These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

Three years experience with a patient data management system at a neonatal intensive care unit.  

PubMed

We report about our experience with the patient data management system (PDMS) Hewlett Packard CareVue 9000 at two neonatal ICUs. We describe our PDMS configuration (hard- and software), local adjustments and enhancements such as knowledge based systems for calculating the parenteral nutrition of newborn infants (VIE-PNN), for advising medication (VIE-Nmed), and for managing mechanical ventilation (VIE-VENT), and the results of a structured interview with our staff members about the acceptance of the system. Despite some criticism nearly all collaborators liked the system, especially because of its time saving automated documentation of vital data and mechanical ventilation parameters. More than 2/3 preferred the computer assisted documentation to charting by hand, only 1/41 would have liked to return to paper documentation. All staff members possessed excellent (15/39) or good (24/39) knowledge of the system. Main points of critique were the system's therapy planning facilities (medication administration records), the restrictive facilities for documenting patient care and the yet unsolved problems of data evaluation and export. PDM systems have to be constantly adapted to the user's needs and to the changing clinical environment. Living with the system asks for an intensive dialog with the system and its functionalities, for creativity and well defined ideas about the future system development. PMID:9669449

Urschitz, M; Lorenz, S; Unterasinger, L; Metnitz, P; Preyer, K; Popow, C

1998-02-01

2

Evaluation of organic, conventional and intensive beef farm systems: health, management and animal production.  

PubMed

The overall aim of the present study was to analyse and compare organic beef cattle farming in Spain with intensive and conventional systems. An on-farm study comparing farm management practices and animal health was carried out. The study also focussed on a slaughterhouse analysis by comparing impacts on the safety and quality of the cattle products. Twenty-four organic and 26 conventional farms were inspected, and farmers responded to a questionnaire that covered all basic data on their husbandry practices, farm management, veterinary treatments and reproductive performance during 2007. Furthermore, data on the hygiene and quality of 244, 2596 and 3021 carcasses of calves from organic, intensive and conventional farms, respectively, were retrieved from the official yearbook (2007) of a slaughterhouse. Differences found between organic and conventional farms across the farm analysis did not substantially reflect differences between both farm types in the predominant diseases that usually occur on beef cattle farms. However, calves reared organically presented fewer condemnations at slaughter compared with intensive and to a lesser extent with conventionally reared calves. Carcass performance also reflected differences between farm type and breed and was not necessarily better in organic farms. PMID:23031524

Blanco-Penedo, I; López-Alonso, M; Shore, R F; Miranda, M; Castillo, C; Hernández, J; Benedito, J L

2012-09-01

3

Solids management and removal for intensive land-based aquaculture production systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review aims to identify and examine realistic aquaculture waste solids management strategies. The main reason for treating solids to be discharged from flow-through systems is to reduce potential negative impacts on the surrounding aquatic environment. In reuse and recycle systems, solids management will be required to maintain culture water quality. In such cases, solids management will often be designed

Simon J. Cripps; Asbjørn Bergheim

2000-01-01

4

Intensive management affects composition of betaproteobacterial ammonia oxidizers in turfgrass systems.  

PubMed

Turfgrass is a highly managed ecosystem subject to frequent fertilization, mowing, irrigation, and application of pesticides. Turf management practices may create a perturbed environment for ammonia oxidizers, a key microbial group responsible for nitrification. To elucidate the long-term effects of turf management on these bacteria, we assessed the composition of betaproteobacterial ammonia oxidizers in a chronosequence of turfgrass systems (i.e., 1, 6, 23, and 95 years old) and the adjacent native pines by using both 16S rRNA and amoA gene fragments specific to ammonia oxidizers. Based on the Shannon-Wiener diversity index of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis patterns and the rarefaction curves of amoA clones, turf management did not change the relative diversity and richness of ammonia oxidizers in turf soils as compared to native pine soils. Ammonia oxidizers in turfgrass systems comprised a suite of phylogenetic clusters common to other terrestrial ecosystems. Nitrosospira clusters 0, 2, 3, and 4; Nitrosospira sp. Nsp65-like sequences; and Nitrosomonas clusters 6 and 7 were detected in the turfgrass chronosequence with Nitrosospira clusters 3 and 4 being dominant. However, both turf age and land change (pine to turf) effected minor changes in ammonia oxidizer composition. Nitrosospira cluster 0 was observed only in older turfgrass systems (i.e., 23 and 95 years old); fine-scale differences within Nitrosospira cluster 3 were seen between native pines and turf. Further investigations are needed to elucidate the ecological implications of the compositional differences. PMID:18040734

Dell, Emily A; Bowman, Daniel; Rufty, Thomas; Shi, Wei

2008-07-01

5

Strategies for the Management of Data-Intensive Safety-Related Systems Alastair Faulkner, M.Sc.; CSE International Ltd.; Flixborough, UK  

E-print Network

Strategies for the Management of Data-Intensive Safety-Related Systems Alastair Faulkner, M of Warwick; Coventry, UK Keywords: data, data-intensive, data-driven, safety-related systems, software, safety Abstract It is common for large infrastructure projects to contain many computer-based systems

Storey, Neil

6

Science-based management of livestock welfare in intensive systems: looking to the future.  

PubMed

As welfare is a multidimensional concept, its assessment should be a multidisciplinary process, providing a comprehensive assessment of animal welfare in any given system. The different measurable aspects of welfare may be turned into welfare indicators and assessed in a scientific manner. Assessment of welfare may combine different approaches that include the assessment of the production system and measurement of animal-based welfare indicators. With both approaches, however, risk managers face difficulties related to the availability of resources for implementing regulations and training staff. Most animal-based welfare indicators have the advantage that they can be measured whatever the production system; they relate to the animal's experience of its own state. It is essential to confirm the reliability of the measures and their robustness to ensure valid welfare assessment, especially for a science-based management approach. Many welfare indicators, even those measured at the individual level, are expressed at group level, as a proportion of the animals. This allows benchmarking and following of trends over time. The decision on what is or is not acceptable from a welfare point of view is an ethical or managerial one. The advantage of a graded welfare indicator is that it allows different thresholds to be set by different people, countries or organisations, depending on the purpose of the assessment. The development of a set of harmonised international welfare indicators for global trade is also discussed. PMID:25000787

Vannier, P; Michel, V; Keeling, L J

2014-04-01

7

Clinical Decision Support and Closed-Loop Control for Cardiopulmonary Management and Intensive Care Unit Sedation Using Expert Systems  

PubMed Central

Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) who require mechanical ventilation due to acute respiratory failure also frequently require the administration of sedative agents. The need for sedation arises both from patient anxiety due to the loss of personal control and the unfamiliar and intrusive environment of the ICU, and also due to pain or other variants of noxious stimuli. While physicians select the agent(s) used for sedation and cardiovascular function, the actual administration of these agents is the responsibility of the nursing staff. If clinical decision support systems and closed-loop control systems could be developed for critical care monitoring and lifesaving interventions as well as the administration of sedation and cardiopulmonary management, the ICU nurse could be released from the intense monitoring of sedation, allowing her/him to focus on other critical tasks. One particularly attractive strategy is to utilize the knowledge and experience of skilled clinicians, capturing explicitly the rules expert clinicians use to decide on how to titrate drug doses depending on the level of sedation. In this paper, we extend the deterministic rule-based expert system for cardiopulmonary management and ICU sedation framework presented in [1] to a stochastic setting by using probability theory to quantify uncertainty and hence deal with more realistic clinical situations. PMID:23620646

Gholami, Behnood; Bailey, James M.; Haddad, Wassim M.; Tannenbaum, Allen R.

2013-01-01

8

Clinical Decision Support and Closed-Loop Control for Cardiopulmonary Management and Intensive Care Unit Sedation Using Expert Systems.  

PubMed

Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) who require mechanical ventilation due to acute respiratory failure also frequently require the administration of sedative agents. The need for sedation arises both from patient anxiety due to the loss of personal control and the unfamiliar and intrusive environment of the ICU, and also due to pain or other variants of noxious stimuli. While physicians select the agent(s) used for sedation and cardiovascular function, the actual administration of these agents is the responsibility of the nursing staff. If clinical decision support systems and closed-loop control systems could be developed for critical care monitoring and lifesaving interventions as well as the administration of sedation and cardiopulmonary management, the ICU nurse could be released from the intense monitoring of sedation, allowing her/him to focus on other critical tasks. One particularly attractive strategy is to utilize the knowledge and experience of skilled clinicians, capturing explicitly the rules expert clinicians use to decide on how to titrate drug doses depending on the level of sedation. In this paper, we extend the deterministic rule-based expert system for cardiopulmonary management and ICU sedation framework presented in [1] to a stochastic setting by using probability theory to quantify uncertainty and hence deal with more realistic clinical situations. PMID:23620646

Gholami, Behnood; Bailey, James M; Haddad, Wassim M; Tannenbaum, Allen R

2012-03-01

9

Intensive Forest Management And Environmental Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is much confusion about environmental consequences of intensive forest management. Even its advocates are apologetic and admit adverse effects of intensive management on long-term sustainability and biodiversity. They need not be: on the global scale, intensive management is the most powerful and practical way to preserve the environment. It is true that preserving biodiversity at a given point is

Boris Zeide

10

Relative impacts of land-use, management intensity and fertilization on microbial community structure in agricultural systems  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Effects of agricultural land management practices on soil prokaryotic diversity have not been well described. Soil microbial communities under three agricultural management systems (conventionally tilled cropland, hayed pasture, and grazed pasture) and two fertilizer systems [inorganic fertilizer (I...

11

Effects of summer catch crop, residue management, soil temperature and water on the succeeding cucumber rhizosphere nitrogen mineralization in intensive production systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nitrogen nutrient management is crucially important in shallow-rooted vegetable production systems characterized by high input\\u000a and high environmental risk. To investigate the effects of summer catch crop (sweet corn, common bean, garland chrysanthemum\\u000a and edible amaranth), residue management, and soil temperature and water on the succeeding cucumber rhizosphere nitrogen mineralization\\u000a in intensive production systems, we determined the rates of net

Yongqiang Tian; Jun Liu; Xueyan Zhang; Lihong Gao

2010-01-01

12

Foundations of data-intensive science: Technology and practice for high throughput, widely distributed, data management and analysis systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Today's large-scale science projects involve world-wide collaborations depend on moving massive amounts of data from an instrument to potentially thousands of computing and storage systems at hundreds of collaborating institutions to accomplish their science. This is true for ATLAS and CMS at the LHC, and it is true for the climate sciences, Belle-II at the KEK collider, genome sciences, the SKA radio telescope, and ITER, the international fusion energy experiment. DOE's Office of Science has been collecting science discipline and instrument requirements for network based data management and analysis for more than a decade. As a result of this certain key issues are seen across essentially all science disciplines that rely on the network for significant data transfer, even if the data quantities are modest compared to projects like the LHC experiments. These issues are what this talk will address; to wit: 1. Optical signal transport advances enabling 100 Gb/s circuits that span the globe on optical fiber with each carrying 100 such channels; 2. Network router and switch requirements to support high-speed international data transfer; 3. Data transport (TCP is still the norm) requirements to support high-speed international data transfer (e.g. error-free transmission); 4. Network monitoring and testing techniques and infrastructure to maintain the required error-free operation of the many R&E networks involved in international collaborations; 5. Operating system evolution to support very high-speed network I/O; 6. New network architectures and services in the LAN (campus) and WAN networks to support data-intensive science; 7. Data movement and management techniques and software that can maximize the throughput on the network connections between distributed data handling systems, and; 8. New approaches to widely distributed workflow systems that can support the data movement and analysis required by the science. All of these areas must be addressed to enable large-scale, widely distributed data analysis systems, and the experience of the LHC can be applied to other scientific disciplines. In particular, specific analogies to the SKA will be cited in the talk.

Johnston, William; Ernst, M.; Dart, E.; Tierney, B.

2014-04-01

13

Scheduling fertilizer applications as a simple mitigation option for reducing N2O emission in intensively managed mown grassland systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A general principle in all proposed N2O mitigation options is the fertilization according to plants' requirements. Meanwhile the amount of N fertilization allowed is regulated in many countries. Due to the high pressure from food security and the need for economic efficiency the given limits are generally used up. In mown grassland systems a simple mitigation option is to optimize the timing of the fertilizer applications. Application of fertilizer, both organic manure and mineral fertilizer, is generally scheduled after each cut in a narrow time window. In practice, the delay between cut and fertilizer application is determined by weather conditions, management conditions and most important by the planning and experience of the individual farmer. Many field experiments have shown that enhanced N2O emissions tend to occur after cuts but before the application of fertilizer, especially when soils are characterized by a high WFPS. These findings suggest that the time of fertilizer application has an important implications for the N2O emission rate and that scheduling fertilization according to soil conditions might be a simple, cheap and efficient measure to mitigate N2O emissions. In this paper we report on results from a sensitivity analysis aiming at quantifying the effects of the timing of the fertilizer applications on N2O emissions from intensively managed, mown grasslands. Simulations for different time schedules were carried out with the comprehensive ecosystem model "ECOSYS" . To our knowledge this aspect has not been systematically investigated from a scientific point of view, but might have been always there within the experiences of attentive environmentally concerned farmers.

Neftel, Albrecht; Calanca, Pierluigi; Felber, Raphael; Grant, Robert; Conen, Franz

2014-05-01

14

Risk factors for kid mortality in West African Dwarf goats under an intensive management system in Ghana.  

PubMed

Breeding records from 1997 to 2000 for West African Dwarf goats kept under an intensive management system on the National Breeding Station at Kintampo in Ghana were analysed for the effect on mortality of sex, season and type of birth, and birth weight. The pre-weaning and post-weaning mortalities were 10% (n = 390) and 23.1% (n = 351), respectively, while the overall mortality from birth up to 12 months of age was 30.8% (n = 390). The post-weaning period recorded significantly higher proportions of deaths in males, females, single-born and twins, during the rainy and dry seasons, and for kids with low or high birth weight, compared to the pre-weaning period. There was significantly higher mortality in male kids than in female kids. The odds and risks of death for male kids were about twice those for females at post-weaning and up to 1 year of age. At pre-weaning and up to 1 year of age, a higher proportion of the dead were twins. Twins had approximately 2.5 the risk of death at pre-weaning, compared to singles. Also, kids born in the rainy season had significantly higher mortality than those born in the dry season. Kids that died by the time of weaning were significantly lighter in weight at birth than those that survived. Male kids had significantly higher mean weights at birth and at weaning, but not at 12 months of age. The significance of these findings is discussed. PMID:15241969

Turkson, P K; Antiri, Y K; Baffuor-Awuah, O

2004-05-01

15

Intensive case management for severe mental illness  

PubMed Central

Background Intensive Case Management (ICM) is a community based package of care, aiming to provide long term care for severely mentally ill people who do not require immediate admission. ICM evolved from two original community models of care, Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) and Case Management (CM), where ICM emphasises the importance of small caseload (less than 20) and high intensity input. Objectives To assess the effects of Intensive Case Management (caseload <20) in comparison with non-Intensive Case Management (caseload > 20) and with standard community care in people with severe mental illness. To evaluate whether the effect of ICM on hospitalisation depends on its fidelity to the ACT model and on the setting. Search methods For the current update of this review we searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (February 2009), which is compiled by systematic searches of major databases, hand searches and conference proceedings. Selection criteria All relevant randomised clinical trials focusing on people with severe mental illness, aged 18 to 65 years and treated in the community-care setting, where Intensive Case Management, non-Intensive Case Management or standard care were compared. Outcomes such as service use, adverse effects, global state, social functioning, mental state, behaviour, quality of life, satisfaction and costs were sought. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For binary outcomes we calculated relative risk (RR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI), on an intention-to-treat basis. For continuous data we estimated mean difference (MD) between groups and its 95% confidence interval (CI). We employed a random-effects model for analyses. We performed a random-effects meta-regression analysis to examine the association of the intervention’s fidelity to the ACT model and the rate of hospital use in the setting where the trial was conducted with the treatment effect. Main results We included 38 trials (7328 participants) in this review. The trials provided data for two comparisons: 1. ICM versus standard care, 2. ICM versus non-ICM. 1. ICM versus standard care Twenty-four trials provided data on length of hospitalisation, and results favoured Intensive Case Management (n=3595, 24 RCTs, MD ?0.86 CI ?1.37 to ?0.34). There was a high level of heterogeneity, but this significance still remained when the outlier studies were excluded from the analysis (n=3143, 20 RCTs, MD ?0.62 CI ?1.00 to ?0.23). Nine studies found participants in the ICM group were less likely to be lost to psychiatric services (n=1633, 9 RCTs, RR 0.43 CI 0.30 to 0.61, I2=49%, p=0.05). One global state scale did show an Improvement in global state for those receiving ICM, the GAF scale (n=818, 5 RCTs, MD 3.41 CI 1.66 to 5.16). Results for mental state as measured through various rating scales, however, were equivocal, with no compelling evidence that ICM was really any better than standard care in improving mental state. No differences in mortality between ICM and standard care groups occurred, either due to ’all causes’ (n=1456, 9 RCTs, RR 0.84 CI 0.48 to 1.47) or to ’suicide’ (n=1456, 9 RCTs, RR 0.68 CI 0.31 to 1.51). Social functioning results varied, no differences were found in terms of contact with the legal system and with employment status, whereas significant improvement in accommodation status was found, as was the incidence of not living independently, which was lower in the ICM group (n=1185, 4 RCTs, RR 0.65 CI 0.49 to 0.88). Quality of life data found no significant difference between groups, but data were weak. CSQ scores showed a greater participant satisfaction in the ICM group (n=423, 2 RCTs, MD 3.23 CI 2.31 to 4.14). 2. ICM versus non-ICM The included studies failed to show a significant advantage of ICM in reducing the average length of hospitalisation (n=2220, 21 RCTs, MD ?0.08 CI ?0.37 to 0.21). They did find ICM to be more advantageous than non-ICM in reducing rate of lost to follo

Dieterich, Marina; Irving, Claire B; Park, Bert; Marshall, Max

2014-01-01

16

Intensive care alarm system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Inductive loop has been added to commercially available call system fitted with earphone receiver. System transmits high frequency signals to nurse's receiver to announce patient's need for help without disturbing others.

Christensen, J. L.; Herbert, A. L.

1973-01-01

17

Managing malaria in the intensive care unit  

PubMed Central

The number of people travelling to malaria-endemic countries continues to increase, and malaria remains the commonest cause of serious imported infection in non-endemic areas. Severe malaria, mostly caused by Plasmodium falciparum, often requires intensive care unit (ICU) admission and can be complicated by cerebral malaria, respiratory distress, acute kidney injury, bleeding complications, and co-infection. The mortality from imported malaria remains significant. This article reviews the manifestations, complications and principles of management of severe malaria as relevant to critical care clinicians, incorporating recent studies of anti-malarial and adjunctive treatment. Effective management of severe malaria includes prompt diagnosis and early institution of effective anti-malarial therapy, recognition of complications, and appropriate supportive management in an ICU. All cases should be discussed with a specialist unit and transfer of the patient considered. PMID:24946778

Marks, M.; Gupta-Wright, A.; Doherty, J. F.; Singer, M.; Walker, D.

2014-01-01

18

Intensive care management of liver transplanted patients  

PubMed Central

Advances in pre-transplant treatment of cirrhosis-related organ dysfunction, intraoperative patient management, and improvements in the treatment of rejection and infections have made human liver transplantation an effective and valuable option for patients with end stage liver disease. However, many important factors, related both to an increasing “marginality” of the implanted graft and unexpected perioperative complications still make immediate post-operative care challenging and the early outcome unpredictable. In recent years sicker patients with multiple comorbidities and organ dysfunction have been undergoing Liver transplantation; appropriate critical care management is required to support prompt graft recovery and prevent systemic complications. Early post-operative management is highly demanding as significant changes may occur in both the allograft and the “distant” organs. A functioning transplanted liver is almost always associated with organ system recovery, resulting in a new life for the patient. However, in the unfortunate event of graft dysfunction, the unavoidable development of multi-organ failure will require an enhanced level of critical care support and a prolonged ICU stay. Strict monitoring and sustainment of cardiorespiratory function, frequent assessment of graft performance, timely recognition of unexpected complications and the institution of prophylactic measures to prevent extrahepatic organ system dysfunction are mandatory in the immediate post-operative period. A reduced rate of complications and satisfactory outcomes have been obtained from multidisciplinary, collaborative efforts, skillful vigilance, and a thorough knowledge of pathophysiologic characteristics of the transplanted liver. PMID:21487537

Feltracco, Paolo; Barbieri, Stefania; Galligioni, Helmut; Michieletto, Elisa; Carollo, Cristiana; Ori, Carlo

2011-01-01

19

LRRB Pavement Management Systems Pavement Management Systems  

E-print Network

LRRB Pavement Management Systems Pavement Management Systems Presented by: Michael Marti SRF for implementing and monitoring research results (RIC) #12;LRRB Pavement Management Systems LRRB Structure LRRB and counties in implementing Pavement Management and/or using better §Project produced several deliverables

Minnesota, University of

20

Effects of summer cover crop and residue management on cucumber growth in intensive Chinese production systems: soil nutrients, microbial properties and nematodes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Yield increases of cucumber following cover crops in a rotation system have been previously reported for intensive Chinese\\u000a agricultural production. However, little information is available as to how this system affects soil microbial properties\\u000a and nematodes. A 4-year field experiment on a greenhouse cucumber double-cropping system was conducted to investigate the\\u000a effects of four different summer cover crops on cucumber

Yongqiang Tian; Xueyan Zhang; Jun Liu; Lihong Gao

2011-01-01

21

Intensive management of a critically endangered species: the kakapo  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since a review of the management of the critically endangered kakapo (Strigops habroptilus) in 1994, management of this species has become more intensive. This paper reports on new developments in the supplementary feeding of kakapo, continuous monitoring and protection of nests from predators, translocations of kakapo between islands, and artificial incubation of eggs and hand-raising of chicks. Supplementary feeding probably

Graeme P Elliott; Don V Merton; Paul W Jansen

2001-01-01

22

IML-CZO: Critical Zone Observatory for Intensively Managed Landscapes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Intensively managed landscapes, regions of significant land use change, serve as a cradle for economic prosperity. However, the intensity of change is responsible for unintended deterioration of our land and water environments. By understanding present day dynamics in the context of long-term co-evolution of the Critical Zone comprising of the landscape, soil and biota, IML-CZO aims to support the assessment of short- and long-term resilience of the crucial ecological, hydrological and climatic services provided by the Critical Zone. An observational network of three sites in Illinois, Iowa, and Minnesota that capture the geological diversity of the low relief, glaciated, and tile-drained landscape will drive novel scientific and technological advances. IML-CZO will provide leadership in developing the next generation of scientists and practitioners, and informing management strategies aimed at reducing the vulnerability of the system to present and emerging trends in human activities. IML-CZO, one of the nine observatories funded by the United States National Science Foundation (NSF), consists of two core sites: the 3,690- sq. km. Upper Sangamon River Basin in Illinois and 270-sq. km. Clear Creek Watershed in Iowa, along with the 44,000- sq. km. Minnesota River Basin as third participating site. These sites together are characterized by low-relief landscapes with poorly drained soils and represent a broad range of physiographic variations found throughout the glaciated Midwest, and thereby provide an opportunity to advance understanding of the CZO in this important region. Through novel measurements, analysis and modeling, IML-CZO aims to address the following questions: • How do different time scales of geologic evolution and anthropogenic influence interact to determine the trajectory of CZ structure and function? • How is the co-evolution of biota, consisting of both vegetation and microbes, and soil affected due to intensive management? • How have dynamic patterns of connectivity, which link across transition zones and heterogeneity, changed by anthropogenic impacts? • How do these changes affect residence times and aggregate fluxes of water, carbon, nutrients, and sediment? IML-CZO will use historical data, existing observational networks, new instruments, remote sensing, sampling and laboratory analyses, and novel sensing technologies using open hardware and unmanned vehicles to study a number of variables related to climate and weather, hydrology, geology, geomorphology, soils, water chemistry, biogeochemistry, ecology, and land management. Additional details are available at imlczo.org.

Kumar, Praveen; Papanicolaou, Thanos

2014-05-01

23

Environmental Management System Plan  

E-print Network

Integrated Environment, Health and Program Elements Environmental ManagementEnvironmental Management System Fiscal Year Improve (EMP classification) IntegratedEnvironmental Management System Plan Executive Summary This Plan is integrated

Fox, Robert

2009-01-01

24

Distributed Storage Systems for Data Intensive Computing  

SciTech Connect

In this chapter, the authors present an overview of the utility of distributed storage systems in supporting modern applications that are increasingly becoming data intensive. Their coverage of distributed storage systems is based on the requirements imposed by data intensive computing and not a mere summary of storage systems. To this end, they delve into several aspects of supporting data-intensive analysis, such as data staging, offloading, checkpointing, and end-user access to terabytes of data, and illustrate the use of novel techniques and methodologies for realizing distributed storage systems therein. The data deluge from scientific experiments, observations, and simulations is affecting all of the aforementioned day-to-day operations in data-intensive computing. Modern distributed storage systems employ techniques that can help improve application performance, alleviate I/O bandwidth bottleneck, mask failures, and improve data availability. They present key guiding principles involved in the construction of such storage systems, associated tradeoffs, design, and architecture, all with an eye toward addressing challenges of data-intensive scientific applications. They highlight the concepts involved using several case studies of state-of-the-art storage systems that are currently available in the data-intensive computing landscape.

Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S [ORNL; Butt, Ali R [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Ma, Xiaosong [ORNL

2012-01-01

25

Building dependability arguments for software intensive systems  

E-print Network

A method is introduced for structuring and guiding the development of end-to-end dependability arguments. The goal is to establish high-level requirements of complex software-intensive systems, especially properties that ...

Seater, Robert Morrison

2009-01-01

26

Information Resources Management: Systems Communicating with Systems. A Session Especially Designed by Senior Managers for Senior Management Officials. Viewgraphs and Presentations. Intensive One-Day Symposium (Gaithersburg, Maryland, December 3, 1987).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Summaries of the welcoming and opening remarks for a symposium on the standards issues that will affect the federal government's planning, acquisition, and use of integrated computer and telecommunications systems over the next five years set the stage for the keynote address by Joseph Timko of IBM entitled "Standards--Perspectives and Evolution."…

General Services Administration, Washington, DC.

27

Assessing Resilience of Intensively Managed Landscapes through Feedbacks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Intensively managed landscapes such as those of the United States agricultural Midwest are hypothesized to be on a different trajectory than natural landscapes in terms of ecosystem processes and landscape evolution. Process networks provide a method to analyze system states as patterns of couplings and feedbacks. It has been shown using FLUXNET data that variables such as precipitation, soil temperature, soil moisture, latent heat flux, and net ecosystem exchange may exhibit synchronized relationships, time-lagged forcing behavior, or feedbacks. The strength of these couplings weakens or breaks down with environmental extremes such as drought. This study compares couplings in measured fluxes observed using a process network approach with couplings of modeled ecohydrological variables. MLCan is a multi-layer canopy-air exchange model that uses FLUXNET tower climate and flux data as input to simulate leaf uptake, stomatal conductance, photosynthesis, soil hydrology, and other descriptors of ecosystem state. This model has been used to assess vegetation acclimation to climate change, altered hydrology due to biofuel crops, and root hydraulic redistribution in different ecosystems. For this study, MLCan is used to simulate conditions for the 2005 growing season at the location of the Bondville, IL flux tower. A process network is defined with nodes representing key measured and simulated variables including streamflow at a nearby gage, precipitation, radiation, soil moisture, leaf uptake, and nutrient fluxes. Couplings are identified using mutual information and transfer entropy statistics. This study effectively validates whether simulated ecosystem state variables demonstrate information flow to the same extent as measured data. The inclusion of streamflow introduces a spatial element to the process network approach that begins to link processes with topography and land use in the watershed. Analysis of coupling types and strengths can be applied to assess resilience characteristics of intensively managed versus natural landscapes.

Goodwell, A. E.; Kumar, P.

2013-12-01

28

Telemedicine as a tool for intensive management of diabetes: the DIABTel experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the current features of the DIABTel telemedicine system and the evaluation outcomes of its use in clinical routine. This telemedicine system is designed to complement the daily care and intensive management of diabetic patients through telemonitoring and telecare services. The system comprises a patient unit (PU) used by patients in their day-to-day activities and a Medical Workstation

Enrique J. Gómez; M. Elena Hernando; A. García; Francisco Del Pozo; J. Cermeño; R. Corcoy; Eulalia Brugués; Alberto De Leiva

2002-01-01

29

WEB BASED ONLINE FEEDBACK MANAGEMENT SYSTEM  

Microsoft Academic Search

This project is to develop a web-based feedback management system called Web Based Online Feedback Management System (WBOFMS) for the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Auckland. It is required to replace the existing paper-based system named Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ). The existing system is very costly and labour intensive and there is no guarantee that the results generated

Richard Wee; Li Lau

30

Nursing management and organizational ethics in the intensive care unit.  

PubMed

This article describes organizational ethics issues involved in nursing management of an intensive care unit. The intensive care team and medical center management have the dual responsibility to create an ethical environment in which to provide optimum patient care. Addressing organizational ethics is key to creating that ethical environment in the intensive care unit. During the past 15-20 yrs, increasing costs in health care, competitive markets, the effect of high technology, and global business changes have set the stage for business and healthcare organizational conflicts that affect the ethical environment. Studies show that critical care nurses experience moral distress and are affected by the ethical climate of both the intensive care unit and the larger organization. Thus, nursing moral distress may result in problems related to recruitment and retention of staff. Other issues with organizational ethics ramifications that may occur in the intensive care unit include patient safety issues (including those related to disruptive behavior), intensive care unit leadership style, research ethics, allocation of resources, triage, and other economic issues. Current organizational ethics conflicts are discussed, a professional practice model is described, and multidisciplinary recommendations are put forth. PMID:17242604

Wlody, Ginger Schafer

2007-02-01

31

Management intensity and topography determined plant diversity in vineyards.  

PubMed

Vineyards are amongst the most intensive forms of agriculture often resulting in simplified landscapes where semi-natural vegetation is restricted to small scattered patches. However, a tendency toward a more sustainable management is stimulating research on biodiversity in these poorly investigated agro-ecosystems. The main aim of this study was to test the effect on plant diversity of management intensity and topography in vineyards located in a homogenous intensive hilly landscape. Specifically, this study evaluated the role of slope, mowing and herbicide treatments frequency, and nitrogen supply in shaping plant diversity and composition of life-history traits. The study was carried out in 25 vineyards located in the area of the Conegliano-Valdobbiadene DOCG (Veneto, NE Italy). In each vineyard, 10 plots were placed and the abundance of all vascular plants was recorded in each plot. Linear multiple regression was used to test the effect of management and topography on plant diversity. Management intensity and topography were both relevant drivers of plant species diversity patterns in our vineyards. The two most important factors were slope and mowing frequency that respectively yielded positive and negative effects on plant diversity. A significant interaction between these two factors was also demonstrated, warning against the detrimental effects of increasing mowing intensity on steep slope where plant communities are more diverse. The response of plant communities to mowing frequency is mediated by a process of selection of resistant growth forms, such in the case of rosulate and reptant species. The other two management-related factors tested in this study, number of herbicide treatments and N fertilization, were less influential. In general, our study corroborates the idea that some simple changes in farming activities, which are compatible with grape production, should be encouraged for improving the natural and cultural value of the landscape by maintaining and improving wild plant diversity. PMID:24098435

Nascimbene, Juri; Marini, Lorenzo; Ivan, Diego; Zottini, Michela

2013-01-01

32

Intensive Innovation Context and Design System Dynamics. The case of Car Information Communication Entertainment (ICE) systems.  

