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Sample records for intensive management system

  1. Lessons learned from past experience with intensive livestock management systems.

    PubMed

    Cronin, G M; Rault, J L; Glatz, P C

    2014-04-01

    The main impetus for 'modern' intensive animal production occurred after the Second World War, when Western governments developed policies to increase the availability of cheap, safe food for their populations. Livestock benefit under intensive husbandry by protection from environmental extremes and predators, and better nutritional and health management. Nevertheless, there are costs to the animal, such as impaired social behaviour, limited choice of living environment or pen mates, poor environmental stimulation and behavioural restrictions. The rapid progress in genetic selection of production traits has also, in some cases, adversely affected welfare by creating anatomical and metabolic problems. Above all, the intensively housed animal is heavily reliant on the stockperson and, therefore, inadequate care and husbandry practices by the stockperson may be the largest welfare risk. In a future in which the food supply may be limited as the world's population grows and land availability shrinks, intensive animal production is likely to expand. At the same time, ethical considerations surrounding intensive farming practices may also become more prominent. Novel technologies provide the opportunity to enhance both the productivity and welfare of intensively kept animals. Developing countries are also establishing more intensive commercial systems to meet their growing need for animal protein. Intensive livestock production in such countries has the potential for major expansion, particularly if such developments address the key constraints of poor welfare, inadequate nutrition, poor reproduction, poor housing, and high mortality often seen with traditional systems, and if farmer access to emerging market opportunities is improved. However, as shown by previous experience, inadequate regulation and staff who lack the appropriate training to care for the welfare of intensively housed livestock can be major challenges to overcome. PMID:25000786

  2. Hydrologic and Water Quality Assessment from an Intensively Managed Watershed Scale Turfgrass System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Managed turf accounts for approximately 17 million hectares of land in the U.S. and is the most intensively managed system in the urban landscape. The primary objective of this research effort was to assess the watershed scale hydrologic and surface water quality impact from a well managed golf cour...

  3. Biology and management of insect pests in North American intensively managed hardwood forest systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Coyle, David R.; Nebeker, T., E.; Hart, E., R.; Mattson, W., J.

    2005-01-01

    Annu. Rev. Entomol. 50:1-29. Abstract Increasing demand for wood and wood products is putting stress on traditional forest production areas, leading to long-term economic and environmental concerns. Intensively managed hardwood forest systems (IMHFS), grown using conventional agricultural as well as forestry methods, can help alleviate potential problems in natural forest production areas. Although IMHFS can produce more biomass per hectare per year than natural forests, the ecologically simplified, monocultural systems may greatly increase the crops susceptibility to pests. Species in the genera Populus and Salix comprise the greatest acreage in IMHFS in North America, but other species, including Liquidambar styracifua and Platanus occidentalis, are also important. We discuss life histories, realized and potential damage, and management options for the most economically infuential pests that affect these hardwood species. The substantial inherent challenges associated with pest management in the monocultural environments created by IMHFS are reviewed. Finally, we discuss ways to design IMHFS that may reduce their susceptibility to pests, increase their growth and productivity potential, and create a more sustainable environment.

  4. Evaluation of organic, conventional and intensive beef farm systems: health, management and animal production.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Penedo, I; Lpez-Alonso, M; Shore, R F; Miranda, M; Castillo, C; Hernndez, J; Benedito, J L

    2012-09-01

    The overall aim of the present study was to analyse and compare organic beef cattle farming in Spain with intensive and conventional systems. An on-farm study comparing farm management practices and animal health was carried out. The study also focussed on a slaughterhouse analysis by comparing impacts on the safety and quality of the cattle products. Twenty-four organic and 26 conventional farms were inspected, and farmers responded to a questionnaire that covered all basic data on their husbandry practices, farm management, veterinary treatments and reproductive performance during 2007. Furthermore, data on the hygiene and quality of 244, 2596 and 3021 carcasses of calves from organic, intensive and conventional farms, respectively, were retrieved from the official yearbook (2007) of a slaughterhouse. Differences found between organic and conventional farms across the farm analysis did not substantially reflect differences between both farm types in the predominant diseases that usually occur on beef cattle farms. However, calves reared organically presented fewer condemnations at slaughter compared with intensive and to a lesser extent with conventionally reared calves. Carcass performance also reflected differences between farm type and breed and was not necessarily better in organic farms. PMID:23031524

  5. Performance of an Electronic Diary System for Intensive Insulin Management in Global Diabetes Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyu; Mou, Jiani; Hackett, Andy P.; Raymond, Stephen A.; Chang, Annette M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: This report describes the performance of a wireless electronic diary (e-diary) system for data collection and enhanced patient–investigator interactions during intensive insulin management in diabetes clinical trials. Materials and Methods: We implemented a customized electronic communication system featuring an e-diary and a Web portal in three global, randomized, controlled Phase 3 clinical trials testing basal insulin peglispro compared with insulin glargine, both combined with prandial insulin lispro, in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and T2DM, respectively). We collected data during 28 weeks of study e-diary use for the report. Results: Patients (n=2,938) in 31 countries used e-diaries to transmit 2,439,087 blood glucose (BG) values, 96% of which were associated by the patient with a protocol time point during the 72-h response window. Of 208,192 hypoglycemia events captured, 96% had a BG value, and 95% had treatments and outcomes entered by patients within the 72-h window. Patients recorded administration of 1,964,477 insulin doses; 93% of basal insulin doses were adherent with the investigator prescription. Investigators adjusted 13 basal and 92 bolus insulin prescriptions per patient-year using the e-diary system. After 26 weeks of treatment and e-diary use in the combined study arms, hemoglobin A1c values decreased by 0.6% or 1.6% and fasting BG decreased by 7.8 or 28 mg/dL in patients with T1DM or T2DM, respectively. Conclusions: The e-diary system enabled comprehensive data collection and facilitated communication between investigators and patients for intensive insulin management in three global clinical trials testing basal insulins. PMID:25826466

  6. [Quality management in intensive care medicine].

    PubMed

    Martin, J; Braun, J-P

    2013-09-01

    Treatment of critical ill patients in the intensive care unit is tantamount to well-designed risk or quality management. Several tools of quality management and quality assurance have been developed in intensive care medicine. In addition to extern quality assurance by benchmarking with regard to the intensive care medicine, peer review procedures have been established for external quality assurance in recent years. In the process of peer review of an intensive care unit (ICU), external physicians and nurses visit the ICU, evaluate on-site proceedings, and discuss with the managing team of the ICU possibilities for optimization. Furthermore, internal quality management in the ICU is possible based on the 10 quality indicators of the German Interdisciplinary Society for Intensive Care Medicine (DIVI, "Deutschen Interdisziplinren Vereinigung fr Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin"). Thereby every ICU has numerous possibilities to improve their quality management system. PMID:23846174

  7. [Quality management in intensive care medicine].

    PubMed

    Martin, J; Braun, J-P

    2014-02-01

    Treatment of critical ill patients in the intensive care unit is tantamount to well-designed risk or quality management. Several tools of quality management and quality assurance have been developed in intensive care medicine. In addition to external quality assurance by benchmarking with regard to the intensive care medicine, peer review procedures have been established for external quality assurance in recent years. In the process of peer review of an intensive care unit (ICU), external physicians and nurses visit the ICU, evaluate on-site proceedings, and discuss with the managing team of the ICU possibilities for optimization. Furthermore, internal quality management in the ICU is possible based on the 10 quality indicators of the German Interdisciplinary Society for Intensive Care Medicine (DIVI, "Deutschen Interdisziplinren Vereinigung fr Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin"). Thereby every ICU has numerous possibilities to improve their quality management system. PMID:24493011

  8. Reducing environmental risk by improving N management in intensive Chinese agricultural systems

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Xiao-Tang; Xing, Guang-Xi; Chen, Xin-Ping; Zhang, Shao-Lin; Zhang, Li-Juan; Liu, Xue-Jun; Cui, Zhen-Ling; Yin, Bin; Christie, Peter; Zhu, Zhao-Liang; Zhang, Fu-Suo

    2009-01-01

    Excessive N fertilization in intensive agricultural areas of China has resulted in serious environmental problems because of atmospheric, soil, and water enrichment with reactive N of agricultural origin. This study examines grain yields and N loss pathways using a synthetic approach in 2 of the most intensive double-cropping systems in China: waterlogged rice/upland wheat in the Taihu region of east China versus irrigated wheat/rainfed maize on the North China Plain. When compared with knowledge-based optimum N fertilization with 30–60% N savings, we found that current agricultural N practices with 550–600 kg of N per hectare fertilizer annually do not significantly increase crop yields but do lead to about 2 times larger N losses to the environment. The higher N loss rates and lower N retention rates indicate little utilization of residual N by the succeeding crop in rice/wheat systems in comparison with wheat/maize systems. Periodic waterlogging of upland systems caused large N losses by denitrification in the Taihu region. Calcareous soils and concentrated summer rainfall resulted in ammonia volatilization (19% for wheat and 24% for maize) and nitrate leaching being the main N loss pathways in wheat/maize systems. More than 2-fold increases in atmospheric deposition and irrigation water N reflect heavy air and water pollution and these have become important N sources to agricultural ecosystems. A better N balance can be achieved without sacrificing crop yields but significantly reducing environmental risk by adopting optimum N fertilization techniques, controlling the primary N loss pathways, and improving the performance of the agricultural Extension Service. PMID:19223587

  9. A Devoted Mini-Computer System for the Management of Clinical and Laboratory Data in an Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Shinozaki, Tamotsu; Deane, Robert S.; Mazuzan, John E.

    1982-01-01

    In order to handle a large amount of clinical, laboratory and physiological information in intensive care units, a prototype distributed computer system is used at the Medical Center Hospital of Vermont. The system enables us to do extra tasks without increasing clerical help, eg., a progress note for respiratory care, statistical data for unit management, computation of cardiac and pulmonary parameters, IV schedule for vasoactive drugs, daily compilation of TISS and APACHE scores, data collection for audits and special products. Special attention is paid to computer/user interaction.

  10. In-stream nitrate responses integrate human and climate systems in an intensively managed landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, A. S.; Davis, C. A.; Burgin, A. J.; Loecke, T.; Riveros-Iregui, D. A.; Schnoebelen, D. J.; Just, C. L.; Thomas, S. A.; Weber, L. J.; St Clair, M. A.; Spak, S.; Dalrymple, K. E.; Li, Y.; Prior, K.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilization is a cornerstone of modern agriculture, but the practice also leads to eutrophication, hypoxia, and harmful algal blooms in both inland and coastal waters. Several studies identify Iowa, Illinois and Indiana as major source areas of N discharged by the Mississippi River to the Gulf of Mexico where large-scale hypoxia develops annually. Continental-scale management of nitrogen requires a comprehensive understanding of watershed-specific hydrologic dynamics and their consequences for nitrate flushing from agricultural landscapes. Spatiotemporal variation in nitrate fluxes is inherently complex due to the broad range of physicochemical and hydraulic properties that influence N movement through soils, groundwater, and rivers. In-stream N fluxes respond to both short- and long-term climactic forcing interacting with the cumulative human modification to both physical and biogeochemical systems in agricultural catchments. Here, we synthesize results from three individual studies in the Iowa River watershed. First, we demonstrate significant inter- and intra-annual variability in stream responses to rainfall events as a function of antecedent moisture conditions in three nested catchments (first through third-order). This study highlights the use of in-situ, high temporal resolution sensor networks as an emerging tool. Next, we leverage a catchment-wide synoptic study repeated in 2013 to demonstrate the landscape-scale impact of climate dynamics interacting with management decisions on the landscape. This study highlights the role of changes in extreme event frequency on water quality in agricultural landscapes. Finally, we extend results onto the landscape, using a numerical model to quantify heterogeneity of key controlling variables within the landscape (e.g., soil texture) and N retention or mobilization. We compare variability in key controls with variability driven by climate over a 60-yr period of record.

  11. Relative impacts of land-use, management intensity and fertilization on microbial community structure in agricultural systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of agricultural land management practices on soil prokaryotic diversity have not been well described. Soil microbial communities under three agricultural management systems (conventionally tilled cropland, hayed pasture, and grazed pasture) and two fertilizer systems [inorganic fertilizer (I...

  12. [Quality management in intensive care medicine. Indispensable for daily routine].

    PubMed

    Martin, J; Braun, J-P

    2012-05-01

    In areas requiring maximum safety like intensive care units or operating room departments, modern quality management and risk management are essential. Treatment of critically ill patients is associated with high risk and, therefore, demands risk management and quality management. External quality assessment in intensive care medicine has been developed based on a core data set and quality indicators. A peer review procedure has been established. In addition, regional networks of intensive care physicians result in improved local networking. In intensive care medicine, this innovative modular system of quality management and risk management is pursued more consequently than in any other specialty. PMID:22526121

  13. Does introduction of a Patient Data Management System (PDMS) improve the financial situation of an intensive care unit?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient Data Management Systems (PDMS) support clinical documentation at the bedside and have demonstrated effects on completeness of patient charting and the time spent on documentation. These systems are costly and raise the question if such a major investment pays off. We tried to answer the following questions: How do costs and revenues of an intensive care unit develop before and after introduction of a PDMS? Can higher revenues be obtained with improved PDMS documentation? Can we present cost savings attributable to the PDMS? Methods Retrospective analysis of cost and reimbursement data of a 25 bed Intensive Care Unit at a German University Hospital, three years before (20042006) and three years after (20072009) PDMS implementation. Results Costs and revenues increased continuously over the years. The profit of the investigated ICU was fluctuating over the years and seemingly depending on other factors as well. We found a small increase in profit in the year after the introduction of the PDMS, but not in the following years. Profit per case peaked at 1039 in 2007, but dropped subsequently to 639 per case. We found no clear evidence for cost savings after the PDMS introduction. Our cautious calculation did not consider additional labour costs for IT staff needed for system maintenance. Conclusions The introduction of a PDMS has probably minimal or no effect on reimbursement. In our case the observed increase in profit was too small to amortize the total investment for PDMS implementation. This may add some counterweight to the literature, where expectations for tools such as the PDMS can be quite unreasonable. PMID:24041117

  14. Foundations of data-intensive science: Technology and practice for high throughput, widely distributed, data management and analysis systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, William; Ernst, M.; Dart, E.; Tierney, B.

    2014-04-01

    Today's large-scale science projects involve world-wide collaborations depend on moving massive amounts of data from an instrument to potentially thousands of computing and storage systems at hundreds of collaborating institutions to accomplish their science. This is true for ATLAS and CMS at the LHC, and it is true for the climate sciences, Belle-II at the KEK collider, genome sciences, the SKA radio telescope, and ITER, the international fusion energy experiment. DOE's Office of Science has been collecting science discipline and instrument requirements for network based data management and analysis for more than a decade. As a result of this certain key issues are seen across essentially all science disciplines that rely on the network for significant data transfer, even if the data quantities are modest compared to projects like the LHC experiments. These issues are what this talk will address; to wit: 1. Optical signal transport advances enabling 100 Gb/s circuits that span the globe on optical fiber with each carrying 100 such channels; 2. Network router and switch requirements to support high-speed international data transfer; 3. Data transport (TCP is still the norm) requirements to support high-speed international data transfer (e.g. error-free transmission); 4. Network monitoring and testing techniques and infrastructure to maintain the required error-free operation of the many R&E networks involved in international collaborations; 5. Operating system evolution to support very high-speed network I/O; 6. New network architectures and services in the LAN (campus) and WAN networks to support data-intensive science; 7. Data movement and management techniques and software that can maximize the throughput on the network connections between distributed data handling systems, and; 8. New approaches to widely distributed workflow systems that can support the data movement and analysis required by the science. All of these areas must be addressed to enable large-scale, widely distributed data analysis systems, and the experience of the LHC can be applied to other scientific disciplines. In particular, specific analogies to the SKA will be cited in the talk.

  15. A Technical Evaluation of Wireless Connectivity from Patient Monitors to an Anesthesia Information Management System During Intensive Care Unit Surgery.

    PubMed

    Simpao, Allan F; Galvez, Jorge A; England, W Randall; Wartman, Elicia C; Scott, James H; Hamid, Michael M; Rehman, Mohamed A; Epstein, Richard H

    2016-02-01

    Surgical procedures performed at the bedside in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia were documented using paper anesthesia records in contrast to the operating rooms, where an anesthesia information management system (AIMS) was used for all cases. This was largely because of logistical problems related to connecting cables between the bedside monitors and our portable AIMS workstations. We implemented an AIMS for documentation in the NICU using wireless adapters to transmit data from bedside monitoring equipment to a portable AIMS workstation. Testing of the wireless AIMS during simulation in the presence of an electrosurgical generator showed no evidence of interference with data transmission. Thirty NICU surgical procedures were documented via the wireless AIMS. Two wireless cases exhibited brief periods of data loss; one case had an extended data gap because of adapter power failure. In comparison, in a control group of 30 surgical cases in which wired connections were used, there were no data gaps. The wireless AIMS provided a simple, unobtrusive, portable alternative to paper records for documenting anesthesia records during NICU bedside procedures. PMID:26797553

  16. Risk factors for kid mortality in West African Dwarf goats under an intensive management system in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Turkson, P K; Antiri, Y K; Baffuor-Awuah, O

    2004-05-01

    Breeding records from 1997 to 2000 for West African Dwarf goats kept under an intensive management system on the National Breeding Station at Kintampo in Ghana were analysed for the effect on mortality of sex, season and type of birth, and birth weight. The pre-weaning and post-weaning mortalities were 10% (n = 390) and 23.1% (n = 351), respectively, while the overall mortality from birth up to 12 months of age was 30.8% (n = 390). The post-weaning period recorded significantly higher proportions of deaths in males, females, single-born and twins, during the rainy and dry seasons, and for kids with low or high birth weight, compared to the pre-weaning period. There was significantly higher mortality in male kids than in female kids. The odds and risks of death for male kids were about twice those for females at post-weaning and up to 1 year of age. At pre-weaning and up to 1 year of age, a higher proportion of the dead were twins. Twins had approximately 2.5 the risk of death at pre-weaning, compared to singles. Also, kids born in the rainy season had significantly higher mortality than those born in the dry season. Kids that died by the time of weaning were significantly lighter in weight at birth than those that survived. Male kids had significantly higher mean weights at birth and at weaning, but not at 12 months of age. The significance of these findings is discussed. PMID:15241969

  17. Intensive care alarm system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, J. L.; Herbert, A. L.

    1973-01-01

    Inductive loop has been added to commercially available call system fitted with earphone receiver. System transmits high frequency signals to nurse's receiver to announce patient's need for help without disturbing others.

  18. Experience with a Simplified Computer Based Intensive Care Monitoring System in the Management of Acutely Ill Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hadley, H. Roger; Rutherford, Harold G.; Smith, Louis L.; Briggs, Burton A.; Neilsen, Ivan R.; Rau, Richard

    1979-01-01

    The need exists for a simplified and ecomonical computer based monitoring system for critically ill surgical patients. Such a system would enjoy widespread use in surgical intensive care units in regional, as well as larger community hospitals. We have assembled such a system which provides digital readout of the usual physiologic parameters, and also provide computer storage of accumulated data for review and evaluation of patient care. The computer provides graphic and digital display and digital printout for subsequent inclusion in the patient records. Most frequent indications for this system include the development of acute respiratory insufficiency or acute circulatory failure due to invasive sepsis and/or severe arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Information most beneficial in patient care included measurement of cardiac output;alveolar arterial oxygen gradient. ImagesFigure 1Figure 5Figure 9Figure 11

  19. Management Planning and Control: Supporting Knowledge-Intensive Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herremans, Irene M.; Isaac, Robert G.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop propositions for empirical validation regarding appropriate management planning and control systems (MPACS) in knowledge-intensive organizations. Design/methodology/approach: The propositions were developed from interviews with members of a knowledge-intensive virtual organization that is known for

  20. Management Planning and Control: Supporting Knowledge-Intensive Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herremans, Irene M.; Isaac, Robert G.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop propositions for empirical validation regarding appropriate management planning and control systems (MPACS) in knowledge-intensive organizations. Design/methodology/approach: The propositions were developed from interviews with members of a knowledge-intensive virtual organization that is known for…

  1. Intensive case management for severe mental illness

    PubMed Central

    Dieterich, Marina; Irving, Claire B; Park, Bert; Marshall, Max

    2014-01-01

    Background Intensive Case Management (ICM) is a community based package of care, aiming to provide long term care for severely mentally ill people who do not require immediate admission. ICM evolved from two original community models of care, Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) and Case Management (CM), where ICM emphasises the importance of small caseload (less than 20) and high intensity input. Objectives To assess the effects of Intensive Case Management (caseload <20) in comparison with non-Intensive Case Management (caseload > 20) and with standard community care in people with severe mental illness. To evaluate whether the effect of ICM on hospitalisation depends on its fidelity to the ACT model and on the setting. Search methods For the current update of this review we searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (February 2009), which is compiled by systematic searches of major databases, hand searches and conference proceedings. Selection criteria All relevant randomised clinical trials focusing on people with severe mental illness, aged 18 to 65 years and treated in the community-care setting, where Intensive Case Management, non-Intensive Case Management or standard care were compared. Outcomes such as service use, adverse effects, global state, social functioning, mental state, behaviour, quality of life, satisfaction and costs were sought. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For binary outcomes we calculated relative risk (RR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI), on an intention-to-treat basis. For continuous data we estimated mean difference (MD) between groups and its 95% confidence interval (CI). We employed a random-effects model for analyses. We performed a random-effects meta-regression analysis to examine the association of the intervention’s fidelity to the ACT model and the rate of hospital use in the setting where the trial was conducted with the treatment effect. Main results We included 38 trials (7328 participants) in this review. The trials provided data for two comparisons: 1. ICM versus standard care, 2. ICM versus non-ICM. 1. ICM versus standard care Twenty-four trials provided data on length of hospitalisation, and results favoured Intensive Case Management (n=3595, 24 RCTs, MD −0.86 CI −1.37 to −0.34). There was a high level of heterogeneity, but this significance still remained when the outlier studies were excluded from the analysis (n=3143, 20 RCTs, MD −0.62 CI −1.00 to −0.23). Nine studies found participants in the ICM group were less likely to be lost to psychiatric services (n=1633, 9 RCTs, RR 0.43 CI 0.30 to 0.61, I2=49%, p=0.05). One global state scale did show an Improvement in global state for those receiving ICM, the GAF scale (n=818, 5 RCTs, MD 3.41 CI 1.66 to 5.16). Results for mental state as measured through various rating scales, however, were equivocal, with no compelling evidence that ICM was really any better than standard care in improving mental state. No differences in mortality between ICM and standard care groups occurred, either due to ’all causes’ (n=1456, 9 RCTs, RR 0.84 CI 0.48 to 1.47) or to ’suicide’ (n=1456, 9 RCTs, RR 0.68 CI 0.31 to 1.51). Social functioning results varied, no differences were found in terms of contact with the legal system and with employment status, whereas significant improvement in accommodation status was found, as was the incidence of not living independently, which was lower in the ICM group (n=1185, 4 RCTs, RR 0.65 CI 0.49 to 0.88). Quality of life data found no significant difference between groups, but data were weak. CSQ scores showed a greater participant satisfaction in the ICM group (n=423, 2 RCTs, MD 3.23 CI 2.31 to 4.14). 2. ICM versus non-ICM The included studies failed to show a significant advantage of ICM in reducing the average length of hospitalisation (n=2220, 21 RCTs, MD −0.08 CI −0.37 to 0.21). They did find ICM to be more advantageous than non-ICM in reducing rate of lost to follow-up (n= 2195, 9 RCTs, RR 0.72 CI 0.52 to 0.99), although data showed a substantial level of heterogeneity (I2=59%, p=0.01). Overall, no significant differences were found in the effects of ICM compared to non-ICM for broad outcomes such as service use, mortality, social functioning, mental state, behaviour, quality of life, satisfaction and costs. 3. Fidelity to ACT Within the meta-regression we found that i. the more ICM is adherent to the ACT model, the better it is at decreasing time in hospital (’organisation fidelity’ variable coefficient −0.36 CI −0.66 to −0.07); and ii. the higher the baseline hospital use in the population, the better ICM is at decreasing time in hospital (’baseline hospital use’ variable coefficient −0.20 CI −0.32 to −0.10). Combining both these variables within the model, ’organisation fidelity’ is no longer significant, but ’baseline hospital use’ result is still significantly influencing time in hospital (regression coefficient −0.18 CI −0.29 to −0.07, p=0.0027). Authors’ conclusions ICM was found effective in ameliorating many outcomes relevant to people with severe mental illnesses. Compared to standard care ICM was shown to reduce hospitalisation and increase retention in care. It also globally improved social functioning, although ICM’s effect on mental state and quality of life remains unclear. ICM is of value at least to people with severe mental illnesses who are in the sub-group of those with a high level of hospitalisation (about 4 days/month in past 2 years) and the intervention should be performed close to the original model. It is not clear, however, what gain ICM provides on top of a less formal non-ICM approach. We do not think that more trials comparing current ICM with standard care or non-ICM are justified, but currently we know of no review comparing non-ICM with standard care and this should be undertaken. PMID:20927766

  2. Ongoing development of the Critical Care Information System: the collaborative approach to automating information management in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed Central

    Hravnak, M.; Stein, K. L.; Dale, B.; Hazy, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    Point-of-care (bedside) clinical information systems can fulfill a variety of functions. Included in these functions are: becoming receptacles for patient data and allowing data to be manipulated into formats that facilitate clinical decision making; functioning as sources for billing and auditing processes; interfacing to other hospital systems and bringing distant data to the bedside; and being a repository for information used in the development of hierarchical and/or relational databases. The initial and ongoing development of these systems in a dynamic clinical environment requires the construction of processes and work pathways to ensure that the needs and requirements of myriad personnel, departments and agencies within the health center milieu are addressed. PMID:1482885

  3. Intensive care management of liver transplanted patients

    PubMed Central

    Feltracco, Paolo; Barbieri, Stefania; Galligioni, Helmut; Michieletto, Elisa; Carollo, Cristiana; Ori, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Advances in pre-transplant treatment of cirrhosis-related organ dysfunction, intraoperative patient management, and improvements in the treatment of rejection and infections have made human liver transplantation an effective and valuable option for patients with end stage liver disease. However, many important factors, related both to an increasing marginality of the implanted graft and unexpected perioperative complications still make immediate post-operative care challenging and the early outcome unpredictable. In recent years sicker patients with multiple comorbidities and organ dysfunction have been undergoing Liver transplantation; appropriate critical care management is required to support prompt graft recovery and prevent systemic complications. Early post-operative management is highly demanding as significant changes may occur in both the allograft and the distant organs. A functioning transplanted liver is almost always associated with organ system recovery, resulting in a new life for the patient. However, in the unfortunate event of graft dysfunction, the unavoidable development of multi-organ failure will require an enhanced level of critical care support and a prolonged ICU stay. Strict monitoring and sustainment of cardiorespiratory function, frequent assessment of graft performance, timely recognition of unexpected complications and the institution of prophylactic measures to prevent extrahepatic organ system dysfunction are mandatory in the immediate post-operative period. A reduced rate of complications and satisfactory outcomes have been obtained from multidisciplinary, collaborative efforts, skillful vigilance, and a thorough knowledge of pathophysiologic characteristics of the transplanted liver. PMID:21487537

  4. Management intensity alters decomposition via biological pathways

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wickings, Kyle; Grandy, A. Stuart; Reed, Sasha; Cleveland, Cory

    2011-01-01

    Current conceptual models predict that changes in plant litter chemistry during decomposition are primarily regulated by both initial litter chemistry and the stage-or extent-of mass loss. Far less is known about how variations in decomposer community structure (e.g., resulting from different ecosystem management types) could influence litter chemistry during decomposition. Given the recent agricultural intensification occurring globally and the importance of litter chemistry in regulating soil organic matter storage, our objectives were to determine the potential effects of agricultural management on plant litter chemistry and decomposition rates, and to investigate possible links between ecosystem management, litter chemistry and decomposition, and decomposer community composition and activity. We measured decomposition rates, changes in litter chemistry, extracellular enzyme activity, microarthropod communities, and bacterial versus fungal relative abundance in replicated conventional-till, no-till, and old field agricultural sites for both corn and grass litter. After one growing season, litter decomposition under conventional-till was 20% greater than in old field communities. However, decomposition rates in no-till were not significantly different from those in old field or conventional-till sites. After decomposition, grass residue in both conventional- and no-till systems was enriched in total polysaccharides relative to initial litter, while grass litter decomposed in old fields was enriched in nitrogen-bearing compounds and lipids. These differences corresponded with differences in decomposer communities, which also exhibited strong responses to both litter and management type. Overall, our results indicate that agricultural intensification can increase litter decomposition rates, alter decomposer communities, and influence litter chemistry in ways that could have important and long-term effects on soil organic matter dynamics. We suggest that future efforts to more accurately predict soil carbon dynamics under different management regimes may need to explicitly consider how changes in litter chemistry during decomposition are influenced by the specific metabolic capabilities of the extant decomposer communities.

  5. Data-intensive management and analysis for scientifc simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, R.; Norris, J.; Reid, L. B.; Cal Jordan IV, G.; Weide, K.; Papka, M. E.

    2011-01-01

    Scientific simulations can produce enormous amounts of data, making the analysis of results and management of files a difficult task for scientists. The simulation management and analysis system (Smaash) described here is designed to allow scientists to easily capture, store, organize, monitor, and analyze simulation results. The system is automatic, standardized, and secure. Smaash was built using open-source tools and modularized to be independent of the scientific simulation. The web-based front-end allows the scientist to easily interact with the data, and has proved its usefulness in improving the efficiency of a scientific team's workflow. High performance parallel computing allows scientists to solve complex physical problems through computer simulation. However, the massive amounts of data generated and the complex computing environment can create additional complications. A recent review by Ludaescher et al.(2009) describes how scientific workflows can assist scientists in extracting knowledge from these data-intensive operations by automating components within pipelines. Within the fusion community, Klasky et al.(2008) and colleagues have developed a system that handles the storage management, data movement, metadata generation and management, and a means to analyze the results. In response to scientists needs, a simulation management and analysis system (Smaash) was developed at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory (USA). Smaash provides an integrated way to monitor simulations and analyze computational results; catalog, store, and retrieve simulations; and prepare output for publications. The system is independent of the particular simulation code, accessible from many HPC and browser-based platforms, and built around open-source software tools. Data security and provenance is considered throughout. The analysis components are hidden behind a web-based front end, enabling scientists to focus on their results and not get bogged down by information overload.

  6. Distributed Storage Systems for Data Intensive Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S; Butt, Ali R; Ma, Xiaosong

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors present an overview of the utility of distributed storage systems in supporting modern applications that are increasingly becoming data intensive. Their coverage of distributed storage systems is based on the requirements imposed by data intensive computing and not a mere summary of storage systems. To this end, they delve into several aspects of supporting data-intensive analysis, such as data staging, offloading, checkpointing, and end-user access to terabytes of data, and illustrate the use of novel techniques and methodologies for realizing distributed storage systems therein. The data deluge from scientific experiments, observations, and simulations is affecting all of the aforementioned day-to-day operations in data-intensive computing. Modern distributed storage systems employ techniques that can help improve application performance, alleviate I/O bandwidth bottleneck, mask failures, and improve data availability. They present key guiding principles involved in the construction of such storage systems, associated tradeoffs, design, and architecture, all with an eye toward addressing challenges of data-intensive scientific applications. They highlight the concepts involved using several case studies of state-of-the-art storage systems that are currently available in the data-intensive computing landscape.

  7. Information Resources Management: Systems Communicating with Systems. A Session Especially Designed by Senior Managers for Senior Management Officials. Viewgraphs and Presentations. Intensive One-Day Symposium (Gaithersburg, Maryland, December 3, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Services Administration, Washington, DC.

    Summaries of the welcoming and opening remarks for a symposium on the standards issues that will affect the federal government's planning, acquisition, and use of integrated computer and telecommunications systems over the next five years set the stage for the keynote address by Joseph Timko of IBM entitled "Standards--Perspectives and Evolution."…

  8. IML-CZO: Critical Zone Observatory for Intensively Managed Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Praveen; Papanicolaou, Thanos

    2014-05-01

    Intensively managed landscapes, regions of significant land use change, serve as a cradle for economic prosperity. However, the intensity of change is responsible for unintended deterioration of our land and water environments. By understanding present day dynamics in the context of long-term co-evolution of the Critical Zone comprising of the landscape, soil and biota, IML-CZO aims to support the assessment of short- and long-term resilience of the crucial ecological, hydrological and climatic services provided by the Critical Zone. An observational network of three sites in Illinois, Iowa, and Minnesota that capture the geological diversity of the low relief, glaciated, and tile-drained landscape will drive novel scientific and technological advances. IML-CZO will provide leadership in developing the next generation of scientists and practitioners, and informing management strategies aimed at reducing the vulnerability of the system to present and emerging trends in human activities. IML-CZO, one of the nine observatories funded by the United States National Science Foundation (NSF), consists of two core sites: the 3,690- sq. km. Upper Sangamon River Basin in Illinois and 270-sq. km. Clear Creek Watershed in Iowa, along with the 44,000- sq. km. Minnesota River Basin as third participating site. These sites together are characterized by low-relief landscapes with poorly drained soils and represent a broad range of physiographic variations found throughout the glaciated Midwest, and thereby provide an opportunity to advance understanding of the CZO in this important region. Through novel measurements, analysis and modeling, IML-CZO aims to address the following questions: How do different time scales of geologic evolution and anthropogenic influence interact to determine the trajectory of CZ structure and function? How is the co-evolution of biota, consisting of both vegetation and microbes, and soil affected due to intensive management? How have dynamic patterns of connectivity, which link across transition zones and heterogeneity, changed by anthropogenic impacts? How do these changes affect residence times and aggregate fluxes of water, carbon, nutrients, and sediment? IML-CZO will use historical data, existing observational networks, new instruments, remote sensing, sampling and laboratory analyses, and novel sensing technologies using open hardware and unmanned vehicles to study a number of variables related to climate and weather, hydrology, geology, geomorphology, soils, water chemistry, biogeochemistry, ecology, and land management. Additional details are available at imlczo.org.

  9. Maximizing Conservation and Production with Intensive Forest Management: It's All About Location.

    PubMed

    Tittler, Rebecca; Filotas, Élise; Kroese, Jasmin; Messier, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Functional zoning has been suggested as a way to balance the needs of a viable forest industry with those of healthy ecosystems. Under this system, part of the forest is set aside for protected areas, counterbalanced by intensive and extensive management of the rest of the forest. Studies indicate this may provide adequate timber while minimizing road construction and favoring the development of large mature and old stands. However, it is unclear how the spatial arrangement of intensive management areas may affect the success of this zoning. Should these areas be agglomerated or dispersed throughout the forest landscape? Should managers prioritize (a) proximity to existing roads, (b) distance from protected areas, or (c) site-specific productivity? We use a spatially explicit landscape simulation model to examine the effects of different spatial scenarios on landscape structure, connectivity for native forest wildlife, stand diversity, harvest volume, and road construction: (1) random placement of intensive management areas, and (2-8) all possible combinations of rules (a)-(c). Results favor the agglomeration of intensive management areas. For most wildlife species, connectivity was the highest when intensive management was far from the protected areas. This scenario also resulted in relatively high harvest volumes. Maximizing distance of intensive management areas from protected areas may therefore be the best way to maximize the benefits of intensive management areas while minimizing their potentially negative effects on forest structure and biodiversity. PMID:26076893

  10. Maximizing Conservation and Production with Intensive Forest Management: It's All About Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tittler, Rebecca; Filotas, Élise; Kroese, Jasmin; Messier, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Functional zoning has been suggested as a way to balance the needs of a viable forest industry with those of healthy ecosystems. Under this system, part of the forest is set aside for protected areas, counterbalanced by intensive and extensive management of the rest of the forest. Studies indicate this may provide adequate timber while minimizing road construction and favoring the development of large mature and old stands. However, it is unclear how the spatial arrangement of intensive management areas may affect the success of this zoning. Should these areas be agglomerated or dispersed throughout the forest landscape? Should managers prioritize (a) proximity to existing roads, (b) distance from protected areas, or (c) site-specific productivity? We use a spatially explicit landscape simulation model to examine the effects of different spatial scenarios on landscape structure, connectivity for native forest wildlife, stand diversity, harvest volume, and road construction: (1) random placement of intensive management areas, and (2-8) all possible combinations of rules (a)-(c). Results favor the agglomeration of intensive management areas. For most wildlife species, connectivity was the highest when intensive management was far from the protected areas. This scenario also resulted in relatively high harvest volumes. Maximizing distance of intensive management areas from protected areas may therefore be the best way to maximize the benefits of intensive management areas while minimizing their potentially negative effects on forest structure and biodiversity.

  11. Assessing Resilience of Intensively Managed Landscapes through Feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwell, A. E.; Kumar, P.

    2013-12-01

    Intensively managed landscapes such as those of the United States agricultural Midwest are hypothesized to be on a different trajectory than natural landscapes in terms of ecosystem processes and landscape evolution. Process networks provide a method to analyze system states as patterns of couplings and feedbacks. It has been shown using FLUXNET data that variables such as precipitation, soil temperature, soil moisture, latent heat flux, and net ecosystem exchange may exhibit synchronized relationships, time-lagged forcing behavior, or feedbacks. The strength of these couplings weakens or breaks down with environmental extremes such as drought. This study compares couplings in measured fluxes observed using a process network approach with couplings of modeled ecohydrological variables. MLCan is a multi-layer canopy-air exchange model that uses FLUXNET tower climate and flux data as input to simulate leaf uptake, stomatal conductance, photosynthesis, soil hydrology, and other descriptors of ecosystem state. This model has been used to assess vegetation acclimation to climate change, altered hydrology due to biofuel crops, and root hydraulic redistribution in different ecosystems. For this study, MLCan is used to simulate conditions for the 2005 growing season at the location of the Bondville, IL flux tower. A process network is defined with nodes representing key measured and simulated variables including streamflow at a nearby gage, precipitation, radiation, soil moisture, leaf uptake, and nutrient fluxes. Couplings are identified using mutual information and transfer entropy statistics. This study effectively validates whether simulated ecosystem state variables demonstrate information flow to the same extent as measured data. The inclusion of streamflow introduces a spatial element to the process network approach that begins to link processes with topography and land use in the watershed. Analysis of coupling types and strengths can be applied to assess resilience characteristics of intensively managed versus natural landscapes.

  12. The residence time of intensively managed agricultural landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowling, Laura; Cherkauer, Keith; Chiu, Chun-mei; Rahman, Sanoar

    2015-04-01

    Much of the agricultural landscape across the Midwestern United States is intensively managed through numerous surface and subsurface drainage improvements, and the growing extraction of groundwater resources. The relatively recent glaciation of the North Central region means that the landscape is less dissected and hydrologically connected than older till areas. Low topographic gradients and underlying dense till which restricts vertical water movement, as well as kettle depressions, have led to poorly drained soils and extensive wetlands within the landscape. Large areas of this land could only be farmed once the excess water was removed through artificial surface and subsurface drainage. Conventional wisdom in the region maintains that subsurface tile drainage reduces the occurrence of peak flow events by increasing soil water storage capacity. At the watershed scale, this view does not take into account the coincident increase in surface drainage and reduction in residence time in surface depressions. This paper explores to what degree water management and irrigation has changed surface and subsurface water storage and residence time over the last century and how this has impacted flow duration throughout the Wabash River system in Indiana, USA. The effects of subsurface tile drains, wetlands and aquifer storage are explicitly represented within the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) macroscale hydrology model. We maintain a focus on the entire Wabash River, a river system of historic importance that is also representative of many similar areas in the till plain region of the agricultural Midwest, which contribute to water quality and flood dynamics of the Mississippi river system. By lowering the water table, surface and subsurface drainage improvements have increased the subsurface storage capacity at the beginning of rain events, but this is overwhelmed by the decrease in surface storage capacity for intermediate to large events, decreasing the current residence time of water relative to pre-settlement conditions.

  13. Nursing management and organizational ethics in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Wlody, Ginger Schafer

    2007-02-01

    This article describes organizational ethics issues involved in nursing management of an intensive care unit. The intensive care team and medical center management have the dual responsibility to create an ethical environment in which to provide optimum patient care. Addressing organizational ethics is key to creating that ethical environment in the intensive care unit. During the past 15-20 yrs, increasing costs in health care, competitive markets, the effect of high technology, and global business changes have set the stage for business and healthcare organizational conflicts that affect the ethical environment. Studies show that critical care nurses experience moral distress and are affected by the ethical climate of both the intensive care unit and the larger organization. Thus, nursing moral distress may result in problems related to recruitment and retention of staff. Other issues with organizational ethics ramifications that may occur in the intensive care unit include patient safety issues (including those related to disruptive behavior), intensive care unit leadership style, research ethics, allocation of resources, triage, and other economic issues. Current organizational ethics conflicts are discussed, a professional practice model is described, and multidisciplinary recommendations are put forth. PMID:17242604

  14. [Laser and intense pulsed light management of couperose and rosacea].

    PubMed

    Dahan, S

    2011-09-01

    Management of couperosis and rosacea has been totally renewed by laser and vascular laser techniques, with efficacy targeted on the telangiectases and to a lesser extent on the erythrosis. Laser management of hypertrophic rosacea or rhinophyma depends on surgical treatment with decortication, continuous CO(2) ablative laser or Erbium, fractionated at high power, then vascular laser treatment for the telangiectases: lasers with pulsed dye, KTP, or pulsed lights for red laser telangiectases and long pulse Nd-Yag laser for blue telangiectases. For papulopustular rosacea, vascular laser treatment (pulsed dye and KTP) and intense pulsed light will be begun once the inflammation has been treated. The major indication for vascular lasers and intense pulsed light is found in erythematotelangiectatic rosacea, with high efficacy for the telangiectases. Diffuse erythrosis is difficult to treat, requiring a high number of laser and/or intense pulsed light sessions. PMID:21907878

  15. Laser and intense pulsed light management of couperose and rosacea.

    PubMed

    Dahan, S

    2011-11-01

    Management of couperosis and rosacea has been totally renewed by laser and vascular laser techniques, with efficacy targeted on the telangiectases and to a lesser extent on the erythrosis. Laser management of hypertrophic rosacea or rhinophyma depends on surgical treatment with decortication, continuous CO(2) ablative laser or Erbium, fractionated at high power, then vascular laser treatment for the telangiectases: lasers with pulsed dye, KTP, or pulsed lights for red laser telangiectases and long pulse Nd-Yag laser for blue telangiectases. For papulopustular rosacea, vascular laser treatment (pulsed dye and KTP) and intense pulsed light will be begun once the inflammation has been treated. The major indication for vascular lasers and intense pulsed light is found in erythematotelangiectatic rosacea, with high efficacy for the telangiectases. Diffuse erythrosis is difficult to treat, requiring a high number of laser and/or intense pulsed light sessions. PMID:22183103

  16. Intelligent monitoring system for intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Nouira, Kaouther; Trabelsi, Abdelwahed

    2012-08-01

    We address in the present paper a medical monitoring system designed as a multi-agent based approach. Our system includes mainly numerous agents that act as correlated multi-agent sub-systems at the three layers of the whole monitoring infrastructure, to avoid non informative alarms and send effective alarms at time. The intelligence in the proposed monitoring system is provided by the use of time series technology. In fact, the capability of continuous learning of time series from the physiological variables allows the design of a system that monitors patients in real-time. Such system is a contrast to the classical threshold-based monitoring system actually present in the Intensive Care Units (ICUs) which causes a huge number of irrelevant alarms. PMID:21505862

  17. Contingency Management Learning Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darst, Paul W.

    Contingency management is a system focused on managing the motivation of students, and can be developed and utilized in any type of physical education environment from elementary to college levels. An analysis of two existing contingency management learning systems (one for a fifth-grade gymnastics unit and the other for a seventh- and eigth-grade

  18. Difficult airway management from Emergency Department till Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Debasis; Bhattacharyya, Prithwis

    2015-09-01

    We report a case of "can ventilate but can't intubate" situation which was successfully managed in the Emergency Department and Intensive Care Unit by the use of ProSeal laryngeal mask airway and Frova Intubating Introducer as bridging rescue devices. Use of appropriate technique while strictly following the difficult airway algorithm is the mainstay of airway management in unanticipated difficult airway situations. Although the multiple airway devices were used but each step took not more than 2 min and "don't struggle, skip to the next step principle" was followed. With the availability of many advanced airway management tools, the intensivists should have a training and experience along with preparedness in order to perform such lifesaving airway managements. PMID:26430345

  19. Difficult airway management from Emergency Department till Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Debasis; Bhattacharyya, Prithwis

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of can ventilate but cant intubate situation which was successfully managed in the Emergency Department and Intensive Care Unit by the use of ProSeal laryngeal mask airway and Frova Intubating Introducer as bridging rescue devices. Use of appropriate technique while strictly following the difficult airway algorithm is the mainstay of airway management in unanticipated difficult airway situations. Although the multiple airway devices were used but each step took not more than 2 min and dont struggle, skip to the next step principle was followed. With the availability of many advanced airway management tools, the intensivists should have a training and experience along with preparedness in order to perform such lifesaving airway managements. PMID:26430345

  20. Energy resource management for energy-intensive manufacturing industries

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, C.W.; Levangie, J.

    1981-10-01

    A program to introduce energy resource management into an energy-intensive manufacturing industry is presented. The food industry (SIC No. 20) was chosen and 20 companies were selected for interviews, but thirteen were actually visited. The methodology for this program is detailed. Reasons for choosing the food industry are described. The substance of the information gained and the principal conclusions drawn from the interviews are given. Results of the model Energy Resource Management Plan applied to three companies are compiled at length. Strategies for dissemination of the information gained are described. (MCW)

  1. Autonomously managed high power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, D. J.; Bechtel, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    The need for autonomous power management capabilities will increase as the power levels of spacecraft increase into the multi-100 kW range. The quantity of labor intensive ground and crew support consumed by the 9 kW Skylab cannot be afforded in support of a 75-300 kW Space Station or high power earth orbital and interplanetary spacecraft. Marshall Space Flight Center is managing a program to develop necessary technologies for high power system autonomous management. To date a reference electrical power system and automation approaches have been defined. A test facility for evaluation and verification of management algorithms and hardware has been designed with the first of the three power channel capability nearing completion.

  2. NASA's Risk Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perera, Jeevan S.

    2011-01-01

    Leadership is key to success. Phased-approach for implementation of risk management is necessary. Risk management system will be simple, accessible and promote communication of information to all relevant stakeholders for optimal resource allocation and risk mitigation. Risk management should be used by all team members to manage risks -- risk office personnel. Each group is assigned Risk Integrators who are facilitators for effective risk management. Risks will be managed at the lowest-level feasible, elevate only those risks that require coordination or management from above. Risk reporting and communication is an essential element of risk management and will combine both qualitative and quantitative elements. Risk informed decision making should be introduced to all levels of management. Provide necessary checks and balances to insure that risks are caught/identified and dealt with in a timely manner. Many supporting tools, processes & training must be deployed for effective risk management implementation. Process improvement must be included in the risk processes.

  3. Enhancing the Biodiversity of Ditches in Intensively Managed UK Farmland

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Rosalind F.; Johnson, Paul J.; Macdonald, David W.; Feber, Ruth E.

    2015-01-01

    Drainage ditches, either seasonally flooded or permanent, are commonly found on intensively managed lowland farmland in the UK. They are potentially important for wetland biodiversity but, despite their ubiquity, information on their biodiversity and management in the wider countryside is scarce. We surveyed 175 ditches for their physical and chemical characteristics, spatial connectivity, plant communities and aquatic invertebrates in an area of intensively managed farmland in Oxfordshire, UK and collected information on ditch management from farmer interviews. Water depth and shade had a small impact on the diversity of plant and invertebrate communities in ditches. Increased shade over the ditch channel resulted in reduced taxonomic richness of both channel vegetation and aquatic invertebrates and channel vegetation cover was lower at shaded sites. Invertebrate taxonomic richness was higher when water was deeper. Spatial connectivity had no detectable impact on the aquatic invertebrate or plant communities found in ditches. The number of families within the orders Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera (EPT), which contain many pollution-sensitive species, declined with decreasing pH of ditch water. As time since dredging increased, the number of EPT families increased in permanent ditches but decreased in temporary ditches. Whether or not a ditch was in an agri-environment scheme had little impact on the reported management regime or biodiversity value of the ditch. Measures for increasing the amount of water in ditches, by increasing the water depth or promoting retention of water in ditches, could increase the biodiversity value of ditches in agricultural land. Some temporary ditches for specialised species should be retained. Reducing the amount of shade over narrow ditches by managing adjacent hedgerows is also likely to increase the species diversity of plant and invertebrate communities within the ditch. We recommend that to preserve or enhance the biodiversity value of ditches, and improve their ecosystem service delivery, management prescriptions for hedgerows adjacent to ditches should differ from those aimed at hedgerows only. PMID:26445146

  4. Training Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCowan, Richard J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a training management system developed by the Center for Development of Social Services. It is a set of practical, systematic procedures designed to manage and evaluate training programs. It is a complete model that meets the necessary criteria for competency-based training system. The system integrates the complex procedures…

  5. Farm animal well-being and intensive production systems.

    PubMed

    Swanson, J C

    1995-09-01

    Animal welfare, or well-being, is a social issue with ethical, scientific, political, and aesthetic properties. Answering questions about the welfare of animals requires scientific definition, assessment, solutions, and public acceptance. With respect to the actual well-being of the animal, most issues are centered on how the animal "feels" when managed within a specific level of confinement, during special agricultural practices (e.g., tail docking, beak trimming, etc.) and handling. Questions of this nature may require exploration of animal cognition, motivation, perception, and emotional states in addition to more commonly recognized indicators of well-being. Several general approaches have emerged for solving problems concerning animal well-being in intensive production systems: environmental, genetic, and therapeutic. Environmental approaches involve modifying existing systems to accommodate specific welfare concerns or development of alternative systems. Genetic approaches involve changing the behavioral and (or) physiological nature of the animal to reduce or eliminate behaviors that are undesirable within intensive system. Therapeutic approaches of a physical (tail docking, beak trimming) and physiological (drug and nutritional therapy) nature bring both concern and promise with regard to the reduction of confinement stress. Finally, the recent focus on commodity quality assurance programs may indirectly provide benefits for animal well-being. Although research in the area of animal well-being will provide important information for better animal management, handling, care, and the physical design of intensive production systems there is still some uncertainty regarding public acceptance. The aesthetics of modern intensive production systems may have as much to do with public acceptance as with science. PMID:8582867

  6. NASA's Risk Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perera, Jeevan S.

    2013-01-01

    Phased-approach for implementation of risk management is necessary. Risk management system will be simple, accessible and promote communication of information to all relevant stakeholders for optimal resource allocation and risk mitigation. Risk management should be used by all team members to manage risks - not just risk office personnel. Each group/department is assigned Risk Integrators who are facilitators for effective risk management. Risks will be managed at the lowest-level feasible, elevate only those risks that require coordination or management from above. Risk informed decision making should be introduced to all levels of management. ? Provide necessary checks and balances to insure that risks are caught/identified and dealt with in a timely manner. Many supporting tools, processes & training must be deployed for effective risk management implementation. Process improvement must be included in the risk processes.

