-shoot, dynamic and static fields.

  19. Intensive therapy and autotransplantation in Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Reece, D E; Phillips, G L

    1994-09-01

    Intensive therapy and autologous marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation is often utilized in Hodgkin's disease patients whose disease has progressed after primary conventional chemotherapy. A number of studies have described long-term disease-free survival in up to 50% of transplanted patients. High-dose chemotherapy conditioning regimens such as "CBV" or "BEAM" have been used more often than regimens containing total body irradiation. Usually unpurged autologous bone marrow has been utilized as the source of hematopoietic stem cell reconstitution, although recently the use of "primed" peripheral blood stem cells has increased markedly. The challenges of transplant-related toxicity and recurrence of disease post-transplant are discussed, as well as possible strategies to reduce these problems. The use of autologous transplantation is discussed in three clinical settings: patients who have failed to enter a complete remission (CR) after primary chemotherapy, those who have relapsed within 12 months of attaining a CR and those who have relapsed after a longer (i.e., > or = 12 months) first CR. When compared with conventional salvage chemotherapy, transplantation appears to produce a higher long-term disease-free survival rate in all of these patient groups. However, assessment of an advantage for autotransplantation, particularly in patients with long first remissions, is difficult without a Phase III trial. On the other hand, recently updated results from our center indicate that 72% of patients relapsing after long initial remissions benefit from autotransplantation at this point in their disease course, and that transplant-related mortality is low in this setting. Other issues addressed include the potential role of autologous transplantation as consolidation therapy in selected high-risk patients in an initial CR, as well as the utility of conventional chemotherapy and involved-field radiotherapy in conjunction with autotransplantation. PMID:7804123

  20. Low intensity laser therapy: the clinical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, Fred

    2006-02-01

    Recently, there has been significant improvement in the process of research and application of Low Intensity Laser Therapy (LILT). Despite this positive direction, a wide discrepancy between the research component and clinical understanding of the technology remains. In our efforts to achieve better clinical results and more fully comprehend the mechanisms of interaction between light and cells, further studies are required. The clinical results presented in this paper are extrapolated from a wide range of musculoskeletal problems including degenerative osteoarthritis, repetitive motion injuries, sports injuries, etc. The paper includes three separate clinical studies comprising 151, 286 and 576 consecutive patient discharges at our clinic. Each patient studied received a specific course of treatment that was designed for that individual and was modified on a continuing basis as the healing process advanced. On each visit, clinical status correlation with the duration, dosage and other parameters was carried out. The essentials of the treatment consisted of a three stage approach. This involved a photon stream emanating from a number of specified gallium-aluminum-arsenide diodes; stage one, red light array, stage two consisting of an array of infrared diodes and stage three consisting of the application of an infrared laser diode probe. On average, each of these groups required less than 10 treatments per patient and resulted in a significant improvement / cure rate greater than 90% in all conditions treated. This report clearly demonstrates the benefits of LILT, indicating that it should be more widely adapted in all medical therapeutic settings.

  1. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... modulating—or controlling—the intensity of the radiation beam in multiple small volumes. IMRT also allows higher ... of multiple intensity-modulated fields coming from different beam directions produce a custom tailored radiation dose that ...

  2. Intensive Diabetes Therapy and Ocular Surgery in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) showed a beneficial effect of 6.5 years of intensive glycemic control on retinopathy in patients with type 1 diabetes. METHODS Between 1983 and 1989, a total of 1441 patients with type 1 diabetes in the DCCT were randomly assigned to receive either intensive diabetes therapy or conventional therapy aimed at preventing hyperglycemic symptoms. They were treated and followed until 1993. Subsequently, 1375 of these patients were followed in the observational Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) study. The self-reported history of ocular surgical procedures was obtained annually. We evaluated the effect of intensive therapy as compared with conventional therapy on the incidence and cost of ocular surgery during these two studies. RESULTS Over a median follow-up of 23 years, 130 ocular operations were performed in 63 of 711 patients assigned to intensive therapy (8.9%) and 189 ocular operations in 98 of 730 patients assigned to conventional therapy (13.4%) (P<0.001). After adjustment for DCCT baseline factors, intensive therapy was associated with a reduction in the risk of any diabetes-related ocular surgery by 48% (95% confidence interval [CI], 29 to 63; P<0.001) and a reduction in the risk of all such ocular procedures by 37% (95% CI, 12 to 55; P = 0.01). Forty-two patients who received intensive therapy and 61 who received conventional therapy underwent cataract extraction (adjusted risk reduction with intensive therapy, 48%; 95% CI, 23 to 65; P = 0.002); 29 patients who received intensive therapy and 50 who received conventional therapy underwent vitrectomy, retinal-detachment surgery, or both (adjusted risk reduction, 45%; 95% CI, 12 to 66; P = 0.01). The costs of surgery were 32% lower in the intensive-therapy group. The beneficial effects of intensive therapy were fully attenuated after adjustment for mean glycated hemoglobin levels over the entire follow-up. CONCLUSIONS

  3. Robust optimization of intensity modulated proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Wei; Zhang Xiaodong; Li Yupeng; Mohan, Radhe

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is highly sensitive to range uncertainties and uncertainties caused by setup variation. The conventional inverse treatment planning of IMPT optimized based on the planning target volume (PTV) is not often sufficient to ensure robustness of treatment plans. In this paper, a method that takes the uncertainties into account during plan optimization is used to mitigate the influence of uncertainties in IMPT. Methods: The authors use the so-called ''worst-case robust optimization'' to render IMPT plans robust in the face of uncertainties. For each iteration, nine different dose distributions are computed--one each for {+-} setup uncertainties along anteroposterior (A-P), lateral (R-L) and superior-inferior (S-I) directions, for {+-} range uncertainty, and the nominal dose distribution. The worst-case dose distribution is obtained by assigning the lowest dose among the nine doses to each voxel in the clinical target volume (CTV) and the highest dose to each voxel outside the CTV. Conceptually, the use of worst-case dose distribution is similar to the dose distribution achieved based on the use of PTV in traditional planning. The objective function value for a given iteration is computed using this worst-case dose distribution. The objective function used has been extended to further constrain the target dose inhomogeneity. Results: The worst-case robust optimization method is applied to a lung case, a skull base case, and a prostate case. Compared with IMPT plans optimized using conventional methods based on the PTV, our method yields plans that are considerably less sensitive to range and setup uncertainties. An interesting finding of the work presented here is that, in addition to reducing sensitivity to uncertainties, robust optimization also leads to improved optimality of treatment plans compared to the PTV-based optimization. This is reflected in reduction in plan scores and in the lower normal tissue doses for the

  4. Long-term Effectiveness of Intensive Therapy in Chronic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaotian; Guarino, Peter; Lo, Albert C; Peduzzi, Peter; Wininger, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Background While recent clinical trials involving robot-assisted therapy have failed to show clinically significant improvement versus conventional therapy, it is possible that a broader strategy of intensive therapy-to include robot-assisted rehabilitation-may yield clinically meaningful outcomes. Objective To test the immediate and sustained effects of intensive therapy (robot-assisted therapy plus intensive conventional therapy) on outcomes in a chronic stroke population. Methods A multivariate mixed-effects model adjusted for important covariates was established to measure the effect of intensive therapy versus usual care. A total of 127 chronic stroke patients from 4 Veterans Affairs medical centers were randomized to either robot-assisted therapy (n = 49), intensive comparison therapy (n = 50), or usual care (n = 28), in the VA-ROBOTICS randomized clinical trial. Patients were at least 6 months poststroke, of moderate-to-severe upper limb impairment. The primary outcome measure was the Fugl-Meyer Assessment at 12 and 36 weeks. Results There was significant benefit of intensive therapy over usual care on the Fugl-Meyer Assessment at 12 weeks with a mean difference of 4.0 points (95% CI = 1.3-6.7); P = .005; however, by 36 weeks, the benefit was attenuated (mean difference 3.4; 95% CI = -0.02 to 6.9; P = .05). Subgroup analyses showed significant interactions between treatment and age, treatment and time since stroke. Conclusions Motor benefits from intensive therapy compared with usual care were observed at 12 and 36 weeks posttherapy; however, this difference was attenuated at 36 weeks. Subgroups analysis showed that younger age, and a shorter time since stroke were associated with greater immediate and long-term improvement of motor function. PMID:26450442

  5. Physical Therapy Intervention in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Eilish; Garber, June

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the elements of the Intervention section of the Infant Care Path for Physical Therapy in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). The types of physical therapy interventions presented in this path are evidence-based and the suggested timing of these interventions is primarily based on practice knowledge from expert…

  6. [Overprotectiveness as a coping reaction in intensive physical therapy].

    PubMed

    Sarimski, K; Hoffmann, I W

    1993-06-01

    25 mothers of children with cerebral palsy who were doing daily intensive physical therapy (Vojta) completed questionnaires concerning their child's temperament, parental attitudes and how they coped with everyday problems. Their responses were compared to those given by mothers who were not under the stress of conducting therapy. The results revealed compensatory coping processes: Mothers doing therapy try to compensate for their child's stress by being overprotective in ambiguous everyday situations. PMID:8342332

  7. Insulin therapy in the pediatric intensive care unit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyperglycemia is a major risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality in the intensive care unit. Insulin therapy has emerged in adult intensive care units, and several pediatric studies are currently being conducted. This review discusses hyperglycemia and the effects of insulin on metabolic a...

  8. Intensive Insulin Therapy in Severely Burned Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jeschke, Marc G.; Kulp, Gabriela A.; Kraft, Robert; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Mlcak, Ron; Lee, Jong O.; Herndon, David N.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Hyperglycemia and insulin resistance have been shown to increase morbidity and mortality in severely burned patients, and glycemic control appears essential to improve clinical outcomes. However, to date no prospective randomized study exists that determines whether intensive insulin therapy is associated with improved post-burn morbidity and mortality. Objectives: To determine whether intensive insulin therapy is associated with improved post-burn morbidity. Methods: A total of 239 severely burned pediatric patients with burns over greater than 30% of their total body surface area were randomized (block randomization 1:3) to intensive insulin treatment (n = 60) or control (n = 179). Measurements and Main Results: Demographics, clinical outcomes, sepsis, glucose metabolism, organ function, and inflammatory, acute-phase, and hypermetabolic responses were determined. Demographics were similar in both groups. Intensive insulin treatment significantly decreased the incidence of infections and sepsis compared with controls (P < 0.05). Furthermore, intensive insulin therapy improved organ function as indicated by improved serum markers, DENVER2 scores, and ultrasound (P < 0.05). Intensive insulin therapy alleviated post-burn insulin resistance and the vast catabolic response of the body (P < 0.05). Intensive insulin treatment dampened inflammatory and acute-phase responses by deceasing IL-6 and acute-phase proteins compared with controls (P < 0.05). Mortality was 4% in the intensive insulin therapy group and 11% in the control group (P = 0.14). Conclusions: In this prospective randomized clinical trial, we showed that intensive insulin therapy improves post-burn morbidity. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00673309). PMID:20395554

  9. Intense Pulsed Light Therapy for Skin Rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    DiBernardo, Barry E; Pozner, Jason N

    2016-07-01

    Intense pulsed light (IPL), also known as pulsed light and broad band light, is a nonlaser light source used to treat a variety of vascular and pigmented lesions, photo damage, active acne, and unwanted hair. Current IPL systems are much improved from older-generation devices with better calibration, integrated cooling, and improved tuning. These devices are extremely popular because of their versatility and are often the first devices recommended and purchased in many offices. PMID:27363767

  10. Variation in prescribing of lipid-lowering medication in primary care is associated with incidence of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality in people with screen-detected diabetes: findings from the ADDITION-Denmark trial

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, R K; Carlsen, A H; Griffin, S J; Charles, M; Christiansen, J S; Borch-Johnsen, K; Sandbæk, A; Lauritzen, T

    2014-01-01

    Aims To examine variation between general practices in the prescription of lipid-lowering treatment to people with screen-detected Type 2 diabetes, and associations with practice and participant characteristics and risk of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. Methods Observational cohort analysis of data from 1533 people with screen-detected Type 2 diabetes aged 40–69 years from the ADDITION-Denmark study. One hundred and seventy-four general practices were cluster randomized to receive: (1) routine diabetes care according to national guidelines (623 individuals), or (2) intensive multifactorial target-driven management (910 individuals). Multivariable logistic regression was used to quantify the association between the proportion of individuals in each practice who redeemed prescriptions for lipid-lowering medication in the two years following diabetes diagnosis and a composite cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcome, adjusting for age, sex, prevalent chronic disease, baseline CVD risk factors, smoking and lipid-lowering medication, and follow-up time. Results The proportion of individuals treated with lipid-lowering medication varied widely between practices (0–100%). There were 118 CVD events over 9431 person-years of follow-up. For the whole trial cohort, the risk of CVD was significantly higher in practices in the lowest compared with the highest quartile for prescribing lipid-lowering medication [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 3.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6–7.3]. Similar trends were found for all-cause mortality. Conclusions More frequent prescription of lipid-lowering treatment was associated with a lower incidence of CVD and all-cause mortality. Improved understanding of factors underlying practice variation in prescribing may enable more frequent use of lipid-lowering treatment. The results highlight the benefits of intensive treatment of people with screen-detected diabetes (Clinical Trials Registry No; NCT 00237549). What's new Despite

  11. A REVIEW OF LOW-INTENSITY ULTRASOUND FOR CANCER THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    WOOD, ANDREW K. W.; SEHGAL, CHANDRA M.

    2015-01-01

    The literature describing the use of low-intensity ultrasound in four major areas of cancer therapy was reviewed - sonodynamic therapy, ultrasound mediated chemotherapy, ultrasound mediated gene delivery and antivascular ultrasound therapy. Each technique consistently resulted in the death of cancer cells and the bioeffects of ultrasound were primarily attributed to thermal actions and inertial cavitation. In each therapeutic modality, theranostic contrast agents composed of microbubbles played a role in both therapy and vascular imaging. The development of these agents is important as it establishes a therapeutic-diagnostic platform which can monitor the success of anti-cancer therapy. Little attention, however, has been given to either the direct assessment of the underlying mechanisms of the observed bioeffects or to the viability of these therapies in naturally occurring cancers in larger mammals; if such investigations provided encouraging data there could be a prompt application of a therapy technique in treating cancer patients. PMID:25728459

  12. Respiratory syncytial virus, infants and intensive therapy.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Ieda Aparecida Correa; Riccetto, Adriana Gut Lopes; Morcillo, André Moreno; Arns, Clarice Weis; Baracat, Emílio Carlos Elias

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the presence of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and to assess the clinical features of the disease in infants with acute low respiratory tract infection hospitalized at pediatric intensive care units (PICU) of two university teaching hospitals in São Paulo State, Brazil. Nasopharyngeal secretions were tested for the RSV by the polymerase chain reaction. Positive and negative groups for the virus were compared in terms of evolution under intensive care (mechanical pulmonary ventilation, medications, invasive procedures, complications and case fatality). Statistical analysis was performed using the Mann Whitney and Fisher's exact tests. A total of 21 infants were assessed, 8 (38.1%) of whom were positive for RSV. The majority of patients were previously healthy while 85.7% required mechanical pulmonary ventilation, 20/21 patients presented with at least one complication, and the fatality rate was 14.3%. RSV positive and negative groups did not differ for the variables studied. Patients involved in this study were critically ill and needed multiple PICU resources, independently of the presence of RSV. Further studies involving larger cohorts are needed to assess the magnitude of the impact of RSV on the clinical evolution of infants admitted to the PICU in our settings. PMID:22358363

  13. A US Claims-Based Analysis of Real-World Lipid-Lowering Treatment Patterns in Patients With High Cardiovascular Disease Risk or a Previous Coronary Event.

    PubMed

    Quek, Ruben G W; Fox, Kathleen M; Wang, Li; Li, Lu; Gandra, Shravanthi R; Wong, Nathan D

    2016-02-15

    The objective was to examine real-world treatment patterns of lipid-lowering therapies and their possible associated intolerance and/or ineffectiveness in patients with high cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk initiating statins and/or ezetimibe. Patients aged ≥18 years who initiated statins and/or ezetimibe from January 01, 2007, to June 30, 2011, were retrospectively identified from the IMS LifeLink PharMetrics Plus commercial claims database. Patients were further classified into 2 cohorts: (1) history of cardiovascular event (CVE) and (2) history of coronary heart disease risk equivalent (CHD RE). Patients had continuous health plan enrollment ≥1 year pre- and post-index date (statin and/or ezetimibe initiation date). Primary outcomes were index statin intensity, treatment modifications, possible associated statin/nonstatin intolerance and/or ineffectiveness issues (based on treatment modification), and time-to-treatment modifications. Analyses for each cohort were stratified by age group (<65 and ≥65 years). A total of 41,934 (history of CVE) and 170,344 patients (history of CHD RE) were included. On the index date, 8.8% to 25.1% of patients were initiated on high-intensity statin. Among patients aged <65, 79.2% and 48.8% of those with history of CVE and 78.6% and 47.3% of those with a history of CHD RE had ≥1 and 2 treatment modifications, respectively. Among all patients, 24.6% to 25.6% had possible statin intolerance and/or ineffectiveness issues after accounting for second treatment modification (if any). In conclusion, in patients with high CVD risk, index statin treatment modifications that imply possible statin intolerance and/or ineffectiveness were frequent; low use of high-intensity statins indicates unmet need in the management of hyperlipidemia and possible remaining unaccounted CVD residual risk. PMID:26742468

  14. The lipid lowering drug lovastatin protects against doxorubicin-induced hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Henninger, Christian; Huelsenbeck, Johannes; Huelsenbeck, Stefanie; Grösch, Sabine; Lackner, Karl J.; Kaina, Bernd; Fritz, Gerhard

    2012-05-15

    Liver is the main detoxifying organ and therefore the target of high concentrations of genotoxic compounds, such as environmental carcinogens and anticancer drugs. Here, we investigated the usefulness of lovastatin, which is nowadays widely used for lipid lowering purpose, as a hepatoprotective drug following the administration of the anthracycline derivative doxorubicin in vivo. To this end, BALB/c mice were exposed to either a single high dose or three consecutive low doses of doxorubicin. Acute and subacute hepatotoxicities were analyzed with or without lovastatin co-treatment. Lovastatin protected the liver against doxorubicin-induced acute pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic stress responses as indicated by an attenuated mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), respectively. Hepatoprotection by lovastatin was due to a reduced induction of DNA damage following doxorubicin treatment. The statin also mitigated subacute anthracycline-provoked hepatotoxicity as shown on the level of doxorubicin- and epirubicin-stimulated CTGF mRNA expression as well as histopathologically detectable fibrosis and serum concentration of marker enzymes of hepatotoxicity (GPT/GLDH). Kidney damage following doxorubicin exposure was not detectable under our experimental conditions. Moreover, lovastatin showed multiple inhibitory effects on doxorubicin-triggered hepatic expression of genes involved in oxidative stress response, drug transport, DNA repair, cell cycle progression and cell death. Doxorubicin also stimulated the formation of ceramides. Ceramide production, however, was not blocked by lovastatin, indicating that hepatoprotection by lovastatin is independent of the sphingolipid metabolism. Overall, the data show that lovastatin is hepatoprotective following genotoxic stress induced by anthracyclines. Based on the data, we hypothesize that statins might be suitable to lower hepatic injury following anthracycline

  15. Apoptosis does not mediate macrophage depletion in rabbit atherosclerotic plaques after dietary lipid lowering.

    PubMed

    Martinet, Wim; Croons, Valerie; Herman, Arnold G; De Meyer, Guido R Y

    2009-08-01

    Unstable atherosclerotic plaques are characterized by a thin fibrous cap that contains few smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and numerous foam cells of macrophage origin. Previously we and others demonstrated that macrophages disappear from atherosclerotic plaques after dietary lipid lowering. However, it remains unclear whether loss of macrophages after lipid lowering occurs via increased apoptosis, decreased macrophage replication and/or recruitment, or via a combination of both. Rabbits were fed a diet supplemented with cholesterol (0.3%) for 24 weeks followed by a normal diet for 4, 12, or 24 weeks. After 24 weeks of cholesterol supplement, plaques showed apoptosis in both macrophages and SMCs, as determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling. Cell replication (Ki-67 immunolabeling) was predominantly present in macrophages. After 24 weeks of cholesterol withdrawal, the thickness and areas of the plaques were unchanged. Nevertheless, plaques showed a considerable loss of macrophages. This event was associated with a reduced immunoreactivity for vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in the endothelial cells starting 4 weeks after cholesterol withdrawal. Apoptosis did not increase after lipid lowering but showed a steady decline. Apart from decreased VCAM-1 expression, a strong decrease in Ki-67 immunolabeling was observed after 12 weeks of cholesterol withdrawal. Our findings suggest that loss of macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques after dietary lipid lowering is not related to induction of macrophage apoptosis but mainly a consequence of impaired monocyte recruitment followed by decreased macrophage replication. This information is essential for understanding the effects of aggressive lipid lowering on plaque stability. PMID:19723077

  16. Effects of Intensive versus Non-Intensive Physical Therapy on Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M A; Zaman, M M; Rahman, M M; Moniruzzaman, M; Ahmed, B; Chhobi, F K; Rahman, N; Akter, M R

    2016-07-01

    Cerebral Palsy (CP) is one of the most common causes of all childhood disorders. There are tone, posture and movements difficulty due to non-progressive damage to the immature brain in CP. The hallmark of CP is a disability in the development of gross motor function (GMF). The influence of gross motor development on fine motor development is more important in early developmental period, specially under three years old and in children with CP. Various therapeutic interventions have been used in the management of GMF development. Among them physical therapy is the most common intervention in CP and is usually a component of mandated programs. Physical therapy means physical stimulations in the form of various therapeutic exercises, touch, massage, limbs and trunk movement, balancing and coordination training, gait and ambulation training, cognitive stimulation as well as speech, language and occupational therapy. Our study focused to see the effect by short term intensive versus non-intensive physical therapy on children GMF development by using gross motor function measure (GMFM) Score sheet, GMFM-88, version 1.0. Study provides the information that physical therapy intervention is effective in GMF development and intensive interventions are more effective in children with spastic CP than non-intensive one. Study also inform that the more early treatment the more effective result. PMID:27612885

  17. Analgesic effect of high intensity laser therapy in knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Stiglić-Rogoznica, Nives; Stamenković, Doris; Frlan-Vrgoc, Ljubinka; Avancini-Dobrović, Viviana; Vrbanić, Tea Schnurrer-Luke

    2011-09-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (KOA), the most common type of osteoarthritis (OA), is associated with pain and inflammation of the joint capsule, impaired muscular stabilization, reduced range of motion and functional disability. High-intensity laser therapy (HILT) involves higher-intensity laser radiation and causes minor and slow light absorption by chromophores. Light stimulation of the deep structures, due to high intensity laser therapy, activates cell metabolism through photochemical effect. The transmissions of pain stimulus are slowed down and result in a quick achievement of pain relief. The aim of our research was to investigate the prompt analgesic effect of HILT on patients with KOA. Knee radiographs were performed on all patients and consequently graded using the Kellgren-Lawrence grading scale (K/L). A group of 96 patients (75 female, 21 male, mean age 59.2) with K/L 2 and 3 were submitted to HILT therapy. Pain intensity was evaluated with visual analogue scale (VAS) before and after the treatment. HILT consisted in one daily application, over a period of ten days, using protocol wavelength, frequency and duration. The results showed statistically significant decrease in VAS after the treatment (p < 0.001). Considering these results, HILT enables prompt analgesic effects in KOA treatment. Therefore HILT is a reliable option in KOA physical therapy. PMID:22220431

  18. Design and synthesis of novel indole-chalcone fibrates as lipid lowering agents.

    PubMed

    Sashidhara, Koneni V; Dodda, Ranga Prasad; Sonkar, Ravi; Palnati, Gopala Reddy; Bhatia, Gitika

    2014-06-23

    A series of novel indole-chalcone fibrates were synthesized and their hypolipidemic activity was evaluated in triton WR-1339 induced hyperlipidemic rat model. Preliminary studies indicated that the hybrids 19, 24 and 29 exhibited potent in vitro antioxidant and significant in vivo antidyslipidemic effects. Our results suggest that these new hybrid architectures may serve as promising leads for the development of next generation lipid lowering agents. PMID:24871900

  19. A review of low-intensity ultrasound for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wood, Andrew K W; Sehgal, Chandra M

    2015-04-01

    The literature describing the use of low-intensity ultrasound in four major areas of cancer therapy-sonodynamic therapy, ultrasound-mediated chemotherapy, ultrasound-mediated gene delivery and anti-vascular ultrasound therapy-was reviewed. Each technique consistently resulted in the death of cancer cells, and the bio-effects of ultrasound were attributed primarily to thermal actions and inertial cavitation. In each therapeutic modality, theranostic contrast agents composed of microbubbles played a role in both therapy and vascular imaging. The development of these agents is important as it establishes a therapeutic-diagnostic platform that can monitor the success of anti-cancer therapy. Little attention, however, has been given either to the direct assessment of the mechanisms underlying the observed bio-effects or to the viability of these therapies in naturally occurring cancers in larger mammals; if such investigations provided encouraging data, there could be prompt application of a therapy technique in the treatment of cancer patients. PMID:25728459

  20. Impact of a Prescription Copayment Increase on Lipid Lowering Medication Adherence in Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Jalpa A.; Zhu, Jingsan; Lee, Bruce; Kimmel, Stephen; Volpp, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Background In February 2002, the VA increased copayments from $2 to $7 per 30-day drug supply of each medication for many veterans. We examined the impact of the copayment increase on lipid lowering medication adherence. Methods and Results Quasi-experimental study using electronic records of 5,604 veterans receiving care at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center from November, 1999 to April, 2004. The “All Copayment” group included veterans subject to copayments for all drugs with no annual cap. Veterans subject to copayments for drugs only if indicated for a non-service connected condition with an annual cap of $840 for out-of-pocket costs comprised the “Some Copayment” group. Veterans who remained copayment exempt formed a natural control group (“No copayment” group). Patients were identified as “adherent” if the proportion of days covered (PDC) with lipid-lowering medications was >= 80%. Patients were identified as having a “continuous gap” if they had at least one continuous episode with no lipid lowering medications for >= 90 days. A difference-indifference approach comparing changes in lipid lowering medication adherence during the 24 months pre- and post- copayment increase among veterans subject to the copayment change versus those who were not. Adherence declined in all three groups after the copayment increase. However, the percent of patients who were adherent (PDC>=80%) declined significantly more in the all copayment (-19.2%) and some copayment (-19.3%) groups relative to the exempt group (-11.9%). The incidence of a continuous gap increased significantly at twice the rate in both copayment groups (+24.6% all copayment group and 24.1% some copayment group) than the exempt group (+11.7%). Compared to the exempt group, the odds of having a continuous gap in the post- relative to the pre-period were significantly higher in both the all copayment group (OR 3.04 95% CI 2.29-4.03) and the some copayment group (OR 1.85 95% CI 1

  1. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Tumor Therapy System and Its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fucheng; He, Ye; Li, Rui

    2007-05-01

    At the end of last century, a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) tumor therapy system was successfully developed and manufactured in China, which has been already applied to clinical therapy. This article aims to discuss the HIFU therapy system and its application. Detailed research includes the following: power amplifiers for high-power ultrasound, ultrasound transducers with large apertures, accurate 3-D mechanical drives, a software control system (both high-voltage control and low-voltage control), and the B-mode ultrasonic diagnostic equipment used for treatment monitoring. Research on the dosage of ultrasound required for tumour therapy in multiple human cases has made it possible to relate a dosage formula, presented in this paper, to other significant parameters such as the volume of thermal tumor solidification, the acoustic intensity (I), and the ultrasound emission time (tn). Moreover, the HIFU therapy system can be applied to the clinical treatment of both benign and malignant tumors in the pelvic and abdominal cavity, such as uterine fibroids, liver cancer and pancreatic carcinoma.

  2. An arc-sequencing algorithm for intensity modulated arc therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, D. M.; Cao, D.; Afghan, M. K. N.; Earl, M. A.

    2007-02-15

    Intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is an intensity modulated radiation therapy delivery technique originally proposed as an alternative to tomotherapy. IMAT uses a series of overlapping arcs to deliver optimized intensity patterns from each beam direction. The full potential of IMAT has gone largely unrealized due in part to a lack of robust and commercially available inverse planning tools. To address this, we have implemented an IMAT arc-sequencing algorithm that translates optimized intensity maps into deliverable IMAT plans. The sequencing algorithm uses simulated annealing to simultaneously optimize the aperture shapes and weights throughout each arc. The sequencer enforces the delivery constraints while minimizing the discrepancies between the optimized and sequenced intensity maps. The performance of the algorithm has been tested for ten patient cases (3 prostate, 3 brain, 2 head-and-neck, 1 lung, and 1 pancreas). Seven coplanar IMAT plans were created using an average of 4.6 arcs and 685 monitor units. Additionally, three noncoplanar plans were created using an average of 16 arcs and 498 monitor units. The results demonstrate that the arc sequencer can provide efficient and highly conformal IMAT plans. An average sequencing time of approximately 20 min was observed.

  3. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy: an Overview for Radiologists

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-sun; Choi, Min Joo; Lim, Hyo Keun; Choi, Dongil

    2008-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound therapy is a novel, emerging, therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves, propagated through tissue media, as carriers of energy. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation as well as hemostasis, thrombolysis and targeted drug/gene delivery. However, the application of this technology still has many drawbacks. It is expected that current obstacles to implementation will be resolved in the near future. In this review, we provide an overview of high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy from the basic physics to recent clinical studies with an interventional radiologist's perspective for the purpose of improving the general understanding of this cutting-edge technology as well as speculating on future developments. PMID:18682666

  4. [Insulin therapy and parenteral nutrition in intensive care: practical aspects].

    PubMed

    Limonta, A; Gastaldi, G; Heidegger, C P; Pichard, C

    2015-03-25

    Critically ill patients are hypercatabolic due to stress and inflammation. This condition induces hyperglycemia. Muscle wasting is intense during critical illness. Its prevention is essential. This is possible by early and appropriate nutritional support. Preserving the function of the gastrointestinal tract with enteral nutrition is the gold standard. However, when targeted protein-caloric intake is not met through enteral nutrition within the first three days in the intensive care unit (ICU), supplemental parenteral nutrition is administered to reduce morbidity and mortality. In addition, in order to limit metabolic imbalance and reduce mortality, glycemic control using insulin therapy is mandatory. This article reviews the current understanding of parenteral nutrition and insulin therapy in ICU patients, and provides the decision model applied in our institution. PMID:26027204

  5. Optimizing antibiotic therapy in the intensive care unit setting

    PubMed Central

    Kollef, Marin H

    2001-01-01

    Antibiotics are one of the most common therapies administered in the intensive care unit setting. In addition to treating infections, antibiotic use contributes to the emergence of resistance among pathogenic microorganisms. Therefore, avoiding unnecessary antibiotic use and optimizing the administration of antimicrobial agents will help to improve patient outcomes while minimizing further pressures for resistance. This review will present several strategies aimed at achieving optimal use of antimicrobial agents. It is important to note that each intensive care unit should have a program in place which monitors antibiotic utilization and its effectiveness. Only in this way can the impact of interventions aimed at improving antibiotic use (e.g. antibiotic rotation, de-escalation therapy) be evaluated at the local level. PMID:11511331

  6. Oxygen therapy in neonatal intensive care units in Khartoum State

    PubMed Central

    Omer, Ilham M; Ibrahim, Nada G; Nasr, Abdalhalim M A

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is a drug that is essential in the treatment and prevention of neonatal hypoxia. The goal of oxygen therapy is to deliver sufficient oxygen to tissues while minimizing oxygen toxicity and oxidative stress. Improvement in monitoring technology of oxygen therapy has helped to improve clinicians’ ability to appropriately apply and deliver oxygen. The objectives of this prospective observational descriptive hospital based study were: to evaluate the practice of oxygen therapy in the neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in Khartoum State, to identify guidelines of oxygen therapy in NICUs, to determine the mode of oxygen delivery to the neonates, and to assess the practice of long term follow up of patients who used oxygen. During the period January – June 2014, 139 neonates were included. Oxygen was delivered to the neonates in the study depending on the clinical assessment. Saturation was not measured at the time of oxygen administration in 119 (85.6%) neonates. Oxygen was delivered by central device in 135 neonates (97.1%). The majority of the staff did not know the practice of long-term follow up. Hundred and sixteen (83.5%) of the nursing staff knew that oxygen has complications but the majority didn’t know the nature of the complications and what causes them. The study showed that there is lack of guidelines of oxygen therapy in the NICUs and lack of monitoring procedures, which is important to be highlighted to overcome the complications and to improve the practice of oxygen therapy.

  7. Optimization, delivery and evaluation of intensity modulated arc therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Michael R.

    Intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is a radiation therapy technique whereby the shape of the cone beam of radiation changes as it rotates around the patient. This is in contrast to other more commonly delivered forms of advanced radiation therapy, Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) or helical tomotherapy. IMRT is a radiation technique where a patient is treated with a cone beam of radiation from a number of fixed beam directions, where the shapes and weights of the radiation beams are varied and tomotherapy is treated with a fan beam of radiation that follows a helical trajectory. In this thesis two aspects of IMAT were investigated: optimization of treatment plans and delivery of plans in conjunction with and without respiratory motion management. Optimization of IMAT deliveries consisted of two studies. In the first study, an algorithm that uses dosimetric ray tracing to set multi-leaf collimator (MLC) positions then directly optimizes the MLC positions to create IMAT treatment plans with only beam shape variations was developed and tested in three phantom studies and a clinical case. The second study investigated variable angular dose rate deliveries to a concave target and assessed the optimization strategy including arc initialization strategy, angular sampling and delivery efficiency. IMAT delivery with and without respiratory gated radiation delivery was studied with dose measurement using radiographic film in a motion phantom. In addition, simulations based on delivered log files were used to confirm that motion management for IMAT is effective and within dosimetric tolerances. As a pilot test, plans from IMRT and tomotherapy for partial breast irradiation were first studied, comparing them to conventional treatments. An IMAT plan was generated for one patient, demonstrating feasibility and was compared with IMRT and tomotherapy. This thesis has introduced a new IMAT optimization algorithm with and without variable angular dose rate, applied

  8. Monitoring the use of lipid-lowering medication among persons with newly diagnosed diabetes: a nationwide register-based study

    PubMed Central

    Vehko, Tuulikki; Sund, Reijo; Arffman, Martti; Manderbacka, Kristiina; Ilanne-Parikka, Pirjo; Keskimäki, Ilmo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To develop a register-based monitoring system to provide information on the use of lipid-lowering medication among persons with diabetes in different patient groups and by socioeconomic position. Design Longitudinal and register-based, before and after diabetes diagnosis. Setting Finnish population. Participants A total of 121 053 persons aged 30–79 years with a new diagnosis of diabetes during 2000–2006. The annual cohorts were divided at the time of diabetes diagnosis by coronary heart disease (CHD) status. Primary and secondary outcome measures Lipid-lowering medication purchases after diabetes diagnosis and prior to the diagnosis. Results According to the health insurance reimbursement data the use of lipid-lowering medication advanced rapidly among people with diabetes in the early 2000s in Finland. Of the patients diagnosed with diabetes in 2000 only one-fourth used lipid-lowering medication in 6–12 months after their diagnosis. For those diagnosed in 2006, the utilization rate was 46%. Among those with a history of CHD the use of medication was markedly higher; 51–58% in 2000 and 77–79% in 2006. Taking into account the increasing trend and measuring the independent effect of the diagnosis of diabetes on lipid-lowering medication, setting the diagnosis increased the use by 10–50%. Despite increasing overall utilisation rates, socioeconomic difference in the use of lipid-lowering medication remained throughout the study period. In particular, the lowest income quintile differed from other income groups and in 2006 its use of lipid-lowering medication remained approximately 10% points lower compared with the overall level. Conclusions The lipid-lowering medication is being applied in an increasing population of new diabetes cases; however, modelling the independent effect of the diagnosis of diabetes on lipid-lowering medication shows that the diagnosis increased use, but did not abolish socioeconomic differences. PMID:24189078

  9. PCSK9 inhibitors: an overview on a new promising lipid-lowering therapy.

    PubMed

    Denegri, Andrea; Petrova-Slater, Iveta; Pasotti, Elena; Rossi, Maria Grazia; Pedrazzini, Giovanni Battista; Moccetti, Tiziano; Moccetti, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by cholesterol deposition in the arterial intima, with subsequent plaque formation and arterial disease. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) plays the most important role in the atherogenesis process, which is the substrate of cardiovascular disease and is the leading cause of death worldwide. Several studies show that a strict control of risk factors, particularly the reduction of LDL-C levels, is a cornerstone in primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. Statins are currently the most effective drugs for lowering LDL-C, but the discovery of proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 (PCSK9) has opened up new therapeutic options in lipid management. PCSK9 reduces LDL-receptors' recycling resulting in a decrease of LDL-C receptors on the surface of hepatocytes and an increase of LDL-C levels in plasma. Obviously, inhibition of PCSK9 has been associated with an increase of LDL-C receptors with subsequent lowering of plasma levels of LDL-C. The clinical development of monoclonal antibodies against PCSK9 has been achieved through phase I and II studies, and nowadays there are many ongoing phase III trials with promising preliminary results. The aim of this review is to update the evidence for PCSK9 monoclonal antibodies, such as evolocumab, alirocumab and bococizumab, in LDL-C management and to discuss their therapeutic perspectives based on the most recent clinical studies, with attention to side-effects. PMID:26855411

  10. Lipid-lowering therapy using statins in patients with cardiovascular risk in clinical practice in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Silaruks, Songkwan; Sriratanasathavorn, Charn; Rawdaree, Petch; Kunjara-Na-Ayudhaya, Rapeephon; Thinkhamrop, Bandit; Sritara, Piyamitr

    2011-01-01

    Background Since the release in Thailand in 2001 of the Third Guidelines by the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults or the Adult Treatment Panel (ATP III), there have been no nationwide studies on the proportion of dyslipidaemic patients who have achieved the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) goals. The authors therefore aimed to estimate the percentage achievement of LDL-C goals based on the modified NCEP ATP III guidelines in intermediate- to high-risk patients. Methods The authors conducted a hospital-based, cross-sectional, epidemiological survey. Patients (1240) were selected consecutively from 50 hospitals across Thailand. Patients were included if they had been treated with statins for at least 3 months. Results Two-thirds were female, and the mean age was 61.7±9.5 years. The median duration of statin treatment was 21 months. Half (633/ 1240) of the patients achieved the LDL-C goal levels as defined by the NCEP guidelines (51.1%, 95% CI 48.3% to 53.8%). The very-high-risk group had the lowest percentage achievement (11.6%; 95% CI 1.6% to 21.6%), compared with 54.2% (95% CI 50.9% to 57.4%) for the high-risk group and 47.0% (95% CI 41.1% to 52.8%) for the moderate-risk group. More males achieved the LDL-C goals than females (55.6% vs 48.9%; p=0.029). Conclusions Overall, 51.1% of the patients with cardiovascular risk, on statins treatment, achieved the NCEP ATP III LDL-C goal levels. PMID:27326004

  11. Drug interactions with lipid-lowering drugs: mechanisms and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Neuvonen, Pertti J; Niemi, Mikko; Backman, Janne T

    2006-12-01

    Lipid-lowering drugs, especially 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A inhibitors (statins), are widely used in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerotic disease. The benefits of statins are well documented. However, lipid-lowering drugs may cause myopathy, even rhabdomyolysis, the risk of which is increased by certain interactions. Simvastatin, lovastatin, and atorvastatin are metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 (simvastatin acid is also metabolized by CYP2C8); their plasma concentrations and risk of myotoxicity are greatly increased by strong inhibitors of CYP3A4 (eg, itraconazole and ritonavir). Weak or moderately potent CYP3A4 inhibitors (eg, verapamil and diltiazem) can be used cautiously with small doses of CYP3A4-dependent statins. Cerivastatin is metabolized by CYP2C8 and CYP3A4, and fluvastatin is metabolized by CYP2C9. The exposure to fluvastatin is increased by less than 2-fold by inhibitors of CYP2C9. Pravastatin, rosuvastatin, and pitavastatin are excreted mainly unchanged, and their plasma concentrations are not significantly increased by pure CYP3A4 inhibitors. Cyclosporine (INN, ciclosporin) inhibits CYP3A4, P-glycoprotein (multidrug resistance protein 1), organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1), and some other hepatic uptake transporters. Gemfibrozil and its glucuronide inhibit CYP2C8 and OATP1B1. These effects of cyclosporine and gemfibrozil explain the increased plasma statin concentrations and, together with pharmacodynamic factors, the increased risk of myotoxicity when coadministered with statins. Inhibitors of OATP1B1 may decrease the benefit/risk ratio of statins by interfering with their entry into hepatocytes, the site of action. Lipid-lowering drugs can be involved also in other interactions, including those between enzyme inducers and CYP3A4 substrate statins, as well as those between gemfibrozil and CYP2C8 substrate antidiabetics. Knowledge of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of lipid-lowering

  12. Lipid-lowering polyketides from a soft coral-derived fungus Cladosporium sp. TZP29.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Meilin; Gao, Huquan; Wu, Chongming; Zhu, Tianjiao; Che, Qian; Gu, Qianqun; Guo, Peng; Li, Dehai

    2015-09-01

    Two new C12 polyketides, cladospolides E and F (1 and 2), together with four known derivatives seco-patulolides A and C (3 and 4), 11-hydroxy-γ-dodecalactone (5) and iso-cladospolide B (6), were isolated from a soft coral-derived fungus Cladosporium sp. TZP-29. Their structures, including the absolute configurations, were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis, modified Mosher's method, and the analysis of their biogenesis. All compounds were non-cytotoxic while compounds 1 and 3-5 showed potent lipid-lowering activity in HepG2 hepatocytes. PMID:26169125

  13. Advances in endonasal low intensity laser irradiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jian-Ling; Liu, Timon C.; Liu, Jiang; Cui, Li-Ping; Liu, Song-hao

    2005-07-01

    Endonasal low intensity laser therapy (ELILT) began in China in 1998. Now in China it is widely applied to treat hyperlipidemia and brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, insomnia, poststroke depression, intractable headache, ache in head or face, cerebral thrombosis, acute ischemic cerebrovascular disease, migraine, brain lesion and mild cognitive impairment. There are four pathways mediating EILILT, Yangming channel, autonomic nervous systems and blood cells. Two unhealth acupoints of Yangming channal inside nose might mediate the one as is low intensity laser acupuncture. Unbalance autonomic nervous systems might be modulated. Blood cells might mediate the one as is intravascular low intensity laser therapy. These three pathways are integrated in ELILT so that serum amyloid β protein, malformation rate of erythrocyte, CCK-8, the level of viscosity at lower shear rates and hematocrit, or serum lipid might decrease, and melanin production/SOD activity or β endorphin might increase after ELILT treatment. These results indicate ELILT might work, but it need to be verified by randomized placebo-controlled trial.

  14. Effect of media milling on lipid-lowering and antioxidant activities of chitosan.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Xia, Wenshui

    2015-01-01

    The effect of media milling on lipid-lowering and antioxidant activities of chitosan was studied in rats fed high-fat diets. Results showed that media-milled chitosan was more effective than chitosan in reducing body weight gain and liver fat accumulation of rats. Compared with chitosan, the reducing effects of media-milled chitosan on serum triacylglycerol (TG), total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) were increased by 10.1, 7.5 and 10.2%, and liver TG and TC-reducing effects were increased by 16.2 and 14.6%, respectively. Rats fed media-milled chitosan showed decreased levels of free fatty acid (FFA) and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. The cholesterol and fat in feces of rats fed media-milled chitosan were higher than those of rats fed chitosan. These results suggested media milling enhanced the lipid-lowering and antioxidant activities of chitosan, and the reason might be partly due to its effect on strengthening the ability of chitosan in promoting fecal lipid excretions. PMID:25450554

  15. Effect of lipid-lowering and anti-hypertensive drugs on plasma homocysteine levels

    PubMed Central

    Dierkes, Jutta; Luley, Claus; Westphal, Sabine

    2007-01-01

    Elevated plasma concentrations of homocysteine, a sulfur-containing amino acid, are a risk factor for coronary, cerebral and peripheral artery disease. Next to other factors, drugs used for the prevention or treatment of cardiovascular disease may modulate plasma homocysteine levels. Thus, a drug induced homocysteine increase may counteract the desired cardioprotective effect. The aim is to summarize the current knowledge on the effect of two important classes of drugs, lipid-lowering drugs and anti-hypertensive drugs, on homocysteine metabolism. Among the lipid-lowering drugs, especially the fibric acid derivatives, which are used for treatment of hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL-cholesterol, are associated with an increase of homocysteine by 20%–50%. This increase can be reduced, but not totally avoided by the addition of folic acid, vitamin B12 and B6 to fibrates. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) do not influence homocysteine concentrations substantially. The effects of nicotinic acid and n3-fatty acids on the homocysteine concentrations are less clear, more studies are necessary to clarify their influence on homocysteine. Antihypertensive drugs have also been studied with respect to homocysteine metabolism. A homocysteine increase has been shown after treatment with hydrochlorothiazide, a lowering was observed after treatment with ß-blockers, but no effect with ACE-inhibitors. The clinical significance of the homocysteine elevation by fibrates and thiazides is not clear. However, individual patients use these drugs for long time, indicating that even moderate increases may be important. PMID:17583180

  16. Randomized trial comparing exercise therapy, alternating cold and hot therapy, and low intensity laser therapy for chronic lumbar muscle strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoguang; Li, Jie; Liu, Timon Chengyi; Yuan, Jianqin; Luo, Qingming

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of exercise therapy, alternating cold and hot (ACH) therapy and low intensity laser (LIL) therapy in patients with chronic lumbar muscle strain (CLMS). Thirty-two patients were randomly allocated to four groups: exercise group, ACH group, LIL group, and combination group of exercise, ACH and LIL, eight in each group. Sixteen treatments were given over the course of 4 weeks. Lumbar muscle endurance, flexion and lateral flexion measures, visual analogue scale (VAS) and lumbar disability questionnaire (LDQ) were used in the clinical and functional evaluations before, immediately after, and 4 weeks after treatment. It was found that the values of endurance, VAS and LDQ in all groups were significantly improved from before to after treatment (P < 0.01). The combination group showed significantly larger reduction on pain level and functional disability than the other groups immediately and 4 weeks after treatment (P < 0.01). Pain level reduced significantly more in the ACH group than in the exercise group or the LIL group immediately and 4 weeks after treatment (P < 0.05). Lumbar muscle endurance and spinal ranges of motion in all groups were improved after treatment but there was no significant difference between any therapy groups. In conclusion, exercise therapy, ACH therapy and LIL therapy were effective in the treatment of CLMS. ACH therapy was more effective than exercise therapy or LIL therapy. The combination therapy of exercise, ACH and LIL had still better rehabilitative effects on CLMS.

  17. Segmentation and leaf sequencing for intensity modulated arc therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gladwish, Adam; Oliver, Mike; Craig, Jeff; Chen, Jeff; Bauman, Glenn; Fisher, Barbara; Wong, Eugene

    2007-05-15

    A common method in generating intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans consists of a three step process: an optimized fluence intensity map (IM) for each beam is generated via inverse planning, this IM is then segmented into discrete levels, and finally, the segmented map is translated into a set of MLC apertures via a leaf sequencing algorithm. To date, limited work has been done on this approach as it pertains to intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT), specifically in regards to the latter two steps. There are two determining factors that separate IMAT segmentation and leaf sequencing from their IMRT equivalents: (1) the intrinsic 3D nature of the intensity maps (standard 2D maps plus the angular component), and (2) that the dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) constraints be met using a minimum number of arcs. In this work, we illustrate a technique to create an IMAT plan that replicates Tomotherapy deliveries by applying IMAT specific segmentation and leaf-sequencing algorithms to Tomotherapy output sinograms. We propose and compare two alternative segmentation techniques, a clustering method, and a bottom-up segmentation method (BUS). We also introduce a novel IMAT leaf-sequencing algorithm that explicitly takes leaf movement constraints into consideration. These algorithms were tested with 51 angular projections of the output leaf-open sinograms generated on the Hi-ART II treatment planning system (Tomotherapy Inc.). We present two geometric phantoms and 2 clinical scenarios as sample test cases. In each case 12 IMAT plans were created, ranging from 2 to 7 intensity levels. Half were generated using the BUS segmentation and half with the clustering method. We report on the number of arcs produced as well as differences between Tomotherapy output sinograms and segmented IMAT intensity maps. For each case one plan for each segmentation method is chosen for full Monte Carlo dose calculation (NumeriX LLC) and dose volume histograms (DVH) are calculated

  18. Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Indonesian Subjects with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors Who Were Not Receiving Lipid-Lowering Agents.

    PubMed

    Kaligis, Rinambaan W M; Adiarto, Suko; Nugroho, Johanes; Pradnyana, Bagus Ari; Lefi, Achmad; Rifqi, Sodiqur

    2016-09-01

    Carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) is frequently utilized for detection of subclinical atherosclerosis. This study aims to investigate the association between the CIMT values and demographic characteristics, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, lipid biochemistry profiles, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels among the Indonesian population. Subjects who had two or more CVD risk factors but were not receiving lipid-lowering therapy were recruited from six hospitals of Indonesia. Measurements of CIMT are obtained by ultrasonography of 12 sites within the common carotid artery. CVD risk factors, lipid and glucose profiles, and hs-CRP values were analyzed with respect to distribution of CIMT. The mean-max CIMT was 0.805 ± 0.190 mm (minimum, 0.268 mm; maximum, 1.652 mm) and the mean-mean CIMT was 0.614 ± 0.190 mm (minimum, 0.127 mm; maximum, 1.388 mm). Multivariate analyses confirmed an independent association between increasing CIMT and increasing age (regression coefficient = 0.004; p = 0.004). Our data show normative mean-mean CIMT data for Indonesian subjects with two or more CVD risk factors who are not receiving lipid-lowering therapy, which may guide CVD risk stratification of asymptomatic individuals in Indonesia. PMID:27574385

  19. Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy for Pediatric Posterior Fossa Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Beltran, Chris; Gray, Jonathan; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To compare intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) to noncoplanar intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of pediatric posterior fossa tumors. Methods and Materials: Nine pediatric patients with posterior fossa tumors, mean age 9 years (range, 6-15 years), treated using IMRT were chosen for this comparative planning study because of their tumor location. Each patient's treatment was replanned to receive 54 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) using five different methods: eight-field noncoplanar IMRT, single coplanar IMAT, double coplanar IMAT, single noncoplanar IMAT, and double noncoplanar IMAT. For each method, the dose to 95% of the PTV was held constant, and the doses to surrounding critical structures were minimized. The different plans were compared based on conformity, total linear accelerator dose monitor units, and dose to surrounding normal tissues, including the entire body, whole brain, temporal lobes, brainstem, and cochleae. Results: The doses to the target and critical structures for the various IMAT methods were not statistically different in comparison with the noncoplanar IMRT plan, with the following exceptions: the cochlear doses were higher and whole brain dose was lower for coplanar IMAT plans; the cochleae and temporal lobe doses were lower and conformity increased for noncoplanar IMAT plans. The advantage of the noncoplanar IMAT plan was enhanced by doubling the treatment arc. Conclusion: Noncoplanar IMAT results in superior treatment plans when compared to noncoplanar IMRT for the treatment of posterior fossa tumors. IMAT should be considered alongside IMRT when treatment of this site is indicated.

  20. Prone Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: 5-Year Results

    SciTech Connect

    Osa, Etin-Osa O.; DeWyngaert, Keith; Roses, Daniel; Speyer, James; Guth, Amber; Axelrod, Deborah; Fenton Kerimian, Maria; Goldberg, Judith D.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a technique of prone breast radiation therapy delivered by a regimen of accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concurrent boost to the tumor bed. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2006, 404 patients with stage I-II breast cancer were prospectively enrolled into 2 consecutive protocols, institutional trials 03-30 and 05-181, that used the same regimen of 40.5 Gy/15 fractions delivered to the index breast over 3 weeks, with a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy (total dose 48 Gy). All patients were treated after segmental mastectomy and had negative margins and nodal assessment. Patients were set up prone: only if lung or heart volumes were in the field was a supine setup attempted and chosen if found to better spare these organs. Results: Ninety-two percent of patients were treated prone, 8% supine. Seventy-two percent had stage I, 28% stage II invasive breast cancer. In-field lung volume ranged from 0 to 228.27 cm{sup 3}, mean 19.65 cm{sup 3}. In-field heart volume for left breast cancer patients ranged from 0 to 21.24 cm{sup 3}, mean 1.59 cm{sup 3}. There was no heart in the field for right breast cancer patients. At a median follow-up of 5 years, the 5-year cumulative incidence of isolated ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was 0.82% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.65%-1.04%). The 5-year cumulative incidence of regional recurrence was 0.53% (95% CI 0.41%-0.69%), and the 5-year overall cumulative death rate was 1.28% (95% CI 0.48%-3.38%). Eighty-two percent (95% CI 77%-85%) of patients judged their final cosmetic result as excellent/good. Conclusions: Prone accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concomitant boost results in excellent local control and optimal sparing of heart and lung, with good cosmesis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 1005, a phase 3, multi-institutional, randomized trial is ongoing and is evaluating the equivalence of a similar dose and

  1. Influence Of Low Intensity Laser Therapy On Diabetic Polyneuropathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Raoof, N. A.; Elnhas, N. G.; Elsayed, I. M.

    2011-09-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a consequence of diabetes-mediated impairment of blood flow, and resultant hypoxia of nerves that may develop within 10 years of the onset of diabetes in 40-50% of people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Low Intensity Laser Therapy (LILT) has been advocated for the treatment of chronic pain disorders as blood flow is an important determinant for pain relief. Comparing the effect of Helium-Neon Laser therapy versus Infrared laser therapy on blood vessels diameter and flow as well as level of sensation for neuropathy. Twenty diabetic patients suffering from neuropathy were enrolled in the study with age 45-55 years. They were assigned randomly into two equal groups in number; Group A underwent an application of He-Neon laser while Group B underwent an application of Infrared laser. Both groups received laser for 2 months. Blood flow velocity, and blood vessel diameter were investigated by using duplex Doppler ultrasound and peripheral neuropathy parameters were investigated by Semmes-Weinstein monofilament assessment. The results revealed that He-Neon laser as well as Infrared laser groups showed significant improvement in blood flow velocity, blood vessel diameter & neuropathy tested parameters after treatment but there was no significance difference between the two types of LILT. LILT is a safe, non-invasive and drug free method for improving blood flow & sensation in patients suffering from diabetic polyneuropathy in addition to preventing one of the most threatening microvascular complications of diabetes.

  2. Bamboo Leaf Flavones and Tea Polyphenols Show a Lipid-lowering Effect in a Rat Model of Hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Yang, C; Yifan, L; Dan, L; Qian, Y; Ming-yan, J

    2015-12-01

    At present, most of the lipid-lowering drugs are western medicines, which have a lot of adverse reactions. Zhucha, an age-old Uyghur medicine, is made up of bamboo leaves and tea (green tea), which has good efficacy and lipid-lowering effect. The purpose of this study was to undertake a pharmacodynamic examination of the optimal proportions of bamboo leaf flavones and tea polyphenols required to achieve lipid lowering in rats. A hyperlipidemia rat model was used to examine the lipid lowering effects of bamboo leaf flavones and tea polyphenols. Wistar rats were divided into 13 groups including one hyperlipidemia model group and 2 positive drug groups as well as experimental groups (9 groups dosed with different proportions of bamboo leaf flavones and tea polyphenols, the 3 dosages of bamboo leaf flavones were 75 mg/kg/d, 50 mg/kg/d and 25 mg/kg/d respectively, the 3 dosages of tea polyphenol were 750 mg/kg/d, 500 mg/kg/d and 250 mg/kg/d). The weight, the levels of triglyceride (TG) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) were determined. A high dose of bamboo leaf flavones (75 mg/kg/d) combined with a medium dose of tea polyphenols (500 mg/kg/d) was deemed to be optimal for achieving a lipid-lowering effect, the weight had the smallest increase and the level of TG and HDL was similar to positive control. The bamboo leaf flavones and tea polyphenols were mixed according to a certain proportion (1:6.7), and the mixture achieved a lipid-lowering effect and might prove to be useful as a natural lipid-lowering agent. PMID:25970469

  3. Comparison of intensity modulated x-ray therapy and intensity modulated proton therapy for selective subvolume boosting: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, R. T.; Barbee, D. L.; Mackie, T. R.; Jeraj, R.

    2007-10-01

    Selective subvolume boosting can theoretically improve tumour control probability while maintaining normal tissue complication probabilities similar to those of uniform dose distributions. In this work the abilities of intensity-modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT) and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) to deliver boosts to multiple subvolumes of varying size and proximities are compared in a thorough phantom study. IMXT plans were created using the step-and-shoot (IMXT-SAS) and helical tomotherapy (IMXT-HT) methods. IMPT plans were created with the spot scanning (IMPT-SS) and distal gradient tracking (IMPT-DGT) methods. IMPT-DGT is a generalization of the distal edge tracking method designed to reduce the number of proton beam spots required to deliver non-uniform dose distributions relative to IMPT-SS. The IMPT methods were delivered over both 180° and 360° arcs. The IMXT-SAS and IMPT-SS methods optimally satisfied the non-uniform dose prescriptions the least and the most, respectively. The IMPT delivery methods reduced the normal tissue integral dose by a factor of about 2 relative to the IMXT delivery methods, regardless of the delivery arc. The IMPT-DGT method reduced the number of proton beam spots by a factor of about 3 relative to the IMPT-SS method.

  4. Clinical Implementation of Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Thoracic Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joe Y.; Li, Heng; Zhu, X. Ronald; Liao, Zhongxing; Zhao, Lina; Liu, Amy; Li, Yupeng; Sahoo, Narayan; Poenisch, Falk; Gomez, Daniel R.; Wu, Richard; Gillin, Michael; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) can improve dose conformality and better spare normal tissue over passive scattering techniques, but range uncertainties complicate its use, particularly for moving targets. We report our early experience with IMPT for thoracic malignancies in terms of motion analysis and management, plan optimization and robustness, and quality assurance. Methods and Materials: Thirty-four consecutive patients with lung/mediastinal cancers received IMPT to a median 66 Gy(relative biological equivalence [RBE]). All patients were able to undergo definitive radiation therapy. IMPT was used when the treating physician judged that IMPT conferred a dosimetric advantage; all patients had minimal tumor motion (<5 mm) and underwent individualized tumor-motion dose-uncertainty analysis and 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomographic (CT)-based treatment simulation and motion analysis. Plan robustness was optimized by using a worst-case scenario method. All patients had 4D CT repeated simulation during treatment. Results: IMPT produced lower mean lung dose (MLD), lung V{sub 5} and V{sub 20}, heart V{sub 40}, and esophageal V{sub 60} than did IMRT (P<.05) and lower MLD, lung V{sub 20}, and esophageal V{sub 60} than did passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT) (P<.05). D{sub 5} to the gross tumor volume and clinical target volume was higher with IMPT than with intensity modulated radiation therapy or PSPT (P<.05). All cases were analyzed for beam-angle-specific motion, water-equivalent thickness, and robustness. Beam angles were chosen to minimize the effect of respiratory motion and avoid previously treated regions, and the maximum deviation from the nominal dose-volume histogram values was kept at <5% for the target dose and met the normal tissue constraints under a worst-case scenario. Patient-specific quality assurance measurements showed that a median 99% (range, 95% to 100%) of the pixels met the 3% dose/3 mm distance criteria for the

  5. Basic studies on intravascular low-intensity laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Duan, Rui; Wang, Shuang-Xi; Liu, Jiang; Cui, Li-Ping; Jin, Hua; Liu, Song-Hao

    2006-09-01

    Intravascular low intensity laser therapy (ILILT) was originally put forward in USA in 1982, but popularized in Russia in 1980s and in China in 1990s, respectively. A randomized placebo-controlled study has shown ILILT clinical efficacy in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. As Chinese therapeutic applications of ILILT were the most widely in the world, its basic research, such as intracellular signal transduction research, blood research in vitro, animal blood research in vivo, human blood research in vivo and traditional Chinese medicine research, was also very progressive in China. Its basic studies will be reviewed in terms of the biological information model of photobiomodulation in this paper. ILILT might work in view of its basic studies, but the further randomized placebo-controlled trial and the further safety research should be done.

  6. Emotional exhaustion and defense mechanisms in intensive therapy unit nurses.

    PubMed

    Regan, Anna; Howard, Ruth A; Oyebode, Jan R

    2009-05-01

    Contrary to its original conceptualization, research has found that emotional demands do not lead to burnout in nurses. According to psychoanalytic theory, unconscious defense mechanisms may protect nurses from conscious awareness of work-related anxiety. This prevents self-report and may explain research findings. The maturity of defense style influences how anxiety is managed. Immature defenses prevent the conscious processing necessary for resolution of anxiety. Therefore, it is hypothesized that the use of immature defenses will lead to emotional exhaustion. This cross-sectional study used questionnaires to explore the defense mechanisms of 87 Intensive Therapy Unit nurses. Although the sample endorsed a predominantly mature defense style, the use of immature defenses predicted emotional exhaustion. Also, lower levels of reported stress associated with emotional demands predicted emotional exhaustion. Although this strongly implies the mediating role of immature defense mechanisms, the results were not statistically significant. PMID:19440106

  7. New Dosimetry Technologies for Imrt (intensity Modulated Radio Therapy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piermattei, A.; Cilla, S.; Pepe, D.; Grimaldi, L.; Craus, M.; Fidanzio, A.; Azario, L.; Dell'Omo, C.; Pasciuti, K.; Viola, P.

    2005-02-01

    An approach to verify the intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using an anthropomorphic phantom is reported. Step and shoot IMRT was delivered to a Rando phantom and the portal dose computed by a treatment planning system (TPS) was verified by a linear array of liquid ion-chambers. The array was calibrated in terms of dose to water, and supplies dose profiles with a spatial resolution of 1mm. In general the comparison between the experimental portal dose profiles and those computed by the TPS, is needed to detect the inaccuracy sources as the approximation of the calculation algorithms, patient positioning, linac mechanical failures as the incorrect sequences of segment beams. Using a Rando phantom the accuracy level of the TPS algorithm that supplies the portal dose was determined by the γ-index.

  8. Low Intensity Laser Therapy Applied in the Healing of Wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, Fred; Matthews, Jeffrey

    2009-06-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the outcomes of Low Intensity Laser Therapy (LILT) on wound healing for patients presenting with pain, compromised neurological and physical function and tissue damage associated with vascular/diabetic ulcerations of the lower extremity. Methods: A retrospective case review of six patients treated with LILT (GaAlAs SLD, 660 nm, 750 mW, 3.6 J/cm2; GaAlAs SLD, 840 nm, 1,500 mW, 6.48 J/cm2; GaAlAs laser, 830 nm, 75 mW, 270 J/cm2) was conducted of clinical features including pain, measured by visual analogue scale (VAS), motor function, measured by range of motion (ROM) and visual outcome, measured by wound dimensions for six patients (n = 6; 5 males, 1 female; age = 67.83 years). Results: Significant progress with regard to alleviation of pain (ΔVAS = -5), improvements in motor function (ΔROM = +40%), epithelialization (wound closure rate = 3%/week) and complete wound closure was achieved. No recurrence of pathology at least one month post cessation of therapy was evident (x¯% reduction in wound area = 100%). Conclusions: LILT achieved consistent, effective and clear endpoints, was cost effective, created no adverse effects and ultimately led to the salvage of extremities.

  9. Metabolomics approach reveals effects of antihypertensives and lipid-lowering drugs on the human metabolism.

    PubMed

    Altmaier, Elisabeth; Fobo, Gisela; Heier, Margit; Thorand, Barbara; Meisinger, Christine; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Waldenberger, Melanie; Gieger, Christian; Illig, Thomas; Adamski, Jerzy; Suhre, Karsten; Kastenmüller, Gabi

    2014-05-01

    The mechanism of antihypertensive and lipid-lowering drugs on the human organism is still not fully understood. New insights on the drugs' action can be provided by a metabolomics-driven approach, which offers a detailed view of the physiological state of an organism. Here, we report a metabolome-wide association study with 295 metabolites in human serum from 1,762 participants of the KORA F4 (Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg) study population. Our intent was to find variations of metabolite concentrations related to the intake of various drug classes and--based on the associations found--to generate new hypotheses about on-target as well as off-target effects of these drugs. In total, we found 41 significant associations for the drug classes investigated: For beta-blockers (11 associations), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (four assoc.), diuretics (seven assoc.), statins (ten assoc.), and fibrates (nine assoc.) the top hits were pyroglutamine, phenylalanylphenylalanine, pseudouridine, 1-arachidonoylglycerophosphocholine, and 2-hydroxyisobutyrate, respectively. For beta-blockers we observed significant associations with metabolite concentrations that are indicative of drug side-effects, such as increased serotonin and decreased free fatty acid levels. Intake of ACE inhibitors and statins associated with metabolites that provide insight into the action of the drug itself on its target, such as an association of ACE inhibitors with des-Arg(9)-bradykinin and aspartylphenylalanine, a substrate and a product of the drug-inhibited ACE. The intake of statins which reduce blood cholesterol levels, resulted in changes in the concentration of metabolites of the biosynthesis as well as of the degradation of cholesterol. Fibrates showed the strongest association with 2-hydroxyisobutyrate which might be a breakdown product of fenofibrate and, thus, a possible marker for the degradation of this drug in the human organism. The analysis of

  10. Lipid-lowering Activity of Natural and Semi-Synthetic Sterols and Stanols.

    PubMed

    Taha, Dhiaa A; Wasan, Ellen K; Wasan, Kishor M; Gershkovich, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of plant sterols/ stanols has long been demonstrated to reduce plasma cholesterol levels. The objective of this review is to demonstrate the lipid-lowering activity and anti-atherogenic effects of natural and semi-synthetic plant sterols/ stanols based on evidence from cell-culture studies, animal studies and clinical trials. Additionally, this review highlights certain molecular mechanisms by which plant sterols/ stanols lower plasma cholesterol levels with a special emphasis on factors that affect the cholesterol-lowering activity of plant sterols/stanols. The crystalline nature and the poor oil solubility of these natural products could be important factors that limit their cholesterol-lowering efficiency. Several attempts have been made to improve the cholesterol-lowering activity by enhancing the bioavailability of crystalline sterols and stanols. Approaches involved reduction of the crystal size and/or esterification with fatty acids from vegetable or fish oils. However, the most promising approach in this context is the chemical modification of plant sterols /stanols into water soluble disodium ascorbyl phytostanyl phosphates analogue by esterification with ascorbic acid. This novel semi-synthetic stanol derivative has improved efficacy over natural plant sterols/ stanols and can provide additional benefits by combining the cholesterol-lowering properties of plant stanols with the antioxidant potential of ascorbic acid. This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page. PMID:26626241

  11. Lipid-lowering drugs prevent neurovascular and cognitive consequences of cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Ouk, Thavarak; Amr, Gilles; Azzaoui, Richard; Delassus, Laëtitia; Fossaert, Emilie; Tailleux, Anne; Bordet, Régis; Modine, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Inflammatory injury and hypoperfusion following cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) are associated with potential brain injury in relationship between CPB, memory impairment, changes in cerebral vascular reactivity and both systemic and cerebral inflammatory reaction. The objective of this study was to assess the preventive effect of a pretreatment with simvastatin or fenofibrate on neurovascular and cognitive consequences of CPB. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated by control diet, simvastatin 10mg/kg/day or fenofibrate 200mg/kg/day for 14days before CPB surgery and were sacrificed immediately after surgery or 24h later. Cognitive function, vascular reactivity, neuronal counts in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal regions, and inflammatory markers were assessed. CPB induced memory impairment and endothelial dysfunction 24h after surgery associated with neuronal loss. Neuronal loss was reduced by simvastatin or fenofibrate treatment in parallel to memory alteration prevention. Pretreatment by simvastatin and fenofibrate prevented CPB-induced endothelial dysfunction. CPB led to early and marked release of TNFα and overexpression of ICAM-1. Both inflammatory marker expression was decreased in the pretreated groups by lipid-lowering drugs. In a rat model of CPB, we demonstrated that simvastatin and fenofibrate protected against CPB-induced endothelial dysfunction, cerebral and systemic inflammation in parallel to memory impairment prevention. PMID:26779598

  12. [Cholesterol goal attainment with lipid lowering drugs. The COMETA Mexico Trial].

    PubMed

    Meaney, Eduardo; Vela, Agustín; Ramos, Alma; Alemao, Evo; Yin, Donald

    2004-01-01

    In a retrospective study to determine rate of patients attaining therapeutic LDL-C goal values with lipid-lowering drugs, 20 specialists and general practitioners were selected who enrolled 120 patients whose lipids were measured after at least 12 weeks of treatment. They were grouped in three categories: group A (absolute risk of CHD in 10 years <10%); group B, with 10-20% risk, and group C, with >20% risk. Goal LDL-C values were <160 mg/dL for group A, <130 for group B, and <100 for group C. Mean age was 57 +/- 12 years, 59% were males, and 51% were in group C; 83% took statins, 12% fibrates alone, and 5%, combinations. Atorvastatin and simvastatin were the most used drugs, at medium doses (mean 12 and 27 mg/day). LDL-C was reduced 25%; overall, 22% of patient doses were adjusted. Therapeutic goals were attained in 29% with initial doses and 42% at the end of study. Goal values were better attained in groups with lower risk. No differences were noticed among distinct physician categories. Data show poor compliance with international guidelines and insufficient attainment of therapeutic goals. PMID:15559229

  13. Lipid lowering effects of iodothyronines: In vivo and in vitro studies on rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Vergani, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is emerging as one of the most common liver diseases, leading to the increasing interest for new therapeutic approaches for its treatment. NAFLD primarily depends on a hypercaloric and/or unbalanced diet leading to overweight and obesity. The liver, in fact, plays a central role in lipid metabolism by importing free fatty acids from the blood and synthesizing, storing, oxidizing and exporting lipids. Furthermore, the liver is the target for the thyroid hormones, thyroxine (T4) and 3,3’,5-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3), that stimulate the basal metabolic rate and lead to body weight loss. In the last decade, other iodothyronines have been shown to possess biological relevance and play some thyromimetic activities; in particular, 3,5-diiodo-L-thyronine (T2) gained large interest. The global effect of iodothyronines on liver lipid metabolism results from the balance between direct and indirect actions on the hepatocyte, leading to stimulation of lipid synthesis, oxidation and autophagy. In this review, the results so far obtained on both in vivo and in vitro models of hepatosteatosis are summarized in order to obtain an updated picture of the lipid-lowering effects of iodothyronines on mammalian liver. PMID:24799985

  14. Dosimetrically Triggered Adaptive Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Karen; Stewart, James; Kelly, Valerie; Xie, Jason; Brock, Kristy K.; Moseley, Joanne; Cho, Young-Bin; Fyles, Anthony; Lundin, Anna; Rehbinder, Henrik; Löf, Johan; Jaffray, David A.; Milosevic, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: The widespread use of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for cervical cancer has been limited by internal target and normal tissue motion. Such motion increases the risk of underdosing the target, especially as planning margins are reduced in an effort to reduce toxicity. This study explored 2 adaptive strategies to mitigate this risk and proposes a new, automated method that minimizes replanning workload. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with cervical cancer participated in a prospective clinical study and underwent pretreatment and weekly magnetic resonance (MR) scans over a 5-week course of daily external beam radiation therapy. Target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) were contoured on each of the scans. Deformable image registration was used to model the accumulated dose (the real dose delivered to the target and OARs) for 2 adaptive replanning scenarios that assumed a very small PTV margin of only 3 mm to account for setup and internal interfractional motion: (1) a preprogrammed, anatomy-driven midtreatment replan (A-IMRT); and (2) a dosimetry-triggered replan driven by target dose accumulation over time (D-IMRT). Results: Across all 30 patients, clinically relevant target dose thresholds failed for 8 patients (27%) if 3-mm margins were used without replanning. A-IMRT failed in only 3 patients and also yielded an additional small reduction in OAR doses at the cost of 30 replans. D-IMRT assured adequate target coverage in all patients, with only 23 replans in 16 patients. Conclusions: A novel, dosimetry-triggered adaptive IMRT strategy for patients with cervical cancer can minimize the risk of target underdosing in the setting of very small margins and substantial interfractional motion while minimizing programmatic workload and cost.