E-print Network

. Recent literature on innovation strategy and organizational change has challenged the classical-industrial organizations» (Ekstedt and al. 1999), «intensive innovation-based strategies,» and «design's strategy, the knowledge/learning management system, and the project management process for new product

Boyer, Edmond

33

Energy resource management for energy-intensive manufacturing industries  

SciTech Connect

A program to introduce energy resource management into an energy-intensive manufacturing industry is presented. The food industry (SIC No. 20) was chosen and 20 companies were selected for interviews, but thirteen were actually visited. The methodology for this program is detailed. Reasons for choosing the food industry are described. The substance of the information gained and the principal conclusions drawn from the interviews are given. Results of the model Energy Resource Management Plan applied to three companies are compiled at length. Strategies for dissemination of the information gained are described. (MCW)

Brenner, C.W.; Levangie, J.

1981-10-01

34

[Meaning of managing intensive care units for the nursing professional].  

PubMed

This study had the aim of understanding the meaning of being a nurse in a management position in Intensive Care Units as well as the feelings coming from this function. Eight nurses from the University Hospital of Parand, Brazil, were interviewed. This is a qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study in which the dejourian theoretical framework was used. The data were gathered from January to March of 2007 through semi-structured interviews, which were then transcribed categorized and subcategorized. The data were analyzed by the analysis of content approach. It was observed that managing means: to provide the patient with care, to manage the nursing assistance as well as the health team. The feelings of pleasure are related to: taking care of the patient, developing team work, the results of the work and the external acknowledgement. PMID:19653564

Martins, Júlia Trevisan; Robazzi, Maria Lúicia do Carmo Cruz; Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci; Garanhani, Mara Lúcia; Haddad, Maria do Carmo Lourenço

2009-03-01

35

NASA's Risk Management System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Leadership is key to success. Phased-approach for implementation of risk management is necessary. Risk management system will be simple, accessible and promote communication of information to all relevant stakeholders for optimal resource allocation and risk mitigation. Risk management should be used by all team members to manage risks -- risk office personnel. Each group is assigned Risk Integrators who are facilitators for effective risk management. Risks will be managed at the lowest-level feasible, elevate only those risks that require coordination or management from above. Risk reporting and communication is an essential element of risk management and will combine both qualitative and quantitative elements. Risk informed decision making should be introduced to all levels of management. Provide necessary checks and balances to insure that risks are caught/identified and dealt with in a timely manner. Many supporting tools, processes & training must be deployed for effective risk management implementation. Process improvement must be included in the risk processes.

Perera, Jeevan S.

2011-01-01

36

Lithium battery management system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Provided is a system for managing a lithium battery system having a plurality of cells. The battery system comprises a variable-resistance element electrically connected to a cell and located proximate a portion of the cell; and a device for determining, utilizing the variable-resistance element, whether the temperature of the cell has exceeded a predetermined threshold. A method of managing the

Thomas J

2012-01-01

37

NASA's Risk Management System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Phased-approach for implementation of risk management is necessary. Risk management system will be simple, accessible and promote communication of information to all relevant stakeholders for optimal resource allocation and risk mitigation. Risk management should be used by all team members to manage risks - not just risk office personnel. Each group/department is assigned Risk Integrators who are facilitators for effective risk management. Risks will be managed at the lowest-level feasible, elevate only those risks that require coordination or management from above. Risk informed decision making should be introduced to all levels of management. ? Provide necessary checks and balances to insure that risks are caught/identified and dealt with in a timely manner. Many supporting tools, processes & training must be deployed for effective risk management implementation. Process improvement must be included in the risk processes.

Perera, Jeevan S.

2013-01-01

38

Management Information System Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Management Information System (MIS) described in this report represents a plan to utilize modern management techniques to facilitate the goal of a learner-responsive school system. The MIS component is being developed to meet the need for the coordination of the resources of staff, facilities, and time with the long range planning and…

Foley, Walter J.; Harr, Gordon G.

39

Medical Information Management System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On-line interactive information processing system easily and rapidly handles all aspects of data management related to patient care. General purpose system is flexible enough to be applied to other data management situations found in areas such as occupational safety data, judicial information, or personnel records.

Alterescu, S.; Hipkins, K. R.; Friedman, C. A.

1979-01-01

40

Waste management system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The function of the waste management system was to control the disposition of solid and liquid wastes and waste stowage gases. The waste management system consisting of a urine subsystem and a fecal subsystem is described in detail and its overall performance is evaluated. Recommendations for improvement are given.

Sauer, R. L.; Jorgensen, G. K.

1975-01-01

41

Intensity-Modulated and 3D-Conformal Radiotherapy for Whole-Ventricular Irradiation as Compared With Conventional Whole-Brain Irradiation in the Management of Localized Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumors  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To compare the sparing potential of cerebral hemispheres with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for whole-ventricular irradiation (WVI) and conventional whole-brain irradiation (WBI) in the management of localized central nervous system germ cell tumors (CNSGCTs). Methods and Materials: Ten cases of patients with localized CNSGCTs and submitted to WVI by use of IMRT with or without a 'boost' to the primary lesion were selected. For comparison purposes, similar treatment plans were produced by use of 3D-CRT (WVI with or without boost) and WBI (opposed lateral fields with or without boost), and cerebral hemisphere sparing was evaluated at dose levels ranging from 2 Gy to 40 Gy. Results: The median prescription dose for WVI was 30.6 Gy (range, 25.2-37.5 Gy), and that for the boost was 16.5 Gy (range, 0-23.4 Gy). Mean irradiated cerebral hemisphere volumes were lower for WVI with IMRT than for 3D-CRT and were lower for WVI with 3D-CRT than for WBI. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was associated with the lowest irradiated volumes, with reductions of 7.5%, 12.2%, and 9.0% at dose levels of 20, 30, and 40 Gy, respectively, compared with 3D-CRT. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy provided statistically significant reductions of median irradiated volumes at all dose levels (p = 0.002 or less). However, estimated radiation doses to peripheral areas of the body were 1.9 times higher with IMRT than with 3D-CRT. Conclusions: Although IMRT is associated with increased radiation doses to peripheral areas of the body, its use can spare a significant amount of normal central nervous system tissue compared with 3D-CRT or WBI in the setting of CNSGCT treatment.

Chen, Michael Jenwei, E-mail: michaelchen@einstein.b [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Silva Santos, Adriana da; Sakuraba, Roberto Kenji; Lopes, Cleverson Perceu; Goncalves, Vinicius Demanboro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Weltman, Eduardo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ferrigno, Robson; Cruz, Jose Carlos [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

2010-02-01

42

Precision Battery Management System  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents a new battery management system for a lithium ion battery pack for more efficient operation and sturdy. The new system contains an embedded microcontroller to track the energy content of cell battery, optimize the output current, and to provide extensive feedback of all the measurements taken. This system sends all data to a telemetry system so that

J. A. Asumadu; Mohammed Haque; Helio Vogel; Charles Willards

2005-01-01

43

Battery management system  

Microsoft Academic Search

A battery management system is described, comprising: a main battery; main battery charging system means coupled to the main battery for charging the main battery during operation of the main battery charging system means; at least one auxiliary battery; primary switching means for coupling the auxiliary battery to a parallel configuration with the main battery charging system means and with

Albright

1993-01-01

44

Smart energy management system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Peak and average energy usage in domestic and industrial environments is growing rapidly and absence of detailed energy consumption metrics is making systematic reduction of energy usage very difficult. Smart energy management system aims at providing a cost-effective solution for managing soaring energy consumption and its impact on green house gas emissions and climate change. The solution is based on

Aniruddha Desai; Jugdutt Singh

2010-01-01

45

Safety Management Systems.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document discusses the issues that need to be considered by the education and training system as it responds to the changing needs of industry in Great Britain. Following a general introduction, the development of quality management ideas is traced. The underlying principles of safety and risk management are clarified and the implications of…

Fido, A. T.; Wood, D. O.

46

Intensive thermodynamic parameters in nonequilibrium systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Considering a broad class of steady-state nonequilibrium systems for which some additive quantities are conserved by the dynamics, we introduce from a statistical approach intensive thermodynamic parameters (ITPs) conjugated to the conserved quantities. This definition does not require any detailed balance relation to be fulfilled. Rather, the system must satisfy a general additivity property, which holds in most of the models usually considered in the literature, including those described by a matrix product ansatz with finite matrices. The main property of these ITPs is to take equal values in two subsystems, making them a powerful tool to describe nonequilibrium phase coexistence, as illustrated on different models. We finally discuss the issue of the equalization of ITPs when two different systems are put into contact. This issue is closely related to the possibility of measuring the ITPs using a small auxiliary system, in the same way as temperature is measured with a thermometer, and points at one of the major difficulties of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. In addition, an efficient alternative determination, based on the measure of fluctuations, is also proposed and illustrated.

Bertin, Eric; Martens, Kirsten; Dauchot, Olivier; Droz, Michel

2007-03-01

47

Global Energy Management System  

E-print Network

- saving the cumulative equivalent of 1.8 billion barrels of oil and reducing carbon dioxide emissions by over 200 million tonnes. In 2000, we redoubled our efforts with deployment of our Global Energy Management System (GEMS), which utilizes international...

Eidt, B. D.

2005-01-01

48

Intranet Document Management Systems.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains how intranets facilitate documentation availability within a company at substantial cost savings. Topics include intranet document management systems (IDMS); publication costs for printed materials; hardware and software specifications; performance; and security. (Author/LRW)

Wen, H. Joseph; Yen, David C.; Lin, Binshan

1998-01-01

49

Budget Management System  

Microsoft Academic Search

At the end of 1984, the State Council resolved to carry out, beginning in 1985, with regard to municipalities directly under the jurisdiction of the central government, the fiscal budgetary management system characterized by \\

1990-01-01

50

Intensive care unit management of patients with stroke.  

PubMed

Patients admitted with the diagnosis of "stroke" have a variety of different disorders that require specific treatment approaches in the critical care unit. Early thrombolysis for ischemic stroke and improvements in surgical and neurointerventional techniques for the treatment of aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage have been milestones in the past decade, but the evolvement of general management principles in critical care and the dedication of neurointensivists are equally important for improved outcomes. Strategies, which have been developed in other areas of intensive care medicine (eg, in patients with septic shock, acute respiratory distress syndrome, or trauma), need to be adopted and modified for the stroke patient. Prevention of iatrogenic complications and nosocomial infections is of utmost importance and requires sufficient numbers of trained personnel and high-quality equipment. Although the focus of attention in stroke patients is "brain resuscitation," comorbidities often limit the diagnostic and therapeutic options, and overall cardiopulmonary and metabolic functions need to be optimized in order to prevent secondary injury and allow the brain to recover. As part of a holistic approach to the rehabilitation process, psychologic and spiritual support for the patient must start early on in the intensive care unit, and family members should be involved in the patient's care and provided with special support as well. PMID:18173942

Schulz-Stübner, Sebastian

2007-11-01

51

Database Management System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In 1981 Wayne Erickson founded Microrim, Inc, a company originally focused on marketing a microcomputer version of RIM (Relational Information Manager). Dennis Comfort joined the firm and is now vice president, development. The team developed an advanced spinoff from the NASA system they had originally created, a microcomputer database management system known as R:BASE 4000. Microrim added many enhancements and developed a series of R:BASE products for various environments. R:BASE is now the second largest selling line of microcomputer database management software in the world.

1990-01-01

52

Establishing a Regional Nitrogen Management Approach to Mitigate Greenhouse Gas Emission Intensity from Intensive Smallholder Maize Production  

PubMed Central

The overuse of Nitrogen (N) fertilizers on smallholder farms in rapidly developing countries has increased greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and accelerated global N consumption over the past 20 years. In this study, a regional N management approach was developed based on the cost of the agricultural response to N application rates from 1,726 on-farm experiments to optimize N management across 12 agroecological subregions in the intensive Chinese smallholder maize belt. The grain yield and GHG emission intensity of this regional N management approach was investigated and compared to field-specific N management and farmers' practices. The regional N rate ranged from 150 to 219 kg N ha?1 for the 12 agroecological subregions. Grain yields and GHG emission intensities were consistent with this regional N management approach compared to field-specific N management, which indicated that this regional N rate was close to the economically optimal N application. This regional N management approach, if widely adopted in China, could reduce N fertilizer use by more than 1.4 MT per year, increase maize production by 31.9 MT annually, and reduce annual GHG emissions by 18.6 MT. This regional N management approach can minimize net N losses and reduce GHG emission intensity from over- and underapplications, and therefore can also be used as a reference point for regional agricultural extension employees where soil and/or plant N monitoring is lacking. PMID:24875747

Wu, Liang; Chen, Xinping; Cui, Zhenling; Zhang, Weifeng; Zhang, Fusuo

2014-01-01

53

Integrated work management system.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories develops technologies to: (1) sustain, modernize, and protect our nuclear arsenal (2) Prevent the spread of weapons of mass destruction; (3) Provide new capabilities to our armed forces; (4) Protect our national infrastructure; (5) Ensure the stability of our nation's energy and water supplies; and (6) Defend our nation against terrorist threats. We identified the need for a single overarching Integrated Workplace Management System (IWMS) that would enable us to focus on customer missions and improve FMOC processes. Our team selected highly configurable commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) software with out-of-the-box workflow processes that integrate strategic planning, project management, facility assessments, and space management, and can interface with existing systems, such as Oracle, PeopleSoft, Maximo, Bentley, and FileNet. We selected the Integrated Workplace Management System (IWMS) from Tririga, Inc. Facility Management System (FMS) Benefits are: (1) Create a single reliable source for facility data; (2) Improve transparency with oversight organizations; (3) Streamline FMOC business processes with a single, integrated facility-management tool; (4) Give customers simple tools and real-time information; (5) Reduce indirect costs; (6) Replace approximately 30 FMOC systems and 60 homegrown tools (such as Microsoft Access databases); and (7) Integrate with FIMS.

Williams, Edward J., Jr.; Henry, Karen Lynne

2010-06-01

54

The carbon budget of newly established temperate grassland depends on management intensity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The carbon exchange of managed temperate grassland, previously converted from arable rotation, was quantified for two levels of management intensities over a period of 3 years. The original field on the Swiss Central Plateau had been separated into two plots of equal size, one plot was subjected to intensive management with nitrogen inputs of 200kgha?1year?1 and frequent cutting, and the

C. Ammann; C. R. Flechard; J. Leifeld; A. Neftel; J. Fuhrer

2007-01-01

55

Data Grid Management Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The "Grid" is an emerging infrastructure for coordinating access across autonomous organizations to distributed, heterogeneous computation and data resources. Data grids are being built around the world as the next generation data handling systems for sharing, publishing, and preserving data residing on storage systems located in multiple administrative domains. A data grid provides logical namespaces for users, digital entities and storage resources to create persistent identifiers for controlling access, enabling discovery, and managing wide area latencies. This paper introduces data grids and describes data grid use cases. The relevance of data grids to digital libraries and persistent archives is demonstrated, and research issues in data grids and grid dataflow management systems are discussed.

Moore, Reagan W.; Jagatheesan, Arun; Rajasekar, Arcot; Wan, Michael; Schroeder, Wayne

2004-01-01

56

Data Base Management Systems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

CSC 455. Data Base Management Systems (3) Corequisite: CSC 332. Introduction to data base concepts, data independence, logical and physical views of data base systems. Data models: hierarchial, network and relational. Data description languages, query functions, relational algebra. Substantial software project required.

Narayan, Sridhar

2003-04-21

57

Purge water management system  

DOEpatents

A purge water management system is described for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

Cardoso-Neto, J.E.; Williams, D.W.

1995-01-01

58

Purge water management system  

DOEpatents

A purge water management system for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

Cardoso-Neto, Joao E. (North Augusta, SC); Williams, Daniel W. (Aiken, SC)

1996-01-01

59

Microgrid Energy Management System  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

While key infrastructures that were not working as a result of the August 14, 2003 blackout were widely publicized, the systems that remained operational received less notice. An item of interest that has implications for better future control of the power grid is a January 2003 document from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The report outlines new concepts for advanced Energy Management Systems for a condensed area of electrical load. The resulting interaction between these "microgrids" and the interconnecting distribution system is also discussed.

Kirby, B. J.; Kueck, J. D.; Labinov, S. D.; Staunton, S. D.

2003-01-01

60

Managing Conflict in Temporary Management Systems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As organizational tasks have grown more complex, several innovative temporary management systems such as matrix management have been developed. The Apollo space program has been an important contribution to the development of matrix management techniques. Discusses the role of conflict within the matrix, its determinants, and the process of…

Wilemon, David L.

1973-01-01

61

Intensive olive orchards on sloping land: good water and pest management are essential.  

PubMed

There is intensive cultivation of olives on sloping land in Jaen-Granada (Spain), Basilicata (Italy) and Western Crete (Greece). The intensive olive groves here are characterised by a tree density of about 250treesha(-1), yearly fertilisation and pruning, several chemical sprays for pest control, soil tillage once to thrice per year and irrigation up to 2700m3ha(-1)yr(-1). Intensive management results in high yields of 3600-6500kgha(-1) but also higher labour costs of 1154-1590euroha(-1)yr(-1), varying per area. The major environmental concerns in this system are related to chemical residues in the fruit, the extinction of useful insects, the depletion of groundwater resources, the pollution of soil and water and the erosion of soil. This paper describes the impact of intensive orchard management on natural resources and gives recommendations for soil and water conservation, reduction of chemicals use and biodiversity enhancement. The specific recommendations for the relevant stakeholders--farmers, technicians, agricultural services and policy makers--are based on the experimental evaluation of different agricultural practices and a socio-economic analysis of local and global production and markets. PMID:17923248

Metzidakis, I; Martinez-Vilela, A; Castro Nieto, G; Basso, B

2008-11-01

62

Building waste management core indicators through Spatial Material Flow Analysis: Net recovery and transport intensity indexes  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sustainability and proximity principles have a key role in waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Core indicators are needed in order to quantify and evaluate them. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A systematic, step-by-step approach is developed in this study for their development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transport may play a significant role in terms of environmental and economic costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Policy action is required in order to advance in the consecution of these principles. - Abstract: In this paper, the material and spatial characterization of the flows within a municipal solid waste (MSW) management system are combined through a Network-Based Spatial Material Flow Analysis. Using this information, two core indicators are developed for the bio-waste fraction, the Net Recovery Index (NRI) and the Transport Intensity Index (TII), which are aimed at assessing progress towards policy-related sustainable MSW management strategies and objectives. The NRI approaches the capacity of a MSW management system for converting waste into resources through a systematic metabolic approach, whereas the TII addresses efficiency in terms of the transport requirements to manage a specific waste flow throughout the entire MSW management life cycle. Therefore, both indicators could be useful in assessing key MSW management policy strategies, such as the consecution of higher recycling levels (sustainability principle) or the minimization of transport by locating treatment facilities closer to generation sources (proximity principle). To apply this methodological approach, the bio-waste management system of the region of Catalonia (Spain) has been chosen as a case study. Results show the adequacy of both indicators for identifying those points within the system with higher capacity to compromise its environmental, economic and social performance and therefore establishing clear targets for policy prioritization. Moreover, this methodological approach permits scenario building, which could be useful in assessing the outcomes of hypothetical scenarios, thus proving its adequacy for strategic planning.

Font Vivanco, David, E-mail: font@cml.leidenuniv.nl [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Puig Ventosa, Ignasi [ENT Environment and Management, Carrer Sant Joan 39, First Floor, 08800 Vilanova i la Geltru, Barcelona (Spain); Gabarrell Durany, Xavier [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

2012-12-15

63

Battery Management System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Battery management system is designed with MCU module, measurement module, alarm module, input module, output module and communication module. It can be able to timely report the states to the user in order to maximize using of battery storage capacity and cycle life.

Li Yamei; Zhen Liping

2010-01-01

64

Automotive battery management systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Battery management system (BMS) is an integral part of an automobile. It protects the battery from damage, predicts battery life and maintains the battery in an operational condition. The BMS performs these tasks by integrating one or more of the functions, such as protecting the cell, controlling the charge, determining the state of charge (SOC), the state of health (SOH),

Bharath Pattipati; Krishna Pattipati; Jon P. Christopherson; Setu Madhavi Namburu; Danil V. Prokhorov; Liu Qiao

2008-01-01

65

Content Management Systems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the authors provide a guide in acquiring content management system. They conducted a vendor survey that covers four areas: (1) general information about the product (including standards supported); (2) administration of the product; (3) functionality; and (4) contact information for readers who want to know more. A list of product…

Wisniewski, Jeff; Stenstrom, Cheryl

2007-01-01

66

Information systems security from a knowledge management perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – Information systems security management is a knowledge-intensive activity that currently depends heavily on the experience of security experts. However, the knowledge dimension of IS security management has been neglected, both by research and industry. This paper aims to explore the sources of IS security knowledge and the potential role of an IS security knowledge management system. Design\\/methodology\\/approach –

Petros Belsis; Spyros Kokolakis; Evangelos A. Kiountouzis

2005-01-01

67

Carbon mineralization in the soils under different cover crops and residue management in an intensive protected vegetable cultivation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Continuous cropping under plastic greenhouses, a common practice in intensive Chinese vegetable production systems, has led to the decline of soil productivity and crop yields. A 4-year greenhouse experiment on cucumber double-cropping systems was conducted in Changping country, Beijing, China, to investigate the effects of summer cover crops and residue management on soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC), C mineralization and

Yongqiang Tian; Juan Liu; Xuhui Wang; Lihong Gao

2011-01-01

68

Software Management System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A software management system, originally developed for Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) by Century Computing, Inc. has evolved from a menu and command oriented system to a state-of-the art user interface development system supporting high resolution graphics workstations. Transportable Applications Environment (TAE) was initially distributed through COSMIC and backed by a TAE support office at GSFC. In 1993, Century Computing assumed the support and distribution functions and began marketing TAE Plus, the system's latest version. The software is easy to use and does not require programming experience.

1994-01-01

69

Integrated Energy and Greenhouse Gas Management System  

E-print Network

an integrated Energy and Greenhouse Gas Management System that allows companies to reduce energy and carbon intensity at the same time all the while bolstering bottom line performance. Reducing energy use and greenhouse gases is not an option but a necessity...

Spates, C. N.

2010-01-01

70

Smart energy management system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Peak and average energy usage in domestic and industrial environments is growing rapidly and absence of detailed energy consumption metrics is making systematic reduction of energy usage very difficult. Smart energy management system aims at providing a cost-effective solution for managing soaring energy consumption and its impact on green house gas emissions and climate change. The solution is based on seamless integration of existing wired and wireless communication technologies combined with smart context-aware software which offers a complete solution for automation of energy measurement and device control. The persuasive software presents users with easy-to-assimilate visual cues identifying problem areas and time periods and encourages a behavioural change to conserve energy. The system allows analysis of real-time/statistical consumption data with the ability to drill down into detailed analysis of power consumption, CO2 emissions and cost. The system generates intelligent projections and suggests potential methods (e.g. reducing standby, tuning heating/cooling temperature, etc.) of reducing energy consumption. The user interface is accessible using web enabled devices such as PDAs, PCs, etc. or using SMS, email, and instant messaging. Successful real-world trial of the system has demonstrated the potential to save 20 to 30% energy consumption on an average. Low cost of deployment and the ability to easily manage consumption from various web enabled devices offers gives this system a high penetration and impact capability offering a sustainable solution to act on climate change today.

Desai, Aniruddha; Singh, Jugdutt

2010-04-01

71

Organic Farming and Landscape Structure: Effects on Insect-Pollinated Plant Diversity in Intensively Managed Grasslands  

PubMed Central

Parallel declines in insect-pollinated plants and their pollinators have been reported as a result of agricultural intensification. Intensive arable plant communities have previously been shown to contain higher proportions of self-pollinated plants compared to natural or semi-natural plant communities. Though intensive grasslands are widespread, it is not known whether they show similar patterns to arable systems nor whether local and/or landscape factors are influential. We investigated plant community composition in 10 pairs of organic and conventional dairy farms across Ireland in relation to the local and landscape context. Relationships between plant groups and local factors (farming system, position in field and soil parameters) and landscape factors (e.g. landscape complexity) were investigated. The percentage cover of unimproved grassland was used as an inverse predictor of landscape complexity, as it was negatively correlated with habitat-type diversity. Intensive grasslands (organic and conventional) contained more insect-pollinated forbs than non-insect pollinated forbs. Organic field centres contained more insect-pollinated forbs than conventional field centres. Insect-pollinated forb richness in field edges (but not field centres) increased with increasing landscape complexity (% unimproved grassland) within 1, 3, 4 and 5km radii around sites, whereas non-insect pollinated forb richness was unrelated to landscape complexity. Pollination systems within intensive grassland communities may be different from those in arable systems. Our results indicate that organic management increases plant richness in field centres, but that landscape complexity exerts strong influences in both organic and conventional field edges. Insect-pollinated forb richness, unlike that for non-insect pollinated forbs, showed positive relationships to landscape complexity reflecting what has been documented for bees and other pollinators. The insect-pollinated forbs, their pollinators and landscape context are clearly linked. This needs to be taken into account when managing and conserving insect-pollinated plant and pollinator communities. PMID:22666450

Power, Eileen F.; Kelly, Daniel L.; Stout, Jane C.

2012-01-01

72

Root Zone Sensors for Irrigation Management in Intensive Agriculture  

PubMed Central

Crop irrigation uses more than 70% of the world’s water, and thus, improving irrigation efficiency is decisive to sustain the food demand from a fast-growing world population. This objective may be accomplished by cultivating more water-efficient crop species and/or through the application of efficient irrigation systems, which includes the implementation of a suitable method for precise scheduling. At the farm level, irrigation is generally scheduled based on the grower’s experience or on the determination of soil water balance (weather-based method). An alternative approach entails the measurement of soil water status. Expensive and sophisticated root zone sensors (RZS), such as neutron probes, are available for the use of soil and plant scientists, while cheap and practical devices are needed for irrigation management in commercial crops. The paper illustrates the main features of RZS’ (for both soil moisture and salinity) marketed for the irrigation industry and discusses how such sensors may be integrated in a wireless network for computer-controlled irrigation and used for innovative irrigation strategies, such as deficit or dual-water irrigation. The paper also consider the main results of recent or current research works conducted by the authors in Tuscany (Italy) on the irrigation management of container-grown ornamental plants, which is an important agricultural sector in Italy. PMID:22574047

Pardossi, Alberto; Incrocci, Luca; Incrocci, Giorgio; Malorgio, Fernando; Battista, Piero; Bacci, Laura; Rapi, Bernardo; Marzialetti, Paolo; Hemming, Jochen; Balendonck, Jos

2009-01-01

73

Data Management System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

CENTRA 2000 Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Auto-trol technology, obtained permission to use software originally developed at Johnson Space Center for the Space Shuttle and early Space Station projects. To support their enormous information-handling needs, a product data management, electronic document management and work-flow system was designed. Initially, just 33 database tables comprised the original software, which was later expanded to about 100 tables. This system, now called CENTRA 2000, is designed for quick implementation and supports the engineering process from preliminary design through release-to-production. CENTRA 2000 can also handle audit histories and provides a means to ensure new information is distributed. The product has 30 production sites worldwide.

1997-01-01

74

Management systems research study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development of a Monte Carlo simulation of procurement activities at the NASA Ames Research Center is described. Data cover: simulation of the procurement cycle, construction of a performance evaluation model, examination of employee development, procedures and review of evaluation criteria for divisional and individual performance evaluation. Determination of the influences and apparent impact of contract type and structure and development of a management control system for planning and controlling manpower requirements.

Bruno, A. V.

1975-01-01

75

Training Management Information System  

SciTech Connect

The Training Management Information System (TMIS) is an integrated information system for all training related activities. TMIS is at the leading edge of training information systems used in the nuclear industry. The database contains all the necessary records to confirm the department's adherence to accreditation criteria and houses all test questions, student records and information needed to evaluate the training process. The key to the TMIS system is that the impact of any change (i.e., procedure change, new equipment, safety incident in the commercial nuclear industry, etc.) can be tracked throughout the training process. This ensures the best training can be performed that meets the needs of the employees. TMIS is comprised of six functional areas: Job and Task Analysis, Training Materials Design and Development, Exam Management, Student Records/Scheduling, Evaluation, and Commitment Tracking. The system consists of a VAX 6320 Cluster with IBM and MacIntosh computers tied into an ethernet with the VAX. Other peripherals are also tied into the system: Exam Generation Stations to include mark sense readers for test grading, Production PC's for Desk-Top Publishing of Training Material, and PC Image Workstations. 5 figs.

Rackley, M.P.

1989-01-01

76

A guideline management system.  

PubMed

This paper describes the architecture of NewGuide, a guide-line management system for handling the whole life cycle of a computerized clinical practice guideline. NewGuide components are organized in a distributed architecture: an editor to formalize guidelines, a repository to store them, an inference engine to implement guidelines instances in a multi-user environment, and a reporting system storing the guidelines logs in order to be able to completely trace any individual physician guideline-based decision process. There is a system "central level" that maintains official versions of the guidelines, and local Healthcare Organizations may download and implement them according to their needs. The architecture has been implemented using the Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) platform. Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) and a set of con-tracts are the key factors for the integration of NewGuide with healthcare legacy systems. They allow maintaining unchanged legacy user interfaces and connecting the system with what-ever electronic patient record. The system functionality will be illustrated in three different contexts: homecare-based pressure ulcer prevention, acute ischemic stroke treatment and heart failure management by general practitioners. PMID:15360768

Ciccarese, Paolo; Caffi, Ezio; Boiocchi, Lorenzo; Quaglini, Silvana; Stefanelli, Mario

2004-01-01

77

Phase Diagram and Scattering Intensity of Binary Amphiphilic Systems  

E-print Network

Phase Diagram and Scattering Intensity of Binary Amphiphilic Systems G. Gompper and Ulrich S parameter, which describe the con- centration and orientation of the amphiphile, respectively, is used to study the phase diagram and the scattering intensity of binary amphiphilic systems. With increasing

Schwarz, Ulrich

78

Intensive management in grasslands causes diffuse water pollution at the farm scale.  

PubMed

Arable land use is generally assumed to be the largest contributor to agricultural diffuse pollution. This study adds to the growing evidence that conventional temperate intensively managed lowland grasslands contribute significantly to soil erosion and diffuse pollution rates. This is the first grassland study to monitor hydrological characteristics and multiple pollutant fluxes (suspended sediment [SS] and the macronutrients: total oxidized nitrogen-N [TON], total phosphorus [TP], and total carbon [TC]) at high temporal resolution (monitoring up to every 15 min) over 1 yr. Monitoring was conducted across three fields (6.5-7.5 ha) on the North Wyke Farm Platform, UK. The estimated annual erosion rates (up to 527.4 kg ha), TP losses (up to 0.9 kg ha), and TC losses (up to 179 kg ha) were similar to or exceeded the losses reported for other grassland, mixed land-use, and arable sites. Annual yields of TON (up to 3 kg ha) were less than arable land-use fluxes and earlier grassland N studies, an important result as the study site is situated within a Nitrate Vulnerable Zone. The high-resolution monitoring allowed detailed "system's functioning" understanding of hydrological processes, mobilization- transport pathways of individual pollutants, and the changes of the relative importance of diffuse pollutants through flow conditions and time. Suspended sediment and TP concentrations frequently exceeded water quality guidelines recommended by the European Freshwater Fisheries Directive (25 mg L) and the European Water Framework Directive (0.04 mg soluble reactive P L), suggesting that intensively managed grasslands pose a significant threat to receiving surface waters. Such sediment and nutrient losses from intensively managed grasslands should be acknowledged in land management guidelines and advice for future compliance with surface water quality standards. PMID:25602218

Peukert, Sabine; Griffith, Bruce A; Murray, Phillip J; Macleod, Christopher J A; Brazier, Richard E

2014-11-01

79

Databases and Data-Intensive Systems  

E-print Network

management (AU) Case partners in health care, finance, sustainability Evaluation, field studies #12;Entry point generation with the Skyline · Given a set of records on n attributes. e.g., hotels, with distance user with monotonic preference functions. * e.g., a hotel 100m from the beach is preferred to a hotel

80

Programmatic risk management system  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Programmatic Risk Management System (PRMS) is to evaluate and manage potential risks associated with proposed projects (i.e., new products or processes, or possible research and technological development projects). Although the PRMS considers some technical aspects of risk, the primary focus of the methodology is programmatic risk. That is, the methodology permits an assessment of risks associated with such issues as the ability to successfully produce a product that performs in accordance with all customer requirements, and the availability and allocation of resources (money, equipment, facilities, skilled personnel). The PRMS process consists of five formalized activities that are essential for effective management of risks associated with proposed projects. These activities include risk assessment, development of appropriate risk mitigation strategies, estimating strategy implementation cost, ranking of risk mitigation strategies for resource allocation, and scheduling of strategy implementing. The PRMS utilizes a ranking system that allows the user to identify the most cost-effective investment of resources of minimizing risk.

