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1

Lessons learned from past experience with intensive livestock management systems.  

PubMed

The main impetus for 'modern' intensive animal production occurred after the Second World War, when Western governments developed policies to increase the availability of cheap, safe food for their populations. Livestock benefit under intensive husbandry by protection from environmental extremes and predators, and better nutritional and health management. Nevertheless, there are costs to the animal, such as impaired social behaviour, limited choice of living environment or pen mates, poor environmental stimulation and behavioural restrictions. The rapid progress in genetic selection of production traits has also, in some cases, adversely affected welfare by creating anatomical and metabolic problems. Above all, the intensively housed animal is heavily reliant on the stockperson and, therefore, inadequate care and husbandry practices by the stockperson may be the largest welfare risk. In a future in which the food supply may be limited as the world's population grows and land availability shrinks, intensive animal production is likely to expand. At the same time, ethical considerations surrounding intensive farming practices may also become more prominent. Novel technologies provide the opportunity to enhance both the productivity and welfare of intensively kept animals. Developing countries are also establishing more intensive commercial systems to meet their growing need for animal protein. Intensive livestock production in such countries has the potential for major expansion, particularly if such developments address the key constraints of poor welfare, inadequate nutrition, poor reproduction, poor housing, and high mortality often seen with traditional systems, and if farmer access to emerging market opportunities is improved. However, as shown by previous experience, inadequate regulation and staff who lack the appropriate training to care for the welfare of intensively housed livestock can be major challenges to overcome. PMID:25000786

Cronin, G M; Rault, J L; Glatz, P C

2014-04-01

2

Biology and management of insect pests in North American intensively managed hardwood forest systems.  

SciTech Connect

Annu. Rev. Entomol. 50:1-29. Abstract Increasing demand for wood and wood products is putting stress on traditional forest production areas, leading to long-term economic and environmental concerns. Intensively managed hardwood forest systems (IMHFS), grown using conventional agricultural as well as forestry methods, can help alleviate potential problems in natural forest production areas. Although IMHFS can produce more biomass per hectare per year than natural forests, the ecologically simplified, monocultural systems may greatly increase the crops susceptibility to pests. Species in the genera Populus and Salix comprise the greatest acreage in IMHFS in North America, but other species, including Liquidambar styracifua and Platanus occidentalis, are also important. We discuss life histories, realized and potential damage, and management options for the most economically infuential pests that affect these hardwood species. The substantial inherent challenges associated with pest management in the monocultural environments created by IMHFS are reviewed. Finally, we discuss ways to design IMHFS that may reduce their susceptibility to pests, increase their growth and productivity potential, and create a more sustainable environment.

Coyle, David R.; Nebeker, T., E.; Hart, E., R.; Mattson, W., J.

2005-01-01

3

Reproductive Performance and Milk Production of Assaf Sheep in an Intensive Management System  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Assaf breed of dairy sheep, a stabilized cross of the Awassi and East Friesian breeds, has replaced the Awassi as the breed of choice in its country of origin, Israel, and has spread to other Mediterranean coun- tries. In Israel the Assaf breed is managed under an intensive production system involving weaning lambs at birth, rearing them artificially, and

G. E. Pollott; E. Gootwine

2004-01-01

4

PanDA Beyond ATLAS : A Scalable Workload Management System For Data Intensive Science  

E-print Network

The LHC experiments are today at the leading edge of large scale distributed data-intensive computational science. The LHC's ATLAS experiment processes data volumes which are particularly extreme, over 140 PB to date, distributed worldwide at over of 120 sites. An important element in the success of the exciting physics results from ATLAS is the highly scalable integrated workflow and dataflow management afforded by the PanDA workload management system, used for all the distributed computing needs of the experiment. The PanDA design is not experiment specific and PanDA is now being extended to support other data intensive scientific applications. PanDA was cited as an example of "a high performance, fault tolerant software for fast, scalable access to data repositories of many kinds" during the "Big Data Research and Development Initiative" announcement, a 200 million USD U.S. government investment in tools to handle huge volumes of digital data needed to spur science and engineering discoveries. In this talk...

Borodin, M; The ATLAS collaboration; Jha, S; Golubkov, D; Klimentov, A; Maeno, T; Nilsson, P; Oleynik, D; Panitkin, S; Petrosyan, A; Schovancova, J; Vaniachine, A; Wenaus, T

2014-01-01

5

Managing and exploiting flash-based storage for data-intensive systems.  

E-print Network

??Modern computing has matured into a data-intensive, service-oriented activity, leading to increasing storage and I/O demands. However, current storage systems are built on slow, failure-prone,… (more)

Park, James

2014-01-01

6

Purdue extension Management-Intensive  

E-print Network

Purdue extension AY-328 Management-Intensive Grazing in Indiana United States Department of Agriculture #12;Management-intensive Grazing in indiana AY-328 2 Ed Heckman Purdue Extension Educator, Retired Susannah Hinds USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service, Northwest Indiana Grazing Land Specialist Keith

7

[Quality management in intensive care medicine].  

PubMed

Treatment of critical ill patients in the intensive care unit is tantamount to well-designed risk or quality management. Several tools of quality management and quality assurance have been developed in intensive care medicine. In addition to external quality assurance by benchmarking with regard to the intensive care medicine, peer review procedures have been established for external quality assurance in recent years. In the process of peer review of an intensive care unit (ICU), external physicians and nurses visit the ICU, evaluate on-site proceedings, and discuss with the managing team of the ICU possibilities for optimization. Furthermore, internal quality management in the ICU is possible based on the 10 quality indicators of the German Interdisciplinary Society for Intensive Care Medicine (DIVI, "Deutschen Interdisziplinären Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin"). Thereby every ICU has numerous possibilities to improve their quality management system. PMID:24493011

Martin, J; Braun, J-P

2014-02-01

8

Current Nitrogen Management Status and Measures to Improve the Intensive Wheat–Maize System in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the first 35 years of the Green Revolution, Chinese grain production doubled, greatly reducing food shortage, but at\\u000a a high environmental cost. In 2005, China alone accounted for around 38% of the global N fertilizer consumption, but the average\\u000a on-farm N recovery efficiency for the intensive wheat–maize system was only 16–18%. Current on-farm N use efficiency (NUE)\\u000a is much lower

Zhenling Cui; Xinping Chen; Fusuo Zhang

2010-01-01

9

Reducing environmental risk by improving N management in intensive Chinese agricultural systems.  

PubMed

Excessive N fertilization in intensive agricultural areas of China has resulted in serious environmental problems because of atmospheric, soil, and water enrichment with reactive N of agricultural origin. This study examines grain yields and N loss pathways using a synthetic approach in 2 of the most intensive double-cropping systems in China: waterlogged rice/upland wheat in the Taihu region of east China versus irrigated wheat/rainfed maize on the North China Plain. When compared with knowledge-based optimum N fertilization with 30-60% N savings, we found that current agricultural N practices with 550-600 kg of N per hectare fertilizer annually do not significantly increase crop yields but do lead to about 2 times larger N losses to the environment. The higher N loss rates and lower N retention rates indicate little utilization of residual N by the succeeding crop in rice/wheat systems in comparison with wheat/maize systems. Periodic waterlogging of upland systems caused large N losses by denitrification in the Taihu region. Calcareous soils and concentrated summer rainfall resulted in ammonia volatilization (19% for wheat and 24% for maize) and nitrate leaching being the main N loss pathways in wheat/maize systems. More than 2-fold increases in atmospheric deposition and irrigation water N reflect heavy air and water pollution and these have become important N sources to agricultural ecosystems. A better N balance can be achieved without sacrificing crop yields but significantly reducing environmental risk by adopting optimum N fertilization techniques, controlling the primary N loss pathways, and improving the performance of the agricultural Extension Service. PMID:19223587

Ju, Xiao-Tang; Xing, Guang-Xi; Chen, Xin-Ping; Zhang, Shao-Lin; Zhang, Li-Juan; Liu, Xue-Jun; Cui, Zhen-Ling; Yin, Bin; Christie, Peter; Zhu, Zhao-Liang; Zhang, Fu-Suo

2009-03-01

10

Feed preparation and feed management strategies within semi-intensive fish farming systems in the tropics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Semi-intensive aquaculture, particularly in the tropics, accounts for nearly 70% of the finfish production of the world. The bulk of this production is based on a handful of species, the most important being the cyprinid species, such as Chinese and Indian major carps, feeding low in the food chain. In the culture practices the endogenous food supply is known to

Albert G. J. Tacon; Sena S. De Silva

1997-01-01

11

Effects of climate and management intensity on nitrous oxide emissions in grassland systems across Europe  

Microsoft Academic Search

Soil\\/atmosphere exchange fluxes of nitrous oxide were monitored for a 3-year period at 10 grassland sites in eight European countries (Denmark, France, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, The Netherlands, Switzerland and United Kingdom), spanning a wide range of climatic, environmental and soil conditions. Most study sites investigated the influence of one or several management practices on N2O exchange, such as nitrogen fertilization

C. R. Flechard; P. Ambus; U. Skiba; R. M. Rees; A. Hensen; A. van Amstel; A. van den Pol-van Dasselaar; J.-F. Soussana; M. Jones; J. C. Clifton-Brown; A. Raschi; L. Horvath; A. Neftel; M. Jocher; C. R. Ammann; J. Leifeld; J. Fuhrer; P. Calanca; E. Thalman; K. Pilegaard; C. Di Marco; C. Campbell; E. Nemitz; K. J. Hargreaves; P. E. Levy; B. C. Ball; S. K. Jones; W. C. M. van de Bulk; T. Groot; M. Blom; R. Domingues; G. J. Kasper; V. Allard; E. Ceschia; P. Cellier; P. Laville; C. Henault; F. Bizouard; M. Abdalla; M. Williams; S. Baronti; F. Berretti; B. Grosz

2007-01-01

12

Estimating Forage Yields For Pastures Management Intensive Grazing  

E-print Network

Estimating Forage Yields For Pastures Management Intensive Grazing The following are expected yield ranges for different soils and fertility levels when utilizing management intensive grazing systems/ac/yr 3.5 tons/ac/yr Rotational Grazing The following are expected yield ranges for management and soil

Guiltinan, Mark

13

Comparing annual and perennial energy cropping systems with different management intensities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Given the political targets, it can be expected that in Europe, energy production from agricultural land will increase and that improved systems for its production are needed. Therefore, a four year field trial was conducted on one site in south-western Germany to compare and evaluate the biomass and energy yield performance of important energy crops. Six energy cropping systems with

Constanze Boehmel; Iris Lewandowski; Wilhelm Claupein

2008-01-01

14

Scheduling fertilizer applications as a simple mitigation option for reducing N2O emission in intensively managed mown grassland systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A general principle in all proposed N2O mitigation options is the fertilization according to plants' requirements. Meanwhile the amount of N fertilization allowed is regulated in many countries. Due to the high pressure from food security and the need for economic efficiency the given limits are generally used up. In mown grassland systems a simple mitigation option is to optimize the timing of the fertilizer applications. Application of fertilizer, both organic manure and mineral fertilizer, is generally scheduled after each cut in a narrow time window. In practice, the delay between cut and fertilizer application is determined by weather conditions, management conditions and most important by the planning and experience of the individual farmer. Many field experiments have shown that enhanced N2O emissions tend to occur after cuts but before the application of fertilizer, especially when soils are characterized by a high WFPS. These findings suggest that the time of fertilizer application has an important implications for the N2O emission rate and that scheduling fertilization according to soil conditions might be a simple, cheap and efficient measure to mitigate N2O emissions. In this paper we report on results from a sensitivity analysis aiming at quantifying the effects of the timing of the fertilizer applications on N2O emissions from intensively managed, mown grasslands. Simulations for different time schedules were carried out with the comprehensive ecosystem model "ECOSYS" . To our knowledge this aspect has not been systematically investigated from a scientific point of view, but might have been always there within the experiences of attentive environmentally concerned farmers.

Neftel, Albrecht; Calanca, Pierluigi; Felber, Raphael; Grant, Robert; Conen, Franz

2014-05-01

15

Intensive care alarm system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Inductive loop has been added to commercially available call system fitted with earphone receiver. System transmits high frequency signals to nurse's receiver to announce patient's need for help without disturbing others.

Christensen, J. L.; Herbert, A. L.

1973-01-01

16

Management Planning and Control: Supporting Knowledge-Intensive Organizations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop propositions for empirical validation regarding appropriate management planning and control systems (MPACS) in knowledge-intensive organizations. Design/methodology/approach: The propositions were developed from interviews with members of a knowledge-intensive virtual organization that is known for…

Herremans, Irene M.; Isaac, Robert G.

2005-01-01

17

Relative impacts of land-use, management intensity and fertilization upon soil microbial community structure in agricultural systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Soil microbial communities under three agricultural management systems (conventionally tilled cropland, hayed pasture, and grazed pasture) and two fertilizer systems (inorganic fertilizer and poultry litter) were compared to that of a ?150-y-old forest near Watkinsville, Georgia. Both 16S rRNA gene clone libraries and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analyses indicated that the structure and composition of bacterial communities in the forest

Kamlesh Jangid; Mark A. Williams; Alan J. Franzluebbers; Jamie S. Sanderlin; Jaxk H. Reeves; Michael B. Jenkins; Dinku M. Endale; David C. Coleman; William B. Whitman

2008-01-01

18

Intensive case management for severe mental illness  

PubMed Central

Background Intensive Case Management (ICM) is a community based package of care, aiming to provide long term care for severely mentally ill people who do not require immediate admission. ICM evolved from two original community models of care, Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) and Case Management (CM), where ICM emphasises the importance of small caseload (less than 20) and high intensity input. Objectives To assess the effects of Intensive Case Management (caseload <20) in comparison with non-Intensive Case Management (caseload > 20) and with standard community care in people with severe mental illness. To evaluate whether the effect of ICM on hospitalisation depends on its fidelity to the ACT model and on the setting. Search methods For the current update of this review we searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (February 2009), which is compiled by systematic searches of major databases, hand searches and conference proceedings. Selection criteria All relevant randomised clinical trials focusing on people with severe mental illness, aged 18 to 65 years and treated in the community-care setting, where Intensive Case Management, non-Intensive Case Management or standard care were compared. Outcomes such as service use, adverse effects, global state, social functioning, mental state, behaviour, quality of life, satisfaction and costs were sought. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For binary outcomes we calculated relative risk (RR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI), on an intention-to-treat basis. For continuous data we estimated mean difference (MD) between groups and its 95% confidence interval (CI). We employed a random-effects model for analyses. We performed a random-effects meta-regression analysis to examine the association of the intervention’s fidelity to the ACT model and the rate of hospital use in the setting where the trial was conducted with the treatment effect. Main results We included 38 trials (7328 participants) in this review. The trials provided data for two comparisons: 1. ICM versus standard care, 2. ICM versus non-ICM. 1. ICM versus standard care Twenty-four trials provided data on length of hospitalisation, and results favoured Intensive Case Management (n=3595, 24 RCTs, MD ?0.86 CI ?1.37 to ?0.34). There was a high level of heterogeneity, but this significance still remained when the outlier studies were excluded from the analysis (n=3143, 20 RCTs, MD ?0.62 CI ?1.00 to ?0.23). Nine studies found participants in the ICM group were less likely to be lost to psychiatric services (n=1633, 9 RCTs, RR 0.43 CI 0.30 to 0.61, I2=49%, p=0.05). One global state scale did show an Improvement in global state for those receiving ICM, the GAF scale (n=818, 5 RCTs, MD 3.41 CI 1.66 to 5.16). Results for mental state as measured through various rating scales, however, were equivocal, with no compelling evidence that ICM was really any better than standard care in improving mental state. No differences in mortality between ICM and standard care groups occurred, either due to ’all causes’ (n=1456, 9 RCTs, RR 0.84 CI 0.48 to 1.47) or to ’suicide’ (n=1456, 9 RCTs, RR 0.68 CI 0.31 to 1.51). Social functioning results varied, no differences were found in terms of contact with the legal system and with employment status, whereas significant improvement in accommodation status was found, as was the incidence of not living independently, which was lower in the ICM group (n=1185, 4 RCTs, RR 0.65 CI 0.49 to 0.88). Quality of life data found no significant difference between groups, but data were weak. CSQ scores showed a greater participant satisfaction in the ICM group (n=423, 2 RCTs, MD 3.23 CI 2.31 to 4.14). 2. ICM versus non-ICM The included studies failed to show a significant advantage of ICM in reducing the average length of hospitalisation (n=2220, 21 RCTs, MD ?0.08 CI ?0.37 to 0.21). They did find ICM to be more advantageous than non-ICM in reducing rate of lost to follo

Dieterich, Marina; Irving, Claire B; Park, Bert; Marshall, Max

2014-01-01

19

Managing malaria in the intensive care unit  

PubMed Central

The number of people travelling to malaria-endemic countries continues to increase, and malaria remains the commonest cause of serious imported infection in non-endemic areas. Severe malaria, mostly caused by Plasmodium falciparum, often requires intensive care unit (ICU) admission and can be complicated by cerebral malaria, respiratory distress, acute kidney injury, bleeding complications, and co-infection. The mortality from imported malaria remains significant. This article reviews the manifestations, complications and principles of management of severe malaria as relevant to critical care clinicians, incorporating recent studies of anti-malarial and adjunctive treatment. Effective management of severe malaria includes prompt diagnosis and early institution of effective anti-malarial therapy, recognition of complications, and appropriate supportive management in an ICU. All cases should be discussed with a specialist unit and transfer of the patient considered. PMID:24946778

Marks, M.; Gupta-Wright, A.; Doherty, J. F.; Singer, M.; Walker, D.

2014-01-01

20

Ongoing development of the Critical Care Information System: the collaborative approach to automating information management in an intensive care unit.  

PubMed Central

Point-of-care (bedside) clinical information systems can fulfill a variety of functions. Included in these functions are: becoming receptacles for patient data and allowing data to be manipulated into formats that facilitate clinical decision making; functioning as sources for billing and auditing processes; interfacing to other hospital systems and bringing distant data to the bedside; and being a repository for information used in the development of hierarchical and/or relational databases. The initial and ongoing development of these systems in a dynamic clinical environment requires the construction of processes and work pathways to ensure that the needs and requirements of myriad personnel, departments and agencies within the health center milieu are addressed. PMID:1482885

Hravnak, M.; Stein, K. L.; Dale, B.; Hazy, J. C.

1992-01-01

21

Intensive care management of liver transplanted patients  

PubMed Central

Advances in pre-transplant treatment of cirrhosis-related organ dysfunction, intraoperative patient management, and improvements in the treatment of rejection and infections have made human liver transplantation an effective and valuable option for patients with end stage liver disease. However, many important factors, related both to an increasing “marginality” of the implanted graft and unexpected perioperative complications still make immediate post-operative care challenging and the early outcome unpredictable. In recent years sicker patients with multiple comorbidities and organ dysfunction have been undergoing Liver transplantation; appropriate critical care management is required to support prompt graft recovery and prevent systemic complications. Early post-operative management is highly demanding as significant changes may occur in both the allograft and the “distant” organs. A functioning transplanted liver is almost always associated with organ system recovery, resulting in a new life for the patient. However, in the unfortunate event of graft dysfunction, the unavoidable development of multi-organ failure will require an enhanced level of critical care support and a prolonged ICU stay. Strict monitoring and sustainment of cardiorespiratory function, frequent assessment of graft performance, timely recognition of unexpected complications and the institution of prophylactic measures to prevent extrahepatic organ system dysfunction are mandatory in the immediate post-operative period. A reduced rate of complications and satisfactory outcomes have been obtained from multidisciplinary, collaborative efforts, skillful vigilance, and a thorough knowledge of pathophysiologic characteristics of the transplanted liver. PMID:21487537

Feltracco, Paolo; Barbieri, Stefania; Galligioni, Helmut; Michieletto, Elisa; Carollo, Cristiana; Ori, Carlo

2011-01-01

22

Intensive care management of liver transplanted patients.  

PubMed

Advances in pre-transplant treatment of cirrhosis-related organ dysfunction, intraoperative patient management, and improvements in the treatment of rejection and infections have made human liver transplantation an effective and valuable option for patients with end stage liver disease. However, many important factors, related both to an increasing "marginality" of the implanted graft and unexpected perioperative complications still make immediate post-operative care challenging and the early outcome unpredictable. In recent years sicker patients with multiple comorbidities and organ dysfunction have been undergoing Liver transplantation; appropriate critical care management is required to support prompt graft recovery and prevent systemic complications. Early post-operative management is highly demanding as significant changes may occur in both the allograft and the "distant" organs. A functioning transplanted liver is almost always associated with organ system recovery, resulting in a new life for the patient. However, in the unfortunate event of graft dysfunction, the unavoidable development of multi-organ failure will require an enhanced level of critical care support and a prolonged ICU stay. Strict monitoring and sustainment of cardiorespiratory function, frequent assessment of graft performance, timely recognition of unexpected complications and the institution of prophylactic measures to prevent extrahepatic organ system dysfunction are mandatory in the immediate post-operative period. A reduced rate of complications and satisfactory outcomes have been obtained from multidisciplinary, collaborative efforts, skillful vigilance, and a thorough knowledge of pathophysiologic characteristics of the transplanted liver. PMID:21487537

Feltracco, Paolo; Barbieri, Stefania; Galligioni, Helmut; Michieletto, Elisa; Carollo, Cristiana; Ori, Carlo

2011-03-27

23

Management intensity alters decomposition via biological pathways  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Current conceptual models predict that changes in plant litter chemistry during decomposition are primarily regulated by both initial litter chemistry and the stage-or extent-of mass loss. Far less is known about how variations in decomposer community structure (e.g., resulting from different ecosystem management types) could influence litter chemistry during decomposition. Given the recent agricultural intensification occurring globally and the importance of litter chemistry in regulating soil organic matter storage, our objectives were to determine the potential effects of agricultural management on plant litter chemistry and decomposition rates, and to investigate possible links between ecosystem management, litter chemistry and decomposition, and decomposer community composition and activity. We measured decomposition rates, changes in litter chemistry, extracellular enzyme activity, microarthropod communities, and bacterial versus fungal relative abundance in replicated conventional-till, no-till, and old field agricultural sites for both corn and grass litter. After one growing season, litter decomposition under conventional-till was 20% greater than in old field communities. However, decomposition rates in no-till were not significantly different from those in old field or conventional-till sites. After decomposition, grass residue in both conventional- and no-till systems was enriched in total polysaccharides relative to initial litter, while grass litter decomposed in old fields was enriched in nitrogen-bearing compounds and lipids. These differences corresponded with differences in decomposer communities, which also exhibited strong responses to both litter and management type. Overall, our results indicate that agricultural intensification can increase litter decomposition rates, alter decomposer communities, and influence litter chemistry in ways that could have important and long-term effects on soil organic matter dynamics. We suggest that future efforts to more accurately predict soil carbon dynamics under different management regimes may need to explicitly consider how changes in litter chemistry during decomposition are influenced by the specific metabolic capabilities of the extant decomposer communities.

Wickings, Kyle; Grandy, A. Stuart; Reed, Sasha; Cleveland, Cory

2011-01-01

24

LRRB Pavement Management Systems Pavement Management Systems  

E-print Network

LRRB Pavement Management Systems Pavement Management Systems Presented by: Michael Marti SRF for implementing and monitoring research results (RIC) #12;LRRB Pavement Management Systems LRRB Structure LRRB and counties in implementing Pavement Management and/or using better §Project produced several deliverables

Minnesota, University of

25

Emerging technologies: software-intensive systems and other current developments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This paper aims to review current research and developments with particular reference to the emerging technologies. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A general review and survey of selected research and development topics is given, and studies in software-intensive systems are highlighted. Findings – The paper illustrates the multi- and trans-disciplinary natures of studies in cybernetics, systems and management science with a

B. H. Rudall; C. J. H. Mann

2009-01-01

26

Distributed Storage Systems for Data Intensive Computing  

SciTech Connect

In this chapter, the authors present an overview of the utility of distributed storage systems in supporting modern applications that are increasingly becoming data intensive. Their coverage of distributed storage systems is based on the requirements imposed by data intensive computing and not a mere summary of storage systems. To this end, they delve into several aspects of supporting data-intensive analysis, such as data staging, offloading, checkpointing, and end-user access to terabytes of data, and illustrate the use of novel techniques and methodologies for realizing distributed storage systems therein. The data deluge from scientific experiments, observations, and simulations is affecting all of the aforementioned day-to-day operations in data-intensive computing. Modern distributed storage systems employ techniques that can help improve application performance, alleviate I/O bandwidth bottleneck, mask failures, and improve data availability. They present key guiding principles involved in the construction of such storage systems, associated tradeoffs, design, and architecture, all with an eye toward addressing challenges of data-intensive scientific applications. They highlight the concepts involved using several case studies of state-of-the-art storage systems that are currently available in the data-intensive computing landscape.

Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S [ORNL; Butt, Ali R [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Ma, Xiaosong [ORNL

2012-01-01

27

Building dependability arguments for software intensive systems  

E-print Network

A method is introduced for structuring and guiding the development of end-to-end dependability arguments. The goal is to establish high-level requirements of complex software-intensive systems, especially properties that ...

Seater, Robert Morrison

2009-01-01

28

Management of phosphorus, potassium, and sulfur in intensive, irrigated lowland rice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Management of soil phosphorus (P), potassium (K) and sulfur (S) resources in intensive, irrigated rice systems has received less attention than increasing cropping intensity and yields with new cultivars, irrigation, and fertilizer N. Crop requirements, input-output balance, and soil supplying capacity of P, K and S in irrigated lowland rice are reviewed. Based on projected rice production requirements, we estimate

A. Dobermann; K. G. Cassman; C. P. Mamaril; J. E. Sheehy

1998-01-01

29

Management intensity alters decomposition via biological pathways  

E-print Network

in replicated con- ventional-till, no-till, and old field agricultural sites for both corn and grass litter communities. However, decomposition rates in no-till were not significantly different from those in old field or conventional-till sites. After decomposition, grass residue in both conventional- and no-till systems

Cleveland, Cory

30

Management intensity alters decomposition via biological pathways  

E-print Network

, microarthropod communities, and bacterial versus fungal relative abundance in replicated con- ventional-till, no-till rates in no-till were not significantly different from those in old field or conventional-till sites. After decomposition, grass residue in both conventional- and no-till systems was enriched in total

Cleveland, Cory

31

Assessing Resilience of Intensively Managed Landscapes through Feedbacks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Intensively managed landscapes such as those of the United States agricultural Midwest are hypothesized to be on a different trajectory than natural landscapes in terms of ecosystem processes and landscape evolution. Process networks provide a method to analyze system states as patterns of couplings and feedbacks. It has been shown using FLUXNET data that variables such as precipitation, soil temperature, soil moisture, latent heat flux, and net ecosystem exchange may exhibit synchronized relationships, time-lagged forcing behavior, or feedbacks. The strength of these couplings weakens or breaks down with environmental extremes such as drought. This study compares couplings in measured fluxes observed using a process network approach with couplings of modeled ecohydrological variables. MLCan is a multi-layer canopy-air exchange model that uses FLUXNET tower climate and flux data as input to simulate leaf uptake, stomatal conductance, photosynthesis, soil hydrology, and other descriptors of ecosystem state. This model has been used to assess vegetation acclimation to climate change, altered hydrology due to biofuel crops, and root hydraulic redistribution in different ecosystems. For this study, MLCan is used to simulate conditions for the 2005 growing season at the location of the Bondville, IL flux tower. A process network is defined with nodes representing key measured and simulated variables including streamflow at a nearby gage, precipitation, radiation, soil moisture, leaf uptake, and nutrient fluxes. Couplings are identified using mutual information and transfer entropy statistics. This study effectively validates whether simulated ecosystem state variables demonstrate information flow to the same extent as measured data. The inclusion of streamflow introduces a spatial element to the process network approach that begins to link processes with topography and land use in the watershed. Analysis of coupling types and strengths can be applied to assess resilience characteristics of intensively managed versus natural landscapes.

Goodwell, A. E.; Kumar, P.

2013-12-01

32

A Writing-Intensive Program for Teaching Retail Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents the writing-intensive design for a retailing management course developed by its instructor in accordance with writing-across-the-curriculum principles. Provides an overview of the semester-long project. Details project procedures for preparatory activities, field research, and writing the marketing plan. (SR)

Darian, Jean C.; And Others

1992-01-01

33

Specifying Intensive Case Management: A Multiple Perspective Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intensive case management” (ICM) programs for people with serious mental illness are found widely throughout the United States. However, there is no standard definition or conceptualization of ICM. Despite these differences, ICM aspires to a set of common principles and core functions derived from the concept of continuity of care. This study attempted to identify the elements of ICM program

Richard W. Schaedle; Irwin Epstein

2000-01-01

34

[Laser and intense pulsed light management of couperose and rosacea].  

PubMed

Management of couperosis and rosacea has been totally renewed by laser and vascular laser techniques, with efficacy targeted on the telangiectases and to a lesser extent on the erythrosis. Laser management of hypertrophic rosacea or rhinophyma depends on surgical treatment with decortication, continuous CO(2) ablative laser or Erbium, fractionated at high power, then vascular laser treatment for the telangiectases: lasers with pulsed dye, KTP, or pulsed lights for red laser telangiectases and long pulse Nd-Yag laser for blue telangiectases. For papulopustular rosacea, vascular laser treatment (pulsed dye and KTP) and intense pulsed light will be begun once the inflammation has been treated. The major indication for vascular lasers and intense pulsed light is found in erythematotelangiectatic rosacea, with high efficacy for the telangiectases. Diffuse erythrosis is difficult to treat, requiring a high number of laser and/or intense pulsed light sessions. PMID:21907878

Dahan, S

2011-09-01

35

Laser and intense pulsed light management of couperose and rosacea.  

PubMed

Management of couperosis and rosacea has been totally renewed by laser and vascular laser techniques, with efficacy targeted on the telangiectases and to a lesser extent on the erythrosis. Laser management of hypertrophic rosacea or rhinophyma depends on surgical treatment with decortication, continuous CO(2) ablative laser or Erbium, fractionated at high power, then vascular laser treatment for the telangiectases: lasers with pulsed dye, KTP, or pulsed lights for red laser telangiectases and long pulse Nd-Yag laser for blue telangiectases. For papulopustular rosacea, vascular laser treatment (pulsed dye and KTP) and intense pulsed light will be begun once the inflammation has been treated. The major indication for vascular lasers and intense pulsed light is found in erythematotelangiectatic rosacea, with high efficacy for the telangiectases. Diffuse erythrosis is difficult to treat, requiring a high number of laser and/or intense pulsed light sessions. PMID:22183103

Dahan, S

2011-11-01

36

Intelligent monitoring system for intensive care units.  

PubMed

We address in the present paper a medical monitoring system designed as a multi-agent based approach. Our system includes mainly numerous agents that act as correlated multi-agent sub-systems at the three layers of the whole monitoring infrastructure, to avoid non informative alarms and send effective alarms at time. The intelligence in the proposed monitoring system is provided by the use of time series technology. In fact, the capability of continuous learning of time series from the physiological variables allows the design of a system that monitors patients in real-time. Such system is a contrast to the classical threshold-based monitoring system actually present in the Intensive Care Units (ICUs) which causes a huge number of irrelevant alarms. PMID:21505862

Nouira, Kaouther; Trabelsi, Abdelwahed

2012-08-01

37

Fluid Management System (FMS) fluid systems overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Viewgraphs on fluid management system (FMS) fluid systems overview are presented. Topics addressed include: fluid management system description including system requirements (integrated nitrogen system, integrated water system, and integrated waste gas system) and physical description; and fluid management system evolution.

Baird, R. S.

1990-01-01

38

Better pain management for elders in the intensive care unit.  

PubMed

By 2040, there will be 70 million people older than 65 years in the United States. Approximately 50% have pain on a daily basis, and research shows that their pain is often underdiagnosed and undertreated. Nurses have an obligation to provide state-of-the-art care and advocate for vulnerable older adults in the intensive care unit (ICU). Untreated pain can complicate an ICU stay and delay discharge. This article briefly reviews difficulties in managing pain in ICU patients, suggests creative methods to properly assess pain, and discusses approaches for encouraging elders in ICU to manage their pain effectively. PMID:25280198

Diallo, Binta; Kautz, Donald D

2014-01-01

39

Energy resource management for energy-intensive manufacturing industries  

SciTech Connect

A program to introduce energy resource management into an energy-intensive manufacturing industry is presented. The food industry (SIC No. 20) was chosen and 20 companies were selected for interviews, but thirteen were actually visited. The methodology for this program is detailed. Reasons for choosing the food industry are described. The substance of the information gained and the principal conclusions drawn from the interviews are given. Results of the model Energy Resource Management Plan applied to three companies are compiled at length. Strategies for dissemination of the information gained are described. (MCW)

Brenner, C.W.; Levangie, J.

1981-10-01

40

Farm animal well-being and intensive production systems.  

PubMed

Animal welfare, or well-being, is a social issue with ethical, scientific, political, and aesthetic properties. Answering questions about the welfare of animals requires scientific definition, assessment, solutions, and public acceptance. With respect to the actual well-being of the animal, most issues are centered on how the animal "feels" when managed within a specific level of confinement, during special agricultural practices (e.g., tail docking, beak trimming, etc.) and handling. Questions of this nature may require exploration of animal cognition, motivation, perception, and emotional states in addition to more commonly recognized indicators of well-being. Several general approaches have emerged for solving problems concerning animal well-being in intensive production systems: environmental, genetic, and therapeutic. Environmental approaches involve modifying existing systems to accommodate specific welfare concerns or development of alternative systems. Genetic approaches involve changing the behavioral and (or) physiological nature of the animal to reduce or eliminate behaviors that are undesirable within intensive system. Therapeutic approaches of a physical (tail docking, beak trimming) and physiological (drug and nutritional therapy) nature bring both concern and promise with regard to the reduction of confinement stress. Finally, the recent focus on commodity quality assurance programs may indirectly provide benefits for animal well-being. Although research in the area of animal well-being will provide important information for better animal management, handling, care, and the physical design of intensive production systems there is still some uncertainty regarding public acceptance. The aesthetics of modern intensive production systems may have as much to do with public acceptance as with science. PMID:8582867

Swanson, J C

1995-09-01

41

Lithium battery management system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Provided is a system for managing a lithium battery system having a plurality of cells. The battery system comprises a variable-resistance element electrically connected to a cell and located proximate a portion of the cell; and a device for determining, utilizing the variable-resistance element, whether the temperature of the cell has exceeded a predetermined threshold. A method of managing the

Thomas J

2012-01-01

42

Operating System Resource Management  

E-print Network

Operating System Resource Management Date: Monday, September 27, 2010 Time: 2:00 ­ 3:00 pm Location allocation and de-allocation by an operating system of processor cores, memory pages, and various types constrained. This talk will propose a scheme for addressing the operating system resource management problem

43

Training Management System  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes a training management system developed by the Center for Development of Social Services. It is a set of practical, systematic procedures designed to manage and evaluate training programs. It is a complete model that meets the necessary criteria for competency-based training system. The system integrates the complex procedures…

McCowan, Richard J.