  15. Preoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy for retroperitoneal sarcoma.

    PubMed

    El-Bared, Nancy; Taussky, Daniel; Mehiri, Selma; Patocskai, Erika; Roberge, David; Donath, David

    2014-06-01

    The use of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has allowed for the administration of high doses to retroperitoneal sarcomas (RSTS) while limiting toxicity to adjacent organs. The purpose of our study is to assess the outcome and toxicities of patients with RSTS treated with neo-adjuvant external beam radiation (EBRT) therapy using IMRT. This is a retrospective study of 21 patients treated with preoperative IMRT for primary or recurrent RSTS between 2005 and 2011. Overall survival (OS) and local recurrence free survival (LRFS) were computed using the Kaplan-Meier method (log-rank test). Acute and chronic toxicities were assessed using the CTCAE v. 3 criteria. The actuarial 2 and 3-year OS was 66% for both and the 5-year OS was 51%. As for LRFS it was 57% at 2 and 3-year and 51% for the 5-year LRFS. Factors predictive for local control were microscopically negative margins (p = 0.022), a median tumor diameter <15 cm (p = 0.007) and pathology of liposarcoma (p = 0.021). Furthermore, patients treated for recurrent disease fared worse (p = 0.04) in local control than patients treated for primary disease. As for OS, patients treated for Grade 1 histology had a better outcome (p 5 0.05). EBRT was generally well tolerated. Acute gastrointestinal (GI) Grade 1 or 2 toxicities occurred in 33% of patients and one patient had unexplained post-radiation Grade 2 fever that resolved after tumor resection. As for chronic toxicities 24% of our patients presented Grade 1 GI toxicity and one patient presented Grade 3 small bowel stenosis not clearly due to radiation toxicity. Despite the location and volume of the tumors treated, preoperative IMRT was very well tolerated in our patients with retroperitoneal sarcoma. Unfortunately local recurrences remain common and dose escalation is to be considered. PMID:23919397

  16. Preoperative Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Retroperitoneal Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    El-Bared, Nancy; Taussky, Daniel; Mehiri, Selma; Patocskai, Erika; Roberge, David; Donath, David

    2014-01-01

    The use of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has allowed for the administration of high doses to retroperitoneal sarcomas (RSTS) while limiting toxicity to adjacent organs. The purpose of our study is to assess the outcome and toxicities of patients with RSTS treated with neo-adjuvant external beam radiation (EBRT) therapy using IMRT. This is a retrospective study of 21 patients treated with preoperative IMRT for primary or recurrent RSTS between 2005 and 2011. Overall survival (OS) and local recurrence free survival (LRFS) were computed using the Kaplan-Meier method (log-rank test). Acute and chronic toxicities were assessed using the CTCAE v. 3 criteria. The actuarial 2 and 3-year OS was 66% for both and the 5-year OS was 51%. As for LRFS it was 57% at 2 and 3-year and 51% for the 5-year LRFS. Factors predictive for local control were microscopically negative margins (p = 0.022), a median tumor diameter <5 cm (p = 0.007) and pathology of liposarcoma (p = 0.021). Furthermore, patients treated for recurrent disease fared worse (p = 0.04) in local control than patients treated for primary disease. As for OS, patients treated for Grade 1 histology had a better outcome (p = 0.05). EBRT was generally well tolerated. Acute gastrointestinal (GI) Grade 1 or 2 toxicities occurred in 33% of patients and one patient had unexplained post-radiation Grade 2 fever that resolved after tumor resection. As for chronic toxicities 24% of our patients presented Grade 1 GI toxicity and one patient presented Grade 3 small bowel stenosis not clearly due to radiation toxicity. Despite the location and volume of the tumors treated, preoperative IMRT was very well tolerated in our patients with retroperitoneal sarcoma. Unfortunately local recurrences remain common and dose escalation is to be considered. PMID:23919397

  17. Approaching oxygen-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Epel, Boris; Redler, Gage; Pelizzari, Charles; Tormyshev, Victor M.; Halpern, Howard J.

    2016-01-01

    The outcome of cancer radiation treatment is strongly correlated with tumor oxygenation. The aim of this study is to use oxygen tension distributions in tumors obtained using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) imaging to devise better tumor radiation treatment. The proposed radiation plan is delivered in two steps. In the first step, a uniform 50% tumor control dose (TCD50) is delivered to the whole tumor. For the second step an additional dose boost is delivered to radioresistant, hypoxic tumor regions. FSa fibrosarcomas grown in the gastrocnemius of the legs of C3H mice were used. Oxygen tension images were obtained using a 250 MHz pulse imager and injectable partially deuterated trityl OX63 (OX71) spin probe. Radiation was delivered with a novel animal intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) XRAD225Cx microCT/radiation therapy delivery system. In a simplified scheme for boost dose delivery, the boost area is approximated by a sphere, whose radius and position are determined using an EPR O2 image. The sphere that irradiates the largest fraction of hypoxic voxels in the tumor was chosen using an algorithm based on Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) analysis. We used the fraction of irradiated hypoxic volume as the true positive determinant and the fraction of irradiated normoxic volume as the false positive determinant in the terms of that analysis. The most efficient treatment is the one that demonstrates the shortest distance from the ROC curve to the upper left corner of the ROC plot. The boost dose corresponds to the difference between TCD90 and TCD50 values. For the control experiment an identical radiation dose to the normoxic tumor area is delivered. PMID:26782211

  18. Ultrasound-based guidance of intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, Albert Y.C. . E-mail: afung@unmc.edu; Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Djajaputra, David; Nehru, Ramasamy M.; Enke, Charles A.

    2006-04-01

    In ultrasound-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of prostate cancer, ultrasound imaging ascertains the anatomical position of patients during x-ray therapy delivery. The ultrasound transducers are made of piezoelectric ceramics. The same crystal is used for both ultrasound production and reception. Three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound devices capture and correlate series of 2-dimensional (2D) B-mode images. The transducers are often arranged in a convex array for focusing. Lower frequency reaches greater depth, but results in low resolution. For clear image, some gel is usually applied between the probe and the skin contact surface. For prostate positioning, axial and sagittal scans are performed, and the volume contours from computed tomography (CT) planning are superimposed on the ultrasound images obtained before radiation delivery at the linear accelerator. The planning volumes are then overlaid on the ultrasound images and adjusted until they match. The computer automatically deduces the offset necessary to move the patient so that the treatment area is in the correct location. The couch is translated as needed. The currently available commercial equipment can attain a positional accuracy of 1-2 mm. Commercial manufacturer designs differ in the detection of probe coordinates relative to the isocenter. Some use a position-sensing robotic arm, while others have infrared light-emitting diodes or pattern-recognition software with charge-couple-device cameras. Commissioning includes testing of image quality and positional accuracy. Ultrasound is mainly used in prostate positioning. Data for 7825 daily fractions of 234 prostate patients indicated average 3D inter-fractional displacement of about 7.8 mm. There was no perceivable trend of shift over time. Scatter plots showed slight prevalence toward superior-posterior directions. Uncertainties of ultrasound guidance included tissue inhomogeneities, speckle noise, probe pressure, and inter

  19. High Intensity Laser Therapy (HILT) versus TENS and NSAIDs in low back pain: clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zati, Allesandro; Fortuna, Damiano; Valent, A.; Filippi, M. V.; Bilotta, Teresa W.

    2004-09-01

    Low back pain, caused by lumbar disc herniation, is prevalently treated with a conservative approach. In this study we valued the efficacy of High Intensity Laser Therapy (HILT), compared with accepted therapies such as TENS and NSAIDs. Laser therapy obtained similar results in the short term, but better clinical effect over time than TENS and NSAIDs. In conclusion high intensity laser therapy appears to be a interesting new treatment, worthy of further research.

  20. Reshapable physical modulator for intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tong; Shikhaliev, Polad M; Al-Ghazi, Muthana; Molloi, Sabee

    2002-10-01

    A new method of generating beam intensity modulation filters for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is presented. The modulator was based on a reshapable material, which is not compressible but can be deformed under pressure. A two-dimensional (2D) piston array was used to repeatedly shape the attenuating material. The material is a mixture of tungsten powder and a silicon-based binder. The linear attenuation coefficient of the material was measured to be 0.409 cm(-1) for a 6 MV x-ray beam. The maximum thickness of the physical modulator is 10.2 cm, allowing a transmission of 1.5%. A 16 x 16 square piston array was used to generate a depth pattern in the deformable attenuating material. Each piston has a cross section of 6.37 x 6.37 mm2. The modulator was placed 65 cm from the radiation source of the linear accelerator in the position of the shielding tray. At this position, each piston projects to a 1.0 x 1.0 cm2 area at the isocenter, giving a treatment field of 16 x 16 cm2. The percent depth dose curve and output factor measurement show a slight beam hardening and a 1%-4% increase in scatter fraction when 2.2-4.4 cm uniform thickness filters are in the beam. The surface dose was decreased with the filter in the beam. Ion chamber and verification films were used to verify the entrance dose. The measured absolute and relative doses were compared with the calculated dose. The agreement of measurements and calculations is within 3%. In order to verify the spatial modulation of dose, 1-D dose profiles were obtained using dose calculations. Calculated and measured profiles were compared. The 20%-80% penumbra of the modulator was measured to be 5.5-10 mm. The results show that a physical modulator formed using a 16 x 16 piston array and a deformable attenuation material can provide intensity modulation for IMRT comparable with those provided by currently available commercial MLC techniques. PMID:12408295

  1. Changing practice with changing research: results of two UK national surveys of intensive insulin therapy in intensive care patients.

    PubMed

    Paddle, J J; Eve, R L; Sharpe, K A

    2011-02-01

    We conducted two telephone surveys of all United Kingdom adult intensive care units in 2007/8 and 2010 to assess practice with regard to intensive insulin therapy for glycaemic control in critically ill patients, and to assess the change in practice following publications in 2008 and 2009 that challenged the evidence for this therapy. Of 243 units that had a written policy for intensive insulin therapy in 2007/8, 232 (96%) still had a policy in 2010. One hundred and six (46%) units had updated their policy in response to new evidence, whereas 126 (54%) stated that it had remained the same. Where intensive care units had changed their policy, we found a significant increase in target limits and a wider target range. Regional variations in practice were also seen. Across seven regions, the percentage of units where the glycaemic control policy had been updated since 2007/8 varied from nil to 78.9%. PMID:21254983

  2. Statins as Regulators of Redox State in the Vascular Endothelium: Beyond Lipid Lowering

    PubMed Central

    Margaritis, Marios; Channon, Keith M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Endothelial dysfunction and the imbalance between nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species production in the vascular endothelium are important early steps in atherogenesis, a major socioeconomic health problem. Statins have well-established roles in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD), due to both their lipid-lowering capacity and their pleiotropic properties. It is therefore important to understand the mechanisms by which statins can modify endothelial function and affect atherogenesis. Recent Advances: In the last decade, the concept of statin pleiotropy has been reinforced by a large number of cell culture, animal, and translational studies. Statins have been shown to suppress the activity of pro-oxidant enzymes (such as NADPH oxidase) and pro-inflammatory transcriptional pathways in the endothelium. At the same time, they enhance endothelial NO synthase expression and activity while they also improve its enzymatic coupling. This leads to increased NO bioavailability and improved endothelial function. Critical Issues: Despite significant recent advances, the exact mechanisms of statin pleitropy are still only partially understood. The vast majority of the published literature relies on animal studies, while the actual mechanistic studies in humans are limited. Future Directions: The success of statins as endothelium redox-modifying agents with a direct impact on clinical outcome highlights the importance of the endothelium as a therapeutic target in CVD. Better understanding of the mechanisms that underlie endothelial dysfunction could lead to the design of novel therapeutic strategies that target the vascular endothelium for the prevention and treatment of CVD. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1198–1215. PMID:24111702

  3. [Study on lipid-lowering traditional Chinese medicines based on pharmacophore technology and patent retrieval].

    PubMed

    Huo, Xiao-qian; He, Yu-su; Qiao, Lian-sheng; Sun, Zhi-yi; Zhang, Yan-ling

    2014-12-01

    The combined application of statins that inhibit HMG-CoA reductase and fibrates that activate PPAR-α can produce a better lipid-lowering effect than the simple application, but with stronger adverse reactions at the same time. In the treatment of hyperlipidemia, the combined administration of TCMs and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor in treating hyperlipidemia shows stable efficacy and less adverse reactions, and provides a new option for the combined application of drugs. In this article, the pharmacophore technology was used to search chemical components of TCMs, trace their source herbs, and determine the potential common TCMs that could activate PPAR-α. Because there is no hyperlipidemia-related medication reference in modern TCM classics, to ensure the high safety and efficacy of all selected TCMs, we selected TCMs that are proved to be combined with statins in the World Traditional/Natural Medicine Patent Database, analyzed corresponding drugs in pharmacophore results based on that, and finally obtained common TCMs that can be applied in PPAR-α and combined with statins. Specifically, the pharmacophore model was based on eight receptor-ligand complexes of PPAR-α. The Receptor-Ligand Pharmacophore Generation module in the DS program was used to build the model, optimize with the Screen Library module, and get the best sub-pharmacophore, which consisted of two hydrogen bond acceptor, three hydrophobic groups and 19 excluded volumes, with the identification effectiveness index value N of 2. 82 and the comprehensive evaluation index CAI value of 1. 84. The model was used to screen the TCMD database, hit 5,235 kinds of chemical components and 1 193 natural animals and plants, and finally determine 62 TCMs. Through patent retrieval, we found 38 TCMs; After comparing with the virtual screening results, we finally got seven TCMs. PMID:25898588

  4. Lipid Lowering Effect of Antioxidant Alpha-Lipoic Acid in Experimental Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Amom, Zulkhairi; Zakaria, Zaiton; Mohamed, Jamaluddin; Azlan, Azrina; Bahari, Hasnah; Taufik Hidayat Baharuldin, Mohd; Aris Moklas, Mohd; Osman, Khairul; Asmawi, Zanariyah; Kamal Nik Hassan, Mohd

    2008-01-01

    Accumulating data demonstrated that hypercholesterolemia and oxidative stress play an important role in the development of atherosclerosis. In the present study, a protective activity of alpha-lipoic acid; a metabolic antioxidant in hypercholesterolemic-induced animals was investigated. Eighteen adult male New Zealand White (NZW) rabbit were segregated into three groups labelled as group N, HCD and ALA (n = 6). Group N (normal control) was fed with normal chow, the rest (HCD and ALA) were fed with 100 g/head/day of 1% cholesterol rich diet to induce hypercholesterolemia. Four point two mg/body weight of alpha lipoic acid was concomintantly supplemented to the ALA group. Drinking water was given ad-libitum. The study was designed for 10 weeks. Blood sampling was taken from the ear lobe vein at the beginning, week 5 and week 10. Plasma was prepared for lipid profile estimation and microsomal lipid peroxidation index indicated with malondialdehyde (MDA) formation. At the end of the experiment, the animals were sacrificed and the aorta were excised for intimal lesion analysis. The plasma total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) levels were found to be significantly low in ALA group compared to that of the HCD group (p<0.05). Similarly, low level of MDA (p<0.05) in ALA group was observed compared to that of the HCD group showing a significant reduction of lipid peroxidation activity. Histomorphometric intimal lesion analysis of the aorta showing less of atheromatous plaque formation in alpha lipoic acid supplemented group (p<0.05) compared to HCD group. These findings suggested that alpha lipoic acid posses a dual lipid lowering and anti-atherosclerotic properties indicated with low plasma TC and LDL levels and reduction of athero-lesion formation in hypercholesterolemic-induced rabbits. PMID:18818758

  5. Resistant starch is more effective than cholestyramine as a lipid-lowering agent in the rat.

    PubMed

    Younes, H; Levrat, M A; Demigné, C; Rémésy, C

    1995-09-01

    Amylase-resistant starch (RS) represents a substrate for the bacterial flora of the colon, and the question arises as whether RS shares with soluble fibers common mechanisms for their lipid-lowering effects. It is uncertain whether a cholesterol-lowering effect depends basically on an enhanced rate of steroid excretion or whether colonic fermentations also play a role in this effect. In the present study, the effect of RS (25% raw potato starch), of a steroid sequestrant (0.8% cholestyramine), or both were compared on bile acid excretion and lipid metabolism in rats fed semipurified diets. RS diets led to a marked rise in cecal size and the cecal pool of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), as well as SCFA absorption; cholestyramine did not noticeably affect cecal fermentation. Whereas cholestyramine was particularly effective at enhancing bile acid excretion, RS was more effective in lowering plasma cholesterol (-32%) and triglycerides (-29%). The activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase was increased fivefold by cholestyramine and twofold by RS. This induction in rats fed RS diets was concomittant to a depressed fatty acid synthase activity. In rats fed the RS diet, there was a lower concentration of cholesterol in all lipoprotein fractions, especially the (d = 1.040-1.080) fraction high-density lipoprotein (HDL1), while those fed cholestyramine had only a significant reduction of HDL1 cholesterol. In contrast to cholestyramine, RS also depressed the concentration of triglycerides in the triglyceride-rich lipoprotein fraction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8577229

  6. Lipid-Lowering Medication Use and Aggression Scores in Women: A Report from the NHLBI-Sponsored WISE Study

    PubMed Central

    OLSON, MARIAN B.; KELSEY, SHERYL F.; MATTHEWS, KAREN A.; MERZ, C. NOEL BAIREY; ETEIBA, WAFIA; McGORRAY, SUSAN P.; CORNELL, CAROL E.; VIDO, DIANE A.; MULDOON, MATTHEW F.

    2010-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to examine the association between the use of lipid-lowering medication and aggressive responding, hostility, cynicism, and depression scores in women undergoing coronary angiography. Methods The cohort included 498 women from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-sponsored Women’s Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation (WISE) study. WISE is a four-center study of women with chest pain who underwent quantitative coronary angiography for suspected myocardial ischemia. The psychosocial indices included the Cook Medley Hostility questionnaire, measuring aggression, hostility, and cynicism, and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Results Compared to those not on lipid-lowering medication, women receiving lipid-lowering pharmacotherapy were older (62 vs. 55 years, p < 0.001) and had more hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and coronary artery disease (CAD, defined as ≥50% stenoses in at least one epicardial artery) (all p < 0.003). Women on lipid-lowering medication had higher aggressive responding scores than those not on medication, 3.0 ± 1.8 vs. 2.7 ± 1.7, respectively (age-adjusted p < 0.003). This association persisted after adjustment for coronary risk factors, education, and extent of angiographic disease (CAD) (p < 0.005), and after exclusion of women using psychotropic medications (p < 0.001). Hostility, cynicism, and depression scores did not differ by medication use. Conclusions In women, lipid-lowering medication may predispose to aggression without affecting hostility or mood, but this hypothesis requires evaluation in placebo-controlled clinical trials. PMID:18321170

  7. AB067. Future ED therapy: low-energy shock wave therapy and low-intensity pulsed ultrasound therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Zhong-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Current treatments for erectile dysfunction (ED) such as phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5Is) and intracavernosal injections (ICI) therapy, such a symptom therapy used as on demanded before sexual intercourse, the clinical efficacy reached to 80%, with mild side effects, however, such a symptom therapy could not restore pathological changes in the penis. Low-energy shock wave therapy (LESWT) has been developed for treating ED, and clinical studies have shown that LESWT has the potential to affect PDE5I non-responders with ED with few adverse effects. Studies have reported that LESWT could partially restore corpus cavernosum fibromuscular pathological changes, include corpus cavernosum smooth muscle and endothelial dysfunction, and neuropathy. Although the mechanisms remain to be further investigated its underlying mechanisms may involve recruiting endogenous mesenchymal stem cells. Recently, device of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been developed and animal study had been proven to have effects of improving erectile function and restoring pathological changes in penile tissue in STZ-induced diabetic ED, however, it is needed to perform clinical study. LESWT & LIPUS could be novel therapy for treating ED with restore pathological changes in the penis in the near future. However, further extensive evidence-based basic and clinical studies are needed.

  8. Changes in N400 Topography Following Intensive Speech Language Therapy for Individuals with Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, K. Ryan; O'Rourke, Heather; Wozniak, Linda A.; Kostopoulos, Ellina; Marchand, Yannick; Newman, Aaron J.

    2012-01-01

    Our goal was to characterize the effects of intensive aphasia therapy on the N400, an electrophysiological index of lexical-semantic processing. Immediately before and after 4 weeks of intensive speech-language therapy, people with aphasia performed a task in which they had to determine whether spoken words were a "match" or a "mismatch" to…

  9. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Dose Painting to Treat Rhabdomyosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Joanna C.; Dharmarajan, Kavita V.; Wexler, Leonard H.; La Quaglia, Michael P.; Happersett, Laura; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To examine local control and patterns of failure in rhabdomyosarcoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (RT) with dose painting (DP-IMRT). Patients and Methods: A total of 41 patients underwent DP-IMRT with chemotherapy for definitive treatment. Nineteen also underwent surgery with or without intraoperative RT. Fifty-six percent had alveolar histologic features. The median interval from beginning chemotherapy to RT was 17 weeks (range, 4-25). Very young children who underwent second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT received reduced doses of 24-36 Gy in 1.4-1.8-Gy fractions. Young adults received 50.4 Gy to the primary tumor and lower doses of 36 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to at-risk lymph node chains. Results: With 22 months of median follow-up, the actuarial local control rate was 90%. Patients aged {<=}7 years who received reduced overall and fractional doses had 100% local control, and young adults had 79% (P=.07) local control. Three local failures were identified in young adults whose primary target volumes had received 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions. Conclusions: DP-IMRT with lower fractional and cumulative doses is feasible for very young children after second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT. DP-IMRT is also feasible in adolescents and young adults with aggressive disease who would benefit from prophylactic RT to high-risk lymph node chains, although dose escalation might be warranted for improved local control. With limited follow-up, it appears that DP-IMRT produces local control rates comparable to those of sequential IMRT in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma.

  10. The Long Term Effectiveness of Intensive Stuttering Therapy: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irani, Farzan; Gabel, Rodney; Daniels, Derek; Hughes, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of client perceptions of an intensive stuttering therapy program that utilizes a multi-faceted approach to therapy. The study also proposed to gain a deeper understanding about the process involved in long-term maintenance of meaningful changes made in therapy. Methods: The…

  11. [Anesthesia and intensive therapy for a patient with mitochondrial myopathy].

    PubMed

    Breucking, E; Mortier, W; Lampert, R; Brandt, L

    1993-10-01

    Since 1983 we have been involved in the diagnostic work-up and emergency treatment of a female patient now 48 years old who has a mitochondrial myopathy resembling Luft's disease. The syndrome was first described in 1959, and in more detail in 1962, by Luft and et al., who reported a picture of hypermetabolism with high temperature, extreme sweating, tachycardia, dyspnoea at rest, polydipsia, polyphagia and irritability but normal thyroid function. In 1971 and 1976 Haydar and Di Mauro presented a second case and proposed treatment with chloramphenicol. Our patient has the third case of the syndrome reported so far: her case was initially published in 1987. CASE REPORT. Since her 17th year of life the patient had suffered from episodes of fever, tachycardia and sweating. At the age of 32 these attacks worsened, leading to unconsciousness and apnoea. The patient then had to be intubated, ventilated and sometimes resuscitated. The diagnosis of MH susceptibility and Luft's disease was made on biochemical grounds after the first muscle biopsy in 1983. Therapy with chloramphenicol failed. Therapy with beta blockers, vitamin C and K or E, coenzyme Q10 and a high-caloric diet was started in 1985. The patient was registered with an emergency service, which flew her to our ICU whenever she had a severe crisis. For milder episodes she was supplied with an oxygen breathing mask at home. Myalgia increased with the episodes starting in 1988, and the patient needed dantrolene infusions and analgesics at home. To facilitate venepuncture a Port-A-Cath system was implanted in 1987, which had to be removed four times due to infection and sepsis. A muscle biopsy was taken in Rotterdam, which revealed differences in mitochondrial function from the biochemical findings recorded in 1983 and not in keeping with Luft's disease. Unfortunately, the patient was not able to undergo further metabolic investigations or therapeutic trials. ANAESTHESIA. The patient received three local and six

  12. Comparative analysis of 60Co intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Fox, Christopher; Romeijn, H Edwin; Lynch, Bart; Men, Chunhua; Aleman, Dionne M; Dempsey, James F

    2008-06-21

    In this study, we perform a scientific comparative analysis of using (60)Co beams in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). In particular, we evaluate the treatment plan quality obtained with (i) 6 MV, 18 MV and (60)Co IMRT; (ii) different numbers of static multileaf collimator (MLC) delivered (60)Co beams and (iii) a helical tomotherapy (60)Co beam geometry. We employ a convex fluence map optimization (FMO) model, which allows for the comparison of plan quality between different beam energies and configurations for a given case. A total of 25 clinical patient cases that each contain volumetric CT studies, primary and secondary delineated targets, and contoured structures were studied: 5 head-and-neck (H&N), 5 prostate, 5 central nervous system (CNS), 5 breast and 5 lung cases. The DICOM plan data were anonymized and exported to the University of Florida optimized radiation therapy (UFORT) treatment planning system. The FMO problem was solved for each case for 5-71 equidistant beams as well as a helical geometry for H&N, prostate, CNS and lung cases, and for 3-7 equidistant beams in the upper hemisphere for breast cases, all with 6 MV, 18 MV and (60)Co dose models. In all cases, 95% of the target volumes received at least the prescribed dose with clinical sparing criteria for critical organs being met for all structures that were not wholly or partially contained within the target volume. Improvements in critical organ sparing were found with an increasing number of equidistant (60)Co beams, yet were marginal above 9 beams for H&N, prostate, CNS and lung. Breast cases produced similar plans for 3-7 beams. A helical (60)Co beam geometry achieved similar plan quality as static plans with 11 equidistant (60)Co beams. Furthermore, 18 MV plans were initially found not to provide the same target coverage as 6 MV and (60)Co plans; however, adjusting the trade-offs in the optimization model allowed equivalent target coverage for 18 MV. For plans with comparable

  13. Comparative analysis of 60Co intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Christopher; Romeijn, H. Edwin; Lynch, Bart; Men, Chunhua; Aleman, Dionne M.; Dempsey, James F.

    2008-06-01

    In this study, we perform a scientific comparative analysis of using 60Co beams in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). In particular, we evaluate the treatment plan quality obtained with (i) 6 MV, 18 MV and 60Co IMRT; (ii) different numbers of static multileaf collimator (MLC) delivered 60Co beams and (iii) a helical tomotherapy 60Co beam geometry. We employ a convex fluence map optimization (FMO) model, which allows for the comparison of plan quality between different beam energies and configurations for a given case. A total of 25 clinical patient cases that each contain volumetric CT studies, primary and secondary delineated targets, and contoured structures were studied: 5 head-and-neck (H&N), 5 prostate, 5 central nervous system (CNS), 5 breast and 5 lung cases. The DICOM plan data were anonymized and exported to the University of Florida optimized radiation therapy (UFORT) treatment planning system. The FMO problem was solved for each case for 5-71 equidistant beams as well as a helical geometry for H&N, prostate, CNS and lung cases, and for 3-7 equidistant beams in the upper hemisphere for breast cases, all with 6 MV, 18 MV and 60Co dose models. In all cases, 95% of the target volumes received at least the prescribed dose with clinical sparing criteria for critical organs being met for all structures that were not wholly or partially contained within the target volume. Improvements in critical organ sparing were found with an increasing number of equidistant 60Co beams, yet were marginal above 9 beams for H&N, prostate, CNS and lung. Breast cases produced similar plans for 3-7 beams. A helical 60Co beam geometry achieved similar plan quality as static plans with 11 equidistant 60Co beams. Furthermore, 18 MV plans were initially found not to provide the same target coverage as 6 MV and 60Co plans; however, adjusting the trade-offs in the optimization model allowed equivalent target coverage for 18 MV. For plans with comparable target coverage

  14. Inverse planning optimization method for intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yihua; Ren, Haozheng; Li, Cunhua; Min, Zhifang; Wan, Jinxin; Ma, Jianxin; Hung, Chih-Cheng

    2013-10-01

    In order to facilitate the leaf sequencing process in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and design of a practical leaf sequencing algorithm, it is an important issue to smooth the planned fluence maps. The objective is to achieve both high-efficiency and high-precision dose delivering by considering characteristics of leaf sequencing process. The key factor which affects total number of monitor units for the leaf sequencing optimization process is the max flow value of the digraph which formulated from the fluence maps. Therefore, we believe that one strategy for compromising dose conformity and total number of monitor units in dose delivery is to balance the dose distribution function and the max flow value mentioned above. However, there are too many paths in the digraph, and we don't know the flow value of which path is the maximum. The maximum flow value among the horizontal paths was selected and used in the objective function of the fluence map optimization to formulate the model. The model is a traditional linear constrained quadratic optimization model which can be solved by interior point method easily. We believe that the smoothed maps from this model are more suitable for leaf sequencing optimization process than other smoothing models. A clinical head-neck case and a prostate case were tested and compared using our proposed model and the smoothing model which is based on the minimization of total variance. The optimization results with the same level of total number of monitor units (TNMU) show that the fluence maps obtained from our model have much better dose performance for the target/non-target region than the maps from total variance based on the smoothing model. This indicates that our model achieves better dose distribution when the algorithm suppresses the TNMU at the same level. Although we have just used the max flow value of the horizontal paths in the diagraph in the objective function, a good balance has been achieved between

  15. Survey of resident education in intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Malik, Renuka; Oh, Julia L; Roeske, John C; Mundt, Arno J

    2005-06-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been gaining increasing popularity among practicing physicians in the U.S., but the extent to which radiation oncology residents are taught the principles of this technology and are trained to use IMRT remains unknown. In this paper, we assessed the current level of resident education in IMRT in the United States. Chief residents at all 77 accredited radiation oncology programs were sent a 13-question survey addressing formal didactics and hands-on experience in IMRT. The survey assessed the frequency, subject, and format of IMRT didactics. Questions also addressed the number of IMRT patients and anatomical sites treated, resident involvement in the IMRT process, and the intent of IMRT use. Finally, residents were asked for their opinions on their IMRT education. Sixty-one surveys (79%) were completed. Overall, forty-three respondents (71%) reported receiving formal IMRT didactics, with nearly one-third reporting extensive didactics (> or = 3 lectures/seminars et cetera per year). The most common didactic formats were lectures (95%) and journal clubs (63%), most commonly supervised by physicists (98%). Involvement by physicians and radiobiologists were reported by 63% and 7% of respondents, respectively. Overall, 87% of respondents had hands-on IMRT training, with nearly one-half having treated > 25 patients. The most common sites treated were head and neck (94%) and prostate (81%). Involvement in all aspects of the IMRT process was common, particularly target and tissue delineation (98%) and plan evaluation (93%). Most respondents (79%) with hands-on experience reported receiving formal didactics. However, nearly one-third received no or only minimal formal didactics. The percentage of respondents desiring increased IMRT didactics and hands-on experience were 70% and 47%, respectively. Our results suggest that the great majority of radiation oncology residents in the United States are currently exposed to didactics

  16. IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy): progress in technology and reimbursement.

    PubMed

    Young, R; Snyder, B

    2001-01-01

    For a new treatment technology to become widely accepted in today's healthcare environment, the technology must not only be effective but also financially viable. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), a technology that enables radiation oncologists to precisely target and attack cancerous tumors with higher doses of radiation using strategically positioned beams while minimizing collateral damage to healthy cells, now meets both criteria. With IMRT, radiation oncologists for the first time have obtained the ability to divide the treatment field covered by each beam angle into hundreds of segments as small as 2.5 mm by 5 mm. Using the adjustable leaves of an MLC to shape the beam and by controlling exposure times, physicians can deliver a different dose to each segment and therefore modulate dose intensity across the entire treatment field. Development of optimal IMRT plans using conventional manual treatment planning methods would take days. To be clinically practical, IMRT required the development of "inverse treatment planning" software. With this software, a radiation oncologist can prescribe the ideal radiation dose for a specific tumor as well as maximum dose limits for surrounding healthy tissue. These numbers are entered into the treatment planning program which then calculates the optimal delivery approach that will best fit the oncologist's requirements. The radiation oncologist then reviews and approves the proposed treatment plan before it is initiated. The most recent advance in IMRT technology offers a "dynamic" mode or "sliding window" technique. In this more rapid delivery method, the beam remains on while the leaves of the collimator continually re-shape and move the beam aperture over the planned treatment area. This creates a moving beam that saturates the tumor volume with the desired radiation dose while leaving the surrounding healthy tissue in a protective shadow created by the leaves of the collimator. In the dynamic mode, an IMRT

  17. [MODERN VIEW ON INTENSIVE THERAPY OF GASTRO-INTESTINAL HEMORRHAGE].

    PubMed

    Tutchenko, M I; Rudyk, D V; Iskra, N I; Trofimenko, S P; Shchur, I V

    2015-10-01

    Basing on analysis of the treatment results in 47 patients for gastro-intestinal hemorrhage, the experience of application of a tranexamic acid in a content of infusion therapy and hemaxam per os was adduced. The data obtained witness the expediency of hemaxam application in a content of therapy on the stage of a hemorrhage letup and for the recurrence prevention. PMID:26946650

  18. Identification of marker genes for lipid-lowering effect of a short-chain fructooligosaccharide by DNA microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Fukasawa, Tomoyuki; Murashima, Koichiro; Nemoto, Tomoko; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Koga, Jinichiro; Kubota, Hidetoshi; Kanegae, Minoru

    2009-01-01

    Administration of short-chain fructooligosaccharide (scFOS) is known to lower serum triglyceride levels in rats fed a high-fat diet, but the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. This study aimed to identify marker genes for lipid-lowering effect of scFOS administration. The changes in hepatic gene expressions in rats fed scFOS were investigated using DNA microarray and quantitative RT-PCR analysis. The DNA microarray showed that phytanoyl-CoA 2-hydroxylase 2 (Phyh2), lipoprotein lipase (Lpl) and tyrosine aminotransferase (Tat) were significantly affected by scFOS administration (p < .05). Since Lpl is involved in lipid metabolism, the up-regulation of Lpl in the liver can be a potential marker of the lipid-lowering effect of scFOS. PMID:22435477

  19. Lipid-lowering agents inhibit hepatic steatosis in a non-alcoholic steatohepatitis-derived hepatocellular carcinoma mouse model.

    PubMed

    Orime, Kazuki; Shirakawa, Jun; Togashi, Yu; Tajima, Kazuki; Inoue, Hideaki; Nagashima, Yoji; Terauchi, Yasuo

    2016-02-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with various metabolic disorders, and the therapeutic strategies for treating NAFLD and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) have not been fully established. In the present study, we examined whether lipid-lowering agents inhibited the progression of NAFLD and tumorigenesis in a non-alcoholic steatohepatitis-derived hepatocellular carcinoma model mouse (STAM mice) generated by streptozotocin injection and a high-fat diet. Seven-week-old STAM mice were divided into groups fed a high-fat diet (Ctl) or a high-fat diet supplemented with ezetimibe (Ez), fenofibrate (Ff), rosuvastatin (Rs), ezetimibe plus fenofibrate (EF), or ezetimibe plus rosuvastatin (ER) for 4 weeks. At the end of the experiments, an oral glucose tolerance test, an insulin tolerance test, biochemical analyses using serum and liver, and a histological analysis of liver were performed in 11-week-old STAM mice. The lipid-lowering agents did not affect the body weight or the casual blood glucose levels in any of the groups. The serum triglyceride level was significantly decreased by Ff, Rs, and EF. Glucose tolerance was improved by Ez and Ff, but none of these agents improved insulin sensitivity. A histochemical analysis revealed that the lipid-lowering agents, with the exception of Rs, significantly inhibited the progression of hepatic steatosis. Nonetheless, no significant changes in the incidence of hepatic tumors were observed in any of the groups. Lipid-lowering agents inhibited the progression of hepatic steatosis without suppressing tumorigenesis in STAM mice. Our data has implications for the mechanism underlying steatosis-independent hepatic tumorigenesis in mice. PMID:26724391

  20. Whole-brain hippocampal sparing radiation therapy: Volume-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy case study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Katrina; Lenards, Nishele; Holson, Janice

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is responsible for memory and cognitive function. An ongoing phase II clinical trial suggests that sparing dose to the hippocampus during whole-brain radiation therapy can help preserve a patient׳s neurocognitive function. Progressive research and advancements in treatment techniques have made treatment planning more sophisticated but beneficial for patients undergoing treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare hippocampal sparing whole-brain (HS-WB) radiation therapy treatment planning techniques using volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We randomly selected 3 patients to compare different treatment techniques that could be used for reducing dose to the hippocampal region. We created 2 treatment plans, a VMAT and an IMRT, from each patient׳s data set and planned on the Eclipse 11.0 treatment planning system (TPS). A total of 6 plans (3 IMRT and 3 VMAT) were created and evaluated for this case study. The physician contoured the hippocampus as per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0933 protocol atlas. The organs at risk (OR) were contoured and evaluated for the plan comparison, which included the spinal cord, optic chiasm, the right and left eyes, lenses, and optic nerves. Both treatment plans produced adequate coverage on the planning target volume (PTV) while significantly reducing dose to the hippocampal region. The VMAT treatment plans produced a more homogenous dose distribution throughout the PTV while decreasing the maximum point dose to the target. However, both treatment techniques demonstrated hippocampal sparing when irradiating the whole brain. PMID:26235550

  1. Role of Ezetimibe in Lipid-Lowering and Cardiovascular Disease Prevention.

    PubMed

    Smith, Bryan A; Wright, Charmaine; Davidson, Michael

    2015-12-01

    With the goal of decreasing low-density cholesterol (LDL-C) to mitigate risk of both primary and secondary cardiovascular outcomes, statins have been the cornerstone of therapy, significantly reducing the incidence of coronary atherosclerotic vascular disease. Previous studies suggest that adding other non-statin LDL-lowering agents may further lower LDL-C without negative side effects. Recent guidelines support the hypothesis that driving the LDL-C level below previously recommended targets may have a beneficial effect. Ezetimibe, a cholesterol absorption blocker that inhibits the Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 (NPC1L1) receptor, has been the focus of recent trials that support its use in cardiovascular risk reduction. For patients not at goal on statin therapy alone, ezetimibe has proven to be a safe, well-tolerated medication that may be used as an adjunct to statin therapy to further reduce LDL-C, resulting in a significant mortality benefit. PMID:26490081

  2. Major Long-Term Benefits of Intensive Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Benefits of Intensive Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes: Study Reports Near-Normal Glucose Levels Lead to Large ... the latest results from a landmark government-sponsored study, reported at a special symposium held at the ...

  3. [Extracorporeal therapy of patients with liver disease in the intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, V; Horvatits, T; Drolz, A; Rutter, K

    2014-05-01

    Acute and acute-on-chronic liver failure are often associated with development of organ failure. Its occurrence is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Extracorporeal replacement therapies are frequently necessary in these patient populations. Replacement therapies can be divided into renal replacement therapies and liver support therapies. These therapies consist of artificial liver support systems (i.e., MARS(®) system, Prometheus(®)), which are able to remove water-soluble and albumin-bound toxins, and of bioartifical liver support systems. This manuscript provides a review of current practice in the extracorporeal support of patients with liver diseases in the intensive care unit. PMID:24770889

  4. Prolonged low intensity EPOCH–rituximab has improved toxicity in Burkitt lymphoma compared with standard short, high intensity therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Shandiz; Peer, Cody J; Figg, William D

    2014-01-01

    Burkitt lymphoma is an aggressive form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has a short doubling time, thus intense short-cycle chemotherapy has been thought to be essential. A recent NCI-sponsored clinical trial investigated DA-EPOCH-R given to 19 HIV-negative patients and a short course regimen (SC-EPOCH-RR) given to 11 HIV-positive patients in hopes of maintaining the efficacy of the regimen while decreasing the typical side effects from the intensive short-cycle chemotherapy. Low intensity EPOCH-R based therapy achieved excellent rates of efficacy despite a significant difference in the median cumulative dose between the DA-EPOCH-R and SC-EPOCH-RR cohorts. Furthermore, both cohorts experienced mainly grade 1 and grade 2 toxicities, with SC-EPOCH-RR cohort patients experiencing less adverse events than DA-EPOCH-R cohort patients. This recent clinical investigation suggests the most important therapeutic principle is not the intensity but rather the length of exposure time above an effective threshold concentration. Since short, intense bolus doses are the standard therapy for Burkitt lymphoma, these findings are clinically relevant and significant. PMID:24919059

  5. Description of an Intensive Dialectical Behavior Therapy Program for Multidiagnostic Clients with Eating Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federici, Anita; Wisniewski, Lucene; Ben-Porath, Denise

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe an intensive outpatient dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) program for multidiagnostic clients with eating disorders who had not responded adequately to standard, empirically supported treatments for eating disorders. The program integrates DBT with empirically supported cognitive behavior therapy approaches that are well…

  6. Physical Therapy Observation and Assessment in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Eilish; Campbell, Suzann K.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the elements of the Observation and Assessment section of the Infant Care Path for Physical Therapy in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). The types of physical therapy assessments presented in this path are evidence-based and the suggested timing of these assessments is primarily based on practice knowledge from expert…

  7. Delivery confirmation of bolus electron conformal therapy combined with intensity modulated x-ray therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kavanaugh, James A.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Fontenot, Jonas P.; Henkelmann, Gregory; Chu, Connel; Carver, Robert A.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that a bolus electron conformal therapy (ECT) dose plan and a mixed beam plan, composed of an intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT) dose plan optimized on top of the bolus ECT plan, can be accurately delivered. Methods: Calculated dose distributions were compared with measured dose distributions for parotid and chest wall (CW) bolus ECT and mixed beam plans, each simulated in a cylindrical polystyrene phantom that allowed film dose measurements. Bolus ECT plans were created for both parotid and CW PTVs (planning target volumes) using 20 and 16 MeV beams, respectively, whose 90% dose surface conformed to the PTV. Mixed beam plans consisted of an IMXT dose plan optimized on top of the bolus ECT dose plan. The bolus ECT, IMXT, and mixed beam dose distributions were measured using radiographic films in five transverse and one sagittal planes for a total of 36 measurement conditions. Corrections for film dose response, effects of edge-on photon irradiation, and effects of irregular phantom optical properties on the Cerenkov component of the film signal resulted in high precision measurements. Data set consistency was verified by agreement of depth dose at the intersections of the sagittal plane with the five measured transverse planes. For these same depth doses, results for the mixed beam plan agreed with the sum of the individual depth doses for the bolus ECT and IMXT plans. The six mean measured planar dose distributions were compared with those calculated by the treatment planning system for all modalities. Dose agreement was assessed using the 4% dose difference and 0.2 cm distance to agreement. Results: For the combined high-dose region and low-dose region, pass rates for the parotid and CW plans were 98.7% and 96.2%, respectively, for the bolus ECT plans and 97.9% and 97.4%, respectively, for the mixed beam plans. For the high-dose gradient region, pass rates for the parotid and CW plans were 93.1% and 94

  8. Variation in Prescription Use and Spending for Lipid-Lowering and Diabetes Medications in the VA Healthcare System

    PubMed Central

    Gellad, Walid F.; Good, Chester B.; Lowe, John C.; Donohue, Julie M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Very little is known about variation in prescription drug use and spending. We examine variation in outpatient prescription use and spending for diabetes and hyperlipidemia in the Veterans Affairs (VA) system and its association with quality measures for these conditions. Study Design and Methods We compared outpatient prescription use, spending and quality of care across 135 VA Medical Centers (VAMCs) in 2008, including 2.3 million patients dispensed lipid-lowering medications and 981,031 dispensed diabetes medications. We calculated VAMC-level cost/patient for these medications, proportion of patients on brand-name drugs, and Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) scores for hyperlipidemia (LDL<100mg/dl) and diabetes (HgA1c>9 or not measured) at each facility. Results The median cost/patient for lipid-lowering agents in 2008 was $49.60 and varied from $39.68 in the least expensive quartile of VAMCs to $69.57 in the most expensive (p<0.001). For diabetes agents, median cost/patient was $158.34 and varied from $123.34 in the least expensive quartile to $198.31 in the most expensive (p<0.001). The proportion of patients dispensed brand name oral drugs in these classes in VAMCs in the most expensive quartile was twice that in the lowest quartile (p<0.001). There was no correlation between VAMC-level prescription spending and performance on HEDIS measures for lipid-lowering drugs (r=.12 and r=.07) or diabetes agents (r=-.10). Conclusions Despite a closely managed formulary, significant variation in prescription spending and use of brand name drugs exists in the VA. Although we could not explicitly risk adjust, there appears to be no association between spending on medications and quality of care. PMID:20964470

  9. Application of Histogram Analysis in Radiation Therapy (HART) in Intensity Modulation Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyakuryal, Anil

    2009-03-01

    A carcinoma is a malignant cancer that emerges from epithelial cells in structures through out the body.It invades the critical organs, could metastasize or spread to lymph nodes.IMRT is an advanced mode of radiation therapy treatment for cancer. It delivers more conformal doses to malignant tumors sparing the critical organs by modulating the intensity of radiation beam.An automated software, HART (S. Jang et al.,2008,Med Phys 35,p.2812) was used for efficient analysis of dose volume histograms (DVH) for multiple targets and critical organs in four IMRT treatment plans for each patient. IMRT data for ten head and neck cancer patients were exported as AAPM/RTOG format files from a commercial treatment planning system at Northwestern Memorial Hospital (NMH).HART extracted DVH statistics were used to evaluate plan indices and to analyze dose tolerance of critical structures at prescription dose (PD) for each patient. Mean plan indices (n=10) were found to be in good agreement with published results for Linac based plans. The least irradiated volume at tolerance dose (TD50) was observed for brainstem and the highest volume for larynx in SIB treatment techniques. Thus HART, an open source platform, has extensive clinical implications in IMRT treatments.

  10. Potent anti-ischaemic effects of statins in chronic stable angina: incremental benefit beyond lipid lowering?

    PubMed Central

    Deanfield, John E.; Sellier, Phillipe; Thaulow, Erik; Bultas, Jan; Yunis, Carla; Shi, Harry; Buch, Jan; Beckerman, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Aims The DoUble-blind Atorvastatin AmLodipine (DUAAL) trial investigated whether atorvastatin decreases ischaemia by a vascular benefit, independent of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering, in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), both alone and in combination with the traditional anti-anginal therapy, amlodipine. Methods and results Randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, multicountry trial (2 weeks run-in and 24 weeks active therapy) comparing three treatments: amlodipine, atorvastatin, and amlodipine + atorvastatin; in 311 patients (78% male; mean age 62 years) with stable angina (≥2 attacks/week), CAD history, ≥3 transient myocardial ischaemia (TMI) episodes, and/or ≥15 min ischaemia on 48 h ambulatory electrocardiographic (AECG) monitoring. Efficacy variables were change in TMI by AECG, exercise ischaemia, angina diary data, and inflammatory biomarkers at Week 26. There was a comparable, highly significant decrease in TMI with amlodipine and atorvastatin, but no additional benefit for the combination. More than 50% of patients became TMI-free in all three groups and this was accompanied by a comparable, marked reduction in angina and nitroglycerin consumption. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein fell by 40% in patients receiving atorvastatin but there was no change with amlodipine. Adverse events were comparable among groups. Conclusion Atorvastatin was as potent an anti-ischaemic agent as amlodipine. Future studies of combination therapies will be instructive. Clinical trial registration information: National clinical trial number: NCT00159718, protocol number A0531031 listed on http://clinicaltrials.gov/. PMID:20494902

  11. Effects of Intensive Therapy and Antecedent Hypoglycemia on Counterregulatory Responses to Hypoglycemia in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Stephen N.; Mann, Stephanie; Briscoe, Vanessa J.; Ertl, Andrew C.; Tate, Donna B.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The physiology of counterregulatory responses during hypoglycemia in intensively treated type 2 diabetic subjects is largely unknown. Therefore, the specific aims of the study tested the hypothesis that 1) 6 months of intensive therapy to lower A1C <7.0% would blunt autonomic nervous system (ANS) responses to hypoglycemia, and 2) antecedent hypoglycemia will result in counterregulatory failure during subsequent hypoglycemia in patients with suboptimal and good glycemic control. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Fifteen type 2 diabetic patients (8 men/7 women) underwent 6-month combination therapy of metformin, glipizide XL, and acarbose to lower A1C to 6.7% and 2-day repeated hypoglycemic clamp studies before and after intensive therapy. A control group of eight nondiabetic subjects participated in a single 2-day repeated hypoglycemic clamp study. RESULTS—Six-month therapy reduced A1C from 10.2 ± 0.5 to 6.7 ± 0.3%. Rates of hypoglycemia increased to 3.2 episodes per patient/month by study end. Hypoglycemia (3.3 ± 0.1 mmol/l) and insulinemia (1,722 ± 198 pmol/l) were similar during all clamp studies. Intensive therapy reduced (P < 0.05) ANS and metabolic counterregulatory responses during hypoglycemia. Antecedent hypoglycemia produced widespread blunting (P < 0.05) of neuroendocrine, ANS, and metabolic counterregulatory responses during subsequent hypoglycemia before and after intensive therapy in type 2 diabetic patients and in nondiabetic control subjects. CONCLUSIONS—Intensive oral combination therapy and antecedent hypoglycemia both blunt physiological defenses against subsequent hypoglycemia in type 2 diabetes. Prior hypoglycemia of only 3.3 ± 0.1 mmol/l can result in counterregulatory failure in type 2 diabetic patients with suboptimal control and can further impair physiological defenses against hypoglycemia in intensively treated type 2 diabetes. PMID:19073776

  12. Dosimetric comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for pancreatic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Arif N.; Dhabaan, Anees H.; Jarrio, Christie S.; Siddiqi, Arsalan K.; Landry, Jerome C.

    2012-10-01

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has been previously evaluated for several tumor sites and has been shown to provide significant dosimetric and delivery benefits when compared with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). To date, there have been no published full reports on the benefits of VMAT use in pancreatic patients compared with IMRT. Ten patients with pancreatic malignancies treated with either IMRT or VMAT were retrospectively identified. Both a double-arc VMAT and a 7-field IMRT plan were generated for each of the 10 patients using the same defined tumor volumes, organs at risk (OAR) volumes, dose, fractionation, and optimization constraints. The planning tumor volume (PTV) maximum dose (55.8 Gy vs. 54.4 Gy), PTV mean dose (53.9 Gy vs. 52.1 Gy), and conformality index (1.11 vs. 0.99) were statistically similar between the IMRT and VMAT plans, respectively. The VMAT plans had a statistically significant reduction in monitor units compared with the IMRT plans (1109 vs. 498, p < 0.001). In addition, the doses to the liver, small bowel, and spinal cord were comparable between the IMRT and VMAT plans. However, the VMAT plans demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in the mean left kidney V{sub 25} (9.4 Gy vs. 2.3 Gy, p = 0.018), mean right kidney V{sub 15} (53.4 Gy vs. 45.9 Gy, p = 0.035), V{sub 20} (32.2 Gy vs. 25.5 Gy, p = 0.016), and V{sub 25} (21.7 Gy vs. 14.9 Gy, p = 0.001). VMAT was investigated in patients with pancreatic malignancies and compared with the current standard of IMRT. VMAT was found to have similar or improved dosimetric parameters for all endpoints considered. Specifically, VMAT provided reduced monitor units and improved bilateral kidney normal tissue dose. The clinical relevance of these benefits in the context of pancreatic cancer patients, however, is currently unclear and requires further investigation.

  13. Electroconvulsive therapy in a psychiatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Hafner, R J; Holme, G

    1994-06-01

    This study reviewed all patients (N = 37) treated with ECT in a psychiatric intensive care unit during 1989-91. Diagnoses were: psychotic depression (8); bipolar disorder, manic phase (13); schizoaffective disorder (14); and schizophrenia (2). All patients were very severely disturbed and had failed to respond to medication given at highest levels judged to be safe, usually over 3-4 weeks. Response to ECT was generally rapid and marked, allowing substantial reductions in medication. To achieve the same clinical outcome for each course of ECT, 50% more unilateral than bilateral treatments were required, suggesting that bilateral ECT has a more rapid effect in this highly disturbed population. PMID:7993281

  14. Omega-(2-Naphthyloxy) amino alkanes as a novel class of anti-hyperglycemic and lipid lowering agents.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Devdutt; Ray, Suprabhat; Srivastava, Arvind K; Chander, Ramesh

    2008-03-01

    omega-(2-Naphthyloxy) amino alkanes, obtained as major by-product during course of synthesis of carbamate esters from omega-(2-naphthyloxy) alkyl halides and amines, showed significant anti-hyperglycemic and lipid lowering activities in various test models as a novel class of compounds. Compounds were tested in rat GLM, SLM, STZ, and STZ-S models at 100mg/kg dose. Of these compound 13 was found to be the most active which caused lowering of sugar by 33.6%, 31.0%, 28.5%, and 73.8% in GLM, SLM, STZ, STZ-S, and db/db mice models, respectively. It also significantly effected lowering of LDL in rat model and also in Hamster model without reducing HDL. Most of the compounds showing anti-diabetic and lipid lowering activity have shown promising PPAR-alpha/gamma/delta-activity. Compounds 6, 13, and 19 have shown very good PPAR-alpha/gamma/delta activity. PMID:18083521

  15. Intensive insulin therapy improves insulin sensitivity and mitochondrial function in severely burned children

    PubMed Central

    Fram, Ricki Y.; Cree, Melanie G.; Wolfe, Robert R.; Mlcak, Ronald P.; Qian, Ting; Chinkes, David L.; Herndon, David N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To institute intensive insulin therapy protocol in an acute pediatric burn unit and study the mechanisms underlying its benefits. Design Prospective, randomized study. Setting An acute pediatric burn unit in a tertiary teaching hospital. Patients Children, 4–18 yrs old, with total body surface area burned ≥40% and who arrived within 1 wk after injury were enrolled in the study. Interventions Patients were randomized to one of two groups. Intensive insulin therapy maintained blood glucose levels between 80 and 110 mg/dL. Conventional insulin therapy maintained blood glucose ≤215 mg/dL. Measurements and Main Results Twenty patients were included in the data analysis consisting of resting energy expenditure, whole body and liver insulin sensitivity, and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function. Studies were performed at 7 days post-burn (pretreatment) and at 21 days postburn (posttreatment). Resting energy expenditure significantly increased posttreatment (1476 ± 124 to 1925 ± 291 kcal/m2·day; p = .02) in conventional insulin therapy as compared with a decline in intensive insulin therapy. Glucose infusion rate was identical between groups before treatment (6.0 ± 0.8 conventional insulin therapy vs. 6.8 ± 0.9 mg/kg·min intensive insulin therapy; p = .5). Intensive insulin therapy displayed a significantly higher glucose clamp infusion rate posttreatment (9.1 ± 1.3 intensive insulin therapy versus 4.8 ± 0.6 mg/kg·min conventional insulin therapy, p = .005). Suppression of hepatic glucose release was significantly greater in the intensive insulin therapy after treatment compared with conventional insulin therapy (5.0 ± 0.9 vs. 2.5 ± 0.6 mg/kg·min; intensive insulin therapy vs. conventional insulin therapy; p = .03). States 3 and 4 mitochondrial oxidation of palmitate significantly improved in intensive insulin therapy (0.9 ± 0.1 to 1.7 ± 0.1 μm O2/CS/mg protein/min for state 3, p = .004; and 0.7 ± 0.1 to 1.3 ± 0.1 μm O2/CS/mg protein

  16. [Solcoseryl in intensive therapy in severe craniocerebral trauma].

    PubMed

    Marusanov, V E; Miroshnichenko, A G; Nikolau, S A; Petrova, N V; Bichun, A B

    2000-01-01

    The state of processes of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant defense was studied in patients with severe isolated craniocerebral closed injury. It was found that starting from the first days in the hospital the patients demonstrated marked alterations in the thiol-disulfide and ascorbate metabolism, activation of lipid peroxidation processes and lower antioxidant defense. The use of Solcoseryl as a component of the antioxidant therapy in treatment of the above mentioned category of patients resulted in considerably better indices of the thiol-disulfide metabolism. The isolated use of Solcoseryl failed to influence the ascorbate metabolism and lipid peroxidation. Solcoseryl used in combination with the ascorbic acid led to normalization of the thiol-disulfide and ascorbade metabolism without influencing the lipid peroxidation processes. Combined use of Solcoseryl and ascorbic acid promoted normalization of the neurological status and stabilization of the arterial pressure level. PMID:10983337

  17. Low-Intensity Electromagnetic Millimeter Waves for Pain Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Usichenko, Taras I.; Edinger, Hardy; Gizhko, Vasyl V.; Lehmann, Christian; Wendt, Michael; Feyerherd, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Millimeter wave therapy (MWT), a non-invasive complementary therapeutic technique is claimed to possess analgesic properties. We reviewed the clinical studies describing the pain-relief effect of MWT. Medline-based search according to review criteria and evaluation of methodological quality of the retrieved studies was performed. Of 13 studies, 9 of them were randomized controlled trials (RCTs), only three studies yielded more than 3 points on the Oxford scale of methodological quality of RCTs. MWT was reported to be effective in the treatment of headache, arthritic, neuropathic and acute postoperative pain. The rapid onset of pain relief during MWT lasting hours to days after, remote to the site of exposure (acupuncture points), was the most characteristic feature in MWT application for pain relief. The most commonly used parameters of MWT were the MW frequencies between 30 and 70 GHz and power density up to 10 mW cm−2. The promising results from pilot case series studies and small-size RCTs for analgesic/hypoalgesic effects of MWT should be verified in large-scale RCTs on the effectiveness of this treatment method. PMID:16786049

  18. Design and synthesis of 3,5-diarylisoxazole derivatives as novel class of anti-hyperglycemic and lipid lowering agents.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Atul; Maurya, Ram Awatar; Sharma, Siddharth; Ahmad, Pervez; Singh, A B; Tamrakar, A K; Srivastava, Arvind K

    2009-07-15

    We have designed 1,3-disubstituted-5-membered heteroaromatic ring system as a common core motif from known anti-hyperglycemic agents. Designed compounds were synthesized and screened for in vivo anti-hyperglycemic activity in sucrose loaded model (SLM), sucrose-challenged streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model (STZ-S) as well as db/db mice model. Some of the synthesized compounds showed promising in vivo anti-hyperglycemic as well as moderate lipid lowering activity. Synthesized Compounds were screened in various in vitro models of type-2 diabeties such as DPP-4, PTP1B and PPARgamma to know the mechanism of their anti-hyperglycemic action. None of the synthesized compounds showed DPP-4 inhibitory as well as PPARgamma activity. These compounds have shown promising PTP-1B inhibitory activity there by revealing that compounds exhibit anti-diabetic activity by PTP1B pathway. PMID:19500993

  19. The effect of rapid lipid lowering with atorvastatin on autonomic parameters in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Szramka, M; Harriss, L; Ninnio, D; Windebank, E; Brack, J; Skiba, M; Krum, H

    2007-04-25

    Many cardiovascular disease states are associated with autonomic dysfunction, specifically sympathetic activation and parasympathetic withdrawal. Both these autonomic derangements are independently associated with adverse prognostic outcomes. HMG CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) reduce cardiovascular mortality and morbidity when compared to placebo in subjects with proven coronary artery disease (CAD), including sudden presumed arrhythmic death. As autonomic dysfunction is associated with arrhythmogenesis, statins may be having a beneficial effect on autonomic function in these subjects. We conducted a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study examining the effect of rapid short-term lipid lowering with a statin on autonomic function in CAD patients. Ten subjects with proven CAD (8 male, 2 female; mean age 63.4 years) were randomised to receive either 80 mg atorvastatin or placebo over a 4 week period followed by a 4 week washout, then the alternative treatment for a further 4 weeks. Autonomic parameters assessed were plasma noradrenaline levels on recumbency and 80 degrees head-up tilt, cold pressor testing, and heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. Plasma noradrenaline levels were significantly reduced (p=0.050) after 20 min rest in the recumbent position, with atorvastatin compared to placebo. A nonsignificant reduction in plasma noradrenaline with atorvastatin compared to placebo was observed in the prolonged 80 degrees head-up position (p=0.207). In addition, sympathovagal balance was shifted to greater vagal predominance with atorvastatin (low-frequency/high-frequency ratio in the HRV frequency domain) when compared to placebo, p=0.06. We found that rapid lipid lowering with atorvastatin reduces sympathetic nervous system in this pilot study of CAD patients. Larger trials are required to definitively address the effects of statins on autonomic activity in these patients. PMID:16889854

  20. Meta-Analysis of the SLCO1B1 c.521T>C Variant Reveals Slight Influence on the Lipid-Lowering Efficacy of Statins

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Ye; Zhu, Xiaohai; Tian, Xuewen; Cheng, Jingjing

    2015-01-01

    Background Several studies have focused on the association between the lipid-lowering efficacy of statins and the SLCO1B1 c.521T>C polymorphism; however, the results are conflicting. The effects of statins show significant variability between individuals. This meta-analysis aimed to investigate the effects of the SLCO1B1 c.521T>C polymorphism on the lipid-lowering effects of statins. Methods We systematically searched PubMed and Web of Science to screen relevant studies. Meta-analysis was performed to identify the association between SLCO1B1 c.521 polymorphisms and the lipid-lowering effects of statinson the basis of the standard mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Additionally, we checked for heterogeneity (I2) among studies and evidence of publication bias. We obtained eight studies including 2,012 wild genotype (T/T) and 526 variant genotype (T/C and C/C) cases. Results No significant difference was observed in the lipid-lowering efficacy of statins between the wildand variant genotypes of SLCO1B1, with a pooled SMD of 0.03 (95% CI: -0.07-0.13). Furthermore, there was no significant effect in the meta-analyses of the variant heterozygote, homozygote, and Chinese populations. Subgroup meta-analysis indicated that the timerequired for the statin to take effectdid notsignificantly affect the association between lipid-lowering efficacy of statins and SLCO1B1 c.521T>C polymorphism. However, thewild genotype improved the lipid-lowering efficacy of simvastatin with a pooled SMD of -0.26 (95% CI: -0.47- -0.05). Conclusions No significant association was detected between the lipid-lowering efficacy of statins and the SLCO1B1 c.521T>C polymorphism, with the exception of simvastatin. PMID:25932441

  1. Comparison of high-intensity laser therapy and ultrasound treatment in the patients with lumbar discopathy.

    PubMed

    Boyraz, Ismail; Yildiz, Ahmet; Koc, Bunyamin; Sarman, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficiency of high intensity laser and ultrasound therapy in patients who were diagnosed with lumbar disc herniation and who were capable of performing physical exercises. 65 patients diagnosed with lumbar disc were included in the study. The patients were randomly divided into three groups: Group 1 received 10 sessions of high intensity laser to the lumbar region, Group 2 received 10 sessions of ultrasound, and Group 3 received medical therapy for 10 days and isometric lumbar exercises. The efficacy of the treatment modalities was compared with the assessment of the patients before the therapy at the end of the therapy, and in third month after the therapy. Comparing the changes between groups, statically significant difference was observed in MH (mental health) parameter before treatment between Groups 1 and 2 and in MH parameter and VAS score in third month of the therapy between Groups 2 and 3. However, the evaluation of the patients after ten days of treatment did not show significant differences between the groups compared to baseline values. We found that HILT, ultrasound, and exercise were efficient therapies for lumbar discopathy but HILT and ultrasound had longer effect on some parameters. PMID:25883952

  2. Comparison of High-Intensity Laser Therapy and Ultrasound Treatment in the Patients with Lumbar Discopathy

    PubMed Central

    Boyraz, Ismail; Yildiz, Ahmet; Koc, Bunyamin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficiency of high intensity laser and ultrasound therapy in patients who were diagnosed with lumbar disc herniation and who were capable of performing physical exercises. 65 patients diagnosed with lumbar disc were included in the study. The patients were randomly divided into three groups: Group 1 received 10 sessions of high intensity laser to the lumbar region, Group 2 received 10 sessions of ultrasound, and Group 3 received medical therapy for 10 days and isometric lumbar exercises. The efficacy of the treatment modalities was compared with the assessment of the patients before the therapy at the end of the therapy, and in third month after the therapy. Comparing the changes between groups, statically significant difference was observed in MH (mental health) parameter before treatment between Groups 1 and 2 and in MH parameter and VAS score in third month of the therapy between Groups 2 and 3. However, the evaluation of the patients after ten days of treatment did not show significant differences between the groups compared to baseline values. We found that HILT, ultrasound, and exercise were efficient therapies for lumbar discopathy but HILT and ultrasound had longer effect on some parameters. PMID:25883952

  3. Increased Intensity of Physical Therapy for a Child with Gross Motor Developmental Delay: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreiber, Joe

    2004-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The intensity of physical therapy provided for children in early intervention (EI) programs may be influenced by a number of factors. In an individualized program, however, some children and families may benefit from an increased frequency of services. The purpose of this case report was to systematically document and…

  4. Two-Day, Intensive Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deacon, Brett

    2007-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a highly effective treatment for panic disorder. However, few patients have access to this treatment, particularly those living in rural areas. In a pilot study, the author previously described the efficacy of a 2-day, intensive, exposure-based CBT intervention that was developed for the purpose of delivering…

  5. The Lipid-lowering Effects of R-bambuterol in Healthy Chinese Volunteers: A Randomized Phase I Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Yanrui; Xu, Hang; Quan, Lei; Zhu, Long; Zeng, Jing; Zhou, Ting; Zou, ChengJuan; Cheng, Qing; Bu, Shujie; Tan, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Background Existing treatments are inadequate for patients at high risk of coronary heart disease caused by elevated levels of plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Bambuterol is a prodrug of β2-agonist commonly used for the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with the advantage of once daily dosing and favorable side effect profile. The potential lipid-lowering effects of bambuterol were unclear, possibly due to the racemic bambuterol (rac-bambuterol) that was used in previous studies. Methods The lipid-lowering effects of R-bambuterol were examined in a randomized phase I trial in 48 healthy Chinese volunteers aged 18–45 years. Participants were randomly assigned to five groups to receive a single dose (2.5 mg, 5 mg or 10 mg) or multiple doses (5 mg) of oral medications of R-bambuterol, or a single dose of rac-bambuterol (10 mg). Plasma lipid levels were measured at baseline, time to peak concentration (Tmax) and 24 h after the treatment. Findings Administration of a single-dose of R-bambuterol resulted in dose-dependent reductions in the levels of plasma LDL-C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), total cholesterol (TC), apolipoprotein B (ApoB) and apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) at Tmax. Levels of LDL-C exhibited the most reductions, which were statistically significant in all three single-dose R-bambuterol groups (all P values < 0.05). R-bambuterol was more potent in LDL-C lowering compared to rac-bambuterol at Tmax (P = 0.08). At 24 h after dosing, the significant lipid lowering effects of R-bambuterol sustained for LDL-C (P = 0.01), ApoB (P = 0.001) and ApoA1 (P = 0.03), but not for HDL-C. The ratio of ApoA1/ApoB was marginally increased (P = 0.06). In the multiple-dose group, LDL-C levels again were significantly reduced (all P values < 0.05), whereas the ratios of ApoA1/ApoB were marginally increased. Interpretation R-bambuterol can lower the plasma levels of LDL-C, and marginally

  6. Lipid-lowering effects of methanolic extract of Vernonia amygdalina leaves in rats fed on high cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Adaramoye, Oluwatosin A; Akintayo, Olajumoke; Achem, Jonah; Fafunso, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the lipid-lowering effects of methanolic extract of Vernonia amygdalina (VA) leaves in rats fed an high cholesterol diet, and compared with a standard hypolipidemic drug, Questran (Qu). The effects of VA on the lipid profile were assessed by measuring the levels of total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, lipid peroxidation (LPO), phospholipid, and glutathione (GSH) in the plasma and liver of the rats. Administration of cholesterol at a dose of 30 mg/0.3 ml, five times in a week for nine consecutive weeks resulted in a significant increase (p < 0.05) in plasma and post mitochondrial fraction (PMF) cholesterol levels by 33% and 55%, respectively. However, treatment with extract of VA at doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg caused a dose dependent reduction in the plasma and PMF cholesterol by 20%, 23% and 23%, 29%, respectively. Similar reduction in cholesterol levels was obtained in Qu-treated rats. Furthermore, VA at 200 mg/kg decreased the plasma and PMF LDL-cholesterol levels by 23% and 49%, and also decreased plasma and PMF triglyceride levels by 29% and 28%, respectively. Also, VA at 100 and 200 mg/kg caused a dose-dependent increase in plasma HDL-cholesterol levels by 41% and 59%, respectively. However, there were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in the PMF HDL-cholesterol and phospholipid levels of the treated rats when compared to hypercholesterolemic rats. There were significant decreases (p < 0.05) in the LPO levels of extract-treated rats. Precisely, VA at 100 and 200 mg/kg decreased the levels of plasma and PMF LPO by 38%, 42% and 35%, 45%, respectively. In addition, VA augmented the cholesterol-induced decrease in PMF glutathione levels of the rats. Taken together, these results suggest the lipid-lowering effects of VA and, probably serve as a new potential natural product for the treatment of hyperlipidemia. PMID:18629374

  7. Radiation-Induced Cancers From Modern Radiotherapy Techniques: Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jinsung; Shin, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Se Byeong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To assess and compare secondary cancer risk resulting from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and proton therapy in patients with prostate and head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy in the scattering mode were planned for 5 prostate caner patients and 5 head-and-neck cancer patients. The secondary doses during irradiation were measured using ion chamber and CR-39 detectors for IMRT and proton therapy, respectively. Organ-specific radiation-induced cancer risk was estimated by applying organ equivalent dose to dose distributions. Results: The average secondary doses of proton therapy for prostate cancer patients, measured 20-60cm from the isocenter, ranged from 0.4 mSv/Gy to 0.1 mSv/Gy. The average secondary doses of IMRT for prostate patients, however, ranged between 3 mSv/Gy and 1 mSv/Gy, approximately one order of magnitude higher than for proton therapy. Although the average secondary doses of IMRT were higher than those of proton therapy for head-and-neck cancers, these differences were not significant. Organ equivalent dose calculations showed that, for prostate cancer patients, the risk of secondary cancers in out-of-field organs, such as the stomach, lungs, and thyroid, was at least 5 times higher for IMRT than for proton therapy, whereas the difference was lower for head-and-neck cancer patients. Conclusions: Comparisons of organ-specific organ equivalent dose showed that the estimated secondary cancer risk using scattering mode in proton therapy is either significantly lower than the cases in IMRT treatment or, at least, does not exceed the risk induced by conventional IMRT treatment.

  8. Effects of low-intensity laser therapy over mini-implants success rate in pigs.

    PubMed

    Garcez, Aguinaldo S; Suzuki, Selly Sayuri; Martinez, Elisabeth Ferreira; Iemini, Mylene Garcez; Suzuki, Hideo

    2015-02-01

    The success rate of miniscrews when used as temporary orthodontic anchorage is relatively high, but some factors could affect its clinical success such as inflammation around the miniscrew. Low-intensity laser therapy has been widely used for biostimulation of tissue and wound healing specially for its anti-inflammatory effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of low-intensity laser therapy over the miniscrew success rate. Five Landrace's pigs received 50 miniscrews on the buccal side of the mandible and on the palate of the maxilla. All the miniscrews were immediately loaded with 250 gf. The laser group were irradiated with a 780-nm diode laser with 70 mWs for 1 min (dose = 34 J/cm(2)); the contralateral side was used as the control group. The miniscrews were photographed and analyzed clinically every week to determine their stability and presence of local inflammation. After 3 weeks, histological analysis and fluorescent microscopy were performed to compare the laser and the control side. Clinical results showed a success rate of 60% for the control group and 80% for the laser-treated group. The histological analysis and fluorescent microscopy demonstrated that the laser group had less inflammatory cells than the control group and the bone neoformation around the miniscrew was more intense. Low-intensity laser therapy increased the success rate of orthodontic miniscrews, probably due to anti-inflammatory effect and bone stimulation. PMID:23929562

  9. Dietary Adherence and Mealtime Behaviors in Young Children with Type 1 Diabetes on Intensive Insulin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Patton, Susana R.; Dolan, Lawrence M.; Chen, Ming; Powers, Scott W.