Mahn, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wood, C.L. [Automated Solutions of Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-07-01

81

Environmental Compliance Management System  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing the Environmental Compliance Management System (ECMS) as a comprehensive, cost-effective tool to ensure (1) that the Laboratory complies with all applicable federal and state environmental laws and regulations, (2) that environmental issues and concerns are recognized and considered in the early phases of projects; and (3) that Laboratory personnel conduct Laboratory operations in the most environmentally acceptable manner. The ECMS is an expert computer system which is designed to allow project engineers to perform an environmental evaluation of their projects. The system includes a Master Program which collects basic project information, provide utility functions, and access the environmental expert modules, environmental expert system modules for each federal and state environmental law which allows the user to obtain specific information on how an individual law may affect his project; and site-specific databases which contain information necessary for effective management of the site under environmental regulations. The ECMS will have the capability to complete and print many of the necessary environmental forms required by federal and state agencies, including the Department of Energy.

Brownson, L.W.; Krsul, T.; Peralta, R.A. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Knudson, D.A.; Rosignolo, C.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1992-09-01

82

Environmental Compliance Management System  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing the Environmental Compliance Management System (ECMS) as a comprehensive, cost-effective tool to ensure (1) that the Laboratory complies with all applicable federal and state environmental laws and regulations, (2) that environmental issues and concerns are recognized and considered in the early phases of projects; and (3) that Laboratory personnel conduct Laboratory operations in the most environmentally acceptable manner. The ECMS is an expert computer system which is designed to allow project engineers to perform an environmental evaluation of their projects. The system includes a Master Program which collects basic project information, provide utility functions, and access the environmental expert modules, environmental expert system modules for each federal and state environmental law which allows the user to obtain specific information on how an individual law may affect his project; and site-specific databases which contain information necessary for effective management of the site under environmental regulations. The ECMS will have the capability to complete and print many of the necessary environmental forms required by federal and state agencies, including the Department of Energy.

Brownson, L.W.; Krsul, T.; Peralta, R.A. (Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Knudson, D.A.; Rosignolo, C.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1992-01-01

83

Mul$-scale Demand-Side Management for Con$nuous Power-intensive Processes  

E-print Network

and uncertainty in prices · Timing and produc(on quan((es (DR)* · Inventory management inventory facilitate performing Demand-side Management (DSM) at air separa$on plants1 Mul$-scale Demand-Side Management for Con$nuous Power-intensive Processes

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

84

Assessing Need for Intensive Case Management in Long-Term Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents a brief screening tool to help case managers identify clients in a home- and community- based services (HCBS) program who need more intensive social work case management (CM). Using existing data from a case management time study ( N ? 242) and a content analysis of 70 cases in a Medicaid waiver- funded HCBS program, this study

Sadhna Diwan; Catherine Ivy; D'Anna Merino; Theresa Brower

2001-01-01

85

Environmental Management System Plan  

SciTech Connect

Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management establishes the policy that Federal agencies conduct their environmental, transportation, and energy-related activities in a manner that is environmentally, economically and fiscally sound, integrated, continually improving, efficient, and sustainable. The Department of Energy (DOE) has approved DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program and DOE Order 430.2B, Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy and Transportation Management as the means of achieving the provisions of this Executive Order. DOE Order 450.1A mandates the development of Environmental Management Systems (EMS) to implement sustainable environmental stewardship practices that: (1) Protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources potentially impacted by facility operations; (2) Meet or exceed applicable environmental, public health, and resource protection laws and regulations; and (3) Implement cost-effective business practices. In addition, the DOE Order 450.1A mandates that the EMS must be integrated with a facility's Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) established pursuant to DOE P 450.4, 'Safety Management System Policy'. DOE Order 430.2B mandates an energy management program that considers energy use and renewable energy, water, new and renovated buildings, and vehicle fleet activities. The Order incorporates the provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. The Order also includes the DOE's Transformational Energy Action Management initiative, which assures compliance is achieved through an Executable Plan that is prepared and updated annually by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL, Berkeley Lab, or the Laboratory) and then approved by the DOE Berkeley Site Office. At the time of this revision to the EMS plan, the 'FY2009 LBNL Sustainability Executable Plan' represented the most current Executable Plan. These DOE Orders and associated policies establish goals and sustainable stewardship practices that are protective of environmental, natural, and cultural resources, and take a life cycle approach that considers aspects such as: (1) Acquisition and use of environmentally preferable products; (2) Electronics stewardship; (3) Energy conservation, energy efficiency, and renewable energy; (4) Pollution prevention, with emphasis on toxic and hazardous chemical and material reduction; (5) Procurement of efficient energy and water consuming materials and equipment; (6) Recycling and reuse; (7) Sustainable and high-performance building design; (8) Transportation and fleet management; and (9) Water conservation. LBNL's approach to sustainable environmental stewardship required under Order 450.1A poses the challenge of implementing its EMS in a compliance-based, performance-based, and cost-effective manner. In other words, the EMS must deliver real and tangible business value at a minimal cost. The purpose of this plan is to describe Berkeley Lab's approach for achieving such an EMS, including an overview of the roles and responsibilities of key Laboratory parties. This approach begins with a broad-based environmental policy consistent with that stated in Chapter 11 of the LBNL Health and Safety Manual (PUB-3000). This policy states that Berkeley Lab is committed to the following: (1) Complying with applicable environmental, public health, and resource conservation laws and regulations. (2) Preventing pollution, minimizing waste, and conserving natural resources. (3) Correcting environmental hazards and cleaning up existing environmental problems, and (4) Continually improving the Laboratory's environmental performance while maintaining operational capability and sustaining the overall mission of the Laboratory. A continual cycle of planning, implementing, evaluating, and improving processes will be performed to achieve goals, objectives, and targets that will help LBNL carry out this policy. Each year, environmental aspects will be identified and their impacts to the environm

Fox, Robert; Thorson, Patrick; Horst, Blair; Speros, John; Rothermich, Nancy; Hatayama, Howard

2009-03-24

86

14 CFR 1212.704 - System manager.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Although the system manager has no line authority over subsystem managers, the system manager does have overall functional...guidance to subsystem managers on implementation of...reports, the system manager will be...

2010-01-01

87

Management issues for high performance storage systems  

SciTech Connect

Managing distributed high-performance storage systems is complex and, although sharing common ground with traditional network and systems management, presents unique storage-related issues. Integration technologies and frameworks exist to help manage distributed network and system environments. Industry-driven consortia provide open forums where vendors and users cooperate to leverage solutions. But these new approaches to open management fall short addressing the needs of scalable, distributed storage. We discuss the motivation and requirements for storage system management (SSM) capabilities and describe how SSM manages distributed servers and storage resource objects in the High Performance Storage System (HPSS), a new storage facility for data-intensive applications and large-scale computing. Modem storage systems, such as HPSS, require many SSM capabilities, including server and resource configuration control, performance monitoring, quality of service, flexible policies, file migration, file repacking, accounting, and quotas. We present results of initial HPSS SSM development including design decisions and implementation trade-offs. We conclude with plans for follow-on work and provide storage-related recommendations for vendors and standards groups seeking enterprise-wide management solutions.

Louis, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Burris, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-03-01

88

NWCG Publication Management System  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This portal provides links to documents produced by the National Wildfire Coordinating Group (NWCG), a group consisting of agencies of the Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Fish and Wildlife Service, and the National Association of State Foresters. Materials accessible here include NWCG qualifications documents, information on prescribed fires, training courses, job aids, and other training materials and forms. Users can also access and download the Fire Behavior Prediction and Fuel Modeling System (BEHAVE), a software package designed to model the behavior of wildfires.

2002-10-14

89

Automatic solar lamp intensity control system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

System that substitutes solar cells directly in the path of the radiation incident on the test volume and uses a dc bridge-null system was developed. The solar cell is affixed to a heat sink mounted on each of three arms for each solar lamp. Control of the radiation from the solar lamps is automatic.

Leverone, H.; Mandell, N.

1968-01-01

90

Modelling of safety management systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Management systems for safety and environment and audits for assessing them have been a major research topic of the last few years. This attention has been fuelled by increasing emphasis in European directives on auditable safety management systems (SMS)11The concept ‘SMS’ is used throughout this paper as a shorthand term to cover the management of all unintended risks to life,

A. R. Hale; B. H. J. Heming; J. Carthey; B. Kirwan

1997-01-01

91

NET GLOBAL WARMING POTENTIAL AND GREENHOUSE GAS INTENSITY IN IRRIGATED CROPPING SYSTEMS IN NORTHEASTERN COLORADO  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The impact of management on global warming potential (GWP), crop production, and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) in irrigated agriculture is not well documented. A no-till (NT) cropping systems study initiated in 1999 to evaluate soil organic C (SOC) sequestration potential in irrigated agriculture...

92

Net Global Warming Potential and Greenhouse Gas Intensity in Irrigated Cropping Systems in Northeastern Colorado  

Microsoft Academic Search

The impact of management on global warming potential (GWP), crop production, and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) in irrigated agriculture is not well documented. A no-till (NT) cropping systems study initiated in 1999 to evaluate soil organic carbon (SOC) se- questration potential in irrigated agriculture was used in this study to make trace gas flux measurements for 3 yr to facilitate

Arvin R. Mosier; Ardell D. Halvorson; Curtis A. Reule; Xuejun J. Liu

2006-01-01

93

Effects of coffee management intensity on composition, structure, and regeneration status of ethiopian moist evergreen afromontane forests.  

PubMed

The effect of arabica coffee management intensity on composition, structure, and regeneration of moist evergreen Afromontane forests was studied in three traditional coffee-management systems of southwest Ethiopia: semiplantation coffee, semiforest coffee, and forest coffee. Vegetation and environmental data were collected in 84 plots from forests varying in intensity of coffee management. After controlling for environmental variation (altitude, aspect, slope, soil nutrient availability, and soil depth), differences in woody species composition, forest structure, and regeneration potential among management systems were compared using one way analysis of variance. The study showed that intensification of forest coffee cultivation to maximize coffee production negatively affects diversity and structure of Ethiopian moist evergreen Afromontane forests. Intensification of coffee productivity starts with the conversion of forest coffee to semiforest coffee, which has significant negative effects on tree seedling abundance. Further intensification leads to the conversion of semiforest to semiplantation coffee, causing significant diversity losses and the collapse of forest structure (decrease of stem density, basal area, crown closure, crown cover, and dominant tree height). Our study underlines the need for shade certification schemes to include variables other than canopy cover and that the loss of species diversity in intensively managed coffee systems may jeopardize the sustainability of coffee production itself through the decrease of ecosystem resilience and disruption of ecosystem services related to coffee yield, such as pollination and pest control. PMID:23180249

Hundera, Kitessa; Aerts, Raf; Fontaine, Alexandre; Van Mechelen, Maarten; Gijbels, Pieter; Honnay, Olivier; Muys, Bart

2013-03-01

94

Effects of Coffee Management Intensity on Composition, Structure, and Regeneration Status of Ethiopian Moist Evergreen Afromontane Forests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effect of arabica coffee management intensity on composition, structure, and regeneration of moist evergreen Afromontane forests was studied in three traditional coffee-management systems of southwest Ethiopia: semiplantation coffee, semiforest coffee, and forest coffee. Vegetation and environmental data were collected in 84 plots from forests varying in intensity of coffee management. After controlling for environmental variation (altitude, aspect, slope, soil nutrient availability, and soil depth), differences in woody species composition, forest structure, and regeneration potential among management systems were compared using one way analysis of variance. The study showed that intensification of forest coffee cultivation to maximize coffee production negatively affects diversity and structure of Ethiopian moist evergreen Afromontane forests. Intensification of coffee productivity starts with the conversion of forest coffee to semiforest coffee, which has significant negative effects on tree seedling abundance. Further intensification leads to the conversion of semiforest to semiplantation coffee, causing significant diversity losses and the collapse of forest structure (decrease of stem density, basal area, crown closure, crown cover, and dominant tree height). Our study underlines the need for shade certification schemes to include variables other than canopy cover and that the loss of species diversity in intensively managed coffee systems may jeopardize the sustainability of coffee production itself through the decrease of ecosystem resilience and disruption of ecosystem services related to coffee yield, such as pollination and pest control.

Hundera, Kitessa; Aerts, Raf; Fontaine, Alexandre; Van Mechelen, Maarten; Gijbels, Pieter; Honnay, Olivier; Muys, Bart

2013-03-01

95

Closed-loop control for cardiopulmonary management and intensive care unit sedation using digital imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation introduces a new problem in the delivery of healthcare, which could result in lower cost and a higher quality of medical care as compared to the current healthcare practice. In particular, a framework is developed for sedation and cardiopulmonary management for patients in the intensive care unit. A method is introduced to automatically detect pain and agitation in nonverbal patients, specifically in sedated patients in the intensive care unit, using their facial expressions. Furthermore, deterministic as well as probabilistic expert systems are developed to suggest the appropriate drug dose based on patient sedation level. Patients in the intensive care unit who require mechanical ventilation due to acute respiratory failure also frequently require the administration of sedative agents. The need for sedation arises both from patient anxiety due to the loss of personal control and the unfamiliar and intrusive environment of the intensive care unit, and also due to pain or other variants of noxious stimuli. In this dissertation, we develop a rule-based expert system for cardiopulmonary management and intensive care unit sedation. Furthermore, we use probability theory to quantify uncertainty and to extend the proposed rule-based expert system to deal with more realistic situations. Pain assessment in patients who are unable to verbally communicate is a challenging problem. The fundamental limitations in pain assessment stem from subjective assessment criteria, rather than quantifiable, measurable data. The relevance vector machine (RVM) classification technique is a Bayesian extension of the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm which achieves comparable performance to SVM while providing posterior probabilities for class memberships and a sparser model. In this dissertation, we use the RVM classification technique to distinguish pain from non-pain as well as assess pain intensity levels. We also correlate our results with the pain intensity assessed by expert and non-expert human examiners. Next, we consider facial expression recognition using an unsupervised learning framework. We show that different facial expressions reside on distinct subspaces if the manifold is unfolded. In particular, semi-definite embedding is used to reduce the dimensionality and unfold the manifold of facial images. Next, generalized principal component analysis is used to fit a series of subspaces to the data points and associate each data point to a subspace. Data points that belong to the same subspace are shown to belong to the same facial expression. In clinical intensive care unit practice sedative/analgesic agents are titrated to achieve a specific level of sedation. The level of sedation is currently based on clinical scoring systems. Examples include the motor activity assessment scale (MAAS), the Richmond agitation-sedation scale (RASS), and the modified Ramsay sedation scale (MRSS). In general, the goal of the clinician is to find the drug dose that maintains the patient at a sedation score corresponding to a moderately sedated state. In this research, we use pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling to find an optimal drug dosing control policy to drive the patient to a desired MRSS score. Atrial fibrillation, a cardiac arrhythmia characterized by unsynchronized electrical activity in the atrial chambers of the heart, is a rapidly growing problem in modern societies. One treatment, referred to as catheter ablation, targets specific parts of the left atrium for radio frequency ablation using an intracardiac catheter. As a first step towards the general solution to the computer-assisted segmentation of the left atrial wall, we use shape learning and shape-based image segmentation to identify the endocardial wall of the left atrium in the delayed-enhancement magnetic resonance images. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

Gholami, Behnood

96

Pain management in the pediatric intensive care unit.  

PubMed

Critically ill pediatric patients are frequently exposed to acute, established, and chronic pain as a result of their disease processes or intensive care therapies. Despite the availability of many drugs and techniques for providing analgesia, these painful conditions are not adequately treated in a large proportion of children. This article reviews some of the reasons for provision of adequate analgesia and sedation, describes the various classes of drugs commonly used in the pediatric intensive care unit, and lists the techniques and indications for regional and topical anesthesia as well as specific clinical applications for adjuvant analgesic agents. Analgesic approaches that do not have an established record of safety and efficacy in pediatric patients are not reviewed. We propose that adequate and early analgesic interventions will minimize patient's discomfort, maintain metabolic homeostasis, and improve a patient's tolerance of intensive care unit therapies and nursing interventions. Adequate analgesia can be provided to even the sickest child using the drugs, techniques, and novel approaches reviewed. PMID:9229164

Chambliss, C R; Anand, K J

1997-06-01

97

Cryptographic Key Management System  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the outcome of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contract DE-OE0000543, requesting the design of a Cryptographic Key Management System (CKMS) for the secure management of cryptographic keys for the energy sector infrastructure. Prime contractor Sypris Electronics, in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL), Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Valicore Technologies, and Purdue University's Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security (CERIAS) and Smart Meter Integration Laboratory (SMIL), has designed, developed and evaluated the CKMS solution. We provide an overview of the project in Section 3, review the core contributions of all contractors in Section 4, and discuss bene#12;ts to the DOE in Section 5. In Section 6 we describe the technical construction of the CKMS solution, and review its key contributions in Section 6.9. Section 7 describes the evaluation and demonstration of the CKMS solution in different environments. We summarize the key project objectives in Section 8, list publications resulting from the project in Section 9, and conclude with a discussion on commercialization in Section 10 and future work in Section 11.

No, author

2014-02-21

98

Computerized training management system  

DOEpatents

A Computerized Training Management System (CTMS) for providing a procedurally defined process that is employed to develop accreditable performance based training programs for job classifications that are sensitive to documented regulations and technical information. CTMS is a database that links information needed to maintain a five-phase approach to training-analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation independent of training program design. CTMS is designed using R-Base.RTM., an-SQL compliant software platform. Information is logically entered and linked in CTMS. Each task is linked directly to a performance objective, which, in turn, is linked directly to a learning objective; then, each enabling objective is linked to its respective test items. In addition, tasks, performance objectives, enabling objectives, and test items are linked to their associated reference documents. CTMS keeps all information up to date since it automatically sorts, files and links all data; CTMS includes key word and reference document searches.

Rice, Harold B. (Franklin Furnace, OH); McNair, Robert C. (East Setauket, NY); White, Kenneth (Shirley, NY); Maugeri, Terry (Wading River, NY)

1998-08-04

99

Computerized training management system  

DOEpatents

A Computerized Training Management System (CTMS) is disclosed for providing a procedurally defined process that is employed to develop accreditable performance based training programs for job classifications that are sensitive to documented regulations and technical information. CTMS is a database that links information needed to maintain a five-phase approach to training-analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation independent of training program design. CTMS is designed using R-Base{trademark}, an-SQL compliant software platform. Information is logically entered and linked in CTMS. Each task is linked directly to a performance objective, which, in turn, is linked directly to a learning objective; then, each enabling objective is linked to its respective test items. In addition, tasks, performance objectives, enabling objectives, and test items are linked to their associated reference documents. CTMS keeps all information up to date since it automatically sorts, files and links all data; CTMS includes key word and reference document searches. 18 figs.

Rice, H.B.; McNair, R.C.; White, K.; Maugeri, T.

1998-08-04

100

Involving Intensive Care Unit Nurses in a Proactive Risk Assessment of the Medication Management Process  

PubMed Central

Background Vulnerabilities in the medication management process can lead to serious patient harm. In intensive care units (ICUs), nurses represent the last line of defense against medication errors. Proactive risk assessment (PRA) offers methods for determining how processes can break down and how people involved in such processes can contribute to or recover from a breakdown. Such methods can also be used to identify ICU nurses’ contribution to the quality and safety of medication management. Methods A PRA method was conducted in a cardiovascular ICU to identify and evaluate failure modes in the nursing medication management process. The contributing factors to the failure modes and the recovery processes used by nurses were also characterized. Results A total of 54 failure modes were identified across the seven steps of the medication management process. For the 4 most critical failure modes, nurses listed 21 contributing factors and 21 recovery processes. Ways were identified to redesign the medication management process, one of which consists of dealing with work system factors that contribute to the most critical failure modes. Conclusions From a data-analysis viewpoint, the PRA method permits one to address a variety of objectives. Different scoring methods can be used to focus on either frequency or criticality of failure modes; one may also focus on a specific step of the process under study. Developing efforts towards eliminating or mitigating contributing factors would help reduce the criticality of the failure modes in terms of their likelihood and impact on patients and/or nurses. Developing systems to support the recovery processes used by nurses may be another approach to process redesign. PMID:20860244

Faye, Hélène; Joy Rivera-Rodriguez, A.; Karsh, Ben-Tzion; Schoofs Hundt, Ann; Baker, Christine; Carayon, Pascale

2011-01-01

101

Condor: Managing Computationally Intensive Jobs from a Computer Science Perspective  

E-print Network

the execution of complex analysis protocols, e.g. LONI (Rex et al, 2003) and FISWIDGETS (Fissel et al, 2003, and executing the same protocol for multiple subjects, but are less proficient at managing program execution-line arguments, and provides a cross- platform graphical user interface to create and manipulate these modules

102

Supplier Management System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Supplier Management System (SMS) allows for a consistent, agency-wide performance rating system for suppliers used by NASA. This version (2.0) combines separate databases into one central database that allows for the sharing of supplier data. Information extracted from the NBS/Oracle database can be used to generate ratings. Also, supplier ratings can now be generated in the areas of cost, product quality, delivery, and audit data. Supplier data can be charted based on real-time user input. Based on these individual ratings, an overall rating can be generated. Data that normally would be stored in multiple databases, each requiring its own log-in, is now readily available and easily accessible with only one log-in required. Additionally, the database can accommodate the storage and display of quality-related data that can be analyzed and used in the supplier procurement decision-making process. Moreover, the software allows for a Closed-Loop System (supplier feedback), as well as the capability to communicate with other federal agencies.

Ramirez, Eric; Gutheinz, Sandy; Brison, James; Ho, Anita; Allen, James; Ceritelli, Olga; Tobar, Claudia; Nguyen, Thuykien; Crenshaw, Harrel; Santos, Roxann

2008-01-01

103

Supporting Human-Intensive Systems Lori A. Clarke  

E-print Network

Supporting Human-Intensive Systems Lori A. Clarke Department of Computer Science University +1 413-545- 0510 avrunin@cs.umass.edu ABSTRACT Executing critical systems often rely on humans, the potential for human error to lead to system failures also increases. In the medical domain, for example

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

104

Safety and Software Intensive Systems: Challenges Old and New  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is an increased use of software in safety-critical systems; a trend that is likely to continue in the future. Although traditional system safety techniques are applica- ble to software intensive systems, there are new challenges emerging. In this report we will address four issues we be- lieve will pose challenges in the future. First, the nature of safety is

Mats Per Erik Heimdahl

2007-01-01

105

Safety and Software Intensive Systems: Challenges Old and New  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is an increased use of software in safety-critical systems; a trend that is likely to continue in the future. Although traditional system safety techniques are applicable to software intensive systems, there are new challenges emerging. In this report we will address four issues we believe will pose challenges in the future. First, the nature of safety is continuing to

Mats P. E. Heimdahl

2007-01-01

106

SUPERFUND SOILS DATA MANAGEMENT SYSTEM  

EPA Science Inventory

This paper describes the Superfund Soil Data Management System (DMS), a PC-based data system being developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in its effort to manage and evaluate treatment and performance data for contaminated soil, sludge, and debris. his system...

107

Effects of Intensive Forest Management Practices on Insect Infestation Levels and Loblolly Pine Growth  

SciTech Connect

This study investigates the relationship between intensive management practices and insect infestation, maximum growth potential studies of loblolly pine over four years using different levels of cultural treatments. Results indicate tree fertilization can increase coneworm infestation and demonstrated that tip moth management can improve initial tree growth.

Nowak, J.T.; Berisford, C.W.

2000-04-01

108

Grassland conservation headlands: Their impact on invertebrate assemblages in intensively managed grassland  

Microsoft Academic Search

Grassland conservation headlands were established on intensively managed grassland fields on four farms in Scotland. Vegetation composition and structure, invertebrate activity density (as measured by pitfall trapping), ground beetle assemblage structure and bird utilisation in these grassland conservation headlands were compared with conventional headlands (i.e. areas of headland managed as per the rest of each field). Increased activity densities of

Lorna J. Cole; David I. McCracken; Laurence Baker; David Parish

2007-01-01

109

Oxygenation of intensive cell-culture system.  

PubMed

The abilities of various methods of oxygenation to meet the demands of high-cell-density culture were investigated using a spin filter perfusion system in a bench-top bioreactor. Oxygen demand at high cell density could not be met by sparging with air inside a spin filter (oxygen transfer values in this condition were comparable with those for surface aeration). Sparging with air outside a spin filter gave adequate oxygen transfer for the support of cell concentrations above 10(7) ml-1 in fully aerobic conditions but the addition of antifoam to control foaming caused blockage of the spinfilter mesh. Bubble-free aeration through immersed silicone tubing with pure oxygen gave similar oxygen transfer rates to that of sparging with air but without the problems of bubble damage and fouling of the spin filter. A supra-optimal level of dissolved oxygen (478% air saturation) inhibited cell growth. However, cells could recover from this stress and reach high density after reduction of the dissolved oxygen level to 50% air saturation. PMID:8590652

Emery, A N; Jan, D C; al-Rubeai, M

1995-11-01

110

Smart grid management & visualization: Smart Power Management System  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents an innovation Smart Power Management System on Smart Grid. This report consists of 5 major sections: smart power system modeling; real time power system monitoring; system engineering database collection and management; grid condition checking and maintenance; smart grid power system fault analysis. Smart Power Management System enables grid management and visualization to be very effective as it

Grace Q. Tang

2011-01-01

111

Hyperbaric critical care patient data management system.  

PubMed

A patient data management system (PDMS) has been used for years in the intensive care unit (ICU) at the Karolinska University Hospital to provide bedside or remote clinical patient documentation and information. Data from monitors, mechanical ventilators and syringe pumps are fed into a central clinical information management system to monitor, display trends and record data of vital parameters, ventilator settings and drugs. In order to continue routine critical care monitoring and recording during hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), without endangering the safety demands of hyperbaric procedures, we have modified the PDMS system for hyperbaric use. Via an ethernet box placed inside the chamber, data are transmitted to the Clinisoft™ system through the local area network. By standardised risk-analysis procedures, in close cooperation between the hyperbaric and biomedical engineering departments, the chamber producer and the notifying body (Germanischer Lloyd), the ethernet box was modified to receive full safety approval by all parties. The PDMS is now functioning routinely during HBOT for intensive care patients so that data can be seen bedside and followed on-line in the ICU. Data are also continuously stored on the clinical information management system for later clinical or research purposes. Work continues to obtain CE approval for hyperbaric use for modern syringe pumps and mechanical ventilators connected to the PDMS system. Improved documentation of ICU care will improve quality of care during HBOT and facilitate research and development in hyperbaric medicine. PMID:22828816

Kronlund, Peter; Lind, Folke; Olsson, Daniel

2012-06-01

112

Networked inventory management information systems: materializing supply chain management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims to explain the driving forces for networked inventory management. Discusses major developments with respect to customer requirements, networked organizations and networked inventory management. Presents high level specifications of networked inventory management information systems (NIMISs). Reviews some decision systems for inventory management, and compares traditional inventory management to networked inventory management. Uses these insights to outline NIMISs for several types

Martin Verwijmeren; Piet van der Vlist; Karel van Donselaar

1996-01-01

113

Intensive mass production of Artemia in a recirculated system  

Microsoft Academic Search

An outdoor closed system for intensive Artemia biomass production was evaluated. The system integrates the use of inexpensive agro-techno products and photosynthesis to create an improved diet for culturing adult Artemia. The diet in the initial days of culture consists of microalgae, followed by a mixture of torula yeast and soy protein. No water or solids are discharged from the

Odi Zmora; Muki Shpigel

2006-01-01

114

Flexible data-management system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Combined ASRDI Data-Management and Analysis Technique (CADMAT) is system of computer programs and procedures that can be used to conduct data-management tasks. System was developed specifically for use by scientists and engineers who are confronted with management and analysis of large quantities of data organized into records of events and parametric fields. CADMAT is particularly useful when data are continually accumulated, such as when the need of retrieval and analysis is ongoing.

Pelouch, J. J., Jr.

1977-01-01

115

Project Management vs. Systems Engineering Management: A Practitioners' View on  

E-print Network

Project Management vs. Systems Engineering Management: A Practitioners' View on IntegratingPROJECT MANAGEMENT VS. SYSTEMS ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT Received 3 August 2010; Revised 18 December 2010 (wileyonlinelibrary.com). DOI 10.1002/sys.20187 ABSTRACT While most Systems Engineering Management (SEM) applications

de Weck, Olivier L.

116

Battery Management in Mobile Systems  

E-print Network

1 Battery Management in Mobile Systems Enrico Macii Politecnico di Torino Torino, Italy 2 Outline for battery-driven optimization capabilities. 4 Dynamic Power Management (DPM) · One of the most effective the "battery is doing" during system operation. · Open-loop policies. 5 Battery-Driven DPM · For battery

Bogliolo, Alessandro

117

a Study of Urban Intensive Land Evaluating System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The contradiction of land supply and demand is becoming increasingly prominent in China. The increasing efficiency of land use is an important means to resolve the conflict. We propose a scientific approach for promoting the urban intensive land use. In this paper, an evaluation system of urban intensive land use is programmed. It is designed to change the manual way of collecting index data and building index system to a dynamical way. The system improves the efficiency and accuracy of the evaluation of urban intensive land use. It achieves intensive evaluation on three scales: macro-level, medium-level and micro-level. We build two data extraction methods. One is XML-based meta-data exchange method that obtains index data from the cadastral database. Another is data monitoring method that writes the index data to the evaluation database at real time. Database technologies are used to calculate index values and build index systems dynamically. GIS technologies are use to achieve three scales evaluation of urban intensive land use.

Jiang, L.; Gu, J.; Chen, X.; You, Y.; Tang, Q.

2012-07-01

118

Spatial intensity profiling of an industrial laser welding system  

SciTech Connect

A investigation was conducted to devise a method to sense the laser beam intensity profile of an industrial laser welding system. The research focuses on monitoring methods and assessing locations within the system where data can be taken which reveal the relationship between the laser beam intensity profile and the input system parameters of the laser beam welding process. Emphasis has been placed on the configuration of a distributed computing environment to acquire, analyze and display the results of the sensed beam profile. Conventional image processing techniques are demonstrated. It was found that a distributed computing environment was useful for processing the large volumes of data generated by this process characterization method, and the distributed computing environment provided the computing power required for computationally intensive analysis and display techniques. The mathematical techniques used to discriminate one data set from another and relate the results to processing conditions are discussed.

Milewski, J.O.