1998-01-01

44

Systems engineering management plans  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) is a comprehensive and effective tool used to assist in the management of systems engineering efforts. It is intended to guide the work of all those involved in the project. The SEMP is comprised of three main sections: technical project planning and control, systems engineering process, and engineering specialty integration. The contents of each

Tamara S

2009-01-01

45

Selection of diurnal roosts by red bats ( Lasiurus borealis) in an intensively managed pine forest in Mississippi  

Microsoft Academic Search

Forest managers are increasingly expected to incorporate biodiversity objectives within forest landscapes devoted to timber production. However, data on which to base management recommendations for bats within these systems are limited. Although the red bat (Lasiurus borealis) is a widespread and common species in temperate forests of North America, little is known of its ecology within intensively managed pine (Pinus

Leslie W. Elmore; Darren A. Miller; Francisco J. Vilella

2004-01-01

46

Emerging paradigms on glucose management in the intensive care unit.  

PubMed

Hyperglycemia is common in critical illness and leads to increased morbidity and mortality. Controversy exists whether tight glycemic control via intensive insulin therapy can safely and effectively improve outcomes. In this review article, we will sort through the pertinent evidence base to identify salient, yet emergent, paradigms to guide management. To this end, we will discuss underlying biologic mechanisms relevant to hyperglycemia and insulinization in critical illness, summarize results of major randomized controlled clinical trials for glycemic control in the intensive care unit (ICU), and fill in the gaps with necessary information. We will conclude with specific messages, not only reflecting our own clinical experiences, but amenable to implementation in different ICU settings. PMID:25078028

Evans, A S; Hosseinian, L; Mechanick, J I

2014-12-01

47

Management Information System Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Management Information System (MIS) described in this report represents a plan to utilize modern management techniques to facilitate the goal of a learner-responsive school system. The MIS component is being developed to meet the need for the coordination of the resources of staff, facilities, and time with the long range planning and…

Foley, Walter J.; Harr, Gordon G.

48

Management Systems in Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Management systems have been adapted for educational administration in response to the need for quality of educational opportunity, collective bargaining, school district consolidation, decreasing enrollments, accountability laws, limited financial resources, and participatory decision-making. Management systems adapted, not adopted, from business…

Wagner, Ivan D.

49

Lithium battery management system  

DOEpatents

Provided is a system for managing a lithium battery system having a plurality of cells. The battery system comprises a variable-resistance element electrically connected to a cell and located proximate a portion of the cell; and a device for determining, utilizing the variable-resistance element, whether the temperature of the cell has exceeded a predetermined threshold. A method of managing the temperature of a lithium battery system is also included.

Dougherty, Thomas J. (Waukesha, WI)

2012-05-08

50

Crop manuring and intensive land management by Europe's first farmers  

PubMed Central

The spread of farming from western Asia to Europe had profound long-term social and ecological impacts, but identification of the specific nature of Neolithic land management practices and the dietary contribution of early crops has been problematic. Here, we present previously undescribed stable isotope determinations of charred cereals and pulses from 13 Neolithic sites across Europe (dating ca. 5900–2400 cal B.C.), which show that early farmers used livestock manure and water management to enhance crop yields. Intensive manuring inextricably linked plant cultivation and animal herding and contributed to the remarkable resilience of these combined practices across diverse climatic zones. Critically, our findings suggest that commonly applied paleodietary interpretations of human and herbivore ?15N values have systematically underestimated the contribution of crop-derived protein to early farmer diets. PMID:23858458

Bogaard, Amy; Fraser, Rebecca; Heaton, Tim H. E.; Wallace, Michael; Vaiglova, Petra; Charles, Michael; Jones, Glynis; Evershed, Richard P.; Styring, Amy K.; Andersen, Niels H.; Arbogast, Rose-Marie; Bartosiewicz, Laszlo; Gardeisen, Armelle; Kanstrup, Marie; Maier, Ursula; Marinova, Elena; Ninov, Lazar; Schafer, Marguerita; Stephan, Elisabeth

2013-01-01

51

Crop manuring and intensive land management by Europe's first farmers.  

PubMed

The spread of farming from western Asia to Europe had profound long-term social and ecological impacts, but identification of the specific nature of Neolithic land management practices and the dietary contribution of early crops has been problematic. Here, we present previously undescribed stable isotope determinations of charred cereals and pulses from 13 Neolithic sites across Europe (dating ca. 5900-2400 cal B.C.), which show that early farmers used livestock manure and water management to enhance crop yields. Intensive manuring inextricably linked plant cultivation and animal herding and contributed to the remarkable resilience of these combined practices across diverse climatic zones. Critically, our findings suggest that commonly applied paleodietary interpretations of human and herbivore ?(15)N values have systematically underestimated the contribution of crop-derived protein to early farmer diets. PMID:23858458

Bogaard, Amy; Fraser, Rebecca; Heaton, Tim H E; Wallace, Michael; Vaiglova, Petra; Charles, Michael; Jones, Glynis; Evershed, Richard P; Styring, Amy K; Andersen, Niels H; Arbogast, Rose-Marie; Bartosiewicz, László; Gardeisen, Armelle; Kanstrup, Marie; Maier, Ursula; Marinova, Elena; Ninov, Lazar; Schäfer, Marguerita; Stephan, Elisabeth

2013-07-30

52

The impact of intensive forest management on carbon stores in forest ecosystems  

SciTech Connect

The expansion of intensive management of forest resources for timber production with the human population growth may have a profound effect on the role forests play in the global carbon cycle. First, the transition from old-growth to intensively managed second-growth forest with short rotations entails major long-term ecosystems changes including the reduction of total woody biomass. Although the biomass of living trees can be restored within a relatively short period of time, dead wood biomass takes considerably longer to reach pre-harvest levels; therefore commonly used rotations are too short for the latter part of ecosystem to recover fully. As dead trees account for 14--18% of the total woody biomass stores in a natural forest, a considerable amount of carbon can be released if this material is not replaced. Second, economically efficient, intensive forest management systems that include commercial thinning and wood salvage can further reduce the total biomass loading of second-growth forests. Long-term study of live and dead wood in thinning trials in the Pacific Northwest and in northwestern Russia suggest that intensive practices can reduce total woody biomass averaged over rotation to 10--25% that found in a natural old-growth forest. Therefore intensive forest management practices may maximize the supply of raw materials, but they may also generate a major carbon flux into the atmosphere. This flux may be significant despite the fact the land-use type remains the same. Effect of intensive forest management practices should be included in future carbon budgets and in developing forest management strategies aimed at increasing carbon storage in forest ecosystems.

Krankina, O.N.; Harmon, M.E. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Forest Science)

1994-06-01

53

Precision Battery Management System  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents a new battery management system for a lithium ion battery pack for more efficient operation and sturdy. The new system contains an embedded microcontroller to track the energy content of cell battery, optimize the output current, and to provide extensive feedback of all the measurements taken. This system sends all data to a telemetry system so that

J. A. Asumadu; Mohammed Haque; Helio Vogel; Charles Willards

2005-01-01

54

Battery management system  

Microsoft Academic Search

A battery management system is described, comprising: a main battery; main battery charging system means coupled to the main battery for charging the main battery during operation of the main battery charging system means; at least one auxiliary battery; primary switching means for coupling the auxiliary battery to a parallel configuration with the main battery charging system means and with

Albright

1993-01-01

55

On the Duality of Data-intensive File System Design: Reconciling HDFS and PVFS  

E-print Network

Systems Managment-- Distributed file systems Keywords Hadoop, HDFS, PVFS, cloud computing, file systems 1On the Duality of Data-intensive File System Design: Reconciling HDFS and PVFS Wittawat, the underlying file system is a key component for scalable application performance. In this paper, we explore

56

Deficiency Report Management System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Customer Feedback Office of the Product Assurance Directorate, MICOM has the mission to manage and analyze data in the Deficiency Reporting System and make recommendations for appropriate actions. This report presents the results of a contract deliver...

J. Marble

1989-01-01

57

Intranet Document Management Systems.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains how intranets facilitate documentation availability within a company at substantial cost savings. Topics include intranet document management systems (IDMS); publication costs for printed materials; hardware and software specifications; performance; and security. (Author/LRW)

Wen, H. Joseph; Yen, David C.; Lin, Binshan

1998-01-01

58

Automotive energy management system  

SciTech Connect

A hydromechanical/hydrostatic automotive energy management system is described that is comprised of two hydraulic units, the system adapted to provide: an efficient, continuously variable optimal transmission ratio, an intermittent optimal engine operation in city traffic and regenerative braking, thereby, the system is able to reduce a car's fuel consumption by as much as one half while improving drivability.

Shiber, S.

1980-09-23

59

Interactive examination management system  

Microsoft Academic Search

To handle several online examination settings, a web-based application test management software, namely interactive examination management system (iEMS), is proposed in this paper. The outstanding points of the proposed system are its good architecture designs, ease of uses, rich features, flexibilities and extensibilities. Seven standard types of questions are supported including multiple-choice, true\\/false, matching, ordering, fill-in the blank, short answer

S. Vasupongayya; T. Kamolphiwong; S. Kamolphiwong; S. Sae-Wong

2010-01-01

60

and management MIT system design  

E-print Network

for industry integrating engineering, management, and systems thinking to address complex challenges in product thinking perspective that integrates management, technology, and social sciences; and · ways to lead acrossand management MIT system design sdm Leadership, Innovation, Systems Thinking opportunities

de Weck, Olivier L.

61

The Integrated Use of Business Continuity Management Systems, Records Management Systems and Knowledge Management Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Much research has been done on integrated use of ISO management system standards. Integrated use of management systems is identified to have shared values of varied integration impacts on resources efficiency building and sustainable development of business processes. However, little research has been done on integrated use of business continuity management systems (BCMS), records management systems (RMS) and knowledge management

Xiaomi An; Wang Wang

2010-01-01

62

Data Grid Management Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The "Grid" is an emerging infrastructure for coordinating access across autonomous organizations to distributed, heterogeneous computation and data resources. Data grids are being built around the world as the next generation data handling systems for sharing, publishing, and preserving data residing on storage systems located in multiple administrative domains. A data grid provides logical namespaces for users, digital entities and storage resources to create persistent identifiers for controlling access, enabling discovery, and managing wide area latencies. This paper introduces data grids and describes data grid use cases. The relevance of data grids to digital libraries and persistent archives is demonstrated, and research issues in data grids and grid dataflow management systems are discussed.

Moore, Reagan W.; Jagatheesan, Arun; Rajasekar, Arcot; Wan, Michael; Schroeder, Wayne

2004-01-01

63

Computer memory management system  

DOEpatents

A computer memory management system utilizing a memory structure system of "intelligent" pointers in which information related to the use status of the memory structure is designed into the pointer. Through this pointer system, The present invention provides essentially automatic memory management (often referred to as garbage collection) by allowing relationships between objects to have definite memory management behavior by use of coding protocol which describes when relationships should be maintained and when the relationships should be broken. In one aspect, the present invention system allows automatic breaking of strong links to facilitate object garbage collection, coupled with relationship adjectives which define deletion of associated objects. In another aspect, The present invention includes simple-to-use infinite undo/redo functionality in that it has the capability, through a simple function call, to undo all of the changes made to a data model since the previous `valid state` was noted.

Kirk, III, Whitson John (Greenwood, MO)

2002-01-01

64

Purge water management system  

DOEpatents

A purge water management system is described for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

Cardoso-Neto, J.E.; Williams, D.W.

1995-01-01

65

Materials management information systems.  

PubMed

The hospital materials management function--ensuring that goods and services get from a source to an end user--encompasses many areas of the hospital and can significantly affect hospital costs. Performing this function in a manner that will keep costs down and ensure adequate cash flow requires effective management of a large amount of information from a variety of sources. To effectively coordinate such information, most hospitals have implemented some form of materials management information system (MMIS). These systems can be used to automate or facilitate functions such as purchasing, accounting, inventory management, and patient supply charges. In this study, we evaluated seven MMISs from seven vendors, focusing on the functional capabilities of each system and the quality of the service and support provided by the vendor. This Evaluation is intended to (1) assist hospitals purchasing an MMIS by educating materials managers about the capabilities, benefits, and limitations of MMISs and (2) educate clinical engineers and information system managers about the scope of materials management within a healthcare facility. Because software products cannot be evaluated in the same manner as most devices typically included in Health Devices Evaluations, our standard Evaluation protocol was not applicable for this technology. Instead, we based our ratings on our observations (e.g., during site visits), interviews we conducted with current users of each system, and information provided by the vendor (e.g., in response to a request for information [RFI]). We divided the Evaluation into the following sections: Section 1. Responsibilities and Information Requirements of Materials Management: Provides an overview of typical materials management functions and describes the capabilities, benefits, and limitations of MMISs. Also includes the supplementary article, "Inventory Cost and Reimbursement Issues" and the glossary, "Materials Management Terminology." Section 2. The MMIS Selection Process: Outlines steps to follow and describes factors to consider when selecting an MMIS. Also includes our Materials Management Process Evaluation and Needs Assessment Worksheet (which is also available online through ECRInet(TM)) and a list of suggested interview questions to be used when gathering user experience information for systems under consideration. Section 3A. MMIS Vendor Profiles: Presents information for the evaluated systems in a standardized, easy-to-compare format. Profiles include an Executive Summary describing our findings, a discussion of user comments, a listing of MMIS specifications, and information on the vendor's business background. Section 3B. Discussion of Vendor Profile Conclusions and Ratings: Presents our ratings and summarizes our rationale for all evaluated systems. Also includes a blank Vendor Profile Template to be used when gathering information on other vendors and systems. We found that, in general, all of the evaluated systems are able to meet most of the functional needs of a materials management department. However, we did uncover significant differences in the quality of service and support provided by each vendor, and our ratings reflect these differences: we rated two of the systems Acceptable--Preferred and four of the systems Acceptable. We have not yet rated the seventh system because our user experience information may not reflect the vendor's new ownership and management. When this vendor provides the references we requested, we will interview users and supply a rating. We caution readers against basing purchasing decisions solely on our ratings. Each hospital must consider the unique needs of its users and its overall strategic plans--a process that can be aided by using our Process Evaluation and Needs Assessment Worksheet. Our conclusions can then be used to narrow down the number of vendors under consideration... PMID:8655344

1996-01-01

66

Management Information System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

New Automated Management Information Center (AMIC) employs innovative microcomputer techniques to create color charts, viewgraphs, or other data displays in a fraction of the time formerly required. Developed under Kennedy Space Center's contract by Boeing Services International Inc., Seattle, WA, AMIC can produce an entirely new informational chart in 30 minutes, or an updated chart in only five minutes. AMIC also has considerable potential as a management system for business firms.

1984-01-01

67

Project Management vs. Systems Engineering Management: A Practitioners' View on  

E-print Network

Project Management vs. Systems Engineering Management: A Practitioners' View on IntegratingPROJECT MANAGEMENT VS. SYSTEMS ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT Received 3 August 2010; Revised 18 December 2010 as technical planning, management, and leadership activities [Frank, 2000]. Systems engineering managers must

de Weck, Olivier L.

68

Computer assisted data analysis in intensive care: the ICDEV project-development of a scientific database system for intensive care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: Patient Data Management Systems (PDMS) for ICUs collect, present and store clinical data. Various intentions\\u000a make analysis of those digitally stored data desirable, such as quality control or scientific purposes. The aim of the Intensive\\u000a Care Data Evaluation project (ICDEV), was to provide a database tool for the analysis of data recorded at various ICUs at\\u000a the University Clinics

Ph. G. H. Metnitz; P. Laback; C. Popow; O. Laback; K. Lenz; M. Hiesmayr

1995-01-01

69

Managing the Management: CORBAbased Instrumentation of Management Systems  

E-print Network

Managing the Management: CORBA­based Instrumentation of Management Systems A. Keller Munich Network Management Team Department of Computer Science, TU MË? unchen Arcisstr. 21, D­80333 Munich, Germany akeller@ieee.org Proceedings of the Sixth IFIP/IEEE International Symposium on Integrated Network Management (IM'99), Boston

70

/Processes, Systems & Performance Manager 5 / / -  

E-print Network

/Processes, Systems & Performance Manager://jobs.teva.co.il/pos5935?referrerId=439 Processes, Systems & Performance Manager-" HTTP://jobs.teva.co.il/pos5917?referrer; / / : - CRO. . . , , . : / ( ) / -3 -data management - / CRO

Pinsky, Ross

71

Spatial distribution of diuron sorption affinity as affected by soil, terrain and management practices in an intensively managed apple orchard.  

PubMed

We investigated how the sorption affinity of diuron (3'-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimenthyl-urea), a moderately hydrophobic herbicide, is affected by soil properties, topography and management practices in an intensively managed orchard system. Soil-landscape analysis was carried out in an apple orchard which had a strong texture contrast soil and a landform with relief difference of 50 m. Diuron sorption (K(d)) affinity was successfully predicted (R(2)=0.79; p<0.001) using a mid-infrared - partial least squares model and calibrated against measured data using a conventional batch sorption technique. Soil and terrain properties explained 75% of the variance of diuron K(d) with TOC, pH(w), slope and WI as key variables. Mean diuron K(d) values were also significantly different (p<0.05) between alley and tree line and between the different management zones. Soil in the tree line generally had lower sorption capacity for diuron than soil in the alleys. Younger stands, which were found to have lower TOC than in the older stands, also had lower diuron K(d) values. In intensively managed orchards, sorption affinity of pesticides to soils was not only affected by soil properties and terrain attributes but also by management regime. PMID:22494903

Umali, Beng P; Oliver, Danielle P; Ostendorf, Bertram; Forrester, Sean; Chittleborough, David J; Hutson, John L; Kookana, Rai S

2012-05-30

72

Managing Conflict in Temporary Management Systems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As organizational tasks have grown more complex, several innovative temporary management systems such as matrix management have been developed. The Apollo space program has been an important contribution to the development of matrix management techniques. Discusses the role of conflict within the matrix, its determinants, and the process of…

Wilemon, David L.

1973-01-01

73

Battery Management System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Battery management system is designed with MCU module, measurement module, alarm module, input module, output module and communication module. It can be able to timely report the states to the user in order to maximize using of battery storage capacity and cycle life.

Li Yamei; Zhen Liping

2010-01-01

74

Automotive battery management systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Battery management system (BMS) is an integral part of an automobile. It protects the battery from damage, predicts battery life and maintains the battery in an operational condition. The BMS performs these tasks by integrating one or more of the functions, such as protecting the cell, controlling the charge, determining the state of charge (SOC), the state of health (SOH),

Bharath Pattipati; Krishna Pattipati; Jon P. Christopherson; Setu Madhavi Namburu; Danil V. Prokhorov; Liu Qiao

2008-01-01

75

Semantische Content Management Systeme  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Content Management Systeme (CMS) sind in vielen Organisationen bereits seit längerer Zeit fester Bestandteil zur Verwaltung und kollaborativen Bearbeitung von Text- und Multimedia-Inhalten. Im Zuge der rasch ansteigenden Fülle an Informationen und somit auch Wissen wird die Überschaubarkeit der Datenbestände jedoch massiv eingeschränkt. Diese und zusätzliche Anforderungen, wie automatisch Datenquellen aus dem World Wide Web (WWW) zu extrahieren, lassen traditionelle CMS immer mehr an ihre Grenzen stoßen. Dieser Beitrag diskutiert die neuen Herausforderungen an traditionelle CMS und bietet Lösungsvorschläge, wie CMS kombiniert mit semantischen Technologien diesen Herausforderungen begegnen können. Die Autoren stellen eine generische Systemarchitektur für Content Management Systeme vor, die einerseits Inhalte für das Semantic Web generieren, andererseits Content aus dem Web 2.0 syndizieren können und bei der Aufbereitung des Content den User mittels semantischer Technologien wie Reasoning oder Informationsextraktion unterstützen. Dabei wird auf Erfahrungen bei der prototypischen Implementierung von semantischer Technologie in ein bestehendes CMS System zurückgegriffen.

Gams, Erich; Mitterdorfer, Daniel

76

Air System Information Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

I flew to Washington last week, a trip rich in distributed information management. Buying tickets, at the gate, in flight, landing and at the baggage claim, myriad messages about my reservation, the weather, our flight plans, gates, bags and so forth flew among a variety of travel agency, airline and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) computers and personnel. By and large, each kind of information ran on a particular application, often specialized to own data formats and communications network. I went to Washington to attend an FAA meeting on System-Wide Information Management (SWIM) for the National Airspace System (NAS) (http://www.nasarchitecture.faa.gov/Tutorials/NAS101.cfm). NAS (and its information infrastructure, SWIM) is an attempt to bring greater regularity, efficiency and uniformity to the collection of stovepipe applications now used to manage air traffic. Current systems hold information about flight plans, flight trajectories, weather, air turbulence, current and forecast weather, radar summaries, hazardous condition warnings, airport and airspace capacity constraints, temporary flight restrictions, and so forth. Information moving among these stovepipe systems is usually mediated by people (for example, air traffic controllers) or single-purpose applications. People, whose intelligence is critical for difficult tasks and unusual circumstances, are not as efficient as computers for tasks that can be automated. Better information sharing can lead to higher system capacity, more efficient utilization and safer operations. Better information sharing through greater automation is possible though not necessarily easy.

Filman, Robert E.

2004-01-01

77

Phase Diagram and Scattering Intensity of Binary Amphiphilic Systems  

E-print Network

Phase Diagram and Scattering Intensity of Binary Amphiphilic Systems G. Gompper and Ulrich S parameter, which describe the con- centration and orientation of the amphiphile, respectively, is used to study the phase diagram and the scattering intensity of binary amphiphilic systems. With increasing

Schwarz, Ulrich

78

Petascale system management experiences.  

SciTech Connect

Petascale High-Performance Computing (HPC) systems are among the largest systems in the world. Intrepid, one such system, is a 40,000 node, 556 teraflop Blue Gene/P system that has been deployed at Argonne National Laboratory. In this paper, we provide some background about the system and our administration experiences. In particular, due to the scale of the system, we have faced a variety of issues, some surprising to us, that are not common in the commodity world. We discuss our expectations, these issues, and approaches we have used to address them. HPC systems are a bellwether for computing systems at large, in multiple regards. HPC users are motivated by the need for absolute performance; this results in two important pushes. HPC users are frequently early adopters of new technologies and techniques. Successful technologies, like Infiniband, prove their value in HPC before gaining wider adoption. Unfortunately, this early adoption alone is not sufficient to achieve the levels of performance required by HPC users; parallelism must also be harnessed. Over the last 15 years, beowulf clustering has provided amazing accessibility to non-HPC-savvy and even non-technical audiences. During this time, substantial adoption of clustering has occurred in many market segments unrelated to computational science. A simple trend has emerged: the scale and performance of high-end HPC systems are uncommon at first, but become commonplace over the course of 3-5 years. For example, in early 2003, several systems on the Top500 list consisted of either 1024 nodes or 4096-8192 cores. In 2008, such systems are commonplace. The most recent generation of high-end HPC systems, so called petascale systems, are the culmination of years of research and development in research and academia. Three such systems have been deployed thus far. In addition to the 556 TF Intrepid system at Argonne National Laboratory, a 596 TF Blue Gene/L-based system has been deployed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and a 504 TF Opteron-based system has been deployed at Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC). Intrepid is comprised of 40,960 nodes with a total of 163,840 cores. While systems like these are uncommon now, we expect them to become more widespread in the coming years. The scale of these large systems impose several requirements upon system architecture. The need for scalability is obvious, however, power efficiency and density constraints have become increasingly important in recent years. At the same time, because the size of administrative staff cannot grow linearly with the system size, more efficient system management techniques are needed. In this paper we will describe our experiences administering Intrepid. Over the last year, we have experienced a number of interesting challenges in this endeavor. Our initial expectation was for scalability to be the dominant system issue. This expectation was not accurate. Several issues expected to have minor impact have played a much greater role in system operations. Debugging, due to the large numbers of components used in scalable system operations, has become a much more difficult endeavor. The system has a sophisticated monitoring system, however, the analysis of this data has been problematic. These issues are not specific to HPC workloads in any way, so we expect them to be of general interest. This paper consists of three major parts. First, we will provide a detailed overview of several important aspects of Intrepid's hardware and software. In this, we will highlight aspects that have featured prominently in our system management experiences. Next, we will describe our administration experiences in detail. Finally, we will draw some conclusions based on these experiences. In particular, we will discuss the implications for the non-HPC world, system managers, and system software developers.

Desai, N.; Bradshaw, R.; Lueninghoener, C.; Cherry, A.; Coghlan, S.; Scullin, W. (LCF); ( MCS)

2008-01-01

79

Building waste management core indicators through Spatial Material Flow Analysis: Net recovery and transport intensity indexes  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sustainability and proximity principles have a key role in waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Core indicators are needed in order to quantify and evaluate them. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A systematic, step-by-step approach is developed in this study for their development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transport may play a significant role in terms of environmental and economic costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Policy action is required in order to advance in the consecution of these principles. - Abstract: In this paper, the material and spatial characterization of the flows within a municipal solid waste (MSW) management system are combined through a Network-Based Spatial Material Flow Analysis. Using this information, two core indicators are developed for the bio-waste fraction, the Net Recovery Index (NRI) and the Transport Intensity Index (TII), which are aimed at assessing progress towards policy-related sustainable MSW management strategies and objectives. The NRI approaches the capacity of a MSW management system for converting waste into resources through a systematic metabolic approach, whereas the TII addresses efficiency in terms of the transport requirements to manage a specific waste flow throughout the entire MSW management life cycle. Therefore, both indicators could be useful in assessing key MSW management policy strategies, such as the consecution of higher recycling levels (sustainability principle) or the minimization of transport by locating treatment facilities closer to generation sources (proximity principle). To apply this methodological approach, the bio-waste management system of the region of Catalonia (Spain) has been chosen as a case study. Results show the adequacy of both indicators for identifying those points within the system with higher capacity to compromise its environmental, economic and social performance and therefore establishing clear targets for policy prioritization. Moreover, this methodological approach permits scenario building, which could be useful in assessing the outcomes of hypothetical scenarios, thus proving its adequacy for strategic planning.

Font Vivanco, David, E-mail: font@cml.leidenuniv.nl [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Puig Ventosa, Ignasi [ENT Environment and Management, Carrer Sant Joan 39, First Floor, 08800 Vilanova i la Geltru, Barcelona (Spain); Gabarrell Durany, Xavier [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

2012-12-15

80

Mastering the management system.  

PubMed

Companies have always found it hard to balance pressing operational concerns with long-term strategic priorities. The tension is critical: World-class processes won't lead to success without the right strategic direction, and the best strategy in the world will get nowhere without strong operations to execute it. In this article, Kaplan, of Harvard Business School, and Norton, founder and director of the Palladium Group, explain how to effectively manage both strategy and operations by linking them tightly in a closed-loop management system. The system comprises five stages, beginning with strategy development, which springs from a company's mission, vision, and value statements, and from an analysis of its strengths, weaknesses, and competitive environment. In the next stage, managers translate the strategy into objectives and initiatives with strategy maps, which organize objectives by themes, and balanced scorecards, which link objectives to performance metrics. Stage three involves creating an operational plan to accomplish the objectives and initiatives; it includes targeting process improvements and preparing sales, resource, and capacity plans and dynamic budgets. Managers then put plans into action, monitoring their effectiveness in stage four. They review operational, environmental, and competitive data; assess progress; and identify barriers to execution. In the final stage, they test the strategy, analyzing cost, profitability, and correlations between strategy and performance. If their underlying assumptions appear faulty, they update the strategy, beginning another loop. The authors present not only a comprehensive blueprint for successful strategy execution but also a managerial tool kit, illustrated with examples from HSBC Rail, Cigna Property and Casualty, and Store 24. The kit incorporates leading management experts' frameworks, outlining where they fit into the management cycle. PMID:18271319

Kaplan, Robert S; Norton, David P

2008-01-01

81

How Do School Systems Manage Pupils' Heterogeneity?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

School systems worldwide respond in particular ways to students' academic heterogeneity, and different countries have developed different strategies to manage such heterogeneity. Whereas some countries separate children according to distinctive educational routes (or tracks) at early ages, others rely on intensive use of grade retention, while…

Dupriez, Vincent; Dumay, Xavier; Vause, Anne

2008-01-01

82

MANAGEMENT CONTROL SYSTEM IN PUBLIC  

E-print Network

1 MANAGEMENT CONTROL SYSTEM IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION: BEYOND RATIONAL MYTHS Nicolas Berland, France bdreveton@iae.univ-poitiers.fr Abstract: The implementation of management control devices. Through two case studies, this paper analyses how two public organizations have implemented management

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

83

Evaluation of High-intensity and Low-intensity Preconditioning Systems  

E-print Network

OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Jason E. Sawyer Committee Members, Andy D. Herring David P. Anderson Tryon A. Wickersham Head of Department, Gary Acuff December 2010 Major Subject: Animal Science iii ABSTRACT Evaluation... of High-intensity and Low-intensity Preconditioning Systems. (December 2010) Andrew Nathan Orsak, B.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Committee: Dr. Jason E. Sawyer Steer calves n = 345 (year 1 n = 183; 253 ? 35 kg, year 2 n = 162; 241 ? 36 kg...

Orsak, Andrew Nathan

2012-02-14

84

Data Management System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

CENTRA 2000 Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Auto-trol technology, obtained permission to use software originally developed at Johnson Space Center for the Space Shuttle and early Space Station projects. To support their enormous information-handling needs, a product data management, electronic document management and work-flow system was designed. Initially, just 33 database tables comprised the original software, which was later expanded to about 100 tables. This system, now called CENTRA 2000, is designed for quick implementation and supports the engineering process from preliminary design through release-to-production. CENTRA 2000 can also handle audit histories and provides a means to ensure new information is distributed. The product has 30 production sites worldwide.

1997-01-01

85

Organic Farming and Landscape Structure: Effects on Insect-Pollinated Plant Diversity in Intensively Managed Grasslands  

PubMed Central

Parallel declines in insect-pollinated plants and their pollinators have been reported as a result of agricultural intensification. Intensive arable plant communities have previously been shown to contain higher proportions of self-pollinated plants compared to natural or semi-natural plant communities. Though intensive grasslands are widespread, it is not known whether they show similar patterns to arable systems nor whether local and/or landscape factors are influential. We investigated plant community composition in 10 pairs of organic and conventional dairy farms across Ireland in relation to the local and landscape context. Relationships between plant groups and local factors (farming system, position in field and soil parameters) and landscape factors (e.g. landscape complexity) were investigated. The percentage cover of unimproved grassland was used as an inverse predictor of landscape complexity, as it was negatively correlated with habitat-type diversity. Intensive grasslands (organic and conventional) contained more insect-pollinated forbs than non-insect pollinated forbs. Organic field centres contained more insect-pollinated forbs than conventional field centres. Insect-pollinated forb richness in field edges (but not field centres) increased with increasing landscape complexity (% unimproved grassland) within 1, 3, 4 and 5km radii around sites, whereas non-insect pollinated forb richness was unrelated to landscape complexity. Pollination systems within intensive grassland communities may be different from those in arable systems. Our results indicate that organic management increases plant richness in field centres, but that landscape complexity exerts strong influences in both organic and conventional field edges. Insect-pollinated forb richness, unlike that for non-insect pollinated forbs, showed positive relationships to landscape complexity reflecting what has been documented for bees and other pollinators. The insect-pollinated forbs, their pollinators and landscape context are clearly linked. This needs to be taken into account when managing and conserving insect-pollinated plant and pollinator communities. PMID:22666450

Power, Eileen F.; Kelly, Daniel L.; Stout, Jane C.

2012-01-01

86

Training Management Information System  

SciTech Connect

The Training Management Information System (TMIS) is an integrated information system for all training related activities. TMIS is at the leading edge of training information systems used in the nuclear industry. The database contains all the necessary records to confirm the department's adherence to accreditation criteria and houses all test questions, student records and information needed to evaluate the training process. The key to the TMIS system is that the impact of any change (i.e., procedure change, new equipment, safety incident in the commercial nuclear industry, etc.) can be tracked throughout the training process. This ensures the best training can be performed that meets the needs of the employees. TMIS is comprised of six functional areas: Job and Task Analysis, Training Materials Design and Development, Exam Management, Student Records/Scheduling, Evaluation, and Commitment Tracking. The system consists of a VAX 6320 Cluster with IBM and MacIntosh computers tied into an ethernet with the VAX. Other peripherals are also tied into the system: Exam Generation Stations to include mark sense readers for test grading, Production PC's for Desk-Top Publishing of Training Material, and PC Image Workstations. 5 figs.

Rackley, M.P.

1989-01-01

87

A guideline management system.  

PubMed

This paper describes the architecture of NewGuide, a guide-line management system for handling the whole life cycle of a computerized clinical practice guideline. NewGuide components are organized in a distributed architecture: an editor to formalize guidelines, a repository to store them, an inference engine to implement guidelines instances in a multi-user environment, and a reporting system storing the guidelines logs in order to be able to completely trace any individual physician guideline-based decision process. There is a system "central level" that maintains official versions of the guidelines, and local Healthcare Organizations may download and implement them according to their needs. The architecture has been implemented using the Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) platform. Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) and a set of con-tracts are the key factors for the integration of NewGuide with healthcare legacy systems. They allow maintaining unchanged legacy user interfaces and connecting the system with what-ever electronic patient record. The system functionality will be illustrated in three different contexts: homecare-based pressure ulcer prevention, acute ischemic stroke treatment and heart failure management by general practitioners. PMID:15360768

Ciccarese, Paolo; Caffi, Ezio; Boiocchi, Lorenzo; Quaglini, Silvana; Stefanelli, Mario

2004-01-01

88

Management systems research study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development of a Monte Carlo simulation of procurement activities at the NASA Ames Research Center is described. Data cover: simulation of the procurement cycle, construction of a performance evaluation model, examination of employee development, procedures and review of evaluation criteria for divisional and individual performance evaluation. Determination of the influences and apparent impact of contract type and structure and development of a management control system for planning and controlling manpower requirements.

Bruno, A. V.

1975-01-01

89

Disney's Enterprise Energy Management Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Disney's Enterprise Energy Management Systems integrates commercial energy management systems with custom web-based energy information systems. This technology-based solution is used throughout the Walt Disney World Resort organization by administrative managers, engineering, operations and maintenance staff, and cast members. Using Disney's energy information system, each Disney business unit's energy usage is continually measured using a “utility report card.” This special

Paul J. Allen

2007-01-01

90

AJAA P17-02 The Adoption and Impact of Management Intensive Rotational  

E-print Network

AJAA P17-02 The Adoption and Impact of Management Intensive Rotational Grazing (MIRG@aae.wisc.edu Abstract: Management intensive rotational grazing has garnered a great deal of interest in recent years rented agricultural land (a proxy for lack of access to land within a short distance of the barn). MIRG

Foltz, Jeremy D.

91

Resources Management System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Delta Data Systems, Inc. was originally formed by NASA and industry engineers to produce a line of products that evolved from ELAS, a NASA-developed computer program. The company has built on that experience, using ELAS as the basis for other remote sensing products. One of these is AGIS, a computer package for geographic and land information systems. AGIS simultaneously processes remotely sensed and map data. The software is designed to operate on a low cost microcomputer, putting resource management tools within reach of small operators.