    2013-01-01

    Diet is an important component of diabetes treatment and integral to successful management. While intensive insulin therapy can allow patients to eat more freely, it is not known how the rapid uptake of intensive therapy in young children with type 1 diabetes has impacted their diet and if diet and healthful eating in young children correlates with mealtime behaviors and glycemic control. This study examined diet, mealtime behaviors, and glucose control in a sample of 39 young children on intensive therapy. This was a one-sample, cross-sectional study. Children had a mean age of 5.1±1.1 years. Children’s 3-day diet diaries were assessed using a deviation scale (measure of adherence) and a healthy eating index. Mealtime behaviors were assessed using the Behavioral Pediatric Feeding Assessment Scale. Children’s glucose control was measured using continuous glucose monitoring. Children’s mean carbohydrate intake was 72%±24% of the recommended levels based on their age, sex, size, and activity level, and children exceeded national guidelines for percentage of calories from fat and saturated fat. A more healthful diet correlated with fewer child mealtime behavior problems, but better dietary adherence correlated with more parent mealtime behavior problems. Even in the context of intensive management, diet can be problematic for young children with type 1 diabetes. Parent-reported problems with mealtime behaviors seem to correlate with healthy eating and dietary adherence. PMID:23351629

  10. Correlation between Ultrasound Reflection Intensity and Tumor Ablation Ratio of Late-Stage Pancreatic Carcinoma in HIFU Therapy: Dynamic Observation on Ultrasound Reflection Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Hui-Yu; Miao, Li-Ying; Wang, Jin-Rui; Xiong, Liu-Lin; Yan, Fang; Zheng, Cui-Shan; Jia, Jian-Wen; Cui, Li-Gang; Chen, Wen

    2013-01-01

    The minimally invasive high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is thermal ablation treatment for late-stage pancreatic carcinoma with widely recognized safety and effectiveness, but there are currently no instant assessment methods for its ablation effect. It is vital to find a real-time high-sensitive assessment method. This research aims to dynamically observe the variation rules of ultrasound reflection intensity, analyze the correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio, and find out the value of ultrasound reflection intensity in prognosis of HIFU ablation effect. HIFU intermittent therapies were retrospectively analyzed for 31 subjects with late-stage pancreatic carcinoma from March 2007 to December 2009 in the study. The variation rules of the ultrasound reflection intensity during HIFU therapy were summarized and the correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio was analyzed based on the tumor ablation ratio indicated by CT scanning. The conclusion is that variation of ultrasound reflection intensity can be used for initial assessment of tumor ablation in HIFU therapy and early prognosis of overall HIFU ablation, providing important clinical basis for improving safety and effectiveness of HIFU therapy. Ultrasound can work as a real-time imaging instrument for observation of HIFU ablation effect in treating late-stage pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:24453916

  11. Defining and Treating Older Adults with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Ineligible for Intensive Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Pettit, Kristen; Odenike, Olatoyosi

    2015-01-01

    Although acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is primarily a disease of older adults (age ≥60 years), the optimal treatment for older adults remains largely undefined. Intensive chemotherapy is rarely beneficial for frail older adults or those with poor-risk disease, but criteria that define fitness and/or appropriateness for intensive chemotherapy remain to be standardized. Evaluation of disease-related and patient-specific factors in the context of clinical decision making has therefore been largely subjective. A uniform approach to identify those patients most likely to benefit from intensive therapies is needed. Here, we review currently available objective measures to define older adults with AML who are ineligible for intensive chemotherapy, and discuss promising investigational approaches. PMID:26697412

  12. Antioxidant, lipid lowering, and membrane stabilization effect of sesamol against doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Chennuru, Anusha; Saleem, Mohamed T S

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the cardioprotective effect of sesamol against doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy in rats. In this study, the cardioprotective effect of sesamol against doxorubicin induced cardiomyopathy in experimental rats was evaluated at the dosage of 50 mg/kg bw. Doxorubicin was administered to rats at a total cumulative dose of 15 mg/kg through intraperitoneal route for 2 weeks in six-divided dose on 8th, 10th, 14th, 16th, 18th, and 21st day. After the last dose administration, the endogenous antioxidants and lipid peroxidation were estimated in heart tissue homogenate. Cardiac biomarkers such as troponin T, LDH, CK, and AST and lipid profiles such as cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, LDL, and VLDL were estimated in serum. Sesamol has cardioprotective activity through normalization of doxorubicin-induced-altered biochemical parameters. Biochemical study was further supported by histopathological study, which shows that sesamol offered myocardial protection from necrotic damage. From these findings, it has been concluded that the sesamol has significant cardioprotection against doxorubicin induced cardiomyopathy via amelioration of oxidative stress, lipid lowering, and membrane stabilization effect. PMID:24228260

  13. A metabolomic and pharmacokinetic study on the mechanism underlying the lipid-lowering effect of orally administered berberine.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shenghua; Cao, Bei; Sun, Runbin; Tang, Yueqing; Paletta, Janice L; Wu, Xiaolei; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Liu, Linsheng; Zha, Weibin; Zhao, Chunyan; Li, Yan; Ridlon, Jason M; Radlon, Jason M; Hylemon, Phillip B; Zhou, Huiping; Aa, Jiye; Wang, Guangji

    2015-02-01

    Clinical and animal studies demonstrated that orally administered berberine had a distinct lipid-lowering effect. However, pharmacokinetic studies showed that berberine was poorly absorbed into the body so the levels of berberine in the blood and target tissues were far below the effective concentrations revealed. To probe the underlying mechanism, the effect of berberine on the biological system was studied on a high-fat-diet-induced hamster hyperlipidemia model. Our results showed that intragastrically-administered berberine was poorly absorbed into circulation and most berberine accumulated in gut content. Although the bioavailability of intragastrically administered berberine was much lower than that of intraperitoneally administered berberine, it had a stronger lipid-lowing effect, indicating that the gastrointestinal tract is a potential target for the hypolipidemic effect of berberine. A metabolomic study on both serum and gut content showed that orally administered berberine significantly regulated molecules involved in lipid metabolism, and increased the generation of bile acids in the hyperlipidemic model. DNA analysis revealed that the orally administered berberine modulated the gut microbiota, and berberine showed a significant inhibition of the 7α-dehydroxylation conversion of cholic acid to deoxycholic acid, indicating a decreased elimination of bile acids in the gut. However, in model hamsters, elevated bile acids failed to downregulate the expression and function of CYP7A1 in a negative feedback loop. It was suggested that the hypocholesterolemic effect of orally administered berberine involves modulating the turnover of bile acids and the farnesoid X receptor signal pathway. PMID:25411028

  14. Effect of low level laser therapy and high intensity laser therapy on endothelial cell proliferation in vitro: preliminary communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukowicz, Malgorzata; Szymanska, Justyna; Goralczyk, Krzysztof; Zajac, Andrzej; Rość, Danuta

    2013-01-01

    Background: The main purpose of this study was to analyze the influence of power intensity and wavelength of Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) and HILT (High Intensity Laser Therapy) on endothelial cell proliferation. Material and methods: The tests were done on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Cultures were exposed to laser irradiation of 660 nm and 670 nm at different dosages, power output was 10 - 40 mW as well as 820 nm with power 100 mW and 808 nm with power 1500 mW. Energy density was from 0.28 to 11,43 J/cm2. Cell proliferation of a control and tested culture was evaluated with a colorimetric device to detect live cells. The tests were repeated 8 times. Results: We observed good effects of LLLT on live isolated ECs and no effects in experiments on previous deep-frozen cultures. Also HILT stimulated the proliferation of HUVEC. Conclusion: Endothelial cells play a key role in vascular homeostasis in humans. We observed the stimulatory effect of LLLT and HILT on proliferation of HUVEC. Many factors influence the proliferation of EC, so is it necessary to continue the experiment with different doses, intensity and cell concentration.

  15. IMPACT OF CONTINUOUS RENAL REPLACEMENT THERAPY INTENSITY ON SEPTIC ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Mayumi, Kengo; Yamashita, Tetsushi; Hamasaki, Yoshifumi; Noiri, Eisei; Nangaku, Masaomi; Yahagi, Naoki; Doi, Kent

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The intensity of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) for acute kidney injury (AKI) has been evaluated, but recent randomized clinical trials have failed to demonstrate a beneficial impact of high intensity on the outcomes. High intensity might cause some detrimental results recognized recently as CRRT trauma. This study was undertaken to evaluate the association of CRRT intensity with mortality in a population of AKI patients treated with lower-intensity CRRT in Japan. A retrospective single-center cohort study enrolled 125 AKI patients treated with CRRT in mixed intensive care units of a university hospital in Japan. Subanalysis was conducted for septic and postsurgical AKI. The median value of the prescribed total effluent rate was 20.1 (interquartile range 15.3–27.1) mL/kg/h. Overall, univariate Cox regression analysis indicated no association of the CRRT intensity with the 60-day in-hospital mortality rate (hazard ratio 1.006, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.991–1.018, P = 0.343). In subanalysis with the septic AKI patients, multivariate analysis revealed two factors associated independently with the 60-day mortality rate: the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score at initiation of CRRT (hazard ratio 1.152, 95% CI 1.025–1.301, P = 0.0171) and the CRRT intensity (hazard ratio 1.024, 95% CI 1.004–1.042, P = 0.0195). The CRRT intensity was associated significantly with higher 60-day in-hospital mortality in septic AKI, suggesting that unknown detrimental effects of CRRT with high-intensity CRRT might worsen the outcomes in septic AKI patients. PMID:26771934

  16. IMPACT OF CONTINUOUS RENAL REPLACEMENT THERAPY INTENSITY ON SEPTIC ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY.

    PubMed

    Mayumi, Kengo; Yamashita, Tetsushi; Hamasaki, Yoshifumi; Noiri, Eisei; Nangaku, Masaomi; Yahagi, Naoki; Doi, Kent

    2016-02-01

    The intensity of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) for acute kidney injury (AKI) has been evaluated, but recent randomized clinical trials have failed to demonstrate a beneficial impact of high intensity on the outcomes. High intensity might cause some detrimental results recognized recently as CRRT trauma. This study was undertaken to evaluate the association of CRRT intensity with mortality in a population of AKI patients treated with lower-intensity CRRT in Japan. A retrospective single-center cohort study enrolled 125 AKI patients treated with CRRT in mixed intensive care units of a university hospital in Japan. Subanalysis was conducted for septic and postsurgical AKI. The median value of the prescribed total effluent rate was 20.1 (interquartile range 15.3-27.1) mL/kg/h. Overall, univariate Cox regression analysis indicated no association of the CRRT intensity with the 60-day in-hospital mortality rate (hazard ratio 1.006, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.991-1.018, P = 0.343). In subanalysis with the septic AKI patients, multivariate analysis revealed two factors associated independently with the 60-day mortality rate: the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score at initiation of CRRT (hazard ratio 1.152, 95% CI 1.025-1.301, P = 0.0171) and the CRRT intensity (hazard ratio 1.024, 95% CI 1.004-1.042, P = 0.0195). The CRRT intensity was associated significantly with higher 60-day in-hospital mortality in septic AKI, suggesting that unknown detrimental effects of CRRT with high-intensity CRRT might worsen the outcomes in septic AKI patients. PMID:26771934

  17. Proton therapy versus intensity modulated x-ray therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer: Estimating secondary cancer risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontenot, Jonas David

    External beam radiation therapy is used to treat nearly half of the more than 200,000 new cases of prostate cancer diagnosed in the United States each year. During a radiation therapy treatment, healthy tissues in the path of the therapeutic beam are exposed to high doses. In addition, the whole body is exposed to a low-dose bath of unwanted scatter radiation from the pelvis and leakage radiation from the treatment unit. As a result, survivors of radiation therapy for prostate cancer face an elevated risk of developing a radiogenic second cancer. Recently, proton therapy has been shown to reduce the dose delivered by the therapeutic beam to normal tissues during treatment compared to intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT, the current standard of care). However, the magnitude of stray radiation doses from proton therapy, and their impact on this incidence of radiogenic second cancers, was not known. The risk of a radiogenic second cancer following proton therapy for prostate cancer relative to IMXT was determined for 3 patients of large, median, and small anatomical stature. Doses delivered to healthy tissues from the therapeutic beam were obtained from treatment planning system calculations. Stray doses from IMXT were taken from the literature, while stray doses from proton therapy were simulated using a Monte Carlo model of a passive scattering treatment unit and an anthropomorphic phantom. Baseline risk models were taken from the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation VII report. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to characterize the uncertainty of risk calculations to uncertainties in the risk model, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons for carcinogenesis, and inter-patient anatomical variations. The risk projections revealed that proton therapy carries a lower risk for radiogenic second cancer incidence following prostate irradiation compared to IMXT. The sensitivity analysis revealed that the results of the risk analysis depended only

  18. A comparison of intensity modulated x-ray therapy to intensity modulated proton therapy for the delivery of non-uniform dose distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Ryan

    2007-12-01

    The distribution of biological characteristics such as clonogen density, proliferation, and hypoxia throughout tumors is generally non-uniform, therefore it follows that the optimal dose prescriptions should also be non-uniform and tumor-specific. Advances in intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT) technology have made the delivery of custom-made non-uniform dose distributions possible in practice. Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) has the potential to deliver non-uniform dose distributions as well, while significantly reducing normal tissue and organ at risk dose relative to IMXT. In this work, a specialized treatment planning system was developed for the purpose of optimizing and comparing biologically based IMXT and IMPT plans. The IMXT systems of step-and-shoot (IMXT-SAS) and helical tomotherapy (IMXT-HT) and the IMPT systems of intensity modulated spot scanning (IMPT-SS) and distal gradient tracking (IMPT-DGT), were simulated. A thorough phantom study was conducted in which several subvolumes, which were contained within a base tumor region, were boosted or avoided with IMXT and IMPT. Different boosting situations were simulated by varying the size, proximity, and the doses prescribed to the subvolumes, and the size of the phantom. IMXT and IMPT were also compared for a whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) case, in which a brain metastasis was simultaneously boosted and the hippocampus was avoided. Finally, IMXT and IMPT dose distributions were compared for the case of non-uniform dose prescription in a head and neck cancer patient that was based on PET imaging with the Cu(II)-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone (Cu-ATSM) hypoxia marker. The non-uniform dose distributions within the tumor region were comparable for IMXT and IMPT. IMPT, however, was capable of delivering the same non-uniform dose distributions within a tumor using a 180° arc as for a full 360° rotation, which resulted in the reduction of normal tissue integral dose by a factor of

  19. High-flow oxygen therapy and other inhaled therapies in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Levy, Sean D; Alladina, Jehan W; Hibbert, Kathryn A; Harris, R Scott; Bajwa, Ednan K; Hess, Dean R

    2016-04-30

    In this Series paper, we review the current evidence for the use of high-flow oxygen therapy, inhaled gases, and aerosols in the care of critically ill patients. The available evidence supports the use of high-flow nasal cannulae for selected patients with acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure. Heliox might prevent intubation or improve gas flow in mechanically ventilated patients with severe asthma. Additionally, it might improve the delivery of aerosolised bronchodilators in obstructive lung disease in general. Inhaled nitric oxide might improve outcomes in a subset of patients with postoperative pulmonary hypertension who had cardiac surgery; however, it has not been shown to provide long-term benefit in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Inhaled prostacyclins, similar to inhaled nitric oxide, are not recommended for routine use in patients with ARDS, but can be used to improve oxygenation in patients who are not adequately stabilised with traditional therapies. Aerosolised bronchodilators are useful in mechanically ventilated patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but are not recommended for those with ARDS. Use of aerosolised antibiotics for ventilator-associated pneumonia and ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis shows promise, but the delivered dose can be highly variable if proper attention is not paid to the delivery method. PMID:27203510

  20. The radiation techniques of tomotherapy & intensity-modulated radiation therapy applied to lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhengfei

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) plays an important role in the management of lung cancer. Development of radiation techniques is a possible way to improve the effect of RT by reducing toxicities through better sparing the surrounding normal tissues. This article will review the application of two forms of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), fixed-field IMRT and helical tomotherapy (HT) in lung cancer, including dosimetric and clinical studies. The advantages and potential disadvantages of these two techniques are also discussed. PMID:26207214

  1. Intensive sleep deprivation and cognitive behavioral therapy for pharmacotherapy refractory insomnia in a hospitalized patient.

    PubMed

    Breitstein, Joshua; Penix, Brandon; Roth, Bernard J; Baxter, Tristin; Mysliwiec, Vincent

    2014-06-15

    The case of a 59-year-old woman psychiatrically hospitalized with comorbid insomnia, suicidal ideation, and generalized anxiety disorder is presented. Pharmacologic therapies were unsuccessful for treating insomnia prior to and during hospitalization. Intensive sleep deprivation was initiated for 40 consecutive hours followed by a recovery sleep period of 8 hours. Traditional components of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTi), sleep restriction, and stimulus control therapies, were initiated on the ward. After two consecutive nights with improved sleep, anxiety, and absence of suicidal ideation, the patient was discharged. She was followed in the sleep clinic for two months engaging in CBTi. Treatment resulted in substantial improvement in her insomnia, daytime sleepiness, and anxiety about sleep. Sleep deprivation regimens followed by a restricted sleep recovery period have shown antidepressant effects in depressed patients. Similar treatment protocols have not been investigated in patients with pharmacotherapy refractory insomnia and generalized anxiety disorder. PMID:24932151

  2. Safety trial of high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sofuni, Atsushi; Moriyasu, Fuminori; Sano, Takatomo; Itokawa, Fumihide; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Kurihara, Toshio; Ishii, Kentaro; Tsuji, Syujiro; Ikeuchi, Nobuhito; Tanaka, Reina; Umeda, Junko; Tonozuka, Ryosuke; Honjo, Mitsuyoshi; Mukai, Shuntaro; Fujita, Mitsuru; Itoi, Takao

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the safety and clinical application of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy for unresectable pancreatic cancer (PC). METHODS: Thirty PC patients (16 cases in stage III and 14 cases in stage IV) with visualized pancreatic tumors were admitted for HIFU therapy as an optional local therapy in addition to systemic chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Informed consent was obtained. This study began at the end of 2008 and was approved by the ethics committee of our hospital [Institutional Review Board (IRB): 890]. The HIFU device used was the FEP-BY02 (Yuande Bio-Medical Engineering, Beijing, China). RESULTS: The mean tumor size after HIFU therapy changed to 30.9 ± 1.7 mm from 31.7 ± 1.7 mm at pre-therapy. There were no significant changes in tumor size, mean number of treatment sessions (2.7 ± 0.1 mm), or mean total treatment time (2.4 ± 0.1 h). The rate of symptom relief effect was 66.7%. The effectiveness of primary lesion treatment was as follows: complete response, 0; partial response, 4; stable disease, 22; progressive disease, 4. Treatment after HIFU therapy included 2 operations, 24 chemotherapy treatments, and 4 best supportive care treatments. Adverse events occurred in 10% of cases, namely pseudocyst formation in 2 cases and mild pancreatitis development in 1. However, no severe adverse events occurred in this study. CONCLUSION: We suggest that HIFU therapy is safe and has the potential to be a new method of combination therapy for PC. PMID:25071354

  3. Metabolomic and pharmacokinetic study on the mechanism underlying the lipid-lowering effect of oral-administrated berberine

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shenghua; Cao, Bei; Sun, Runbin; Tang, Yueqing; Paletta, Janice L.; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Liu, Linsheng; Zha, Weibin; Zhao, Chunyan; Li, Yan; Radlon, Jason M.; Hylemon, Phillip B.; Zhou, Huiping; Aa, Jiye; Wang, Guangji

    2014-01-01

    Clinic and animal studies demonstrated that oral-administrated berberine had distinct lipid-lowering effect. However, pharmacokinetic studies showed berberine was poorly absorbed into the body so that the levels of berberine in the blood and target tissues were far below the effective concentrations revealed. To probe the underlying mechanism, the effect of berberine on biological system was studied on a high-fat-diet-induced hamster hyperlipidemia model. Our results showed that intragastric-administered berberine was poorly absorbed into circulation and most berberine accumulated in gut content. Although the bioavailability for intragastric-administered berberine was much lower than that of intraperitoneal-administered berberine, it had stronger lipid-lowing effect, indicating gastrointestinal is a potential target for hypolipidemic effect of berberine. Metabolomic study on both serum and gut content showed that oral-administrated berberine significantly regulated molecules involved in lipid metabolism, and increased the generation of bile acids in the hyperlipidemic model. DNA analysis revealed that the oral-administered berberine modulated the gut microbiota, and BBR showed a significant inhibition on the 7α-dehydroxylation conversion of cholic acid to deoxycholic acid, indicating a decreased elimination of bile acids in the gut. However, in model hamsters, elevated bile acids failed to down-regulate the expression and function of CYP7A1 in a negative feed-back way. It was suggested that the hypocholesterolemic effect for oral-administrated berberine is involved in its effect on modulating the turnover of bile acids and farnesoid X receptor signal pathway. PMID:25411028

  4. Alpha lipoic acid possess dual antioxidant and lipid lowering properties in atherosclerotic-induced New Zealand White rabbit.

    PubMed

    Zulkhairi, A; Zaiton, Z; Jamaluddin, M; Sharida, F; Mohd, T H B; Hasnah, B; Nazmi, H M; Khairul, O; Zanariyah, A

    2008-12-01

    There is accumulating data demonstrated hypercholesterolemia and oxidative stress play an important role in the development of atherosclerosis. In the present study, a protective activity of alpha-lipoic acid; a metabolic antioxidant in hypercholesterolemic-induced animals was investigated. Eighteen adult male New Zealand White (NZW) rabbit were segregated into three groups labelled as group K, AT and ALA (n=6). While group K was fed with normal chow and acted as a control, the rest fed with 100 g/head/day with 1% high cholesterol diet to induce hypercholesterolemia. 4.2 mg/body weight of alpha lipoic acid was supplemented daily to the ALA group. Drinking water was given ad-libitum. The study was designed for 10 weeks. Blood sampling was taken from the ear lobe vein at the beginning of the study, week 5 and week 10 and plasma was prepared for lipid profile estimation and microsomal lipid peroxidation index indicated with malondialdehyde (MDA) formation. Animals were sacrificed at the end of the study and the aortas were excised for intimal lesion analysis. The results showed a significant reduction of lipid peroxidation index indicated with low MDA level (p<0.05) in ALA group compared to that of the AT group. The blood total cholesterol (TCHOL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) levels were found to be significantly low in ALA group compared to that of the AT group (p<0.05). Histomorphometric intimal lesion analysis of the aorta showing less of atheromatous plaque formation in alpha lipoic acid supplemented group (p<0.05) compared to that of AT group. These findings suggested that apart from its antioxidant activity, alpha lipoic acid may also posses a lipid lowering effect indicated with low plasma TCHOL and LDL levels and reduced the athero-lesion formation in rabbits fed a high cholesterol diet. PMID:18538528

  5. Treatment planning, optimization, and beam delivery technqiues for intensity modulated proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengbusch, Evan R.

    , beamlet weight, the number of delivered beamlets, and the number of delivery angles. These methods are evaluated via treatment planning studies including left-sided whole breast irradiation, lung stereotactic body radiotherapy, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and whole brain radiotherapy with hippocampal avoidance. Improvements in efficiency and efficacy relative to traditional proton therapy and intensity modulated photon radiation therapy are discussed.

  6. Implementation of a procalcitonin-guided algorithm for antibiotic therapy in the burn intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Lavrentieva, A.; Kontou, P.; Soulountsi, V.; Kioumis, J.; Chrysou, O.; Bitzani, M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The purpose of this study was to examine the hypothesis that an algorithm based on serial measurements of procalcitonin (PCT) allows reduction in the duration of antibiotic therapy compared with empirical rules, and does not result in more adverse outcomes in burn patients with infectious complications. All burn patients requiring antibiotic therapy based on confirmed or highly suspected bacterial infections were eligible. Patients were assigned to either a procalcitonin-guided (study group) or a standard (control group) antibiotic regimen. The following variables were analyzed and compared in both groups: duration of antibiotic treatment, mortality rate, percentage of patients with relapse or superinfection, maximum SOFA score (days 1-28), length of ICU and hospital stay. A total of 46 Burn ICU patients receiving antibiotic therapy were enrolled in this study. In 24 patients antibiotic therapy was guided by daily procalcitonin and clinical assessment. PCT guidance resulted in a smaller antibiotic exposure (10.1±4 vs. 15.3±8 days, p=0.034) without negative effects on clinical outcome characteristics such as mortality rate, percentage of patients with relapse or superinfection, maximum SOFA score, length of ICU and hospital stay. The findings thus show that use of a procalcitonin-guided algorithm for antibiotic therapy in the burn intensive care unit may contribute to the reduction of antibiotic exposure without compromising clinical outcome parameters. PMID:27279801

  7. Incorporating deliverable monitor unit constraints into spot intensity optimization in intensity-modulated proton therapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wenhua; Lim, Gino; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Yupeng; Zhu, X. Ronald; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility and impact of incorporating deliverable monitor unit (MU) constraints into spot intensity optimization (SIO) in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment planning. The current treatment planning system (TPS) for IMPT disregards deliverable MU constraints in the SIO routine. It performs a post-processing procedure on an optimized plan to enforce deliverable MU values that are required by the spot scanning proton delivery system. This procedure can create a significant dose distribution deviation between the optimized and post-processed deliverable plans, especially when small spot spacings are used. In this study, we introduce a two-stage linear programming approach to optimize spot intensities and constrain deliverable MU values simultaneously, i.e., a deliverable SIO (DSIO) model. Thus, the post-processing procedure is eliminated and the associated optimized plan deterioration can be avoided. Four prostate cancer cases at our institution were selected for study and two parallel opposed beam angles were planned for all cases. A quadratic programming based model without MU constraints, i.e., a conventional SIO (CSIO) model, was also implemented to emulate commercial TPS. Plans optimized by both the DSIO and CSIO models were evaluated for five different settings of spot spacing from 3 to 7 mm. For all spot spacings, the DSIO-optimized plans yielded better uniformity for the target dose coverage and critical structure sparing than did the CSIO-optimized plans. With reduced spot spacings, more significant improvements in target dose uniformity and critical structure sparing were observed in the DSIO than in the CSIO-optimized plans. Additionally, better sparing of the rectum and bladder was achieved when reduced spacings were used for the DSIO-optimized plans. The proposed DSIO approach ensures the deliverability of optimized IMPT plans that take into account MU constraints. This eliminates the post

  8. Incorporating deliverable monitor unit constraints into spot intensity optimization in intensity-modulated proton therapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenhua; Lim, Gino; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Yupeng; Zhu, X Ronald; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility and impact of incorporating deliverable monitor unit (MU) constraints into spot intensity optimization (SIO) in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment planning. The current treatment planning system (TPS) for IMPT disregards deliverable MU constraints in the SIO routine. It performs a post-processing procedure on an optimized plan to enforce deliverable MU values that are required by the spot scanning proton delivery system. This procedure can create a significant dose distribution deviation between the optimized and post-processed deliverable plans, especially when small spot spacings are used. In this study, we introduce a two-stage linear programming approach to optimize spot intensities and constrain deliverable MU values simultaneously, i.e., a deliverable SIO (DSIO) model. Thus, the post-processing procedure is eliminated and the associated optimized plan deterioration can be avoided. Four prostate cancer cases at our institution were selected for study and two parallel opposed beam angles were planned for all cases. A quadratic programming based model without MU constraints, i.e., a conventional SIO (CSIO) model, was also implemented to emulate commercial TPS. Plans optimized by both the DSIO and CSIO models were evaluated for five different settings of spot spacing from 3 to 7 mm. For all spot spacings, the DSIO-optimized plans yielded better uniformity for the target dose coverage and critical structure sparing than did the CSIO-optimized plans. With reduced spot spacings, more significant improvements in target dose uniformity and critical structure sparing were observed in the DSIO than in the CSIO-optimized plans. Additionally, better sparing of the rectum and bladder was achieved when reduced spacings were used for the DSIO-optimized plans. The proposed DSIO approach ensures the deliverability of optimized IMPT plans that take into account MU constraints. This eliminates the post

  9. Clinical Outcomes of Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiation Therapy for Carcinoma of the Cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Hasselle, Michael D.; Rose, Brent S.; Kochanski, Joel D.; Nath, Sameer K.; Bafana, Rounak; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Hasan, Yasmin; Roeske, John C.; Mundt, Arno J.; Mell, Loren K.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate disease outcomes and toxicity in cervical cancer patients treated with pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: We included all patients with Stage I-IVA cervical carcinoma treated with IMRT at three different institutions from 2000-2007. Patients treated with extended field or conventional techniques were excluded. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans were designed to deliver 45 Gy in 1.8-Gy daily fractions to the planning target volume while minimizing dose to the bowel, bladder, and rectum. Toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group system. Overall survival and disease-free survival were estimated by use of the Kaplan-Meier method. Pelvic failure, distant failure, and late toxicity were estimated by use of cumulative incidence functions. Results: The study included 111 patients. Of these, 22 were treated with postoperative IMRT, 8 with IMRT followed by intracavitary brachytherapy and adjuvant hysterectomy, and 81 with IMRT followed by planned intracavitary brachytherapy. Of the patients, 63 had Stage I-IIA disease and 48 had Stage IIB-IVA disease. The median follow-up time was 27 months. The 3-year overall survival rate and the disease-free survival rate were 78% (95% confidence interval [CI], 68-88%) and 69% (95% CI, 59-81%), respectively. The 3-year pelvic failure rate and the distant failure rate were 14% (95% CI, 6-22%) and 17% (95% CI, 8-25%), respectively. Estimates of acute and late Grade 3 toxicity or higher were 2% (95% CI, 0-7%) and 7% (95% CI, 2-13%), respectively. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy is associated with low toxicity and favorable outcomes, supporting its safety and efficacy for cervical cancer. Prospective clinical trials are needed to evaluate the comparative efficacy of IMRT vs. conventional techniques.

  10. Feasibility of a unified approach to intensity-modulated radiation therapy and volume-modulated arc therapy optimization and delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, Douglas A. Chen, Jeff Z.; MacFarlane, Michael; Wong, Eugene; Battista, Jerry J.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of unified intensity-modulated arc therapy (UIMAT) which combines intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) optimization and delivery to produce superior radiation treatment plans, both in terms of dose distribution and efficiency of beam delivery when compared with either VMAT or IMRT alone. Methods: An inverse planning algorithm for UIMAT was prototyped within the PINNACLE treatment planning system (Philips Healthcare). The IMRT and VMAT deliveries are unified within the same arc, with IMRT being delivered at specific gantry angles within the arc. Optimized gantry angles for the IMRT and VMAT phases are assigned automatically by the inverse optimization algorithm. Optimization of the IMRT and VMAT phases is done simultaneously using a direct aperture optimization algorithm. Five treatment plans each for prostate, head and neck, and lung were generated using a unified optimization technique and compared with clinical IMRT or VMAT plans. Delivery verification was performed with an ArcCheck phantom (Sun Nuclear) on a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems). Results: In this prototype implementation, the UIMAT plans offered the same target dose coverage while reducing mean doses to organs at risk by 8.4% for head-and-neck cases, 5.7% for lung cases, and 3.5% for prostate cases, compared with the VMAT or IMRT plans. In addition, UIMAT can be delivered with similar efficiency as VMAT. Conclusions: In this proof-of-concept work, a novel radiation therapy optimization and delivery technique that interlaces VMAT or IMRT delivery within the same arc has been demonstrated. Initial results show that unified VMAT/IMRT has the potential to be superior to either standard IMRT or VMAT.

  11. A modular approach to intensity-modulated arc therapy optimization with noncoplanar trajectories.

    PubMed

    Papp, Dávid; Bortfeld, Thomas; Unkelbach, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Utilizing noncoplanar beam angles in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has the potential to combine the benefits of arc therapy, such as short treatment times, with the benefits of noncoplanar intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans, such as improved organ sparing. Recently, vendors introduced treatment machines that allow for simultaneous couch and gantry motion during beam delivery to make noncoplanar VMAT treatments possible. Our aim is to provide a reliable optimization method for noncoplanar isocentric arc therapy plan optimization. The proposed solution is modular in the sense that it can incorporate different existing beam angle selection and coplanar arc therapy optimization methods. Treatment planning is performed in three steps. First, a number of promising noncoplanar beam directions are selected using an iterative beam selection heuristic; these beams serve as anchor points of the arc therapy trajectory. In the second step, continuous gantry/couch angle trajectories are optimized using a simple combinatorial optimization model to define a beam trajectory that efficiently visits each of the anchor points. Treatment time is controlled by limiting the time the beam needs to trace the prescribed trajectory. In the third and final step, an optimal arc therapy plan is found along the prescribed beam trajectory. In principle any existing arc therapy optimization method could be incorporated into this step; for this work we use a sliding window VMAT algorithm. The approach is demonstrated using two particularly challenging cases. The first one is a lung SBRT patient whose planning goals could not be satisfied with fewer than nine noncoplanar IMRT fields when the patient was treated in the clinic. The second one is a brain tumor patient, where the target volume overlaps with the optic nerves and the chiasm and it is directly adjacent to the brainstem. Both cases illustrate that the large number of angles utilized by isocentric noncoplanar VMAT plans

  12. A modular approach to intensity-modulated arc therapy optimization with noncoplanar trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, Dávid; Bortfeld, Thomas; Unkelbach, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Utilizing noncoplanar beam angles in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has the potential to combine the benefits of arc therapy, such as short treatment times, with the benefits of noncoplanar intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans, such as improved organ sparing. Recently, vendors introduced treatment machines that allow for simultaneous couch and gantry motion during beam delivery to make noncoplanar VMAT treatments possible. Our aim is to provide a reliable optimization method for noncoplanar isocentric arc therapy plan optimization. The proposed solution is modular in the sense that it can incorporate different existing beam angle selection and coplanar arc therapy optimization methods. Treatment planning is performed in three steps. First, a number of promising noncoplanar beam directions are selected using an iterative beam selection heuristic; these beams serve as anchor points of the arc therapy trajectory. In the second step, continuous gantry/couch angle trajectories are optimized using a simple combinatorial optimization model to define a beam trajectory that efficiently visits each of the anchor points. Treatment time is controlled by limiting the time the beam needs to trace the prescribed trajectory. In the third and final step, an optimal arc therapy plan is found along the prescribed beam trajectory. In principle any existing arc therapy optimization method could be incorporated into this step; for this work we use a sliding window VMAT algorithm. The approach is demonstrated using two particularly challenging cases. The first one is a lung SBRT patient whose planning goals could not be satisfied with fewer than nine noncoplanar IMRT fields when the patient was treated in the clinic. The second one is a brain tumor patient, where the target volume overlaps with the optic nerves and the chiasm and it is directly adjacent to the brainstem. Both cases illustrate that the large number of angles utilized by isocentric noncoplanar VMAT plans

  13. Short-term intensive family therapy for adolescent eating disorders: 30-month outcome.

    PubMed

    Marzola, Enrica; Knatz, Stephanie; Murray, Stuart B; Rockwell, Roxanne; Boutelle, Kerri; Eisler, Ivan; Kaye, Walter H

    2015-05-01

    Family therapy approaches have generated impressive empirical evidence in the treatment of adolescent eating disorders (EDs). However, the paucity of specialist treatment providers limits treatment uptake; therefore, our group developed the intensive family therapy (IFT)-a 5-day treatment based on the principles of family-based therapy for EDs. We retrospectively examined the long-term efficacy of IFT in both single-family (S-IFT) and multi-family (M-IFT) settings evaluating 74 eating disordered adolescents who underwent IFT at the University of California, San Diego, between 2006 and 2013. Full remission was defined as normal weight (≥ 95% of expected for sex, age, and height), Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) global score within 1 SD of norms, and absence of binge-purging behaviours. Partial remission was defined as weight ≥ 85% of expected or ≥ 95% but with elevated EDE-Q global score and presence of binge-purging symptoms (<1/week). Over a mean follow-up period of 30 months, 87.8% of participants achieved either full (60.8%) or partial remission (27%), while 12.2% reported a poor outcome, with both S-IFT and M-IFT showing comparable outcomes. Short-term, intensive treatments may be cost-effective and clinically useful where access to regular specialist treatment is limited. PMID:25783849

  14. Compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator Development For Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy And Homeland Security Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y -; Caporaso, G J; Guethlein, G; Sampayan, S; Akana, G; Anaya, R; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Gower, E; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Hickman, B; Holmes, C; Horner, A; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Pearson, D; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Sanders, D; Stanley, J; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Weir, J

    2009-06-17

    Compact dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator technology is being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The DWA accelerator uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. Its high electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The DWA concept can be applied to accelerate charge particle beams with any charge to mass ratio and energy. Based on the DWA system, a novel compact proton therapy accelerator is being developed. This proton therapy system will produce individual pulses that can be varied in intensity, energy and spot width. The system will be capable of being sited in a conventional linac vault and provide intensity modulated rotational therapy. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, SiC photoconductive switches and compact proton sources. Applications of the DWA accelerator to problems in homeland security will also be discussed.

  15. Intensive combined modality therapy including low-dose TBI in high-risk Ewing's sarcoma patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, T.J.; Glaubiger, D.; Diesseroth, A.; Makuch, R.; Waller, B.; Pizzo, P.; Glatstein, E.

    1983-12-01

    Twenty-four high-risk Ewing's sarcoma patients were treated on an intensive combined modality protocol including low-dose fractionated total body irradiaiton (TBI) and autologous bone marrow infusion (ABMI). Twenty patients (83%) achieved a complete clinical response to the primary and/or metastatic sites following induction therapy. The median disease-free interval was 18 months, and nine patients remain disease-free with a follow-up of 22 to 72 months. Local failure as a manifestation of initial relapse occurred in only three patients (15%), each having synchronous distant failure. Eight patients failed initially with only distant metastases, usually within 1-2 years following a complete clinical response. Two patterns of granulocyte recovery following consolidative therapy (including TBI and ABMI) were recognized. The time to platelet recovery was different for the groups with early and late granulocyte recovery. Patients with late recovery did not tolerate maintenance chemotherapy. However, there was no difference in disease-free and overall survival, when comparing the groups with early and late granulocyte recovery. It is concluded that these high-risk Ewing's sarcoma patients remain a poor-prognosis group in spite of intensive combined modality therapy including low-dose TBI. The control of microscopic systemic disease remains the major challenge to improving the cure rate. A new combined modality protocol with high-dose 'therapeutic' TBI (800 rad/2 fractions) is being used and the protocol design is outlined.

  16. Modeling secondary cancer risk following paediatric radiotherapy: a comparison of intensity modulated proton therapy and photon therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Naomi

    Proton radiotherapy is known to reduce the radiation dose delivered to normal healthy tissue compared to photon techniques. The increase in normal tissue sparing could result in fewer acute and late effects from radiation therapy. In this work proton therapy plans were created for patients previously treated using photon therapy. Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans were planned using inverse planning in VarianRTM's Eclipse(TM) treatment planning system with a scanning proton beam model to the same relative biological effectiveness (RBE)-weighted prescription dose as the photon plan. Proton and photon plans were compared for target dose conformity and homogeneity, body volumes receiving 2 Gy and 5 Gy, integral dose, dose to normal tissues and second cancer risk. Secondary cancer risk was determined using two methods. The relative risk of secondary cancer was found using the method described by Nguyen et al. 1 by applying a linear relationship between integral dose and relative risk of secondary cancer. The second approach used Schneider et al. 's organ equivalent dose concept to describe the dose in the body and then calculate the excess absolute risk and cumulative risk for solid cancers in the body. IMPT and photon plans had similar target conformity and homogeneity. However IMPT plans had reduced integral dose and volumes of the body receiving low dose. Overall the risk of radiation induced secondary cancer was lower for IMPT plans compared to the corresponding photon plans with a reduction of ~36% using the integral dose model and ˜50% using the organ equivalent dose model. *Please refer to dissertation for footnotes.

  17. Gemfibrozil, a Lipid-lowering Drug, Inhibits the Induction of Nitric-oxide Synthase in Human Astrocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Pahan, Kalipada; Jana, Malabendu; Liu, Xiaojuan; Taylor, Bradley S.; Wood, Charles; Fischer, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    Gemfibrozil, a lipid-lowering drug, inhibited cytokine-induced production of NO and the expression of inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) in human U373MG astroglial cells and primary astrocytes. Similar to gemfibrozil, clofibrate, another fibrate drug, also inhibited the expression of iNOS. Inhibition of human iNOS promoter-driven luciferase activity by gemfibrozil in cytokine-stimulated U373MG astroglial cells suggests that this compound inhibits the transcription of iNOS. Since gemfibrozil is known to activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α), we investigated the role of PPAR-α in gemfibrozil-mediated inhibition of iNOS. Gemfibrozil induced peroxisome proliferator-responsive element (PPRE)-dependent luciferase activity, which was inhibited by the expression of ΔhPPAR-α, the dominant-negative mutant of human PPAR-α. However, ΔhPPAR-α was unable to abrogate gemfibrozil-mediated inhibition of iNOS suggesting that gemfibrozil inhibits iNOS independent of PPAR-α. The human iNOS promoter contains consensus sequences for the binding of transcription factors, including interferon-γ (IFN-γ) regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) binding to interferon-stimulated responsive element (ISRE), signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) binding to γ-activation site (GAS), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), activator protein-1 (AP-1), and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ); therefore, we investigated the effect of gemfibrozil on the activation of these transcription factors. The combination of interleukin (IL)-1β and IFN-γ induced the activation of NF-κB, AP-1, C/EBPβ, and GAS but not that of ISRE, suggesting that IRF-1 may not be involved in cytokine-induced expression of iNOS in human astrocytes. Interestingly, gemfibrozil strongly inhibited the activation of NF-κB, AP-1, and C/EBPβ but not that of GAS in cytokine-stimulated astroglial cells. These results suggest that gemfibrozil inhibits the induction of iNOS probably by

  18. Advances in MR image-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-sun

    2015-05-01

    The clinical role of magnetic resonance image-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is rapidly expanding due to its merit of non-invasiveness. MR thermometry based on a proton resonance frequency shift technique is able to accurately measure HIFU-induced temperature changes, which provides considerable advantages over ultrasonography-guided HIFU in terms of safety and therapeutic efficacy. Recent studies and the resulting technological advances in MR-HIFU such as MR thermometry for moving organs, MR-acoustic radiation force imaging, and a volumetric mild hyperthermia technique further will expand its clinical roles from mere ablation therapy to targeted drug delivery and chemo- or radio-sensitisation for cancer treatment. In this article, MR-HIFU therapy is comprehensively reviewed with an emphasis on the roles of MR imaging in HIFU therapy, techniques of MR monitoring, recent advances in clinical MR-HIFU systems, and potential future applications of MR-HIFU therapy. In addition, the pros and cons of MR-HIFU when compared with ultrasonography-guided HIFU are discussed. PMID:25373687

  19. FusionArc optimization: A hybrid volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Matuszak, Martha M.; McShan, Daniel L.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Steers, Jennifer M.; Long, Troy; Edwin Romeijn, H.; Fraass, Benedick A.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To introduce a hybrid volumetric modulated arc therapy/intensity modulated radiation therapy (VMAT/IMRT) optimization strategy called FusionArc that combines the delivery efficiency of single-arc VMAT with the potentially desirable intensity modulation possible with IMRT.Methods: A beamlet-based inverse planning system was enhanced to combine the advantages of VMAT and IMRT into one comprehensive technique. In the hybrid strategy, baseline single-arc VMAT plans are optimized and then the current cost function gradients with respect to the beamlets are used to define a metric for predicting which beam angles would benefit from further intensity modulation. Beams with the highest metric values (called the gradient factor) are converted from VMAT apertures to IMRT fluence, and the optimization proceeds with the mixed variable set until convergence or until additional beams are selected for conversion. One phantom and two clinical cases were used to validate the gradient factor and characterize the FusionArc strategy. Comparisons were made between standard IMRT, single-arc VMAT, and FusionArc plans with one to five IMRT/hybrid beams.Results: The gradient factor was found to be highly predictive of the VMAT angles that would benefit plan quality the most from beam modulation. Over the three cases studied, a FusionArc plan with three converted beams achieved superior dosimetric quality with reductions in final cost ranging from 26.4% to 48.1% compared to single-arc VMAT. Additionally, the three beam FusionArc plans required 22.4%-43.7% fewer MU/Gy than a seven beam IMRT plan. While the FusionArc plans with five converted beams offer larger reductions in final cost-32.9%-55.2% compared to single-arc VMAT-the decrease in MU/Gy compared to IMRT was noticeably smaller at 12.2%-18.5%, when compared to IMRT.Conclusions: A hybrid VMAT/IMRT strategy was implemented to find a high quality compromise between gantry-angle and intensity-based degrees of freedom. This

  20. FusionArc optimization: A hybrid volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning strategy

    PubMed Central

    Matuszak, Martha M.; Steers, Jennifer M.; Long, Troy; McShan, Daniel L.; Fraass, Benedick A.; Edwin Romeijn, H.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To introduce a hybrid volumetric modulated arc therapy/intensity modulated radiation therapy (VMAT/IMRT) optimization strategy called FusionArc that combines the delivery efficiency of single-arc VMAT with the potentially desirable intensity modulation possible with IMRT. Methods: A beamlet-based inverse planning system was enhanced to combine the advantages of VMAT and IMRT into one comprehensive technique. In the hybrid strategy, baseline single-arc VMAT plans are optimized and then the current cost function gradients with respect to the beamlets are used to define a metric for predicting which beam angles would benefit from further intensity modulation. Beams with the highest metric values (called the gradient factor) are converted from VMAT apertures to IMRT fluence, and the optimization proceeds with the mixed variable set until convergence or until additional beams are selected for conversion. One phantom and two clinical cases were used to validate the gradient factor and characterize the FusionArc strategy. Comparisons were made between standard IMRT, single-arc VMAT, and FusionArc plans with one to five IMRT/hybrid beams. Results: The gradient factor was found to be highly predictive of the VMAT angles that would benefit plan quality the most from beam modulation. Over the three cases studied, a FusionArc plan with three converted beams achieved superior dosimetric quality with reductions in final cost ranging from 26.4% to 48.1% compared to single-arc VMAT. Additionally, the three beam FusionArc plans required 22.4%–43.7% fewer MU/Gy than a seven beam IMRT plan. While the FusionArc plans with five converted beams offer larger reductions in final cost—32.9%–55.2% compared to single-arc VMAT—the decrease in MU/Gy compared to IMRT was noticeably smaller at 12.2%–18.5%, when compared to IMRT. Conclusions: A hybrid VMAT/IMRT strategy was implemented to find a high quality compromise between gantry-angle and intensity-based degrees of freedom

  1. Optimization of intensity-modulated very high energy (50-250 MeV) electron therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeboah, C.; Sandison, G. A.; Moskvin, V.

    2002-04-01

    This work evaluates the potential of very high energy (50-250 MeV) electron beams for dose conformation and identifies those variables that influence optimized dose distributions for this modality. Intensity-modulated plans for a prostate cancer model were optimized as a function of the importance factors, beam energy and number of energy bins, number of beams, and the beam orientations. A trial-and-error-derived constellation of importance factors for target and sensitive structures to achieve good conformal dose distributions was 500, 50, 10 and 1 for the target, rectum, bladder and normal tissues respectively. Electron energies greater than 100 MeV were found to be desirable for intensity-modulated very high energy electron therapy (VHEET) of prostate cancer. Plans generated for lower energy beams had relatively poor conformal dose distributions about the target region and delivered high doses to sensitive structures. Fixed angle beam treatments utilizing a large number of fields in the range 9-21 provided acceptable plans. Using more than 21 beams at fixed gantry angles had an insignificant effect on target coverage, but resulted in an increased dose to sensitive structures and an increased normal tissue integral dose. Minor improvements in VHEET plans utilizing a `small' number (=<9) of beams may be achieved if, in addition to intensity modulation, energy modulation is implemented using a small number (=<3) of beam energies separated by 50 to 100 MeV. Rotation therapy provided better target dose homogeneity but unfortunately resulted in increased rectal dose, bladder dose and normal tissue integral dose relative to the 21-field fixed angle treatment plan. Modulation of the beam energy for rotation therapy had no beneficial consequences on the optimized dose distributions. Lastly, selection of beam orientations influenced the optimized treatment plan even when a large number of beams (approximately 15) were employed.

  2. TH-A-BRE-01: The Status of Intensity Modulated Proton and Ion Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, L; Zhu, X; Unkelbach, J; Schulte, R

    2014-06-15

    IMRT with photons has become a radiation therapy standard of care for many cancer treatment sites. The situation is quite different with intensity modulated particle (protons and ion) radiation therapy (IMPT). With the rapid development of beam scanning techniques and many of the newer proton facilities exclusively offering active beam scanning as their radiation delivery technique, it is timely to give an update on the status and challenges of IMPT. The leading principle in IMPT is to aim at the target from several, not necessarily coplanar, directions with multiple pencil beams that are modulated in their intensity and adjusted in their energy such that a desired dose distribution or, more generally, a desired bio-effective dose distribution is achieved. Different from low-LET photons, the varying relative biological effectiveness (RBE) along the beam path adds an additional dimension to the treatment planning process and will require biophysical modeling at least for carbon ion therapy. IMPT involves computationally challenging tasks, yet it needs to be very fast in order to be clinically relevant. To make IMPT computationally tractable, robust and efficient optimization methods are required. Lastly, IMPT planning is very sensitive to accurate knowledge of relative stopping and scattering powers of the intervening tissues as well as intra- and inter-fraction motion. Robust planning methods are being developed in order to obtain IMPT plans that are less sensitive against such uncertainties. This therapy symposium will present an update on the current status and emerging developments of IMPT from the medical physics perspective. Learning Objectives: Become familiar with current delivery techniques for IMPT and their limitations. Understand the basics of dose calculational algorithms and commissioning of IMPT. Learn how to assess the accuracy of planning and delivery of IMPT treatments. Get an overview of currently used and emerging optimization techniques. Learn

  3. Successful nonsurgical management of post-orthodontic gingival enlargement with intensive cause-related periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Kwon, TaeHyun; Kim, David M; Levin, Liran

    2015-03-01

    Successful nonsurgical management of severe postorthodontic gingival enlargement and erythema in a 24-year-old male is presented. The patient received an intensive cause-related periodontal therapy, consisting of oral hygiene instruction, scaling and root planing, and weekly recall visits. At week five, complete resolution of the lesions was achieved. By targeting the primary etiologic factor, i.e., plaque, periodontal health was restored without needing surgical intervention. Reducing the bacterial load will give the biologic natural healing capacity of the body the opportunity to stabilize the periodontal condition and, thus, should be considered as the first line of intervention before a surgical approach is taken. PMID:25928969

  4. High-intensity laser therapy during chronic degenerative tenosynovitis experimentally induced in broiler chickens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortuna, Damiano; Rossi, Giacomo; Bilotta, Teresa W.; Zati, Allesandro; Gazzotti, Valeria; Venturini, Antonio; Pinna, Stefania; Serra, Christian; Masotti, Leonardo

    2002-10-01

    The aims of this study was the safety and the efficacy of High Intensity Laser Therapy (HILT) on chronic degenerative tenosynovitis. We have effectuated the histological evaluation and seroassay (C reactive protein) on 18 chickens affect by chronic degenerative tenosynovitis experimentally induced. We have been employed a Nd:YAG laser pulsed wave; all irradiated subjects received the same total energy (270 Joule) with a fluence of 7,7 J/cm2 and intensity of 10,7 W/cm2. The histological findings revealed a distinct reduction of the mineralization of the choral matrix, the anti-inflammatory effect of the laser, the hyperplasia of the synoviocytes and ectasia of the lymphatic vessels.

  5. Intensive therapy induces contralateral white matter changes in chronic stroke patients with Broca's aphasia.

    PubMed

    Wan, Catherine Y; Zheng, Xin; Marchina, Sarah; Norton, Andrea; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2014-09-01

    Using a pre-post design, eleven chronic stroke patients with large left hemisphere lesions and nonfluent aphasia underwent diffusion tensor imaging and language testing before and after receiving 15 weeks of an intensive intonation-based speech therapy. This treated patient group was compared to an untreated patient group (n=9) scanned twice over a similar time period. Our results showed that the treated group, but not the untreated group, had reductions in fractional anisotropy in the white matter underlying the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG, pars opercularis and pars triangularis), the right posterior superior temporal gyrus, and the right posterior cingulum. Furthermore, we found that greater improvements in speech production were associated with greater reductions in FA in the right IFG (pars opercularis). Thus, our findings showed that an intensive rehabilitation program for patients with nonfluent aphasia led to structural changes in the right hemisphere, which correlated with improvements in speech production. PMID:25041868

  6. A beam intensity monitor for the Loma Linda cancer therapy proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Coutrakon, G.; Miller, D. ); Kross, B.J.; Anderson, D.F. ); DeLuca, P. Jr.; Siebers, J. )

    1991-07-01

    A beam intensity monitor was tested in a 230-MeV proton beam at the Loma Linda Proton Therapy Accelerator during its commissioning at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The intensity monitor was designed to regulate the beam intensity extracted from the proton synchrotron. The proton beam is tunable between 70 and 250 MeV with an adjustable intensity between 10{sup 10} and 10{sup 11} protons per spill. A beam spill is typically 1 s long with a 2-s repetition period. The intensity monitor must be radiation hard, expose minimum mass to the beam, and measure intensity to 1% in 1-ms time intervals. To this end, a 5-cm-thick xenon gas scintillator optically coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) was tested to measure its response to the proton beam. The gas cell was operated at 1.2 atm of pressure and has 12.7-{mu}m-thick titanium entrance and exit foils. The total mass exposed to the beam is 0.14 g/cm{sup 2} and is dominated by the titanium windows. This mass corresponds to a range attenuation equal to 1.4 mm of water. The energy lost to the xenon gas is about 70 keV per proton. Each passing proton will produce approximately 2000 photons. With a detection efficiency on the order of 0.05% for this UV light, one would anticipate over 10{sup 10} photoelectrons per second. In a 1-ms time bin there will be approximately 10{sup 7} photoelectrons. This yields a resolution limited by systematics. For unregulated 0.4-s proton spills, we observe a response bandwidth in excess of 10{sup 4} Hz. While signal-to-noise and linearity were not easily measured, we estimate as few as 10{sup 3} protons can be observed suggesting a dynamic range in excess of 10{sup 5} is available.

  7. A beam intensity monitor for the Loma Linda cancer therapy proton accelerator.

    PubMed

    Coutrakon, G; Miller, D; Kross, B J; Anderson, D F; DeLuca, P; Siebers, J

    1991-01-01

    A beam intensity monitor was tested in a 230-MeV proton beam at the Loma Linda Proton Therapy Accelerator during its commissioning at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The intensity monitor was designed to regulate the beam intensity extracted from the proton synchrotron. The proton beam is tunable between 70 and 250 MeV with an adjustable intensity between 10(10) and 10(11) protons per spill. A beam spill is typically 1 s long with a 2-s repetition period. The intensity monitor must be radiation hard, expose minimum mass to the beam, and measure intensity to 1% in 1-ms time intervals. To this end, a 5-cm-thick xenon gas scintillator optically coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) was tested to measure its response to the proton beam. The gas cell was operated at 1.2 atm of pressure and has 12.7-microns-thick titanium entrance and exit foils. The total mass exposed to the beam is 0.14 g/cm2 and is dominated by the titanium windows. This mass corresponds to a range attenuation equal to 1.4 mm of water. The energy lost to the xenon gas is about 70 keV per proton. Each passing proton will produce approximately 2000 photons. With a detection efficiency on the order of 0.05% for this UV light, one would anticipate over 10(10) photoelectrons per second. In a 1-ms time bin there will be approximately 10(7) photoelectrons. This yields a resolution limited by systematics. For unregulated 0.4-s proton spills, we observe a response bandwidth in excess of 10(4) Hz. While signal-to-noise and linearity were not easily measured, we estimate as few as 10(3) protons can be observed suggesting a dynamic range in excess of 10(5) is available. PMID:1656180

  8. Carcinoma of the anal canal: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, Charlotte; Moloney, Phillip; Mathlum, Maitham

    2013-12-15

    Patients with anal canal carcinoma treated with standard conformal radiotherapy frequently experience severe acute and late toxicity reactions to the treatment area. Roohipour et al. (Dis Colon Rectum 2008; 51: 147–53) stated a patient's tolerance of chemoradiation to be an important prediction of treatment success. A new intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique for anal carcinoma cases has been developed at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre aimed at reducing radiation to surrounding healthy tissue. A same-subject repeated measures design was used for this study, where five anal carcinoma cases at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre were selected. Conformal and IMRT plans were generated and dosimetric evaluations were performed. Each plan was prescribed a total of 54 Gray (Gy) over a course of 30 fractions to the primary site. The IMRT plans resulted in improved dosimetry to the planning target volume (PTV) and reduction in radiation to the critical structures (bladder, external genitalia and femoral heads). Statistically there was no difference between the IMRT and conformal plans in the dose to the small and large bowel; however, the bowel IMRT dose–volume histogram (DVH) doses were consistently lower. The IMRT plans were superior to the conformal plans with improved dose conformity and reduced radiation to the surrounding healthy tissue. Anecdotally it was found that patients tolerated the IMRT treatment better than the three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy. This study describes and compares the planning techniques.

  9. Predictive factors for acute radiation pneumonitis in postoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy of esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yaqin; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Shu; Wu, Qiang; Jiang, Xiaoqin; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Jin; Li, Zhiping; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Ying Jie; Bai, Sen; Xu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background Radiation pneumonitis (RP) is a common side reaction in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. There are few reports about RP in esophageal cancer patients receiving postoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). This study aims to analyze clinical or dosimetric factors associated with RP, and provides data for radiotherapy planning. Methods We reviewed 68 postoperative esophageal cancer patients who were treated with radiotherapy at the West China Hospital from October 2010 to November 2012 to identify any correlation between the clinical or dosimetric parameters and acute radiation pneumonitis (ARP) or severe acute radiation pneumonitis (SARP) by t-test, chi-square test, and logistic regression analysis. Results Of the 68 patients, 33 patients (48.5%) developed ARP, 13 of which (19.1%) developed SARP. Of these 33 patients, 8 (11.8%), 12 (17.6%), 11 (16.2%), and 2 (2.9%) patients were grade 1, 2, 3, and 4 ARP, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that lung infection during radiotherapy, use of VMAT, mean lung dose (MLD), and dosimetric parameters (e.g. V20, V30) are significantly correlated with RP. Multivariate analysis found that lung infection during radiotherapy, MLD ≥ 12 Gy, and V30 ≥ 13% are significantly correlated with an increased risk of RP. Conclusion Lung infection during radiotherapy and low radiation dose volume distribution were predictive factors associated with RP and should be accounted for during radiation planning. PMID:26273335

  10. Imaging Changes in Pediatric Intracranial Ependymoma Patients Treated With Proton Beam Radiation Therapy Compared to Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gunther, Jillian R.; Sato, Mariko; Chintagumpala, Murali; Ketonen, Leena; Jones, Jeremy Y.; Allen, Pamela K.; Paulino, Arnold C.; Okcu, M. Fatih; Su, Jack M.; Weinberg, Jeffrey; Boehling, Nicholas S.; Khatua, Soumen; Adesina, Adekunle; Dauser, Robert; Whitehead, William E.; Mahajan, Anita

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The clinical significance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes after radiation therapy (RT) in children with ependymoma is not well defined. We compared imaging changes following proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) to those after photon-based intensity modulated RT (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients with nonmetastatic intracranial ependymoma who received postoperative RT (37 PBRT, 35 IMRT) were analyzed retrospectively. MRI images were reviewed by 2 neuroradiologists. Results: Sixteen PBRT patients (43%) developed postradiation MRI changes at 3.8 months (median) with resolution by 6.1 months. Six IMRT patients (17%) developed changes at 5.3 months (median) with 8.3 months to resolution. Mean age at radiation was 4.4 and 6.9 years for PBRT and IMRT, respectively (P=.06). Age at diagnosis (>3 years) and time of radiation (≥3 years) was associated with fewer imaging changes on univariate analysis (odds ratio [OR]: 0.35, P=.048; OR: 0.36, P=.05). PBRT (compared to IMRT) was associated with more frequent imaging changes, both on univariate (OR: 3.68, P=.019) and multivariate (OR: 3.89, P=.024) analyses. Seven (3 IMRT, 4 PBRT) of 22 patients with changes had symptoms requiring intervention. Most patients were treated with steroids; some PBRT patients also received bevacizumab and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. None of the IMRT patients had lasting deficits, but 2 patients died from recurrent disease. Three PBRT patients had persistent neurological deficits, and 1 child died secondarily to complications from radiation necrosis. Conclusions: Postradiation MRI changes are more common with PBRT and in patients less than 3 years of age at diagnosis and treatment. It is difficult to predict causes for development of imaging changes that progress to clinical significance. These changes are usually self-limiting, but some require medical intervention, especially those involving the brainstem.

  11. Intensive insulin therapy and mortality among critically ill patients: a meta-analysis including NICE-SUGAR study data

    PubMed Central

    Griesdale, Donald E.G.; de Souza, Russell J.; van Dam, Rob M.; Heyland, Daren K.; Cook, Deborah J.; Malhotra, Atul; Dhaliwal, Rupinder; Henderson, William R.; Chittock, Dean R.; Finfer, Simon; Talmor, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Background Hyperglycemia is associated with increased mortality in critically ill patients. Randomized trials of intensive insulin therapy have reported inconsistent effects on mortality and increased rates of severe hypoglycemia. We conducted a meta-analysis to update the totality of evidence regarding the influence of intensive insulin therapy compared with conventional insulin therapy on mortality and severe hypoglycemia in the intensive care unit (ICU). Methods We conducted searches of electronic databases, abstracts from scientific conferences and bibliographies of relevant articles. We included published randomized controlled trials conducted in the ICU that directly compared intensive insulin therapy with conventional glucose management and that documented mortality. We included in our meta-analysis the data from the recent NICE-SUGAR (Normoglycemia in Intensive Care Evaluation — Survival Using Glucose Algorithm Regulation) study. Results We included 26 trials involving a total of 13 567 patients in our meta-analysis. Among the 26 trials that reported mortality, the pooled relative risk (RR) of death with intensive insulin therapy compared with conventional therapy was 0.93 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.83–1.04). Among the 14 trials that reported hypoglycemia, the pooled RR with intensive insulin therapy was 6.0 (95% CI 4.5–8.0). The ICU setting was a contributing factor, with patients in surgical ICUs appearing to benefit from intensive insulin therapy (RR 0.63, 95% CI 0.44–0.91); patients in the other ICU settings did not (medical ICU: RR 1.0, 95% CI 0.78–1.28; mixed ICU: RR 0.99, 95% CI 0.86–1.12). The different targets of intensive insulin therapy (glucose level ≤ 6.1 mmol/L v. ≤ 8.3 mmol/L) did not influence either mortality or risk of hypoglycemia. Interpretation Intensive insulin therapy significantly increased the risk of hypoglycemia and conferred no overall mortality benefit among critically ill patients. However, this therapy may

  12. Family-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Comparison of Intensive and Weekly Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Geffken, Gary R.; Merlo, Lisa J.; Mann, Giselle; Duke, Danny; Munson, Melissa; Adkins, Jennifer; Grabill, Kristen M.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Goodman, Wayne K.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relative efficacy of intensive versus weekly cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: Forty children and adolescents with OCD (range 7-17 years) were randomized to receive 14 sessions of weekly or intensive (daily psychotherapy sessions) family-based…

  13. Intensive Statin Therapy in NSTE-ACS Patients Undergoing PCI: Clinical and Biochemical Effects

    PubMed Central

    Fayez, George; Nassar, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Early initiation of statin therapy in acute coronary syndrome patients has a favorable prognostic impact because of its anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic properties. In this study, we explored the effect of atorvastatin-loading, followed by intensive atorvastatin therapy, on clinical and biochemical outcomes in non-ST-segment-elevation acute coronary syndrome patients who were scheduled for percutaneous coronary intervention. We prospectively enrolled 140 patients (mean age, 56 ± 9 years, 68% men). Once eligible, patients were randomly assigned to receive either a moderate 20-mg daily dose of atorvastatin (Group A) or a 160-mg loading dose followed by an intensified 80-mg daily dose (Group B). High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels were recorded before and after intervention. Evaluation after 6 months included hs-CRP levels, left ventricular systolic function, and major adverse cardiac events. We found no significant difference between the 2 groups in regard to the interventional data. However, blood sampling after coronary intervention, and again 6 months later, revealed a significant decline in mean hs-CRP level among Group B patients (P <0.001). Moreover, patients in Group B manifested a higher left ventricular ejection fraction than did patients in Group A (P <0.05). After 6 months, we found no significant difference between groups in the incidence of major adverse cardiac events. We conclude that intensive atorvastatin therapy in non-ST-segment-elevation acute coronary syndrome patients is associated with lower hs-CRP levels and with higher left ventricular ejection fraction after 6 months, with no significant impact on adverse cardiac events. PMID:26664304

  14. Treatment of extensive scalp lesions with segmental intensity-modulated photon therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bedford, James L. . E-mail: James.Bedford@icr.ac.uk; Childs, Peter J.; Hansen, Vibeke Nordmark; Warrington, Alan P.; Mendes, Ruheena L.; Glees, John P.

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: To compare static electron therapy, electron arc therapy, and photon intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for treatment of extensive scalp lesions and to examine the dosimetric accuracy of the techniques. Methods and Materials: A retrospective treatment-planning study was performed to evaluate the relative merits of static electron fields, arcing electron fields, and five-field photon IMRT. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) were used to verify the accuracy of the techniques. The required thickness of bolus was investigated, and an anthropomorphic phantom was also used to examine the effects of air gaps between the wax bolus used for the IMRT technique and the patient's scalp. Results: Neither static nor arcing electron techniques were able to provide a reliable coverage of the planning target volume (PTV), owing to obliquity of the fields in relation to the scalp. The IMRT technique considerably improved PTV dose uniformity, though it irradiated a larger volume of brain. Either 0.5 cm or 1.0 cm of wax bolus was found to be suitable. Air gaps of up to 1 cm between the bolus and the patient's scalp were correctly handled by the treatment-planning system and had negligible influence on the dose to the scalp. Conclusions: Photon IMRT provides a feasible alternative to electron techniques for treatment of large scalp lesions, resulting in improved homogeneity of dose to the PTV but with a moderate increase in dose to the brain.

  15. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy to bilateral lower limb extremities concurrently: a planning case study

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, Emma Miles, Wesley; Fenton, Paul; Frantzis, Jim

    2014-09-15

    Non-melanomatous skin cancers represent 80% of all newly diagnosed cancers in Australia with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) being the most common. A previously healthy 71-year-old woman presented with widespread and tender superficial skin cancers on the lower bilateral limbs. External beam radiation therapy through the use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) was employed as the treatment modality of choice as this technique provides conformal dose distribution to a three-dimensional treatment volume while reducing toxicity to surrounding tissues. The patient was prescribed a dose of 60 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) with 1.0 cm bolus over the ventral surface of each limb. The beam arrangement consisted of six treatment fields that avoided entry and exit through the contralateral limb. The treatment plans met the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) guidelines and produced highly conformal dosimetric results. Skin toxicity was measured against the National Cancer Institute: Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI: CTCAE) version 3. A well-tolerated treatment was delivered with excellent results given the initial extent of the disease. This case study has demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of IMRT for skin cancers as an alternative to surgery and traditional superficial radiation therapy, utilising a complex PTV of the extremities for patients with similar presentations.

  16. Application of Jean Piaget's theory of human development for nursing children in an adult intensive therapy unit.

    PubMed

    Green, A

    1991-12-01

    Piaget (1964) believed that interaction with the environment has a large part to play in human development. Matthew (1986) states that in an ideal world critically ill children should be cared for by staff trained in paediatrics, within designated paediatric intensive therapy units. Unfortunately, there are only 28 paediatric intensive therapy units in Great Britain (CMA Medical Data, 1987), consequently each year a third of children requiring intensive care are admitted to adult intensive therapy units (ITU). A knowledge and understanding of developmental psychology can therefore be beneficial to nurses in assessing which stage of development a child has reached, in order to plan the correct level of stimulation, and hence facilitate progress rather than regression in the accomplishment of developmental tasks. The psychological and social processes involved in Jean Piaget's (1896-1980) theory of human development are discussed with regard to nursing children requiring intubation and ventilation in an adult ITU. PMID:1765639

  17. Modeling and Predicting Tissue Movement and Deformation for High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xiangyun; Yuan, Zhiyong; Lai, Qianfeng; Guo, Jiaxiang; Zheng, Qi; Yu, Sijiao; Tong, Qianqian; Si, Weixin; Sun, Mingui

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In ultrasound-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) therapy, the target tissue (such as a tumor) often moves and/or deforms in response to an external force. This problem creates difficulties in treating patients and can lead to the destruction of normal tissue. In order to solve this problem, we present a novel method to model and predict the movement and deformation of the target tissue during ultrasound-guided HIFU therapy. Methods Our method computationally predicts the position of the target tissue under external force. This prediction allows appropriate adjustments in the focal region during the application of HIFU so that the treatment head is kept aligned with the diseased tissue through the course of therapy. To accomplish this goal, we utilize the cow tissue as the experimental target tissue to collect spatial sequences of ultrasound images using the HIFU equipment. A Geodesic Localized Chan-Vese (GLCV) model is developed to segment the target tissue images. A 3D target tissue model is built based on the segmented results. A versatile particle framework is constructed based on Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) to model the movement and deformation of the target tissue. Further, an iterative parameter estimation algorithm is utilized to determine the essential parameters of the versatile particle framework. Finally, the versatile particle framework with the determined parameters is used to estimate the movement and deformation of the target tissue. Results To validate our method, we compare the predicted contours with the ground truth contours. We found that the lowest, highest and average Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) values between predicted and ground truth contours were, respectively, 0.9615, 0.9770 and 0.9697. Conclusion Our experimental result indicates that the proposed method can effectively predict the dynamic contours of the moving and deforming tissue during ultrasound-guided HIFU therapy. PMID:25993644

  18. Quality of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans Using a {sup 60}Co Magnetic Resonance Image Guidance Radiation Therapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Wooten, H. Omar Green, Olga; Yang, Min; DeWees, Todd; Kashani, Rojano; Olsen, Jeff; Michalski, Jeff; Yang, Deshan; Tanderup, Kari; Hu, Yanle; Li, H. Harold; Mutic, Sasa

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: This work describes a commercial treatment planning system, its technical features, and its capabilities for creating {sup 60}Co intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans for a magnetic resonance image guidance radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system. Methods and Materials: The ViewRay treatment planning system (Oakwood Village, OH) was used to create {sup 60}Co IMRT treatment plans for 33 cancer patients with disease in the abdominal, pelvic, thorax, and head and neck regions using physician-specified patient-specific target coverage and organ at risk (OAR) objectives. Backup plans using a third-party linear accelerator (linac)-based planning system were also created. Plans were evaluated by attending physicians and approved for treatment. The {sup 60}Co and linac plans were compared by evaluating conformity numbers (CN) with 100% and 95% of prescription reference doses and heterogeneity indices (HI) for planning target volumes (PTVs) and maximum, mean, and dose-volume histogram (DVH) values for OARs. Results: All {sup 60}Co IMRT plans achieved PTV coverage and OAR sparing that were similar to linac plans. PTV conformity for {sup 60}Co was within <1% and 3% of linac plans for 100% and 95% prescription reference isodoses, respectively, and heterogeneity was on average 4% greater. Comparisons of OAR mean dose showed generally better sparing with linac plans in the low-dose range <20 Gy, but comparable sparing for organs with mean doses >20 Gy. The mean doses for all {sup 60}Co plan OARs were within clinical tolerances. Conclusions: A commercial {sup 60}Co MR-IGRT device can produce highly conformal IMRT treatment plans similar in quality to linac IMRT for a variety of disease sites. Additional work is in progress to evaluate the clinical benefit of other novel features of this MR-IGRT system.