1991-12-31

119

Spatial intensity profiling of an industrial laser welding system  

SciTech Connect

A investigation was conducted to devise a method to sense the laser beam intensity profile of an industrial laser welding system. The research focuses on monitoring methods and assessing locations within the system where data can be taken which reveal the relationship between the laser beam intensity profile and the input system parameters of the laser beam welding process. Emphasis has been placed on the configuration of a distributed computing environment to acquire, analyze and display the results of the sensed beam profile. Conventional image processing techniques are demonstrated. It was found that a distributed computing environment was useful for processing the large volumes of data generated by this process characterization method, and the distributed computing environment provided the computing power required for computationally intensive analysis and display techniques. The mathematical techniques used to discriminate one data set from another and relate the results to processing conditions are discussed.

Milewski, J.O.

1991-01-01

120

Efficient Evaluation System for Learning Management Systems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A learning management system (LMS) provides the platform for web-based learning environment by enabling the management, delivery, tracking of learning, testing, communication, registration process and scheduling. There are many LMS systems on the market that can be obtained for free or through payment. It has now become an important task to choose…

Cavus, Nadire

2009-01-01

121

Intelligent Integrated System Health Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Intelligent Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) is the management of data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) with the purposeful objective of determining the health of a system (Management: storage, distribution, sharing, maintenance, processing, reasoning, and presentation). Presentation discusses: (1) ISHM Capability Development. (1a) ISHM Knowledge Model. (1b) Standards for ISHM Implementation. (1c) ISHM Domain Models (ISHM-DM's). (1d) Intelligent Sensors and Components. (2) ISHM in Systems Design, Engineering, and Integration. (3) Intelligent Control for ISHM-Enabled Systems

Figueroa, Fernando

2012-01-01

122

Medical-Information-Management System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Medical Information Management System (MIMS) computer program interactive, general-purpose software system for storage and retrieval of information. Offers immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases required. User quickly and efficiently extracts, displays, and analyzes data. Used in management of medical data and handling all aspects of data related to care of patients. Other applications include management of data on occupational safety in public and private sectors, handling judicial information, systemizing purchasing and procurement systems, and analyses of cost structures of organizations. Written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77.

Alterescu, Sidney; Friedman, Carl A.; Frankowski, James W.

1989-01-01

123

Fine root length production, mortality and standing root crop dynamics in an intensively managed sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) coppice  

Microsoft Academic Search

We used minirhizotrons and micro-video technology to study fine root production, mortality and standing root crop dynamics in an intensively managed sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) coppice. The experiment was a split-plot design with two levels of fertilization. Low-level treatment plots received 560 kg ha-1 yr-1 fertilizer (19:9:19 NPK) via a drip irrigation system and high-level treatment plots received twice this

Jeffrey S. Price; Ronald L. Hendrick

1998-01-01

124

Health & Safety Management System Queen's University  

E-print Network

Health & Safety Management System Queen's University December 2003 #12;Queen's University Health & Safety Management System 2 1. Introduction Under Provincial Health and Safety legislation Responsibility System provides the building blocks for an effective Health and Safety Management System. The key

Ellis, Randy

125

Intensive Care Unit–Acquired Weakness: Implications for Physical Therapist Management  

PubMed Central

Patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) can develop a condition referred to as “ICU-acquired weakness.” This condition is characterized by profound weakness that is greater than might be expected to result from prolonged bed rest. Intensive care unit–acquired weakness often is accompanied by dysfunction of multiple organ systems. Individuals with ICU-acquired weakness typically have significant activity limitations, often requiring physical assistance for even the most basic activities associated with bed mobility. Many of these individuals have activity limitations months to years after hospitalization. The purpose of this article is to review evidence that guides physical rehabilitation of people with ICU-acquired weakness. Included are diagnostic criteria, medical management, and prognostic indicators, as well as criteria for beginning physical rehabilitation, with an emphasis on patient safety. Data are presented indicating that rehabilitation can be implemented with very few adverse effects. Evidence is provided for appropriate measurement approaches and for physical intervention strategies. Finally, some of the key issues are summarized that should be investigated to determine the best intervention guidelines for individuals with ICU-acquired weakness. PMID:22282769

Moss, Marc; Quan, Dianna; Schenkman, Margaret

2012-01-01

126

Service Systems as Customer-Intensive Systems and Its Implications for Service Science and Engineering  

Microsoft Academic Search

What does differentiate service systems from traditional subjects of systems engineering such as manufacturing, and software? We address this issue by defining customer-intensive systems, based on ideas by Sampson (2001), and show how customer-intensive systems encompass almost all service systems. After proposing a new form of visualization for customer-intensive processes and discussing its merits and shortcomings, we argue how in

Claudio S. Pinhanez

2008-01-01

127

Computer assisted management of information in an intensive care unit.  

PubMed

In order to use the capability of computers for handling large amounts of information, we developed a program for the acquisition, handling, storage and retrieval of administrative and clinical information generated in the 20 bedded multidisciplinary critical care unit of a University Hospital. At an initial phase a personal computer (PC) was used to collect information from 4362 patients, that included registration data, coded admission problems, techniques and special treatments, and final diagnosis. This information combined with free text provided a discharge report. Complementary programs allowed calculation and storage of hemodynamic and gas exchange parameters. This experience led to a second phase in which a computer with microprocessor Intel 80386 at 25 MHz, 8 MB RAM, 310 MB hard disk and a streamer for 150 MB cartridge tape back up, using UNIX operating system, permitted multiple users working simultaneously through 1 central console and 7 ASCII terminals. Data input included demographic data, previous and admission problems in coded form, present history and physical examination in free text, list of present problems in coded form, comments on evolution, record of special techniques and treatments, laboratory data, treatment, final diagnosis and facility for using all the information to elaborate the final report. Side modules provide help for drugs dosing, protocols for specific conditions and clerical routines. The system is open for connection to other areas of the Hospital. Data from more than 2000 patients have been included so far.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1447538

Cereijo, E

1992-10-01

128

The large-scale structure of software-intensive systems  

PubMed Central

The computer metaphor is dominant in most discussions of neuroscience, but the semantics attached to that metaphor are often quite naive. Herein, we examine the ontology of software-intensive systems, the nature of their structure and the application of the computer metaphor to the metaphysical questions of self and causation. PMID:23386964

Booch, Grady

2012-01-01

129

Airway management issues in the intensive care unit: revisiting old paradigms and broadening our horizons.  

PubMed

Airway management in the intensive care setting provides unique challenges that can be quite daunting, even for the most experienced practitioner. Airways are usually intubated for long periods, multiple comorbidities often interfere with "routine" airway management practices, and patients are often physiologically disadvantaged or hemodynamically unstable. Strapped with this calamity, the first responder to a patient with an acutely compromised airway is often someone less experienced with global airway management skills. As anesthesiologists, we are very familiar with the skill sets necessary to handle these predicaments, and as intensivists, we have the fortunate opportunity to share that wealth of information and experience. Airway care in the intensive care unit is a continuum-from elective or emergent intubation, to airway preservation and hygiene, to elective or unintentional extubation. Thus, familiarization with the basics of airway management in routine and "first responder" settings should bolster confidence and greatly improve patient safety and outcomes. PMID:21521684

Keck, Jeffrey P; Mort, Thomas C

2011-04-01

130

Unilateral persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous: intensive management approach with excellent outcome beyond visual maturation.  

PubMed

Persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV) is an ocular developmental disorder resulting from incomplete apoptosis of the embryonic hyaloid vasculature. Unilateral PHPV is traditionally associated with a poor prognosis because of the challenges associated with managing progressive anisometropic amblyopia. We report a child with unilateral PHPV who underwent cataract extraction, primary posterior capsulotomy with anterior vitrectomy and intraocular lens implantation followed by combined trabeculectomy/trabeculotomy within the first 8?weeks of life. Intensive optometric and orthoptic input was required for many years to manage the increasing anisometropic amblyopia with final visual acuity of 20/40 unaided in the affected eye and without evidence of glaucomatous optic neuropathy. This case illustrates the excellent visual outcome possible in a child with complex, unilateral PHPV using an intensive management approach comprising: early surgical intervention for congenital cataract and secondary glaucoma, meticulous monitoring of refraction, visual acuity and intraocular pressure and motivated parents who engaged in the management. PMID:25564632

Yusuf, Imran H; Patel, Chetan Kantibhai; Salmon, John F

2015-01-01

131

The influence of abiotic controls and management intensity on phosphorus cycling in established grassland and forest ecosystems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is commonly assumed that the bioavailability and cycling of phosphorus (P) is mainly controlled by abiotic soil properties including soil pH and the concentrations and reactivities of clay minerals, CaCO3 and Al/Fe oxides In managed ecosystems, kind, timing and duration of P additions and type and amount of harvested biomass are the major input and output fluxes. Our objective was to disentangle the effects of abiotic controls, and type and intensity of management on the P cycle in soils of temperate grasslands and forests of different management intensity in three regions across Germany in the frame of the Biodiversity Exploratories project. The pH value was the most important variable explaining P concentrations and partitioning in soil and changes in pH are the main mechanism how land-use is affecting the P cycle. However, after the influence of pH was accounted for in a sequential statistical approach, land-use intensity, classified according to the extent of annual biomass removal, explained a significant (P < 0.05) part of the variance in the contributions of several P fractions to total P (TP) among all studied regions and land-use types. In grassland soils of highly diverse systems (up to 57 plant species) in one of the study regions, the Schwäbische Alb, a mid-range mountain area on limestone where soils showed a limited variation in pH in the carbonate buffer range, pedogenic Fe oxide concentrations, fertilizer-P application rates, and TP concentrations in soil explained more than half of the variation in bioavailable inorganic (Pi) concentrations extracted with NaHCO3 in soil. Our results demonstrate that mainly soil pH and mineralogical composition, and intensity of management of the managed ecosystems are significant controls of the P cycle determining the size of bioavailable P pool in soil.

Alt, F.; Oelmann, Y.; Wilcke, W.

2011-12-01

132

Effects of intensive forest management practices on insect infestation levels and loblolly pine growth.  

PubMed

Intensive forest management practices have been shown to increase tree growth and shorten rotation time. However, they may also lead to an increased need for insect pest management because of higher infestation levels and lower action thresholds. To investigate the relationship between intensive management practices and insect infestation, maximum growth potential studies of loblolly pine, Pinus taeda L., were conducted over 4 yr using a hierarchy of cultural treatments. The treatments were herbaceous weed control (H), H + irrigation (I), H + I + fertilizer (F), and H + I + F + pest control (P). These treatments were monitored for differences in growth and insect infestation levels related to the increasing management intensities. The Nantucket pine tip moth, Rhyacionia frustrana (Comstock), was consistently found infesting study trees. In the third field season, the H + I + F + P treatment had significantly more southern pine coneworm, Dioryctria amatella (Hulst), attacks than the H and H + I treatments. There were significant differences in volume index (D2H) among all treatments after each of the four growing seasons. This study indicated that tree fertilization can increase coneworm infestation and demonstrated that tip moth management can improve tree growth initially. Future measurements will determine if the growth gains from tip moth management are transitory or sustainable. PMID:10826182

Nowak, J T; Berisford, C W

2000-04-01

133

Integrated Learning Management Systems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four integrated learning management packages were reviewed: "CentraOne", "IntraLearn", "Lyceum", and "Silicon Chalk". These products provide different combinations of synchronous and asynchronous tools. The current report examines the products in relation to their specific value for distance educators and students.

Clark, Sharon; Cossarin, Mary; Doxsee, Harry; Schwartz, Linda

2004-01-01

134

DEPARTMENT CHAIR Engineering Management & Systems Engineering Department  

E-print Network

DEPARTMENT CHAIR Engineering Management & Systems Engineering Department Old Dominion University leading to doctoral and masters degrees in Engineering Management and Systems Engineering as well the department's collegial atmosphere. An earned doctorate in engineering management and/or systems engineering

135

ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (EIMS)  

EPA Science Inventory

The Environmental Information Management System (EIMS) organizes descriptive information (metadata) for data sets, databases, documents, models, projects, and spatial data. The EIMS design provides a repository for scientific documentation that can be easily accessed with standar...

136

Computer Systems and Network Manager  

E-print Network

is required. Ability to demonstrate successful information systems project management experience with clients and coordinating the work of others. Strong written and oral communication skills are required. #12;DESIRABLE

137

Shopping for outage management systems  

SciTech Connect

Customer service is becoming increasingly important to electric utilities. Outage management is an important part of customer service. Good outage management means quickly responding to outages and keeping customers informed about outages. Each outage equals lost customer satisfaction and lost revenue. Outage management is increasingly important because of new competition among utilities for customers, pressure from regulators, and internal pressure to cut costs. The market has several existing software products for outage management. How does a utility judge whether these products satisfy their specific needs? Technology is changing rapidly to support outage management. Which technology is proven and cost-effective? The purpose of this paper is to outline the procedure for evaluating outage management systems, and to discuss the key features to look for. It also gives our opinion of the features that represent state of the art. This paper will not discuss specific products or list vendors names.

Chou, Y.C.; Konneker, L.K.; Watkins, T.R.

1995-12-31

138

RIMS: Resource Information Management System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overview is given of the capabilities and functions of the resource management system (RIMS). It is a simple interactive DMS tool which allows users to build, modify, and maintain data management applications. The RIMS minimizes programmer support required to develop/maintain small data base applications. The RIMS also assists in bringing the United Information Services (UIS) budget system work inhouse. Information is also given on the relationship between the RIMS and the user community.

Symes, J.

1983-01-01

139

Management Information Systems Progress Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An overview is provided of progress in the development of a management information system for the California community colleges. First, background is presented on the current Uniform Statewide Reporting System (USRS), and problems with the system are identified and discussed (i.e., lack of student outcome information, unintegrated data, lack of…

Hamre, William

140

Accurate mathematical models to describe the lactation curve of Lacaune dairy sheep under intensive management.  

PubMed

Although the intensive production system of Lacaune dairy sheep is the only profitable method for producers outside of the French Roquefort area, little is known about this type of systems. This study evaluated yield records of 3677 Lacaune sheep under intensive management between 2005 and 2010 in order to describe the lactation curve of this breed and to investigate the suitability of different mathematical functions for modeling this curve. A total of 7873 complete lactations during a 40-week lactation period corresponding to 201 281 pieces of weekly yield data were used. First, five mathematical functions were evaluated on the basis of the residual mean square, determination coefficient, Durbin Watson and Runs Test values. The two better models were found to be Pollott Additive and fractional polynomial (FP). In the second part of the study, the milk yield, peak of milk yield, day of peak and persistency of the lactations were calculated with Pollot Additive and FP models and compared with the real data. The results indicate that both models gave an extremely accurate fit to Lacaune lactation curves in order to predict milk yields (P = 0.871), with the FP model being the best choice to provide a good fit to an extensive amount of real data and applicable on farm without specific statistical software. On the other hand, the interpretation of the parameters of the Pollott Additive function helps to understand the biology of the udder of the Lacaune sheep. The characteristics of the Lacaune lactation curve and milk yield are affected by lactation number and length. The lactation curves obtained in the present study allow the early identification of ewes with low milk yield potential, which will help to optimize farm profitability. PMID:23257242

Elvira, L; Hernandez, F; Cuesta, P; Cano, S; Gonzalez-Martin, J-V; Astiz, S

2013-06-01

141

Seasonal Habitat Selection by Raccoons (Procyon lotor) in Intensively Managed Pine Forests of Central Mississippi  

Microsoft Academic Search

Raccoons (Procyon lotor) are ecological generalists, existing in diverse land- scapes. Although general habitat use patterns of raccoons have been extensively described, little research has examined raccoon habitat selection within landscapes managed intensively for wood fiber production. Furthermore, no published studies using radio-telemetry have detailed raccoon habitat selection at multiple spatial scales. We monitored 31 raccoons on a 2000 ha

MICHAEL J. CHAMBERLAIN; L. MIKE CONNER; BRUCE D. LEOPOLD

2002-01-01

142

Secure, Efficient Data Transport and Replica Management for High-Performance Data-Intensive Computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

After studying data-intensive, high-performance computing applications such as high- energy physics and climate modeling, we conclude that these applications require two fundamental data management services: secure, reliable, efficient transfer of data in wide area environments and the ability to register and locate multiple copies of data sets. In this paper, we present our design of these services in the Globus

William E. Allcock; Joseph Bester; John Bresnahan; Ann L. Chervenak; Ian T. Foster; Carl Kesselman; Sam Meder; Veronika Nefedova; Darcy Quesnel; Steven Tuecke

2001-01-01

143

Evaluation of New York State's Children and Youth Intensive Case Management Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The evaluation plan for New York State's Children and Youth Intensive Case Management (CYICM) Program is described, which was introduced in July 1988. The CYICM Program is a statewide intervention focusing on keeping children with serious emotional disturbances in the least restrictive environment appropriate to their needs. It is a…

Dollard, Norin; And Others

144

Comparison of management intensive grazing and continuous grazing in beef cattle pasture  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Management intensive grazing (MIG) offers the potential to increase the financial profitability and productivity of grazing beef and dairy farms in Appalachian Ohio, with minimum environmental impacts. The objective of the project was to compare MIG with conventional continuous grazing (CG) and rela...

145

Environmental Management System Plan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management establishes the policy that Federal agencies conduct their environmental, transportation, and energy-related activities in a manner that is environmentally, economically and fiscally sound, integrated, continually improving, efficient, and sustainable. The Department of Energy (DOE) has approved DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program and DOE Order 430.2B, Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy

Robert Fox; Patrick Thorson; Blair Horst; John Speros; Nancy Rothermich; Howard Hatayama

2009-01-01

146

Automated flight test management system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Phase 1 development of an automated flight test management system (ATMS) as a component of a rapid prototyping flight research facility for artificial intelligence (AI) based flight concepts is discussed. The ATMS provides a flight engineer with a set of tools that assist in flight test planning, monitoring, and simulation. The system is also capable of controlling an aircraft during flight test by performing closed loop guidance functions, range management, and maneuver-quality monitoring. The ATMS is being used as a prototypical system to develop a flight research facility for AI based flight systems concepts at NASA Ames Dryden.

Hewett, M. D.; Tartt, D. M.; Agarwal, A.

1991-01-01

147

Progress and challenges to the global waste management system.  

PubMed

Rapid economic growth, urbanization and increasing population have caused (materially intensive) resource consumption to increase, and consequently the release of large amounts of waste to the environment. From a global perspective, current waste and resource management lacks a holistic approach covering the whole chain of product design, raw material extraction, production, consumption, recycling and waste management. In this article, progress and different sustainability challenges facing the global waste management system are presented and discussed. The study leads to the conclusion that the current, rather isolated efforts, in different systems for waste management, waste reduction and resource management are indeed not sufficient in a long term sustainability perspective. In the future, to manage resources and wastes sustainably, waste management requires a more systems-oriented approach that addresses the root causes for the problems. A specific issue to address is the development of improved feedback information (statistics) on how waste generation is linked to consumption. PMID:24938296

Singh, Jagdeep; Laurenti, Rafael; Sinha, Rajib; Frostell, Björn

2014-09-01

148

Manure management. A systems approach.  

PubMed

Traditionally, the management of manure nutrients has focused primarily on the production, collection, storage, and field application of manure. By contrast, a total systems approach expands this focus to include concerns about human and animal health, odor and fly control, nutrient import and handling, ration balancing and feeding management to optimize dietary nutrient utilization, management of crop harvest and storage to maximize feed palatability and nutrient digestibility, manure processing for export, farm economics of nutrient management, and the broader economic impacts of environmental regulation and enforcement. In the future, the focus of manure and nutrient management must be to optimize nutrient flow and utilization at every point within the total dairy farm system. A total systems approach to nutrient management is vital to the future of the dairy industry. This approach requires a broad spectrum of scientific expertise that includes multidisciplinary teams involving agronomists, dairy scientists, economists, engineers, microbiologists, soil scientists, veterinarians, and regulators to deal successfully with the complex issues pertaining to dairy nutrient management. PMID:9361237

Grusenmeyer, D C; Cramer, T N

1997-10-01

149

23 CFR 970.204 - Management systems requirements.  

... FEDERAL LANDS HIGHWAYS NATIONAL PARK SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS National Park Service Management Systems § 970.204 Management systems...development, establishment, implementation and operation of management systems. The...

2014-04-01

150

23 CFR 970.204 - Management systems requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... FEDERAL LANDS HIGHWAYS NATIONAL PARK SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS National Park Service Management Systems § 970.204 Management systems...development, establishment, implementation and operation of management systems. The...

2013-04-01

151

23 CFR 970.204 - Management systems requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... FEDERAL LANDS HIGHWAYS NATIONAL PARK SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS National Park Service Management Systems § 970.204 Management systems...development, establishment, implementation and operation of management systems. The...

2012-04-01

152

PPPL Project Management System Page 1 of 111 PPPL Project Management System Description Rev-01  

E-print Network

PPPL Project Management System Page 1 of 111 PPPL Project Management System Description Rev-01 Project Management System Description (PMSD) Revision 1 June 2011 Prepared by: ___________________________________ Date: ________________ Tim Stevenson Head, Project Management Office Approved by

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

153

Integrated safety management system verification: Volume 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Department of Energy (DOE) Policy (P) 450.4, Safety Management System Policy, commits to institutionalizing an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) throughout the DOE complex. The DOE Acquisition Regulations (DEAR 48 CFR 970) requires contractors to manage and perform work in accordance with a documented Integrated Safety Management System. The Manager, Richland Operations Office (RL), initiated a combined Phase 1 and

1998-01-01

154

Steam System Data Management  

E-print Network

? Fabrication Training (Six Year Training) ? Welding Certifications ?Retired From Chevron After 25 Years ? Established A Steam System Program ? Planner For Routine Maintenance Work ? Planner For Steam System Improvements ? Wal-Tech Valve, Inc. ? Purchased... From Chevron After 32Years ? Established A Steam System Program ? Long Range Planner For Routine And Project Work ? Planner For Outage Work ?Major Contributor For Establishing A Planning Process For The Refinery. ? Teacher for New Planners...

Roberts, D.

2013-01-01

155

Redundancy management of inertial systems.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The paper reviews developments in failure detection and isolation techniques applicable to gimballed and strapdown systems. It examines basic redundancy management goals of improved reliability, performance and logistic costs, and explores mechanizations available for both input and output data handling. The meaning of redundant system reliability in terms of available coverage, system MTBF, and mission time is presented and the practical hardware performance limitations of failure detection and isolation techniques are explored. Simulation results are presented illustrating implementation coverages attainable considering IMU performance models and mission detection threshold requirements. The implications of a complete GN&C redundancy management method on inertial techniques are also explored.

Mckern, R. A.; Musoff, H.

1973-01-01

156

Campus Telephone Systems: Managing Change.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Issues facing a college or university that seeks to change its telephone system are raised in seven chapters. Major topics addressed by this resource guide are: telephone deregulation and changes in the telephone industry, the new technology available, how to manage a system, consultants, financing options, and institutional case studies. Specific…

National Association of College and University Business Officers, Washington, DC.

157

Safeguards Information Management Systems (SIMS)  

SciTech Connect

The requirements for the management of information at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and its Department of Safeguards are rapidly changing. Historically, the Department of Safeguards has had the requirement to process large volumes of conventional safeguards information. An information management system is currently in place that adequately handles the IAEA`s conventional safeguards data needs. In the post-Iraq environment, however, there is a growing need to expand the IAEA information management capability to include unconventional forms of information. These data include environmental sampling results, photographs, video film, lists of machine tools, and open-source materials such as unclassified publications. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has responded to this information management need by implementing the Safeguards Information Management Systems (SIMS) initiative. SIMS was created by the DOE to anticipate and respond to IAEA information management needs through a multilaboratory initiative that will utilize an integrated approach to develop and deploy technology in a timely and cost-effective manner. The DOE will use the SIMS initiative to coordinate US information management activities that support the IAEA Department of Safeguards.

Sorenson, R.J.; Sheely, K.B. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Brown, J.B. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Horton, R.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Strittmatter, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Manatt, D.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1994-04-01

158

Managing risk in software systems  

SciTech Connect

A methodology for risk management in the design of software systems is presented. It spans security, safety, and correct operation of software within the context of its environment, and produces a risk analysis and documented risk management strategy. It is designed to be iteratively applied, to attain appropriate levels of detail throughout the analysis. The methodology and supporting tools are discussed. The methodology is critiqued relative to other research in the field. Some sample applications of the methodology are presented.

Fletcher, S.K.; Jansma, R.M.; Murphy, M.D. [and others

1995-07-01

159

Superposed Epoch Analysis of Current Systems During Intense Magnetic Storms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A statistical approach to investigating the intensity and timing of storm-time current systems is conducted and presented. The Hot Electron and Ion Drift Integrator (HEIDI) model was used to simulate all of the intense storms (Dstmin < -100 nT) from solar cycle 23 (1996-2005). Five different HEIDI input combinations were used to create a large collection of numerical results, varying the plasma outer boundary condition and electric field description in the model. The simulation results are then combined with a normalized superposed epoch analysis, where each phase of each storm is prorated to the average duration of that phase and then all of the storms are averaged together. The azimuthal currents in the HEIDI simulation domain are classified as westward and eastward symmetric ring current, partial ring current, banana current, and tail current. The average behavior of these current systems with respect to the HEIDI plasma and electric field boundary conditions are then presented and discussed. It is found that the Volland-Stern electric field produces an earlier increase in the inner magnetospheric current systems because of the usage of the 3-h Kp index. A self-consistent electric field develops the current systems a few hours later, but produces much stronger asymmetric current systems (partial, banana, and tail currents), especially in the main phase of the storm. Applying a nonuniform local time distribution for the plasma outer boundary condition slightly increases the magnitudes of the current systems, but this effect is smaller than the electric field influence.

Liemohn, M. W.; Katus, R. M.

2013-05-01

160

Sona Systems, Ltd. EXPERIMENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM  

E-print Network

. As a licensee of the software, you are granted a right to copy this documentation, modify it, and distribute of your organization. You will find this documentation covers every feature of the software, while you maySona Systems, Ltd. EXPERIMENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Master Documentation Set Version 2.65 Copyright

Cooper, Brenton G.

161

The CMS Data Management System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The data management elements in CMS are scalable, modular, and designed to work together. The main components are PhEDEx, the data transfer and location system; the Data Booking Service (DBS), a metadata catalog; and the Data Aggregation Service (DAS), designed to aggregate views and provide them to users and services. Tens of thousands of samples have been cataloged and petabytes of data have been moved since the run began. The modular system has allowed the optimal use of appropriate underlying technologies. In this contribution we will discuss the use of both Oracle and NoSQL databases to implement the data management elements as well as the individual architectures chosen. We will discuss how the data management system functioned during the first run, and what improvements are planned in preparation for 2015.

Giffels, M.; Guo, Y.; Kuznetsov, V.; Magini, N.; Wildish, T.

2014-06-01

162

Portfolio 2000: managing clinical systems.  

PubMed

Powerful forces are changing the provision of health care. Management is transitioning into new responsibility for a leaner, more flexible, customer-focused operation to support the goals of integrated systems of the 21st century--to minimize disease and to promote health. In response to this evolution, the clinical systems management concept describes multidimensional competencies, which are transportable throughout the continuum of care (1). These new knowledge competencies and core competencies applied in a different context are characterized in this paper. PMID:10185008

Hunter, L L

1998-01-01

163

The Cheetah Data Management System  

SciTech Connect

Cheetah is a data management system based on the C programming language. The premise of Cheetah is that the banks' of FORTRAN based systems should be structures' as defined by the C language. Cheetah is a system to mange these structures, while preserving the use of the C language in its native form. For C structures managed by Cheetah, the user can use Cheetah utilities such as reading and writing, in a machine independent form, both binary and text files to disk or over a network. Files written by Cheetah also contain a dictionary describing in detail the data contained in the file. Such information is intended to be used by interactive programs for presenting the contents of the file. Such information is intended to be used by interactive programs for presenting the contents of file. Cheetah has been ported to many different operating systems with no operating system dependent switches.

Kunz, P.F. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (USA)); Word, G.B. (Rutgers--the State Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (USA). Dept. of Physics)

1991-03-01

164

Integrated Systems Health Management for Intelligent Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The implementation of an integrated system health management (ISHM) capability is fundamentally linked to the management of data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) with the purposeful objective of determining the health of a system. It is akin to having a team of experts who are all individually and collectively observing and analyzing a complex system, and communicating effectively with each other in order to arrive at an accurate and reliable assessment of its health. In this paper, concepts, procedures, and approaches are presented as a foundation for implementing an intelligent systems ]relevant ISHM capability. The capability stresses integration of DIaK from all elements of a system. Both ground-based (remote) and on-board ISHM capabilities are compared and contrasted. The information presented is the result of many years of research, development, and maturation of technologies, and of prototype implementations in operational systems.

Figueroa, Fernando; Melcher, Kevin

2011-01-01

165

Challenges in management of blast injuries in Intensive Care Unit: Case series and review.  

PubMed

Blast injuries are rare, but life-threatening medical emergencies. We report the clinical presentation and management of four bomb blast victims admitted in Intensive Care Unit of Trauma center of our hospital in 2011. Three of them had lung injury; hemothorax (2) and pneumothorax (1). Traumatic brain injury was present in only one. Long bone fractures were present in all the victims. Presence of multiple shrapnels was a universal finding. Two blast victims died (day 7 and day 9); cause of death was multi-organ failure and septic shock. Issues relating to complexity of injuries, complications, management, and outcome are discussed. PMID:25538416

Samra, Tanvir; Pawar, Mridula; Kaur, Jasvinder

2014-12-01

166

12 years of intensive management increases soil carbon stocks in Loblolly pine and Sweetgum stands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To achieve and maintain productivity goals, forest managers rely on intensive management strategies. These strategies have resulted in considerable gains in forest productivity. However, the impacts of these strategies on belowground carbon dynamics is less clear. Carbon dynamics are influenced by a multitude of factors including soil moisture, nutrient status, net primary productivity and carbon allocation patterns. In this study, we describe the impact of four management strategies on soil carbon and nitrogen stocks in 12-year-old loblolly pine and sweetgum plantations. The management strategies are: (1) complete understory control, (2) complete understory control + drip irrigation, (3) complete understory control + drip irrigation and fertilization and (4) complete understory control + drip irrigation and fertilization and pest control. These management strategies were replicated on 3 blocks in a randomized complete block design. After 12 years, soil carbon stocks increased with increasing management intensity for both tree species. This effect was consistent throughout the depth increments measured (0-10, 10-20, 20-30 cm). Alternatively, no significant effect was detected for soil nitrogen at any depth increment. Sweetgum had higher soil carbon and nitrogen stocks at each depth increment than loblolly pine. There was a greater difference in nitrogen stocks than carbon stocks between the two species resulting in lower soil C:N ratios in the sweetgum stands. These observations may be due to differences in net primary productivity, rooting structure and carbon allocation patterns of sweetgum compared with loblolly pine. To determine the relative stability of the carbon and nitrogen stocks for the different treatments and tree species, we sequentially fractionated the soil samples into six fractions of differing stability. Although soil carbon stocks for both species increased with management intensity, there was no detectable difference in the soil carbon fractions based on management intensity. Additionally, there was no difference between soil carbon fractions based on tree species. These observations suggest that although external inputs (i.e., moisture, carbon and nutrients) increase soil carbon stocks, they do not alter soil carbon stabilization mechanisms at these sites.

Sanchez, F. G.; Samuelson, L.; Johnsen, K.

2009-12-01

167

Challenges in management of blast injuries in Intensive Care Unit: Case series and review  

PubMed Central

Blast injuries are rare, but life-threatening medical emergencies. We report the clinical presentation and management of four bomb blast victims admitted in Intensive Care Unit of Trauma center of our hospital in 2011. Three of them had lung injury; hemothorax (2) and pneumothorax (1). Traumatic brain injury was present in only one. Long bone fractures were present in all the victims. Presence of multiple shrapnels was a universal finding. Two blast victims died (day 7 and day 9); cause of death was multi-organ failure and septic shock. Issues relating to complexity of injuries, complications, management, and outcome are discussed.