  7. Metadata management staging system

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-08-01

    Django application providing a user-interface for building a file and metadata management system. An evolution of our Node.js and CouchDb metadata management system. This one focuses on server functionality and uses a well-documented, rational and REST-ful API for data access.

  8. Medical Information Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterescu, S.; Hipkins, K. R.; Friedman, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    On-line interactive information processing system easily and rapidly handles all aspects of data management related to patient care. General purpose system is flexible enough to be applied to other data management situations found in areas such as occupational safety data, judicial information, or personnel records.

  9. Waste management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, R. L.; Jorgensen, G. K.

    1975-01-01

    The function of the waste management system was to control the disposition of solid and liquid wastes and waste stowage gases. The waste management system consisting of a urine subsystem and a fecal subsystem is described in detail and its overall performance is evaluated. Recommendations for improvement are given.

  10. Management Systems in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Ivan D.

    Management systems have been adapted for educational administration in response to the need for quality of educational opportunity, collective bargaining, school district consolidation, decreasing enrollments, accountability laws, limited financial resources, and participatory decision-making. Management systems adapted, not adopted, from business…

  11. Lithium battery management system

    DOEpatents

    Dougherty, Thomas J.

    2012-05-08

    Provided is a system for managing a lithium battery system having a plurality of cells. The battery system comprises a variable-resistance element electrically connected to a cell and located proximate a portion of the cell; and a device for determining, utilizing the variable-resistance element, whether the temperature of the cell has exceeded a predetermined threshold. A method of managing the temperature of a lithium battery system is also included.

  12. Intensity-Modulated and 3D-Conformal Radiotherapy for Whole-Ventricular Irradiation as Compared With Conventional Whole-Brain Irradiation in the Management of Localized Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Michael Jenwei; Silva Santos, Adriana da; Sakuraba, Roberto Kenji; Lopes, Cleverson Perceu; Goncalves, Vinicius Demanboro; Weltman, Eduardo; Ferrigno, Robson; Cruz, Jose Carlos

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the sparing potential of cerebral hemispheres with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for whole-ventricular irradiation (WVI) and conventional whole-brain irradiation (WBI) in the management of localized central nervous system germ cell tumors (CNSGCTs). Methods and Materials: Ten cases of patients with localized CNSGCTs and submitted to WVI by use of IMRT with or without a 'boost' to the primary lesion were selected. For comparison purposes, similar treatment plans were produced by use of 3D-CRT (WVI with or without boost) and WBI (opposed lateral fields with or without boost), and cerebral hemisphere sparing was evaluated at dose levels ranging from 2 Gy to 40 Gy. Results: The median prescription dose for WVI was 30.6 Gy (range, 25.2-37.5 Gy), and that for the boost was 16.5 Gy (range, 0-23.4 Gy). Mean irradiated cerebral hemisphere volumes were lower for WVI with IMRT than for 3D-CRT and were lower for WVI with 3D-CRT than for WBI. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was associated with the lowest irradiated volumes, with reductions of 7.5%, 12.2%, and 9.0% at dose levels of 20, 30, and 40 Gy, respectively, compared with 3D-CRT. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy provided statistically significant reductions of median irradiated volumes at all dose levels (p = 0.002 or less). However, estimated radiation doses to peripheral areas of the body were 1.9 times higher with IMRT than with 3D-CRT. Conclusions: Although IMRT is associated with increased radiation doses to peripheral areas of the body, its use can spare a significant amount of normal central nervous system tissue compared with 3D-CRT or WBI in the setting of CNSGCT treatment.

  13. [Quality assurance and quality management in intensive care].

    PubMed

    Notz, K; Dubb, R; Kaltwasser, A; Hermes, C; Pfeffer, S

    2015-11-01

    Treatment success in hospitals, particularly in intensive care units, is directly tied to quality of structure, process, and outcomes. Technological and medical advancements lead to ever more complex treatment situations with highly specialized tasks in intensive care nursing. Quality criteria that can be used to describe and correctly measure those highly complex multiprofessional situations have only been recently developed and put into practice.In this article, it will be shown how quality in multiprofessional teams can be definded and assessed in daily clinical practice. Core aspects are the choice of a nursing theory, quality assurance measures, and quality management. One possible option of quality assurance is the use of standard operating procedures (SOPs). Quality can ultimately only be achieved if professional groups think beyond their boundaries, minimize errors, and establish and live out instructions and SOPs. PMID:26472462

  14. Comparison of intensive case management for psychotic and nonpsychotic patients.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Somaia

    2016-02-01

    While the original goal of intensive community-based service programs such as assertive community treatment (ACT) was reduction of hospital use, this goal has diminished in importance because of the extensive reduction in inpatient bed availability and use. This study sought to identify target populations that benefit most from such programs, hypothesizing that those with psychotic symptoms would show more benefits than others because of improved medication compliance. Administrative outcome data from the Department of Veterans Affairs Mental Health Intensive Case Management program from 2008-2011 were compared among 3 groups: (a) veterans clinically diagnosed with a psychotic disorder who also exhibited at least moderately severe psychotic symptoms (N = 2,502); (b) veterans with a psychotic disorder who did not exhibit such symptoms (N = 2,338); and (c) veterans with no psychotic diagnoses (N = 820). Baseline characteristics were compared to identify potentially confounding differences between the groups. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to compare changes in symptoms, substance use, and community functioning 6 months after entry. Two significant differences were observed between the 3 groups after controlling for baseline measures, but not in the hypothesized direction, thus failing to confirm our hypothesis. Although we did not find evidence that patients with psychotic symptoms benefit any more from intensive community-based care than other participants, this study highlights a need to clarify the role of intensive case management (ICM) services in a context in which minimizing inpatient care plays is a less central objective, and tends to encourage offering ACT to selected patients with nonpsychotic disorders. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26168139

  15. Operations management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandli, A. E.; Eckelkamp, R. E.; Kelly, C. M.; Mccandless, W.; Rue, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of an operations management system is to provide an orderly and efficient method to operate and maintain aerospace vehicles. Concepts are described for an operations management system and the key technologies are highlighted which will be required if this capability is brought to fruition. Without this automation and decision aiding capability, the growing complexity of avionics will result in an unmanageable workload for the operator, ultimately threatening mission success or survivability of the aircraft or space system. The key technologies include expert system application to operational tasks such as replanning, equipment diagnostics and checkout, global system management, and advanced man machine interfaces. The economical development of operations management systems, which are largely software, will require advancements in other technological areas such as software engineering and computer hardware.

  16. RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AMONG INTENSIVE CARE NURSES: AN ETHNOGRAPHIC STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Abbas; Najar, Ali Vafaee; Bakhshi, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nurses are the main users of supplies and equipment applied in the Intensive Care Units (ICUs) which are high-priced and costly. Therefore, understanding ICU nurses’ experiences about resource management contributes to the better control of the costs. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the culture of nurses’ working environment regarding the resource management in the ICUs in Iran. Patients and Methods: In this study, a focused ethnographic method was used. Twenty-eight informants among ICU nurses and other professional individuals were purposively selected and interviewed. As well, 400 hours of ethnographic observations as a participant observer was used for data gathering. Data analysis was performed using the methods described by Miles and Huberman (1994). Results: Two main themes describing the culture of ICU nurses regarding resource management included (a) consumption monitoring and auditing, and (b) prudent use. The results revealed that the efforts for resource management are conducted in the conditions of scarcity and uncertainty in supply. ICU nurses had a sense of futurism in the supply and use of resources in the unit and do the planning through taking the rules and guidelines as well as the available resources and their values into account. Improper storage of some supplies and equipment was a reaction to this uncertain condition among nurses. Conclusions: To manage the resources effectively, improvement of supply chain management in hospital seems essential. It is also necessary to hold educational classes in order to enhance the nurses’ awareness on effective supply chain and storage of the items in the unit stock. PMID:26889097

  17. Systems engineering management plans.

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Tamara S.

    2009-10-01

    The Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) is a comprehensive and effective tool used to assist in the management of systems engineering efforts. It is intended to guide the work of all those involved in the project. The SEMP is comprised of three main sections: technical project planning and control, systems engineering process, and engineering specialty integration. The contents of each section must be tailored to the specific effort. A model outline and example SEMP are provided. The target audience is those who are familiar with the systems engineering approach and who have an interest in employing the SEMP as a tool for systems management. The goal of this document is to provide the reader with an appreciation for the use and importance of the SEMP, as well as provide a framework that can be used to create the management plan.

  18. The impact of intensive forest management on carbon stores in forest ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Krankina, O.N.; Harmon, M.E. . Dept. of Forest Science)

    1994-06-01

    The expansion of intensive management of forest resources for timber production with the human population growth may have a profound effect on the role forests play in the global carbon cycle. First, the transition from old-growth to intensively managed second-growth forest with short rotations entails major long-term ecosystems changes including the reduction of total woody biomass. Although the biomass of living trees can be restored within a relatively short period of time, dead wood biomass takes considerably longer to reach pre-harvest levels; therefore commonly used rotations are too short for the latter part of ecosystem to recover fully. As dead trees account for 14--18% of the total woody biomass stores in a natural forest, a considerable amount of carbon can be released if this material is not replaced. Second, economically efficient, intensive forest management systems that include commercial thinning and wood salvage can further reduce the total biomass loading of second-growth forests. Long-term study of live and dead wood in thinning trials in the Pacific Northwest and in northwestern Russia suggest that intensive practices can reduce total woody biomass averaged over rotation to 10--25% that found in a natural old-growth forest. Therefore intensive forest management practices may maximize the supply of raw materials, but they may also generate a major carbon flux into the atmosphere. This flux may be significant despite the fact the land-use type remains the same. Effect of intensive forest management practices should be included in future carbon budgets and in developing forest management strategies aimed at increasing carbon storage in forest ecosystems.

  19. Intranet Document Management Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wen, H. Joseph; Yen, David C.; Lin, Binshan

    1998-01-01

    Explains how intranets facilitate documentation availability within a company at substantial cost savings. Topics include intranet document management systems (IDMS); publication costs for printed materials; hardware and software specifications; performance; and security. (Author/LRW)

  20. Automotive energy management system

    SciTech Connect

    Shiber, S.

    1980-09-23

    A hydromechanical/hydrostatic automotive energy management system is described that is comprised of two hydraulic units, the system adapted to provide: an efficient, continuously variable optimal transmission ratio, an intermittent optimal engine operation in city traffic and regenerative braking, thereby, the system is able to reduce a car's fuel consumption by as much as one half while improving drivability.

  1. A clinical decision support system prototype for cardiovascular intensive care.

    PubMed

    Lau, F

    1994-08-01

    This paper describes the development and validation of a decision-support system prototype that can help manage hypovolemic hypotension in the Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit (CVICU). The prototype uses physiologic pattern-matching, therapeutic protocols, computational drug-dosage response modeling and expert reasoning heuristics in its selection of intervention strategies and choices. As part of model testing, the prototype simulated real-time operation by processing historical physiologic and intervention data on a patient sequentially, generating alerts on questionable data, critiques of interventions instituted and recommendations on preferred interventions. Bench-testing with 399 interventions from 13 historical cases showed therapies for bleeding and fluid replacement proposed by the prototype were significantly more consistent (p < 0.0001) than those instituted by the staff when compared against expert critiques (80% versus 44%). This study has demonstrated the feasibility of formalizing hemodynamic management of CVICU patients in a manner that may be implemented and evaluated in a clinical setting. PMID:7829934

  2. Database Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    In 1981 Wayne Erickson founded Microrim, Inc, a company originally focused on marketing a microcomputer version of RIM (Relational Information Manager). Dennis Comfort joined the firm and is now vice president, development. The team developed an advanced spinoff from the NASA system they had originally created, a microcomputer database management system known as R:BASE 4000. Microrim added many enhancements and developed a series of R:BASE products for various environments. R:BASE is now the second largest selling line of microcomputer database management software in the world.

  3. Integrated work management system.

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Edward J., Jr.; Henry, Karen Lynne

    2010-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories develops technologies to: (1) sustain, modernize, and protect our nuclear arsenal (2) Prevent the spread of weapons of mass destruction; (3) Provide new capabilities to our armed forces; (4) Protect our national infrastructure; (5) Ensure the stability of our nation's energy and water supplies; and (6) Defend our nation against terrorist threats. We identified the need for a single overarching Integrated Workplace Management System (IWMS) that would enable us to focus on customer missions and improve FMOC processes. Our team selected highly configurable commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) software with out-of-the-box workflow processes that integrate strategic planning, project management, facility assessments, and space management, and can interface with existing systems, such as Oracle, PeopleSoft, Maximo, Bentley, and FileNet. We selected the Integrated Workplace Management System (IWMS) from Tririga, Inc. Facility Management System (FMS) Benefits are: (1) Create a single reliable source for facility data; (2) Improve transparency with oversight organizations; (3) Streamline FMOC business processes with a single, integrated facility-management tool; (4) Give customers simple tools and real-time information; (5) Reduce indirect costs; (6) Replace approximately 30 FMOC systems and 60 homegrown tools (such as Microsoft Access databases); and (7) Integrate with FIMS.

  4. Oil field management system

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-09-23

    Oil field management systems and methods for managing operation of one or more wells producing a high void fraction multiphase flow. The system includes a differential pressure flow meter which samples pressure readings at various points of interest throughout the system and uses pressure differentials derived from the pressure readings to determine gas and liquid phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flow. One or both of the gas and liquid phase mass flow rates are then compared with predetermined criteria. In the event such mass flow rates satisfy the predetermined criteria, a well control system implements a correlating adjustment action respecting the multiphase flow. In this way, various parameters regarding the high void fraction multiphase flow are used as control inputs to the well control system and thus facilitate management of well operations.

  5. Automated RTOP Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, P.

    1984-01-01

    The structure of NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology electronic information system network from 1983 to 1985 is illustrated. The RTOP automated system takes advantage of existing hardware, software, and expertise, and provides: (1) computerized cover sheet and resources forms; (2) electronic signature and transmission; (3) a data-based information system; (4) graphics; (5) intercenter communications; (6) management information; and (7) text editing. The system is coordinated with Headquarters efforts in codes R,E, and T.

  6. Data Grid Management Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Reagan W.; Jagatheesan, Arun; Rajasekar, Arcot; Wan, Michael; Schroeder, Wayne

    2004-01-01

    The "Grid" is an emerging infrastructure for coordinating access across autonomous organizations to distributed, heterogeneous computation and data resources. Data grids are being built around the world as the next generation data handling systems for sharing, publishing, and preserving data residing on storage systems located in multiple administrative domains. A data grid provides logical namespaces for users, digital entities and storage resources to create persistent identifiers for controlling access, enabling discovery, and managing wide area latencies. This paper introduces data grids and describes data grid use cases. The relevance of data grids to digital libraries and persistent archives is demonstrated, and research issues in data grids and grid dataflow management systems are discussed.

  7. Purge water management system

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoso-Neto, J.E.; Williams, D.W.

    1996-02-13

    A purge water management system is described for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated. 4 figs.

  8. Purge water management system

    DOEpatents

    Cardoso-Neto, J.E.; Williams, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    A purge water management system is described for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

  9. Purge water management system

    DOEpatents

    Cardoso-Neto, Joao E.; Williams, Daniel W.

    1996-01-01

    A purge water management system for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

  10. Computer memory management system

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, III, Whitson John

    2002-01-01

    A computer memory management system utilizing a memory structure system of "intelligent" pointers in which information related to the use status of the memory structure is designed into the pointer. Through this pointer system, The present invention provides essentially automatic memory management (often referred to as garbage collection) by allowing relationships between objects to have definite memory management behavior by use of coding protocol which describes when relationships should be maintained and when the relationships should be broken. In one aspect, the present invention system allows automatic breaking of strong links to facilitate object garbage collection, coupled with relationship adjectives which define deletion of associated objects. In another aspect, The present invention includes simple-to-use infinite undo/redo functionality in that it has the capability, through a simple function call, to undo all of the changes made to a data model since the previous `valid state` was noted.

  11. [Nursing performance in materials management in intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Romano, C; Veiga, K

    1998-01-01

    This study had as a goal to identify the nursing practice in management of material resources in a general hospital. It is a descriptive work of quanti-qualitative nature, performed in four ICU's (Intensive Care Units) among the largest general hospitals in Salvador-Bahia. It has been observed that (only) in three out of four Units, there was the presence of nurses in the commission of material purchase and selection. In addition, the participation of the nursing group in the process of material prevision and control is the lowest, there is lack of evaluation of purchased material; resulting, in turn, in the not occasional presence, of second line, useless and of low quality materials which directly or indirectly affect the provided care. It has been noticed that the nursing performance in material resources management became restrict, only for the reposition of these consumed materials, without, therefore, an effective and efficient insertion in the process of prevision, selection, purchasing and controlling. PMID:10776289

  12. Management Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    New Automated Management Information Center (AMIC) employs innovative microcomputer techniques to create color charts, viewgraphs, or other data displays in a fraction of the time formerly required. Developed under Kennedy Space Center's contract by Boeing Services International Inc., Seattle, WA, AMIC can produce an entirely new informational chart in 30 minutes, or an updated chart in only five minutes. AMIC also has considerable potential as a management system for business firms.

  13. Establishing a Regional Nitrogen Management Approach to Mitigate Greenhouse Gas Emission Intensity from Intensive Smallholder Maize Production

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liang; Chen, Xinping; Cui, Zhenling; Zhang, Weifeng; Zhang, Fusuo

    2014-01-01

    The overuse of Nitrogen (N) fertilizers on smallholder farms in rapidly developing countries has increased greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and accelerated global N consumption over the past 20 years. In this study, a regional N management approach was developed based on the cost of the agricultural response to N application rates from 1,726 on-farm experiments to optimize N management across 12 agroecological subregions in the intensive Chinese smallholder maize belt. The grain yield and GHG emission intensity of this regional N management approach was investigated and compared to field-specific N management and farmers' practices. The regional N rate ranged from 150 to 219 kg N ha−1 for the 12 agroecological subregions. Grain yields and GHG emission intensities were consistent with this regional N management approach compared to field-specific N management, which indicated that this regional N rate was close to the economically optimal N application. This regional N management approach, if widely adopted in China, could reduce N fertilizer use by more than 1.4 MT per year, increase maize production by 31.9 MT annually, and reduce annual GHG emissions by 18.6 MT. This regional N management approach can minimize net N losses and reduce GHG emission intensity from over- and underapplications, and therefore can also be used as a reference point for regional agricultural extension employees where soil and/or plant N monitoring is lacking. PMID:24875747

  14. Building waste management core indicators through Spatial Material Flow Analysis: net recovery and transport intensity indexes.

    PubMed

    Font Vivanco, David; Puig Ventosa, Ignasi; Gabarrell Durany, Xavier

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, the material and spatial characterization of the flows within a municipal solid waste (MSW) management system are combined through a Network-Based Spatial Material Flow Analysis. Using this information, two core indicators are developed for the bio-waste fraction, the Net Recovery Index (NRI) and the Transport Intensity Index (TII), which are aimed at assessing progress towards policy-related sustainable MSW management strategies and objectives. The NRI approaches the capacity of a MSW management system for converting waste into resources through a systematic metabolic approach, whereas the TII addresses efficiency in terms of the transport requirements to manage a specific waste flow throughout the entire MSW management life cycle. Therefore, both indicators could be useful in assessing key MSW management policy strategies, such as the consecution of higher recycling levels (sustainability principle) or the minimization of transport by locating treatment facilities closer to generation sources (proximity principle). To apply this methodological approach, the bio-waste management system of the region of Catalonia (Spain) has been chosen as a case study. Results show the adequacy of both indicators for identifying those points within the system with higher capacity to compromise its environmental, economic and social performance and therefore establishing clear targets for policy prioritization. Moreover, this methodological approach permits scenario building, which could be useful in assessing the outcomes of hypothetical scenarios, thus proving its adequacy for strategic planning. PMID:22819043

  15. Management control system description

    SciTech Connect

    Bence, P. J.

    1990-10-01

    This Management Control System (MCS) description describes the processes used to manage the cost and schedule of work performed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) for the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), Richland, Washington. Westinghouse Hanford will maintain and use formal cost and schedule management control systems, as presented in this document, in performing work for the DOE-RL. This MCS description is a controlled document and will be modified or updated as required. This document must be approved by the DOE-RL; thereafter, any significant change will require DOE-RL concurrence. Westinghouse Hanford is the DOE-RL operations and engineering contractor at the Hanford Site. Activities associated with this contract (DE-AC06-87RL10930) include operating existing plant facilities, managing defined projects and programs, and planning future enhancements. This document is designed to comply with Section I-13 of the contract by providing a description of Westinghouse Hanford's cost and schedule control systems used in managing the above activities. 5 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Software Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A software management system, originally developed for Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) by Century Computing, Inc. has evolved from a menu and command oriented system to a state-of-the art user interface development system supporting high resolution graphics workstations. Transportable Applications Environment (TAE) was initially distributed through COSMIC and backed by a TAE support office at GSFC. In 1993, Century Computing assumed the support and distribution functions and began marketing TAE Plus, the system's latest version. The software is easy to use and does not require programming experience.

  17. Management Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finlayson, Jean, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This collection of papers addresses key questions facing college managers and others choosing, introducing, and living with big, complex computer-based systems. "What Use the User Requirement?" (Tony Coles) stresses the importance of an information strategy driven by corporate objectives, not technology. "Process of Selecting a Computerised MIS in

  18. Advanced Distribution Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avazov, Artur R.; Sobinova, Liubov A.

    2016-02-01

    This article describes the advisability of using advanced distribution management systems in the electricity distribution networks area and considers premises of implementing ADMS within the Smart Grid era. Also, it gives the big picture of ADMS and discusses the ADMS advantages and functionalities.

  19. Managing Complex Dynamical Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, John C.; Webster, Robert L.; Curry, Jeanie A.; Hammond, Kevin L.

    2011-01-01

    Management commonly engages in a variety of research designed to provide insight into the motivation and relationships of individuals, departments, organizations, etc. This paper demonstrates how the application of concepts associated with the analysis of complex systems applied to such data sets can yield enhanced insights for managerial action.

  20. Content Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisniewski, Jeff; Stenstrom, Cheryl

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors provide a guide in acquiring content management system. They conducted a vendor survey that covers four areas: (1) general information about the product (including standards supported); (2) administration of the product; (3) functionality; and (4) contact information for readers who want to know more. A list of product

  1. Managing Conflict in Temporary Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilemon, David L.

    1973-01-01

    As organizational tasks have grown more complex, several innovative temporary management systems such as matrix management have been developed. The Apollo space program has been an important contribution to the development of matrix management techniques. Discusses the role of conflict within the matrix, its determinants, and the process of

  2. Analytical Services Management System

    SciTech Connect

    2005-03-30

    Analytical Services Management System (ASMS) provides sample management services. Sample management includes sample planning for analytical requests, sample tracking for shipping and receiving by the laboratory, receipt of the analytical data deliverable, processing the deliverable and payment of the laboratory conducting the analyses. ASMS is a web based application that provides the ability to manage these activities at multiple locations for different customers. ASMS provides for the assignment of single to multiple samples for standard chemical and radiochemical analyses. ASMS is a flexible system which allows the users to request analyses by line item code. Line item codes are selected based on the Basic Ordering Agreement (BOA) format for contracting with participating laboratories. ASMS also allows contracting with non-BOA laboratories using a similar line item code contracting format for their services. ASMS allows sample and analysis tracking from sample planning and collection in the field through sample shipment, laboratory sample receipt, laboratory analysis and submittal of the requested analyses, electronic data transfer, and payment of the laboratories for the completed analyses. The software when in operation contains business sensitive material that is used as a principal portion of the Kaiser Analytical Management Services business model. The software version provided is the most recent version, however the copy of the application does not contain business sensitive data from the associated Oracle tables such as contract information or price per line item code.

  3. Analytical Services Management System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-03-30

    Analytical Services Management System (ASMS) provides sample management services. Sample management includes sample planning for analytical requests, sample tracking for shipping and receiving by the laboratory, receipt of the analytical data deliverable, processing the deliverable and payment of the laboratory conducting the analyses. ASMS is a web based application that provides the ability to manage these activities at multiple locations for different customers. ASMS provides for the assignment of single to multiple samples for standardmore » chemical and radiochemical analyses. ASMS is a flexible system which allows the users to request analyses by line item code. Line item codes are selected based on the Basic Ordering Agreement (BOA) format for contracting with participating laboratories. ASMS also allows contracting with non-BOA laboratories using a similar line item code contracting format for their services. ASMS allows sample and analysis tracking from sample planning and collection in the field through sample shipment, laboratory sample receipt, laboratory analysis and submittal of the requested analyses, electronic data transfer, and payment of the laboratories for the completed analyses. The software when in operation contains business sensitive material that is used as a principal portion of the Kaiser Analytical Management Services business model. The software version provided is the most recent version, however the copy of the application does not contain business sensitive data from the associated Oracle tables such as contract information or price per line item code.« less

  4. Air System Information Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filman, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    I flew to Washington last week, a trip rich in distributed information management. Buying tickets, at the gate, in flight, landing and at the baggage claim, myriad messages about my reservation, the weather, our flight plans, gates, bags and so forth flew among a variety of travel agency, airline and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) computers and personnel. By and large, each kind of information ran on a particular application, often specialized to own data formats and communications network. I went to Washington to attend an FAA meeting on System-Wide Information Management (SWIM) for the National Airspace System (NAS) (http://www.nasarchitecture.faa.gov/Tutorials/NAS101.cfm). NAS (and its information infrastructure, SWIM) is an attempt to bring greater regularity, efficiency and uniformity to the collection of stovepipe applications now used to manage air traffic. Current systems hold information about flight plans, flight trajectories, weather, air turbulence, current and forecast weather, radar summaries, hazardous condition warnings, airport and airspace capacity constraints, temporary flight restrictions, and so forth. Information moving among these stovepipe systems is usually mediated by people (for example, air traffic controllers) or single-purpose applications. People, whose intelligence is critical for difficult tasks and unusual circumstances, are not as efficient as computers for tasks that can be automated. Better information sharing can lead to higher system capacity, more efficient utilization and safer operations. Better information sharing through greater automation is possible though not necessarily easy.

  5. Smart energy management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Aniruddha; Singh, Jugdutt

    2010-04-01

    Peak and average energy usage in domestic and industrial environments is growing rapidly and absence of detailed energy consumption metrics is making systematic reduction of energy usage very difficult. Smart energy management system aims at providing a cost-effective solution for managing soaring energy consumption and its impact on green house gas emissions and climate change. The solution is based on seamless integration of existing wired and wireless communication technologies combined with smart context-aware software which offers a complete solution for automation of energy measurement and device control. The persuasive software presents users with easy-to-assimilate visual cues identifying problem areas and time periods and encourages a behavioural change to conserve energy. The system allows analysis of real-time/statistical consumption data with the ability to drill down into detailed analysis of power consumption, CO2 emissions and cost. The system generates intelligent projections and suggests potential methods (e.g. reducing standby, tuning heating/cooling temperature, etc.) of reducing energy consumption. The user interface is accessible using web enabled devices such as PDAs, PCs, etc. or using SMS, email, and instant messaging. Successful real-world trial of the system has demonstrated the potential to save 20 to 30% energy consumption on an average. Low cost of deployment and the ability to easily manage consumption from various web enabled devices offers gives this system a high penetration and impact capability offering a sustainable solution to act on climate change today.

  6. Very high intensity fiber transmission systems

    SciTech Connect

    Setchell, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    Various applications are currently motivating interest in the transmission of very high laser intensities through optical fibers. As intensities within a fiber are increased, however, laser breakdown or laser-induced fiber damage will eventually occur and interrupt fiber transmission. For a number of years we have been studying these effects during the transmission of Q-switched, Nd/YAG laser pulses through step-index, multimode, fused-silica fiber. We have found that fiber transmission is often limited by a plasma-forming breakdown occurring at the fiber entrance face. This breakdown results in subtle surface modifications that can leave the surface more resistant to further breakdown or damage events. Catastrophic fiber damage can also occur as a result of a number of different mechanisms, with damage appearing at fiber end faces, within the initial ``entry`` segment of the fiber path, and at other internal sites due to effects related to the particular fiber routing. An overview of these past observations is presented, and issues requiring further study are identified.

  7. Power management system

    DOEpatents

    Algrain, Marcelo C. (Peoria, IL); Johnson, Kris W. (Washington, IL); Akasam, Sivaprasad (Peoria, IL); Hoff, Brian D. (East Peoria, IL)

    2007-10-02

    A method of managing power resources for an electrical system of a vehicle may include identifying enabled power sources from among a plurality of power sources in electrical communication with the electrical system and calculating a threshold power value for the enabled power sources. A total power load placed on the electrical system by one or more power consumers may be measured. If the total power load exceeds the threshold power value, then a determination may be made as to whether one or more additional power sources is available from among the plurality of power sources. At least one of the one or more additional power sources may be enabled, if available.

  8. Petascale system management experiences.

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, N.; Bradshaw, R.; Lueninghoener, C.; Cherry, A.; Coghlan, S.; Scullin, W.

    2008-01-01

    Petascale High-Performance Computing (HPC) systems are among the largest systems in the world. Intrepid, one such system, is a 40,000 node, 556 teraflop Blue Gene/P system that has been deployed at Argonne National Laboratory. In this paper, we provide some background about the system and our administration experiences. In particular, due to the scale of the system, we have faced a variety of issues, some surprising to us, that are not common in the commodity world. We discuss our expectations, these issues, and approaches we have used to address them. HPC systems are a bellwether for computing systems at large, in multiple regards. HPC users are motivated by the need for absolute performance; this results in two important pushes. HPC users are frequently early adopters of new technologies and techniques. Successful technologies, like Infiniband, prove their value in HPC before gaining wider adoption. Unfortunately, this early adoption alone is not sufficient to achieve the levels of performance required by HPC users; parallelism must also be harnessed. Over the last 15 years, beowulf clustering has provided amazing accessibility to non-HPC-savvy and even non-technical audiences. During this time, substantial adoption of clustering has occurred in many market segments unrelated to computational science. A simple trend has emerged: the scale and performance of high-end HPC systems are uncommon at first, but become commonplace over the course of 3-5 years. For example, in early 2003, several systems on the Top500 list consisted of either 1024 nodes or 4096-8192 cores. In 2008, such systems are commonplace. The most recent generation of high-end HPC systems, so called petascale systems, are the culmination of years of research and development in research and academia. Three such systems have been deployed thus far. In addition to the 556 TF Intrepid system at Argonne National Laboratory, a 596 TF Blue Gene/L-based system has been deployed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and a 504 TF Opteron-based system has been deployed at Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC). Intrepid is comprised of 40,960 nodes with a total of 163,840 cores. While systems like these are uncommon now, we expect them to become more widespread in the coming years. The scale of these large systems impose several requirements upon system architecture. The need for scalability is obvious, however, power efficiency and density constraints have become increasingly important in recent years. At the same time, because the size of administrative staff cannot grow linearly with the system size, more efficient system management techniques are needed. In this paper we will describe our experiences administering Intrepid. Over the last year, we have experienced a number of interesting challenges in this endeavor. Our initial expectation was for scalability to be the dominant system issue. This expectation was not accurate. Several issues expected to have minor impact have played a much greater role in system operations. Debugging, due to the large numbers of components used in scalable system operations, has become a much more difficult endeavor. The system has a sophisticated monitoring system, however, the analysis of this data has been problematic. These issues are not specific to HPC workloads in any way, so we expect them to be of general interest. This paper consists of three major parts. First, we will provide a detailed overview of several important aspects of Intrepid's hardware and software. In this, we will highlight aspects that have featured prominently in our system management experiences. Next, we will describe our administration experiences in detail. Finally, we will draw some conclusions based on these experiences. In particular, we will discuss the implications for the non-HPC world, system managers, and system software developers.

  9. Mastering the management system.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Robert S; Norton, David P

    2008-01-01

    Companies have always found it hard to balance pressing operational concerns with long-term strategic priorities. The tension is critical: World-class processes won't lead to success without the right strategic direction, and the best strategy in the world will get nowhere without strong operations to execute it. In this article, Kaplan, of Harvard Business School, and Norton, founder and director of the Palladium Group, explain how to effectively manage both strategy and operations by linking them tightly in a closed-loop management system. The system comprises five stages, beginning with strategy development, which springs from a company's mission, vision, and value statements, and from an analysis of its strengths, weaknesses, and competitive environment. In the next stage, managers translate the strategy into objectives and initiatives with strategy maps, which organize objectives by themes, and balanced scorecards, which link objectives to performance metrics. Stage three involves creating an operational plan to accomplish the objectives and initiatives; it includes targeting process improvements and preparing sales, resource, and capacity plans and dynamic budgets. Managers then put plans into action, monitoring their effectiveness in stage four. They review operational, environmental, and competitive data; assess progress; and identify barriers to execution. In the final stage, they test the strategy, analyzing cost, profitability, and correlations between strategy and performance. If their underlying assumptions appear faulty, they update the strategy, beginning another loop. The authors present not only a comprehensive blueprint for successful strategy execution but also a managerial tool kit, illustrated with examples from HSBC Rail, Cigna Property and Casualty, and Store 24. The kit incorporates leading management experts' frameworks, outlining where they fit into the management cycle. PMID:18271319

  10. Data Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    CENTRA 2000 Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Auto-trol technology, obtained permission to use software originally developed at Johnson Space Center for the Space Shuttle and early Space Station projects. To support their enormous information-handling needs, a product data management, electronic document management and work-flow system was designed. Initially, just 33 database tables comprised the original software, which was later expanded to about 100 tables. This system, now called CENTRA 2000, is designed for quick implementation and supports the engineering process from preliminary design through release-to-production. CENTRA 2000 can also handle audit histories and provides a means to ensure new information is distributed. The product has 30 production sites worldwide.

  11. Training Management Information System

    SciTech Connect

    Rackley, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    The Training Management Information System (TMIS) is an integrated information system for all training related activities. TMIS is at the leading edge of training information systems used in the nuclear industry. The database contains all the necessary records to confirm the department's adherence to accreditation criteria and houses all test questions, student records and information needed to evaluate the training process. The key to the TMIS system is that the impact of any change (i.e., procedure change, new equipment, safety incident in the commercial nuclear industry, etc.) can be tracked throughout the training process. This ensures the best training can be performed that meets the needs of the employees. TMIS is comprised of six functional areas: Job and Task Analysis, Training Materials Design and Development, Exam Management, Student Records/Scheduling, Evaluation, and Commitment Tracking. The system consists of a VAX 6320 Cluster with IBM and MacIntosh computers tied into an ethernet with the VAX. Other peripherals are also tied into the system: Exam Generation Stations to include mark sense readers for test grading, Production PC's for Desk-Top Publishing of Training Material, and PC Image Workstations. 5 figs.

  12. A guideline management system.

    PubMed

    Ciccarese, Paolo; Caffi, Ezio; Boiocchi, Lorenzo; Quaglini, Silvana; Stefanelli, Mario

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the architecture of NewGuide, a guide-line management system for handling the whole life cycle of a computerized clinical practice guideline. NewGuide components are organized in a distributed architecture: an editor to formalize guidelines, a repository to store them, an inference engine to implement guidelines instances in a multi-user environment, and a reporting system storing the guidelines logs in order to be able to completely trace any individual physician guideline-based decision process. There is a system "central level" that maintains official versions of the guidelines, and local Healthcare Organizations may download and implement them according to their needs. The architecture has been implemented using the Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) platform. Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) and a set of con-tracts are the key factors for the integration of NewGuide with healthcare legacy systems. They allow maintaining unchanged legacy user interfaces and connecting the system with what-ever electronic patient record. The system functionality will be illustrated in three different contexts: homecare-based pressure ulcer prevention, acute ischemic stroke treatment and heart failure management by general practitioners. PMID:15360768

  13. Management systems research study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, A. V.

    1975-01-01

    The development of a Monte Carlo simulation of procurement activities at the NASA Ames Research Center is described. Data cover: simulation of the procurement cycle, construction of a performance evaluation model, examination of employee development, procedures and review of evaluation criteria for divisional and individual performance evaluation. Determination of the influences and apparent impact of contract type and structure and development of a management control system for planning and controlling manpower requirements.

  14. Chemical Management System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-10-30

    CMS provides an inventory of all chemicals on order or being held in the laboratory, to provide a specific location for all chemical containers, to ensure that health and safety regulatory codes are being upheld, and to provide PNNL staff with hazardous chemical information to better manage their inventories. CMS is comprised of five major modules: 1) chemical purchasing, 2) chemical inventory, 3) chemical names, properties, and hazard groups, 4) reporting, and 5) system administration.

  15. Resources Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Delta Data Systems, Inc. was originally formed by NASA and industry engineers to produce a line of products that evolved from ELAS, a NASA-developed computer program. The company has built on that experience, using ELAS as the basis for other remote sensing products. One of these is AGIS, a computer package for geographic and land information systems. AGIS simultaneously processes remotely sensed and map data. The software is designed to operate on a low cost microcomputer, putting resource management tools within reach of small operators.

  16. Root Zone Sensors for Irrigation Management in Intensive Agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Pardossi, Alberto; Incrocci, Luca; Incrocci, Giorgio; Malorgio, Fernando; Battista, Piero; Bacci, Laura; Rapi, Bernardo; Marzialetti, Paolo; Hemming, Jochen; Balendonck, Jos

    2009-01-01

    Crop irrigation uses more than 70% of the world’s water, and thus, improving irrigation efficiency is decisive to sustain the food demand from a fast-growing world population. This objective may be accomplished by cultivating more water-efficient crop species and/or through the application of efficient irrigation systems, which includes the implementation of a suitable method for precise scheduling. At the farm level, irrigation is generally scheduled based on the grower’s experience or on the determination of soil water balance (weather-based method). An alternative approach entails the measurement of soil water status. Expensive and sophisticated root zone sensors (RZS), such as neutron probes, are available for the use of soil and plant scientists, while cheap and practical devices are needed for irrigation management in commercial crops. The paper illustrates the main features of RZS’ (for both soil moisture and salinity) marketed for the irrigation industry and discusses how such sensors may be integrated in a wireless network for computer-controlled irrigation and used for innovative irrigation strategies, such as deficit or dual-water irrigation. The paper also consider the main results of recent or current research works conducted by the authors in Tuscany (Italy) on the irrigation management of container-grown ornamental plants, which is an important agricultural sector in Italy. PMID:22574047

  17. Root zone sensors for irrigation management in intensive agriculture.

    PubMed

    Pardossi, Alberto; Incrocci, Luca; Incrocci, Giorgio; Malorgio, Fernando; Battista, Piero; Bacci, Laura; Rapi, Bernardo; Marzialetti, Paolo; Hemming, Jochen; Balendonck, Jos

    2009-01-01

    Crop irrigation uses more than 70% of the world's water, and thus, improving irrigation efficiency is decisive to sustain the food demand from a fast-growing world population. This objective may be accomplished by cultivating more water-efficient crop species and/or through the application of efficient irrigation systems, which includes the implementation of a suitable method for precise scheduling. At the farm level, irrigation is generally scheduled based on the grower's experience or on the determination of soil water balance (weather-based method). An alternative approach entails the measurement of soil water status. Expensive and sophisticated root zone sensors (RZS), such as neutron probes, are available for the use of soil and plant scientists, while cheap and practical devices are needed for irrigation management in commercial crops. The paper illustrates the main features of RZS' (for both soil moisture and salinity) marketed for the irrigation industry and discusses how such sensors may be integrated in a wireless network for computer-controlled irrigation and used for innovative irrigation strategies, such as deficit or dual-water irrigation. The paper also consider the main results of recent or current research works conducted by the authors in Tuscany (Italy) on the irrigation management of container-grown ornamental plants, which is an important agricultural sector in Italy. PMID:22574047

  18. A system management methodology for building successful resource management systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornstein, Rhoda Shaller; Willoughby, John K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a system management methodology for building successful resource management systems that possess lifecycle effectiveness. This methodology is based on an analysis of the traditional practice of Systems Engineering Management as it applies to the development of resource management systems. The analysis produced fifteen significant findings presented as recommended adaptations to the traditional practice of Systems Engineering Management to accommodate system development when the requirements are incomplete, unquantifiable, ambiguous and dynamic. Ten recommended adaptations to achieve operational effectiveness when requirements are incomplete, unquantifiable or ambiguous are presented and discussed. Five recommended adaptations to achieve system extensibility when requirements are dynamic are also presented and discussed. The authors conclude that the recommended adaptations to the traditional practice of Systems Engineering Management should be implemented for future resource management systems and that the technology exists to build these systems extensibly.

  19. Building waste management core indicators through Spatial Material Flow Analysis: Net recovery and transport intensity indexes

    SciTech Connect

    Font Vivanco, David; Puig Ventosa, Ignasi; Gabarrell Durany, Xavier

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sustainability and proximity principles have a key role in waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Core indicators are needed in order to quantify and evaluate them. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A systematic, step-by-step approach is developed in this study for their development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transport may play a significant role in terms of environmental and economic costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Policy action is required in order to advance in the consecution of these principles. - Abstract: In this paper, the material and spatial characterization of the flows within a municipal solid waste (MSW) management system are combined through a Network-Based Spatial Material Flow Analysis. Using this information, two core indicators are developed for the bio-waste fraction, the Net Recovery Index (NRI) and the Transport Intensity Index (TII), which are aimed at assessing progress towards policy-related sustainable MSW management strategies and objectives. The NRI approaches the capacity of a MSW management system for converting waste into resources through a systematic metabolic approach, whereas the TII addresses efficiency in terms of the transport requirements to manage a specific waste flow throughout the entire MSW management life cycle. Therefore, both indicators could be useful in assessing key MSW management policy strategies, such as the consecution of higher recycling levels (sustainability principle) or the minimization of transport by locating treatment facilities closer to generation sources (proximity principle). To apply this methodological approach, the bio-waste management system of the region of Catalonia (Spain) has been chosen as a case study. Results show the adequacy of both indicators for identifying those points within the system with higher capacity to compromise its environmental, economic and social performance and therefore establishing clear targets for policy prioritization. Moreover, this methodological approach permits scenario building, which could be useful in assessing the outcomes of hypothetical scenarios, thus proving its adequacy for strategic planning.

  20. Environmental Compliance Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Brownson, L.W.; Krsul, T.; Peralta, R.A.; Knudson, D.A.; Rosignolo, C.L.

    1992-09-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing the Environmental Compliance Management System (ECMS) as a comprehensive, cost-effective tool to ensure (1) that the Laboratory complies with all applicable federal and state environmental laws and regulations, (2) that environmental issues and concerns are recognized and considered in the early phases of projects; and (3) that Laboratory personnel conduct Laboratory operations in the most environmentally acceptable manner. The ECMS is an expert computer system which is designed to allow project engineers to perform an environmental evaluation of their projects. The system includes a Master Program which collects basic project information, provide utility functions, and access the environmental expert modules, environmental expert system modules for each federal and state environmental law which allows the user to obtain specific information on how an individual law may affect his project; and site-specific databases which contain information necessary for effective management of the site under environmental regulations. The ECMS will have the capability to complete and print many of the necessary environmental forms required by federal and state agencies, including the Department of Energy.

  1. Environmental Compliance Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Brownson, L.W.; Krsul, T.; Peralta, R.A. ); Knudson, D.A.; Rosignolo, C.L. )

    1992-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing the Environmental Compliance Management System (ECMS) as a comprehensive, cost-effective tool to ensure (1) that the Laboratory complies with all applicable federal and state environmental laws and regulations, (2) that environmental issues and concerns are recognized and considered in the early phases of projects; and (3) that Laboratory personnel conduct Laboratory operations in the most environmentally acceptable manner. The ECMS is an expert computer system which is designed to allow project engineers to perform an environmental evaluation of their projects. The system includes a Master Program which collects basic project information, provide utility functions, and access the environmental expert modules, environmental expert system modules for each federal and state environmental law which allows the user to obtain specific information on how an individual law may affect his project; and site-specific databases which contain information necessary for effective management of the site under environmental regulations. The ECMS will have the capability to complete and print many of the necessary environmental forms required by federal and state agencies, including the Department of Energy.

  2. A digital intensity stabilization system for HeNe laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhimeng; Lu, Guangfeng; Yang, Kaiyong; Long, Xingwu; Huang, Yun

    2012-02-01

    A digital intensity stabilization system for HeNe laser is developed. Based on a switching power IC to design laser power supply and a general purpose microcontroller to realize digital PID control, the system constructs a closed loop to stabilize the laser intensity by regulating its discharge current. The laser tube is made of glass ceramics and its integrated structure is steady enough to eliminate intensity fluctuations at high frequency and attenuates all intensity fluctuations, and this makes it easy to tune the control loop. The control loop between discharge current and photodiode voltage eliminates the long-term drifts. The intensity stability of the HeNe laser with this system is 0.014% over 12 h.

  3. Organic Farming and Landscape Structure: Effects on Insect-Pollinated Plant Diversity in Intensively Managed Grasslands

    PubMed Central

    Power, Eileen F.; Kelly, Daniel L.; Stout, Jane C.

    2012-01-01

    Parallel declines in insect-pollinated plants and their pollinators have been reported as a result of agricultural intensification. Intensive arable plant communities have previously been shown to contain higher proportions of self-pollinated plants compared to natural or semi-natural plant communities. Though intensive grasslands are widespread, it is not known whether they show similar patterns to arable systems nor whether local and/or landscape factors are influential. We investigated plant community composition in 10 pairs of organic and conventional dairy farms across Ireland in relation to the local and landscape context. Relationships between plant groups and local factors (farming system, position in field and soil parameters) and landscape factors (e.g. landscape complexity) were investigated. The percentage cover of unimproved grassland was used as an inverse predictor of landscape complexity, as it was negatively correlated with habitat-type diversity. Intensive grasslands (organic and conventional) contained more insect-pollinated forbs than non-insect pollinated forbs. Organic field centres contained more insect-pollinated forbs than conventional field centres. Insect-pollinated forb richness in field edges (but not field centres) increased with increasing landscape complexity (% unimproved grassland) within 1, 3, 4 and 5km radii around sites, whereas non-insect pollinated forb richness was unrelated to landscape complexity. Pollination systems within intensive grassland communities may be different from those in arable systems. Our results indicate that organic management increases plant richness in field centres, but that landscape complexity exerts strong influences in both organic and conventional field edges. Insect-pollinated forb richness, unlike that for non-insect pollinated forbs, showed positive relationships to landscape complexity reflecting what has been documented for bees and other pollinators. The insect-pollinated forbs, their pollinators and landscape context are clearly linked. This needs to be taken into account when managing and conserving insect-pollinated plant and pollinator communities. PMID:22666450

  4. [Mechanical cardiac assist systems in intensive care].

    PubMed

    Figulla, H R; Scholz, K H

    1994-01-01

    The indications for the use of mechanical cardiac assist-devices are sudden death, cardiogenic shock, severe coronary ischemia and high-risk PTCA. Among the cardiac assist-devices, currently available for cardiologists and cardiac surgeons, are the Intraaortal Balloon Pump (IABP), the implantable turbine-pump, the percutaneous cardiopulmonary support (PCPS), centrifugal pumps which are connected via a thoracotomy and intra- and extrathoracic total artificial hearts. It is easy to position the IABP, which can be continuously used over the course of several days. In the case of cardiogenic shock, the pump should be implanted as soon as possible, in order to facilitate revascularisation procedure in a patient with ischemic heart disease. By this procedures the survival rate of ischemic cardiogenic shock has been raised from 20% to 60%. However, the IABP does not prove supportive in the case of an MI without shock or in high-risk PTCA. The implantable turbine pump (Hemopump TM) is available in 3 configurations, ranging in external size from 14 F to 26 F. Of these, only the 14 F pumps can be implanted percutaneously by a Seldinger technique, whereas the bigger pumps require arteriotomy or thoracotomy for placement. The pump-rates of these systems reach from 2.0 l/min to 4.5 l/min. These pumps are used in high-risk PTCA as well as CABG-surgery without cardiopulmonary support, but are still currently in a test phase. However, at this point, it is still too early to finally evaluate the clinical importance of these systems. The percutaneous cardiopulmonary support (PCPS) has a major advantage over all other assist device systems, as it completely replaces the circulation. Therefore, PCPS is especially indicated in cardiac arrest, because it can be inserted very quickly, even without having to interrupt resuscitation. A second indication is high-risk PTCA, where it can be used also as a stand-by system. A study with 801 patients, investigating the use of this system in high-risk PTCA, resulted in a hospital mortality of 6.9%. In therapy-resistant circulatory arrest, approximately 30% of patients could be saved with this system, provided that there is a very quick access to it, as there is for example in the cardiac cath lab. Centrifugal pumps, which are inserted via a thoracotomy, and artificial hearts have become very important and are now used routinely in cardiac surgery to support patients, who have developed therapy-refractory heart failure, and in transplantation-surgery as "bridging to transplant". These systems, however, bear the complications of hemorrhage and thromboembolism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:7863708

  5. Environmental management system.

    SciTech Connect

    Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) Environmental Management System (EMS) is identification of environmental consequences from SNL/NM activities, products, and/or services to develop objectives and measurable targets for mitigation of any potential impacts to the environment. This Source Document discusses the annual EMS process for analysis of environmental aspects and impacts and also provides the fiscal year (FY) 2010 analysis. Further information on the EMS structure, processes, and procedures are described within the programmatic EMS Manual (PG470222).

  6. TFTR data management system

    SciTech Connect

    Randerson, L.; Chu, J.; Ludescher, C.; Malsbury, J.; Stark, W.

    1986-08-01

    Developments in the tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR) data-management system supporting data acquisition and off-line physics data reduction are described. Data from monitor points, timing channels, transient recorder channels, and other devices are acquired and stored for use by on-line tasks. Files are transferred off line automatically. A configuration utility determines data acquired and files transferred. An event system driven by file arrival activates off-line reduction processes. A post-run process transfers files not shipped during runs. Files are archived to tape and are retrievable by digraph and shot number. Automatic skimming based on most recent access, file type, shot numbers, and user-set protections maintains the files required for post-run data reduction.

  7. Discrepancy Reporting Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Tonja M.; Lin, James C.; Chatillon, Mark L.

    2004-01-01

    Discrepancy Reporting Management System (DRMS) is a computer program designed for use in the stations of NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) to help establish the operational history of equipment items; acquire data on the quality of service provided to DSN customers; enable measurement of service performance; provide early insight into the need to improve processes, procedures, and interfaces; and enable the tracing of a data outage to a change in software or hardware. DRMS is a Web-based software system designed to include a distributed database and replication feature to achieve location-specific autonomy while maintaining a consistent high quality of data. DRMS incorporates commercial Web and database software. DRMS collects, processes, replicates, communicates, and manages information on spacecraft data discrepancies, equipment resets, and physical equipment status, and maintains an internal station log. All discrepancy reports (DRs), Master discrepancy reports (MDRs), and Reset data are replicated to a master server at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory; Master DR data are replicated to all the DSN sites; and Station Logs are internal to each of the DSN sites and are not replicated. Data are validated according to several logical mathematical criteria. Queries can be performed on any combination of data.