  19. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy for Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, Joseph C.; Beg, Muhammad S.; Das, Prajnan; Meyer, Jeffrey

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To compare the cost-effectiveness of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for anal cancer and determine disease, patient, and treatment parameters that influence the result. Methods and Materials: A Markov decision model was designed with the various disease states for the base case of a 65-year-old patient with anal cancer treated with either IMRT or 3D-CRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Health states accounting for rates of local failure, colostomy failure, treatment breaks, patient prognosis, acute and late toxicities, and the utility of toxicities were informed by existing literature and analyzed with deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analysis. Results: In the base case, mean costs and quality-adjusted life expectancy in years (QALY) for IMRT and 3D-CRT were $32,291 (4.81) and $28,444 (4.78), respectively, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $128,233/QALY for IMRT compared with 3D-CRT. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis found that IMRT was cost-effective in 22%, 47%, and 65% of iterations at willingness-to-pay thresholds of $50,000, $100,000, and $150,000 per QALY, respectively. Conclusions: In our base model, IMRT was a cost-ineffective strategy despite the reduced acute treatment toxicities and their associated costs of management. The model outcome was sensitive to variations in local and colostomy failure rates, as well as patient-reported utilities relating to acute toxicities.

  20. Cardiac Exposure in the Dynamic Conformal Arc Therapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Xin; Feng, Yuanming; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Ying; Zhou, Li; Deng, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To retrospectively evaluate the cardiac exposure in three cohorts of lung cancer patients treated with dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) at our institution in the past seven years. Methods and Materials A total of 140 lung cancer patients were included in this institutional review board approved study: 25 treated with DCAT, 70 with IMRT and 45 with VMAT. All plans were generated in a same commercial treatment planning system and have been clinically accepted and delivered. The dose distribution to the heart and the effects of tumor laterality, the irradiated heart volume and the beam-to-heart distance on the cardiac exposure were investigated. Results The mean dose to the heart among all 140 plans was 4.5 Gy. Specifically, the heart received on average 2.3, 5.2 and 4.6 Gy in the DCAT, IMRT and VMAT plans, respectively. The mean heart doses for the left and right lung tumors were 4.1 and 4.8 Gy, respectively. No patients died with evidence of cardiac disease. Three patients (2%) with preexisting cardiac condition developed cardiac disease after treatment. Furthermore, the cardiac exposure was found to increase linearly with the irradiated heart volume while decreasing exponentially with the beam-to-heart distance. Conclusions Compared to old technologies for lung cancer treatment, modern radiotherapy treatment modalities demonstrated better heart sparing. But the heart dose in lung cancer radiotherapy is still higher than that in the radiotherapy of breast cancer and Hodgkin’s disease where cardiac complications have been extensively studied. With strong correlations of mean heart dose with beam-to-heart distance and irradiated heart volume, cautions should be exercised to avoid long-term cardiac toxicity in the lung cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. PMID:26630566

  1. Treatment-related complications of radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy: comparative effectiveness of intensity-modulated versus conformal radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Crandley, Edwin F; Hegarty, Sarah E; Hyslop, Terry; Wilson, David D; Dicker, Adam P; Showalter, Timothy N

    2014-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is frequently utilized after prostatectomy without strong evidence for an improvement in outcomes compared to conformal radiation therapy (RT). We analyzed a large group of patients treated with RT after radical prostatectomy (RP) to compare complications after IMRT and CRT. The Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database was queried to identify male Medicare beneficiaries aged 66 years or older who underwent prostatectomy with 1+ adverse pathologic features and received postprostatectomy RT between 1995 and 2007. Chi-square test was used to compare baseline characteristics between the treatment groups. First complication events, based upon administrative procedure or diagnosis codes occurring >1 year after start of RT, were compared for IMRT versus CRT groups. Propensity score adjustment was performed to adjust for potential confounders. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models of time to first complication were performed. A total of 1686 patients were identified who received RT after RP (IMRT = 634, CRT = 1052). Patients treated with IMRT were more likely to be diagnosed after 2004 (P < 0.001), have minimally invasive prostatectomy (P < 0.001) and have positive margins (P = 0.019). IMRT use increased over time. After propensity score adjustment, IMRT was associated with lower rate of gastrointestinal (GI) complications, and higher rate of genitourinary-incontinence complications, compared to CRT. The observed outcomes after IMRT must be considered when determining the optimal approach for postprostatectomy RT and warrant additional study. PMID:24519910

  2. Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy for Lymph Node Metastasized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fonteyne, Valerie; De Gersem, Werner; De Neve, Wilfried; Jacobs, Filip; Lumen, Nicolaas; Vandecasteele, Katrien; Villeirs, Geert; De Meerleer, Gert

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the planning results and acute toxicity after hypofractionated intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy and androgen deprivation for lymph node metastasized (Stage N1) prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 31 patients with Stage T1-T4N1M0 prostate cancer were treated with intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy and 3 years of androgen deprivation as primary treatment. The clinical target volume (CTV{sub p}) was the prostate and seminal vesicles. Elective lymph node areas ({sub e}) were delineated and expanded by 2 mm to create the CTV{sub e}. The planning target volumes (PTV{sub p} and PTV{sub e}) were created using a three-dimensional expansion of the CTV{sub p} and CTV{sub e}, respectively, of 7 mm. A median dose of 69.3 Gy and 50 Gy was prescribed to the PTV{sub p} and PTV{sub e} respectively, to be delivered in 25 fractions. Upper and lower gastrointestinal toxicity was scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group toxicity and radiotherapy-induced lower intestinal toxicity scoring system. Genitourinary toxicity was scored using a combined Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, LENT-SOMA (late effects normal tissue-subjective, objective, management, analytic), and Common Toxicity Criteria toxicity scoring system. Results: The median follow-up time was 3 months. The mean prescription dose to the CTV{sub p} and PTV{sub p} was 70.4 Gy and 68.6 Gy, respectively. The minimal dose to the CTV{sub e} and PTV{sub e} was 49.0 Gy and 47.0 Gy, respectively. No acute Grade 2 or greater gastrointestinal toxicity occurred. Fourteen patients developed acute Grade 2 lower gastrointestinal toxicity. Acute Grade 3 and 2 genitourinary toxicity developed in 2 and 14 patients, respectively. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that hypofractionated intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy as primary therapy for N1 prostate cancer is feasible with low toxicity.

  3. Combination of intensity-based image registration with 3D simulation in radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pan; Malsch, Urban; Bendl, Rolf

    2008-09-01

    Modern techniques of radiotherapy like intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) make it possible to deliver high dose to tumors of different irregular shapes at the same time sparing surrounding healthy tissue. However, internal tumor motion makes precise calculation of the delivered dose distribution challenging. This makes analysis of tumor motion necessary. One way to describe target motion is using image registration. Many registration methods have already been developed previously. However, most of them belong either to geometric approaches or to intensity approaches. Methods which take account of anatomical information and results of intensity matching can greatly improve the results of image registration. Based on this idea, a combined method of image registration followed by 3D modeling and simulation was introduced in this project. Experiments were carried out for five patients 4DCT lung datasets. In the 3D simulation, models obtained from images of end-exhalation were deformed to the state of end-inhalation. Diaphragm motions were around -25 mm in the cranial-caudal (CC) direction. To verify the quality of our new method, displacements of landmarks were calculated and compared with measurements in the CT images. Improvement of accuracy after simulations has been shown compared to the results obtained only by intensity-based image registration. The average improvement was 0.97 mm. The average Euclidean error of the combined method was around 3.77 mm. Unrealistic motions such as curl-shaped deformations in the results of image registration were corrected. The combined method required less than 30 min. Our method provides information about the deformation of the target volume, which we need for dose optimization and target definition in our planning system.

  4. Comparison of three dimensional conformal radiation therapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy for low radiation exposure of normal tissue in patients with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Cakir, Aydin; Akgun, Zuleyha; Fayda, Merdan; Agaoglu, Fulya

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy has an important role in the treatment of prostate cancer. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) techniques are all applied for this purpose. However, the risk of secondary radiation-induced bladder cancer is significantly elevated in irradiated patients compared surgery-only or watchful waiting groups. There are also reports of risk of secondary cancer with low doses to normal tissues. This study was designed to compare received volumes of low doses among 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT techniques for prostate patients. Ten prostate cancer patients were selected retrospectively for this planning study. Treatment plans were generated using 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT techniques. Conformity index (CI), homogenity index (HI), receiving 5 Gy of the volume (V5%), receiving 2 Gy of the volume (V2%), receiving 1 Gy of the volume (V1%) and monitor units (MUs) were compared. This study confirms that VMAT has slightly better CI while thev olume of low doses was higher. VMAT had lower MUs than IMRT. 3D-CRT had the lowest MU, CI and HI. If target coverage and normal tissue sparing are comparable between different treatment techniques, the risk of second malignancy should be a important factor in the selection of treatment. PMID:25921146

  5. Bridging the gap between IMRT and VMAT: Dense angularly sampled and sparse intensity modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ruijiang; Xing, Lei

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: To propose an alternative radiation therapy (RT) planning and delivery scheme with optimal angular beam sampling and intrabeam modulation for improved dose distribution while maintaining high delivery efficiency. Methods: In the proposed approach, coined as dense angularly sampled and sparse intensity modulated RT (DASSIM-RT), a large number of beam angles are used to increase the angular sampling, leading to potentially more conformal dose distributions as compared to conventional IMRT. At the same time, intensity modulation of the incident beams is simplified to eliminate the dispensable segments, compensating the increase in delivery time caused by the increased number of beams and facilitating the plan delivery. In a sense, the proposed approach shifts and transforms, in an optimal fashion, some of the beam segments in conventional IMRT to the added beams. For newly available digital accelerators, the DASSIM-RT delivery can be made very efficient by concatenating the beams so that they can be delivered sequentially without operator's intervention. Different from VMAT, the level of intensity modulation in DASSIS-RT is field specific and optimized to meet the need of each beam direction. Three clinical cases (a head and neck (HN) case, a pancreas case, and a lung case) are used to evaluate the proposed RT scheme. DASSIM-RT, VMAT, and conventional IMRT plans are compared quantitatively in terms of the conformality index (CI) and delivery efficiency. Results: Plan quality improves generally with the number and intensity modulation of the incident beams. For a fixed number of beams or fixed level of intensity modulation, the improvement saturates after the intensity modulation or number of beams reaches to a certain level. An interplay between the two variables is observed and the saturation point depends on the values of both variables. For all the cases studied here, the CI of DASSIM-RT with 15 beams and 5 intensity levels (0.90, 0.79, and 0.84 for the HN

  6. Impact of baseline lipoprotein and C-reactive protein levels on coronary atheroma regression following high-intensity statin therapy.

    PubMed

    Puri, Rishi; Nissen, Steven E; Shao, Mingyuan; Uno, Kiyoko; Kataoka, Yu; Kapadia, Samir R; Tuzcu, E Murat; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2014-11-15

    Guidelines now recommend high-intensity statin therapy in all patients with proven atherosclerotic disease. Yet the impact of baseline lipoprotein and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels on measures of disease regression to this therapy are unknown. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that high-intensity statin therapy causes equivalent degrees of coronary atheroma regression irrespective of baseline lipoprotein and CRP levels. In 8 prospective randomized trials using serial coronary intravascular ultrasound, 1,881 patients who maintained or switched to 18- to 24 months of high-intensity statin therapy (rosuvastatin 40 mg or atorvastatin 80 mg) were stratified according to baseline lipoprotein and CRP levels. Changes in coronary percentage atheroma volume (PAV) and total atheroma volume (TAV) were evaluated. High-intensity statin therapy produced significant reductions from baseline in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 38.4%, non-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol by 33.6%, triglycerides by 13.1%, and CRP by 33.3%, while increasing HDL cholesterol by 11.7% (p <0.001 for all). This was associated with regression of PAV by 0.7% and of TAV by 8.2 mm(3) (p <0.001 for both). No significant differences of changes in PAV and TAV were observed across baseline quintiles of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, or CRP. Moreover, across all measured lipoproteins and CRP, most patients demonstrated plaque regression (defined as any change from baseline in PAV or TAV <0). In conclusion, high-intensity statin therapy attenuated the natural progression of coronary atherosclerosis in all strata of patients with coronary artery disease irrespective of baseline lipoprotein or CRP levels. These findings provide support for the latest United States guideline recommendations for the broad use of high-intensity statin therapy in all patients with atherosclerosis, regardless of baseline lipid status. PMID:25282317

  7. Matching Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy to an Anterior Low Neck Field

    SciTech Connect

    Amdur, Robert J. Liu, Chihray; Li, Jonathan; Mendenhall, William; Hinerman, Russell

    2007-10-01

    When using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to treat head and neck cancer with the primary site above the level of the larynx, there are two basic options for the low neck lymphatics: to treat the entire neck with IMRT, or to match the IMRT plan to a conventional anterior 'low neck' field. In view of the potential advantages of using a conventional low neck field, it is important to look for ways to minimize or manage the problems of matching IMRT to a conventional radiotherapy field. Treating the low neck with a single anterior field and the standard larynx block decreases the dose to the larynx and often results in a superior IMRT plan at the primary site. The purpose of this article is to review the most applicable studies and to discuss our experience with implementing a technique that involves moving the position of the superior border of the low neck field several times during a single treatment fraction.

  8. Simple tool for prediction of parotid gland sparing in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gensheimer, Michael F.; Hummel-Kramer, Sharon M.; Cain, David; Quang, Tony S.

    2015-10-01

    Sparing one or both parotid glands is a key goal when planning head and neck cancer radiation treatment. If the planning target volume (PTV) overlaps one or both parotid glands substantially, it may not be possible to achieve adequate gland sparing. This finding results in physicians revising their PTV contours after an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan has been run and reduces workflow efficiency. We devised a simple formula for predicting mean parotid gland dose from the overlap of the parotid gland and isotropically expanded PTV contours. We tested the tool using 44 patients from 2 institutions and found agreement between predicted and actual parotid gland doses (mean absolute error = 5.3 Gy). This simple method could increase treatment planning efficiency by improving the chance that the first plan presented to the physician will have optimal parotid gland sparing.

  9. Improved highly accurate localized motion imaging for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Xiaolei; Azuma, Takashi; Sugiyama, Ryusuke; Kanazawa, Kengo; Seki, Mika; Sasaki, Akira; Takeuchi, Hideki; Fujiwara, Keisuke; Itani, Kazunori; Tamano, Satoshi; Takagi, Shu; Sakuma, Ichiro; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2016-07-01

    Visualizing an area subjected to high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is necessary for controlling the amount of HIFU exposure. One of the promising monitoring methods is localized motion imaging (LMI), which estimates coagulation length by detecting the change in stiffness. In this study, we improved the accuracy of our previous LMI by dynamic cross-correlation window (DCCW) and maximum vibration amount (MVA) methods. The DCCW method was used to increase the accuracy of estimating vibration amplitude, and the MVA method was employed to increase signal–noise ratio of the decrease ratio at the coagulated area. The qualitative comparison of results indicated that the two proposed methods could suppress the effect of noise. Regarding the results of the quantitative comparison, coagulation length was estimated with higher accuracy by the improved LMI method, and the root-mean-square error (RMSE) was reduced from 2.51 to 1.69 mm.

  10. PRESAGE® as a new calibration method for high intensity focused ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, M.; McErlean, C.; Rivens, I.; Adamovics, J.; Leach, M. O.; ter Haar, G.; Doran, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    High Intensity Focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a non-invasive cancer therapy that makes use of the mainly thermal effects of ultrasound to destroy tissue. In order to achieve reliable treatment planning, it is necessary to characterise the ultrasound source (transducer) and to understand how the wave propagates in tissue and the energy deposition in the focal region. This novel exploratory study investigated how HIFU affects PRESAGE®, an optical phantom used for radiotherapy dosimetry, which is potentially a rapid method of calibrating the transducer. Samples, of two different formulations, were exposed to focused ultrasound and imaged using Optical Computed Tomography. First results showed that, PRESAGE® changes colour on ultrasound exposure (darker green regions were observed) with the alterations being related to the acoustic power and sample composition. Future work will involve quantification of these alterations and understanding how to relate them to the mechanisms of action of HIFU.

  11. American Society of Radiation Oncology recommendations for documenting intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatments.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Timothy; Das, Rupak; Low, Daniel; Yin, Fang-Fang; Balter, James; Palta, Jatinder; Eifel, Patricia

    2009-08-01

    Despite the widespread use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for approximately a decade, a lack of adequate guidelines for documenting these treatments persists. Proper IMRT treatment documentation is necessary for accurate reconstruction of prior treatments when a patient presents with a marginal recurrence. This is especially crucial when the follow-up care is managed at a second treatment facility not involved in the initial IMRT treatment. To address this issue, an American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) workgroup within the American ASTRO Radiation Physics Committee was formed at the request of the ASTRO Research Council to develop a set of recommendations for documenting IMRT treatments. This document provides a set of comprehensive recommendations for documenting IMRT treatments, as well as image-guidance procedures, with example forms provided. PMID:19616738

  12. American Society of Radiation Oncology Recommendations for Documenting Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Timothy Das, Rupak; Low, Daniel; Yin Fangfang; Balter, James; Palta, Jatinder; Eifel, Patricia

    2009-08-01

    Despite the widespread use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for approximately a decade, a lack of adequate guidelines for documenting these treatments persists. Proper IMRT treatment documentation is necessary for accurate reconstruction of prior treatments when a patient presents with a marginal recurrence. This is especially crucial when the follow-up care is managed at a second treatment facility not involved in the initial IMRT treatment. To address this issue, an American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) workgroup within the American ASTRO Radiation Physics Committee was formed at the request of the ASTRO Research Council to develop a set of recommendations for documenting IMRT treatments. This document provides a set of comprehensive recommendations for documenting IMRT treatments, as well as image-guidance procedures, with example forms provided.

  13. Design status of an intense 14 MeV neutron source for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Ze-En; Su, Tong-Ling; Cheng, Shang-Wen; Jia, Wen-Bao

    2002-09-01

    Design and development of an intense 14 MeV neutron source for cancer therapy is in progress at the Institute of Nuclear Research of Lanzhou University. The neutrons from the T(d,n) 4He reaction are produced by bombarding a rotating titanium tritide target with a 40 mA deuteron beam at 600 keV. The designed neutron yield is 8×10 12 n/s and the maximum dose rate at a 100 cm source-to-skin distance is 25 cGy/min. The HV terminal, accelerating column and HV power supply are enclosed inside a stainless steel pressure vessel containing 6 atm SF 6 gas to provide the electrical insulation.

  14. Preliminary evidence of genetic determinants of adiponectin response to fenofibrate in the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adiponectin is an adipose-secreted protein that has been linked to changes in insulin sensitivity, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and inflammatory patterns. Although fenofibrate therapy can raise adiponectin levels, treatment response is heterogeneous and heritable, suggesting a role f...

  15. Spherical cluster analysis for beam angle optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangert, Mark; Oelfke, Uwe

    2010-10-01

    An intuitive heuristic to establish beam configurations for intensity-modulated radiation therapy is introduced as an extension of beam ensemble selection strategies applying scalar scoring functions. It is validated by treatment plan comparisons for three intra-cranial, pancreas, and prostate cases each. Based on a patient specific matrix listing the radiological quality of candidate beam directions individually for every target voxel, a set of locally ideal beam angles is generated. The spherical distribution of locally ideal beam angles is characteristic for every treatment site and patient: ideal beam angles typically cluster around distinct orientations. We interpret the cluster centroids, which are identified with a spherical K-means algorithm, as irradiation angles of an intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment plan. The fluence profiles are subsequently optimized during a conventional inverse planning process. The average computation time for the pre-optimization of a beam ensemble is six minutes on a state-of-the-art work station. The treatment planning study demonstrates the potential benefit of the proposed beam angle optimization strategy. For the three prostate cases under investigation, the standard treatment plans applying nine coplanar equi-spaced beams and treatment plans applying an optimized non-coplanar nine-beam ensemble yield clinically comparable dose distributions. For symmetric patient geometries, the dose distribution formed by nine equi-spaced coplanar beams cannot be improved significantly. For the three pancreas and intra-cranial cases under investigation, the optimized non-coplanar beam ensembles enable better sparing of organs at risk while guaranteeing equivalent target coverage. Beam angle optimization by spherical cluster analysis shows the biggest impact for target volumes located asymmetrically within the patient and close to organs at risk.

  16. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Primary Soft Tissue Sarcoma of the Extremity: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Alektiar, Kaled M. . E-mail: alektiak@mskcc.org; Hong, Linda; Brennan, Murray F.; Della-Biancia, Cesar; Singer, Samuel

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To report preliminary results on using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as an adjuvant treatment in primary soft tissue sarcoma (STS) of the extremity. Methods and Materials: Between February 2002 and March 2005, 31 adult patients with primary STS of the extremity were treated with surgery and adjuvant IMRT. Tumor size was >10 cm in 74% of patients and grade was high in 77%. Preoperative IMRT was given to 7 patients (50 Gy) and postoperative IMRT (median dose, 63 Gy) was given to 24 patients. Complete gross resection including periosteal stripping or bone resection was required in 10, and neurolysis or nerve resection in 20. The margins were positive or within 1 mm in 17. Complications from surgery and radiation therapy (RT) were assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events grading system. Results: Median follow-up time was 23 months. Grade 1 RT dermatitis developed in 71% of patients, Grade 2 in 16%, and Grade 3 in 10%. Infectious wound complications developed in 13% and noninfectious complications in 10%. Two patients (6.4%) developed fractures. Grade 1 neuropathy developed in 28% of patients and Grade 2 in 5%. The rates of Grade 1 and 2 joint stiffness were each 19%. Grade 1 edema was observed in 19% of patients and Grade 2 in 13%. The 2-year local control, distant control, and overall survival were 95%, 65%, and 81%, respectively. Conclusion: Intensity modulated RT appears to provide excellent local control in a difficult group of high-risk patients. The morbidity profile is also favorable, but longer follow-up is needed to confirm the results from this study.

  17. The effect of massage therapy on occupational stress of Intensive Care Unit nurses

    PubMed Central

    Nazari, Fateme; Mirzamohamadi, Mojtaba; Yousefi, Hojatollah

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the main causes of stress in the lives of people is their jobs. Occupational stress is causing a wide range of significant issues in health and community services. Nursing is the most stressful profession in the health services. Massage therapy is one way of coping with stress. This study was conducted to determine the effect of massage therapy on stress in nurses. Materials and Methods: This study was a clinical trial on 66 male and female nurses working in intensive care units (dialysis, ICU, and CCU) of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran, in 2013. Participants were selected according to the aims and inclusion criteria of the study. Then, they were randomly divided into experimental and control groups. The Occupational Stress Inventory (OSI) (Osipow and Spokane, 1987) was completed by participants of the two groups before, immediately after, and 2 weeks after the intervention. General Swedish massage was performed on participants of the experimental group for 25 min in each session, twice a week for 4 weeks. Data were analyzed by descriptive and inferential statistics [Chi-square, t-test, and repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA)] using SPSS software. Results: Results showed that the difference in overall mean occupation stress scores between experimental and control groups 2 weeks after the intervention was significant (P < 0.001). Conclusions: According to the results, it is recommended that massage, as a valuable noninvasive method, be used for nurses in intensive care units to reduce their stress, promote mental health, and prevent the decrease in quality of nursing work life. PMID:26257809

  18. Robust Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) Increases Estimated Clinical Benefit in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Lisanne V.; Steenbakkers, Roel J. H. M.; ten Haken, Bennie; van der Laan, Hans Paul; van ‘t Veld, Aart A.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Korevaar, Erik W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the clinical benefit of robust optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (minimax IMPT) with current photon Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) and PTV-based IMPT for head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. The clinical benefit is quantified in terms of both Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) and target coverage in the case of setup and range errors. Methods and Materials For 10 HNC patients, PTV-based IMRT (7 fields), minimax and PTV-based IMPT (2, 3, 4, 5 and 7 fields) plans were tested on robustness. Robust optimized plans differed from PTV-based plans in that they target the CTV and penalize possible error scenarios, instead of using the static isotropic CTV-PTV margin. Perturbed dose distributions of all plans were acquired by simulating in total 8060 setup (±3.5 mm) and range error (±3%) combinations. NTCP models for xerostomia and dysphagia were used to predict the clinical benefit of IMPT versus IMRT. Results The robustness criterion was met in the IMRT and minimax IMPT plans in all error scenarios, but this was only the case in 1 of 40 PTV-based IMPT plans. Seven (out of 10) patients had relatively large NTCP reductions in minimax IMPT plans compared to IMRT. For these patients, xerostomia and dysphagia NTCP values were reduced by 17.0% (95% CI; 13.0–21.1) and 8.1% (95% CI; 4.9–11.2) on average with minimax IMPT. Increasing the number of fields did not contribute to plan robustness, but improved organ sparing. Conclusions The estimated clinical benefit in terms of NTCP of robust optimized (minimax) IMPT is greater than that of IMRT and PTV-based IMPT in HNC patients. Furthermore, the target coverage of minimax IMPT plans in the presence of errors was comparable to IMRT plans. PMID:27030987

  19. [Is intensive functional insulin therapy the method of choice in newly diagnosed type-1 diabetes mellitus?].

    PubMed

    Araszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Zozulińska, Dorota; Trepińska, Magdalena; Wierusz-Wysocka, Bogna

    2004-11-01

    The aim of our study was a prospective evaluation of type 1 diabetic patients treated with intensive insulin therapy. We recruited 100 patients (62 males and 38 females) aged 24.3+/-6.2 years with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes. The mean observation period was 5.2+/-1.5 years. Parameters of diabetes metabolic balance, occurrence of chronic complications and patients' knowledge about the disease and the methods of its treatment were evaluated. 68% of the patients controlled their glycaemia regularly before main meals and 53% of them had a diabetic diary. In the knowledge test 20% of the subjects reached < or = 11 points, 62% 11-17 points and 18% > 17 points (mean 14.4+/-3.2 points of maximal 20 to achieve). The mean result in the questionnaire of knowledge about the disease was 28.1+/-4.9 points. Fasting glycaemia was 7.2+/-3.4 mmol/l, 2h postprandial glycaemia 9.4+/-3.6 mmol/l, HbA1c 7.5+/-1.4%, the mean C-peptide level 0.9+/-0.4 ng/ml and the number of hypoglycaemic episodes was 6/individual/month. We observed a statistically significant correlation between the level of patients' knowledge and HbA1c (r=-0.31, p<0.05). Retinopathy and nephropathy were detected in 8 (9%) and 6 (6.8%) subjects respectively. The risk of microangiopathy was connected with low knowledge (RR: 5.67; 95% CI: 2.02-15.82, p<0.0002). The study confirms the crucial role of intensive insulin therapy and systematic patients' education concerning the disease in maintaining a good metabolic control and thus reducing the risk of diabetic vascular complications. PMID:15754632

  20. Multifield Optimization Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Head and Neck Tumors: A Translation to Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Steven J.; Cox, James D.; Gillin, Michael; Mohan, Radhe; Garden, Adam S.; Rosenthal, David I.; Gunn, G. Brandon; Weber, Randal S.; Kies, Merrill S.; Lewin, Jan S.; Munsell, Mark F.; Palmer, Matthew B.; Sahoo, Narayan; Zhang, Xiaodong; Liu, Wei; Zhu, X. Ronald

    2014-07-15

    Background: We report the first clinical experience and toxicity of multifield optimization (MFO) intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for patients with head and neck tumors. Methods and Materials: Fifteen consecutive patients with head and neck cancer underwent MFO-IMPT with active scanning beam proton therapy. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) had comprehensive treatment extending from the base of the skull to the clavicle. The doses for chemoradiation therapy and radiation therapy alone were 70 Gy and 66 Gy, respectively. The robustness of each treatment plan was also analyzed to evaluate sensitivity to uncertainties associated with variations in patient setup and the effect of uncertainties with proton beam range in patients. Proton beam energies during treatment ranged from 72.5 to 221.8 MeV. Spot sizes varied depending on the beam energy and depth of the target, and the scanning nozzle delivered the spot scanning treatment “spot by spot” and “layer by layer.” Results: Ten patients presented with SCC and 5 with adenoid cystic carcinoma. All 15 patients were able to complete treatment with MFO-IMPT, with no need for treatment breaks and no hospitalizations. There were no treatment-related deaths, and with a median follow-up time of 28 months (range, 20-35 months), the overall clinical complete response rate was 93.3% (95% confidence interval, 68.1%-99.8%). Xerostomia occurred in all 15 patients as follows: grade 1 in 10 patients, grade 2 in 4 patients, and grade 3 in 1 patient. Mucositis within the planning target volumes was seen during the treatment of all patients: grade 1 in 1 patient, grade 2 in 8 patients, and grade 3 in 6 patients. No patient experienced grade 2 or higher anterior oral mucositis. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first clinical report of MFO-IMPT for head and neck tumors. Early clinical outcomes are encouraging and warrant further investigation of proton therapy in prospective clinical trials.

  1. The community intensive therapy team: development and philosophy of a new service.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Ahmed; Salmon, Gill; Ahuja, Alka; Steed, Liz

    2006-10-01

    The Community Intensive Therapy Team (CITT) has been operating since 1998. It was developed to cater for the needs of patients with complex difficulties referred to a specialist Child and Adolescent Health Service (CAMHS) in South Wales, UK. The patients served by the CITT are comparable with patients who might be referred for admission to an inpatient unit and include patients with eating disorders, psychosis, affective disorders, adjustment disorders or repetitive self-harm. The theoretical model used is based on a biopsychosocial model which aims to empower and support family members. The philosophy of the CITT is to work with the child and family in their own environment, tailoring the therapy to the needs of all concerned. CITT makes use of the strengths within the patient, the family and extended family, the agencies already involved and the environment. Since its introduction, the CITT has been able to manage all the complex referrals made to it from the generic Tier 2/3 CAMHS teams it serves, with minimal recourse to inpatient beds. PMID:17163227

  2. High-intensity focused ultrasound therapy in combination with gemcitabine for unresectable pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Wei; Yan, Tao; Wang, Guojin; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Dinghua

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the therapeutic effect and safety of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy combined with gemcitabine in treating unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. Methods The 45 patients suffering from pancreatic carcinoma were randomized into two groups. The patients in the experimental group (n=23) received HIFU in combination with gemcitabine and those in the control group (n=22) received gemcitabine alone. The effect and clinical benefit rates in the two groups were compared. The median survival time and 6-month and 12-month survival rates were calculated by Kaplan–Meier method and log-rank test. Results The median survival time and 6-month survival rate were significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group (8.91 months vs 5.53 months, 73.9% vs 40.9%, respectively P<0.05), but 12-month survival rate was not statistically different between the two groups (13.0% vs 4.5%, P>0.05). The clinical benefit rates in the experimental group and the control group were 69.6% and 36.3%, respectively (P<0.05). The pain remission rate in the experimental group was significantly higher than that in the control group (65.2% vs 31.8%, P<0.05). Conclusion HIFU in combination with gemcitabine is better than gemcitabine alone. This combinatorial therapy may become a better and effective treatment for unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27194912

  3. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound: Current Status for Image-Guided Therapy.

    PubMed

    Copelan, Alexander; Hartman, Jason; Chehab, Monzer; Venkatesan, Aradhana M

    2015-12-01

    Image-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is an innovative therapeutic technology, permitting extracorporeal or endocavitary delivery of targeted thermal ablation while minimizing injury to the surrounding structures. While ultrasound-guided HIFU was the original image-guided system, MR-guided HIFU has many inherent advantages, including superior depiction of anatomic detail and superb real-time thermometry during thermoablation sessions, and it has recently demonstrated promising results in the treatment of both benign and malignant tumors. HIFU has been employed in the management of prostate cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, uterine leiomyomas, and breast tumors, and has been associated with success in limited studies for palliative pain management in pancreatic cancer and bone tumors. Nonthermal HIFU bioeffects, including immune system modulation and targeted drug/gene therapy, are currently being explored in the preclinical realm, with an emphasis on leveraging these therapeutic effects in the care of the oncology patient. Although still in its early stages, the wide spectrum of therapeutic capabilities of HIFU offers great potential in the field of image-guided oncologic therapy. PMID:26622104

  4. Reirradiation of spinal metastases with intensity-modulated radiation therapy: an analysis of 23 patients

    PubMed Central

    Kawashiro, Shohei; Harada, Hideyuki; Katagiri, Hirohisa; Asakura, Hirofumi; Ogawa, Hirofumi; Onoe, Tsuyoshi; Sumita, Kiyomi; Murayama, Shigeyuki; Murata, Hideki; Nemoto, Kenji; Takahashi, Mitsuru; Nishimura, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of reirradiation with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for spinal metastases. We retrospectively analyzed 23 patients with spinal metastases who underwent IMRT reirradiation between December 2006 and July 2013. We evaluated the spinal radiation doses during the first and second radiation therapy courses, the interval between the courses, and the clinical outcomes after reirradiation, including skeletal-related events, local control rates (LCRs), overall survival (OS), and toxicities. The median time from the first irradiation to reirradiation was 13 months (range, 2–75 months). The median reirradiation dose delivered to 90% of the planning target volume was 24.5 Gy in 5 fractions (range, 14.7–50 Gy in 3–25 fractions). Nineteen patients experienced pain at reirradiation, and 15 of these attained pain relief. Two of the three patients with paresis in the upper or lower extremities upon initiation of reirradiation demonstrated improvement. Local progression was identified in four patients. The median time to local progression was 37 months. The 1- and 2-year LCRs after reirradiation were 88% and 75%, respectively. The 1- and 2-year OS rates after reirradiation were 45% and 20%, respectively, with a median OS of 12 months. No late toxicities occurred. In conclusion, spinal metastasis reirradiation using IMRT appears safe; pain relief and paresis improvement and/or prevention can be expected, along with a reduced risk of radiation-induced toxicity, especially in the spinal cord. PMID:26662113

  5. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Localized Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarty, Twisha; Crane, Christopher H.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Mansfield, Paul F.; Briere, Tina M.; Beddar, A. Sam; Mok, Henry; Reed, Valerie K.; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E.; Das, Prajnan

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate dosimetric parameters, acute toxicity, pathologic response, and local control in patients treated with preoperative intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for localized gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods: Between November 2007 and April 2010, 25 patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma were treated with induction chemotherapy, followed by preoperative IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy and, finally, surgical resection. The median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin in 18 patients, capecitabine in 3, and other regimens in 4. Subsequently, resection was performed with total gastrectomy in 13 patients, subtotal gastrectomy in 7, and other surgeries in 5. Results: Target coverage, expressed as the ratio of the minimum dose received by 99% of the planning target volume to the prescribed dose, was a median of 0.97 (range, 0.92-1.01). The median V{sub 30} (percentage of volume receiving at least 30 Gy) for the liver was 26%; the median V{sub 20} (percentage of volume receiving at least 20 Gy) for the right and left kidneys was 14% and 24%, respectively; and the median V{sub 40} (percentage of volume receiving at least 40 Gy) for the heart was 18%. Grade 3 acute toxicity developed in 14 patients (56%), including dehydration in 10, nausea in 8, and anorexia in 5. Grade 4 acute toxicity did not develop in any patient. There were no significant differences in the rates of acute toxicity, hospitalization, or feeding tube use in comparison to those in a group of 50 patients treated with preoperative three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy. R0 resection was obtained in 20 patients (80%), and pathologic complete response occurred in 5 (20%). Conclusions: Preoperative IMRT for gastric adenocarcinoma was well tolerated, accomplished excellent target coverage and normal structure sparing, and led to appropriate

  6. Clinical Impact of Sample Interference on Intensive Insulin Therapy in Severely Burned Patients: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Nam K.; Godwin, Zachary R.; Bockhold, Jennifer C.; Passerini, Anthony G.; Cheng, Julian; Ingemason, Morgan

    2013-01-01

    Objective Severely burned patients benefit from intensive insulin therapy (IIT) for tight glycemic control (TGC). We evaluated the clinical impact of automatic correction of hematocrit and ascorbic acid interference for bedside glucose monitoring performance in critically ill burn patients. Methods The performance of two point-of-care glucose monitoring systems (GMS): (a) GMS1, an autocorrecting device, and (b) GMS2, a non-correcting device were compared. Sixty remnant arterial blood samples were collected in a prospective observational study to evaluate hematocrit and ascorbic acid effects on GMS1 vs. GMS2 accuracy paired against a plasma glucose reference. Next we enrolled 12 patients in a pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT). Patients were randomized 1:1 to receive IIT targeting a TGC interval of 111–151 mg/dL and guided by either GMS1 or GMS2. GMS bias, mean insulin rate, and glycemic variability were calculated. Results In the prospective study, GMS1 results were similar to plasma glucose results (mean bias: −0.75[4.0] mg/dL, n=60, P=0.214). GMS2 results significantly differed from paired plasma glucose results (mean bias: −5.66[18.7] mg/dL, n=60, P=0.048). Ascorbic acid therapy elicited significant GMS2 performance bias (29.2[27.2], P<0.001). RCT results reported lower mean bias (P<0.001), glycemic variability (P<0.05), mean insulin rate (P<0.001), and frequency of hypoglycemia (P<0.001) in the GMS1 group than the GMS2 group. Conclusions Anemia and high dose ascorbic acid therapy negatively impact GMS accuracy and TGC in burn patients. Automatic correction of confounding factors improves glycemic control. Further studies are warranted to determine outcomes associated with accurate glucose monitoring during IIT. PMID:23884048

  7. Acute Esophagus Toxicity in Lung Cancer Patients After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kwint, Margriet; Uyterlinde, Wilma; Nijkamp, Jasper; Chen, Chun; Bois, Josien de; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Heuvel, Michel van den; Knegjens, Joost; Herk, Marcel van; Belderbos, Jose

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose-effect relation between acute esophageal toxicity (AET) and the dose-volume parameters of the esophagus after intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: One hundred thirty-nine patients with inoperable NSCLC treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy were prospectively analyzed. The fractionation scheme was 66 Gy in 24 fractions. All patients received concurrently a daily dose of cisplatin (6 mg/m Superscript-Two ). Maximum AET was scored according to Common Toxicity Criteria 3.0. Dose-volume parameters V5 to V70, D{sub mean} and D{sub max} of the esophagus were calculated. A logistic regression analysis was performed to analyze the dose-effect relation between these parameters and grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 AET. The outcome was compared with the clinically used esophagus V35 prediction model for grade {>=}2 after radical 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) treatment. Results: In our patient group, 9% did not experience AET, and 31% experienced grade 1 AET, 38% grade 2 AET, and 22% grade 3 AET. The incidence of grade 2 and grade 3 AET was not different from that in patients treated with CCRT using 3DCRT. The V50 turned out to be the most significant dosimetric predictor for grade {>=}3 AET (P=.012). The derived V50 model was shown to predict grade {>=}2 AET significantly better than the clinical V35 model (P<.001). Conclusions: For NSCLC patients treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy, the V50 was identified as most accurate predictor of grade {>=}3 AET. There was no difference in the incidence of grade {>=}2 AET between 3DCRT and IMRT in patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

  8. Low-intensity laser therapy to treat dentin hypersensitivity: comparative clinical study using different light doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizarelli, Rosane F. Z.; Mazzetto, Marcello O.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2001-04-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity is the most common patient's complain related to pain. In fact, this is a challenge to treat specially if conventional techniques are used. The possibility to treat pain through a low intensity laser gives us an opportunity to solve this important clinical problem without promote a discomfort to patient. The main point here is not if this kind of treatment is anti- inflammatory to pulp and/or biostimulatory to production of irregular secondary dentin. The most important point here is to understand how much energy is necessary to reach conditions where to tooth become insensible to external stimulus. Our double-blinded study compared a group without laser (Placebo) with five other groups where different doses at 660 nm low intensity laser were employed. The final conclusion is that for 660 nm laser therapy, the doses from 0.13 to 2.0 J/cm2 were more efficiency than the others. The follow up care in this study was of 45 days.

  9. Proposed method for internal electron therapy based on high-intensity laser acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepper, Michal; Barkai, Uri; Gannot, Israel

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the main methods to treat cancer. However, due to the propagation pattern of high-energy photons in tissue and their inability to discriminate between healthy and malignant tissues, healthy tissues may also be damaged, causing undesired side effects. A possible method for internal electron therapy, based on laser acceleration of electrons inside the patient's body, is suggested. In this method, an optical waveguide, optimized for high intensities, is used to transmit the laser radiation and accelerate electrons toward the tumor. The radiation profile can be manipulated in order to create a patient-specific radiation treatment profile by changing the laser characteristics. The propagation pattern of electrons in tissues minimizes the side effects caused to healthy tissues. A simulation was developed to demonstrate the use of this method, calculating the trajectories of the accelerated electron as a function of laser properties. The simulation was validated by comparison to theory, showing a good fit for laser intensities of up to 2×1020 (W/cm2), and was then used to calculate suggested treatment profiles for two tumor test cases (with and without penetration to the tumor). The results show that treatment profiles can be designed to cover tumor area with minimal damage to adjacent tissues.

  10. Dosimetric and QA aspects of Konrad inverse planning system for commissioning intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Shrikant; Sathiyanarayanan, V K; Bhangle, Janhavi; Swamy, Kumara; Basu, Sumit

    2007-04-01

    The intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning is performed using the Konrad inverse treatment planning system and the delivery of the treatment by using Siemens Oncor Impression Plus linear accelerator (step and shoot), which has been commissioned recently. The basic beam data required for commissioning the system were generate. The quality assurance of relative and absolute dose distribution was carried out before clinical implementation. The salient features of Konrad planning system, like dependence of grid size on dose volume histogram (DVH), number of intensity levels and step size in sequencer, are studied quantitatively and qualitatively.To verify whether the planned dose [from treatment planning system (TPS)] and delivered dose are the same, the absolute dose at a point is determined using CC01 ion chamber and the axial plane dose distribution is carried out using Kodak EDR2 in conjunction with OmniPro IMRT Phantom and OmniPro IMRT software from Scanditronix Wellhofer. To obtain the optimum combination in leaf sequencer module, parameters like number of intensity levels, step size are analyzed. The difference between pixel values of optimum fluence profile and the fluence profile obtained for various combinations of number of intensity levels and step size is compared and plotted. The calculations of the volume of any RT structure in the dose volume histogram are compared using grid sizes 3 mm and 4 mm. The measured and planned dose at a point showed good agreement (<3%) except for a few cases wherein the chamber was placed in a relatively high dose gradient region. The axial plane dose distribution using film dosimetry shows excellent agreement (correlation coefficient >0.97) in all the cases. In the leaf sequencer module, the combination of number of intensity level 7 with step size of 3 is the optimal solution for obtaining deliverable segments. The RT structure volume calculation is found to be more accurate with grid size of 3 mm for

  11. High remission and low relapse with prolonged intensive DMARD therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (PRINT)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ru; Zhao, Jin-Xia; Su, Yin; He, Jing; Chen, Li-Na; Gu, Fei; Zhao, Cheng; Deng, Xue-Rong; Zhou, Wei; Hao, Yan-Jie; Xue, Yu; Liu, Hua-Xiang; Zhao, Yi; Zou, Qing-Hua; Liu, Xiang-Yuan; Zhu, Ping; Sun, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Zhuo-Li; Zou, He-Jian; Li, Xing-Fu; Liu, Yi; Fang, Yong-Fei; Keystone, Edward; McInnes, Iain B.; Li, Zhan-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To determine whether prolonged intensive disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) treatment (PRINT) leads to high remission and low relapse rates in patients with severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: In this multicenter, randomized and parallel treatment trial, 346 patients with active RA (disease activity score (28 joints) [DAS28] (erythrocyte sedimentation rate [ESR]) > 5.1) were enrolled from 9 centers. In phase 1, patients received intensive treatment with methotrexate, leflunomide, and hydroxychloroquine, up to 36 weeks, until remission (DAS28 ≤ 2.6) or a low disease activity (2.6 < DAS28 ≤ 3.2) was achieved. In phase 2, patients achieving remission or low disease activity were followed up with randomization to 1 of 2 step-down protocols: leflunomide plus hydroxychloroquine combination or leflunomide monotherapy. The primary endpoints were good European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response (DAS28 (ESR) < 3.2 and a decrease of DAS28 by at least 1.2) during the intensive treatment and the disease state retention rate during step-down maintenance treatment. Predictors of a good EULAR response in the intensive treatment period and disease flare in the maintenance period were sought. Results: A good EULAR response was achieved in 18.7%, 36.9%, and 54.1% of patients at 12, 24, and 36 weeks, respectively. By 36 weeks, 75.4% of patients achieved good and moderate EULAR responses. Compared with those achieving low disease activity and a high health assessment questionnaire (HAQ > 0.5), patients achieving remission (DAS28 ≤ 2.6) and low HAQ (≤ 0.5) had a significantly higher retention rate when tapering the DMARDs treatment (P = 0.046 and P = 0.01, respectively). There was no advantage on tapering to combination rather than monotherapy. Conclusions: Remission was achieved in a proportion of patients with RA receiving prolonged intensive DMARD therapy. Low disease activity at the start of disease taper leads to less subsequent

  12. Imaging of Intracellular and Extracellular ROS Levels in Atherosclerotic Mouse Aortas Ex Vivo: Effects of Lipid Lowering by Diet or Atorvastatin

    PubMed Central

    Ekstrand, Matias; Gustafsson Trajkovska, Maria; Perman-Sundelin, Jeanna; Fogelstrand, Per; Adiels, Martin; Johansson, Martin; Mattsson-Hultén, Lillemor

    2015-01-01

    Objective The first objective was to investigate if intracellular and extracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within the mouse aorta increase before or after diet-induced lesion formation. The second objective was to investigate if intracellular and extracellular ROS correlates to cell composition in atherosclerotic lesions. The third objective was to investigate if intracellular and extracellular ROS levels within established atherosclerotic lesions can be reduced by lipid lowering by diet or atorvastatin. Approach and Results To address our objectives, we established a new imaging technique to visualize and quantify intracellular and extracellular ROS levels within intact mouse aortas ex vivo. Using this technique, we found that intracellular, but not extracellular, ROS levels increased prior to lesion formation in mouse aortas. Both intracellular and extracellular ROS levels were increased in advanced lesions. Intracellular ROS correlated with lesion content of macrophages. Extracellular ROS correlated with lesion content of smooth muscle cells. The high levels of ROS in advanced lesions were reduced by 5 days high dose atorvastatin treatment but not by lipid lowering by diet. Atorvastatin treatment did not affect lesion inflammation (aortic arch mRNA levels of CXCL 1, ICAM-1, MCP-1, TNF-α, VCAM, IL-6, and IL-1β) or cellular composition (smooth muscle cell, macrophage, and T-cell content). Conclusions Aortic levels of intracellular ROS increase prior to lesion formation and may be important in initiation of atherosclerosis. Our results suggest that within lesions, macrophages produce mainly intracellular ROS whereas smooth muscle cells produce extracellular ROS. Short term atorvastatin treatment, but not lipid lowering by diet, decreases ROS levels within established advanced lesions; this may help explain the lesion stabilizing and anti-inflammatory effects of long term statin treatment. PMID:26098110

  13. Fatal pneumonitis associated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy for mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Aaron M. . E-mail: aallen@lroc.harvard.edu; Czerminska, Maria; Jaenne, Pasi A.; Sugarbaker, David J.; Bueno, Raphael; Harris, Jay R.; Court, Laurence; Baldini, Elizabeth H.

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To describe the initial experience at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women's Hospital with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as adjuvant therapy after extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) and adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: The medical records of patients treated with IMRT after EPP and adjuvant chemotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. IMRT was given to a dose of 54 Gy to the clinical target volume in 1.8 Gy daily fractions. Treatment was delivered with a dynamic multileaf collimator using a sliding window technique. Eleven of 13 patients received heated intraoperative cisplatin chemotherapy (225 mg/m{sup 2}). Two patients received neoadjuvant intravenous cisplatin/pemetrexed, and 10 patients received adjuvant cisplatin/pemetrexed chemotherapy after EPP but before radiation therapy. All patients received at least 2 cycles of intravenous chemotherapy. The contralateral lung was limited to a V20 (volume of lung receiving 20 Gy or more) of 20% and a mean lung dose (MLD) of 15 Gy. All patients underwent fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for staging, and any FDG-avid areas in the hemithorax were given a simultaneous boost of radiotherapy to 60 Gy. Statistical comparisons were done using two-sided t test. Results: Thirteen patients were treated with IMRT from December 2004 to September 2005. Six patients developed fatal pneumonitis after treatment. The median time from completion of IMRT to the onset of radiation pneumonitis was 30 days (range 5-57 days). Thirty percent of patients (4 of 13) developed acute Grade 3 nausea and vomiting. One patient developed acute Grade 3 thrombocytopenia. The median V20, MLD, and V5 (volume of lung receiving 5 Gy or more) for the patients who developed pneumonitis was 17.6% (range, 15.3-22.3%), 15.2 Gy (range, 13.3-17 Gy), and 98.6% (range, 81-100%), respectively, as compared with 10.9% (range, 5.5-24.7%) (p = 0.08), 12.9 Gy (range, 8.7-16.9 Gy) (p = 0.07), and 90% (range

  14. Fast radiographic film calibration procedure for helical tomotherapy intensity modulated radiation therapy dose verification

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Yulong; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Weng Xuejun; Penagaricano, Jose; Ratanatharathorn, Vaneerat

    2005-06-15

    Film dosimetry offers an advantageous in-phantom planar dose verification tool in terms of spatial resolution and ease of handling for quality assurance (QA) of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. A critical step in the success of such a technique is that the film calibration be appropriately conducted. This paper presents a fast and efficient film calibration method for a helical tomotherapy unit using a single sheet of film. Considering the unique un-flattened cone shaped profile from a helical tomotherapy beam, a custom leaf control file (sinogram) was created, to produce a valley shaped intensity pattern. There are eleven intensity steps in the valley pattern, representing varying dose values from 38 to 265 cGy. This dose range covers the most commonly prescribed doses in fractionated IMRT treatments. An ion chamber in a solid water phantom was used to measure the dose in each of the eleven steps. For daily film calibration the whole procedure, including film exposure, processing, digitization and analysis, can be completed within 15 min, making it practical to use this technique routinely. This method is applicable to film calibration on a helical tomotherapy unit and is particularly useful in IMRT planar dose verification due to its efficiency and reproducibility. In this work, we characterized the dose response of the KODAK EDR2 ready-pack film which was used to develop the step valley dose maps and the IMRT QA planar doses. A comparison between the step valley technique and multifilm based calibration showed that both calibration methods agreed with less than 0.4% deviation in the clinically useful dose ranges.

  15. Incorporation of gantry angle correction for 3D dose prediction in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sumida, Iori; Yamaguchi, Hajime; Kizaki, Hisao; Aboshi, Keiko; Tsujii, Mari; Yamada, Yuji; Yagi, Masashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Pretreatment dose verification with beam-by-beam analysis for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is commonly performed with a gantry angle of 0° using a 2D diode detector array. Any changes in multileaf collimator (MLC) position between the actual treatment gantry angle and 0° may result in deviations from the planned dose. We evaluated the effects of MLC positioning errors between the actual treatment gantry angles and nominal gantry angles. A gantry angle correction (GAC) factor was generated by performing a non-gap test at various gantry angles using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). To convert pixel intensity to dose at the MLC abutment positions, a non-gap test was performed using an EPID and a film at 0° gantry angle. We then assessed the correlations between pixel intensities and doses. Beam-by-beam analyses for 15 prostate IMRT cases as patient-specific quality assurance were performed with a 2D diode detector array at 0° gantry angle to determine the relative dose error for each beam. The resulting relative dose error with or without GAC was added back to the original dose grid for each beam. We compared the predicted dose distributions with or without GAC for film measurements to validate GAC effects. A gamma pass rate with a tolerance of 2%/2 mm was used to evaluate these dose distributions. The gamma pass rate with GAC was higher than that without GAC (P = 0.01). The predicted dose distribution improved with GAC, although the dosimetric effect to a patient was minimal. PMID:25742866

  16. Optimization and quality assurance of an image-guided radiation therapy system for intensity-modulated radiation therapy radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Jen-San; Micaily, Bizhan; Miyamoto, Curtis

    2012-10-01

    To develop a quality assurance (QA) of XVI cone beam system (XVIcbs) for its optimal imaging-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) implementation, and to construe prostate tumor margin required for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) if IGRT is unavailable. XVIcbs spatial accuracy was explored with a humanoid phantom; isodose conformity to lesion target with a rice phantom housing a soap as target; image resolution with a diagnostic phantom; and exposure validation with a Radcal ion chamber. To optimize XVIcbs, rotation flexmap on coincidency between gantry rotational axis and that of XVI cone beam scan was investigated. Theoretic correlation to image quality of XVIcbs rotational axis stability was elaborately studied. Comprehensive QA of IGRT using XVIcbs has initially been explored and then implemented on our general IMRT treatments, and on special IMRT radiotherapies such as head and neck (H and N), stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT), stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Fifteen examples of prostate setup accounted for 350 IGRT cone beam system were analyzed. IGRT accuracy results were in agreement {+-} 1 mm. Flexmap 0.25 mm met the manufacturer's specification. Films confirmed isodose coincidence with target (soap) via XVIcbs, otherwise not. Superficial doses were measured from 7.2-2.5 cGy for anatomic diameters 15-33 cm, respectively. Image quality was susceptible to rotational stability or patient movement. IGRT using XVIcbs on general IMRT treatments such as prostate, SRT, SRS, and SBRT for setup accuracy were verified; and subsequently coordinate shifts corrections were recorded. The 350 prostate IGRT coordinate shifts modeled to Gaussian distributions show central peaks deviated off the isocenter by 0.6 {+-} 3.0 mm, 0.5 {+-} 4.5 mm in the X(RL)- and Z(SI)-coordinates, respectively; and 2.0 {+-} 3.0 mm in the Y(AP)-coordinate as a result of belly and bladder capacity variations. Sixty-eight percent of confidence was

  17. Whole Abdominopelvic Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor After Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Fontanilla, Hiral P.; Hayes-Jordan, Andrea; Subbiah, Vivek; Bilton, Stephen D.; Chang, Eric L.; Grosshans, David R.; McAleer, Mary F.; Sulman, Eric P.; Woo, Shiao Y.; Anderson, Peter; Green, Holly L.; Mahajan, Anita

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSCRT) is an uncommon pediatric tumor with a poor prognosis. Aggressive multimodality therapy is the current treatment approach; however. treatment toxicity is of concern. We report our results with whole abdominopelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (WAP-IMRT) as a component of multimodality therapy for DSCRT at a single institution. Materials/Methods: Medical records of all patients with DSCRT who received WAP-IMRT as part of definitive treatment at MD Anderson (2006-2010) were identified and reviewed. Results: Eight patients with DSRCT received WAP-IMRT with a median follow-up of 15.2 months. All patients received multiple courses of chemotherapy followed by surgical debulking of intra-abdominal disease; seven also had intraoperative hyperthermic cisplatin. WAP-IMRT was delivered to a total dose of 30 Gy postoperatively; four patients received a simultaneous boost (6-10 Gy) to sites of gross residual disease. Seven patients received concurrent chemotherapy during WAP-IMRT. No Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 4 nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea occurred during RT. Red-cell transfusions were given to two patients to maintain hemoglobin levels >10 g/dL. Grade 4 cytopenia requiring growth factor support occurred in only one patient; no other significant cytopenias were noted. WAP-IMRT resulted in 25% lower radiation doses to the lumbosacral vertebral bodies and pelvic bones than conventional RT plans. The median time to local or distant failure after WAP-IMRT was 8.73 months in seven patients. One patient who had completed RT 20 months before the last follow-up remains alive without evidence of disease. Five patients (63%) experienced treatment failure in the abdomen. Distant failure occurred in three patients (37.5%). Conclusions: WAP-IMRT with concurrent radiosensitizing chemotherapy was well tolerated after aggressive surgery for DSCRT. Enhanced bone sparing with IMRT probably accounts for the low hematologic

  18. Disease Control After Reduced Volume Conformal and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Childhood Craniopharyngioma

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant, Thomas E.; Kun, Larry E.; Hua, Chia-Ho; Wu, Shengjie; Xiong, Xiaoping; Sanford, Robert A.; Boop, Frederick A.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To estimate the rate of disease control after conformal radiation therapy using reduced clinical target volume (CTV) margins and to determine factors that predict for tumor progression. Methods and Materials: Eighty-eight children (median age, 8.5 years; range, 3.2-17.6 years) received conformal or intensity modulated radiation therapy between 1998 and 2009. The study group included those prospectively treated from 1998 to 2003, using a 10-mm CTV, defined as the margin surrounding the solid and cystic tumor targeted to receive the prescription dose of 54 Gy. The CTV margin was subsequently reduced after 2003, yielding 2 groups of patients: those treated with a CTV margin greater than 5 mm (n=26) and those treated with a CTV margin less than or equal to 5 mm (n=62). Disease progression was estimated on the basis of additional variables including sex, race, extent of resection, tumor interventions, target volume margins, and frequency of weekly surveillance magnetic resonance (MR) imaging during radiation therapy. Median follow-up was 5 years. Results: There was no difference between progression-free survival rates based on CTV margins (>5 mm vs ≤5 mm) at 5 years (88.1% ± 6.3% vs 96.2% ± 4.4% [P=.6386]). There were no differences based on planning target volume (PTV) margins (or combined CTV plus PTV margins). The PTV was systematically reduced from 5 to 3 mm during the time period of the study. Factors predictive of superior progression-free survival included Caucasian race (P=.0175), no requirement for cerebrospinal fluid shunting (P=.0066), and number of surveillance imaging studies during treatment (P=.0216). Patients whose treatment protocol included a higher number of weekly surveillance MR imaging evaluations had a lower rate of tumor progression. Conclusions: These results suggest that targeted volume reductions for radiation therapy using smaller margins are feasible and safe but require careful monitoring. We are currently investigating

  19. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between the immunosuppressant sirolimus and the lipid-lowering drug ezetimibe in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Oswald, S; Nassif, A; Modess, C; Keiser, M; Hanke, U; Engel, A; Lütjohann, D; Weitschies, W; Siegmund, W

    2010-06-01

    Organ transplant recipients who have dyslipidemia related to immunosuppression may benefit from cholesterol-lowering therapy with ezetimibe, a substrate of ABCB1, ABCC2, and OATP1B1. Adverse pharmacokinetic interactions are hypothesized with sirolimus, which is a substrate of OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 and an inhibitor of ABCB1, OATP1B1, and OATP1B3 but not of ABCC2. However, competition between sirolimus and ezetimibe for ABCB1 and OATP1B1 is not of major clinical relevance, as confirmed in our randomized, controlled, single-dose study in healthy subjects. PMID:20220747

  20. Accuracy of Real-time Couch Tracking During 3-dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy, Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy, and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbert, Juergen; Baier, Kurt; Hermann, Christian; Flentje, Michael; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of real-time couch tracking for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Intrafractional motion trajectories of 15 prostate cancer patients were the basis for this phantom study; prostate motion had been monitored with the Calypso System. An industrial robot moved a phantom along these trajectories, motion was detected via an infrared camera system, and the robotic HexaPOD couch was used for real-time counter-steering. Residual phantom motion during real-time tracking was measured with the infrared camera system. Film dosimetry was performed during delivery of 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Results: Motion of the prostate was largest in the anterior-posterior direction, with systematic ( N-Ary-Summation ) and random ({sigma}) errors of 2.3 mm and 2.9 mm, respectively; the prostate was outside a threshold of 5 mm (3D vector) for 25.0%{+-}19.8% of treatment time. Real-time tracking reduced prostate motion to N-Ary-Summation =0.01 mm and {sigma} = 0.55 mm in the anterior-posterior direction; the prostate remained within a 1-mm and 5-mm threshold for 93.9%{+-}4.6% and 99.7%{+-}0.4% of the time, respectively. Without real-time tracking, pass rates based on a {gamma} index of 2%/2 mm in film dosimetry ranged between 66% and 72% for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT, on average. Real-time tracking increased pass rates to minimum 98% on average for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT. Conclusions: Real-time couch tracking resulted in submillimeter accuracy for prostate cancer, which transferred into high dosimetric accuracy independently of whether 3D-CRT, IMRT, or VMAT was used.

  1. Berberine metabolites could induce low density lipoprotein receptor up-regulation to exert lipid-lowering effects in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Cao, Shijie; Wang, Ying; Xu, Peixiang; Yan, Jiankun; Bin, Wen; Qiu, Feng; Kang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Berberine (BBR) is an isoquinoline alkaloid isolated from several Chinese herbal medicines, such as Coptis chinensis, Berberis aristata, and Coptis japonica. It exhibits a lipid-lowering effect by up-regulating the hepatic low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) expression. However, the plasma concentration of BBR is very low after oral administration for the reason that BBR is poorly absorbed and rapidly metabolized. Therefore, it is hard to explain the pharmacological effects of BBR in vivo. Here, RT-PCR, Western blotting and Oil Red O staining were used to investigate the effects of four BBR metabolites on LDLR expression and lipid accumulation in human hepatoma Hep G2 cells. Our results suggested that BBR increased the LDLR mRNA and protein levels in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Four metabolites of BBR, jatrorrhizine, columbamine, berberrubine and demethyleneberberine, were found to be able to up-regulate LDLR mRNA and protein expression. Moreover, almost all the metabolites had potent effects on inhibiting cellular lipid accumulation. These results suggest that both BBR and its metabolites exhibit lipid-lowering effects by up-regulating LDLR expression, and BBR and its metabolites might be the in vivo active forms of BBR produced after oral administration. This study provides information to help us understand the mechanisms underlying the hypolipidemic effects of BBR in vivo. PMID:24321576

  2. Lipid-Lowering Effects of Pediococcus acidilactici M76 Isolated from Korean Traditional Makgeolli in High Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Yeon-Jeong; Baik, Sang-Ho; Cha, Youn-Soo

    2014-01-01

    The effect of Pediococcus acidilactici M76 (lactic acid bacteria) isolated from makgeolli on mice fed a high fat diet was investigated to clarify the lipid lowering function. C57BL/6J male mice were randomly divided into a normal diet (ND) group, high fat diet (HD) group, HD plus Pediococcus acidilactici DSM 20284 reference strain (PR) group, and HD plus Pediococcus acidilactici M76 strain (PA) groups. The lyophilized PA and PR strain were dissolved in distilled water at a final concentration of 1.25 × 109 cfu/mL and was given orally to animals at a dose of 4 mL/kg body weight for 12 weeks. The PA group had a lower final body weight, adipose tissue weight, and lipid profile than those in the HD group. Additionally, level of ACC, FAS and PPAR-γ, a key lipid synthesis enzyme, was markedly suppressed in the PA compared to those in the HD group. These data suggest that P. acidilactici M76 may exert a lipid-lowering effect in high fat diet- induced obese mice. PMID:24609135

  3. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Anal Malignancies: A Preliminary Toxicity and Disease Outcomes Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pepek, Joseph M.; Willett, Christopher G.; Wu, Q. Jackie; Yoo, Sua; Clough, Robert W.; Czito, Brian G.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has the potential to reduce toxicities associated with chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of anal cancer. This study reports the results of using IMRT in the treatment of anal cancer. Methods and Materials: Records of patients with anal malignancies treated with IMRT at Duke University were reviewed. Acute toxicity was graded using the NCI CTCAEv3.0 scale. Overall survival (OS), metastasis-free survival (MFS), local-regional control (LRC) and colostomy-free survival (CFS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Forty-seven patients with anal malignancy (89% canal, 11% perianal skin) were treated with IMRT between August 2006 and September 2008. Median follow-up was 14 months (19 months for SCC patients). Median radiation dose was 54 Gy. Eight patients (18%) required treatment breaks lasting a median of 5 days (range, 2-7 days). Toxicity rates were as follows: Grade 4: leukopenia (7%), thrombocytopenia (2%); Grade 3: leukopenia (18%), diarrhea (9%), and anemia (4%); Grade 2: skin (93%), diarrhea (24%), and leukopenia (24%). The 2-year actuarial overall OS, MFS, LRC, and CFS rates were 85%, 78%, 90% and 82%, respectively. For SCC patients, the 2-year OS, MFS, LRC, and CFS rates were 100%, 100%, 95%, and 91%, respectively. Conclusions: IMRT-based chemoradiotherapy for anal cancer results in significant reductions in normal tissue dose and acute toxicities versus historic controls treated without IMRT, leading to reduced rates of toxicity-related treatment interruption. Early disease-related outcomes seem encouraging. IMRT is emerging as a standard therapy for anal cancer.

  4. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of anal cancer: Toxicity and clinical outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Milano, Michael T.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Farrey, Karl J.; Rash, Carla C.; Heimann, Ruth; Chmura, Steven J. . E-mail: schmura@radonc.uchicago.edu

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: To assess survival, local control, and toxicity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients were treated with nine-field IMRT plans. Thirteen received concurrent 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C, whereas 1 patient received 5-fluorouracil alone. Seven patients were planned with three-dimensional anteroposterior/posterior-anterior (AP/PA) fields for dosimetric comparison to IMRT. Results: Compared with AP/PA, IMRT reduced the mean and threshold doses to small bowel, bladder, and genitalia. Treatment was well tolerated, with no Grade {>=}3 acute nonhematologic toxicity. There were no treatment breaks attributable to gastrointestinal or skin toxicity. Of patients who received mitomycin C, 38% experienced Grade 4 hematologic toxicity. IMRT did not afford bone marrow sparing, possibly resulting from the clinical decision to prescribe 45 Gy to the whole pelvis in most patients, vs. the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-recommended 30.6 Gy whole pelvic dose. Three of 17 patients, who did not achieve a complete response, proceeded to an abdominoperineal resection and colostomy. At a median follow-up of 20.3 months, there were no other local failures. Two-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and colostomy-free survival are: 91%, 65%, and 82% respectively. Conclusions: In this hypothesis-generating analysis, the acute toxicity and clinical outcome with IMRT in the treatment of anal cancer is encouraging. Compared with historical controls, local control is not compromised despite efforts to increase conformality and reduce normal structure dose.

  5. Replanning During Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Improved Quality of Life in Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Haihua; Hu Wei; Wang Wei; Chen Peifang; Ding Weijun; Luo Wei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Anatomic and dosimetric changes have been reported during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of replanning on quality of life (QoL) and clinical outcomes during the course of IMRT for NPC patients. Methods and Materials: Between June 2007 and August 2011, 129 patients with NPC were enrolled. Forty-three patients received IMRT without replanning, while 86 patients received IMRT replanning after computed tomography (CT) images were retaken part way through therapy. Chinese versions of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 and Head and Neck Quality of Life Questionnaire 35 were completed before treatment began and at the end of treatment and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after the completion of treatment. Overall survival (OS) data were compared using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: IMRT replanning had a profound impact on the QoL of NPC patients, as determined by statistically significant changes in global QoL and other QoL scales. Additionally, the clinical outcome comparison indicates that replanning during IMRT for NPC significantly improved 2-year local regional control (97.2% vs 92.4%, respectively, P=.040) but did not improve 2-year OS (89.8% vs 82.2%, respectively, P=.475). Conclusions: IMRT replanning improves QoL as well as local regional control in patients with NPC. Future research is needed to determine the criteria for replanning for NPC patients undergoing IMRT.

  6. SU-E-T-124: Dosimetric Comparison of HDR Brachytherapy and Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J; Wu, H; Das, I

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy is known to be able to deliver more radiation dose to tumor while minimizing radiation dose to surrounding normal tissues. Proton therapy also provides superior dose distribution due to Bragg peak. Since both HDR and Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) are beneficial for their quick dose drop off, our goal in this study is to compare the pace of dose gradient drop-off between HDR and IMPT plans based on the same CT image data-set. In addition, normal tissues sparing were also compared among HDR, IMPT and SBRT. Methods: Five cervical cancer cases treated with EBRT + HDR boost combination with Tandem and Ovoid applicator were used for comparison purpose. Original HDR plans with prescribed dose of 5.5 Gy x 5 fractions were generated and optimized. The 100% isodose line of HDR plans was converted to a dose volume, and treated as CTV for IMPT and SBRT planning. The same HDR CT scans were also used for IMPT plan and SBRT plan for direct comparison. The philosophy of the IMPT and SBRT planning was to create the same CTV coverage as HDR plans. All three modalities treatment plans were compared to each other with a set of predetermined criteria. Results: With similar target volume coverage in cervix cancer boost treatment, HDR provides a slightly sharper dose drop-off from 100% to 50% isodose line, averagely in all directions compared to IMPT. However, IMPT demonstrated more dose gradient drop-off at the junction of the target and normal tissues by providing more normal tissue sparing and superior capability to reduce integral dose. Conclusion: IMPT is capable of providing comparable dose drop-off as HDR. IMPT can be explored as replacement for HDR brachytherapy in various applications.

  7. Staff attitudes and expectations about music therapy: pediatric oncology versus neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Bouhairie, Annie; Kemper, Kathi J; Martin, Kathleen; Woods, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Music is commonly used to reduce stress, but it has not been universally adopted in inpatient and outpatient settings. We compared the attitudes of staff in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and the pediatric outpatient hematology oncology unit (PEDS ONC) toward music therapy. A cross-sectional survey of NICU staff was performed in the winter of 2003 and of PEDS ONC staff in the summer of 2005. Eligible subjects were 187 NICU and 20 PEDS ONC staff members. Surveys were distributed by e-mail, in person, and in staff mail boxes. Data were analyzed using simple descriptive statistics, chi-square test, and logistic regression. t-Tests and chi-square test were used to compare responses in the two units. The response rate was 75% in the NICU and 100% in PEDS ONC unit. Staff in the two locations were similar: the mean age of the staff was 37 years in NICU and 40 years in the PEDS ONC (p>.1); over 80% of the staff were female in both units and most (70% in the NICU, 75% in PEDS ONC) reported some previous musical training . Most agreed that music enjoyed by patients could reduce stress (86% in the NICU, 100% in PEDS ONC) and improve sleep (79% in the NICU, 95% in PEDS ONC). Attitudes toward music in both clinical settings were significantly associated with prior musical training , experience, and profession. Staff in both the NICU and PEDS ONC hold favorable attitudes toward music for patients. Staff attitudes in both inpatient and outpatient settings are not barriers to providing music therapy. PMID:19442339

  8. Expert Consensus Contouring Guidelines for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Esophageal and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Abraham J.; Bosch, Walter R.; Chang, Daniel T.; Hong, Theodore S.; Jabbour, Salma K.; Kleinberg, Lawrence R.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Thomas, Charles R.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose/Objective(s): Current guidelines for esophageal cancer contouring are derived from traditional 2-dimensional fields based on bony landmarks, and they do not provide sufficient anatomic detail to ensure consistent contouring for more conformal radiation therapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Therefore, we convened an expert panel with the specific aim to derive contouring guidelines and generate an atlas for the clinical target volume (CTV) in esophageal or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Methods and Materials: Eight expert academically based gastrointestinal radiation oncologists participated. Three sample cases were chosen: a GEJ cancer, a distal esophageal cancer, and a mid-upper esophageal cancer. Uniform computed tomographic (CT) simulation datasets and accompanying diagnostic positron emission tomographic/CT images were distributed to each expert, and the expert was instructed to generate gross tumor volume (GTV) and CTV contours for each case. All contours were aggregated and subjected to quantitative analysis to assess the degree of concordance between experts and to generate draft consensus contours. The panel then refined these contours to generate the contouring atlas. Results: The κ statistics indicated substantial agreement between panelists for each of the 3 test cases. A consensus CTV atlas was generated for the 3 test cases, each representing common anatomic presentations of esophageal cancer. The panel agreed on guidelines and principles to facilitate the generalizability of the atlas to individual cases. Conclusions: This expert panel successfully reached agreement on contouring guidelines for esophageal and GEJ IMRT and generated a reference CTV atlas. This atlas will serve as a reference for IMRT contours for clinical practice and prospective trial design. Subsequent patterns of failure analyses of clinical datasets using these guidelines may require modification in the future.