Samra, Tanvir; Pawar, Mridula; Kaur, Jasvinder

2014-01-01

168

A relative-intensity two-color phosphor thermography system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA LaRC has developed a relative-intensity two-color phosphor thermography system. This system has become a standard technique for acquiring aerothermodynamic data in LaRC Hypersonic Facilities Complex (HFC). The relative intensity theory and its application to the LaRC phosphor thermography system is discussed along with the investment casting technique which is critical to the utilization of the phosphor method for aerothermodynamic studies. Various approaches to obtaining quantitative heat transfer data using thermographic phosphors are addressed and comparisons between thin-film data and thermographic phosphor data on an orbiter-like configuration are presented. In general, data from these two techniques are in good agreement. A discussion is given on the application of phosphors to integration heat transfer data reduction techniques (the thin film method) and preliminary heat transfer data obtained on a calibration sphere using thin-film equations are presented. Finally, plans for a new phosphor system which uses target recognition software are discussed.

Merski, N. Ronald

1991-01-01

169

Managing Hardware Configurations and Data Products for the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment  

E-print Network

The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) is an ambitious new radio telescope project for measuring cosmic expansion and investigating dark energy. Keeping good records of both physical configuration of its 1280 antennas and their analogue signal chains as well as the ~100 TB of data produced daily from its correlator will be essential to the success of CHIME. In these proceedings we describe the database-driven software we have developed to manage this complexity.

Hincks, Adam D

2014-01-01

170

Managing Large Scale Network Model for Energy Management Systems & Business Management Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prior to the start up of the standard market design (SMD-2), the New York independent system operator (NYISO) used various tools to maintain and update three network models used to support the energy management system (EMS) and business management systems (BMS) applications. The process of maintaining and updating the network models for EMS & BMS applications became more challenged and

De Tran; E. Haq

2007-01-01

171

Computerized clinical dietetics management system.  

PubMed

A computerized Clinical Dietetics Management System (CDMS) was designed to support and facilitate accurate and timely delivery of clinical dietetics services. The CDMS is an integral part of a comprehensive hospital computer system that interfaces with 17 data bases. Thirty-one functions provide order processing, inquiry, calculations, message sending, charge capture, data base maintenance, and management reporting capabilities. System features include immediate and continuous access to the most current patient information, automatic routing of messages, a complete diet-order history for each patient and minimal printed output. Since implementation of the CDMS, users report benefits such as smoothing of workload peaks, fewer interruptions, fewer wasted trays, better and faster problem solving, and increased visibility in clinical dietetics services. The dynamic nature of the system allows additional applications to be added as they are developed. PMID:3745746

Weathers, B J; Hoover, L W; Warriner, W J; Dillon, J D

1986-09-01

172

Integrated safety management system verification: Volume 2  

Microsoft Academic Search

Department of Energy (DOE) Policy (P) 450.4, Safety Management System Policy, commits to institutionalization of an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) throughout the DOE complex. The DOE Acquisition Regulations (DEAR, 48 CFR 970) requires contractors to manage and perform work in accordance with a documented Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS). Guidance and expectations have been provided to PNNL by incorporation

1998-01-01

173

Building Knowledge Base Management Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Advanced applications in elds such as CAD, software engineering, real-time process control, corporate repositories and digital libraries require the construction, ef- cient access and management of large, shared knowledge bases. Such knowledge bases cannot be built using exist- ing tools such as expert system shells, because these do not scale up, nor can they be built in terms of existing

John Mylopoulos; Vinay K. Chaudhri; Dimitris Plexousakis; Adel Shrufi; Thodoros Topaloglou

1996-01-01

174

Hierarchical storage management system evaluation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program at NASA Ames Research Center has been developing a hierarchical storage management system, NAStore, for some 6 years. This evaluation compares functionality, performance, reliability, and other factors of NAStore and three commercial alternatives. FileServ is found to be slightly better overall than NAStore and DMF. UniTree is found to be severely lacking in comparison.

Woodrow, Thomas S.

1993-01-01

175

The Cheetah data management system  

SciTech Connect

Cheetah is a data management system based on the C programming language, with support for other languages. Its main goal is to transfer data between memory and I/O steams in a general way. The streams are either associated with disk files or are network data stems. Cheetah provides optional convenience functions to assist in the management of C structures. Cheetah steams are self-describing so that general purpose applications can fully understand an incoming steam. This information can be used to display the data in an incoming steam to the user of an interactive general application, complete with variable names and optional comments.

Kunz, P.F. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)); Word, G.B. (Rutgers--the State Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

1992-09-01

176

Commissioning of Peacock System for intensity-modulated radiation therapy.  

PubMed

The Peacock System was introduced to perform tomographic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Commissioning of the Peacock System included the alignment of the multileaf intensity-modulating collimator (MIMiC) to the beam axis, the alignment of the RTA device for immobilization, and checking the integrity of the CRANE for indexing the treatment couch. In addition, the secondary jaw settings, couch step size, and transmission through the leaves were determined. The dosimetric data required for the CORVUS planning system were divided into linear accelerator-specific and MIMiC-specific. The linear accelerator-specific dosimetric data were relative output in air, relative output in phantom, percent depth dose for a range of field sizes, and diagonal dose profiles for a large field size. The MIMiC-specific dosimetric data were the in-plane and cross-plane dose profiles of a small and a large field size to derive the penumbra fit. For each treatment unit, the Beam Utility software requires the data be entered into the CORVUS planning system in modular forms. These modules were treatment unit information, angle definition, configuration, gantry and couch angles range, dosimetry, results, and verification plans. After the appropriate machine data were entered, CORVUS created a dose model. The dose model was used to create known simple dose distribution for evaluation using the verification tools of the CORVUS. The planned doses for phantoms were confirmed using an ion chamber for point dose measurement and film for relative dose measurement. The planning system calibration factor was initially set at 1.0 and will be changed after data on clinical cases are acquired. The treatment unit was released for clinical use after the approval icon was checked in the verification plans module. PMID:11417508

Saw, C B; Ayyangar, K M; Thompson, R B; Zhen, W; Enke, C A

2001-01-01

177

Hydrologic response of northern wetlands to silvicultural water management systems  

SciTech Connect

Two types of water management systems are used to ameliorate saturated soil conditions which limit silvicultural operations and site productivity in northern wetlands. The pattern ditch system is an intensive drainage network designed to regulate water table depth in peat soils. The prescription drainage system is a low-intensity drainage system that is used to develop apparent drainage patterns in mineral and histic-mineral soils. These water management systems may either increase or decrease peak flow, base flow, and the duration of peak flow events, depending on drainage system design, climate, season, site characteristics, and land use. The most common hydrologic response to drainage is an increase in peak flow and base flow, and an increase in annual runoff. The effect of wetland drainage on watershed hydrology depends on the proportion of the watershed drained. Drainage may also affect water quality, nutrient cycling, vegetation composition and structure.

Trettin, C.C.

1994-09-01

178

PROMIS (Procurement Management Information System)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The PROcurement Management Information System (PROMIS) provides both detailed and summary level information on all procurement actions performed within NASA's procurement offices at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). It provides not only on-line access, but also schedules procurement actions, monitors their progress, and updates Forecast Award Dates. Except for a few computational routines coded in FORTRAN, the majority of the systems is coded in a high level language called NATURAL. A relational Data Base Management System called ADABAS is utilized. Certain fields, called descriptors, are set up on each file to allow the selection of records based on a specified value or range of values. The use of like descriptors on different files serves as the link between the falls, thus producing a relational data base. Twenty related files are currently being maintained on PROMIS.

1987-01-01

179

MIMS - MEDICAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

MIMS, Medical Information Management System is an interactive, general purpose information storage and retrieval system. It was first designed to be used in medical data management, and can be used to handle all aspects of data related to patient care. Other areas of application for MIMS include: managing occupational safety data in the public and private sectors; handling judicial information where speed and accuracy are high priorities; systemizing purchasing and procurement systems; and analyzing organizational cost structures. Because of its free format design, MIMS can offer immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases is required. File structures, data categories, field lengths and formats, including alphabetic and/or numeric, are all user defined. The user can quickly and efficiently extract, display, and analyze the data. Three means of extracting data are provided: certain short items of information, such as social security numbers, can be used to uniquely identify each record for quick access; records can be selected which match conditions defined by the user; and specific categories of data can be selected. Data may be displayed and analyzed in several ways which include: generating tabular information assembled from comparison of all the records on the system; generating statistical information on numeric data such as means, standard deviations and standard errors; and displaying formatted listings of output data. The MIMS program is written in Microsoft FORTRAN-77. It was designed to operate on IBM Personal Computers and compatibles running under PC or MS DOS 2.00 or higher. MIMS was developed in 1987.

Frankowski, J. W.

1994-01-01

180

Metrics for border management systems.  

SciTech Connect

There are as many unique and disparate manifestations of border systems as there are borders to protect. Border Security is a highly complex system analysis problem with global, regional, national, sector, and border element dimensions for land, water, and air domains. The complexity increases with the multiple, and sometimes conflicting, missions for regulating the flow of people and goods across borders, while securing them for national security. These systems include frontier border surveillance, immigration management and customs functions that must operate in a variety of weather, terrain, operational conditions, cultural constraints, and geopolitical contexts. As part of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project 08-684 (Year 1), the team developed a reference framework to decompose this complex system into international/regional, national, and border elements levels covering customs, immigration, and border policing functions. This generalized architecture is relevant to both domestic and international borders. As part of year two of this project (09-1204), the team determined relevant relative measures to better understand border management performance. This paper describes those relative metrics and how they can be used to improve border management systems.

Duggan, Ruth Ann

2009-07-01

181

The performance of intensive care units: does good management make a difference?  

PubMed

A significant portion of health care resources are spent in intensive care units with, historically, up to two-fold variation in risk-adjusted mortality. Technological, demographic, and social forces are likely to lead to an increased volume of intensive care in the future. Thus, it is important to identify ways of more efficiently managing intensive care units and reducing the variation in patient outcomes. Based on data collected from 17,440 patients across 42 ICUs, the present study examines the factors associated with risk-adjusted mortality, risk-adjusted average length of stay, nurse turnover, evaluated technical quality of care, and evaluated ability to meet family member needs. Using the Apache III methodology for risk-adjustment, findings reveal that: 1) technological availability is significantly associated with lower risk-adjusted mortality (beta = -.42); 2) diagnostic diversity is significantly associated with greater risk-adjusted mortality (beta = .46); and 3) caregiver interaction comprising the culture, leadership, coordination, communication, and conflict management abilities of the unit is significantly associated with lower risk-adjusted length of stay (beta = .34), lower nurse turnover (beta = -.36), higher evaluated technical quality of care (beta = .81), and greater evaluated ability to meet family member needs (beta = .74). Furthermore, units with greater technological availability are significantly more likely to be associated with hospitals that are more profitable, involved in teaching activities, and have unit leaders actively participating in hospital-wide quality improvement activities. The findings hold a number of important managerial and policy implications regarding technological adoption, specialization, and the quality of interaction among ICU team members. They suggest intervention "leverage points" for care givers, managers, and external policy makers in efforts to continuously improve the outcomes of intensive care. PMID:8182978

Shortell, S M; Zimmerman, J E; Rousseau, D M; Gillies, R R; Wagner, D P; Draper, E A; Knaus, W A; Duffy, J

1994-05-01

182

Integrated Systems Health Management for Intelligent Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The implementation of an integrated system health management (ISHM) capability is fundamentally linked to the management of data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) with the purposeful objective of determining the health of a system. Management implies storage, distribution, sharing, maintenance, processing, reasoning, and presentation. ISHM is akin to having a team of experts who are all individually and collectively observing and analyzing a complex system, and communicating effectively with each other in order to arrive at an accurate and reliable assessment of its health. In this chapter, concepts, procedures, and approaches are presented as a foundation for implementing an ISHM capability relevant to intelligent systems. The capability stresses integration of DIaK from all elements of a system, emphasizing an advance toward an on-board, autonomous capability. Both ground-based and on-board ISHM capabilities are addressed. The information presented is the result of many years of research, development, and maturation of technologies, and of prototype implementations in operational systems.

Figueroa, Fernando; Melcher, Kevin

2011-01-01

183

Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) System Manager  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) mission is an ambitious NASA space science mission in which 4 spacecraft are flown in tight formation about a highly elliptical orbit. Each spacecraft has multiple instruments that measure particle and field compositions in the Earths magnetosphere. By controlling the members relative motion, MMS can distinguish temporal and spatial fluctuations in a way that a single spacecraft cannot.To achieve this control, 2 sets of four maneuvers, distributed evenly across the spacecraft must be performed approximately every 14 days. Performing a single maneuver on an individual spacecraft is usually labor intensive and the complexity becomes clearly increases with four. As a result, the MMS flight dynamics team turned to the System Manager to put the routine or error-prone under machine control freeing the analysts for activities that require human judgment.The System Manager is an expert system that is capable of handling operations activities associated with performing MMS maneuvers. As an expert system, it can work off a known schedule, launching jobs based on a one-time occurrence or on a set reoccurring schedule. It is also able to detect situational changes and use event-driven programming to change schedules, adapt activities, or call for help.

Schiff, Conrad; Maher, Francis Alfred; Henely, Sean Philip; Rand, David

2014-01-01

184

Real-time estimation system for seismic-intensity exposed-population  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For an appropriate first-action to an earthquake, risk (damage) information evaluated in real-time are important as well as hazard (ground motion) information. To meet this need, we are developing real-time estimation system (J-RISQ) for exposed population and earthquake damage on buildings. We plan to open the web page of estimated exposed population to the public from autumn. When an earthquake occurs, seismic intensities are calculated at each observation station and sent to the DMC (Data Management Center) in different timing. For rapid estimation, the system does not wait for the data from all the stations but begins the first estimation when the number of the stations observing the seismic intensity of 2.5 or larger exceeds the threshold amount. Estimations are updated several times using all the available data at that moment. Spatial distribution of seismic intensity in 250 m meshes is estimated by the site amplification factor of surface layers and the observed data. By using this intensity distribution, the exposed population is estimated using population data of each mesh. The exposed populations for municipalities and prefectures are estimated by summing-up the exposures of included meshes for the area and are appropriately rounded taking estimation precision into consideration. The estimated intensities for major cities are shown by the histograms, which indicate the variation of the estimated values in the city together with the observed maximum intensity. The variation is mainly caused by the difference of the site amplification factors. The intensities estimated for meshes with large amplification factor are sometimes larger than the maximum value observed in the city. The estimated results are seen on the web site just after the earthquake. The results of the past earthquakes can be easily searched by keywords such as date, magnitudes, seismic intensities and source areas. The summary of the results in the one-page report of Portable Document Format is also available. This system has been experimentally operated since 2010 and has performed the estimations in real-time for more than 670 earthquakes by July of 2012. For about 75 % of these earthquakes, it takes less than one minute to send the e-mail of first estimation after receiving data from the first triggered station, and therefore, the rapidity of the system is satisfactory. To upload a PDF report form to the web site, it takes approximately additional 30 second.

Aoi, S.; Nakamura, H.; Kunugi, T.; Suzuki, W.; Fujiwara, H.

2013-12-01

185

Separating key management from file system security  

Microsoft Academic Search

No secure network file system has ever grown to span the Internet. Existing systems all lack adequate key management for security at a global scale. Given the diversity of the Internet, any particular mechanism a file system employs to manage keys will fail to support many types of use.We propose separating key management from file system security, letting the world

David Mazières; Michael Kaminsky; M. Frans Kaashoek; Emmett Witchel

1999-01-01

186

A transporter management system for shipyard  

Microsoft Academic Search

A transporter management system for shipyards using technologies of DGPS, GIS, communication (such as SMS transmission and reception), and sensing techniques is presented in this paper. Examples are demonstrated on how these technologies are applied to the transporter management system. The authors propose an intelligent logistics management system that can be used in shipyards. The system utilizes satellite signals and

Kyu-Chan Lee; Yeong-Ho Lee; Kil-Jong Lee; Yung-Deug Son; Oyoung Lee

2003-01-01

187

Battery Management System for Electric Vehicle Application  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to solve the key technology of electric vehicle (EV), a battery management system (BMS) is proposed here to settle the critical issues. The system includes several common modules: data acquisition unit, communication unit and battery state estimation model. Two additional management units are developed here, one is thermal management and the other is high voltage management which improve

Jiaxi Qiang; Lin Yang; Guoqiang Ao; Hu Zhong

2006-01-01

188

Electromagnetic-Guided DMLC Tracking Enables Motion Management for Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy  

PubMed Central

Purpose Intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is attractive due to high dose conformality and efficient delivery. However, managing intrafraction motion is challenging for IMAT. The purpose of this research was to develop and investigate electromagnetic-guided DMLC tracking as an enabling technology to treat moving targets during IMAT. Materials/Methods A real-time 3D DMLC-based target tracking system was developed and integrated with a linac. The DMLC tracking software inputs a real-time electromagnetically measured target position and the IMAT plan and dynamically creates new leaf positions directed at the moving target. Low and high modulation IMAT plans were created for lung and prostate cancer cases. The IMAT plans were delivered to a 3-axis motion platform programmed with measured patient motion. Dosimetric measurements were acquired by placing an ion chamber array on the moving platform. Measurements were acquired with tracking, without tracking (current clinical practice), and with the phantom in a static position (reference). Analysis of dose distribution differences from the static reference used a ?-test. Results On average, 1.6% of dose points for the lung plans and 1.2% of points for the prostate plans failed the 3mm/3% ?-test with tracking; without tracking 34% and 14% (respectively) of points failed the ?-test. The delivery time was the same with and without tracking. Conclusions For the first time electromagnetic-guided DMLC target tracking with IMAT has been investigated. Dose distributions to moving targets with DMLC tracking were significantly superior to those without tracking. There was no loss of treatment efficiency with DMLC tracking. PMID:20615630

Keall, Paul J.; Sawant, Amit; Cho, Byungchul; Ruan, Dan; Wu, Junqing; Poulsen, Per; Petersen, Jay; Newell, Laurence J.; Cattell, Herbert; Korreman, Stine

2010-01-01

189

5 CFR 9701.405 - Performance management system requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE...PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Performance Management §...

2011-01-01

190

5 CFR 9701.405 - Performance management system requirements.  

...Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE...PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Performance Management §...

2014-01-01

191

5 CFR 9701.405 - Performance management system requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE...PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Performance Management §...

2013-01-01

192

5 CFR 9701.405 - Performance management system requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE...PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Performance Management §...

2012-01-01

193

Fungal Infections in Intensive Care Unit: Challenges in Diagnosis and Management  

PubMed Central

Infections have almost become an inseparable part of the intensive care units throughout the globe in spite of numerous advancements in diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. With advances in critical care medicine and introduction of broad-spectrum antibiotics, the incidence of invasive fungal infections in intensive care is on the rise, especially in patients with immunosuppression. The aim of this review is to collect recent information about various types of invasive fungal infections prevalent in the intensive care unit, the problems in their diagnosis and recent trends in their management. A thorough literature search was made in PubMed and Google using the following keywords for our search: Invasive fungal infection, antifungal therapy in intensive care unit, candidiasis. The major fungi implicated worldwide are Candida and Aspergillus spp., followed by Cryptococcus, Histoplasma, etc., in endemic areas. These produce a wide variety of infections that are difficult to diagnose as most of the diagnosing tests are non-specific and the culture takes a long time. An early suspicion of fungal infection with institution of appropriate antifungal therapy is mandatory for a positive outcome and to prevent development of invasive fungal infection. PMID:23919197

Bajwa, SJ; Kulshrestha, A

2013-01-01

194

Data management system advanced architectures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The topics relating to the Space Station Freedom (SSF) are presented in view graph form and include: (1) the data management system (DMS) concept; (2) DMS evolution rationale; (3) the DMS advance architecture task; (4) DMS group support for Ames payloads; (5) DMS testbed development; (6) the DMS architecture task status; (7) real time multiprocessor testbed; (8) networked processor performance; (9) and the DMS advance architecture task 1992 goals.

Chevers, ED

1991-01-01

195

Automated Platform Management System Scheduling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Platform Management System was established to coordinate the operation of platform systems and instruments. The management functions are split between ground and space components. Since platforms are to be out of contact with the ground more than the manned base, the on-board functions are required to be more autonomous than those of the manned base. Under this concept, automated replanning and rescheduling, including on-board real-time schedule maintenance and schedule repair, are required to effectively and efficiently meet Space Station Freedom mission goals. In a FY88 study, we developed several promising alternatives for automated platform planning and scheduling. We recommended both a specific alternative and a phased approach to automated platform resource scheduling. Our recommended alternative was based upon use of exactly the same scheduling engine in both ground and space components of the platform management system. Our phased approach recommendation was based upon evolutionary development of the platform. In the past year, we developed platform scheduler requirements and implemented a rapid prototype of a baseline platform scheduler. Presently we are rehosting this platform scheduler rapid prototype and integrating the scheduler prototype into two Goddard Space Flight Center testbeds, as the ground scheduler in the Scheduling Concepts, Architectures, and Networks Testbed and as the on-board scheduler in the Platform Management System Testbed. Using these testbeds, we will investigate rescheduling issues, evaluate operational performance and enhance the platform scheduler prototype to demonstrate our evolutionary approach to automated platform scheduling. The work described in this paper was performed prior to Space Station Freedom rephasing, transfer of platform responsibility to Code E, and other recently discussed changes. We neither speculate on these changes nor attempt to predict the impact of the final decisions. As a consequence some of our work and results may be outdated when this paper is published.

Hull, Larry G.

1990-01-01

196

Superfund Soils Data Management System  

SciTech Connect

The paper describes the Superfund Soil Data Management System (DMS), a PC-based data system being developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in its effort to manage and evaluate treatment and performance data for contaminated soil, sludge, and debris. The system will be used to support two basic EPA objectives: (1) technology transfer; and (2) support for the development of RCRA land disposal restrictions (LDRs) for contaminated soil and debris. CDM Federal Programs Corporation is supporting EPA in the development of this data base. EPA is compiling and evaluating soil, sludge, and debris treatment data from a variety of sources such as: EPA Superfund remedial and removal actions, RCRA and UST corrective actions, SITE program demonstrations, and other research programs; Department of Energy (DOE); Department of Defense (DOD); treatment vendors; private contractors; and research organizations. This influx of data has created the information management need addressed by the Superfund Soil DMS. Written in dBASE III+ (a popular PC-based data base language), the Superfund Soil DMS stores: Quantitative and qualitative data on ex-situ soil, sludge, and debris treatment technologies, Quality control (QC) data (such as blank, spike recoveries, surrogate recoveries, etc.), Bibliographic and site information, and Abstracts and extensive comments regarding treatment performance, successes and problems, design and operating information, and recommendations for additional research.

Schmuller, J.; Hudson, D.E.; Perdek, J.M.; Troast, R.

1992-01-01

197

Computerized clinical documentation system in the pediatric intensive care unit  

PubMed Central

Background To determine whether a computerized clinical documentation system (CDS): 1) decreased time spent charting and increased time spent in patient care; 2) decreased medication errors; 3) improved clinical decision making; 4) improved quality of documentation; and/or 5) improved shift to shift nursing continuity. Methods Before and after implementation of CDS, a time study involving nursing care, medication delivery, and normalization of serum calcium and potassium values was performed. In addition, an evaluation of completeness of documentation and a clinician survey of shift to shift reporting were also completed. This was a modified one group, pretest-posttest design. Results With the CDS there was: improved legibility and completeness of documentation, data with better accessibility and accuracy, no change in time spent in direct patient care or charting by nursing staff. Incidental observations from the study included improved management functions of our nurse manager; improved JCAHO documentation compliance; timely access to clinical data (labs, vitals, etc); a decrease in time and resource use for audits; improved reimbursement because of the ability to reconstruct lost charts; limited human data entry by automatic data logging; eliminated costs of printing forms. CDS cost was reasonable. Conclusions When compared to a paper chart, the CDS provided a more legible, compete, and accessible patient record without affecting time spent in direct patient care. The availability of the CDS improved shift to shift reporting. Other observations showed that the CDS improved management capabilities; helped physicians deliver care; improved reimbursement; limited data entry errors; and reduced costs. PMID:11604105

2001-01-01

198

Platform Management System (PMS) evolution  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In fiscal year 1988 a study was begun to define the platform management system (PMS) functions required for the mature platform operations era. The objectives of the task include: (1) defining how to increase the operational productivity of the platform by providing enhanced capability for responding to changing events, (2) influencing the initial PMS design by identifying required 'hooks and scars', and (3) evaluation potential automation techniques that are appropriate given predicted onboard computing resources. Initial platform operations scenarios were defined. The focus was on PMS-related functions where operations enhancements are likely to occur. Operations productivity was defined in terms of scientific productivity of the platform as well as the level of automation of the ground system. The Platform Operations Productivity Enhancement Report was completed earlier this year documenting system enhancements to increase science productivity and ground system automation. Using the baseline PMS defined in the PMS Definition Document as a starting point, the resulting PMS-specific enhancements were molded into a sequence of progressively more sophisticated operations management capabilities. This sequence of upgrades to the PMS has been documented in a PMS Evolution Plan. The plan includes enhancements in the areas of resources scheduling, resource modeling, system and payload anomaly management, and transaction sequence interpretation. A plan for migration of functions from the ground portion of the PMS to the flight portion is also included. The impacts of this plan on the platform are now being documented to ensure that the required 'hooks and scars' are included in the baseline system. Future plans include a prototype of some of the PMS enhancements to address the feasibility of and techniques for implementing these enhancements in the onboard computing environment.

Tilley, Mike; Hartley, Jonathan

1990-01-01

199

Toward a Science of Design for Software-Intensive Systems Joshua Eckroth1  

E-print Network

Toward a Science of Design for Software-Intensive Systems Joshua Eckroth1 , Ricardo Aytche2 and Guy for design, science of design, and software-intensive systems. By identifying design issues currently affecting the field, we will show why software-intensive systems require a science of design. We have also

Xuan, Dong

200

Towards CORBAbased Enterprise Management: Managing CORBAbased Systems with SNMP Platforms  

E-print Network

1 Towards CORBA­based Enterprise Management: Managing CORBA­based Systems with SNMP Platforms and control management agents via CORBA are still hard to find on the market while SNMP­ based platforms will present a feasible and practical ap­ proach to this problem: it allows the extension of exist­ ing SNMP

201

Electric vehicle energy management system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This thesis investigates and analyzes novel strategies for the optimum energy management of electric vehicles (EVs). These are aimed to maximize the useful life of the EV batteries and make the EV more practical in order to increase its acceptability to market. The first strategy concerns the right choice of the batteries for the EV according to the user's driving habits, which may vary. Tests conducted at the University of Massachusetts Lowell battery lab show that the batteries perform differently from one manufacturer to the other. The second strategy was to investigate the fast chargeability of different batteries, which leads to reduce the time needed to recharge the EV battery pack. Tests were conducted again to prove that only few battery types could be fast charged. Test data were used to design a fast battery charger that could be installed in an EV charging station. The third strategy was the design, fabrication and application of an Electric Vehicle Diagnostic and Rejuvenation System (EVDRS). This system is based on Mosfet Controlled Thyristors (MCTs). It is capable of quickly identifying any failing battery(s) within the EV pack and rejuvenating the whole battery pack without dismantling them and unloading them. A novel algorithm to rejuvenate Electric Vehicle Sealed Lead Acid Batteries is described. This rejuvenation extends the useful life of the batteries and makes the EV more competitive. The fourth strategy was to design a thermal management system for EV, which is crucial to the safe operation, and the achievement of normal/optimal performance of, electric vehicle (EV) batteries. A novel approach for EV thermal management, based on Pettier-Effect heat pumps, was designed, fabricated and tested in EV. It shows the application of this type of technology for thermal management of EVs.

Alaoui, Chakib

202

Data management system DIU test system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An operational and functional description is given of the data management system. Descriptions are included for the test control unit, analog stimulus panel, discrete stimulus panel, and the precision source. The mechanical configuration is defined and illustrated to provide card and component location for modification or repair. The unit level interfaces are mirror images of the DIU interfaces and are described in the Final Technical Report for NASA-MSFC contract NAS8-29155.

1976-01-01

203

A holistic life cycle analysis of waste management scenarios at increasing source segregation intensity: the case of an Italian urban area.  

PubMed

Life cycle analysis of several waste management scenarios for an Italian urban area was performed on the basis of different source segregation collection (SS) intensities from 0% up to 52%. Source segregated waste was recycled and or/recovered by composting. Residual waste management options were by landfilling, incineration with energy recovery or solid recovered fuel (SRF) production to substitute for coal. The increase in fuel and materials consumption due to increase in SS had negligible influence on the environmental impact of the system. Recycling operations such as incineration and SRF were always advantageous for impact reduction. There was lower impact for an SS of 52% even though the difference with the SS intensity of 35% was quite limited, about 15%. In all the configurations analyzed, the best environmental performance was achieved for the management system producing SRF by the biodrying process. PMID:25008299

Di Maria, Francesco; Micale, Caterina

2014-11-01

204

System safety management lessons learned  

SciTech Connect

The Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research, Development and Acquisition directed the Army Safety Center to provide an audit of the causes of accidents and safety of use restrictions on recently fielded systems by tracking residual hazards back through the acquisition process. The objective was to develop ''lessons learned'' that could be applied to the acquisition process to minimize mishaps in fielded systems. System safety management lessons learned are defined as Army practices or policies, derived from past successes and failures, that are expected to be effective in eliminating or reducing specific systemic causes of residual hazards. They are broadly applicable and supportive of the Army structure and acquisition objectives. 29 refs., 7 figs.

Piatt, J.A.

1989-05-01

205

Integrated Building Management System (IBMS)  

SciTech Connect

This project provides a combination of software and services that more easily and cost-effectively help to achieve optimized building performance and energy efficiency. Featuring an open-platform, cloud- hosted application suite and an intuitive user experience, this solution simplifies a traditionally very complex process by collecting data from disparate building systems and creating a single, integrated view of building and system performance. The Fault Detection and Diagnostics algorithms developed within the IBMS have been designed and tested as an integrated component of the control algorithms running the equipment being monitored. The algorithms identify the normal control behaviors of the equipment without interfering with the equipment control sequences. The algorithms also work without interfering with any cooperative control sequences operating between different pieces of equipment or building systems. In this manner the FDD algorithms create an integrated building management system.