  8. Intensive management in grasslands causes diffuse water pollution at the farm scale.

    PubMed

    Peukert, Sabine; Griffith, Bruce A; Murray, Phillip J; Macleod, Christopher J A; Brazier, Richard E

    2014-11-01

    Arable land use is generally assumed to be the largest contributor to agricultural diffuse pollution. This study adds to the growing evidence that conventional temperate intensively managed lowland grasslands contribute significantly to soil erosion and diffuse pollution rates. This is the first grassland study to monitor hydrological characteristics and multiple pollutant fluxes (suspended sediment [SS] and the macronutrients: total oxidized nitrogen-N [TON], total phosphorus [TP], and total carbon [TC]) at high temporal resolution (monitoring up to every 15 min) over 1 yr. Monitoring was conducted across three fields (6.5-7.5 ha) on the North Wyke Farm Platform, UK. The estimated annual erosion rates (up to 527.4 kg ha), TP losses (up to 0.9 kg ha), and TC losses (up to 179 kg ha) were similar to or exceeded the losses reported for other grassland, mixed land-use, and arable sites. Annual yields of TON (up to 3 kg ha) were less than arable land-use fluxes and earlier grassland N studies, an important result as the study site is situated within a Nitrate Vulnerable Zone. The high-resolution monitoring allowed detailed "system's functioning" understanding of hydrological processes, mobilization- transport pathways of individual pollutants, and the changes of the relative importance of diffuse pollutants through flow conditions and time. Suspended sediment and TP concentrations frequently exceeded water quality guidelines recommended by the European Freshwater Fisheries Directive (25 mg L) and the European Water Framework Directive (0.04 mg soluble reactive P L), suggesting that intensively managed grasslands pose a significant threat to receiving surface waters. Such sediment and nutrient losses from intensively managed grasslands should be acknowledged in land management guidelines and advice for future compliance with surface water quality standards. PMID:25602218

  9. Environmental Management System Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Robert; Thorson, Patrick; Horst, Blair; Speros, John; Rothermich, Nancy; Hatayama, Howard

    2009-03-24

    Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management establishes the policy that Federal agencies conduct their environmental, transportation, and energy-related activities in a manner that is environmentally, economically and fiscally sound, integrated, continually improving, efficient, and sustainable. The Department of Energy (DOE) has approved DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program and DOE Order 430.2B, Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy and Transportation Management as the means of achieving the provisions of this Executive Order. DOE Order 450.1A mandates the development of Environmental Management Systems (EMS) to implement sustainable environmental stewardship practices that: (1) Protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources potentially impacted by facility operations; (2) Meet or exceed applicable environmental, public health, and resource protection laws and regulations; and (3) Implement cost-effective business practices. In addition, the DOE Order 450.1A mandates that the EMS must be integrated with a facility's Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) established pursuant to DOE P 450.4, 'Safety Management System Policy'. DOE Order 430.2B mandates an energy management program that considers energy use and renewable energy, water, new and renovated buildings, and vehicle fleet activities. The Order incorporates the provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. The Order also includes the DOE's Transformational Energy Action Management initiative, which assures compliance is achieved through an Executable Plan that is prepared and updated annually by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL, Berkeley Lab, or the Laboratory) and then approved by the DOE Berkeley Site Office. At the time of this revision to the EMS plan, the 'FY2009 LBNL Sustainability Executable Plan' represented the most current Executable Plan. These DOE Orders and associated policies establish goals and sustainable stewardship practices that are protective of environmental, natural, and cultural resources, and take a life cycle approach that considers aspects such as: (1) Acquisition and use of environmentally preferable products; (2) Electronics stewardship; (3) Energy conservation, energy efficiency, and renewable energy; (4) Pollution prevention, with emphasis on toxic and hazardous chemical and material reduction; (5) Procurement of efficient energy and water consuming materials and equipment; (6) Recycling and reuse; (7) Sustainable and high-performance building design; (8) Transportation and fleet management; and (9) Water conservation. LBNL's approach to sustainable environmental stewardship required under Order 450.1A poses the challenge of implementing its EMS in a compliance-based, performance-based, and cost-effective manner. In other words, the EMS must deliver real and tangible business value at a minimal cost. The purpose of this plan is to describe Berkeley Lab's approach for achieving such an EMS, including an overview of the roles and responsibilities of key Laboratory parties. This approach begins with a broad-based environmental policy consistent with that stated in Chapter 11 of the LBNL Health and Safety Manual (PUB-3000). This policy states that Berkeley Lab is committed to the following: (1) Complying with applicable environmental, public health, and resource conservation laws and regulations. (2) Preventing pollution, minimizing waste, and conserving natural resources. (3) Correcting environmental hazards and cleaning up existing environmental problems, and (4) Continually improving the Laboratory's environmental performance while maintaining operational capability and sustaining the overall mission of the Laboratory. A continual cycle of planning, implementing, evaluating, and improving processes will be performed to achieve goals, objectives, and targets that will help LBNL carry out this policy. Each year, environmental aspects will be identified and their impacts to the environment will be evaluated. Objectives and targets will be developed (or updated) for each aspect that is determined to have a significant impact. Environmental Management Programs (EMPs) will be prepared (or updated) to document actions necessary for reducing certain environmental impacts. Each EMP will identify responsible parties and associated target deadlines for each action. Quarterly, environmental programs will be reviewed for compliance issues and effectiveness. Annually, an internal assessment will be performed to evaluate the progress of the EMS, and LBNL senior management will review the results. In addition, at least once every 3 years a third-party audit will be performed to validate that the EMS is being implemented according to plan.

  10. Data System Architectures: Recent Experiences from Data Intensive Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanisamy, G.; Frame, M. T.; Boden, T.; Devarakonda, R.; Zolly, L.; Hutchison, V.; Latysh, N.; Krassovski, M.; Killeffer, T.; Hook, L.

    2014-12-01

    U.S. Federal agencies are frequently trying to address new data intensive projects that require next generation of data system architectures. This presentation will focus on two new such architectures: USGS's Science Data Catalog (SDC) and DOE's Next Generation Ecological Experiments - Arctic Data System. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed a Science Data Catalog (data.usgs.gov) to include records describing datasets, data collections, and observational or remotely-sensed data. The system was built using service oriented architecture and allows USGS scientists and data providers to create and register their data using either a standards-based metadata creation form or simply to register their already-created metadata records with the USGS SDC Dashboard. This dashboard then compiles the harvested metadata records and sends them to the post processing and indexing service using the JSON format. The post processing service, with the help of various ontologies and other geo-spatial validation services, auto-enhances these harvested metadata records and creates a Lucene index using the Solr enterprise search platform. Ultimately, metadata is made available via the SDC search interface. DOE's Next Generation Ecological Experiments (NGEE) Arctic project deployed a data system that allows scientists to prepare, publish, archive, and distribute data from field collections, lab experiments, sensors, and simulated modal outputs. This architecture includes a metadata registration form, data uploading and sharing tool, a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) tool, a Drupal based content management tool (http://ngee-arctic.ornl.gov), and a data search and access tool based on ORNL's Mercury software (http://mercury.ornl.gov). The team also developed Web-metric tools and a data ingest service to visualize geo-spatial and temporal observations.

  11. CAN INTENSIVE MANAGEMENT INCREASE CARBON STORAGE IN FORESTS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    A possible response to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration is to attempt to increase the amount of carbon stored in terrestrial vegetation. ne approach to increasing the size of the terrestrial carbon sink is to increase the growth of forests by utilizing intensive forest ma...

  12. Cryptographic Key Management System

    SciTech Connect

    No, author

    2014-02-21

    This report summarizes the outcome of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contract DE-OE0000543, requesting the design of a Cryptographic Key Management System (CKMS) for the secure management of cryptographic keys for the energy sector infrastructure. Prime contractor Sypris Electronics, in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL), Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Valicore Technologies, and Purdue University's Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security (CERIAS) and Smart Meter Integration Laboratory (SMIL), has designed, developed and evaluated the CKMS solution. We provide an overview of the project in Section 3, review the core contributions of all contractors in Section 4, and discuss bene#12;ts to the DOE in Section 5. In Section 6 we describe the technical construction of the CKMS solution, and review its key contributions in Section 6.9. Section 7 describes the evaluation and demonstration of the CKMS solution in different environments. We summarize the key project objectives in Section 8, list publications resulting from the project in Section 9, and conclude with a discussion on commercialization in Section 10 and future work in Section 11.

  13. Computerized training management system

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Harold B. (Franklin Furnace, OH); McNair, Robert C. (East Setauket, NY); White, Kenneth (Shirley, NY); Maugeri, Terry (Wading River, NY)

    1998-08-04

    A Computerized Training Management System (CTMS) for providing a procedurally defined process that is employed to develop accreditable performance based training programs for job classifications that are sensitive to documented regulations and technical information. CTMS is a database that links information needed to maintain a five-phase approach to training-analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation independent of training program design. CTMS is designed using R-Base.RTM., an-SQL compliant software platform. Information is logically entered and linked in CTMS. Each task is linked directly to a performance objective, which, in turn, is linked directly to a learning objective; then, each enabling objective is linked to its respective test items. In addition, tasks, performance objectives, enabling objectives, and test items are linked to their associated reference documents. CTMS keeps all information up to date since it automatically sorts, files and links all data; CTMS includes key word and reference document searches.

  14. Computerized training management system

    DOEpatents

    Rice, H.B.; McNair, R.C.; White, K.; Maugeri, T.

    1998-08-04

    A Computerized Training Management System (CTMS) is disclosed for providing a procedurally defined process that is employed to develop accreditable performance based training programs for job classifications that are sensitive to documented regulations and technical information. CTMS is a database that links information needed to maintain a five-phase approach to training-analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation independent of training program design. CTMS is designed using R-Base{trademark}, an-SQL compliant software platform. Information is logically entered and linked in CTMS. Each task is linked directly to a performance objective, which, in turn, is linked directly to a learning objective; then, each enabling objective is linked to its respective test items. In addition, tasks, performance objectives, enabling objectives, and test items are linked to their associated reference documents. CTMS keeps all information up to date since it automatically sorts, files and links all data; CTMS includes key word and reference document searches. 18 figs.

  15. Supplier Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, Eric; Gutheinz, Sandy; Brison, James; Ho, Anita; Allen, James; Ceritelli, Olga; Tobar, Claudia; Nguyen, Thuykien; Crenshaw, Harrel; Santos, Roxann

    2008-01-01

    Supplier Management System (SMS) allows for a consistent, agency-wide performance rating system for suppliers used by NASA. This version (2.0) combines separate databases into one central database that allows for the sharing of supplier data. Information extracted from the NBS/Oracle database can be used to generate ratings. Also, supplier ratings can now be generated in the areas of cost, product quality, delivery, and audit data. Supplier data can be charted based on real-time user input. Based on these individual ratings, an overall rating can be generated. Data that normally would be stored in multiple databases, each requiring its own log-in, is now readily available and easily accessible with only one log-in required. Additionally, the database can accommodate the storage and display of quality-related data that can be analyzed and used in the supplier procurement decision-making process. Moreover, the software allows for a Closed-Loop System (supplier feedback), as well as the capability to communicate with other federal agencies.

  16. Manpower management information system /MIS/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gravette, M. C.; King, W. L.

    1971-01-01

    System of programs capable of building and maintaining data bank provides all levels of management with regular manpower evaluation reports and data source for special management exercises on manpower.

  17. Effect of channel catfish stocking rate on yield and water quality in an intensive production system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of stocking rate on production of NWAC 103 strain channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) and water quality was investigated using a completely randomized design in an intensively managed biofloc raceway system. Each of the 9 HDPE-lined raceways (4.6 m x 9.2 m with a 0.9-m water depth; 42.2...

  18. Avian Species Richness in Relation to Intensive Forest Management Practices in Early Seral Tree Plantations

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jay E.; Kroll, Andrew J.; Giovanini, Jack; Duke, Steven D.; Ellis, Tana M.; Betts, Matthew G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Managers of landscapes dedicated to forest commodity production require information about how practices influence biological diversity. Individual species and communities may be threatened if management practices truncate or simplify forest age classes that are essential for reproduction and survival. For instance, the degradation and loss of complex diverse forest in young age classes have been associated with declines in forest-associated Neotropical migrant bird populations in the Pacific Northwest, USA. These declines may be exacerbated by intensive forest management practices that reduce hardwood and broadleaf shrub cover in order to promote growth of economically valuable tree species in plantations. Methodology and Principal Findings We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to evaluate relationships between avian species richness and vegetation variables that reflect stand management intensity (primarily via herbicide application) on 212 tree plantations in the Coast Range, Oregon, USA. Specifically, we estimated the influence of broadleaf hardwood vegetation cover, which is reduced through herbicide applications, on bird species richness and individual species occupancy. Our model accounted for imperfect detection. We used average predictive comparisons to quantify the degree of association between vegetation variables and species richness. Both conifer and hardwood cover were positively associated with total species richness, suggesting that these components of forest stand composition may be important predictors of alpha diversity. Estimates of species richness were 3580% lower when imperfect detection was ignored (depending on covariate values), a result that has critical implications for previous efforts that have examined relationships between forest composition and species richness. Conclusion and Significance Our results revealed that individual and community responses were positively associated with both conifer and hardwood cover. In our system, patterns of bird community assembly appear to be associated with stand management strategies that retain or increase hardwood vegetation while simultaneously regenerating the conifer cover in commercial tree plantations. PMID:22905249

  19. Comparison of net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity affected by management practices in two dryland cropping sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the effect of management practices on net global warming potential (GWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) that account for all sources and sinks of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in dryland cropping systems. The objective of this study was to compare the effect of a combinat...

  20. Integrated Management Tracking System

    SciTech Connect

    2000-03-30

    The Integrated Management Tracking System (IMTS) is a "Web Enabled" Client/Server Business application that provides for the Identification and Resolution of commitments, situations, events and problems. The IMTS engine is written with Microsoft Active Server Pages (ASP) for IIS4. The system provides for reporting, entering, editing, closing and administration over a Intranet, Extranet or Internet. This Application facilitates: Electronic assignment, acceptance and tracking to completion. Email notifications of assigned action. Establishment of Due Dates. Electronic search and retrieval based on keywords in combination with user specified database parameters (Document Type, Date Ranges, etc.). Coded for Trending and Reporting. User selected reports. Various levels of access for reports and administration. The "Server" side of this application consists of a Microsoft Access database running on a NT Server with Internet Information Server (IIS). As the "Client" side of the application runs on any Web browser, this solution is a cost effective, user friendly application that lends itself to organizations not physically colocated in one location providing information immediately available to everyone at once.

  1. Integrated Management Tracking System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2000-03-30

    The Integrated Management Tracking System (IMTS) is a "Web Enabled" Client/Server Business application that provides for the Identification and Resolution of commitments, situations, events and problems. The IMTS engine is written with Microsoft Active Server Pages (ASP) for IIS4. The system provides for reporting, entering, editing, closing and administration over a Intranet, Extranet or Internet. This Application facilitates: Electronic assignment, acceptance and tracking to completion. Email notifications of assigned action. Establishment of Due Dates. Electronicmore » search and retrieval based on keywords in combination with user specified database parameters (Document Type, Date Ranges, etc.). Coded for Trending and Reporting. User selected reports. Various levels of access for reports and administration. The "Server" side of this application consists of a Microsoft Access database running on a NT Server with Internet Information Server (IIS). As the "Client" side of the application runs on any Web browser, this solution is a cost effective, user friendly application that lends itself to organizations not physically colocated in one location providing information immediately available to everyone at once.« less

  2. Systems management techniques and problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Report is reviewed which discusses history and trends of systems management, its basic principles, and nature of problems that lend themselves to systems approach. Report discusses systems engineering as applied to weapons acquisition, ecology, patient monitoring, and retail merchandise operations.

  3. QFD Application to a Software - Intensive System Development Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, T. L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Quality Function Deployment (QFD), adapted to requirements engineering for a software-intensive system development project, and sysnthesizes the lessons learned from the application of QFD to the Network Control System (NCS) pre-project of the Deep Space Network.

  4. Management of Acute Right Ventricular Failure in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Ventetuolo, Corey E.

    2014-01-01

    Right ventricular (RV) failure occurs when the RV fails to maintain enough blood flow through the pulmonary circulation to achieve adequate left ventricular filling. This can occur suddenly in a previously healthy heart due to massive pulmonary embolism or right-sided myocardial infarction, but many cases encountered in the intensive care unit involve worsening of compensated RV failure in the setting of chronic heart and lung disease. Management of RV failure is directed at optimizing right-sided filling pressures and reducing afterload. Due to a lower level of vascular tone, vasoactive medications have less salient effects on reducing vascular resistance in the pulmonary than in the systemic circulation. Successful management requires reversal of any conditions that heighten pulmonary vascular tone and the use of selective pulmonary vasodilators at doses that do not induce systemic hypotension or worsening of oxygenation. Systemic systolic arterial pressure should be kept close to RV systolic pressure to maintain RV perfusion. When these efforts fail, the judicious use of inotropic agents may help improve RV contractility enough to maintain cardiac output. Extracorporeal life support is increasingly being used to support patients with acute RV failure who fail to respond to medical management while the underlying cause of their RV failure is addressed. PMID:24828526

  5. SUPERFUND SOILS DATA MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the Superfund Soil Data Management System (DMS), a PC-based data system being developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in its effort to manage and evaluate treatment and performance data for contaminated soil, sludge, and debris. his system...

  6. Project management knowledge engineering system

    SciTech Connect

    Rahbar, F.F. ); Yates, J.K. ); Spencer, G.R. )

    1991-07-01

    This article examines a knowledge-based optimal scheduling system designed to monitor the progress towards project objectives and minimize delays in scheduled completion dates. This computerized system was developed to reduce management by exception techniques (crisis management) and to help concentrate efforts on project objectives. The system's operation and use are discussed.

  7. Spatial intensity profiling of an industrial laser welding system

    SciTech Connect

    Milewski, J.O.

    1991-12-31

    A investigation was conducted to devise a method to sense the laser beam intensity profile of an industrial laser welding system. The research focuses on monitoring methods and assessing locations within the system where data can be taken which reveal the relationship between the laser beam intensity profile and the input system parameters of the laser beam welding process. Emphasis has been placed on the configuration of a distributed computing environment to acquire, analyze and display the results of the sensed beam profile. Conventional image processing techniques are demonstrated. It was found that a distributed computing environment was useful for processing the large volumes of data generated by this process characterization method, and the distributed computing environment provided the computing power required for computationally intensive analysis and display techniques. The mathematical techniques used to discriminate one data set from another and relate the results to processing conditions are discussed.

  8. Fluid management system technology discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symons, E. Patrick

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on fluid management system technology discipline for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: subcritical cryogenic storage and transfer; fluid handling; and components and instrumentation.

  9. Closed-loop control for cardiopulmonary management and intensive care unit sedation using digital imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, Behnood

    This dissertation introduces a new problem in the delivery of healthcare, which could result in lower cost and a higher quality of medical care as compared to the current healthcare practice. In particular, a framework is developed for sedation and cardiopulmonary management for patients in the intensive care unit. A method is introduced to automatically detect pain and agitation in nonverbal patients, specifically in sedated patients in the intensive care unit, using their facial expressions. Furthermore, deterministic as well as probabilistic expert systems are developed to suggest the appropriate drug dose based on patient sedation level. Patients in the intensive care unit who require mechanical ventilation due to acute respiratory failure also frequently require the administration of sedative agents. The need for sedation arises both from patient anxiety due to the loss of personal control and the unfamiliar and intrusive environment of the intensive care unit, and also due to pain or other variants of noxious stimuli. In this dissertation, we develop a rule-based expert system for cardiopulmonary management and intensive care unit sedation. Furthermore, we use probability theory to quantify uncertainty and to extend the proposed rule-based expert system to deal with more realistic situations. Pain assessment in patients who are unable to verbally communicate is a challenging problem. The fundamental limitations in pain assessment stem from subjective assessment criteria, rather than quantifiable, measurable data. The relevance vector machine (RVM) classification technique is a Bayesian extension of the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm which achieves comparable performance to SVM while providing posterior probabilities for class memberships and a sparser model. In this dissertation, we use the RVM classification technique to distinguish pain from non-pain as well as assess pain intensity levels. We also correlate our results with the pain intensity assessed by expert and non-expert human examiners. Next, we consider facial expression recognition using an unsupervised learning framework. We show that different facial expressions reside on distinct subspaces if the manifold is unfolded. In particular, semi-definite embedding is used to reduce the dimensionality and unfold the manifold of facial images. Next, generalized principal component analysis is used to fit a series of subspaces to the data points and associate each data point to a subspace. Data points that belong to the same subspace are shown to belong to the same facial expression. In clinical intensive care unit practice sedative/analgesic agents are titrated to achieve a specific level of sedation. The level of sedation is currently based on clinical scoring systems. Examples include the motor activity assessment scale (MAAS), the Richmond agitation-sedation scale (RASS), and the modified Ramsay sedation scale (MRSS). In general, the goal of the clinician is to find the drug dose that maintains the patient at a sedation score corresponding to a moderately sedated state. In this research, we use pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling to find an optimal drug dosing control policy to drive the patient to a desired MRSS score. Atrial fibrillation, a cardiac arrhythmia characterized by unsynchronized electrical activity in the atrial chambers of the heart, is a rapidly growing problem in modern societies. One treatment, referred to as catheter ablation, targets specific parts of the left atrium for radio frequency ablation using an intracardiac catheter. As a first step towards the general solution to the computer-assisted segmentation of the left atrial wall, we use shape learning and shape-based image segmentation to identify the endocardial wall of the left atrium in the delayed-enhancement magnetic resonance images. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  10. Dynamic light intensity detection system of aerodrome assistance light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jianshu; Song, Jiye; Yu, Zhijing; Chen, Fei; Shi, Xudong; Gao, Qingji

    2007-11-01

    The techniques used in dynamic detection of airfield lighting intensity are introduced in this paper. These techniques can take place of the old method of checking all manually, and the system can detect the lights intensity online quickly and exactly, so as to find out the light faults and ensure the safety of planes taking off, landing and slipping. The system uses a car with a string of sensors which have been cosine calibrated and v(?) calibrated to detect the light intensity. When the car is moving, the sensors can detect the lights' horizontal section. To accurately measure the distance from the measured aerodrome assistance light to the moving car, and then calculate the light intensity and protract the iso-candela curve, the Doppler ranging radar system is used. To guarantee the dependability of the system and the measurement precision, a video monitoring and guiding system is used to assure the car to run along the airfield lights line, then light orientation sensors are used to eliminate the radar's cumulating errors. The experiment indicates that this system is feasible and has high detecting precision.

  11. Stream Channel Change in an Intensively Managed Agricultural Landscape: Implications for Critical Zone Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Q. W.; Rhoads, B. L.; Andresen, W.

    2014-12-01

    During the Anthropocene, humans have had a substantial impact on fluvial systems throughout the world. Perhaps nowhere is the human imprint on stream systems more pronounced than in the intensively managed agriculture landscapes of the midwestern United States. This study examines changes in the structure of the stream network and in the planform dynamics of stream channels within the upper Sangamon River basin in Illinois - a watershed that is part of a new Critical Zone Observatory focusing on intensively managed landscapes (IML-CZO). The research explores changes in network structure as the landscape changed from prairie and forest into drained farmland dominated by row crop agriculture. It also documents the planform dynamics of stream and river channels over the past 80 to 100 years. Results show that the spatial extent of channels within the stream network expanded greatly as land was cleared and drained for agriculture. Expansion of the network into headwater portions of the watershed occurred through the construction of drainage ditches that serve as outlets for tile drainage systems underlying relatively flat, poorly drained farmland. Analysis of planform dynamics reveals that most of these drainage ditches have not changed alignment since initial construction. Although drainage ditches are maintained by local drainage districts, these human-created channels also are remarkably resistant to change in planform over time. The major type of planform change in headwater streams involves artificial straightening of meandering channels to expand the extent of drainage channels. Many sections of the meandering Sangamon River are heavily forested and exhibit little or no planform change over the past 80-100 years. Sections that are most active tend to occur where forest cover is less prevalent due to clearing of trees for pasture or cropland. Overall, the results demonstrate the pronounced imprint of humans on the structure and planform dynamics of a fluvial system in an intensively managed watershed. Undoubtedly this imprint has an important influence on downstream fluxes of water, nutrients, and sediment, which are a primary focus of ongoing process-based research in the IML-CZO.

  12. A Low Intensity Rainfall Simulator and Runoff Collection System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponte, V. M.; Piechota, T. C.

    2001-12-01

    In the past, rainfall simulators have been designed for high intensity events; however there is a lack of studies on the simulation of low rainfall intensities. This research presents a system capable of performing rainfall simulations over large areas with intensities as low as 15.5mm/h (0.6in/h) and a Coefficient of Variation greater than 0.8. The system consists of towers distributed spatially in the corners of hypothetical equilateral triangles with varying sizes. The simulation area should be inside the triangles to ensure adequate coverage and minimize wind effects. Thus, the minimum configuration for the system is three towers. Each tower consists of three aluminum legs that are 2.5m (8ft) high and support a 1/4 GG - SS 10 nozzle, manufactured by Spraying Systems Corporation. A pressure gauge is incorporated in each tower to monitor the flow. The water supply is pumped from a tank into a main hose that has a flow control and pressure gauge. The water is subdivided into individual hoses that supply water to each tower. The hose diameters vary according to the number of towers used in each simulation. This configuration is capable of simulating a wide range of rainfall intensities over small and large regions. The collection of the runoff is accomplished with a 1 1/2 in semicircular PVC Pipe. This system is applied to a research project that evaluates the impacts of dust suppressants on disturbed lands.

  13. Effects of coffee management intensity on composition, structure, and regeneration status of ethiopian moist evergreen afromontane forests.

    PubMed

    Hundera, Kitessa; Aerts, Raf; Fontaine, Alexandre; Van Mechelen, Maarten; Gijbels, Pieter; Honnay, Olivier; Muys, Bart

    2013-03-01

    The effect of arabica coffee management intensity on composition, structure, and regeneration of moist evergreen Afromontane forests was studied in three traditional coffee-management systems of southwest Ethiopia: semiplantation coffee, semiforest coffee, and forest coffee. Vegetation and environmental data were collected in 84 plots from forests varying in intensity of coffee management. After controlling for environmental variation (altitude, aspect, slope, soil nutrient availability, and soil depth), differences in woody species composition, forest structure, and regeneration potential among management systems were compared using one way analysis of variance. The study showed that intensification of forest coffee cultivation to maximize coffee production negatively affects diversity and structure of Ethiopian moist evergreen Afromontane forests. Intensification of coffee productivity starts with the conversion of forest coffee to semiforest coffee, which has significant negative effects on tree seedling abundance. Further intensification leads to the conversion of semiforest to semiplantation coffee, causing significant diversity losses and the collapse of forest structure (decrease of stem density, basal area, crown closure, crown cover, and dominant tree height). Our study underlines the need for shade certification schemes to include variables other than canopy cover and that the loss of species diversity in intensively managed coffee systems may jeopardize the sustainability of coffee production itself through the decrease of ecosystem resilience and disruption of ecosystem services related to coffee yield, such as pollination and pest control. PMID:23180249

  14. Effects of Coffee Management Intensity on Composition, Structure, and Regeneration Status of Ethiopian Moist Evergreen Afromontane Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hundera, Kitessa; Aerts, Raf; Fontaine, Alexandre; Van Mechelen, Maarten; Gijbels, Pieter; Honnay, Olivier; Muys, Bart

    2013-03-01

    The effect of arabica coffee management intensity on composition, structure, and regeneration of moist evergreen Afromontane forests was studied in three traditional coffee-management systems of southwest Ethiopia: semiplantation coffee, semiforest coffee, and forest coffee. Vegetation and environmental data were collected in 84 plots from forests varying in intensity of coffee management. After controlling for environmental variation (altitude, aspect, slope, soil nutrient availability, and soil depth), differences in woody species composition, forest structure, and regeneration potential among management systems were compared using one way analysis of variance. The study showed that intensification of forest coffee cultivation to maximize coffee production negatively affects diversity and structure of Ethiopian moist evergreen Afromontane forests. Intensification of coffee productivity starts with the conversion of forest coffee to semiforest coffee, which has significant negative effects on tree seedling abundance. Further intensification leads to the conversion of semiforest to semiplantation coffee, causing significant diversity losses and the collapse of forest structure (decrease of stem density, basal area, crown closure, crown cover, and dominant tree height). Our study underlines the need for shade certification schemes to include variables other than canopy cover and that the loss of species diversity in intensively managed coffee systems may jeopardize the sustainability of coffee production itself through the decrease of ecosystem resilience and disruption of ecosystem services related to coffee yield, such as pollination and pest control.

  15. Managed care and the diffusion of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Bruce L.; Zhang, Yun; Skolarus, Ted A.; Wei, John T.; Montie, James E.; Schroeck, Florian R.; Hollenbeck, Brent K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To better understand associations between managed care penetration in healthcare markets and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) adoption. Methods We used Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data to identify men diagnosed with prostate cancer between 2001 and 2007 who were treated with radiation therapy (n=55,162). We categorized managed care penetration in Health Service Areas (HSAs) as low (<3%), intermediate (310%), and high (>10%); and assessed our main outcomes (i.e., probability of IMRT adoption, which is the ability of a healthcare market to deliver IMRT, and IMRT utilization in HSA markets) using a Cox proportional-hazards model and Poisson regression model, respectively. Results Compared to markets with low managed care penetration, populations in highly penetrated HSAs were more racially diverse (25% vs. 15% non-white, p<0.01), densely populated (2,110 vs. 145 people/square mile, p<0.01), and wealthier (median income $48,500 vs. $31,900, p<0.01). The probability of IMRT adoption was greatest in markets with the highest managed care penetration (e.g., 0.82 (high) vs. 0.72 (low) in 2007, p=0.05). Among adopting markets, the use of IMRT increased in all HSA categories. However, relative to markets with low managed care penetration, IMRT utilization was constrained in markets with the highest penetration (0.69 (high) vs. 0.76 (low) in 2007, p<0.01). Conclusion Markets with higher managed care penetration demonstrated a greater propensity for acquiring IMRT technology. However, after adopting IMRT, more highly penetrated markets had roughly 7% slower growth in utilization over the study period. These findings provide insight into the implications of delivery system reforms for cancer-related technologies. PMID:23206767

  16. Carbon dynamics of intensively managed forest along a full rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreaux, V.; Bosc, A.; Bonnefond, J.; Burlett, R.; Lamaud, E.; Sartore, M.; Trichet, P.; Chipeaux, C.; Lambrot, C.; Kowalski, A. S.; Loustau, D.

    2012-12-01

    Temperate and tropical forests are increasingly exploited for wood and biomass extraction and only one third of forest area was considered as primary in the recent FRA in 2010. Management practices affect the soil-forest-atmosphere continuum through various effects on soil and surface properties. They result ultimately in either positive or negative changes in the biomass and soil carbon pools but, if any, few datasets or modeling tools are available for quantifying their impacts on the net carbon balance of forest stands. To analyse these effects, the net half-hourly fluxes of CO2, water vapour and heat exchanges were monitored for 23 years in two closed stands of maritime pines in southwestern France. Carbon content of the aboveground biomass was measured annually and soil pools 10-early in the younger stand and 5-yearly in the mature stand. For analysing the data collected and disentangling the climate and management effects, we used the three components process-based model GRAECO+ (Loustau et al. this session) linking a 3D radiative transfer and photosynthesis model, MAESTRA, a soil carbon model adapted from ROTH-C and a plant growth model. Eddy flux data were processed, gapfilled and partitioned using the methodological recommendations (Aubinet et al. 2000, Adv. Eco. Res:30, 114-173, Falge et al. 2001, Agr. For. Meteo. : 107, 43-69, Reichstein et al. 2005, Glob. Change Biol., 11:1424-1439). Analysis of the sequence showed that, whether by an increased sensitivity to soil drought compared to the pines or by a rapid re-colonization of the inter-row after understorey removal and plowing, the weeded vegetation contributed to create specific intra-annual dynamics of the fluxes and therefore, controls the dynamics of carbon balance of the stand. After three growing seasons, the stand was already a carbon sink, but the impact of thinning and weeded vegetation removal at the age of 5-year brought the balance to almost neutral. We interpret this change as the combined effects of the reduction of the LAI, the enhancement of the heterotrophic respiration related to the decomposition of dead materials and the improvement of the mineralization of the large stock of soil organic matter by tillage. At the mature stage, the stand remains consistently a carbon sink and CO2 fluxes were insensitive to thinning. Conversely, the carbon balance was sensitive to climate effects as evidenced by repeated drastic reductions in NEP caused by soil drought. Our data underlines the importance of disturbances linked to forest management for the forest carbon balance during the early stage of tree growth. Since management intensification tends to shorten the forest life cycle and enhance the share of the young stages, our results confirm that the consequence of management operations on the carbon cycle in forest may revert intensified forest stands from a net sink to a source and should be accounted for carefully.

  17. Hyperbaric critical care patient data management system.

    PubMed

    Kronlund, Peter; Lind, Folke; Olsson, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    A patient data management system (PDMS) has been used for years in the intensive care unit (ICU) at the Karolinska University Hospital to provide bedside or remote clinical patient documentation and information. Data from monitors, mechanical ventilators and syringe pumps are fed into a central clinical information management system to monitor, display trends and record data of vital parameters, ventilator settings and drugs. In order to continue routine critical care monitoring and recording during hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), without endangering the safety demands of hyperbaric procedures, we have modified the PDMS system for hyperbaric use. Via an ethernet box placed inside the chamber, data are transmitted to the Clinisoft system through the local area network. By standardised risk-analysis procedures, in close cooperation between the hyperbaric and biomedical engineering departments, the chamber producer and the notifying body (Germanischer Lloyd), the ethernet box was modified to receive full safety approval by all parties. The PDMS is now functioning routinely during HBOT for intensive care patients so that data can be seen bedside and followed on-line in the ICU. Data are also continuously stored on the clinical information management system for later clinical or research purposes. Work continues to obtain CE approval for hyperbaric use for modern syringe pumps and mechanical ventilators connected to the PDMS system. Improved documentation of ICU care will improve quality of care during HBOT and facilitate research and development in hyperbaric medicine. PMID:22828816

  18. Flexible data-management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelouch, J. J., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Combined ASRDI Data-Management and Analysis Technique (CADMAT) is system of computer programs and procedures that can be used to conduct data-management tasks. System was developed specifically for use by scientists and engineers who are confronted with management and analysis of large quantities of data organized into records of events and parametric fields. CADMAT is particularly useful when data are continually accumulated, such as when the need of retrieval and analysis is ongoing.

  19. Lighting system with thermal management system

    DOEpatents

    Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton Earl; Stecher, Thomas Elliot; Seeley, Charles Erklin; Kuenzler, Glenn Howard; Wolfe, Jr., Charles Franklin; Utturkar, Yogen Vishwas; Sharma, Rajdeep; Prabhakaran, Satish; Icoz, Tunc

    2015-02-24

    Lighting systems having unique configurations are provided. For instance, the lighting system may include a light source, a thermal management system and driver electronics, each contained within a housing structure. The light source is configured to provide illumination visible through an opening in the housing structure. The thermal management system is configured to provide an air flow, such as a unidirectional air flow, through the housing structure in order to cool the light source. The driver electronics are configured to provide power to each of the light source and the thermal management system.

  20. Lighting system with thermal management system

    DOEpatents

    Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton Earl; Stecher, Thomas Elliot; Seeley, Charles Erklin; Kuenzler, Glenn Howard; Wolfe, Jr., Charles Franklin; Utturkar, Yogen Vishwas; Sharma, Rajdeep; Prabhakaran, Satish; Icoz, Tunc

    2015-08-25

    Lighting systems having unique configurations are provided. For instance, the lighting system may include a light source, a thermal management system and driver electronics, each contained within a housing structure. The light source is configured to provide illumination visible through an opening in the housing structure. The thermal management system is configured to provide an air flow, such as a unidirectional air flow, through the housing structure in order to cool the light source. The driver electronics are configured to provide power to each of the light source and the thermal management system.

  1. Lighting system with thermal management system

    DOEpatents

    Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton; Stecher, Thomas; Seeley, Charles; Kuenzler, Glenn; Wolfe, Jr., Charles; Utturkar, Yogen; Sharma, Rajdeep; Prabhakaran, Satish; Icoz, Tunc

    2013-05-07

    Lighting systems having unique configurations are provided. For instance, the lighting system may include a light source, a thermal management system and driver electronics, each contained within a housing structure. The light source is configured to provide illumination visible through an opening in the housing structure. The thermal management system is configured to provide an air flow, such as a unidirectional air flow, through the housing structure in order to cool the light source. The driver electronics are configured to provide power to each of the light source and the thermal management system.

  2. The large-scale structure of software-intensive systems

    PubMed Central

    Booch, Grady

    2012-01-01

    The computer metaphor is dominant in most discussions of neuroscience, but the semantics attached to that metaphor are often quite naive. Herein, we examine the ontology of software-intensive systems, the nature of their structure and the application of the computer metaphor to the metaphysical questions of self and causation. PMID:23386964

  3. Data base management systems activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Data Management System-1100 is designed to operate in conjunction with the UNIVAC 1100 Series Operating System on any 1100 Series computer. DMS-1100 is divided into the following four major software components: (1) Data Definition Languages (DDL); (2) Data Management Routine (DMR); (3) Data Manipulation Languages (DML); and (4) Data Base Utilities (DBU). These software components are described in detail.

  4. Fuel cell gas management system

    DOEpatents

    DuBose, Ronald Arthur (Marietta, GA)

    2000-01-11

    A fuel cell gas management system including a cathode humidification system for transferring latent and sensible heat from an exhaust stream to the cathode inlet stream of the fuel cell; an anode humidity retention system for maintaining the total enthalpy of the anode stream exiting the fuel cell equal to the total enthalpy of the anode inlet stream; and a cooling water management system having segregated deionized water and cooling water loops interconnected by means of a brazed plate heat exchanger.

  5. Efficient Evaluation System for Learning Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavus, Nadire

    2009-01-01

    A learning management system (LMS) provides the platform for web-based learning environment by enabling the management, delivery, tracking of learning, testing, communication, registration process and scheduling. There are many LMS systems on the market that can be obtained for free or through payment. It has now become an important task to choose…

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT AND SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS THEORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental Systems Management is the management of environmental problems at the systems level fully accounting for the multi-dimensional nature of the environment. This includes socio-economic dimensions as well as the usual physical and life science aspects. This is importa...

  7. Fault management for data systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Mark A.; Iverson, David L.; Patterson-Hine, F. Ann

    1993-01-01

    Issues related to automating the process of fault management (fault diagnosis and response) for data management systems are considered. Substantial benefits are to be gained by successful automation of this process, particularly for large, complex systems. The use of graph-based models to develop a computer assisted fault management system is advocated. The general problem is described and the motivation behind choosing graph-based models over other approaches for developing fault diagnosis computer programs is outlined. Some existing work in the area of graph-based fault diagnosis is reviewed, and a new fault management method which was developed from existing methods is offered. Our method is applied to an automatic telescope system intended as a prototype for future lunar telescope programs. Finally, an application of our method to general data management systems is described.

  8. Effects of Intensive Forest Management Practices on Insect Infestation Levels and Loblolly Pine Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, J.T.; Berisford, C.W.

    2000-04-01

    This study investigates the relationship between intensive management practices and insect infestation, maximum growth potential studies of loblolly pine over four years using different levels of cultural treatments. Results indicate tree fertilization can increase coneworm infestation and demonstrated that tip moth management can improve initial tree growth.

  9. Workflow management systems in radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendler, Thomas; Meetz, Kirsten; Schmidt, Joachim

    1998-07-01

    In a situation of shrinking health care budgets, increasing cost pressure and growing demands to increase the efficiency and the quality of medical services, health care enterprises are forced to optimize or complete re-design their processes. Although information technology is agreed to potentially contribute to cost reduction and efficiency improvement, the real success factors are the re-definition and automation of processes: Business Process Re-engineering and Workflow Management. In this paper we discuss architectures for the use of workflow management systems in radiology. We propose to move forward from information systems in radiology (RIS, PACS) to Radiology Management Systems, in which workflow functionality (process definitions and process automation) is implemented through autonomous workflow management systems (WfMS). In a workflow oriented architecture, an autonomous workflow enactment service communicates with workflow client applications via standardized interfaces. In this paper, we discuss the need for and the benefits of such an approach. The separation of workflow management system and application systems is emphasized, and the consequences that arise for the architecture of workflow oriented information systems. This includes an appropriate workflow terminology, and the definition of standard interfaces for workflow aware application systems. Workflow studies in various institutions have shown that most of the processes in radiology are well structured and suited for a workflow management approach. Numerous commercially available Workflow Management Systems (WfMS) were investigated, and some of them, which are process- oriented and application independent, appear suitable for use in radiology.

  10. Intelligent Integrated System Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Intelligent Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) is the management of data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) with the purposeful objective of determining the health of a system (Management: storage, distribution, sharing, maintenance, processing, reasoning, and presentation). Presentation discusses: (1) ISHM Capability Development. (1a) ISHM Knowledge Model. (1b) Standards for ISHM Implementation. (1c) ISHM Domain Models (ISHM-DM's). (1d) Intelligent Sensors and Components. (2) ISHM in Systems Design, Engineering, and Integration. (3) Intelligent Control for ISHM-Enabled Systems

  11. Medical-Information-Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterescu, Sidney; Friedman, Carl A.; Frankowski, James W.

    1989-01-01

    Medical Information Management System (MIMS) computer program interactive, general-purpose software system for storage and retrieval of information. Offers immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases required. User quickly and efficiently extracts, displays, and analyzes data. Used in management of medical data and handling all aspects of data related to care of patients. Other applications include management of data on occupational safety in public and private sectors, handling judicial information, systemizing purchasing and procurement systems, and analyses of cost structures of organizations. Written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77.

  12. FAILSAFE Health Management for Embedded Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Gregory A.; Wagner, David A.; Wen, Hui Ying; Barry, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    The FAILSAFE project is developing concepts and prototype implementations for software health management in mission- critical, real-time embedded systems. The project unites features of the industry-standard ARINC 653 Avionics Application Software Standard Interface and JPL s Mission Data System (MDS) technology (see figure). The ARINC 653 standard establishes requirements for the services provided by partitioned, real-time operating systems. The MDS technology provides a state analysis method, canonical architecture, and software framework that facilitates the design and implementation of software-intensive complex systems. The MDS technology has been used to provide the health management function for an ARINC 653 application implementation. In particular, the focus is on showing how this combination enables reasoning about, and recovering from, application software problems.

  13. Specific intensive care management of patients with traumatic brain injury: Present and future

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Tumul; Kowalski, Stephen; Arabi, Yaseen; Dash, Hari Hara

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major global problem and affects approximately 10 million peoples annually; therefore has a substantial impact on the health-care system throughout the world. In this article, we have summarized various aspects of specific intensive care management in patients with TBI including the emerging evidence mainly after the Brain Trauma Foundation (BTF) 2007 and also highlighted the scope of the future therapies. This review has involved the relevant clinical trials and reviews (from 1 January 2007 to 31 March 2013), which specifically discussed about the topic. Though, BTF guideline based management strategies could provide standardized protocols for the management of patients with TBI and have some promising effects on mortality and morbidity; there is still need of inclusion of many suggestions based on various published after 2007. The main focus of majority of these trials remained to prevent or to treat the secondary brain injury. The future therapy will be directed to treat injured neurons and may benefit the outcome. There is also urgent need to develop some good prognostic indicators as well. PMID:24843345

  14. Intensity approximation of random fluctuation in complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yulmetyev, R. M.; Gafarov, F. M.; Yulmetyeva, D. G.; Emeljanova, N. A.

    2002-01-01

    The Markov and non-Markov processes in complex systems are examined with the help of dynamical information Shannon entropy method. Here we consider the essential role of two mutually independent channels of entropy involving creation of correlation and annihilation of correlation. The developed method has been used to analyze the intensity fluctuation of the complex systems of various nature: in psychology (to analyze numerical and pattern short-time human memory, to study the effect of stress on the parameters of the dynamical taping-test) and in cardiology (to analyze the random dynamics of RR-intervals in human ECG's and to diagnose various diseases of human cardiovascular systems). The received results show that the application of intensity approximation allows to improve essentially the diagnostics of parameters in the evolution of human dynamic states.

  15. Integrated Learning Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Sharon; Cossarin, Mary; Doxsee, Harry; Schwartz, Linda

    2004-01-01

    Four integrated learning management packages were reviewed: "CentraOne", "IntraLearn", "Lyceum", and "Silicon Chalk". These products provide different combinations of synchronous and asynchronous tools. The current report examines the products in relation to their specific value for distance educators and students.

  16. Developing a Management System (AMOAS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrell, James E.; Price, Bonnie B.

    To evaluate their school management personnel, the Muhlenberg (Pennsylvania) School District adopted the Administrative Management by Objectives Appraisal System (AMOAS). Administrators are evaluated on the basis of objectives that they establish in conjunction with their immediate supervisor and on everyday job performance. Above satisfactory

  17. Rationalizing Management Information System Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parden, Robert J.

    This paper examines the proposition that management information systems (MIS) for colleges and universities are not achieving their original objectives of supporting better management decisions by providing more and better information in a more timely manner. As a consequence, the MIS activity should be reduced in scope, and standardized to

  18. Performance of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source Accelerator System

    SciTech Connect

    Brumwell, F.; Potts, C.; Rauchas, A.; Stipp, V.; Volk, G.

    1986-09-22

    The performance of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) Accelerator System is reported, including an increase in average beam current to 13.4 microamperes and increased reliability to 93.2%. Brief discussions are given for the performance of the major accelerator subsystems, including the H/sup -/ ion source and preaccelerator, the 50 MeV linac, and the synchrotron and its subsystems. (LEW)

  19. [Systemic amyloidosis revealed by an intense nephrotic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Sanmartin, Nancy; Janvier, Frdric; Chianea, Denis; Fagot, Thierry; Renard, Christophe; Vest, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome which is caused by a renal amyloidosis. This clinical case is characterized by intensity of clinicals and biologicals abnormalities and by its uncommun cause. We also review current data on the nephrotic syndrome as well as on the systemic amyloidosis and to evoke the indications of the immunoglobulin free-light-chains quantification in the diagnostic approach. PMID:21464002

  20. Telemedicine as a tool for intensive management of diabetes: the DIABTel experience.

    PubMed

    Gómez, E J; Hernando, M E; García, A; Del Pozo, F; Cermeño, J; Corcoy, R; Brugués, E; De Leiva, A

    2002-08-01

    This paper presents the current features of the DIABTel telemedicine system and the evaluation outcomes of its use in clinical routine. This telemedicine system is designed to complement the daily care and intensive management of diabetic patients through telemonitoring and telecare services. The system comprises a patient unit (PU) used by patients in their day-to-day activities and a Medical Workstation used by physicians and nurses at hospitals. Both applications offer tools to collect, manage, view and interpret data and to exchange data and messages. The system was evaluated for usability, telemedical protocols, metabolic control and quality of life. This evaluation consisted in a 6-month cross-over pilot study with ten Type I diabetic patients. The results of the evaluation allowed assessment of the telemedicine protocols in terms of the number of communications/patient (21.6+/-7.7); days between communications (5.4+/-2.66); messages sent by physicians (118 text messages); and data and messages transmitted by patients (3524 blood glucose readings, 1649 day-to-day insulin adjustments, 24 exercise reports, ten diet modifications and 63 text messages). Physicians performed more therapeutic changes during the DIABTel period than in the control period. There was a trend towards HbA1c improvement during DIABTel use with no incidence in the number of hypoglycaemias. This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility of the DIABTel system in clinical routine use and its potential benefits for diabetes care: improving the availability of information necessary for therapy adjustments; offering new physician-patient communication tools; increasing patient empowerment and education; and showing a positive trend towards improving the metabolic control of patients. Further studies are needed to validate these findings and to promote telemedicine as an opportunity to better diabetes care. PMID:12100795

  1. System Wide Information Management (SWIM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hritz, Mike; McGowan, Shirley; Ramos, Cal

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation lists questions regarding the implementation of System Wide Information Management (SWIM). Some of the questions concern policy issues and strategies, technology issues and strategies, or transition issues and strategies.

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (EIMS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Information Management System (EIMS) organizes descriptive information (metadata) for data sets, databases, documents, models, projects, and spatial data. The EIMS design provides a repository for scientific documentation that can be easily accessed with standar...

  3. Data management system technology discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Harry F.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on data management system technology discipline for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: systems technology area needs; storage technology area needs; processor technology area needs; communications technology area needs; software system technology area needs; human interface technology area needs; software development and verification; and onboard communications.

  4. RIMS: Resource Information Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symes, J.

    1983-01-01

    An overview is given of the capabilities and functions of the resource management system (RIMS). It is a simple interactive DMS tool which allows users to build, modify, and maintain data management applications. The RIMS minimizes programmer support required to develop/maintain small data base applications. The RIMS also assists in bringing the United Information Services (UIS) budget system work inhouse. Information is also given on the relationship between the RIMS and the user community.

  5. Interconnecting heterogeneous database management systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gligor, V. D.; Luckenbaugh, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that there is still a great need for the development of improved communication between remote, heterogeneous database management systems (DBMS). Problems regarding the effective communication between distributed DBMSs are primarily related to significant differences between local data managers, local data models and representations, and local transaction managers. A system of interconnected DBMSs which exhibit such differences is called a network of distributed, heterogeneous DBMSs. In order to achieve effective interconnection of remote, heterogeneous DBMSs, the users must have uniform, integrated access to the different DBMs. The present investigation is mainly concerned with an analysis of the existing approaches to interconnecting heterogeneous DBMSs, taking into account four experimental DBMS projects.

  6. Does age influence the intensity of care in a managed care organization?

    PubMed

    Long, Michael J; Lescoe-Long, Mary

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine whether an inverse relationship between age and the intensity of care prevailed in an elderly, functionally impaired population enrolled in a managed care organization. The secondary objective was to determine whether those who died during the study were treated more intensively than the survivors. A total of 278 enrollees in a managed care organization who were 75 years and over, had a severe functional disability, excessive hospital or Emergency Department use, volunteered to take part in a 2-year study. Seventy-seven clients died during the study. We calculated indices of outpatient care intensity and hospital care intensity for the study period. With minor exceptions, the results clearly show that, for this group of clients, the intensity of outpatient care was clearly, inversely related to age. The intensity of hospital care was also inversely related to age, thereby ruling out the hypothesis that it was being substituted for outpatient care. The results also clearly show that, for this population, those who died during the study period were treated more intensively than the survivors. We found strong support for our hypotheses. An investigation of the reasons for these findings was beyond the scope of our data. PMID:15923922

  7. Automated flight test management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewett, M. D.; Tartt, D. M.; Agarwal, A.

    1991-01-01

    The Phase 1 development of an automated flight test management system (ATMS) as a component of a rapid prototyping flight research facility for artificial intelligence (AI) based flight concepts is discussed. The ATMS provides a flight engineer with a set of tools that assist in flight test planning, monitoring, and simulation. The system is also capable of controlling an aircraft during flight test by performing closed loop guidance functions, range management, and maneuver-quality monitoring. The ATMS is being used as a prototypical system to develop a flight research facility for AI based flight systems concepts at NASA Ames Dryden.