  9. Adoption of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy For Early-Stage Breast Cancer From 2004 Through 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Elyn H.; Mougalian, Sarah S.; Soulos, Pamela R.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Gross, Cary P.; Yu, James B.

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a newer method of radiation therapy (RT) that has been increasingly adopted as an adjuvant treatment after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). IMRT may result in improved cosmesis compared to standard RT, although at greater expense. To investigate the adoption of IMRT, we examined trends and factors associated with IMRT in women under the age of 65 with early stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective study of early stage breast cancer patients treated with BCS followed by whole-breast irradiation (WBI) who were ≤65 years old in the National Cancer Data Base from 2004 to 2011. We used logistic regression to identify factors associated with receipt of IMRT (vs standard RT). Results: We identified 11,089 women with early breast cancer (9.6%) who were treated with IMRT and 104,448 (90.4%) who were treated with standard RT, after BCS. The proportion of WBI patients receiving IMRT increased yearly from 2004 to 2009, with 5.3% of WBI patients receiving IMRT in 2004 and 11.6% receiving IMRT in 2009. Further use of IMRT declined afterward, with the proportion remaining steady at 11.0% and 10.7% in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Patients treated in nonacademic community centers were more likely to receive IMRT (odds ratio [OR], 1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.30-1.43 for nonacademic vs academic center). Compared to privately insured patients, the uninsured patients (OR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.70-0.95) and those with Medicaid insurance (OR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.79-0.95) were less likely to receive IMRT. Conclusions: The use of IMRT rose from 2004 to 2009 and then stabilized. Important nonclinical factors associated with IMRT use included facility type and insurance status.

  10. Linear Energy Transfer-Guided Optimization in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy: Feasibility Study and Clinical Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Craft, David; Niemierko, Andrzej; Trofimov, Alexei; Paganetti, Harald

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility and potential clinical benefit of linear energy transfer (LET) guided plan optimization in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Methods and Materials: A multicriteria optimization (MCO) module was used to generate a series of Pareto-optimal IMPT base plans (BPs), corresponding to defined objectives, for 5 patients with head-and-neck cancer and 2 with pancreatic cancer. A Monte Carlo platform was used to calculate dose and LET distributions for each BP. A custom-designed MCO navigation module allowed the user to interpolate between BPs to produce deliverable Pareto-optimal solutions. Differences among the BPs were evaluated for each patient, based on dose–volume and LET–volume histograms and 3-dimensional distributions. An LET-based relative biological effectiveness (RBE) model was used to evaluate the potential clinical benefit when navigating the space of Pareto-optimal BPs. Results: The mean LET values for the target varied up to 30% among the BPs for the head-and-neck patients and up to 14% for the pancreatic cancer patients. Variations were more prominent in organs at risk (OARs), where mean LET values differed by a factor of up to 2 among the BPs for the same patient. An inverse relation between dose and LET distributions for the OARs was typically observed. Accounting for LET-dependent variable RBE values, a potential improvement on RBE-weighted dose of up to 40%, averaged over several structures under study, was noticed during MCO navigation. Conclusions: We present a novel strategy for optimizing proton therapy to maximize dose-averaged LET in tumor targets while simultaneously minimizing dose-averaged LET in normal tissue structures. MCO BPs show substantial LET variations, leading to potentially significant differences in RBE-weighted doses. Pareto-surface navigation, using both dose and LET distributions for guidance, provides the means for evaluating a large variety of deliverable plans and aids in

  11. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in the Salvage of Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Sufang; Lin Shaojun; Tham, Ivan W.K.; Pan Jianji; Lu Jun; Lu, Jiade J.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Local recurrences of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) may be salvaged by reirradiation with conventional techniques, but with significant morbidity. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) may improve the therapeutic ratio by reducing doses to normal tissue. The aim of this study was to address the efficacy and toxicity profile of IMRT for a cohort of patients with locally recurrent NPC. Methods and Materials: Between August 2003 and June 2009, 70 patients with radiologic or pathologically proven locally recurrent NPC were treated with IMRT. The median time to recurrence was 30 months after the completion of conventional radiation to definitive dose. Fifty-seven percent of the tumors were classified asrT3-4. The minimum planned doses were 59.4 to 60 Gy in 1.8- to 2-Gy fractions per day to the gross disease with margins, with or without chemotherapy. Results: The median dose to the recurrent tumor was 70 Gy (range, 50-77.4 Gy). Sixty-five patients received the planned radiation therapy; 5 patients received between 50 and 60 Gy because of acute side effects. With a median follow-up time of 25 months, the rates of 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 65.8%, 65.8%, and 67.4%, respectively. Moderate to severe late toxicities were noted in 25 patients (35.7%). Eleven patients (15.7%) had posterior nasal space ulceration, 17 (24.3%) experienced cranial nerve palsies, 12 (17.1%) had trismus, and 12 (17.1%) experienced deafness. Extended disease-free interval (relative risk 2.049) and advanced T classification (relative risk 3.895) at presentation were adverse prognostic factors. Conclusion: Reirradiation with IMRT provides reasonable long-term control in patients with locally recurrent NPC.

  12. The calculated risk of fatal secondary malignancies from intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kry, Stephen F.; Salehpour, Mohammad . E-mail: msalehpour@mdanderson.org; Followill, David S.; Stovall, Marilyn; Kuban, Deborah A.; White, R. Allen; Rosen, Isaac I.

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: Out-of-field radiation doses to normal tissues may be associated with an increased risk of secondary malignancies, particularly in long-term survivors. Step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), an increasingly popular treatment modality, yields higher out-of-field doses than do conventional treatments, because of an increase in required monitor units (beam-on time). Methods: We used published risk coefficients (NRCP Report 116) and out-of-field dose equivalents to multiple organ sites to estimate a conservative maximal risk of fatal secondary malignancy associated with 6 IMRT approaches and 1 conventional external-beam approach for prostate cancer. Results: Depending on treatment energy, the IMRT treatments required 3.5-4.9 times as many monitor units to deliver as did the conventional treatment. The conservative maximum risk of fatal second malignancy was 1.7% for conventional radiation, 2.1% for IMRT using 10-MV X-rays, and 5.1% for IMRT using 18-MV X-rays. Intermediate risks were associated with IMRT using 6-MV X-rays: 2.9% for treatment with the Varian accelerator and 3.7% for treatment with the Siemens accelerator, as well as using 15-MV X-rays: 3.4% (Varian) and 4.0% (Siemens). Conclusion: The risk of fatal secondary malignancy differed substantially between IMRT and conventional radiation therapy for prostate cancer, as well as between different IMRT approaches. Perhaps this risk should be considered when choosing the optimal treatment technique and delivery system for patients who will undergo prostate radiation.

  13. Kilovoltage Intrafraction Monitoring for Prostate Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy: First Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Jin Aun; Booth, Jeremy T.; Poulsen, Per R.; Fledelius, Walther; Worm, Esben Schjodt; Eade, Thomas; Hegi, Fiona; Kneebone, Andrew; Kuncic, Zdenka; Keall, Paul J.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Most linear accelerators purchased today are equipped with a gantry-mounted kilovoltage X-ray imager which is typically used for patient imaging prior to therapy. A novel application of the X-ray system is kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring (KIM), in which the 3-dimensional (3D) tumor position is determined during treatment. In this paper, we report on the first use of KIM in a prospective clinical study of prostate cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT). Methods and Materials: Ten prostate cancer patients with implanted fiducial markers undergoing conventionally fractionated IMAT (RapidArc) were enrolled in an ethics-approved study of KIM. KIM involves acquiring kV images as the gantry rotates around the patient during treatment. Post-treatment, markers in these images were segmented to obtain 2D positions. From the 2D positions, a maximum likelihood estimation of a probability density function was used to obtain 3D prostate trajectories. The trajectories were analyzed to determine the motion type and the percentage of time the prostate was displaced {>=}3, 5, 7, and 10 mm. Independent verification of KIM positional accuracy was performed using kV/MV triangulation. Results: KIM was performed for 268 fractions. Various prostate trajectories were observed (ie, continuous target drift, transient excursion, stable target position, persistent excursion, high-frequency excursions, and erratic behavior). For all patients, 3D displacements of {>=}3, 5, 7, and 10 mm were observed 5.6%, 2.2%, 0.7% and 0.4% of the time, respectively. The average systematic accuracy of KIM was measured at 0.46 mm. Conclusions: KIM for prostate IMAT was successfully implemented clinically for the first time. Key advantages of this method are (1) submillimeter accuracy, (2) widespread applicability, and (3) a low barrier to clinical implementation. A disadvantage is that KIM delivers additional imaging dose to the patient.

  14. Investigation of therapy improvement using real-time photoacoustic imaging guided high intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Huizhong

    There are a lot of risks in cancer treatment by invasive surgery, such as bleeding, wound infection, and long recovery time, etc. Therefore, there is great need for minimally- or non-invasive treatment. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a rapidly growing and truly non-invasive technology. It has been widely used in therapeutic applications, such as rapid tissue heating and tissue ablation. With proper imaging guidance, HIFU treatment can be performed totally noninvasively. Currently, ultrasound imaging-guided HIFU has been extensively studied. However, ultrasound imaging guidance is less precise because of the relatively low imaging contrast, sensitivity, and specificity for noninvasive detection. In this study, we employed photoacoustic imaging (PAI) technique, which has been developed a novel promising imaging technique for early cancer detection, to guide HIFU treatment. The goal of this study is to investigate the feasibility of PAI to guide, monitor in real time and enhance the HIFU therapy. In this dissertation, as the first step, the integrated PAI and HIFU system had been shown to have the feasibility to guide HIFU both ex vivo and in vivo. Then, the system was improved and developed to a real-time PAI-guided HIFU system. It is demonstrated that the sensitivity of PA detection for HIFU lesion is very high and the saturation of PA signals can be used as the indicator for tissue coagulation. During the temperature measurement using this system, laser-enhanced HIFU heating was found. Thus, we further investigated the laser enhanced technique in both HIFU heating and pulsed HIFU thrombolysis. In the HIFU therapy, laser light was employed to illuminate the sample concurrently with HIFU radiation. The resulting cavitation was detected with a passive cavitation detector. We demonstrated that concurrent light illumination during HIFU has the potential to significantly enhance HIFU by reducing cavitation threshold.

  15. Beam angle optimization for intensity-modulated radiation therapy using a guided pattern search method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Humberto; Dias, Joana M.; Ferreira, Brígida C.; Lopes, Maria C.

    2013-05-01

    Generally, the inverse planning of radiation therapy consists mainly of the fluence optimization. The beam angle optimization (BAO) in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) consists of selecting appropriate radiation incidence directions and may influence the quality of the IMRT plans, both to enhance better organ sparing and to improve tumor coverage. However, in clinical practice, most of the time, beam directions continue to be manually selected by the treatment planner without objective and rigorous criteria. The goal of this paper is to introduce a novel approach that uses beam’s-eye-view dose ray tracing metrics within a pattern search method framework in the optimization of the highly non-convex BAO problem. Pattern search methods are derivative-free optimization methods that require a few function evaluations to progress and converge and have the ability to better avoid local entrapment. The pattern search method framework is composed of a search step and a poll step at each iteration. The poll step performs a local search in a mesh neighborhood and ensures the convergence to a local minimizer or stationary point. The search step provides the flexibility for a global search since it allows searches away from the neighborhood of the current iterate. Beam’s-eye-view dose metrics assign a score to each radiation beam direction and can be used within the pattern search framework furnishing a priori knowledge of the problem so that directions with larger dosimetric scores are tested first. A set of clinical cases of head-and-neck tumors treated at the Portuguese Institute of Oncology of Coimbra is used to discuss the potential of this approach in the optimization of the BAO problem.

  16. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Significantly Improves Acute Gastrointestinal Toxicity in Pancreatic and Ampullary Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Yovino, Susannah; Poppe, Matthew; Jabbour, Salma; David, Vera; Garofalo, Michael; Pandya, Naimesh; Alexander, Richard; Hanna, Nader; Regine, William F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Among patients with upper abdominal malignancies, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can improve dose distributions to critical dose-limiting structures near the target. Whether these improved dose distributions are associated with decreased toxicity when compared with conventional three-dimensional treatment remains a subject of investigation. Methods and Materials: 46 patients with pancreatic/ampullary cancer were treated with concurrent chemoradiation (CRT) using inverse-planned IMRT. All patients received CRT based on 5-fluorouracil in a schema similar to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 97-04. Rates of acute gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity for this series of IMRT-treated patients were compared with those from RTOG 97-04, where all patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal techniques. Chi-square analysis was used to determine if there was a statistically different incidence in acute GI toxicity between these two groups of patients. Results: The overall incidence of Grade 3-4 acute GI toxicity was low in patients receiving IMRT-based CRT. When compared with patients who had three-dimensional treatment planning (RTOG 97-04), IMRT significantly reduced the incidence of Grade 3-4 nausea and vomiting (0% vs. 11%, p = 0.024) and diarrhea (3% vs. 18%, p = 0.017). There was no significant difference in the incidence of Grade 3-4 weight loss between the two groups of patients. Conclusions: IMRT is associated with a statistically significant decrease in acute upper and lower GI toxicity among patients treated with CRT for pancreatic/ampullary cancers. Future clinical trials plan to incorporate the use of IMRT, given that it remains a subject of active investigation.

  17. Computer-assisted selection of coplanar beam orientations in intensity-modulated radiation therapy*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugachev, A.; Xing, L.

    2001-09-01

    In intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the incident beam orientations are often determined by a trial and error search. The conventional beam's-eye view (BEV) tool becomes less helpful in IMRT because it is frequently required that beams go through organs at risk (OARs) in order to achieve a compromise between the dosimetric objectives of the planning target volume (PTV) and the OARs. In this paper, we report a beam's-eye view dosimetrics (BEVD) technique to assist in the selection of beam orientations in IMRT. In our method, each beam portal is divided into a grid of beamlets. A score function is introduced to measure the `goodness' of each beamlet at a given gantry angle. The score is determined by the maximum PTV dose deliverable by the beamlet without exceeding the tolerance doses of the OARs and normal tissue located in the path of the beamlet. The overall score of the gantry angle is given by a sum of the scores of all beamlets. For a given patient, the score function is evaluated for each possible beam orientation. The directions with the highest scores are then selected as the candidates for beam placement. This procedure is similar to the BEV approach used in conventional radiation therapy, except that the evaluation by a human is replaced by a score function to take into account the intensity modulation. This technique allows one to select beam orientations without the excessive computing overhead of computer optimization of beam orientation. It also provides useful insight into the problem of selection of beam orientation and is especially valuable for complicated cases where the PTV is surrounded by several sensitive structures and where it is difficult to select a set of `good' beam orientations. Several two-dimensional (2D) model cases were used to test the proposed technique. The plans obtained using the BEVD-selected beam orientations were compared with the plans obtained using equiangular spaced beams. For all the model cases investigated

  18. RISK OF SECONDARY MILIGNANT NEOPLASMS FROM PROTON THERAPY AND INTENSITY-MODULATED X-RAY THERAPY FOR EARLY-STAGE PROSTATE CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Fontenot, Jonas D.; Lee, Andrew K.; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the risk of a secondary malignant neoplasm (SMN) from proton therapy relative to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using X-rays, taking into account contributions from both primary and secondary sources of radiation, for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials A proton therapy plan and a 6-MV IMRT plan were constructed for 3 patients with early-stage adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Doses from the primary fields delivered to organs at risk of developing an SMN were determined from treatment plans. Secondary doses from the proton therapy and IMRT were determined from Monte Carlo simulations and available measured data, respectively. The risk of an SMN was estimated from primary and secondary doses on an organ-by-organ basis by use of risk models from the Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation. Results Proton therapy reduced the risk of an SMN by 26% to 39% compared with IMRT. The risk of an SMN for both modalities was greatest in the in-field organs. However, the risks from the in-field organs were considerably lower with the proton therapy plan than with the IMRT plan. This reduction was attributed to the substantial sparing of the rectum and bladder from exposure to the therapeutic beam by the proton therapy plan. Conclusions When considering exposure to primary and secondary radiation, proton therapy can reduce the risk of an SMN in prostate patients compared with contemporary IMRT. PMID:19427561

  19. Risk of Secondary Malignant Neoplasms From Proton Therapy and Intensity-Modulated X-Ray Therapy for Early-Stage Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fontenot, Jonas D.; Lee, Andrew K.; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the risk of a secondary malignant neoplasm (SMN) from proton therapy relative to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using X-rays, taking into account contributions from both primary and secondary sources of radiation, for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A proton therapy plan and a 6-MV IMRT plan were constructed for 3 patients with early-stage adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Doses from the primary fields delivered to organs at risk of developing an SMN were determined from treatment plans. Secondary doses from the proton therapy and IMRT were determined from Monte Carlo simulations and available measured data, respectively. The risk of an SMN was estimated from primary and secondary doses on an organ-by-organ basis by use of risk models from the Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation. Results: Proton therapy reduced the risk of an SMN by 26% to 39% compared with IMRT. The risk of an SMN for both modalities was greatest in the in-field organs. However, the risks from the in-field organs were considerably lower with the proton therapy plan than with the IMRT plan. This reduction was attributed to the substantial sparing of the rectum and bladder from exposure to the therapeutic beam by the proton therapy plan. Conclusions: When considering exposure to primary and secondary radiation, proton therapy can reduce the risk of an SMN in prostate patients compared with contemporary IMRT.

  20. MAGIC-type polymer gel for three-dimensional dosimetry: intensity-modulated radiation therapy verification.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, Helen; Karlsson, Anna; Bäck, Sven A J; Olsson, Lars E; Haraldsson, Pia; Engström, Per; Nyström, Håkan

    2003-06-01

    A new type of polymer gel dosimeter, which responds well to absorbed dose even when manufactured in the presence of normal levels of oxygen, was recently described by Fong et al. [Phys. Med. Biol. 46, 3105-3113 (2001)] and referred to by the acronym MAGIC. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using this new type of gel for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) verification. Gel manufacturing was carried out in room atmosphere under normal levels of oxygen. IMRT inverse treatment planning was performed using the Helios software. The gel was irradiated using a linear accelerator equipped with a dynamic multileaf collimator, and intensity modulation was achieved using sliding window technique. The response to absorbed dose was evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging. Measured and calculated dose distributions were compared with regard to in-plane isodoses and dose volume histograms. In addition, the spatial and dosimetric accuracy was evaluated using the gamma formalism. Good agreement between calculated and measured data was obtained. In the isocenter plane, the 70% and 90% isodoses acquired using the different methods are mostly within 2 mm, with up to 3 mm disagreement at isolated points. For the planning target volume (PTV), the calculated mean relative dose was 96.8 +/- 2.5% (1 SD) and the measured relative mean dose was 98.6 +/- 2.2%. Corresponding data for an organ at risk was 34.4 +/- 0.9% and 32.7 +/- 0.7%, respectively. The gamma criterion (3 mm spatial/3% dose deviation) was fulfilled for 94% of the pixels in the target region. Discrepancies were found in hot spots the upper and lower parts of the PTV, where the measured dose was up to 11% higher than calculated. This was attributed to sub optimal scatter kernels used in the treatment planning system dose calculations. Our results indicate great potential for IMRT verification using MAGIC-type polymer gel. PMID:12852552

  1. Fast intensity-modulated arc therapy based on 2-step beam segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Bratengeier, Klaus; Gainey, Mark; Sauer, Otto A.; Richter, Anne; Flentje, Michael

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Single or few arc intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is intended to be a time saving irradiation method, potentially replacing classical intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The aim of this work was to evaluate the quality of different IMAT methods with the potential of fast delivery, which also has the possibility of adapting to the daily shape of the target volume. Methods: A planning study was performed. Novel double and triple IMAT techniques based on the geometrical analysis of the target organ at risk geometry (2-step IMAT) were evaluated. They were compared to step and shoot IMRT reference plans generated using direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO). Volumetric arc (VMAT) plans from commercial preclinical software (SMARTARC) were used as an additional benchmark to classify the quality of the novel techniques. Four cases with concave planning target volumes (PTV) with one dominating organ at risk (OAR), viz., the PTV/OAR combination of the ESTRO Quasimodo phantom, breast/lung, spine metastasis/spinal cord, and prostate/rectum, were used for the study. The composite objective value (COV) and other parameters representing the plan quality were studied. Results: The novel 2-step IMAT techniques with geometry based segment definition were as good as or better than DMPO and were superior to the SMARTARC VMAT techniques. For the spine metastasis, the quality measured by the COV differed only by 3%, whereas the COV of the 2-step IMAT for the other three cases decreased by a factor of 1.4-2.4 with respect to the reference plans. Conclusions: Rotational techniques based on geometrical analysis of the optimization problem (2-step IMAT) provide similar or better plan quality than DMPO or the research version of SMARTARC VMAT variants. The results justify pursuing the goal of fast IMAT adaptation based on 2-step IMAT techniques.

  2. Comparison of Plan Quality Provided by Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy and Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Daliang; Holmes, Timothy W.; Afghan, Muhammad K.N.; Shepard, David M.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is an arc-based approach to intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) that can be delivered on a conventional linear accelerator using a conventional multileaf collimator. In a previous work, we demonstrated that our arc-sequencing algorithm can produce highly conformal IMAT plans. Through plan comparisons, we explored the ability of IMAT to serve as an alternative to helical tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: The IMAT plans were created for 10 patients previously treated with helical tomotherapy. Treatment plan comparisons, according to the target dose coverage and critical structure sparing, were performed to determine whether similar plan quality could be achieved using IMAT. Results: In 8 of 10 patient cases, IMAT was able to provide plan quality comparable to that of helical tomotherapy. In 2 of these 8 cases, the use of non-axial coplanar or non-coplanar arcs in IMAT planning led to significant improvements in normal tissue sparing. The remaining 2 cases posed particular dosimetric challenges. In 1 case, the target was immediately adjacent to a spinal cord that had received previous irradiation. The second case involved multiple target volumes and multiple prescription levels. Both IMAT and tomotherapy were able to produce clinically acceptable plans. Tomotherapy, however, provided a more uniform target dose and improved critical structure sparing. Conclusions: For most cases, IMAT can provide plan qualities comparable to that of helical tomotherapy. For some intracranial tumors, IMAT's ability to deliver non-coplanar arcs led to significant dosimetric improvements. Helical tomotherapy, however, can provide improved dosimetric results in the most complex cases.

  3. Continuous renal replacement therapy: continuous blood purification in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, R; Ronco, C

    1998-05-01

    Severe acute renal failure (SARF) occurs when renal dysfunction is such that haemodialysis or haemofiltration becomes necessary to maintain homeostasis. SARF is increasingly seen in association with multiorgan failure and has become a predominantly Intensive Care Unit disorder. Because of this change in epidemiology, the treatment of SARF has evolved from being exclusively nephrologist and intermittent haemodialysis-based to being mostly intensivist and continuous haemofiltration-based, particularly in European countries with a strong ICU tradition and in Australia. Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) has several advantages in critically ill patients, including greater flexibility, excellent haemodynamic tolerance, outstanding fluid balance control, excellent control of uraemia, prevention of cerebral oedema, ability to provide full and aggressive nutrition, and a possible anti-inflammatory effect. The blood purification effect of CRRT may, in fact, go beyond the simple control of uraemia. Several animal studies have now shown that CRRT attenuates the haemodynamic consequences of bacteraemia or endotoxaemia. Such studies have also shown that increasing the intensity of fluid exchange may offer further beneficial effects in the setting of sepsis. In the light of these findings, CRRT is moving into the area of adjuvant treatment of sepsis, and pilot randomized controlled trials are being conducted to test the hypothesis that CRRT, either in standard or high fluid exchange volumes, attenuates the inflammatory effects of sepsis in humans. In the future, the use of CRRT may extend beyond its initial scope into the area of adjuvant management of sepsis and continuous blood purification may become part of a complex multifaceted approach to multiorgan dysfunction. PMID:9777092

  4. Feasibility of intensive parent-child interaction therapy (I-PCIT): Results from an open trial

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Paulo A.; Bagner, Daniel M.; Slavec, Janine; Hungerford, Gabriela; Kent, Kristine; Babinski, Dara; Derefinko, Karen; Pasalich, Dave

    2014-01-01

    Objective The current pilot study examined the feasibility, acceptability, and initial outcome of an intensive and more condensed version of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (90 minute sessions for 5 days/week over the course of 2 weeks). Method Using an open trial design, 11 children (M child age = 5.01 years) and their mothers completed a baseline period of 2 weeks, a treatment period of 2 weeks, and a post-treatment evaluation. A follow-up evaluation was also conducted 4 months following treatment completion. Across all assessments, mothers completed measures of child behavior and parenting stress, and observational data was collected during three 5-minute standard situations that vary in the degree of parental control (child-led play, parent-led play, & clean-up). Results All 11 families completed the intervention with extremely high attendance and reported high satisfaction. Results across both mother report and observations showed that: a) externalizing behavior problems were stable during the baseline period; b) treatment was effective in reducing externalizing behavior problems (ds = 1.67-2.50), improving parenting skills (ds = 1.93-6.04), and decreasing parenting stress (d = .91); and c) treatment gains were maintained at follow-up (ds = .53-3.50). Conclusions Overall, preliminary data suggest that a brief and intensive format of a parent-training intervention is a feasible and effective treatment for young children with externalizing behavior problems with clinical implications for improving children's behavioral impairment in a very brief period of time. PMID:26097286

  5. Quantitative analysis of tomotherapy, linear-accelerator-based 3D conformal radiation therapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, and 4D conformal radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Hae-Kag; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Lee, Jong-Woong; Park, Hoon-Hee

    2012-04-01

    This study quantified, evaluated and analyzed the radiation dose to which tumors and normal tissues were exposed in 3D conformal radiation therapy (CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and tomotherapy by using a dose volume histogram (DVH) that represented the volume dose and the dose distribution of anatomical structures in the evaluation of treatment planning. Furthermore, a comparison was made for the dose to the gross tumor volume (GTV) and the planning target volume (PTV) of organ to be treated based on the change in field size for three- and four-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT and 4D-CT) (gating based) and in the histogram with a view to proving the usefulness of 4D-CT therapy, which corresponds to respiration-gated radiation therapy. According to the study results, a comparison of 3D CRT, IMRT with a linear accelerator (LINAC), and tomotherapy demonstrated that the GTV of the cranium was higher for tomotherapy than for 3D CRT and IMRT with a LINAC by 5.2% and 4.6%, respectively. The GTV of the neck was higher for tomotherapy than for 3D CRT and IMRT with a LINAC by 6.5% and 2.0%, respectively. The GTV of the pelvis was higher for tomotherapy than for 3D CRT and IMRT with a LINAC by 8.6% and 3.7%, respectively. When the comparison was made for the 3D-CT and the 4D-CT (gating based) treatment equipment, the GTV and the PTV became smaller for 4D-CT treatment planning than for 3D-CT, which could reduce the area in which normal tissues in the surroundings are exposed to an unnecessary radiation dose. In addition, when 4D-CT treatment planning (gating based) was used, the radiation dose could be concentrated on the GTV, CTV or PTV, which meant that the treatment area exceeded that when 3D-CT's treatment planning was used. Moreover, the radiation dose on nearby normal tissues could be reduced. When 4D-CT treatment planning (gating based) was utilized, unnecessary areas that were exposed to a radiation dose could be reduced more than they could

  6. Quantification of beam complexity in intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment plans

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Weiliang Cho, Sang Hyun; Zhang, Xiaodong; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Hoffman, Karen E.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Excessive complexity in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans increases the dose uncertainty, prolongs the treatment time, and increases the susceptibility to changes in patient or target geometry. To date, the tools for quantitative assessment of IMRT beam complexity are still lacking. In this study, The authors have sought to develop metrics to characterize different aspects of beam complexity and investigate the beam complexity for IMRT plans of different disease sites. Methods: The authors evaluated the beam complexity scores for 65 step-and-shoot IMRT plans from three sites (prostate, head and neck, and spine) and 26 volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for the prostate. On the basis of the beam apertures and monitor unit weights of all segments, the authors calculated the mean aperture area, extent of aperture shape irregularity, and degree of beam modulation for each beam. Then the beam complexity values were averaged to obtain the complexity metrics of the IMRT plans. The authors studied the correlation between the beam complexity metrics and the quality assurance (QA) results. Finally, the effects of treatment planning parameters on beam complexity were studied. Results: The beam complexity scores were not uniform among the prostate IMRT beams from different gantry angles. The lateral beams had larger monitor units and smaller shape irregularity, while the anterior-posterior beams had larger modulation values. On average, the prostate IMRT plans had the smallest aperture irregularity, beam modulation, and normalized monitor units; the head and neck IMRT plans had large beam irregularity and beam modulation; and the spine stereotactic radiation therapy plans often had small beam apertures, which may have been associated with the relatively large discrepancies between planned and QA measured doses. There were weak correlations between the beam complexity scores and the measured dose errors. The prostate VMAT beams showed

  7. Bile Acid Malabsorption After Pelvic and Prostate Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: An Uncommon but Treatable Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Victoria; Benton, Barbara; Sohaib, Aslam; Dearnaley, David; Andreyev, H. Jervoise N.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a significant therapeutic advance in prostate cancer, allowing increased tumor dose delivery and increased sparing of normal tissues. IMRT planning uses strict dose constraints to nearby organs to limit toxicity. Bile acid malabsorption (BAM) is a treatable disorder of the terminal ileum (TI) that presents with symptoms similar to radiation therapy toxicity. It has not been described in patients receiving RT for prostate cancer in the contemporary era. We describe new-onset BAM in men after IMRT for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Diagnosis of new-onset BAM was established after typical symptoms developed, selenium-75 homocholic acid taurine (SeHCAT) scanning showed 7-day retention of <15%, and patients' symptoms unequivocally responded to a bile acid sequestrant. The TI was identified on the original radiation therapy plan, and the radiation dose delivered was calculated and compared with accepted dose-volume constraints. Results: Five of 423 men treated in a prospective series of high-dose prostate and pelvic IMRT were identified with new onset BAM (median age, 65 years old). All reported having normal bowel habits before RT. The volume of TI ranged from 26-141 cc. The radiation dose received by the TI varied between 11.4 Gy and 62.1 Gy (uncorrected). Three of 5 patients had TI treated in excess of 45 Gy (equivalent dose calculated in 2-Gy fractions, using an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 3) with volumes ranging from 1.6 cc-49.0 cc. One patient had mild BAM (SeHCAT retention, 10%-15%), 2 had moderate BAM (SeHCAT retention, 5%-10%), and 2 had severe BAM (SeHCAT retention, <5%). The 3 patients whose TI received {>=}45 Gy developed moderate to severe BAM, whereas those whose TI received <45 Gy had only mild to moderate BAM. Conclusions: Radiation delivered to the TI during IMRT may cause BAM. Identification of the TI from unenhanced RT planning computed tomography scans is difficult and may impede accurate

  8. Simvastatin Efficiently Lowers Small LDL-IgG Immune Complex Levels: A Therapeutic Quality beyond the Lipid-Lowering Effect.

    PubMed

    Hörl, Gerd; Froehlich, Harald; Ferstl, Ulrika; Ledinski, Gerhard; Binder, Josepha; Cvirn, Gerhard; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Trauner, Michael; Koidl, Christoph; Tafeit, Erwin; Amrein, Karin; Scharnagl, Hubert; Jürgens, Günther; Hallström, Seth

    2016-01-01

    We investigated a polyethylene glycol non-precipitable low-density lipoprotein (LDL) subfraction targeted by IgG and the influence of statin therapy on plasma levels of these small LDL-IgG-immune complexes (LDL-IgG-IC). LDL-subfractions were isolated from 6 atherosclerotic subjects and 3 healthy individuals utilizing iodixanol density gradient ultracentrifugation. Cholesterol, apoB and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were determined in each fraction by enzymatic testing, dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluorescence immunoassay and high-performance liquid chromatography, respectively. The levels of LDL-IgG-IC were quantified densitometrically following lipid electrophoresis, particle size distribution was assessed with dynamic light scattering and size exclusion chromatography. The influence of simvastatin (40 mg/day for three months) on small LDL-IgG-IC levels and their distribution among LDL-subfractions (salt gradient separation) were investigated in 11 patients with confirmed coronary artery disease (CAD). We demonstrate that the investigated LDL-IgG-IC are small particles present in atherosclerotic patients and healthy subjects. In vitro assembly of LDL-IgG-IC resulted in particle density shifts indicating a composition of one single molecule of IgG per LDL particle. Normalization on cholesterol levels revealed MDA values twice as high for LDL-subfractions rich in small LDL-IgG-IC if compared to dominant LDL-subfractions. Reactivity of affinity purified small LDL-IgG-IC to monoclonal antibody OB/04 indicates a high degree of modified apoB and oxidative modification. Simvastatin therapy studied in the CAD patients significantly lowered LDL levels and to an even higher extent, small LDL-IgG-IC levels without affecting their distribution. In conclusion simvastatin lowers levels of small LDL-IgG-IC more effectively than LDL-cholesterol and LDL-apoB levels in atherosclerotic patients. This antiatherogenic effect may additionally contribute to the known beneficial

  9. Simvastatin Efficiently Lowers Small LDL-IgG Immune Complex Levels: A Therapeutic Quality beyond the Lipid-Lowering Effect

    PubMed Central

    Ferstl, Ulrika; Ledinski, Gerhard; Binder, Josepha; Cvirn, Gerhard; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Trauner, Michael; Koidl, Christoph; Tafeit, Erwin; Amrein, Karin; Scharnagl, Hubert; Jürgens, Günther; Hallström, Seth

    2016-01-01

    We investigated a polyethylene glycol non-precipitable low-density lipoprotein (LDL) subfraction targeted by IgG and the influence of statin therapy on plasma levels of these small LDL-IgG-immune complexes (LDL-IgG-IC). LDL-subfractions were isolated from 6 atherosclerotic subjects and 3 healthy individuals utilizing iodixanol density gradient ultracentrifugation. Cholesterol, apoB and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were determined in each fraction by enzymatic testing, dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluorescence immunoassay and high-performance liquid chromatography, respectively. The levels of LDL-IgG-IC were quantified densitometrically following lipid electrophoresis, particle size distribution was assessed with dynamic light scattering and size exclusion chromatography. The influence of simvastatin (40 mg/day for three months) on small LDL-IgG-IC levels and their distribution among LDL-subfractions (salt gradient separation) were investigated in 11 patients with confirmed coronary artery disease (CAD). We demonstrate that the investigated LDL-IgG-IC are small particles present in atherosclerotic patients and healthy subjects. In vitro assembly of LDL-IgG-IC resulted in particle density shifts indicating a composition of one single molecule of IgG per LDL particle. Normalization on cholesterol levels revealed MDA values twice as high for LDL-subfractions rich in small LDL-IgG-IC if compared to dominant LDL-subfractions. Reactivity of affinity purified small LDL-IgG-IC to monoclonal antibody OB/04 indicates a high degree of modified apoB and oxidative modification. Simvastatin therapy studied in the CAD patients significantly lowered LDL levels and to an even higher extent, small LDL-IgG-IC levels without affecting their distribution. In conclusion simvastatin lowers levels of small LDL-IgG-IC more effectively than LDL-cholesterol and LDL-apoB levels in atherosclerotic patients. This antiatherogenic effect may additionally contribute to the known beneficial

  10. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for the treatment of nonanaplastic thyroid cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbluth, Benjamin D.; Serrano, Victoria B.S.; Happersett, Laura; Shaha, Ashok R.; Tuttle, R. Michael; Narayana, Ashwatha; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Chong, Lanceford M.; Lee, Nancy Y. . E-mail: leen2@mskcc.org

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) enables highly conformal treatment for thyroid cancer (TC). In this study, we review outcomes/toxicity in a series of TC patients treated with IMRT. Methods and Materials: Between July 2001 and January 2004, 20 nonanaplastic TC patients underwent IMRT. Mean age was 55. There were 3 T2 and 17 T4 patients. Sixteen patients had N1 disease. Seven patients had metastases before RT. Fifteen underwent surgery before RT. Radioactive iodine (RAI) and chemotherapy were used in 70% and 40%, respectively. Median total RT dose was 63 Gy. Results: With two local failures, 2-year local progression-free rate was 85%. There were six deaths, with a 2-year overall survival rate of 60%. For patients with M0 disease, the 2-year distant metastases-free rate was 46%. The worst acute mucositis and pharyngitis was Grade 3 (n = 7 and 3, respectively). Two patients had Grade 3 acute skin toxicity and 2 had Grade 3 acute laryngeal toxicity. No significant radiation-related late effects were reported. Conclusions: IMRT for TC is feasible and effective in appropriately selected cases. Acute toxicity is manageable with proactive clinical care. Ideal planning target volume doses have yet to be determined. Additional patients and long-term follow-up are needed to confirm these preliminary findings and to clarify late toxicities.

  11. Compact multileaf collimator for conformal and intensity modulated fast neutron therapy: electromechanical design and validation.

    PubMed

    Farr, J B; Maughan, R L; Yudelev, M; Blosser, E; Brandon, J; Horste, T; Forman, J D

    2006-09-01

    The electromechanical properties of a 120-leaf, high-resolution, computer-controlled, fast neutron multileaf collimator (MLC) are presented. The MLC replaces an aging, manually operated multirod collimator. The MLC leaves project 5 mm in the isocentric plane perpendicular to the beam axis. A taper is included on the leaves matching beam divergence along one axis. The 5-mm leaf projection width is chosen to give high-resolution conformality across the entire field. The maximum field size provided is 30 x 30 cm2. To reduce the interleaf transmission a 0.254-mm blocking step is included. End-leaf steps totaling 0.762 mm are also provided allowing opposing leaves to close off within the primary radiation beam. The neutron MLC also includes individual 45 degrees and 60 degrees automated universal tungsten wedges. The automated high-resolution neutron collimation provides an increase in patient throughput capacity, enables a new modality, intensity modulated neutron therapy, and limits occupational radiation exposure by providing remote operation from a shielded console area. PMID:17022226

  12. A pencil beam algorithm for intensity modulated proton therapy derived from Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Soukup, Martin; Fippel, Matthias; Alber, Markus

    2005-11-01

    A pencil beam algorithm as a component of an optimization algorithm for intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is presented. The pencil beam algorithm is tuned to the special accuracy requirements of IMPT, where in heterogeneous geometries both the position and distortion of the Bragg peak and the lateral scatter pose problems which are amplified by the spot weight optimization. Heterogeneity corrections are implemented by a multiple raytracing approach using fluence-weighted sub-spots. In order to derive nuclear interaction corrections, Monte Carlo simulations were performed. The contribution of long ranged products of nuclear interactions is taken into account by a fit to the Monte Carlo results. Energy-dependent stopping power ratios are also implemented. Scatter in optional beam line accessories such as range shifters or ripple filters is taken into account. The collimator can also be included, but without additional scattering. Finally, dose distributions are benchmarked against Monte Carlo simulations, showing 3%/1 mm agreement for simple heterogeneous phantoms. In the case of more complicated phantoms, principal shortcomings of pencil beam algorithms are evident. The influence of these effects on IMPT dose distributions is shown in clinical examples. PMID:16237243

  13. The accuracy of inhomogeneity corrections in intensity modulated radiation therapy planning in Philips Pinnacle system.

    PubMed

    Alaei, Parham; Higgins, Patrick D

    2011-01-01

    The degree of accuracy of inhomogeneity corrections in a treatment planning system is dependent on the algorithm used by the system. The choice of field size, however, could have an effect on the calculation accuracy as well. There have been several evaluation studies on the accuracy of inhomogeneity corrections used by different algorithms. Most of these studies, however, focus on evaluating the dose in phantom using simplified geometry and open/static fields. This work focuses on evaluating the degree of dose accuracy in calculations involving intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fields incident on a phantom containing both lung- and bone-equivalent heterogeneities using 6 and 10 MV beams. IMRT treatment plans were generated using the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system and delivered to a phantom containing 55 thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) locations within the lung and bone and near the lung and bone interfaces with solid water. The TLD readings were compared with the dose predicted by the planning system. We find satisfactory agreement between planned and delivered doses, with an overall absolute average difference between measurement and calculation of 1.2% for the 6 MV and 3.1% for the 10 MV beam with larger variations observed near the interfaces and in areas of high-dose gradient. The results presented here demonstrate that the convolution algorithm used in the Pinnacle treatment planning system produces accurate results in IMRT plans calculated and delivered to inhomogeneous media, even in regions that potentially lack electronic equilibrium. PMID:20627517

  14. The Accuracy of Inhomogeneity Corrections in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning in Philips Pinnacle System

    SciTech Connect

    Alaei, Parham; Higgins, Patrick D.

    2011-10-01

    The degree of accuracy of inhomogeneity corrections in a treatment planning system is dependent on the algorithm used by the system. The choice of field size, however, could have an effect on the calculation accuracy as well. There have been several evaluation studies on the accuracy of inhomogeneity corrections used by different algorithms. Most of these studies, however, focus on evaluating the dose in phantom using simplified geometry and open/static fields. This work focuses on evaluating the degree of dose accuracy in calculations involving intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fields incident on a phantom containing both lung- and bone-equivalent heterogeneities using 6 and 10 MV beams. IMRT treatment plans were generated using the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system and delivered to a phantom containing 55 thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) locations within the lung and bone and near the lung and bone interfaces with solid water. The TLD readings were compared with the dose predicted by the planning system. We find satisfactory agreement between planned and delivered doses, with an overall absolute average difference between measurement and calculation of 1.2% for the 6 MV and 3.1% for the 10 MV beam with larger variations observed near the interfaces and in areas of high-dose gradient. The results presented here demonstrate that the convolution algorithm used in the Pinnacle treatment planning system produces accurate results in IMRT plans calculated and delivered to inhomogeneous media, even in regions that potentially lack electronic equilibrium.

  15. Meningioma Causing Visual Impairment: Outcomes and Toxicity After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Maclean, Jillian; Fersht, Naomi; Bremner, Fion; Stacey, Chris; Sivabalasingham, Suganya; Short, Susan

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate ophthalmologic outcomes and toxicity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with meningiomas causing visual deficits. Methods and Materials: A prospective observational study with formal ophthalmologic and clinical assessment of 30 consecutive cases of meningioma affecting vision treated with IMRT from 2007 to 2011. Prescriptions were 50.4 Gy to mean target dose in 28 daily fractions. The median follow-up time was 28 months. Twenty-six meningiomas affected the anterior visual pathway (including 3 optic nerve sheath meningiomas); 4 were posterior to the chiasm. Results: Vision improved objectively in 12 patients (40%). Improvements were in visual field (5/16 patients), color vision (4/9 patients), acuity (1/15 patients), extraocular movements (3/11 patients), ptosis (1/5 patients), and proptosis (2/6 patients). No predictors of clinical response were found. Two patients had minor reductions in tumor dimensions on magnetic resonance imaging, 1 patient had radiological progression, and the other patients were stable. One patient experienced grade 2 keratitis, 1 patient had a minor visual field loss, and 5 patients had grade 1 dry eye. Conclusion: IMRT is an effective method for treating meningiomas causing ophthalmologic deficits, and toxicity is minimal. Thorough ophthalmologic assessment is important because clinical responses often occur in the absence of radiological change.

  16. Dosimetric comparison of tools for intensity modulated radiation therapy with gamma analysis: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbas, Ugur; Okutan, Murat; Demir, Bayram; Koksal, Canan

    2015-07-01

    Dosimetry of the Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is very important because of the complex dose distributions. Diode arrays are the most common and practical measurement tools for clinical usage for IMRT. Phantom selection is critical for QA process. IMRT treatment plans are recalculated for the phantom irradiation in QA. Phantoms are made in different geometrical shapes to measure the doses of different types of irradiation techniques. Comparison of measured and calculated dose distributions for IMRT can be made by using gamma analysis. In this study, 10 head-and-neck IMRT QA plans were created with Varian Eclipse 8.9 treatment planning system. Water equivalent RW3-slab phantoms, Octavius-2 phantom and PTW Seven29 2D-array were used for QA measurements. Gantry, collimator and couch positions set to 00 and QA plans were delivered to RW3 and Octavius phantoms. Then the positions set to original angles and QA plans irradiated again. Measured and calculated fluence maps were evaluated with gamma analysis for different DD and DTA criteria. The effect of different set-up conditions for RW3 and Octavius phantoms in QA plan delivery evaluated by gamma analysis. Results of gamma analysis show that using RW3-slab phantoms with setting parameters to 00 is more appropriate for IMRT QA.

  17. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound for Cancer Therapy--harnessing its non-linearity

    SciTech Connect

    Haar, Gail ter

    2008-06-24

    In medicine in general, and for cancer treatments in particular, there is a drive to find effective non-invasive therapies. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) represents one such technique. In principle, it is simple--a high energy ultrasound beam is brought to a tight focus within a target which may lie several centimetres below the skin surface (for example, in a tumour of the liver), and is used to destroy a selected tissue volume. The main mechanism for cell killing in a HIFU beam is heat. Ultrasound energy absorption is frequency dependent, the higher frequencies being absorbed most strongly. Significant thermal advantage may therefore be gained from non-linear propagation, which generates higher harmonics, in tissue. Acoustic cavitation and thermal exsolution of gas (boiling) also contribute to tissue damage. This activity leads to the local mechanical disruption of cells. In addition, the non-linear oscillation of these bubbles leads to enhanced energy deposition. The acoustic emissions from such bubbles are characteristic of their behaviour and may be correlated to some extent with the appearance of the disruption produced. The more widespread clinical acceptance of HIFU is awaiting faster, and more efficient, energy delivery and treatment monitoring. A better understanding of the nonlinear aspects of HIFU propagation in tissue is thus important if this technique is to benefit more patients.

  18. Dosimetric evaluations of the interplay effect in respiratory-gated intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Hungcheng; Wu, Andrew; Brandner, Edward D.; Heron, Dwight E.; Huq, M. Saiful; Yue, Ning J.; Chen Wencheng

    2009-03-15

    The interplay between a mobile target and a dynamic multileaf collimator can compromise the accuracy of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Our goal in this study is to investigate the dosimetric effects caused by the respiratory motion during IMRT. A moving phantom was built to simulate the typical breathing motion. Different sizes of the gating windows were selected for gated deliveries. The residual motions during the beam-on period ranged from 0.5 to 3 cm. An IMRT plan with five treatment fields from different gantry angles were delivered to the moving phantom for three irradiation conditions: Stationary condition, moving with the use of gating system, and moving without the use of gating system. When the residual motion was 3 cm, the results showed significant differences in dose distributions between the stationary condition and the moving phantom without gating beam control. The overdosed or underdosed areas enclosed about 33% of the treatment area. In contrast, the dose distribution on the moving phantom with gating window set to 0.5 cm showed no significant differences from the stationary phantom. With the appropriate setting of the gating window, the deviation of dose from the respiratory motion can be minimized. It appeals that limiting the residual motion to less than 0.5 cm is critical for the treatments of mobile structures.

  19. Validation of a track repeating algorithm for intensity modulated proton therapy: clinical cases study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yepes, Pablo P.; Eley, John G.; Liu, Amy; Mirkovic, Dragan; Randeniya, Sharmalee; Titt, Uwe; Mohan, Radhe

    2016-04-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) methods are acknowledged as the most accurate technique to calculate dose distributions. However, due its lengthy calculation times, they are difficult to utilize in the clinic or for large retrospective studies. Track-repeating algorithms, based on MC-generated particle track data in water, accelerate dose calculations substantially, while essentially preserving the accuracy of MC. In this study, we present the validation of an efficient dose calculation algorithm for intensity modulated proton therapy, the fast dose calculator (FDC), based on a track-repeating technique. We validated the FDC algorithm for 23 patients, which included 7 brain, 6 head-and-neck, 5 lung, 1 spine, 1 pelvis and 3 prostate cases. For validation, we compared FDC-generated dose distributions with those from a full-fledged Monte Carlo based on GEANT4 (G4). We compared dose-volume-histograms, 3D-gamma-indices and analyzed a series of dosimetric indices. More than 99% of the voxels in the voxelized phantoms describing the patients have a gamma-index smaller than unity for the 2%/2 mm criteria. In addition the difference relative to the prescribed dose between the dosimetric indices calculated with FDC and G4 is less than 1%. FDC reduces the calculation times from 5 ms per proton to around 5 μs.

  20. A fast optimization algorithm for multicriteria intensity modulated proton therapy planning

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Wei; Craft, David; Madden, Thomas M.; Zhang, Kewu; Kooy, Hanne M.; Herman, Gabor T.

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: To describe a fast projection algorithm for optimizing intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans and to describe and demonstrate the use of this algorithm in multicriteria IMPT planning. Methods: The authors develop a projection-based solver for a class of convex optimization problems and apply it to IMPT treatment planning. The speed of the solver permits its use in multicriteria optimization, where several optimizations are performed which span the space of possible treatment plans. The authors describe a plan database generation procedure which is customized to the requirements of the solver. The optimality precision of the solver can be specified by the user. Results: The authors apply the algorithm to three clinical cases: A pancreas case, an esophagus case, and a tumor along the rib cage case. Detailed analysis of the pancreas case shows that the algorithm is orders of magnitude faster than industry-standard general purpose algorithms (MOSEK's interior point optimizer, primal simplex optimizer, and dual simplex optimizer). Additionally, the projection solver has almost no memory overhead. Conclusions: The speed and guaranteed accuracy of the algorithm make it suitable for use in multicriteria treatment planning, which requires the computation of several diverse treatment plans. Additionally, given the low memory overhead of the algorithm, the method can be extended to include multiple geometric instances and proton range possibilities, for robust optimization.

  1. A nested partitions framework for beam angle optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Warren D; Zhang, Hao H; Nazareth, Daryl P; Shi, Leyuan; Meyer, Robert R

    2008-06-21

    Coupling beam angle optimization with dose optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) increases the size and complexity of an already large-scale combinatorial optimization problem. We have developed a novel algorithm, nested partitions (NP), that is capable of finding suitable beam angle sets by guiding the dose optimization process. NP is a metaheuristic that is flexible enough to guide the search of a heuristic or deterministic dose optimization algorithm. The NP method adaptively samples from the entire feasible region, or search space, and coordinates the sampling effort with a systematic partitioning of the feasible region at successive iterations, concentrating the search in promising subsets. We used a 'warm-start' approach by initiating NP with beam angle samples derived from an integer programming (IP) model. In this study, we describe our implementation of the NP framework with a commercial optimization algorithm. We compared the NP framework with equi-spaced beam angle selection, the IP method, greedy heuristic and random sampling heuristic methods. The results of the NP approach were evaluated using two clinical cases (head and neck and whole pelvis) involving the primary tumor and nodal volumes. Our results show that NP produces better quality solutions than the alternative considered methods. PMID:18523351

  2. A nested partitions framework for beam angle optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, Warren D.; Zhang, Hao H.; Nazareth, Daryl P.; Shi, Leyuan; Meyer, Robert R.

    2008-06-01

    Coupling beam angle optimization with dose optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) increases the size and complexity of an already large-scale combinatorial optimization problem. We have developed a novel algorithm, nested partitions (NP), that is capable of finding suitable beam angle sets by guiding the dose optimization process. NP is a metaheuristic that is flexible enough to guide the search of a heuristic or deterministic dose optimization algorithm. The NP method adaptively samples from the entire feasible region, or search space, and coordinates the sampling effort with a systematic partitioning of the feasible region at successive iterations, concentrating the search in promising subsets. We used a 'warm-start' approach by initiating NP with beam angle samples derived from an integer programming (IP) model. In this study, we describe our implementation of the NP framework with a commercial optimization algorithm. We compared the NP framework with equi-spaced beam angle selection, the IP method, greedy heuristic and random sampling heuristic methods. The results of the NP approach were evaluated using two clinical cases (head and neck and whole pelvis) involving the primary tumor and nodal volumes. Our results show that NP produces better quality solutions than the alternative considered methods.

  3. Strategies to reduce curative antibiotic therapy in intensive care units (adult and paediatric).

    PubMed

    Bretonnière, Cédric; Leone, Marc; Milési, Christophe; Allaouchiche, Bernard; Armand-Lefevre, Laurence; Baldesi, Olivier; Bouadma, Lila; Decré, Dominique; Figueiredo, Samy; Gauzit, Rémy; Guery, Benoît; Joram, Nicolas; Jung, Boris; Lasocki, Sigismond; Lepape, Alain; Lesage, Fabrice; Pajot, Olivier; Philippart, François; Souweine, Bertrand; Tattevin, Pierre; Timsit, Jean-François; Vialet, Renaud; Zahar, Jean Ralph; Misset, Benoît; Bedos, Jean-Pierre

    2015-07-01

    Emerging resistance to antibiotics shows no signs of decline. At the same time, few new antibacterials are being discovered. There is a worldwide recognition regarding the danger of this situation. The urgency of the situation and the conviction that practices should change led the Société de Réanimation de Langue Française (SRLF) and the Société Française d'Anesthésie et de Réanimation (SFAR) to set up a panel of experts from various disciplines. These experts met for the first time at the end of 2012 and have since met regularly to issue the following 67 recommendations, according to the rigorous GRADE methodology. Five fields were explored: i) the link between the resistance of bacteria and the use of antibiotics in intensive care; ii) which microbiological data and how to use them to reduce antibiotic consumption; iii) how should antibiotic therapy be chosen to limit consumption of antibiotics; iv) how can antibiotic administration be optimized; v) review and duration of antibiotic treatments. In each institution, the appropriation of these recommendations should arouse multidisciplinary discussions resulting in better knowledge of local epidemiology, rate of antibiotic use, and finally protocols for improving the stewardship of antibiotics. These efforts should contribute to limit the emergence of resistant bacteria. PMID:26077053

  4. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Megan E.; Chen, Allen M. . E-mail: allenmchen@yahoo.com; Bucci, M. Kara; El-Sayed, Ivan; Xia Ping; Kaplan, Michael J.; Eisele, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcome of patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2004, 36 patients with malignancies of the sinonasal region were treated with IMRT. Thirty-two patients (89%) were treated in the postoperative setting after gross total resection. Treatment plans were designed to provide a dose of 70 Gy to 95% or more of the gross tumor volume (GTV) and 60 Gy to 95% or more of the clinical tumor volume (CTV) while sparing neighboring critical structures including the optic chiasm, optic nerves, eyes, and brainstem. The primary sites were: 13 ethmoid sinus, 10 maxillary sinus, 7 nasal cavity, and 6 other. Histology was: 12 squamous cell, 7 esthesioneuroblastoma, 5 adenoid cystic, 5 undifferentiated, 5 adenocarcinoma, and 2 other. Median follow-up was 51 months among surviving patients (range, 9-82 months). Results: The 2-year and 5-year estimates of local control were 62% and 58%, respectively. One patient developed isolated distant metastasis, and none developed isolated regional failure. The 5-year rates of disease-free and overall survival were 55% and 45%, respectively. The incidence of ocular toxicity was minimal with no patients reporting decreased vision. Late complications included xerophthalmia (1 patient), lacrimal stenosis (1 patient), and cataract (1 patient). Conclusion: Although IMRT for malignancies of the sinonasal region does not appear to lead to significant improvements in disease control, the low incidence of complications is encouraging.

  5. Brain Plasticity following Intensive Bimanual Therapy in Children with Hemiparesis: Preliminary Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Maya; Myers, Vicki; Green, Dido; Schertz, Mitchell; Shiran, Shelly I.; Geva, Ronny; Artzi, Moran; Gordon, Andrew M.; Fattal-Valevski, Aviva; Ben Bashat, Dafna

    2015-01-01

    Neuroplasticity studies examining children with hemiparesis (CH) have focused predominantly on unilateral interventions. CH also have bimanual coordination impairments with bimanual interventions showing benefits. We explored neuroplasticity following hand-arm bimanual intensive therapy (HABIT) of 60 hours in twelve CH (6 females, mean age 11 ± 3.6 y). Serial behavioral evaluations and MR imaging including diffusion tensor (DTI) and functional (fMRI) imaging were performed before, immediately after, and at 6-week follow-up. Manual skills were assessed repeatedly with the Assisting Hand Assessment, Children's Hand Experience Questionnaire, and Jebsen-Taylor Test of Hand Function. Beta values, indicating the level of activation, and lateralization index (LI), indicating the pattern of brain activation, were computed from fMRI. White matter integrity of major fibers was assessed using DTI. 11/12 children showed improvement after intervention in at least one measure, with 8/12 improving on two or more tests. Changes were retained in 6/8 children at follow-up. Beta activation in the affected hemisphere increased at follow-up, and LI increased both after intervention and at follow-up. Correlations between LI and motor function emerged after intervention. Increased white matter integrity was detected in the corpus callosum and corticospinal tract after intervention in about half of the participants. Results provide first evidence for neuroplasticity changes following bimanual intervention in CH. PMID:26640717

  6. Low Intensity Laser Therapy (LILT) Versus Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation On Microcirculation In Diabetic Neuropathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battecha, Kadria H.; Atya, Azza M.

    2011-09-01

    Reduced microcirculation is a morbid element of neuropathy and one of the most common complications of uncontrolled diabetes. Many physical modalities have gained a considerable attention for enhancing cutaneous microcirculation in diabetic patients and prevent its serious complications. Accordingly, the present study was conducted to compare between the effect of low intensity laser therapy (LILT) and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on microcirculation in diabetic neuropathy. Thirty diabetic polyneuropathic patients ranged in age from 45-60 years participated in this study. They were randomly divided into two groups of equal number; patients in group (A) received LILT on plantar surface of foot with a dose of 3 J/cm2 and wavelength (904 nm), while those in group (B) received TENS on lower leg for 30 minutes with frequency (2 HZ). Treatment was conducted 3 times/week for 6 weeks. The cutaneous microcirculation was evaluated by Laser Doppler flowmetry at the baseline and at the end of treatment. Results revealed that group (A) showed statistically significant increase in the cutaneous microcirculation compared with group (B). So, it was concluded that LILT has to be more efficient than TENS in increasing cutaneous microcirculation in patients with diabetic neuropathy.

  7. Organisational standards for the delivery of intensity-modulated radiation therapy in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Whitton, A; Warde, P; Sharpe, M; Oliver, T K; Bak, K; Leszczynski, K; Etheridge, S; Fleming, K; Gutierrez, E; Favell, L; Green, E

    2009-04-01

    By minimising the effect of irradiation on surrounding tissue, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can deliver higher, more effective doses to the targeted tumour site, minimising treatment-related morbidity and possibly improving cancer control and cure. A multidisciplinary IMRT Expert Panel was convened to develop the organisational standards for the delivery of IMRT. The systematic literature search used MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Database, the National Guidelines Clearing House and the Health Technology Assessment Database. An environmental scan of unpublished literature used the Google search engine to review the websites of key organisations, cancer agencies/centres and vendor sites in Canada, the USA, Australia and Europe. In total, 22 relevant guidance documents were identified; 12 from the published literature and 10 from the environmental scan. Professional and organisational standards for the provision of IMRT were developed through the analysis of this evidence and the consensus opinion of the IMRT Expert Panel. The resulting standards address the following domains: planning of new IMRT programmes, practice setting requirements, tools, devices and equipment requirements; professional training requirements; role of personnel; and requirements for quality assurance and safety. Here the IMRT Expert Panel offers organisational and professional standards for the delivery of IMRT, with the intent of promoting innovation, improving access and enhancing patient care. PMID:19062263

  8. Comparison of optimization algorithms in intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Rachel

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy is used to better conform the radiation dose to the target, which includes avoiding healthy tissue. Planning programs employ optimization methods to search for the best fluence of each photon beam, and therefore to create the best treatment plan. The Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research (CERR), a program written in MATLAB, was used to examine some commonly-used algorithms for one 5-beam plan. Algorithms include the genetic algorithm, quadratic programming, pattern search, constrained nonlinear optimization, simulated annealing, the optimization method used in Varian EclipseTM, and some hybrids of these. Quadratic programing, simulated annealing, and a quadratic/simulated annealing hybrid were also separately compared using different prescription doses. The results of each dose-volume histogram as well as the visual dose color wash were used to compare the plans. CERR's built-in quadratic programming provided the best overall plan, but avoidance of the organ-at-risk was rivaled by other programs. Hybrids of quadratic programming with some of these algorithms seems to suggest the possibility of better planning programs, as shown by the improved quadratic/simulated annealing plan when compared to the simulated annealing algorithm alone. Further experimentation will be done to improve cost functions and computational time.

  9. Compact multileaf collimator for conformal and intensity modulated fast neutron therapy: Electromechanical design and validation

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, J. B.; Maughan, R. L.; Yudelev, M.; Blosser, E.; Brandon, J.; Horste, T.; Forman, J. D.

    2006-09-15

    The electromechanical properties of a 120-leaf, high-resolution, computer-controlled, fast neutron multileaf collimator (MLC) are presented. The MLC replaces an aging, manually operated multirod collimator. The MLC leaves project 5 mm in the isocentric plane perpendicular to the beam axis. A taper is included on the leaves matching beam divergence along one axis. The 5-mm leaf projection width is chosen to give high-resolution conformality across the entire field. The maximum field size provided is 30x30 cm{sup 2}. To reduce the interleaf transmission a 0.254-mm blocking step is included. End-leaf steps totaling 0.762 mm are also provided allowing opposing leaves to close off within the primary radiation beam. The neutron MLC also includes individual 45 deg. and 60 deg. automated universal tungsten wedges. The automated high-resolution neutron collimation provides an increase in patient throughput capacity, enables a new modality, intensity modulated neutron therapy, and limits occupational radiation exposure by providing remote operation from a shielded console area.

  10. In vivo measurements with MOSFET detectors in oropharynx and nasopharynx intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Marcie, Serge . E-mail: serge.marcie@cal.nice.fnclcc.fr; Charpiot, Elisabeth; Bensadoun, Rene-Jean; Ciais, Gaston; Herault, Joel; Costa, Andre; Gerard, Jean-Pierre

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of in vivo measurements with metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters for oropharynx and nasopharynx intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: During a 1-year period, in vivo measurements of the dose delivered to one or two points of the oral cavity by IMRT were obtained with MOSFET dosimeters. Measurements were obtained during each session of 48 treatment plans for 21 patients, all of whom were fitted with a custom-made mouth plate. Calculated and measured values were compared. Results: A total of 344 and 452 measurements were performed for the right and left sides, respectively, of the oral cavity. Seventy percent of the discrepancies between calculated and measured values were within {+-}5%. Uncertainties were due to interfraction patient positions, intrafraction patient movements, and interfraction MOSFET positions. Nevertheless, the discrepancies between the measured and calculated means were within {+-}5% for 92% and 95% of the right and left sides, respectively. Comparison of these discrepancies and the discrepancies between calculated values and measurements made on a phantom revealed that all differences were within {+-}5%. Conclusion: Our experience demonstrates the feasibility of in vivo measurements with MOSFET dosimeters for oropharynx and nasopharynx IMRT.

  11. Setup errors in patients treated with intensity-modulated whole pelvic radiation therapy for gynecological malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Haslam, Joshua J.; Lujan, Anthony E.; Mundt, Arno J.; Bonta, Dacian V.; Roeske, John C. . E-mail: Roeske@rover.uchicago.edu

    2005-03-31

    Intensity-modulated whole pelvic radiation therapy (IM-WPRT) has decreased the incidence of gastrointestinal complications by reducing the volume of normal tissue irradiated in gynecologic patients. However, IM-WPRT plans result in steep dose gradients around the target volume, and thus accurate patient setup is essential. To quantify the accuracy of our patient positioning, we examined the weekly portal films of 46 women treated with IM-WPRT at our institution. All patients were positioned using a customized immobilization device that was indexed to the treatment table. Setup errors were evaluated by comparing portal images to simulation images using an algorithm that registers user-defined open curve segments drawn on both sets of film. The setup errors, which were separated into systematic and random components, ranged from 1.9 to 3.7 mm for the translations and 1.3 deg to 4.4 deg for the 2 in-plane translations. The systematic errors were all less than the respective random errors, with the largest error in the anterior/posterior direction. In addition, there was no correlation between the magnitude of these errors and patient-specific factors (age, weight, height). In the future, we will investigate the effect of these setup errors on the delivered dose distribution.

  12. SU-E-P-18: Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Cervical Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, W; Qiao, X; Zhou, Z; Song, Y; Zhang, R; Zhen, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the outcomes and prognostic factors of cervical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods: Thirty-seven patients with cervical esophageal SCC treated with IMRT were analyzed retrospectively. They received 54–66 Gy in 27–32 fractions. Nineteen patients received concurrent (n=12) or sequential (n=7) platinum-based two drugs chemoradiotherapy. Overall survival (OS), local control rates (LCR) and prognostic factors were evaluated. Acute toxicities and patterns of first failures were observed. Results: The median follow-up was 46 months for alive patients. The l-, 3-, 4- and 5-year OS of the all patients were 83.8%, 59.1%, 47.5% and 32.6% respectively. The median survival time was 46 months. The l-, 3-,4- and 5-year LCR were 82.9%, 63.0%, 54.5% and 54.5%, respectively. Univariate and Multivariate analysis all showed that size of GTV was an independent prognostic factor (p=0.033, p=0.039). There were no patients with Grade 3 acute radiation esophagitis and Grade 2–4 acute pneumonitis. The local failure accounted for 70.0% of all treatment-related failures. Conclusion: IMRT is safe and effective in the treatment of cervical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Size of GTV is an independent prognostic factor. Local failure still remains the main reason of treatment failures. The authors declare no conflicts of interest in preparing this article.

  13. Validation of a track repeating algorithm for intensity modulated proton therapy: clinical cases study.

    PubMed

    Yepes, Pablo P; Eley, John G; Liu, Amy; Mirkovic, Dragan; Randeniya, Sharmalee; Titt, Uwe; Mohan, Radhe

    2016-04-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) methods are acknowledged as the most accurate technique to calculate dose distributions. However, due its lengthy calculation times, they are difficult to utilize in the clinic or for large retrospective studies. Track-repeating algorithms, based on MC-generated particle track data in water, accelerate dose calculations substantially, while essentially preserving the accuracy of MC. In this study, we present the validation of an efficient dose calculation algorithm for intensity modulated proton therapy, the fast dose calculator (FDC), based on a track-repeating technique. We validated the FDC algorithm for 23 patients, which included 7 brain, 6 head-and-neck, 5 lung, 1 spine, 1 pelvis and 3 prostate cases. For validation, we compared FDC-generated dose distributions with those from a full-fledged Monte Carlo based on GEANT4 (G4). We compared dose-volume-histograms, 3D-gamma-indices and analyzed a series of dosimetric indices. More than 99% of the voxels in the voxelized phantoms describing the patients have a gamma-index smaller than unity for the 2%/2 mm criteria. In addition the difference relative to the prescribed dose between the dosimetric indices calculated with FDC and G4 is less than 1%. FDC reduces the calculation times from 5 ms per proton to around 5 μs. PMID:26961764

  14. A fast optimization algorithm for multicriteria intensity modulated proton therapy planning

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Craft, David; Madden, Thomas M.; Zhang, Kewu; Kooy, Hanne M.; Herman, Gabor T.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a fast projection algorithm for optimizing intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans and to describe and demonstrate the use of this algorithm in multicriteria IMPT planning. Methods: The authors develop a projection-based solver for a class of convex optimization problems and apply it to IMPT treatment planning. The speed of the solver permits its use in multicriteria optimization, where several optimizations are performed which span the space of possible treatment plans. The authors describe a plan database generation procedure which is customized to the requirements of the solver. The optimality precision of the solver can be specified by the user. Results: The authors apply the algorithm to three clinical cases: A pancreas case, an esophagus case, and a tumor along the rib cage case. Detailed analysis of the pancreas case shows that the algorithm is orders of magnitude faster than industry-standard general purpose algorithms (MOSEK’s interior point optimizer, primal simplex optimizer, and dual simplex optimizer). Additionally, the projection solver has almost no memory overhead. Conclusions: The speed and guaranteed accuracy of the algorithm make it suitable for use in multicriteria treatment planning, which requires the computation of several diverse treatment plans. Additionally, given the low memory overhead of the algorithm, the method can be extended to include multiple geometric instances and proton range possibilities, for robust optimization. PMID:20964213

  15. Combining segment generation with direct step-and-shoot optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsson, Fredrik

    2008-09-15

    A method for generating a sequence of intensity-modulated radiation therapy step-and-shoot plans with increasing number of segments is presented. The objectives are to generate high-quality plans with few, large and regular segments, and to make the planning process more intuitive. The proposed method combines segment generation with direct step-and-shoot optimization, where leaf positions and segment weights are optimized simultaneously. The segment generation is based on a column generation approach. The method is evaluated on a test suite consisting of five head-and-neck cases and five prostate cases, planned for delivery with an Elekta SLi accelerator. The adjustment of segment shapes by direct step-and-shoot optimization improves the plan quality compared to using fixed segment shapes. The improvement in plan quality when adding segments is larger for plans with few segments. Eventually, adding more segments contributes very little to the plan quality, but increases the plan complexity. Thus, the method provides a tool for controlling the number of segments and, indirectly, the delivery time. This can support the planner in finding a sound trade-off between plan quality and treatment complexity.

  16. Accounting for range uncertainties in the optimization of intensity modulated proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Unkelbach, Jan; Chan, Timothy C Y; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2007-05-21

    Treatment plans optimized for intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) may be sensitive to range variations. The dose distribution may deteriorate substantially when the actual range of a pencil beam does not match the assumed range. We present two treatment planning concepts for IMPT which incorporate range uncertainties into the optimization. The first method is a probabilistic approach. The range of a pencil beam is assumed to be a random variable, which makes the delivered dose and the value of the objective function a random variable too. We then propose to optimize the expectation value of the objective function. The second approach is a robust formulation that applies methods developed in the field of robust linear programming. This approach optimizes the worst case dose distribution that may occur, assuming that the ranges of the pencil beams may vary within some interval. Both methods yield treatment plans that are considerably less sensitive to range variations compared to conventional treatment plans optimized without accounting for range uncertainties. In addition, both approaches--although conceptually different--yield very similar results on a qualitative level. PMID:17473350

  17. Racial Differences in Diffusion of Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cobran, Ewan K; Chen, Ronald C; Overman, Robert; Meyer, Anne-Marie; Kuo, Tzy-Mey; O'Brien, Jonathon; Sturmer, Til; Sheets, Nathan C; Goldin, Gregg H; Penn, Dolly C; Godley, Paul A; Carpenter, William R

    2016-09-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), an innovative treatment option for prostate cancer, has rapidly diffused over the past decade. To inform our understanding of racial disparities in prostate cancer treatment and outcomes, this study compared diffusion of IMRT in African American (AA) and Caucasian American (CA) prostate cancer patients during the early years of IMRT diffusion using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. A retrospective cohort of 947 AA and 10,028 CA patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer from 2002 through 2006, who were treated with either IMRT or non-IMRT as primary treatment within 1 year of diagnoses was constructed. Logistic regression was used to examine potential differences in diffusion of IMRT in AA and CA patients, while adjusting for socioeconomic and clinical covariates. A significantly smaller proportion of AA compared with CA patients received IMRT for localized prostate cancer (45% vs. 53%, p < .0001). Racial differences were apparent in multivariable analysis though did not achieve statistical significance, as time and factors associated with race (socioeconomic, geographic, and tumor related factors) explained the preponderance of variance in use of IMRT. Further research examining improved access to innovative cancer treatment and technologies is essential to reducing racial disparities in cancer care. PMID:25657192

  18. An integral quality monitoring system for real-time verification of intensity modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Mohammad K.; Norrlinger, Bernhard D.; Smale, Jason R.; Heaton, Robert K.; Galbraith, Duncan; Fan, Cary; Jaffray, David A.