1993-01-01

92

On the Duality of Data-intensive File System Design  

E-print Network

parallel file system for Hadoop workloads? · PVFS: parallel file system · HDFS: file system designed application Hadoop framework File system API HDFS client library HDFS servers PVFS shim layer (via JNI) UnmodiOn the Duality of Data- intensive File System Design: Reconciling HDFS and PVFS Wittawat

93

Intensive rearing system for fish larvae research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Larvae nutrition and in general larvae culture is considered to be the ‘bottle neck’ for marine finfish culture. Fish larvae rearing experiments investigating nutritional factors or rearing protocols are carried out in various systems, from small beakers to very large commercial tanks, making it difficult to compare data across systems.A continuous supply of live or dry feeds and a controlled

Sagiv Kolkovski; John Curnow; Justin King

2004-01-01

94

A digital intensity stabilization system for HeNe laser  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A digital intensity stabilization system for HeNe laser is developed. Based on a switching power IC to design laser power supply and a general purpose microcontroller to realize digital PID control, the system constructs a closed loop to stabilize the laser intensity by regulating its discharge current. The laser tube is made of glass ceramics and its integrated structure is steady enough to eliminate intensity fluctuations at high frequency and attenuates all intensity fluctuations, and this makes it easy to tune the control loop. The control loop between discharge current and photodiode voltage eliminates the long-term drifts. The intensity stability of the HeNe laser with this system is 0.014% over 12 h.

Wei, Zhimeng; Lu, Guangfeng; Yang, Kaiyong; Long, Xingwu; Huang, Yun

2012-02-01

95

Incident management systems in disaster management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Particularly since the 11 September terrorist attacks in the USA, much attention has been given to the development and implementation of incident management systems (IMS). The IMS is a tool for marshalling pre-identified and pre-assembled resources to respond to an emergency or disaster. IMS is particularly useful when personnel and resources from many agencies and jurisdictions are required to manage

Ronald W. Perry

2003-01-01

96

A comparison of butterfly communities along field margins under traditional and intensive management in SE Finland  

Microsoft Academic Search

Butterfly communities of field boundaries were studied in nine traditionally managed (grazed, mown) and eight intensively managed (ploughed, fertilised) farmland sites. Transect count data over 3 years (1997–1999) covered a total of 53 species and 5382 individuals. The butterfly fauna was rather similar under both management forms; species richness and relative abundance did not differ significantly between habitats, species diversity

Kimmo Saarinen

2002-01-01

97

Bench-to-bedside review: Leadership and conflict management in the intensive care unit  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the management of critical care units, leadership and conflict management are vital areas for the successful performance of the unit. In this article a practical approach to define competencies for leadership and principles and practices of conflict management are offered. This article is, by lack of relevant intensive care unit (ICU) literature, not evidence based, but it is the

Rob JM Strack van Schijndel; Hilmar Burchardi

2007-01-01

98

Calibration of an intensity ratio system for 3D imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An intensity ratio method for 3D imaging is proposed with error analysis given for assessment and future improvements. The method is cheap and reasonably fast as it requires no mechanical scanning or laborious correspondence computation. One drawback of the intensity ratio methods which hamper their widespread use is the undesirable change of image intensity. This is usually caused by the difference in reflection from different parts of an object surface and the automatic iris or gain control of the camera. In our method, gray-level patterns used include an uniform pattern, a staircase pattern and a sawtooth pattern to make the system more robust against errors in intensity ratio. 3D information of the surface points of an object can be derived from the intensity ratios of the images by triangulation. A reference back plane is put behind the object to monitor the change in image intensity. Errors due to camera calibration, projector calibration, variations in intensity, imperfection of the slides etc. are analyzed. Early experiments of the system using a newvicon CCTV camera with back plane intensity correction gives a mean-square range error of about 0.5 percent. Extensive analysis of various errors is expected to yield methods for improving the accuracy.

Tsui, H. T.; Tang, K. C.

1989-03-01

99

Discrepancy Reporting Management System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Discrepancy Reporting Management System (DRMS) is a computer program designed for use in the stations of NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) to help establish the operational history of equipment items; acquire data on the quality of service provided to DSN customers; enable measurement of service performance; provide early insight into the need to improve processes, procedures, and interfaces; and enable the tracing of a data outage to a change in software or hardware. DRMS is a Web-based software system designed to include a distributed database and replication feature to achieve location-specific autonomy while maintaining a consistent high quality of data. DRMS incorporates commercial Web and database software. DRMS collects, processes, replicates, communicates, and manages information on spacecraft data discrepancies, equipment resets, and physical equipment status, and maintains an internal station log. All discrepancy reports (DRs), Master discrepancy reports (MDRs), and Reset data are replicated to a master server at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory; Master DR data are replicated to all the DSN sites; and Station Logs are internal to each of the DSN sites and are not replicated. Data are validated according to several logical mathematical criteria. Queries can be performed on any combination of data.

Cooper, Tonja M.; Lin, James C.; Chatillon, Mark L.

2004-01-01

100

Nitrogen fluxes in intensive grassland systems  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, several advances have occurred in our understanding of the transformations and losses of nitrogen from grassland systems. This is particularly important in view of the inherently low efficiency of nitrogen utilization in animal production and the substantial increase that has occurred in inputs of nitrogen to grassland. This volume contains a selection of revised and updated papers. The processes affecting the utilization of nitrogen are discussed, in particular the impact of the ruminant on the nitrogen cycle in grassland. Emphasis is given to movement of nitrogen into and out of the soil organic matter and to processes of nitrogen loss including leaching from grazed swards and emission of nitrogenous gases to the atmosphere. Strategies to improve the overall efficiency of utilization are discussed in several papers.

Van der Meer, H.V.; Ryden, J.C.; Ennik, G.C.

1986-01-01

101

Management issues for high performance storage systems  

SciTech Connect

Managing distributed high-performance storage systems is complex and, although sharing common ground with traditional network and systems management, presents unique storage-related issues. Integration technologies and frameworks exist to help manage distributed network and system environments. Industry-driven consortia provide open forums where vendors and users cooperate to leverage solutions. But these new approaches to open management fall short addressing the needs of scalable, distributed storage. We discuss the motivation and requirements for storage system management (SSM) capabilities and describe how SSM manages distributed servers and storage resource objects in the High Performance Storage System (HPSS), a new storage facility for data-intensive applications and large-scale computing. Modem storage systems, such as HPSS, require many SSM capabilities, including server and resource configuration control, performance monitoring, quality of service, flexible policies, file migration, file repacking, accounting, and quotas. We present results of initial HPSS SSM development including design decisions and implementation trade-offs. We conclude with plans for follow-on work and provide storage-related recommendations for vendors and standards groups seeking enterprise-wide management solutions.

Louis, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Burris, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-03-01

102

Avian Species Richness in Relation to Intensive Forest Management Practices in Early Seral Tree Plantations  

PubMed Central

Background Managers of landscapes dedicated to forest commodity production require information about how practices influence biological diversity. Individual species and communities may be threatened if management practices truncate or simplify forest age classes that are essential for reproduction and survival. For instance, the degradation and loss of complex diverse forest in young age classes have been associated with declines in forest-associated Neotropical migrant bird populations in the Pacific Northwest, USA. These declines may be exacerbated by intensive forest management practices that reduce hardwood and broadleaf shrub cover in order to promote growth of economically valuable tree species in plantations. Methodology and Principal Findings We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to evaluate relationships between avian species richness and vegetation variables that reflect stand management intensity (primarily via herbicide application) on 212 tree plantations in the Coast Range, Oregon, USA. Specifically, we estimated the influence of broadleaf hardwood vegetation cover, which is reduced through herbicide applications, on bird species richness and individual species occupancy. Our model accounted for imperfect detection. We used average predictive comparisons to quantify the degree of association between vegetation variables and species richness. Both conifer and hardwood cover were positively associated with total species richness, suggesting that these components of forest stand composition may be important predictors of alpha diversity. Estimates of species richness were 35–80% lower when imperfect detection was ignored (depending on covariate values), a result that has critical implications for previous efforts that have examined relationships between forest composition and species richness. Conclusion and Significance Our results revealed that individual and community responses were positively associated with both conifer and hardwood cover. In our system, patterns of bird community assembly appear to be associated with stand management strategies that retain or increase hardwood vegetation while simultaneously regenerating the conifer cover in commercial tree plantations. PMID:22905249

Jones, Jay E.; Kroll, Andrew J.; Giovanini, Jack; Duke, Steven D.; Ellis, Tana M.; Betts, Matthew G.

2012-01-01

103

Intensive Scheduling: Restructuring America's Secondary Schools through Time Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Some of the difficult questions surrounding intensive scheduling, along with examples of successful applications of this approach, are described in this document. This book offers a blueprint from a practitioner's perspective and is intended for educators and lay people interested in improving secondary schools. Chapter 1 demonstrates how to…

Hottenstein, David S.

104

Database management system for instrument data management  

SciTech Connect

Data from many measuring devices throughout the Savannah River Site (SRS) is transmitted to a central location for processing as a vital component in the SRS emergency preparedness and response program. The data processing is currently accomplished using VAX-based FORTRAN programs with the data stored in Digital's Record Management System (RMS) files which is shared using global COMMON. A program is underway to store and process this data using a Structured Query Language (SQL)-based Database Management System (DBMS). The advantages of replacing the current system with one using an SQL-based DBMS are discussed.

Tatum, C.P.

1990-01-01

105

Virginia's traffic management system  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that Northern Virginia, like most other urban areas, faces the challenge of moving more and more vehicles on roads that are already overloaded. Traffic in Northern Virginia is continually increasing, but the development surrounding Interstate 395, 495, and 66 makes little room available for roadway expansion. Even if land were unlimited, the strict requirement of the Clean Air Act make building roads difficult. This paper reports that ensuring the most efficient use of the interstate highways is the goal of the Virginia Department of Transportation's (VDOT's) traffic management system (TMS). TMS is a computerized highway surveillance and control system that monitors 30 interstate miles on I-395, I-495, and I-66. The system helps squeeze the most use from these interstates by detecting and helping clear accidents or disabled vehicles and by smoothing traffic flow. TMS spots and helps clear an average of two incidents a day and prevents accidents caused by erratic traffic flow from ramps onto the main line. For motorists, these TMS functions translate into decreased travel time, vehicle operating costs, and air pollution. VDOT's TMS is the foundation for the intelligent vehicle-highway systems of tomorrow. It employs several elements that work together to improve traffic flow.

Morris, J.; Marber, S. (Virginia Dept. of Transportation, VA (US))

1992-07-01

106

Establish Deficiency Report Management System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Internal system for management control of deficiency report processing. Effort includes assessing activities, assigning management goals, measuring progress and periodic updating of procedures for efficient Quality Deficiency Reports (QDRs). Keywords: Dev...

J. Marble

1989-01-01

107

ASCOT data base management system  

SciTech Connect

The ASCOT data base management system is designed to handle the data produced by both the experimental and theoretical efforts of the DOE Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) project. The data base envisioned is hierarchically structured, sparse, and compact. Information concerning any given data file is stored in a directory file. The data base management system uses a relational data management approach. Presently three management schema are being developed for use with the data base. 5 figures.

Barbieri, J.; Nyholm, R.; Castro, C.; Hill, K.

1980-07-01

108

Computerized training management system  

DOEpatents

A Computerized Training Management System (CTMS) is disclosed for providing a procedurally defined process that is employed to develop accreditable performance based training programs for job classifications that are sensitive to documented regulations and technical information. CTMS is a database that links information needed to maintain a five-phase approach to training-analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation independent of training program design. CTMS is designed using R-Base{trademark}, an-SQL compliant software platform. Information is logically entered and linked in CTMS. Each task is linked directly to a performance objective, which, in turn, is linked directly to a learning objective; then, each enabling objective is linked to its respective test items. In addition, tasks, performance objectives, enabling objectives, and test items are linked to their associated reference documents. CTMS keeps all information up to date since it automatically sorts, files and links all data; CTMS includes key word and reference document searches. 18 figs.

Rice, H.B.; McNair, R.C.; White, K.; Maugeri, T.

1998-08-04

109

Computerized training management system  

DOEpatents

A Computerized Training Management System (CTMS) for providing a procedurally defined process that is employed to develop accreditable performance based training programs for job classifications that are sensitive to documented regulations and technical information. CTMS is a database that links information needed to maintain a five-phase approach to training-analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation independent of training program design. CTMS is designed using R-Base.RTM., an-SQL compliant software platform. Information is logically entered and linked in CTMS. Each task is linked directly to a performance objective, which, in turn, is linked directly to a learning objective; then, each enabling objective is linked to its respective test items. In addition, tasks, performance objectives, enabling objectives, and test items are linked to their associated reference documents. CTMS keeps all information up to date since it automatically sorts, files and links all data; CTMS includes key word and reference document searches.

Rice, Harold B. (Franklin Furnace, OH); McNair, Robert C. (East Setauket, NY); White, Kenneth (Shirley, NY); Maugeri, Terry (Wading River, NY)

1998-08-04

110

Clinical Problems Associated with the Intensive Management of Performance Horses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The physical as well as the behavioural requirements of the horse changed little through the process of domestication. This\\u000a means that horses kept within an intensively housed environment and used for performance, physically and behaviourally are\\u000a susceptible to specific clinical conditions, injuries and diseases. In this chapter, physiological and clinical problems such\\u000a as those causing pain related behaviours and head

R. A. Casey

111

Supplier Management System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Supplier Management System (SMS) allows for a consistent, agency-wide performance rating system for suppliers used by NASA. This version (2.0) combines separate databases into one central database that allows for the sharing of supplier data. Information extracted from the NBS/Oracle database can be used to generate ratings. Also, supplier ratings can now be generated in the areas of cost, product quality, delivery, and audit data. Supplier data can be charted based on real-time user input. Based on these individual ratings, an overall rating can be generated. Data that normally would be stored in multiple databases, each requiring its own log-in, is now readily available and easily accessible with only one log-in required. Additionally, the database can accommodate the storage and display of quality-related data that can be analyzed and used in the supplier procurement decision-making process. Moreover, the software allows for a Closed-Loop System (supplier feedback), as well as the capability to communicate with other federal agencies.

Ramirez, Eric; Gutheinz, Sandy; Brison, James; Ho, Anita; Allen, James; Ceritelli, Olga; Tobar, Claudia; Nguyen, Thuykien; Crenshaw, Harrel; Santos, Roxann

2008-01-01

112

Systems management techniques and problems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Report is reviewed which discusses history and trends of systems management, its basic principles, and nature of problems that lend themselves to systems approach. Report discusses systems engineering as applied to weapons acquisition, ecology, patient monitoring, and retail merchandise operations.

1971-01-01

113

Effects of Coffee Management Intensity on Composition, Structure, and Regeneration Status of Ethiopian Moist Evergreen Afromontane Forests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effect of arabica coffee management intensity on composition, structure, and regeneration of moist evergreen Afromontane forests was studied in three traditional coffee-management systems of southwest Ethiopia: semiplantation coffee, semiforest coffee, and forest coffee. Vegetation and environmental data were collected in 84 plots from forests varying in intensity of coffee management. After controlling for environmental variation (altitude, aspect, slope, soil nutrient availability, and soil depth), differences in woody species composition, forest structure, and regeneration potential among management systems were compared using one way analysis of variance. The study showed that intensification of forest coffee cultivation to maximize coffee production negatively affects diversity and structure of Ethiopian moist evergreen Afromontane forests. Intensification of coffee productivity starts with the conversion of forest coffee to semiforest coffee, which has significant negative effects on tree seedling abundance. Further intensification leads to the conversion of semiforest to semiplantation coffee, causing significant diversity losses and the collapse of forest structure (decrease of stem density, basal area, crown closure, crown cover, and dominant tree height). Our study underlines the need for shade certification schemes to include variables other than canopy cover and that the loss of species diversity in intensively managed coffee systems may jeopardize the sustainability of coffee production itself through the decrease of ecosystem resilience and disruption of ecosystem services related to coffee yield, such as pollination and pest control.

Hundera, Kitessa; Aerts, Raf; Fontaine, Alexandre; Van Mechelen, Maarten; Gijbels, Pieter; Honnay, Olivier; Muys, Bart

2013-03-01

114

Effects of coffee management intensity on composition, structure, and regeneration status of ethiopian moist evergreen afromontane forests.  

PubMed

The effect of arabica coffee management intensity on composition, structure, and regeneration of moist evergreen Afromontane forests was studied in three traditional coffee-management systems of southwest Ethiopia: semiplantation coffee, semiforest coffee, and forest coffee. Vegetation and environmental data were collected in 84 plots from forests varying in intensity of coffee management. After controlling for environmental variation (altitude, aspect, slope, soil nutrient availability, and soil depth), differences in woody species composition, forest structure, and regeneration potential among management systems were compared using one way analysis of variance. The study showed that intensification of forest coffee cultivation to maximize coffee production negatively affects diversity and structure of Ethiopian moist evergreen Afromontane forests. Intensification of coffee productivity starts with the conversion of forest coffee to semiforest coffee, which has significant negative effects on tree seedling abundance. Further intensification leads to the conversion of semiforest to semiplantation coffee, causing significant diversity losses and the collapse of forest structure (decrease of stem density, basal area, crown closure, crown cover, and dominant tree height). Our study underlines the need for shade certification schemes to include variables other than canopy cover and that the loss of species diversity in intensively managed coffee systems may jeopardize the sustainability of coffee production itself through the decrease of ecosystem resilience and disruption of ecosystem services related to coffee yield, such as pollination and pest control. PMID:23180249

Hundera, Kitessa; Aerts, Raf; Fontaine, Alexandre; Van Mechelen, Maarten; Gijbels, Pieter; Honnay, Olivier; Muys, Bart

2013-03-01

115

QFD Application to a Software - Intensive System Development Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the use of Quality Function Deployment (QFD), adapted to requirements engineering for a software-intensive system development project, and sysnthesizes the lessons learned from the application of QFD to the Network Control System (NCS) pre-project of the Deep Space Network.

Tran, T. L.

1996-01-01

116

Anaesthesia and intensive care management of face transplantation.  

PubMed

The face-grafting techniques are innovative and highly complex, requiring well-defined organization of all the teams involved. Subsequent to the first report in France in 2005, there have been 17 facial allograft transplantations performed worldwide. We describe anaesthesia and postoperative management, and the problems encountered, during the course of seven facial composite tissue grafts performed between 2007 and 2011 in our hospital. The reasons for transplantation were ballistic trauma in four patients, extensive neurofibromatosis in two patients, and severe burns in one patient. Anaesthesia for this long procedure involves advanced planning for airway management, vascular access, technique of anaesthesia, and fluid management. Preparation and grafting phases were highly haemorrhagic (>one blood volume), requiring massive transfusion. Median (range) volumes given for packed red cell (PRC) and fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) were 64.2 ml kg(-1) (35.5-227.5) and 46.2 ml kg(-1) (6.3-173.7), respectively. Blood loss quantification was difficult because of diffuse bleeding to the drapes. The management of patients with neurofibromatosis or burns involving the whole face was more difficult and haemorrhagic than the patients with lower face transplantation. Average surgical duration was 19.1 h (15-28 h). Postoperative severe graft oedema was present in most patients. Most patients encountered complications in ICU, such as renal insufficiency, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and jugular thrombosis. Opportunistic bacterial infections were a feature during the postoperative period in these highly immunosuppressed patients. PMID:23704190

Sedaghati-nia, A; Gilton, A; Liger, C; Binhas, M; Cook, F; Ait-Mammar, B; Scherrer, E; Hivelin, M; Lantieri, L; Marty, J; Plaud, B

2013-10-01

117

Year in review 2007: Critical Care – intensive care unit management  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the development of new technologies and drugs, health care is becoming increasisngly complex and expensive. Governments and health care providers around the world devote a large proportion of their budgets to maintaining quality of care. During 2007, Critical Care published several papers that highlight important aspects of critical care management, which can be subdivided into structure, processes and outcomes,

Clayton Barbieri; Shannon S Carson; André Carlos Amaral

2008-01-01

118

SUPERFUND SOILS DATA MANAGEMENT SYSTEM  

EPA Science Inventory

This paper describes the Superfund Soil Data Management System (DMS), a PC-based data system being developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in its effort to manage and evaluate treatment and performance data for contaminated soil, sludge, and debris. his system...

119

A user interface management system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The design and construction of the user interface to interactive systems is receiving increased attention. This paper describes a user interface management system that allows a designer\\/developer to focus on the logical functionality of an application without the usual bookkeeping associated with a conventional programming language. The user interface management system contains two components: a special purpose, application independent dialogue

David J. Kasik

1982-01-01

120

Knowledge Management and Assistance Systems  

E-print Network

1 1 Knowledge Management and Assistance Systems Bernd Neumann WS 2007/08 2 Topics Introduction Applications of Knowledge-based Systems Role of Knowledge Management Knowledge Representation Techniques Semantic Networks Relational Structures Frame-based Knowledge Representation Rule-based Systems Case

Hamburg,.Universität

121

Managed care and the diffusion of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer  

PubMed Central

Objective To better understand associations between managed care penetration in healthcare markets and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) adoption. Methods We used Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data to identify men diagnosed with prostate cancer between 2001 and 2007 who were treated with radiation therapy (n=55,162). We categorized managed care penetration in Health Service Areas (HSAs) as low (<3%), intermediate (3–10%), and high (>10%); and assessed our main outcomes (i.e., probability of IMRT adoption, which is the ability of a healthcare market to deliver IMRT, and IMRT utilization in HSA markets) using a Cox proportional-hazards model and Poisson regression model, respectively. Results Compared to markets with low managed care penetration, populations in highly penetrated HSAs were more racially diverse (25% vs. 15% non-white, p<0.01), densely populated (2,110 vs. 145 people/square mile, p<0.01), and wealthier (median income $48,500 vs. $31,900, p<0.01). The probability of IMRT adoption was greatest in markets with the highest managed care penetration (e.g., 0.82 (high) vs. 0.72 (low) in 2007, p=0.05). Among adopting markets, the use of IMRT increased in all HSA categories. However, relative to markets with low managed care penetration, IMRT utilization was constrained in markets with the highest penetration (0.69 (high) vs. 0.76 (low) in 2007, p<0.01). Conclusion Markets with higher managed care penetration demonstrated a greater propensity for acquiring IMRT technology. However, after adopting IMRT, more highly penetrated markets had roughly 7% slower growth in utilization over the study period. These findings provide insight into the implications of delivery system reforms for cancer-related technologies. PMID:23206767

Jacobs, Bruce L.; Zhang, Yun; Skolarus, Ted A.; Wei, John T.; Montie, James E.; Schroeck, Florian R.; Hollenbeck, Brent K.

2012-01-01

122

Spatial intensity profiling of an industrial laser welding system  

SciTech Connect

A investigation was conducted to devise a method to sense the laser beam intensity profile of an industrial laser welding system. The research focuses on monitoring methods and assessing locations within the system where data can be taken which reveal the relationship between the laser beam intensity profile and the input system parameters of the laser beam welding process. Emphasis has been placed on the configuration of a distributed computing environment to acquire, analyze and display the results of the sensed beam profile. Conventional image processing techniques are demonstrated. It was found that a distributed computing environment was useful for processing the large volumes of data generated by this process characterization method, and the distributed computing environment provided the computing power required for computationally intensive analysis and display techniques. The mathematical techniques used to discriminate one data set from another and relate the results to processing conditions are discussed.

Milewski, J.O.

1991-01-01

123

Involving Intensive Care Unit Nurses in a Proactive Risk Assessment of the Medication Management Process  

PubMed Central

Background Vulnerabilities in the medication management process can lead to serious patient harm. In intensive care units (ICUs), nurses represent the last line of defense against medication errors. Proactive risk assessment (PRA) offers methods for determining how processes can break down and how people involved in such processes can contribute to or recover from a breakdown. Such methods can also be used to identify ICU nurses’ contribution to the quality and safety of medication management. Methods A PRA method was conducted in a cardiovascular ICU to identify and evaluate failure modes in the nursing medication management process. The contributing factors to the failure modes and the recovery processes used by nurses were also characterized. Results A total of 54 failure modes were identified across the seven steps of the medication management process. For the 4 most critical failure modes, nurses listed 21 contributing factors and 21 recovery processes. Ways were identified to redesign the medication management process, one of which consists of dealing with work system factors that contribute to the most critical failure modes. Conclusions From a data-analysis viewpoint, the PRA method permits one to address a variety of objectives. Different scoring methods can be used to focus on either frequency or criticality of failure modes; one may also focus on a specific step of the process under study. Developing efforts towards eliminating or mitigating contributing factors would help reduce the criticality of the failure modes in terms of their likelihood and impact on patients and/or nurses. Developing systems to support the recovery processes used by nurses may be another approach to process redesign. PMID:20860244

Faye, Helene; Joy Rivera-Rodriguez, A.; Karsh, Ben-Tzion; Schoofs Hundt, Ann; Baker, Christine; Carayon, Pascale

2011-01-01

124

Effects of Intensive Forest Management Practices on Insect Infestation Levels and Loblolly Pine Growth  

SciTech Connect

This study investigates the relationship between intensive management practices and insect infestation, maximum growth potential studies of loblolly pine over four years using different levels of cultural treatments. Results indicate tree fertilization can increase coneworm infestation and demonstrated that tip moth management can improve initial tree growth.

Nowak, J.T.; Berisford, C.W.

2000-04-01

125

Carbon dynamics of intensively managed forest along a full rotation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Temperate and tropical forests are increasingly exploited for wood and biomass extraction and only one third of forest area was considered as primary in the recent FRA in 2010. Management practices affect the soil-forest-atmosphere continuum through various effects on soil and surface properties. They result ultimately in either positive or negative changes in the biomass and soil carbon pools but, if any, few datasets or modeling tools are available for quantifying their impacts on the net carbon balance of forest stands. To analyse these effects, the net half-hourly fluxes of CO2, water vapour and heat exchanges were monitored for 23 years in two closed stands of maritime pines in southwestern France. Carbon content of the aboveground biomass was measured annually and soil pools 10-early in the younger stand and 5-yearly in the mature stand. For analysing the data collected and disentangling the climate and management effects, we used the three components process-based model GRAECO+ (Loustau et al. this session) linking a 3D radiative transfer and photosynthesis model, MAESTRA, a soil carbon model adapted from ROTH-C and a plant growth model. Eddy flux data were processed, gapfilled and partitioned using the methodological recommendations (Aubinet et al. 2000, Adv. Eco. Res:30, 114-173, Falge et al. 2001, Agr. For. Meteo. : 107, 43-69, Reichstein et al. 2005, Glob. Change Biol., 11:1424-1439). Analysis of the sequence showed that, whether by an increased sensitivity to soil drought compared to the pines or by a rapid re-colonization of the inter-row after understorey removal and plowing, the weeded vegetation contributed to create specific intra-annual dynamics of the fluxes and therefore, controls the dynamics of carbon balance of the stand. After three growing seasons, the stand was already a carbon sink, but the impact of thinning and weeded vegetation removal at the age of 5-year brought the balance to almost neutral. We interpret this change as the combined effects of the reduction of the LAI, the enhancement of the heterotrophic respiration related to the decomposition of dead materials and the improvement of the mineralization of the large stock of soil organic matter by tillage. At the mature stage, the stand remains consistently a carbon sink and CO2 fluxes were insensitive to thinning. Conversely, the carbon balance was sensitive to climate effects as evidenced by repeated drastic reductions in NEP caused by soil drought. Our data underlines the importance of disturbances linked to forest management for the forest carbon balance during the early stage of tree growth. Since management intensification tends to shorten the forest life cycle and enhance the share of the young stages, our results confirm that the consequence of management operations on the carbon cycle in forest may revert intensified forest stands from a net sink to a source and should be accounted for carefully.

Moreaux, V.; Bosc, A.; Bonnefond, J.; Burlett, R.; Lamaud, E.; Sartore, M.; Trichet, P.; Chipeaux, C.; Lambrot, C.; Kowalski, A. S.; Loustau, D.

2012-12-01

126

Battery Management in Mobile Systems  

E-print Network

1 Battery Management in Mobile Systems Enrico Macii Politecnico di Torino Torino, Italy 2 Outline for battery-driven optimization capabilities. 4 Dynamic Power Management (DPM) · One of the most effective the "battery is doing" during system operation. · Open-loop policies. 5 Battery-Driven DPM · For battery

Bogliolo, Alessandro

127

The Legion Resource Management System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent technological developments, including gigabit networkingtechnology and low-cost, high-performance microprocessors, have givenrise to metacomputing environments. Metacomputing environments combinehosts from multiple administrative domains via transnational andworld-wide networks. Managing the resources in such a system is a complextask, but is necessary to efficiently and economically execute userprograms. The Legion resource management system is flexible both in itssupport...

Steve J. Chapin; Dimitrios Katramatos; John F. Karpovich; Andrew S. Grimshaw

1999-01-01

128

Dynamic memory management methodology applied to embedded telecom network systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Presents a new methodology for dynamic memory management of embedded telecom network systems. This methodology enables the designer to further raise the abstraction level of the initial system specification and to achieve optimized embedded system designs. This methodology is well suited for systems characterized by a set of concurrent and dynamic processes, very high-bit-rate data streams, and intensive data transfer

Chantal Ykman-couvreur; Jurgen Lambrecht; Diederik Verkest; Francky Catthoor; Bengt Svantesson; Ahmed Hemani; Fabian Wolf

2002-01-01

129

Fuel cell gas management system  

DOEpatents

A fuel cell gas management system including a cathode humidification system for transferring latent and sensible heat from an exhaust stream to the cathode inlet stream of the fuel cell; an anode humidity retention system for maintaining the total enthalpy of the anode stream exiting the fuel cell equal to the total enthalpy of the anode inlet stream; and a cooling water management system having segregated deionized water and cooling water loops interconnected by means of a brazed plate heat exchanger.

DuBose, Ronald Arthur (Marietta, GA)

2000-01-11

130

Managing new oral anticoagulants in the intensive care unit.  

PubMed

Warfarin has been the mainstay of oral anticoagulation for more than half a century. Within the last several years, 2 new classes of oral anticoagulants have been introduced as potential alternatives to warfarin for certain indications. The oral direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran, and 2 factor Xa inhibitors, rivaroxaban and apixaban, are the newest agents approved for use in the United States. These agents have been studied in various areas including stroke prophylaxis in atrial fibrillation, prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism, and for reduction of ischemic events following acute coronary syndromes. While these agents do not require routine monitoring of international normalized ratio, these agents may be more challenging to reverse than traditional warfarin therapy. The following review will focus on describing the areas where the new oral anticoagulant agents have been studied, the basic pharmacologic characteristics of each agent, and how to appropriately manage the reversal of these agents when indicated. PMID:24002428

Gass, Jennifer Ann; Weeks, Phillip A

2013-01-01

131

Anaerobic digestion of sludge from intensive recirculating aquaculture systems: Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intensive recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) produce high volumes of biosolid waste which is a potential source of pollution if not properly treated. A reduction in sludge-mass would therefore minimize the potential environmental hazard and economic burden stemming from its disposal. Recently, anaerobic digestion was suggested as an alternative to aquaculture sludge digestion and stabilization in RAS. This practice results not

Natella Mirzoyan; Yossi Tal; Amit Gross

2010-01-01

132

Open Source Course Management and Assessment System  

E-print Network

LON-CAPA: Open Source Course Management and Assessment System Gerd Kortemeyer Michigan State Assembly Course Management Resource Assembly Course Management #12;Campus A Campus B Resource Assembly Course Management Resource Assembly Course Management LON-CAPA Architecture Shared Cross

133

ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEM HEALTH MANAGEMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the most critical systems in any aerospace vehicle is the electrical power system. Comprised of energy generation, energy storage, power distribution, and power management, the electrical power system (EPS) is relied upon by every major subsystem for proper operation. In order to meet the safety requirements of aeronautics and space systems - and provide for their reliability, maintainability,

Robert M. Button; Amy Chicatelli

134

Computer assisted management of information in an intensive care unit.  

PubMed

In order to use the capability of computers for handling large amounts of information, we developed a program for the acquisition, handling, storage and retrieval of administrative and clinical information generated in the 20 bedded multidisciplinary critical care unit of a University Hospital. At an initial phase a personal computer (PC) was used to collect information from 4362 patients, that included registration data, coded admission problems, techniques and special treatments, and final diagnosis. This information combined with free text provided a discharge report. Complementary programs allowed calculation and storage of hemodynamic and gas exchange parameters. This experience led to a second phase in which a computer with microprocessor Intel 80386 at 25 MHz, 8 MB RAM, 310 MB hard disk and a streamer for 150 MB cartridge tape back up, using UNIX operating system, permitted multiple users working simultaneously through 1 central console and 7 ASCII terminals. Data input included demographic data, previous and admission problems in coded form, present history and physical examination in free text, list of present problems in coded form, comments on evolution, record of special techniques and treatments, laboratory data, treatment, final diagnosis and facility for using all the information to elaborate the final report. Side modules provide help for drugs dosing, protocols for specific conditions and clerical routines. The system is open for connection to other areas of the Hospital. Data from more than 2000 patients have been included so far.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1447538

Cereijo, E

1992-10-01

135

Intensive Care Unit-Acquired Weakness: Implications for Physical Therapist Management  

PubMed Central

Patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) can develop a condition referred to as “ICU-acquired weakness.” This condition is characterized by profound weakness that is greater than might be expected to result from prolonged bed rest. Intensive care unit–acquired weakness often is accompanied by dysfunction of multiple organ systems. Individuals with ICU-acquired weakness typically have significant activity limitations, often requiring physical assistance for even the most basic activities associated with bed mobility. Many of these individuals have activity limitations months to years after hospitalization. The purpose of this article is to review evidence that guides physical rehabilitation of people with ICU-acquired weakness. Included are diagnostic criteria, medical management, and prognostic indicators, as well as criteria for beginning physical rehabilitation, with an emphasis on patient safety. Data are presented indicating that rehabilitation can be implemented with very few adverse effects. Evidence is provided for appropriate measurement approaches and for physical intervention strategies. Finally, some of the key issues are summarized that should be investigated to determine the best intervention guidelines for individuals with ICU-acquired weakness. PMID:22282769

Moss, Marc; Quan, Dianna; Schenkman, Margaret

2012-01-01

136

Systems Thinking and Management Epistemology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Epistemology, or the theory of knowledge, is concerned with the nature and scope of knowledge, its presuppositions and basis, and the general reliability of claims to knowledge. Since its birth, Social Systems Sciences (S3) has been critical of positivist epistemology in the discipline of management. The epistemological foundations of management theory have evolved with the development of three paradigms—the idea

Omid Nodoushani

1999-01-01

137

Towards consistent performance management systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Performance indicators (PIs) and performance measurement are popular topics in management literature nowadays. However, hardly ever is attention paid to the consequences of the relationships that often exist between the different PIs for designing effective, consistent performance management systems for organizations as a whole. Presents a concrete method for constructing a consistent set of PIs forming the basis of a

Simme Douwe P. Flapper; Leonard Fortuin; Paul P. M. Stoop

1996-01-01

138

The Athena Service Management System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Maintaining, managing, and supporting an unbounded number of distributed net- work services on multiple server instances requires new solutions. The Athena Service Management System provides centralized control of data administration, a protocol for interface to the database, tools for accessing and modifying the database, and an automated mechanism for data distribution.

Mark A. Rosenstein; Daniel E. Geer Jr.; Peter J. Levine

1988-01-01

139

Organizational structure : management techniques and lessons learned in aligning technical and program management resources in engineering-intensive organizations  

E-print Network

The roles of systems engineering, program and project management, and engineering management are continuously blurred and challenged in complex engineering organizations. The demands made of each of these functions can ...

Siddiqui, Talha, 1969-

2005-01-01

140

Indiana Medicaid Management Information System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Indiana Medicaid Management Information System (MMIS) library tape consists of (4) MMIS Copy Program libraries: Program library, Macro library, Process library, and Copy library. The library tape supports the Indiana MMIS Detail Design documentation w...