  8. Memory intensive functional architecture for distributed computer control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dimmler, D.G.

    1983-10-01

    A memory-intensive functional architectue for distributed data-acquisition, monitoring, and control systems with large numbers of nodes has been conceptually developed and applied in several large-scale and some smaller systems. This discussion concentrates on: (1) the basic architecture; (2) recent expansions of the architecture which now become feasible in view of the rapidly developing component technologies in microprocessors and functional large-scale integration circuits; and (3) implementation of some key hardware and software structures and one system implementation which is a system for performing control and data acquisition of a neutron spectrometer at the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. The spectrometer is equipped with a large-area position-sensitive neutron detector.

  9. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Tumor Therapy System and Its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fucheng; He, Ye; Li, Rui

    2007-05-01

    At the end of last century, a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) tumor therapy system was successfully developed and manufactured in China, which has been already applied to clinical therapy. This article aims to discuss the HIFU therapy system and its application. Detailed research includes the following: power amplifiers for high-power ultrasound, ultrasound transducers with large apertures, accurate 3-D mechanical drives, a software control system (both high-voltage control and low-voltage control), and the B-mode ultrasonic diagnostic equipment used for treatment monitoring. Research on the dosage of ultrasound required for tumour therapy in multiple human cases has made it possible to relate a dosage formula, presented in this paper, to other significant parameters such as the volume of thermal tumor solidification, the acoustic intensity (I), and the ultrasound emission time (tn). Moreover, the HIFU therapy system can be applied to the clinical treatment of both benign and malignant tumors in the pelvic and abdominal cavity, such as uterine fibroids, liver cancer and pancreatic carcinoma.

  10. A relative-intensity two-color phosphor thermography system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merski, N. Ronald

    1991-01-01

    The NASA LaRC has developed a relative-intensity two-color phosphor thermography system. This system has become a standard technique for acquiring aerothermodynamic data in LaRC Hypersonic Facilities Complex (HFC). The relative intensity theory and its application to the LaRC phosphor thermography system is discussed along with the investment casting technique which is critical to the utilization of the phosphor method for aerothermodynamic studies. Various approaches to obtaining quantitative heat transfer data using thermographic phosphors are addressed and comparisons between thin-film data and thermographic phosphor data on an orbiter-like configuration are presented. In general, data from these two techniques are in good agreement. A discussion is given on the application of phosphors to integration heat transfer data reduction techniques (the thin film method) and preliminary heat transfer data obtained on a calibration sphere using thin-film equations are presented. Finally, plans for a new phosphor system which uses target recognition software are discussed.

  11. Demil planning and management system

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, C.C.; Bormet, S.M.; Whitfield, R.G.; Bowen, M.; Chun, K.C.; Golden, R.E.; Fuller, R.

    1997-08-01

    The National Maintenance Point (NMP) Branch of the US Army Industrial Operations Command (IOC) serves as the Single Manager for Conventional Ammunition (SMCA) agent for managing the renovation, modification, recycling, and disposal of conventional ammunition, thereby improving readiness. The mission of the NMP includes program management for demilitarization (demil) activities, ammunition maintenance, and ammunition peculiar equipment (APE) projects. Through an Interagency Agreement between the US Army and the US Department of Energy, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing an integrated data management system, called the Demil Planning and Management System (DPMS), for IOC. DPMS is intended to help NMP efficiently manage information on ongoing demil project activities and asset inventories, plan future projects, and allocate budgets. This system, when fully implemented, will also make it possible for the user community to interactively access the DPMS database; perform data entry and queries; and run reports through network, modem, and Internet access to the system. This paper describes the principal components of the DPMS, current capabilities, and planned enhancements.

  12. Automated plant, production management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenova, V. I.; Belov, V. I.

    1984-12-01

    The development of a complex of tasks for the operational management of production (OUP) within the framework of an automated system for production management (ASUP) shows that it is impossible to have effective computations without reliable initial information. The influence of many factors involving the production and economic activity of the entire enterprise upon the plan and course of production are considered. It is suggested that an adequate model should be available which covers all levels of the hierarchical system: workplace, section (bridgade), shop, enterprise, and the model should be incorporated into the technological sequence of performance and there should be provisions for an adequate man machine system.

  13. Campus Telephone Systems: Managing Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of College and University Business Officers, Washington, DC.

    Issues facing a college or university that seeks to change its telephone system are raised in seven chapters. Major topics addressed by this resource guide are: telephone deregulation and changes in the telephone industry, the new technology available, how to manage a system, consultants, financing options, and institutional case studies. Specific

  14. Managing Risk in Systems Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePaoli, Marilyn M.; And Others

    Stanford University's use of a risk assessment methodology to improve the management of systems development projects is discussed. After examining the concepts of hazard, peril, and risk as they relate to the system development process, three ways to assess risk are covered: size, structure, and technology. The overall objective for Stanford…

  15. XCPU2 process management system

    SciTech Connect

    Ionkov, Latchesar; Van Hensbergen, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Xcpu2 is a new process management system that allows the users to specify custom file system for a running job. Most cluster management systems enforce single software distribution running on all nodes. Xcpu2 allows programs running on the cluster to work in environment identical to the user's desktop, using the same versions of the libraries and tools the user installed locally, and accessing the configuration file in the same places they are located on the desktop. Xcpu2 builds on our earlier work with the Xcpu system. Like Xcpu, Xcpu2's process management interface is represented as a set of files exported by a 9P file server. It supports heterogeneous clusters and multiple head nodes. Unlike Xcpu, it uses pull instead of push model. In this paper we describe the Xcpu2 clustering model, its operation and how the per-job filesystem configuration can be used to solve some of the common problems when running a cluster.

  16. An Analysis of Intensive Mode Pedagogy in Management Education in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Sita; Nargundkar, Rajendra

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Management education is at its peak in India. But pedagogy and modes of delivery are not always innovative compared to top international Business Schools. It is through experimentation that the paper may be able to discover what works best in our context. The purpose of this paper is to determine the effectiveness of intensive mode of

  17. Comparison of management intensive grazing and continuous grazing in beef cattle pasture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Management intensive grazing (MIG) offers the potential to increase the financial profitability and productivity of grazing beef and dairy farms in Appalachian Ohio, with minimum environmental impacts. The objective of the project was to compare MIG with conventional continuous grazing (CG) and rela...

  18. Ultimate biochemical oxygen demand in semi-intensively managed shrimp pond waters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three independent studies were conducted to quantified ultimate biochemical oxygen demand (UBOD) and the corresponding decomposition rate constant for production pond (average 21.5 ha each) waters and effluents on six semi-intensively managed marine shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) farms in Honduras. S...

  19. Evaluation of New York State's Children and Youth Intensive Case Management Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dollard, Norin; And Others

    The evaluation plan for New York State's Children and Youth Intensive Case Management (CYICM) Program is described, which was introduced in July 1988. The CYICM Program is a statewide intervention focusing on keeping children with serious emotional disturbances in the least restrictive environment appropriate to their needs. It is a

  20. Managing risk in software systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, S.K.; Jansma, R.M.; Murphy, M.D.

    1995-07-01

    A methodology for risk management in the design of software systems is presented. It spans security, safety, and correct operation of software within the context of its environment, and produces a risk analysis and documented risk management strategy. It is designed to be iteratively applied, to attain appropriate levels of detail throughout the analysis. The methodology and supporting tools are discussed. The methodology is critiqued relative to other research in the field. Some sample applications of the methodology are presented.

  1. The influence of abiotic controls and management intensity on phosphorus cycling in established grassland and forest ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alt, F.; Oelmann, Y.; Wilcke, W.

    2011-12-01

    It is commonly assumed that the bioavailability and cycling of phosphorus (P) is mainly controlled by abiotic soil properties including soil pH and the concentrations and reactivities of clay minerals, CaCO3 and Al/Fe oxides In managed ecosystems, kind, timing and duration of P additions and type and amount of harvested biomass are the major input and output fluxes. Our objective was to disentangle the effects of abiotic controls, and type and intensity of management on the P cycle in soils of temperate grasslands and forests of different management intensity in three regions across Germany in the frame of the Biodiversity Exploratories project. The pH value was the most important variable explaining P concentrations and partitioning in soil and changes in pH are the main mechanism how land-use is affecting the P cycle. However, after the influence of pH was accounted for in a sequential statistical approach, land-use intensity, classified according to the extent of annual biomass removal, explained a significant (P < 0.05) part of the variance in the contributions of several P fractions to total P (TP) among all studied regions and land-use types. In grassland soils of highly diverse systems (up to 57 plant species) in one of the study regions, the Schwbische Alb, a mid-range mountain area on limestone where soils showed a limited variation in pH in the carbonate buffer range, pedogenic Fe oxide concentrations, fertilizer-P application rates, and TP concentrations in soil explained more than half of the variation in bioavailable inorganic (Pi) concentrations extracted with NaHCO3 in soil. Our results demonstrate that mainly soil pH and mineralogical composition, and intensity of management of the managed ecosystems are significant controls of the P cycle determining the size of bioavailable P pool in soil.

  2. Historical changes in channel network extent and channel planform in an intensively managed landscape: Natural versus human-induced effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoads, Bruce L.; Lewis, Quinn W.; Andresen, William

    2016-01-01

    Humans have become major geomorphological agents, effecting substantial change in the characteristics of Earth's physical landscapes. The agricultural Midwest of the United States is a region marked by pronounced human influence at the landscape scale. Humans undoubtedly have strongly influenced critical zone processes, including fluvial processes, in intensively managed agricultural landscapes, yet the exact nature of human alteration of these processes is unknown. This study documents historical changes in the extent of the stream channel network and in channel planform within the upper Sangamon River basin - an intensively managed agricultural watershed in Illinois. Results indicate that the modern channel network is nearly three times more extensive than the channel network in the 1820s. Most change in drainage density has occurred in headwater portions of the basin where numerous drainage ditches have been added to the network to drain flat uplands. No detectable change in channel position is evident between 1940 and 2012 along about 60% of the total length of the Sangamon River and its major tributaries. Nearly 30% of the total length exhibits change related to meander dynamics (cutoffs and lateral migration), whereas about 8% has changed as a result of channelization. Channelized sections typically remain straight for decades following human modification, supporting the notion that humans produce long-lasting catastrophic change in channel planform in this region. The findings confirm that humans are effective agents of morphological change in fluvial systems in this intensively managed watershed. Documenting human-induced versus natural changes in fluvial systems is important for evaluating how other critical zone processes in intensively managed landscapes have been affected by these changes. Human-induced changes in channel extent and planform most likely have altered this landscape from one dominated by biogeochemical transformations and storage of water and sediment prior to agricultural development into one now characterized by enhanced fluxes of water, sediment, and nutrients.

  3. Bench-to-bedside review: Leadership and conflict management in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Strack van Schijndel, Rob JM; Burchardi, Hilmar

    2007-01-01

    In the management of critical care units, leadership and conflict management are vital areas for the successful performance of the unit. In this article a practical approach to define competencies for leadership and principles and practices of conflict management are offered. This article is, by lack of relevant intensive care unit (ICU) literature, not evidence based, but it is the result of personal experience and a study of literature on leadership as well on conflicts and negotiations in non-medical areas. From this, information was selected that was recognisable to the authors and, thus, also seems to be useful knowledge for medical doctors in the ICU environment. PMID:18086322

  4. Integrated Systems Health Management for Intelligent Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Melcher, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of an integrated system health management (ISHM) capability is fundamentally linked to the management of data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) with the purposeful objective of determining the health of a system. It is akin to having a team of experts who are all individually and collectively observing and analyzing a complex system, and communicating effectively with each other in order to arrive at an accurate and reliable assessment of its health. In this paper, concepts, procedures, and approaches are presented as a foundation for implementing an intelligent systems ]relevant ISHM capability. The capability stresses integration of DIaK from all elements of a system. Both ground-based (remote) and on-board ISHM capabilities are compared and contrasted. The information presented is the result of many years of research, development, and maturation of technologies, and of prototype implementations in operational systems.

  5. Towards ethical decision support and knowledge management in neonatal intensive care.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Frize, M; Eng, P; Walker, R; Catley, C

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies in neonatal medicine, clinical nursing, and cognitive psychology have indicated the need to augment current decision-making practice in neonatal intensive care units with computerized, intelligent decision support systems. Rapid progress in artificial intelligence and knowledge management facilitates the design of collaborative ethical decision-support tools that allow clinicians to provide better support for parents facing inherently difficult choices, such as when to withdraw aggressive treatment. The appropriateness of using computers to support ethical decision-making is critically analyzed through research and literature review. In ethical dilemmas, multiple diverse participants need to communicate and function as a team to select the best treatment plan. In order to do this, physicians require reliable estimations of prognosis, while parents need a highly useable tool to help them assimilate complex medical issues and address their own value system. Our goal is to improve and structuralize the ethical decision-making that has become an inevitable part of modern neonatal care units. The paper contributes to clinical decision support by outlining the needs and basis for ethical decision support and justifying the proposed development efforts. PMID:17271019

  6. The CMS Data Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giffels, M.; Guo, Y.; Kuznetsov, V.; Magini, N.; Wildish, T.

    2014-06-01

    The data management elements in CMS are scalable, modular, and designed to work together. The main components are PhEDEx, the data transfer and location system; the Data Booking Service (DBS), a metadata catalog; and the Data Aggregation Service (DAS), designed to aggregate views and provide them to users and services. Tens of thousands of samples have been cataloged and petabytes of data have been moved since the run began. The modular system has allowed the optimal use of appropriate underlying technologies. In this contribution we will discuss the use of both Oracle and NoSQL databases to implement the data management elements as well as the individual architectures chosen. We will discuss how the data management system functioned during the first run, and what improvements are planned in preparation for 2015.

  7. Operational Management System for Regulated Water Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loenen, A.; van Dijk, M.; van Verseveld, W.; Berger, H.

    2012-04-01

    Most of the Dutch large rivers, canals and lakes are controlled by the Dutch water authorities. The main reasons concern safety, navigation and fresh water supply. Historically the separate water bodies have been controlled locally. For optimizating management of these water systems an integrated approach was required. Presented is a platform which integrates data from all control objects for monitoring and control purposes. The Operational Management System for Regulated Water Systems (IWP) is an implementation of Delft-FEWS which supports operational control of water systems and actively gives advice. One of the main characteristics of IWP is that is real-time collects, transforms and presents different types of data, which all add to the operational water management. Next to that, hydrodynamic models and intelligent decision support tools are added to support the water managers during their daily control activities. An important advantage of IWP is that it uses the Delft-FEWS framework, therefore processes like central data collection, transformations, data processing and presentation are simply configured. At all control locations the same information is readily available. The operational water management itself gains from this information, but it can also contribute to cost efficiency (no unnecessary pumping), better use of available storage and advise during (water polution) calamities.

  8. The Cheetah Data Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, P.F. ); Word, G.B. . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-03-01

    Cheetah is a data management system based on the C programming language. The premise of Cheetah is that the banks' of FORTRAN based systems should be structures' as defined by the C language. Cheetah is a system to mange these structures, while preserving the use of the C language in its native form. For C structures managed by Cheetah, the user can use Cheetah utilities such as reading and writing, in a machine independent form, both binary and text files to disk or over a network. Files written by Cheetah also contain a dictionary describing in detail the data contained in the file. Such information is intended to be used by interactive programs for presenting the contents of the file. Such information is intended to be used by interactive programs for presenting the contents of file. Cheetah has been ported to many different operating systems with no operating system dependent switches.

  9. Intense relativistic electron beam injector system for tokamak current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, V.L.; Creedon, J.M.; Ecker, B.M.; Helava, H.I.

    1983-04-01

    We report experimental and theoretical studies of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) injection system designed for tokamak current drive experiments. The injection system uses a standard high-voltage pulsed REB generator and a magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) to drive an REB-accelerating diode in plasma. A series of preliminary experiments has been carried out to test the system by injecting REBs into a test chamber with preformed plasma and applied magnetic field. REBs were accelerated from two types of diodes: a conventional vacuum diode with foil anode, and a plasma diode, i.e., an REB cathode immersed in the plasma. REB current was in the range of 50 to 100 kA and REB particle energy ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 MeV. MITL power density exceeded 10 GW/cm/sup 2/. Performance of the injection system and REB transport properties is documented for plasma densities from 5 x 10/sup 12/ to 2 x 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/. Injection system data are compared with numerical calculations of the performance of the coupled system consisting of the generator, MITL, and diode.

  10. Management issues in systems engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shishko, Robert; Chamberlain, Robert G.; Aster, Robert; Bilardo, Vincent; Forsberg, Kevin; Mooz, Hal; Polaski, Lou; Wade, Ron

    1993-01-01

    When applied to a system, the doctrine of successive refinement is a divide-and-conquer strategy. Complex systems are sucessively divided into pieces that are less complex, until they are simple enough to be conquered. This decomposition results in several structures for describing the product system and the producing system. These structures play important roles in systems engineering and project management. Many of the remaining sections in this chapter are devoted to describing some of these key structures. Structures that describe the product system include, but are not limited to, the requirements tree, system architecture and certain symbolic information such as system drawings, schematics, and data bases. The structures that describe the producing system include the project's work breakdown, schedules, cost accounts and organization.

  11. Integrated therapy safety management system

    PubMed Central

    Podtschaske, Beatrice; Fuchs, Daniela; Friesdorf, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Aims The aim is to demonstrate the benefit of the medico-ergonomic approach for the redesign of clinical work systems. Based on the six layer model, a concept for an integrated therapy safety management is drafted. This concept could serve as a basis to improve resilience. Methods The concept is developed through a concept-based approach. The state of the art of safety and complexity research in human factors and ergonomics forms the basis. The findings are synthesized to a concept for integrated therapy safety management. The concept is applied by way of example for the medication process to demonstrate its practical implementation. Results The integrated therapy safety management is drafted in accordance with the six layer model. This model supports a detailed description of specific work tasks, the corresponding responsibilities and related workflows at different layers by using the concept of bridge managers. Bridge managers anticipate potential errors and monitor the controlled system continuously. If disruptions or disturbances occur, they respond with corrective actions which ensure that no harm results and they initiate preventive measures for future procedures. The concept demonstrates that in a complex work system, the human factor is the key element and final authority to cope with the residual complexity. The expertise of the bridge managers and the recursive hierarchical structure results in highly adaptive clinical work systems and increases their resilience. Conclusions The medico-ergonomic approach is a highly promising way of coping with two complexities. It offers a systematic framework for comprehensive analyses of clinical work systems and promotes interdisciplinary collaboration. PMID:24007448

  12. Managing complexity of aerospace systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaskar, Shashank

    Growing complexity of modern aerospace systems has exposed the limits of conventional systems engineering tools and challenged our ability to design them in a timely and cost effective manner. According to the US Government Accountability Office (GAO), in 2009 nearly half of the defense acquisition programs are expecting 25% or more increase in unit acquisition cost. Increase in technical complexity has been identified as one of the primary drivers behind cost-schedule overruns. Thus to assure the affordability of future aerospace systems, it is increasingly important to develop tools and capabilities for managing their complexity. We propose an approach for managing the complexity of aerospace systems to address this pertinent problem. To this end, we develop a measure that improves upon the state-of-the-art metrics and incorporates key aspects of system complexity. We address the problem of system decomposition by presenting an algorithm for module identification that generates modules to minimize integration complexity. We demonstrate the framework on diverse spacecraft and show the impact of design decisions on integration cost. The measure and the algorithm together help the designer track and manage complexity in different phases of system design. We next investigate how complexity can be used as a decision metric in the model-based design (MBD) paradigm. We propose a framework for complexity enabled design space exploration that introduces the idea of using complexity as a non-traditional design objective. We also incorporate complexity with the component based design paradigm (a sub-field of MBD) and demonstrate it on several case studies. The approach for managing complexity is a small but significant contribution to the vast field of complexity management. We envision our approach being used in concert with a suite of complexity metrics to provide an ability to measure and track complexity through different stages of design and development. This will not only lead to simpler designs but also help the designers calculate the impact of their design decisions on integration cost.

  13. A systems engineering management approach to resource management applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornstein, Rhoda Shaller

    1989-01-01

    The author presents a program management response to the following question: How can the traditional practice of systems engineering management, including requirements specification, be adapted, enhanced, or modified to build future planning and scheduling systems for effective operations? The systems engineering management process, as traditionally practiced, is examined. Extensible resource management systems are discussed. It is concluded that extensible systems are a partial solution to problems presented by requirements that are incomplete, partially immeasurable, and often dynamic. There are positive indications that resource management systems have been characterized and modeled sufficiently to allow their implementation as extensible systems.

  14. Information Security Management - Part Of The Integrated Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, Constantin Adrian

    2015-07-01

    The international management standards allow their integrated approach, thereby combining aspects of particular importance to the activity of any organization, from the quality management systems or the environmental management of the information security systems or the business continuity management systems. Although there is no national or international regulation, nor a defined standard for the Integrated Management System, the need to implement an integrated system occurs within the organization, which feels the opportunity to integrate the management components into a cohesive system, in agreement with the purpose and mission publicly stated. The issues relating to information security in the organization, from the perspective of the management system, raise serious questions to any organization in the current context of electronic information, reason for which we consider not only appropriate but necessary to promote and implement an Integrated Management System Quality - Environment - Health and Operational Security - Information Security

  15. Atomizer for thermal management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, Charles L. (Inventor); Weiler, Jeff (Inventor); Palmer, Randal T. (Inventor); Appel, Philip W. (Inventor); Knight, Paul A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An atomizer for thermal management system for efficiently thermally managing one or more heat producing devices. The atomizer for thermal management system includes a housing having a coolant passage and a dispensing end, an orifice within the dispensing end, and an actuator manipulating a plunger within the housing. The plunger includes a head that is sealable within a recessed portion of the orifice to open or close the orifice. The coolant passes through the coolant passage into the orifice for spraying upon a heat producing device. The actuator may reciprocate so that the coolant spray emitted through the orifice is pulsating. The pulsing frequency may be increased to increase cooling or decreased to decrease cooling of the heat producing device.

  16. Thermal management systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Gering, Kevin L.; Haefner, Daryl R.

    2006-12-12

    A thermal management system for a vehicle includes a heat exchanger having a thermal energy storage material provided therein, a first coolant loop thermally coupled to an electrochemical storage device located within the first coolant loop and to the heat exchanger, and a second coolant loop thermally coupled to the heat exchanger. The first and second coolant loops are configured to carry distinct thermal energy transfer media. The thermal management system also includes an interface configured to facilitate transfer of heat generated by an internal combustion engine to the heat exchanger via the second coolant loop in order to selectively deliver the heat to the electrochemical storage device. Thermal management methods are also provided.

  17. Data management system performance modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiser, Larry M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses analytical techniques that have been used to gain a better understanding of the Space Station Freedom's (SSF's) Data Management System (DMS). The DMS is a complex, distributed, real-time computer system that has been redesigned numerous times. The implications of these redesigns have not been fully analyzed. This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages for static analytical techniques such as Rate Monotonic Analysis (RMA) and also provides a rationale for dynamic modeling. Factors such as system architecture, processor utilization, bus architecture, queuing, etc. are well suited for analysis with a dynamic model. The significance of performance measures for a real-time system are discussed.

  18. BIOSOLIDS DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (BDMS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose:see hard copy attachment "EPA's Biosolids Data Management System and Plans for Evaluating Biosolids Quality"
    Legislation/Enabling Authority:CWA Section 402
    Supported Program:OW, OWM, OECA, ORD, OSW, Regions 1-10, states, local facilitie...

  19. "Project Management Controls with Systems."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dell' Isola, A. J.

    There have recently been a number of new concepts introduced into the building industry to reduce building costs. In this speech, the author illustrates how three of these new concepts -- construction management, building systems, and value engineering -- can be combined to effect significant reduction in both the initial and the ownership costs

  20. Creating a Performance Management System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneier, Craig Eric; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The authors demonstrate the comprehensiveness of a performance management system and why it isn't just performance appraisal anymore. They discuss choosing performance appraisal measures and standards, communicating performance expectations, planning for performance, monitoring and controlling performance, appraising performance, providing

  1. Remotely Accessible Management System (RAMS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Rex

    Oakland Schools, an Intermediate School District for Administration, operates a Remotely Accessible Management System (RAMS). RAMS is composed of over 100 computer programs, each of which performs procedures on the files of the 28 local school districts comprising the constituency of Oakland Schools. This regional service agency covers 900 square

  2. Hierarchical storage management system evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodrow, Thomas S.

    1993-01-01

    The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program at NASA Ames Research Center has been developing a hierarchical storage management system, NAStore, for some 6 years. This evaluation compares functionality, performance, reliability, and other factors of NAStore and three commercial alternatives. FileServ is found to be slightly better overall than NAStore and DMF. UniTree is found to be severely lacking in comparison.

  3. COKEMASTER: Coke plant management system

    SciTech Connect

    Johanning, J.; Reinke, M.

    1996-12-31

    To keep coke utilization in ironmaking as competitive as possible, the potential to improve the economics of coke production has to be utilized. As one measure to meet this need of its customers, Krupp Koppers has expanded its existing ECOTROL computer system for battery heating control to a comprehensive Coke Plant Management System. Increased capacity utilization, lower energy consumption, stabilization of plant operation and ease of operation are the main targets.

  4. [Energy flux and energy balance closure of intensively managed lei bamboo forest ecosystem].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-fei; Jiang, Hong; Zhou, Guo-mo; Sun, Cheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-04-01

    By using open-path eddy covariance system and meteorological instruments, an observation was conducted on the sensitive heat flux, latent heat flux, net radiation, soil heat flux, air temperature, ground temperature, and precipitation in a intensively managed Lei bamboo forest ecosystem in 2011, with the diurnal and monthly variations of energy flux as well as the distribution pattern of each energy component analyzed, and the Bowen ratio and energy balance closure calculated. The yearly net radiation of the forest ecosystem was 2928. 92 MJ m-2, and the latent heat flux, sensitive heat flux, and soil heat flux were 1384.90, 927.54, and -28.27 MJ m-2, respectively. Both the daily and the monthly variations of the energy components showed a single peak curve. The sensible and latent heat fluxes were 31.7% and 47.3% of the net radiation, respectively, indicating that latent heat flux was the main form of energy loss. The Bowen ratio followed the "U"-shaped pattern, and fluctuated from 0. 285 to 2. 062, suggesting that soil was a heat source. The yearly energy balance closure of the forest ecosystem was 0. 782, and the monthly average was 0.808. PMID:23898666

  5. Integrated Systems Health Management for Intelligent Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Melcher, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of an integrated system health management (ISHM) capability is fundamentally linked to the management of data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) with the purposeful objective of determining the health of a system. Management implies storage, distribution, sharing, maintenance, processing, reasoning, and presentation. ISHM is akin to having a team of experts who are all individually and collectively observing and analyzing a complex system, and communicating effectively with each other in order to arrive at an accurate and reliable assessment of its health. In this chapter, concepts, procedures, and approaches are presented as a foundation for implementing an ISHM capability relevant to intelligent systems. The capability stresses integration of DIaK from all elements of a system, emphasizing an advance toward an on-board, autonomous capability. Both ground-based and on-board ISHM capabilities are addressed. The information presented is the result of many years of research, development, and maturation of technologies, and of prototype implementations in operational systems.

  6. Automated Car Park Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabros, J. P.; Tabañag, D.; Espra, A.; Gerasta, O. J.

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to develop a prototype for an Automated Car Park Management System that will increase the quality of service of parking lots through the integration of a smart system that assists motorist in finding vacant parking lot. The research was based on implementing an operating system and a monitoring system for parking system without the use of manpower. This will include Parking Guidance and Information System concept which will efficiently assist motorists and ensures the safety of the vehicles and the valuables inside the vehicle. For monitoring, Optical Character Recognition was employed to monitor and put into list all the cars entering the parking area. All parking events in this system are visible via MATLAB GUI which contain time-in, time-out, time consumed information and also the lot number where the car parks. To put into reality, this system has a payment method, and it comes via a coin slot operation to control the exit gate. The Automated Car Park Management System was successfully built by utilizing microcontrollers specifically one PIC18f4550 and two PIC16F84s and one PIC16F628A.

  7. Integrated Computer System of Management in Logistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chwesiuk, Krzysztof

    2011-06-01

    This paper aims at presenting a concept of an integrated computer system of management in logistics, particularly in supply and distribution chains. Consequently, the paper includes the basic idea of the concept of computer-based management in logistics and components of the system, such as CAM and CIM systems in production processes, and management systems for storage, materials flow, and for managing transport, forwarding and logistics companies. The platform which integrates computer-aided management systems is that of electronic data interchange.

  8. The Cheetah data management system

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, P.F. ); Word, G.B. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1992-09-01

    Cheetah is a data management system based on the C programming language, with support for other languages. Its main goal is to transfer data between memory and I/O steams in a general way. The streams are either associated with disk files or are network data stems. Cheetah provides optional convenience functions to assist in the management of C structures. Cheetah steams are self-describing so that general purpose applications can fully understand an incoming steam. This information can be used to display the data in an incoming steam to the user of an interactive general application, complete with variable names and optional comments.

  9. CMS - HLT Configuration Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daponte, Vincenzo; Bocci, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    The CMS High Level Trigger (HLT) is a collection of software algorithms that run using an optimized version of the CMS offline reconstruction software. The HLT uses Python configuration files each containing hundreds of "modules", organized in "sequences" and "paths". Each configuration usually uses an average of 2200 different modules and more than 400 independent trigger paths. The complexity of the HLT configurations and their large number require the design of a suitable data management system. The work presented here describes the solution designed to manage the considerable number of configurations developed and to assist the editing of new configurations.

  10. Breeding bird community response to establishing intercropped switchgrass in intensively-managed pine stands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loman, Zachary G.; Riffell, Samuel K.; Wheat, Bradley R.; Miller, Darrin A.; Martin, James A.; Vilella, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Intercropping switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) between tree rows within young pine (Pinus spp.) plantations is a potential method to generate lignocellulosic biofuel feedstocks within intensively managed forests. Intensively managed pine supports a diverse avian assemblage potentially affected by establishment and maintenance of an annual biomass feedstock via changes in plant communities, dead wood resources, and habitat structure. We sought to understand how establishing switchgrass on an operational scale affects bird communities within intercropped plantations as compared to typical intensively managed loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) forest. We conducted breeding bird point counts using distance sampling for three years (2011–2013) following establishment of intercropped switchgrass stands (6 replicates), traditionally-managed pine plantations, and switchgrass-only plots (0.1 km2 minimum) in Kemper Co., MS. We detected 59 breeding bird species from 11,195 detections. Neotropical migrants and forest-edge associated species were less abundant in intercropped plots than controls the first two years after establishment and more abundant in year three. Short distance migrants and residents were scarce in intercropped and control plots initially, and did not differ between these two treatments in any year. Species associated with pine-grass habitat structure were less abundant initially in intercropped plots, but converged with pine controls in subsequent years. Switchgrass monocultures provided minimal resources for birds. If songbird conservation is a management priority, managers should consider potential reductions of some breeding birds for one to two years following intercropping. It is unclear how these relationships may change outside the breeding season and as stands age.

  11. Metrics for border management systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, Ruth Ann

    2009-07-01

    There are as many unique and disparate manifestations of border systems as there are borders to protect. Border Security is a highly complex system analysis problem with global, regional, national, sector, and border element dimensions for land, water, and air domains. The complexity increases with the multiple, and sometimes conflicting, missions for regulating the flow of people and goods across borders, while securing them for national security. These systems include frontier border surveillance, immigration management and customs functions that must operate in a variety of weather, terrain, operational conditions, cultural constraints, and geopolitical contexts. As part of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project 08-684 (Year 1), the team developed a reference framework to decompose this complex system into international/regional, national, and border elements levels covering customs, immigration, and border policing functions. This generalized architecture is relevant to both domestic and international borders. As part of year two of this project (09-1204), the team determined relevant relative measures to better understand border management performance. This paper describes those relative metrics and how they can be used to improve border management systems.

  12. MIMS - MEDICAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankowski, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    MIMS, Medical Information Management System is an interactive, general purpose information storage and retrieval system. It was first designed to be used in medical data management, and can be used to handle all aspects of data related to patient care. Other areas of application for MIMS include: managing occupational safety data in the public and private sectors; handling judicial information where speed and accuracy are high priorities; systemizing purchasing and procurement systems; and analyzing organizational cost structures. Because of its free format design, MIMS can offer immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases is required. File structures, data categories, field lengths and formats, including alphabetic and/or numeric, are all user defined. The user can quickly and efficiently extract, display, and analyze the data. Three means of extracting data are provided: certain short items of information, such as social security numbers, can be used to uniquely identify each record for quick access; records can be selected which match conditions defined by the user; and specific categories of data can be selected. Data may be displayed and analyzed in several ways which include: generating tabular information assembled from comparison of all the records on the system; generating statistical information on numeric data such as means, standard deviations and standard errors; and displaying formatted listings of output data. The MIMS program is written in Microsoft FORTRAN-77. It was designed to operate on IBM Personal Computers and compatibles running under PC or MS DOS 2.00 or higher. MIMS was developed in 1987.

  13. PROMIS (Procurement Management Information System)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The PROcurement Management Information System (PROMIS) provides both detailed and summary level information on all procurement actions performed within NASA's procurement offices at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). It provides not only on-line access, but also schedules procurement actions, monitors their progress, and updates Forecast Award Dates. Except for a few computational routines coded in FORTRAN, the majority of the systems is coded in a high level language called NATURAL. A relational Data Base Management System called ADABAS is utilized. Certain fields, called descriptors, are set up on each file to allow the selection of records based on a specified value or range of values. The use of like descriptors on different files serves as the link between the falls, thus producing a relational data base. Twenty related files are currently being maintained on PROMIS.

  14. [Effects of intensive management on abundance and composition of soil N2-fixing bacteria in Phyllostachys heterocycla stands].

    PubMed

    He, Dong-hua; Chen, Jun-hui; Xu, Qiu-fang; Shen, Qiu-lan; Li, Yong-chun; Mao, Xin-wei; Cheng, Min

    2015-10-01

    Denaturing gradient-gel electrophoresis and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) were employed to determine the effects of intensive management on soil N2-fixing bacteria in a moso bamboo (Phyllostachys heterocycla) plantation. Soil samples were collected from the moso bamboo stands receiving 0 (CK), 10, 15, 20, and 25 years of intensive management. It was found that intensive management caused a strong decrease in soil pH but a general increase in soil available nutrients. The structure of the N2-fixing bacterial communities in the soils having received 10 and 25 years of intensive management were quite similar to that from the CK; however, those from 15 and 20 years of intensification differed from the CK. With increasing time of intensive management, the abundance and diversity of the nifH gene at first decreased and then increased, with the minimum values being observed after 15 years of intensive management, indicating the eventual resiliency of N2-fixing bacteria to disturbance induced by intensive management. Redundancy analysis indicated that soil available potassium, available nitrogen, nitrite nitrogen, and ammonium nitrogen were more closely related to the changes of N2-fixing bacterial community structure compared with the other soil indices measured. In conclusion, the soil N2-fixing bacterial community was negatively affected by intensive management in the short term, but could recover in the long term. PMID:26995903

  15. Challenges in management of blast injuries in Intensive Care Unit: Case series and review

    PubMed Central

    Samra, Tanvir; Pawar, Mridula; Kaur, Jasvinder

    2014-01-01

    Blast injuries are rare, but life-threatening medical emergencies. We report the clinical presentation and management of four bomb blast victims admitted in Intensive Care Unit of Trauma center of our hospital in 2011. Three of them had lung injury; hemothorax (2) and pneumothorax (1). Traumatic brain injury was present in only one. Long bone fractures were present in all the victims. Presence of multiple shrapnels was a universal finding. Two blast victims died (day 7 and day 9); cause of death was multi-organ failure and septic shock. Issues relating to complexity of injuries, complications, management, and outcome are discussed. PMID:25538416

  16. Real-time estimation system for seismic-intensity exposed-population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoi, S.; Nakamura, H.; Kunugi, T.; Suzuki, W.; Fujiwara, H.

    2013-12-01

    For an appropriate first-action to an earthquake, risk (damage) information evaluated in real-time are important as well as hazard (ground motion) information. To meet this need, we are developing real-time estimation system (J-RISQ) for exposed population and earthquake damage on buildings. We plan to open the web page of estimated exposed population to the public from autumn. When an earthquake occurs, seismic intensities are calculated at each observation station and sent to the DMC (Data Management Center) in different timing. For rapid estimation, the system does not wait for the data from all the stations but begins the first estimation when the number of the stations observing the seismic intensity of 2.5 or larger exceeds the threshold amount. Estimations are updated several times using all the available data at that moment. Spatial distribution of seismic intensity in 250 m meshes is estimated by the site amplification factor of surface layers and the observed data. By using this intensity distribution, the exposed population is estimated using population data of each mesh. The exposed populations for municipalities and prefectures are estimated by summing-up the exposures of included meshes for the area and are appropriately rounded taking estimation precision into consideration. The estimated intensities for major cities are shown by the histograms, which indicate the variation of the estimated values in the city together with the observed maximum intensity. The variation is mainly caused by the difference of the site amplification factors. The intensities estimated for meshes with large amplification factor are sometimes larger than the maximum value observed in the city. The estimated results are seen on the web site just after the earthquake. The results of the past earthquakes can be easily searched by keywords such as date, magnitudes, seismic intensities and source areas. The summary of the results in the one-page report of Portable Document Format is also available. This system has been experimentally operated since 2010 and has performed the estimations in real-time for more than 670 earthquakes by July of 2012. For about 75 % of these earthquakes, it takes less than one minute to send the e-mail of first estimation after receiving data from the first triggered station, and therefore, the rapidity of the system is satisfactory. To upload a PDF report form to the web site, it takes approximately additional 30 second.

  17. Managing Hardware Configurations and Data Products for the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hincks, A. D.; Shaw, J. R.; Chime Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) is an ambitious new radio telescope project for measuring cosmic expansion and investigating dark energy. Keeping good records of both physical configuration of its 1280 antennas and their analogue signal chains as well as the 100 TB of data produced daily from its correlator will be essential to the success of CHIME. In these proceedings we describe the database-driven software we have developed to manage this complexity.

  18. Principles and practice of managing difficult behaviour situations in intensive care.

    PubMed

    Maunder, T

    1997-04-01

    Nurses working in intensive care units may be vulnerable to verbal or physical aggression from relatives. This article explores the principles and skills associated with de-escalating aggression in such scenarios. These nurses may also be exposed to manipulative patterns of behaviour on the part of relatives and the article explores a research technique with which to manage this kind of situation. PMID:9180499

  19. Configuration Management File Manager Developed for Numerical Propulsion System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Follen, Gregory J.

    1997-01-01

    One of the objectives of the High Performance Computing and Communication Project's (HPCCP) Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) is to provide a common and consistent way to manage applications, data, and engine simulations. The NPSS Configuration Management (CM) File Manager integrated with the Common Desktop Environment (CDE) window management system provides a common look and feel for the configuration management of data, applications, and engine simulations for U.S. engine companies. In addition, CM File Manager provides tools to manage a simulation. Features include managing input files, output files, textual notes, and any other material normally associated with simulation. The CM File Manager includes a generic configuration management Application Program Interface (API) that can be adapted for the configuration management repositories of any U.S. engine company.

  20. Applying Management Information Systems to Staffing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    After reviewing some concepts and principles for effective data management, the author applies the concepts to nurse staffing systems for the management of human resources. He defines a seven-step process for establishing a management information system, from defining the management objective to implementing the system. (Author/CT)

  1. Hybrid power management system and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A system and method for hybrid power management. The system includes photovoltaic cells, ultracapacitors, and pulse generators. In one embodiment, the hybrid power management system is used to provide power for a highway safety flasher.

  2. Hybrid Power Management System and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A system and method for hybrid power management. The system includes photovoltaic cells, ultracapacitors, and pulse generators. In one embodiment, the hybrid power management system is used to provide power for a highway safety flasher.

  3. RHEED intensities from two-dimensional heteroepitaxial nanoscale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniluk, Andrzej

    2014-11-01

    A practical computing algorithm has been developed for calculating the reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) from the molecular beam epitaxy growing surface. The calculations are based on the use of the dynamical diffraction theory in which the electrons are taken to be diffracted by a potential, which is periodic in the dimension perpendicular to the surface. The computer program presented in this paper enables calculations for three basic types of diffuse potential for crystalline heteroepitaxial structures, including the possible existence of various diffuse scattering models through the layer parallel to the surface. Catalogue identifier: AETW_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETW_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 68483 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 480831 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: Intel i7-based PC. Operating system: Windows, Linux. RAM: The presented algorithm belongs to the linear memory class of the computational complexity O(n). Word size: 64 bits Classification: 4.6, 6.2, 7.2. Nature of problem: RHEED rocking curves (the specular beam intensities versus the glancing angle) recorded from heteroepitaxial layers are used for the non-destructive evaluation of epilayer thickness and composition with a high degree of accuracy. Rocking curves from such heterostructures are often very complex because the thickness fringes from every layer beat together. Simulations based on the dynamical diffraction theory are generally used to interpret the rocking curves of such structures from which very small changes in thickness and composition can be obtained. Rocking curves are also used to determine the level of strain and its relaxation mechanism in a lattice-mismatched system. Solution method: RHEED intensities are calculated within the framework of the general matrix formulation described in Ref. [1] under the one-beam condition [2,3]. The dynamical diffraction calculations presented in this paper utilize the systematic reflection case in RHEED, in which the atomic potential in the planes parallel to the surface are projected onto the surface normal, so that the results are insensitive to the atomic arrangement in the layers parallel to the surface. In this paper, an approach in which oscillating changes in the intensity appear as a combined effect of changes in the refraction conditions and changes in diffuse scattering for different models of the scattering potential is implemented. Running time: Numerically, the problem of calculating the changes in RHEED oscillation intensity from growing layers is an NP problem. The time computational complexity of the presented algorithm depends on the number of layers for both the substrate and the growing layers included in the calculations. The time-computational complexity of the presented solution is O(n2), where n is the total number of layers used in the calculations. A. Daniluk, Comput. Phys. Commun. 166 (2005) 123. L.M. Peng, M.J. Whelan, Surf. Sci. Lett. 238 (1990) L446. Y. Horio, A. Ichimiya, Japan. J. Appl. Phys. 33 (1994) L377.

  4. Hematodinium sp. in Irish Cancer pagurus fisheries: infection intensity as a potential fisheries management tool.

    PubMed

    Chualin, C N; Hayes, M; Allen, B; Robinson, M

    2009-01-28

    Infection of Cancer pagurus by a parasitic dinoflagellate of the genus Hematodinium is described for the first time in Ireland. An industry-based monitoring programme was established to determine seasonality of infection intensity and prevalence in the country's 3 largest brown crab fisheries in the southwest, north and southeast. The parasite was present in all areas for the majority of sampling periods, with highest prevalences recorded in pre-recruit animals of both sexes. Microscopic examination of haemolymph revealed trophont, plasmodial and dinospore stages of the parasite. Overall prevalence in males (16%) was higher than in females (9%). Prevalence of Hematodinium sp. infection ranged from 0 to 51%, but a distinct seasonal trend was not apparent. Infection intensity was seasonal with significantly higher peaks occurring in late autumn/early winter months than in other quarters, corresponding to industry reports of moribund and dead pink-shelled crabs in commercial catches. We postulate that seawater temperature or a temperature-linked process is a key factor in triggering the final stages of infection, as significant autumn peaks were followed by a reduction in infection intensity as temperature decreased in the late winter/early spring months with no increase in intensity again until the following autumn. We propose that infection intensity, rather than prevalence, provides a more appropriate indication of the period when there is greatest potential for biological and economic impacts; the parameter's application as a fisheries management tool is discussed. PMID:19301637

  5. Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) System Manager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiff, Conrad; Maher, Francis Alfred; Henely, Sean Philip; Rand, David

    2014-01-01

    The Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) mission is an ambitious NASA space science mission in which 4 spacecraft are flown in tight formation about a highly elliptical orbit. Each spacecraft has multiple instruments that measure particle and field compositions in the Earths magnetosphere. By controlling the members relative motion, MMS can distinguish temporal and spatial fluctuations in a way that a single spacecraft cannot.To achieve this control, 2 sets of four maneuvers, distributed evenly across the spacecraft must be performed approximately every 14 days. Performing a single maneuver on an individual spacecraft is usually labor intensive and the complexity becomes clearly increases with four. As a result, the MMS flight dynamics team turned to the System Manager to put the routine or error-prone under machine control freeing the analysts for activities that require human judgment.The System Manager is an expert system that is capable of handling operations activities associated with performing MMS maneuvers. As an expert system, it can work off a known schedule, launching jobs based on a one-time occurrence or on a set reoccurring schedule. It is also able to detect situational changes and use event-driven programming to change schedules, adapt activities, or call for help.

  6. Automated Platform Management System Scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Larry G.

    1990-01-01

    The Platform Management System was established to coordinate the operation of platform systems and instruments. The management functions are split between ground and space components. Since platforms are to be out of contact with the ground more than the manned base, the on-board functions are required to be more autonomous than those of the manned base. Under this concept, automated replanning and rescheduling, including on-board real-time schedule maintenance and schedule repair, are required to effectively and efficiently meet Space Station Freedom mission goals. In a FY88 study, we developed several promising alternatives for automated platform planning and scheduling. We recommended both a specific alternative and a phased approach to automated platform resource scheduling. Our recommended alternative was based upon use of exactly the same scheduling engine in both ground and space components of the platform management system. Our phased approach recommendation was based upon evolutionary development of the platform. In the past year, we developed platform scheduler requirements and implemented a rapid prototype of a baseline platform scheduler. Presently we are rehosting this platform scheduler rapid prototype and integrating the scheduler prototype into two Goddard Space Flight Center testbeds, as the ground scheduler in the Scheduling Concepts, Architectures, and Networks Testbed and as the on-board scheduler in the Platform Management System Testbed. Using these testbeds, we will investigate rescheduling issues, evaluate operational performance and enhance the platform scheduler prototype to demonstrate our evolutionary approach to automated platform scheduling. The work described in this paper was performed prior to Space Station Freedom rephasing, transfer of platform responsibility to Code E, and other recently discussed changes. We neither speculate on these changes nor attempt to predict the impact of the final decisions. As a consequence some of our work and results may be outdated when this paper is published.

  7. Data management system advanced architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevers, ED

    1991-01-01

    The topics relating to the Space Station Freedom (SSF) are presented in view graph form and include: (1) the data management system (DMS) concept; (2) DMS evolution rationale; (3) the DMS advance architecture task; (4) DMS group support for Ames payloads; (5) DMS testbed development; (6) the DMS architecture task status; (7) real time multiprocessor testbed; (8) networked processor performance; (9) and the DMS advance architecture task 1992 goals.

  8. Management of Complications of End-Stage Liver Disease in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    DellaVolpe, Jeffrey D; Garavaglia, Jeffrey M; Huang, David T

    2016-02-01

    The management of critically ill patients with end-stage liver disease can be challenging due to the vulnerability of this population and the wide-ranging complications of the disease. This review proposes an approach based on the major organ systems affected, to provide a framework for managing the most common complications. Although considerable practice variation exists, a focus on the evidence behind the most common practices will ensure the development of the optimal skillset to appropriately manage this disease. PMID:25223828

  9. Management information systems software evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Tunisi, N.; Ghazzawi, A.; Gruyaert, F.; Clarke, D.

    1995-11-01

    In November 1993, Saudi Aramco management endorsed a proposal to coordinate the development of the Management Information Systems (MISs) of four concurrent projects for its facilities Controls Modernization Program. The affected projects were the Ras Tanura Refinery Upgrade Project, the Abqaiq Plant Controls Modernization and the Shedgum and Uthmaniyah Gas plants Control Upgrade Projects. All of these projects had a significant requirement of MISs in their scope. Under the leadership of the Process and Control Systems Department, and MIS Coordination Team was formed with representatives of several departments. An MIS Applications Evaluation procedure was developed based on the Kepner Tregoe Decisions Analysis Process and general questionnaires were sent to over a hundred potential Vendors. The applications were divided into several categories, such as: Data Capture and Historization, Human User Interface, Trending, Reporting, Graphic Displays, Data Reconciliation, Statistical Analysis, Expert Systems, Maintenance Applications, Document Management and Operations Planning and Scheduling. For each of the MIS Application areas, detailed follow-up questionnaires were used to short list the candidate products. In May and June 1994, selected Vendors were invited to Saudi Arabia for an Exhibition which was open to all Saudi Aramco employees. In conjunction with this, the Vendors were subjected to a rigorous product testing exercise by independent teams of testers. The paper will describe the methods used and the lessons learned in this extensive software evaluation phase, which was a first for Saudi Aramco.

  10. Platform Management System (PMS) evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilley, Mike; Hartley, Jonathan

    1990-01-01

    In fiscal year 1988 a study was begun to define the platform management system (PMS) functions required for the mature platform operations era. The objectives of the task include: (1) defining how to increase the operational productivity of the platform by providing enhanced capability for responding to changing events, (2) influencing the initial PMS design by identifying required 'hooks and scars', and (3) evaluation potential automation techniques that are appropriate given predicted onboard computing resources. Initial platform operations scenarios were defined. The focus was on PMS-related functions where operations enhancements are likely to occur. Operations productivity was defined in terms of scientific productivity of the platform as well as the level of automation of the ground system. The Platform Operations Productivity Enhancement Report was completed earlier this year documenting system enhancements to increase science productivity and ground system automation. Using the baseline PMS defined in the PMS Definition Document as a starting point, the resulting PMS-specific enhancements were molded into a sequence of progressively more sophisticated operations management capabilities. This sequence of upgrades to the PMS has been documented in a PMS Evolution Plan. The plan includes enhancements in the areas of resources scheduling, resource modeling, system and payload anomaly management, and transaction sequence interpretation. A plan for migration of functions from the ground portion of the PMS to the flight portion is also included. The impacts of this plan on the platform are now being documented to ensure that the required 'hooks and scars' are included in the baseline system. Future plans include a prototype of some of the PMS enhancements to address the feasibility of and techniques for implementing these enhancements in the onboard computing environment.

  11. Weed resistance challenges and management under herbicide resistant cropping systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the last six decades, herbicides have been the mainstay of weed management in cropping systems around the world, especially in the Western Hemisphere. A direct consequence of intensive use of herbicides is the development of resistance in weed populations. The extreme popularity of transgenic g...

  12. Hydrologic response of northern wetlands to silvicultural water management systems

    SciTech Connect

    Trettin, C.C.

    1994-09-01

    Two types of water management systems are used to ameliorate saturated soil conditions which limit silvicultural operations and site productivity in northern wetlands. The pattern ditch system is an intensive drainage network designed to regulate water table depth in peat soils. The prescription drainage system is a low-intensity drainage system that is used to develop apparent drainage patterns in mineral and histic-mineral soils. These water management systems may either increase or decrease peak flow, base flow, and the duration of peak flow events, depending on drainage system design, climate, season, site characteristics, and land use. The most common hydrologic response to drainage is an increase in peak flow and base flow, and an increase in annual runoff. The effect of wetland drainage on watershed hydrology depends on the proportion of the watershed drained. Drainage may also affect water quality, nutrient cycling, vegetation composition and structure.