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: To develop an independent and on-line beam monitoring system, which can validate the accuracy of segment-by-segment energy fluence delivery for each treatment field. The system is also intended to be utilized for pretreatment dosimetric quality assurance of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), on-line image-guided adaptive radiation therapy, and volumetric modulated arc therapy. Methods: The system, referred to as the integral quality monitor (IQM), utilizes an area integrating energy fluence monitoring sensor (AIMS) positioned between the final beam shaping device [i.e., multileaf collimator (MLC)] and the patient. The prototype AIMS consists of a novel spatially sensitive large area ionization chamber with a gradient along the direction of the MLC motion. The signal from the AIMS provides a simple output for each beam segment, which is compared in real time to the expected value. The prototype ionization chamber, with a physical area of 22x22 cm{sup 2}, has been constructed out of aluminum with the electrode separations varying linearly from 2 to 20 mm. A calculation method has been developed to predict AIMS signals based on an elementwise integration technique, which takes into account various predetermined factors, including the spatial response function of the chamber, MLC characteristics, beam transmission through the secondary jaws, and field size factors. The influence of the ionization chamber on the beam has been evaluated in terms of transmission, surface dose, beam profiles, and depth dose. The sensitivity of the system was tested by introducing small deviations in leaf positions. A small set of IMRT fields for prostate and head and neck plans was used to evaluate the system. The ionization chamber and the data acquisition software systems were interfaced to two different types of linear accelerators: Elekta Synergy and Varian iX. Results: For a 10x10 cm{sup 2} field, the chamber attenuates the beam intensity by 7% and 5% for 6 and 18

  19. High-intensity statin therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yu-Ling; Qiu, Bo; Wang, Jing; Deng, Song-Bai; Wu, Ling; Jing, Xiao-Dong; Du, Jian-Lin; Liu, Ya-Jie; She, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of high-intensity statin therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Design A systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing high-intensity statin therapy (atorvastatin 80 mg or rosuvastatin 20/40 mg) with moderate/mild statin treatment or placebo were derived from the databases (PubMed, Embase, Ovid, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library, and ISI Web of Knowledge). Outcome measure Primary end points: clinical events (all-cause mortality, stroke, myocardial infarction and heart failure); secondary end points: serum lipid, renal function changes and adverse events. Results A total of six RCTs with 10 993 adult patients with CKD were included. A significant decrease in stroke was observed in the high-intensity statin therapy group (RR 0.69, 95% CI 0.56 to 0.85). However, the roles of high-intensity statin in decreasing all-cause mortality (RR 0.85, 95% CI 0.67 to 1.09), myocardial infarction (RR 0.69, 95% CI 0.40 to 1.18) and heart failure (RR 0.73, 95% CI 0.48 to 1.13) remain unclear with low evidence. High-intensity statin also had obvious effects on lowering the LDL-C level but no clear effects on renal protection. Although pooled results showed no significant difference between the intervention and control groups in adverse event occurrences, it was still insufficient to put off the doubts that high-intensity statin might increase adverse events because of limited data sources and low quality evidences. Conclusions High-intensity statin therapy could effectively reduce the risk of stroke in patients with CKD. However, its effects on all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, heart failure and renal protection remain unclear. Moreover, it is hard to draw conclusions on the safety assessment of intensive statin treatment in this particular population. More studies are needed to credibly evaluate the effects

  20. Stereotactic body radiation therapy planning with duodenal sparing using volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: A dosimetric analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rachit; Wild, Aaron T.; Ziegler, Mark A.; Hooker, Ted K.; Dah, Samson D.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Kang, Jun; Smith, Koren; Zeng, Jing; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Tryggestad, Erik; Ford, Eric; Herman, Joseph M.

    2013-10-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) achieves excellent local control for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), but may increase late duodenal toxicity. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivers intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a rotating gantry rather than multiple fixed beams. This study dosimetrically evaluates the feasibility of implementing duodenal constraints for SBRT using VMAT vs IMRT. Non–duodenal sparing (NS) and duodenal-sparing (DS) VMAT and IMRT plans delivering 25 Gy in 1 fraction were generated for 15 patients with LAPC. DS plans were constrained to duodenal D{sub max} of<30 Gy at any point. VMAT used 1 360° coplanar arc with 4° spacing between control points, whereas IMRT used 9 coplanar beams with fixed gantry positions at 40° angles. Dosimetric parameters for target volumes and organs at risk were compared for DS planning vs NS planning and VMAT vs IMRT using paired-sample Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Both DS VMAT and DS IMRT achieved significantly reduced duodenal D{sub mean}, D{sub max}, D{sub 1cc}, D{sub 4%}, and V{sub 20} {sub Gy} compared with NS plans (all p≤0.002). DS constraints compromised target coverage for IMRT as demonstrated by reduced V{sub 95%} (p = 0.01) and D{sub mean} (p = 0.02), but not for VMAT. DS constraints resulted in increased dose to right kidney, spinal cord, stomach, and liver for VMAT. Direct comparison of DS VMAT and DS IMRT revealed that VMAT was superior in sparing the left kidney (p<0.001) and the spinal cord (p<0.001), whereas IMRT was superior in sparing the stomach (p = 0.05) and the liver (p = 0.003). DS VMAT required 21% fewer monitor units (p<0.001) and delivered treatment 2.4 minutes faster (p<0.001) than DS IMRT. Implementing DS constraints during SBRT planning for LAPC can significantly reduce duodenal point or volumetric dose parameters for both VMAT and IMRT. The primary consequence of implementing DS constraints for VMAT is increased dose to other organs at

  1. SU-E-T-62: Cardiac Toxicity in Dynamic Conformal Arc Therapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy of Lung Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Ming, X; Zhang, Y; Feng, Y; Zhou, L; Deng, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The cardiac toxicity for lung cancer patients, each treated with dynamic conformal arc therapy (DAT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is investigated. Methods: 120 lung patients were selected for this study: 25 treated with DAT, 50 with IMRT and 45 with VMAT. For comparison, all plans were generated in the same treatment planning system, normalized such that the 100% isodose lines encompassed 95% of planning target volume. The plan quality was evaluated in terms of homogeneity index (HI) and 95% conformity index (%95 CI) for target dose coverage and mean dose, maximum dose, V{sub 30} Gy as well as V{sub 5} Gy for cardiac toxicity analysis. Results: When all the plans were analyzed, the VMAT plans offered the best target coverage with 95% CI = 0.992 and HI = 1.23. The DAT plans provided the best heart sparing with mean heart dose = 2.3Gy and maximum dose = 11.6Gy, as compared to 5.7 Gy and 31.1 Gy by IMRT as well as 4.6 Gy and 30.9 Gy by VMAT. The mean V30Gy and V5Gy of the heart in the DAT plans were up to 11.7% lower in comparison to the IMRT and VMAT plans. When the tumor volume was considered, the VMAT plans spared up to 70.9% more doses to the heart when the equivalent diameter of the tumor was larger than 4cm. Yet the maximum dose to the heart was reduced the most in the DAT plans with up to 139.8% less than that of the other two plans. Conclusion: Overall, the VMAT plans achieved the best target coverage among the three treatment modalities, and would spare the heart the most for the larger tumors. The DAT plans appeared advantageous in delivering the least maximum dose to the heart as compared to the IMRT and VMAT plans.

  2. Stereotactic body radiation therapy planning with duodenal sparing using volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: A dosimetric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rachit; Wild, Aaron T.; Ziegler, Mark A.; Hooker, Ted K.; Dah, Samson D.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Kang, Jun; Smith, Koren; Zeng, Jing; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Tryggestad, Erik; Ford, Eric; Herman, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) achieves excellent local control for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), but may increase late duodenal toxicity. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivers intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a rotating gantry rather than multiple fixed beams. This study dosimetrically evaluates the feasibility of implementing duodenal constraints for SBRT using VMAT vs IMRT. Non–duodenal sparing (NS) and duodenal-sparing (DS) VMAT and IMRT plans delivering 25 Gy in 1 fraction were generated for 15 patients with LAPC. DS plans were constrained to duodenal Dmax of <30 Gy at any point. VMAT used 1 360° coplanar arc with 4° spacing between control points, whereas IMRT used 9 coplanar beams with fixed gantry positions at 40° angles. Dosimetric parameters for target volumes and organs at risk were compared for DS planning vs NS planning and VMAT vs IMRT using paired-sample Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Both DS VMAT and DS IMRT achieved significantly reduced duodenal Dmean, Dmax, D1cc, D4%, and V20 Gy compared with NS plans (all p ≤ 0.002). DS constraints compromised target coverage for IMRT as demonstrated by reduced V95% (p = 0.01) and Dmean (p = 0.02), but not for VMAT. DS constraints resulted in increased dose to right kidney, spinal cord, stomach, and liver for VMAT. Direct comparison of DS VMAT and DS IMRT revealed that VMAT was superior in sparing the left kidney (p < 0.001) and the spinal cord (p < 0.001), whereas IMRT was superior in sparing the stomach (p = 0.05) and the liver (p = 0.003). DS VMAT required 21% fewer monitor units (p < 0.001) and delivered treatment 2.4 minutes faster (p < 0.001) than DS IMRT. Implementing DS constraints during SBRT planning for LAPC can significantly reduce duodenal point or volumetric dose parameters for both VMAT and IMRT. The primary consequence of implementing DS constraints for VMAT is increased dose to other organs at risk, whereas for IMRT it is compromised

  3. Dosimetric advantages of intensity-modulated proton therapy for oropharyngeal cancer compared with intensity-modulated radiation: A case-matched control analysis.

    PubMed

    Holliday, Emma B; Kocak-Uzel, Esengul; Feng, Lei; Thaker, Nikhil G; Blanchard, Pierre; Rosenthal, David I; Gunn, G Brandon; Garden, Adam S; Frank, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    A potential advantage of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) over intensity-modulated (photon) radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) is lower radiation dose to several critical structures involved in the development of nausea and vomiting, mucositis, and dysphagia. The purpose of this study was to quantify doses to critical structures for patients with OPC treated with IMPT and compare those with doses on IMRT plans generated for the same patients and with a matched cohort of patients actually treated with IMRT. In this study, 25 patients newly diagnosed with OPC were treated with IMPT between 2011 and 2012. Comparison IMRT plans were generated for these patients and for additional IMRT-treated controls extracted from a database of patients with OPC treated between 2000 and 2009. Cases were matched based on the following criteria, in order: unilateral vs bilateral therapy, tonsil vs base of tongue primary, T-category, N-category, concurrent chemotherapy, induction chemotherapy, smoking status, sex, and age. Results showed that the mean doses to the anterior and posterior oral cavity, hard palate, larynx, mandible, and esophagus were significantly lower with IMPT than with IMRT comparison plans generated for the same cohort, as were doses to several central nervous system structures involved in the nausea and vomiting response. Similar differences were found when comparing dose to organs at risks (OARs) between the IMPT cohort and the case-matched IMRT cohort. In conclusion, these findings suggest that patients with OPC treated with IMPT may experience fewer and less severe side effects during therapy. This may be the result of decreased beam path toxicities with IMPT due to lower doses to several dysphagia, odynophagia, and nausea and vomiting-associated OARs. Further study is needed to evaluate differences in long-term disease control and chronic toxicity between patients with OPC treated with IMPT in comparison to those

  4. Influence of robust optimization in intensity-modulated proton therapy with different dose delivery techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Wei; Li Yupeng; Li Xiaoqiang; Cao Wenhua; Zhang Xiaodong

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: The distal edge tracking (DET) technique in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) allows for high energy efficiency, fast and simple delivery, and simple inverse treatment planning; however, it is highly sensitive to uncertainties. In this study, the authors explored the application of DET in IMPT (IMPT-DET) and conducted robust optimization of IMPT-DET to see if the planning technique's sensitivity to uncertainties was reduced. They also compared conventional and robust optimization of IMPT-DET with three-dimensional IMPT (IMPT-3D) to gain understanding about how plan robustness is achieved. Methods: They compared the robustness of IMPT-DET and IMPT-3D plans to uncertainties by analyzing plans created for a typical prostate cancer case and a base of skull (BOS) cancer case (using data for patients who had undergone proton therapy at our institution). Spots with the highest and second highest energy layers were chosen so that the Bragg peak would be at the distal edge of the targets in IMPT-DET using 36 equally spaced angle beams; in IMPT-3D, 3 beams with angles chosen by a beam angle optimization algorithm were planned. Dose contributions for a number of range and setup uncertainties were calculated, and a worst-case robust optimization was performed. A robust quantification technique was used to evaluate the plans' sensitivity to uncertainties. Results: With no uncertainties considered, the DET is less robust to uncertainties than is the 3D method but offers better normal tissue protection. With robust optimization to account for range and setup uncertainties, robust optimization can improve the robustness of IMPT plans to uncertainties; however, our findings show the extent of improvement varies. Conclusions: IMPT's sensitivity to uncertainties can be improved by using robust optimization. They found two possible mechanisms that made improvements possible: (1) a localized single-field uniform dose distribution (LSFUD) mechanism, in which the

  5. Influence of robust optimization in intensity-modulated proton therapy with different dose delivery techniques

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Li, Yupeng; Li, Xiaoqiang; Cao, Wenhua; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The distal edge tracking (DET) technique in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) allows for high energy efficiency, fast and simple delivery, and simple inverse treatment planning; however, it is highly sensitive to uncertainties. In this study, the authors explored the application of DET in IMPT (IMPT-DET) and conducted robust optimization of IMPT-DET to see if the planning technique’s sensitivity to uncertainties was reduced. They also compared conventional and robust optimization of IMPT-DET with three-dimensional IMPT (IMPT-3D) to gain understanding about how plan robustness is achieved. Methods: They compared the robustness of IMPT-DET and IMPT-3D plans to uncertainties by analyzing plans created for a typical prostate cancer case and a base of skull (BOS) cancer case (using data for patients who had undergone proton therapy at our institution). Spots with the highest and second highest energy layers were chosen so that the Bragg peak would be at the distal edge of the targets in IMPT-DET using 36 equally spaced angle beams; in IMPT-3D, 3 beams with angles chosen by a beam angle optimization algorithm were planned. Dose contributions for a number of range and setup uncertainties were calculated, and a worst-case robust optimization was performed. A robust quantification technique was used to evaluate the plans’ sensitivity to uncertainties. Results: With no uncertainties considered, the DET is less robust to uncertainties than is the 3D method but offers better normal tissue protection. With robust optimization to account for range and setup uncertainties, robust optimization can improve the robustness of IMPT plans to uncertainties; however, our findings show the extent of improvement varies. Conclusions: IMPT’s sensitivity to uncertainties can be improved by using robust optimization. They found two possible mechanisms that made improvements possible: (1) a localized single-field uniform dose distribution (LSFUD) mechanism, in which the

  6. Image-based dynamic MLC tracking of moving targets during intensity modulated arc therapy

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Fledelius, Walther; Cho, Byungchul; Keall, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) enables efficient and highly conformal dose delivery. However, intrafraction motion may compromise the delivered target dose distribution. Dynamic MLC (DMLC) tracking can potentially mitigate the impact of target motion on the dose. The purpose of this study was to use a single kV imager for DMLC tracking during IMAT and to investigate the ability of this tracking to maintain the dose distribution. Methods A motion phantom carrying a 2D ion chamber array and build-up material with an embedded gold marker reproduced eight representative tumor trajectories(four lung tumors,four prostate). For each trajectory, a low and high intensity modulated IMAT plan were delivered with and without DMLC tracking. The 3D real-time target position signal for tracking was provided by fluoroscopic kV images acquired immediately before and during treatment. For each image, the 3D position of the embedded marker was estimated from the imaged 2D position by a probability based method. The MLC leaves were continuously refitted to the estimated 3D position. For lung, prediction was used to compensate for the tracking latency. The delivered 2D dose distributions were measured with the ion chamber array and compared with a reference dose distribution delivered without target motion using a 3%/3mm γ-test. Results For lung tumor motion, tracking reduced the mean γ-failure rate from 38% to 0.7% for low modulation IMAT plans and from 44% to 2.8% for high modulation plans. For prostate, the γ-failure rate reduction was from 19% to 0% (low modulation) and from 20% to 2.7% (high modulation). The dominating contributor to the residual γ-failures during tracking was target localization errors for most lung cases and leaf fitting for most prostate cases. Conclusion Image-based tracking for IMAT was demonstrated for the first time. The tracking greatly improved the dose distributions to moving targets. PMID:22401924

  7. Assessing software upgrades, plan properties and patient geometry using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) complexity metrics

    SciTech Connect

    McGarry, Conor K.; Chinneck, Candice D.; O'Toole, Monica M.; O'Sullivan, Joe M; Prise, Kevin M.; Hounsell, Alan R.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to compare the sensitivity of different metrics to detect differences in complexity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans following upgrades, changes to planning parameters, and patient geometry. Correlations between complexity metrics are also assessed. Method: A program was developed to calculate a series of metrics used to describe the complexity of IMRT fields using monitor units (MUs) and multileaf collimator files: Modulation index (MI), modulation complexity score (MCS), and plan intensity map variation (PIMV). Each metric, including the MUs, was used to assess changes in beam complexity for six prostate patients, following upgrades in the inverse planning optimization software designed to incorporate direct aperture optimization (DAO). All beams were delivered to a 2D ionization chamber array and compared to those calculated using gamma analysis. Each complexity metric was then calculated for all beams, on a different set of six prostate IMRT patients, to assess differences between plans calculated using different minimum field sizes and different maximum segment numbers. Different geometries, including CShape, prostate, and head and neck phantoms, were also assessed using the metrics. Correlations between complexity metrics were calculated for 20 prostate IMRT patients. Results: MU, MCS, MI, and PIMV could all detect reduced complexity following an upgrade to the optimization leaf sequencer, although only MI and MCS could detect a reduction in complexity when one-step optimization (DAO) was employed rather than two-step optimization. All metrics detected a reduction in complexity when the minimum field size was increased from 1 to 4 cm and all apart from PIMV detected reduced complexity when the number of segments was significantly reduced. All metrics apart from MI showed differences in complexity depending on the treatment site. Significant correlations exist between all metrics apart from MI and PIMV for

  8. Multibeam tomotherapy: a new treatment unit devised for multileaf collimation, intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Achterberg, Nils; Müller, Reinhold G

    2007-10-01

    A fully integrated system for treatment planning, application, and verification for automated multileaf collimator (MLC) based, intensity-modulated, image-guided, and adaptive radiation therapy (IMRT, IGRT and ART, respectively) is proposed. Patient comfort, which was the major development goal, will be achieved through a new unit design and short treatment times. Our device for photon beam therapy will consist of a new dual energy linac with five fixed treatment heads positioned evenly along one plane but one electron beam generator only. A minimum of moving parts increases technical reliability and reduces motion times to a minimum. Motion is allowed solely for the MLCs, the robotic patient table, and the small angle gantry rotation of +/- 36 degrees. Besides sophisticated electron beam guidance, this compact setup can be built using existing modules. The flattening-filter-free treatment heads are characterized by reduced beam-on time and contain apertures restricted in one dimension to the area of maximum primary fluence output. In the case of longer targets, this leads to a topographic intensity modulation, thanks to the combination of "step and shoot" MLC delivery and discrete patient couch motion. Owing to the limited number of beam directions, this multislice cone beam serial tomotherapy is referred to as "multibeam tomotherapy." Every patient slice is irradiated by one treatment head at any given moment but for one subfield only. The electron beam is then guided to the next head ready for delivery, while the other heads are preparing their leaves for the next segment. The "Multifocal MLC-positioning" algorithm was programmed to enable treatment planning and optimize treatment time. We developed an overlap strategy for the longitudinally adjacent fields of every beam direction, in doing so minimizing the field match problem and the effects of possible table step errors. Clinical case studies show for the same or better planning target volume coverage, better

  9. Multibeam tomotherapy: A new treatment unit devised for multileaf collimation, intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Achterberg, Nils; Mueller, Reinhold G.

    2007-10-15

    A fully integrated system for treatment planning, application, and verification for automated multileaf collimator (MLC) based, intensity-modulated, image-guided, and adaptive radiation therapy (IMRT, IGRT and ART, respectively) is proposed. Patient comfort, which was the major development goal, will be achieved through a new unit design and short treatment times. Our device for photon beam therapy will consist of a new dual energy linac with five fixed treatment heads positioned evenly along one plane but one electron beam generator only. A minimum of moving parts increases technical reliability and reduces motion times to a minimum. Motion is allowed solely for the MLCs, the robotic patient table, and the small angle gantry rotation of {+-}36 deg. . Besides sophisticated electron beam guidance, this compact setup can be built using existing modules. The flattening-filter-free treatment heads are characterized by reduced beam-on time and contain apertures restricted in one dimension to the area of maximum primary fluence output. In the case of longer targets, this leads to a topographic intensity modulation, thanks to the combination of 'step and shoot' MLC delivery and discrete patient couch motion. Owing to the limited number of beam directions, this multislice cone beam serial tomotherapy is referred to as 'multibeam tomotherapy.' Every patient slice is irradiated by one treatment head at any given moment but for one subfield only. The electron beam is then guided to the next head ready for delivery, while the other heads are preparing their leaves for the next segment. The 'Multifocal MLC-positioning' algorithm was programmed to enable treatment planning and optimize treatment time. We developed an overlap strategy for the longitudinally adjacent fields of every beam direction, in doing so minimizing the field match problem and the effects of possible table step errors. Clinical case studies show for the same or better planning target volume coverage, better

  10. Lipid-lowering and anti-inflammatory effects of omega 3 ethyl esters and krill oil: a randomized, cross-over, clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Rosticci, Martina; Morbini, Martino; Cagnati, Marcella; Grandi, Elisa; Parini, Angelo; Borghi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) derived from different sources could have different lipid-lowering effects in humans. The main aim of our study was to compare the short-term triglyceride-lowering efficacy of krill oil and purified omega 3 ethyl ester PUFAs in mildly overweight hypertriglyceridemic subjects. Material and methods This double-blind, randomized clinical trial was carried out in 25 moderately hypertriglyceridemic subjects (TG = 150–500 mg/dl). After a 4-week run-in, participants were allocated to treatment with similar pills containing omega 3 ethyl ester PUFAs 1000 mg twice a day vs. krill oil 500 mg twice a day. After 4 weeks of treatment, participants were asked to observe a 4-week wash-out period, and they were then assigned to the alternative treatment for a further period of 4 weeks. Results Although both PUFA sources were able to improve TG plasma levels, esterified omega 3 PUFAs were more efficacious than krill oil (p < 0.05). Nonetheless, only krill oil treatment was able to significantly improve high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein AI levels, compared to both baseline (p < 0.05) and end of treatment with esterified omega 3 PUFAs (p < 0.05) values. Both treatments were able to significantly reduce high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels from the baseline (p < 0.05), but krill oil improved it more efficaciously than esterified omega 3 PUFAs (p < 0.05). Conclusions Krill oil has lipid-lowering effects comparable with those obtained through a 4-fold higher dose of purified omega 3 ethyl ester PUFAs in mildly overweight hypertriglyceridemic subjects, while more efficaciously reducing hs-CRP. PMID:27279841

  11. Automatically-generated rectal dose constraints in intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Taejin; Kim, Yong Nam; Kim, Soo Kon; Kang, Sei-Kwon; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Park, Soah; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Han, Taejin; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Meyeon; Kim, Kyoung-Joo; Bae, Hoonsik; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-06-01

    The dose constraint during prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization should be patient-specific for better rectum sparing. The aims of this study are to suggest a novel method for automatically generating a patient-specific dose constraint by using an experience-based dose volume histogram (DVH) of the rectum and to evaluate the potential of such a dose constraint qualitatively. The normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) of the rectum with respect to V %ratio in our study were divided into three groups, where V %ratio was defined as the percent ratio of the rectal volume overlapping the planning target volume (PTV) to the rectal volume: (1) the rectal NTCPs in the previous study (clinical data), (2) those statistically generated by using the standard normal distribution (calculated data), and (3) those generated by combining the calculated data and the clinical data (mixed data). In the calculated data, a random number whose mean value was on the fitted curve described in the clinical data and whose standard deviation was 1% was generated by using the `randn' function in the MATLAB program and was used. For each group, we validated whether the probability density function (PDF) of the rectal NTCP could be automatically generated with the density estimation method by using a Gaussian kernel. The results revealed that the rectal NTCP probability increased in proportion to V %ratio , that the predictive rectal NTCP was patient-specific, and that the starting point of IMRT optimization for the given patient might be different. The PDF of the rectal NTCP was obtained automatically for each group except that the smoothness of the probability distribution increased with increasing number of data and with increasing window width. We showed that during the prostate IMRT optimization, the patient-specific dose constraints could be automatically generated and that our method could reduce the IMRT optimization time as well as maintain the

  12. Hypofractionated Dose-Painting Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Chemotherapy for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A Prospective Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Bakst, Richard L.; Lee, Nancy; Pfister, David G.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Hunt, Margie A.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of dose-painting intensity-modulated radiation therapy (DP-IMRT) with a hypofractionated regimen to treat nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) with concomitant toxicity reduction. Methods and Materials: From October 2002 through April 2007, 25 newly diagnosed NPC patients were enrolled in a prospective trial. DP-IMRT was prescribed to deliver 70.2 Gy using 2.34-Gy fractions to the gross tumor volume for the primary and nodal sites while simultaneously delivering 54 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to regions at risk of microscopic disease. Patients received concurrent and adjuvant platin-based chemotherapy similar to the Intergroup 0099 trial. Results: Patient and disease characteristics are as follows: median age, 46; 44% Asian; 68% male; 76% World Health Organization III; 20% T1, 52% T2, 16% T3, 12% T4; 20% N0, 36% N1, 36% N2, 8% N3. With median follow-up of 33 months, 3-year local control was 91%, regional control was 91%, freedom from distant metastases was 91%, and overall survival was 89%. The average mean dose to each cochlea was 43 Gy. With median audiogram follow-up of 14 months, only one patient had clinically significant (Grade 3) hearing loss. Twelve percent of patients developed temporal lobe necrosis; one patient required surgical resection. Conclusions: Preliminary findings using a hypofractionated DP-IMRT regimen demonstrated that local control, freedom from distant metastases, and overall survival compared favorably with other series of IMRT and chemotherapy. The highly conformal boost to the tumor bed resulted low rates of severe ototoxicity (Grade 3-4). However, the incidence of in-field brain radiation necrosis indicates that 2.34 Gy per fraction is not safe in this setting.

  13. Disease Control and Ototoxicity Using Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Tumor-Bed Boost for Medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Polkinghorn, William R.; Dunkel, Ira J.; Souweidane, Mark M.; Khakoo, Yasmin; Lyden, David C.; Gilheeney, Stephen W.; Becher, Oren J.; Budnick, Amy S.; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We previously reported excellent local control for treating medulloblastoma with a limited boost to the tumor bed. In order to decrease ototoxicity, we subsequently implemented a tumor-bed boost using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the clinical results of which we report here. Patients and Methods: A total of 33 patients with newly diagnosed medulloblastoma, 25 with standard risk, and 8 with high risk, were treated on an IMRT tumor-bed boost following craniospinal irradiation (CSI). Six standard-risk patients were treated with an institutional protocol with 18 Gy CSI in conjunction with intrathecal iodine-131-labeled monoclonal antibody. The majority of patients received concurrent vincristine and standard adjuvant chemotherapy. Pure-tone audiograms were graded according to National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Median age was 9 years old (range, 4-46 years old). Median follow-up was 63 months. Kaplan-Meier estimates of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates for standard-risk patients who received 23.4 or 36 Gy CSI (not including those who received 18 Gy CSI with radioimmunotherapy) were 81.4% and 88.4%, respectively, at 5 years; 5-year PFS and OS rates for high-risk patients were both 87.5%. There were no isolated posterior fossa failures outside of the boost volume. Posttreatment audiograms were available for 31 patients, of whom 6%, at a median follow-up of 19 months, had developed Grade 3 hearing loss. Conclusion: An IMRT tumor-bed boost results in excellent local control while delivering a low mean dose to the cochlea, resulting in a low rate of ototoxicity.

  14. Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Versus Helical Tomotherapy in Nasopharynx Cancer: Planning Comparison and NTCP Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Widesott, Lamberto Pierelli, Alessio; Fiorino, Claudio; Dell'Oca, Italo; Broggi, Sara; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Di Muzio, Nadia; Fazio, Ferruccio; Calandrino, Riccardo; Schwarz, Marco

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To compare intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) treatment plans for nasopharynx cancer using a simultaneous integrated boost approach. Methods and Materials: The data from 6 patients who had previously been treated with HT were used. A three-beam IMPT technique was optimized in the Hyperion treatment planning system, simulating a 'beam scanning' technique. HT was planned using the tomotherapy treatment planning system. Both techniques were optimized to simultaneously deliver 66 Gy in 30 fractions to planning target volume (PTV1; GTV and enlarged nodes) and 54 Gy to PTV2 subclinical, electively treated nodes. Normal tissue complication probability calculation was performed for the parotids and larynx. Results: Very similar PTVs coverage and homogeneity of the target dose distribution for IMPT and HT were found. The conformity index was significantly lower for protons than for photons (1.19 vs. 1.42, respectively). The mean dose to the ipsilateral and contralateral parotid glands decreased by 6.4 Gy and 5.6 Gy, respectively, with IMPT. The volume of mucosa and esophagus receiving {>=}20 Gy and {>=}30 Gy with IMPT was significantly lower than with HT. The average volume of larynx receiving {>=}50 Gy was significantly lower with HT, while for thyroid, it was comparable. The volume receiving {>=}30, {>=}20, and {>=}10 Gy in total body volume decreased with IMPT by 14.5%, 19.4%, and 23.1%, respectively. The normal tissue complication probability for the parotid glands was significantly lower with IMPT for all sets of parameters; however, we also estimated an almost full recovery of the contralateral parotid with HT. The normal tissue complication probability for the larynx was not significantly different between the two irradiation techniques. Conclusion: Excellent target coverage, homogeneity within the PTVs, and sparing of the organs at risk were reached with both modalities. IMPT allows for better sparing of most organs at

  15. Three-Year Outcomes of Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Simultaneous Integrated Boost

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Mark W.; Godette, Karen D.; Whitaker, Daisy J.; Davis, Lawrence W.; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To report our clinical experience using breast intensity-modulated radiation therapy with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB-IMRT). Methods and Materials: Retrospective review identified 354 Stage 0 to III breast cancer patients treated with SIB-IMRT after conservative surgery between 2003 and 2006. The most common fractionation (89%) simultaneously delivered 1.8 Gy to the ipsilateral breast tissue and 2.14 Gy to the resection cavity, yielding a breast dose of 45 Gy (25 fractions) and cavity dose 59.92 Gy (28 fractions), biologically equivalent for tumor control to 45 Gy to the breast with sequential 16-Gy boost (33 fractions). Results: A total of 356 breasts in 354 patients were treated: 282 with invasive breast cancer, and 74 with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). For left breast radiation, median cardiac V{sub 15} was 2.9% and left ventricular V{sub 15} 1.7%. Median follow-up was 33 months (range, 4-73 months). Acute toxicity was Grade 1 in 57% of cases, Grade 2 in 43%, and Grade 3 in <1%. For invasive breast cancer, the 3-year overall survival was 97.6% and risk of any locoregional recurrence was 2.8%. For ductal carcinoma in situ, 3-year overall survival was 98% and risk of locoregional recurrence 1.4%. In 142 cases at a minimum of 3 years follow-up, global breast cosmesis was judged by physicians as good or excellent in 96.5% and fair in 3.5%. Conclusions: Breast SIB-IMRT reduced treatment duration by five fractions with a favorable acute toxicity profile and low cardiac dose for left breast treatment. At 3 years, locoregional control was excellent, and initial assessment suggested good or excellent cosmesis in a high percentage of evaluable patients.

  16. Ototoxicity After Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy in Children With Medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Paulino, Arnold C.; Lobo, Mark; Teh, Bin S.; Okcu, M. Fatih; South, Michael; Butler, E. Brian; Su, Jack; Chintagumpala, Murali

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To report the incidence of Pediatric Oncology Group (POG) Grade 3 or 4 ototoxicity in a cohort of patients treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI) followed by posterior fossa (PF) and/or tumor bed (TB) boost using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2006, 44 patients with medulloblastoma were treated with CSI followed by IMRT to the PF and/or TB and cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Patients with standard-risk disease were treated with 18 to 23.4 Gy CSI followed by either a (1) PF boost to 36 Gy and TB boost to 54 to 55.8 Gy or (2) TB boost to 55.8 Gy. Patients with high-risk disease received 36 to 39.6 Gy CSI followed by a (1) PF boost to 54 to 55.8 Gy, (2) PF boost to 45 Gy and TB boost to 55.8 Gy, or (3) TB boost to 55.8 Gy. Median audiogram follow-up was 41 months (range, 11-92.4 months). Results: POG Grade Ototoxicity 0, 1, 2, 3. and 4 was found in 29, 32, 11, 13. and 3 ears. respectively, with POG Grade 3 or 4 accounting for 18.2% of cases. There was a statistically significant difference in mean radiation dose (D{sub mean}) cochlea according to degree of ototoxicity, with D{sub mean} cochlea increasing with severity of hearing loss (p = 0.027). Conclusions: Severe ototoxicity was seen in 18.2% of ears in children treated with IMRT boost and cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Increasing dose to the cochlea was associated with increasing severity of hearing loss.

  17. Automation and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Individualized High-Quality Tangent Breast Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Purdie, Thomas G.; Dinniwell, Robert E.; Fyles, Anthony; Sharpe, Michael B.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the large-scale clinical implementation and performance of an automated treatment planning methodology for tangential breast intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Automated planning was used to prospectively plan tangential breast IMRT treatment for 1661 patients between June 2009 and November 2012. The automated planning method emulates the manual steps performed by the user during treatment planning, including anatomical segmentation, beam placement, optimization, dose calculation, and plan documentation. The user specifies clinical requirements of the plan to be generated through a user interface embedded in the planning system. The automated method uses heuristic algorithms to define and simplify the technical aspects of the treatment planning process. Results: Automated planning was used in 1661 of 1708 patients receiving tangential breast IMRT during the time interval studied. Therefore, automated planning was applicable in greater than 97% of cases. The time for treatment planning using the automated process is routinely 5 to 6 minutes on standard commercially available planning hardware. We have shown a consistent reduction in plan rejections from plan reviews through the standard quality control process or weekly quality review multidisciplinary breast rounds as we have automated the planning process for tangential breast IMRT. Clinical plan acceptance increased from 97.3% using our previous semiautomated inverse method to 98.9% using the fully automated method. Conclusions: Automation has become the routine standard method for treatment planning of tangential breast IMRT at our institution and is clinically feasible on a large scale. The method has wide clinical applicability and can add tremendous efficiency, standardization, and quality to the current treatment planning process. The use of automated methods can allow centers to more rapidly adopt IMRT and enhance access to the documented

  18. Beam orientation optimization for intensity modulated radiation therapy using adaptive l2,1-minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xun; Men, Chunhua; Lou, Yifei; Jiang, Steve B.

    2011-10-01

    Beam orientation optimization (BOO) is a key component in the process of intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment planning. It determines to what degree one can achieve a good treatment plan in the subsequent plan optimization process. In this paper, we have developed a BOO algorithm via adaptive l2, 1-minimization. Specifically, we introduce a sparsity objective function term into our model which contains weighting factors for each beam angle adaptively adjusted during the optimization process. Such an objective function favors a small number of beam angles. By optimizing a total objective function consisting of a dosimetric term and the sparsity term, we are able to identify unimportant beam angles and gradually remove them without largely sacrificing the dosimetric objective. In one typical prostate case, the convergence property of our algorithm, as well as how beam angles are selected during the optimization process, is demonstrated. Fluence map optimization (FMO) is then performed based on the optimized beam angles. The resulting plan quality is presented and is found to be better than that of equiangular beam orientations. We have further systematically validated our algorithm in the contexts of 5-9 coplanar beams for five prostate cases and one head and neck case. For each case, the final FMO objective function value is used to compare the optimized beam orientations with the equiangular ones. It is found that, in the majority of cases tested, our BOO algorithm leads to beam configurations which attain lower FMO objective function values than those of corresponding equiangular cases, indicating the effectiveness of our BOO algorithm. Superior plan qualities are also demonstrated by comparing DVH curves between BOO plans and equiangular plans.

  19. The influence of angular misalignment on fixed-portal intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Low, D A; Zhu, X R; Purdy, J A; Söderström, S

    1997-07-01

    A method has been developed to estimate potential dose errors due to linear accelerator angular setting misalignments of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) treatments. A first-order approximation to the dose error at a point is modeled as the dot product of the dose gradient and the shift vector of the point due to the rotational error. The analysis method is applied to a previously published set of optimized fluences for a 50 MV IMRT pelvis irradiation. Three of the published cases exhibiting a wide range of modulation are presented; a rectangular open field, a field optimized for a static multileaf collimator defining the portal outline coupled with a single broad bremsstrahlung profile modulation, and a fully modulated field using a physical modulator. To examine the energy dependence of angle setting errors, the study is repeated using the same fluence distributions, but with a dose-spread kernel appropriate for a 6 MV photon beam. The collimator angle error is set to 2 degree, and the dose error determined with both a centrally located isocenter and an isocenter chosen to model a split-field geometry. The dose error due to a 2 degree gantry setting error is assessed at a plane 10 cm distal to the isocenter. The mathematical form of the dose error due to couch motion is similar to the other two errors, so the dose error resulting from a couch angle missetting is not presented. The magnitude of the errors is largest for the 6 MV beam, while the volume encompassed by the errors is greater for the 50 MV beam. The gantry error yields the largest dose error values, with the 6 MV modulated case presenting dose errors of greater than 40%. PMID:9243475

  20. Proton energy optimization and reduction for intensity-modulated proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenhua; Lim, Gino; Liao, Li; Li, Yupeng; Jiang, Shengpeng; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Zhu, X Ronald; Gomez, Daniel; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-11-01

    Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is commonly delivered via the spot-scanning technique. To 'scan' the target volume, the proton beam is controlled by varying its energy to penetrate the patient's body at different depths. Although scanning the proton beamlets or spots with the same energy can be as fast as 10-20 m s(-1), changing from one proton energy to another requires approximately two additional seconds. The total IMPT delivery time thus depends mainly on the number of proton energies used in a treatment. Current treatment planning systems typically use all proton energies that are required for the proton beam to penetrate in a range from the distal edge to the proximal edge of the target. The optimal selection of proton energies has not been well studied. In this study, we sought to determine the feasibility of optimizing and reducing the number of proton energies in IMPT planning. We proposed an iterative mixed-integer programming optimization method to select a subset of all available proton energies while satisfying dosimetric criteria. We applied our proposed method to six patient datasets: four cases of prostate cancer, one case of lung cancer, and one case of mesothelioma. The numbers of energies were reduced by 14.3%-18.9% for the prostate cancer cases, 11.0% for the lung cancer cases and 26.5% for the mesothelioma case. The results indicate that the number of proton energies used in conventionally designed IMPT plans can be reduced without degrading dosimetric performance. The IMPT delivery efficiency could be improved by energy layer optimization leading to increased throughput for a busy proton center in which a delivery system with slow energy switch is employed. PMID:25295881

  1. The effect of photon energy on intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Wonmo; Park, Jong Min; Choi, Chang Heon; Ha, Sung Whan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of common three photon energies (6-MV, 10-MV, and 15-MV) on intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans to treat prostate cancer patients. Materials and Methods Twenty patients with prostate cancer treated locally to 81.0 Gy were retrospectively studied. 6-MV, 10-MV, and 15-MV IMRT plans for each patient were generated using suitable planning objectives, dose constraints, and 8-field setting. The plans were analyzed in terms of dose-volume histogram for the target coverage, dose conformity, organs at risk (OAR) sparing, and normal tissue integral dose. Results Regardless of the energies chosen at the plans, the target coverage, conformity, and homogeneity of the plans were similar. However, there was a significant dose increase in rectal wall and femoral heads for 6-MV compared to those for 10-MV and 15-MV. The V20 Gy of rectal wall with 6-MV, 10-MV, and 15-MV were 95.6%, 88.4%, and 89.4% while the mean dose to femoral heads were 31.7, 25.9, and 26.3 Gy, respectively. Integral doses to the normal tissues in higher energy (10-MV and 15-MV) plans were reduced by about 7%. Overall, integral doses in mid and low dose regions in 6-MV plans were increased by up to 13%. Conclusion In this study, 10-MV prostate IMRT plans showed better OAR sparing and less integral doses than the 6-MV. The biological and clinical significance of this finding remains to be determined afterward, considering neutron dose contribution. PMID:23120741

  2. Proton energy optimization and reduction for intensity-modulated proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Wenhua; Lim, Gino; Liao, Li; Li, Yupeng; Jiang, Shengpeng; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Zhu, X. Ronald; Gomez, Daniel; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is commonly delivered via the spot-scanning technique. To “scan” the target volume, the proton beam is controlled by varying its energy to penetrate the patient’s body at different depths. Although scanning the proton beamlets or spots with the same energy can be as fast as 10–20 m/s, changing from one proton energy to another requires approximately two additional seconds. The total IMPT delivery time thus depends mainly on the number of proton energies used in a treatment. Current treatment planning systems typically use all proton energies that are required for the proton beam to penetrate in a range from the distal edge to the proximal edge of the target. The optimal selection of proton energies has not been well studied. In this study, we sought to determine the feasibility of optimizing and reducing the number of proton energies in IMPT planning. We proposed an iterative mixed-integer programming optimization method to select a subset of all available proton energies while satisfying dosimetric criteria. We applied our proposed method to six patient datasets: four cases of prostate cancer, one case of lung cancer, and one case of mesothelioma. The numbers of energies were reduced by 14.3%–18.9% for the prostate cancer cases, 11.0% for the lung cancer cases, and 26.5% for the mesothelioma case. The results indicate that the number of proton energies used in conventionally designed IMPT plans can be reduced without degrading dosimetric performance. The IMPT delivery efficiency could be improved by energy layer optimization leading to increased throughput for a busy proton center in which a delivery system with slow energy switch is employed. PMID:25295881

  3. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated and volumetric arc radiation therapy for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    LI, ZHIPING; ZENG, JIANSHUANG; WANG, ZI; ZHU, HONG; WEI, YUQUAN

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare radiotherapy treatment plans for gastric cancer using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and single/double-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (SA/DA-VMAT) delivery techniques. A total of 29 postoperative gastric cancer patients were enrolled in this study and each patient was scheduled 5-field IMRT (5F-IMRT), 7-field IMRT (7F-IMRT), SA-VMAT and DA-VMAT techniques. Dose-volume histogram statistics, conformal index (CI), homogeneity index (HI) and monitor units (MUs) were analyzed to compare treatment plans. The DA-VMAT plans exceeded the other three methods in terms of planning tumor volume dose and organs at risk in the kidneys, but not in the liver. DA-VMAT exhibited a better mean CI (0.87±0.03) and HI (0.10±0.01) than the other techniques. In addition, for the kidneys the dose sparing (V13, V18 and mean kidney dose) was improved by DA-VMAT plans. Similar results were observed for MUs. However, 5F-IMRT showed a marginal advantage in V30 and mean dose in normal liver when compared with DA-VMAT. The results of this study suggest that DA-VMAT provides improved tumor coverage when compared with 5F-IMRT, 7F-IMRT and SA-VMAT; however, DA-VMAT exhibits no advantage in liver protection when compared with 5F-IMRT. Further studies are required to establish differences in treatment outcomes among the four technologies. PMID:25202345

  4. Proton energy optimization and reduction for intensity-modulated proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wenhua; Lim, Gino; Liao, Li; Li, Yupeng; Jiang, Shengpeng; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Zhu, X. Ronald; Gomez, Daniel; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-10-01

    Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is commonly delivered via the spot-scanning technique. To ‘scan’ the target volume, the proton beam is controlled by varying its energy to penetrate the patient’s body at different depths. Although scanning the proton beamlets or spots with the same energy can be as fast as 10-20 m s-1, changing from one proton energy to another requires approximately two additional seconds. The total IMPT delivery time thus depends mainly on the number of proton energies used in a treatment. Current treatment planning systems typically use all proton energies that are required for the proton beam to penetrate in a range from the distal edge to the proximal edge of the target. The optimal selection of proton energies has not been well studied. In this study, we sought to determine the feasibility of optimizing and reducing the number of proton energies in IMPT planning. We proposed an iterative mixed-integer programming optimization method to select a subset of all available proton energies while satisfying dosimetric criteria. We applied our proposed method to six patient datasets: four cases of prostate cancer, one case of lung cancer, and one case of mesothelioma. The numbers of energies were reduced by 14.3%-18.9% for the prostate cancer cases, 11.0% for the lung cancer cases and 26.5% for the mesothelioma case. The results indicate that the number of proton energies used in conventionally designed IMPT plans can be reduced without degrading dosimetric performance. The IMPT delivery efficiency could be improved by energy layer optimization leading to increased throughput for a busy proton center in which a delivery system with slow energy switch is employed.

  5. Intensity modulated radiation-therapy for preoperative posterior abdominal wall irradiation of retroperitoneal liposarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Bossi, Alberto . E-mail: alberto.bossi@uz.kuleuven.ac.be; De Wever, Ivo; Van Limbergen, Erik; Vanstraelen, Bianca

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative external-beam radiation therapy (preop RT) in the management of Retroperitoneal Liposarcomas (RPLS) typically involves the delivery of radiation to the entire tumor mass: yet this may not be necessary. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a new strategy of preop RT for RPLS in which the target volume is limited to the contact area between the tumoral mass and the posterior abdominal wall. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and Jan 2005, 18 patients with the diagnosis of RPLS have been treated following a pilot protocol of pre-op RT, 50 Gy in 25 fractions of 2 Gy/day. The Clinical Target Volume (CTV) has been limited to the posterior abdominal wall, region at higher risk for local relapse. A Three-Dimensional conformal (3D-CRT) and an Intensity Modulated (IMRT) plan were generated and compared; toxicity was reported following the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. Results: All patients completed the planned treatment and the acute toxicity was tolerable: 2 patients experienced Grade 3 and 1 Grade 2 anorexia while 2 patients developed Grade 2 nausea. IMRT allows a better sparing of the ipsilateral and the contralateral kidney. All tumors were successfully resected without major complications. At a median follow-up of 27 months 2 patients developed a local relapse and 1 lung metastasis. Conclusions: Our strategy of preop RT is feasible and well tolerated: the rate of resectability is not compromised by limiting the preop CTV to the posterior abdominal wall and a better critical-structures sparing is obtained with IMRT.

  6. Long term effects of high intensity laser therapy in lateral epicondylitis patients.

    PubMed

    Akkurt, Ekrem; Kucuksen, Sami; Yılmaz, Halim; Parlak, Selman; Sallı, Ali; Karaca, Gülten

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate short- and long-term effects of high-intensity laser therapy (HILT) in lateral epicondylitis (LE) patients. Thirty patients with LE diagnosis (23 unilateral and 7 bilateral in total 37 elbows) were treated using HILT. LE patients were evaluated before, right after, and 6 months following HILT intervention post-treatment using visual analogue scale for pain (VAS) during activity and resting. Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) Score and hand grip strength test (HGST) were used. The participants of the present study were also evaluated using Short-Form 36 (SF-36) before and 6 months after the treatment. Out of the 30 patients, 8 were male and 22 female with a mean age of 47.2 ± 9.7. The activity and resting VAS, DASH, and HGST scores revealed statistically significant improvement (p = 0.001) following treatment. Whereas VAS activity, DASH, and HGST scores increased after treatment until post-treatment 6 months significantly (p = 0.001), VAS resting scores remained stable (p = 0.476). A statistically significant improvement was also evident in the physical and mental components of SF-36 scores following treatment until post-treatment 6 months compared to pre-treatment scores (p = 0.001). In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that HILT is a reliable, safe, and effective treatment option in LE patients in the short and long term considering pain, functional status, and quality of life. PMID:26714978

  7. Prognostic value of Diabetes in Patients with Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Treated with Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hao; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Wen-Fei; Mao, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Fan; Guo, Rui; Liu, Li-Zhi; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying; Ma, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The prognostic value of diabetes remains unknown in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 1489 patients with non-metastatic, histologically-proven NPC treated using IMRT. 81/1489 (5.4%) patients were diabetic, 168/1489 (11.3%) were prediabetic, and 1240/1489 (83.3%) were normoglycemic. The 4-year disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), loco-regional relapse-free survival (LRRFS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) rates were 77.1% vs. 82.4% (P = 0.358), 85.8% vs. 91.0% (P = 0.123), 90.9% vs. 91.7% (P = 0.884), and 85.5% vs. 89.2% (P = 0.445) for diabetic vs. normoglycemic patients, and 82.4% vs. 82.4% (P = 0.993), 88.7% vs. 91.0% (P = 0.285), 90.6% vs. 91.7% (P = 0.832) and 91.5% vs. 89.2% (P = 0.594) for preidabetic vs. normoglycemic patients. Multivariate analysis did not established diabetes as poor prognostic factors in NPC patients treated with IMRT (P = 0.332 for DFS, P = 0.944 for OS, P = 0.977 for LRRFS, P = 0.157 for DMFS), however, triglycerides and low density lipoprotein cholesterol were independent prognostic factors. In conclusion, diabetes does not appear to be a prognostic factor in NPC patients treated with IMRT, and attention should be paid to hyperglycemia-associated hyperlipaemia. PMID:26927312

  8. Evaluation of Parotid Gland Function following Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seok Ho; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Joo Young; Park, Sung Yong; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Joo Young

    2006-01-01

    Purpose This study was undertaken to determine the parotid gland tolerance dose levels following intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for treating patients who suffered with head and neck cancer. Materials and Methods From February 2003 through June 2004, 34 head and neck patients with 6 months of follow-up were evaluated for xerostomia after being treated by IMRT. Their median age was 59 years (range: 29~78). Xerostomia was assessed using a 4-question xerostomia questionnaire score (XQS) and a test for the salivary flow rates (unstimulated and stimulated: USFR and SSFR, respectively). The patients were also given a validated LENT SOMA scale (LSS) questionnaire. Evaluations were performed before IMRT and at 1, 3 and 6 months after IMRT. Results All 34 patients showed significant changes in the XQS, LSS and Salivary Flow rates (USFR and SSFR) after IMRT. No significant changes in the XQS or LSS were noted in 12 patients who received a total parotid mean dose of ≤3,100 cGy at 1, 3 and 6 months post-IMRT relative to the baseline values. However, for the 22 patients who received >3,100 cGy, significant increases in the XQS and LSS were observed. The USFR and SSFR from the parotid glands in 7 patients who received ≤2,750 cGy were significantly preserved at up to 6 months after IMRT. However, the USFR and SSFR in 27 patients who were treated with >2,750 cGy were significantly lower than the baseline values at all times after IMRT. Conclusion We suggest that the total parotid mean dose should be limited to ≤2,750 cGy to preserve the USFR and SSFR and so improve the subsequent quality of life. PMID:19771265

  9. An Anatomically Validated Brachial Plexus Contouring Method for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Velde, Joris; Audenaert, Emmanuel; Speleers, Bruno; Vercauteren, Tom; Mulliez, Thomas; Vandemaele, Pieter; Achten, Eric; Kerckaert, Ingrid; D'Herde, Katharina; De Neve, Wilfried; Van Hoof, Tom

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To develop contouring guidelines for the brachial plexus (BP) using anatomically validated cadaver datasets. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were used to obtain detailed visualizations of the BP region, with the goal of achieving maximal inclusion of the actual BP in a small contoured volume while also accommodating for anatomic variations. Methods and Materials: CT and MRI were obtained for 8 cadavers positioned for intensity modulated radiation therapy. 3-dimensional reconstructions of soft tissue (from MRI) and bone (from CT) were combined to create 8 separate enhanced CT project files. Dissection of the corresponding cadavers anatomically validated the reconstructions created. Seven enhanced CT project files were then automatically fitted, separately in different regions, to obtain a single dataset of superimposed BP regions that incorporated anatomic variations. From this dataset, improved BP contouring guidelines were developed. These guidelines were then applied to the 7 original CT project files and also to 1 additional file, left out from the superimposing procedure. The percentage of BP inclusion was compared with the published guidelines. Results: The anatomic validation procedure showed a high level of conformity for the BP regions examined between the 3-dimensional reconstructions generated and the dissected counterparts. Accurate and detailed BP contouring guidelines were developed, which provided corresponding guidance for each level in a clinical dataset. An average margin of 4.7 mm around the anatomically validated BP contour is sufficient to accommodate for anatomic variations. Using the new guidelines, 100% inclusion of the BP was achieved, compared with a mean inclusion of 37.75% when published guidelines were applied. Conclusion: Improved guidelines for BP delineation were developed using combined MRI and CT imaging with validation by anatomic dissection.

  10. Prognostic value of Diabetes in Patients with Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Treated with Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hao; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Wen-Fei; Mao, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Fan; Guo, Rui; Liu, Li-Zhi; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying; Ma, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The prognostic value of diabetes remains unknown in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 1489 patients with non-metastatic, histologically-proven NPC treated using IMRT. 81/1489 (5.4%) patients were diabetic, 168/1489 (11.3%) were prediabetic, and 1240/1489 (83.3%) were normoglycemic. The 4-year disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), loco-regional relapse-free survival (LRRFS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) rates were 77.1% vs. 82.4% (P = 0.358), 85.8% vs. 91.0% (P = 0.123), 90.9% vs. 91.7% (P = 0.884), and 85.5% vs. 89.2% (P = 0.445) for diabetic vs. normoglycemic patients, and 82.4% vs. 82.4% (P = 0.993), 88.7% vs. 91.0% (P = 0.285), 90.6% vs. 91.7% (P = 0.832) and 91.5% vs. 89.2% (P = 0.594) for preidabetic vs. normoglycemic patients. Multivariate analysis did not established diabetes as poor prognostic factors in NPC patients treated with IMRT (P = 0.332 for DFS, P = 0.944 for OS, P = 0.977 for LRRFS, P = 0.157 for DMFS), however, triglycerides and low density lipoprotein cholesterol were independent prognostic factors. In conclusion, diabetes does not appear to be a prognostic factor in NPC patients treated with IMRT, and attention should be paid to hyperglycemia-associated hyperlipaemia. PMID:26927312

  11. Gamma evaluation combined with isocenter optimal matching in intensity modulated radiation therapy quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Jino; Choi, Jin Hwa; Park, Suk Won; Park, Kwangwoo; Park, Sungho

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) dose comparisons are widely performed by using a gamma evaluation with patient-specific intensity modulated radiation therapy quality assurance (IMRT QA) or dose delivery quality assurance (DQA). In this way, a pass/fail determination is made for a particular treatment plan. When gamma evaluation results are close to the failure criterion, the pass/fail decision may change applying a small shift to the center of the 2D dose distribution. In this study, we quantitatively evaluated the meaning of such a small relative shift in a 2D dose distribution comparison. In addition, we propose the use of a small shift for a pass/fail criterion in gamma analysis, where the concept of isocenter optimal matching (IOM) is applied to IMRT QA of 20 patients. Gamma evaluations were performed to compare two dose distributions, one with and the other without IOM. In-house software was developed in C++ in order to find IOM values including both translational and rotational shifts. Upon gamma evaluation failure, further investigation was initiated using IOM. In this way, three groups were categorized: group 1 for `pass' on gamma evaluation, group 21 for `fail' on the gamma evaluation and `pass' on the gamma the evaluation with IOM, and group 22 for `fail' on the both gamma evaluations and the IOM calculation. IOM results revealed that some failures could be considered as a `pass'. In group 21, 88.98% (fail) of the averaged gamma pass rate changed to 90.45% (pass) when IOM was applied. On average, a ratio of γ ≥ 1 was reduced by 11.06% in 20 patients. We propose that gamma evaluations that do not pass with a rate of 85% to 90% may be augmented with IOM to reveal a potential pass result.

  12. Vaginal Motion and Bladder and Rectal Volumes During Pelvic Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy After Hysterectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Jhingran, Anuja; Salehpour, Mohammad; Sam, Marianne; Levy, Larry; Eifel, Patricia J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate variations in bladder and rectal volume and the position of the vaginal vault during a 5-week course of pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) after hysterectomy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients were instructed how to fill their bladders before simulation and treatment. These patients underwent computed tomography simulations with full and empty bladders and then underwent rescanning twice weekly during IMRT; patients were asked to have full bladder for treatment. Bladder and rectal volumes and the positions of vaginal fiducial markers were determined, and changes in volume and position were calculated. Results: The mean full and empty bladder volumes at simulation were 480 cc (range, 122-1,052) and 155 cc (range, 49-371), respectively. Bladder volumes varied widely during IMRT: the median difference between the maximum and minimum volumes was 247 cc (range, 96-585). Variations in rectal volume during IMRT were less pronounced. For the 16 patients with vaginal fiducial markers in place throughout IMRT, the median maximum movement of the markers during IMRT was 0.59 cm in the right-left direction (range, 0-0.9), 1.46 cm in the anterior-posterior direction (range, 0.8-2.79), and 1.2 cm in the superior-inferior direction (range, 0.6-2.1). Large variations in rectal or bladder volume frequently correlated with significant displacement of the vaginal apex. Conclusion: Although treatment with a full bladder is usually preferred because of greater sparing of small bowel, our data demonstrate that even with detailed instruction, patients are unable to maintain consistent bladder filling. Variations in organ position during IMRT can result in marked changes in the position of the target volume and the volume of small bowel exposed to high doses of radiation.

  13. Electromagnetic-Guided Dynamic Multileaf Collimator Tracking Enables Motion Management for Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Keall, Paul J.; Sawant, Amit; Cho, Byungchul; Ruan, Dan; Wu Junqing; Poulsen, Per; Petersen, Jay; Newell, Laurence J.; Cattell, Herbert; Korreman, Stine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is attractive because of high-dose conformality and efficient delivery. However, managing intrafraction motion is challenging for IMAT. The purpose of this research was to develop and investigate electromagnetically guided dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking as an enabling technology to treat moving targets during IMAT. Methods and Materials: A real-time three-dimensional DMLC-based target tracking system was developed and integrated with a linear accelerator. The DMLC tracking software inputs a real-time electromagnetically measured target position and the IMAT plan, and dynamically creates new leaf positions directed at the moving target. Low- and high-modulation IMAT plans were created for lung and prostate cancer cases. The IMAT plans were delivered to a three-axis motion platform programmed with measured patient motion. Dosimetric measurements were acquired by placing an ion chamber array on the moving platform. Measurements were acquired with tracking, without tracking (current clinical practice), and with the phantom in a static position (reference). Analysis of dose distribution differences from the static reference used a {gamma}-test. Results: On average, 1.6% of dose points for the lung plans and 1.2% of points for the prostate plans failed the 3-mm/3% {gamma}-test with tracking; without tracking, 34% and 14% (respectively) of points failed the {gamma}-test. The delivery time was the same with and without tracking. Conclusions: Electromagnetic-guided DMLC target tracking with IMAT has been investigated for the first time. Dose distributions to moving targets with DMLC tracking were significantly superior to those without tracking. There was no loss of treatment efficiency with DMLC tracking.

  14. "Low-intensity laser therapy effect on the recovery of traumatic spinal cord injury".

    PubMed

    Paula, Alecsandra Araujo; Nicolau, Renata Amadei; Lima, Mario de Oliveira; Salgado, Miguel Angel Castillo; Cogo, José Carlos

    2014-11-01

    Scientific advances have been made to optimize the healing process in spinal cord injury. Studies have been developed to obtain effective treatments in controlling the secondary injury that occurs after spinal cord injury, which substantially changes the prognosis. Low-intensity laser therapy (LILT) has been applied in neuroscience due to its anti-inflammatory effects on biological tissue in the repairing process. Few studies have been made associating LILT to the spinal cord injury. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the LILT (GaAlAs laser-780 nm) on the locomotor functional recovery, histomorphometric, and histopathological changes of the spinal cord after moderate traumatic injury in rats (spinal cord injury at T9 and T10). Thirty-one adult Wistar rats were used, which were divided into seven groups: control without surgery (n = 3), control surgery (n = 3), laser 6 h after surgery (n = 5), laser 48 h after surgery (n = 5), medullar lesion (n = 5) without phototherapy, medullar lesion + laser 6 h after surgery (n = 5), and medullar lesion + laser 48 h after surgery (n = 5). The assessment of the motor function was performed using Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) scale and adapted Sciatic Functional Index (aSFI). The assessment of urinary dysfunction was clinically performed. After 21 days postoperative, the animals were euthanized for histological and histomorphometric analysis of the spinal cord. The results showed faster motor evolution in rats with spinal contusion treated with LILT, maintenance of the effectiveness of the urinary system, and preservation of nerve tissue in the lesion area, with a notorious inflammation control and increased number of nerve cells and connections. In conclusion, positive effects on spinal cord recovery after moderate traumatic spinal cord injury were shown after LILT. PMID:24858233

  15. Patterns of Disease Recurrence Following Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Garden, Adam S.; Dong, Lei; Morrison, William H.; Stugis, Erich M.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Schwartz, David L.; Kies, Merill S.; Ang, K. Kian; Rosenthal, David I.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To report mature results of a large cohort of patients diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx who were treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: The database of patients irradiated at The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center was searched for patients diagnosed with oropharyngeal cancer and treated with IMRT between 2000 and 2007. A retrospective review of outcome data was performed. Results: The cohort consisted of 776 patients. One hundred fifty-nine patients (21%) were current smokers, 279 (36%) former smokers, and 337 (43%) never smokers. T and N categories and American Joint Committee on Cancer group stages were distributed as follows: T1/x, 288 (37%); T2, 288 (37%); T3, 113 (15%); T4, 87 (11%); N0, 88(12%); N1/x, 140 (18%); N2a, 101 (13%); N2b, 269 (35%); N2c, 122 (16%); and N3, 56 (7%); stage I, 18(2%); stage II, 40(5%); stage III, 150(19%); and stage IV, 568(74%). Seventy-one patients (10%) presented with nodes in level IV. Median follow-up was 54 months. The 5-year overall survival, locoregional control, and overall recurrence-free survival rates were 84%, 90%, and 82%, respectively. Primary site recurrence developed in 7% of patients, and neck recurrence with primary site control in 3%. We could only identify 12 patients (2%) who had locoregional recurrence outside the high-dose target volumes. Poorer survival rates were observed in current smokers, patients with larger primary (T) tumors and lower neck disease. Conclusions: Patients with oropharyngeal cancer treated with IMRT have excellent disease control. Locoregional recurrence was uncommon, and most often occurred in the high dose volumes. Parotid sparing was accomplished in nearly all patients without compromising tumor coverage.

  16. In vitro study of cell survival following dynamic MLC intensity-modulated radiation therapy dose delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Moiseenko, Vitali; Duzenli, Cheryl; Durand, Ralph E.

    2007-04-15

    The possibility of reduced cell kill following intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) compared to conventional radiation therapy has been debated in the literature. This potential reduction in cell kill relates to prolonged treatment times typical of IMRT dose delivery and consequently increased repair of sublethal lesions. While there is some theoretical support to this reduction in cell kill published in the literature, direct experimental evidence specific to IMRT dose delivery patterns is lacking. In this study we present cell survival data for three cell lines: Chinese hamster V79 fibroblasts, human cervical carcinoma, SiHa and colon adenocarcinoma, WiDr. Cell survival was obtained for 2.1 Gy delivered as acute dose with parallel-opposed pair (POP), irradiation time 75 s, which served as a reference; regular seven-field IMRT, irradiation time 5 min; and IMRT with a break for multiple leaf collimator (MLC) re-initialization after three fields were delivered, irradiation time 10 min. An actual seven-field dynamic MLC IMRT plan for a head and neck patient was used. The IMRT plan was generated for a Varian EX or iX linear accelerator with 120 leaf Millenium MLC. Survival data were also collected for doses 1x, 2x, 3x, 4x, and 5x 2.1 Gy to establish parameters of the linear-quadratic equation describing survival following acute dose delivery. Cells were irradiated inside an acrylic cylindrical phantom specifically designed for this study. Doses from both IMRT and POP were validated using ion chamber measurements. A reproducible increase in cell survival was observed following IMRT dose delivery. This increase varied from small for V79, with a surviving fraction of 0.8326 following POP vs 0.8420 following uninterrupted IMRT, to very pronounced for SiHa, with a surviving fraction of 0.3903 following POP vs 0.5330 for uninterrupted IMRT. When compared to IMRT or IMRT with a break for MLC initialization, cell survival following acute dose delivery was

  17. Potential Benefits of Scanned Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Versus Advanced Photon Therapy With Regard to Sparing of the Salivary Glands in Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Water, Tara A. van de; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Jong, Marije E. de; Schilstra, Cornelis; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that scanned intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) results in a significant dose reduction to the parotid and submandibular glands as compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy with photons (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for oropharyngeal cancer. In addition, we investigated whether the achieved dose reductions would theoretically translate into a reduction of salivary dysfunction and xerostomia. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with N0 oropharyngeal carcinoma were used. The intensity-modulated plans delivered simultaneously 70 Gy to the boost planning target volume (PTV2) and 54 Gy to the elective nodal areas (PTV1). The 3D-CRT technique delivered sequentially 70 Gy and 46 Gy to PTV2 and PTV1, respectively. Normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated for salivary dysfunction and xerostomia. Results: Planning target volume coverage results were similar for IMPT and IMRT. Intensity-modulated proton therapy clearly improved the conformity. The 3D-CRT results were inferior to these results. The mean dose to the parotid glands by 3D-CRT (50.8 Gy), IMRT (25.5 Gy), and IMPT (16.8 Gy) differed significantly. For the submandibular glands no significant differences between IMRT and IMPT were found. The dose reductions obtained with IMPT theoretically translated into a significant reduction in normal tissue complication probability. Conclusion: Compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT, IMPT improved sparing of the organs at risk, while keeping similar target coverage results. The dose reductions obtained with IMPT vs. IMRT and 3D-CRT varied widely per individual patient. Intensity-modulated proton therapy theoretically translated into a clinical benefit for most cases, but this requires clinical validation.

  18. Practical considerations for the dosing and adjustment of continuous renal replacement therapy in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Galvagno, Samuel M; Hong, Caron M; Lissauer, Matthew E; Baker, Andrew K; Murthi, Sarah B; Herr, Daniel L; Stein, Deborah M

    2013-12-01

    Familiarity with the initiation, dosing, adjustment, and termination of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is a core skill for contemporary intensivists. Guidelines for how to administer CRRT in the intensive care unit are not well documented. The purpose of this review is to discuss the modalities, terminology, and components of CRRT, with an emphasis on the practical aspects of dosing, adjustments, and termination. Management of electrolyte and acid-base derangements commonly encountered with acute renal failure is emphasized. Knowledge regarding the practical aspects of managing CRRT in the intensive care unit is a prerequisite for achieving desired physiological end points. PMID:23890937

  19. Dosimetric comparison of hybrid volumetric-modulated arc therapy, volumetric-modulated arc therapy, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for left-sided early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jia-Fu; Yeh, Dah-Cherng; Yeh, Hui-Ling; Chang, Chen-Fa; Lin, Jin-Ching

    2015-10-01

    To compare the dosimetric performance of 3 different treatment techniques: hybrid volumetric-modulated arc therapy (hybrid-VMAT), pure-VMAT, and fixed-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (F-IMRT) for whole-breast irradiation of left-sided early breast cancer. The hybrid-VMAT treatment technique and 2 other treatment techniques—pure-VMAT and F-IMRT—were compared retrospectively in 10 patients with left-sided early breast cancer. The treatment plans of these patients were replanned using the same contours based on the original computed tomography (CT) data sets. Dosimetric parameters were calculated to evaluate plan quality. Total monitor units (MUs) and delivery time were also recorded and evaluated. The hybrid-VMAT plan generated the best results in dose coverage of the target and the dose uniformity inside the target (p < 0.0001 for conformal index [CI]; p = 0.0002 for homogeneity index [HI] of planning target volume [PTV]{sub 50.4} {sub Gy} and p < 0.0001 for HI of PTV{sub 62} {sub Gy}). Volumes of ipsilateral lung irradiated to doses of 20 Gy (V{sub 20} {sub Gy}) and 5 Gy (V{sub 5} {sub Gy}) by the hybrid-VMAT plan were significantly less than those of the F-IMRT and the pure-VMAT plans. The volume of ipsilateral lung irradiated to a dose of 5 Gy was significantly less using the hybrid-VMAT plan than that using the F-IMRT or the pure-VMAT plan. The total mean MUs for the hybrid-VMAT plan were significantly less than those for the F-IMRT or the pure-VMAT plan. The mean machine delivery time was 3.23 ± 0.29 minutes for the hybrid-VMAT plans, which is longer than that for the pure-VMAT plans but shorter than that for the F-IMRT plans. The hybrid-VMAT plan is feasible for whole-breast irradiation of left-sided early breast cancer.

  20. Dosimetric comparison of hybrid volumetric-modulated arc therapy, volumetric-modulated arc therapy, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for left-sided early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jia-Fu; Yeh, Dah-Cherng; Yeh, Hui-Ling; Chang, Chen-Fa; Lin, Jin-Ching

    2015-01-01

    To compare the dosimetric performance of 3 different treatment techniques: hybrid volumetric-modulated arc therapy (hybrid-VMAT), pure-VMAT, and fixed-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (F-IMRT) for whole-breast irradiation of left-sided early breast cancer. The hybrid-VMAT treatment technique and 2 other treatment techniques—pure-VMAT and F-IMRT—were compared retrospectively in 10 patients with left-sided early breast cancer. The treatment plans of these patients were replanned using the same contours based on the original computed tomography (CT) data sets. Dosimetric parameters were calculated to evaluate plan quality. Total monitor units (MUs) and delivery time were also recorded and evaluated. The hybrid-VMAT plan generated the best results in dose coverage of the target and the dose uniformity inside the target (p < 0.0001 for conformal index [CI]; p = 0.0002 for homogeneity index [HI] of planning target volume [PTV](50.4 Gy) and p < 0.0001 for HI of PTV(62 Gy)). Volumes of ipsilateral lung irradiated to doses of 20 Gy (V(20 Gy)) and 5 Gy (V(5 Gy)) by the hybrid-VMAT plan were significantly less than those of the F-IMRT and the pure-VMAT plans. The volume of ipsilateral lung irradiated to a dose of 5 Gy was significantly less using the hybrid-VMAT plan than that using the F-IMRT or the pure-VMAT plan. The total mean MUs for the hybrid-VMAT plan were significantly less than those for the F-IMRT or the pure-VMAT plan. The mean machine delivery time was 3.23 ± 0.29 minutes for the hybrid-VMAT plans, which is longer than that for the pure-VMAT plans but shorter than that for the F-IMRT plans. The hybrid-VMAT plan is feasible for whole-breast irradiation of left-sided early breast cancer. PMID:26116150

  1. Pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy enhances targeted delivery of cetuximab to colon cancer xenograft model in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Jung; Kim, Young-Sun; Yang, Jehoon; Sun, Woo Chul; Park, Hajan; Chae, Sun Young; Namgung, Mi-Sun; Choi, Kyu-Sil

    2013-02-01

    Our aim was to evaluate whether pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy enhances the effect of an epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted chemotherapeutic drug, cetuximab, in treating human colon cancer xenografts in a mouse model. Balb/c nude mice with subcutaneous xenografts of HT-29 cells were randomly categorized into control (n = 9), pulsed HIFU alone (n = 10), cetuximab monotherapy (n = 8) or combined pulsed HIFU and cetuximab therapy (n = 9) group. Cetuximab, pulsed HIFU therapy, or both were administered three times per week starting from day 8 after tumor cell injection. Based on tumor growth curves up to 34 days, the combination therapy group showed more suppressed tumor growth than all other groups (p < 0.05). The final relative tumor volumes were 5.4 ± 2.1, 5.2 ± 1.3, 4.8 ± 1.8, and 3.1 ± 0.9 for control, pulsed HIFU alone, cetuximab monotherapy, and combination therapy groups, respectively. In conclusion, pulsed HIFU therapy appears to enhance the anti-tumor effect of epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted cetuximab on human colon cancer xenograft models in mice. PMID:23219035

  2. Dynamic optical modulation of an electron beam on a photocathode RF gun: Toward intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondoh, Takafumi; Kashima, Hiroaki; Yang, Jinfeng; Yoshida, Yoichi; Tagawa, Seiichi

    2008-10-01

    In intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the aim is to deliver reduced doses of radiation to normal tissue. As a step toward IMRT, we examined dynamic optical modulation of an electron beam produced by a photocathode RF gun. Images on photomasks were transferred onto a photocathode by relay imaging. The resulting beam was controlled by a remote mirror. The modulated electron beam maintained its shape on acceleration, had a fine spatial resolution, and could be moved dynamically by optical methods.