W. Gulban

1976-01-01

141

BIOSOLIDS DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (BDMS)  

EPA Science Inventory

Resource Purpose: see hard copy attachment "EPA's Biosolids Data Management System and Plans for Evaluating Biosolids Quality" Legislation/Enabling Authority: CWA Section 402 Supported Program: OW, OWM, OECA, ORD, OSW, Regions 1-10, states, local facilitie...

142

Environmental Management System Plan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management establishes the policy that Federal agencies conduct their environmental, transportation, and energy-related activities in a manner that is environmentally, economically and fiscally sound, integrated, continually improving, efficient, and sustainable. The Department of Energy (DOE) has approved DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program and DOE Order 430.2B, Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy

Robert Fox; Patrick Thorson; Blair Horst; John Speros; Nancy Rothermich; Howard Hatayama

2009-01-01

143

RIMS: Resource Information Management System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overview is given of the capabilities and functions of the resource management system (RIMS). It is a simple interactive DMS tool which allows users to build, modify, and maintain data management applications. The RIMS minimizes programmer support required to develop/maintain small data base applications. The RIMS also assists in bringing the United Information Services (UIS) budget system work inhouse. Information is also given on the relationship between the RIMS and the user community.

Symes, J.

1983-01-01

144

Managing pipeline systems: key roles.  

PubMed

While the UK has an enviable safety record in the management of medical gas systems, it is only via strict adherence to the four tenets - 'continuity, adequacy, identity, and quality' - embodied within Health Technical Memorandum 02-01: 2006 - 'Medical Gas Pipeline Systems' (MGPS) that we can be certain that patients will not be harmed by these systems. So says Geoff Dillow, a former training head at the forerunner to today's Eastwood Park, the National Centre for Hospital Engineering, and co-author of the HTM, who has over 35 years' professional experience in assessing medical gas systems for compliance. In the first of four HEJ guidance articles on 'Managing Medical Gas Pipeline Systems' planned for coming months, he examines the critical role of the MGPS Permit to Work System (PTWS), and describes the parts played by those involved in its implementation and day-to-day management. PMID:23678657

Dillow, Geoff

2013-04-01

145

Extensively managed strips in intensively cultivated grasslands as possible contributors to increased plant species richness  

Microsoft Academic Search

This four-year study investigated whether partitioning intensively managed grass crop fields by non-fertilized, extensively managed permanent strips created new habitats for semi-natural grassland plants and contributed to increased plant species richness. The strips were set aside in the grass crop or ploughed at the start of the experiment, and either uncut or cut each autumn. Uncut strips became species-poor and

Hege Hovd

2008-01-01

146

Superposed Epoch Analysis of Current Systems During Intense Magnetic Storms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A statistical approach to investigating the intensity and timing of storm-time current systems is conducted and presented. The Hot Electron and Ion Drift Integrator (HEIDI) model was used to simulate all of the intense storms (Dstmin < -100 nT) from solar cycle 23 (1996-2005). Five different HEIDI input combinations were used to create a large collection of numerical results, varying the plasma outer boundary condition and electric field description in the model. The simulation results are then combined with a normalized superposed epoch analysis, where each phase of each storm is prorated to the average duration of that phase and then all of the storms are averaged together. The azimuthal currents in the HEIDI simulation domain are classified as westward and eastward symmetric ring current, partial ring current, banana current, and tail current. The average behavior of these current systems with respect to the HEIDI plasma and electric field boundary conditions are then presented and discussed. It is found that the Volland-Stern electric field produces an earlier increase in the inner magnetospheric current systems because of the usage of the 3-h Kp index. A self-consistent electric field develops the current systems a few hours later, but produces much stronger asymmetric current systems (partial, banana, and tail currents), especially in the main phase of the storm. Applying a nonuniform local time distribution for the plasma outer boundary condition slightly increases the magnitudes of the current systems, but this effect is smaller than the electric field influence.

Liemohn, M. W.; Katus, R. M.

2013-05-01

147

Automated flight test management system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Phase 1 development of an automated flight test management system (ATMS) as a component of a rapid prototyping flight research facility for artificial intelligence (AI) based flight concepts is discussed. The ATMS provides a flight engineer with a set of tools that assist in flight test planning, monitoring, and simulation. The system is also capable of controlling an aircraft during flight test by performing closed loop guidance functions, range management, and maneuver-quality monitoring. The ATMS is being used as a prototypical system to develop a flight research facility for AI based flight systems concepts at NASA Ames Dryden.

Hewett, M. D.; Tartt, D. M.; Agarwal, A.

1991-01-01

148

Towards CORBAbased Enterprise Management: Managing CORBAbased Systems with SNMP Platforms  

E-print Network

1 Towards CORBA­based Enterprise Management: Managing CORBA­based Systems with SNMP Platforms are in widespread use. The consen­ sus on the advantages of CORBA for managing complex system infrastuctures distributed object environments. Keywords--- CORBA, Enterprise Management, SNMP Platforms, Distributed Systems

149

The influence of abiotic controls and management intensity on phosphorus cycling in established grassland and forest ecosystems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is commonly assumed that the bioavailability and cycling of phosphorus (P) is mainly controlled by abiotic soil properties including soil pH and the concentrations and reactivities of clay minerals, CaCO3 and Al/Fe oxides In managed ecosystems, kind, timing and duration of P additions and type and amount of harvested biomass are the major input and output fluxes. Our objective was to disentangle the effects of abiotic controls, and type and intensity of management on the P cycle in soils of temperate grasslands and forests of different management intensity in three regions across Germany in the frame of the Biodiversity Exploratories project. The pH value was the most important variable explaining P concentrations and partitioning in soil and changes in pH are the main mechanism how land-use is affecting the P cycle. However, after the influence of pH was accounted for in a sequential statistical approach, land-use intensity, classified according to the extent of annual biomass removal, explained a significant (P < 0.05) part of the variance in the contributions of several P fractions to total P (TP) among all studied regions and land-use types. In grassland soils of highly diverse systems (up to 57 plant species) in one of the study regions, the Schwäbische Alb, a mid-range mountain area on limestone where soils showed a limited variation in pH in the carbonate buffer range, pedogenic Fe oxide concentrations, fertilizer-P application rates, and TP concentrations in soil explained more than half of the variation in bioavailable inorganic (Pi) concentrations extracted with NaHCO3 in soil. Our results demonstrate that mainly soil pH and mineralogical composition, and intensity of management of the managed ecosystems are significant controls of the P cycle determining the size of bioavailable P pool in soil.

Alt, F.; Oelmann, Y.; Wilcke, W.

2011-12-01

150

Environmental management: A system approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a system framework whose purpose is to improve understanding of environmental management. By analyzing the links between elements of the environmental management system, it is possible to construct a model that aids thinking systematically about the decision-making subsystem, and other subsystems, of the entire environmental management system. Through a multidisciplinary environmental approach, each of the individual subsystems is able to adapt to threats and opportunities. The fields of government, market economics, social responsibility and ecology, for example, are so complex that it is extremely difficult to develop a framework that gives full consideration to all aspects. This paper, through the application of a highly idealized system framework, attempts to show the general relationships that exist between complex system elements.

Petak, William J.

1981-05-01

151

The File Manager System  

PubMed Central

A database system written in Standard MUMPS has been implemented at a dozen Veterans Administration sites. While originally designed as a tool for programmers, the package can also be run as a standalone “programmerless” system. Through terminal dialogues, non-technical users can create, edit and store database schemas, and input and output “programs”.

Timson, George

1980-01-01

152

Steam System Data Management  

E-print Network

? Fabrication Training (Six Year Training) ? Welding Certifications ?Retired From Chevron After 25 Years ? Established A Steam System Program ? Planner For Routine Maintenance Work ? Planner For Steam System Improvements ? Wal-Tech Valve, Inc. ? Purchased... ? Air Conditioning/Refrigeration Course ? Pipe Fitting Training (Four Year Training) ? Fabrication Training (Six Year Training) ?Welding Certifications ? Advanced Class Amateur Radio License ?Background ? Maintenance Field For 48 Years ?Retired...

Roberts, D.

2013-01-01

153

Accurate mathematical models to describe the lactation curve of Lacaune dairy sheep under intensive management.  

PubMed

Although the intensive production system of Lacaune dairy sheep is the only profitable method for producers outside of the French Roquefort area, little is known about this type of systems. This study evaluated yield records of 3677 Lacaune sheep under intensive management between 2005 and 2010 in order to describe the lactation curve of this breed and to investigate the suitability of different mathematical functions for modeling this curve. A total of 7873 complete lactations during a 40-week lactation period corresponding to 201 281 pieces of weekly yield data were used. First, five mathematical functions were evaluated on the basis of the residual mean square, determination coefficient, Durbin Watson and Runs Test values. The two better models were found to be Pollott Additive and fractional polynomial (FP). In the second part of the study, the milk yield, peak of milk yield, day of peak and persistency of the lactations were calculated with Pollot Additive and FP models and compared with the real data. The results indicate that both models gave an extremely accurate fit to Lacaune lactation curves in order to predict milk yields (P = 0.871), with the FP model being the best choice to provide a good fit to an extensive amount of real data and applicable on farm without specific statistical software. On the other hand, the interpretation of the parameters of the Pollott Additive function helps to understand the biology of the udder of the Lacaune sheep. The characteristics of the Lacaune lactation curve and milk yield are affected by lactation number and length. The lactation curves obtained in the present study allow the early identification of ewes with low milk yield potential, which will help to optimize farm profitability. PMID:23257242

Elvira, L; Hernandez, F; Cuesta, P; Cano, S; Gonzalez-Martin, J-V; Astiz, S

2013-06-01

154

FOREST MANAGEMENT INTENSITY OF NONINDUSTRIAL PRIVATE FOREST LANDOWNERS IN MISSISSIPPI: 1998-2006 DATA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mississippi's nonindustrial private forest (NIPF) landowners who owned at least 20 acres of forestland were surveyed annually from 1998 to 2006 to ascertain how intensively NIPF landowners managed their lands. Specifically, landowners were asked to report the number of acres treated and treatment costs for two broad categories of activities: (1) capital expenditures, which included site preparation, fertilization, regeneration, and

Yiling Deng; Ian A. Munn

155

Seasonal Habitat Selection by Raccoons (Procyon lotor) in Intensively Managed Pine Forests of Central Mississippi  

Microsoft Academic Search

Raccoons (Procyon lotor) are ecological generalists, existing in diverse land- scapes. Although general habitat use patterns of raccoons have been extensively described, little research has examined raccoon habitat selection within landscapes managed intensively for wood fiber production. Furthermore, no published studies using radio-telemetry have detailed raccoon habitat selection at multiple spatial scales. We monitored 31 raccoons on a 2000 ha

MICHAEL J. CHAMBERLAIN; L. MIKE CONNER; BRUCE D. LEOPOLD

2002-01-01

156

Nutrient management for intensive animal agriculture: policies and practices for sustainability  

Microsoft Academic Search

The intensity of animal production around the world has increased substantially during the last half-century, which has led to large problems with the disposal of manures and waste waters. The focus of this paper is on the development of national policies to improve the nutrient management of concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), where nutrients are invariably in surplus. To create

J. L. Sims; L. F. Bergstrom; B. T. Bowden; O. Oenema

2005-01-01

157

Resource Management for Distributed Parallel Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Multiprocessor systems should exist in the the larger context of distributed systems, allowing multiprocessor resources to be shared by those that need them. Unfortunately, typical multiprocessor resource management techniques do not scale to large networks. The Prospero Resource Manager (PRM) is a scalable resource allocation system that supports the allocation of processing resources in large networks and multiprocessor systems. To manage resources in such distributed parallel systems, PRM employs three types of managers: system managers, job managers, and node managers. There exist multiple independent instances of each type of manager, reducing bottlenecks. The complexity of each manager is further reduced because each is designed to utilize information at an appropriate level of abstraction.

Neuman, B. Clifford; Rao, Santosh

1993-01-01

158

Demil planning and management system  

SciTech Connect

The National Maintenance Point (NMP) Branch of the US Army Industrial Operations Command (IOC) serves as the Single Manager for Conventional Ammunition (SMCA) agent for managing the renovation, modification, recycling, and disposal of conventional ammunition, thereby improving readiness. The mission of the NMP includes program management for demilitarization (demil) activities, ammunition maintenance, and ammunition peculiar equipment (APE) projects. Through an Interagency Agreement between the US Army and the US Department of Energy, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing an integrated data management system, called the Demil Planning and Management System (DPMS), for IOC. DPMS is intended to help NMP efficiently manage information on ongoing demil project activities and asset inventories, plan future projects, and allocate budgets. This system, when fully implemented, will also make it possible for the user community to interactively access the DPMS database; perform data entry and queries; and run reports through network, modem, and Internet access to the system. This paper describes the principal components of the DPMS, current capabilities, and planned enhancements.

Huber, C.C.; Bormet, S.M.; Whitfield, R.G.; Bowen, M.; Chun, K.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Golden, R.E. [Army Pacific, Fort Shafter, HI (United States); Fuller, R. [Army Industrial Operations Command, Rock Island, IL (United States). National Maintenance Point Branch

1997-08-01

159

Bench-to-bedside review: Leadership and conflict management in the intensive care unit  

PubMed Central

In the management of critical care units, leadership and conflict management are vital areas for the successful performance of the unit. In this article a practical approach to define competencies for leadership and principles and practices of conflict management are offered. This article is, by lack of relevant intensive care unit (ICU) literature, not evidence based, but it is the result of personal experience and a study of literature on leadership as well on conflicts and negotiations in non-medical areas. From this, information was selected that was recognisable to the authors and, thus, also seems to be useful knowledge for medical doctors in the ICU environment. PMID:18086322

Strack van Schijndel, Rob JM; Burchardi, Hilmar

2007-01-01

160

Intentional Systems Management: Managing Forests for Biodiversity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conservation of biodiversity provides for economic, social, and environmental sustainability. Intentional management is designed to manage conflicts among groups with conflicting interests. Our goal was to ascertain if intentional management and principles of conservation of biodiversity could be combined into upland and riparian forest management strategies that would be applicable to various land ownerships and, consequently, help resolve land allocation

Andrew B. Carey; Bruce R. Lippke; John Sessions

1999-01-01

161

Memory intensive functional architecture for distributed computer control systems  

SciTech Connect

A memory-intensive functional architectue for distributed data-acquisition, monitoring, and control systems with large numbers of nodes has been conceptually developed and applied in several large-scale and some smaller systems. This discussion concentrates on: (1) the basic architecture; (2) recent expansions of the architecture which now become feasible in view of the rapidly developing component technologies in microprocessors and functional large-scale integration circuits; and (3) implementation of some key hardware and software structures and one system implementation which is a system for performing control and data acquisition of a neutron spectrometer at the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. The spectrometer is equipped with a large-area position-sensitive neutron detector.

Dimmler, D.G.

1983-10-01

162

Airborne Battle Management System (ABMS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Navy under the Airborne Battle Management System (ABMS) program, sponsored by ONR Code 31 (Command, Control and Combat Systems) and executed by NAVAIR, is addressing the shifting focus of naval operations to power projection in a littoral environment, as expressed in “Forward from the Sea” and “Operational Maneuver from the Sea”. To effectively project naval power into the littoral

G. Mersten

2000-01-01

163

Communication systems for load management  

SciTech Connect

Load management and distribution automation schemes of electric utilities require an extensive, reliable and economical communication system. Several communication technologies have been investigated, tested and employed to optimize these schemes. This paper examines these communication techniques, discusses advantages and disadvantages of each with a special emphasis on power line carrier system (PLC), and finally presents recommendations and suggests areas for future research.

Sherif, Y.S.; Zahir, S.S.

1985-12-01

164

High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Tumor Therapy System and Its Application  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At the end of last century, a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) tumor therapy system was successfully developed and manufactured in China, which has been already applied to clinical therapy. This article aims to discuss the HIFU therapy system and its application. Detailed research includes the following: power amplifiers for high-power ultrasound, ultrasound transducers with large apertures, accurate 3-D mechanical drives, a software control system (both high-voltage control and low-voltage control), and the B-mode ultrasonic diagnostic equipment used for treatment monitoring. Research on the dosage of ultrasound required for tumour therapy in multiple human cases has made it possible to relate a dosage formula, presented in this paper, to other significant parameters such as the volume of thermal tumor solidification, the acoustic intensity (I), and the ultrasound emission time (tn). Moreover, the HIFU therapy system can be applied to the clinical treatment of both benign and malignant tumors in the pelvic and abdominal cavity, such as uterine fibroids, liver cancer and pancreatic carcinoma.

Sun, Fucheng; He, Ye; Li, Rui

2007-05-01

165

MIT System Design and Management Program  

E-print Network

MIT System Design and Management Program MIT System Design and Management Program Leadership, innovation, systems thinking #12;MIT System Design and Management Program #12;about MIT The mission of MIT of leaders, MIT's System Design and Management Program (SDM) educates mid-career technical professionals

de Weck, Olivier L.

166

Children's exposures to farm worksite hazards on management-intensive grazing operations.  

PubMed

Agricultural injuries continue to be an important source of childhood mortality and morbidity. There is an agreement within the injury prevention community that environmental modification is the most effective strategy for injury prevention. A growing trend among dairy farmers in the upper Midwest and Northeast regions of the United States is the adoption of management-intensive grazing (MIG) as a new technique for dairy management that actually encompasses environmental modification, decreasing the reliance on and use of tractors and machinery (major sources of fatal and nonfatal injuries to children). The purpose of this study was to explore how restructuring the work and the work environment through the use of MIG may affect children's exposure to farm worksite hazards. The study specifically focused on the most hazardous farm worksite exposures for children based on injury surveillance data (tractors, machinery, large animals, heights, and water sources). An online survey was sent to 68 Wisconsin agricultural extension agents knowledgeable about dairy operations in their counties to collect data regarding their perceptions of potential childhood farm safety hazards on MIG operations. A total of 31 surveys were returned using the online survey system, resulting in a 46% response rate. Survey results suggest that children on MIG operations do in fact have decreased exposure to farm machinery. However, there was a perceived increase in children's overall worksite exposure, in addition to specific increases in exposure to all-terrain vehicles and animals. Adoption of a MIG system clearly involves changes in exposures for children, and understanding the full impact of these changes will require further study of the effects of these exposure tradeoffs on the risks for injuries of varying nature and severity. PMID:19437277

Fisher, Regina M; Berg, Richard L; Marlenga, Barbara

2009-01-01

167

HIERARCHICAL MANAGEMENT OF BATTLEFIELD NETWORKS WITH THE SHAMAN MANAGEMENT SYSTEM  

E-print Network

HIERARCHICAL MANAGEMENT OF BATTLEFIELD NETWORKS WITH THE SHAMAN MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Adarshpal S Architecture for MANagement) is a novel management framework developed at the University of Delaware as a part of the research in network management sponsored by the ATIRP Consortium. SHAMAN extends the traditional flat SNMP

Sethi, Adarshpal

168

PPPL Project Management System Page 1 of 111 PPPL Project Management System Description Rev-01  

E-print Network

PPPL Project Management System Page 1 of 111 PPPL Project Management System Description Rev-01 Project Management System Description (PMSD) Revision 1 June 2011 Prepared by: ___________________________________ Date: ________________ Tim Stevenson Head, Project Management Office Approved by

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

169

Managers Managing: The Workings of an Administrative System.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Focused on top managers working within administrative systems, this book identifies the major principles governing these managers' behavior. Since the organization's business and the manager's own career interests determine what occurs in an administrative system, the signals managers send out to underscore their own competence are also…

Hannaway, Jane

170

Operating system support for database management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several operating system services are examined with a view toward their applicability to support of database management functions. These services include buffer pool management; the file system; scheduling, process management, and interprocess communication; and consistency control.

Michael Stonebraker

1981-01-01

171

Integrated Systems Health Management for Intelligent Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The implementation of an integrated system health management (ISHM) capability is fundamentally linked to the management of data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) with the purposeful objective of determining the health of a system. It is akin to having a team of experts who are all individually and collectively observing and analyzing a complex system, and communicating effectively with each other in order to arrive at an accurate and reliable assessment of its health. In this paper, concepts, procedures, and approaches are presented as a foundation for implementing an intelligent systems ]relevant ISHM capability. The capability stresses integration of DIaK from all elements of a system. Both ground-based (remote) and on-board ISHM capabilities are compared and contrasted. The information presented is the result of many years of research, development, and maturation of technologies, and of prototype implementations in operational systems.

Figueroa, Fernando; Melcher, Kevin

2011-01-01

172

Workflow management in large distributed systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The MonALISA (Monitoring Agents using a Large Integrated Services Architecture) framework provides a distributed service system capable of controlling and optimizing large-scale, data-intensive applications. An essential part of managing large-scale, distributed data-processing facilities is a monitoring system for computing facilities, storage, networks, and the very large number of applications running on these systems in near realtime. All this monitoring information gathered for all the subsystems is essential for developing the required higher-level services—the components that provide decision support and some degree of automated decisions—and for maintaining and optimizing workflow in large-scale distributed systems. These management and global optimization functions are performed by higher-level agent-based services. We present several applications of MonALISA's higher-level services including optimized dynamic routing, control, data-transfer scheduling, distributed job scheduling, dynamic allocation of storage resource to running jobs and automated management of remote services among a large set of grid facilities.

Legrand, I.; Newman, H.; Voicu, R.; Dobre, C.; Grigoras, C.

2011-12-01

173

Virtual attendant system and parking management system  

US Patent & Trademark Office Database

A control and management system for defined areas, employs a card reader, vehicle sensing loop detectors and electric eyes, entrance door sensors and operators, truck securement devices, cameras, a control system with memory, and a wireless connection or internet/intranet connection, is provided to produce event log documentation. The event information is readily accessible by management or supervisory personnel, to see all of the recorded information concerning a specified event. Thus, an event can be readily reconstructed after the fact, using all available sensors and other information relevant to a manager or supervisor. An alert can be issued whenever an abnormal or unauthorized event occurs during operations. A QR code reader can be provided which communicates with the system to enable a person carrying the cell phone to scan QR codes at specified locations or on specified items or vehicles.

2014-09-09

174

Operational Management System for Regulated Water Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most of the Dutch large rivers, canals and lakes are controlled by the Dutch water authorities. The main reasons concern safety, navigation and fresh water supply. Historically the separate water bodies have been controlled locally. For optimizating management of these water systems an integrated approach was required. Presented is a platform which integrates data from all control objects for monitoring and control purposes. The Operational Management System for Regulated Water Systems (IWP) is an implementation of Delft-FEWS which supports operational control of water systems and actively gives advice. One of the main characteristics of IWP is that is real-time collects, transforms and presents different types of data, which all add to the operational water management. Next to that, hydrodynamic models and intelligent decision support tools are added to support the water managers during their daily control activities. An important advantage of IWP is that it uses the Delft-FEWS framework, therefore processes like central data collection, transformations, data processing and presentation are simply configured. At all control locations the same information is readily available. The operational water management itself gains from this information, but it can also contribute to cost efficiency (no unnecessary pumping), better use of available storage and advise during (water polution) calamities.

van Loenen, A.; van Dijk, M.; van Verseveld, W.; Berger, H.

2012-04-01

175

Integrated therapy safety management system  

PubMed Central

Aims The aim is to demonstrate the benefit of the medico-ergonomic approach for the redesign of clinical work systems. Based on the six layer model, a concept for an ‘integrated therapy safety management’ is drafted. This concept could serve as a basis to improve resilience. Methods The concept is developed through a concept-based approach. The state of the art of safety and complexity research in human factors and ergonomics forms the basis. The findings are synthesized to a concept for ‘integrated therapy safety management’. The concept is applied by way of example for the ‘medication process’ to demonstrate its practical implementation. Results The ‘integrated therapy safety management’ is drafted in accordance with the six layer model. This model supports a detailed description of specific work tasks, the corresponding responsibilities and related workflows at different layers by using the concept of ‘bridge managers’. ‘Bridge managers’ anticipate potential errors and monitor the controlled system continuously. If disruptions or disturbances occur, they respond with corrective actions which ensure that no harm results and they initiate preventive measures for future procedures. The concept demonstrates that in a complex work system, the human factor is the key element and final authority to cope with the residual complexity. The expertise of the ‘bridge managers’ and the recursive hierarchical structure results in highly adaptive clinical work systems and increases their resilience. Conclusions The medico-ergonomic approach is a highly promising way of coping with two complexities. It offers a systematic framework for comprehensive analyses of clinical work systems and promotes interdisciplinary collaboration. PMID:24007448

Podtschaske, Beatrice; Fuchs, Daniela; Friesdorf, Wolfgang

2013-01-01

176

Atomizer for thermal management system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An atomizer for thermal management system for efficiently thermally managing one or more heat producing devices. The atomizer for thermal management system includes a housing having a coolant passage and a dispensing end, an orifice within the dispensing end, and an actuator manipulating a plunger within the housing. The plunger includes a head that is sealable within a recessed portion of the orifice to open or close the orifice. The coolant passes through the coolant passage into the orifice for spraying upon a heat producing device. The actuator may reciprocate so that the coolant spray emitted through the orifice is pulsating. The pulsing frequency may be increased to increase cooling or decreased to decrease cooling of the heat producing device.

Tilton, Charles L. (Inventor); Weiler, Jeff (Inventor); Palmer, Randal T. (Inventor); Appel, Philip W. (Inventor); Knight, Paul A. (Inventor)

2008-01-01

177

Policy Driven Management for Distributed Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Separating management policy from the automated managers which interpret the policy facilitates the dynamic change of behaviour of a distributed management system. This permits it to adapt to evolutionary changes in the system being managed and to new application requirements. Changing the behaviour of automated managers can be achieved by changing the policy without have to reimplement them - this

Morris Sloman

1994-01-01

178

BUILDING A MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM  

Microsoft Academic Search

Statistics are an important tool in management decision-making. Every area of the library performs work that is measurable in some way. In many libraries data on collection activities results from daily routines, and is facilitated by integrated library systems, but the collection of data on reference activities is left to periodic sampling, generated by hand tallying. In 1994 at the

Nancy Burford

179

Remotely Accessible Management System (RAMS).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oakland Schools, an Intermediate School District for Administration, operates a Remotely Accessible Management System (RAMS). RAMS is composed of over 100 computer programs, each of which performs procedures on the files of the 28 local school districts comprising the constituency of Oakland Schools. This regional service agency covers 900 square…

Wood, Rex

180

Heat management system for aircraft  

Microsoft Academic Search

A novel heat management system for aircraft is provided which is based on the aircraft fuel as the heat exchange medium and comprises a dedicated thermal reserves fuel tank for containing refrigerated aircraft fuel (or other expendable liquid) which is cooled by heat exchange with the primary aircraft fuel flow to the engines; a fuel line loop for conducting fuel

1983-01-01

181

Data management system performance modeling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper discusses analytical techniques that have been used to gain a better understanding of the Space Station Freedom's (SSF's) Data Management System (DMS). The DMS is a complex, distributed, real-time computer system that has been redesigned numerous times. The implications of these redesigns have not been fully analyzed. This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages for static analytical techniques such as Rate Monotonic Analysis (RMA) and also provides a rationale for dynamic modeling. Factors such as system architecture, processor utilization, bus architecture, queuing, etc. are well suited for analysis with a dynamic model. The significance of performance measures for a real-time system are discussed.

Kiser, Larry M.

1993-01-01

182

A hybrid model for intensively managed Douglas-fir plantations in the Pacific Northwest, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent advances in traditional forest growth models have been achieved by linking growth predictions to key ecophysiological\\u000a processes in a hybrid approach that combines the strengths of both empirical and process-based models. A hybrid model was\\u000a constructed for intensively managed Douglas-fir plantations in the Pacific Northwest, USA, by embedding components representing\\u000a fundamental physiological processes and detailed tree allometrics into an

Aaron R. Weiskittel; Douglas A. Maguire; Robert A. Monserud; Gregory P. Johnson

2010-01-01

183

Factors that influence the intensity of non-agricultural management of plant resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated the relationships of land tenure, biological, cultural and spatial variables and their effect on the intensity\\u000a of management of 20 edible plants used by the Santa Maria Tecomavaca community in Oaxaca State, Mexico. We developed a non-linear\\u000a generalized model showing that land ownership, cultural importance and biological characteristics of a plant are the most\\u000a significant factors influencing farmers’

Martha S. González-Insuasti; Carlos Martorell; Javier Caballero

2008-01-01

184

Configuration Management File Manager Developed for Numerical Propulsion System Simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One of the objectives of the High Performance Computing and Communication Project's (HPCCP) Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) is to provide a common and consistent way to manage applications, data, and engine simulations. The NPSS Configuration Management (CM) File Manager integrated with the Common Desktop Environment (CDE) window management system provides a common look and feel for the configuration management of data, applications, and engine simulations for U.S. engine companies. In addition, CM File Manager provides tools to manage a simulation. Features include managing input files, output files, textual notes, and any other material normally associated with simulation. The CM File Manager includes a generic configuration management Application Program Interface (API) that can be adapted for the configuration management repositories of any U.S. engine company.

Follen, Gregory J.

1997-01-01

185

Integrated Systems Health Management for Intelligent Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The implementation of an integrated system health management (ISHM) capability is fundamentally linked to the management of data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) with the purposeful objective of determining the health of a system. Management implies storage, distribution, sharing, maintenance, processing, reasoning, and presentation. ISHM is akin to having a team of experts who are all individually and collectively observing and analyzing a complex system, and communicating effectively with each other in order to arrive at an accurate and reliable assessment of its health. In this chapter, concepts, procedures, and approaches are presented as a foundation for implementing an ISHM capability relevant to intelligent systems. The capability stresses integration of DIaK from all elements of a system, emphasizing an advance toward an on-board, autonomous capability. Both ground-based and on-board ISHM capabilities are addressed. The information presented is the result of many years of research, development, and maturation of technologies, and of prototype implementations in operational systems.

Figueroa, Fernando; Melcher, Kevin

2011-01-01

186

Challenges encountered by critical care unit managers in the large intensive care units.  

PubMed

Background: Nurses in intensive care units (ICUs) are exposed regularly to huge demands interms of fulfilling the many roles that are placed upon them. Unit managers, in particular, are responsible for the efficient management of the units and have the responsibilities of planning, organising, leading and controlling the daily activities in order to facilitate the achievement of the unit objectives.Objectives: The objective of this study was to explore and present the challenges encountered by ICU managers in the management of large ICUs.Method: A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study was conducted at five hospital ICUs in Gauteng province, South Africa. Data were collected through individual interviews from purposively-selected critical care unit managers, then analysed using the matic coding.Results: Five themes emerged from the data: challenges related to the layout and structure of the unit, human resources provision and staffing, provision of material resources, stressors in the unit and visitors in the ICU.Conclusion: Unit managers in large ICUs face multifaceted challenges which include the demand for efficient and sufficient specialised nurses; lack of or inadequate equipment that goes along with technology in ICU and supplies; and stressors in the ICU that limit the efficiency to plan, organise, lead and control the daily activities in the unit. The challenges identified call for multiple strategies to assist in the efficient management of large ICUs. PMID:24832540

Matlakala, Mokgadi C; Bezuidenhout, Martie C; Botha, Annali D H

2014-01-01

187

Management intensity and vegetation complexity affect web-building spiders and their prey.  

PubMed

Agricultural management and vegetation complexity affect arthropod diversity and may alter trophic interactions between predators and their prey. Web-building spiders are abundant generalist predators and important natural enemies of pests. We analyzed how management intensity (tillage, cutting of the vegetation, grazing by cattle, and synthetic and organic inputs) and vegetation complexity (plant species richness, vegetation height, coverage, and density) affect rarefied richness and composition of web-building spiders and their prey with respect to prey availability and aphid predation in 12 habitats, ranging from an uncut fallow to a conventionally managed maize field. Spiders and prey from webs were collected manually and the potential prey were quantified using sticky traps. The species richness of web-building spiders and the order richness of prey increased with plant diversity and vegetation coverage. Prey order richness was lower at tilled compared to no-till sites. Hemipterans (primarily aphids) were overrepresented, while dipterans, hymenopterans, and thysanopterans were underrepresented in webs compared to sticky traps. The per spider capture efficiency for aphids was higher at tilled than at no-till sites and decreased with vegetation complexity. After accounting for local densities, 1.8 times more aphids were captured at uncut compared to cut sites. Our results emphasize the functional role of web-building spiders in aphid predation, but suggest negative effects of cutting or harvesting. We conclude that reduced management intensity and increased vegetation complexity help to conserve local invertebrate diversity, and that web-building spiders at sites under low management intensity (e.g., semi-natural habitats) contribute to aphid suppression at the landscape scale. PMID:23494286

Diehl, Eva; Mader, Viktoria L; Wolters, Volkmar; Birkhofer, Klaus

2013-10-01

188

Towards space traffic management system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Space is getting more and more crowded because of the increasing number of space objects and the limited availability of prime orbital locations. The continual situation makes space operations more and more complicated by the time passes. This complexity requires more international coordination and data to be considered. The paper makes the case for a space traffic management system (STMS) and proposes a reference model for STMS. The proposed STMS performs five main services: Space Monitoring & Tracking Service, Space Data Management Service, Space Operation Service, Space Warning Service and Space Conflict Management Service. The paper elaborates and explains these services, taking into consideration the political and especially technical challenges together with pertinent international law, regulations and accepted practice.

Cukurtepe, Haydar; Akgun, Ilker

2009-09-01

189

Computerized clinical documentation system in the pediatric intensive care unit  

PubMed Central

Background To determine whether a computerized clinical documentation system (CDS): 1) decreased time spent charting and increased time spent in patient care; 2) decreased medication errors; 3) improved clinical decision making; 4) improved quality of documentation; and/or 5) improved shift to shift nursing continuity. Methods Before and after implementation of CDS, a time study involving nursing care, medication delivery, and normalization of serum calcium and potassium values was performed. In addition, an evaluation of completeness of documentation and a clinician survey of shift to shift reporting were also completed. This was a modified one group, pretest-posttest design. Results With the CDS there was: improved legibility and completeness of documentation, data with better accessibility and accuracy, no change in time spent in direct patient care or charting by nursing staff. Incidental observations from the study included improved management functions of our nurse manager; improved JCAHO documentation compliance; timely access to clinical data (labs, vitals, etc); a decrease in time and resource use for audits; improved reimbursement because of the ability to reconstruct lost charts; limited human data entry by automatic data logging; eliminated costs of printing forms. CDS cost was reasonable. Conclusions When compared to a paper chart, the CDS provided a more legible, compete, and accessible patient record without affecting time spent in direct patient care. The availability of the CDS improved shift to shift reporting. Other observations showed that the CDS improved management capabilities; helped physicians deliver care; improved reimbursement; limited data entry errors; and reduced costs. PMID:11604105

2001-01-01

190

A Systematic Review of Intensive Cardiopulmonary Management after Spinal Cord Injury  

PubMed Central

Abstract Intensive cardiopulmonary management is frequently undertaken in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI), particularly due to the occurrence of neurogenic shock and ventilatory insufficiency and in an attempt to reduce secondary injury. We undertook a systematic review of the literature to examine the evidence that intensive care management improves outcome after SCI and to attempt to define key parameters for cardiopulmonary support/resuscitation. We review the literature in five areas: management of SCI patients in specialized centers, risk in SCI patients of cardiopulmonary complications, parameters for blood pressure and oxygenation/ventilation support following SCI, risk factors for cardiopulmonary insufficiency requiring ICU care after SCI, and preventative strategies to reduce the risks of cardiopulmonary complications in SCI patients. The literature supports that, in light of the significant incidence of cardiorespiratory complications, SCI patients should be managed in a monitored special care unit. There is weak evidence supporting the maintenance of MAP >85 mmHg for a period extending up to 1 week following SCI. PMID:20030558

Christie, Sean

2011-01-01

191

Hydrologic response of northern wetlands to silvicultural water management systems  

SciTech Connect

Two types of water management systems are used to ameliorate saturated soil conditions which limit silvicultural operations and site productivity in northern wetlands. The pattern ditch system is an intensive drainage network designed to regulate water table depth in peat soils. The prescription drainage system is a low-intensity drainage system that is used to develop apparent drainage patterns in mineral and histic-mineral soils. These water management systems may either increase or decrease peak flow, base flow, and the duration of peak flow events, depending on drainage system design, climate, season, site characteristics, and land use. The most common hydrologic response to drainage is an increase in peak flow and base flow, and an increase in annual runoff. The effect of wetland drainage on watershed hydrology depends on the proportion of the watershed drained. Drainage may also affect water quality, nutrient cycling, vegetation composition and structure.