  13. Integrated Building Management System (IBMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Anita Lewis

    2012-07-01

    This project provides a combination of software and services that more easily and cost-effectively help to achieve optimized building performance and energy efficiency. Featuring an open-platform, cloud- hosted application suite and an intuitive user experience, this solution simplifies a traditionally very complex process by collecting data from disparate building systems and creating a single, integrated view of building and system performance. The Fault Detection and Diagnostics algorithms developed within the IBMS have been designed and tested as an integrated component of the control algorithms running the equipment being monitored. The algorithms identify the normal control behaviors of the equipment without interfering with the equipment control sequences. The algorithms also work without interfering with any cooperative control sequences operating between different pieces of equipment or building systems. In this manner the FDD algorithms create an integrated building management system.

  14. System safety management lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Piatt, J.A.

    1989-05-01

    The Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research, Development and Acquisition directed the Army Safety Center to provide an audit of the causes of accidents and safety of use restrictions on recently fielded systems by tracking residual hazards back through the acquisition process. The objective was to develop ''lessons learned'' that could be applied to the acquisition process to minimize mishaps in fielded systems. System safety management lessons learned are defined as Army practices or policies, derived from past successes and failures, that are expected to be effective in eliminating or reducing specific systemic causes of residual hazards. They are broadly applicable and supportive of the Army structure and acquisition objectives. 29 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Utilities systems management - Flying demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moir, I.; Capener, P. H.

    The design and operation of the utilities systems management (USM) hardware developed for the UK Experimental Aircraft Program (EAP) demonstrator are presented in extensive drawings and diagrams and briefly characterized. The USM links the basic aircraft systems (fuel, engine, environmental control, secondary power, hydraulics, etc.) to the avionics or mission bus. It comprises a dedicated MIL-STD-1553B bus, distributed data-acquisition units with local processing and control, an integrated power control, and interfaces with the multifunction displays of the digital cockpit. The overall operation of the USM is outlined; and the system implementation and packaging are discussed. Particular attention is given to the use of relays (rather than solid-state devices) for discrete power switching. When compared to conventional utilities control systems, the USM is shown to provide weight and operating-cost savings of over 50 percent and an eightfold improvement in availability.

  16. Use of database management software in a management information system.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, M

    1991-01-01

    If information is to play a useful role in the decision making process, an organization must design a system for capturing, organizing and presenting information from daily activities to its managers. Use of relational database management software to design a custom application as part of a management information system is both practical and cost effective. Designing a database management application is very challenging but well worth the effort, asserts the author of this case study. PMID:10119686

  17. Integrated soil–crop system management for food security

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin-Ping; Cui, Zhen-Ling; Vitousek, Peter M.; Cassman, Kenneth G.; Matson, Pamela A.; Bai, Jin-Shun; Meng, Qing-Feng; Hou, Peng; Yue, Shan-Chao; Römheld, Volker; Zhang, Fu-Suo

    2011-01-01

    China and other rapidly developing economies face the dual challenge of substantially increasing yields of cereal grains while at the same time reducing the very substantial environmental impacts of intensive agriculture. We used a model-driven integrated soil–crop system management approach to develop a maize production system that achieved mean maize yields of 13.0 t ha−1 on 66 on-farm experimental plots—nearly twice the yield of current farmers’ practices—with no increase in N fertilizer use. Such integrated soil–crop system management systems represent a priority for agricultural research and implementation, especially in rapidly growing economies. PMID:21444818

  18. Combat Agility Management System (CAMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skow, Andrew; Porada, William

    1994-01-01

    The proper management of energy becomes a complex task in fighter aircraft which have high angle of attack (AOA) capability. Maneuvers at high AOA are accompanied by high bleed rates (velocity decrease), a characteristic that is usually undesirable in a typical combat arena. Eidetics has developed under NASA SBIR Phase 1 and NAVAIR SBIR Phase 2 contracts a system which allows a pilot to more easily and effectively manage the trade-off of energy (airspeed or altitude) for turn rate while not imposing hard limits on the high AOA nose pointing capability that can be so important in certain air combat maneuver situations. This has been accomplished by incorporating a two-stage angle of attack limiter into the flight control laws. The first stage sets a limit on AOA to achieve a limit on the maximum bleed rate (selectable) by limiting AOA to values which are dependent on the aircraft attitude and dynamic pressure (or flight path, velocity, and altitude). The second stage sets an AOA limit near the AOA for C(sub l max). One of the principal benefits of such a system is that it enables a low-experience pilot to become much more proficient at managing his energy. The Phase 2 simulation work is complete, and an exploratory flight test on the F-18 HARV is planned for the Fall of 1994 to demonstrate/validate the concept.

  19. Electromagnetic-Guided Dynamic Multileaf Collimator Tracking Enables Motion Management for Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Keall, Paul J.; Sawant, Amit; Cho, Byungchul; Ruan, Dan; Wu Junqing; Poulsen, Per; Petersen, Jay; Newell, Laurence J.; Cattell, Herbert; Korreman, Stine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is attractive because of high-dose conformality and efficient delivery. However, managing intrafraction motion is challenging for IMAT. The purpose of this research was to develop and investigate electromagnetically guided dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking as an enabling technology to treat moving targets during IMAT. Methods and Materials: A real-time three-dimensional DMLC-based target tracking system was developed and integrated with a linear accelerator. The DMLC tracking software inputs a real-time electromagnetically measured target position and the IMAT plan, and dynamically creates new leaf positions directed at the moving target. Low- and high-modulation IMAT plans were created for lung and prostate cancer cases. The IMAT plans were delivered to a three-axis motion platform programmed with measured patient motion. Dosimetric measurements were acquired by placing an ion chamber array on the moving platform. Measurements were acquired with tracking, without tracking (current clinical practice), and with the phantom in a static position (reference). Analysis of dose distribution differences from the static reference used a {gamma}-test. Results: On average, 1.6% of dose points for the lung plans and 1.2% of points for the prostate plans failed the 3-mm/3% {gamma}-test with tracking; without tracking, 34% and 14% (respectively) of points failed the {gamma}-test. The delivery time was the same with and without tracking. Conclusions: Electromagnetic-guided DMLC target tracking with IMAT has been investigated for the first time. Dose distributions to moving targets with DMLC tracking were significantly superior to those without tracking. There was no loss of treatment efficiency with DMLC tracking.

  20. Development of a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Hydrophone System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Mark E.; Gessert, James

    2009-04-01

    The growing clinical use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has driven a need for reliable, reproducible measurements of HIFU acoustic fields. We have previously presented data on a reflective scatterer approach, incorporating several novel features for improved bandwidth, reliability, and reproducibility [Proc. 2005 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium, 1739-1742]. We now report on several design improvements which have increase the signal to noise ratio of the system, and potentially reduced the cost of implementation. For the scattering element, we now use an artificial sapphire material to provide a more uniform radiating surface. The receiver is a segmented, truncated spherical structure with a 10 cm radius; the scattering element is positioned at the center of the sphere. The receiver is made from 25 micron thick, biaxially stretched PVDF, with a Pt-Au electrode on the front surface. In the new design, a specialized backing material provides the stiffness required to maintain structural stability, while at the same time providing both electrical shielding and ultrasonic absorption. Compared with the previous version, the new receiver design has improved the noise performance by 8-12 dB; the new scattering sphere has reduced the scattering loss by another 14 dB, producing an effective sensitivity of -298 dB re 1 microVolt/Pa. The design trade-off still involves receiver sensitivity with effective spot size, and signal distortion from the scatter structure. However, the reduced cost and improved repeatability of the new scatter approach makes the overall design more robust for routine waveform measurements of HIFU systems.

  1. Development of a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Hydrophone System

    SciTech Connect

    Schafer, Mark E.; Gessert, James

    2009-04-14

    The growing clinical use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has driven a need for reliable, reproducible measurements of HIFU acoustic fields. We have previously presented data on a reflective scatterer approach, incorporating several novel features for improved bandwidth, reliability, and reproducibility [Proc. 2005 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium, 1739-1742]. We now report on several design improvements which have increase the signal to noise ratio of the system, and potentially reduced the cost of implementation. For the scattering element, we now use an artificial sapphire material to provide a more uniform radiating surface. The receiver is a segmented, truncated spherical structure with a 10 cm radius; the scattering element is positioned at the center of the sphere. The receiver is made from 25 micron thick, biaxially stretched PVDF, with a Pt-Au electrode on the front surface. In the new design, a specialized backing material provides the stiffness required to maintain structural stability, while at the same time providing both electrical shielding and ultrasonic absorption. Compared with the previous version, the new receiver design has improved the noise performance by 8-12 dB; the new scattering sphere has reduced the scattering loss by another 14 dB, producing an effective sensitivity of -298 dB re 1 microVolt/Pa. The design trade-off still involves receiver sensitivity with effective spot size, and signal distortion from the scatter structure. However, the reduced cost and improved repeatability of the new scatter approach makes the overall design more robust for routine waveform measurements of HIFU systems.

  2. Case study: applying management policies to manage distributed queuing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumair, Bernhard; Wies, Ren

    1996-06-01

    The increasing deployment of workstations and high performance endsystems in addition to the operation of mainframe computers leads to a situation where many companies can no longer afford for their expensive workstations to run idle for long hours during the night or with little load during daytime. Distributed queuing systems and batch systems (DQSs) provide an efficient basis to make use of these unexploited resources and allow corporations to replace expensive supercomputers with clustered workstations running DQSs. To employ these innovative DQSs on a large scale, the management policies for scheduling jobs, configuring queues, etc must be integrated in the overall management process for the IT infrastructure. For this purpose, the concepts of application management and management policies are introduced and discussed. The definition, automatic transformation, and implementation of policies on management platforms to effectively manage DQSs will show that policy-based application management is already possible using the existing management functionality found in today's systems.

  3. Fluid management systems technology summaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, J. A.; Blatt, M. H.; Bennett, F. O., Jr.; Campbell, B. J.

    1974-01-01

    A summarization and categorization of the pertinent literature associated with fluid management systems technology having potential application to in-orbit fluid transfer and/or associated storage are presented. A literature search was conducted to obtain pertinent documents for review. Reports determined to be of primary significance were summarized in the following manner: (1) report identification, (2) objective(s) of the work, (3) description of pertinent work performed, (4) major results, and (5) comments of the reviewer. Pertinent figures are presented on a single facing page separate from the text. Specific areas covered are: fluid line dynamics and thermodynamics, low-g mass gauging, other instrumentation, stratification/pressurization, low-g vent systems, fluid mixing refrigeration and reliquefaction, and low-g interface control and liquid acquisition systems. Reports which were reviewed and not summarized, along with reasons for not summarizing, are also listed.

  4. Intensity-based fibre-optic sensing system using contrast modulation of subcarrier interference pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, G.; Sherer, T. N.; Maitland, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    A novel technique to compensate for unwanted intensity losses in a fiber-optic sensing system is described. The technique involves a continuous sinusoidal modulation of the light source intensity at radio frequencies and an intensity sensor placed in an unbalanced interferometer. The system shows high sensitivity and stability.

  5. Integrated Procurement Management System, Version II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    Integrated Procurement Management System, Version II (IPMS II) is online/ batch system for collecting developing, managing and disseminating procurementrelated data at NASA Johnson Space Center. Portions of IPMS II adaptable to other procurement situations.

  6. Regional anesthesia for management of acute pain in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    De Pinto, Mario; Dagal, Armagan; ODonnell, Brendan; Stogicza, Agnes; Chiu, Sheila; Edwards, William Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a major problem for Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients. Despite numerous improvements it is estimated that as many as 70% of the patients experience moderate-to-severe postoperative pain during their stay in the ICU. Effective pain management means not only decreasing pain intensity, but also reducing the opioids side effects. Minimizing nausea, vomiting, urinary retention, and sedation may indeed facilitate patient recovery and it is likely to shorten the ICU and hospital stay. Adequate postoperative and post-trauma pain management is also crucial for the achievement of effective rehabilitation. Furthermore, recent studies suggest that effective acute pain management may be helpful in reducing the development of chronic pain. When used appropriately, and in combination with other treatment modalities, regional analgesia techniques (neuraxial and peripheral nerve blocks) have the potential to reduce or eliminate the physiological stress response to surgery and trauma, decreasing the possibility of surgical complications and improving the outcomes. Also they may reduce the total amount of opioid analgesics necessary to achieve adequate pain control and the development of potentially dangerous side effects. PMID:26557482

  7. Seasonal nitrous oxide flux from an intensively managed pasture in a humid subtropical ecosystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brams, Eugene A.; Anthony, W. H.; Hutchinson, G. L.; Livingston, G. P.

    1989-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) flux from vented chambers was measured over intensively and minimally managed bermuda grass hay meadows in a humid, subtropical ecosystem for several years during scheduled sampling protocol following harvest, fertilization and rainfall events while measuring diel N2O emissions once during each of 5 seasonal day growth cycles which divided each calendar year. Soil pools of nitrite NO2(-), nitrate NO3(-), and ammonia (NH3) were measured in soil samples taken at 2 and 10 cm depths during each emission collection to determine transformations of the nitrogen pools coupled with N2O emissions. The highest diel N2O emission occur midday in the Spring cycle, measuring 9.0 g N/ha/d only for several weeks, while emissions dropped to less than 1.0 g N/ha/day during hot, dry, and colder months. Intensively managed meadows (4 fertilizations and harvests per year plus pest management) induced higher seasonal N2O emissions than minimal treatment (1 fertilization and harvest) averaging 2.75 and 5.97 g N/ha/day. Nitrous oxide emission data as responses to soil parameters and environmental parameters were also measured where air temperature, soil moisture, and fertilization were the most powerful factors.

  8. Regional anesthesia for management of acute pain in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    De Pinto, Mario; Dagal, Armagan; O'Donnell, Brendan; Stogicza, Agnes; Chiu, Sheila; Edwards, William Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a major problem for Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients. Despite numerous improvements it is estimated that as many as 70% of the patients experience moderate-to-severe postoperative pain during their stay in the ICU. Effective pain management means not only decreasing pain intensity, but also reducing the opioids' side effects. Minimizing nausea, vomiting, urinary retention, and sedation may indeed facilitate patient recovery and it is likely to shorten the ICU and hospital stay. Adequate postoperative and post-trauma pain management is also crucial for the achievement of effective rehabilitation. Furthermore, recent studies suggest that effective acute pain management may be helpful in reducing the development of chronic pain. When used appropriately, and in combination with other treatment modalities, regional analgesia techniques (neuraxial and peripheral nerve blocks) have the potential to reduce or eliminate the physiological stress response to surgery and trauma, decreasing the possibility of surgical complications and improving the outcomes. Also they may reduce the total amount of opioid analgesics necessary to achieve adequate pain control and the development of potentially dangerous side effects. PMID:26557482

  9. Risk-Informed Safety Assurance and Probabilistic Assessment of Mission-Critical Software-Intensive Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guarro, Sergio B.

    2010-01-01

    This report validates and documents the detailed features and practical application of the framework for software intensive digital systems risk assessment and risk-informed safety assurance presented in the NASA PRA Procedures Guide for Managers and Practitioner. This framework, called herein the "Context-based Software Risk Model" (CSRM), enables the assessment of the contribution of software and software-intensive digital systems to overall system risk, in a manner which is entirely compatible and integrated with the format of a "standard" Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), as currently documented and applied for NASA missions and applications. The CSRM also provides a risk-informed path and criteria for conducting organized and systematic digital system and software testing so that, within this risk-informed paradigm, the achievement of a quantitatively defined level of safety and mission success assurance may be targeted and demonstrated. The framework is based on the concept of context-dependent software risk scenarios and on the modeling of such scenarios via the use of traditional PRA techniques - i.e., event trees and fault trees - in combination with more advanced modeling devices such as the Dynamic Flowgraph Methodology (DFM) or other dynamic logic-modeling representations. The scenarios can be synthesized and quantified in a conditional logic and probabilistic formulation. The application of the CSRM method documented in this report refers to the MiniAERCam system designed and developed by the NASA Johnson Space Center.

  10. Design and Data Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messer, Elizabeth; Messer, Brad; Carter, Judy; Singletary, Todd; Albasini, Colby; Smith, Tammy

    2007-01-01

    The Design and Data Management System (DDMS) was developed to automate the NASA Engineering Order (EO) and Engineering Change Request (ECR) processes at the Propulsion Test Facilities at Stennis Space Center for efficient and effective Configuration Management (CM). Prior to the development of DDMS, the CM system was a manual, paper-based system that required an EO or ECR submitter to walk the changes through the acceptance process to obtain necessary approval signatures. This approval process could take up to two weeks, and was subject to a variety of human errors. The process also requires that the CM office make copies and distribute them to the Configuration Control Board members for review prior to meetings. At any point, there was a potential for an error or loss of the change records, meaning the configuration of record was not accurate. The new Web-based DDMS eliminates unnecessary copies, reduces the time needed to distribute the paperwork, reduces time to gain the necessary signatures, and prevents the variety of errors inherent in the previous manual system. After implementation of the DDMS, all EOs and ECRs can be automatically checked prior to submittal to ensure that the documentation is complete and accurate. Much of the configuration information can be documented in the DDMS through pull-down forms to ensure consistent entries by the engineers and technicians in the field. The software also can electronically route the documents through the signature process to obtain the necessary approvals needed for work authorization. The workflow of the system allows for backups and timestamps that determine the correct routing and completion of all required authorizations in a more timely manner, as well as assuring the quality and accuracy of the configuration documents.

  11. Microcomputer Database Management Systems for Bibliographic Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard, Richard

    1986-01-01

    Discusses criteria for evaluating microcomputer database management systems (DBMS) used for storage and retrieval of bibliographic data. Two popular types of microcomputer DBMS--file management systems and relational database management systems--are evaluated with respect to these criteria. (Author/MBR)

  12. Randomized trial of intensive bisphosphonate treatment versus symptomatic management in Paget's disease of bone.

    PubMed

    Langston, Anne L; Campbell, Marion K; Fraser, William D; MacLennan, Graeme S; Selby, Peter L; Ralston, Stuart H

    2010-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are widely regarded as the treatment of choice for Paget's disease of bone (PDB) because of their potent inhibitory effects on bone turnover, but the effects of bisphosphonate therapy on symptoms and complications of PDB have been little studied. Here we report the results of a randomized trial that compared the effects of symptomatic treatment with intensive bisphosphonate therapy in a cohort of 1324 patients with PDB who were followed up for a median of 3 years (range 2 to 5 years). The symptomatic treatment group was treated only if they had pagetic bone pain, for which they were first given analgesics or anti-inflammatory drugs, followed by bisphosphonates if they did not respond. The intensive group received repeat courses of bisphosphonates irrespective of symptoms with the aim of reducing and maintaining serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels within the normal range. The endpoints were fracture, orthopedic surgery, quality of life, bone pain, and hearing thresholds. Serum ALP levels were significantly lower in the intensive treatment group than in with the symptomatic treatment group within 4 months of commencing treatment and remained lower throughout the study (p < .001). There was no difference between the groups in quality of life (as assessed by the SF36 questionnaire), in overall bodily pain, or in pagetic bone pain. Hearing thresholds, as assessed by audiometry did not change significantly and did not differ between the treatment groups. Clinical fractures occurred in 46 of 661 patients (7.0%) in the intensive treatment group compared with 49 of 663 patients (7.4%) in the symptomatic treatment group, and orthopedic surgery was required in 50 of 661 patients (7.3%) in the intensive treatment group and in 55 of 663 patients (8.3%) in the symptomatic treatment group. These differences were not significant. Subgroup analyses of patients with elevated ALP levels at baseline and those who did or did not receive bisphosphonates during the study yielded similar results to those in the study group as a whole. We conclude that striving to maintain normal ALP levels with intensive bisphosphonate therapy confers no clinical advantage over symptom-driven management in patients with established PDB. Neither management strategy had a significant beneficial impact on pain or quality of life (Clinical trial registration number ISRCTN12989577). PMID:19580457

  13. Crop manuring and intensive land management by Europe’s first farmers

    PubMed Central

    Bogaard, Amy; Fraser, Rebecca; Heaton, Tim H. E.; Wallace, Michael; Vaiglova, Petra; Charles, Michael; Jones, Glynis; Evershed, Richard P.; Styring, Amy K.; Andersen, Niels H.; Arbogast, Rose-Marie; Bartosiewicz, László; Gardeisen, Armelle; Kanstrup, Marie; Maier, Ursula; Marinova, Elena; Ninov, Lazar; Schäfer, Marguerita; Stephan, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    The spread of farming from western Asia to Europe had profound long-term social and ecological impacts, but identification of the specific nature of Neolithic land management practices and the dietary contribution of early crops has been problematic. Here, we present previously undescribed stable isotope determinations of charred cereals and pulses from 13 Neolithic sites across Europe (dating ca. 5900–2400 cal B.C.), which show that early farmers used livestock manure and water management to enhance crop yields. Intensive manuring inextricably linked plant cultivation and animal herding and contributed to the remarkable resilience of these combined practices across diverse climatic zones. Critically, our findings suggest that commonly applied paleodietary interpretations of human and herbivore δ15N values have systematically underestimated the contribution of crop-derived protein to early farmer diets. PMID:23858458

  14. Intensive care unit without walls: seeking patient safety by improving the efficiency of the system.

    PubMed

    Gordo, F; Abella, A

    2014-10-01

    The term "ICU without walls" refers to innovative management in Intensive Care, based on two key elements: (1) collaboration of all medical and nursing staff involved in patient care during hospitalization and (2) technological support for severity early detection protocols by identifying patients at risk of deterioration throughout the hospital, based on the assessment of vital signs and/or laboratory test values, with the clear aim of improving critical patient safety in the hospitalization process. At present, it can be affirmed that there is important work to be done in the detection of severity and early intervention in patients at risk of organ dysfunction. Such work must be adapted to the circumstances of each center and should include training in the detection of severity, multidisciplinary work in the complete patient clinical process, and the use of technological systems allowing intervention on the basis of monitored laboratory and physiological parameters, with effective and efficient use of the information generated. Not only must information be generated, but also efficient management of such information must also be achieved. It is necessary to improve our activity through innovation in management procedures that facilitate the work of the intensivist, in collaboration with other specialists, throughout the hospital environment. Innovation is furthermore required in the efficient management of the information generated in hospitals, through intelligent and directed usage of the new available technology. PMID:24661919

  15. Evaluation in a Management by Objectives System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goddu, Roland

    Management and supervision in a management by objectives system do not focus on the quality or efficiency of a list of activities. Rather, the manager and supervisor validate progress in reaching agreed outcomes. The implementation of a management and supervision by results approach requires (a) agreement on a statement of mission; (b) agreement

  16. On-farm habitat restoration counters biotic homogenization in intensively managed agriculture.

    PubMed

    Ponisio, Lauren C; M'Gonigle, Leithen K; Kremen, Claire

    2016-02-01

    To slow the rate of global species loss, it is imperative to understand how to restore and maintain native biodiversity in agricultural landscapes. Currently, agriculture is associated with lower spatial heterogeneity and turnover in community composition (β-diversity). While some techniques are known to enhance α-diversity, it is unclear whether habitat restoration can re-establish β-diversity. Using a long-term pollinator dataset, comprising ∼9,800 specimens collected from the intensively managed agricultural landscape of the Central Valley of California, we show that on-farm habitat restoration in the form of native plant 'hedgerows', when replicated across a landscape, can boost β-diversity by approximately 14% relative to unrestored field margins, to levels similar to some natural communities. Hedgerows restore β-diversity by promoting the assembly of phenotypically diverse communities. Intensively managed agriculture imposes a strong ecological filter that negatively affects several important dimensions of community trait diversity, distribution, and uniqueness. However, by helping to restore phenotypically diverse pollinator communities, small-scale restorations such as hedgerows provide a valuable tool for conserving biodiversity and promoting ecosystem services. PMID:26542192

  17. Effect of 26 years of intensively managed Carya cathayensis stands on soil organic carbon and fertility.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiasen; Huang, Jianqin; Liu, Dan; Li, Jianwu; Zhang, Jinchi; Wang, Hailong

    2014-01-01

    Chinese hickory (Carya cathayensis), a popular nut food tree species, is mainly distributed in southeastern China. A field study was carried out to investigate the effect of long-term intensive management on fertility of soils under a C. cathayensis forest. Results showed that after 26 years' intensive management, the soil organic carbon (SOC) content of the A and B horizons reduced by 19% and 14%, respectively. The reduced components of SOC are mainly the alkyl C and O-alkyl C, whereas the aromatic C and carbonyl C remain unchanged. The reduction of active organic matter could result in degradation of soil fertility. The pH value of soil in the A horizon had dropped by 0.7 units on average. The concentrations of the major nutrients also showed a decreasing trend. On average the concentrations of total nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) of tested soils dropped by 21.8%, 7.6%, and 13.6%, respectively, in the A horizon. To sustain the soil fertility and C. cathayensis production, it is recommended that more organic fertilizers (manures) should be used together with chemical fertilizers. Lime should also be applied to reduce soil acidity. PMID:24558339

  18. A survey of the management of needlestick injuries from incapacitated patients in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Burrows, L A; Padkin, A

    2010-09-01

    The Human Tissue Act 2004 and Mental Capacity Act 2005 resulted in a change in the management of needlestick injuries sustained from incapacitated patients. It appears unlawful to test for blood-borne viruses without a patient's consent for the sole benefit of the healthcare worker. This survey of intensive care units within England, Wales and Northern Ireland investigated how needlestick injuries from incapacitated patients had been managed within the previous year. Of the 225 intensive care units surveyed, 99 (44%) responded. Sixty-two (62.6%) reported a needlestick injury to a healthcare worker from an incapacitated patient. Thirty-six (64.3%) patients were tested for blood-borne viruses without consent. Sixteen (25.8%) patients tested positive for blood-borne viruses. Only 19 (30.6%) healthcare workers took post-exposure prophylaxis following the injury. These results show that needlestick injuries from incapacitated patients are common and that the majority of patients were tested for blood-borne viruses without consent. PMID:21198483

  19. Cosmic ray intensity gradients in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckibben, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    Recent progress in the determination of cosmic-ray intensity gradients is reviewed. Direct satellite measurements of the integral gradient are described together with various types of indirect measurements, including measurements of the Ar-37/Ar-39 ratio in samples from the Lost City meteorite, studies of anisotropies in neutron-monitor counting rates, and analysis of the sidereal diurnal anisotropy observed at a single point on earth. Nucleonic radial gradients and electron gradients measured by satellites in differential energy windows are discussed, and theoretical studies of the physical processes involved in these gradients are summarized. Observations of intensity gradients in heliographic latitude are reported.

  20. Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Using the HI-ART II Helical Tomotherapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Timothy W. Hudes, Richard; Dziuba, Sylwester; Kazi, Abdul; Hall, Mark; Dawson, Dana

    2008-07-01

    The highly integrated adaptive radiation therapy (HI-ART II) helical tomotherapy unit is a new radiotherapy machine designed to achieve highly precise and accurate treatments at all body sites. The precision and accuracy of the HI-ART II is similar to that provided by stereotactic radiosurgery systems, hence the historical distinction between external beam radiotherapy and stereotactic procedures based on differing precision requirements is removed for this device. The objectives of this work are: (1) to describe stereotactic helical tomotherapy processes (SRS, SBRT); (2) to show that the precision and accuracy of the HI-ART meet the requirements defined for SRS and SBRT; and (3) to describe the clinical implementation of a stereotactic image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) system that incorporates optical motion management.

  1. Managing Soil Properties through Dryland Cropping System Intensities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modification of soil functioning/quality parameters (i.e., organic matter content) is important to improve the capacity of soil as a water storage-reservoir for crop production in dryland. A long-term dryland cropping research study was established at the USDA-ARS farm near Lubbock, Texas in 2003, ...

  2. Managing soil properties through dryland cropping system intensities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transition from irrigated to dryland production is imminent for the Southern High Plains region due to the minimum recharge occurring to the Ogallala aquifer. Thus, a long-term dryland study was established on USDA-ARS farmland near Lubbock, Texas in 2003 to evaluate the ability of different cr...

  3. School Management Information Systems in Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demir, Kamile

    2006-01-01

    Developments in information technologies have been impacting upon educational organizations. Principals have been using management information systems to improve the efficiency of administrative services. The aim of this research is to explore principals' perceptions about management information systems and how school management information…

  4. Educational Management Information Systems: Progress and Prospectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, John A.

    An educational management information system is a network of communication channels, information sources, computer storage and retrieval devices, and processing routines that provide data to educational managers at different levels, places, and times to facilitate decisionmaking. Management information systems should be differentiated from…

  5. Single System Image Cluster Management

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-02-13

    Cluster computing has quickly proven itself to be a capable workhorse for a wide variety of production computing tasks; however, setting up and maintaining a cluster still requires significantly more effort than administrating just a single machine. As computing hardware descreases in price and cluster sizes grow, it is becoming increasingly important to manage clusters cleverly so that a system administration effort can "scale" as well. To ease the task of mananging many machines, administratorsmore » often deploy an environment that is homogeneous across all nodes of a cluster, and maintain a snapshot of the filesystem as a 'master image'. However due to operational, behavioral, and physical constraints, many nodes often require numerous deviations from the master image in order to operate as desired.« less

  6. Business Management System Support Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, Jay

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to develop a searchable database compiled with internal and external audit findings/observations. The data will correspond to the findings and observations from the date of Center-wide implementation of the ISO 9001-2000 standard to the present (2003-2008). It was derived and extracted from several sources and was in multiple formats. Once extracted, categorization of the findings/observations would be possible. The final data was mapped to the ISO 9001-2000 standard with the understanding that it will be displayed graphically. The data will be used to verify trends, associate risks, and establish timelines to identify strengths and weaknesses to determine areas of improvement in the Kennedy Space Center Business Management System Internal Audit Program.

  7. An Introduction to Database Management Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warden, William H., III; Warden, Bette M.

    1984-01-01

    Description of database management systems for microcomputers highlights system features and factors to consider in microcomputer system selection. A method for ranking database management systems is explained and applied to a defined need, i.e., software support for indexing a weekly newspaper. A glossary of terms and 32-item bibliography are

  8. The effect of off-resonant excitation on intensity-intensity correlation spectra in three-level, lambda systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diloreto, Christopher; Rangan, Chitra

    2015-05-01

    Developing methods for the detection of single molecules interacting with the environment has been a large area of research. These methods are quite varied in their execution and include antigen binding, surface plasmon resonance and fluorescence among many others. These methods all take advantage of the fact that molecular processes often change how a substrate interacts with light when a certain molecule is bound to it. With this in mind, we investigate if energy level changes of a fluorescent molecule due to ambient interactions can be detected by monitoring the two-time intensity-intensity correlation spectrum of the molecule when driven by electromagnetic waves. As these correlations depend on the severity of the off-resonance driving excitation, if the two-time intensity-intensity correlation spectrum were to be continuously monitored for a target transition in a three-level system, any changes that occur in the correlation spectrum could used to determine if the energy levels have changed and if any interactions have taken place.

  9. A closed-loop automatic control system for high-intensity acoustic test systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slusser, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Description of an automatic control system for high-intensity acoustic tests in reverberation chambers. Working in 14 one-third-octave bands from 50 to 1000 Hz, the desired sound pressure levels are set into the memory in the control system before the test. The control system then increases the sound pressure level in the reverberation chamber gradually in each of the one-third-octave bands until the level set in the memory is reached. This level is then maintained for the duration of the test. Additional features of the system are overtest protection, the capability of 'holding' the spectrum at any time, and the presence of a total test timer.

  10. Tank waste remediation system configuration management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Vann, J.M.

    1998-01-08

    The configuration management program for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project Mission supports management of the project baseline by providing the mechanisms to identify, document, and control the functional and physical characteristics of the products. This document is one of the tools used to develop and control the mission and work. It is an integrated approach for control of technical, cost, schedule, and administrative information necessary to manage the configurations for the TWRS Project Mission. Configuration management focuses on five principal activities: configuration management system management, configuration identification, configuration status accounting, change control, and configuration management assessments. TWRS Project personnel must execute work in a controlled fashion. Work must be performed by verbatim use of authorized and released technical information and documentation. Application of configuration management will be consistently applied across all TWRS Project activities and assessed accordingly. The Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) configuration management requirements are prescribed in HNF-MP-013, Configuration Management Plan (FDH 1997a). This TWRS Configuration Management Plan (CMP) implements those requirements and supersedes the Tank Waste Remediation System Configuration Management Program Plan described in Vann, 1996. HNF-SD-WM-CM-014, Tank Waste Remediation System Configuration Management Implementation Plan (Vann, 1997) will be revised to implement the requirements of this plan. This plan provides the responsibilities, actions and tools necessary to implement the requirements as defined in the above referenced documents.

  11. Daily management systems in medicine.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Lane F

    2014-01-01

    "Lean" (continuous improvement) organizations make use of daily management systems (DMS) that are designed so that problems can be quickly identified, front-line staff are empowered to fix the problems that they can, and problems that the front-line staff cannot fix are escalated and countermeasures created quickly. Key components of a DMS include leadership standard work, visual controls, and a daily accountability process, as well as discipline involving each of these three components. The author's organization recently had the opportunity to open a new, nonreplacement hospital, allowing the incorporation of continuous improvement principles into the hospital's design and operations. One high-priority task was the creation of a DMS, which was structured as a tiered "huddle" system. All of the front-line clinical areas, as well as all clinical and nonclinical ancillary support areas, conduct morning huddles. Problems identified at these huddles and needing escalation are then brought to a patient flow huddle and an integrated huddle. All of these huddles occur daily and have a standard format with three clearly defined components: metrics-goal review, daily readiness assessment, and problem accountability reporting. The huddles also provide a daily opportunity to see and converse with the people with whom one needs to discuss certain issues. The process of bringing people together for these huddles can contribute significantly to team formation, coordination of efforts, and development of a culture of trust. PMID:24617697

  12. Design and implementation of a real-time clinical alerting system for intensive care unit.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsiao-Ting; Ma, Wun-Chun; Liou, Der Ming

    2002-01-01

    Nowadays many hospitals use clinical information systems (CIS) to improve patient health care and information management. CIS retrieves and manages patient information such as patient administration, laboratory data and medications. Specialized CIS, especially Intensive Care Unit (ICU) CIS, needs to handle more additional information. How to process and make use of this enormous amount of physiologic data generated by ICU is a significant topic in CIS design. We have designed and implemented a real-time clinical alerting system for ICU, which executes alert algorithms on the database records of 63 ICU physiologic parameters. The user can create various alert rules with our rule editor to supervise the values or trends of these parameters. When an alert condition on a specific patient is detected, the system notices the clinicians in charge with mobile phones or pagers. With this functionality, up-to-date patient information is provided for clinicians inverted exclamation mark | use in judging the patient inverted exclamation mark |s condition and making treatment decisions. PMID:12463801

  13. Knowledge-based systems for power management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lollar, L. F.

    1992-01-01

    NASA-Marshall's Electrical Power Branch has undertaken the development of expert systems in support of further advancements in electrical power system automation. Attention is given to the features (1) of the Fault Recovery and Management Expert System, (2) a resource scheduler or Master of Automated Expert Scheduling Through Resource Orchestration, and (3) an adaptive load-priority manager, or Load Priority List Management System. The characteristics of an advisory battery manager for the Hubble Space Telescope, designated the 'nickel-hydrogen expert system', are also noted.

  14. AOIPS water resources data management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, E. S.; Shotwell, R. L.; Place, M. C.; Belknap, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    A geocoded data management system applicable for hydrological applications was designed to demonstrate the utility of the Atmospheric and Oceanographic Information Processing System (AOIPS) for hydrological applications. Within that context, the geocoded hydrology data management system was designed to take advantage of the interactive capability of the AOIPS hardware. Portions of the Water Resource Data Management System which best demonstrate the interactive nature of the hydrology data management system were implemented on the AOIPS. A hydrological case study was prepared using all data supplied for the Bear River watershed located in northwest Utah, southeast Idaho, and western Wyoming.

  15. The Dark Energy Survey Data Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, Joseph J.; Barkhouse, Wayne; Beldica, Cristina; Bertin, Emmanuel; Dora Cai, Y.; Nicolaci da Costa, Luiz A.; Darnell, J.Anthony; Daues, Gregory E.; Jarvis, Michael; Gower, Michelle; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab /Rio de Janeiro Observ.

    2008-07-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) collaboration will study cosmic acceleration with a 5000 deg2 griZY survey in the southern sky over 525 nights from 2011-2016. The DES data management (DESDM) system will be used to process and archive these data and the resulting science ready data products. The DESDM system consists of an integrated archive, a processing framework, an ensemble of astronomy codes and a data access framework. We are developing the DESDM system for operation in the high performance computing (HPC) environments at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) and Fermilab. Operating the DESDM system in an HPC environment offers both speed and flexibility. We will employ it for our regular nightly processing needs, and for more compute-intensive tasks such as large scale image coaddition campaigns, extraction of weak lensing shear from the full survey dataset, and massive seasonal reprocessing of the DES data. Data products will be available to the Collaboration and later to the public through a virtual-observatory compatible web portal. Our approach leverages investments in publicly available HPC systems, greatly reducing hardware and maintenance costs to the project, which must deploy and maintain only the storage, database platforms and orchestration and web portal nodes that are specific to DESDM. In Fall 2007, we tested the current DESDM system on both simulated and real survey data. We used TeraGrid to process 10 simulated DES nights (3TB of raw data), ingesting and calibrating approximately 250 million objects into the DES Archive database. We also used DESDM to process and calibrate over 50 nights of survey data acquired with the Mosaic2 camera. Comparison to truth tables in the case of the simulated data and internal crosschecks in the case of the real data indicate that astrometric and photometric data quality is excellent.

  16. The Dark Energy Survey data management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Joseph J.; Adams, Darren; Barkhouse, Wayne; Beldica, Cristina; Bertin, Emmanuel; Cai, Y. Dora; da Costa, Luiz A. Nicolaci; Darnell, J. Anthony; Daues, Gregory E.; Jarvis, Michael; Gower, Michelle; Lin, Huan; Martelli, Leandro; Neilsen, Eric; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Ogando, Ricardo L. C.; Parga, Alex; Sheldon, Erin; Tucker, Douglas; Kuropatkin, Nikolay; Stoughton, Chris

    2008-07-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) collaboration will study cosmic acceleration with a 5000 deg2 griZY survey in the southern sky over 525 nights from 2011-2016. The DES data management (DESDM) system will be used to process and archive these data and the resulting science ready data products. The DESDM system consists of an integrated archive, a processing framework, an ensemble of astronomy codes and a data access framework. We are developing the DESDM system for operation in the high performance computing (HPC) environments at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) and Fermilab. Operating the DESDM system in an HPC environment offers both speed and flexibility. We will employ it for our regular nightly processing needs, and for more compute-intensive tasks such as large scale image coaddition campaigns, extraction of weak lensing shear from the full survey dataset, and massive seasonal reprocessing of the DES data. Data products will be available to the Collaboration and later to the public through a virtual-observatory compatible web portal. Our approach leverages investments in publicly available HPC systems, greatly reducing hardware and maintenance costs to the project, which must deploy and maintain only the storage, database platforms and orchestration and web portal nodes that are specific to DESDM. In Fall 2007, we tested the current DESDM system on both simulated and real survey data. We used Teragrid to process 10 simulated DES nights (3TB of raw data), ingesting and calibrating approximately 250 million objects into the DES Archive database. We also used DESDM to process and calibrate over 50 nights of survey data acquired with the Mosaic2 camera. Comparison to truth tables in the case of the simulated data and internal crosschecks in the case of the real data indicate that astrometric and photometric data quality is excellent.

  17. Managing geometric information with a data base management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dube, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    The strategies for managing computer based geometry are described. The computer model of geometry is the basis for communication, manipulation, and analysis of shape information. The research on integrated programs for aerospace-vehicle design (IPAD) focuses on the use of data base management system (DBMS) technology to manage engineering/manufacturing data. The objectives of IPAD is to develop a computer based engineering complex which automates the storage, management, protection, and retrieval of engineering data. In particular, this facility must manage geometry information as well as associated data. The approach taken on the IPAD project to achieve this objective is discussed. Geometry management in current systems and the approach taken in the early IPAD prototypes are examined.

  18. Knowledge Management: A System Dynamics Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saurabh, Kumar

    2005-01-01

    In the present day market scenario of intense competition, organizations need to know what they know and be able to leverage on its knowledge base to gain competitive advantage. In this knowledge era, organisations can create and sustain competitive advantage through initiation of appropriate knowledge management processes. The organisations that

  19. The effect of three culture methods on intensive culture system of pacific white shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhen; Wan, Rong; Song, Xiefa; Gao, Lei

    2013-09-01

    Different culture methods may affect the intensive culture system of Pacific white shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei) regarding water quality and growth and economic performance. This study evaluated the potential effects of three culture methods through cultivation of juvenile shrimps under consistent tank management conditions for 84 d. The three methods involved shrimp cultivation in different tanks, i.e., outdoor tanks with cement bottom (mode-C), greenhouse tanks with cement bottom (mode-G) and outdoor tanks with mud-substrate (mode-M). Results showed that water temperature was significantly higher in mode-G than that in mode-C ( P < 0.05). In contrast to the other two treatments, mode-M had stable pH after 50 d cultivation of shrimps. In the mid-late period, the average concentrations of TAN, NO2-N, DIP and COD were significantly lower in mode-M and mode-G compared with those in mode-C ( P < 0.05). Despite lack of differences in the final shrimp weight among different treatments ( P > 0.05), mode-M had significantly higher shrimp yield, survival rate and feed conversion rate ( P < 0.05) than other modes. There were significant differences in revenue and net return among different treatments ( P < 0.05). These demonstrated that the treatments of mode-G and mode-M were conductive to the intensive culture system of L. vannamei.

  20. Managing Space System Faults: Coalescing NASA's Views

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muirhead, Brian; Fesq, Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    Managing faults and their resultant failures is a fundamental and critical part of developing and operating aerospace systems. Yet, recent studies have shown that the engineering "discipline" required to manage faults is not widely recognized nor evenly practiced within the NASA community. Attempts to simply name this discipline in recent years has been fraught with controversy among members of the Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM), Fault Management (FM), Fault Protection (FP), Hazard Analysis (HA), and Aborts communities. Approaches to managing space system faults typically are unique to each organization, with little commonality in the architectures, processes and practices across the industry.

  1. Project management plan for Contract Management Information System (CONTRACT)

    SciTech Connect

    Severud, K.J.

    1995-01-27

    The office of the Vice President of A/E Construction for ICF Kaiser has requested that OSHA compliance statistics be made available to management for companies subcontracting to the ICF Kaiser Company. In addition, a need to better manage contract administrative data for the Contracts Administration and the Construction Management Projects organizations has been identified. The Contract Management Information System is being developed to achieve these objectives. This document provides a Project Management Plan for development of the Contract Management Administration System (CONTRACT) by Design Services DAD/CAE Support. The Project Management Plan describes the project work breakdown structure, safety and quality considerations, with associated cost, schedule and project management information. The CONTRACT System is intended to aid the ICF Kaiser divisions with tracking of A/E subcontractor information to include general contract administration information used by the Contracts Administration organization, contract and safety performance data used by the Construction Management Projects and office of the organization and Vice President of A/E Construction.

  2. Impact of Hydrologic Variability on Nutrient Age Distribution in Intensively Managed Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Woo, D. K.

    2014-12-01

    The distribution, concentration, and transport of nutrients in agricultural landscapes are of significant societal concern. Our interests in reactive nitrogen and the nitrogen cycle have shifted from increasing the efficiency of nitrogen delivery to target crop species to decreasing environmental damage caused by intensive agricultural practices. Enhancing the reactive nitrogen use efficiency to increase food production to meet future demand inevitably contributes to an increase in the reactive nitrogen load in the ecosystem, and damaging the environment. However, due to the complexity of the nitrogen cycle, the dynamics of nitrogen in soils and its interactions with ecohydrological processes at the watershed and regional scales are not well understood to enable adequate remedial measures. To unravel the complexity of this dynamics we have developed a model for characterizing the nitrogen age (elapsed time) distribution. The goal of our study is to develop and analyze the dynamics of nitrogen in the context of age and transit times resulting from advection, mixing, and production/destruction processes; evaluate the effects of micro-topographic variability on the nitrogen age distributions; and investigate how the temporal dynamics of the nitrogen age distribution are affected by changes in the variability of climate drivers. Our study is performed for the Upper Sangamon River Basin in the Critical Zone Observatory for Intensively Managed Landscapes (IML-CZO).

  3. Habitat restoration promotes pollinator persistence and colonization in intensively managed agriculture.

    PubMed

    M'Gonigle, Leithen K; Ponisio, Lauren C; Cutler, Kerry; Kremen, Claire

    2015-09-01

    Widespread evidence of pollinator declines has led to policies supporting habitat restoration including in agricultural landscapes. Yet, little is yet known about the effectiveness of these restoration techniques for promoting stable populations and communities of pollinators, especially in intensively managed agricultural landscapes. Introducing floral resources, such as flowering hedgerows, to enhance intensively cultivated agricultural landscapes is known to increase the abundances of native insect pollinators in and around restored areas. Whether this is a result of local short-term concentration at flowers or indicative of true increases in the persistence and species richness of these communities remains unclear. It is also unknown whether this practice supports species of conservation concern (e.g., those with more specialized dietary requirements). Analyzing occupancies of native bees and syrphid flies from 330 surveys across 15 sites over eight years, we found that hedgerow restoration promotes rates of between-season persistence and colonization as compared with unrestored field edges. Enhanced persistence and colonization, in turn, led to the formation of more species-rich communities. We also find that hedgerows benefit floral resource specialists more than generalists, emphasizing the value of this restoration technique for conservation in agricultural landscapes. PMID:26552264

  4. Management of Instructional Information Systems Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bank, Adrianne; Williams, Richard C.

    This report on the Management of Instructional Information Systems Project describes its activities in developing and disseminating research on educational information systems to school personnel. Section 1 presents the methodology of an ongoing review of the management information systems literature for information relevant to educational…

  5. Management system, organizational climate and performance relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, B. D.

    1979-01-01

    Seven aerospace firms were investigated to determine if a relationship existed among management systems, organizational climate, and organization performance. Positive relationships were found between each of these variables, but a statistically significant relationship existed only between the management system and organizational climate. The direction and amount of communication and the degree of decentralized decision-making, elements of the management system, also had a statistically significant realtionship with organization performance.

  6. A model for international border management systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, Ruth Ann

    2008-09-01

    To effectively manage the security or control of its borders, a country must understand its border management activities as a system. Using its systems engineering and security foundations as a Department of Energy National Security Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories has developed such an approach to modeling and analyzing border management systems. This paper describes the basic model and its elements developed under Laboratory Directed Research and Development project 08-684.

  7. A wireless diabetes management and communication system.

    PubMed

    Vigersky, Robert A; Hanson, Eric; McDonough, Edward; Rapp, Timothy; Pajak, John; Galen, Robert S

    2003-01-01

    Current diabetes management requires the collection of a large volume of data by the patient for analysis by his or her provider. There are numerous practical and technical barriers to doing this effectively and efficiently. In addition, the calculation of the correct insulin dose is complex because it requires considering anticipated carbohydrate consumption and exercise in addition to the current blood glucose level. A Diabetes Management and Communication System (DMCS) has been developed using a Compaq iPAQ Pocket PC with a Sprint PCS wireless AirCard. This system circumvents the problem of multiple proprietary programs for each brand of meter and permits the accurate determination of the proper insulin dose. Privacy is maintained by using only the iPAQ serial number as the patient identifier with access to the website protected by unique patient and provider passwords. The iPAQ was programmed with formulas that included: insulin sensitivity factor, current glucose level, amount of carbohydrates, appropriate carbohydrate:insulin ratio for that meal, and duration/intensity of exercise. Once the information is entered, an insulin dose is calculated, although an alternative dose can be selected. The data are downloaded to http://www.HealthSentry.net, where they are displayed in both tabular and graphic form. The patient may view the glucose data in both tabular and graphic form on the iPAQ. Thus a DMCS has been developed to assist patients and providers in improving glycemic control. A proof-of-concept study is underway to determine the effectiveness of the DMCS in patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus who are currently using insulin pumps. PMID:14511424

  8. A Lightweight, High-performance I/O Management Package for Data-intensive Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun

    2011-06-22

    Our group has been working with ANL collaborators on the topic “bridging the gap between parallel file system and local file system” during the course of this project period. We visited Argonne National Lab -- Dr. Robert Ross’s group for one week in the past summer 2007. We looked over our current project progress and planned the activities for the incoming years 2008-09. The PI met Dr. Robert Ross several times such as HEC FSIO workshop 08, SC’08 and SC’10. We explored the opportunities to develop a production system by leveraging our current prototype to (SOGP+PVFS) a new PVFS version. We delivered SOGP+PVFS codes to ANL PVFS2 group in 2008.We also talked about exploring a potential project on developing new parallel programming models and runtime systems for data-intensive scalable computing (DISC). The methodology is to evolve MPI towards DISC by incorporating some functions of Google MapReduce parallel programming model. More recently, we are together exploring how to leverage existing works to perform (1) coordination/aggregation of local I/O operations prior to movement over the WAN, (2) efficient bulk data movement over the WAN, (3) latency hiding techniques for latency-intensive operations. Since 2009, we start applying Hadoop/MapReduce to some HEC applications with LANL scientists John Bent and Salman Habib. Another on-going work is to improve checkpoint performance at I/O forwarding Layer for the Road Runner super computer with James Nuetz and Gary Gridder at LANL. Two senior undergraduates from our research group did summer internships about high-performance file and storage system projects in LANL since 2008 for consecutive three years. Both of them are now pursuing Ph.D. degree in our group and will be 4th year in the PhD program in Fall 2011 and go to LANL to advance two above-mentioned works during this winter break. Since 2009, we have been collaborating with several computer scientists (Gary Grider, John bent, Parks Fields, James Nunez, Hsing-Bung Chen, etc) from HPC5 and James Ahrens from Advanced Computing Laboratory in Los Alamos National Laboratory. We hold a weekly conference and/or video meeting on advancing works at two fronts: the hardware/software infrastructure of building large-scale data intensive cluster and research publications. Our group members assist in constructing several onsite LANL data intensive clusters. Two parties have been developing software codes and research papers together using both sides’ resources.

  9. University Program Management Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gans, Gary (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA's objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well-being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data. This report was prepared by the Education Division/FE, Office of Human Resources and Education.

  10. University Program Management Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gans, Gary (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA's objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data.

  11. University Program Management Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA' objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data.

  12. The marketing function in managed care systems.

    PubMed

    Fleming, K; Short, M; Warren, W E

    1999-01-01

    As managed care spreads through the health care service industry, marketing professionals are faced with the challenge of marketing highly integrated systems. This paper explores three questions related to this development: (1) what is unique about managed care marketing, (2) how has managed care impacted health care marketing, and (3) what new strategies and trends will shape these developing markets? PMID:11010210

  13. A Computer System for Mission Managers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolchin, Robert; Achar, Sathy; Yang, Tina; Lee, Tom

    1987-01-01

    Mission Managers' Workstation (MMW) is personal-computer-based system providing data management and reporting functions to assist Space Shuttle mission managers. Allows to relate events and stored data in timely and organized fashion. Using MMW, standard reports formatted, generated, edited, and electronically communicated with minimum clerical help. Written in PASCAL, BASIC, and assembler.