  3. Ultra-rapid access to words in chronic aphasia: the effects of intensive language action therapy (ILAT).

    PubMed

    MacGregor, Lucy J; Difrancesco, Stephanie; Pulvermüller, Friedemann; Shtyrov, Yury; Mohr, Bettina

    2015-03-01

    Effects of intensive language action therapy (ILAT) on automatic language processing were assessed using Magnetoencephalography (MEG). Auditory magnetic mismatch negativity (MMNm) responses to words and pseudowords were recorded in twelve patients with chronic aphasia before and immediately after two weeks of ILAT. Following therapy, Patients showed significant clinical improvements of auditory comprehension as measured by the Token Test and in word retrieval and naming as measured by the Boston Naming Test. Neuromagnetic responses dissociated between meaningful words and meaningless word-like stimuli ultra-rapidly, approximately 50 ms after acoustic information first allowed for stimulus identification. Over treatment, there was a significant increase in the left-lateralisation of this early word-elicited activation, observed in perilesional fronto-temporal regions. No comparable change was seen for pseudowords. The results may reflect successful, therapy-induced, language restitution in the left hemisphere. PMID:25403745

  4. A Randomized, Rater-Blinded, Parallel Trial of Intensive Speech Therapy in Sub-Acute Post-Stroke Aphasia: The SP-I-R-IT Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Isabel Pavao; Leal, Gabriela; Fonseca, Isabel; Farrajota, Luisa; Aguiar, Marta; Fonseca, Jose; Lauterbach, Martin; Goncalves, Luis; Cary, M. Carmo; Ferreira, Joaquim J.; Ferro, Jose M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is conflicting evidence regarding the benefits of intensive speech and language therapy (SLT), particularly because intensity is often confounded with total SLT provided. Aims: A two-centre, randomized, rater-blinded, parallel study was conducted to compare the efficacy of 100 h of SLT in a regular (RT) versus intensive (IT)…

  5. Intrafractional 3D localization using kilovoltage digital tomosynthesis for sliding-window intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Hunt, Margie; Pham, Hai; Tang, Grace; Mageras, Gig

    2015-09-01

    To implement novel imaging sequences integrated into intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and determine 3D positions for intrafractional patient motion monitoring and management.In one method, we converted a static gantry IMRT beam into a series of arcs in which dose index and multileaf collimator positions for all control points were unchanged, but gantry angles were modified to oscillate ± 3° around the original angle. Kilovoltage (kV) projections were acquired continuously throughout delivery and reconstructed to provide a series of 6° arc digital tomosynthesis (DTS) images which served to evaluate the in-plane positions of embedded-fiducials/vertebral-body. To obtain out-of-plane positions via triangulation, a 20° gantry rotation with beam hold-off was inserted during delivery to produce a pair of 6° DTS images separated by 14°. In a second method, the gantry remained stationary, but both kV source and detector moved over a 15° longitudinal arc using pitch and translational adjustment of the robotic arms. Evaluation of localization accuracy in an anthropomorphic Rando phantom during simulated intrafractional motion used programmed couch translations from customized scripts. Purpose-built software was used to reconstruct DTS images, register them to reference template images and calculate 3D fiducial positions.No significant dose difference (<0.5%) was found between the original and converted IMRT beams. For a typical hypofractionated spine treatment, 200 single DTS (6° arc) and 10 paired DTS (20° arc) images were acquired for each IMRT beam, providing in-plane and out-of-plane monitoring every 1.6 and 34.5 s, respectively. Mean ± standard deviation error in predicted position was -0.3 ± 0.2 mm, -0.1 ± 0.1 mm in-plane, and 0.2 ± 0.4 mm out-of-plane with rotational gantry, 0.8 ± 0.1 mm, -0.7 ± 0.3 mm in-plane and 1.1 ± 0.1 mm out-of-plane with translational source/detector.Acquiring 3D fiducial positions from kV-DTS during fixed gantry

  6. Adverse Events of Extracorporeal Ultrasound-Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tinghe; Luo, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Background High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is considered to be an alternative to surgery. Extracorporeal ultrasound-guided HIFU (USgFU) has been clinically used to treat solid tumors. Preliminary trials in a small sample of a Western population suggested that this modality was safe. Most trials are performed in China thereby providing comprehensive data for understanding the safety profile. The aim of this study was to evaluate adverse events of USgFU therapy. Methods and Findings Clinical data were searched in 2 Chinese databases. Adverse events of USgFU were summarized and compared with those of magnetic resonance-guided HIFU (MRgFU; for uterine, bone or breast tumor) and transrectal ultrasound-guided HIFU (for prostate cancer or benign prostate hyperplasia). USgFU treatment was performed using 7 types of device. Side effects were evaluated in 13262 cases. There were fewer adverse events in benign lesions than in malignant lesions (11.81% vs. 21.65%, p<0.0001). Rates of adverse events greatly varied between the disease types (0–280%, p<0.0001) and between the applied HIFU devices in both malignant (10.58–44.38%, p<0.0001) and benign lesions (1.67–17.57%, p<0.0001). Chronological analysis did not demonstrate a decrease in the rate of adverse events. Based upon evaluable adverse events, incidences in USgFU were consistent with those in MRgFU or transrectal HIFU. Some side effects frequently occurred following transrectal HIFU were not reported in USgFU. Several events including intrahepatic metastasis, intraoperative high fever, and occlusions of the superior mesenteric artery should be of particular concern because they have not been previously noted. The types of adverse events suggested that they were ultrasonic lesions. Conclusion The frequency of adverse events depended on the location of the lesion and the type of HIFU device; however, side effects of USgFU were not yet understood. USgFU did not decrease the incidence of adverse events compared

  7. Larynx-sparing techniques using intensity-modulated radiation therapy for oropharyngeal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bar Ad, Voichita; Lin, Haibo; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Deville, Curtiland; Dutta, Pinaki R.; Tochner, Zelig; Both, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to explore whether the laryngeal dose can be reduced by using 2 intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques: whole-neck field IMRT technique (WF-IMRT) vs. junctioned IMRT (J-IMRT). The effect on planning target volumes (PTVs) coverage and laryngeal sparing was evaluated. WF-IMRT technique consisted of a single IMRT plan, including the primary tumor and the superior and inferior neck to the level of the clavicular heads. The larynx was defined as an organ at risk extending superiorly to cover the arytenoid cartilages and inferiorly to include the cricoid cartilage. The J-IMRT technique consisted of an IMRT plan for the primary tumor and the superior neck, matched to conventional antero-posterior opposing lower neck fields at the level of the thyroid notch. A central block was used for the anterior lower neck field at the level of the larynx to restrict the dose to the larynx. Ten oropharyngeal cancer cases were analyzed. Both the primary site and bilateral regional lymphatics were included in the radiotherapy targets. The averaged V95 for the PTV57.6 was 99.2% for the WF-IMRT technique compared with 97.4% (p = 0.02) for J-IMRT. The averaged V95 for the PTV64 was 99.9% for the WF-IMRT technique compared with 98.9% (p = 0.02) for J-IMRT and the averaged V95 for the PT70 was 100.0% for WF-IMRT technique compared with 99.5% (p = 0.04) for J-IMRT. The averaged mean laryngeal dose was 18 Gy with both techniques. The averaged mean doses within the matchline volumes were 69.3 Gy for WF-MRT and 66.2 Gy for J-IMRT (p = 0.03). The WF-IMRT technique appears to offer an optimal coverage of the target volumes and a mean dose to the larynx similar with J-IMRT and should be further evaluated in clinical trials.

  8. Effectiveness of robust optimization in intensity-modulated proton therapy planning for head and neck cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Wei; Li Xiaoqiang; Park, Peter C.; Ronald Zhu, X.; Mohan, Radhe; Frank, Steven J.; Li Yupeng; Dong Lei

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is highly sensitive to uncertainties in beam range and patient setup. Conventionally, these uncertainties are dealt using geometrically expanded planning target volume (PTV). In this paper, the authors evaluated a robust optimization method that deals with the uncertainties directly during the spot weight optimization to ensure clinical target volume (CTV) coverage without using PTV. The authors compared the two methods for a population of head and neck (H and N) cancer patients. Methods: Two sets of IMPT plans were generated for 14 H and N cases, one being PTV-based conventionally optimized and the other CTV-based robustly optimized. For the PTV-based conventionally optimized plans, the uncertainties are accounted for by expanding CTV to PTV via margins and delivering the prescribed dose to PTV. For the CTV-based robustly optimized plans, spot weight optimization was guided to reduce the discrepancy in doses under extreme setup and range uncertainties directly, while delivering the prescribed dose to CTV rather than PTV. For each of these plans, the authors calculated dose distributions under various uncertainty settings. The root-mean-square dose (RMSD) for each voxel was computed and the area under the RMSD-volume histogram curves (AUC) was used to relatively compare plan robustness. Data derived from the dose volume histogram in the worst-case and nominal doses were used to evaluate the plan optimality. Then the plan evaluation metrics were averaged over the 14 cases and were compared with two-sided paired t tests. Results: CTV-based robust optimization led to more robust (i.e., smaller AUCs) plans for both targets and organs. Under the worst-case scenario and the nominal scenario, CTV-based robustly optimized plans showed better target coverage (i.e., greater D{sub 95%}), improved dose homogeneity (i.e., smaller D{sub 5%}- D{sub 95%}), and lower or equivalent dose to organs at risk. Conclusions: CTV

  9. Including Robustness in Multi-criteria Optimization for Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Unkelbach, Jan; Trofimov, Alexei; Madden, Thomas; Kooy, Hanne; Bortfeld, Thomas; Craft, David

    2012-01-01

    We present a method to include robustness into a multi-criteria optimization (MCO) framework for intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). The approach allows one to simultaneously explore the tradeoff between different objectives as well as the tradeoff between robustness and nominal plan quality. In MCO, a database of plans, each emphasizing different treatment planning objectives, is pre-computed to approximate the Pareto surface. An IMPT treatment plan that strikes the best balance between the different objectives can be selected by navigating on the Pareto surface. In our approach, robustness is integrated into MCO by adding robustified objectives and constraints to the MCO problem. Uncertainties (or errors) of the robust problem are modeled by pre-calculated dose-influence matrices for a nominal scenario and a number of pre-defined error scenarios (shifted patient positions, proton beam undershoot and overshoot). Objectives and constraints can be defined for the nominal scenario, thus characterizing nominal plan quality. A robustified objective represents the worst objective function value that can be realized for any of the error scenarios and thus provides a measure of plan robustness. The optimization method is based on a linear projection solver and is capable of handling large problem sizes resulting from a fine dose grid resolution, many scenarios, and a large number of proton pencil beams. A base of skull case is used to demonstrate the robust optimization method. It is demonstrated that the robust optimization method reduces the sensitivity of the treatment plan to setup and range errors to a degree that is not achieved by a safety margin approach. A chordoma case is analysed in more detail to demonstrate the involved tradeoffs between target underdose and brainstem sparing as well as robustness and nominal plan quality. The latter illustrates the advantage of MCO in the context of robust planning. For all cases examined, the robust optimization for

  10. Failure Patterns After Hemithoracic Pleural Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Rimner, Andreas; Spratt, Daniel E.; Zauderer, Marjorie G.; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Wu, Abraham J.; Foster, Amanda; Yorke, Ellen D.; Adusumilli, Prasad; Rusch, Valerie W.; Krug, Lee M.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: We previously reported our technique for delivering intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to the entire pleura while attempting to spare the lung in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Herein, we report a detailed pattern-of-failure analysis in patients with MPM who were unresectable or underwent pleurectomy/decortication (P/D), uniformly treated with hemithoracic pleural IMRT. Methods and Materials: Sixty-seven patients with MPM were treated with definitive or adjuvant hemithoracic pleural IMRT between November 2004 and May 2013. Pretreatment imaging, treatment plans, and posttreatment imaging were retrospectively reviewed to determine failure location(s). Failures were categorized as in-field (within the 90% isodose line), marginal (<90% and ≥50% isodose lines), out-of-field (outside the 50% isodose line), or distant. Results: The median follow-up was 24 months from diagnosis and the median time to in-field local failure from the end of RT was 10 months. Forty-three in-field local failures (64%) were found with a 1- and 2-year actuarial failure rate of 56% and 74%, respectively. For patients who underwent P/D versus those who received a partial pleurectomy or were deemed unresectable, the median time to in-field local failure was 14 months versus 6 months, respectively, with 1- and 2-year actuarial in-field local failure rates of 43% and 60% versus 66% and 83%, respectively (P=.03). There were 13 marginal failures (19%). Five of the marginal failures (38%) were located within the costomediastinal recess. Marginal failures decreased with increasing institutional experience (P=.04). Twenty-five patients (37%) had out-of-field failures. Distant failures occurred in 32 patients (48%). Conclusions: After hemithoracic pleural IMRT, local failure remains the dominant form of failure pattern. Patients treated with adjuvant hemithoracic pleural IMRT after P/D experience a significantly longer time to local and distant failure than

  11. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Oropharyngeal Carcinoma: Effect of Tumor Volume on Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lok, Benjamin H.; Setton, Jeremy; Caria, Nicola; Romanyshyn, Jonathan; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Park, Jeffery; Rowan, Nicholas; Sherman, Eric J.; Fury, Matthew G.; Ho, Alan; Pfister, David G.; Wong, Richard J.; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Zhang, Zhigang; Schupak, Karen D.; Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Rao, Shyam D.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of primary gross tumor volume (pGTV) and nodal gross tumor volume (nGTV) on treatment outcomes in patients treated with definitive intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and April 2009, a total of 442 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx were treated with IMRT with curative intent at our center. Thirty patients treated postoperatively and 2 additional patients who started treatment more than 6 months after diagnosis were excluded. A total of 340 patients with restorable treatment plans were included in this present study. The majority of the patients underwent concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. The pGTV and nGTV were calculated using the original clinical treatment plans. Cox proportional hazards models and log-rank tests were used to evaluate the correlation between tumor volumes and overall survival (OS), and competing risks analysis tools were used to evaluate the correlation between local failure (LF), regional failure (RF), distant metastatic failure (DMF) vs. tumor volumes with death as a competing risk. Results: Median follow-up among surviving patients was 34 months (range, 5-67). The 2-year cumulative incidence of LF, RF and DF in this cohort of patients was 6.1%, 5.2%, and 12.2%, respectively. The 2-year OS rate was 88.6%. Univariate analysis determined pGTV and T-stage correlated with LF (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.004, respectively), whereas nGTV was not associated with RF. On multivariate analysis, pGTV and N-stage were independent risk factors for overall survival (p = 0.0003 and p = 0.0073, respectively) and distant control (p = 0.0008 and p = 0.002, respectively). Conclusions: In this cohort of patients with OPC treated with IMRT, pGTV was found to be associated with overall survival, local failure, and distant metastatic failure.

  12. Including robustness in multi-criteria optimization for intensity-modulated proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Unkelbach, Jan; Trofimov, Alexei; Madden, Thomas; Kooy, Hanne; Bortfeld, Thomas; Craft, David

    2012-02-01

    We present a method to include robustness in a multi-criteria optimization (MCO) framework for intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). The approach allows one to simultaneously explore the trade-off between different objectives as well as the trade-off between robustness and nominal plan quality. In MCO, a database of plans each emphasizing different treatment planning objectives, is pre-computed to approximate the Pareto surface. An IMPT treatment plan that strikes the best balance between the different objectives can be selected by navigating on the Pareto surface. In our approach, robustness is integrated into MCO by adding robustified objectives and constraints to the MCO problem. Uncertainties (or errors) of the robust problem are modeled by pre-calculated dose-influence matrices for a nominal scenario and a number of pre-defined error scenarios (shifted patient positions, proton beam undershoot and overshoot). Objectives and constraints can be defined for the nominal scenario, thus characterizing nominal plan quality. A robustified objective represents the worst objective function value that can be realized for any of the error scenarios and thus provides a measure of plan robustness. The optimization method is based on a linear projection solver and is capable of handling large problem sizes resulting from a fine dose grid resolution, many scenarios, and a large number of proton pencil beams. A base-of-skull case is used to demonstrate the robust optimization method. It is demonstrated that the robust optimization method reduces the sensitivity of the treatment plan to setup and range errors to a degree that is not achieved by a safety margin approach. A chordoma case is analyzed in more detail to demonstrate the involved trade-offs between target underdose and brainstem sparing as well as robustness and nominal plan quality. The latter illustrates the advantage of MCO in the context of robust planning. For all cases examined, the robust optimization for

  13. A GPU-accelerated and Monte Carlo-based intensity modulated proton therapy optimization system

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Jiasen Beltran, Chris; Seum Wan Chan Tseung, Hok; Herman, Michael G.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Conventional spot scanning intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment planning systems (TPSs) optimize proton spot weights based on analytical dose calculations. These analytical dose calculations have been shown to have severe limitations in heterogeneous materials. Monte Carlo (MC) methods do not have these limitations; however, MC-based systems have been of limited clinical use due to the large number of beam spots in IMPT and the extremely long calculation time of traditional MC techniques. In this work, the authors present a clinically applicable IMPT TPS that utilizes a very fast MC calculation. Methods: An in-house graphics processing unit (GPU)-based MC dose calculation engine was employed to generate the dose influence map for each proton spot. With the MC generated influence map, a modified least-squares optimization method was used to achieve the desired dose volume histograms (DVHs). The intrinsic CT image resolution was adopted for voxelization in simulation and optimization to preserve spatial resolution. The optimizations were computed on a multi-GPU framework to mitigate the memory limitation issues for the large dose influence maps that resulted from maintaining the intrinsic CT resolution. The effects of tail cutoff and starting condition were studied and minimized in this work. Results: For relatively large and complex three-field head and neck cases, i.e., >100 000 spots with a target volume of ∼1000 cm{sup 3} and multiple surrounding critical structures, the optimization together with the initial MC dose influence map calculation was done in a clinically viable time frame (less than 30 min) on a GPU cluster consisting of 24 Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan cards. The in-house MC TPS plans were comparable to a commercial TPS plans based on DVH comparisons. Conclusions: A MC-based treatment planning system was developed. The treatment planning can be performed in a clinically viable time frame on a hardware system costing around 45

  14. Origin of Tumor Recurrence After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Raktoe, Sawan A.S.; Dehnad, Homan; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.; Braunius, Weibel; Terhaard, Chris H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To model locoregional recurrences of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) treated with primary intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in order to find the origins from which recurrences grow and relate their location to original target volume borders. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of OSCC treated with primary IMRT between January 2002 and December 2009. Locoregional recurrence volumes were delineated on diagnostic scans and coregistered rigidly with treatment planning computed tomography scans. Each recurrence was analyzed with two methods. First, overlapping volumes of a recurrence and original target were measured ('volumetric approach') and assessed as 'in-field', 'marginal', or 'out-field'. Then, the center of mass (COM) of a recurrence volume was assumed as the origin from where a recurrence expanded, the COM location was compared with original target volume borders and assessed as 'in-field', 'marginal', or 'out-field'. Results: One hundred thirty-one OSCC were assessed. For all patients alive at the end of follow-up, the mean follow-up time was 40 months (range, 12-83 months); 2 patients were lost to follow-up. The locoregional recurrence rate was 27%. Of all recurrences, 51% were local, 23% were regional, and 26% had both local and regional recurrences. Of all recurrences, 74% had imaging available for assessment. Regarding volumetric analysis of local recurrences, 15% were in-field gross tumor volume (GTV), and 65% were in-field clinical tumor volume (CTV). Using the COM approach, we found that 70% of local recurrences were in-field GTV and 90% were in-field CTV. Of the regional recurrences, 25% were volumetrically in-field GTV, and using the COM approach, we found 54% were in-field GTV. The COM of local out-field CTV recurrences were maximally 16 mm outside CTV borders, whereas for regional recurrences, this was 17 mm. Conclusions: The COM model is practical and specific for recurrence assessment. Most

  15. A feedback constraint optimization method for intensity-modulated radiation therapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    LI, YONGWU; SUN, XIAONAN; WANG, QI; ZHOU, QINXUAN; GU, BENXING; SHI, GUOZHI; JIANG, DONGLIANG

    2015-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is able to achieve good target conformance with a limited dose to organs at risk (OARs); however, IMRT increases the irradiation volume and monitor units (MUs) required. The present study aimed to evaluate the use of an IMRT plan with fewer segments and MUs, while maintaining quality in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. In the present study, two types of IMRT plan were therefore compared: The direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO)-RT method and the feedback constraint DMPO-RT (fc_DMPO-RT) method, which utilizes compensative feedback constraint in DMPO-RT and maintains optimization. Plans for 23 patients were developed with identical dose prescriptions. Each plan involved synchronous delivery to various targets, with identical OAR constraints, by means of 7 coplanar fields. The average dose, maximum dose, dose-volume histograms of targets and the OAR, MUs of the plan, the number of segments, delivery time and accuracy were subsequently compared. The fc_DMPO-RT exhibited superior dose distribution in terms of the average, maximum and minimum doses to the gross tumor volume compared with that of DMPO-RT (t=62.7, 20.5 and 22.0, respectively; P<0.05). The fc_DMPO-RT also resulted in a smaller maximum dose to the spinal cord (t=7.3; P<0.05), as well as fewer MUs, fewer segments and decreased treatment times than that of the DMPO-RT (t=6.2, 393.4 and 244.3, respectively; P<0.05). The fc_DMPO-RT maintained plan quality with fewer segments and MUs, and the treatment time was significantly reduced, thereby resulting in reduced radiation leakage and an enhanced curative effect. Therefore, introducing feedback constraint into DMPO may result in improved IMRT planning. In nasopharyngeal carcinoma specifically, feedback constraint resulted in the improved protection of OARs in proximity of targets (such as the brainstem and parotid) due to sharp dose distribution and reduced MUs. PMID:26622793

  16. Investigation of geometric uncertainty introduced dosimetric variation in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and its intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Miao

    The intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) can generate plans with reduced normal tissue toxicity and increased target dose conformity. However, geometric uncertainty associated with the treatment process could introduce large dose variations between the delivered dose distribution and the planned. There are three common types of geometric uncertainty: setup uncertainty, inter-, and intra-fractional organ motion. This thesis work will investigate setup uncertainty and inter-fractional organ motion introduced dose variation and find solutions to minimize such variations. A proton treatment planning system was developed by using Geant4 Monte Carlo toolbox as the dose calculation engine. The setup uncertainty was studied on the head and neck cancer site. Plan delivery simulation shown large dose variation occurred even with small amount of setup uncertainty. Two intervention strategies were investigated: (i) different proton pencil beam sizes, and (ii) the energy margin. By varying proton pencil beam size, we found the larger the beam size the less the dose variation, nevertheless the higher normal tissue dose. The energy margin is a planning strategy incorporating the possible motion effect into the planning stage by assigning proton pencil beams an energy value large enough to guarantee protons will travel to where they are planned. The energy margin solution was tested to be effective to minimize the dose variation in the distal edge tracking (DET) based IMPT. The inter-fractional motion was studied by looking at the daily prostate shift in the prostate cancer treatment. Delivery simulation for prostate cancer IMPT shown large dose variation would result even if the image guidance (IG) technique was used to realign the prostate back to its original location on the planning CT. A novel on-line adaptive image guided IMPT (A-IG-IMPT) technique was proposed to minimize the dose variation. By updating the energy value for individual proton pencil beam from the on

  17. Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy for Cervical and Endometrial Cancer: A Prospective Report on Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Vandecasteele, Katrien; Tummers, Philippe; Makar, Amin; Eijkeren, Marc van; Delrue, Louke; Denys, Hannelore; Lambert, Bieke; Beerens, Anne-Sophie; Van den Broecke, Rudy; Lambein, Kathleen; Fonteyne, Valerie; De Meerleer, Gert

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To report on toxicity after postoperative intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) for cervical (CC) and endometrial cancer (EC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-four CC and 41 EC patients were treated with postoperative IMAT. If indicated, para-aortic lymph node irradiation (preventive or when affected, PALN) and/or concomitant cisplatin (40 mg/m Superscript-Two , weekly) was administered. The prescribed dose for IMAT was 45 Gy (CC, 25 fractions) and 46 Gy (EC, 23 fractions), followed by a brachytherapeutic boost if possible. Radiation-related toxicity was assessed prospectively. The effect of concomitant cisplatin and PALN irradiation was evaluated. Results: Regarding acute toxicity (n = 65), Grade 3 and 2 acute gastrointestinal toxicity was observed in zero and 63% of patients (79% CC, 54% EC), respectively. Grade 3 and 2 acute genitourinary toxicity was observed in 1% and 18% of patients, respectively. Grade 2 (21%) and 3 (12%) hematologic toxicity (n = 41) occurred only in CC patients. Seventeen percent of CC patients and 2% of EC patients experienced Grade 2 fatigue and skin toxicity, respectively. Adding cisplatin led to an increase in Grade >2 nausea (57% vs. 9%; p = 0.01), Grade 2 nocturia (24% vs. 4%; p = 0.03), Grade {>=}2 hematologic toxicity (38% vs. nil, p = 0.003), Grade {>=}2 leukopenia (33% vs. nil, p = 0.009), and a strong trend toward more fatigue (14% vs. 2%; p = 0.05). Para-aortic lymph node irradiation led to an increase of Grade 2 nocturia (31% vs. 4%, p = 0.008) and a strong trend toward more Grade >2 nausea (44% vs. 18%; p = 0.052). Regarding late toxicity (n = 45), no Grade 3 or 4 late toxicity occurred. Grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicity, genitourinary toxicity, and fatigue occurred in 4%, 9%, and 1% of patients. Neither concomitant cisplatin nor PALN irradiation increased late toxicity rates. Conclusions: Postoperative IMAT for EC or CC is associated with low acute and late toxicity. Concomitant chemotherapy and PALN irradiation

  18. Verification of intensity modulated radiation therapy beams using a tissue equivalent plastic scintillator dosimetry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petric, Martin Peter

    This thesis describes the development and implementation of a novel method for the dosimetric verification of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fields with several advantages over current techniques. Through the use of a tissue equivalent plastic scintillator sheet viewed by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, this method provides a truly tissue equivalent dosimetry system capable of efficiently and accurately performing field-by-field verification of IMRT plans. This work was motivated by an initial study comparing two IMRT treatment planning systems. The clinical functionality of BrainLAB's BrainSCAN and Varian's Helios IMRT treatment planning systems were compared in terms of implementation and commissioning, dose optimization, and plan assessment. Implementation and commissioning revealed differences in the beam data required to characterize the beam prior to use with the BrainSCAN system requiring higher resolution data compared to Helios. This difference was found to impact on the ability of the systems to accurately calculate dose for highly modulated fields, with BrainSCAN being more successful than Helios. The dose optimization and plan assessment comparisons revealed that while both systems use considerably different optimization algorithms and user-control interfaces, they are both capable of producing substantially equivalent dose plans. The extensive use of dosimetric verification techniques in the IMRT treatment planning comparison study motivated the development and implementation of a novel IMRT dosimetric verification system. The system consists of a water-filled phantom with a tissue equivalent plastic scintillator sheet built into the top surface. Scintillation light is reflected by a plastic mirror within the phantom towards a viewing window where it is captured using a CCD camera. Optical photon spread is removed using a micro-louvre optical collimator and by deconvolving a glare kernel from the raw images. Characterization of this

  19. Treatment of Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma With Adjuvant or Definitive Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.; Thotakura, Vijaya; Balboni, Tracy A.; Norris, Charles M.; Haddad, Robert I.; Posner, Marshall R.; Lorch, Jochen; Goguen, Laura A.; Annino, Donald J.; Tishler, Roy B.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The optimal management of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) typically involves surgical resection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in the setting of adverse pathologic features. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is frequently used to treat oral cavity cancers, but published IMRT outcomes specific to this disease site are sparse. We report the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute experience with IMRT-based treatment for OCSCC. Methods and Materials: Retrospective study of all patients treated at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for OCSCC with adjuvant or definitive IMRT between August 2004 and December 2009. The American Joint Committee on Cancer disease stage criteria distribution of this cohort included 5 patients (12%) with stage I; 10 patients (24%) with stage II (n = 10, 24%),; 14 patients (33%) with stage III (n = 14, 33%),; and 13 patients (31%) with stage IV. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS); secondary endpoints were locoregional control (LRC) and acute and chronic toxicity. Results: Forty-two patients with OCSCC were included, 30 of whom were initially treated with surgical resection. Twenty-three (77%) of 30 surgical patients treated with adjuvant IMRT also received concurrent chemotherapy, and 9 of 12 (75%) patients treated definitively without surgery were treated with CRT or induction chemotherapy and CRT. With a median follow-up of 2.1 years (interquartile range, 1.1-3.1 years) for all patients, the 2-year actuarial rates of OS and LRC following adjuvant IMRT were 85% and 91%, respectively, and the comparable results for definitive IMRT were 63% and 64% for OS and LRC, respectively. Only 1 patient developed symptomatic osteoradionecrosis, and among patients without evidence of disease, 35% experienced grade 2 to 3 late dysphagia, with only 1 patient who was continuously gastrostomy-dependent. Conclusions: In this single-institution series, postoperative IMRT was associated with promising LRC

  20. Leakage-Penumbra effect in intensity modulated radiation therapy step-and-shoot dose delivery

    PubMed Central

    Grigorov, Grigor N; Chow, James CL

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the leakage-penumbra (LP) effect with a proposed correction method for the step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). METHODS: Leakage-penumbra dose profiles from 10 randomly selected prostate IMRT plans were studied. The IMRT plans were delivered by a Varian 21 EX linear accelerator equipped with a 120-leaf multileaf collimator (MLC). For each treatment plan created by the Pinnacle3 treatment planning system, a 3-dimensional LP dose distribution generated by 5 coplanar photon beams, starting from 0o with equal separation of 72o, was investigated. For each photon beam used in the step-and-shoot IMRT plans, the first beam segment was set to have the largest area in the MLC leaf-sequencing, and was equal to the planning target volume (PTV). The overshoot effect (OSE) and the segment positional errors were measured using a solid water phantom with Kodak (TL and X-OMAT V) radiographic films. Film dosimetric analysis and calibration were carried out using a film scanner (Vidar VXR-16). The LP dose profiles were determined by eliminating the OSE and segment positional errors with specific individual irradiations. RESULTS: A non-uniformly distributed leaf LP dose ranging from 3% to 5% of the beam dose was measured in clinical IMRT beams. An overdose at the gap between neighboring segments, represented as dose peaks of up to 10% of the total BP, was measured. The LP effect increased the dose to the PTV and surrounding critical tissues. In addition, the effect depends on the number of beams and segments for each beam. Segment positional error was less than the maximum tolerance of 1 mm under a dose rate of 600 monitor units per minute in the treatment plans. The OSE varying with the dose rate was observed in all photon beams, and the effect increased from 1 to 1.3 Gy per treatment of the rectal intersection. As the dosimetric impacts from the LP effect and OSE may increase the rectal post-radiation effects, a correction of LP was proposed and

  1. Optimal beam design on intensity-modulated radiation therapy with simultaneous integrated boost in nasopharyngeal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Mei-Chun; Hu, Yu-Wen; Liu, Ching-Sheng; Lee, Jeun-Shenn; Huang, Pin-I; Yen, Sang-Hue; Lee, Yuh-Lin; Hsieh, Chun-Mei; Shiau, Cheng-Ying

    2014-10-01

    This study aims to determine the optimal beam design among various combinations of field numbers and beam trajectories for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique for the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). We used 10 fields with gantry angles of 155°, 130°, 75°, 25°, 0° L, 0° R, 335°, 285°, 230°, and 205° denoted as F10. To decrease doses in the spinal cord, the F10 technique was designed by featuring 2 pairs of split-opposed beam fields at 155° to 335° and 205° to 25°, as well as one pair of manually split beam fields at 0°. The F10 technique was compared with 4 other common field arrangements: F7E, 7 fields with 50° equally spaced gantry angles; F7, the basis of F10 with 155°, 130°, 75°, 0°, 285°, 230°, and 205°; F9E, 9 fields with 40° equally spaced gantry angles; and FP, 7 posterior fields with 180°, 150°, 120°, 90°, 270°, 240°, and 210°. For each individual case of 10 patients, the customized constraints derived after optimization with the standard F10 technique were applied to 4 other field arrangements. The 4 new optimized plans of each individual case were normalized to achieve the same coverage of planning target volume (PTV){sub 63} {sub Gy} as that of the standard F10 technique. The F10 field arrangement exhibited the best coverage in PTV{sub 70} {sub Gy} and the least mean dose in the trachea-esophagus region. Furthermore, the F10 field arrangement demonstrated the highest level of conformity in the low-dose region and the least monitor unit. The F10 field arrangement performed more outstandingly than the other field arrangements in PTV{sub 70} {sub Gy} coverage and spared the central organ. This arrangement also exhibited the highest conformity and delivery efficiency. The F10 technique is recommended as the standard beam geometry for the SIB-IMRT of NPC.

  2. Uncertainty reduction in intensity modulated proton therapy by inverse Monte Carlo treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morávek, Zdenek; Rickhey, Mark; Hartmann, Matthias; Bogner, Ludwig

    2009-08-01

    Treatment plans for intensity-modulated proton therapy may be sensitive to some sources of uncertainty. One source is correlated with approximations of the algorithms applied in the treatment planning system and another one depends on how robust the optimization is with regard to intra-fractional tissue movements. The irradiated dose distribution may substantially deteriorate from the planning when systematic errors occur in the dose algorithm. This can influence proton ranges and lead to improper modeling of the Braggpeak degradation in heterogeneous structures or particle scatter or the nuclear interaction part. Additionally, systematic errors influence the optimization process, which leads to the convergence error. Uncertainties with regard to organ movements are related to the robustness of a chosen beam setup to tissue movements on irradiation. We present the inverse Monte Carlo treatment planning system IKO for protons (IKO-P), which tries to minimize the errors described above to a large extent. Additionally, robust planning is introduced by beam angle optimization according to an objective function penalizing paths representing strongly longitudinal and transversal tissue heterogeneities. The same score function is applied to optimize spot planning by the selection of a robust choice of spots. As spots can be positioned on different energy grids or on geometric grids with different space filling factors, a variety of grids were used to investigate the influence on the spot-weight distribution as a result of optimization. A tighter distribution of spot weights was assumed to result in a more robust plan with respect to movements. IKO-P is described in detail and demonstrated on a test case and a lung cancer case as well. Different options of spot planning and grid types are evaluated, yielding a superior plan quality with dose delivery to the spots from all beam directions over optimized beam directions. This option shows a tighter spot-weight distribution

  3. EBT GAFCHROMIC{sup TM} film dosimetry in compensator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vaezzadeh, Seyedali; Allahverdi, Mahmoud; Nedaie, Hasan A.; Ay, Mohammadreza; Shirazi, Alireza; Yarahmadi, Mehran

    2013-07-01

    The electron benefit transfer (EBT) GAFCHROMIC films possess a number of features making them appropriate for high-quality dosimetry in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Compensators to deliver IMRT are known to change the beam-energy spectrum as well as to produce scattered photons and to contaminate electrons; therefore, the accuracy and validity of EBT-film dosimetry in compensator-based IMRT should be investigated. Percentage-depth doses and lateral-beam profiles were measured using EBT films in perpendicular orientation with respect to 6 and 18 MV photon beam energies for: (1) different thicknesses of cerrobend slab (open, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, and 6.0 cm), field sizes (5×5, 10×10, and 20×20 cm{sup 2}), and measurement depths (D{sub max}, 5.0 and 10.0 cm); and (2) step-wedged compensator in a solid phantom. To verify results, same measurements were implemented using a 0.125 cm{sup 3} ionization chamber in a water phantom and also in Monte Carlo simulations using the Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport computer code. The mean energy of photons was increased due to beam hardening in comparison with open fields at both 6 and 18 MV energies. For a 20×20 cm{sup 2} field size of a 6 MV photon beam and a 6.0 cm thick block, the surface dose decreased by about 12% and percentage-depth doses increased up to 3% at 30.0 cm depth, due to the beam-hardening effect induced by the block. In contrast, at 18 MV, the surface dose increased by about 8% and depth dose reduced by 3% at 30.0 cm depth. The penumbral widths (80% to 20%) increase with block thickness, field size, and beam energy. The EBT film results were in good agreement with the ionization chamber dose profiles and Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport computer code simulation behind the step-wedged compensator. Also, there was a good agreement between the EBT-film and the treatment-planning results on the anthropomorphic phantom. The EBT films can be accurately used as a 2D dosimeter for dose

  4. Dosimetric Comparison of Three-Dimensional Conformal Proton Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy, and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Treatment of Pediatric Craniopharyngiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Boehling, Nicholas S.; Grosshans, David R.; Bluett, Jaques B.; Palmer, Matthew T.; Song, Xiaofei; Amos, Richard A.; Sahoo, Narayan; Meyer, Jeffrey J.; Mahajan, Anita; Woo, Shiao Y.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Cranial irradiation in pediatric patients is associated with serious long-term adverse effects. We sought to determine whether both three-dimensional conformal proton radiotherapy (3D-PRT) and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) decrease integral dose to brain areas known to harbor neuronal stem cells, major blood vessels, and other normal brain structures for pediatric patients with craniopharyngiomas. Methods and Materials: IMRT, forward planned, passive scattering proton, and IMPT plans were generated and optimized for 10 pediatric patients. The dose was 50.4 Gy (or cobalt Gy equivalent) delivered in 28 fractions with the requirement for planning target volume (PTV) coverage of 95% or better. Integral dose data were calculated from differential dose-volume histograms. Results: The PTV target coverage was adequate for all modalities. IMRT and IMPT yielded the most conformal plans in comparison to 3D-PRT. Compared with IMRT, 3D-PRT and IMPT plans had a relative reduction of integral dose to the hippocampus (3D-PRT, 20.4; IMPT, 51.3%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), dentate gyrus (27.3, 75.0%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), and subventricular zone (4.5, 57.8%{sup Asterisk-Operator }). Vascular organs at risk also had reduced integral dose with the use of proton therapy (anterior cerebral arteries, 33.3{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 100.0%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; middle cerebral arteries, 25.9%{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 100%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; anterior communicating arteries, 30.8{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 41.7%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; and carotid arteries, 51.5{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 77.6{sup Asterisk-Operator }). Relative reduction of integral dose to the infratentorial brain (190.7{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 109.7%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), supratentorial brain without PTV (9.6, 26.8%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), brainstem (45.6, 22.4%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), and whole brain without PTV (19.4{sup Asterisk

  5. SPECT study of low intensity He-Ne laser intravascular irradiation therapy for brain infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xue-Chang; Dong, Jia-Zheng; Chu, Xiao-Fan; Jia, Shao-Wei; Liu, Timon C.; Jiao, Jian-Ling; Zheng, Xi-Yuan; Zhou, Ci-Xiong

    2003-12-01

    We used single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in brain perfusion imaging to study the changes of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and cerebral function in brain infarction patients treated with intravascular laser irradiation of blood (ILIB). 17 of 35 patients with brain infarction were admitted to be treated by ILIB on the base of standard drug therapy, and SPECT brain perfusion imaging was performed before and after ILIB therapy with self-comparison. The results were analyzed in quantity with brain blood flow function change rate (BFCR%) model. Effect of ILIB during the therapy process in the other 18 patients were also observed. In the 18 patients, SPECT indicated an improvement of rCBF (both in focus and in total brain) and cerebral function after a 30 min-ILIB therapy. And the 17 patients showed an enhancement of total brain rCBF and cerebral function after ILIB therapy in comparison with that before, especially for the focus side of the brain. The enhancement for focus itself was extremely obvious with a higher significant difference (P<0.0001). The mirror regions had no significant change (P>0.05). BFCR% of foci was prominently higher than that of mirror regions (P<0.0001). In conclusion, the ILIB therapy can improve rCBF and cerebral function and activate brain cells of patients with brain infarction. The results denote new evidence of ILIB therapy for those patients with cerebral ischemia.

  6. Cationic peptide mR18L with lipid lowering properties inhibits LPS-induced systemic and liver inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Sharifov, Oleg F; Nayyar, Gaurav; Ternovoy, Vladimir V; Mishra, Vinod K; Litovsky, Silvio H; Palgunachari, Mayakonda N; Garber, David W; Anantharamaiah, G M; Gupta, Himanshu

    2013-07-12

    The cationic single domain peptide mR18L has demonstrated lipid-lowering and anti-atherogenic properties in different dyslipidemic mouse models. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammation is considered as one of the potential triggers for atherosclerosis. Here, we evaluated anti-inflammatory effects of mR18L peptide against LPS-mediated inflammation. First, we tested the efficacy and tolerance of 1, 2.5 and 5mg/kg mR18L in normolipidemic rats stimulated with 5mg/kg LPS. LPS and then mR18L were injected in different intraperitoneal regions. By 2h post LPS, mR18L inhibited LPS-mediated plasma TNF-α elevation at all doses, with the effect being stronger for 2.5mg/kg (P<0.05 vs. 1mg/kg, non-significant vs. 5mg/kg). In a similar model, 2.5mg/kg mR18L reduced LPS-mediated inflammation in the liver, as assessed by microscopic examination of liver sections and measurements of iNOS expression in the liver tissue. In plasma, 2.5mg/kg mR18L decreased levels of TNF-α and IL-6, decreased endotoxin activity and enhanced HDL binding to LPS. In another similar experiment, mR18L administered 1h post LPS, prevented elevation of plasma triglycerides by 6h post LPS and increased plasma activity of anti-oxidant enzyme paraoxonase 1, along with noted trends in reducing plasma levels of endotoxin and IL-6. Surface plasmon resonance study revealed that mR18L readily binds LPS. We conclude that mR18L exerts anti-endotoxin activity at least in part due to direct LPS-binding and LPS-neutralizing effects. We suggest that anti-endotoxin activity of mR18L is an important anti-inflammatory property, which may increase anti-atherogenic potential of this promising orally active lipid-lowering peptide. PMID:23791744

  7. The formation of short-chain fatty acids is positively associated with the blood lipid-lowering effect of lupin kernel fiber in moderately hypercholesterolemic adults.

    PubMed

    Fechner, Anita; Kiehntopf, Michael; Jahreis, Gerhard

    2014-05-01

    Lupin kernel fiber beneficially modifies blood lipids because of its bile acid-binding capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the preventive effects of a lupin kernel fiber preparation on cardiovascular diseases and to clarify possible mechanisms. In a randomized, double-blind, controlled crossover trial, 60 moderately hypercholesterolemic adults (plasma total cholesterol: >5.2 mmol/L) passed 3 intervention periods in different orders with a 2-wk washout phase between each. Participants consumed either a high-fiber diet containing 25-g/d lupin kernel fiber (LF) or citrus fiber (CF), or a low-fiber control diet (CD) for 4 wk each. Anthropometric, plasma, and fecal variables were assessed at baseline and after the interventions. Contrary to the CF period, total (9%) and LDL (12%) cholesterol as well as triacylglycerols (10%) were lower after the LF period when compared with the CD period [P ≤ 0.02, adjusted for baseline, age, gender, and body mass index (BMI)]. HDL cholesterol remained unchanged. Moreover, the LF period reduced high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (P = 0.02) and systolic blood pressure (P = 0.01) when compared with baseline. Bile acid binding could not be shown because the excretion of total bile acids remained constant after the high-fiber diets. However, the LF period resulted in an enhanced formation of the main short-chain fatty acids in comparison with the CD period. During the CF period, only acetate increased significantly. Both high-fiber diets led to higher satiety and modified nutritional behavior, resulting in significantly lower body weight, BMI, and waist circumference compared with the CD period. The blood lipid-lowering effects of LF are apparently not a result of bile acid binding. Rather, we hypothesize for the first time, to our knowledge, that the blood lipid-lowering effects of LF may be mainly attributed to the formation of short-chain fatty acids, specifically propionate and acetate. This trial was registered at

  8. Evolution of Volume and Signal Intensity on Fluid-attenuated Inversion Recovery MR Images after Endovascular Stroke Therapy.

    PubMed

    Federau, Christian; Mlynash, Michael; Christensen, Soren; Zaharchuk, Greg; Cha, Brannon; Lansberg, Maarten G; Wintermark, Max; Albers, Gregory W

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To analyze both volume and signal evolution on magnetic resonance (MR) fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images between the images after endovascular therapy and day 5 (which was the prespecified end point for infarct volume in the Diffusion and Perfusion Imaging Evaluation for Understanding Stroke Evolution [DEFUSE 2] trial) in a subset of patients enrolled in the DEFUSE 2 study. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the local ethics committee at all participating sites. Informed written consent was obtained from all patients. In this post hoc analysis of the DEFUSE 2 study, 35 patients with FLAIR images acquired both after endovascular therapy (median time after symptom onset, 12 hours) and at day 5 were identified. Patients were separated into two groups based on the degree of reperfusion achieved on time to maximum greater than 6-second perfusion imaging (≥90% vs <90%). After coregistration and signal normalization, lesion volumes and signal intensity were assessed by using FLAIR imaging for the initial lesion (ie, visible after endovascular therapy) and the recruited lesion (the additional lesion visible on day 5, but not visible after endovascular therapy). Statistical significance was assessed by using Wilcoxon signed-rank, Mann-Whitney U, and Fisher exact tests. Results All 35 patients had FLAIR lesion growth between the after-revascularization examination and day 5. Median lesion growth was significantly larger in patients with <90% reperfusion (27.85 mL) compared with ≥90% (8.12 mL; P = .003). In the initial lesion, normalized signal did not change between after endovascular therapy (median, 1.60) and day 5 (median, 1.58) in the ≥90% reperfusion group (P = .97), but increased in the <90% reperfusion group (from 1.60 to 1.73; P = .01). In the recruited lesion, median normalized signal increased significantly in both groups between after endovascular therapy and day 5 (after endovascular therapy, from 1.19 to 1.56, P

  9. Evidence for Intensive Aphasia Therapy: Consideration of Theories From Neuroscience and Cognitive Psychology.

    PubMed

    Dignam, Jade K; Rodriguez, Amy D; Copland, David A

    2016-03-01

    Treatment intensity is a critical component to the delivery of speech-language pathology and rehabilitation services. Within aphasia rehabilitation, however, insufficient evidence currently exists to guide clinical decision making with respect to the optimal treatment intensity. This review considers perspectives from 2 key bodies of research, the neuroscience and cognitive psychology literature, with respect to the scheduling of aphasia rehabilitation services. Neuroscience research suggests that intensive training is a key element of rehabilitation and is necessary to achieve functional and neurologic changes after a stroke occurs. In contrast, the cognitive psychology literature suggests that optimal long-term learning is achieved when training is provided in a distributed or nonintensive schedule. These perspectives are evaluated and discussed with respect to the current evidence for treatment intensity in aphasia rehabilitation. In addition, directions for future research are identified, including study design, methods of defining and measuring treatment intensity, and selection of outcome measures in aphasia rehabilitation. PMID:26107539

  10. Intense pulsed light therapy for superficial pigmented lesions evaluated by reflectance-mode confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Toyonobu; Negishi, Kei; Hariya, Takeshi; Kunizawa, Naomi; Ikuta, Kaori; Yanai, Motohiro; Wakamatsu, Shingo

    2006-10-01

    Intense pulsed light (IPL) therapy is reported to be effective for pigment removal from pigmented lesions. However, the dynamic mechanism of pigment removal by IPL therapy is not completely understood. We investigated the mechanism of IPL therapy for the removal of pigmented skin lesions through non-invasive observation of the epidermis. Subjects with solar lentigines on the face were treated with three sessions of IPL therapy. The solar lentigines were observed on consecutive days after the treatments using reflectance-mode confocal microscopy (RCM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). In addition, desquamated microcrusts that formed after the treatment were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The images of RCM and OCT showed that the melanosomes in the epidermal basal layer rapidly migrated to the skin surface. The TEM images of the extruded microcrusts revealed numerous melanosomes together with cell debris. It was also found that the IPL irradiated melanocytes in the lesions seemed to be left intact and resumed their high activity after treatment. We conclude that IPL therapy effectively removed the dense melanosomes in the epidermal-basal layer. However, additional application of suppressive drugs such as hydroquinone or Q-switched laser irradiation is necessary to suppress the remaining active melanocytes. PMID:16741506

  11. Clinical efficiency of applying low-intensity laser therapy in treating dyscirculatory encephalopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putilina, M. V.; Kozlov, V. I.; Vakhtin, V. I.

    2001-04-01

    An investigation was made of applying laser therapy combined with drug preparations in treating 300 patients affected by dyscirculatory encephalopathy. Neurological and neuropsychological examinations together with electroencephalography, rheoencephalography, computerized tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging were used to assess the patients' states prior to and after the treatment. It was found that the combined application of laser therapy and drug preparations produced a more pronounced therapeutic effect as compared with that produced by the separate application of laser therapy and drug preparations. The results obtained allowed us to conclude that the 0.89 micrometers laser infrared radiation increased patients' susceptibility to drugs. Moreover, the combined laser therapy improved the cerebral bloodflow and activated the metabolic and plastic functions of neurons. This decreased or eliminated late complications provoked by the cerebral blood circulation insufficiency.

  12. A Comparison of Helical Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, and 3D-Conformal Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Poppe, Matthew M.; Narra, Venkat; Yue, Ning J.; Zhou Jinghao; Nelson, Carl; Jabbour, Salma K.

    2011-01-01

    We assessed dosimetric differences in pancreatic cancer radiotherapy via helical intensity-modulated radiotherapy (HIMRT), linac-based IMRT, and 3D-conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) with regard to successful plan acceptance and dose to critical organs. Dosimetric analysis was performed in 16 pancreatic cases that were planned to 54 Gy; both post-pancreaticoduodenectomy (n = 8) and unresected (n = 8) cases were compared. Without volume modification, plans met constraints 75% of the time with HIMRT and IMRT and 13% with 3D-CRT. There was no statistically significantly improvement with HIMRT over conventional IMRT in reducing liver V35, stomach V45, or bowel V45. HIMRT offers improved planning target volume (PTV) dose homogeneity compared with IMRT, averaging a lower maximum dose and higher volume receiving the prescription dose (D100). HIMRT showed an increased mean dose over IMRT to bowel and liver. Both HIMRT and IMRT offer a statistically significant improvement over 3D-CRT in lowering dose to liver, stomach, and bowel. The results were similar for both unresected and resected patients. In pancreatic cancer, HIMRT offers improved dose homogeneity over conventional IMRT and several significant benefits to 3D-CRT. Factors to consider before incorporating IMRT into pancreatic cancer therapy are respiratory motion, dose inhomogeneity, and mean dose.

  13. Comparing the Trend of Physical Activity and Caloric Intake between Lipid-Lowering Drug Users and Nonusers among Adults with Dyslipidemia: Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (2010–2013)

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jin-Young; Chekal, Lan; Kim, Se-Won; Lee, Jee-Yon

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare the physical activity and caloric intake trends of lipid-lowering drug users with those of non-users among Korean adults with dyslipidemia. Methods This study was a repeated cross-sectional study with a nationally representative sample of 2,635 Korean adults with dyslipidemia based on the 2010–2013 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Physical activity was assessed using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, and caloric intake was estimated through 24-hour dietary recall. All statistical analyses were conducted using IBM SPSS ver. 21.0 (IBM Co., Armonk, NY, USA). The changes in physical activity and caloric intake were investigated for lipid-lowering drug users and non-users using generalized linear models. Results The proportion of lipid-lowering drug users in the 2010–2013 survey population increased from 3.5% to 5.0% (P<0.001). Among adults of dyslipidemia, total of 1,562 participants (56.6%) reported taking lipid-lowering drugs, and 1,073 (43.4%) reported not taking lipid-lowering drugs. Drug users were more likely to be older and less educated and to have a diagnosis of diabetes, higher body mass index, and lower low density lipoprotein cholesterol level. Physical activity trends were tested separately for the lipid-lowering drug users and non-users, and a significant decrease was found among the drug users during the study period. Physical activity among the drug users in 2013 was 38% lower (1,357.3±382.7 metabolic equivalent [MET]; P for trend=0.002) than in 2010 (2,201.4±442.6 MET). In contrast, there was no statistically significant difference between drug users and non-users in the trend of caloric intake during the same period. Conclusion Physical activity significantly decreased among lipid-lowering drug users between 2010 and 2013, which was not observed among non-users. The importance of physical activity may need to be re-emphasized for lipid-lowering drug users

  14. A novel conformity index for intensity modulated radiation therapy plan evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Fion W. K.; Law, Maria Y. Y.

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has gained popularity in the treatment of cancers. Manual evaluation of IMRT plans for head-and-neck cancers has been especially challenging necessitating efficient and objective assessment tools. In this work, the authors address this issue by developing a personalized conformity index (CI) for comparison of IMRT plans for head-and-neck cancers and evaluating its plan quality discerning power in comparison with other widely used CIs. Methods: A two-dimensional CI with dose and distance incorporated (CI{sub DD}) was developed using the MATLAB program language, to quantify the planning target volume (PTV) coverage. Valuable information contained in the digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM) RT objects were harvested for computation of each of the CI{sub DD} components. Apart from the dose penalty factor, a distance-based exponential function was employed by varying the penalty weight associated with the location of cold spots within the PTV. With the goal of deriving a customized penalty factor, the distances between individual pixel and its nearest PTV boundary was found. Using the exponential function, the impact of distance penalty was substantially larger for cold spots closer to the PTV centroid but petered out quickly wherever they were situated in the vicinity of PTV border. In order to evaluate the CI{sub DD} scoring system, three CT image data sets of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients were collected. Ten IMRT plans with degrading qualities were generated from each dataset and were ranked based on CI{sub DD} and other existing indices. The coefficient of variance was calculated for each dataset to compare the degree of variation. Results: The CI{sub DD} scoring system that considered spatial importance of each voxel within the PTV was successfully developed. The results demonstrated that the CI{sub DD} including four discrete factors could provide accurate rankings of plan quality by

  15. Pilot study comparing multi-family therapy to single family therapy for adults with anorexia nervosa in an intensive eating disorder program.

    PubMed

    Dimitropoulos, Gina; Farquhar, Jamie C; Freeman, Victoria Emily; Colton, Patricia Anne; Olmsted, Marion Patricia

    2015-07-01

    Multi-family therapy (MFT) has yet to be evaluated in families of adults with anorexia nervosa (AN). The study aims were: (i) assess the feasibility of MFT for AN; and, (ii) assess whether MFT is associated with improved outcomes for families compared with single-family therapy (SFT). Adult patients with AN consecutively referred to an eating disorder treatment program were assigned (non-randomly) to receive eight sessions of SFT or MFT. Assessment occurred pre-therapy, immediately post-therapy, and at 3-month follow-up. A total of 37 female patients (13 SFT, 24 MFT) and 45 family members (16 SFT, 29 MFT) completed treatment. There were significant time effects for patients' BMI, eating disorder-related psychopathology and multiple family outcome measures. There were no differences between MFT and SFT on family outcome measures at end of treatment and 3 months post treatment. MFT is a feasible intervention that can be used in adult intensive treatment for those with AN. PMID:25823423

  16. Association of DNA Methylation at CPT1A Locus with Metabolic Syndrome in the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network (GOLDN) Study.

    PubMed

    Das, Mithun; Sha, Jin; Hidalgo, Bertha; Aslibekyan, Stella; Do, Anh N; Zhi, Degui; Sun, Dianjianyi; Zhang, Tao; Li, Shengxu; Chen, Wei; Srinivasan, Sathanur R; Tiwari, Hemant K; Absher, Devin; Ordovas, Jose M; Berenson, Gerald S; Arnett, Donna K; Irvin, Marguerite R

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we conducted an epigenome-wide association study of metabolic syndrome (MetS) among 846 participants of European descent in the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network (GOLDN). DNA was isolated from CD4+ T cells and methylation at ~470,000 cytosine-phosphate-guanine dinucleotide (CpG) pairs was assayed using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. We modeled the percentage methylation at individual CpGs as a function of MetS using linear mixed models. A Bonferroni-corrected P-value of 1.1 x 10(-7) was considered significant. Methylation at two CpG sites in CPT1A on chromosome 11 was significantly associated with MetS (P for cg00574958 = 2.6x10(-14) and P for cg17058475 = 1.2x10(-9)). Significant associations were replicated in both European and African ancestry participants of the Bogalusa Heart Study. Our findings suggest that methylation in CPT1A is a promising epigenetic marker for MetS risk which could become useful as a treatment target in the future. PMID:26808626

  17. Lipid-lowering and antioxidant effects of hydroxytyrosol and its triacetylated derivative recovered from olive tree leaves in cholesterol-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Jemai, Hedya; Fki, Ines; Bouaziz, Mohamed; Bouallagui, Zouhaier; El Feki, Abdelfattah; Isoda, Hiroko; Sayadi, Sami

    2008-04-23

    This study was designed to test the lipid-lowering and antioxidative activities of triacetylated hydroxytyrosol compared with its native compound, hydroxytyrosol, purified from olive tree leaves. Wistar rats fed a standard laboratory diet or a cholesterol-rich diet for 16 weeks were used. The serum lipid levels, the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) level, as an indicator of lipid peroxidation, and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) as well as that of catalase (CAT) were examined. The cholesterol-rich diet induced hypercholesterolemia that was manifested in the elevation of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Administration of hydroxytyrosol and triacetylated hydroxytyrosol (3 mg/kg of body weight) decreased the serum levels of TC, TG, and LDL-C significantly and increased the serum level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Furthermore, the content of TBARS in liver, heart, kidney, and aorta decreased significantly when hydroxytyrosol and its triacetylated derivatives were orally administered to rats compared with those fed a cholesterol-rich diet. In addition, triacetylated hydroxytyrosol and hydroxytyrosol increased CAT and SOD activities in the liver. These results suggested that the hypolipidemic effect of triacetylated hydroxytyrosol and hydroxytyrosol might be due to their abilities to lower serum TC, TG, and LDL-C levels as well as to their antioxidant activities preventing the lipid peroxidation process. PMID:18380465

  18. Association of DNA Methylation at CPT1A Locus with Metabolic Syndrome in the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network (GOLDN) Study

    PubMed Central

    Das, Mithun; Sha, Jin; Hidalgo, Bertha; Aslibekyan, Stella; Do, Anh N.; Zhi, Degui; Sun, Dianjianyi; Zhang, Tao; Li, Shengxu; Chen, Wei; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Tiwari, Hemant K.; Absher, Devin; Ordovas, Jose M.; Berenson, Gerald S.; Arnett, Donna K.; Irvin, Marguerite R.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we conducted an epigenome-wide association study of metabolic syndrome (MetS) among 846 participants of European descent in the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network (GOLDN). DNA was isolated from CD4+ T cells and methylation at ~470,000 cytosine-phosphate-guanine dinucleotide (CpG) pairs was assayed using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. We modeled the percentage methylation at individual CpGs as a function of MetS using linear mixed models. A Bonferroni-corrected P-value of 1.1 x 10−7 was considered significant. Methylation at two CpG sites in CPT1A on chromosome 11 was significantly associated with MetS (P for cg00574958 = 2.6x10-14 and P for cg17058475 = 1.2x10-9). Significant associations were replicated in both European and African ancestry participants of the Bogalusa Heart Study. Our findings suggest that methylation in CPT1A is a promising epigenetic marker for MetS risk which could become useful as a treatment target in the future. PMID:26808626

  19. Comparison of Low-Dose Rosuvastatin with Atorvastatin in Lipid-Lowering Efficacy and Safety in a High-Risk Pakistani Cohort: An Open-Label Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Abdul Rehman

    2014-01-01

    Background. Treatment of hyperlipidemia is helpful in both primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart disease and stroke. Aim. To compare lipid-lowering efficacy of rosuvastatin with atorvastatin. Methodology. This open-label randomized controlled trial was carried out at 1 Mountain Medical Battalion from September 2012 to August 2013 on patients with type 2 diabetes, hypertension, myocardial infarction, or stroke, meriting treatment with a statin. Those with secondary causes of dyslipidemia were excluded. Blood samples for estimation of serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL-C, and LDL-C were collected after a 12-hour fast. Patients were randomly allocated to receive either atorvastatin 10 mg HS or rosuvastatin 5 mg HS daily. Lipid levels were rechecked after six weeks. Results. Atorvastatin was used in 63 patients and rosuvastatin in 66. There was a greater absolute and percent reduction in serum LDL-C levels with rosuvastatin as compared to atorvastatin (0.96 versus 0.54 mg/dL; P = 0.011 and 24.34 versus 13.66%; P = 0.045), whereas reduction in all other fractions was equal. Myalgias were seen in 5 (7.94%) patients treated with atorvastatin and 8 (12.12%) patients treated with rosuvastatin (P: 0.432). Conclusion. Rosuvastatin produces a greater reduction in serum LDL-C levels and should therefore be preferred over atorvastatin. PMID:24800084

  20. The effect of low-intensity laser therapy (LILT) on cutaneous wound healing and pain relief in rats.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hyun-Mo; Yong, Min-Sik; Na, Sang-Su

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the impact of low-intensity laser therapy on wound healing and pain control using a rat cutaneous wound model. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (between 220-240 g, 7 weeks) were used in this study. The rats were anesthetized and a circular fragment of skin was removed from the dorsal region of the back by a punch with an 8-mm diameter. The animals were randomly divided into 6 groups, Groups C 1, C 3, and C 5, control groups, received no laser treatment. Groups T 1, T 3, and T 5 received laser treatment for 20 min per day for 1, 3 and 5 days, respectively. Lumbar spine and dorsal skin were extracted and processed using western blot analysis. [Results] Periodical observation showed increases in NGF expression on the skin, and decreases in c-fos expression by the spinal cord in the treatment groups compared to the control group. [Conclusion] The present findings suggest that low-intensity laser therapy could be used as an effective therapy for wound healing and pain relief, and could be further used as a clinical approach for treating cutaneous wounds. PMID:26696711

  1. Increasing intensity of therapies assigned at diagnosis does not improve survival of adults with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Krug, U; Berdel, W E; Gale, R P; Haferlach, C; Schnittger, S; Müller-Tidow, C; Braess, J; Spiekermann, K; Staib, P; Beelen, D; Serve, H; Schliemann, C; Stelljes, M; Balleisen, L; Maschmeyer, G; Grüneisen, A; Eimermacher, H; Giagounidis, A; Rasche, H; Hehlmann, R; Lengfelder, E; Thiel, E; Reichle, A; Aul, C; Ludwig, W-D; Kern, W; Haferlach, T; Köpcke, W; Görlich, D; Sauerland, M C; Heinecke, A; Wörmann, B J; Hiddemann, W; Büchner, T

    2016-06-01

    We randomized 3375 adults with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome to test whether increasingly intensive chemotherapies assigned at study-entry and analyzed on an intent-to-treat basis improved outcomes. In total, 1529 subjects <60 years were randomized to receive: (1) a first course of induction therapy with high-dose cytarabine and mitoxantrone (HAM) or with standard-dose cytarabine, daunorubicin and 6-thioguanine (TAD) followed by a second course of HAM; (2) granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) or no G-CSF before induction and consolidation courses; and (3) high-dose therapy and an autotransplant or maintenance chemotherapy. In total, 1846 subjects ⩾60 years were randomized to receive: (1) a first induction course of HAM or TAD and second induction course of HAM (if they had bone marrow blasts ⩾5% after the first course); and (2) G-CSF or no G-CSF as above. Median follow-up was 7.4 years (range, 1 day to 14.7 years). Five-year event-free survivals (EFSs) for subjects receiving a first induction course of HAM vs TAD were 17% (95% confidence interval, 15, 18%) vs 16% (95% confidence interval 14, 18%; P=0.719). Five-year EFSs for subjects randomized to receive or not receive G-CSF were 19% (95% confidence interval 16, 21%) vs 16% (95% confidence interval 14, 19%; P=0.266). Five-year relapse-free survivals (RFSs) for subjects <60 years receiving an autotransplant vs maintenance therapy were 43% (95% confidence interval 40, 47%) vs 40 (95% confidence interval 35, 44%; P=0.535). Many subjects never achieved pre-specified landmarks and consequently did not receive their assigned therapies. These data indicate the limited impact of more intensive therapies on outcomes of adults with AML. Moreover, none of the more intensive therapies we tested improved 5-year EFS, RFS or any other outcomes. PMID:26859081

  2. 5-Aminolevulinic Acid-based Photodynamic Intense Pulsed Light Therapy Shows Better Effects in the Treatment of Skin Photoaging in Asian Skin

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Leihong Flora; Gold, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of photodynamic intense pulsed light therapy on skin photoaging in Asian skin. Methods: This was a prospective, single-blinded, controlled, clinical trial with 40 patients enrolled. The enrolled patients applied 5% 5-aminolevulinic acid on the left side of the face while a placebo was applied on the right side of the face. After a one-hour incubation, the patients received intense pulsed light therapy. After four treatment cycles, the pH values, transepidermal water loss of the dermis of the forehead and canthus skin, as well as the moisture capacity of stratum corneum and the global score of photoaging were assessed. Results: The pH value of forehead and canthus skin, moisture capacity of stratum corneum, and the dermis of forehead and canthus skin of the photodynamic intense pulsed light therapy treated sides were significantly higher than those of the control sides in all of the patients. The photoaging score decreased after the therapy on both sides, with the photodynamic intense pulsed light therapy treated sides decreasing more than the control sides (P<0.01). Conclusion: 5-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic intense pulsed light therapy showed better effects in the treatment of skin photoaging compared to intense pulsed light therapy alone. PMID:20725543

  3. A comprehensive dosimetric study of pancreatic cancer treatment using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric-modulated radiation therapy (VMAT), and passive-scattering and modulated-scanning proton therapy (PT)

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Xuanfeng; Dionisi, Francesco; Tang, Shikui; Ingram, Mark; Hung, Chun-Yu; Prionas, Evangelos; Lichtenwalner, Phil; Butterwick, Ian; Zhai, Huifang; Yin, Lingshu; Lin, Haibo; Kassaee, Alireza; Avery, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    With traditional photon therapy to treat large postoperative pancreatic target volume, it often leads to poor tolerance of the therapy delivered and may contribute to interrupted treatment course. This study was performed to evaluate the potential advantage of using passive-scattering (PS) and modulated-scanning (MS) proton therapy (PT) to reduce normal tissue exposure in postoperative pancreatic cancer treatment. A total of 11 patients with postoperative pancreatic cancer who had been previously treated with PS PT in University of Pennsylvania Roberts Proton Therapy Center from 2010 to 2013 were identified. The clinical target volume (CTV) includes the pancreatic tumor bed as well as the adjacent high-risk nodal areas. Internal (iCTV) was generated from 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT), taking into account target motion from breathing cycle. Three-field and 4-field 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy, 2-arc volumetric-modulated radiation therapy, and 2-field PS and MS PT were created on the patients’ average CT. All the plans delivered 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). Overall, 98% of PTV was covered by 95% of the prescription dose and 99% of iCTV received 98% prescription dose. The results show that all the proton plans offer significant lower doses to the left kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), stomach (mean and V{sub 20} {sub Gy}), and cord (maximum dose) compared with all the photon plans, except 3-field 3DCRT in cord maximum dose. In addition, MS PT also provides lower doses to the right kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), liver (mean dose), total bowel (V{sub 20} {sub Gy} and mean dose), and small bowel (V{sub 15} {sub Gy} absolute volume ratio) compared with all the photon plans and PS PT. The dosimetric advantage of PT points to the possibility of treating tumor bed and comprehensive nodal areas while providing a more tolerable treatment course that could be used for dose

  4. Outcomes for youth receiving intensive in-home therapy or residential care: a comparison using propensity scores.

    PubMed

    Barth, Richard P; Greeson, Johanna K P; Guo, Shenyang; Green, Rebecca L; Hurley, Sarah; Sisson, Jocelyn

    2007-10-01

    This study compares outcomes for behaviorally troubled children receiving intensive in-home therapy (IIHT) and those receiving residential care (RC). Propensity score matching is used to identify matched pairs of youth (n = 786) with equivalent propensity for IIHT. The majority of pretreatment differences between the IIHT and RC groups are eliminated following matching. Logistic regression is then conducted on outcome differences at 1 year postdischarge. Results show that IIHT recipients had a greater tendency (.615) toward living with family, making progress in school, not experiencing trouble with the law, and placement stability compared with RC youth (.558; p < .10). This suggests that IIHT is at least as effective for achieving positive outcomes. Given IIHT's reduced restrictiveness and cost, intensive in-home services should be the preferred treatment over RC in most cases. PMID:18194029

  5. Intensive Dysarthria Therapy for Older Children with Cerebral Palsy: Findings from Six Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Lindsay; Smallman, Claire; Farrier, Faith

    2006-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy often have speech, language and communication difficulties that affect their access to social and educational activities. Speech and language therapy to improve the intelligibility of the speech of children with cerebral palsy has long been advocated, but there is a dearth of research investigating therapy…

  6. Intensive Speech and Language Therapy for Older Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systems Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Lindsay; Miller, Nick; Robson, Sheila; Steen, Nick

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether speech therapy using a speech systems approach to controlling breath support, phonation, and speech rate can increase the speech intelligibility of children with dysarthria and cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Sixteen children with dysarthria and CP participated in a modified time series design. Group characteristics were…

  7. Patterns of Care and Outcomes Associated With Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy for Older Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, James B.; Soulos, Pamela R.; Sharma, Richa; Makarov, Danil V.; Decker, Roy H.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Desai, Rani A.; Cramer, Laura D.; Gross, Cary P.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) requires a high degree of expertise compared with standard radiation therapy (RT). We performed a retrospective cohort study of Medicare patients treated with IMRT compared with standard RT to assess outcomes in national practice. Methods and Materials: Using the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database, we identified patients treated with radiation for cancer of the head and neck from 2002 to 2005. We used multivariate Cox models to determine whether the receipt of IMRT was associated with differences in survival. Results: We identified 1613 patients, 33.7% of whom received IMRT. IMRT was not associated with differences in survival: the 3-year overall survival was 50.5% for IMRT vs. 49.6% for standard RT (p = 0.47). The 3-year cancer-specific survival was 60.0% for IMRT vs. 58.8% (p = 0.45). Conclusion: Despite its complexity and resource intensive nature, IMRT use seems to be as safe as standard RT in national community practice, because the use of IMRT did not have an adverse impact on survival.