Trettin, C.C.

1994-09-01

192

Competitiveness of management-intensive grazing dairies in the mid-Atlantic region from 1995 to 2009.  

PubMed

This paper used farm income tax returns (Schedule F) data from 62 dairy farmers who milked 200 cows or fewer in western and central Maryland and southwestern Pennsylvania (hereafter, the mid-Atlantic region) to assess the relative financial performance of management-intensive grazing (MIG) and confinement dairy operations over the 15-yr period from 1995 through 2009. Data were not available from all farmers in all years; on average, the sample analyzed contained 11 MIG farms and 26 confinement farms. Management-intensive grazing operators were more profitable on a per hundredweight, per cow, and per acre basis, and no less profitable on a whole-farm basis. Even though the confinement operators had higher gross income than MIG operators, their expenses exceeded those of MIG operators. Profits of MIG operations were less variable as well, so that MIG operators faced less income risk. Increased reliance on grazing has other benefits as well. Grazing seems to be a much healthier practice for dairy cows. Veterinary, breeding, and medicine costs per cow are much less for cows that are pastured than those raised in confinement systems. Because they are healthier, cows that are grazed can be milked longer (or culled less frequently). As a result, MIG operators have a larger number of higher quality animals for sale (e.g., bred heifers). Management-intensive operations are also less labor intensive. Reductions in crop production and in the time cows spend in the barn led to significant reductions in field work and cleaning operations in the barn. Costs of hired labor were thus substantially lower in MIG operations than in confinement operations. Land requirements likely impose the principal limitation on the size of intensive grazing operations. In the mid-Atlantic, for instance, grazing operations need 1.5 to 2.0 acres of pasture for every dairy cow/calf equivalent to provide sufficient grass to support a dairy operation. Pasture land for MIG operators must be contiguous to the milking parlor and located no farther than a cow can walk to and from twice a day. That requirement likely limits the maximum size of an intensive grazing operation, especially in areas where land prices and rents are high, as they are in much of the mid-Atlantic. PMID:23313000

Hanson, J C; Johnson, D M; Lichtenberg, E; Minegishi, K

2013-03-01

193

RHEED intensities from two-dimensional heteroepitaxial nanoscale systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A practical computing algorithm has been developed for calculating the reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) from the molecular beam epitaxy growing surface. The calculations are based on the use of the dynamical diffraction theory in which the electrons are taken to be diffracted by a potential, which is periodic in the dimension perpendicular to the surface. The computer program presented in this paper enables calculations for three basic types of diffuse potential for crystalline heteroepitaxial structures, including the possible existence of various diffuse scattering models through the layer parallel to the surface. Catalogue identifier: AETW_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETW_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 68483 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 480831 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: Intel i7-based PC. Operating system: Windows, Linux. RAM: The presented algorithm belongs to the linear memory class of the computational complexity O(n). Word size: 64 bits Classification: 4.6, 6.2, 7.2. Nature of problem: RHEED rocking curves (the specular beam intensities versus the glancing angle) recorded from heteroepitaxial layers are used for the non-destructive evaluation of epilayer thickness and composition with a high degree of accuracy. Rocking curves from such heterostructures are often very complex because the thickness fringes from every layer beat together. Simulations based on the dynamical diffraction theory are generally used to interpret the rocking curves of such structures from which very small changes in thickness and composition can be obtained. Rocking curves are also used to determine the level of strain and its relaxation mechanism in a lattice-mismatched system. Solution method: RHEED intensities are calculated within the framework of the general matrix formulation described in Ref. [1] under the one-beam condition [2,3]. The dynamical diffraction calculations presented in this paper utilize the systematic reflection case in RHEED, in which the atomic potential in the planes parallel to the surface are projected onto the surface normal, so that the results are insensitive to the atomic arrangement in the layers parallel to the surface. In this paper, an approach in which oscillating changes in the intensity appear as a combined effect of changes in the refraction conditions and changes in diffuse scattering for different models of the scattering potential is implemented. Running time: Numerically, the problem of calculating the changes in RHEED oscillation intensity from growing layers is an NP problem. The time computational complexity of the presented algorithm depends on the number of layers for both the substrate and the growing layers included in the calculations. The time-computational complexity of the presented solution is O(n2), where n is the total number of layers used in the calculations. A. Daniluk, Comput. Phys. Commun. 166 (2005) 123. L.M. Peng, M.J. Whelan, Surf. Sci. Lett. 238 (1990) L446. Y. Horio, A. Ichimiya, Japan. J. Appl. Phys. 33 (1994) L377.

Daniluk, Andrzej

2014-11-01

194

ISO 9000 Quality Management System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ISO 9000 series describes a quality management system applicable to any organization. In this chapter we present the requirements of the standard in a way that is as close as possible to the needs of analytical laboratories. The sequence of the requirements follows that in the ISO 9001:2008 standard. In addition, the guidelines for performance improvement set out in the ISO 9004 are reviewed. Both standards should be used as a reference as well as the basis for further elaboration.

Hadjicostas, Evsevios

195

ISO 9000 Quality Management System  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The ISO 9000 series describes a quality management system applicable to any organization. In this chapter we present the requirements\\u000a of the standard in a way that is as close as possible to the needs of analytical laboratories. The sequence of the requirements\\u000a follows that in the ISO 9001:2008 standard. In addition, the guidelines for performance improvement set out in

Evsevios Hadjicostas

2010-01-01

196

The Janus system manager's guide  

SciTech Connect

This guide describes the steps necessary to fully install and maintain the Janus combat simulation on a Digital Equipment Corp. (DEC) VAX computer. It is designed to familiarize System Managers with the operational concepts associated with the Janus package. This guide will not describe how to run the model itself. For information regarding the Janus simulation, or its associated utilities, please refer to the Janus documentation set.

Pimper, J.E.; Calloway, D.R.; Elko, S.D.; Rhodes, J.J.; Uzelac, M.J.; Wilson, J.

1989-09-01

197

Adaptation and Workflow Management Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Today, companies - large and small - can select Workflow Management Systems (WfMSs) to support their business processes. When processes are critical, it is fundamental that WfMS infrastructures continue to provide pre-established service levels to users in the face of disruptions. Adaptation ad-dresses precisely this issue. Current architectures do not incorporate adequate solutions that enhance WfMSs' adaptation. In this paper

Jorge Cardoso; Amit Sheth

2005-01-01

198

An ICU Protocol Development and Management System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patient care is commonly managed by clinicians using general guidelines or specific protocols. Acute, severe illness may require care in an intensive care unit (ICU), with many aspects of care managed concurrently. Variation of aspects of care among patients, clinicians, ICUs and institutions is well-known, and is due to a lack of standardization in clinical decision making and the inability

Jiabin Xie; Adwait Nerlikar; John R. Glover; Bruce A. Mckinley

2000-01-01

199

Separating key management from file system security  

Microsoft Academic Search

No secure network file system has ever grown to span the Internet. Existing systems all lack adequate key management for security at a global scale. Given the diversity of the Internet, any particular mechanism a file system employs to manage keys will fail to support many types of use.We propose separating key management from file system security, letting the world

David Mazičres; Michael Kaminsky; M. Frans Kaashoek; Emmett Witchel

1999-01-01

200

MIT System Design and Management Program  

E-print Network

MIT System Design and Management Program 2008-2009 employment report for self-funded SDM students Leadership, innovation, systems thinking System Design and Management Program Massachusetts Institute-mail: sdm@mit.edu Website: sdm.mit.edu MIT's System Design and Management Program is operated jointly by MIT

Gabrieli, John

201

Separating key management from file system security  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract No secure network file system has ever grown to span the Internet. Existing systems all lack adequate key management for security at a global scale. Given the diversity of the Internet, any particular mechanism a file system employs to manage,keys will fail to support many types of use. We propose separating key management,from file system security, letting the world

David Mazičres; Michael Kaminsky; M. Frans Kaashoek; Emmett Witchel

2000-01-01

202

Platform Management System (PMS) evolution  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In fiscal year 1988 a study was begun to define the platform management system (PMS) functions required for the mature platform operations era. The objectives of the task include: (1) defining how to increase the operational productivity of the platform by providing enhanced capability for responding to changing events, (2) influencing the initial PMS design by identifying required 'hooks and scars', and (3) evaluation potential automation techniques that are appropriate given predicted onboard computing resources. Initial platform operations scenarios were defined. The focus was on PMS-related functions where operations enhancements are likely to occur. Operations productivity was defined in terms of scientific productivity of the platform as well as the level of automation of the ground system. The Platform Operations Productivity Enhancement Report was completed earlier this year documenting system enhancements to increase science productivity and ground system automation. Using the baseline PMS defined in the PMS Definition Document as a starting point, the resulting PMS-specific enhancements were molded into a sequence of progressively more sophisticated operations management capabilities. This sequence of upgrades to the PMS has been documented in a PMS Evolution Plan. The plan includes enhancements in the areas of resources scheduling, resource modeling, system and payload anomaly management, and transaction sequence interpretation. A plan for migration of functions from the ground portion of the PMS to the flight portion is also included. The impacts of this plan on the platform are now being documented to ensure that the required 'hooks and scars' are included in the baseline system. Future plans include a prototype of some of the PMS enhancements to address the feasibility of and techniques for implementing these enhancements in the onboard computing environment.

Tilley, Mike; Hartley, Jonathan

1990-01-01

203

Battery Management System for Electric Vehicle Application  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to solve the key technology of electric vehicle (EV), a battery management system (BMS) is proposed here to settle the critical issues. The system includes several common modules: data acquisition unit, communication unit and battery state estimation model. Two additional management units are developed here, one is thermal management and the other is high voltage management which improve

Jiaxi Qiang; Lin Yang; Guoqiang Ao; Hu Zhong

2006-01-01

204

Enhancing Knowledge Management Systems with Cognitive Agents  

E-print Network

1 Enhancing Knowledge Management Systems with Cognitive Agents (Améliorer les Systèmes de Gestion Email: thierry.nabeth@insead.edu Summary. After identifying the key challenges of knowledge management management systems that implement this vision and that in particular support the knowledge management

Corran, Ruth

205

Integrated Building Management System (IBMS)  

SciTech Connect

This project provides a combination of software and services that more easily and cost-effectively help to achieve optimized building performance and energy efficiency. Featuring an open-platform, cloud- hosted application suite and an intuitive user experience, this solution simplifies a traditionally very complex process by collecting data from disparate building systems and creating a single, integrated view of building and system performance. The Fault Detection and Diagnostics algorithms developed within the IBMS have been designed and tested as an integrated component of the control algorithms running the equipment being monitored. The algorithms identify the normal control behaviors of the equipment without interfering with the equipment control sequences. The algorithms also work without interfering with any cooperative control sequences operating between different pieces of equipment or building systems. In this manner the FDD algorithms create an integrated building management system.

Anita Lewis

2012-07-01

206

Service Quality Management Systems: An Annotated Bibliography.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This bibliography is intended to provide a resource for those interested in gaining an introduction to the area of service quality management systems. Service quality management systems are concerned with optimizing the customer-supplier quality relations...

W. R. Young

1992-01-01

207

Revised June 2014 Training Management System (TMS)  

E-print Network

Revised June 2014 Training Management System (TMS) User Manual Contents Accessing the TMS.................................................................................................................15 #12;2 Accessing the TMS Before accessing the Training Management System you must know your Harvard

Heller, Eric

208

Risk-Informed Safety Assurance and Probabilistic Assessment of Mission-Critical Software-Intensive Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report validates and documents the detailed features and practical application of the framework for software intensive digital systems risk assessment and risk-informed safety assurance presented in the NASA PRA Procedures Guide for Managers and Practitioner. This framework, called herein the "Context-based Software Risk Model" (CSRM), enables the assessment of the contribution of software and software-intensive digital systems to overall system risk, in a manner which is entirely compatible and integrated with the format of a "standard" Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), as currently documented and applied for NASA missions and applications. The CSRM also provides a risk-informed path and criteria for conducting organized and systematic digital system and software testing so that, within this risk-informed paradigm, the achievement of a quantitatively defined level of safety and mission success assurance may be targeted and demonstrated. The framework is based on the concept of context-dependent software risk scenarios and on the modeling of such scenarios via the use of traditional PRA techniques - i.e., event trees and fault trees - in combination with more advanced modeling devices such as the Dynamic Flowgraph Methodology (DFM) or other dynamic logic-modeling representations. The scenarios can be synthesized and quantified in a conditional logic and probabilistic formulation. The application of the CSRM method documented in this report refers to the MiniAERCam system designed and developed by the NASA Johnson Space Center.

Guarro, Sergio B.

2010-01-01

209

Canadian Society of Nephrology guidelines for the management of patients with ESRD treated with intensive hemodialysis.  

PubMed

Intensive (longer and more frequent) hemodialysis has emerged as an alternative to conventional hemodialysis for the treatment of patients with end-stage renal disease. However, given the differences in dialysis delivery and models of care associated with intensive dialysis, alternative approaches to patient management may be required. The purpose of this work was to develop a clinical practice guideline for the Canadian Society of Nephrology. We applied the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach for guideline development and performed targeted systematic reviews and meta-analysis (when appropriate) to address prioritized clinical management questions. We included studies addressing the treatment of patients with end-stage renal disease with short daily (?5 days per week, <3 hours per session), long (3-4 days per week, ?5.5 hours per session), or long-frequent (?5 days per week, ?5.5 hours per session) hemodialysis. We included clinical trials and observational studies with or without a control arm (1990 and later). Based on a prioritization exercise, 6 interventions of interest included optimal vascular access type, buttonhole cannulation, antimicrobial prophylaxis for buttonhole cannulation, closed connector devices, and dialysate calcium and dialysate phosphate additives for patients receiving intensive hemodialysis. We developed 6 recommendations addressing the interventions of interest. Overall quality of the evidence was very low and all recommendations were conditional. We provide detailed commentaries to guide in shared decision making. The main limitation was the very low overall quality of evidence that precluded strong recommendations. Most included studies were small single-arm observational studies. Three randomized controlled trials were applicable, but provided only indirect evidence. Published information for patient values and preference was lacking. In conclusion, we provide 6 recommendations for the practice of intensive hemodialysis. However, due to very low-quality evidence, all recommendations were conditional. We therefore also highlight priorities for future research. PMID:23566638

Nesrallah, Gihad E; Mustafa, Reem A; MacRae, Jennifer; Pauly, Robert P; Perkins, David N; Gangji, Azim; Rioux, Jean-Philippe; Steele, Andrew; Suri, Rita S; Chan, Christopher T; Copland, Michael; Komenda, Paul; McFarlane, Philip A; Pierratos, Andreas; Lindsay, Robert; Zimmerman, Deborah L

2013-07-01

210

Investigation of integration accuracy of sound-power measurement using an automated sound-intensity system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Automated sound-intensity systems have been used routinely for indoor measurement of the sound power of earthmoving equipment and automobiles. The measurement surface is a hemisphere, with sound intensity on the concrete floor assumed to be zero. The system automatically moves an array of sound-intensity probes over the hemisphere, making measurements at desired locations and computing the sound power when the

R. Hickling; P. Lee; W. Wei

1997-01-01

211

Traffic Management System Performance November 11, 2002  

E-print Network

Traffic Management System Performance November 11, 2002 David Levinson1 Wei Chen2 Department uses regression analysis to evaluate long-run traffic management system performance. Three important for testing the macroscopic association between traffic management and traffic system performance. Key Words

Levinson, David M.

212

Post-DiplomaBachelorofManagement ManagementInformationSystems  

E-print Network

Post-DiplomaBachelorofManagement ManagementInformationSystems Name for advising information (E480; 329-2153). Program Planning GuideThe University of Lethbridge The PostAdministration,Management or a related discipline,and to students with an Accelerated Accounting Certificate. Admission to the Post

Seldin, Jonathan P.

213

Potassium in Atlantic Coastal Plain Soils: II. Crop Responses and Changes in Soil Potassium Under Intensive Management  

E-print Network

Intensive Management D. R. Parker,* G. J. Hendricks, and D. L. Sparks ABSTRACT Corn (Zea mays L.) grown the land in the grain when modern picker-shellers are used for harvest (Welch and Flannery, 1985

Sparks, Donald L.

214

Management of arterial lines and blood sampling in intensive care: a threat to patient safety.  

PubMed

In 2008, the UK National Patient Safety Agency (NPSA) made recommendations for safe arterial line management. Following a patient safety incident in our intensive care unit (ICU), we surveyed current practice in arterial line management and determined whether these recommendations had been adopted. We contacted all 241 adult ICUs in the UK; 228 (94.6%) completed the survey. Some NPSA recommendations have been widely implemented - use of sodium chloride 0.9% as flush fluid, two-person checking of fluids before use - and their practice was consistent. Others have been incompletely implemented and many areas of practice (prescription of fluids, two-person checking at shift changes, use of opaque pressure bags, arterial sampling technique) were highly variable. More importantly, the use of the wrong fluid as an arterial flush was reported by 30% of respondents for ICU practice, and a further 30% for practice elsewhere in the hospital. Our survey provides evidence of continuing risk to patients. PMID:24006919

Leslie, R A; Gouldson, S; Habib, N; Harris, N; Murray, H; Wells, V; Cook, T M

2013-11-01

215

A holistic life cycle analysis of waste management scenarios at increasing source segregation intensity: The case of an Italian urban area.  

PubMed

Life cycle analysis of several waste management scenarios for an Italian urban area was performed on the basis of different source segregation collection (SS) intensities from 0% up to 52%. Source segregated waste was recycled and or/recovered by composting. Residual waste management options were by landfilling, incineration with energy recovery or solid recovered fuel (SRF) production to substitute for coal. The increase in fuel and materials consumption due to increase in SS had negligible influence on the environmental impact of the system. Recycling operations such as incineration and SRF were always advantageous for impact reduction. There was lower impact for an SS of 52% even though the difference with the SS intensity of 35% was quite limited, about 15%. In all the configurations analyzed, the best environmental performance was achieved for the management system producing SRF by the biodrying process. PMID:25008299

Di Maria, Francesco; Micale, Caterina

2014-11-01

216

Intensive Care Unit without walls: Seeking patient safety by improving the efficiency of the system.  

PubMed

The term "ICU without walls" refers to innovative management in Intensive Care, based on two key elements: (1) collaboration of all medical and nursing staff involved in patient care during hospitalization and (2) technological support for severity early detection protocols by identifying patients at risk of deterioration throughout the hospital, based on the assessment of vital signs and/or laboratory test values, with the clear aim of improving critical patient safety in the hospitalization process. At present, it can be affirmed that there is important work to be done in the detection of severity and early intervention in patients at risk of organ dysfunction. Such work must be adapted to the circumstances of each center and should include training in the detection of severity, multidisciplinary work in the complete patient clinical process, and the use of technological systems allowing intervention on the basis of monitored laboratory and physiological parameters, with effective and efficient use of the information generated. Not only must information be generated, but also efficient management of such information must also be achieved. It is necessary to improve our activity through innovation in management procedures that facilitate the work of the intensivist, in collaboration with other specialists, throughout the hospital environment. Innovation is furthermore required in the efficient management of the information generated in hospitals, through intelligent and directed usage of the new available technology. PMID:24661919

Gordo, F; Abella, A

2014-10-01

217

A 17025:2005A 17025:2005 Management SystemManagement System  

E-print Network

A 17025:2005A 17025:2005 Management SystemManagement System Made SimpleMade Simple What to think about when reviewingWhat to think about when reviewing the Management Systemthe Management System #12 are not mutually exclusiveRequirements are not mutually exclusive HolisticHolistic This is a complete system

218

Pain prevalence, intensity, assessment and management in a hospitalized pediatric population.  

PubMed

New research, regulatory guidelines, and practice initiatives have improved pain management in infants, children, and adolescents, but obstacles remain. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence and demographics of pain, as well as pain management practice patterns in hospitalized children in a tertiary-care university hospital. We prospectively collected data including patient demographics, presence/absence and location of pain, pain intensity, pain assessment documentation, analgesic use, side effects of analgesic therapy, and patient/family satisfaction. Two hundred male (58%) and female, medical and surgical (61%) patients, averaging 9 ± 6.2 years were studied. Pain was common (86%) and often moderate to severe (40%). Surgical patients reported pain more frequently when enrolled than did medical patients (99% vs. 65%). Female gender, age ? 5 years, and Caucasian race were all associated with higher mean pain scores. Furthermore, females and Caucasian children consumed more opioids than males and non-Caucasians. Identified obstacles to optimal analgesic management include lack of documented physician pain assessment (<5%), a high prevalence of "as needed" analgesic dosing, frequent opioid-induced side effects (44% nausea and vomiting, 27% pruritus), and patient/family dissatisfaction with pain management (2%-7%). The data demonstrated that despite a concentrated focus on improving pain management over the past decade, pain remains common in hospitalized children. Identification of patient populations and characteristics that predispose to increased pain (e.g., female, Caucasian, postoperative patient) as well as obstacles to analgesic management provide a focus for the development of targeted interventions and research to further improve care. PMID:24602421

Kozlowski, Lori J; Kost-Byerly, Sabine; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Thompson, Carol B; Vasquenza, Kelly J; Rothman, Sharon K; Billett, Carol; White, Elizabeth D; Yaster, Myron; Monitto, Constance L

2014-03-01

219

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND FACILITY MANAGEMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

In industry and big organisations facility management has become a managing tool of more and more importance. In times of decreasing profit rates and harder competition every company is forced to develop better strategies for resource and facility management. In this context the questions arise: What is facility management, what offers GIS and how can Geographic Information Systems improve facility

T. Schürle; A. Boy; D. Fritsch

1998-01-01

220

Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS) Configuration Management Plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the Software Configuration Management (SCM) approach and procedures to be utilized in developing and maintaining the Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS). The configuration management procedures are necessary to ensure that any changes made to software and related documentation are consistent with ATMS goals and contained securely in a central library. This plan applies to all software and associated documentation used in producing ATMS V1.0 and ATMS V2.0 system.

Weidert, R.S.

1994-01-01

221

Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: Report of a Combined Obstetrical and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit  

PubMed Central

The methodology, equipment and personnel required to carry out an intensive-care program in the management of high-risk pregnancies have been outlined. The perinatal mortality rate has been determined and its etiology has been analyzed. There appear to be three conditions in which the degree of high risk is such as to warrant provision of the complete facilities of the service we described, viz., (a) severe pre-eclampsia; (b) marked intrauterine growth retardation with placental insufficiency as determined from serial measurements of uterine growth and estriol determinations; and (c) irreversible labour in premature pregnancies where a birth weight of 2200 g. or less is anticipated. Numerous other conditions that we have monitored have perhaps had their good outcome because of monitoring facilities. A less sophisticated and more easily applied method of monitoring should be available within the context of routine labour and delivery rooms. There is a pressing need to re-evaluate and change some of our methods of educating our undergraduate, postgraduate and practising physicians and to provide continuing education in the realm of prenatal care and recognition of high-risk pregnancy. Regionalization and centralization of this type of intensive care for high-risk pregnancies are required. Indispensable to the success of this type of project is the incorporation, without physical, emotional or intellectual barriers, of both a pediatric and an obstetrical component within the intensive-care unit. ImagesFIG. 3 PMID:5344991

Effer, S. B.

1969-01-01

222

Outpatient Management Following Intensive Induction or Salvage Chemotherapy for Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

PubMed Central

Adults with newly diagnosed or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) commonly receive intensive chemotherapy to achieve disease remission. In the United States and many other countries, it is standard practice that these patients remain hospitalized “preemptively” until blood count recovery due to the risk for overwhelming infections and bleeding during pancytopenia. This care policy requires hospitalization for an average of 3–4 weeks after completion of chemotherapy. However, highly effective oral prophylactic antimicrobials are now available, and transfusion support of outpatients has become routine in recent years. As a result, the care of patients with hematologic malignancies treated with other intensive modalities is increasingly shifting from inpatient to outpatient settings. Benefits of this shift could include reduced need for medical resources such as transfusions or intravenous antimicrobial therapy, improved quality of life (QOL), decreased rates of nosocomial infections, and lower cost. Increasing evidence indicates that selected AML patients undergoing intensive remission induction or salvage chemotherapy can be discharged early after completion of chemotherapy and followed closely in a well-equipped and –staffed outpatient facility safely and less costly. Further demonstration that the current approach of “preemptive” hospitalization is medically unjustified, economically more burdensome, and adversely affects health-related QOL would very likely change the management of these patients throughout this country and elsewhere and establish a new standard practice that improves cancer care. PMID:24518520

Walter, Roland B.; Taylor, Lenise R.; Gardner, Kelda M.; Dorcy, Kathleen Shannon; Vaughn, Jennifer E.; Estey, Elihu H.

2014-01-01

223

Successful management of an MRSA outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit.  

PubMed

We report an MRSA outbreak in our 25-bed tertiary neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), which was successfully contained. Methods include a retrospective review of patient files, microbiology records and meeting protocols. During the seven months of outbreak, 27 patients and seven health care workers (HCWs) had positive cultures for MRSA. The outbreak was caused by the epidemic Rhine-Hessen strain; cultured isolates were monoclonal. After a sharp increase of the number of new MRSA-cases the installation of an outbreak management team (OMT) and implementation of comprehensive measures (extensive screening and decolonization strategy including orally applied vancomycin, isolation wards, intensive disinfection regimen) successfully terminated the outbreak within one month. Ten (53%) of 19 patients with completed follow-up and all of the HCWs were decolonized successfully. Gastrointestinal colonization was present in 15 of 27 (56%) neonates, and was associated with poor decolonization success (30% vs. 78% in absence of gastrointestinal colonization). A comprehensive outbreak management can terminate an outbreak in a NICU setting within a short time. Thorough screening of nares, throat and especially stool is necessary for correct cohorting. Gastrointestinal decolonization in neonates seems difficult. PMID:21298461

Heinrich, N; Mueller, A; Bartmann, P; Simon, A; Bierbaum, G; Engelhart, S

2011-07-01

224

Psychological factors in intensive management of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.  

PubMed

With the publication of the DCCT results in 1993, hope has been given to patients with type I diabetes that blindness, kidney failure, and neuropathies are not necessarily what awaits them. However, to assume that diabetes is simply a disease that can be controlled "if only the patient would be compliant" is an incredibly naive way to approach treatment. Practitioners need to be keenly aware of not only the complexities of intensive management of type I diabetes but perhaps more importantly the numerous psychological factors that determine whether treatment adherence will occur. Psychological issues such as patient perceptions of symptoms, fear, unawareness of symptoms because of autonomic dysregulation or cognitive decline, attitudes, and control issues need to be assessed. These issues can be assessed quite easily with questionnaires, scales, and interview schedules readily available to practitioners. Additionally, for those patients who may not be attuned to monitoring physiologic or cognitive cues, awareness training and other coping skills interventions are available that can be incorporated into existing diabetes education programs. A mutual effort by the patient and health-care provider team can lead to success in intensive management of IDDM. PMID:8969335

Strauss, G J

1996-12-01

225

Designing an oil spill information management system  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the architectural design of OSIMS, an Oil Spill Information Management System, which is an integrated information management tool that consists of an object-relational database management system, an adaptive decision support system, an advanced visualization system (AVS) and a geographic information system (GIS). OSIMS will handle large and diverse databases of environmental, ecological, geographical, engineering, and regulatory information and will be used for risk analysis and contingency planning.

Douligeris, C.; Collins, J.; Iakovou, E.; Sun, P.; Riggs, K.R. [Univ. of Miami, Coral Gables, FL (United States)

1995-12-31

226

Case management for high-intensity service users: towards a relational approach to care co-ordination.  

PubMed

This study is based on a formative evaluation of a case management service for high-intensity service users in Northern England. The evaluation had three main purposes: (i) to assess the quality of the organisational infrastructure; (ii) to obtain a better understanding of the key influences that played a role in shaping the development of the service; and (iii) to identify potential changes in practice that may help to improve the quality of service provision. The evaluation was informed by Gittell's relational co-ordination theory, which focuses upon cross-boundary working practices that facilitate task integration. The Assessment of Chronic Illness Care Survey was used to assess the organisational infrastructure and qualitative interviews with front line staff were conducted to explore the key influences that shaped the development of the service. A high level of strategic commitment and political support for integrated working was identified. However, the quality of care co-ordination was variable. The most prominent operational factor that appeared to influence the scope and quality of care co-ordination was the pattern of interaction between the case managers and their co-workers. The co-ordination of patient care was much more effective in integrated co-ordination networks. Key features included clearly defined, task focussed, relational workspaces with interactive forums where case managers could engage with co-workers in discussions about the management of interdependent care activities. In dispersed co-ordination networks with fewer relational workspaces, the case managers struggled to work as effectively. The evaluation concluded that the creation of flexible and efficient task focused relational workspaces that are systemically managed and adequately resourced could help to improve the quality of care co-ordination, particularly in dispersed networks. PMID:21143543

McEvoy, Phil; Escott, Diane; Bee, Penny

2011-01-01

227

23 CFR 972.204 - Management systems requirements.  

...Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL LANDS HIGHWAYS FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Fish and Wildlife Service Management Systems § 972.204 Management systems...

2014-04-01

228

48 CFR 45.105 - Contractors' property management system compliance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Contractors' property management system compliance. 45.105 Section...105 Contractors' property management system compliance. (a) The...the contractor's property management system does not comply with...

2012-10-01

229

48 CFR 45.105 - Contractors' property management system compliance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Contractors' property management system compliance. 45.105 Section...105 Contractors' property management system compliance. (a) The...the contractor's property management system does not comply with...

2010-10-01

230

20 CFR 435.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Standards for financial management systems. 435.21 Section 435...21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Introduction. ...Recipients' financial management systems must provide for the...

2013-04-01

231

48 CFR 245.105 - Contractor's property management system compliance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Contractor's property management system compliance. 245.105...ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY...Contractor's property management system compliance. The...

2010-10-01

232

48 CFR 45.105 - Contractors' property management system compliance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false Contractors' property management system compliance. 45.105 Section...105 Contractors' property management system compliance. (a) The...the contractor's property management system does not comply with...

2011-10-01

233

20 CFR 435.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Standards for financial management systems. 435.21 Section 435...21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Introduction. ...Recipients' financial management systems must provide for the...

2012-04-01

234

48 CFR 45.105 - Contractors' property management system compliance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Contractors' property management system compliance. 45.105 Section...105 Contractors' property management system compliance. (a) The...the contractor's property management system does not comply with...

2013-10-01

235

Milk production, raw milk quality and fertility of dromedary camels (Camelus Dromedarius) under intensive management.  

PubMed

In many arid countries, dromedaries play an important role as a milk source in rural areas. However, the milk and meat production potential of this species is not well understood and documented. A large-scale camel dairy farm was established in 2006 in the United Arab Emirates. This study summarises the most important data on milk production, raw milk quality and reproductive efficiency collected on this farm during the first three years of operation. The average daily milk production, the mean length of lactation and the mean total milk production per lactation of 174 dromedaries were 6.0 ± 0.12 kg (± SEM), 586 ± 11.0 days (± SEM) and 3314 ± 98.5 kg (± SEM), respectively. The lactation curve reached its peak during the 4th month after parturition (mean ± SEM, 8.9 ± 0.04 kg), then it declined gradually, falling to 50% of the maximum by the 16th month postpartum (mean ± SEM, 4.3 ± 0.06 kg). Milking three times a day did not increase daily milk production compared to two times milking. Mean total viable bacterial count (TVC) and mean somatic cell count (SCC, ± SEM) of bulk raw camel milk were 4,403 ± 94 CFU/cm3 and 392,602 ± 5,999 cells/cm3 for a one-year period, respectively. There was a significant difference among months (P < 0.001). Coliform count was < 10 CFU/cm3 in most cases (96.5%). The average (± SEM) fat, protein, lactose, total solids (TS) and solid-non-fat (SNF) concentrations of individual milk samples were 2.51 ± 0.03%, 2.60 ± 0.01%, 4.03 ± 0.03%, 9.98 ± 0.03% and 7.56 ± 0.03%, respectively. Lactation period, average daily milk production and morning vs. evening milking significantly influenced milk chemical composition. For the 470 camels in the breeding programme, end-of-season pregnancy rate and birth rate were 87.0% and 82.6%, respectively, after natural mating. We have demonstrated that sustainable milk production is possible from a traditional species, the dromedary camel, under an intensive management system. PMID:23439293

Nagy, Péter; Thomas, Sonia; Markó, Orsolya; Juhász, Jutka

2013-03-01

236

School Management Information Systems in Primary Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developments in information technologies have been impacting upon educational organizations. Principals have been using management information systems to improve the efficiency of administrative services. The aim of this research is to explore principals' perceptions about management information systems and how school management information…

Demir, Kamile

2006-01-01

237

Electronic Reserves and Blackboard's Course Management System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electronic reserves joined the mainstream in academic libraries about the same time that course management systems were being developed. Containing much broader applicability and aimed at a larger audience, course management systems achieved a rapid popularity and familiarity with faculty and students. Because one of the course management functions, delivery of electronic documents, overlapped with electronic reserves, faculty, students, and

Charlotte Cubbage

2003-01-01

238

Biochar application reduces N2O emission in intensively managed temperate grassland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Biochar, a pyrolysis product of organic residues, is seen as an amendment for agricultural soils to improve soil fertility, sequester CO2 and reduce N2O emissions. Mainly used in highly weathered tropical soils, the interest of using biochar in intensively managed temperate soils is increasing. Our previous laboratory incubations have shown N2O reduction potentials of between 20 and 100% for temperate soils after biochar application (Felber et al., Biogeosciences Discuss, 2012). To assess the effect of biochar application under field conditions, a plot experiment (3 control vs. 3 biochar amended plots of 3x3 m size at a rate of 15 t ha-1) was set up in a temperate intensively managed grassland soil. N2O and CO2 emissions were quasi-continuously measured by static chambers under standard management practice over 8 months. In parallel soil samples were taken monthly from all plots and their N2O and CO2 productions were measured under controlled conditions in the lab. At the beginning of the field measurements (April 2011) cumulative N2O fluxes from biochar amended plots were above those of control plots, but the pattern reversed towards reduced fluxes from biochar plots after 3 months and the reduction reached about 15% by the end of 2011. The biochar effect on reducing N2O emissions in the laboratory was two times that of the field measurements, indicating that results from laboratory experiments are not directly transferable to field conditions. The experiments indicate a substantial N2O emission reduction potential of biochar in temperate grassland fields.