  14. [Changes in soil organic carbon and soil microbial functional diversity of Carya cathayensis plantations under intensive managements].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia-Sen; Qian, Jin-Fang; Tong, Zhi-Peng; Huang, Jian-Qin; Zhao, Ke-Li

    2014-09-01

    The change characteristics of soil organic carbon and microbial function diversity in Chinese hickory Carya cathayensis stands with different intensive-management durations (5, 10, 15 and 20 years) were studied. The results showed that soil total organic carbon (TOC), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) decreased significantly, while the stability of soil C pool increased significantly after the conversion from evergreen and deciduous broadleaf forest to intensively-managed forest (IMF). TOC, MBC and WSOC in the hickory forest soil decreased by 28.4%, 34.1% and 53.3% with 5-year intensive management, and by 38.6%, 48.9% and 64.1% with 20-year intensive management, respectively. The proportions of carboxyl C, phenolic C and aromatic C in the hickory forest soil all increased significantly, and the aromaticity of soil organic C increased by 23.0%. Soil microbial functional diversity decreased greatly af- ter intensive management of Chinese hickory forest. Significant differences in average well color development (AWCD) were found between the 0- and 5-year treatments and the 10-, 15- and 20- year treatments. The microbial diversity indexes (H) and evenness indexes (E) in the 0- and 5-year treatments were much greater than in the 10- and 20-year treatments. Correlation analysis showed that there were significant correlations among soil TOC, WSOC, MBC, AWCD, H and E. PMID:25757296

  15. Lion (Panthera leo) populations are declining rapidly across Africa, except in intensively managed areas.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Hans; Chapron, Guillaume; Nowell, Kristin; Henschel, Philipp; Funston, Paul; Hunter, Luke T B; Macdonald, David W; Packer, Craig

    2015-12-01

    We compiled all credible repeated lion surveys and present time series data for 47 lion (Panthera leo) populations. We used a Bayesian state space model to estimate growth rate-λ for each population and summed these into three regional sets to provide conservation-relevant estimates of trends since 1990. We found a striking geographical pattern: African lion populations are declining everywhere, except in four southern countries (Botswana, Namibia, South Africa, and Zimbabwe). Population models indicate a 67% chance that lions in West and Central Africa decline by one-half, while estimating a 37% chance that lions in East Africa also decline by one-half over two decades. We recommend separate regional assessments of the lion in the World Conservation Union (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species: already recognized as critically endangered in West Africa, our analysis supports listing as regionally endangered in Central and East Africa and least concern in southern Africa. Almost all lion populations that historically exceeded ∼ 500 individuals are declining, but lion conservation is successful in southern Africa, in part because of the proliferation of reintroduced lions in small, fenced, intensively managed, and funded reserves. If management budgets for wild lands cannot keep pace with mounting levels of threat, the species may rely increasingly on these southern African areas and may no longer be a flagship species of the once vast natural ecosystems across the rest of the continent. PMID:26504235

  16. Clinical Alarms in Intensive Care Units: Perceived Obstacles of Alarm Management and Alarm Fatigue in Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ok Min; Lee, Young Whee; Cho, Insook

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this descriptive study was to investigate the current situation of clinical alarms in intensive care unit (ICU), nurses' recognition of and fatigue in relation to clinical alarms, and obstacles in alarm management. Methods Subjects were ICU nurses and devices from 48 critically ill patient cases. Data were collected through direct observation of alarm occurrence and questionnaires that were completed by the ICU nurses. The observation time unit was one hour block. One bed out of 56 ICU beds was randomly assigned to each observation time unit. Results Overall 2,184 clinical alarms were counted for 48 hours of observation, and 45.5 clinical alarms occurred per hour per subject. Of these, 1,394 alarms (63.8%) were categorized as false alarms. The alarm fatigue score was 24.3 ± 4.0 out of 35. The highest scoring item was "always get bothered due to clinical alarms". The highest scoring item in obstacles was "frequent false alarms, which lead to reduced attention or response to alarms". Conclusions Nurses reported that they felt some fatigue due to clinical alarms, and false alarms were also obstacles to proper management. An appropriate hospital policy should be developed to reduce false alarms and nurses' alarm fatigue. PMID:26893950

  17. TUBERCULOSIS INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (TIMS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    TIMS is a Windows-based client/server application that assists health departments and other facilities to manage TB patients, to conduct TB surveillance activities, and to manage TB programs overall. TIMS provides for electronic transmission of TB surveillance data (OMB No. 0920-...

  18. Grants Management: A Systems Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Edmond H.

    1973-01-01

    The typical grants management process is analyzed into components and each component is discussed with a view to alternative ways of designing the component. An evaluation model is presented in which administrators may appraise the desirability of actual or planned grants management approaches. (Author/DN)

  19. Optimal Multi-scale Demand-side Management for Continuous Power-Intensive Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sumit

    With the advent of deregulation in electricity markets and an increasing share of intermittent power generation sources, the profitability of industrial consumers that operate power-intensive processes has become directly linked to the variability in energy prices. Thus, for industrial consumers that are able to adjust to the fluctuations, time-sensitive electricity prices (as part of so-called Demand-Side Management (DSM) in the smart grid) offer potential economical incentives. In this thesis, we introduce optimization models and decomposition strategies for the multi-scale Demand-Side Management of continuous power-intensive processes. On an operational level, we derive a mode formulation for scheduling under time-sensitive electricity prices. The formulation is applied to air separation plants and cement plants to minimize the operating cost. We also describe how a mode formulation can be used for industrial combined heat and power plants that are co-located at integrated chemical sites to increase operating profit by adjusting their steam and electricity production according to their inherent flexibility. Furthermore, a robust optimization formulation is developed to address the uncertainty in electricity prices by accounting for correlations and multiple ranges in the realization of the random variables. On a strategic level, we introduce a multi-scale model that provides an understanding of the value of flexibility of the current plant configuration and the value of additional flexibility in terms of retrofits for Demand-Side Management under product demand uncertainty. The integration of multiple time scales leads to large-scale two-stage stochastic programming problems, for which we need to apply decomposition strategies in order to obtain a good solution within a reasonable amount of time. Hence, we describe two decomposition schemes that can be applied to solve two-stage stochastic programming problems: First, a hybrid bi-level decomposition scheme with novel Lagrangean-type and subset-type cuts to strengthen the relaxation. Second, an enhanced cross-decomposition scheme that integrates Benders decomposition and Lagrangean decomposition on a scenario basis. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our developed methodology, we provide several industrial case studies throughout the thesis.

  20. Disaster management in Australia: the national emergency management system.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, J

    2001-06-01

    Australia has a well-established emergency management system to manage the threats to communities from natural and technological hazards. The key elements of the system are described with particular emphasis on the impact of disasters on Australia, fundamental concepts, and principles of planning. Emergency physicians have a key role in the development of emergency plans and in the overall health response to disasters. They can enhance their understanding of local, State and national arrangements by participating in exercises and appropriate disaster medicine and emergency management courses. PMID:11482853

  1. Information Systems Coordinate Emergency Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    The rescue crews have been searching for the woman for nearly a week. Hurricane Katrina devastated Hancock County, the southernmost point in Mississippi, and the woman had stayed through the storm in her beach house. There is little hope of finding her alive; the search teams know she is gone because the house is gone. Late at night in the art classroom of the school that is serving as the county s emergency operations center, Craig Harvey is discussing the search with the center s commander. Harvey is the Chief Operating Officer of a unique company called NVision Solutions Inc., based at NASA s Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, only a couple of miles away. He and his entire staff have set up a volunteer operation in the art room, supporting the emergency management efforts using technology and capabilities the company developed through its NASA partnerships. As he talks to the commander, Harvey feels an idea taking shape that might lead them to the woman s location. Working with surface elevation data and hydrological principles, Harvey creates a map showing how the floodwaters from the storm would have flowed along the topography of the region around the woman s former home. Using the map, search crews find the woman s body in 15 minutes. Recovering individuals who have been lost is a sad reality of emergency management in the wake of a disaster like Hurricane Katrina in 2005. But the sooner answers can be provided, the sooner a community s overall recovery can take place. When damage is extensive, resources are scattered, and people are in dire need of food, shelter, and medical assistance, the speed and efficiency of emergency operations can be the key to limiting the impact of a disaster and speeding the process of recovery. And a key to quick and effective emergency planning and response is geographic information. With a host of Earth-observing satellites orbiting the globe at all times, NASA generates an unmatched wealth of data about our ever-changing planet. This information can be captured, analyzed, and visualized by geographic information systems (GIS) to produce maps, charts, and other tools that can reveal information essential to a wide variety of applications including emergency management. Knowing precise, real-time information about the size, location, environmental conditions, and resulting damage of an event like a flood or wildfire as well as the location and numbers of emergency responders and other resources contributes directly to the effectiveness of disaster mitigation. The need for such information is also evident when responding to homeland security threats, such as a terrorist attack. Recognizing the value of its geospatial information resources for this and other purposes, in 1998 Stennis and the state of Mississippi partnered to form what became the Enterprise for Innovative Geospatial Solutions (EIGS) industry cluster, supporting the growth of remote sensing and GIS-based research and business. As part of EIGS, several companies partnered with NASA through dual use and Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts. Among those was NVision.

  2. Waste Management Information System (WMIS) User Guide

    SciTech Connect

    R. E. Broz

    2008-12-22

    This document provides the user of the Waste Management Information System (WMIS) instructions on how to use the WMIS software. WMIS allows users to initiate, track, and close waste packages. The modular design supports integration and utilization of data throuh the various stages of waste management. The phases of the waste management work process include generation, designation, packaging, container management, procurement, storage, treatment, transportation, and disposal.

  3. A multi-taxon approach reveals the effect of management intensity on biodiversity in Alpine larch grasslands.

    PubMed

    Nascimbene, Juri; Fontana, Veronika; Spitale, Daniel

    2014-07-15

    In the Alps, larch grasslands form one of the most pleasing aspects of the landscape. However, their effectiveness in contributing to biodiversity conservation may depend on the intensity of their management. We used a multi-taxon approach to evaluate the effects of the intensification of management practices and those of abandonment on the biodiversity of the main autotrophic organisms hosted in this habitat, including vascular plants, bryophytes, and lichens. The study was carried out in the eastern part of South Tyrol, in the Italian Alps, where the diversity patterns of these three organismal groups were compared among intensively managed, extensively managed, and abandoned stands. The management intensity was found to strongly influence the biodiversity of the organisms, with a general pattern indicating the best conditions in extensively managed stands. Both abandonment and management intensification were detrimental to biodiversity through different mechanisms that led to species loss or to major shifts in species composition. However, the most negative effects were related to management intensification, mainly due to the high nitrogen supply, providing evidence for the increasing impact of eutrophication on Alpine environments. PMID:24784735

  4. The role of metrics and measurements in a software intensive total quality management environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Charles B.

    1992-01-01

    Paramax Space Systems began its mission as a member of the Rockwell Space Operations Company (RSOC) team which was the successful bidder on a massive operations consolidation contract for the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) at JSC. The contract awarded to the team was the Space Transportation System Operations Contract (STSOC). Our initial challenge was to accept responsibility for a very large, highly complex and fragmented collection of software from eleven different contractors and transform it into a coherent, operational baseline. Concurrently, we had to integrate a diverse group of people from eleven different companies into a single, cohesive team. Paramax executives recognized the absolute necessity to develop a business culture based on the concept of employee involvement to execute and improve the complex process of our new environment. Our executives clearly understood that management needed to set the example and lead the way to quality improvement. The total quality management policy and the metrics used in this endeavor are presented.

  5. Development of Intensity-Duration-Frequency curves at ungauged sites: risk management under changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, San Chuin; Raghavan, Srivatsan V.; Liong, Shie-Yui

    2014-12-01

    The impact of a changing climate is already being felt on several hydrological systems both on a regional and sub-regional scale of the globe. Southeast Asia is one of the regions strongly affected by climate change. With climate change, one of the anticipated impacts is an increase in the intensity and frequency of extreme rainfall which further increase the region's flood catastrophes, human casualties and economic loss. Optimal mitigation measures can be undertaken only when stormwater systems are designed using rainfall Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) curves derived from a long and good quality rainfall data. Developing IDF curves for the future climate can be even more challenging especially for ungauged sites. The current practice to derive current climate's IDF curves for ungauged sites is, for example, to `borrow' or `interpolate' data from regions of climatologically similar characteristics. Recent measures to derive IDF curves for present climate was performed by extracting rainfall data from a high spatial resolution Regional Climate Model driven by ERA-40 reanalysis dataset. This approach has been demonstrated on an ungauged site (Java, Indonesia) and the results were quite promising. In this paper, the authors extend the application of the approach to other ungauged sites particularly in Peninsular Malaysia. The results of the study undoubtedly have significance contribution in terms of local and regional hydrology (Malaysia and Southeast Asian countries). The anticipated impacts of climate change especially increase in rainfall intensity and its frequency appreciates the derivation of future IDF curves in this study. It also provides policy makers better information on the adequacy of storm drainage design, for the current climate at the ungauged sites, and the adequacy of the existing storm drainage to cope with the impacts of climate change.

  6. A holistic life cycle analysis of waste management scenarios at increasing source segregation intensity: The case of an Italian urban area

    SciTech Connect

    Di Maria, Francesco Micale, Caterina

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Waste management scenarios starting from different SS intensity were analyzed by LCA. • Several experimental data were utilized for the inventory. • Collection activities influences marginally global impact. • Maximum global environmental gain was achieved by SRF for coke substitution. - Abstract: Life cycle analysis of several waste management scenarios for an Italian urban area was performed on the basis of different source segregation collection (SS) intensities from 0% up to 52%. Source segregated waste was recycled and or/recovered by composting. Residual waste management options were by landfilling, incineration with energy recovery or solid recovered fuel (SRF) production to substitute for coal. The increase in fuel and materials consumption due to increase in SS had negligible influence on the environmental impact of the system. Recycling operations such as incineration and SRF were always advantageous for impact reduction. There was lower impact for an SS of 52% even though the difference with the SS intensity of 35% was quite limited, about 15%. In all the configurations analyzed, the best environmental performance was achieved for the management system producing SRF by the biodrying process.

  7. Software for Intelligent System Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis C.

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the characteristics and advantages of autonomy and artificial intelligence in systems health monitoring. The presentation lists technologies relevant to Intelligent System Health Management (ISHM), and some potential applications.

  8. A Blood Bank Information Management System

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, James J.

    1982-01-01

    A computerized Blood Bank Management system is described. Features include product oriented data input, inventory control reports, product utilization reports, rapid retrieval of individual patient reports. Relative benefits of the system are discussed.

  9. [Development of the ophthalmology information management system].

    PubMed

    Mei, Xue-qin; Yang, Tao; Yang, Gui-fang

    2007-11-01

    This article demonstrates the necessity and feasibility of setting up the ophthalmology information management system. It expounds the system's configuration, main functions and hardware, especially the key designing points of the information interfaces. PMID:18269046

  10. Ridge 2000 Data Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwillie, A. M.; Carbotte, S. M.; Arko, R. A.; Haxby, W. F.; Ryan, W. B.; Chayes, D. N.; Lehnert, K. A.; Shank, T. M.

    2005-12-01

    Hosted at Lamont by the marine geoscience Data Management group, mgDMS, the NSF-funded Ridge 2000 electronic database, http://www.marine-geo.org/ridge2000/, is a key component of the Ridge 2000 multi-disciplinary program. The database covers each of the three Ridge 2000 Integrated Study Sites: Endeavour Segment, Lau Basin, and 8-11N Segment. It promotes the sharing of information to the broader community, facilitates integration of the suite of information collected at each study site, and enables comparisons between sites. The Ridge 2000 data system provides easy web access to a relational database that is built around a catalogue of cruise metadata. Any web browser can be used to perform a versatile text-based search which returns basic cruise and submersible dive information, sample and data inventories, navigation, and other relevant metadata such as shipboard personnel and links to NSF program awards. In addition, non-proprietary data files, images, and derived products which are hosted locally or in national repositories, as well as science and technical reports, can be freely downloaded. On the Ridge 2000 database page, our Data Link allows users to search the database using a broad range of parameters including data type, cruise ID, chief scientist, geographical location. The first Ridge 2000 field programs sailed in 2004 and, in addition to numerous data sets collected prior to the Ridge 2000 program, the database currently contains information on fifteen Ridge 2000-funded cruises and almost sixty Alvin dives. Track lines can be viewed using a recently- implemented Web Map Service button labelled Map View. The Ridge 2000 database is fully integrated with databases hosted by the mgDMS group for MARGINS and the Antarctic multibeam and seismic reflection data initiatives. Links are provided to partner databases including PetDB, SIOExplorer, and the ODP Janus system. Improved inter-operability with existing and new partner repositories continues to be strengthened. One major effort involves the gradual unification of the metadata across these partner databases. Standardised electronic metadata forms that can be filled in at sea are available from our web site. Interactive map-based exploration and visualisation of the Ridge 2000 database is provided by GeoMapApp, a freely-available Java(tm) application being developed within the mgDMS group. GeoMapApp includes high-resolution bathymetric grids for the 8-11N EPR segment and allows customised maps and grids for any of the Ridge 2000 ISS to be created. Vent and instrument locations can be plotted and saved as images, and Alvin dive photos are also available.

  11. Multi-micro system for I/O intensive applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tse, F.M.

    1983-01-01

    During the acceptance test of a computerized product, it is desirable to be able to test the load handling capability of the system. This paper describes a load generation system using a multiprocessor architecture to generate the large amount of data needed to load-test the dimension AIS/system 85. The system described in this paper consists of a total of 25 processors and employs a unique bussing scheme. The system uses a master-slave organization and includes several levels of hierarchically ordered busses. The host processor is used for high-level task execution and overall timing control. The 24 slave processors are used for parallel high-speed data collection and compression. 5 references.

  12. Model Point-of-Care Ultrasound Curriculum in an Intensive Care Unit Fellowship Program and Its Impact on Patient Management

    PubMed Central

    Killu, Keith; Coba, Victor; Mendez, Michael; Reddy, Subhash; Adrzejewski, Tanja; Huang, Yung; Ede, Jessica; Horst, Mathilda

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study was designed to assess the clinical applicability of a Point-of-Care (POC) ultrasound curriculum into an intensive care unit (ICU) fellowship program and its impact on patient care. Methods. A POC ultrasound curriculum for the surgical ICU (SICU) fellowship was designed and implemented in an urban, academic tertiary care center. It included 30 hours of didactics and hands-on training on models. Minimum requirement for each ICU fellow was to perform 2550 exams on respective systems or organs for a total not less than 125 studies on ICU. The ICU fellows implemented the POC ultrasound curriculum into their daily practice in managing ICU patients, under supervision from ICU staff physicians, who were instructors in POC ultrasound. Impact on patient care including finding a new diagnosis or change in patient management was reviewed over a period of one academic year. Results. 873 POC ultrasound studies in 203 patients admitted to the surgical ICU were reviewed for analysis. All studies included were done through the POC ultrasound curriculum training. The most common exams performed were 379 lung/pleural exams, 239 focused echocardiography and hemodynamic exams, and 237 abdominal exams. New diagnosis was found in 65.52% of cases (95% CI 0.590, 0.720). Changes in patient management were found in 36.95% of cases (95% CI 0.303, 0.435). Conclusions. Implementation of POC ultrasound in the ICU with a structured fellowship curriculum was associated with an increase in new diagnosis in about 2/3 and change in management in over 1/3 of ICU patients studied. PMID:25478217

  13. Greenhouse gas budget (CO2, CH4 and N2O) of intensively managed grassland following restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merbold, Lutz; Eugster, Werner; Stieger, Jacqueline; Zahniser, Mark; Nelson, David; Buchmann, Nina

    2014-05-01

    The first full greenhouse gas (GHG) flux budget of an intensively managed grassland in Switzerland (Chamau) is presented. The three major trace gases, carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) were measured with the eddy covariance (EC) technique. For CO2 concentrations, an open-path infrared gas analyzer was used, while N2O and CH4 concentrations were measured with a recently developed continuous-wave quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer (QCLAS). We investigated the magnitude of these trace gas emissions after grassland restoration, including ploughing, harrowing, sowing and fertilization with inorganic and organic fertilizers in 2012. Large peaks of N2O fluxes (20 - 50 nmol m-2 s-1 compared to a < 5 nmol m-2 s-1 background) were observed during thawing of the soil after the winter period and after mineral fertilizer application followed by re-sowing in the beginning of the summer season. N2O fluxes were controlled by nitrogen input, plant productivity, soil water content and temperature. Management activities led to increased variations of N2O fluxes up to 14 days after the management event as compared to background fluxes measured during periods without management (< 5nmol m-2 s-1). Fluxes of CO2 remained small until full plant development in early summer 2012. In contrast methane emissions showed only minor variations over time. The annual GHG flux budget was dominated by N2O (48 % contribution) and CO2 emissions (44 %). CH4 flux contribution to the annual budget was only minor (8 %). We conclude that recently developed multi-species QCLAS in an EC system open new opportunities to determine the temporal variation of N2O and CH4 fluxes, which further allow to quantify annual emissions. With respect to grassland restoration, our study emphasizes the key role of N2O and CO2 losses after ploughing, changing a permanent grassland from a carbon sink to a significant carbon source.

  14. Management noninformation systems in health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Herzlinger, R

    1976-01-01

    The health care manager is often an unwitting accomplice in the creation of noninformation systems because he fails to assume leadership in designing, installing and operating the system. There's also strong evidence that many managers could use a good course in basic accounting. PMID:10241307

  15. Changing Course Management Systems: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Kathy A.; Meyer, Katrina A.

    2005-01-01

    During 2003, the North Dakota University System began to be concerned about the cost of supporting multiple course management systems. Since 1997, the 11 NDUS institutions had used 9 different course management packages, including one homegrown product (HTMLeZ) and such proprietary products as Blackboard, WebCT, and e-College. The University of

  16. Decision support system for nursing management control

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, C.J.

    1983-01-01

    A knowledge representation approach for expert systems supporting decision processes in business is proposed. A description of a knowledge representation schema using a logic programming metalanguage is described, then the role of such a schema in a management expert system is demonstrated through the problem of nursing management control in hospitals. 18 references.

  17. Left Brain Systems and Right Brain Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jerry W.; Service, Allan L.

    1980-01-01

    Shortcomings of management information systems in managerial functions are often attributed to differences between "left brain" activities performed by machines and "right brain" activities performed in decision making. It is argued that academic management information systems should incorporate and recognize both kinds of activity. (MSE)

  18. WEED MANAGEMENT IN CONSERVATION CROP PRODUCTION SYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Information on weed management in conservation crop production systems is needed as adoption of practices such as reduced tillage and cover crops become more widespread. This review summarizes recent research on weed management aspects in these systems. Changes in soil environment and patterns of t...

  19. Changing Course Management Systems: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Kathy A.; Meyer, Katrina A.

    2005-01-01

    During 2003, the North Dakota University System began to be concerned about the cost of supporting multiple course management systems. Since 1997, the 11 NDUS institutions had used 9 different course management packages, including one homegrown product (HTMLeZ) and such proprietary products as Blackboard, WebCT, and e-College. The University of…

  20. ATARS reconnaissance management system (RMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carew-Jones, Rodney

    1993-02-01

    The ATARS RMS is an advanced digital image formatting and computing unit. It links the ATARS EO and IR sensors, digital tape recorders and datalink together into a coherent tactical reconnaissance sensor suite. Image management, storage and display functions ensure effective reconnaissance data handling. Comprehensive Operational Flight Program processing facilities provide automatic mission management and effective integration of ATARS with the flight crew, host aircraft, and ground station.

  1. ["Symptomatic Treatment of Delirium, Anxiety and Stress, and Protocol Based Analgesia, Sedation and Management of Sleep in Intensive Care Patients"].

    PubMed

    Mller, Anika; Wei, Bjrn; Spies, Claudia D

    2015-11-01

    Critically ill patients suffer from anxiety, stress, pain, sleep disturbance and delirium. The updated version of the German evidence and consensus based guideline "Analgesia, Sedation and Delirium management in Intensive Care - DAS 2015" contributes an improved therapeutic management and is aimed to improve clinical outcome based on the current state of evidence. The task force members were representatives from 17 national medical societies therefore have consented following guiding principle in common: "Patients in intensive care shall be awake, alert and free of pain, anxiety and delirium, to be able to participate in the healing process actively." PMID:26650949

  2. Designing, managing and improving the operative and intensive care in polytrauma

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Sukhminderjit Singh; Kaur, Jasbir; Bajwa, Sukhwinder Kaur; Kaur, Gagandeep; Singh, Amarjit; Parmar, S S; Kapoor, Vinod

    2011-01-01

    Background and Context: Polytrauma is a leading cause of mortality in the developing countries and efforts from various quarters are required to deal with this increasing menace. Aims and Objectives: An attempt has been made by the coordinated efforts of the intensive care and trauma team of a newly established tertiary care institute in designing and improving the trauma care services to realign its functions with national policies by analyzing the profile of polytrauma victims and successfully managing them. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was carried out among the 531 polytrauma admissions in the emergency department. The information pertaining to age and gender distribution, locality, time to trauma and initial resuscitation, cause of injury, type of injury, influence of alcohol, drug addiction, presenting clinical picture, Glasgow Coma score on admission and few other variables were also recorded. The indications for various operative interventions and intensive care unit (ICU) admissions were analyzed thoroughly with a concomitant improvement of our trauma care services and thereby augmenting the national policies and programs. A statistical analysis was carried out with chi-square and analysis of variance ANOVA tests, using SPSS software version 10.0 for windows. The value of P<0.05 was considered significant and P<0.0001 as highly significant. Results: Majority of the 531 polytrauma patients hailed from rural areas (63.65%), riding on the two wheelers (38.23%), and predominantly comprised young adult males. Fractures of long bones and head injury was the most common injury pattern (37.85%) and 51.41% of the patients presented with shock and hemorrhage. Airway management and intubation became necessary in 42.93% of the patients, whereas 52.16% of the patients were operated within the first 6 hours of admission for various indications. ICU admission was required for 45.76% of the patients because of their deteriorating clinical condition, and overall,ionotropic support was administered in 55.93% of the patients for successful resuscitation. Conclusions: There is an urgent need for proper implementation ofpre-hospital and advanced trauma life support measures at grass-root level. Analyzing the profile of polytrauma victims at a national level and simultaneously improving the trauma care services at every health center are very essential to decrease the mortality and morbidity. The improvement can be augmented further by strengthening the rural health infrastructure, strict traffic rules, increasing public awareness and participation and coordination among the various public and private agencies in dealing with polytrauma. PMID:22090744

  3. Nova laser assurance-management system

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, A.J.

    1983-07-18

    In a well managed project, Quality Assurance is an integral part of the management activities performed on a daily basis. Management assures successful performance within budget and on schedule by using all the good business, scientific, engineering, quality assurance, and safety practices available. Quality assurance and safety practices employed on Nova are put in perspective by integrating them into the overall function of good project management. The Nova assurance management system was developed using the quality assurance (QA) approach first implemented at LLNL in early 1978. The LLNL QA program is described as an introduction to the Nova assurance management system. The Nova system is described pictorially through the Nova configuration, subsystems and major components, interjecting the QA techniques which are being pragmatically used to assure the successful completion of the project.

  4. Sequencing Information Management System (SIMS). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, C.

    1996-02-15

    A feasibility study to develop a requirements analysis and functional specification for a data management system for large-scale DNA sequencing laboratories resulted in a functional specification for a Sequencing Information Management System (SIMS). This document reports the results of this feasibility study, and includes a functional specification for a SIMS relational schema. The SIMS is an integrated information management system that supports data acquisition, management, analysis, and distribution for DNA sequencing laboratories. The SIMS provides ad hoc query access to information on the sequencing process and its results, and partially automates the transfer of data between laboratory instruments, analysis programs, technical personnel, and managers. The SIMS user interfaces are designed for use by laboratory technicians, laboratory managers, and scientists. The SIMS is designed to run in a heterogeneous, multiplatform environment in a client/server mode. The SIMS communicates with external computational and data resources via the internet.

  5. Interruption management in the intensive care unit: Predicting resumption times and assessing distributed support.

    PubMed

    Grundgeiger, Tobias; Sanderson, Penelope; MacDougall, Hamish G; Venkatesh, Balasubramanian

    2010-12-01

    Interruptions are frequent in many work domains. Researchers in health care have started to study interruptions extensively, but their studies usually do not use a theoretically guided approach. Conversely, researchers conducting theoretically rich laboratory studies on interruptions have not usually investigated how effectively their findings account for humans working in complex systems such as intensive care units. In the current study, we use the memory for goals theory and prospective memory theory to investigate which properties of an interruption influence how long it takes nurses to resume interrupted critical care tasks. We collected data with a mobile eye tracker in an intensive care unit and developed multiple regression models to predict resumption times. In 55.8% of all interruptions there was a finite-and therefore analyzable-resumption lag. For these cases, the main regression model explained 30.9% (adjusted R) of the variance. Longer interruptions (?=.36, p<.001) and changes in physical location due to interruptions (?=.40, p<.001) lengthened the resumption lag. We also calculated regression models on subsets of the data to investigate the generality of the above findings across different situations. In a further 37.6% of all interruptions, nurses used behavioral strategies that greatly diminished or eliminated individual prospective memory demands caused by interruptions, resulting in no analyzable resumption lag. We introduce a descriptive model that accounts for how nurses' behaviors affect the cognitive demand of resuming an interrupted task. Finally, we discuss how the disruptive effects of interruptions in the intensive care unit could be diminished or prevented. PMID:21198250

  6. Evidence and consensus based guideline for the management of delirium, analgesia, and sedation in intensive care medicine. Revision 2015 (DAS-Guideline 2015) - short version.

    PubMed

    Baron, Ralf; Binder, Andreas; Biniek, Rolf; Braune, Stephan; Buerkle, Hartmut; Dall, Peter; Demirakca, Sueha; Eckardt, Rahel; Eggers, Verena; Eichler, Ingolf; Fietze, Ingo; Freys, Stephan; Frnd, Andreas; Garten, Lars; Gohrbandt, Bernhard; Harth, Irene; Hartl, Wolfgang; Heppner, Hans-Jrgen; Horter, Johannes; Huth, Ralf; Janssens, Uwe; Jungk, Christine; Kaeuper, Kristin Maria; Kessler, Paul; Kleinschmidt, Stefan; Kochanek, Matthias; Kumpf, Matthias; Meiser, Andreas; Mueller, Anika; Orth, Maritta; Putensen, Christian; Roth, Bernd; Schaefer, Michael; Schaefers, Rainhild; Schellongowski, Peter; Schindler, Monika; Schmitt, Reinhard; Scholz, Jens; Schroeder, Stefan; Schwarzmann, Gerhard; Spies, Claudia; Stingele, Robert; Tonner, Peter; Trieschmann, Uwe; Tryba, Michael; Wappler, Frank; Waydhas, Christian; Weiss, Bjoern; Weisshaar, Guido

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, under the guidance of the DGAI (German Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine) and DIVI (German Interdisciplinary Association for Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine), twelve German medical societies published the "Evidence- and Consensus-based Guidelines on the Management of Analgesia, Sedation and Delirium in Intensive Care". Since then, several new studies and publications have considerably increased the body of evidence, including the new recommendations from the American College of Critical Care Medicine (ACCM) in conjunction with Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) and American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) from 2013. For this update, a major restructuring and extension of the guidelines were needed in order to cover new aspects of treatment, such as sleep and anxiety management. The literature was systematically searched and evaluated using the criteria of the Oxford Center of Evidence Based Medicine. The body of evidence used to formulate these recommendations was reviewed and approved by representatives of 17 national societies. Three grades of recommendation were used as follows: Grade "A" (strong recommendation), Grade "B" (recommendation) and Grade "0" (open recommendation). The result is a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, evidence and consensus-based set of level 3 guidelines. This publication was designed for all ICU professionals, and takes into account all critically ill patient populations. It represents a guide to symptom-oriented prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of delirium, anxiety, stress, and protocol-based analgesia, sedation, and sleep-management in intensive care medicine. PMID:26609286

  7. Evidence and consensus based guideline for the management of delirium, analgesia, and sedation in intensive care medicine. Revision 2015 (DAS-Guideline 2015) – short version

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Ralf; Binder, Andreas; Biniek, Rolf; Braune, Stephan; Buerkle, Hartmut; Dall, Peter; Demirakca, Sueha; Eckardt, Rahel; Eggers, Verena; Eichler, Ingolf; Fietze, Ingo; Freys, Stephan; Fründ, Andreas; Garten, Lars; Gohrbandt, Bernhard; Harth, Irene; Hartl, Wolfgang; Heppner, Hans-Jürgen; Horter, Johannes; Huth, Ralf; Janssens, Uwe; Jungk, Christine; Kaeuper, Kristin Maria; Kessler, Paul; Kleinschmidt, Stefan; Kochanek, Matthias; Kumpf, Matthias; Meiser, Andreas; Mueller, Anika; Orth, Maritta; Putensen, Christian; Roth, Bernd; Schaefer, Michael; Schaefers, Rainhild; Schellongowski, Peter; Schindler, Monika; Schmitt, Reinhard; Scholz, Jens; Schroeder, Stefan; Schwarzmann, Gerhard; Spies, Claudia; Stingele, Robert; Tonner, Peter; Trieschmann, Uwe; Tryba, Michael; Wappler, Frank; Waydhas, Christian; Weiss, Bjoern; Weisshaar, Guido

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, under the guidance of the DGAI (German Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine) and DIVI (German Interdisciplinary Association for Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine), twelve German medical societies published the “Evidence- and Consensus-based Guidelines on the Management of Analgesia, Sedation and Delirium in Intensive Care”. Since then, several new studies and publications have considerably increased the body of evidence, including the new recommendations from the American College of Critical Care Medicine (ACCM) in conjunction with Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) and American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) from 2013. For this update, a major restructuring and extension of the guidelines were needed in order to cover new aspects of treatment, such as sleep and anxiety management. The literature was systematically searched and evaluated using the criteria of the Oxford Center of Evidence Based Medicine. The body of evidence used to formulate these recommendations was reviewed and approved by representatives of 17 national societies. Three grades of recommendation were used as follows: Grade “A” (strong recommendation), Grade “B” (recommendation) and Grade “0” (open recommendation). The result is a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, evidence and consensus-based set of level 3 guidelines. This publication was designed for all ICU professionals, and takes into account all critically ill patient populations. It represents a guide to symptom-oriented prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of delirium, anxiety, stress, and protocol-based analgesia, sedation, and sleep-management in intensive care medicine. PMID:26609286

  8. Issue Management Risk Ranking Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Novack, Steven David; Marshall, Frances Mc Clellan; Stromberg, Howard Merion; Grant, Gary Michael

    1999-06-01

    Thousands of safety issues have been collected on-line at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) as part of the Issue Management Plan. However, there has been no established approach to prioritize collected and future issues. The authors developed a methodology, based on hazards assessment, to identify and risk rank over 5000 safety issues collected at INEEL. This approach required that it was easily applied and understandable for site adaptation and commensurate with the Integrated Safety Plan. High-risk issues were investigated and mitigative/preventive measures were suggested and ranked based on a cost-benefit scheme to provide risk-informed safety measures. This methodology was consistent with other integrated safety management goals and tasks providing a site-wide risk informed decision tool to reduce hazardous conditions and focus resources on high-risk safety issues. As part of the issue management plan, this methodology was incorporated at the issue collection level and training was provided to management to better familiarize decision-makers with concepts of safety and risk. This prioritization methodology and issue dissemination procedure will be discussed. Results of issue prioritization and training efforts will be summarized. Difficulties and advantages of the process will be reported. Development and incorporation of this process into INEELs lessons learned reporting and the site-wide integrated safety management program will be shown with an emphasis on establishing self reliance and ownership of safety issues.

  9. Issue Management Risk Ranking Systems

    SciTech Connect

    F. M. Marshall; G. M. Grant; H. M. Stromberg; S. D. Novack

    1999-06-01

    Thousands of safety issues have been collected on-line at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) as part of the Issue Management Plan. However, there has been no established approach to prioritize collected and future issues. The authors developed a methodology, based on hazards assessment, to identify and risk rank over 5000 safety issues collected at INEEL. This approach required that it was easily applied and understandable for site adaptation and commensurate with the Integrated Safety Plan. High-risk issues were investigated and mitigative/preventive measures were suggested and ranked based on a cost-benefit scheme to provide risk-informed safety measures. This methodology was consistent with other integrated safety management goals and tasks providing a site-wide risk-informed decision tool to reduce hazardous conditions and focus resources on high-risk safety issues. As part of the issue management plan, this methodology was incorporated at the issue collection level and training was provided to management to better familiarize decision-makers with concepts of safety and risk. This prioritization methodology and issue dissemination procedure will be discussed. Results of issue prioritization and training efforts will be summarized. Difficulties and advantages of the process will be reported. Development and incorporation of this process into INEEL's lessons learned reporting and the site-wide integrated safety management program will be shown with an emphasis on establishing self reliance and ownership of safety issues.

  10. The phenomenology of intense electromagnetic wave interactions with systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cabayan, H.S.

    1986-03-12

    Recent advances in laboratory high power microwave (HPM) source capabilities have raised concerns regarding the survivability of US systems if HPM weapon systems using such sources are deployed in the battlefield. In this paper an overview of recent US achievements in HPM sources is given. Upper bounds to future HPM threats on targets from first principles are derived. Again using a simplified first principles approach, the phenomenology of HPM interaction with targets is examined and scaling laws for the target response with frequency, pulse width, and fluence are derived.

  11. Software configuration management plan for HANDI 2000 business management system

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.

    1998-08-25

    The Software Configuration Management Plan (SCMP) describes the configuration management and control environment for HANDI 2000 for the PP and PS software as well as any custom developed software. This plan establishes requirements and processes for uniform documentation control, system change control, systematic evaluation and coordination of HANDI 2000. This SCMP becomes effective as this document is acceptance and will provide guidance through implementation efforts.

  12. Conceptual framework of knowledge management for ethical decision-making support in neonatal intensive care.

    PubMed

    Frize, Monique; Yang, Lan; Walker, Robin C; O'Connor, Annette M

    2005-06-01

    This research is built on the belief that artificial intelligence estimations need to be integrated into clinical social context to create value for health-care decisions. In sophisticated neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), decisions to continue or discontinue aggressive treatment are an integral part of clinical practice. High-quality evidence supports clinical decision-making, and a decision-aid tool based on specific outcome information for individual NICU patients will provide significant support for parents and caregivers in making difficult "ethical" treatment decisions. In our approach, information on a newborn patient's likely outcomes is integrated with the physician's interpretation and parents' perspectives into codified knowledge. Context-sensitive content adaptation delivers personalized and customized information to a variety of users, from physicians to parents. The system provides structuralized knowledge translation and exchange between all participants in the decision, facilitating collaborative decision-making that involves parents at every stage on whether to initiate, continue, limit, or terminate intensive care for their infant. PMID:16138537

  13. Training Issues Associated with COTS-based Information Intensive Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farr, John V.; Verma, Dinesh

    2002-01-01

    A literature review and survey responses from 194 information technology and aerospace contractors identified methods and outcomes of training delivery. Results were used to develop a framework for evaluating and selecting commercial off-the-shelf systems (COTS) for operations and maintenance training. (Contains 11 references.) (SK)

  14. Web-Based Evaluation System for Learning Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Momani, Alaa

    2010-01-01

    E-learning systems have become an issue in recent years. A learning management system (LMS) is an electronic environment helps the educational society to communicate, exchange information, manage, and schedule the learning process. This study has provided a web-based evaluation system that may help the users to choose the convenient system…

  15. LIGHT INTENSITY AFFECTS DISTRIBUTION OF ATTACKING PSEUDACTEON CURVATUS (DIPTERA: PHORIDAE) IN A LABORATORY REARING SYSTEM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Distribution of attacking phorid flies (Pseudacteon curvatus Borgmeier) in a laboratory rearing system was tested for dependence on light intensity under 2 different light regimes. Light intensity (range, approx. 220-340 Lux) influenced fly distribution in light regime 1; in the second light regime...

  16. Multiple system modelling of waste management.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Ola; Bisaillon, Mattias

    2011-12-01

    Due to increased environmental awareness, planning and performance of waste management has become more and more complex. Therefore waste management has early been subject to different types of modelling. Another field with long experience of modelling and systems perspective is energy systems. The two modelling traditions have developed side by side, but so far there are very few attempts to combine them. Waste management systems can be linked together with energy systems through incineration plants. The models for waste management can be modelled on a quite detailed level whereas surrounding systems are modelled in a more simplistic way. This is a problem, as previous studies have shown that assumptions on the surrounding system often tend to be important for the conclusions. In this paper it is shown how two models, one for the district heating system (MARTES) and another one for the waste management system (ORWARE), can be linked together. The strengths and weaknesses with model linking are discussed when compared to simplistic assumptions on effects in the energy and waste management systems. It is concluded that the linking of models will provide a more complete, correct and credible picture of the consequences of different simultaneous changes in the systems. The linking procedure is easy to perform and also leads to activation of project partners. However, the simulation procedure is a bit more complicated and calls for the ability to run both models. PMID:21855313

  17. An Analysis of the Environments of Intense Convective Systems in West Africa in 2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholls, Stephen D.; Mohr, Karen I.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the local- and regional-scale thermodynamical and dynamical environments associated with intense convective systems in West Africa during 2003. We identified convective system cases from TRMM microwave imagery, classifying each case by the system minimum 85-GHz brightness temperature and by the estimated elapsed time of propagation from high terrain. The speed of the mid-level jet, the magnitude of the low-level shear, and the surface equivalent potential temperature (theta(sub e)) were greater for the intense cases compared to the non-intense cases, although the differences between the means tended to be small, less than 3K for surface theta(sub e). Hypothesis testing of a series of commonly used intensity prediction metrics resulted in significant results only for low-level metrics such as convective available potential energy and not for any of the mid- or upper-level metrics such as 700-hPa theta(sub e). None of the environmental variables or intensity metrics by themselves or in combination appeared to be reliable direct predictors of intensity. In the regional scale analysis, the majority of intense convective systems occurred in the surface baroclinic zone where surface theta(sub e) exceeded 344 K and the 700-hPa zonal wind speeds were less than -6/ms. Fewer intense cases compared to non-intense cases were associated with African easterly wave troughs. Fewer than 25% of our cases occurred in environments with detectable Saharan dust loads, and the results for intense and non-intense cases were similar. Our results for the regional analysis were consistent with the seasonal movement of the WAM and the intertropical front, regional differences in topography, and AEW energetics.

  18. Contingency management treatments are equally efficacious for both sexes in intensive outpatient settings.

    PubMed

    Rash, Carla J; Petry, Nancy M

    2015-10-01

    Clear differences are present in men and women's developmental course of substance use disorders. Whether these sex differences affect substance abuse treatment outcomes is less apparent. The present study investigated sex differences in demographic and intake characteristics and assessed sex, treatment condition, and interactive effects on 3 treatment outcomes: treatment retention, longest duration of abstinence, and percentage of negative samples submitted. Participants (N = 920) were randomized to contingency management (CM) for abstinence or standard care treatment in 1 of 5 clinical trials. In terms of pretreatment characteristics, women reported lower educational achievement and more unemployment; were younger and more likely to submit a positive urine sample at intake; and experienced more problems in employment, drug, family, and psychiatric domains. Men reported more years of alcohol use and significantly higher alcohol and legal problem severity. Men and women stayed in treatment for similar durations of time and had similar abstinence outcomes. No significant Sex Treatment Condition interactions were present across the 3 outcomes. These results suggest that treatment-seeking substance users in intensive outpatient settings benefit equally well from CM interventions, regardless of sex. PMID:26167714

  19. Increase in carbon emissions from forest fires after intensive reforestation and forest management programs.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung-Deuk; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Park, Byung-Kwon

    2006-12-15

    This paper shows an example of substantial increase in carbon emissions from forest fires after reforestation on a national scale. It is the first estimation of historical carbon emissions from forest fires in Korea during the last 40 years. Investigation was focused on the recent increase in large forest fires and its closely related factors. A simple modeling approach to estimate carbon emission was applied. The direct carbon emission from forest fires in 2000, ranging from 115 to 300 Gg C, corresponds to 1-3% of the annual carbon uptake by forests. The influence of forest fires on the carbon cycle in Korea is not so significant, but Korean forests have a large potential for generating severe local fires due to increasing forest carbon density and a high forest area ratio (forest area/total land area) of 65%. The carbon emission per area burned (Mg C ha(-1)) clearly reflects the trend toward increases in the number of severe fires. Statistical analyses and the trends of annual temperature and precipitation show that the recent large increase in carbon emissions may be the negative consequences of intensive forest regrowth that is the product of successful reforestation and forest management programs rather than the effect of climate change. These results imply a need for further studies in other countries, where large-scale plantation has been conducted, to evaluate the role of plantation and forest fires on the global carbon cycle. PMID:17081594

  20. Protocol-Based Care versus Individualized Management of Patients in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Siner, Jonathan M; Connors, Geoffrey R

    2015-12-01

    The delivery of evidence-based care in the high-acuity environment of the intensive care unit can be challenging. In an effort to help turn guidelines and standards of care into consistent and uniform practice, physicians and hospitals turn toward protocol-based medical care. A protocol can help guide a practitioner to make correct interventions, at the right time, and in the proper order when managing a given disease. But to be considered a success, a protocol must meet several standards. A protocol must facilitate consistent practice, guiding the practitioner to deliver care more consistently than without the protocol. A good protocol must also be in alignment with the provider's general practice and beliefs to assure wide adoption and complete penetrance. Finally, the protocol must deliver the most medically correct care-neither simplifying nor overcomplicating health care delivery. In addition to the care the protocol delivers, it must overcome other barriers to gain acceptance. These include concerns about protocol usage among medical trainees, physician concern regarding loss of autonomy, and the ceiling effect protocol-driven care places on expert practitioners, among other concerns. The aim of this article is to critically appraise what it means for a protocol to be considered successful with an aim toward improving protocol design and implementation in the future. PMID:26595047

  1. Integrated System Health Management Development Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Jorge; Smith, Harvey; Morris, Jon

    2009-01-01

    This software toolkit is designed to model complex systems for the implementation of embedded Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) capability, which focuses on determining the condition (health) of every element in a complex system (detect anomalies, diagnose causes, and predict future anomalies), and to provide data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) to control systems for safe and effective operation.

  2. Improvements to information management systems simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilek, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    The performance of personnel in the augmentation and improvement of the interactive IMSIM information management simulation model is summarized. With this augmented model, NASA now has even greater capabilities for the simulation of computer system configurations, data processing loads imposed on these configurations, and executive software to control system operations. Through these simulations, NASA has an extremely cost effective capability for the design and analysis of computer-based data management systems.

  3. Wheel speed management control system for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodzeit, Neil E. (Inventor); Linder, David M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A spacecraft attitude control system uses at least four reaction wheels. In order to minimize reaction wheel speed and therefore power, a wheel speed management system is provided. The management system monitors the wheel speeds and generates a wheel speed error vector. The error vector is integrated, and the error vector and its integral are combined to form a correction vector. The correction vector is summed with the attitude control torque command signals for driving the reaction wheels.

  4. High-Intensity Radiated Field Fault-Injection Experiment for a Fault-Tolerant Distributed Communication System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Amy M.; Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo; Malekpour, Mahyar R.; Gonzalez, Oscar R.; Gray, W. Steven

    2010-01-01

    Safety-critical distributed flight control systems require robustness in the presence of faults. In general, these systems consist of a number of input/output (I/O) and computation nodes interacting through a fault-tolerant data communication system. The communication system transfers sensor data and control commands and can handle most faults under typical operating conditions. However, the performance of the closed-loop system can be adversely affected as a result of operating in harsh environments. In particular, High-Intensity Radiated Field (HIRF) environments have the potential to cause random fault manifestations in individual avionic components and to generate simultaneous system-wide communication faults that overwhelm existing fault management mechanisms. This paper presents the design of an experiment conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center's HIRF Laboratory to statistically characterize the faults that a HIRF environment can trigger on a single node of a distributed flight control system.

  5. Y-12 Integrated Materials Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Alspaugh, D. H.; Hickerson, T. W.

    2002-06-03

    The Integrated Materials Management System, when fully implemented, will provide the Y-12 National Security Complex with advanced inventory information and analysis capabilities and enable effective assessment, forecasting and management of nuclear materials, critical non-nuclear materials, and certified supplies. These capabilities will facilitate future Y-12 stockpile management work, enhance interfaces to existing National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) corporate-level information systems, and enable interfaces to planned NNSA systems. In the current national nuclear defense environment where, for example, weapons testing is not permitted, material managers need better, faster, more complete information about material properties and characteristics. They now must manage non-special nuclear material at the same high-level they have managed SNM, and information capabilities about both must be improved. The full automation and integration of business activities related to nuclear and non-nuclear materials that will be put into effect by the Integrated Materials Management System (IMMS) will significantly improve and streamline the process of providing vital information to Y-12 and NNSA managers. This overview looks at the kinds of information improvements targeted by the IMMS project, related issues, the proposed information architecture, and the progress to date in implementing the system.

  6. Integrated safety management system verification: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, R.F.

    1998-08-10

    Department of Energy (DOE) Policy (P) 450.4, Safety Management System Policy, commits to institutionalization of an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) throughout the DOE complex. The DOE Acquisition Regulations (DEAR, 48 CFR 970) requires contractors to manage and perform work in accordance with a documented Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS). Guidance and expectations have been provided to PNNL by incorporation into the operating contract (Contract DE-ACM-76FL0 1830) and by letter. The contract requires that the contractor submit a description of their ISMS for approval by DOE. PNNL submitted their proposed Safety Management System Description for approval on November 25,1997. RL tentatively approved acceptance of the description pursuant to a favorable recommendation from this review. The Integrated Safety Management System Verification is a review of the adequacy of the ISMS description in fulfilling the requirements of the DEAR and the DOE Policy. The purpose of this review is to provide the Richland Operations Office Manager with a recommendation for approval of the ISMS description of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory based upon compliance with the requirements of 49 CFR 970.5204(-2 and -78); and to verify the extent and maturity of ISMS implementation within the Laboratory. Further the review will provide a model for other DOE laboratories managed by the Office of Assistant Secretary for Energy Research.

  7. Estimation Leaf Area using Imaging Lidar Data in Intensively and Extensively Managed Temperate Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peduzzi, A.; Thomas, V. A.; Wynne, R. H.; Fox, T. R.

    2008-12-01

    Quantification of forest leaf area provides critical information for natural resource management, biodiversity, and carbon cycle studies. Specifically, leaf area index (LAI) is a key variable for the parameterization of regional, continental, and global ecosystem process models. LAI was assessed in two different forest ecosystems: a mixed hardwood and pine natural forest and nutrient by tree density loblolly pine research trials. Light detection and ranging (lidar) remote sensing data were used to model LAI and canopy gaps. Differences between nutrient additions and stem density on LAI were also evaluated. Soil nutrient availability can dramatically increase the plant LAI values and also influence the LAI dynamics of the species. Results can be the base for decision support systems to implement silvicultural practices in forest management and tree growth as well as crown development and leaf production and their relationship to forest carbon accumulation and growth. Additionally, there is opportunity to improve regional LAI models derived from optical remote sensing data, where the success in many cases has been limited, generating estimates that are often not precise enough to be used in natural forest management.