Anita Lewis

2012-07-01

206

Systemic Hypertension Requiring Treatment in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit  

PubMed Central

Objectives To determine the difference in the risk factors for systemic hypertension in preterm and term infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Study design Data were collected from an existing database of NICU children and confirmed by chart-review. Systemic hypertension was defined when 3 separate measurements of systolic and/or diastolic blood pressure were >95th% percentile and an anti-hypertensive medication was administered for > 2 weeks in the NICU. Results From 4,203 infants, we identified 53 (1.3%) with treated hypertension; of whom 74% were preterm, 11% required surgical intervention and 85% required medications upon discharge. The pressure of a patent ductus arteriosus, umbilical catheterization, left ventricular hypertrophy, hypertensive medication at discharge and mortality was similar between the term and preterm. The major risk factors for preterm infants, especially those below 28 weeks gestation, were bronchopulmonary dysplasia and iatrogenic factors, but, in term infants, they were systemic diseases. Term infants were diagnosed with hypertension earlier during hospitalization, had a shorter duration of stay in NICU, and had higher incidence of hypertension needing more than 3 medications than preterm infants. Conclusions Perinatal risk factors are significant contributors to infantile hypertension. Term infants were diagnosed with hypertension earlier, had a shorter duration of stay, and had a higher incidence of resistant hypertension than preterm infants. PMID:23394775

Sahu, Raj; Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Yu, Robert; Shete, Sanjay; Bricker, John T.; Gupta-Malhotra, Monesha

2013-01-01

207

Privacy in Identity & Access Management systems  

E-print Network

Privacy in Identity & Access Management systems Andreas Pashalidis Katholieke Universiteit Leuven the approaches for addressing privacy in open identity and access management systems that have been taken&AM. INTRODUCTION Identity and Access Management (I&AM) systems support access control, namely ensuring that access

Mitchell, Chris

208

Applying Module System Research to Package Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Package managers found in popular operating systems are similar to module systems in many programming languages. Recent language research has focused on numerous ways to improve module systems, especially by endowing them with the characteristics of components. These improvements map well to package managers also. We identify several weak- nesses with package managers, describe how components solve these problems in

David B. Tucker; Shriram Krishnamurthi

209

Crop manuring and intensive land management by Europe’s first farmers  

PubMed Central

The spread of farming from western Asia to Europe had profound long-term social and ecological impacts, but identification of the specific nature of Neolithic land management practices and the dietary contribution of early crops has been problematic. Here, we present previously undescribed stable isotope determinations of charred cereals and pulses from 13 Neolithic sites across Europe (dating ca. 5900–2400 cal B.C.), which show that early farmers used livestock manure and water management to enhance crop yields. Intensive manuring inextricably linked plant cultivation and animal herding and contributed to the remarkable resilience of these combined practices across diverse climatic zones. Critically, our findings suggest that commonly applied paleodietary interpretations of human and herbivore ?15N values have systematically underestimated the contribution of crop-derived protein to early farmer diets. PMID:23858458

Bogaard, Amy; Fraser, Rebecca; Heaton, Tim H. E.; Wallace, Michael; Vaiglova, Petra; Charles, Michael; Jones, Glynis; Evershed, Richard P.; Styring, Amy K.; Andersen, Niels H.; Arbogast, Rose-Marie; Bartosiewicz, László; Gardeisen, Armelle; Kanstrup, Marie; Maier, Ursula; Marinova, Elena; Ninov, Lazar; Schäfer, Marguerita; Stephan, Elisabeth

2013-01-01

210

Combat Agility Management System (CAMS)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The proper management of energy becomes a complex task in fighter aircraft which have high angle of attack (AOA) capability. Maneuvers at high AOA are accompanied by high bleed rates (velocity decrease), a characteristic that is usually undesirable in a typical combat arena. Eidetics has developed under NASA SBIR Phase 1 and NAVAIR SBIR Phase 2 contracts a system which allows a pilot to more easily and effectively manage the trade-off of energy (airspeed or altitude) for turn rate while not imposing hard limits on the high AOA nose pointing capability that can be so important in certain air combat maneuver situations. This has been accomplished by incorporating a two-stage angle of attack limiter into the flight control laws. The first stage sets a limit on AOA to achieve a limit on the maximum bleed rate (selectable) by limiting AOA to values which are dependent on the aircraft attitude and dynamic pressure (or flight path, velocity, and altitude). The second stage sets an AOA limit near the AOA for C(sub l max). One of the principal benefits of such a system is that it enables a low-experience pilot to become much more proficient at managing his energy. The Phase 2 simulation work is complete, and an exploratory flight test on the F-18 HARV is planned for the Fall of 1994 to demonstrate/validate the concept.

Skow, Andrew; Porada, William

1994-01-01

211

Implementing ACCM critical care guidelines for septic shock management in a Cuban pediatric intensive care unit.  

PubMed

INTRODUCTION Sepsis is the most common direct cause of death worldwide and septic shock the syndrome's most serious complication. In 2002, the pediatric intensive care unit of the José Luis Miranda Pediatric University Hospital in Santa Clara (Villa Clara Province), Cuba, began implementing the recently published guidelines of the American College of Critical Care Medicine (ACCM) for management of pediatric and neonatal septic shock, observing a drop in case fatality from 34.6% to 19% between the years 2003 and 2007. ACCM updated these Guidelines in 2007. OBJECTIVE Describe experiences with the use of the 2007 ACCM updated Guidelines and discuss their possible impact in reducing case fatality. METHODS Between 2008 and 2010, a study was conducted of 280 children and adolescents, from newborns through 18 years, admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit with a diagnosis of septic shock. The diagnostic and therapeutic criteria used were those recommended in the ACCM's 2007 updated Guidelines. The dependent variable was case fatality. Independent variables were age, sex, comorbidity or prior chronic disease, origin and course of sepsis, hemodynamic state, blood glucose level, hyperglycemia, organ dysfunction, volume of fluid therapy administered, use of mechanical ventilation and therapeutic response. RESULTS In the 3-year period, 28-day case fatality was 11.1% (31/280). A total of 45 patients had comorbidities, with 14 deaths and a case fatality rate of 31.1% vs. 7.2% (17/235) in previously healthy patients. Cold shock with a hemodynamic state of low cardiac output and high systemic vascular resistance predominated (68.9%), with low cardiac output and low systemic vascular resistance the least common type (12.5%), but the one with highest case fatality (34.4%). Hyperglycemia was present in 39.6% of patients, with 15.3% case fatality; case fatality was higher (25.6%) when hyperglycemia was in the 10-15.9 mmol/L range. Fluid therapy of 40-100 mL/kg was administered in the first hour to 90% of patients, increasing to >96% in the first 3-6 hours. The most common therapeutic response was fluid refractory, dobutamine responsive (39.3%). Mechanical ventilation was used in 33.9% of patients, with a case fatality of 30.5%. Cardiovascular, respiratory and hematologic dysfunctions were common. Failure of ?4 organs raised case fatality to 77.8%. CONCLUSIONS Implementation of ACCM Guidelines facilitates timely, appropriate care for septic shock patients and contributes to lower case fatality. Early aggressive fluid therapy with support of vasoactive drugs, either singly or in combination, has a positive impact on patient outcomes. Similar studies with a larger number of patients are needed to corroborate these conclusions. PMID:25208120

Cartaya, José M; Rovira, Luis E; Segredo, Yamilet; Alvarez, Idalys; Acevedo, Yoandra; Moya, Ariel

2014-01-01

212

Fluid management systems technology summaries  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A summarization and categorization of the pertinent literature associated with fluid management systems technology having potential application to in-orbit fluid transfer and/or associated storage are presented. A literature search was conducted to obtain pertinent documents for review. Reports determined to be of primary significance were summarized in the following manner: (1) report identification, (2) objective(s) of the work, (3) description of pertinent work performed, (4) major results, and (5) comments of the reviewer. Pertinent figures are presented on a single facing page separate from the text. Specific areas covered are: fluid line dynamics and thermodynamics, low-g mass gauging, other instrumentation, stratification/pressurization, low-g vent systems, fluid mixing refrigeration and reliquefaction, and low-g interface control and liquid acquisition systems. Reports which were reviewed and not summarized, along with reasons for not summarizing, are also listed.

Stark, J. A.; Blatt, M. H.; Bennett, F. O., Jr.; Campbell, B. J.

1974-01-01

213

46 CFR 16.500 - Management Information System requirements.  

... false Management Information System requirements. 16...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS...TESTING Management Information System § 16.500 Management Information System requirements....

2014-10-01

214

46 CFR 16.500 - Management Information System requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... false Management Information System requirements. 16...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS...TESTING Management Information System § 16.500 Management Information System requirements....

2012-10-01

215

46 CFR 16.500 - Management Information System requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Management Information System requirements. 16...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS...TESTING Management Information System § 16.500 Management Information System requirements....

2013-10-01

216

46 CFR 16.500 - Management Information System requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Management Information System requirements. 16...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS...TESTING Management Information System § 16.500 Management Information System requirements....

2011-10-01

217

Clevidipine: a review of its use for managing blood pressure in perioperative and intensive care settings.  

PubMed

The ultrashort-acting dihydropyridine calcium channel antagonist clevidipine (Cleviprex(®)) has a rapid onset and offset of effect and reduces blood pressure (BP) by decreasing arteriolar resistance without affecting venous capacitance vessels. This article reviews the clinical efficacy and tolerability of intravenous clevidipine when used to manage BP in perioperative and intensive care settings, as well as summarizing its pharmacological properties. Intravenous clevidipine effectively treated preoperative and postoperative hypertension in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, according to the results of the randomized, multicentre, double-blind, phase III ESCAPE-1 and ESCAPE-2 trials. The randomized, open-label, multicentre, phase III ECLIPSE trials indicated that in terms of keeping systolic BP within the target range, clevidipine was more effective than nitroglycerin or sodium nitroprusside perioperatively and had similar efficacy to nicardipine postoperatively in cardiac surgery patients. In small, double-blind trials in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery, perioperative clevidipine was noninferior to nitroglycerin, and postoperative clevidipine had similar efficacy to sodium nitroprusside. Noncomparative studies demonstrated that clevidipine provided rapid BP control in patients with acute neurological injuries (including intracerebral haemorrhage, subarachnoid haemorrhage and acute ischaemic stroke), and was not associated with 'overshoot' in the vast majority of patients. Intravenous clevidipine was generally well tolerated and was usually associated with no reflex tachycardia or only very modest increases in heart rate. In conclusion, intravenous clevidipine is a valuable agent for the management of BP in perioperative and intensive care settings. PMID:25312594

Keating, Gillian M

2014-10-01

218

A survey of the management of needlestick injuries from incapacitated patients in intensive care units.  

PubMed

The Human Tissue Act 2004 and Mental Capacity Act 2005 resulted in a change in the management of needlestick injuries sustained from incapacitated patients. It appears unlawful to test for blood-borne viruses without a patient's consent for the sole benefit of the healthcare worker. This survey of intensive care units within England, Wales and Northern Ireland investigated how needlestick injuries from incapacitated patients had been managed within the previous year. Of the 225 intensive care units surveyed, 99 (44%) responded. Sixty-two (62.6%) reported a needlestick injury to a healthcare worker from an incapacitated patient. Thirty-six (64.3%) patients were tested for blood-borne viruses without consent. Sixteen (25.8%) patients tested positive for blood-borne viruses. Only 19 (30.6%) healthcare workers took post-exposure prophylaxis following the injury. These results show that needlestick injuries from incapacitated patients are common and that the majority of patients were tested for blood-borne viruses without consent. PMID:21198483

Burrows, L A; Padkin, A

2010-09-01

219

Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: Report of a Combined Obstetrical and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit  

PubMed Central

The methodology, equipment and personnel required to carry out an intensive-care program in the management of high-risk pregnancies have been outlined. The perinatal mortality rate has been determined and its etiology has been analyzed. There appear to be three conditions in which the degree of high risk is such as to warrant provision of the complete facilities of the service we described, viz., (a) severe pre-eclampsia; (b) marked intrauterine growth retardation with placental insufficiency as determined from serial measurements of uterine growth and estriol determinations; and (c) irreversible labour in premature pregnancies where a birth weight of 2200 g. or less is anticipated. Numerous other conditions that we have monitored have perhaps had their good outcome because of monitoring facilities. A less sophisticated and more easily applied method of monitoring should be available within the context of routine labour and delivery rooms. There is a pressing need to re-evaluate and change some of our methods of educating our undergraduate, postgraduate and practising physicians and to provide continuing education in the realm of prenatal care and recognition of high-risk pregnancy. Regionalization and centralization of this type of intensive care for high-risk pregnancies are required. Indispensable to the success of this type of project is the incorporation, without physical, emotional or intellectual barriers, of both a pediatric and an obstetrical component within the intensive-care unit. ImagesFIG. 3 PMID:5344991

Effer, S. B.

1969-01-01

220

Design and Data Management System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Design and Data Management System (DDMS) was developed to automate the NASA Engineering Order (EO) and Engineering Change Request (ECR) processes at the Propulsion Test Facilities at Stennis Space Center for efficient and effective Configuration Management (CM). Prior to the development of DDMS, the CM system was a manual, paper-based system that required an EO or ECR submitter to walk the changes through the acceptance process to obtain necessary approval signatures. This approval process could take up to two weeks, and was subject to a variety of human errors. The process also requires that the CM office make copies and distribute them to the Configuration Control Board members for review prior to meetings. At any point, there was a potential for an error or loss of the change records, meaning the configuration of record was not accurate. The new Web-based DDMS eliminates unnecessary copies, reduces the time needed to distribute the paperwork, reduces time to gain the necessary signatures, and prevents the variety of errors inherent in the previous manual system. After implementation of the DDMS, all EOs and ECRs can be automatically checked prior to submittal to ensure that the documentation is complete and accurate. Much of the configuration information can be documented in the DDMS through pull-down forms to ensure consistent entries by the engineers and technicians in the field. The software also can electronically route the documents through the signature process to obtain the necessary approvals needed for work authorization. The workflow of the system allows for backups and timestamps that determine the correct routing and completion of all required authorizations in a more timely manner, as well as assuring the quality and accuracy of the configuration documents.

Messer, Elizabeth; Messer, Brad; Carter, Judy; Singletary, Todd; Albasini, Colby; Smith, Tammy

2007-01-01

221

Enterprise Storage Management System Dan Glasser1  

E-print Network

Enterprise Storage Management System Dan Glasser1 , Madeline Hardojo1 , Anand Sundaram1 , Nate.fayad@sjsu.edu Abstract: Enterprise Storage Management System is an interactive and user-friendly program that will enable storage technology and falling price of the storage, IT managers buy more storage devices

Fayad, Mohamed

222

Applying Internet management standards to fieldbus systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Today each fieldbus system has its own network management. In contrast to this multitude of solutions, we discuss a unified approach in that we integrate a fieldbus into the management framework of the Internet. Such a combination provides access to the fieldbus system from local or global computer networks by the use of common LAN management tools. We present different

Martin Knizak; Michael Kunes; Martin Manninger; Thilo Sauter

1997-01-01

223

School Management Information Systems in Primary Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developments in information technologies have been impacting upon educational organizations. Principals have been using management information systems to improve the efficiency of administrative services. The aim of this research is to explore principals' perceptions about management information systems and how school management information…

Demir, Kamile

2006-01-01

224

Educational Management Information Systems: Progress and Prospectives.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An educational management information system is a network of communication channels, information sources, computer storage and retrieval devices, and processing routines that provide data to educational managers at different levels, places, and times to facilitate decisionmaking. Management information systems should be differentiated from…

Evans, John A.

225

Intensive care unit without walls: seeking patient safety by improving the efficiency of the system.  

PubMed

The term "ICU without walls" refers to innovative management in Intensive Care, based on two key elements: (1) collaboration of all medical and nursing staff involved in patient care during hospitalization and (2) technological support for severity early detection protocols by identifying patients at risk of deterioration throughout the hospital, based on the assessment of vital signs and/or laboratory test values, with the clear aim of improving critical patient safety in the hospitalization process. At present, it can be affirmed that there is important work to be done in the detection of severity and early intervention in patients at risk of organ dysfunction. Such work must be adapted to the circumstances of each center and should include training in the detection of severity, multidisciplinary work in the complete patient clinical process, and the use of technological systems allowing intervention on the basis of monitored laboratory and physiological parameters, with effective and efficient use of the information generated. Not only must information be generated, but also efficient management of such information must also be achieved. It is necessary to improve our activity through innovation in management procedures that facilitate the work of the intensivist, in collaboration with other specialists, throughout the hospital environment. Innovation is furthermore required in the efficient management of the information generated in hospitals, through intelligent and directed usage of the new available technology. PMID:24661919

Gordo, F; Abella, A

2014-10-01

226

Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System Data Management System  

E-print Network

Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Data Management System Single Satellite 2/1/2006 iii Preface The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Data Management System of the Earth's climate and radiant environment. The CERES Data Management Team works with the CERES Science

227

MEMIS: Multimedia emergency management information system  

SciTech Connect

In this paper the authors present a prototype management information system (MIS) designed for emergency managers: MEMIS (multimedia emergency management information system). The purpose is to show the technological possibilities and ease of development, and the tasks that can be supported by such systems. MEMIS is based on the latest technology for the development of MISs: multimedia, animation, voice and video communication, LAN and WAN, and machine intelligence. MEMIS covers the three most important tasks of an emergency manager: (1) emergency planning (facility management, site selection for hazardous activities, designation of hazardous material shipment routes), (2) emergency response (notification, monitoring, and response management), and (3) the daily management work (communications by phone, fax, and e-mail; database and spreadsheet management). MEMIS communicates with (and can control) standard software packages and databases used in the emergency management community, such as CAMEO. Its open architecture makes it easy to incorporate features designed to meet the unique needs of a specified region or nation.

Beroggi, G.E.G. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Aebi, M. [Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Computer Science; Wallace, W.A. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

1995-12-31

228

Scoring systems in the intensive care unit: A compendium  

PubMed Central

Severity scales are important adjuncts of treatment in the intensive care unit (ICU) in order to predict patient outcome, comparing quality-of-care and stratification for clinical trials. Even though disease severity scores are not the key elements of treatment, they are however, an essential part of improvement in clinical decisions and in identifying patients with unexpected outcomes. Prediction models do face many challenges, but, proper application of these models helps in decision making at the right time and in decreasing hospital cost. In fact, they have become a necessary tool to describe ICU populations and to explain differences in mortality. However, it is also important to note that the choice of the severity score scale, index, or model should accurately match the event, setting or application; as mis-application, of such systems can lead to wastage of time, increased cost, unwarranted extrapolations and poor science. This article provides a brief overview of ICU severity scales (along with their predicted death/survival rate calculations) developed over the last 3 decades including several of them which has been revised accordingly. PMID:24872651

Rapsang, Amy Grace; Shyam, Devajit C.

2014-01-01

229

Forests may need centuries to recover their original productivity after continuous intensive management: an example from Douglas-fir stands.  

PubMed

How long would it take for forests to recover their original productivity following continuous intensive management if they are left untouched? This issue was explored using the model FORECAST, calibrated and validated for coastal Douglas-fir stands on Vancouver Island (western Canada). Three types of forest management (production of timber, pulp, and biomass) were simulated, being different in utilization level and rotation length (stem-only and 75-year rotation for timber production, whole-tree and 30-year rotation for pulp/fiber, and whole-tree and 15-year rotations for biomass production). Management was simulated for 150 years, followed by several cycles of natural growth without management ending with a stand-replacing windstorm with a return time of 200 years. Productivity-related ecological variables in previously managed stands were compared to natural forests. Stands developed after management for timber would quickly reach values similar to non-managed forests for tree and understory total biomass, stored carbon, available nitrogen and soil organic matter (SOM). However, intensive management regimes designed for fiber and biomass production would cause a decrease in SOM and nutrient availability, increasing understory biomass. As a consequence, stands recovering from intensive management would need at least two stand-replacing events (400 years) to reach a productivity status similar to non-managed stands. Stands developed after management for biomass would take much longer, up to 600 or 800 years to recover similar values of SOM and understory biomass, respectively. Current fertilization prescriptions will likely be not enough to stop a quick drop in forest productivity associated with intensive management. Intensifying forest management to achieve short-term objectives could produce a reduction of stand productivity that would influence tree growth for very long time (up to several centuries), if such management is continuously implemented at the same stand. Some of these effects could be reduced if one rotation of intensive management (for pulp or bioenergy) is followed by a rotation of management for timber, or by leaving the forest without management for an equivalent time. PMID:22917531

Blanco, Juan A

2012-10-15

230

Michigan School District Buys Energy Management System.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the aid of a federal grant for energy conservation, the Warren Consolidated School System (Michigan) will purchase a Margaux 6400 Building Management system to manage energy usage in 35 district buildings. Reasons for selecting the system and system capabilities are briefly discussed. (Author/JN)

Technological Horizons in Education, 1982

1982-01-01

231

Development of a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Hydrophone System  

SciTech Connect

The growing clinical use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has driven a need for reliable, reproducible measurements of HIFU acoustic fields. We have previously presented data on a reflective scatterer approach, incorporating several novel features for improved bandwidth, reliability, and reproducibility [Proc. 2005 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium, 1739-1742]. We now report on several design improvements which have increase the signal to noise ratio of the system, and potentially reduced the cost of implementation. For the scattering element, we now use an artificial sapphire material to provide a more uniform radiating surface. The receiver is a segmented, truncated spherical structure with a 10 cm radius; the scattering element is positioned at the center of the sphere. The receiver is made from 25 micron thick, biaxially stretched PVDF, with a Pt-Au electrode on the front surface. In the new design, a specialized backing material provides the stiffness required to maintain structural stability, while at the same time providing both electrical shielding and ultrasonic absorption. Compared with the previous version, the new receiver design has improved the noise performance by 8-12 dB; the new scattering sphere has reduced the scattering loss by another 14 dB, producing an effective sensitivity of -298 dB re 1 microVolt/Pa. The design trade-off still involves receiver sensitivity with effective spot size, and signal distortion from the scatter structure. However, the reduced cost and improved repeatability of the new scatter approach makes the overall design more robust for routine waveform measurements of HIFU systems.

Schafer, Mark E. [Sonic Tech, Inc., Ambler, PA 19002 (United States); Gessert, James [Sonora Medical Systems, Longmont, CO 80503 (United States)

2009-04-14

232

CIS 330: Database Management Systems Course Number & Title (A.1) CIS 330: Database Management Systems  

E-print Network

CIS 330: Database Management Systems Course Number & Title (A.1) CIS 330: Database Management & Johannes Gehrke, Database Management Systems (third edition), McGraw Hill. Additional materials as handouts, e.g., research papers Catalog Description (A.5a) Introduction to database management systems

Plotkin, Joshua B.

233

Image-based document management systems for medical records.  

PubMed

Using image scanning as a document capture mechanism at time of treatment or on day of discharge automates the medical record to achieve the larger objectives of simultaneous concurrent access to an electronic chart. This form of keyless document capture, although appearing labor intensive, is justified for improving business management and quality of care. Coupled with optical character recognition or barcode recognition for keyless data capture, medical information may be more easily made available for clinical research. Not merely a microfilm alternative, a medical record management system accelerates chart completion. Labor reduction is realized by eliminating filing and retrieval of active charts, loose sheet handling, photocopying, chart assembly, and chart location control. By reducing the reasons for chart completion delays, accelerated billing of Medicare accounts will occur, resulting in a reduction in receivables. Image-based document management systems accomplish the three things required of a senior manager in health care: (1) solve problems, (2) save money, and (3) make money. PMID:10116256

Massengill, S P

1992-03-01

234

Interaural intensity and latency difference in the dolphin's auditory system.  

PubMed

Binaural hearing mechanisms were measured in dolphins (Inia geoffrensis) by recording the auditory nerve evoked response from the body surface. The azimuthal position of a sound source at 10-15 degrees from the longitudinal axis elicited interaural intensity disparity up to 20 dB and interaural latency difference as large as 250 microseconds. The latter was many times greater than the acoustical interaural time delay. This latency difference seems to be caused by the intensity disparity. The latency difference seems to be an effective way of coding of intensity disparity. PMID:1816509

Popov, V V; Supin AYa

1991-12-01

235

Managing geometric information with a data base management system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The strategies for managing computer based geometry are described. The computer model of geometry is the basis for communication, manipulation, and analysis of shape information. The research on integrated programs for aerospace-vehicle design (IPAD) focuses on the use of data base management system (DBMS) technology to manage engineering/manufacturing data. The objectives of IPAD is to develop a computer based engineering complex which automates the storage, management, protection, and retrieval of engineering data. In particular, this facility must manage geometry information as well as associated data. The approach taken on the IPAD project to achieve this objective is discussed. Geometry management in current systems and the approach taken in the early IPAD prototypes are examined.

Dube, R. P.

1984-01-01

236

Comprehensive Safety Management System in Subway Operation System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Subway safety is a very important research area at home and abroad. According to a major subway accident occurred, the characteristic, operation pattern, system failure pattern of subway operation system is analyzed in this paper. The principle of system engineering is used, Comprehensive Safety Management System Framework was established for subway operational safety system. Comprehensive Safety Management System includes to

Dai Baoqian; Wang Tong

2010-01-01

237

Project management plan for Contract Management Information System (CONTRACT)  

SciTech Connect

The office of the Vice President of A/E Construction for ICF Kaiser has requested that OSHA compliance statistics be made available to management for companies subcontracting to the ICF Kaiser Company. In addition, a need to better manage contract administrative data for the Contracts Administration and the Construction Management Projects organizations has been identified. The Contract Management Information System is being developed to achieve these objectives. This document provides a Project Management Plan for development of the Contract Management Administration System (CONTRACT) by Design Services DAD/CAE Support. The Project Management Plan describes the project work breakdown structure, safety and quality considerations, with associated cost, schedule and project management information. The CONTRACT System is intended to aid the ICF Kaiser divisions with tracking of A/E subcontractor information to include general contract administration information used by the Contracts Administration organization, contract and safety performance data used by the Construction Management Projects and office of the organization and Vice President of A/E Construction.

Severud, K.J.

1995-01-27

238

Can Small Intensive Case Management Teams be as Effective as Large Teams?  

PubMed

In 2007, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) implemented a program to deliver the full array of Assertive Community Treatment services in areas with low population density using teams with small staffs. VHA administrative data were used to compare treatment and outcomes of veterans who received services from teams with only two or three staff (N = 805) and veterans served by teams with ten or more staff (N = 861). After adjusting for baseline difference, smaller teams had statistically significantly less symptom improvement and smaller declines in suicidality indices but effect sizes were small and there were no differences on 11 other outcomes. These data demonstrate the clinical need, practical feasibility and potential effectiveness of providing intensive case management through small teams. PMID:24821332

Mohamed, Somaia

2015-02-01

239

Categorizing impacts of implementing Enterprise Content Management Systems  

E-print Network

Electronic Document Management EDMS Electronic Document Management System ERM Electronic Records Management others) the previously separated ISs for Electronic Document Management (EDM), Electronic RecordsCategorizing impacts of implementing Enterprise Content Management Systems Knut R. Grahlmann, Cokky

Utrecht, Universiteit

240

PhD IN MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SySTEMS  

E-print Network

PhD IN MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING FINANCE MARKETING MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SySTEMS ORGANIZATIONAL BEh that interests you. APPLICATION PROCEDURES A$75applicationfeeisrequired.Weprefer online credit card payment (Visa INFORMATION* Tuition and fees (per semester) NewYorkstateresident $4,932 Non-resident $9,180 Housing variable

Suzuki, Masatsugu

241

Trust Management in the Finnish Ministries: Evaluation of Management Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our purpose was to find out to what extent civil servants—managers, specialists, and experts—in 13 Finnish ministries have confidence in their management systems. We defined trust as a kind of deep sentiment, more fundamental than mere acceptance, satisfaction or legitimacy. Trust and mistrust are strong motivators for cooperation and collaboration. They are logical outcomes of social interaction in terms of

Risto Harisalo; Jari Stenvall

2003-01-01

242

Automated transportation management system (ATMS) software project management plan (SPMP)  

SciTech Connect

The Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS) Software Project Management plan (SPMP) is the lead planning document governing the life cycle of the ATMS and its integration into the Transportation Information Network (TIN). This SPMP defines the project tasks, deliverables, and high level schedules involved in developing the client/server ATMS software.

Weidert, R.S., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-05-20

243

45 CFR 2541.200 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-10-01

244

45 CFR 1174.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-10-01

245

29 CFR 97.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-07-01

246

13 CFR 143.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-01-01

247

24 CFR 85.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-04-01

248

28 CFR 66.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-07-01

249

20 CFR 437.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-04-01

250

22 CFR 135.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-04-01

251

40 CFR 31.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-07-01

252

49 CFR 18.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-10-01

253

38 CFR 43.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-07-01

254

36 CFR 1207.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-07-01

255

10 CFR 600.220 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-01-01

256

44 CFR 13.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-10-01

257

34 CFR 80.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-07-01

258

7 CFR 3016.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-01-01

259

45 CFR 602.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-10-01

260

43 CFR 12.60 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-10-01

261

15 CFR 24.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-01-01

262

45 CFR 1157.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-10-01

263

14 CFR 1273.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-01-01

264

32 CFR 33.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-07-01

265

21 CFR 1403.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-04-01

266

29 CFR 1470.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-07-01

267

45 CFR 92.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-10-01

268

34 CFR 80.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other grantees...contract and subgrant award documents, etc. (7) Cash management. Procedures...

2010-07-01

269

22 CFR 226.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Standards for financial management systems. 226...Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ...Post-award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 226.21 Standards for financial management systems....

2010-04-01

270

29 CFR 95.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Standards for financial management systems. 95...GOVERNMENTS, AND INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS ...Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 95.21 Standards for financial management systems....

2010-07-01

271

The Dark Energy Survey Data Management System  

SciTech Connect

The Dark Energy Survey (DES) collaboration will study cosmic acceleration with a 5000 deg2 griZY survey in the southern sky over 525 nights from 2011-2016. The DES data management (DESDM) system will be used to process and archive these data and the resulting science ready data products. The DESDM system consists of an integrated archive, a processing framework, an ensemble of astronomy codes and a data access framework. We are developing the DESDM system for operation in the high performance computing (HPC) environments at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) and Fermilab. Operating the DESDM system in an HPC environment offers both speed and flexibility. We will employ it for our regular nightly processing needs, and for more compute-intensive tasks such as large scale image coaddition campaigns, extraction of weak lensing shear from the full survey dataset, and massive seasonal reprocessing of the DES data. Data products will be available to the Collaboration and later to the public through a virtual-observatory compatible web portal. Our approach leverages investments in publicly available HPC systems, greatly reducing hardware and maintenance costs to the project, which must deploy and maintain only the storage, database platforms and orchestration and web portal nodes that are specific to DESDM. In Fall 2007, we tested the current DESDM system on both simulated and real survey data. We used TeraGrid to process 10 simulated DES nights (3TB of raw data), ingesting and calibrating approximately 250 million objects into the DES Archive database. We also used DESDM to process and calibrate over 50 nights of survey data acquired with the Mosaic2 camera. Comparison to truth tables in the case of the simulated data and internal crosschecks in the case of the real data indicate that astrometric and photometric data quality is excellent.

Mohr, Joseph J.; /Illinois U., Urbana, Astron. Dept. /Illinois U., Urbana; Barkhouse, Wayne; /North Dakota U.; Beldica, Cristina; /Illinois U., Urbana; Bertin, Emmanuel; /Paris, Inst. Astrophys.; Dora Cai, Y.; /NCSA, Urbana; Nicolaci da Costa, Luiz A.; /Rio de Janeiro Observ.; Darnell, J.Anthony; /Illinois U., Urbana, Astron. Dept.; Daues, Gregory E.; /NCSA, Urbana; Jarvis, Michael; /Pennsylvania U.; Gower, Michelle; /NCSA, Urbana; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab /Rio de Janeiro Observ.

2008-07-01

272

The Dark Energy Survey Data Management System  

E-print Network

The Dark Energy Survey collaboration will study cosmic acceleration with a 5000 deg2 griZY survey in the southern sky over 525 nights from 2011-2016. The DES data management (DESDM) system will be used to process and archive these data and the resulting science ready data products. The DESDM system consists of an integrated archive, a processing framework, an ensemble of astronomy codes and a data access framework. We are developing the DESDM system for operation in the high performance computing (HPC) environments at NCSA and Fermilab. Operating the DESDM system in an HPC environment offers both speed and flexibility. We will employ it for our regular nightly processing needs, and for more compute-intensive tasks such as large scale image coaddition campaigns, extraction of weak lensing shear from the full survey dataset, and massive seasonal reprocessing of the DES data. Data products will be available to the Collaboration and later to the public through a virtual-observatory compatible web portal. Our approach leverages investments in publicly available HPC systems, greatly reducing hardware and maintenance costs to the project, which must deploy and maintain only the storage, database platforms and orchestration and web portal nodes that are specific to DESDM. In Fall 2007, we tested the current DESDM system on both simulated and real survey data. We used Teragrid to process 10 simulated DES nights (3TB of raw data), ingesting and calibrating approximately 250 million objects into the DES Archive database. We also used DESDM to process and calibrate over 50 nights of survey data acquired with the Mosaic2 camera. Comparison to truth tables in the case of the simulated data and internal crosschecks in the case of the real data indicate that astrometric and photometric data quality is excellent.