  8. Anti-Aging and Tissue Regeneration Ability of Policosanol Along with Lipid-Lowering Effect in Hyperlipidemic Zebrafish via Enhancement of High-Density Lipoprotein Functionality.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Young; Yoo, Jeong-Ah; Lim, So-Mang; Cho, Kyung-Hyun

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the tissue regeneration and lipid-lowering effects of policosanol (PCO) by employing a hyperlipidemic zebrafish model. A reconstituted high-density lipoprotein containing policosanol (PCO-rHDL) facilitated greater cell growth and replication with less apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in BV-2 microglial cell lines. From in vivo study, injection of rHDL containing apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) caused 76 ± 4% (p = 0.01) greater tissue regeneration activity than the phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) control, whereas PCO-rHDL caused 94 ± 7% (p = 0.002) increased regeneration. PCO in ethanol (EtOH) showed lower cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitory ability than did anacetrapib, whereas PCO-rHDL showed higher inhibitory ability than anacetrapib, suggesting a synergistic effect between PCO and rHDL. Following 9 weeks of PCO consumption, the PCO group (0.003% PCO in Tetrabit) showed the highest survivability (80%), whereas normal diet (ND) and high-cholesterol diet (HCD) control groups showed 67% and 70% survival rates, respectively. Supplementation with a HCD resulted in two-fold elevation of CETP activity along with 3- and 2.5-fold increases in serum total cholesterol (TC) and triglycerides (TGs) levels, respectively. Consumption of PCO for 9 weeks resulted in 40 ± 5% (p = 0.01 vs. HCD) and 33 ± 4% (p = 0.02 vs. HCD) reduction of TC and TGs levels, respectively. Serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level increased up to 37 ± 2 mg/dL (p = 0.004), whereas the percentage of HDL-C/TC increased up to 20 ± 2% from 5 ± 1% compared to the HCD control. The serum glucose level was reduced to 47 ± 2% (p = 0.002) compared to the HCD control. Fatty liver change and hepatic inflammation levels were remarkably increased upon HCD consumption and were two-fold higher than that under ND. However, the PCO group showed 58 ± 5% (p = 0.001) and 50 ± 3

  9. Anti-Aging and Tissue Regeneration Ability of Policosanol Along with Lipid-Lowering Effect in Hyperlipidemic Zebrafish via Enhancement of High-Density Lipoprotein Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Young; Yoo, Jeong-Ah; Lim, So-Mang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the tissue regeneration and lipid-lowering effects of policosanol (PCO) by employing a hyperlipidemic zebrafish model. A reconstituted high-density lipoprotein containing policosanol (PCO-rHDL) facilitated greater cell growth and replication with less apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in BV-2 microglial cell lines. From in vivo study, injection of rHDL containing apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) caused 76 ± 4% (p = 0.01) greater tissue regeneration activity than the phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) control, whereas PCO-rHDL caused 94 ± 7% (p = 0.002) increased regeneration. PCO in ethanol (EtOH) showed lower cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitory ability than did anacetrapib, whereas PCO-rHDL showed higher inhibitory ability than anacetrapib, suggesting a synergistic effect between PCO and rHDL. Following 9 weeks of PCO consumption, the PCO group (0.003% PCO in Tetrabit) showed the highest survivability (80%), whereas normal diet (ND) and high-cholesterol diet (HCD) control groups showed 67% and 70% survival rates, respectively. Supplementation with a HCD resulted in two-fold elevation of CETP activity along with 3- and 2.5-fold increases in serum total cholesterol (TC) and triglycerides (TGs) levels, respectively. Consumption of PCO for 9 weeks resulted in 40 ± 5% (p = 0.01 vs. HCD) and 33 ± 4% (p = 0.02 vs. HCD) reduction of TC and TGs levels, respectively. Serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level increased up to 37 ± 2 mg/dL (p = 0.004), whereas the percentage of HDL-C/TC increased up to 20 ± 2% from 5 ± 1% compared to the HCD control. The serum glucose level was reduced to 47 ± 2% (p = 0.002) compared to the HCD control. Fatty liver change and hepatic inflammation levels were remarkably increased upon HCD consumption and were two-fold higher than that under ND. However, the PCO group showed 58 ± 5% (p = 0.001) and 50

  10. A Phase II Study of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to the Pelvis for Postoperative Patients With Endometrial Carcinoma: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trial 0418

    SciTech Connect

    Jhingran, Anuja; Winter, Kathryn; Portelance, Lorraine; Miller, Brigitte; Salehpour, Mohammad; Gaur, Rakesh; Souhami, Luis; Small, William; Berk, Lawrence; Gaffney, David

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of pelvic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with endometrial cancer in a multi-institutional setting and to determine whether this treatment is associated with fewer short-term bowel adverse events than standard radiation therapy. Methods: Patients with adenocarcinoma of the endometrium treated with pelvic radiation therapy alone were eligible. Guidelines for target definition and delineation, dose prescription, and dose-volume constraints for the targets and critical normal structures were detailed in the study protocol and a web-based atlas. Results: Fifty-eight patients were accrued by 25 institutions; 43 were eligible for analysis. Forty-two patients (98%) had an acceptable IMRT plan; 1 had an unacceptable variation from the prescribed dose to the nodal planning target volume. The proportions of cases in which doses to critical normal structures exceeded protocol criteria were as follows: bladder, 67%; rectum, 76%; bowel, 17%; and femoral heads, 33%. Twelve patients (28%) developed grade {>=}2 short-term bowel adverse events. Conclusions: Pelvic IMRT for endometrial cancer is feasible across multiple institutions with use of a detailed protocol and centralized quality assurance (QA). For future trials, contouring of vaginal and nodal tissue will need continued monitoring with good QA and better definitions will be needed for organs at risk.

  11. Intensive (Daily) Behavior Therapy for School Refusal: A Multiple Baseline Case Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolin, David F.; Whiting, Sara; Maltby, Nicholas; Diefenbach, Gretchen J.; Lothstein, Mary Anne; Hardcastle, Surrey; Catalano, Amy; Gray, Krista

    2009-01-01

    The following multiple baseline case series examines school refusal behavior in 4 male adolescents. School refusal symptom presentation was ascertained utilizing a functional analysis from the School Refusal Assessment Scale (Kearney, 2002). For the majority of cases, treatment was conducted within a 15-session intensive format over a 3-week…

  12. Study finds low-intensity therapy for Burkitt lymphoma highly effective

    Cancer.gov

    Adult patients with a type of cancer known as Burkitt lymphoma had excellent long-term survival rates—upwards of 90 percent—following treatment with low-intensity chemotherapy regimens, according to a new clinical trial finding. Burkitt lymphoma is the mo

  13. Long-Term Follow-up of Participants with Heart Failure in the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT)

    PubMed Central

    Piller, Linda B.; Baraniuk, Sarah; Simpson, Lara M.; Cushman, William C.; Massie, Barry M.; Einhorn, Paula T.; Oparil, Suzanne; Ford, Charles E.; Graumlich, James F.; Dart, Richard A.; Parish, David C.; Retta, Tamrat M.; Cuyjet, Aloysius B.; Jafri, Syed Z.; Furberg, Curt D.; Saklayen, Mohammad G.; Thadani, Udho; Probstfield, Jeffrey L.; Davis, Barry R.

    2011-01-01

    Background In the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT), a randomized, double-blind, practice-based, active-control, comparative effectiveness trial in high-risk hypertensive participants, risk of new-onset heart failure (HF) was higher in the amlodipine (2.5-10 mg/day) and lisinopril (10-40 mg/day) arms compared with the chlorthalidone (12.5-25 mg/day) arm . Similar to other studies, mortality rates following new-onset HF were very high (≥50% at 5 years), and were similar across randomized treatment arms. After the randomized phase of the trial ended in 2002, outcomes were determined from administrative databases. Methods and Results Using national databases, post-trial follow-up mortality through 2006 was obtained on participants who developed new-onset HF during the randomized (in-trial) phase of ALLHAT. Mean follow-up for the entire period was 8.9 years. Of 1761 participants with incident HF in-trial, 1348 died. Post-HF all-cause mortality was similar across treatment groups with adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of 0.95 (0.81-1.12) and 1.05 (0.89-1.25), respectively, for amlodipine and lisinopril compared with chlorthalidone, and 10-year adjusted rates of 86%, 87%, and 83%, respectively. All-cause mortality rates were also similar among those with reduced ejection fractions (84%) and preserved ejection fractions (81%) with no significant differences by randomized treatment arm. Conclusions Once HF develops, risk of death is high and consistent across randomized treatment groups. Measures to prevent the development of HF, especially blood pressure control, must be a priority if mortality associated with development of HF is to be addressed. PMID:21969009

  14. [Cost benefits of intensive insulin therapy using injections, external pumps and implantable pumps].

    PubMed

    Selam, J L; Haardt, M J; Berne, C; Dorange, C; Lanoe, J L; Bethoux, J P; Slama, G

    1993-12-01

    Since feasibility is now proven, cost-efficacy of external sub-cutaneous (EXT) and implantable programmable (IMP) insulin pumps needs to be compared to those of intensified conventional insulin therapy (CONV). Only metabolic efficacy and short-term direct costs are easily evaluable. We (WHO-CSII Study) and others have shown that glycemic control and severe hypoglycemia risk are slightly improved, while ketoacidosis risk and costs are aggravated with EXT vs CONV. We (CEDIT Study) and others have shown that glycemic control, mild and severe hypoglycemic risks are improved, with no increase in ketoacidosis rates although a doubling in costs with IMP vs CONV. Rigid interpretation of the above data would limit indications of insulin pumps to patients experiencing frequent hypoglycemias while on intensified conventional insulin therapy. PMID:8206188

  15. Laser-driven beam lines for delivering intensity modulated radiation therapy with particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, K. M.; Schell, S.; Wilkens, J. J.

    2013-07-01

    Laser-accelerated particles can provide a promising opportunity for radiation therapy of cancer. Potential advantages arise from combining a compact, cost-efficient treatment unit with the physical advantages in dose delivery of charged particle beams. We consider different dose delivery schemes and the required devices to design a possible treatment unit. The secondary radiation produced in several beam line elements remains a challenge to be addressed.

  16. Laser-driven beam lines for delivering intensity modulated radiation therapy with particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, K. M.; Schell, S.; Wilkens, J. J.

    2013-07-26

    Laser-accelerated particles can provide a promising opportunity for radiation therapy of cancer. Potential advantages arise from combining a compact, cost-efficient treatment unit with the physical advantages in dose delivery of charged particle beams. We consider different dose delivery schemes and the required devices to design a possible treatment unit. The secondary radiation produced in several beam line elements remains a challenge to be addressed.

  17. Varying Treatment Intensity in a Home-Based Parent and Child Therapy Program for Families Living in Poverty: A Randomized Clinic Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrasco, Jennifer M.; Fox, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    This study addressed the question of whether increasing the intensity of a parent and child therapy program would improve results for young children with significant behavior problems from families living in poverty. Children were randomly assigned to either a standard condition or an intensity condition that provided 50% more treatment over a…

  18. Determinants of Concurrent Motor and Language Recovery during Intensive Therapy in Chronic Stroke Patients: Four Single-Case Studies

    PubMed Central

    Primaßin, Annika; Scholtes, Nina; Heim, Stefan; Huber, Walter; Neuschäfer, Martina; Binkofski, Ferdinand; Werner, Cornelius J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite intensive research on mechanisms of recovery of function after stroke, surprisingly little is known about determinants of concurrent recovery of language and motor functions in single patients. The alternative hypotheses are that the two functions might either “fight for resources” or use the same mechanisms in the recovery process. Here, we present follow-up data of four exemplary patients with different base levels of motor and language abilities. We assessed functional scales and performed exact lesion analysis to examine the connection between lesion parameters and recovery potential in each domain. Results confirm that preservation of the corticospinal tracts (CSTs) is a neural predictor for good motor recovery while preservation of the arcuate fasciculus (AF) is important for a good language recovery. However, results further indicate that even patients with large lesions in CST, AF, and superior longitudinal fasciculus, respectively, are able to recover their motor/language abilities during intensive therapy. We further found some indicators of a facilitating interaction between motor and language recovery. Patients with positive improvement of motor skills after therapy also improved in language skills, while the patients with no motor improvements were not able to gain any language recovery. PMID:26500606

  19. Should thrombolytic therapy be administered in the mobile intensive care unit in patients with evolving myocardial infarction? A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Roth, A; Barbash, G I; Hod, H; Miller, H I; Rath, S; Modan, M; Har-Zahav, Y; Keren, G; Bassan, S; Kaplinsky, E

    1990-04-01

    The growing recognition of the importance of early thrombolysis in evolving myocardial infarction was the basis for the present study, which evaluated the effectiveness, feasibility and safety of prehospital thrombolytic therapy. In a relatively small study, 118 patients were allocated to receive either prehospital treatment with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) in the mobile intensive care unit (group A, 74 patients) or hospital treatment (group B, 44 patients). A total of 120 mg of rt-PA was infused over a period of 6 h. All patients were fully heparinized and underwent radionuclide left ventriculography and coronary angiography during hospitalization. Although group A was treated significantly earlier than group B after onset of symptoms (94 +/- 36 versus 137 +/- 45 min, respectively; p less than 0.001), no significant differences were observed between the groups in 1) extent of myocardial necrosis, 2) global left ventricular ejection fraction at discharge, 3) patency of infarct-related artery, 4) length of hospital stay, and 5) mortality at 60 days. However, a trend to a lower incidence of congestive heart failure at hospital discharge was observed in the prehospital-treated compared with the hospital-treated group (7% versus 16%, respectively; p = NS). No major complications occurred during transportation. It is concluded that myocardial infarction can be accurately diagnosed and thrombolytic therapy initiated relatively safely during the prehospital phase by the mobile intensive care team, thus instituting a beneficial clinical trend in favor of prehospital thrombolysis. PMID:2107239

  20. Intensity-modulated x-ray (IMXT) versus proton (IMPT) therapy for theragnostic hypoxia-based dose painting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Ryan T.; Bowen, Stephen R.; Bentzen, Søren M.; Rockwell Mackie, T.; Jeraj, Robert

    2008-08-01

    In this work the abilities of intensity-modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT) and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) to deliver boosts based on theragnostic imaging were assessed. Theragnostic imaging is the use of functional or molecular imaging data for prescribing radiation dose distributions. Distal gradient tracking, an IMPT method designed for the delivery of non-uniform dose distributions, was assessed. Dose prescriptions for a hypoxic region in a head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patient were designed to either uniformly boost the region or redistribute the dose based on positron emission tomography (PET) images of the 61Cu(II)-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (61Cu-ATSM) hypoxia surrogate. Treatment plans for the prescriptions were created for four different delivery methods: IMXT delivered with step-and-shoot and with helical tomotherapy, and IMPT delivered with spot scanning and distal gradient tracking. IMXT and IMPT delivered comparable dose distributions within the boost region for both uniform and redistributed theragnostic boosts. Normal tissue integral dose was lower by a factor of up to 3 for IMPT relative to the IMXT. For all delivery methods, the mean dose to the nearby organs at risk changed by less than 2 Gy for redistributed versus uniform boosts. The distal gradient tracking method resulted in comparable plans to the spot scanning method while reducing the number of proton beam spots by a factor of over 3.

  1. Feasibility of intensive multimodal therapy in infants affected by rhabdoid tumors - experience of the EU-RHAB registry.

    PubMed

    Seeringer, A; Bartelheim, K; Kerl, K; Hasselblatt, M; Leuschner, I; Rutkowski, S; Timmermann, B; Kortmann, R-D; Koscielniak, E; Schneppenheim, R; Warmuth-Metz, M; Gerß, J; Siebert, R; Graf, N; Boos, J; Frühwald, M C

    2014-05-01

    Rhabdoid tumors mainly affect infants and other very young children with a marked vulnerability towards intensive therapy such as invasive surgery, high dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and dose intense radiotherapy. Radiotherapy (RT) is a promising option in rhabdoid tumors but its application in infants remains controversial. Neurocognitive and vascular side effects occur even long after completion of therapy. Therapeutic recommendations suggested by the European Rhabdoid Registry including RT, high dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and methotrexate (MTX) were developed by a consensus committee. Unique to our EU-RHAB database is the ability to analyze data of 64 of 81 registered infants (under one year of age) separate from older children. 20 (age at diagnoses 2-12 months) of these had received radiotherapy. To our knowledge, this is the first report specifically analyzing treatment data of infants suffering from malignant rhabdoid tumors. Our results suggest that radiotherapy significantly increases the mean survival time as well as the 3 year overall survival in infants. We detected a doubling of survival times in infants who received RT. Overall, our results suggest that infants benefit from RT with tolerable acute side effects. Severe long term sequelae likely due to intraventricular MTX and/or RT were reported in 4 patients (leukoencephalopathy). No differences in chemotherapy-related toxicity were observed between infants and children. We suggest that a nihilistic therapeutic approach towards young infants is not warranted and that RT may not be a priori rejected as a therapeutic option in infants. PMID:24633978

  2. Intensity modulated radiation therapy with simultaneous integrated boost based dose escalation on neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced distal esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ming; Aguila, Fernando N; Patel, Taral; Knapp, Mark; Zhu, Xue-Qiang; Chen, Xi-Lin; Price, Phillip D

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate impact of radiation therapy dose escalation through intensity modulated radiation therapy with simultaneous integrated boost (IMRT-SIB). METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the patients who underwent four-dimensional-based IMRT-SIB-based neoadjuvant chemoradiation protocol. During the concurrent chemoradiation therapy, radiation therapy was through IMRT-SIB delivered in 28 consecutive daily fractions with total radiation doses of 56 Gy to tumor and 5040 Gy dose-painted to clinical tumor volume, with a regimen at the discretion of the treating medical oncologist. This was followed by surgical tumor resection. We analyzed pathological completion response (pCR) rates its relationship with overall survival and event-free survival. RESULTS: Seventeen patients underwent dose escalation with the IMRT-SIB protocol between 2007 and 2014 and their records were available for analysis. Among the IMRT-SIB-treated patients, the toxicity appeared mild, the most common side effects were grade 1-3 esophagitis (46%) and pneumonitis (11.7%). There were no cardiac events. The Ro resection rate was 94% (n = 16), the pCR rate was 47% (n = 8), and the postoperative morbidity was zero. There was one mediastinal failure found, one patient had local failure at the anastomosis site, and the majority of failures were distant in the lung or bone. The 3-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 41% (n = 7) and 53% (n = 9), respectively. CONCLUSION: The dose escalation through IMRT-SIB in the chemoradiation regimen seems responsible for down-staging the distal esophageal with well-tolerated complications. PMID:27190587

  3. [Provision of apparatus to resuscitation and intensive therapy departments of the cardiology service].

    PubMed

    Smerdov, A A

    1980-01-01

    The article describes monitoring systems for following critically-ill patients, and cardio-resuscitation complex, apparatus for defibrillation, and short-term anaesthesy, cardiostimulators. All these units have been elaborated and serially produced by the Radioelectronic Medical Equipment Association. Their importance and place in providing the patients treatment and diagnosis in resuscitation and intensive care departments of the cardiological service are shown. PMID:7442501

  4. Spot-scanning beam proton therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy for ipsilateral head and neck malignancies: A treatment planning comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Kandula, Shravan; Zhu, Xiaorong; Garden, Adam S.; Gillin, Michael; Rosenthal, David I.; Ang, Kie-Kian; Mohan, Radhe; Amin, Mayankkumar V.; Garcia, John A.; Wu, Richard; Sahoo, Narayan; Frank, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy for head and neck malignancies can have side effects that impede quality of life. Theoretically, proton therapy can reduce treatment-related morbidity by minimizing the dose to critical normal tissues. We evaluated the feasibility of spot-scanning proton therapy for head and neck malignancies and compared dosimetry between those plans and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. Plans from 5 patients who had undergone IMRT for primary tumors of the head and neck were used for planning proton therapy. Both sets of plans were prepared using computed tomography (CT) scans with the goals of achieving 100% of the prescribed dose to the clinical target volume (CTV) and 95% to the planning TV (PTV) while maximizing conformity to the PTV. Dose-volume histograms were generated and compared, as were conformity indexes (CIs) to the PTVs and mean doses to the organs at risk (OARs). Both modalities in all cases achieved 100% of the dose to the CTV and 95% to the PTV. Mean PTV CIs were comparable (0.371 IMRT, 0.374 protons, p = 0.953). Mean doses were significantly lower in the proton plans to the contralateral submandibular (638.7 cGy IMRT, 4.3 cGy protons, p = 0.002) and parotid (533.3 cGy IMRT, 48.5 cGy protons, p = 0.003) glands; oral cavity (1760.4 cGy IMRT, 458.9 cGy protons, p = 0.003); spinal cord (2112.4 cGy IMRT, 249.2 cGy protons, p = 0.002); and brainstem (1553.52 cGy IMRT, 166.2 cGy protons, p = 0.005). Proton plans also produced lower maximum doses to the spinal cord (3692.1 cGy IMRT, 2014.8 cGy protons, p = 0.034) and brainstem (3412.1 cGy IMRT, 1387.6 cGy protons, p = 0.005). Normal tissue V{sub 10}, V{sub 30}, and V{sub 50} values were also significantly lower in the proton plans. We conclude that spot-scanning proton therapy can significantly reduce the integral dose to head and neck critical structures. Prospective studies are underway to determine if this reduced dose translates to improved quality of life.

  5. Preliminary outcome and toxicity report of extended-field, intensity-modulated radiation therapy for gynecologic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, Joseph K. . E-mail: jsalama@radonc.uchicago.edu; Mundt, Arno J.; Roeske, John; Mehta, Neil

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this article is to report a preliminary analysis of our initial clinical experience with extended-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy for gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: Between November 2002 and May 2005, 13 women with gynecologic malignancies were treated with extended-field radiation therapy. Of the women, 7 had endometrial cancer, 4 cervical cancer, 1 recurrent endometrial cancer, and 1 suspected cervical cancer. All women underwent computed tomography planning, with the upper vagina, parametria, and uterus (if present) contoured within the CTV. In addition, the clinical target volume contained the pelvic and presacral lymph nodes as well as the para-aortic lymph nodes. All acute toxicity was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE v 3.0). All late toxicity was scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late toxicity score. Results: The median follow-up was 11 months. Extended-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for gynecologic malignancies was well tolerated. Two patients experienced Grade 3 or higher toxicity. Both patients were treated with concurrent cisplatin based chemotherapy. Neither patient was planned with bone marrow sparing. Eleven patients had no evidence of late toxicity. One patient with multiple previous surgeries experienced a bowel obstruction. One patient with bilateral grossly involved and unresectable common iliac nodes experienced bilateral lymphedema. Extended-field-IMRT achieved good local control with only 1 patient, who was metastatic at presentation, and 1 patient not able to complete treatment, experiencing in-field failure. Conclusions: Extended-field IMRT is safe and effective with a low incidence of acute toxicity. Longer follow-up is needed to assess chronic toxicity, although early results are promising.

  6. Role of Focal Therapy with High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound in the Management of Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuru, Timur H; van Essen, Julius; Pfister, David; Porres, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Overtreatment of prostate cancer (PC) remains one of the main burdens in uro-oncology. Focal therapy may be a reasonable alternative with less side effects and morbidity. Application of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) induces immediate and irreversible coagulation. The treatment leads to consecutive necrosis with sharply delineated margins, making HIFU a promising tool for the focal therapy of localized PC. Unlike radiation, the treatment leaves no collateral damage outside of the heated tissue, allowing repeated use of HIFU, if necessary. In case of non-organ-confined relapse, additional radical salvage therapy can be performed. This review gives an overview of the existing evidence on focal HIFU. Today, 3 HIFU devices are approved for the treatment of localized PC: Sonablate™, Ablatherm™ and the FocalOne™ device. In summary, the first published results of focal HIFU are promising. The quality of life and potency of the patients are well preserved. Therefore, HIFU treatment, and especially focal ablation of tumor foci, seems to be a safe alternative to standard treatment, with low side effects. The oncologic results seem satisfactory but need further follow-up to validate this practice of PC control. PMID:26632846

  7. [Psychological aspects of remission induced by intensive insulin therapy in type I diabetes. A retrospective study of 44 patients].

    PubMed

    Ziegler, O; Kolopp, M; Kahn, J P; Floquet, B; Goudot, C; Beyel, P; Drouin, P; Debry, G

    1991-01-01

    The psychological consequences of induced remission of type 1 diabetes, have not yet been investigated thoroughly. We studied the psychological status of 44 patients (16 women, 28 men), age 21 years +/- 8 months (mean +/- SD), whose remission lasted 12 +/- 9 months. Patients' psychological reactions were analyzed retrospectively, using a 20 items standardized questionnaire, investigating 3 successive periods: 1) initial intensive insulin therapy; 2) remission; 3) permanent insulin therapy. 8% of the subjects only considered the remission phase useless, whereas 49% expressed a positive appraisal. Hope was predominant feeling, 25% of the patients believing in a completed recovery of diabetes. Perceived therapeutic constraints were, in decreasing order: regimen, way of life's regularity, self monitoring of blood glucose. When starting permanent insulin therapy, opposite answers were given: 49% negative feelings, 33% positive feelings and 18% ambivalent feelings. During this period, insulin injections represented the major therapeutic constraint, followed by self monitoring of blood glucose. To summarize, induced remission does not appear to be psychologically harmful and is considered useful by a large majority of patients. Effective psychological support has to be offered to help those patients to cope with their irrational hopes of healing and to dampen their deception at the end of the remission period. PMID:1752345

  8. Outpatient Long-term Intensive Therapy for Alcoholics (OLITA): a successful biopsychosocial approach to the treatment of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Krampe, Henning; Stawicki, Sabina; Hoehe, Margret R; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2007-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is a frequent, chronic, relapsing, and incurable disease with enormous societal costs. Thus, alcoholism therapy and research into its outcome are of major importance for public health. The present article will: (i) give a brief overview of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and treatment outcomes of alcohol dependence; (ii) introduce the basic principles of outpatient long-term therapy of alcohol-dependent patients; and (iii) discuss in detail process-outcome research on Outpatient Long-term Intensive Therapy for Alcoholics (OLITA). This successful biopsychosocial approach to the treatment of alcoholism shows a 9-year abstinence rate of over 50%, a re-employment rate of 60%, and a dramatic recovery from comorbid depression, anxiety disorders, and physical sequelae. The outcome data are empirically based on treatment processes that have proven high predictive validity and give concrete information about where to focus the therapeutic efforts. Thus, process-outcome research on OLITA can serve for the development of new therapeutic guidelines on adapting individual relapse prevention strategies. PMID:18286800

  9. Outpatient Long-term Intensive Therapy for Alcoholics (OLITA): a successful biopsychosocial approach to the treatment of alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Krampe, Henning; Stawicki, Sabina; Hoehe, Margret R.; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2007-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is a frequent, chronic, relapsing, and incurable disease with enormous societal costs. Thus, alcoholism therapy and research into its outcome are of major importance for public health. The present article will: (i) give a brief overview of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and treatment outcomes of alcohol dependence; (ii) introduce the basic principles of outpatient long-term therapy of alcohol-dependent patients; and (iii) discuss in detail process-outcome research on Outpatient Long-term intensive Therapy for Alcoholics (OLITA). This successful biopsychosocial approach to the treatment of alcoholisms shows a 9-year abstinence rate of over 50%, a re-employment rate of 60%, and a dramatic recovery from comorbid depression, anxiety disorders, and physical sequelae. The outcome data are empirically based on treatment processes that have proven high predictive validity and give concrete information about where to focus the therapeutic efforts. Thus, process-outcome research on OLITA can serve for the development of new therapeutic guidelines on adapting individual relapse prevention strategies. PMID:18286800

  10. Displacement analysis of diagnostic ultrasound backscatter: a methodology for characterizing, modeling, and monitoring high intensity focused ultrasound therapy.

    PubMed

    Speyer, Gavriel; Kaczkowski, Peter J; Brayman, Andrew A; Crum, Lawrence A

    2010-07-01

    Accurate monitoring of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is critical for widespread clinical use. Pulse-echo diagnostic ultrasound (DU) is known to exhibit temperature sensitivity through relative changes in time-of-flight between two sets of radio frequency (RF) backscatter measurements, one acquired before and one after therapy. These relative displacements, combined with knowledge of the exposure protocol, material properties, heat transfer, and measurement noise statistics, provide a natural framework for estimating the administered heating, and thereby therapy. The proposed method, termed displacement analysis, identifies the relative displacements using linearly independent displacement patterns, or modes, each induced by a particular time-varying heating applied during the exposure interval. These heating modes are themselves linearly independent. This relationship implies that a linear combination of displacement modes aligning the DU measurements is the response to an identical linear combination of heating modes, providing the heating estimate. Furthermore, the accuracy of coefficient estimates in this approximation is determined a priori, characterizing heating, thermal dose, and temperature estimates for any given protocol. Predicted performance is validated using simulations and experiments in alginate gel phantoms. Evidence for a spatially distributed interaction between temperature and time-of-flight changes is presented. PMID:20649206

  11. Long-term results of forward intensity-modulated radiation therapy for patients with early-stage breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Boram; Lee, Jihae; Lee, Kyung-Ja; Lee, Rena; Moon, Byung In

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To observe long-term clinical outcomes for patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with forward intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), including local control and clinical toxicities. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed a total of 214 patients with stage I-II breast cancer who were treated with breast conserving surgery followed by adjuvant breast radiation therapy between 2001 and 2008. All patients were treated using forward IMRT. The whole breast was irradiated to a dose of 50 to 50.4 Gy followed by an 8 to 12 Gy electron boost to the surgical bed. Results The median age was 46 years (range, 21 to 82 years) and the medial follow-up time was 7.3 years (range, 2.4 to 11.7 years). Stage T1 was 139 (65%) and T2 was 75 (35%), respectively. Ipsilateral breast recurrence was observed in 3 patients. The 5- and 10-year local control rates were 99.1% and 97.8%, respectively. The cosmetic outcome was evaluated according to the Harvard scale and 89.4% of patients were scored as excellent or good. Conclusion The whole breast radiation therapy as an adjuvant treatment using a forward IMRT technique showed excellent long-term local control as well as favorable outcomes of toxicity and cosmesis. PMID:24501706

  12. The clinical potential of high energy, intensity and energy modulated electron beams optimized by simulated annealing for conformal radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, Bill Jean, Jr.

    Purpose. The advent of new, so called IVth Generation, external beam radiation therapy treatment machines (e.g. Scanditronix' MM50 Racetrack Microtron) has raised the question of how the capabilities of these new machines might be exploited to produce extremely conformal dose distributions. Such machines possess the ability to produce electron energies as high as 50 MeV and, due to their scanned beam delivery of electron treatments, to modulate intensity and even energy, within a broad field. Materials and methods. Two patients with 'challenging' tumor geometries were selected from the patient archives of the Cancer Therapy and Research Center (CTRC), in San Antonio Texas. The treatment scheme that was tested allowed for twelve, energy and intensity modulated beams, equi-spaced about the patient-only intensity was modulated for the photon treatment. The elementary beams, incident from any of the twelve allowed directions, were assumed parallel, and the elementary electron beams were modeled by elementary beam data. The optimal arrangement of elementary beam energies and/or intensities was optimized by Szu-Hartley Fast Simulated Annealing Optimization. Optimized treatment plans were determined for each patient using both the high energy, intensity and energy modulated electron (HIEME) modality, and the 6 MV photon modality. The 'quality' of rival plans were scored using three different, popular objective functions which included Root Mean Square (RMS), Maximize Dose Subject to Dose and Volume Limitations (MDVL - Morrill et. al.), and Probability of Uncomplicated Tumor Control (PUTC) methods. The scores of the two optimized treatments (i.e. HIEME and intensity modulated photons) were compared to the score of the conventional plan with which the patient was actually treated. Results. The first patient evaluated presented a deeply located target volume, partially surrounding the spinal cord. A healthy right kidney was immediately adjacent to the tumor volume, separated

  13. Electron intensity modulation for mixed-beam radiation therapy with an x-ray multi-leaf collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Rebecca

    The current standard treatment for head and neck cancer at our institution uses intensity-modulated x-ray therapy (IMRT), which improves target coverage and sparing of critical structures by delivering complex fluence patterns from a variety of beam directions to conform dose distributions to the shape of the target volume. The standard treatment for breast patients is field-in-field forward-planned IMRT, with initial tangential fields and additional reduced-weight tangents with blocking to minimize hot spots. For these treatment sites, the addition of electrons has the potential of improving target coverage and sparing of critical structures due to rapid dose falloff with depth and reduced exit dose. In this work, the use of mixed-beam therapy (MBT), i.e., combined intensity-modulated electron and x-ray beams using the x-ray multi-leaf collimator (MLC), was explored. The hypothesis of this study was that addition of intensity-modulated electron beams to existing clinical IMRT plans would produce MBT plans that were superior to the original IMRT plans for at least 50% of selected head and neck and 50% of breast cases. Dose calculations for electron beams collimated by the MLC were performed with Monte Carlo methods. An automation system was created to facilitate communication between the dose calculation engine and the treatment planning system. Energy and intensity modulation of the electron beams was accomplished by dividing the electron beams into 2x2-cm2 beamlets, which were then beam-weight optimized along with intensity-modulated x-ray beams. Treatment plans were optimized to obtain equivalent target dose coverage, and then compared with the original treatment plans. MBT treatment plans were evaluated by participating physicians with respect to target coverage, normal structure dose, and overall plan quality in comparison with original clinical plans. The physician evaluations did not support the hypothesis for either site, with MBT selected as superior in 1

  14. Assessments of Sequential Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Boost (SqIB) Treatments Using HART

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyakuryal, Anil

    2009-05-01

    A retrospective study was pursued to evaluate the SqIB treatments performed on ten head and neck cancer patients(n=10).Average prescription doses (PDs) of 39 Gy,15Gy and 17.8Gy were delivered consecutively from larger to smaller planning target volumes(ptvs) in three different treatment plans using 6 MV X-ray photon beams from a Linear accelerator (SLA Linac, Elekta) on BID weak on-weak off schedules. These plans were statistically evaluated on basis of plan indices (PIs),dose response of targets and critical structures, and dose tolerance(DT) of various organs utilizing the DVH analysis automated software known as Histogram Analysis in Radiation Therapy-HART(S.Jang et al., 2008, Med Phys 35, p.2812). Mean SqIB PIs were found consistent with the reported values for varying radio-surgical systems.The 95.5%(n=10)of each ptvs and the gross tumor volume also received 95% (n=10)of PDs in treatments. The average volume of ten organs (N=10) affected by each PDs shrank with decreasing size of ptvs in above plans.A largest volume of Oropharynx (79%,n=10,N=10) irradiated at PD, but the largest volume of Larynx (98%, n=10, N=10) was vulnerable to DT of structure (TD50).Thus, we have demonstrated the efficiency and accuracy of HART in the assessment of Linac based plans in radiation therapy treatments of cancer.

  15. Dosimetric and Radiobiological Consequences of Computed Tomography–Guided Adaptive Strategies for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Battista, Jerry J.; Johnson, Carol; Turnbull, David; Kempe, Jeff; Bzdusek, Karl; Van Dyk, Jacob; Bauman, Glenn

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To examine a range of scenarios for image-guided adaptive radiation therapy of prostate cancer, including different schedules for megavoltage CT imaging, patient repositioning, and dose replanning. Methods and Materials: We simulated multifraction dose distributions with deformable registration using 35 sets of megavoltage CT scans of 13 patients. We computed cumulative dose–volume histograms, from which tumor control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) for rectum were calculated. Five-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with 18-MV x-rays was planned to achieve an isocentric dose of 76 Gy to the clinical target volume (CTV). The differences between D{sub 95}, tumor control probability, V{sub 70Gy}, and NTCP for rectum, for accumulated versus planned dose distributions, were compared for different target volume sizes, margins, and adaptive strategies. Results: The CTV D{sub 95} for IMRT treatment plans, averaged over 13 patients, was 75.2 Gy. Using the largest CTV margins (10/7 mm), the D{sub 95} values accumulated over 35 fractions were within 2% of the planned value, regardless of the adaptive strategy used. For tighter margins (5 mm), the average D{sub 95} values dropped to approximately 73.0 Gy even with frequent repositioning, and daily replanning was necessary to correct this deficit. When personalized margins were applied to an adaptive CTV derived from the first 6 treatment fractions using the STAPLE (Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation) algorithm, target coverage could be maintained using a single replan 1 week into therapy. For all approaches, normal tissue parameters (rectum V{sub 70Gy} and NTCP) remained within acceptable limits. Conclusions: The frequency of adaptive interventions depends on the size of the CTV combined with target margins used during IMRT optimization. The application of adaptive target margins (<5 mm) to an adaptive CTV determined 1 week into therapy minimizes

  16. A UK general practice population cohort study investigating the association between lipid lowering drugs and 30-day mortality following medically attended acute respiratory illness

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Roshni; Myles, Puja R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cholesterol lowering drugs HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) and PPARα activators (fibrates) have been shown to reduce host inflammation via non-disease specific immunomodulatory mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that commonly prescribed drugs in general practice, statins and fibrates, may be beneficial in influenza-like illness related mortality. This retrospective cohort study examines the association between two lipid lowering drugs, statins and fibrates, and all-cause 30-day mortality following a medically attended acute respiratory illness (MAARI). Methods. Primary care patient data were retrospectively extracted from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) database. The sample comprised 201,179 adults aged 30 years or older experiencing a MAARI episode. Patient exposure to statins or fibrates was coded as separate dichotomous variables and deemed current if the most recent GP prescription was issued in the 30 days prior to MAARI diagnosis. Multivariable logistic regression and Cox regression were used for analyses. Adjustment was carried out for chronic lung disease, heart failure, metformin and glitazones, comorbidity burden, socio-demographic and lifestyle variables such as smoking status and body mass index (BMI). Statistical interaction tests were carried out to check for effect modification by gender, body mass index, smoking status and comorbidity. Results. A total of 1,096 (5%) patients died within the 30-day follow up period. Of this group, 213 (19.4%) were statin users and 4 (0.4%) were fibrate users. After adjustment, a significant 35% reduction in odds [adj OR; 0.65 (95% CI [0.52–0.80])] and a 33% reduction in the hazard [adj HR: 0.67 (95% CI [0.55–0.83])] of all-cause 30-day mortality following MAARI was observed in statin users. A significant effect modification by comorbidity burden was observed for the association between statin use and MAARI-related mortality. Fibrate use was associated with a non

  17. Should Antihypertensive Treatment Recommendations Differ in Patients With and Without Coronary Heart Disease? (from the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial [ALLHAT]).

    PubMed

    Alderman, Michael H; Davis, Barry R; Piller, Linda B; Ford, Charles E; Baraniuk, M Sarah; Pressel, Sara L; Assadi, Mahshid A; Einhorn, Paula T; Haywood, L Julian; Ilamathi, Ekambaram; Oparil, Suzanne; Retta, Tamrat M

    2016-01-01

    Thiazide-type diuretics have been recommended for initial treatment of hypertension in most patients, but should this recommendation differ for patients with and without coronary heart disease (CHD)? The Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT) was a randomized, double-blind hypertension treatment trial in 42,418 participants with high risk of combined cardiovascular disease (CVD) (25% with preexisting CHD). This post hoc analysis compares long-term major clinical outcomes in those assigned amlodipine (n = 9048) or lisinopril (n = 9,054) with those assigned chlorthalidone (n = 15,255), stratified by CHD status. After 4 to 8 years, randomized treatment was discontinued. Total follow-up (active treatment + passive surveillance using national databases for deaths and hospitalizations) was 8 to 13 years. For most CVD outcomes, end-stage renal disease, and total mortality, there were no differences across randomized treatment arms regardless of baseline CHD status. In-trial rates of CVD were significantly higher for lisinopril compared with chlorthalidone, and rates of heart failure were significantly higher for amlodipine compared with chlorthalidone in those with and without CHD (overall hazard ratios [HRs] 1.10, p <0.001, and 1.38, p <0.001, respectively). During extended follow-up, significant outcomes according to CHD status interactions (p = 0.012) were noted in amlodipine versus chlorthalidone comparison for CVD and CHD mortality (HR 0.88, p = 0.04, and 0.84, p = 0.04, respectively) in those with CHD at baseline (HR 1.06, p = 0.15, and 1.08, p = 0.17) and in those without. The results of the overall increased stroke mortality in lisinopril compared with chlorthalidone (HR 1.2; p = 0.03) and hospitalized heart failure in amlodipine compared with chlorthalidone (HR 1.12; p = 0.01) during extended follow-up did not differ by baseline CHD status. In conclusion, these results provide no reason to alter our previous

  18. A UK general practice population cohort study investigating the association between lipid lowering drugs and 30-day mortality following medically attended acute respiratory illness.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Roshni; Venkatesan, Sudhir; Myles, Puja R

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cholesterol lowering drugs HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) and PPARα activators (fibrates) have been shown to reduce host inflammation via non-disease specific immunomodulatory mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that commonly prescribed drugs in general practice, statins and fibrates, may be beneficial in influenza-like illness related mortality. This retrospective cohort study examines the association between two lipid lowering drugs, statins and fibrates, and all-cause 30-day mortality following a medically attended acute respiratory illness (MAARI). Methods. Primary care patient data were retrospectively extracted from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) database. The sample comprised 201,179 adults aged 30 years or older experiencing a MAARI episode. Patient exposure to statins or fibrates was coded as separate dichotomous variables and deemed current if the most recent GP prescription was issued in the 30 days prior to MAARI diagnosis. Multivariable logistic regression and Cox regression were used for analyses. Adjustment was carried out for chronic lung disease, heart failure, metformin and glitazones, comorbidity burden, socio-demographic and lifestyle variables such as smoking status and body mass index (BMI). Statistical interaction tests were carried out to check for effect modification by gender, body mass index, smoking status and comorbidity. Results. A total of 1,096 (5%) patients died within the 30-day follow up period. Of this group, 213 (19.4%) were statin users and 4 (0.4%) were fibrate users. After adjustment, a significant 35% reduction in odds [adj OR; 0.65 (95% CI [0.52-0.80])] and a 33% reduction in the hazard [adj HR: 0.67 (95% CI [0.55-0.83])] of all-cause 30-day mortality following MAARI was observed in statin users. A significant effect modification by comorbidity burden was observed for the association between statin use and MAARI-related mortality. Fibrate use was associated with a non

  19. Intensive OutPatient Therapy for Clergy Burnout: How Much Difference Can a Week Make?

    PubMed

    Muse, Stephen; Love, Milton; Christensen, Kyle

    2016-02-01

    A pre-test and post-test quasi-experimental matched pairs design was used to assess the effectiveness of a week-long multi-therapist intensive outpatient intervention process with clergy suffering from depression and burnout. Participants (n = 23) in the "Clergy in Kairos" program of the Pastoral Institute (Muse in J Pastor Care Couns 61(3):183-195, 2007) constituted the experimental variable. Clergy surveyed from United Methodist and Presbyterian denominations (n = 121) provided a control group from which 23 respondents were selected whose pre-test scores in depression and burnout were statistically equivalent to those in the experimental group. The treatment group consisted of clergy from three denominations who self-selected (or in some cases were referred by denominational officials) into the program. At the outset, clergy in both groups reported equivalent levels of conflict, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and depression. At the 6-months follow-up, clergy in the experimental group showed significant improvement of depression, emotional exhaustion, and depersonalization scores. By contrast, there was no change in the burnout and depression scores in the control group at 6-months post-test. Findings suggest the usefulness of a week-long multi-therapist intensive outpatient intervention in reducing burnout and depression. PMID:25682015

  20. A retrospective study on intensity-modulated radiation therapy combined with chemotherapy after D2 radical surgery for gastric carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    LUO, WENGUANG; ZHANG, HONGYAN; ZHAO, YUFEI; WANG, LIN; QI, LIJUN; RAN, JINGJING; LIU, LEI; WU, AIDONG

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the clinical value of different chemotherapies, the efficacy of intensity-modulated radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy following D2 radical surgery for gastric carcinoma was evaluated in this study. A total of 102 patients who underwent D2 radical surgery for gastric carcinoma followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) between January, 2008 and March, 2012, were selected. The 5/7 field intensity-modulated radiation therapy was used, with a planning target volume dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks. Among these patients, 45 were administered 400 mg/m2/day fluorouracil and 20 mg/m2/day tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol through intravenous infusion 4 days before and 3 days after the radiotherapy (F-CRT group), while 57 patients received 825 mg/m2 capecitabine orally twice a day (C-CRT group). The 3-year overall and the disease-free survival rates were 75.5 and 70.5%, respectively. The overall 3-year survival rates of the F-CRT and C-CRT groups were 72.2 and 78.5% (P>0.05), respectively, and the 3-year disease-free survival rates were 67.7 and 72.8% (P>0.05), respectively. No significant differences were observed between the two groups. However, during the concurrent CRT, significant differences were found in the incidence of grade 1–2 haematological toxicity between the F-CRT and C-CRT groups (73.3 vs. 50.9%, respectively; χ2 =5.320, P=0.021). Significant differences were also found in the incidence of grade 1–2 gastrointestinal reactions between the two groups (77.8 vs. 57.9%, respectively; χ2=4.474, P=0.034). Therefore, intensity-modulated radiation therapy combined with concurrent chemotherapy following D2 radical surgery for gastric cancer was found to be safe and effective. In addition, radiotherapy was better tolerated and more likely to be completed using C-CRT rather than F-CRT. PMID:27123273

  1. Comparison of testicular dose delivered by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in patients with prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jeffrey M.; Handorf, Elizabeth A.; Price, Robert A.; Cherian, George; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Chen, David Y.; Kutikov, Alexander; Johnson, Matthew E.; Ma, Chung-Ming Charlie; Horwitz, Eric M.

    2015-10-01

    A small decrease in testosterone level has been documented after prostate irradiation, possibly owing to the incidental dose to the testes. Testicular doses from prostate external beam radiation plans with either intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were calculated to investigate any difference. Testicles were contoured for 16 patients being treated for localized prostate cancer. For each patient, 2 plans were created: 1 with IMRT and 1 with VMAT. No specific attempt was made to reduce testicular dose. Minimum, maximum, and mean doses to the testicles were recorded for each plan. Of the 16 patients, 4 received a total dose of 7800 cGy to the prostate alone, 7 received 8000 cGy to the prostate alone, and 5 received 8000 cGy to the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes. The mean (range) of testicular dose with an IMRT plan was 54.7 cGy (21.1 to 91.9) and 59.0 cGy (25.1 to 93.4) with a VMAT plan. In 12 cases, the mean VMAT dose was higher than the mean IMRT dose, with a mean difference of 4.3 cGy (p = 0.019). There was a small but statistically significant increase in mean testicular dose delivered by VMAT compared with IMRT. Despite this, it unlikely that there is a clinically meaningful difference in testicular doses from either modality.

  2. SmartArc-Based Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Dosimetric Comparison With Both Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Clemente, Stefania; Wu, BinBin; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Fusco, Vincenzo; Ricchetti, Francesco; Wong, John; McNutt, Todd

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the roles of volumetric modulated arc therapy with SmartArc (VMAT-S), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) for oropharyngeal cancer using a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) approach. Methods and Materials: Eight patients treated with IMRT were selected at random. Plans were computed for both IMRT and VMAT-S (using Pinnacle TPS for an Elekta Infinity linac) along with HT. A three-dose level prescription was used to deliver 70 Gy, 63 Gy, and 58.1 Gy to regions of macroscopic, microscopic high-risk, and microscopic low-risk disease, respectively. All doses were given in 35 fractions. Comparisons were performed on dose-volume histogram data, monitor units per fraction (MU/fx), and delivery time. Results: VMAT-S target coverage was close to that achieved by IMRT, but inferior to HT. The conformity and homogeneity within the PTV were improved for HT over all strategies. Sparing of the organs at risk (OAR) was achieved with all modalities. VMAT-S (along with HT) shortened delivery time (mean, -38%) and reduced MU/fx (mean, -28%) compared with IMRT. Conclusion: VMAT-S represents an attractive solution because of the shorter delivery time and the lower number of MU/fx compared with IMRT. However, in this complex clinical setting, current VMAT-S does not appear to provide any distinct advantage compared with helical tomotherapy.

  3. A dosimetric comparative study: Volumetric modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy in the treatment of nasal cavity carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Kham; Cummings, David; Lanza, Vincent C.; Morris, Kathleen; Wang, Congjun; Sutton, Jordan; Garcia, John

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the differences between volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of nasal cavity carcinomas. The treatment of 10 patients, who had completed IMRT treatment for resected tumors of the nasal cavity, was replanned with the Philips Pinnacle{sup 3} Version 9 treatment-planning system. The IMRT plans used a 9-beam technique whereas the VMAT (known as SmartArc) plans used a 3-arc technique. Both types of plans were optimized using Philips Pinnacle{sup 3} Direct Machine Parameter Optimization algorithm. IMRT and VMAT plans' quality was compared by evaluating the maximum, minimum, and mean doses to the target volumes and organs at risk, monitor units (MUs), and the treatment delivery time. Our results indicate that VMAT is capable of greatly reducing treatment delivery time and MUs compared with IMRT. The reduction of treatment delivery time and MUs can decrease the effects of intrafractional uncertainties that can occur because of patient movement during treatment delivery. VMAT's plans further reduce doses to critical structures that are in close proximity to the target volume.

  4. A new Monte Carlo-based treatment plan optimization approach for intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongbao; Tian, Zhen; Shi, Feng; Song, Ting; Wu, Zhaoxia; Liu, Yaqiang; Jiang, Steve; Jia, Xun

    2015-04-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) plan optimization needs beamlet dose distributions. Pencil-beam or superposition/convolution type algorithms are typically used because of their high computational speed. However, inaccurate beamlet dose distributions may mislead the optimization process and hinder the resulting plan quality. To solve this problem, the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation method has been used to compute all beamlet doses prior to the optimization step. The conventional approach samples the same number of particles from each beamlet. Yet this is not the optimal use of MC in this problem. In fact, there are beamlets that have very small intensities after solving the plan optimization problem. For those beamlets, it may be possible to use fewer particles in dose calculations to increase efficiency. Based on this idea, we have developed a new MC-based IMRT plan optimization framework that iteratively performs MC dose calculation and plan optimization. At each dose calculation step, the particle numbers for beamlets were adjusted based on the beamlet intensities obtained through solving the plan optimization problem in the last iteration step. We modified a GPU-based MC dose engine to allow simultaneous computations of a large number of beamlet doses. To test the accuracy of our modified dose engine, we compared the dose from a broad beam and the summed beamlet doses in this beam in an inhomogeneous phantom. Agreement within 1% for the maximum difference and 0.55% for the average difference was observed. We then validated the proposed MC-based optimization schemes in one lung IMRT case. It was found that the conventional scheme required 10(6) particles from each beamlet to achieve an optimization result that was 3% difference in fluence map and 1% difference in dose from the ground truth. In contrast, the proposed scheme achieved the same level of accuracy with on average 1.2 × 10(5) particles per beamlet. Correspondingly, the computation

  5. A new Monte Carlo-based treatment plan optimization approach for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongbao; Tian, Zhen; Shi, Feng; Song, Ting; Wu, Zhaoxia; Liu, Yaqiang; Jiang, Steve; Jia, Xun

    2015-04-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) plan optimization needs beamlet dose distributions. Pencil-beam or superposition/convolution type algorithms are typically used because of their high computational speed. However, inaccurate beamlet dose distributions may mislead the optimization process and hinder the resulting plan quality. To solve this problem, the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation method has been used to compute all beamlet doses prior to the optimization step. The conventional approach samples the same number of particles from each beamlet. Yet this is not the optimal use of MC in this problem. In fact, there are beamlets that have very small intensities after solving the plan optimization problem. For those beamlets, it may be possible to use fewer particles in dose calculations to increase efficiency. Based on this idea, we have developed a new MC-based IMRT plan optimization framework that iteratively performs MC dose calculation and plan optimization. At each dose calculation step, the particle numbers for beamlets were adjusted based on the beamlet intensities obtained through solving the plan optimization problem in the last iteration step. We modified a GPU-based MC dose engine to allow simultaneous computations of a large number of beamlet doses. To test the accuracy of our modified dose engine, we compared the dose from a broad beam and the summed beamlet doses in this beam in an inhomogeneous phantom. Agreement within 1% for the maximum difference and 0.55% for the average difference was observed. We then validated the proposed MC-based optimization schemes in one lung IMRT case. It was found that the conventional scheme required 106 particles from each beamlet to achieve an optimization result that was 3% difference in fluence map and 1% difference in dose from the ground truth. In contrast, the proposed scheme achieved the same level of accuracy with on average 1.2 × 105 particles per beamlet. Correspondingly, the computation time

  6. Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography-Based Treatment Planning for Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Proton Therapy for Distal Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiaodong; Zhao Kuaile; Guerrero, Thomas M.; Mcguire, Sean E.; Yaremko, Brian; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Hui Zhouguang; Li Yupeng; Newhauser, Wayne D.; Mohan, Radhe; Liao Zhongxing

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To compare three-dimensional (3D) and four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT)-based treatment plans for proton therapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for esophageal cancer in terms of doses to the lung, heart, and spinal cord and variations in target coverage and normal tissue sparing. Methods and Materials: The IMRT and proton plans for 15 patients with distal esophageal cancer were designed from the 3D average CT scans and then recalculated on 10 4D CT data sets. Dosimetric data were compared for tumor coverage and normal tissue sparing. Results: Compared with IMRT, median lung volumes exposed to 5, 10, and 20 Gy and mean lung dose were reduced by 35.6%, 20.5%, 5.8%, and 5.1 Gy for a two-beam proton plan and by 17.4%, 8.4%, 5%, and 2.9 Gy for a three-beam proton plan. The greater lung sparing in the two-beam proton plan was achieved at the expense of less conformity to the target (conformity index [CI], 1.99) and greater irradiation of the heart (heart-V40, 41.8%) compared with the IMRT plan(CI, 1.55, heart-V40, 35.7%) or the three-beam proton plan (CI, 1.46, heart-V40, 27.7%). Target coverage differed by more than 2% between the 3D and 4D plans for patients with substantial diaphragm motion in the three-beam proton and IMRT plans. The difference in spinal cord maximum dose between 3D and 4D plans could exceed 5 Gy for the proton plans partly owing to variations in stomach gas filling. Conclusions: Proton therapy provided significantly better sparing of lung than did IMRT. Diaphragm motion and stomach gas-filling must be considered in evaluating target coverage and cord doses.

  7. Assessment of organ dose reduction and secondary cancer risk associated with the use of proton beam therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy in treatment of neuroblastomas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To compare proton beam therapy (PBT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with conformal radiation therapy (CRT) in terms of their organ doses and ability to cause secondary cancer in normal organs. Methods Five patients (median age, 4 years; range, 2–11 years) who underwent PBT for retroperitoneal neuroblastoma were selected for treatment planning simulation. Four patients had stage 4 tumors and one had stage 2A tumor, according to the International Neuroblastoma Staging System. Two patients received 36 Gy, two received 21.6 Gy, and one received 41.4 Gy of radiation. The volume structures of these patients were used for simulations of CRT and IMRT treatment. Dose–volume analyses of liver, stomach, colon, small intestine, pancreas, and bone were performed for the simulations. Secondary cancer risks in these organs were calculated using the organ equivalent dose (OED) model, which took into account the rates of cell killing, repopulation, and the neutron dose from the treatment machine. Results In all evaluated organs, the mean dose in PBT was 20–80% of that in CRT. IMRT also showed lower mean doses than CRT for two organs (20% and 65%), but higher mean doses for the other four organs (110–120%). The risk of secondary cancer in PBT was 24–83% of that in CRT for five organs, but 121% of that in CRT for pancreas. The risk of secondary cancer in IMRT was equal to or higher than CRT for four organs (range 100–124%). Conclusion Low radiation doses in normal organs are more frequently observed in PBT than in IMRT. Assessments of secondary cancer risk showed that PBT reduces the risk of secondary cancer in most organs, whereas IMRT is associated with a higher risk than CRT. PMID:24180282

  8. Prospective Randomized Phase 2 Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With or Without Oncolytic Adenovirus-Mediated Cytotoxic Gene Therapy in Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Freytag, Svend O.; Stricker, Hans; Lu, Mei; Elshaikh, Mohamed; Aref, Ibrahim; Pradhan, Deepak; Levin, Kenneth; Kim, Jae Ho; Peabody, James; Siddiqui, Farzan; Barton, Kenneth; Pegg, Jan; Zhang, Yingshu; Cheng, Jingfang; Oja-Tebbe, Nancy; Bourgeois, Renee; Gupta, Nilesh; Lane, Zhaoli; Rodriguez, Ron; DeWeese, Theodore; and others

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of combining oncolytic adenovirus-mediated cytotoxic gene therapy (OAMCGT) with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-four men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer were randomly assigned to receive either OAMCGT plus IMRT (arm 1; n=21) or IMRT only (arm 2; n=23). The primary phase 2 endpoint was acute (≤90 days) toxicity. Secondary endpoints included quality of life (QOL), prostate biopsy (12-core) positivity at 2 years, freedom from biochemical/clinical failure (FFF), freedom from metastases, and survival. Results: Men in arm 1 exhibited a greater incidence of low-grade influenza-like symptoms, transaminitis, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia than men in arm 2. There were no significant differences in gastrointestinal or genitourinary events or QOL between the 2 arms. Two-year prostate biopsies were obtained from 37 men (84%). Thirty-three percent of men in arm 1 were biopsy-positive versus 58% in arm 2, representing a 42% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm (P=.13). There was a 60% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm in men with <50% positive biopsy cores at baseline (P=.07). To date, 1 patient in each arm exhibited biochemical failure (arm 1, 4.8%; arm 2, 4.3%). No patient developed hormone-refractory or metastatic disease, and none has died from prostate cancer. Conclusions: Combining OAMCGT with IMRT does not exacerbate the most common side effects of prostate radiation therapy and suggests a clinically meaningful reduction in positive biopsy results at 2 years in men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer.

  9. Dosimetric effects of weight loss or gain during volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pair, Matthew L.; Du, Weiliang; Rojas, Hector D.; Kanke, James E.; McGuire, Sean E.; Lee, Andrew K.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.

    2013-10-01

    Weight loss or gain during the course of radiation therapy for prostate cancer can alter the planned dose to the target volumes and critical organs. Typically, source-to-surface distance (SSD) measurements are documented by therapists on a weekly basis to ensure that patients' exterior surface and isocenter-to-skin surface distances remain stable. The radiation oncology team then determines whether the patient has undergone a physical change sufficient to require a new treatment plan. The effect of weight change (SSD increase or decrease) on intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) dosimetry is not well known, and it is unclear when rescanning or replanning is needed. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of weight change (SSD increase or decrease) on IMRT or VMAT dose delivery in patients with prostate cancer and to determine the SSD change threshold for replanning. Whether IMRT or VMAT provides better dose stability under weight change conditions was also determined. We generated clinical IMRT and VMAT prostate and seminal vesicle treatment plans for varying SSDs for 10 randomly selected patients with prostate cancer. The differences due to SSD change were quantified by a specific dose change for a specified volume of interest. The target mean dose, decreased or increased by 2.9% per 1-cm SSD decrease or increase in IMRT and by 3.6% in VMAT. If the SSD deviation is more than 1 cm, the radiation oncology team should determine whether to continue treatment without modifications, to adjust monitor units, or to resimulate and replan.

  10. Two-Year and Lifetime Cost-Effectiveness of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, Racquel E.; Sheets, Nathan C.; Wheeler, Stephanie B.; Nutting, Chris; Hall, Emma; Chera, Bhishamjit S.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the cost-effectiveness of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in the treatment of head-and neck-cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: We used a Markov model to simulate radiation therapy-induced xerostomia and dysphagia in a hypothetical cohort of 65-year-old HNC patients. Model input parameters were derived from PARSPORT (CRUK/03/005) patient-level trial data and quality-of-life and Medicare cost data from published literature. We calculated average incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) from the US health care perspective as cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained and compared our ICERs with current cost-effectiveness standards whereby treatment comparators less than $50,000 per QALY gained are considered cost-effective. Results: In the first 2 years after initial treatment, IMRT is not cost-effective compared with 3D-CRT, given an average ICER of $101,100 per QALY gained. However, over 15 years (remaining lifetime on the basis of average life expectancy of a 65-year-old), IMRT is more cost-effective at $34,523 per QALY gained. Conclusion: Although HNC patients receiving IMRT will likely experience reduced xerostomia and dysphagia symptoms, the small quality-of-life benefit associated with IMRT is not cost-effective in the short term but may be cost-effective over a patient's lifetime, assuming benefits persist over time and patients are healthy and likely to live for a sustained period. Additional data quantifying the long-term benefits of IMRT, however, are needed.

  11. High intensity focused ultrasound: A noninvasive therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    The noninvasive ablation of pancreatic cancer with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) energy is received increasingly widespread interest. With rapidly temperature rise to cytotoxic levels within the focal volume of ultrasound beams, HIFU can selectively ablate a targeted lesion of the pancreas without any damage to surrounding or overlying tissues. Preliminary studies suggest that this approach is technical safe and feasible, and can be used alone or in combination with systemic chemotherapy for the treatment of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. It can effectively alleviate cancer-related abdominal pain, and may confer an additional survival benefit with few significant complications. This review provides a brief overview of HIFU, describes current clinical applications, summarizes characteristics of continuous and pulsed HIFU, and discusses future applications and challenges in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:25469016

  12. Clinical Application of High-intensity Focused Ultrasound in Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yi-Hsuan; Kuo, Shou-Jen; Tsai, Horng-Der; Chou, Ming-Chih; Yeh, Guang-Perng

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of cancer is an important issue in both developing and developed countries. Clinical use of ultrasound in cancer is not only for the diagnosis but also for the treatment. Focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) is a noninvasive technique. By using the combination of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and imaging method, FUS has the potential to ablate tumor lesions precisely. The main mechanisms of HIFU ablation involve mechanical and thermal effects. Recent advances in HIFU have increased its popularity. Some promising results were achieved in managing various malignancies, including pancreas, prostate, liver, kidney, breast and bone. Other applications include brain tumor ablation and disruption of the blood-brain barrier. We aim at briefly outlining the clinical utility of FUS as a noninvasive technique for a variety of types of cancer treatment. PMID:26918034

  13. Clinical Application of High-intensity Focused Ultrasound in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Yi-Hsuan; Kuo, Shou-Jen; Tsai, Horng-Der; Chou, Ming-Chih; Yeh, Guang-Perng

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of cancer is an important issue in both developing and developed countries. Clinical use of ultrasound in cancer is not only for the diagnosis but also for the treatment. Focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) is a noninvasive technique. By using the combination of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and imaging method, FUS has the potential to ablate tumor lesions precisely. The main mechanisms of HIFU ablation involve mechanical and thermal effects. Recent advances in HIFU have increased its popularity. Some promising results were achieved in managing various malignancies, including pancreas, prostate, liver, kidney, breast and bone. Other applications include brain tumor ablation and disruption of the blood-brain barrier. We aim at briefly outlining the clinical utility of FUS as a noninvasive technique for a variety of types of cancer treatment. PMID:26918034

  14. High intensity focused ultrasound: a noninvasive therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng

    2014-11-28

    The noninvasive ablation of pancreatic cancer with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) energy is received increasingly widespread interest. With rapidly temperature rise to cytotoxic levels within the focal volume of ultrasound beams, HIFU can selectively ablate a targeted lesion of the pancreas without any damage to surrounding or overlying tissues. Preliminary studies suggest that this approach is technical safe and feasible, and can be used alone or in combination with systemic chemotherapy for the treatment of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. It can effectively alleviate cancer-related abdominal pain, and may confer an additional survival benefit with few significant complications. This review provides a brief overview of HIFU, describes current clinical applications, summarizes characteristics of continuous and pulsed HIFU, and discusses future applications and challenges in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:25469016

  15. Stochastic ray tracing for simulation of high intensity focal ultrasound therapy.

    PubMed

    Koskela, Julius; Vahala, Erkki; de Greef, Martijn; Lafitte, Luc P; Ries, Mario

    2014-09-01

    An algorithm is presented for rapid simulation of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fields. Essentially, the method combines ray tracing with Monte Carlo integration to evaluate the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral. A large number of computational particles, phonons, are distributed among the elements of a phase-array transducer. The phonons are emitted into random directions and are propagated along trajectories computed with the ray tracing method. As the simulation progresses, an improving stochastic estimate of the acoustic field is obtained. The method can adapt to complicated geometries, and it is well suited to parallelization. The method is verified against reference simulations and pressure measurements from an ex vivo porcine thoracic tissue sample. Results are presented for acceleration with graphics processing units (GPUs). The method is expected to serve in applications, where flexibility and rapid computation time are crucial, in particular clinical HIFU treatment planning. PMID:25190416

  16. Development of a compensator-based intensity-modulated radiation therapy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Steve Bin

    In the present work, some major issues have been addressed to develop a compensator based IMRT system. A FSPB model has been developed to calculate the dosimetric input for the inverse treatment planning and to evaluate the optimization results. The PB dose kernel is represented with a sum of three Gaussian functions. The FSPB kernel is calculated by integrating the PB kernel with a uniform fluence distribution over the FSPB cross section and thus expressed with a closed analytical form. The amplitudes and standard deviations for the Gaussians are determined by fitting the calculated broad beam dose distributions with the measured data in water phantom. The superposition of the FSPB kernels with different weights yields the dose distributions in the patient's body for irregular blocked and compensated fields. The model has been verified by comparing the calculation with measurement for typical open, blocked, and wedged fields. An optimization procedure has been developed to calculate the optimal intensity profiles and thus the compensator geometries. The objective function of quadratic form, the target dose-uniformity constraints, and the dose-volume constraints to the critical structures are integrated into an augmented objective function by the use of the Zangwill's penalty function method. The augmented objective function is minimized using a gradient method. The compensator geometries are designed using the optimized intensity profiles. The significance of the beam perturbations caused by the compensator has also been investigated using the OMEGA Monte Carlo simulation for a 6 MV beam and cerrobend compensators. The developed inverse planning system has been applied to some patient's geometries. Five clinical cases have been studied, which include two with prostate cancer and three with brain, esophagus, and lung cancers. The dose distributions achieved by the system is very conformal to the target. The target dose is very homogeneous while the critical

  17. Shape-based ultrasound tomography using a Born model with application to high intensity focused ultrasound therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ülker Karbeyaz, Başak; Miller, Eric L.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2008-01-01

    A shaped-based ultrasound tomography method is proposed to reconstruct ellipsoidal objects using a linearized scattering model. The method is motivated by the desire to detect the presence of lesions created by high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in applications of cancer therapy. The computational size and limited view nature of the relevant three-dimensional inverse problem renders impractical the use of traditional pixel-based reconstruction methods. However, by employing a shape-based parametrization it is only necessary to estimate a small number of unknowns describing the geometry of the lesion, in this paper assumed to be ellipsoidal. The details of the shape-based nonlinear inversion method are provided. Results obtained from a commercial ultrasound scanner and a tissue phantom containing a HIFU-like lesion demonstrate the feasibility of the approach where a 20 mm×5 mm×6 mm ellipsoidal inclusion was detected with an accuracy of around 5%. PMID:18529211

  18. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for head and neck cancer: emphasis on the selection and delineation of the targets.

    PubMed

    Eisbruch, Avraham; Foote, Robert L; O'Sullivan, Brian; Beitler, Jonathan J; Vikram, Bhadrasain

    2002-07-01

    The head and neck contain many critical, noninvolved structures in close vicinity to the targets. The tightly conformal doses produced by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and the lack of internal organ motion in the head and neck, provide the potential for organ sparing and improved tumor irradiation. Many studies of treatment planning for head and neck cancer have demonstrated the dosimetric superiority of IMRT over conventional techniques in these respects. The initial results of clinical studies demonstrate reduced xerostomia. They suggest an improvement in tumor control, which needs to be verified in larger studies and longer follow-up. Critical issues for successful outcome of head and neck IMRT are accurate selection of the neck lymph nodes that require adjuvant treatment, and accurate delineation on the planning computed tomography (CT) of the lymph-node bearing areas and subclinical disease adjoining the gross tumor. This review emphasizes these topics and provides some guidelines. PMID:12118389

  19. A Phase 1 Study of Everolimus + Weekly Cisplatin + Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fury, Matthew G.; Lee, Nancy Y.; Sherman, Eric; Ho, Alan L.; Rao, Shyam; Heguy, Adriana; Shen, Ronglai; Korte, Susan; Lisa, Donna; Ganly, Ian; Patel, Snehal; Wong, Richard J.; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin; Haque, Sofia; Katabi, Nora; Pfister, David G.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Elevated expression of eukaryotic protein synthesis initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in histologically cancer-free margins of resected head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) is mediated by mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and has been associated with increased risk of disease recurrence. Preclinically, inhibition of mTORC1 with everolimus sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin and radiation. Methods and Materials: This was single-institution phase 1 study to establish the maximum tolerated dose of daily everolimus given with fixed dose cisplatin (30 mg/m{sup 2} weekly × 6) and concurrent intensity modulated radiation therapy for patients with locally and/or regionally advanced head-and-neck cancer. The study had a standard 3 + 3 dose-escalation design. Results: Tumor primary sites were oral cavity (4), salivary gland (4), oropharynx (2), nasopharynx (1), scalp (1), and neck node with occult primary (1). In 4 of 4 cases in which resected HNSCC surgical pathology specimens were available for immunohistochemistry, elevated expression of eIF4E was observed in the cancer-free margins. The most common grade ≥3 treatment-related adverse event was lymphopenia (92%), and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were mucositis (n=2) and failure to thrive (n=1). With a median follow up of 19.4 months, 2 patients have experienced recurrent disease. The maximum tolerated dose was everolimus 5 mg/day. Conclusions: Head-and-neck cancer patients tolerated everolimus at therapeutic doses (5 mg/day) given with weekly cisplatin and intensity modulated radiation therapy. The regimen merits further evaluation, especially among patients who are status post resection of HNSCCs that harbor mTORC1-mediated activation of eIF4E in histologically negative surgical margins.

  20. Effect of Prolonged Radiotherapy Treatment Time on Survival Outcomes after Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Dong-Hua; Shen, Ting; Mai, Dong-Mei; Hu, Wei-Han; Mo, Hao-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the influence of prolonged radiation treatment time (RTT) on survival outcomes in nasopharyngeal carcinoma after continuous intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials Retrospectively review 321 patients with NPC treated between October 2009 and December 2010 and all of them underwent simultaneous accelerated intensity-modulated radiation therapy. The fractionated dose was 2–2.47 Gy/F (median 2.27 Gy), and the total dose for nasopharyngeal region was 64–74 Gy/ 28–33 fractions. The association of prolonged RTT and treatment interruption with PFS, LRFS and DFFS were assessed by univariate analysis and multivariate analysis. Survival analyses were carried out using Kaplan–Meier methodology and the log-rank test was used to assess the difference. The Cox regression proportional hazard model was used for multivariate analyses and evaluating the prognostic parameters for PFS, LRFS and DFFS. Results Univariate analysis revealed no significant associations between prolonged RTT and PFS, LRFS, DFFS when dichotomized using various cut-off values (all P>0.05). In multivariate analysis, RTT (range, 36–63 days) as a continuous variable, had no influence on any survival outcome as well (P>0.05). T and N classification were independent prognostic factors for PFS, LRFS and DFFS (all P<0.05, except T classification for LRFS, P = 0.057). Age was an independent prognostic factor for PFS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.033; P = 0.008) and DFFS (HR, 1.032; P = 0.043). Conclusion We conclude that no such association between survival outcomes and radiation treatment duration (range: 36–63 days) can be found in the present retrospective study, however, we have to remind that prolongation in treatment should be limited in clinical application and interruptions caused by any reason should be minimized as much as possible. PMID:26506559

  1. A stereotactic radiation therapy device for retinoblastoma using a noncircular collimator and intensity filter.

    PubMed

    Cormack, R A; Kooy, H M; Bellerive, M R; Loeffler, J S; Petersen, R A; Tarbell, N J

    1998-08-01

    The proximity of the lens to the retina makes the treatment of retinoblastoma a challenge for external beam radiation therapy. The approximately 1 mm separation between the posterior edge of the lens and the anterior region of the retina causes a trade-off between coverage of the entire retina and excessive dose to the lens. A stereotactic, LINAC based, lens sparing technique for treating retinoblastoma is presented. The technique uses noncoplanar arcs with the lens at isocenter. A special noncircular collimator blocks the lens but it al