Felber, R.; Leifeld, J.; Neftel, A.

2012-04-01

239

Effect of Intensity Modulator Extinction on Practical Quantum Key Distribution System  

E-print Network

We study how the imperfection of intensity modulator effects on the security of a practical quantum key distribution system. The extinction ratio of the realistic intensity modulator is considered in our security analysis. We show that the secret key rate increases, under the practical assumption that the indeterminable noise introduced by the imperfect intensity modulator can not be controlled by the eavesdropper.

Jing-Zheng Huang; Zhen-Qiang Yin; Shuang Wang; Hong-Wei Li; Wei Chen; Zheng-Fu Han

2012-06-28

240

MEMIS: Multimedia emergency management information system  

SciTech Connect

In this paper the authors present a prototype management information system (MIS) designed for emergency managers: MEMIS (multimedia emergency management information system). The purpose is to show the technological possibilities and ease of development, and the tasks that can be supported by such systems. MEMIS is based on the latest technology for the development of MISs: multimedia, animation, voice and video communication, LAN and WAN, and machine intelligence. MEMIS covers the three most important tasks of an emergency manager: (1) emergency planning (facility management, site selection for hazardous activities, designation of hazardous material shipment routes), (2) emergency response (notification, monitoring, and response management), and (3) the daily management work (communications by phone, fax, and e-mail; database and spreadsheet management). MEMIS communicates with (and can control) standard software packages and databases used in the emergency management community, such as CAMEO. Its open architecture makes it easy to incorporate features designed to meet the unique needs of a specified region or nation.

Beroggi, G.E.G. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Aebi, M. [Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Computer Science; Wallace, W.A. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

1995-12-31

241

Revisiting Cost-Benefit Relationships of Behavior Management Strategies: What Special Educators Say about Usefulness, Intensity, and Effectiveness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, the authors determine special educators' judgments of the use, intensity, and effectiveness of communication and behavior management strategies. In an earlier study, F. H. Wood (1991) examined general educators' cost-benefit considerations in managing behavior of students with emotional or behavioral disorders. As an extension of…

Kaff, Marilyn S.; Zabel, Robert H.; Milham, Morgan

2007-01-01

242

Intensive management fails to promote recruitment in the last large population of Juniperus communis (L.) in Flanders (Belgium)  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, the effectiveness of management measures aimed at promoting recruitment in the last large Flemish juniper population at Heiderbos is evaluated. We resurveyed demographic plots 23 years after their establishment in 1980 and linked the population changes with detailed records of the intensive management during the same period. Between 1980 and 2003 the population size has decreased by

Kris Verheyen; Koen Schreurs; Bert Vanholen; Martin Hermy

2005-01-01

243

Intensive Innovation Context and Design System Dynamics. The case of Car Information Communication Entertainment (ICE) systems.  

E-print Network

, from the first car radio developed by the firm in the late 1950s, to ongoing new generations of «in-car will examine a major European automotive supplier of car radio equipment that offers a paradigmatic caseIntensive Innovation Context and Design System Dynamics. The case of Car Information Communication

Boyer, Edmond

244

Theater Battle Management Core System Systems Engineering Case Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Theater Battle Management Core System (TBMCS) is an integrated air command and control (C2) system that performs standardized, secure, automated air battle planning and execution management for Air Force, multi-service, and allied commanders in theate...

B. Krause, J. J. Collens

2005-01-01

245

CIS 330: Database Management Systems Course Number & Title (A.1) CIS 330: Database Management Systems  

E-print Network

CIS 330: Database Management Systems Course Number & Title (A.1) CIS 330: Database Management & Johannes Gehrke, Database Management Systems (third edition), McGraw Hill. Additional materials as handouts, e.g., research papers Catalog Description (A.5a) Introduction to database management systems

Plotkin, Joshua B.

246

Hospital information management system: an evolutionary knowledge management perspective.  

PubMed

The evolving paradigm shift resulting from IT, social and technological changes has created a need for developing an innovative knowledge-based healthcare system, which can effectively meet global healthcare system demands and also cater to future trends. The Hospital Information Management System (HIMS) is developed with this sole aim in mind, which helps in processing and management of hospital information not only inside the boundary, but also beyond the hospital boundary, e.g., telemedicine or e-healthcare. The purpose of this paper is to present such kind of functional HIMS, which can efficiently satisfy the current and future system requirements by using Knowledge Management (KM) and data management systems. The HIMS is developed in a KM context, wherein users can share and use the knowledge more effectively. The proposed system is fully compatible with future technical, social, managerial and economical requirements. PMID:18048272

Wadhwa, S; Saxena, Avneet; Wadhwa, Bharat

2007-01-01

247

Improved Heat Transfer and Performance of High Intensity Combustion Systems for Reformer Furnace Applications  

E-print Network

Developments over the past fifteen years have evolved new short flame, high intensity (1,000,000 BTU/HR/ft3 ) combustion systems for industrial uses. Such systems produce a more uniform and higher heat flux than conventional low intensity systems...

Williams, F. D. M.; Kondratas, H. M.

1983-01-01

248

Business Management System Support Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this research project was to develop a searchable database compiled with internal and external audit findings/observations. The data will correspond to the findings and observations from the date of Center-wide implementation of the ISO 9001-2000 standard to the present (2003-2008). It was derived and extracted from several sources and was in multiple formats. Once extracted, categorization of the findings/observations would be possible. The final data was mapped to the ISO 9001-2000 standard with the understanding that it will be displayed graphically. The data will be used to verify trends, associate risks, and establish timelines to identify strengths and weaknesses to determine areas of improvement in the Kennedy Space Center Business Management System Internal Audit Program.

Parikh, Jay

2008-01-01

249

Extremely high-intensity laser interactions with fundamental quantum systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The field of laser-matter interaction traditionally deals with the response of atoms, molecules, and plasmas to an external light wave. However, the recent sustained technological progress is opening up the possibility of employing intense laser radiation to trigger or substantially influence physical processes beyond atomic-physics energy scales. Available optical laser intensities exceeding 1022W/cm2 can push the fundamental light-electron interaction to the extreme limit where radiation-reaction effects dominate the electron dynamics, can shed light on the structure of the quantum vacuum, and can trigger the creation of particles such as electrons, muons, and pions and their corresponding antiparticles. Also, novel sources of intense coherent high-energy photons and laser-based particle colliders can pave the way to nuclear quantum optics and may even allow for the potential discovery of new particles beyond the standard model. These are the main topics of this article, which is devoted to a review of recent investigations on high-energy processes within the realm of relativistic quantum dynamics, quantum electrodynamics, and nuclear and particle physics, occurring in extremely intense laser fields.

Di Piazza, A.; Müller, C.; Hatsagortsyan, K. Z.; Keitel, C. H.

2012-07-01

250

23 CFR 971.204 - Management systems requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 971.204 Section 971...LANDS HIGHWAYS FOREST SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Forest Highway Program Management Systems § 971.204 Management systems...

2011-04-01

251

23 CFR 972.204 - Management systems requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 972.204 Section 972...HIGHWAYS FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Fish and Wildlife Service Management Systems § 972.204 Management systems...

2012-04-01

252

23 CFR 971.204 - Management systems requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 971.204 Section 971...LANDS HIGHWAYS FOREST SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Forest Highway Program Management Systems § 971.204 Management systems...

2013-04-01

253

23 CFR 971.204 - Management systems requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 971.204 Section 971...LANDS HIGHWAYS FOREST SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Forest Highway Program Management Systems § 971.204 Management systems...

2012-04-01

254

23 CFR 970.204 - Management systems requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 970.204 Section 970...HIGHWAYS NATIONAL PARK SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS National Park Service Management Systems § 970.204 Management systems...

2013-04-01

255

23 CFR 972.204 - Management systems requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 972.204 Section 972...HIGHWAYS FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Fish and Wildlife Service Management Systems § 972.204 Management systems...

2013-04-01

256

23 CFR 973.204 - Management systems requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 973.204 Section 973... FEDERAL LANDS HIGHWAYS MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS PERTAINING TO THE BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS... Bureau of Indian Affairs Management Systems § 973.204 Management systems...

2013-04-01

257

23 CFR 970.204 - Management systems requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 970.204 Section 970...HIGHWAYS NATIONAL PARK SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS National Park Service Management Systems § 970.204 Management systems...

2012-04-01

258

23 CFR 973.204 - Management systems requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 973.204 Section 973... FEDERAL LANDS HIGHWAYS MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS PERTAINING TO THE BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS... Bureau of Indian Affairs Management Systems § 973.204 Management systems...

2012-04-01

259

The effect of three culture methods on intensive culture system of pacific white shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Different culture methods may affect the intensive culture system of Pacific white shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei) regarding water quality and growth and economic performance. This study evaluated the potential effects of three culture methods through cultivation of juvenile shrimps under consistent tank management conditions for 84 d. The three methods involved shrimp cultivation in different tanks, i.e., outdoor tanks with cement bottom (mode-C), greenhouse tanks with cement bottom (mode-G) and outdoor tanks with mud-substrate (mode-M). Results showed that water temperature was significantly higher in mode-G than that in mode-C ( P < 0.05). In contrast to the other two treatments, mode-M had stable pH after 50 d cultivation of shrimps. In the mid-late period, the average concentrations of TAN, NO2-N, DIP and COD were significantly lower in mode-M and mode-G compared with those in mode-C ( P < 0.05). Despite lack of differences in the final shrimp weight among different treatments ( P > 0.05), mode-M had significantly higher shrimp yield, survival rate and feed conversion rate ( P < 0.05) than other modes. There were significant differences in revenue and net return among different treatments ( P < 0.05). These demonstrated that the treatments of mode-G and mode-M were conductive to the intensive culture system of L. vannamei.

Ma, Zhen; Wan, Rong; Song, Xiefa; Gao, Lei

2013-09-01

260

The Dark Energy Survey Data Management System  

SciTech Connect

The Dark Energy Survey (DES) collaboration will study cosmic acceleration with a 5000 deg2 griZY survey in the southern sky over 525 nights from 2011-2016. The DES data management (DESDM) system will be used to process and archive these data and the resulting science ready data products. The DESDM system consists of an integrated archive, a processing framework, an ensemble of astronomy codes and a data access framework. We are developing the DESDM system for operation in the high performance computing (HPC) environments at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) and Fermilab. Operating the DESDM system in an HPC environment offers both speed and flexibility. We will employ it for our regular nightly processing needs, and for more compute-intensive tasks such as large scale image coaddition campaigns, extraction of weak lensing shear from the full survey dataset, and massive seasonal reprocessing of the DES data. Data products will be available to the Collaboration and later to the public through a virtual-observatory compatible web portal. Our approach leverages investments in publicly available HPC systems, greatly reducing hardware and maintenance costs to the project, which must deploy and maintain only the storage, database platforms and orchestration and web portal nodes that are specific to DESDM. In Fall 2007, we tested the current DESDM system on both simulated and real survey data. We used TeraGrid to process 10 simulated DES nights (3TB of raw data), ingesting and calibrating approximately 250 million objects into the DES Archive database. We also used DESDM to process and calibrate over 50 nights of survey data acquired with the Mosaic2 camera. Comparison to truth tables in the case of the simulated data and internal crosschecks in the case of the real data indicate that astrometric and photometric data quality is excellent.

Mohr, Joseph J.; /Illinois U., Urbana, Astron. Dept. /Illinois U., Urbana; Barkhouse, Wayne; /North Dakota U.; Beldica, Cristina; /Illinois U., Urbana; Bertin, Emmanuel; /Paris, Inst. Astrophys.; Dora Cai, Y.; /NCSA, Urbana; Nicolaci da Costa, Luiz A.; /Rio de Janeiro Observ.; Darnell, J.Anthony; /Illinois U., Urbana, Astron. Dept.; Daues, Gregory E.; /NCSA, Urbana; Jarvis, Michael; /Pennsylvania U.; Gower, Michelle; /NCSA, Urbana; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab /Rio de Janeiro Observ.

2008-07-01

261

The Dark Energy Survey Data Management System  

E-print Network

The Dark Energy Survey collaboration will study cosmic acceleration with a 5000 deg2 griZY survey in the southern sky over 525 nights from 2011-2016. The DES data management (DESDM) system will be used to process and archive these data and the resulting science ready data products. The DESDM system consists of an integrated archive, a processing framework, an ensemble of astronomy codes and a data access framework. We are developing the DESDM system for operation in the high performance computing (HPC) environments at NCSA and Fermilab. Operating the DESDM system in an HPC environment offers both speed and flexibility. We will employ it for our regular nightly processing needs, and for more compute-intensive tasks such as large scale image coaddition campaigns, extraction of weak lensing shear from the full survey dataset, and massive seasonal reprocessing of the DES data. Data products will be available to the Collaboration and later to the public through a virtual-observatory compatible web portal. Our approach leverages investments in publicly available HPC systems, greatly reducing hardware and maintenance costs to the project, which must deploy and maintain only the storage, database platforms and orchestration and web portal nodes that are specific to DESDM. In Fall 2007, we tested the current DESDM system on both simulated and real survey data. We used Teragrid to process 10 simulated DES nights (3TB of raw data), ingesting and calibrating approximately 250 million objects into the DES Archive database. We also used DESDM to process and calibrate over 50 nights of survey data acquired with the Mosaic2 camera. Comparison to truth tables in the case of the simulated data and internal crosschecks in the case of the real data indicate that astrometric and photometric data quality is excellent.

Joseph J. Mohr; Wayne Barkhouse; Cristina Beldica; Emmanuel Bertin; Y. Dora Cai; Luiz da Costa; J. Anthony Darnell; Gregory E. Daues; Michael Jarvis; Michelle Gower; Huan Lin; leandro Martelli; Eric Neilsen; Chow-Choong Ngeow; Ricardo Ogando; Alex Parga; Erin Sheldon; Douglas Tucker; Nikolay Kuropatkin; Chris Stoughton

2008-07-16

262

A microprocessor-based battery management system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The system was developed for the management of industrial truck batteries and battery charging equipment, but the concepts and architectures used can be expanded for use with stationary battery systems. With the battery charger as an integral part of the BMS (battery management system), modifications in the charging scenario such as automatic equalizing can be introduced. Discharge tests can be

M. W. Healy; E. C. Rhyne

1990-01-01

263

Alert Management Systems: A Quick Introduction  

E-print Network

Alert Management Systems: A Quick Introduction Robert Grossman University of Illinois at Chicago to screen events, build profiles associated with the events, and send alerts based upon the profiles and events. These types of systems are becoming known as alert management systems (AMS). We give some

Grossman, Robert

264

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (MIS) CONCENTRATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES  

E-print Network

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (MIS) CONCENTRATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES The management information systems concentration, like a major, focuses on the use of information technology for value creation creation. Link to Rensselaer 2012-2013 Catalog Required Courses MGMT 4240 Systems Analysis & Design MGMT

Salama, Khaled

265

Performance management: a framework for management control systems research  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper proposes a framework for analysing the operation of management control systems structured around five central issues. These issues relate to objectives, strategies and plans for their attainment, target-setting, incentive and reward structures and information feedback loops. Their central focus is on the management of organizational performance. Because the framework has been inductively developed, its application is `tested' against

David Otley

1999-01-01

266

Electrofluidic systems for contrast management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Operating in dynamic lighting conditions and in greatly varying backgrounds is challenging. Current paints and state-ofthe- art passive adaptive coatings (e.g. photochromics) are not suitable for multi- environment situations. A semi-active, low power, skin is needed that can adapt its reflective properties based on the background environment to minimize contrast through the development and incorporation of suitable pigment materials. Electrofluidic skins are a reflective display technology for electronic ink and paper applications. The technology is similar to that in E Ink but makes use of MEMS based microfluidic structures, instead of simple black and white ink microcapsules dispersed in clear oil. Electrofluidic skin's low power operation and fast switching speeds (~20 ms) are an improvement over current state-ofthe- art contrast management technologies. We report on a microfluidic display which utilizes diffuse pigment dispersion inks to change the contrast of the underlying substrate from 5.8% to 100%. Voltage is applied and an electromechanical pressure is used to pull a pigment dispersion based ink from a hydrophobic coated reservoir into a hydrophobic coated surface channel. When no voltage is applied, the Young-Laplace pressure pushes the pigment dispersion ink back down into the reservoir. This allows the pixel to switch from the on and off state by balancing the two pressures. Taking a systems engineering approach from the beginning of development has enabled the technology to be integrated into larger systems.

Rebello, Keith J.; Maranchi, Jeffrey P.; Tiffany, Jason E.; Brown, Christopher Y.; Maisano, Adam J.; Hagedon, Matthew A.; Heikenfeld, Jason C.

2012-06-01

267

Time domain referencing in intensity modulation fiber optic sensing systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Intensity modulation sensors are classified by the way in which the reference and signal channels are separated: in space, wavelength, or time domains. To implement the time-domain referencing, different types of fiber-optic loops have been used. A pulse of short duration sent into the loop results in a series of pulses of different amplitudes. The information about the measured parameter is retrieved from the relative amplitudes of pulses in the same train.

Adamovsky, Grigory

1986-01-01

268

Management system, organizational climate and performance relationships  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Seven aerospace firms were investigated to determine if a relationship existed among management systems, organizational climate, and organization performance. Positive relationships were found between each of these variables, but a statistically significant relationship existed only between the management system and organizational climate. The direction and amount of communication and the degree of decentralized decision-making, elements of the management system, also had a statistically significant realtionship with organization performance.

Davis, B. D.

1979-01-01

269

Multiagent architectures for intelligent traffic management systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports our experiences with agent-based architectures for intelligent traffic management systems. We describe and compare integrated TRYS and TRYS autonomous agents, two multiagent systems that perform decision support for real-time traffic management in the urban motorway network around Barcelona. Both systems draw upon traffic management agents that use similar knowledge-based reasoning techniques in order to deal with local

Josefa Z. Hernández; Sascha Ossowski; Ana Garc??a-Serrano

2002-01-01

270

A model for international border management systems.  

SciTech Connect

To effectively manage the security or control of its borders, a country must understand its border management activities as a system. Using its systems engineering and security foundations as a Department of Energy National Security Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories has developed such an approach to modeling and analyzing border management systems. This paper describes the basic model and its elements developed under Laboratory Directed Research and Development project 08-684.

Duggan, Ruth Ann

2008-09-01

271

A wireless diabetes management and communication system.  

PubMed

Current diabetes management requires the collection of a large volume of data by the patient for analysis by his or her provider. There are numerous practical and technical barriers to doing this effectively and efficiently. In addition, the calculation of the correct insulin dose is complex because it requires considering anticipated carbohydrate consumption and exercise in addition to the current blood glucose level. A Diabetes Management and Communication System (DMCS) has been developed using a Compaq iPAQ Pocket PC with a Sprint PCS wireless AirCard. This system circumvents the problem of multiple proprietary programs for each brand of meter and permits the accurate determination of the proper insulin dose. Privacy is maintained by using only the iPAQ serial number as the patient identifier with access to the website protected by unique patient and provider passwords. The iPAQ was programmed with formulas that included: insulin sensitivity factor, current glucose level, amount of carbohydrates, appropriate carbohydrate:insulin ratio for that meal, and duration/intensity of exercise. Once the information is entered, an insulin dose is calculated, although an alternative dose can be selected. The data are downloaded to http://www.HealthSentry.net, where they are displayed in both tabular and graphic form. The patient may view the glucose data in both tabular and graphic form on the iPAQ. Thus a DMCS has been developed to assist patients and providers in improving glycemic control. A proof-of-concept study is underway to determine the effectiveness of the DMCS in patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus who are currently using insulin pumps. PMID:14511424

Vigersky, Robert A; Hanson, Eric; McDonough, Edward; Rapp, Timothy; Pajak, John; Galen, Robert S

2003-01-01

272

A multi-taxon approach reveals the effect of management intensity on biodiversity in Alpine larch grasslands.  

PubMed

In the Alps, larch grasslands form one of the most pleasing aspects of the landscape. However, their effectiveness in contributing to biodiversity conservation may depend on the intensity of their management. We used a multi-taxon approach to evaluate the effects of the intensification of management practices and those of abandonment on the biodiversity of the main autotrophic organisms hosted in this habitat, including vascular plants, bryophytes, and lichens. The study was carried out in the eastern part of South Tyrol, in the Italian Alps, where the diversity patterns of these three organismal groups were compared among intensively managed, extensively managed, and abandoned stands. The management intensity was found to strongly influence the biodiversity of the organisms, with a general pattern indicating the best conditions in extensively managed stands. Both abandonment and management intensification were detrimental to biodiversity through different mechanisms that led to species loss or to major shifts in species composition. However, the most negative effects were related to management intensification, mainly due to the high nitrogen supply, providing evidence for the increasing impact of eutrophication on Alpine environments. PMID:24784735

Nascimbene, Juri; Fontana, Veronika; Spitale, Daniel

2014-07-15

273

Management Information Systems in Educational Organizations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This chapter of "Principles of School Business Management" provides an overview of the role of computers--and microcomputers in particular--in the school business management process. The chapter opens with a background discussion of the management information system (MIS) concept in general. This topic is examined in terms of the characteristics…

Dembowski, Frederick L.

274

BachelorofManagement InformationSystems  

E-print Network

://www.uleth.ca/ross/ppgs/ppg.html Calendar Year: 2006-2007 Faculty: Arts & Science - Year 1 Management - Years 2, 3, & 4 Admission Admission of Management - Information Systems 2 Calendar Year - 2006-2007 ECON 1010 STAT 1770 1 Fine Arts & Humanities Course Fine Arts & Humanities Course Elective - Non-Management 2 FALL (Sept - Dec) ECON 1012 One of

Seldin, Jonathan P.

275

COURSE PROGRAM MANAGEMENT OF EDUCATIONAL SYSTEMS  

E-print Network

1 « » COURSE PROGRAM MANAGEMENT OF EDUCATIONAL SYSTEMS Author : O. Mashkina, Ph.D. 1 of "Management" and "Education management" specializations. The practical portion of the course focuses. GOALS AND OBJECTIVES OF THE COURSE In the last quarter of the 20th century, conceptual

Kaplan, Alexander

276

A Lightweight, High-performance I/O Management Package for Data-intensive Computing  

SciTech Connect

Our group has been working with ANL collaborators on the topic â??bridging the gap between parallel file system and local file systemâ?ť during the course of this project period. We visited Argonne National Lab -- Dr. Robert Rossâ??s group for one week in the past summer 2007. We looked over our current project progress and planned the activities for the incoming years 2008-09. The PI met Dr. Robert Ross several times such as HEC FSIO workshop 08, SCâ??08 and SCâ??10. We explored the opportunities to develop a production system by leveraging our current prototype to (SOGP+PVFS) a new PVFS version. We delivered SOGP+PVFS codes to ANL PVFS2 group in 2008.We also talked about exploring a potential project on developing new parallel programming models and runtime systems for data-intensive scalable computing (DISC). The methodology is to evolve MPI towards DISC by incorporating some functions of Google MapReduce parallel programming model. More recently, we are together exploring how to leverage existing works to perform (1) coordination/aggregation of local I/O operations prior to movement over the WAN, (2) efficient bulk data movement over the WAN, (3) latency hiding techniques for latency-intensive operations. Since 2009, we start applying Hadoop/MapReduce to some HEC applications with LANL scientists John Bent and Salman Habib. Another on-going work is to improve checkpoint performance at I/O forwarding Layer for the Road Runner super computer with James Nuetz and Gary Gridder at LANL. Two senior undergraduates from our research group did summer internships about high-performance file and storage system projects in LANL since 2008 for consecutive three years. Both of them are now pursuing Ph.D. degree in our group and will be 4th year in the PhD program in Fall 2011 and go to LANL to advance two above-mentioned works during this winter break. Since 2009, we have been collaborating with several computer scientists (Gary Grider, John bent, Parks Fields, James Nunez, Hsing-Bung Chen, etc) from HPC5 and James Ahrens from Advanced Computing Laboratory in Los Alamos National Laboratory. We hold a weekly conference and/or video meeting on advancing works at two fronts: the hardware/software infrastructure of building large-scale data intensive cluster and research publications. Our group members assist in constructing several onsite LANL data intensive clusters. Two parties have been developing software codes and research papers together using both sidesâ?? resources.

Wang, Jun

2011-06-22

277

On the Duality of Data-intensive File System Design  

E-print Network

framework and runs cloud workload (Hadoop) · PVFS: parallel file system · HDFS: file system designed for Hadoop · Tells a story of making a parallel file system work well in a cloud workload #12;Wittawat © November 11!http://www.pdl.cmu.edu/ 6 Hadoop application Hadoop framework File system API (Java) HDFS

278

Niche systems help hospitals manage useful data.  

PubMed

Hospitals often struggle to more effectively manage their information. However, their main problem is not the lack of data to solve problems with, it is the lack of useful data. By incorporating a specialized or "niche" system of information management, hospitals will have specific data they can use for strategic planning without being overwhelmed by repetitive or unneeded information. This is the third article in a special report on managing managed care. PMID:10290057

Katz, P M; Lohman, P

1988-11-01

279

Waste Management Information System (WMIS) User Guide  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the user of the Waste Management Information System (WMIS) instructions on how to use the WMIS software. WMIS allows users to initiate, track, and close waste packages. The modular design supports integration and utilization of data throuh the various stages of waste management. The phases of the waste management work process include generation, designation, packaging, container management, procurement, storage, treatment, transportation, and disposal.

R. E. Broz

2008-12-22

280

Greenhouse gas budget (CO2, CH4 and N2O) of intensively managed grassland following restoration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The first full greenhouse gas (GHG) flux budget of an intensively managed grassland in Switzerland (Chamau) is presented. The three major trace gases, carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) were measured with the eddy covariance (EC) technique. For CO2 concentrations, an open-path infrared gas analyzer was used, while N2O and CH4 concentrations were measured with a recently developed continuous-wave quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer (QCLAS). We investigated the magnitude of these trace gas emissions after grassland restoration, including ploughing, harrowing, sowing and fertilization with inorganic and organic fertilizers in 2012. Large peaks of N2O fluxes (20 - 50 nmol m-2 s-1 compared to a < 5 nmol m-2 s-1 background) were observed during thawing of the soil after the winter period and after mineral fertilizer application followed by re-sowing in the beginning of the summer season. N2O fluxes were controlled by nitrogen input, plant productivity, soil water content and temperature. Management activities led to increased variations of N2O fluxes up to 14 days after the management event as compared to background fluxes measured during periods without management (< 5nmol m-2 s-1). Fluxes of CO2 remained small until full plant development in early summer 2012. In contrast methane emissions showed only minor variations over time. The annual GHG flux budget was dominated by N2O (48 % contribution) and CO2 emissions (44 %). CH4 flux contribution to the annual budget was only minor (8 %). We conclude that recently developed multi-species QCLAS in an EC system open new opportunities to determine the temporal variation of N2O and CH4 fluxes, which further allow to quantify annual emissions. With respect to grassland restoration, our study emphasizes the key role of N2O and CO2 losses after ploughing, changing a permanent grassland from a carbon sink to a significant carbon source.

Merbold, Lutz; Eugster, Werner; Stieger, Jacqueline; Zahniser, Mark; Nelson, David; Buchmann, Nina

2014-05-01

281

The alfalfa leafcutting bee, Megachile rotundata: the world's most intensively managed solitary bee.  

PubMed

The alfalfa leafcutting bee (ALCB), Megachile rotundata F. (Megachildae), was accidentally introduced into the United States by the 1940s. Nest management of this Eurasian nonsocial pollinator transformed the alfalfa seed industry in North America, tripling seed production. The most common ALCB management practice is the loose cell system, in which cocooned bees are removed from nesting cavities for cleaning and storage. Traits of ALCBs that favored their commercialization include gregarious nesting; use of leaves for lining nests; ready acceptance of affordable, mass-produced nesting materials; alfalfa pollination efficacy; and emergence synchrony with alfalfa bloom. The ALCB became a commercial success because much of its natural history was understood, targeted research was pursued, and producer ingenuity was encouraged. The ALCB presents a model system for commercializing other solitary bees and for advancing new testable hypotheses in diverse biological disciplines. PMID:20809804

Pitts-Singer, Theresa L; Cane, James H

2011-01-01

282

The role of metrics and measurements in a software intensive total quality management environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Paramax Space Systems began its mission as a member of the Rockwell Space Operations Company (RSOC) team which was the successful bidder on a massive operations consolidation contract for the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) at JSC. The contract awarded to the team was the Space Transportation System Operations Contract (STSOC). Our initial challenge was to accept responsibility for a very large, highly complex and fragmented collection of software from eleven different contractors and transform it into a coherent, operational baseline. Concurrently, we had to integrate a diverse group of people from eleven different companies into a single, cohesive team. Paramax executives recognized the absolute necessity to develop a business culture based on the concept of employee involvement to execute and improve the complex process of our new environment. Our executives clearly understood that management needed to set the example and lead the way to quality improvement. The total quality management policy and the metrics used in this endeavor are presented.

Daniels, Charles B.

1992-01-01

283

University Program Management Information System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA's objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well-being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data. This report was prepared by the Education Division/FE, Office of Human Resources and Education.

Gans, Gary (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

284

University Program Management Information System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA's objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data.

Gans, Gary (Technical Monitor)

2004-01-01

285

University Program Management Information System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA' objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data.

2001-01-01

286

5 CFR 9701.405 - Performance management system requirements.  

...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Performance management system requirements. 9701.405...HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Performance Management § 9701.405 Performance management system requirements. (a) DHS...

2014-01-01

287

5 CFR 9701.405 - Performance management system requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Performance management system requirements. 9701.405...HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Performance Management § 9701.405 Performance management system requirements. (a) DHS...

2011-01-01

288

5 CFR 9701.405 - Performance management system requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Performance management system requirements. 9701.405...HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Performance Management § 9701.405 Performance management system requirements. (a) DHS...

2012-01-01

289

5 CFR 9701.405 - Performance management system requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Performance management system requirements. 9701.405...HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Performance Management § 9701.405 Performance management system requirements. (a) DHS...

2013-01-01

290

A Knowledge Management System Using Bayesian Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In today’s world, decision support and knowledge management processes are strategic and interdependent activities in many\\u000a organizations. The companies’ interest on a correct knowledge management is grown, more than interest on the mere knowledge\\u000a itself. This paper proposes a Knowledge Management System based on Bayesian networks. The system has been tested collecting\\u000a and using data coming from projects and processes

Patrizia Ribino; Antonio Oliveri; Giuseppe Lo Re; Salvatore Gaglio

2009-01-01

291

Privacy Impact Assessment OFEO Facilities Management System Facilities Center  

E-print Network

Privacy Impact Assessment OFEO Facilities Management System ­ Facilities Center I. System Identification 1. IT System Name: Facilities Management System - FacilityCenter 2. IT System Sponsor: Office. IT System Manager: Michelle T. Gooch, Facilities Management Systems Manager 5. PIA Author: Michelle T. Gooch

Mathis, Wayne N.

292

[Development of the ophthalmology information management system].  

PubMed

This article demonstrates the necessity and feasibility of setting up the ophthalmology information management system. It expounds the system's configuration, main functions and hardware, especially the key designing points of the information interfaces. PMID:18269046

Mei, Xue-qin; Yang, Tao; Yang, Gui-fang

2007-11-01

293

A Blood Bank Information Management System  

PubMed Central

A computerized Blood Bank Management system is described. Features include product oriented data input, inventory control reports, product utilization reports, rapid retrieval of individual patient reports. Relative benefits of the system are discussed.

Farmer, James J.

1982-01-01

294

Information Systems Coordinate Emergency Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rescue crews have been searching for the woman for nearly a week. Hurricane Katrina devastated Hancock County, the southernmost point in Mississippi, and the woman had stayed through the storm in her beach house. There is little hope of finding her alive; the search teams know she is gone because the house is gone. Late at night in the art classroom of the school that is serving as the county s emergency operations center, Craig Harvey is discussing the search with the center s commander. Harvey is the Chief Operating Officer of a unique company called NVision Solutions Inc., based at NASA s Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, only a couple of miles away. He and his entire staff have set up a volunteer operation in the art room, supporting the emergency management efforts using technology and capabilities the company developed through its NASA partnerships. As he talks to the commander, Harvey feels an idea taking shape that might lead them to the woman s location. Working with surface elevation data and hydrological principles, Harvey creates a map showing how the floodwaters from the storm would have flowed along the topography of the region around the woman s former home. Using the map, search crews find the woman s body in 15 minutes. Recovering individuals who have been lost is a sad reality of emergency management in the wake of a disaster like Hurricane Katrina in 2005. But the sooner answers can be provided, the sooner a community s overall recovery can take place. When damage is extensive, resources are scattered, and people are in dire need of food, shelter, and medical assistance, the speed and efficiency of emergency operations can be the key to limiting the impact of a disaster and speeding the process of recovery. And a key to quick and effective emergency planning and response is geographic information. With a host of Earth-observing satellites orbiting the globe at all times, NASA generates an unmatched wealth of data about our ever-changing planet. This information can be captured, analyzed, and visualized by geographic information systems (GIS) to produce maps, charts, and other tools that can reveal information essential to a wide variety of applications including emergency management. Knowing precise, real-time information about the size, location, environmental conditions, and resulting damage of an event like a flood or wildfire as well as the location and numbers of emergency responders and other resources contributes directly to the effectiveness of disaster mitigation. The need for such information is also evident when responding to homeland security threats, such as a terrorist attack. Recognizing the value of its geospatial information resources for this and other purposes, in 1998 Stennis and the state of Mississippi partnered to form what became the Enterprise for Innovative Geospatial Solutions (EIGS) industry cluster, supporting the growth of remote sensing and GIS-based research and business. As part of EIGS, several companies partnered with NASA through dual use and Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts. Among those was NVision.

2012-01-01

295

Algorithmic Problems in Review-Management Systems  

E-print Network

Algorithmic Problems in Review-Management Systems References: · T. Lappas, M. Crovella, E. Terzi- Management Systems Users-Customers: ­ Read reviews to form opinions Users-Reviewers: ­ Write reviews attributes Image Quality Battery Life Ease of Use Features Affordability Portability Construction #12;The

Terzi, Evimaria

296

Requirements management system browser software requirements specification  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this document is to define the essential user requirements for the Requirements Management System Browser (RMSB) application. This includes specifications for the Graphical User Interface (GUI) and the supporting database structures. The RMSB application is needed to provide an easy to use PC-based interface to browse system engineering data stored and managed in a UNIX software application.

1996-01-01

297

Decision support system for nursing management control  

SciTech Connect

A knowledge representation approach for expert systems supporting decision processes in business is proposed. A description of a knowledge representation schema using a logic programming metalanguage is described, then the role of such a schema in a management expert system is demonstrated through the problem of nursing management control in hospitals. 18 references.

Ernst, C.J.

1983-01-01

298

Electronic Resource Management Systems in Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Electronic resource management (ERM) systems have inundated the library marketplace. Both integrated library systems (ILS) vendors and subscription agents are now offering products and service enhancements that claim to help libraries efficiently manage their electronic resources. Additionally, some homegrown and open-source solutions have emerged…

Grogg, Jill E.