Joseph J. Mohr; Wayne Barkhouse; Cristina Beldica; Emmanuel Bertin; Y. Dora Cai; Luiz da Costa; J. Anthony Darnell; Gregory E. Daues; Michael Jarvis; Michelle Gower; Huan Lin; leandro Martelli; Eric Neilsen; Chow-Choong Ngeow; Ricardo Ogando; Alex Parga; Erin Sheldon; Douglas Tucker; Nikolay Kuropatkin; Chris Stoughton

2008-07-16

273

PV integration by building Energy Management System  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper focuses on Energy Management System (EMS) applied to the residential sector. The EMS architecture is proposed. It is composed on three layers: anticipation, reactive and device (local) layers. However, to validate global control algorithms, a simulator capable of interoperating with energy management systems must be used. This work presents a solution for real-time simulation with a networked system

Rim. Missaoui; Ghaith. Warkozek; Seddik. Bacha; Stephane. Ploix

2011-01-01

274

Development of an Integrated Distribution Management System  

Microsoft Academic Search

This final report details the components, functionality, costs, schedule and benefits of developing an Integrated Distribution Management System (IDMS) for power distribution system operation. The Distribution Automation (DA) and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems used by electric power companies to manage the distribution of electric power to retail energy consumers are vital components of the Nations critical infrastructure.

Schatz; Joe E

2010-01-01

275

A microprocessor-based battery management system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The system was developed for the management of industrial truck batteries and battery charging equipment, but the concepts and architectures used can be expanded for use with stationary battery systems. With the battery charger as an integral part of the BMS (battery management system), modifications in the charging scenario such as automatic equalizing can be introduced. Discharge tests can be

M. W. Healy; E. C. Rhyne

1990-01-01

276

Management system, organizational climate and performance relationships  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Seven aerospace firms were investigated to determine if a relationship existed among management systems, organizational climate, and organization performance. Positive relationships were found between each of these variables, but a statistically significant relationship existed only between the management system and organizational climate. The direction and amount of communication and the degree of decentralized decision-making, elements of the management system, also had a statistically significant realtionship with organization performance.

Davis, B. D.

1979-01-01

277

A model for international border management systems.  

SciTech Connect

To effectively manage the security or control of its borders, a country must understand its border management activities as a system. Using its systems engineering and security foundations as a Department of Energy National Security Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories has developed such an approach to modeling and analyzing border management systems. This paper describes the basic model and its elements developed under Laboratory Directed Research and Development project 08-684.

Duggan, Ruth Ann

2008-09-01

278

Greenhouse gas budget (CO2, CH4 and N2O) of intensively managed grassland following restoration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The first full greenhouse gas (GHG) flux budget of an intensively managed grassland in Switzerland (Chamau) is presented. The three major trace gases, carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) were measured with the eddy covariance (EC) technique. For CO2 concentrations, an open-path infrared gas analyzer was used, while N2O and CH4 concentrations were measured with a recently developed continuous-wave quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer (QCLAS). We investigated the magnitude of these trace gas emissions after grassland restoration, including ploughing, harrowing, sowing and fertilization with inorganic and organic fertilizers in 2012. Large peaks of N2O fluxes (20 - 50 nmol m-2 s-1 compared to a < 5 nmol m-2 s-1 background) were observed during thawing of the soil after the winter period and after mineral fertilizer application followed by re-sowing in the beginning of the summer season. N2O fluxes were controlled by nitrogen input, plant productivity, soil water content and temperature. Management activities led to increased variations of N2O fluxes up to 14 days after the management event as compared to background fluxes measured during periods without management (< 5nmol m-2 s-1). Fluxes of CO2 remained small until full plant development in early summer 2012. In contrast methane emissions showed only minor variations over time. The annual GHG flux budget was dominated by N2O (48 % contribution) and CO2 emissions (44 %). CH4 flux contribution to the annual budget was only minor (8 %). We conclude that recently developed multi-species QCLAS in an EC system open new opportunities to determine the temporal variation of N2O and CH4 fluxes, which further allow to quantify annual emissions. With respect to grassland restoration, our study emphasizes the key role of N2O and CO2 losses after ploughing, changing a permanent grassland from a carbon sink to a significant carbon source.

Merbold, Lutz; Eugster, Werner; Stieger, Jacqueline; Zahniser, Mark; Nelson, David; Buchmann, Nina

2014-05-01

279

Model Point-of-Care Ultrasound Curriculum in an Intensive Care Unit Fellowship Program and Its Impact on Patient Management  

PubMed Central

Objectives. This study was designed to assess the clinical applicability of a Point-of-Care (POC) ultrasound curriculum into an intensive care unit (ICU) fellowship program and its impact on patient care. Methods. A POC ultrasound curriculum for the surgical ICU (SICU) fellowship was designed and implemented in an urban, academic tertiary care center. It included 30 hours of didactics and hands-on training on models. Minimum requirement for each ICU fellow was to perform 25–50 exams on respective systems or organs for a total not less than 125 studies on ICU. The ICU fellows implemented the POC ultrasound curriculum into their daily practice in managing ICU patients, under supervision from ICU staff physicians, who were instructors in POC ultrasound. Impact on patient care including finding a new diagnosis or change in patient management was reviewed over a period of one academic year. Results. 873 POC ultrasound studies in 203 patients admitted to the surgical ICU were reviewed for analysis. All studies included were done through the POC ultrasound curriculum training. The most common exams performed were 379 lung/pleural exams, 239 focused echocardiography and hemodynamic exams, and 237 abdominal exams. New diagnosis was found in 65.52% of cases (95% CI 0.590, 0.720). Changes in patient management were found in 36.95% of cases (95% CI 0.303, 0.435). Conclusions. Implementation of POC ultrasound in the ICU with a structured fellowship curriculum was associated with an increase in new diagnosis in about 2/3 and change in management in over 1/3 of ICU patients studied. PMID:25478217

Killu, Keith; Coba, Victor; Mendez, Michael; Reddy, Subhash; Adrzejewski, Tanja; Huang, Yung; Ede, Jessica; Horst, Mathilda

2014-01-01

280

Enabling Dynamic Security Management of Networked Systems  

E-print Network

Enabling Dynamic Security Management of Networked Systems via Device-Embedded Security Gregory R, diagnosis, isolation, and repair of successful breaches in borders and device security perimeters. Managing functionality and outlines some challenge of designing and managing self-securing devices. #12;2 Keywords

281

Enabling Dynamic Security Management of Networked Systems  

E-print Network

Enabling Dynamic Security Management of Networked Systems via Device­Embedded Security Gregory R, diagnosis, isolation, and repair of successful breaches in borders and device security perimeters. Managing functionality and outlines some challenge of designing and managing self­securing devices. #12; 2 Keywords

282

Policy Provisioning for Distributed Identity Management Systems  

E-print Network

-grained access control for managing identity from security and privacy perspectives, they have not fullyPolicy Provisioning for Distributed Identity Management Systems Hidehito Gomi Yahoo! JAPAN Research framework is described that supports the management of the lifecycle of identity information distributed be

Boyer, Edmond

283

Open Source Course Management and Assessment System  

E-print Network

Cross-Institutional Resource Library Resource Assembly Course Management Resource Assembly Course-CAPA Architecture Shared Cross-Institutional Resource Library Resource Assembly Course Management Resource AssemblyLON-CAPA: Open Source Course Management and Assessment System Gerd Kortemeyer Michigan State

284

First on-line isotopic characterization of N2O emitted from intensively managed grassland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The analysis of the four main isotopic N2O species (14N14N16O, 14N15N16O, 15N14N16O, 14N14N18O) and especially the intramolecular distribution of 15N (site preference, SP) has been suggested as a tool to distinguish source processes and to help constrain the global N2O budget. However, current studies suffer from limited spatial and temporal resolution capabilities due to the combination of discrete flask sampling with subsequent laboratory-based mass spectrometric analysis. Quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS) allows selective high-precision analysis of N2O isotopic species at trace levels and is suitable for in situ measurements. Here, we present results from the first field campaign, conducted on an intensively managed grassland in central Switzerland. N2O mole fractions and isotopic composition were determined in the atmospheric surface layer (2 m height) at high temporal resolution with a modified state-of-the-art laser spectrometer connected to an automated N2O preconcentration unit. The analytical performance was determined from repeated measurements of a compressed air tank and resulted in measurement repeatability of 0.20, 0.12 and 0.11‰ for ?15N?, ?15N? and ?18O, respectively. Simultaneous eddy-covariance N2O flux measurements were used to determine the flux-averaged isotopic signature of soil-emitted N2O. Our measurements indicate that in general, nitrifier-denitrification and denitrification were the prevalent sources of N2O during the campaign, and that variations in isotopic composition were rather due to alterations in the extent to which N2O was reduced to N2, than other pathways such as hydroxylamine oxidation. Management and rewetting events were characterized by low values of the intra-molecular 15N site preference (SP), ?15Nbulk and ?18O, suggesting nitrifier denitrification and incomplete heterotrophic bacterial denitrification responded most strongly to the induced disturbances. Flux-averaged isotopic composition of N2O from intensively managed grassland was 6.9 ± 4.3, -17.4 ± 6.2 and 27.4 ± 3.6‰ for SP, ?15Nbulk and ?18O, respectively. The approach presented here is capable of providing long-term datasets also for other N2O emitting ecosystems, which can be used to further constrain global N2O inventories.

Wolf, B.; Merbold, L.; Decock, C.; Tuzson, B.; Harris, E.; Six, J.; Emmenegger, L.; Mohn, J.

2015-01-01

285

34 CFR 74.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...financial management systems. 74...Education Office of the Secretary...and Program Management § 74...management systems. ...accounting system. These...the Cash Management Improvement...Approved by the Office of...

2012-07-01

286

34 CFR 74.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...financial management systems. 74...Education Office of the Secretary...and Program Management § 74...management systems. ...accounting system. These...the Cash Management Improvement...Approved by the Office of...

2014-07-01

287

34 CFR 74.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...financial management systems. 74...Education Office of the Secretary...and Program Management § 74...management systems. ...accounting system. These...the Cash Management Improvement...Approved by the Office of...

2011-07-01

288

34 CFR 74.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...financial management systems. 74...Education Office of the Secretary...and Program Management § 74...management systems. ...accounting system. These...the Cash Management Improvement...Approved by the Office of...

2013-07-01

289

Waste Management Information System (WMIS) User Guide  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the user of the Waste Management Information System (WMIS) instructions on how to use the WMIS software. WMIS allows users to initiate, track, and close waste packages. The modular design supports integration and utilization of data throuh the various stages of waste management. The phases of the waste management work process include generation, designation, packaging, container management, procurement, storage, treatment, transportation, and disposal.

R. E. Broz

2008-12-22

290

A closed-loop automatic control system for high-intensity acoustic test systems.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Description of an automatic control system for high-intensity acoustic tests in reverberation chambers. Working in 14 one-third-octave bands from 50 to 1000 Hz, the desired sound pressure levels are set into the memory in the control system before the test. The control system then increases the sound pressure level in the reverberation chamber gradually in each of the one-third-octave bands until the level set in the memory is reached. This level is then maintained for the duration of the test. Additional features of the system are overtest protection, the capability of 'holding' the spectrum at any time, and the presence of a total test timer.

Slusser, R. A.

1973-01-01

291

Management intensity – not biodiversity – the driver of ecosystem services in a long-term row crop experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

A positive role for biodiversity is assumed for managed ecosystems. We conducted a 12-year study of this sustainability principle, through separate manipulation of management intensity and crop diversity. The site was located in southwest Michigan, representative of rain-fed production, with high climate variability and well-drained soils. Provisioning services of grain and protein yield were monitored, simultaneous with supporting services of

Sieglinde S. Snapp; Lowell E. Gentry; Richard Harwood

2010-01-01

292

Software for Intelligent System Health Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation describes the characteristics and advantages of autonomy and artificial intelligence in systems health monitoring. The presentation lists technologies relevant to Intelligent System Health Management (ISHM), and some potential applications.

Trevino, Luis C.

2004-01-01

293

Silvicultural Systems for Managing Ponderosa Pine1  

E-print Network

affect our management in the near term are identified. Introduction Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa PSilvicultural Systems for Managing Ponderosa Pine1 Andrew Youngblood2 Abstract Silviculturists have, harvesting, and re-establishing a stand) for ponderosa pine, with uneven-aged systems used to a lesser degree

Standiford, Richard B.

294

Maximizing Energy Savings with Energy Management Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is the third in a series of three articles on enterprise energy management (EEM) systems featured in Strategic Planning for Energy and the Environment. The first article described the current state-of-the-art in EEM systems and their associated benefits in controlling energy cost, quality, and reliability (see Vol. 22, #4). The second piece considered energy in terms of managing the

John C. Van Gorp

2004-01-01

295

Decision support system for nursing management control  

SciTech Connect

A knowledge representation approach for expert systems supporting decision processes in business is proposed. A description of a knowledge representation schema using a logic programming metalanguage is described, then the role of such a schema in a management expert system is demonstrated through the problem of nursing management control in hospitals. 18 references.

Ernst, C.J.

1983-01-01

296

Electronic Resource Management Systems in Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Electronic resource management (ERM) systems have inundated the library marketplace. Both integrated library systems (ILS) vendors and subscription agents are now offering products and service enhancements that claim to help libraries efficiently manage their electronic resources. Additionally, some homegrown and open-source solutions have emerged…

Grogg, Jill E.

2008-01-01

297

A Resource Management Architecture for Metacomputing Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Metacomputing systems are intended to support remote and\\/or concurrent use of geo- graphically distributed computational resources. Resource management in such systems is complicated by ve concerns that do not typically arise in other situations: site autonomy and heterogeneous substrates at the resources, and application requirements for policy exten- sibility, co-allocation, and online control. We describe a resource management architecture that

Karl Czajkowski; Ian T. Foster; Nicholas T. Karonis; Carl Kesselman; Stuart Martin; Warren Smith; Steven Tuecke

1998-01-01

298

Implementation Problems of Management Control Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To provide a deeper understanding and a systematic analysis of the implementation problems of management control systems in Indian companies and to determine the relationship, if any, between these problems on the one hand, and the characteristics of the company and the design of the management control systems on the other. Also, the research project was intended to develop

Bhattacharyya S K; Camillus J C

299

Agile Safety Management System of Chemicals Transportation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper develops an architecture of Agile Safety Management System of Chemicals Transportation (ASMSCT) based on multi-agent based model and software reusability. The decision maker can be an alliance which deal with management activities involving proactive risk analysis, emergency response and regular safety information service. The top level information model and control model are studied in detail and the system

Tao Yang; Zhongding Huang

2009-01-01

300

Changing Course Management Systems: Lessons Learned  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During 2003, the North Dakota University System began to be concerned about the cost of supporting multiple course management systems. Since 1997, the 11 NDUS institutions had used 9 different course management packages, including one homegrown product (HTMLeZ) and such proprietary products as Blackboard, WebCT, and e-College. The University of…

Smart, Kathy A.; Meyer, Katrina A.

2005-01-01

301

Cybersecurity, Capital Allocations and Management Control Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The design and use of management control systems can play a key role in dealing with cybersecurity issues that have arisen in tandem with the emergence of the Internet. Efficient management control systems will reduce a firm's likelihood of suffering significant losses from cybersecurity breaches. Drawing on and extending the extant agency-based capital budgeting literature, this paper demonstrates the relevance

Lawrence A. Gordon; Martin P. Loeb; Tashfeen Sohail; Chih-Yang Tseng; Lei Zhou

2008-01-01

302

University Program Management Information System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA's objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data.

Gans, Gary (Technical Monitor)

2004-01-01

303

University Program Management Information System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA's objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well-being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data. This report was prepared by the Education Division/FE, Office of Human Resources and Education.

Gans, Gary (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

304

University Program Management Information System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA' objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data.

2001-01-01

305

Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System Data Management System  

E-print Network

Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Data Management System DRAFT ES-8 Collection The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Data Management System supports the data processing needs of the CERES Science Team research to increase understanding of the Earth's climate and radiant

306

Web-Based Evaluation System for Learning Management Systems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

E-learning systems have become an issue in recent years. A learning management system (LMS) is an electronic environment helps the educational society to communicate, exchange information, manage, and schedule the learning process. This study has provided a web-based evaluation system that may help the users to choose the convenient system

Momani, Alaa

2010-01-01

307

Total quality environmental management: Integrating environmental and quality management systems  

SciTech Connect

As the oilfield industry strives to globally sustain continuous movement of environmental and quality performance, companies have come to realize Total Quality Environmental Management (TQEM) is essential in product research, development manufacturing and services. As our industry endeavors to continuously improve, more emphasis is being placed upon the management systems we apply such as ISO 14000 and ISO 9000. These standards are tools for improving environmental and quality performance, meeting customer requirements, and increasing profitability. lbs paper presents actual examples of the successful integration of environmental and quality management systems into an operational TQEM system. Also presented are pilot study evaluations of the draft ISO 14000 standards by two certified ISO 9000 facilities. Examples of continuous improvement and cross-functional teams as means to merge environment and quality management into the functions of process control, corrective and preventive action, document control, and waste management are presented. Results and improvements from facilities involved with TQEM discussed along with their strategies and progress in consolidating the environmental and quality programs into a single, viable management system. The case histories from various facilities demonstrate the implementation of TQEM and in TQEM promotes a cleaner environment, reduces costs, con- serves energy and raw materials, minimizes pollutants and wastes, and reduces redundant paperwork.

Carley, J.A.; Kubala, G.; Hudson, T. [and others

1996-11-01

308

Designing, managing and improving the operative and intensive care in polytrauma  

PubMed Central

Background and Context: Polytrauma is a leading cause of mortality in the developing countries and efforts from various quarters are required to deal with this increasing menace. Aims and Objectives: An attempt has been made by the coordinated efforts of the intensive care and trauma team of a newly established tertiary care institute in designing and improving the trauma care services to realign its functions with national policies by analyzing the profile of polytrauma victims and successfully managing them. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was carried out among the 531 polytrauma admissions in the emergency department. The information pertaining to age and gender distribution, locality, time to trauma and initial resuscitation, cause of injury, type of injury, influence of alcohol, drug addiction, presenting clinical picture, Glasgow Coma score on admission and few other variables were also recorded. The indications for various operative interventions and intensive care unit (ICU) admissions were analyzed thoroughly with a concomitant improvement of our trauma care services and thereby augmenting the national policies and programs. A statistical analysis was carried out with chi-square and analysis of variance ANOVA tests, using SPSS software version 10.0 for windows. The value of P<0.05 was considered significant and P<0.0001 as highly significant. Results: Majority of the 531 polytrauma patients hailed from rural areas (63.65%), riding on the two wheelers (38.23%), and predominantly comprised young adult males. Fractures of long bones and head injury was the most common injury pattern (37.85%) and 51.41% of the patients presented with shock and hemorrhage. Airway management and intubation became necessary in 42.93% of the patients, whereas 52.16% of the patients were operated within the first 6 hours of admission for various indications. ICU admission was required for 45.76% of the patients because of their deteriorating clinical condition, and overall,ionotropic support was administered in 55.93% of the patients for successful resuscitation. Conclusions: There is an urgent need for proper implementation ofpre-hospital and advanced trauma life support measures at grass-root level. Analyzing the profile of polytrauma victims at a national level and simultaneously improving the trauma care services at every health center are very essential to decrease the mortality and morbidity. The improvement can be augmented further by strengthening the rural health infrastructure, strict traffic rules, increasing public awareness and participation and coordination among the various public and private agencies in dealing with polytrauma. PMID:22090744

Bajwa, Sukhminderjit Singh; Kaur, Jasbir; Bajwa, Sukhwinder Kaur; Kaur, Gagandeep; Singh, Amarjit; Parmar, S S; Kapoor, Vinod

2011-01-01

309

High-intensity subpicosecond vacuum ultraviolet laser system  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have been developing an ultrashort-pulse high-intensity vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser. Ultrashort VUV pulses at 126 nm have been produced in rare-gases by nonlinear wavelength conversion of an infrared Ti:sapphire laser at 882 nm. This pulse will be amplified inside an Ar2* amplifier excited by optical-field-induced ionization electrons. The amplification characteristics of the Ar2* amplifier has been improved by plasma

Shoichi Kubodera; Masanori Kaku; Yuta Taniguchi; Masahito Katto; Atsushi Yokotani; Noriaki Miyanaga; Kunioki Mima

2008-01-01

310

Time domain referencing in intensity modulation fiber optic sensing systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Intensity modulation sensors are classified depending on the way in which the reference and signal channels are separated: in space, wavelength (frequency), or time domains. To implement the time domain referencing different types of fiber optic (FO) loops have been used. A pulse of short duration sent into the loop results in a series of pulses of different amplitudes. The information about the measured parameter is retrieved from the relative amplitudes of pulses in the same train.

Adamovsky, G.

1986-01-01

311

TUBERCULOSIS INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (TIMS)  

EPA Science Inventory

TIMS is a Windows-based client/server application that assists health departments and other facilities to manage TB patients, to conduct TB surveillance activities, and to manage TB programs overall. TIMS provides for electronic transmission of TB surveillance data (OMB No. 0920-...

312

Intensive management of high-utilizing adults with sickle cell disease lowers admissions.  

PubMed

A minority of super-utilizing adults with sickle cell disease (SCD) account for a disproportionate number of emergency department (ED) and hospital admissions. We performed a retrospective cohort study comparing the rate of admission before and after the opening of a clinic for adults with SCD. Unique to this clinic was an intensive intervention management strategy, focusing on super-utilizing adults with 12 or more admissions per year. ED/hospital and 30 days admission rates were compared, 1 year pre- and post-intervention, for those adults who established in the clinic. Prior to the intervention, 17 super-utilizers, comprising 15% of the pre-intervention cohort (n=115), accounted for 58% of the total admissions and had an admission rate of 28 per patient-year. When pre- and post-intervention years were compared, rate of ED/hospital admission per patient-year for super-utilizers decreased from 27.9 to 13.5 (P< 0.001), while there was not a significant reduction for the entire cohort (7.1 vs. 6.1, P=0.84). Similarly, the decrease in rate of 30 day re-admission was larger for the super-utilizers (13.5 per patient-year to 1.8, P<0.001), than the whole cohort (2.6 per patient-year to 0.7, P=0.006). Among the super-utilizers, the reduced rate of admission from the pre- to post-clinic intervention year equated to 252 fewer ED/hospital admissions and 227 fewer 30 day re-admissions. This management strategy focusing on super-utilizing adults with SCD lowered admission and 30 day re-admission rate. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID:25469750

Koch, Kathryn L; Karafin, Matthew S; Simpson, Pippa; Field, Joshua J

2014-12-01

313

Information Systems Coordinate Emergency Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rescue crews have been searching for the woman for nearly a week. Hurricane Katrina devastated Hancock County, the southernmost point in Mississippi, and the woman had stayed through the storm in her beach house. There is little hope of finding her alive; the search teams know she is gone because the house is gone. Late at night in the art classroom of the school that is serving as the county s emergency operations center, Craig Harvey is discussing the search with the center s commander. Harvey is the Chief Operating Officer of a unique company called NVision Solutions Inc., based at NASA s Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, only a couple of miles away. He and his entire staff have set up a volunteer operation in the art room, supporting the emergency management efforts using technology and capabilities the company developed through its NASA partnerships. As he talks to the commander, Harvey feels an idea taking shape that might lead them to the woman s location. Working with surface elevation data and hydrological principles, Harvey creates a map showing how the floodwaters from the storm would have flowed along the topography of the region around the woman s former home. Using the map, search crews find the woman s body in 15 minutes. Recovering individuals who have been lost is a sad reality of emergency management in the wake of a disaster like Hurricane Katrina in 2005. But the sooner answers can be provided, the sooner a community s overall recovery can take place. When damage is extensive, resources are scattered, and people are in dire need of food, shelter, and medical assistance, the speed and efficiency of emergency operations can be the key to limiting the impact of a disaster and speeding the process of recovery. And a key to quick and effective emergency planning and response is geographic information. With a host of Earth-observing satellites orbiting the globe at all times, NASA generates an unmatched wealth of data about our ever-changing planet. This information can be captured, analyzed, and visualized by geographic information systems (GIS) to produce maps, charts, and other tools that can reveal information essential to a wide variety of applications including emergency management. Knowing precise, real-time information about the size, location, environmental conditions, and resulting damage of an event like a flood or wildfire as well as the location and numbers of emergency responders and other resources contributes directly to the effectiveness of disaster mitigation. The need for such information is also evident when responding to homeland security threats, such as a terrorist attack. Recognizing the value of its geospatial information resources for this and other purposes, in 1998 Stennis and the state of Mississippi partnered to form what became the Enterprise for Innovative Geospatial Solutions (EIGS) industry cluster, supporting the growth of remote sensing and GIS-based research and business. As part of EIGS, several companies partnered with NASA through dual use and Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts. Among those was NVision.

2012-01-01

314

Increase Productivity - Implement Energy Management Systems with Project Management Techniques  

E-print Network

INCREASE PRODUCTIVITY IMPLEMENT ENERGY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS WITH PROJECT MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES M. Pete Spinner, P.E. Glass Division, Ford Motor Company Detroit, Michigan Lawrence Institute of Technology Southfield, Michigan ABSTRACT... major work items that have to be done to prepare have climbed appreciably (from $0.50 to $1 per the feasibility report. million BTU in 1978 to $4 and $5 in 1982) there has been an abrupt halt in 1983 to escalating This presentation highlights the work...

Spinner, M. P.

1984-01-01

315

A native ground nesting bee, Nomia melanderi, sustainably managed to pollinate alfalfa across an intensively agricultural landscape  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Technical Abstract: The world’s only intensively managed ground-nesting bee, the alkali bee (Nomia melanderi Cockerell), has been used for >50 years as an effective pollinator of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) grown for seed across the western USA. Throughout the 240 km2 Touchet Valley alfalfa farmin...

316

Automated load management for spacecraft power systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An account is given of the results of a study undertaken by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to design and implement the load management techniques for autonomous spacecraft power systems, such as the Autonomously Managed Power System Test Facility. Attention is given to four load-management criteria, which encompass power bus balancing on multichannel power systems, energy balancing in such systems, power quality matching of loads to buses, and contingency load shedding/adding. Full implementation of these criteria calls for the addition of a second power channel.

Lollar, Louis F.

1987-01-01

317

Managing ambiguity and danger in an intensive therapy unit: ritual practices and sequestration.  

PubMed

This paper reports on a particular aspect of a larger ethnographic study of nursing culture in an intensive therapy unit (ITU), accomplished through participant observation over a 12-month period, followed by interviews with 15 nurses. The paper suggests that the ITU environment is perceived as 'dangerous', its dangerousness stemming from the ambiguity of its patients' conditions. Drawing on anthropological concepts of liminality, pollution, anomaly and breaching of boundaries, the paper identifies various ambiguities inherent in ITU patients' conditions. It then explores the ways in which these anomalies are managed through sequestration and other ritual and symbolic practices. Notwithstanding the undoubted scientific reasons for particular nursing practices, the paper argues that there are also ritual and symbolic elements serving other more complex purposes, both protecting patients and staff and symbolising the highly valued phenomenon of keeping patients safe. The paper identifies a contradiction inherent in nursing work in this locale inasmuch as rituals and symbolism coexist with technical and research-based elements of nursing care. PMID:17298608

Philpin, Susan

2007-03-01

318

23 CFR 972.204 - Management systems requirements.  

...LANDS HIGHWAYS FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Fish and Wildlife Service Management Systems...systems and their associated databases; and (5) A process...management systems will use databases with a geographical...

2014-04-01

319

23 CFR 972.204 - Management systems requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...LANDS HIGHWAYS FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Fish and Wildlife Service Management Systems...systems and their associated databases; and (5) A process...management systems will use databases with a geographical...

2012-04-01

320

23 CFR 972.204 - Management systems requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...LANDS HIGHWAYS FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Fish and Wildlife Service Management Systems...systems and their associated databases; and (5) A process...management systems will use databases with a geographical...

2011-04-01

321

23 CFR 972.204 - Management systems requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...LANDS HIGHWAYS FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Fish and Wildlife Service Management Systems...systems and their associated databases; and (5) A process...management systems will use databases with a geographical...

2013-04-01

322

2 CFR 215.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Standards for financial management systems. 215.21 Section...and Agreements Office of Management and Budget Guidance...and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET CIRCULARS...financial management systems. (a)...

2011-01-01

323

2 CFR 215.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Standards for financial management systems. 215.21 Section...and Agreements Office of Management and Budget Guidance...and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET CIRCULARS...financial management systems. (a)...

2012-01-01

324

2 CFR 215.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Standards for financial management systems. 215.21 Section...and Agreements Office of Management and Budget Guidance...and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET CIRCULARS...financial management systems. (a)...

2013-01-01

325

7 CFR 550.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 550.20 Section 550...AGREEMENTS Management of Agreements Financial Management § 550.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) REE agencies...

2013-01-01

326

7 CFR 550.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 550.20 Section 550...AGREEMENTS Management of Agreements Financial Management § 550.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) REE agencies...

2014-01-01

327

7 CFR 550.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 550.20 Section 550...AGREEMENTS Management of Agreements Financial Management § 550.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) REE agencies...

2012-01-01

328

7 CFR 550.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 550.20 Section 550...AGREEMENTS Management of Agreements Financial Management § 550.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) REE agencies...

2011-01-01

329

Intensive Eucalyptus plantation management in Brazil: Long-term effects on soil carbon dynamics across 300 sites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Intensively managed forest plantations now cover more than 6 million hectares in Brazil, and another 20 million hectares in other tropical regions. Although aboveground biomass, and therefore carbon, is well monitored due to commercial interest, the belowground carbon dynamics and site sustainability remain poorly understood. So, how does intensive silviculture change the storage of carbon in soils? Trends in soil organic carbon from land-use change indicate that conversion from pastures to Eucalyptus plantations should maintain soil carbon stocks. However, comprehensive, long-term studies are needed to understand the variability in these trends to better manage these systems for sustainable productivity across a highly variable landscape, as well as to understand the role that soils may play in sequestering carbon for climate change mitigation. In this unique, long-term soil study, soil samples were collected in the 1980s/90s, 2001, and 2010 across 300 intensively managed Eucalyptus plantation sites located in the states of Bahia, Espirito Santo, and Sao Paulo, Brazil. Natural ecosystems for these states include Savannah-Dry Forest, Atlantic Forest, and Savanna, respectively. The sampling covered at least three complete rotations of Eucalyptus at each site; climate, past land use, productivity, and soil characteristics vary across this geographic gradient. Across the two periods, both Espirito Santo (P<0.001) and Bahia (P=0.05) showed a decrease in soil carbon concentrations, while Sao Paulo saw no change over time. For the 0-30 cm layer, plantations in Espirito Santo state had the largest decrease in soil carbon concentration up to 2001, decreasing soil carbon stocks at an average rate of 1.3 Mg C ha-1 year-1. This, however, was followed by no significant change from 2001 to 2010 which may indicate stabilization of soil carbon stocks under the new land use. The Eucalyptus in Bahia created no change in the first sampling period, but saw a decline of 0.35 Mg C ha-1year-1 in soil carbon in the second sampling period from 2001-2010. Initial results show that, across the regions, sites that had higher soil carbon stocks tended to lose more soil carbon under intensive silviculture. In all three regions, clay content related strongly to soil carbon concentrations. However, the clay did not have a consistent relationship with the rates of change in soil carbon concentration, varying among regions, with negative, positive, and no relationship for the 2001-2010 time period. Further investigation will determine relationships with temperature and precipitation, past land use history, and Eucalyptus productivity. These results will be essential in evaluating the effects on soil organic carbon dynamics due to conversion to short-rotation Eucalyptus plantations in the tropics across a broad and variable landscape.