  8. Development of a change management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, Cathy Bonifas

    1993-01-01

    The complexity and interdependence of software on a computer system can create a situation where a solution to one problem causes failures in dependent software. In the computer industry, software problems arise and are often solved with 'quick and dirty' solutions. But in implementing these solutions, documentation about the solution or user notification of changes is often overlooked, and new problems are frequently introduced because of insufficient review or testing. These problems increase when numerous heterogeneous systems are involved. Because of this situation, a change management system plays an integral part in the maintenance of any multisystem computing environment. At the NASA Ames Advanced Computational Facility (ACF), the Online Change Management System (OCMS) was designed and developed to manage the changes being applied to its multivendor computing environment. This paper documents the research, design, and modifications that went into the development of this change management system (CMS).

  9. A multifunctional rotary photoelectric encoder management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zunzhong; Ying, Yibin

    2005-11-01

    The rotary photoelectric encoder can be used in many fields, such as robot research, fruit assembly lines, and so on. If there have many photoelectric encoders in one system, it's difficult to manage them and acquire the right pulse number. So it's important to design a multifunctional management system. It includes a powerful microchip with high processing speed, assuring the acquisition precision of rotary pulse. It uses a special method to judge the rotary direction and will be competent for many occasions which rotary direction changes quickly. Considering encoder data transmission, the management system provides a serial port using RS-485 protocol to transmit current pulse data and rotary direction. It allows linking a maximum of 100 management systems using only two communication lines to up-systems and also configing the encoder counting pattern locally (using the keyboard) or remotely (through the computer).

  10. Performance analysis of instrumentation system management policies

    SciTech Connect

    Waheed, A.; Melfi, V.F.; Rover, D.T.

    1995-12-01

    Run-time trace data helps to debug and analyze the parallel programs. Obtaining and managing this data during run-time is the responsibility of an instrumentation system that incurs overhead. In its worst case, this overhead can result in severe perturbation of the behavior of the actual program. This paper presents a queuing model for an instrumentation system. The purpose is to provide a rigorous mathematical tool that could allow the analysis of the overhead of program behavior due to the instrumentation system management policies. We summarize the effects of two management policies: FOF and FAOF policies.

  11. A native ground nesting bee, Nomia melanderi, sustainably managed to pollinate alfalfa across an intensively agricultural landscape

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical Abstract: The worlds only intensively managed ground-nesting bee, the alkali bee (Nomia melanderi Cockerell), has been used for >50 years as an effective pollinator of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) grown for seed across the western USA. Throughout the 240 km2 Touchet Valley alfalfa farmin...

  12. Managed care in four managed competition OECD health systems.

    PubMed

    Shmueli, Amir; Stam, Piet; Wasem, Jürgen; Trottmann, Maria

    2015-07-01

    Managed care emerged in the American health system in the 1980s as a way to manage suppliers' induced demand and to contain insurers' costs. While in Israel the health insurers have always been managed care organizations, owning health care facilities, employing medical personnel or contracting selectively with independent providers, European insurers have been much more passive, submitting themselves to collective agreements between insurers' and providers' associations, accompanied by extensive government regulation of prices, quantities, and budgets. With the 1990s reforms, and the introduction of risk-adjusted "managed competition", a growing pressure to allow the European insurers to manage their own care - including selective contracting with providers - has emerged, with varying speed of the introduction of policy changes across the individual countries. This paper compares experiences with managed care in Israel, The Netherlands, Germany and Switzerland since the 1990s. After a brief description of the health insurance markets in the four countries, we focus comparatively on the emergence of managed care in the markets for ambulatory care and inpatient market care. We conclude with an evaluation of the current situation and a discussion of selected health policy issues. PMID:25776034

  13. Study of a final focus system for high intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, Enrique; Eylon, Shmuel; Roy, Prabir K.; Yu, Simon S.; Bieniosek, Frank M.; Shuman, Derek B.; Waldron, William L.

    2004-06-01

    The NTX experiment at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high perveance heavy ion beams. The final focus scenario in an HIF driver consists of several large aperture quadrupole magnets followed by a drift section in which the beam space charge is neutralized by a plasma. This beam is required to hit a millimeter-sized target spot at the end of the drift section. The objective of the NTX experiments and associated theory and simulations is to study the various physical mechanisms that determine the final spot size (radius r{sub s}) at a given distance (f) from the end of the last quadrupole. In a fusion driver, f is the standoff distance required to keep the chamber wall and superconducting magnets properly protected. The NTX final quadrupole focusing system produces a converging beam at the entrance to the neutralized drift section where it focuses to a small spot. The final spot is determined by the conditions of the beam entering the quadrupole section, the beam dynamics in the magnetic lattice, and the plasma neutralization dynamics in the drift section. The main issues are the control of emittance growth due to high order fields from magnetic multipoles and image fields. In this paper, we will describe the theoretical and experimental aspects of the beam dynamics in the quadrupole lattice, and how these physical effects influence the final beam size. In particular, we present theoretical and experimental results on the dependence of final spot size on geometric aberrations and perveance.

  14. Effective maintenance practices to manage system aging

    SciTech Connect

    Chockie, A.; Bjorkelo, K.

    1992-01-01

    For a variety of economic and technical reasons, there has been a growing concern with the aging of complex systems and components and the role that maintenance can play in reducing this degradation. A study for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission was recently undertaken to identify effective maintenance practices that could be adapted by the nuclear industry in the United States to assist in managing the aging degradation of plant systems and components. Four organizations were examined to assess the influence that their maintenance programs have on their ability to address the systems and component aging degradation issues. An effective maintenance program was found to be essential to the management of system and component aging. The four key elements of an effective maintenance program that are important to an aging management program were identified. These are: the selection of critical systems and components; the development of an understanding of aging through the collection and analysis of equipment performance information; the development of appropriate preventive and predictive maintenance tasks to manage equipment and system aging degradation; the use of feedback mechanisms to continuously improve the management of aging systems and components. These elements were found to be common to all four organizations. In examining how the four organizations have structured their maintenance programs to include these key elements provides valuable lessons not only for the nuclear power industry, but also for any industrial organization that is concerned with the management of system and component aging degradation. This document provides detail, of these studies.

  15. Agricultural Drainage Management Systems Task Force (ADMSTF)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Agricultural Drainage Management Systems (ADMS) Task Force was initiated during a Charter meeting in the fall of 2002 by dedicated professional employees of Federal, State, and Local Government Agencies and Universities. The Agricultural Drainage Management (ADM) Coalition was established in 200...

  16. Software for Intelligent System Health Management (ISHM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis C.

    2004-01-01

    The slide presentation is a briefing in four areas: overview of health management paradigms; overview of the ARC-Houston Software Engineering Technology Workshop held on April 20-22, 2004; identified technologies relevant to technical themes of intelligent system health management; and the author's thoughts on these topics.

  17. Business School's Performance Management System Standards Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azis, Anton Mulyono; Simatupang, Togar M.; Wibisono, Dermawan; Basri, Mursyid Hasan

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to compare various Performance Management Systems (PMS) for business school in order to find the strengths of each standard as inputs to design new model of PMS. There are many critical aspects and gaps notified for new model to improve performance and even recognized that self evaluation performance management is not well…

  18. Implementation of Integrated System Fault Management Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Schmalzel, John; Morris, Jon; Smith, Harvey; Turowski, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Fault Management to support rocket engine test mission with highly reliable and accurate measurements; while improving availability and lifecycle costs. CORE ELEMENTS: Architecture, taxonomy, and ontology (ATO) for DIaK management. Intelligent Sensor Processes; Intelligent Element Processes; Intelligent Controllers; Intelligent Subsystem Processes; Intelligent System Processes; Intelligent Component Processes.

  19. Intensive Eucalyptus plantation management in Brazil: Long-term effects on soil carbon dynamics across 300 sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, R. L.; Stape, J.; Binkley, D.

    2011-12-01

    Intensively managed forest plantations now cover more than 6 million hectares in Brazil, and another 20 million hectares in other tropical regions. Although aboveground biomass, and therefore carbon, is well monitored due to commercial interest, the belowground carbon dynamics and site sustainability remain poorly understood. So, how does intensive silviculture change the storage of carbon in soils? Trends in soil organic carbon from land-use change indicate that conversion from pastures to Eucalyptus plantations should maintain soil carbon stocks. However, comprehensive, long-term studies are needed to understand the variability in these trends to better manage these systems for sustainable productivity across a highly variable landscape, as well as to understand the role that soils may play in sequestering carbon for climate change mitigation. In this unique, long-term soil study, soil samples were collected in the 1980s/90s, 2001, and 2010 across 300 intensively managed Eucalyptus plantation sites located in the states of Bahia, Espirito Santo, and Sao Paulo, Brazil. Natural ecosystems for these states include Savannah-Dry Forest, Atlantic Forest, and Savanna, respectively. The sampling covered at least three complete rotations of Eucalyptus at each site; climate, past land use, productivity, and soil characteristics vary across this geographic gradient. Across the two periods, both Espirito Santo (P<0.001) and Bahia (P=0.05) showed a decrease in soil carbon concentrations, while Sao Paulo saw no change over time. For the 0-30 cm layer, plantations in Espirito Santo state had the largest decrease in soil carbon concentration up to 2001, decreasing soil carbon stocks at an average rate of 1.3 Mg C ha-1 year-1. This, however, was followed by no significant change from 2001 to 2010 which may indicate stabilization of soil carbon stocks under the new land use. The Eucalyptus in Bahia created no change in the first sampling period, but saw a decline of 0.35 Mg C ha-1year-1 in soil carbon in the second sampling period from 2001-2010. Initial results show that, across the regions, sites that had higher soil carbon stocks tended to lose more soil carbon under intensive silviculture. In all three regions, clay content related strongly to soil carbon concentrations. However, the clay did not have a consistent relationship with the rates of change in soil carbon concentration, varying among regions, with negative, positive, and no relationship for the 2001-2010 time period. Further investigation will determine relationships with temperature and precipitation, past land use history, and Eucalyptus productivity. These results will be essential in evaluating the effects on soil organic carbon dynamics due to conversion to short-rotation Eucalyptus plantations in the tropics across a broad and variable landscape.

  20. Integrated safety management system verification: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, R.F.

    1998-08-12

    Department of Energy (DOE) Policy (P) 450.4, Safety Management System Policy, commits to institutionalizing an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) throughout the DOE complex. The DOE Acquisition Regulations (DEAR 48 CFR 970) requires contractors to manage and perform work in accordance with a documented Integrated Safety Management System. The Manager, Richland Operations Office (RL), initiated a combined Phase 1 and Phase 2 Integrated Safety Management Verification review to confirm that PNNL had successfully submitted a description of their ISMS and had implemented ISMS within the laboratory facilities and processes. A combined review was directed by the Manager, RL, based upon the progress PNNL had made in the implementation of ISM. This report documents the results of the review conducted to verify: (1) that the PNNL integrated safety management system description and enabling documents and processes conform to the guidance provided by the Manager, RL; (2) that corporate policy is implemented by line managers; (3) that PNNL has provided tailored direction to the facility management; and (4) the Manager, RL, has documented processes that integrate their safety activities and oversight with those of PNNL. The general conduct of the review was consistent with the direction provided by the Under Secretary`s Draft Safety Management System Review and Approval Protocol. The purpose of this review was to provide the Manager, RL, with a recommendation to the adequacy of the ISMS description of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory based upon compliance with the requirements of 49 CFR 970.5204(-2 and -78); and, to provide an evaluation of the extent and maturity of ISMS implementation within the Laboratory. Further, this review was intended to provide a model for other DOE Laboratories. In an effort to reduce the time and travel costs associated with ISM verification the team agreed to conduct preliminary training and orientation electronically and by phone. These activities are normally conducted during a pre-visit trip to the site. The Team recommends approval of the Integrated Safety Management System Description subject to the resolution of the Areas of Concerns noted here.

  1. Gregorian optical system with non-linear optical technology for protection against intense optical transients

    DOEpatents

    Ackermann, Mark R.; Diels, Jean-Claude M.

    2007-06-26

    An optical system comprising a concave primary mirror reflects light through an intermediate focus to a secondary mirror. The secondary mirror re-focuses the image to a final image plane. Optical limiter material is placed near the intermediate focus to optically limit the intensity of light so that downstream components of the optical system are protected from intense optical transients. Additional lenses before and/or after the intermediate focus correct optical aberrations.

  2. Methods of forming thermal management systems and thermal management methods

    DOEpatents

    Gering, Kevin L.; Haefner, Daryl R.

    2012-06-05

    A thermal management system for a vehicle includes a heat exchanger having a thermal energy storage material provided therein, a first coolant loop thermally coupled to an electrochemical storage device located within the first coolant loop and to the heat exchanger, and a second coolant loop thermally coupled to the heat exchanger. The first and second coolant loops are configured to carry distinct thermal energy transfer media. The thermal management system also includes an interface configured to facilitate transfer of heat generated by an internal combustion engine to the heat exchanger via the second coolant loop in order to selectively deliver the heat to the electrochemical storage device. Thermal management methods are also provided.

  3. ADAMS: AIRLAB data management system user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, C. L.; Ingogly, W. F.; Lauterbach, L. A.

    1986-01-01

    The AIRLAB Data Management System (ADAMS) is an online environment that supports research at NASA's AIRLAB. ADAMS provides an easy to use interactive interface that eases the task of documenting and managing information about experiments and improves communication among project members. Data managed by ADAMS includes information about experiments, data sets produced, software and hardware available in AIRLAB as well as that used in a particular experiment, and an on-line engineer's notebook. The User's Guide provides an overview of the ADAMS system as well as details of the operations available within ADAMS. A tutorial section takes the user step-by-step through a typical ADAMS session. ADAMS runs under the VAX/VMS operating system and uses the ORACLE database management system and DEC/FMS (the Forms Management System). ADAMS can be run from any VAX connected via DECnet to the ORACLE host VAX. The ADAMS system is designed for simplicity, so interactions within the underlying data management system and communications network are hidden from the user.

  4. Automated Traffic Management System and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, Brian J. (Inventor); Spirkovska, Liljana (Inventor); McDermott, William J. (Inventor); Reisman, Ronald J. (Inventor); Gibson, James (Inventor); Iverson, David L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A data management system and method that enables acquisition, integration, and management of real-time data generated at different rates, by multiple heterogeneous incompatible data sources. The system achieves this functionality by using an expert system to fuse data from a variety of airline, airport operations, ramp control, and air traffic control tower sources, to establish and update reference data values for every aircraft surface operation. The system may be configured as a real-time airport surface traffic management system (TMS) that electronically interconnects air traffic control, airline data, and airport operations data to facilitate information sharing and improve taxi queuing. In the TMS operational mode, empirical data shows substantial benefits in ramp operations for airlines, reducing departure taxi times by about one minute per aircraft in operational use, translating as $12 to $15 million per year savings to airlines at the Atlanta, Georgia airport. The data management system and method may also be used for scheduling the movement of multiple vehicles in other applications, such as marine vessels in harbors and ports, trucks or railroad cars in ports or shipping yards, and railroad cars in switching yards. Finally, the data management system and method may be used for managing containers at a shipping dock, stock on a factory floor or in a warehouse, or as a training tool for improving situational awareness of FAA tower controllers, ramp and airport operators, or commercial airline personnel in airfield surface operations.

  5. DATA BASE SYSTEM FOR STATE WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the WAMIS Release II Data Base Management System as developed by the above performing organization. It includes system design, development procedures, development procedures, overview of data and a discussion of problems and recommendations. The appendixes c...

  6. Political Systems vs. Management Systems in Collegiate Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunn, Bruce

    1990-01-01

    The emergence of the information age is necessitating the idea that political systems, which govern collegiate organizations with bureaucracy, be replaced with management systems that employ "third wave" principles to produce a zenith of pedagogical productivity. (Author)

  7. Core Technical Capability Laboratory Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaykhian, Linda; Dugger, Curtis; Griffin, Laurie

    2008-01-01

    The Core Technical Capability Lab - oratory Management System (CTCLMS) consists of dynamically generated Web pages used to access a database containing detailed CTC lab data with the software hosted on a server that allows users to have remote access.

  8. American Indian Systems for Natural Resource Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quintana, Jorge O.

    1992-01-01

    Outlines the philosophy and general principles of "primitive" indigenous production technologies and natural resource management systems in North and South America. Discusses indigenous practices that promote sustainable production in gathering, hunting and fishing, minerals extraction, and agriculture. (SV)

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT / POLLUTION PREVENTION RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Goal 8.4 Improve Environmental Systems Management (Formally Pollution Prevention and New Technology) Background The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed and evaluated tools and technologies to monitor, prevent, control, and clean-up pollution through...

  10. Closed-Loop Hybrid Flight Management Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, George; Sridhar, Banavar (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The objective of our research is to develop a methodology for the modeling, design, verification of flight management systems for the next generation of airspace operations. The overall point of view taken is shown schematically by a block diagram.

  11. A System Model for Water Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, Colin; Roquier, Bastien; Soutter, Marc; Mermoud, Andr

    2009-03-01

    Although generally accepted as a necessary step to improve water management and planning, integrated water resources management (IWRM) methodology does not provide a clear definition of what should be integrated. The various water-related issues that IWRM might encompass are well documented in the literature, but they are generally addressed separately. Therefore, water management lacks a holistic, systems-based description, with a special emphasis on the interrelations between issues. This article presents such a system model for water management, including a graphical representation and textual descriptions of the various water issues, their components, and their interactions. This model is seen as an aide-memoire and a generic reference, providing background knowledge helping to elicit actual system definitions, in possible combination with other participatory systems approaches. The applicability of the model is demonstrated through its application to two test case studies.

  12. Auto-Versioning Systems Image Manager

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-08-01

    The av_sys_image_mgr utility provides an interface for the creation, manipulation, and analysis of system boot images for computer systems. It is primarily intended to provide a convenient method for managing the introduction of changes to boot images for long-lived production HPC systems.

  13. Airport Economics: Management Control Financial Reporting Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchbinder, A.

    1972-01-01

    The development of management control financial reporting systems for airport operation is discussed. The operation of the system to provide the reports required for determining the specific revenue producing facilities of airports is described. The organization of the cost reporting centers to show the types of information provided by the system is analyzed.

  14. Management Information Systems: Applications to Educational Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witkin, Belle Ruth

    An orientation to management information systems (MIS) is offered which presents information about MIS in the context of public education and suggests some considerations that should be taken into account in designing and operating such systems. MIS is defined as a set of operating procedures that act as a control system to automatically provide

  15. How Effective Managers Use Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alter, Steven L.

    1976-01-01

    Based on a study of 56 computerized decision-support systems, discusses the potential value of various decision-support systems, examines the challenges and risks such systems pose to managers, and suggests strategies for meeting those challenges and risks. (JG)

  16. 23 CFR 971.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... requirements of this subpart consistent with 23 CFR 660.105(b). The management systems may be tailored to meet... MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Forest Highway Program Management Systems 971.204 Management systems requirements. (a... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 971.204 Section...

  17. 23 CFR 971.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... requirements of this subpart consistent with 23 CFR 660.105(b). The management systems may be tailored to meet... MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Forest Highway Program Management Systems 971.204 Management systems requirements. (a... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 971.204 Section...

  18. 23 CFR 971.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... requirements of this subpart consistent with 23 CFR 660.105(b). The management systems may be tailored to meet... MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Forest Highway Program Management Systems 971.204 Management systems requirements. (a... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 971.204 Section...

  19. 23 CFR 972.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 972.204 Section 972.204... WILDLIFE SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Fish and Wildlife Service Management Systems 972.204 Management systems requirements. (a) The FWS shall develop, establish and implement the management systems...

  20. 23 CFR 972.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... WILDLIFE SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Fish and Wildlife Service Management Systems § 972.204 Management systems requirements. (a) The FWS shall develop, establish and implement the management systems as... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 972.204 Section...

  1. 23 CFR 972.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... WILDLIFE SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Fish and Wildlife Service Management Systems § 972.204 Management systems requirements. (a) The FWS shall develop, establish and implement the management systems as... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 972.204 Section...

  2. 23 CFR 972.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... WILDLIFE SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Fish and Wildlife Service Management Systems § 972.204 Management systems requirements. (a) The FWS shall develop, establish and implement the management systems as... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 972.204 Section...

  3. Contribution of different grass species to plant-atmosphere ammonia exchange in intensively managed grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, M.; Herrmann, B.; Jones, S.; Neftel, A.; Sutton, M. A.; Schjoerring, J. K.

    2008-06-01

    Species diversity in grasslands usually declines with increasing input of nitrogen from fertilizers or atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Conversely, species diversity may also impact the build-up of soil nitrogen pools. Limited information is available on how plant-atmosphere ammonia exchange is related to species diversity in grasslands. We have here investigated grass species abundance and different foliar nitrogen pools in 4-year-old intensively managed grassland. Apoplastic pH and NH4+ concentrations of the 8 most abundant species were used to calculate stomatal NH3 compensation points. Apoplastic NH4+ concentrations differed considerably among the species, ranging from 13 to 117 ?M, with highest values in Festuca pratensis. Also apoplastic pH values varied, from pH 6.0 in Phleum pratense to 6.9 in Dactylis glomerata. The observed differences in apoplastic NH4+ and pH resulted in a large span of predicted values for the stomatal NH3 compensation point which ranged from 0.20 to 6.57 nmol mol-1. Three species (Lolium perenne, Festuca pratensis and Dactylis glomerata) had sufficiently high NH3 compensation points and abundance to contribute to the NH3 emission of the whole field. At the same time, other grass species such as Phleum pratense and Lolium multiflorum had NH3 compensation points below the atmospheric NH3 concentration and could thus contribute to NH3 uptake from the atmosphere. Evaluated across species, leaf bulk-tissue NH4+ concentrations correlated well (r2=0.902) with stomatal NH3 compensation points calculated on the basis of the apoplastic bioassay. This suggests that leaf tissue NH4+ concentrations combined with data for the frequency distribution of the corresponding species can be used for predicting the NH3 exchange potential of a mixed grass sward.

  4. Integrated Management System - Scope, Possibilities And Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čekanová, Katarína

    2015-06-01

    Organizations are becoming more aware of the importance of integrated management systems (IMS). Interest in this subject indicates that IMS are seen as "management systems of the future". Based on this, the aim of this articles characterizes the possibility of building IMS through the identification of common elements and specific requirements in accordance with the ISO 9001, ISO 14001 and OHSAS 18001 professional references. Part of the article is the methodology of building IMS in the organization.

  5. Real-time analysis for intensive care: development and deployment of the artemis analytic system.

    PubMed

    Blount, Marion; Ebling, Maria R; Eklund, J Mikael; James, Andrew G; McGregor, Carolyn; Percival, Nathan; Smith, Kathleen P; Sow, Daby

    2010-01-01

    The lives of many thousands of children born premature or ill at term around the world have been saved by those who work within neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Modern-day neonatologists, together with nursing staff and other specialists within this domain, enjoy modern technologies for activities such as financial transactions, online purchasing, music, and video on demand. Yet, when they move into their workspace, in many cases, they are supported by nearly the same technology they used 20 years ago. Medical devices provide visual displays of vital signs through physiological streams such as electrocardiogram (ECG), heart rate, blood oxygen saturation (SpO(2)), and respiratory rate. Electronic health record initiatives around the world provide an environment for the electronic management of medical records, but they fail to support the high-frequency interpretation of streaming physiological data. We have taken a collaborative research approach to address this need to provide a flexible platform for the real-time online analysis of patients' data streams to detect medically significant conditions that precede the onset of medical complications. The platform supports automated or clinician-driven knowledge discovery to discover new relationships between physiological data stream events and latent medical conditions as well as to refine existing analytics. Patients benefit from the system because earlier detection of signs of the medical conditions may lead to earlier intervention that may potentially lead to improved patient outcomes and reduced length of stays. The clinician benefits from a decision support tool that provides insight into multiple streams of data that are too voluminous to assess with traditional methods. The remainder of this article summarizes the strengths of our research collaboration and the resulting environment known as Artemis, which is currently being piloted within the NICU of The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Although the discussion in this article focuses on a NICU, the technologies can be applied to any intensive care environment. PMID:20659848

  6. Tank waste remediation system risk management list

    SciTech Connect

    Collard, L.B.

    1995-10-31

    The Tank Waste Remedation System (TWRS) Risk Management List and it`s subset of critical risks, the Critical Risk Management List, provide a tool to senior RL and WHC management (Level-1 and -2) to manage programmatic risks that may significantly impact the TWRS program. The programmatic risks include cost, schedule, and performance risks. Performance risk includes technical risk, supportability risk (such as maintainability and availability), and external risk (i.e., beyond program control, for example, changes in regulations). The risk information includes a description, its impacts, as evaluation of the likelihood, consequences and risk value, possible mitigating actions, and responsible RL and WHC managers. The issues that typically form the basis for the risks are presented in a separate table and the affected functions are provided on the management lists.

  7. The configuration management program for the Emergency Management Support System

    SciTech Connect

    Probasco, K M; Stephan, E G

    1991-08-01

    Emergency response software is used increasingly by the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Emergency Management Project (EMP) personnel at Hanford Site. This software must be reliable, of high quality, and capable of performing critical functions to support assessment of actual or potential consequences of any hazardous accidents onsite or events having potential offsite impacts. To better control the software and ensure its suitability for use as a tool to protect employees, the public, and environment, a method for specifying and certifying its capabilities and documenting its development and implementation was needed. A team of EMP staff, composed of personnel from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Boeing Computer Services- Richland (BCSR) under the direction of PNL EMP, responded to this need by developing a software configuration management program (CMP). This report documents the development of the CMP, including the strategies upon which the CMP is based, and describes the program as it has been implemented for EMS System software. The program relies on the integration of its three primary elements: the configuration management staff, tools, and process. Configuration management staff run the program, using specially designed configuration management forms to guide, document, and track the life cycle of the software. The configuration management process itself is reflected in the instructive forms and summarized in flowcharts representing each phase of the process -- from requirements specification through implementation and maintenance. 7 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Determination of atmospheric nitrogen deposition to a semi-natural peat bog site in an intensively managed agricultural landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurkuck, Miriam; Brümmer, Christian; Mohr, Karsten; Grünhage, Ludger; Flessa, Heinz; Kutsch, Werner L.

    2014-11-01

    Rising levels of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition have been found to affect the primary productivity and species composition of most terrestrial ecosystems. Highly vulnerable ecosystems such as nutrient-poor bogs are expected to respond to increasing N input rates with a decrease in plant species diversity. Our study site - a moderately drained raised bog and one of only very few remaining protected peatland areas in Northwestern Germany - is surrounded by highly fertilised agricultural land and intensive livestock production. We quantified the annual deposition of atmospheric N over a period of two years. Dry deposition rates of different N species and their reactants were calculated from day and night-time concentrations measured by a KAPS denuder filter system. Dry N deposition amounted to 10.9 ± 1.0 kg N ha-1 yr-1 (year 1) and 10.5 ± 1.0 kg N ha-1 yr-1 (year 2). More than 80% of total deposited N was attributed to ammonia (NH3). A strong seasonality in NH3 concentrations and depositions could be observed. Day and night-time concentrations and depositions, however, did not differ significantly. Total N deposition including bulk N deposition resulted in about 25 kg N ha-1 yr-1. Our results suggest that the intensive agricultural land management of surrounding areas and strongly emitting animal husbandry lead to N inputs into the protected peatland area that exceed the ecosystem's specific critical load up to fivefold. This gives rise to the assumption that a further shift in plant species composition with a subsequent alteration of the local hydrological regime can be expected.

  9. A resource management architecture for metacomputing systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, K.; Foster, I.; Karonis, N.; Kesselman, C.; Martin, S.; Smith, W.; Tuecke, S.

    1999-08-24

    Metacomputing systems are intended to support remote and/or concurrent use of geographically distributed computational resources. Resource management in such systems is complicated by five concerns that do not typically arise in other situations: site autonomy and heterogeneous substrates at the resources, and application requirements for policy extensibility, co-allocation, and online control. We describe a resource management architecture that addresses these concerns. This architecture distributes the resource management problem among distinct local manager, resource broker, and resource co-allocator components and defines an extensible resource specification language to exchange information about requirements. We describe how these techniques have been implemented in the context of the Globus metacomputing toolkit and used to implement a variety of different resource management strategies. We report on our experiences applying our techniques in a large testbed, GUSTO, incorporating 15 sites, 330 computers, and 3600 processors.

  10. MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING SYSTEM OF WASTE WATER DISPOSAL SYSTEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Michihiro; Tsuruta, Takashi; Kaito, Kiyoyuki; Kobayashi, Kiyoshi

    Sewage works facilities consist of various assets groups. And there are many kinds of financial resources. In order to optimize the maintenance plan, and to secure the stability and sustainability of sewage works management, it is necessary to carry out financial simulation based on the life-cycle cost analysis. Furthermore, it is important to develop management accounting system that is interlinked with the financial accounting system, because many sewage administration bodies have their financial accounting systems as public enterprises. In this paper, a management accounting system, which is designed to provide basic information for asset management of sewage works facilities, is presented. Also the applicability of the management accounting system presented in this paper is examined through financial simulations.

  11. [A medical consumable material management information system].

    PubMed

    Tang, Guoping; Hu, Liang

    2014-05-01

    Medical consumables material is essential supplies to carry out medical work, which has a wide range of varieties and a large amount of usage. How to manage it feasibly and efficiently that has been a topic of concern to everyone. This article discussed about how to design a medical consumable material management information system that has a set of standardized processes, bring together medical supplies administrator, suppliers and clinical departments. Advanced management mode, enterprise resource planning (ERP) applied to the whole system design process. PMID:25241525

  12. Department of Energy Project Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-08

    This manual provides guidance to all appropriate personnel for implementation of DOE Project Management Policy. It sets forth the principles and requirements that govern the development, approval, and execution of DOE's outlay programs as embodied within the Project Management System (PMS). Its primary goal is to assure application of sound management principles providing a disciplined, systematic, and coordinated approach resulting in efficient planning, organization, coordination, budgeting, management, review, and control of DOE projects. The provisions of this manual are mandatory for the Department's Major Systems Acquisitions (MSA's) and Major Projects and will be used for other projects to the extent practicable. Department's project-management task is over 250 projects, with a total estimated cost in excess of $24 billion at completion. This diverse array of project activities requires a broad spectrum of scientific, engineering, and management skills to assure that they meet planned technical and other objectives and are accomplished on schedule, within cost and scope, and that they serve the purposes intended. In recognition of these requirements and the Department's ever-increasing magnitude of responsibilities, an interim Project Management System was established and has been in use for over a year. This manual constitutes an update of the system based on the experience gained and lessons learned during this initial period.

  13. X-33/RLV System Health Management/Vehicle Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouyos, William; Wangu, Srimal

    1998-01-01

    To reduce operations costs, Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLVS) must include highly reliable robust subsystems which are designed for simple repair access with a simplified servicing infrastructure, and which incorporate expedited decision-making about faults and anomalies. A key component for the Single Stage To Orbit (SSTO) RLV system used to meet these objectives is System Health Management (SHM). SHM incorporates Vehicle Health Management (VHM), ground processing associated with the vehicle fleet (GVHM), and Ground Infrastructure Health Management (GIHM). The primary objective of SHM is to provide an automated and paperless health decision, maintenance, and logistics system. Sanders, a Lockheed Martin Company, is leading the design, development, and integration of the SHM system for RLV and for X-33 (a sub-scale, sub-orbit Advanced Technology Demonstrator). Many critical technologies are necessary to make SHM (and more specifically VHM) practical, reliable, and cost effective. This paper will present the X-33 SHM design which forms the baseline for the RLV SHM, and it will discuss applications of advanced technologies to future RLVs. In addition, this paper will describe a Virtual Design Environment (VDE) which is being developed for RLV. This VDE will allow for system design engineering, as well as program management teams, to accurately and efficiently evaluate system designs, analyze the behavior of current systems, and predict the feasibility of making smooth and cost-efficient transitions from older technologies to newer ones. The RLV SHM design methodology will reduce program costs, decrease total program life-cycle time, and ultimately increase mission success.

  14. System safety management: A new discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, W. C.

    1971-01-01

    The systems theory is discussed in relation to safety management. It is suggested that systems safety management, as a new discipline, holds great promise for reducing operating errors, conserving labor resources, avoiding operating costs due to mistakes, and for improving managerial techniques. It is pointed out that managerial failures or system breakdowns are the basic reasons for human errors and condition defects. In this respect, a recommendation is made that safety engineers stop visualizing the problem only with the individual (supervisor or employee) and see the problem from the systems point of view.

  15. Image and information management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Tina L. (Inventor); Raney, Michael C. (Inventor); Dougherty, Dennis M. (Inventor); Kent, Peter C. (Inventor); Brucker, Russell X. (Inventor); Lampert, Daryl A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A system and methods through which pictorial views of an object's configuration, arranged in a hierarchical fashion, are navigated by a person to establish a visual context within the configuration. The visual context is automatically translated by the system into a set of search parameters driving retrieval of structured data and content (images, documents, multimedia, etc.) associated with the specific context. The system places ''hot spots'', or actionable regions, on various portions of the pictorials representing the object. When a user interacts with an actionable region, a more detailed pictorial from the hierarchy is presented representing that portion of the object, along with real-time feedback in the form of a popup pane containing information about that region, and counts-by-type reflecting the number of items that are available within the system associated with the specific context and search filters established at that point in time.

  16. Image and information management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Tina L. (Inventor); Raney, Michael C. (Inventor); Dougherty, Dennis M. (Inventor); Kent, Peter C. (Inventor); Brucker, Russell X. (Inventor); Lampert, Daryl A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A system and methods through which pictorial views of an object's configuration, arranged in a hierarchical fashion, are navigated by a person to establish a visual context within the configuration. The visual context is automatically translated by the system into a set of search parameters driving retrieval of structured data and content (images, documents, multimedia, etc.) associated with the specific context. The system places hot spots, or actionable regions, on various portions of the pictorials representing the object. When a user interacts with an actionable region, a more detailed pictorial from the hierarchy is presented representing that portion of the object, along with real-time feedback in the form of a popup pane containing information about that region, and counts-by-type reflecting the number of items that are available within the system associated with the specific context and search filters established at that point in time.

  17. [Electronic poison information management system].

    PubMed

    Kabata, Piotr; Waldman, Wojciech; Kaletha, Krystian; Sein Anand, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    We describe deployment of electronic toxicological information database in poison control center of Pomeranian Center of Toxicology. System was based on Google Apps technology, by Google Inc., using electronic, web-based forms and data tables. During first 6 months from system deployment, we used it to archive 1471 poisoning cases, prepare monthly poisoning reports and facilitate statistical analysis of data. Electronic database usage made Poison Center work much easier. PMID:24466697

  18. Multiple system modelling of waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, Ola; Bisaillon, Mattias

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: > Linking of models will provide a more complete, correct and credible picture of the systems. > The linking procedure is easy to perform and also leads to activation of project partners. > The simulation procedure is a bit more complicated and calls for the ability to run both models. - Abstract: Due to increased environmental awareness, planning and performance of waste management has become more and more complex. Therefore waste management has early been subject to different types of modelling. Another field with long experience of modelling and systems perspective is energy systems. The two modelling traditions have developed side by side, but so far there are very few attempts to combine them. Waste management systems can be linked together with energy systems through incineration plants. The models for waste management can be modelled on a quite detailed level whereas surrounding systems are modelled in a more simplistic way. This is a problem, as previous studies have shown that assumptions on the surrounding system often tend to be important for the conclusions. In this paper it is shown how two models, one for the district heating system (MARTES) and another one for the waste management system (ORWARE), can be linked together. The strengths and weaknesses with model linking are discussed when compared to simplistic assumptions on effects in the energy and waste management systems. It is concluded that the linking of models will provide a more complete, correct and credible picture of the consequences of different simultaneous changes in the systems. The linking procedure is easy to perform and also leads to activation of project partners. However, the simulation procedure is a bit more complicated and calls for the ability to run both models.

  19. An integrated scheduling and program management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, D.; Gibson, J. D.; Williams, G. G.

    2012-09-01

    An integrated scheduling and program management system is being developed for the MMT Observatory (MMTO), Arizona, USA. A systems engineering approach is used to combine existing and new relational databases, spreadsheets, file storage systems, and web-based user interfaces into a single unified system. An overview of software design, data management, user interfaces, and techniques for performance assessment is presented. Goals of this system include streamlined data management and an optimized user experience. The MMTO has over a dozen different telescope configurations, including three secondary mirrors and a wide range of observing instruments. Scheduling is complex for the varying telescope configurations, limited available observing time, and appropriate astronomic conditions (e.g., lunar phase) for each science project. Scheduled telescope configurations can be used to perform safety checks of actual configuration during telescope operations. Programmatic information is automatically input into nightly telescope operator (TO) logs by the system. The TO's provide additional information into the system on telescope usage, observing conditions (e.g., weather conditions), and observatory closure (e.g., from instrument malfunction or inclement weather). All of this information is synthesized to assess telescope and observatory performance. Web interfaces to the system can be used by observers to submit information, such as travel plans, instrumentation requirements, and observing catalogs. A service request (SR) (i.e., trouble report) system has also been developed for tracking operational issues. The specific needs of the MMTO have been met through in-house software development of this integrated scheduling and program management system.

  20. A Process Management System for Networked Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tingting; Wang, Huifen; Liu, Linyan

    With the development of computer, communication and network, networked manufacturing has become one of the main manufacturing paradigms in the 21st century. Under the networked manufacturing environment, there exist a large number of cooperative tasks susceptible to alterations, conflicts caused by resources and problems of cost and quality. This increases the complexity of administration. Process management is a technology used to design, enact, control, and analyze networked manufacturing processes. It supports efficient execution, effective management, conflict resolution, cost containment and quality control. In this paper we propose an integrated process management system for networked manufacturing. Requirements of process management are analyzed and architecture of the system is presented. And a process model considering process cost and quality is developed. Finally a case study is provided to explain how the system runs efficiently.

  1. Multimedia case management system implemented in Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Howard D.; Davis, Midge L.; Handy, Dale L.; Kvarfordt, Kent B.; Ford, Glenn

    1999-01-01

    Managing the timely access of information is a major challenge facing law enforcement agencies. One of the areas of greatest need is that of the case management process. During the course of FY98, the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), the Counterdrug Technology Assessment Center (CTAC), the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), and the Criminal Investigative Bureau (CIB) of the state of Idaho, created a Northwest testbed to develop and integrate a multimedia case management system. A system was developed to assist investigators in tracking and maintaining investigative cases and improving access to internal and external data resources. In this paper, we discuss the results of our case management system development and the ability to present state and federal information incorporating object oriented and multimedia techniques. We then outline our plans for future research and development.

  2. System Management Software for Virtual Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Vallee, Geoffroy R; Naughton, III, Thomas J; Scott, Stephen L

    2007-01-01

    Recently there has been an increased interest in the use of system-level virtualization using mature solutions such as Xen, QEMU, or VMWare. These virtualization platforms are being used in distributed and parallel environments including high performance computing. The use of virtual machines within such environments introduces new challenges to system management. These include tedious tasks such as deploying para-virtualized host operating systems to support virtual machine execution or virtual overlay networks to connect these virtual machines. Additionally, there is the problem of machine definition and deployment, which is complicated by differentiation in the underlying virtualization technology. This paper discusses tools for the deployment and management of both host operating systems and virtual machines in clusters. We begin with an overview of system-level virtualization and move on to a description of tools that we have developed to aid with these environments. These tools extend prior work in the area of cluster installation, configuration and management.

  3. Integrated Project Management System description. [UMTRAP Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is a Department of Energy (DOE) designated Major System Acquisition (MSA). To execute and manage the Project mission successfully and to comply with the MSA requirements, the UMTRA Project Office ( Project Office'') has implemented and operates an Integrated Project Management System (IPMS). The Project Office is assisted by the Technical Assistance Contractor's (TAC) Project Integration and Control (PIC) Group in system operation. Each participant, in turn, provides critical input to system operation and reporting requirements. The IPMS provides a uniform structured approach for integrating the work of Project participants. It serves as a tool for planning and control, workload management, performance measurement, and specialized reporting within a standardized format. This system description presents the guidance for its operation. Appendices 1 and 2 contain definitions of commonly used terms and abbreviations and acronyms, respectively. 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. [Scoring systems in intensive care medicine : principles, models, application and limits].

    PubMed

    Fleig, V; Brenck, F; Wolff, M; Weigand, M A

    2011-10-01

    Scoring systems are used in all diagnostic areas of medicine. Several parameters are evaluated and rated with points according to their value in order to simplify a complex clinical situation with a score. The application ranges from the classification of disease severity through determining the number of staff for the intensive care unit (ICU) to the evaluation of new therapies under study conditions. Since the introduction of scoring systems in the 1980's a variety of different score models has been developed. The scoring systems that are employed in intensive care and are discussed in this article can be categorized into prognostic scores, expenses scores and disease-specific scores. Since the introduction of compulsory recording of two scoring systems for accounting in the German diagnosis-related groups (DRG) system, these tools have gained more importance for all intensive care physicians. Problems remain in the valid calculation of scores and interpretation of the results. PMID:21997474

  5. Fluid management system for a zero gravity cryogenic storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lak, Tibor I. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    The fluid management system comprises a mixing/recirculation system including an external recirculation pump for receiving fluid from a zero gravity storage system and returning an output flow of the fluid to the storage system. An internal axial spray injection system is provided for receiving a portion of the output flow from the recirculation pump. The spray injection system thermally de-stratifies liquid and gaseous cryogenic fluid stored in the storage system.

  6. Risk management and expert system development methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Larry; Gilstrap, Lewey

    1991-01-01

    A risk-based expert-system development methodology has been developed to provide guidance to managers and technical personnel and to serve as a standard for developing expert systems. Expert-system development differs from conventional software development in that the information needed to prepare system requirements for expert systems is not known at the outset of a project and is obtained by knowledge engineering methods. The paper describes the expert-system life cycle, development methodology, and the approach taken in this methodology to manage and reduce the risks in expert system development. Also examined are the risks of using and of not using a methodology, the studies undertaken to validate the provisions of the expert system development methodology, and the results of these validation studies.

  7. Management Organization Systems Technique; A Management System for Higher Education--Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wayne County Community Coll., Detroit, MI.

    Instruction is the focus of the final pamphlet in a six-part series describing the Management Organization Systems Technique (MOST). The system was designed at Wayne County Community College to determine the goals and objectives of the college and assist management in their attainment and evaluation. The instruction component of the system takes

  8. Plasma reactor waste management systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, Robert O., Jr.; Rindt, John R.; Ness, Sumitra R.

    1992-01-01

    The University of North Dakota is developing a plasma reactor system for use in closed-loop processing that includes biological, materials, manufacturing, and waste processing. Direct-current, high-frequency, or microwave discharges will be used to produce plasmas for the treatment of materials. The plasma reactors offer several advantages over other systems, including low operating temperatures, low operating pressures, mechanical simplicity, and relatively safe operation. Human fecal material, sunflowers, oats, soybeans, and plastic were oxidized in a batch plasma reactor. Over 98 percent of the organic material was converted to gaseous products. The solids were then analyzed and a large amount of water and acid-soluble materials were detected. These materials could possibly be used as nutrients for biological systems.

  9. Annual nitrous oxide emissions from intensively managed soils in Maui, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Zachariassen, J.; Matson, P.A.; Vitousek, P.M. NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA )

    1993-06-01

    High inputs of fertilizer N and other intensive cropping practices have become widespread in many agricultural areas of the tropics. In an effort to examine the effects of these practices on trace gas-atmosphere exchange we measured N[sub 2]O, CO[sub 2], and CH[sub 4] flux in a range of heavily fertilized sugar cane systems. Annual N[sub 2]O fluxes during 1992 appeared to be highest on the leeward or dry side of the island ranging from 20-40 mgN m[sup [minus]2]y[sup [minus]1]; roughly 50% of these emissions occurred during fertilization events. On the windward wet side of the island N[sub 2]O fluxes ranged from about 11-30 mgN m[sup [minus]2]y[sup [minus]1]; from 10 to 30% of these emissions occurred during fertilization events. Methane was usually taken up by these soils and variability was slightly higher on the wet side vs. the dry side; although the CO[sub 2] data set was small, flux appeared to be higher on the wet side vs. the dry side.

  10. Automated Power Systems Management (APSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridgeforth, A. O.

    1981-01-01

    A breadboard power system incorporating autonomous functions of monitoring, fault detection and recovery, command and control was developed, tested and evaluated to demonstrate technology feasibility. Autonomous functions including switching of redundant power processing elements, individual load fault removal, and battery charge/discharge control were implemented by means of a distributed microcomputer system within the power subsystem. Three local microcomputers provide the monitoring, control and command function interfaces between the central power subsystem microcomputer and the power sources, power processing and power distribution elements. The central microcomputer is the interface between the local microcomputers and the spacecraft central computer or ground test equipment.

  11. An alternative approach in operator allocation labor intensive manufacturing system: A three-phase methodology framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mat Rani, Ruzanita; Ismail, Wan Rosmanira

    2013-04-01

    Operator allocation is one of the most important decisions that can affect productivity in labor-intensive manufacturing system. Improper decision on operator allocation will reduce company's throughput and increase waste. Therefore, all factors such as operators' performance and operational constraints need to be considered in making the best operator allocation decision. Most of previous studies used two phases methodology. In two phases methodology, they used operational constraints and treated all operators to have the same level of performance for making decision on operator allocation. Therefore, in this paper a three-phase methodology is proposed to determine the optimal operator allocation. This methodology advances the existing approach on operator allocation by combining operators' performance and operational constraints. The methodology starts with evaluating the operators' performance. Then, it is followed with determining inputs and outputs for operator allocation alternatives and it ends with determining the optimal operator allocation. This paper will give ideas and directions to the management of the manufacturing company in determining the optimal operator allocation decision.

  12. A method for optimizing integrated system health management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jambor, Bruno; Rouch, Robin L.; Eger, George W.; Black, Stephen T.

    1996-03-01

    The cost of operating the existing fleet of launch vehicles, both expendable and reusable, is too high. The high cost is attributable to two primary sources: people-intensive checkout procedures and delayed launches. This latter has cost impacts on both launch procedures and other launch operations through ripple-down effects. Without significant changes in how the launch vehicle community does business, the next generation of vehicles shall be burdened by the same high costs. By integrating system health management into the next generation, Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) operations costs can be reduced. A method for optimizing Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) is being developed under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC). This paper describes the work currently underway at LMC. ISHM shall be implemented on the prototype vehicle X-33 in order to demonstrate its usefulness for RLV.

  13. 23 CFR 970.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... engineering support for the development, implementation, and maintenance of the management systems. (c) The... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 970.204 Section 970.204... SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS National Park Service Management Systems 970.204 Management...

  14. 23 CFR 970.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... engineering support for the development, implementation, and maintenance of the management systems. (c) The... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 970.204 Section 970.204... SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS National Park Service Management Systems 970.204 Management...

  15. Relative Importance of Nitrous Oxide Vs. Nitric Oxide Emissions from Soils Across a Management Intensity and Biodiversity Gradient.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfand, I.; Gallagher, C.; Moneymaker, B. C. G.; Robertson, G. P.

    2014-12-01

    Soil emissions of nitrous (N2O) and nitric (NO) oxides contribute to both greenhouse gases balance and ozone production and destruction in the atmosphere. Understanding the controls on soil fluxes of these gases is vital for the development of mitigation opportunities and for understanding their impact on atmospheric chemistry. We measured soil N2O and NO emissions from 9 ecosystems across management intensity and biodiversity gradient using semi-continuous automatic chambers over 2 years. The fluxes were measured 4 times a day in: two continuous corn systems, a monoculture without cover crops (CC) and with cover crops (CCcc), a corn-soybean rotation with cover crops (CScc), switchgrass (SWG), miscanthus (MIS); Poplar (POP), successional community (SUC), a native grasses mix (NGM), and a native prairie (NP) ecosystem with 20 different plant species. All ecosystems except NP were fertilized. Cumulative soil emissions of N2O and NO from the ecosystems decreased with increasing biodiversity and reduced management. The highest fluxes were measured in the CC and the lowest fluxes in the NP ecosystems. Within annual ecosystems the addition of cover crops reduced cumulative soil N2O emissions by 50%: from 1140 to 620 g N ha-1 y-1. Fertilized perennial grasses exhibited 3 - 8 times higher cumulative N2O fluxes then those from fertilized NGM, SUC, and POP ecosystems: 870 and 450 g N ha-1 y-1in SWG and MIS ecosystems, respectively. Native prairie exhibited a cumulative flux close to nil. Cumulative NO emissions from the annual ecosystems were also reduced by 50 - 90% by cover crops: fluxes were 254, 103, and 30 g N ha-1 y-1 in CC, CScc, and CCcc ecosystems, respectively. In all other studied ecosystems NO emissions did not exceed 16 g N ha-1 y-1 and decreased with increasing biodiversity and reduced management. Overall, NO emissions contributed up to 18% to cumulative N2O and NO emissions from the studied ecosystems. Temporal variability of hourly N2O fluxes was lower in perennial than in annual ecosystems, while soil emissions of NO exhibited the opposite dynamics and were more variable in perennial than in annual ecosystems. Soil temperature was a poor predictor of hourly N2O and NO emissions from annual systems, but explained up to 20% of emissions variability in perennial ecosystems.

  16. X-33/RLV System Health Management/ Vehicle Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbos, Raymond J.; Mouyos, William

    1998-01-01

    To reduce operations cost, the RLV must include the following elements: highly reliable, robust subsystems designed for simple repair access with a simplified servicing infrastructure and incorporating expedited decision making about faults and anomalies. A key component for the Single Stage to Orbit (SSTO) RLV System used to meet these objectives is System Health Management (SHM). SHM deals with the vehicle component- Vehicle Health Management (VHM), the ground processing associated with the fleet (GVHM) and the Ground Infrastructure Health Management (GIHM). The objective is to provide an automated collection and paperless health decision, maintenance and logistics system. Many critical technologies are necessary to make the SHM (and more specifically VHM) practical, reliable and cost effective. Sanders is leading the design, development and integration of the SHM system for RLV and X-33 SHM (a sub-scale, sub-orbit Advanced Technology Demonstrator). This paper will present the X-33 SHM design which forms the baseline for RLV SHM. This paper will also discuss other applications of these technologies.

  17. Tank waste remediation system systems engineering management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Peck, L.G.

    1996-02-06

    This Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) describes the Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) implementation of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Systems Engineering (SE) policy provided in Tank Waste Remediation System Systems Engineering Management Policy, DOE/RL letter, 95-RTI-107, Oct. 31, 1995. This SEMP defines the products, process, organization, and procedures used by the TWRS Program to accomplish SE objectives. This TWRS SEMP is applicable to all aspects of the TWRS Program and will be used as the basis for tailoring SE to apply necessary concepts and principles to develop and mature the processes and physical systems necessary to achieve the desired end states of the program.

  18. Contribution of different grass species to plant-atmosphere ammonia exchange in intensively managed grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, M.; Herrmann, B.; Jones, S.; Neftel, A.; Sutton, M. A.; Schjoerring, J. K.