2008-01-01

299

A Resource Management Architecture for Metacomputing Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Metacomputing systems are intended to support remote and\\/or concurrent use of geo- graphically distributed computational resources. Resource management in such systems is complicated by ve concerns that do not typically arise in other situations: site autonomy and heterogeneous substrates at the resources, and application requirements for policy exten- sibility, co-allocation, and online control. We describe a resource management architecture that

Karl Czajkowski; Ian T. Foster; Nicholas T. Karonis; Carl Kesselman; Stuart Martin; Warren Smith; Steven Tuecke

1998-01-01

300

Managing secure computer systems and networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

No computer system or computer network can today be operated without the necessary security measures to secure and protect the electronic assets stored, processed and transmitted using such systems and networks. Very often the effort in managing such security and protection measures are totally underestimated. This paper provides an overview of the security management needed to secure and protect a

1996-01-01

301

Dynamic power management in environmentally powered systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper a framework for energy management in energy harvesting embedded systems is presented. As a possible example scenario, we focus on wireless sensor nodes which are powered by solar cells. We demonstrate that classical power management solutions have to be reconceived and\\/or new problems arise if perpetual operation of the system is required. In particular, we provide a

Clemens Moser; Jian-Jia Chen; Lothar Thiele

2010-01-01

302

Health & Safety Management System Queen's University  

E-print Network

Health & Safety Management System Queen's University December 2003 #12;Queen's University Health & Safety Management System 2 1. Introduction Under Provincial Health and Safety legislation, the Occupational Health and Safety Act, (the OH&S Act), places the onus for compliance with the legislation

Ellis, Randy

303

Managing Manure with Biogas Recovery Systems  

E-print Network

Managing Manure with Biogas Recovery Systems Improved Performance at Competitive Costs 1EPA United is managing manure and process water in a way that controls odors and protects environ- mental quality. Biogas emissions and capture biogas--a useful source of energy. About Anaerobic Digestion Biogas recovery systems

Mukhtar, Saqib

304

Changing Course Management Systems: Lessons Learned  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During 2003, the North Dakota University System began to be concerned about the cost of supporting multiple course management systems. Since 1997, the 11 NDUS institutions had used 9 different course management packages, including one homegrown product (HTMLeZ) and such proprietary products as Blackboard, WebCT, and e-College. The University of…

Smart, Kathy A.; Meyer, Katrina A.

2005-01-01

305

Supporting Workflow in a Course Management System  

Microsoft Academic Search

CMS is a secure and scalable web-based course management system developed by the Cornell University Computer Science Department. The system was designed to simplify, streamline, and automate many aspects of the workflow associated with running a large course, such as course creation, importing students, management of student workgroups, online submission of assignments, assignment of graders, grading, handling regrade requests, and

Chavdar Botev; Hubert Chao; Theodore Chao; Yim Cheng; Raymond Doyle; Sergey Grankin; Jon Guarino; Saikat Guha; Pei-Chen Lee; Dan Perry; Christopher Re; Ilya Rifkin; Tingyan Yuan; Dora Abdullah; Kathy Carpenter; David Gries; Dexter Kozen; Andrew C. Myers; David I. Schwartz; Jayavel Shanmugasundaram

2005-01-01

306

Total quality environmental management: Integrating environmental and quality management systems  

SciTech Connect

As the oilfield industry strives to globally sustain continuous movement of environmental and quality performance, companies have come to realize Total Quality Environmental Management (TQEM) is essential in product research, development manufacturing and services. As our industry endeavors to continuously improve, more emphasis is being placed upon the management systems we apply such as ISO 14000 and ISO 9000. These standards are tools for improving environmental and quality performance, meeting customer requirements, and increasing profitability. lbs paper presents actual examples of the successful integration of environmental and quality management systems into an operational TQEM system. Also presented are pilot study evaluations of the draft ISO 14000 standards by two certified ISO 9000 facilities. Examples of continuous improvement and cross-functional teams as means to merge environment and quality management into the functions of process control, corrective and preventive action, document control, and waste management are presented. Results and improvements from facilities involved with TQEM discussed along with their strategies and progress in consolidating the environmental and quality programs into a single, viable management system. The case histories from various facilities demonstrate the implementation of TQEM and in TQEM promotes a cleaner environment, reduces costs, con- serves energy and raw materials, minimizes pollutants and wastes, and reduces redundant paperwork.

Carley, J.A.; Kubala, G.; Hudson, T. [and others

1996-11-01

307

Land use effects on soil carbon fractions in the southeastern United States. I. Management-intensive versus extensive grazing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Changes in grassland management intended to increase productivity can lead to sequestration of substantial amounts of atmospheric C in soils. Management-intensive grazing (MiG) can increase forage production in mesic pastures, but potential impacts on soil C have not been evaluated. We sampled four pastures (to 50 cm depth) in Virginia, USA, under MiG and neighboring pastures that were extensively grazed or

Richard T. Conant; Johan Six; Keith Paustian

2003-01-01

308

Sequencing Information Management System (SIMS). Final report  

SciTech Connect

A feasibility study to develop a requirements analysis and functional specification for a data management system for large-scale DNA sequencing laboratories resulted in a functional specification for a Sequencing Information Management System (SIMS). This document reports the results of this feasibility study, and includes a functional specification for a SIMS relational schema. The SIMS is an integrated information management system that supports data acquisition, management, analysis, and distribution for DNA sequencing laboratories. The SIMS provides ad hoc query access to information on the sequencing process and its results, and partially automates the transfer of data between laboratory instruments, analysis programs, technical personnel, and managers. The SIMS user interfaces are designed for use by laboratory technicians, laboratory managers, and scientists. The SIMS is designed to run in a heterogeneous, multiplatform environment in a client/server mode. The SIMS communicates with external computational and data resources via the internet.

Fields, C.

1996-02-15

309

The intensity correlation function of "blinking" quantum systems  

E-print Network

Explicit expressions are determined for the photon correlation function of ``blinking'' quantum systems, i.e. systems with different types of fluorescent periods. These expressions can be used for a fit to experimental data and for obtaining system parameters therefrom. For two dipole-dipole interacting $V$ systems the dependence on the dipole coupling constant is explicitly given and shown to be particularly pronounced if the strong driving is reduced. We propose to use this for an experimental verification of the dipole-dipole interaction.

Gerhard C. Hegerfeldt; Dirk Seidel

2002-05-24

310

Ridge 2000 Data Management System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hosted at Lamont by the marine geoscience Data Management group, mgDMS, the NSF-funded Ridge 2000 electronic database, http://www.marine-geo.org/ridge2000/, is a key component of the Ridge 2000 multi-disciplinary program. The database covers each of the three Ridge 2000 Integrated Study Sites: Endeavour Segment, Lau Basin, and 8-11N Segment. It promotes the sharing of information to the broader community, facilitates integration of the suite of information collected at each study site, and enables comparisons between sites. The Ridge 2000 data system provides easy web access to a relational database that is built around a catalogue of cruise metadata. Any web browser can be used to perform a versatile text-based search which returns basic cruise and submersible dive information, sample and data inventories, navigation, and other relevant metadata such as shipboard personnel and links to NSF program awards. In addition, non-proprietary data files, images, and derived products which are hosted locally or in national repositories, as well as science and technical reports, can be freely downloaded. On the Ridge 2000 database page, our Data Link allows users to search the database using a broad range of parameters including data type, cruise ID, chief scientist, geographical location. The first Ridge 2000 field programs sailed in 2004 and, in addition to numerous data sets collected prior to the Ridge 2000 program, the database currently contains information on fifteen Ridge 2000-funded cruises and almost sixty Alvin dives. Track lines can be viewed using a recently- implemented Web Map Service button labelled Map View. The Ridge 2000 database is fully integrated with databases hosted by the mgDMS group for MARGINS and the Antarctic multibeam and seismic reflection data initiatives. Links are provided to partner databases including PetDB, SIOExplorer, and the ODP Janus system. Improved inter-operability with existing and new partner repositories continues to be strengthened. One major effort involves the gradual unification of the metadata across these partner databases. Standardised electronic metadata forms that can be filled in at sea are available from our web site. Interactive map-based exploration and visualisation of the Ridge 2000 database is provided by GeoMapApp, a freely-available Java(tm) application being developed within the mgDMS group. GeoMapApp includes high-resolution bathymetric grids for the 8-11N EPR segment and allows customised maps and grids for any of the Ridge 2000 ISS to be created. Vent and instrument locations can be plotted and saved as images, and Alvin dive photos are also available.

Goodwillie, A. M.; Carbotte, S. M.; Arko, R. A.; Haxby, W. F.; Ryan, W. B.; Chayes, D. N.; Lehnert, K. A.; Shank, T. M.

2005-12-01

311

QMDS: a file system metadata management service supporting a graph data model-based query language  

Microsoft Academic Search

File system metadata management has become a bottleneck for many data-intensive applications that rely on high-performance file systems. Part of the bottleneck is due to the limitations of an almost 50-year-old interface standard with metadata abstractions that were designed at a time when high-end file systems managed less than 100 MB. Today's high-performance file systems store 7–9 orders of magnitude more

Sasha Ames; Maya Gokhale; Carlos Maltzahn

2012-01-01

312

QMDS: A File System Metadata Management Service Supporting a Graph Data Model-Based Query Language  

Microsoft Academic Search

File system metadata management has become a bottleneck for many data-intensive applications that rely on high-performance file systems. Part of the bottleneck is due to the limitations of an almost 50 year old interface standard with metadata abstractions that were designed at a time when high-end file systems managed less than 100MB. Today's high- performance file systems store 7 to

Sasha Ames; Maya B. Gokhale; Carlos Maltzahn

2011-01-01

313

Software configuration management plan for HANDI 2000 business management system  

SciTech Connect

The Software Configuration Management Plan (SCMP) describes the configuration management and control environment for HANDI 2000 for the PP and PS software as well as any custom developed software. This plan establishes requirements and processes for uniform documentation control, system change control, systematic evaluation and coordination of HANDI 2000. This SCMP becomes effective as this document is acceptance and will provide guidance through implementation efforts.

Wilson, D.

1998-08-25

314

Conceptual framework of knowledge management for ethical decision-making support in neonatal intensive care.  

PubMed

This research is built on the belief that artificial intelligence estimations need to be integrated into clinical social context to create value for health-care decisions. In sophisticated neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), decisions to continue or discontinue aggressive treatment are an integral part of clinical practice. High-quality evidence supports clinical decision-making, and a decision-aid tool based on specific outcome information for individual NICU patients will provide significant support for parents and caregivers in making difficult "ethical" treatment decisions. In our approach, information on a newborn patient's likely outcomes is integrated with the physician's interpretation and parents' perspectives into codified knowledge. Context-sensitive content adaptation delivers personalized and customized information to a variety of users, from physicians to parents. The system provides structuralized knowledge translation and exchange between all participants in the decision, facilitating collaborative decision-making that involves parents at every stage on whether to initiate, continue, limit, or terminate intensive care for their infant. PMID:16138537

Frize, Monique; Yang, Lan; Walker, Robin C; O'Connor, Annette M

2005-06-01

315

High-Intensity Radiated Field Fault-Injection Experiment for a Fault-Tolerant Distributed Communication System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Safety-critical distributed flight control systems require robustness in the presence of faults. In general, these systems consist of a number of input/output (I/O) and computation nodes interacting through a fault-tolerant data communication system. The communication system transfers sensor data and control commands and can handle most faults under typical operating conditions. However, the performance of the closed-loop system can be adversely affected as a result of operating in harsh environments. In particular, High-Intensity Radiated Field (HIRF) environments have the potential to cause random fault manifestations in individual avionic components and to generate simultaneous system-wide communication faults that overwhelm existing fault management mechanisms. This paper presents the design of an experiment conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center's HIRF Laboratory to statistically characterize the faults that a HIRF environment can trigger on a single node of a distributed flight control system.

Yates, Amy M.; Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo; Malekpour, Mahyar R.; Gonzalez, Oscar R.; Gray, W. Steven

2010-01-01

316

Housing Management: Management Information System. Volume V. Security Monitoring System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report is part of the Public Housing Management Improvement Program. This part of the program was used to reduce crime within public housing projects by providing data needed to ensure maximum saturation of high crime areas by combinations of local po...

1976-01-01

317

An expert system for ISO 9000 quality management system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ISO 9000 quality management system is becoming more important for all sectors of industry. Due to the open door policy in China, managers are now aware of the significance of implementing the ISO 9000 quality assurance system in their companies or factories. However, the ISO 9000 quality system is new to a lot of people, so in order to

L. L. Cheng; W. M. Tsang; K. L. Yeung

1993-01-01

318

Multiple system modelling of waste management.  

PubMed

Due to increased environmental awareness, planning and performance of waste management has become more and more complex. Therefore waste management has early been subject to different types of modelling. Another field with long experience of modelling and systems perspective is energy systems. The two modelling traditions have developed side by side, but so far there are very few attempts to combine them. Waste management systems can be linked together with energy systems through incineration plants. The models for waste management can be modelled on a quite detailed level whereas surrounding systems are modelled in a more simplistic way. This is a problem, as previous studies have shown that assumptions on the surrounding system often tend to be important for the conclusions. In this paper it is shown how two models, one for the district heating system (MARTES) and another one for the waste management system (ORWARE), can be linked together. The strengths and weaknesses with model linking are discussed when compared to simplistic assumptions on effects in the energy and waste management systems. It is concluded that the linking of models will provide a more complete, correct and credible picture of the consequences of different simultaneous changes in the systems. The linking procedure is easy to perform and also leads to activation of project partners. However, the simulation procedure is a bit more complicated and calls for the ability to run both models. PMID:21855313

Eriksson, Ola; Bisaillon, Mattias

2011-12-01

319

Acid Sphingomyelinase Serum Activity Predicts Mortality in Intensive Care Unit Patients after Systemic Inflammation: A Prospective Cohort Study  

PubMed Central

Introduction Acid sphingomyelinase is involved in lipid signalling pathways and regulation of apoptosis by the generation of ceramide and plays an important role during the host response to infectious stimuli. It thus has the potential to be used as a novel diagnostic marker in the management of critically ill patients. The objective of our study was to evaluate acid sphingomyelinase serum activity (ASM) as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in a mixed intensive care unit population before, during, and after systemic inflammation. Methods 40 patients admitted to the intensive care unit at risk for developing systemic inflammation (defined as systemic inflammatory response syndrome plus a significant procalcitonin [PCT] increase) were included. ASM was analysed on ICU admission, before (PCTbefore), during (PCTpeak) and after (PCTlow) onset of SIRS. Patients undergoing elective surgery served as control (N?=?8). Receiver-operating characteristics curves were computed. Results ASM significantly increased after surgery in the eight control patients. Patients from the intensive care unit had significantly higher ASM on admission than control patients after surgery. 19 out of 40 patients admitted to the intensive care unit developed systemic inflammation and 21 did not, with no differences in ASM between these two groups on admission. In patients with SIRS and PCT peak, ASM between admission and PCTbefore was not different, but further increased at PCTpeak in non-survivors and was significantly higher at PCTlow compared to survivors. Survivors exhibited decreased ASM at PCTpeak and PCTlow. Receiver operating curve analysis on discrimination of ICU mortality showed an area under the curve of 0.79 for ASM at PCTlow. Conclusions In summary, ASM was generally higher in patients admitted to the intensive care unit compared to patients undergoing uncomplicated surgery. ASM did not indicate onset of systemic inflammation. In contrast to PCT however, it remained high in non-surviving ICU patients after systemic inflammation. PMID:25384060

Reinicke, Maike; Winoto-Morbach, Supandi; Schadler, Dirk; Zick, Gunther; Frerichs, Inez; Weiler, Norbert; Schutze, Stefan

2014-01-01

320

Measuring perceived air quality and intensity by a Sensor System, the European Project SysPAQ  

E-print Network

Measuring perceived air quality and intensity by a Sensor System, the European Project Sys.mueller@tu-berlin.de SUMMARY At present, indoor air quality is assessed exclusively by human panels. Because this method is time consuming and cost intensive, little attention is paid to indoor air quality in the planning

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

321

System R: relational approach to database management  

Microsoft Academic Search

System R is a database management system which provides a high level relational data interface. The systems provides a high level of data independence by isolating the end user as much as possible from underlying storage structures. The system permits definition of a variety of relational views on common underlying data. Data control features are provided, including authorization, integrity assertions,

Morton M. Astrahan; Mike W. Blasgen; Donald D. Chamberlin; Kapali P. Eswaran; Jim Gray; Patricia P. Griffiths; W. Frank King III; Raymond A. Lorie; Paul R. McJones; James W. Mehl; Gianfranco R. Putzolu; Irving L. Traiger; Bradford W. Wade; Vera Watson

1976-01-01

322

Improvements to information management systems simulator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The performance of personnel in the augmentation and improvement of the interactive IMSIM information management simulation model is summarized. With this augmented model, NASA now has even greater capabilities for the simulation of computer system configurations, data processing loads imposed on these configurations, and executive software to control system operations. Through these simulations, NASA has an extremely cost effective capability for the design and analysis of computer-based data management systems.

Bilek, R. W.

1972-01-01

323

Nonlinear Magnetoresistance Oscillations in Intensely Irradiated Two-Dimensional Electron Systems Induced by Multiphoton Processes.  

SciTech Connect

We report on magneto-oscillations in differential resistivity of a two-dimensional electron system subject to intense microwave radiation. The period of these oscillations is determined not only by microwave frequency but also by its intensity. A theoretical model based on quantum kinetics at high microwave power captures all important characteristics of this phenomenon which is strongly nonlinear in microwave intensity. Our results demonstrate a crucial role of the multiphoton processes near the cyclotron resonance and its harmonics in the presence of strong dc electric field and offer a unique way to reliably determine the intensity of microwaves acting on electrons.

Khodas, M.; Chiang, H.-S.; Hatke, A.T.; Zudov, M.A.; Vavilov, M.G.; Pfeiffer, L.N.; West, K.W.

2010-05-21

324

An Analysis of the Environments of Intense Convective Systems in West Africa in 2003  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We investigated the local- and regional-scale thermodynamical and dynamical environments associated with intense convective systems in West Africa during 2003. We identified convective system cases from TRMM microwave imagery, classifying each case by the system minimum 85-GHz brightness temperature and by the estimated elapsed time of propagation from high terrain. The speed of the mid-level jet, the magnitude of the low-level shear, and the surface equivalent potential temperature (theta(sub e)) were greater for the intense cases compared to the non-intense cases, although the differences between the means tended to be small, less than 3K for surface theta(sub e). Hypothesis testing of a series of commonly used intensity prediction metrics resulted in significant results only for low-level metrics such as convective available potential energy and not for any of the mid- or upper-level metrics such as 700-hPa theta(sub e). None of the environmental variables or intensity metrics by themselves or in combination appeared to be reliable direct predictors of intensity. In the regional scale analysis, the majority of intense convective systems occurred in the surface baroclinic zone where surface theta(sub e) exceeded 344 K and the 700-hPa zonal wind speeds were less than -6/ms. Fewer intense cases compared to non-intense cases were associated with African easterly wave troughs. Fewer than 25% of our cases occurred in environments with detectable Saharan dust loads, and the results for intense and non-intense cases were similar. Our results for the regional analysis were consistent with the seasonal movement of the WAM and the intertropical front, regional differences in topography, and AEW energetics.

Nicholls, Stephen D.; Mohr, Karen I.

2010-01-01

325

Issue Management Risk Ranking Systems  

SciTech Connect

Thousands of safety issues have been collected on-line at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) as part of the Issue Management Plan. However, there has been no established approach to prioritize collected and future issues. The authors developed a methodology, based on hazards assessment, to identify and risk rank over 5000 safety issues collected at INEEL. This approach required that it was easily applied and understandable for site adaptation and commensurate with the Integrated Safety Plan. High-risk issues were investigated and mitigative/preventive measures were suggested and ranked based on a cost-benefit scheme to provide risk-informed safety measures. This methodology was consistent with other integrated safety management goals and tasks providing a site-wide risk informed decision tool to reduce hazardous conditions and focus resources on high-risk safety issues. As part of the issue management plan, this methodology was incorporated at the issue collection level and training was provided to management to better familiarize decision-makers with concepts of safety and risk. This prioritization methodology and issue dissemination procedure will be discussed. Results of issue prioritization and training efforts will be summarized. Difficulties and advantages of the process will be reported. Development and incorporation of this process into INEELs lessons learned reporting and the site-wide integrated safety management program will be shown with an emphasis on establishing self reliance and ownership of safety issues.

Novack, Steven David; Marshall, Frances Mc Clellan; Stromberg, Howard Merion; Grant, Gary Michael

1999-06-01

326

Issue Management Risk Ranking Systems  

SciTech Connect

Thousands of safety issues have been collected on-line at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) as part of the Issue Management Plan. However, there has been no established approach to prioritize collected and future issues. The authors developed a methodology, based on hazards assessment, to identify and risk rank over 5000 safety issues collected at INEEL. This approach required that it was easily applied and understandable for site adaptation and commensurate with the Integrated Safety Plan. High-risk issues were investigated and mitigative/preventive measures were suggested and ranked based on a cost-benefit scheme to provide risk-informed safety measures. This methodology was consistent with other integrated safety management goals and tasks providing a site-wide risk-informed decision tool to reduce hazardous conditions and focus resources on high-risk safety issues. As part of the issue management plan, this methodology was incorporated at the issue collection level and training was provided to management to better familiarize decision-makers with concepts of safety and risk. This prioritization methodology and issue dissemination procedure will be discussed. Results of issue prioritization and training efforts will be summarized. Difficulties and advantages of the process will be reported. Development and incorporation of this process into INEEL's lessons learned reporting and the site-wide integrated safety management program will be shown with an emphasis on establishing self reliance and ownership of safety issues.

F. M. Marshall; G. M. Grant; H. M. Stromberg; S. D. Novack

1999-06-01

327

Configuration management plan for the Automated Transportation Management System  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the Software Configuration Management (SCM) approach and procedures to be utilized in ensuring and controlling the development process of the Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS). The sponsor has identified ATMS and its components as unclassified and non-sensitive. The configuration management procedures are necessary to ensure that any changes made to software and related documentation are consistent with ATMS goals and objectives and contained securely in a central library. The objectives of the Plan are to (1) Establish product baselines that support the change process; (2) Ensure that all system changes support ATMS goals and objectives; (3) Ensure that the potential impacts of system changes are adequately evaluated prior to implementation; (4) Ensure that the latest approved versions of all software are being used in all environments (current production, development and future production); (5) Establish a configuration status reporting standard that informs pertinent individuals of ATMS system status; (6) Ensure that the baselines always remain current with the production software and documentation; (7) Ensure that configuration management is integrated with other management plans designed to meet the overall objectives and goals of ATMS; and (8) Ensure that the configuration library function of maintaining all master copies of documentation and software for each product is supported.

Genoni, S.K. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-04-01

328

Integrated safety management system verification: Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

Department of Energy (DOE) Policy (P) 450.4, Safety Management System Policy, commits to institutionalization of an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) throughout the DOE complex. The DOE Acquisition Regulations (DEAR, 48 CFR 970) requires contractors to manage and perform work in accordance with a documented Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS). Guidance and expectations have been provided to PNNL by incorporation into the operating contract (Contract DE-ACM-76FL0 1830) and by letter. The contract requires that the contractor submit a description of their ISMS for approval by DOE. PNNL submitted their proposed Safety Management System Description for approval on November 25,1997. RL tentatively approved acceptance of the description pursuant to a favorable recommendation from this review. The Integrated Safety Management System Verification is a review of the adequacy of the ISMS description in fulfilling the requirements of the DEAR and the DOE Policy. The purpose of this review is to provide the Richland Operations Office Manager with a recommendation for approval of the ISMS description of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory based upon compliance with the requirements of 49 CFR 970.5204(-2 and -78); and to verify the extent and maturity of ISMS implementation within the Laboratory. Further the review will provide a model for other DOE laboratories managed by the Office of Assistant Secretary for Energy Research.

Christensen, R.F.

1998-08-10

329

7 CFR 550.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 550.20 Section 550...AGREEMENTS Management of Agreements Financial Management § 550.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) REE agencies...

2011-01-01

330

5 CFR 430.304 - SES performance management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 false SES performance management systems. 430.304 ...CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Managing Senior Executive...Performance § 430.304 SES performance management systems. (a) To...

2013-01-01

331

5 CFR 430.304 - SES performance management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false SES performance management systems. 430.304 ...CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Managing Senior Executive...Performance § 430.304 SES performance management systems. (a) To...

2011-01-01

332

5 CFR 430.304 - SES performance management systems.  

...2014-01-01 false SES performance management systems. 430.304 ...CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Managing Senior Executive...Performance § 430.304 SES performance management systems. (a) To...

2014-01-01

333

5 CFR 430.304 - SES performance management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-01-01 false SES performance management systems. 430.304 ...CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Managing Senior Executive...Performance § 430.304 SES performance management systems. (a) To...

2012-01-01

334

Intensive Eucalyptus plantation management in Brazil: Long-term effects on soil carbon dynamics across 300 sites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Intensively managed forest plantations now cover more than 6 million hectares in Brazil, and another 20 million hectares in other tropical regions. Although aboveground biomass, and therefore carbon, is well monitored due to commercial interest, the belowground carbon dynamics and site sustainability remain poorly understood. So, how does intensive silviculture change the storage of carbon in soils? Trends in soil organic carbon from land-use change indicate that conversion from pastures to Eucalyptus plantations should maintain soil carbon stocks. However, comprehensive, long-term studies are needed to understand the variability in these trends to better manage these systems for sustainable productivity across a highly variable landscape, as well as to understand the role that soils may play in sequestering carbon for climate change mitigation. In this unique, long-term soil study, soil samples were collected in the 1980s/90s, 2001, and 2010 across 300 intensively managed Eucalyptus plantation sites located in the states of Bahia, Espirito Santo, and Sao Paulo, Brazil. Natural ecosystems for these states include Savannah-Dry Forest, Atlantic Forest, and Savanna, respectively. The sampling covered at least three complete rotations of Eucalyptus at each site; climate, past land use, productivity, and soil characteristics vary across this geographic gradient. Across the two periods, both Espirito Santo (P<0.001) and Bahia (P=0.05) showed a decrease in soil carbon concentrations, while Sao Paulo saw no change over time. For the 0-30 cm layer, plantations in Espirito Santo state had the largest decrease in soil carbon concentration up to 2001, decreasing soil carbon stocks at an average rate of 1.3 Mg C ha-1 year-1. This, however, was followed by no significant change from 2001 to 2010 which may indicate stabilization of soil carbon stocks under the new land use. The Eucalyptus in Bahia created no change in the first sampling period, but saw a decline of 0.35 Mg C ha-1year-1 in soil carbon in the second sampling period from 2001-2010. Initial results show that, across the regions, sites that had higher soil carbon stocks tended to lose more soil carbon under intensive silviculture. In all three regions, clay content related strongly to soil carbon concentrations. However, the clay did not have a consistent relationship with the rates of change in soil carbon concentration, varying among regions, with negative, positive, and no relationship for the 2001-2010 time period. Further investigation will determine relationships with temperature and precipitation, past land use history, and Eucalyptus productivity. These results will be essential in evaluating the effects on soil organic carbon dynamics due to conversion to short-rotation Eucalyptus plantations in the tropics across a broad and variable landscape.

Cook, R. L.; Stape, J.; Binkley, D.

2011-12-01

335

Computerized dairy records management systems  

E-print Network

; e) presence of a moisten and swollen vulva; f) discharge of clear mucus from the vulva; and g) a small decrease in milk production (7, 9). It is the manager's responsibility to design the most effective method of observing and recognizing oestrus...; e) presence of a moisten and swollen vulva; f) discharge of clear mucus from the vulva; and g) a small decrease in milk production (7, 9). It is the manager's responsibility to design the most effective method of observing and recognizing oestrus...

Acosta, Alejandro E. Gonzalez

2012-06-07

336

Training Issues Associated with COTS-based Information Intensive Systems.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A literature review and survey responses from 194 information technology and aerospace contractors identified methods and outcomes of training delivery. Results were used to develop a framework for evaluating and selecting commercial off-the-shelf systems (COTS) for operations and maintenance training. (Contains 11 references.) (SK)

Farr, John V.; Verma, Dinesh

2002-01-01

337

CONNECT: Emergent Connectors for Eternal Software Intensive Networked Systems  

E-print Network

living environment. Key technologies such as the Internet, the Web and wireless computing devices of networked systems, although interoperability bridges may possibly be deployed among them. Further, the fast pace at which technology evolves at all abstraction layers increasingly challenges the lifetime

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

338

Development of a change management system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The complexity and interdependence of software on a computer system can create a situation where a solution to one problem causes failures in dependent software. In the computer industry, software problems arise and are often solved with 'quick and dirty' solutions. But in implementing these solutions, documentation about the solution or user notification of changes is often overlooked, and new problems are frequently introduced because of insufficient review or testing. These problems increase when numerous heterogeneous systems are involved. Because of this situation, a change management system plays an integral part in the maintenance of any multisystem computing environment. At the NASA Ames Advanced Computational Facility (ACF), the Online Change Management System (OCMS) was designed and developed to manage the changes being applied to its multivendor computing environment. This paper documents the research, design, and modifications that went into the development of this change management system (CMS).

Parks, Cathy Bonifas

1993-01-01

339

Effective maintenance practices to manage system aging  

SciTech Connect

For a variety of economic and technical reasons, there has been a growing concern with the aging of complex systems and components and the role that maintenance can play in reducing this degradation. A study for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission was recently undertaken to identify effective maintenance practices that could be adapted by the nuclear industry in the United States to assist in managing the aging degradation of plant systems and components. Four organizations were examined to assess the influence that their maintenance programs have on their ability to address the systems and component aging degradation issues. An effective maintenance program was found to be essential to the management of system and component aging. The four key elements of an effective maintenance program that are important to an aging management program were identified. These are: the selection of critical systems and components; the development of an understanding of aging through the collection and analysis of equipment performance information; the development of appropriate preventive and predictive maintenance tasks to manage equipment and system aging degradation; the use of feedback mechanisms to continuously improve the management of aging systems and components. These elements were found to be common to all four organizations. In examining how the four organizations have structured their maintenance programs to include these key elements provides valuable lessons not only for the nuclear power industry, but also for any industrial organization that is concerned with the management of system and component aging degradation. This document provides detail, of these studies.

Chockie, A.; Bjorkelo, K.

1992-01-01

340

System safety education focused on system management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

System safety is defined and characteristics of the system are outlined. Some of the principle characteristics include role of humans in hazard analysis, clear language for input and output, system interdependence, self containment, and parallel analysis of elements.

Grose, V. L.

1971-01-01

341

Measuring Environmental Sustainability of Intensive Poultry-Rearing System  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Sustainability of human activities is one of the most important concerns of the European Union. Consequently, the need to\\u000a assess the level of sustainability achieved both at local and at government level is increasing. This process involves all\\u000a economic sectors, including agriculture and, in particular, livestock. Until several years ago livestock production systems\\u000a were mainly focused on production efficiency and

Simone Bastianoni; Antonio Boggia; Cesare Castellini; Cinzia Stefano; Valentina Niccolucci; Emanuele Novelli; Luisa Paolotti; Antonio Pizzigallo

342

Tactical deployments of laser systems into low-intensity conflicts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the advancements in laser diode technology over the past three years laser systems are becoming smaller, more efficient, dependable, and inexpensive. They have proven field utility as illuminators, designators, rangefinders, and communicators. With the shifting roles of the military, new applications of lasers are being realized. Lasers are being used as non-lethal force multipliers in operations such as UNITED SHIELD. Future implementations of lasers in non-lethal roles may be seen in Bosnia.

Ireland, Robert J.

1997-01-01

343

A battery management system for electric buses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Under a contract funded by the Advanced Lead Acid Battery Consortium (ALABC), the author was given the task of developing an advanced monitoring and control technology (MACT) to manage lead acid batteries used in electric vehicles. Using the latest semiconductor technology, his goal is to develop a battery management system that focuses on maximizing the discharge and recharge efficiency of

B. O'Brien

1994-01-01

344

A Systems Approach to Managing Oil  

E-print Network

A Systems Approach to Managing Oil Transportation Risk in Prince William Sound Jason R. W. Merrick Received April 21, 2000; revised June 12, 2000; accepted June 26, 2000MANAGING OIL TRANSPORTATION RISK about the safety of oil transportation in the Prince William Sound, Alaska. As a result, a large number

van Dorp, Johan René

345

Towards Eco-friendly Database Management Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Database management systems (DBMSs) have largely ignored the task of managing the energy consumed during query processing. Both economical and environmental factors now require that DBMSs pay close attention to energy consumption. In this paper we approach this issue by considering energy consumption as a first-class performance goal for query processing in a DBMS. We present two concrete techniques that

Willis Lang; Jignesh M. Patel

2009-01-01

346

Distributed geographic information systems in forest management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Managing a forest in the present implies a look towards the future and, in the field of geographic information systems (GIS), it involves the interoperability of existing data and information, which are increasingly determinant in intelligent forest planning and management. Recognizing the global importance of forests in economic, environmental and social dimensions presents a new challenge for those interested in

Andre Barriguinha; Pedro Cabral; Miguel Neto

2011-01-01

347

[Essential guidelines for Quality Management System].  

PubMed

The guidelines describe the essential parts of the quality management system to fulfil the requirements of the standard EN ISO 15 189. It includes mainly the organisation, the definition of responsibilities, training of personnel, the document control, the quality control, identification and control of nonconformities, corrective actions, preventive actions and evaluation, as audits and the management review. PMID:23765013

Daunizeau, A

2013-06-01

348

Knowledge Management in Expert Systems Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

In business surroundings characterized by tough competition and more demanding customers, in order to ensure stable market position and good relationship with customers, companies' main task becomes proper use of corporate knowledge. Knowledge management is directed towards identification, creation and exchange of knowledge. Many concepts of knowledge management have roots in the area of expert systems and artificial intelligence in

Olivera Grljevic; Bosnjak Zita

349

Cooperative Autonomic Management in Dynamic Distributed Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The centralized management of large distributed systems is often impractical, particularly when the both the topology and status of the system change dynamically. This paper proposes an approach to application-centric self-management in large distributed systems consisting of a collection of autonomic components that join and leave the system dynamically. Cooperative autonomic components self-organize into a dynamically created overlay network. Through local information sharing with neighbors, each component gains access to global information as needed for optimizing performance of applications. The approach has been validated and evaluated by developing a decentralized autonomic system consisting of multiple autonomic application managers previously developed for the In-VIGO grid-computing system. Using analytical results from complex random network and measurements done in a prototype system, we demonstrate the robustness, self-organization and adaptability of our approach, both theoretically and experimentally.

Xu, Jing; Zhao, Ming; Fortes, José A. B.

350

Response of cyanobacterial carbon concentrating system to light intensity: a simulated analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cyanobacteria possess a delicate system known as the carbon concentrating mechanism (CCM), which can efficiently elevate the\\u000a intracellular inorganic carbon (Ci) concentration via active transportation. The system requires energy supplied by photosystems;\\u000a therefore, the activity of the Ci transporter is closely related to light intensity. However, the relationship between CCM\\u000a and light intensity has rarely been evaluated. Here, we present

Xiang Fu; Boping Han

2010-01-01

351

Determination of atmospheric nitrogen deposition to a semi-natural peat bog site in an intensively managed agricultural landscape  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rising levels of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition have been found to affect the primary productivity and species composition of most terrestrial ecosystems. Highly vulnerable ecosystems such as nutrient-poor bogs are expected to respond to increasing N input rates with a decrease in plant species diversity. Our study site - a moderately drained raised bog and one of only very few remaining protected peatland areas in Northwestern Germany - is surrounded by highly fertilised agricultural land and intensive livestock production. We quantified the annual deposition of atmospheric N over a period of two years. Dry deposition rates of different N species and their reactants were calculated from day and night-time concentrations measured by a KAPS denuder filter system. Dry N deposition amounted to 10.9 ± 1.0 kg N ha-1 yr-1 (year 1) and 10.5 ± 1.0 kg N ha-1 yr-1 (year 2). More than 80% of total deposited N was attributed to ammonia (NH3). A strong seasonality in NH3 concentrations and depositions could be observed. Day and night-time concentrations and depositions, however, did not differ significantly. Total N deposition including bulk N deposition resulted in about 25 kg N ha-1 yr-1. Our results suggest that the intensive agricultural land management of surrounding areas and strongly emitting animal husbandry lead to N inputs into the protected peatland area that exceed the ecosystem's specific critical load up to fivefold. This gives rise to the assumption that a further shift in plant species composition with a subsequent alteration of the local hydrological regime can be expected.

Hurkuck, Miriam; Brümmer, Christian; Mohr, Karsten; Grünhage, Ludger; Flessa, Heinz; Kutsch, Werner L.

2014-11-01

352

ADAMS: AIRLAB data management system user's guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The AIRLAB Data Management System (ADAMS) is an online environment that supports research at NASA's AIRLAB. ADAMS provides an easy to use interactive interface that eases the task of documenting and managing information about experiments and improves communication among project members. Data managed by ADAMS includes information about experiments, data sets produced, software and hardware available in AIRLAB as well as that used in a particular experiment, and an on-line engineer's notebook. The User's Guide provides an overview of the ADAMS system as well as details of the operations available within ADAMS. A tutorial section takes the user step-by-step through a typical ADAMS session. ADAMS runs under the VAX/VMS operating system and uses the ORACLE database management system and DEC/FMS (the Forms Management System). ADAMS can be run from any VAX connected via DECnet to the ORACLE host VAX. The ADAMS system is designed for simplicity, so interactions within the underlying data management system and communications network are hidden from the user.

Conrad, C. L.; Ingogly, W. F.; Lauterbach, L. A.

1986-01-01

353

Environmental Management System Demonstration Project. Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report outlines the activities of the Environmental Management System (EMS) Demonstration Project, provides an analysis of how the project participants progressed in implementing the ISO 14001 Standard, discusses EMS implementation issues, incentives...

C. P. Diamond

1996-01-01

354

Electronic Resource Management Systems From ILS Vendors  

E-print Network

For several years libraries, especially larger libraries and research libraries, have been more and more desperately seeking systems and tools to help them manage electronic resources for several years. To date, most ...

Duranceau, Ellen

355

American Indian Systems for Natural Resource Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Outlines the philosophy and general principles of "primitive" indigenous production technologies and natural resource management systems in North and South America. Discusses indigenous practices that promote sustainable production in gathering, hunting and fishing, minerals extraction, and agriculture. (SV)

Quintana, Jorge O.

1992-01-01

356

Core Technical Capability Laboratory Management System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Core Technical Capability Lab - oratory Management System (CTCLMS) consists of dynamically generated Web pages used to access a database containing detailed CTC lab data with the software hosted on a server that allows users to have remote access.

Shaykhian, Linda; Dugger, Curtis; Griffin, Laurie

2008-01-01

357

Los Alamos Plutonium Facility Waste Management System  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the new computer-based transuranic (TRU) Waste Management System (WMS) being implemented at the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The Waste Management System is a distributed computer processing system stored in a Sybase database and accessed by a graphical user interface (GUI) written in Omnis7. It resides on the local area network at the Plutonium Facility and is accessible by authorized TRU waste originators, count room personnel, radiation protection technicians (RPTs), quality assurance personnel, and waste management personnel for data input and verification. Future goals include bringing outside groups like the LANL Waste Management Facility on-line to participate in this streamlined system. The WMS is changing the TRU paper trail into a computer trail, saving time and eliminating errors and inconsistencies in the process.

Smith, K.; Montoya, A.; Wieneke, R.; Wulff, D.; Smith, C.; Gruetzmacher, K.

1997-02-01

358

DEPARTMENT CHAIR Engineering Management & Systems Engineering Department  

E-print Network

DEPARTMENT CHAIR Engineering Management & Systems Engineering Department Old Dominion University, Norfolk VA The Batten College of Engineering and Technology at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, VA, Dean's Office, 102 Kaufman Hall, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529. Review of applications

359

Optimal Power Management in Wireless Control Systems  

E-print Network

Optimal Power Management in Wireless Control Systems Konstantinos Gatsis, Student Member, IEEE channels, power adaptation, linear quadratic control, con- trol/communication separation, event to the controller over a wireless fading channel. The power allocated to these transmissions determines

Plotkin, Joshua B.

360

Introducing Energy Management Systems into Smaller Facilities  

E-print Network

oversized. As a result, the energy appetite of this class of building often makes them excellent candidates for installation of a small energy management system. Owners considering the potential benefits of EMS control will, however, need to educate...

Lawrence, J. A.

1983-01-01

361

ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT / POLLUTION PREVENTION RESEARCH  

EPA Science Inventory

Goal 8.4 Improve Environmental Systems Management (Formally Pollution Prevention and New Technology) Background The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed and evaluated tools and technologies to monitor, prevent, control, and clean-up pollution through...

362

Contribution of different grass species to plant-atmosphere ammonia exchange in intensively managed grassland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Species diversity in grasslands usually declines with increasing input of nitrogen from fertilizers or atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Conversely, species diversity may also impact the build-up of soil nitrogen pools. Limited information is available on how plant-atmosphere ammonia exchange is related to species diversity in grasslands. We have here investigated grass species abundance and different foliar nitrogen pools in 4-year-old intensively managed grassland. Apoplastic pH and NH4+ concentrations of the 8 most abundant species were used to calculate stomatal NH3 compensation points. Apoplastic NH4+ concentrations differed considerably among the species, ranging from 13 to 117 ?M, with highest values in Festuca pratensis. Also apoplastic pH values varied, from pH 6.0 in Phleum pratense to 6.9 in Dactylis glomerata. The observed differences in apoplastic NH4+ and pH resulted in a large span of predicted values for the stomatal NH3 compensation point which ranged from 0.20 to 6.57 nmol mol-1. Three species (Lolium perenne, Festuca pratensis and Dactylis glomerata) had sufficiently high NH3 compensation points and abundance to contribute to the NH3 emission of the whole field. At the same time, other grass species such as Phleum pratense and Lolium multiflorum had NH3 compensation points below the atmospheric NH3 concentration and could thus contribute to NH3 uptake from the atmosphere. Evaluated across species, leaf bulk-tissue NH4+ concentrations correlated well (r2=0.902) with stomatal NH3 compensation points calculated on the basis of the apoplastic bioassay. This suggests that leaf tissue NH4+ concentrations combined with data for the frequency distribution of the corresponding species can be used for predicting the NH3 exchange potential of a mixed grass sward.

Mattsson, M.; Herrmann, B.; Jones, S.; Neftel, A.; Sutton, M. A.; Schjoerring, J. K.

2008-06-01

363

Polycythemia in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Risk Factors, Symptoms, Pattern, and Management Controversy  

PubMed Central

Background: Polycythemia (PC) is defined as venous hematocrit (hct) ?65%.? Its incidence is high among certain risk factors (RFs). Its management is controversy. Aims: To determine: (1) The incidence of PC in our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). (2) Most common RF, symptoms, and laboratory abnormalities (LA) associated with PC and their effect on the length of hospital stay (LOS). (3) Whether noninvasive interventions are effective in reducing hct. (4) Hct pattern of PC neonates. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Setting: NICU at a maternity and children hospital. Materials and Methods: Records review of all neonates from March 2011 to August 2013. Inclusions criteria were: (1) Venous hct ?65%. (2) Neonates born in our institution. (3) Early umbilical cord clamping. (4) Gestational age ?34 weeks. Statistical Analysis: Chi-square and multiple regression analysis. Results: One hundred and one PC neonates were eligible. Incidence of PC in our NICU is 14.5%. The most common RF, symptoms, and LA were: Small for gestational age, jaundice and hypoglycemia respectively. Tachypnea (? P - 0.04) and oliguria (P - 0.03) significantly prolonged LOS. Noninvasive interventions or observation could not reduce the hct significantly (P - 0.24). The hcts mean peaked maximally at a mean of 2.8 h of age. Conclusion: PC incidence in our NICU is higher than the reported incidence in healthy newborns. Most of the PC neonates were either symptomatic or having LA. Noninvasive interventions or observation were not effective in reducing hct in polycythemic neonates. Hct in both healthy and PC neonates peaked at the same pattern. PMID:25024975

Alsafadi, Tariq Rushdi Mohieldeen; Hashmi, Saad Manzoor; Youssef, Hala Atta; Suliman, Awatif Khogali; Abbas, Haifa'A Mansour; Albaloushi, Mohammad Hakem

2014-01-01

364

Advances in HEV Battery Management Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

A critical element of a hybrid-electric-vehicle (HEV) propulsion system is the battery management system (BMS), which controls the performance of the HEV battery, the costliest and heaviest component of the propulsion system. This paper examines the relevance and criticality of an HEV BMS as a whole; that is, its general functions and \\

Gregory L. Plett; Martin J. Klein

2006-01-01

365

Risk Management for Service-Oriented Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Web service technology can be used for integrating hetero- geneous and autonomous applications into cross-organizational systems. A key problem is to support a high quality of service-oriented systems despite vulnerabilities caused by the use of external web services. One important aspect that has received little attention so far is risk manage- ment for such systems. This paper discusses risks peculiar

Natallia Kokash

2007-01-01

366

Seminar 10! Project Management & System Design!  

E-print Network

://www.princeton.edu/~stengel/FRS.html! Project Management & System Design: ! [Fundamentals of Space Systems] Ch. 1 (ER); [Digital Apollo] Ch 5" Hine et al! #12;"Braincase on the tip of a firecracker": Apollo Guidance" Mindell, D., Digital Apollo System! Thor Inertial Measurement Unit! "Braincase on the tip of a firecracker": Apollo Guidance" Primary

Stengel, Robert F.

367

Hybrid control in air traffic management systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a new collaborative project involving the University of California, Berkeley, NASA Ames Research Center, and Honeywell Systems Research Center, the authors have begun the study of hierarchical, hybrid control systems in the framework of air traffic management systems (ATMS). The need for a new ATMS arises from the overcrowding of large urban airports and the need to more efficiently

S. Sastry; G. Meyer; C. Tomlin; J. Lygeros; D. Godbole; G. Pappas

1995-01-01

368

Management Information Systems: Applications to Educational Administration.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An orientation to management information systems (MIS) is offered which presents information about MIS in the context of public education and suggests some considerations that should be taken into account in designing and operating such systems. MIS is defined as a set of operating procedures that act as a control system to automatically provide…

Witkin, Belle Ruth

369

USP: A Lightweight File System Management Framework  

Microsoft Academic Search

With data amount growing at an ever increasing rate, file system, as the basis of data management, its functionality and content are becoming more and more complex. Thus the file system is forced to be upgraded constantly, in order to satisfy the growing demands. However, the reinvention of new file systems is always a high-cost task. Although there are frameworks

Zhan Shi; Dan Feng; Heng Zhao; Lingfang Zeng

2010-01-01

370

ERP-based human resource management system  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper focuses on the enterprise ERP-based human resources management, design and realization process. System uses the Microsoft Visual Studio. NET and SQL Server 2005 database software as a development platform, using C# programming language as a system application programming language. The structure using B\\/S mode, full use of network resources, reduces costs, and through optimization of system architecture and

Liwei Geng; Yujin Li; Yinan Wu

2010-01-01

371

Designing a new generalized battery management system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Battery management systems (BMSs) are used in many battery-operated industrial and commercial systems to make the battery operation more efficient and the estimation of battery state nondestructive. The existing BMS techniques are examined in this paper and a new design methodology for a generalized reliable BMS is proposed. The main advantage of the proposed BMS compared to the existing systems

John Chatzakis; Kostas Kalaitzakis; Nicholas C. Voulgaris; Stefanos N. Manias

2003-01-01

372

Dynamic power management for portable systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Portable systems require long battery lifetime while still delivering high performance. Dynamic power management (DPM) policies trade off the performance for the power consumption at the system level in portable devices. In this work we present the time-indexed SMDP model (TISMDP) that we use to derive optimal policy for DPM in portable systems. TISMDP model is needed to handle the

Tajana Simunic; Luca Benini; Peter W. Glynn; Giovanni De Micheli

2000-01-01

373

The smart Battery management system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The performance of the battery pack will directly affect the rapid development of the electric vehicle. In this paper, it presents that in the various states, the Li-lon Battery are controlled and protected by bq78pl114-the latest Battery Management Controller made in TI CO., LTD, and introduces its features. Many controllers are operated on real time by Single Chip Micyoco, it

Xiao-feng Wan; Jian-ping Wu; Hai-lin Hu

2009-01-01

374

STRUDEL: A Website Management System  

Microsoft Academic Search

IntroductionThe growth of the World-Wide Web has created a newkind of data management problem: building and maintainingWeb sites. Building a Web site involves severaltasks, such as choosing what information will be availableat the site, organizing that information in individualpages or in graphs of linked pages, and specifyingthe visual presentation of pages in HTML. Creating andmanaging large sites is tedious, because

Mary F. Fernández; Daniela Florescu; Jaewoo Kang; Alon Y. Levy; Dan Suciu

1997-01-01

375

A resource management architecture for metacomputing systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Metacomputing systems are intended to support remote and\\/or concurrent use of geographically distributed computational resources.\\u000a Resource management in such systems is complicated by five concerns that do not typically arise in other situations: site\\u000a autonomy and heterogeneous substrates at the resources, and application requirements for policy extensibility, co-allocation,\\u000a and online control. We describe a resource management architecture that addresses these

Karl Czajkowski; Ian Foster; Nick Karonis; Carl Kesselman; Stuart Martin; Warren Smith; Steven Tuecke

1999-01-01

376

Increase Productivity - Implement Energy Management Systems with Project Management Techniques  

E-print Network

though you are absolute ly certain your recommended system is the most feasible, you must go through the exercise of sev eral other systems. This could be considered a waste of time but you better do as the Corporate Finance staff with their bright.... These are plant committees, seminars and exchange bulletins. Energy savings ideas should be identified and implemented and shared among the plants, divisions. Third, MOTIVATION AND ENTHUSIASM. This can be maintained through management reports and by giving...

Spinner, M. P.

1984-01-01

377

The Recovery Manager of the System R Database Manager  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recovery subsystem of an experimental data management system is described and evaluated. The transactmn concept allows application programs to commit, abort, or partially undo their effects. The DO-UNDO-REDO protocol allows new recoverable types and operations to be added to the recovery system Apphcation programs can record data m the transaction log to facilitate application-specific recovery. Transaction undo and redo

Jim Gray; Paul R. McJones; Mike W. Blasgen; Bruce G. Lindsay; Raymond A. Lorie; Thomas G. Price; Franco Putzolu; Irving L. Traiger

1981-01-01

378

Inappropriate emergency management of status epilepticus in children contributes to need for intensive care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To characterise the clinical features, emergency pre-paediatric intensive care (PIC) treatment, and course of status epilepticus (SE) in children admitted to PIC. This may provide insight into reasons for admission to PIC and provide a framework for the development of strategies that decrease the requirement for intensive care.Design: Cross sectional, retrospective study.Setting: A tertiary paediatric institution’s intensive care unit.Participants:

R F M Chin; L Verhulst; B G R Neville; M J Peters; R C Scott

2004-01-01

379

Composition of Management System for Smart Homes  

E-print Network

The paper addresses modular hierarchical design (composition) of a management system for smart homes. The management system consists of security subsystem (access control, alarm control), comfort subsystem (temperature, etc.), intelligence subsystem (multimedia, houseware). The design solving process is based on Hierarchical Morphological Multicriteria Design (HMMD) approach: (1) design of a tree-like system model, (2) generation of design alternatives for leaf nodes of the system model, (3) Bottom-Up process: (i) multicriteria selection of design alternatives for system parts/components and (ii) composing the selected alternatives into a resultant combination (while taking into account ordinal quality of the alternatives above and their compatibility). A realistic numerical example illustrates the design process of a management system for smart homes.

Levin, Mark Sh; Klapproth, Alexander

2011-01-01

380

A resource management architecture for metacomputing systems.  

SciTech Connect

Metacomputing systems are intended to support remote and/or concurrent use of geographically distributed computational resources. Resource management in such systems is complicated by five concerns that do not typically arise in other situations: site autonomy and heterogeneous substrates at the resources, and application requirements for policy extensibility, co-allocation, and online control. We describe a resource management architecture that addresses these concerns. This architecture distributes the resource management problem among distinct local manager, resource broker, and resource co-allocator components and defines an extensible resource specification language to exchange information about requirements. We describe how these techniques have been implemented in the context of the Globus metacomputing toolkit and used to implement a variety of different resource management strategies. We report on our experiences applying our techniques in a large testbed, GUSTO, incorporating 15 sites, 330 computers, and 3600 processors.

Czajkowski, K.; Foster, I.; Karonis, N.; Kesselman, C.; Martin, S.; Smith, W.; Tuecke, S.

1999-08-24

381

Introduction to the Chemical Management System  

SciTech Connect

The CMS, a Laboratory-wide electronic chemical inventory tracking system, will assist PNL by establishing comprehensive, integrated, Laboratory-wide databases supported by consistent and standardized procedures for chemical inventory management. It will provide PNL with the information needed to meet its current chemical management responsibilities and regulatory requirements. Its objectives are to provide an inventory of all chemicals being held at PNL facilities, to provide a specific location for all chemical containers, to ensure that health and safety regulatory codes are being upheld, and to provide PNL staff and managers with hazardous-chemical information for better inventory management. It is composed of 5 modules: chemical purchasing; chemical inventory; chemical names, properties, and hazardous groups; reporting; and system manager.

Sawyer, J.G.

1993-01-01

382

MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING SYSTEM OF WASTE WATER DISPOSAL SYSTEMS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sewage works facilities consist of various assets groups. And there are many kinds of financial resources. In order to optimize the maintenance plan, and to secure the stability and sustainability of sewage works management, it is necessary to carry out financial simulation based on the life-cycle cost analysis. Furthermore, it is important to develop management accounting system that is interlinked with the financial accounting system, because many sewage administration bodies have their financial accounting systems as public enterprises. In this paper, a management accounting system, which is designed to provide basic information for asset management of sewage works facilities, is presented. Also the applicability of the management accounting system presented in this paper is examined through financial simulations.

Hori, Michihiro; Tsuruta, Takashi; Kaito, Kiyoyuki; Kobayashi, Kiyoshi

383

[A medical consumable material management information system].  

PubMed

Medical consumables material is essential supplies to carry out medical work, which has a wide range of varieties and a large amount of usage. How to manage it feasibly and efficiently that has been a topic of concern to everyone. This article discussed about how to design a medical consumable material management information system that has a set of standardized processes, bring together medical supplies administrator, suppliers and clinical departments. Advanced management mode, enterprise resource planning (ERP) applied to the whole system design process. PMID:25241525

Tang, Guoping; Hu, Liang

2014-05-01

384

On the duality of data-intensive file system design: reconciling HDFS and PVFS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data-intensive applications fall into two computing styles: Internet services (cloud computing) or high-performance computing (HPC). In both categories, the underlying file system is a key component for scalable application performance. In this paper, we explore the similarities and differences between PVFS, a parallel file system used in HPC at large scale, and HDFS, the primary storage system used in cloud

Wittawat Tantisiriroj; Seung Woo Son; Swapnil Patil; Samuel J. Lang; Garth Gibson; Robert B. Ross

2011-01-01

385

Data-intensive file systems for Internet services: A rose by any other name ...  

E-print Network

, Hadoop distributed file system (HDFS) and Amazon S3, are defining this new purpose-built paradigm shipping are found to be different, but supportable in parallel file systems. Performance of HadoopData-intensive file systems for Internet services: A rose by any other name ... Wittawat

386

20 CFR 435.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 435.21 Section...435.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Introduction...requirements. Recipients' financial management systems must provide...

2011-04-01

387

14 CFR 1273.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2010-01-01 true Standards for financial management systems. 1273.20 Section...1273.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2011-01-01

388

10 CFR 600.121 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 600.121 Section...600.121 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...600.181, recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2011-01-01

389

15 CFR 14.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 14.21 Section...14.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The Grants...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2011-01-01

390

36 CFR 1210.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1210.21 Section...1210.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The NHPRC...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2011-07-01

391

10 CFR 600.311 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 600.311 Section...600.311 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...encouraged to use existing financial management systems to the...

2011-01-01

392

10 CFR 600.220 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 600.220 Section...600.220 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2011-01-01

393

29 CFR 1470.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1470.20 Section...1470.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2011-07-01

394

7 CFR 3019.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 3019.21 Section...3019.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2011-01-01

395

13 CFR 143.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 143.20 Section...143.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2011-01-01

396

29 CFR 97.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 97.20 Section...97.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2011-07-01

397

40 CFR 30.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 30.21 Section...30.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) EPA shall...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2011-07-01

398

22 CFR 145.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 145.21 Section...145.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The Department...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2011-04-01

399

38 CFR 49.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 49.21 Section...49.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2011-07-01

400

40 CFR 35.6270 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 35.6270 Section...35.6270 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Accounting...review of the adequacy of the financial management system as described in...

2011-07-01

401

45 CFR 92.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 92.20 Section...92.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2011-10-01

402

45 CFR 74.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 74.21 Section...74.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...appropriate. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2011-10-01

403

38 CFR 43.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 43.20 Section...43.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2011-07-01

404

45 CFR 2541.200 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 2541.200 ...2541.200 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2011-10-01

405

22 CFR 135.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 135.20 Section...135.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2011-04-01

406

49 CFR 18.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 18.20 Section...18.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2011-10-01

407

22 CFR 226.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 226.21 Section...226.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2011-04-01

408

36 CFR 1207.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1207.20 Section...1207.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2011-07-01

409

15 CFR 24.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 24.20 Section...24.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2011-01-01

410

32 CFR 32.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 32.21 Section...32.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) DoD Components...information. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2011-07-01

411

20 CFR 437.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 437.20 Section...437.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2011-04-01

412

22 CFR 518.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2009-04-01 true Standards for financial management systems. 518.21 Section...518.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2011-04-01

413

7 CFR 3016.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 3016.20 Section...3016.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2011-01-01

414

32 CFR 34.11 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 34.11 Section...34.11 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...encouraged to use existing financial management systems...

2011-07-01

415

32 CFR 33.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 33.20 Section...33.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2011-07-01

416

40 CFR 31.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 31.20 Section...31.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2011-07-01

417

2 CFR 215.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 215.21 Section...215.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2011-01-01

418

29 CFR 95.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 95.21 Section...95.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2011-07-01

419

7 CFR 249.11 - Financial management system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Financial management system. 249.11...249.11 Financial management system. (a) Disclosure...maintain a financial management system that provides... (f) Resolution of audit findings. The State...cash draws against its Letter of Credit in...

2010-01-01

420

7 CFR 248.11 - Financial management system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Financial management system. 248.11...248.11 Financial management system. (a) Disclosure...maintain a financial management system which provides... (f) Resolution of audit findings. The State...cash draws against its Letter of Credit in...

2010-01-01

421

20 CFR 633.311 - Management information systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Management information systems. 633.311 Section...Procedures § 633.311 Management information systems. All grantees shall...a program and financial management system which meets...

2010-04-01

422

5 CFR 9901.405 - Performance management system requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Performance management system requirements. 9901.405...SECURITY PERSONNEL SYSTEM (NSPS) Performance Management § 9901.405 Performance management system requirements. (a) The...

2011-01-01

423

23 CFR 970.204 - Management systems requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...evaluate the effectiveness of the management systems in enhancing transportation...planning process. (g) The management systems shall be operated so investment decisions based on management system outputs can be considered...national, regional, and park...

2010-04-01

424

23 CFR 972.204 - Management systems requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...the effectiveness of the management systems in enhancing...process. (g) The management systems shall be operated...investment decisions based on management system outputs can be accomplished at the regional...

2010-04-01

425

23 CFR 971.204 - Management systems requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...the effectiveness of the management systems in enhancing...process. (f) The management systems shall be operated...investment decisions based on management system outputs can be accomplished at the State...

2010-04-01

426

23 CFR 970.204 - Management systems requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...concerning the management systems, each agency's responsibilities...implementing the management systems, implementation schedule...technical engineering support for the development...maintenance of the management systems. (c) The NPS shall...making project selection decisions under 23...

2011-04-01

427

23 CFR 972.204 - Management systems requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...concerning the management systems, each agency's responsibilities...implementing the management systems, implementation schedule...technical engineering support for the development...maintenance of the management systems. (c) The FWS shall...making project selection decisions under 23...

2011-04-01

428

45 CFR 1183.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Standards for financial management systems. 1183.20 Section...NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES INSTITUTE... Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2012-10-01

429

45 CFR 1174.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Standards for financial management systems. 1174.20 Section...NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL... Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2011-10-01

430

45 CFR 1174.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Standards for financial management systems. 1174.20 Section...NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL... Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2012-10-01

431

45 CFR 1174.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Standards for financial management systems. 1174.20 Section...NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL... Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2013-10-01

432

45 CFR 1183.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Standards for financial management systems. 1183.20 Section...NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES INSTITUTE... Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2013-10-01

433

45 CFR 1183.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Standards for financial management systems. 1183.20 Section...NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES INSTITUTE... Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2011-10-01

434

14 CFR 152.303 - Financial management system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Financial management system. 152.303...AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements...152.303 Financial management system. Each sponsor...maintain a financial management system that meets...

2011-01-01

435

48 CFR 970.5232-7 - Financial management system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...5232-7 Financial management system. As prescribed...following clause: Financial Management System (DEC 2000) ...administer a financial management system that is suitable to provide proper accounting in accordance...

2011-10-01

436

46 CFR 16.500 - Management Information System requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Management Information System requirements. 16.500 Section...AND SEAMEN CHEMICAL TESTING Management Information System § 16.500 Management Information System requirements. (a) Data...

2013-10-01

437

7 CFR 277.6 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...false Standards for financial management systems. 277.6 Section 277...6 Standards for financial management systems. (a) General. This...prescribes standards for financial management systems in administering program...

2014-01-01

438

32 CFR 34.11 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Standards for financial management systems. 34.11 Section 34...11 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients shall...encouraged to use existing financial management systems established for doing...

2013-07-01

439

36 CFR 1210.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...true Standards for financial management systems. 1210.21 Section 1210...21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The NHPRC shall...b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the...

2013-07-01

440

45 CFR 74.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Standards for financial management systems. 74.21 Section 74...21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients shall...b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the...

2013-10-01

441

46 CFR 16.500 - Management Information System requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Management Information System requirements. 16.500 Section...AND SEAMEN CHEMICAL TESTING Management Information System § 16.500 Management Information System requirements. (a) Data...

2012-10-01

442

7 CFR 3019.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Standards for financial management systems. 3019.21 Section 3019...21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal awarding...b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the...

2013-01-01

443

32 CFR 32.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Standards for financial management systems. 32.21 Section 32...21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) DoD Components...b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the...

2013-07-01

444

32 CFR 32.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Standards for financial management systems. 32.21 Section 32...21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) DoD Components...b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the...

2012-07-01

445

15 CFR 14.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Standards for financial management systems. 14.21 Section 14...21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The Grants Officer...b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the...

2012-01-01

446

29 CFR 95.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Standards for financial management systems. 95.21 Section 95...21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients shall...b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the...

2013-07-01

447

38 CFR 49.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Standards for financial management systems. 49.21 Section 49...21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal awarding...b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the...

2013-07-01

448

14 CFR 152.303 - Financial management system.  

...2014-01-01 false Financial management system. 152.303 Section 152...Requirements § 152.303 Financial management system. Each sponsor or planning...establish and maintain a financial management system that meets the standards...

2014-01-01

449

36 CFR 1210.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...false Standards for financial management systems. 1210.21 Section 1210...21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The NHPRC shall...b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the...

2014-07-01

450

32 CFR 34.11 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Standards for financial management systems. 34.11 Section 34...11 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients shall...encouraged to use existing financial management systems established for doing...

2012-07-01

451

22 CFR 518.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...true Standards for financial management systems. 518.21 Section 518...21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal awarding...b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the...

2012-04-01

452

22 CFR 226.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Standards for financial management systems. 226.21 Section 226...21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients shall...b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the...

2013-04-01

453

7 CFR 550.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Standards for financial management systems. 550.20 Section 550...20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) REE agencies shall...b) Cooperators' financial management systems shall provide for the...

2012-01-01

454

22 CFR 226.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Standards for financial management systems. 226.21 Section 226...21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients shall...b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the...

2012-04-01

455

36 CFR 1210.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Standards for financial management systems. 1210.21 Section 1210...21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The NHPRC shall...b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the...

2012-07-01

456

40 CFR 30.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Standards for financial management systems. 30.21 Section 30...21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) EPA shall require...b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the...

2012-07-01

457

22 CFR 145.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Standards for financial management systems. 145.21 Section 145...21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The Department...b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the...

2012-04-01

458

22 CFR 145.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Standards for financial management systems. 145.21 Section 145...21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The Department...b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the...

2013-04-01

459

7 CFR 550.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Standards for financial management systems. 550.20 Section 550...20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) REE agencies shall...b) Cooperators' financial management systems shall provide for the...

2013-01-01

460

2 CFR 215.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Standards for financial management systems. 215.21 Section 215...21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal awarding...b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the...

2012-01-01

461

29 CFR 97.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...true Standards for financial management systems. 97.20 Section 97...20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State must...statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other grantees and...

2014-07-01

462

22 CFR 226.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...false Standards for financial management systems. 226.21 Section 226...21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients shall...b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the...

2014-04-01

463

76 FR 7526 - Major System Acquisition; Earned Value Management  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...and maintain an Earned Value Management System (EVMS) for firm-fixed-price...contractors to have an Earned Value Management System (EVMS) for major acquisitions...requires use of an Earned Value Management System (EVMS) on acquisitions...

2011-02-10

464

40 CFR 30.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Standards for financial management systems. 30.21 Section 30...21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) EPA shall require...b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the...

2013-07-01

465

10 CFR 600.311 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...false Standards for financial management systems. 600.311 Section 600...311 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients are encouraged to use existing financial management systems to the extent that the...

2014-01-01

466

36 CFR 1207.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...false Standards for financial management systems. 1207.20 Section 1207...20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State must...statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other grantees and...

2014-07-01

467

29 CFR 95.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...true Standards for financial management systems. 95.21 Section 95...21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients shall...b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the...

2014-07-01

468

22 CFR 518.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...true Standards for financial management systems. 518.21 Section 518...21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal awarding...b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the...

2013-04-01

469

48 CFR 52.234-4 - Earned Value Management System.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Earned Value Management System. 52.234-4 Section 52... 52.234-4 Earned Value Management System. As prescribed in 34.203...following clause: Earned Value Management System (JUL 2006) (a) The...

2010-10-01

470

48 CFR 252.234-7002 - Earned Value Management System.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Earned Value Management System. 252.234-7002 Section...234-7002 Earned Value Management System. As prescribed in 234...following clause: Earned Value Management System (APR 2008) (a) In the...

2010-10-01

471

29 CFR 95.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Standards for financial management systems. 95.21 Section 95...21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients shall...b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the...

2012-07-01

472

7 CFR 3019.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Standards for financial management systems. 3019.21 Section 3019...21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal awarding...b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the...

2012-01-01

473

15 CFR 14.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Standards for financial management systems. 14.21 Section 14...21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The Grants Officer...b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the...

2013-01-01

474

38 CFR 49.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Standards for financial management systems. 49.21 Section 49...21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal awarding...b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the...

2012-07-01

475

2 CFR 215.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Standards for financial management systems. 215.21 Section 215...21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal awarding...b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the...

2013-01-01

476

Evaluation of Content Management Systems (CMS): a Supply Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Content management systems (CMS) provide an optimal solution by organising information and, mostly, creating and managing an enterprise's knowledge. Nevertheless there is a big confusion about the functionalities that characterise CMS and about the differences with less performing products such as web content management systems, document and records management systems and enterprise content management systems. This paper aims to show

Clara Benevolo; Serena Negri

477

SLAC Management Systems Larry Dardzinski/Ops/x4794  

E-print Network

SLAC Management Systems PPA Update 24 May 12 Larry Dardzinski/Ops/x4794 #12;Outline · Management · Discussion Page 2 #12;A simple definition of a Management System A management system is the means by which of Management Systems? · Allow your customers and users to efficiently and effectively access your services

Wechsler, Risa H.

478

Changes in sedation management in German intensive care units between 2002 and 2006: a national follow-up survey  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this study, conducted in 2006, was to find out whether changes in sedation management in German intensive care units took place in comparison with our survey from 2002. Methods We conducted a follow-up survey with a descriptive and comparative cross-sectional multi-center design. A postal survey was sent between January and May 2006, up to four times, to the same 269 hospitals that participated in our first survey in 2002. The same questionnaire as in 2002 was used with a few additional questions. Results Two hundred fourteen (82%) hospitals replied. Sixty-seven percent of the hospitals carried out changes in sedation management since the 2002 survey. Reasons for changes were published literature (46%), national guidelines (29%), and scientific lectures (32%). Sedation protocols (8% versus 52%) and a sedation scale (21% versus 46%) were used significantly more frequently. During sedation periods of up to 24 hours, significantly less midazolam was used (46% versus 35%). In comparison to 2002, sufentanil and epidural analgesia were used much more frequently in all phases of sedation, and fentanyl more rarely. For periods of greater than 72 hours, remifentanil was used more often. A daily sedation break was introduced by 34% of the hospitals, and a pain scale by 21%. Conclusion The increased implementation of protocols and scoring systems for the measurement of sedation depth and analgesia, a daily sedation break, and the use of more short-acting analgesics and sedatives account for more patient-oriented analgesia and sedation in 2006 compared with 2002. PMID:18062820

Martin, Jorg; Franck, Martin; Sigel, Stefan; Weiss, Manfred; Spies, Claudia

2007-01-01

479

Managing knowledge in enterprise systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Enterprise Systems are comprehensive and complex applications that form the core business operating system for many companies worldwide and throughout most industries. The selection, implementation, use and continuous change of Enterprise Systems (ES) (e.g. mySAP.com) require a great amount of knowledge and experience. Due to the lack of in-house ES knowledge and the high costs of engaging experienced implementation consultants,

Roy Chan; Michael Rosemann

2001-01-01

480

A Process Management System for Networked Manufacturing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the development of computer, communication and network, networked manufacturing has become one of the main manufacturing paradigms in the 21st century. Under the networked manufacturing environment, there exist a large number of cooperative tasks susceptible to alterations, conflicts caused by resources and problems of cost and quality. This increases the complexity of administration. Process management is a technology used to design, enact, control, and analyze networked manufacturing processes. It supports efficient execution, effective management, conflict resolution, cost containment and quality control. In this paper we propose an integrated process management system for networked manufacturing. Requirements of process management are analyzed and architecture of the system is presented. And a process model considering process cost and quality is developed. Finally a case study is provided to explain how the system runs efficiently.

Liu, Tingting; Wang, Huifen; Liu, Linyan