    2009-01-01

    Species diversity in grasslands usually declines with increasing input of nitrogen from fertilizers or atmospheric deposition. Conversely, species diversity may also impact the build-up of soil and plant nitrogen pools. One important pool is NH3/NH4+ which also can be exchanged between plant leaves and the atmosphere. Limited information is available on how plant-atmosphere ammonia exchange is related to species diversity in grasslands. We have here investigated grass species abundance and different foliar nitrogen pools in 4-year-old intensively managed grassland. Apoplastic pH and NH4+ concentrations of the 8 most abundant species (Lolium perenne, Phleum pratense, Festuca pratensis, Lolium multiflorum, Poa pratensis, Dactylis glomerata, Holcus lanatus, Bromus mollis) were used to calculate stomatal NH3 compensation points. Apoplastic NH4+ concentrations differed considerably among the species, ranging from 13 to 117 ?M, with highest values in Festuca pratensis. Also apoplastic pH values varied, from pH 6.0 in Phleum pratense to 6.9 in Dactylis glomerata. The observed differences in apoplastic NH4+ and pH resulted in a large span of predicted values for the stomatal NH3 compensation point which ranged between 0.20 and 6.57 nmol mol-1. Three species (Lolium perenne, Festuca pratensis and Dactylis glomerata) had sufficiently high NH3 compensation point and abundance to contribute to the bi-directional NH3 fluxes recorded over the whole field. The other 5 grass species had NH3 compensation points considerably below the atmospheric NH3 concentration and were thus not likely to contribute to NH3 emission but only to NH3 uptake from the atmosphere. Evaluated across species, leaf bulk-tissue NH4+ concentrations correlated well (r2=0.902) with stomatal NH3 compensation points calculated on the basis of the apoplastic bioassay. This suggests that leaf tissue NH4+ concentrations combined with data for the frequency distribution of the corresponding species can be used for predicting the NH3 exchange potential of a mixed grass sward.

  19. Context based configuration management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawdiak, Yuri O. (Inventor); Gurram, Mohana M. (Inventor); Maluf, David A. (Inventor); Mederos, Luis A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A computer-based system for configuring and displaying information on changes in, and present status of, a collection of events associated with a project. Classes of icons for decision events, configurations and feedback mechanisms, and time lines (sequential and/or simultaneous) for related events are displayed. Metadata for each icon in each class is displayed by choosing and activating the corresponding icon. Access control (viewing, reading, writing, editing, deleting, etc.) is optionally imposed for metadata and other displayed information.

  20. Smoke management system considerations for hotel atriums

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, M.E.

    1983-07-01

    This article examines the many life safety problems inherent in open balcony atriums, particularly those in hotels. Focuses on the smoke-management system of a hotel, and shows what can be achieved by an architect, an owner, a building department and a fire department that works together to achieve an enhanced level of life safety in the building's construction. Emphasizes that the hotel should be fully sprinklered; that it have carefully thought-out detection and alarm systems; that it have a reliably engineered smoke management system; and that it be routinely inspected and maintained. Discusses life safety concerns, smoke extraction, and failure mode analysis.

  1. Development of an Integrated Distribution Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Schatz, Joe E.

    2010-10-20

    This final report details the components, functionality, costs, schedule and benefits of developing an Integrated Distribution Management System (IDMS) for power distribution system operation. The Distribution Automation (DA) and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems used by electric power companies to manage the distribution of electric power to retail energy consumers are vital components of the Nation’s critical infrastructure. Providing electricity is an essential public service and a disruption in that service, if not quickly restored, could threaten the public safety and the Nation’s economic security. Our Nation’s economic prosperity and quality of life have long depended on the essential services that utilities provide; therefore, it is necessary to ensure that electric utilities are able to conduct their operations safely and efficiently. A fully integrated technology of applications is needed to link various remote sensing, communications and control devices with other information tools that help guide Power Distribution Operations personnel. A fully implemented IDMS will provide this, a seamlessly integrated set of applications to raise electric system operating intelligence. IDMS will enhance DA and SCADA through integration of applications such as Geographic Information Systems, Outage Management Systems, Switching Management and Analysis, Operator Training Simulator, and other Advanced Applications, including unbalanced load flow and fault isolation/service restoration. These apps are capable of utilizing and obtaining information from appropriately installed DER, and by integrating disparate systems, the Distribution Operators will benefit from advanced capabilities when analyzing, controlling and operating the electric system.

  2. Improving Ohio's Education Management Information System (EMIS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Legislative Office of Education Oversight, Columbus.

    Due to legislative mandate, the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) was required to develop a system (the Education Management Information System) that would increase the amount of information available to state-level policy makers and the public. Some recommendations for improving the function of EMIS are offered in this report. The text provides

  3. Financial Management of the Chelsea School System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemente, Paul, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the challenges Boston University (Massachusetts) faced in achieving two goals in its partnership agreement with the Chelsea (Massachusetts) public school system: (1) to improve Chelsea schools' financial management; and (2) to expand the range of operating funds available to the school system. (GR)

  4. Generalized Data Management Systems--Some Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minker, Jack

    A Generalized Data Management System (GDMS) is a software environment provided as a tool for analysts, administrators, and programmers who are responsible for the maintenance, query and analysis of a data base to permit the manipulation of newly defined files and data with the existing programs and system. Because the GDMS technology is believed…

  5. A high reliability battery management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moody, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    Over a period of some 5 years Canadian Astronautics Limited (CAL) has developed a system to autonomously manage, and thus prolong the life of, secondary storage batteries. During the development, the system was aimed at the space vehicle application using nickel cadmium batteries, but is expected to be able to enhance the life and performance of any rechargeable electrochemical couple. The system handles the cells of a battery individually and thus avoids the problems of over, and under, drive that inevitably occur in a battery of cells managed by an averaging system. This individual handling also allow cells to be totally bypassed in the event of failure, thus avoiding the losses associated with low capacity, partial short circuit, and the catastrophe of open circuit. The system has an optional capability of managing redundant batteries simultaneously, adding the advantage of on line reconditioning of one battery, while the other maintains the energy storage capability of the overall system. As developed, the system contains a dedicated, redundant, microprocessor, but the capability exists to have this computing capability time shared, or remote, and operating through a data link. As adjuncts to the basic management system CAL has developed high efficiency, polyphase, power regulators for charge and discharge power conditioning.

  6. NASA Administrative Data Base Management Systems, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radosevich, J. D. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Strategies for converting to a data base management system (DBMS) and the implementation of the software packages necessary are discussed. Experiences with DBMS at various NASA centers are related including Langley's ADABAS/NATURAL and the NEMS subsystem of the NASA metrology informaton system. The value of the integrated workstation with a personal computer is explored.

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (EIMS) FACT SHEET

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the fact sheet is to provide information about the US EPA Office of Research and Developments Environmental Information Management System. The fact sheet indicates the type of records that are in EIMS, systems that are integrated with EIMS as well as some highligh...

  8. Software for managing multicrate FASTBUS Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Deiss, S.R.; Gustavson, D.B.

    1982-10-01

    The FASTBUS System Manager software that was designed and implemented on an LSI-11 system using PASCAL is described. Particular attention is given to the file structures, file access mechanisms, and basic routing algorithms. Portability to other machines and languages is described.

  9. A Database Management System for Interlibrary Loan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Amy

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the increasing complexity of dealing with interlibrary loan requests and describes a database management system for interlibrary loans used at Texas Tech University. System functions are described, including file control, records maintenance, and report generation, and the impact on staff productivity is discussed. (CLB)

  10. Implementing a Microcomputer Database Management System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manock, John J.; Crater, K. Lynne

    1985-01-01

    Current issues in selecting, structuring, and implementing microcomputer database management systems in research administration offices are discussed, and their capabilities are illustrated with the system used by the University of North Carolina at Wilmington. Trends in microcomputer technology and their likely impact on research administration

  11. Generalized Data Management Systems--Some Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minker, Jack

    A Generalized Data Management System (GDMS) is a software environment provided as a tool for analysts, administrators, and programmers who are responsible for the maintenance, query and analysis of a data base to permit the manipulation of newly defined files and data with the existing programs and system. Because the GDMS technology is believed

  12. MSFC Propulsion Systems Department Knowledge Management Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caraccioli, Paul A.

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Knowledge Management (KM) project of the Propulsion Systems Department at Marshall Space Flight Center. KM is needed to support knowledge capture, preservation and to support an information sharing culture. The presentation includes the strategic plan for the KM initiative, the system requirements, the technology description, the User Interface and custom features, and a search demonstration.

  13. Filling of orbital fluid management systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merino, F.; Blatt, M. H.; Thies, N. C.

    1978-01-01

    A study was performed with three objectives: (1) analyze fluid management system fill under orbital conditions; (2) determine what experimentation is needed; and (3) develop an experimental program. The fluid management system was a 1.06m (41.7 in) diameter pressure vessel with screen channel device. Analyses were conducted using liquid hydrogen and N2O4. The influence of helium and autogenous pressurization systems was considered. Analyses showed that fluid management system fill will be more difficult with a cryogen than with an earth storable. The key to a successful fill with cryogens is in devising techniques for filling without vent liquid, and removing trapped vapor from the screen device at tank fill completion. This will be accomplished with prechill, fill, and vapor condensation processes. Refill will require a vent and purge process, to dilute the residual helium, prior to introducing liquid. Neither prechill, chill, nor purge processes will be required for earth storables.

  14. Adding Data Management Services to Parallel File Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Scott

    2015-03-04

    The objective of this project, called DAMASC for “Data Management in Scientific Computing”, is to coalesce data management with parallel file system management to present a declarative interface to scientists for managing, querying, and analyzing extremely large data sets efficiently and predictably. Managing extremely large data sets is a key challenge of exascale computing. The overhead, energy, and cost of moving massive volumes of data demand designs where computation is close to storage. In current architectures, compute/analysis clusters access data in a physically separate parallel file system and largely leave it scientist to reduce data movement. Over the past decades the high-end computing community has adopted middleware with multiple layers of abstractions and specialized file formats such as NetCDF-4 and HDF5. These abstractions provide a limited set of high-level data processing functions, but have inherent functionality and performance limitations: middleware that provides access to the highly structured contents of scientific data files stored in the (unstructured) file systems can only optimize to the extent that file system interfaces permit; the highly structured formats of these files often impedes native file system performance optimizations. We are developing Damasc, an enhanced high-performance file system with native rich data management services. Damasc will enable efficient queries and updates over files stored in their native byte-stream format while retaining the inherent performance of file system data storage via declarative queries and updates over views of underlying files. Damasc has four key benefits for the development of data-intensive scientific code: (1) applications can use important data-management services, such as declarative queries, views, and provenance tracking, that are currently available only within database systems; (2) the use of these services becomes easier, as they are provided within a familiar file-based ecosystem; (3) common optimizations, e.g., indexing and caching, are readily supported across several file formats, avoiding effort duplication; and (4) performance improves significantly, as data processing is integrated more tightly with data storage. Our key contributions are: SciHadoop which explores changes to MapReduce assumption by taking advantage of semantics of structured data while preserving MapReduce’s failure and resource management; DataMods which extends common abstractions of parallel file systems so they become programmable such that they can be extended to natively support a variety of data models and can be hooked into emerging distributed runtimes such as Stanford’s Legion; and Miso which combines Hadoop and relational data warehousing to minimize time to insight, taking into account the overhead of ingesting data into data warehousing.

  15. Enhancing the quality of care in the intensive care unit: a systems engineering approach.

    PubMed

    Tropello, Steven P; Ravitz, Alan D; Romig, Mark; Pronovost, Peter J; Sapirstein, Adam

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an overview of systems engineering and describes common core principles found in systems engineering methodologies. The Patient Care Program Acute Care Initiative collaboration between the Armstrong Institute of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, which will use systems engineering to reduce patient harm in the intensive care unit, is introduced. Specific examples of applying a systems engineering approach to the Patient Care Program Acute Care Initiative are presented. PMID:23182531

  16. Neural network system for traffic flow management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, John F.; Elibiary, Khalid J.; Petersson, L. E. Rickard

    1992-09-01

    Atlanta will be the home of several special events during the next five years ranging from the 1996 Olympics to the 1994 Super Bowl. When combined with the existing special events (Braves, Falcons, and Hawks games, concerts, festivals, etc.), the need to effectively manage traffic flow from surface streets to interstate highways is apparent. This paper describes a system for traffic event response and management for intelligent navigation utilizing signals (TERMINUS) developed at Georgia Tech for adaptively managing special event traffic flows in the Atlanta, Georgia area. TERMINUS (the original name given Atlanta, Georgia based upon its role as a rail line terminating center) is an intelligent surface street signal control system designed to manage traffic flow in Metro Atlanta. The system consists of three components. The first is a traffic simulation of the downtown Atlanta area around Fulton County Stadium that models the flow of traffic when a stadium event lets out. Parameters for the surrounding area include modeling for events during various times of day (such as rush hour). The second component is a computer graphics interface with the simulation that shows the traffic flows achieved based upon intelligent control system execution. The final component is the intelligent control system that manages surface street light signals based upon feedback from control sensors that dynamically adapt the intelligent controller's decision making process. The intelligent controller is a neural network model that allows TERMINUS to control the configuration of surface street signals to optimize the flow of traffic away from special events.

  17. Intensive care management of patients with acute intermittent porphyria: Clinical report of four cases and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Madhur; Rath, Girija P.; Padhy, Uma P.; Marda, Manish; Mahajan, Charu; Dash, Hari H.

    2010-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), the most common and the most severe form of acute hepatic porphyria, is an autosomal dominant condition. It results from lower-than-normal levels (less than 50%) of porphobilinogen (PBG) deaminase. Patients may present commonly with gastrointestinal complaints and neuropsychiatric manifestations. Diagnosis may be confirmed with the presence of intermediary metabolites of haem synthesis, amino levulinic acid (ALA) and PBG in urine or with specific enzyme assays. Abdominal pain is the most common symptom (90%). Peripheral polyneuropathy, primarily motor with flaccid paresis of proximal musculature, with or without autonomic involvement, is characteristic. Respiratory failure necessitates ventilator and intensive care support. Avoidance of precipitating factors and the use of haem preparations and intravenous dextrose form the basis of management. Gabapentin and propofol, rather than the conventional antiepileptics appear to be the appropriate choice for seizure control. Here, we present intensive care management of four cases of AIP with varying clinical presentation. PMID:20859493

  18. Laboratory Information Systems Management and Operations.

    PubMed

    Cucoranu, Ioan C

    2016-03-01

    The main mission of a laboratory information system (LIS) is to manage workflow and deliver accurate results for clinical management. Successful selection and implementation of an anatomic pathology LIS is not complete unless it is complemented by specialized information technology support and maintenance. LIS is required to remain continuously operational with minimal or no downtime and the LIS team has to ensure that all operations are compliant with the mandated rules and regulations. PMID:26851664

  19. Laboratory Information Systems Management and Operations.

    PubMed

    Cucoranu, Ioan C

    2015-06-01

    The main mission of a laboratory information system (LIS) is to manage workflow and deliver accurate results for clinical management. Successful selection and implementation of an anatomic pathology LIS is not complete unless it is complemented by specialized information technology support and maintenance. LIS is required to remain continuously operational with minimal or no downtime and the LIS team has to ensure that all operations are compliant with the mandated rules and regulations. PMID:26065790

  20. Performance management system enhancement and maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleaver, T. G.; Ahour, R.; Johnson, B. R.

    1984-01-01

    The research described in this report concludes a two-year effort to develop a Performance Management System (PMS) for the NCC computers. PMS provides semi-automated monthly reports to NASA and contractor management on the status and performance of the NCC computers in the TDRSS program. Throughout 1984, PMS was tested, debugged, extended, and enhanced. Regular PMS monthly reports were produced and distributed. PMS continues to operate at the NCC under control of Bendix Corp. personnel.

  1. National launch strategy vehicle data management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordes, David

    1990-01-01

    The national launch strategy vehicle data management system (NLS/VDMS) was developed as part of the 1990 NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship Program. The system was developed under the guidance of the Engineering Systems Branch of the Information Systems Office, and is intended for use within the Program Development Branch PD34. The NLS/VDMS is an on-line database system that permits the tracking of various launch vehicle configurations within the program development office. The system is designed to permit the definition of new launch vehicles, as well as the ability to display and edit existing launch vehicles. Vehicles can be grouped in logical architectures within the system. Reports generated from this package include vehicle data sheets, architecture data sheets, and vehicle flight rate reports. The topics covered include: (1) system overview; (2) initial system development; (3) supercard hypermedia authoring system; (4) the ORACLE database; and (5) system evaluation.

  2. Landsat Pathfinder tropical forest information management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, W.; Chomentowski, W.; Harville, J.; Skole, D.; Vellekamp, K.

    1994-01-01

    A Tropical Forest Information Management System_(TFIMS) has been designed to fulfill the needs of HTFIP in such a way that it tracks all aspects of the generation and analysis of the raw satellite data and the derived deforestation dataset. The system is broken down into four components: satellite image selection, processing, data management and archive management. However, as we began to think of how the TFIMS could also be used to make the data readily accessible to all user communities we realized that the initial system was too project oriented and could only be accessed locally. The new system needed development in the areas of data ingest and storage, while at the same time being implemented on a server environment with a network interface accessible via Internet. This paper summarizes the overall design of the existing prototype (version 0) information management system and then presents the design of the new system (version 1). The development of version 1 of the TFIMS is ongoing. There are no current plans for a gradual transition from version 0 to version 1 because the significant changes are in how the data within the HTFIP will be made accessible to the extended community of scientists, policy makers, educators, and students and not in the functionality of the basic system.

  3. Description of data base management systems activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    One of the major responsibilities of the JPL Computing and Information Services Office is to develop and maintain a JPL plan for providing computing services to the JPL management and administrative community that will lead to improved productivity. The CISO plan to accomplish this objective has been titled 'Management and Administrative Support Systems' (MASS). The MASS plan is based on the continued use of JPL's IBM 3032 Computer system for administrative computing and for the MASS functions. The current candidate administrative Data Base Management Systems required to support the MASS include ADABASE, Cullinane IDMS and TOTAL. Previous uses of administrative Data Base Systems have been applied to specific local functions rather than in a centralized manner with elements common to the many user groups. Limited capacity data base systems have been installed in microprocessor based office automation systems in a few Project and Management Offices using Ashton-Tate dBASE II. These experiences plus some other localized in house DBMS uses have provided an excellent background for developing user and system requirements for a single DBMS to support the MASS program.

  4. Obstetric hemorrhage in a case of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator: Anaesthesia and intensive care management

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sandeep Kumar; Bhat, Ravindra R.; Kavitha, Jayaram; Kundra, Pankaj; Parida, Satyen

    2016-01-01

    The physiological changes occurring during pregnancy and labor may reveal or exacerbate the symptoms of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM). The addition of obstetric hemorrhage to this presents a unique challenge to the anesthesiologists and intensivists managing these patients in the operation theatres and the Intensive Care Units. Here we present a case of HOCM with automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator in situ and postpartum hemorrhagic shock. PMID:26957702

  5. Obstetric hemorrhage in a case of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator: Anaesthesia and intensive care management.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sandeep Kumar; Bhat, Ravindra R; Kavitha, Jayaram; Kundra, Pankaj; Parida, Satyen

    2016-01-01

    The physiological changes occurring during pregnancy and labor may reveal or exacerbate the symptoms of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM). The addition of obstetric hemorrhage to this presents a unique challenge to the anesthesiologists and intensivists managing these patients in the operation theatres and the Intensive Care Units. Here we present a case of HOCM with automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator in situ and postpartum hemorrhagic shock. PMID:26957702

  6. Management of a patient with Opalski's syndrome in intensive care unit and mini review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Aslanidis, T; Chytas, I; Kontos, A; Giannakou-Peftoulidou, M

    2012-01-01

    Stroke syndromes include a variety of syndromes with often overlapping clinical presentations. When ipsilateral hemiplegia is associated with symptoms of a lateral medullary syndrome, it corresponds to the submedullary syndrome of Opalski. A 72-year-old woman presented with sudden onset of headache, gait disturbance, and recurrent vomiting. Her clinical status gradually deteriorated and she was admitted to the intensive care unit where a variety of problems, related to her diagnosis (Opalski syndrome), were managed. PMID:23935321

  7. Tank waste remediation system systems engineering management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Peck, L.G.

    1998-01-08

    This Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) describes the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) implementation of the US Department of Energy (DOE) systems engineering policy provided in 97-IMSD-193. The SEMP defines the products, process, organization, and procedures used by the TWRS Project to implement the policy. The SEMP will be used as the basis for tailoring the systems engineering applications to the development of the physical systems and processes necessary to achieve the desired end states of the program. It is a living document that will be revised as necessary to reflect changes in systems engineering guidance as the program evolves. The US Department of Energy-Headquarters has issued program management guidance, DOE Order 430. 1, Life Cycle Asset Management, and associated Good Practice Guides that include substantial systems engineering guidance.

  8. 1995 Baseline solid waste management system description

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.S.; Konynenbelt, H.S.

    1995-09-01

    This provides a detailed solid waste system description that documents the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) strategy for managing Hanford`s solid low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, transuranic and transuranic mixed waste, and greater-than-Class III waste. This system description is intended for use by managers of the solid waste program, facility and system planners, as well as system modelers. The system description identifies the TSD facilities that constitute the solid waste system and defines these facilities` interfaces, schedules, and capacities. It also provides the strategy for treating each of the waste streams generated or received by the Hanford Site from generation or receipt through final destination.

  9. Intelligent Systems for Power Management and Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Robert M.

    2002-01-01

    The motivation behind an advanced technology program to develop intelligent power management and distribution (PMAD) systems is described. The program concentrates on developing digital control and distributed processing algorithms for PMAD components and systems to improve their size, weight, efficiency, and reliability. Specific areas of research in developing intelligent DC-DC converters and distributed switchgear are described. Results from recent development efforts are presented along with expected future benefits to the overall PMAD system performance.

  10. Uncertainty management in intelligent design aiding systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Donald E.; Gabbert, Paula S.

    1988-01-01

    A novel approach to uncertainty management which is particularly effective in intelligent design aiding systems for large-scale systems is presented. The use of this approach in the materials handling system design domain is discussed. It is noted that, during any point in the design process, a point value can be obtained for the evaluation of feasible designs; however, the techniques described provide unique solutions for these point values using only the current information about the design environment.

  11. Adaptable data management for systems biology investigations

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, John; Rovira, Hector; Cavnor, Chris; Burdick, David; Killcoyne, Sarah; Shmulevich, Ilya

    2009-01-01

    Background Within research each experiment is different, the focus changes and the data is generated from a continually evolving barrage of technologies. There is a continual introduction of new techniques whose usage ranges from in-house protocols through to high-throughput instrumentation. To support these requirements data management systems are needed that can be rapidly built and readily adapted for new usage. Results The adaptable data management system discussed is designed to support the seamless mining and analysis of biological experiment data that is commonly used in systems biology (e.g. ChIP-chip, gene expression, proteomics, imaging, flow cytometry). We use different content graphs to represent different views upon the data. These views are designed for different roles: equipment specific views are used to gather instrumentation information; data processing oriented views are provided to enable the rapid development of analysis applications; and research project specific views are used to organize information for individual research experiments. This management system allows for both the rapid introduction of new types of information and the evolution of the knowledge it represents. Conclusion Data management is an important aspect of any research enterprise. It is the foundation on which most applications are built, and must be easily extended to serve new functionality for new scientific areas. We have found that adopting a three-tier architecture for data management, built around distributed standardized content repositories, allows us to rapidly develop new applications to support a diverse user community. PMID:19265554

  12. Selecting a Course Management System: Selecting and Implementing a Course Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandernach, B. Jean; Donnelli-Sallee, Emily; Dailey-Hebert, Amber

    2006-01-01

    Institutions of higher education are embracing the role of the Internet as a medium to promote on-demand communication between faculty and students. As such, online course management systems have become an efficient and effective means of facilitating learning outside the classroom. To ensure that a course management system meets the needs and…

  13. 5 CFR 9701.405 - Performance management system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Performance management system... RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Performance Management § 9701.405...

  14. 5 CFR 9701.405 - Performance management system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Performance management system... RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Performance Management § 9701.405...

  15. Rules system for a relational data base management system

    SciTech Connect

    Stonebraker, M; Johnson, R; Rosenberg, S

    1982-04-20

    This paper presents the specification and proposed implementation of a rules system for a relational data base manager. The motivation for this proposal is the fact that integrity constraints, protection, triggers, alerters, and views are ALL examples of special purpose rules systems. We suggest that all five services can be obtained in one unified way through a single rules system.

  16. Ontological Model of Business Process Management Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoilov, G.; Deliiska, B.

    2008-10-01

    The activities which constitute business process management (BPM) can be grouped into five categories: design, modeling, execution, monitoring and optimization. Dedicated software packets for business process management system (BPMS) are available on the market. But the efficiency of its exploitation depends on used ontological model in the development time and run time of the system. In the article an ontological model of BPMS in area of software industry is investigated. The model building is preceded by conceptualization of the domain and taxonomy of BPMS development. On the base of the taxonomy an simple online thesaurus is created.

  17. Error Management Techniques For Optical Disk Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsover, S. L.; Thomas, C. H.

    1982-04-01

    RCA Corporation has been actively developing optical disc media, techniques and systems which can store 1011 bits per disc at bit error rates of 10-9 and user data rates of 100 Mb/s. In parallel with efforts to improve the media and hardware, new techniques have been developed to manage the statistically inevitable errors which will occur in the recording, storage and playback process. These techniques, which include EDAC codes, data blocking formats and data verification schemes, have been implemented in operating hardware at RCA. Error sources in Optical Disc systems are outlined and media and hardware error management techniques are described.

  18. A new quantum control scheme for multilevel systems based on effective decomposition by intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, M.

    2009-03-01

    A new quantum control scheme for general multilevel systems using intense laser fields is proposed. In the present scheme, the target subspace consisting of several quantum levels is effectively isolated by applying intense cw lasers with specific conditions. The formulation is carried out using the Green function with the help of projection operator method. Dynamics of the isolated target subspace is governed by an effective Hamiltonian. The developed scheme is applied to the quantum control of dissipative four- and five-level systems. It is clarified that the present method makes it possible not only to manipulate the coherent population dynamics but also to suppress the dissipative dynamics.

  19. Fiber optic sensing systems using high frequency resonant sensing heads with intensity sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Maitland, Duncan J., IV

    1988-01-01

    Optical fibers have an inherent capability of transmitting high bandwidth analog and digital signals. To apply this property of fiber optics to remote sensing, special sensing heads as well as signal processing electronics have to be developed. In systems employing intensity modulating sensors, there is also a need for a referencing technique to compensate for changes in the transmission of the connecting fibers and light source intensity. Fiber optic sensing systems incorporated in sensing heads of a special configuration are discussed. Different modes of operation as well as resonant conditions are explained. Theoretical and experimental analyses are also given.

  20. Operations system administration plan for HANDI 2000 business management system

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.E.

    1998-09-29

    The Hanford Data Integration 2000 (HANDI 2000) Project will result in an integrated and comprehensive set of functional applications containing core information necessary to support the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC). It is based on the Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) product solution with commercially proven business processes. This includes systems that support finance, supply, chemical management, human resources and payroll activities on the Hanford Site. The Passport (PP) software is an integrated application for Accounts Payable, Contract Management, Inventory Management, Purchasing, and Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS). The PeopleSoft (PS) software is an integrated application for General Ledger, Project Costing, Human Resources, Payroll, Benefits, and Training. The implementation of this set of products, as the first deliverable of the HANDI 2000 Project, is referred to as Business Management System (BMS) and MSDS.

  1. Expert System For Pilot Assistance: The Challenge Of An Intensive Prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, Paolo; Dabbene, Danilo; Luise, Federica; Giordanengo, Patrizia

    1989-03-01

    It's a common opinion that in the 1990s combat aircraft a new generation of avionic systems with a more integrated hardware and software will take place, involving innovative software about signal processing, sensor fusion and especially expert system software to reduce pilot workload and to improve system performance. AI theories, methodologies and techniques seem to be generally adequate to these purposes, even for complex applications such as those of Pilot Assistance. In some cases, it is not completely clear yet, if the state of the art in this technology is adequate to meet the needs of such a complex project, and we are still in a phase in which the cost-effectiveness of the AI techniques must be fully demonstrated. A lot of companies are carrying on researches and projects in order to evaluate suitability, maturity and costs of these techniques. An effective approach to the acquisition and use of AI techniques may be the definition of a wide project involving the development of prototypes with increasing functions and performance. The real challenge of an intensive and rapid prototyping is double: from the technical point of view one can investigate technologies and pick up information on the suitability and the adequacy of certain techniques; from the project management point of view one can redefine the purposes of the project and their timing considering the gathered experiences. In this paper we describe the methodologies and techniques employed to develop an Expert System for Pilot Assistance while performing route planning or replanning, the functional characteristics of a first prototype working on Lisp machine, and its current architecture. This prototype is able to provide the pilot with dynamic information about the geography of terrain (accessing an object-oriented database), the tactical situation, the meteo conditions and the current state of the aircraft; further, static information about threats characteristics, fuel consumption, aircraft configuration and pre-planned route are also available through an interface simulating a Head-Down Display. The system is able to plan complete ground attack missions and especially to suggest the most suitable push-up point for the run-in on target. The experiences gathered during the development of this prototype have been very useful to define the architecture of a more powerful prototype which is now being carried out.

  2. Display-management system for MFTF

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.O.

    1981-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) is controlled by 65 local control microcomputers which are supervised by a local network of nine 32-bit minicomputers. Associated with seven of the nine computers are state-of-the-art graphics devices, each with extensive local processing capability. These devices provide the means for an operator to interact with the control software running on the minicomputers. It is critical that the information the operator views accurately reflects the current state of the experiment. This information is integrated into dynamically changing pictures called displays. The primary organizational component of the display system is the software-addressable segment. The segments created by the display creation software are managed by display managers associated with each graphics device. Each display manager uses sophisticated storage management mechanisms to keep the proper segments resident in the local graphics device storage.

  3. Enhanced Pair Production in Multicenter Systems by SuperIntense Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandrauk, Andre

    2014-03-01

    Electron-positron(e-e +) pair production is considered for many-center systems with multiple bare nuclei immersed in intense static electric fields corresponding to the extrema of electric fields planned by future super intense laser pulse sources with intensities I > 1024 W/cm2. It is shown analytically using an exactly solvable 1-D delta potential model in a multicenter Dirac equation that there are two distinct regimes where pair production rates are enhanced.At small internuclear distances, the effective nuclear charge approaches the critical charge where the ground state dives into the negative continuum of the Dirac equation. At large atomic distances a new mechanism is predicted, similar to Charge Resonance Enhanced Ionization of molecules by intense, I ~ 1024 W/cm2, laser pulses. Multicenter resonances from the negative energy states are shown to cross into the positive energy states due to large field induced Stark shifts thus resulting in a resonantly enhanced pair production mechanism. A numerical method is developed to calculate the pair production rates from the multicenter Dirac equation. The latter is evaluated for systems (clusters) up to five nuclei of large charge. It is shown that the pair production rate for multicenter systems in superintense electric fields generally exceeds by orders of magnitudes the Schwinger tunneling rate which requires intensities of ~ 1029 W''/cm2. Funded by Canada Research Chair Program.

  4. Project Management in NASA: The system and the men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pontious, R. H.; Barnes, L. B.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical description of the NASA project management system is presented with emphasis on the human element. The NASA concept of project management, program managers, and the problems and strengths of the NASA system are discussed.

  5. Emergy-based comparative analysis of energy intensity in different industrial systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhe; Geng, Yong; Wang, Hui; Sun, Lu; Ma, Zhixiao; Tian, Xu; Yu, Xiaoman

    2015-12-01

    With the rapid economic development, energy consumption of China has been the second place in the world next to the USA. Usually, measuring energy consumption intensity or efficiency applies heat unit which is joule per gross domestic production (GDP) or coal equivalent per GDP. However, this measuring approach is only oriented by the conversion coefficient of heat combustion which does not match the real value of the materials during their formation in the ecological system. This study applied emergy analysis to evaluate the energy consumption intensity to fill this gap. Emergy analysis is considered as a bridge between ecological system and economic system, which can evaluate the contribution of ecological products and services as well as the load placed on environmental systems. In this study, emergy indicator for performing energy consumption intensity of primary energy was proposed. Industrial production is assumed as the main contributor of energy consumption compared to primary and tertiary industries. Therefore, this study validated this method by investigating the two industrial case studies which were Dalian Economic Development Area (DEDA) and Fuzhou economic and technological area (FETA), to comparatively study on their energy consumption intensity between the different kinds of industrial systems and investigate the reasons behind the differences. The results show that primary energy consumption (PEC) of DEDA was much higher than that of FETA during 2006 to 2010 and its primary energy consumption ratio (PECR) to total emergy involvement had a dramatically decline from year 2006 to 2010. In the same time, nonrenewable energy of PEC in DEDA was also much higher than that in FETA. The reason was that industrial structure of DEDA was mainly formed by heavy industries like petro-chemistry industry, manufacturing industries, and high energy-intensive industries. However, FETA was formed by electronic business, food industry, and light industries. Although the GDP of DEDA was much higher than that of FETA, its energy intensity was higher as well. Through the 5-year development, energy consumption intensity in DEDA made a significant reduction from 3.90E+16 seJ/$ to 1.84E+16 seJ/$, which was attributed by the improvement of industrial structure, construction of eco-industrial park and circular economic industrial park. The proposed emergy indicator for demonstrating energy consumption intensity overcame the weakness that the indicator was only transformed from the heat burning. Therefore, this study shows an optional way to measure energy consumption intensity from the perspective of material ecological contribution. PMID:26182884

  6. Satellite Application for Disaster Management Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okpanachi, George

    Abstract Satellites are becoming increasingly vital to modern day disaster management activities. Earth observation (EO) satellites provide images at various wavelengths that assist rapid-mapping in all phases of the disaster management cycle: mitigation of potential risks in a given area, preparedness for eventual disasters, immediate response to a disaster event, and the recovery/reconstruction efforts follo wing it. Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) assist all the phases by providing precise location and navigation data, helping manage land and infrastructures, and aiding rescue crews coordinate their search efforts. Effective disaster management is a complex problem, because it involves many parameters, which are usually not easy to measure and even identify: Analysis of current situation, planning, optimum resource management, coordination, controlling and monitoring current activities and making quick and correct decisions are only some of these parameters, whose complete list is very long. Disaster management information systems (DMIS) assist disaster management to analyse the situation better, make decisions and suggest further actions following the emergency plans. This requires not only fast and thorough processing and optimization abilities, but also real-time data provided to the DMIS. The need of DMIS for disaster’s real-time data can be satisfied by small satellites data utilization. Small satellites can provide up-to-data, plus a better media to transfer data. This paper suggests a rationale and a framework for utilization of small Satellite data by DMIS. DMIS should be used ‘’before’’, ‘’during’’ and ‘’after’’ the disasters. Data provided by the Small Satellites are almost crucial in any period of the disasters, because early warning can save lives, and satellite data may help to identify disasters before they occur. The paper also presents’ ‘when’’, ‘’where’’ and ‘’how’’ small satellite data should be used by DMIS.

  7. Management of lacerated and swollen tongue after convulsive seizure with a mouth protector: interprofessional collaboration including dentists in intensive care.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Reiko; Soga, Yoshihiko; Moriya, Yoshie; Okui, Akemi; Takeuchi, Tetsuo; Sato, Kenji; Morimatsu, Hiroshi; Morita, Manabu

    2014-12-01

    We encountered a 74-year-old male patient with tongue laceration after convulsive seizures under intensive care. The tongue showed severe swelling, and the right ventral surface had been lacerated by his isolated and pointed right lower canine. Our university hospital has established a perioperative management center, and is promoting interprofessional collaboration, including dentists, in perioperative management. Dentists collaborating in the perioperative management center took dental impressions, with the support of anesthesiologists who opened the patient's jaw under propofol sedation, to produce a mouth protector. By raising the patient's bite, the completed mouth protector prevented the isolated tooth from contacting the tongue and protected the lacerated wound. Use of the mouth protector prevented the lacerated tongue from coming into contact with the pointed tooth, and the tongue healed gradually. These findings underscore that interprofessional collaboration including dentists can improve the quality of medical care. PMID:25519032

  8. Phased implementation of a distribution management system

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.B.; Wilson, W.D.

    1995-12-31

    Yorkshire Electricity Group pic (YE) is one of twelve Regional Electricity Companies in England and Wales. It serves two million domestic, commercial, industrial and agricultural customers through an extensive distribution network at voltages up to and including 132kV. In December 1993 YE awarded Westinghouse Systems Ltd, a major contract for a computer based Distribution Management System (DMS) designed to manage its entire High Voltage (HV) network. The paper describes the pragmatic approach being taken to the implementation of the first phase of DMS which will provide YE with sophisticated diagram navigation and flexible system control facilities thereby enabling its control centre rationalization program to take place in 1996. The DMS will incorporate many of the latest technical innovations including automatic switching schedule generation and condition based switchgear maintenance. These will be integrated with a powerful SCADA system to provide control engineers with fast access to control centre information through a carefully developed Graphical User Interface. To meet challenging performance and availability requirements the DMS will model the HV network in its own integrated database which will be populated with data from existing GIS and Plant File systems. Future phases will involve interfacing the DMS to a new Distribution Asset Management System (DAMS) together with the introduction of an Expert System for alarm handling and the validation of SCADA data using a neural network.

  9. Implementation of SAP Waste Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, M.L.; LaBorde, C.M.; Nichols, C.D.

    2008-07-01

    The Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) assumed responsibility for newly generated waste on October 1, 2005. To ensure effective management and accountability of newly generated waste, Y-12 has opted to utilize SAP, Y-12's Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) tool, to track low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed waste (MW), hazardous waste, and non-regulated waste from generation through acceptance and disposal. SAP Waste will include the functionality of the current waste tracking system and integrate with the applicable modules of SAP already in use. The functionality of two legacy systems, the Generator Entry System (GES) and the Waste Information Tracking System (WITS), and peripheral spreadsheets, databases, and e-mail/fax communications will be replaced by SAP Waste. Fundamentally, SAP Waste will promote waste acceptance for certification and disposal, not storage. SAP Waste will provide a one-time data entry location where waste generators can enter waste container information, track the status of their waste, and maintain documentation. A benefit of the new system is that it will provide a single data repository where Y-12's Waste Management organization can establish waste profiles, verify and validate data, maintain inventory control utilizing hand-held data transfer devices, schedule and ship waste, manage project accounting, and report on waste handling activities. This single data repository will facilitate the production of detailed waste generation reports for use in forecasting and budgeting, provide the data for required regulatory reports, and generate metrics to evaluate the performance of the Waste Management organization and its subcontractors. SAP Waste will replace the outdated and expensive legacy system, establish tools the site needs to manage newly generated waste, and optimize the use of the site's ERP tool for integration with related business processes while promoting disposition of waste. (authors)

  10. Requirements management system browser software requirements specification

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, D.D.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to define the essential user requirements for the Requirements Management System Browser (RMSB) application. This includes specifications for the Graphical User Interface (GUI) and the supporting database structures. The RMSB application is needed to provide an easy to use PC-based interface to browse system engineering data stored and managed in a UNIX software application. The system engineering data include functions, requirements, and architectures that make up the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) technical baseline. This document also covers the requirements for a software application titled ``RMSB Data Loader (RMSB- DL)``, referred to as the ``Parser.`` The Parser is needed to read and parse a data file and load the data structure supporting the Browser.

  11. Automated diagnostics for aerospace power management systems

    SciTech Connect

    Granieri, M.N.; Darty, M.

    1995-12-31

    Due to safety and mission criticality, aerospace power management systems require built in fault tolerance. Existing systems focus on hardware redundancy and lack the characteristics needed to provide rapid fault diagnostics and reconfiguration of power flow to critical users. Solid state power control (SSPC) electronics can provide faster switching times than electromechanical devices and when this technology is coupled with advanced software for diagnostics, a fault tolerant system design can be implemented. This paper describes a new project to integrate advanced SSPC electronics with newly available, knowledge-based diagnostic software in order to demonstrate the ability to detect, isolate and implement corrective action within a short period of time consistent with requirements for uninterrupted power. A fast embedded microprocessor will be used to run the diagnostic software and control power electronics. This project seeks to demonstrate the technology needed to enable a power management and distribution system to automatically compensate for faults in real time.

  12. Distributed Data Management and Distributed File Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girone, Maria

    2015-12-01

    The LHC program has been successful in part due to the globally distributed computing resources used for collecting, serving, processing, and analyzing the large LHC datasets. The introduction of distributed computing early in the LHC program spawned the development of new technologies and techniques to synchronize information and data between physically separated computing centers. Two of the most challenges services are the distributed file systems and the distributed data management systems. In this paper I will discuss how we have evolved from local site services to more globally independent services in the areas of distributed file systems and data management and how these capabilities may continue to evolve into the future. I will address the design choices, the motivations, and the future evolution of the computing systems used for High Energy Physics.

  13. HGDBMS: a human genetics database management system.

    PubMed

    Seuchter, S A; Skolnick, M H

    1988-10-01

    Human genetics research involves a large number of complex data sets naturally organized in hierarchical structures. Data collection is performed on different levels, e.g., the project level, pedigree level, individual level, and sample level. Different aspects of a study utilize different views of the data, requiring a flexible database management system (DBMS) which satisfies these different needs for data collection and retrieval. We describe HGDBMS, a comprehensive relational DBMS, implemented as an application of the GENISYS I DBMS, which allows embedding the hierarchical structure of pedigrees in a relational structure. The system's file structure is described in detail. Currently our Melanoma and Chromosome 17 map studies are managed with HGDBMS. Our initial experience demonstrates the value of a flexible system which supports the needs for data entry, update, storage, reporting, and analysis required during different phases of genetic research. Further developments will focus on the integration of HGDBMS with a human genetics expert system shell and analysis programs. PMID:3180747

  14. 23 CFR 971.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... requirements of this subpart consistent with 23 CFR 660.105(b). The management systems may be tailored to meet... maintain the management systems and their associated databases; and (5) A process for data collection, processing, analysis, and updating for each management system. (c) All management systems will use...

  15. 48 CFR 245.105 - Contractors' property management system compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY General 245.105 Contractors' property management system compliance. (a) Definitions— (1) Acceptable property management system and property management system are defined in the clause at 252.245-7003, Contractor...

  16. 48 CFR 245.105 - Contractors' property management system compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY General 245.105 Contractors' property management system compliance. (a) Definitions— (1) Acceptable property management system and property management system are defined in the clause at 252.245-7003, Contractor...

  17. 48 CFR 245.105 - Contractors' property management system compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY General 245.105 Contractors' property management system compliance. (a) Definitions— (1) Acceptable property management system and property management system are defined in the clause at 252.245-7003, Contractor...

  18. 48 CFR 245.105 - Contractors' property management system compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY General 245.105 Contractors' property management system compliance. (a) Definitions— (1) Acceptable property management system and property management system are defined in the clause at 252.245-7003, Contractor...

  19. 23 CFR 970.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... with a geographical reference system that can be used to geolocate all database information. (e... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 970.204 Section 970.204... SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS National Park Service Management Systems § 970.204 Management...

  20. 23 CFR 970.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... with a geographical reference system that can be used to geolocate all database information. (e... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 970.204 Section 970.204... SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS National Park Service Management Systems § 970.204 Management...

  1. 15 CFR 995.25 - Quality management system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Quality management system. 995.25... § 995.25 Quality management system. (a) Quality management system for CEVADs. (1) CEVAD shall operate a quality management system, based on ISO 9001-2000 or equivalent, which embraces all elements of...

  2. 14 CFR 121.495 - Fatigue risk management system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fatigue risk management system. 121.495... Fatigue risk management system. (a) No certificate holder may exceed any provision of this subpart unless approved by the FAA under a Fatigue Risk Management System. (b) The Fatigue Risk Management System...

  3. 48 CFR 52.234-4 - Earned Value Management System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Earned Value Management....234-4 Earned Value Management System. As prescribed in 34.203(c), insert the following clause: Earned Value Management System (MAY 2014) (a) The Contractor shall use an earned value management system...

  4. 48 CFR 2452.242-71 - Contract management system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Contract management system... 2452.242-71 Contract management system. As prescribed in 2442.1107, insert the following clause: Contract Management System (FEB 2006) (a) The contractor shall use contract management baseline...

  5. 48 CFR 52.234-4 - Earned Value Management System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Earned Value Management....234-4 Earned Value Management System. As prescribed in 34.203(c), insert the following clause: Earned Value Management System (JUL 2006) (a) The Contractor shall use an earned value management system...

  6. 14 CFR 121.495 - Fatigue risk management system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fatigue risk management system. 121.495... Fatigue risk management system. (a) No certificate holder may exceed any provision of this subpart unless approved by the FAA under a Fatigue Risk Management System. (b) The Fatigue Risk Management System...

  7. 48 CFR 52.234-4 - Earned Value Management System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Earned Value Management....234-4 Earned Value Management System. As prescribed in 34.203(c), insert the following clause: Earned Value Management System (JUL 2006) (a) The Contractor shall use an earned value management system...

  8. 48 CFR 2452.242-71 - Contract management system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Contract management system... 2452.242-71 Contract management system. As prescribed in 2442.1107, insert the following clause: Contract Management System (FEB 2006) (a) The contractor shall use contract management baseline...

  9. 48 CFR 2452.242-71 - Contract management system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Contract management system... 2452.242-71 Contract management system. As prescribed in 2442.1107, insert the following clause: Contract Management System (FEB 2006) (a) The contractor shall use contract management baseline...

  10. 48 CFR 2452.242-71 - Contract management system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Contract management system... 2452.242-71 Contract management system. As prescribed in 2442.1107, insert the following clause: Contract Management System (FEB 2006) (a) The contractor shall use contract management baseline...

  11. 15 CFR 995.25 - Quality management system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Quality management system. 995.25... § 995.25 Quality management system. (a) Quality management system for CEVADs. (1) CEVAD shall operate a quality management system, based on ISO 9001-2000 or equivalent, which embraces all elements of...

  12. 48 CFR 52.234-4 - Earned Value Management System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Earned Value Management....234-4 Earned Value Management System. As prescribed in 34.203(c), insert the following clause: Earned Value Management System (JUL 2006) (a) The Contractor shall use an earned value management system...

  13. AOIPS water resources data management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanwie, P.

    1977-01-01

    The text and computer-generated displays used to demonstrate the AOIPS (Atmospheric and Oceanographic Information Processing System) water resources data management system are investigated. The system was developed to assist hydrologists in analyzing the physical processes occurring in watersheds. It was designed to alleviate some of the problems encountered while investigating the complex interrelationships of variables such as land-cover type, topography, precipitation, snow melt, surface runoff, evapotranspiration, and streamflow rates. The system has an interactive image processing capability and a color video display to display results as they are obtained.

  14. Battery management system with distributed wireless sensors

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Bandhauer, Todd M.

    2016-02-23

    A system for monitoring parameters of an energy storage system having a multiplicity of individual energy storage cells. A radio frequency identification and sensor unit is connected to each of the individual energy storage cells. The radio frequency identification and sensor unit operates to sense the parameter of each individual energy storage cell and provides radio frequency transmission of the parameters of each individual energy storage cell. A management system monitors the radio frequency transmissions from the radio frequency identification and sensor units for monitoring the parameters of the energy storage system.

  15. Space Station ground data management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heuser, Jan; Sloan, William

    1987-01-01

    KSC is planning a Space Station Ground Data Management System (GDMS) for support of functional interface verification, integration and test of Space Station modules and elements. This computer system, planned for initial operational support in 1992, currently is entering a definition and prototyping stage. This paper provides an overview of the GDMS system concept. It synopsizes system functional capabilities, and discusses software and hardware architectural approaches currently under evaluation. It identifies programmatic constraints and their influence upon the concept, as well as specific technical issues planned for study or evaluation via prototyping.

  16. Strategic threat management: an exploration of nursing strategies in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Durso, Francis T; Ferguson, Ashley N; Kazi, Sadaf; Cunningham, Charlene; Ryan, Christina

    2015-03-01

    Part of the work of a critical care nurse is to manage the threats that arise that could impede efficient and effective job performance. Nurses manage threats by employing various strategies to keep performance high and workload manageable. We investigated strategic threat management by using the Threat-Strategy Interview. Threats frequently involved technology, staff, or organizational components. The threats were managed by a toolbox of multifaceted strategies, the most frequent of which involved staff-, treatment- (patient + technology), examination- (patient + clinician), and patient-oriented strategies. The profile of strategies for a particular threat often leveraged work facets similar to the work facet that characterized the threat. In such cases, the nurse's strategy was directed at eliminating the threat (not working around it). A description at both a domain invariant level - useful for understanding strategic threat management generally - and a description at an operational, specific level - useful for guiding interventions-- are presented. A structural description of the relationship among threats, strategies, and the cues that trigger them is presented in the form of an evidence accumulation framework of strategic threat management. PMID:25287275

  17. Financial management in leading health care systems.

    PubMed

    Smith, D G; Wheeler, J R; Rivenson, H L; Reiter, K L

    2000-01-01

    To understand better the financial management practices and strategies of modern health care organizations, we conducted interviews with chief financial officers (CFOs) of several leading health care systems. In this introduction, we present an overview of the project and summary responses on corporate financial structures and strategic challenges facing CFOs. PMID:10845383

  18. DESIGN INFORMATION REPORT: SLUDGE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over 270 comprehensive performance evaluations have shown that sludge management system limitations were severe enough to contribute to noncompliance with NPDES permits in 49 percent of the plants evaluated. ost limitations could be attributed to one or more of the following: nac...

  19. The watershed and river systems management program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markstrom, S.L.; Frevert, D.; Leavesley, G.H.

    2005-01-01

    The Watershed and River System Management Program (WaRSMP), a joint effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), is focused on research and development of decision support systems and their application to achieve an equitable balance among diverse water resource management demands. Considerations include: (1) legal and political constraints; (2) stake holder and consensus-building; (3) sound technical knowledge; (4) flood control, consumptive use, and hydropower; (5) water transfers; (6) irrigation return flows and water quality; (7) recreation; (8) habitat for endangered species; (9) water supply and proration; (10) near-surface groundwater; and (11) water ownership, accounting, and rights. To address the interdisciplinary and multi-stake holder needs of real-time watershed management, WaRSMP has developed a decision support system toolbox. The USGS Object User Interface facilitates the coupling of Reclamation's RiverWare reservoir operations model with the USGS Modular Modeling and Precipitation Runoff Modeling Systems through a central database. This integration is accomplished through the use of Model and Data Management Interfaces. WaRSMP applications include Colorado River Main stem and Gunnison Basin, the Yakima Basin, the Middle Rio Grande Basin, the Truckee-Carson Basin, and the Umatilla Basin.

  20. Alabama Vocational Management Information System. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Douglas; And Others

    A project was developed to design and implement a management information system (MIS) to provide decision makers with accurate, usable, and timely data and information concerning input, output, and impact of vocational education. The objectives were to (1) design an MIS embracing student accounting, fiscal accounting, manpower analysis, and