Cook, R. L.; Stape, J.; Binkley, D.

2011-12-01

330

Wheel speed management control system for spacecraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A spacecraft attitude control system uses at least four reaction wheels. In order to minimize reaction wheel speed and therefore power, a wheel speed management system is provided. The management system monitors the wheel speeds and generates a wheel speed error vector. The error vector is integrated, and the error vector and its integral are combined to form a correction vector. The correction vector is summed with the attitude control torque command signals for driving the reaction wheels.

Goodzeit, Neil E. (Inventor); Linder, David M. (Inventor)

1991-01-01

331

Rule Management System for Ontology-based Recommendation System  

E-print Network

Rule Management System for Ontology-based Recommendation System Sarunyoo Ngamsrithepparit1@gmail.com, krunapon@kku.ac.th, marut.buranarach@nectec.or.th, seksan.poltree@gmail.com Abstract-- Rule management system was developed in order to provide a facility for domain experts to pass on their knowledge in rule

Runapongsa, Kanda

332

Cask system maintenance in the Federal Waste Management System  

Microsoft Academic Search

In early 1988, in support of the development of the transportation system for the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (OCRWM), a feasibility study was undertaken to define a the concept for a stand-alone, green-field'' facility for maintaining the Federal Waste Management System (FWMS) casks. This study provided and initial layout facility design, an estimate of the construction costs,

R. B. Pope; M. J. Rennich; L. G. Medley; C. R. Attaway

1991-01-01

333

System R: relational approach to database management  

Microsoft Academic Search

System R is a database management system which provides a high level relational data interface. The systems provides a high level of data independence by isolating the end user as much as possible from underlying storage structures. The system permits definition of a variety of relational views on common underlying data. Data control features are provided, including authorization, integrity assertions,

Morton M. Astrahan; Mike W. Blasgen; Donald D. Chamberlin; Kapali P. Eswaran; Jim Gray; Patricia P. Griffiths; W. Frank King III; Raymond A. Lorie; Paul R. McJones; James W. Mehl; Gianfranco R. Putzolu; Irving L. Traiger; Bradford W. Wade; Vera Watson

1976-01-01

334

Prognostic health management for avionic systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Maintenance of aircraft electronic systems has traditionally been performed in reaction to reported failures or through periodic system replacements. Recent changes in weapons platform acquisition and support requirements have spurred interest in application of prognostic health management (PHM) concepts developed for mechanical systems to electronic systems. The approach, development, and validation of prognostics for two types of electronic equipment are

Rolf F. Orsagh; Douglas W. Brown; Patrick W. Kalgren; Carl S. Byington; Andrew J. Hess; Thomas Dabney

2006-01-01

335

High-Intensity Radiated Field Fault-Injection Experiment for a Fault-Tolerant Distributed Communication System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Safety-critical distributed flight control systems require robustness in the presence of faults. In general, these systems consist of a number of input/output (I/O) and computation nodes interacting through a fault-tolerant data communication system. The communication system transfers sensor data and control commands and can handle most faults under typical operating conditions. However, the performance of the closed-loop system can be adversely affected as a result of operating in harsh environments. In particular, High-Intensity Radiated Field (HIRF) environments have the potential to cause random fault manifestations in individual avionic components and to generate simultaneous system-wide communication faults that overwhelm existing fault management mechanisms. This paper presents the design of an experiment conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center's HIRF Laboratory to statistically characterize the faults that a HIRF environment can trigger on a single node of a distributed flight control system.

Yates, Amy M.; Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo; Malekpour, Mahyar R.; Gonzalez, Oscar R.; Gray, W. Steven

2010-01-01

336

Management of Rare Central Nervous System Tumors  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The management of rare central nervous system (CNS) tumors varies greatly, depending upon several key factors. The location\\u000a of the tumor may be the most important consideration in the management, specifically the neurosurgical management, of any\\u000a intracranial lesion. The location, of course, determines what neurological deficits a patient may have and the degree of resectability\\u000a of the tumor. For instance,

Gery Hsu; Raymond Sawaya

337

Acid Sphingomyelinase Serum Activity Predicts Mortality in Intensive Care Unit Patients after Systemic Inflammation: A Prospective Cohort Study  

PubMed Central

Introduction Acid sphingomyelinase is involved in lipid signalling pathways and regulation of apoptosis by the generation of ceramide and plays an important role during the host response to infectious stimuli. It thus has the potential to be used as a novel diagnostic marker in the management of critically ill patients. The objective of our study was to evaluate acid sphingomyelinase serum activity (ASM) as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in a mixed intensive care unit population before, during, and after systemic inflammation. Methods 40 patients admitted to the intensive care unit at risk for developing systemic inflammation (defined as systemic inflammatory response syndrome plus a significant procalcitonin [PCT] increase) were included. ASM was analysed on ICU admission, before (PCTbefore), during (PCTpeak) and after (PCTlow) onset of SIRS. Patients undergoing elective surgery served as control (N?=?8). Receiver-operating characteristics curves were computed. Results ASM significantly increased after surgery in the eight control patients. Patients from the intensive care unit had significantly higher ASM on admission than control patients after surgery. 19 out of 40 patients admitted to the intensive care unit developed systemic inflammation and 21 did not, with no differences in ASM between these two groups on admission. In patients with SIRS and PCT peak, ASM between admission and PCTbefore was not different, but further increased at PCTpeak in non-survivors and was significantly higher at PCTlow compared to survivors. Survivors exhibited decreased ASM at PCTpeak and PCTlow. Receiver operating curve analysis on discrimination of ICU mortality showed an area under the curve of 0.79 for ASM at PCTlow. Conclusions In summary, ASM was generally higher in patients admitted to the intensive care unit compared to patients undergoing uncomplicated surgery. ASM did not indicate onset of systemic inflammation. In contrast to PCT however, it remained high in non-surviving ICU patients after systemic inflammation. PMID:25384060

Reinicke, Maike; Winoto-Morbach, Supandi; Schädler, Dirk; Zick, Günther; Frerichs, Inéz; Weiler, Norbert; Schütze, Stefan

2014-01-01

338

Issue Management Risk Ranking Systems  

SciTech Connect

Thousands of safety issues have been collected on-line at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) as part of the Issue Management Plan. However, there has been no established approach to prioritize collected and future issues. The authors developed a methodology, based on hazards assessment, to identify and risk rank over 5000 safety issues collected at INEEL. This approach required that it was easily applied and understandable for site adaptation and commensurate with the Integrated Safety Plan. High-risk issues were investigated and mitigative/preventive measures were suggested and ranked based on a cost-benefit scheme to provide risk-informed safety measures. This methodology was consistent with other integrated safety management goals and tasks providing a site-wide risk-informed decision tool to reduce hazardous conditions and focus resources on high-risk safety issues. As part of the issue management plan, this methodology was incorporated at the issue collection level and training was provided to management to better familiarize decision-makers with concepts of safety and risk. This prioritization methodology and issue dissemination procedure will be discussed. Results of issue prioritization and training efforts will be summarized. Difficulties and advantages of the process will be reported. Development and incorporation of this process into INEEL's lessons learned reporting and the site-wide integrated safety management program will be shown with an emphasis on establishing self reliance and ownership of safety issues.

F. M. Marshall; G. M. Grant; H. M. Stromberg; S. D. Novack

1999-06-01

339

Issue Management Risk Ranking Systems  

SciTech Connect

Thousands of safety issues have been collected on-line at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) as part of the Issue Management Plan. However, there has been no established approach to prioritize collected and future issues. The authors developed a methodology, based on hazards assessment, to identify and risk rank over 5000 safety issues collected at INEEL. This approach required that it was easily applied and understandable for site adaptation and commensurate with the Integrated Safety Plan. High-risk issues were investigated and mitigative/preventive measures were suggested and ranked based on a cost-benefit scheme to provide risk-informed safety measures. This methodology was consistent with other integrated safety management goals and tasks providing a site-wide risk informed decision tool to reduce hazardous conditions and focus resources on high-risk safety issues. As part of the issue management plan, this methodology was incorporated at the issue collection level and training was provided to management to better familiarize decision-makers with concepts of safety and risk. This prioritization methodology and issue dissemination procedure will be discussed. Results of issue prioritization and training efforts will be summarized. Difficulties and advantages of the process will be reported. Development and incorporation of this process into INEELs lessons learned reporting and the site-wide integrated safety management program will be shown with an emphasis on establishing self reliance and ownership of safety issues.

Novack, Steven David; Marshall, Frances Mc Clellan; Stromberg, Howard Merion; Grant, Gary Michael

1999-06-01

340

Determination of atmospheric nitrogen deposition to a semi-natural peat bog site in an intensively managed agricultural landscape  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rising levels of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition have been found to affect the primary productivity and species composition of most terrestrial ecosystems. Highly vulnerable ecosystems such as nutrient-poor bogs are expected to respond to increasing N input rates with a decrease in plant species diversity. Our study site - a moderately drained raised bog and one of only very few remaining protected peatland areas in Northwestern Germany - is surrounded by highly fertilised agricultural land and intensive livestock production. We quantified the annual deposition of atmospheric N over a period of two years. Dry deposition rates of different N species and their reactants were calculated from day and night-time concentrations measured by a KAPS denuder filter system. Dry N deposition amounted to 10.9 ± 1.0 kg N ha-1 yr-1 (year 1) and 10.5 ± 1.0 kg N ha-1 yr-1 (year 2). More than 80% of total deposited N was attributed to ammonia (NH3). A strong seasonality in NH3 concentrations and depositions could be observed. Day and night-time concentrations and depositions, however, did not differ significantly. Total N deposition including bulk N deposition resulted in about 25 kg N ha-1 yr-1. Our results suggest that the intensive agricultural land management of surrounding areas and strongly emitting animal husbandry lead to N inputs into the protected peatland area that exceed the ecosystem's specific critical load up to fivefold. This gives rise to the assumption that a further shift in plant species composition with a subsequent alteration of the local hydrological regime can be expected.

Hurkuck, Miriam; Brümmer, Christian; Mohr, Karsten; Grünhage, Ludger; Flessa, Heinz; Kutsch, Werner L.

2014-11-01

341

Complexity Management in System-level Design  

E-print Network

these tools are applied. For example, consider the design of a real-time MPEG2 encoder. One design possibility1 of 22 Complexity Management in System-level Design Asawaree Kalavade Edward A. Lee Keywords design space exploration, hardware-software codesign, design methodology management, design flow

342

Management Systems in Teacher Corps Projects.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book represents the culmination of a twelve-month management training and development program conducted by the New England Teacher Corps Network for its project directors and staff. Wesley Brown and Perry Zirkel trace the organizational evolution of Teacher Corps projects. William Smith presents a theoretical analysis of the management system

Henderson, Robert C., Ed.

343

Implementation of Integrated System Fault Management Capability  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fault Management to support rocket engine test mission with highly reliable and accurate measurements; while improving availability and lifecycle costs. CORE ELEMENTS: Architecture, taxonomy, and ontology (ATO) for DIaK management. Intelligent Sensor Processes; Intelligent Element Processes; Intelligent Controllers; Intelligent Subsystem Processes; Intelligent System Processes; Intelligent Component Processes.

Figueroa, Fernando; Schmalzel, John; Morris, Jon; Smith, Harvey; Turowski, Mark

2008-01-01

344

A Systems Approach to Managing Oil  

E-print Network

A Systems Approach to Managing Oil Transportation Risk in Prince William Sound Jason R. W. Merrick Received April 21, 2000; revised June 12, 2000; accepted June 26, 2000MANAGING OIL TRANSPORTATION RISK about the safety of oil transportation in the Prince William Sound, Alaska. As a result, a large number

van Dorp, Johan René

345

A battery management system for electric buses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Under a contract funded by the Advanced Lead Acid Battery Consortium (ALABC), the author was given the task of developing an advanced monitoring and control technology (MACT) to manage lead acid batteries used in electric vehicles. Using the latest semiconductor technology, his goal is to develop a battery management system that focuses on maximizing the discharge and recharge efficiency of

B. O'Brien

1994-01-01

346

Prototype expert system for load management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Demand Side Management (DSM) offers electric utilities a method to better serve their customer base. With efficient utilization of the demand side resource, a utility can reap economic benefit while improving system security without the need to build expensive generation that might rarely be used. Demand side management options represent the ability to have individual customers reduce their load upon

M. K. Goldenblatt; M. S. Giuffre; K. A. Glidden; D. H. Johnson; K. L. Nohalty

1992-01-01

347

PRECISION MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS FOR CONSERVATION AND PROFITABILITY  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The uses of site-specific information (e.g., yield maps, soil sampling) can extend beyond variable-rate management of inputs to managing parts of a field in completely different ways (e.g., cropping system, conservation measures). In this paper, we discuss the development and initial evaluation of s...

348

[Essential guidelines for Quality Management System].  

PubMed

The guidelines describe the essential parts of the quality management system to fulfil the requirements of the standard EN ISO 15 189. It includes mainly the organisation, the definition of responsibilities, training of personnel, the document control, the quality control, identification and control of nonconformities, corrective actions, preventive actions and evaluation, as audits and the management review. PMID:23765013

Daunizeau, A

2013-06-01

349

Performance issues of Smart Transportation Management systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to use the conceptual model of the Smart Transportation Management (STM) system and analyze how the included factors change the performance of distribution activities and what management issues are at stake. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – To prepare the paper, a literature study was made and case studies carried out in companies and organizations that

Gunnar Stefansson; Kenth Lumsden

2009-01-01

350

RICE UNIVERSITY Context for System Resource Management  

E-print Network

RICE UNIVERSITY Context for System Resource Management: An Application in Wireless Data Management my advisor, Dr. Lin Zhong, for his guidance and support throughout my academic life at Rice of my teachers from friends. Special thanks to my professors at Rice and Sharif, my teachers at Allameh

Zhong, Lin

351

Software for Intelligent System Health Management (ISHM)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The slide presentation is a briefing in four areas: overview of health management paradigms; overview of the ARC-Houston Software Engineering Technology Workshop held on April 20-22, 2004; identified technologies relevant to technical themes of intelligent system health management; and the author's thoughts on these topics.

Trevino, Luis C.

2004-01-01

352

Contribution of different grass species to plant-atmosphere ammonia exchange in intensively managed grassland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Species diversity in grasslands usually declines with increasing input of nitrogen from fertilizers or atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Conversely, species diversity may also impact the build-up of soil nitrogen pools. Limited information is available on how plant-atmosphere ammonia exchange is related to species diversity in grasslands. We have here investigated grass species abundance and different foliar nitrogen pools in 4-year-old intensively managed grassland. Apoplastic pH and NH4+ concentrations of the 8 most abundant species were used to calculate stomatal NH3 compensation points. Apoplastic NH4+ concentrations differed considerably among the species, ranging from 13 to 117 ?M, with highest values in Festuca pratensis. Also apoplastic pH values varied, from pH 6.0 in Phleum pratense to 6.9 in Dactylis glomerata. The observed differences in apoplastic NH4+ and pH resulted in a large span of predicted values for the stomatal NH3 compensation point which ranged from 0.20 to 6.57 nmol mol-1. Three species (Lolium perenne, Festuca pratensis and Dactylis glomerata) had sufficiently high NH3 compensation points and abundance to contribute to the NH3 emission of the whole field. At the same time, other grass species such as Phleum pratense and Lolium multiflorum had NH3 compensation points below the atmospheric NH3 concentration and could thus contribute to NH3 uptake from the atmosphere. Evaluated across species, leaf bulk-tissue NH4+ concentrations correlated well (r2=0.902) with stomatal NH3 compensation points calculated on the basis of the apoplastic bioassay. This suggests that leaf tissue NH4+ concentrations combined with data for the frequency distribution of the corresponding species can be used for predicting the NH3 exchange potential of a mixed grass sward.

Mattsson, M.; Herrmann, B.; Jones, S.; Neftel, A.; Sutton, M. A.; Schjoerring, J. K.

2008-06-01

353

Greenhouse gas budget (CO2, CH4 and N2O) of intensively managed grassland following restoration.  

PubMed

The first full greenhouse gas (GHG) flux budget of an intensively managed grassland in Switzerland (Chamau) is presented. The three major trace gases, carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) were measured with the eddy covariance (EC) technique. For CO2 concentrations, an open-path infrared gas analyzer was used, while N2O and CH4 concentrations were measured with a recently developed continuous-wave quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer (QCLAS). We investigated the magnitude of these trace gas emissions after grassland restoration, including ploughing, harrowing, sowing, and fertilization with inorganic and organic fertilizers in 2012. Large peaks of N2O fluxes (20-50 nmol m(-2) s(-1) compared with a <5 nmol m(-2) s(-1) background) were observed during thawing of the soil after the winter period and after mineral fertilizer application followed by re-sowing in the beginning of the summer season. Nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes were controlled by nitrogen input, plant productivity, soil water content and temperature. Management activities led to increased variations of N2O fluxes up to 14 days after the management event as compared with background fluxes measured during periods without management (<5 nmol m(-2) s(-1)). Fluxes of CO2 remained small until full plant development in early summer 2012. In contrast, methane emissions showed only minor variations over time. The annual GHG flux budget was dominated by N2O (48% contribution) and CO2 emissions (44%). CH4 flux contribution to the annual budget was only minor (8%). We conclude that recently developed multi-species QCLAS in an EC system open new opportunities to determine the temporal variation of N2O and CH4 fluxes, which further allow to quantify annual emissions. With respect to grassland restoration, our study emphasizes the key role of N2O and CO2 losses after ploughing, changing a permanent grassland from a carbon sink to a significant carbon source. PMID:24395474

Merbold, Lutz; Eugster, Werner; Stieger, Jacqueline; Zahniser, Mark; Nelson, David; Buchmann, Nina

2014-06-01

354

Automated Traffic Management System and Method  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A data management system and method that enables acquisition, integration, and management of real-time data generated at different rates, by multiple heterogeneous incompatible data sources. The system achieves this functionality by using an expert system to fuse data from a variety of airline, airport operations, ramp control, and air traffic control tower sources, to establish and update reference data values for every aircraft surface operation. The system may be configured as a real-time airport surface traffic management system (TMS) that electronically interconnects air traffic control, airline data, and airport operations data to facilitate information sharing and improve taxi queuing. In the TMS operational mode, empirical data shows substantial benefits in ramp operations for airlines, reducing departure taxi times by about one minute per aircraft in operational use, translating as $12 to $15 million per year savings to airlines at the Atlanta, Georgia airport. The data management system and method may also be used for scheduling the movement of multiple vehicles in other applications, such as marine vessels in harbors and ports, trucks or railroad cars in ports or shipping yards, and railroad cars in switching yards. Finally, the data management system and method may be used for managing containers at a shipping dock, stock on a factory floor or in a warehouse, or as a training tool for improving situational awareness of FAA tower controllers, ramp and airport operators, or commercial airline personnel in airfield surface operations.

Glass, Brian J. (Inventor); Spirkovska, Liljana (Inventor); McDermott, William J. (Inventor); Reisman, Ronald J. (Inventor); Gibson, James (Inventor); Iverson, David L. (Inventor)

2000-01-01

355

ADAMS: AIRLAB data management system user's guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The AIRLAB Data Management System (ADAMS) is an online environment that supports research at NASA's AIRLAB. ADAMS provides an easy to use interactive interface that eases the task of documenting and managing information about experiments and improves communication among project members. Data managed by ADAMS includes information about experiments, data sets produced, software and hardware available in AIRLAB as well as that used in a particular experiment, and an on-line engineer's notebook. The User's Guide provides an overview of the ADAMS system as well as details of the operations available within ADAMS. A tutorial section takes the user step-by-step through a typical ADAMS session. ADAMS runs under the VAX/VMS operating system and uses the ORACLE database management system and DEC/FMS (the Forms Management System). ADAMS can be run from any VAX connected via DECnet to the ORACLE host VAX. The ADAMS system is designed for simplicity, so interactions within the underlying data management system and communications network are hidden from the user.

Conrad, C. L.; Ingogly, W. F.; Lauterbach, L. A.

1986-01-01

356

7 CFR 248.11 - Financial management system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Financial management system. 248.11...248.11 Financial management system. (a) Disclosure...maintain a financial management system which provides...property and other assets and all FMNP funds...balances, assets, liabilities, outlays, and...

2010-01-01

357

7 CFR 246.13 - Financial management system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Financial management system. 246.13...246.13 Financial management system. (a) Disclosure...maintain a financial management system which provides...property and other assets and all Program funds...balances, assets, liabilities, outlays, and...

2011-01-01

358

48 CFR 970.5232-7 - Financial management system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...5232-7 Financial management system. As prescribed...clause: Financial Management System (DEC 2000...administer a financial management system that is suitable...DOE requirements for assets, liabilities,...

2011-10-01

359

7 CFR 249.11 - Financial management system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Financial management system. 249.11...249.11 Financial management system. (a) Disclosure...maintain a financial management system that provides...property and other assets and all SFMNP funds...balances, assets, liabilities, outlays, and...

2010-01-01

360

7 CFR 248.11 - Financial management system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Financial management system. 248.11...248.11 Financial management system. (a) Disclosure...maintain a financial management system which provides...property and other assets and all FMNP funds...balances, assets, liabilities, outlays, and...

2011-01-01

361

7 CFR 249.11 - Financial management system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Financial management system. 249.11...249.11 Financial management system. (a) Disclosure...maintain a financial management system that provides...property and other assets and all SFMNP funds...balances, assets, liabilities, outlays, and...

2011-01-01

362

45 CFR 602.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Standards for financial management systems. 602.20 Section 602...Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE...Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State must...The financial management systems of other grantees and...

2013-10-01

363

45 CFR 602.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Standards for financial management systems. 602.20 Section 602...Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE...Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State must...The financial management systems of other grantees and...

2012-10-01

364

45 CFR 602.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...Standards for financial management systems. 602.20 Section 602...Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE...Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State must...The financial management systems of other grantees and...

2014-10-01

365

45 CFR 1183.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

... Standards for financial management systems. 1183.20 Section... INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE... Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2014-10-01

366

45 CFR 1183.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Standards for financial management systems. 1183.20 Section... INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE... Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2013-10-01

367

45 CFR 1183.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Standards for financial management systems. 1183.20 Section... INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE... Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2012-10-01

368

45 CFR 1183.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Standards for financial management systems. 1183.20 Section... INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE... Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2011-10-01

369

23 CFR 970.204 - Management systems requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...ensuring the outputs of the management systems are considered...and coordination of all management system outputs to systematically...existing transportation assets cost-effectively; (3) A description of each management system; (4) A...

2011-04-01

370

28 CFR 70.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 70.21 Section...70.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems must provide...

2014-07-01

371

32 CFR 33.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 33.20 Section...33.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2014-07-01

372

45 CFR 1174.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1174.20 Section...1174.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2012-10-01

373

13 CFR 143.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 143.20 Section...143.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2014-01-01

374

36 CFR 1207.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1207.20 Section...1207.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2012-07-01

375

28 CFR 66.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 66.20 Section...66.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2013-07-01

376

45 CFR 74.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 74.21 Section...74.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...appropriate. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2012-10-01

377

20 CFR 435.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 435.21 Section...435.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Introduction...requirements. Recipients' financial management systems must provide...

2011-04-01

378

45 CFR 2541.200 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 2541.200 ...2541.200 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2014-10-01

379

40 CFR 30.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 30.21 Section...30.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) EPA shall...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2013-07-01

380

45 CFR 1157.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1157.20 Section...1157.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2013-10-01

381

7 CFR 3016.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 3016.20 Section...3016.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2012-01-01

382

10 CFR 600.311 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 600.311 Section...600.311 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...encouraged to use existing financial management systems to the...

2012-01-01

383

45 CFR 2543.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 2543.21 Section...2543.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2011-10-01

384

49 CFR 18.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 18.20 Section...18.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2014-10-01

385

13 CFR 143.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 143.20 Section...143.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2013-01-01

386

40 CFR 35.6270 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 35.6270 Section...35.6270 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Accounting...review of the adequacy of the financial management system as described in...

2012-07-01

387

10 CFR 600.121 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 600.121 Section...600.121 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...600.181, recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2013-01-01

388

14 CFR 1273.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1273.20 Section...1273.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2014-01-01

389

36 CFR 1210.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1210.21 Section...1210.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The NHPRC...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2011-07-01

390

29 CFR 1470.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1470.20 Section...1470.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2013-07-01

391

10 CFR 600.220 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 600.220 Section...600.220 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2013-01-01

392

32 CFR 32.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 32.21 Section...32.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) DoD Components...information. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2012-07-01

393

7 CFR 3019.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 3019.21 Section...3019.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2014-01-01

394

29 CFR 95.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2013-07-01 true Standards for financial management systems. 95.21 Section...95.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2014-07-01

395

45 CFR 1157.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1157.20 Section...1157.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2012-10-01

396

10 CFR 600.121 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 600.121 Section...600.121 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...600.181, recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2012-01-01

397

15 CFR 24.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 24.20 Section...24.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2014-01-01

398

29 CFR 1470.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1470.20 Section...1470.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2014-07-01

399

32 CFR 33.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 33.20 Section...33.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2012-07-01

400

38 CFR 43.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 43.20 Section...43.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2012-07-01

401

7 CFR 3019.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 3019.21 Section...3019.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2011-01-01

402

22 CFR 226.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 226.21 Section...226.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2011-04-01

403

24 CFR 84.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 84.21 Section...84.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) HUD shall...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2012-04-01

404

32 CFR 32.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 32.21 Section...32.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) DoD Components...information. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2011-07-01

405

44 CFR 13.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2011-10-01 true Standards for financial management systems. 13.20 Section...13.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2012-10-01

406

32 CFR 32.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 32.21 Section...32.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) DoD Components...information. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2013-07-01

407

45 CFR 1174.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1174.20 Section...1174.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2013-10-01

408

22 CFR 135.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 135.20 Section...135.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2013-04-01

409

24 CFR 84.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 84.21 Section...84.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) HUD shall...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2011-04-01

410

38 CFR 43.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 43.20 Section...43.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2013-07-01

411

40 CFR 35.6270 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 35.6270 Section...35.6270 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Accounting...review of the adequacy of the financial management system as described in...

2013-07-01

412

20 CFR 437.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 437.20 Section...437.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2014-04-01

413

38 CFR 49.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 49.21 Section...49.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2012-07-01

414

22 CFR 145.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 145.21 Section...145.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The Department...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2011-04-01

415

22 CFR 518.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2009-04-01 true Standards for financial management systems. 518.21 Section...518.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2011-04-01

416

44 CFR 13.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 13.20 Section...13.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2013-10-01

417

20 CFR 437.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 437.20 Section...437.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2012-04-01

418

29 CFR 95.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 95.21 Section...95.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2013-07-01

419

24 CFR 85.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 85.20 Section...85.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2013-04-01

420

20 CFR 437.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 437.20 Section...437.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2013-04-01

421

7 CFR 3016.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 3016.20 Section...3016.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2014-01-01

422

40 CFR 35.6270 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 35.6270 Section...35.6270 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Accounting...review of the adequacy of the financial management system as described in...

2011-07-01

423

10 CFR 600.220 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 600.220 Section...600.220 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2012-01-01

424

40 CFR 30.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 30.21 Section...30.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) EPA shall...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2011-07-01

425

44 CFR 13.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 13.20 Section...13.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2014-10-01

426

40 CFR 30.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 30.21 Section...30.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) EPA shall...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2012-07-01

427

45 CFR 2543.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 2543.21 Section...2543.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2012-10-01

428

28 CFR 70.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 70.21 Section...70.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems must provide...

2011-07-01

429

15 CFR 14.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 14.21 Section...14.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The Grants...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2014-01-01

430

36 CFR 1210.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1210.21 Section...1210.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The NHPRC...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2014-07-01

431

22 CFR 518.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2009-04-01 true Standards for financial management systems. 518.21 Section...518.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2012-04-01

432

15 CFR 14.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 14.21 Section...14.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The Grants...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2013-01-01

433

22 CFR 135.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 135.20 Section...135.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2014-04-01

434

36 CFR 1210.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1210.21 Section...1210.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The NHPRC...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2012-07-01

435

45 CFR 92.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 92.20 Section...92.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2013-10-01

436

45 CFR 74.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 74.21 Section...74.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...appropriate. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2011-10-01

437

22 CFR 226.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 226.21 Section...226.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2012-04-01

438

10 CFR 600.121 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 600.121 Section...600.121 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...600.181, recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2014-01-01

439

40 CFR 31.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 31.20 Section...31.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2013-07-01

440

21 CFR 1403.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1403.20 Section...1403.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2013-04-01

441

20 CFR 435.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 435.21 Section...435.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Introduction...requirements. Recipients' financial management systems must provide...

2014-04-01

442

36 CFR 1207.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2012-07-01 true Standards for financial management systems. 1207.20 Section...1207.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2013-07-01

443

45 CFR 74.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 74.21 Section...74.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...appropriate. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2013-10-01

444

40 CFR 35.6270 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 35.6270 Section...35.6270 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Accounting...review of the adequacy of the financial management system as described in...

2014-07-01

445

29 CFR 95.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 95.21 Section...95.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2012-07-01

446

38 CFR 49.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 49.21 Section...49.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2014-07-01

447

20 CFR 435.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 435.21 Section...435.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Introduction...requirements. Recipients' financial management systems must provide...

2012-04-01

448

7 CFR 3019.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 3019.21 Section...3019.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2013-01-01

449

21 CFR 1403.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1403.20 Section...1403.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2012-04-01

450

32 CFR 34.11 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 34.11 Section...34.11 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...encouraged to use existing financial management systems...

2012-07-01

451

24 CFR 84.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 84.21 Section...84.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) HUD shall...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2014-04-01

452

45 CFR 74.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 74.21 Section...74.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...appropriate. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2014-10-01

453

15 CFR 14.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 14.21 Section...14.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The Grants...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2012-01-01

454

40 CFR 31.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 31.20 Section...31.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2014-07-01

455

7 CFR 3016.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 3016.20 Section...3016.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2013-01-01

456

28 CFR 66.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 66.20 Section...66.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2012-07-01

457

21 CFR 1403.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1403.20 Section...1403.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2014-04-01

458

45 CFR 2543.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 2543.21 Section...2543.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2013-10-01

459

10 CFR 600.311 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 600.311 Section...600.311 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...encouraged to use existing financial management systems to the...

2014-01-01

460

10 CFR 600.311 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 600.311 Section...600.311 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...encouraged to use existing financial management systems to the...

2013-01-01

461

40 CFR 31.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 31.20 Section...31.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2012-07-01

462

14 CFR 1273.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1273.20 Section...1273.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2012-01-01

463

45 CFR 2543.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 2543.21 Section...2543.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2014-10-01

464

22 CFR 518.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 518.21 Section...518.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2014-04-01

465

22 CFR 226.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 226.21 Section...226.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2013-04-01

466

24 CFR 85.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 85.20 Section...85.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2014-04-01

467

32 CFR 32.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 32.21 Section...32.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) DoD Components...information. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2014-07-01

468

49 CFR 18.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 18.20 Section...18.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2013-10-01

469

24 CFR 84.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 84.21 Section...84.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) HUD shall...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2013-04-01

470

40 CFR 30.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 30.21 Section...30.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) EPA shall...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2014-07-01

471

15 CFR 24.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 24.20 Section...24.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2012-01-01

472

45 CFR 1174.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1174.20 Section...1174.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2014-10-01

473

10 CFR 600.311 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 600.311 Section...600.311 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...encouraged to use existing financial management systems to the...

2011-01-01

474

38 CFR 43.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 43.20 Section...43.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2014-07-01

475

10 CFR 600.121 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 600.121 Section...600.121 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...600.181, recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2011-01-01

476

22 CFR 145.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 145.21 Section...145.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The Department...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2014-04-01

477

15 CFR 24.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 24.20 Section...24.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2013-01-01

478

7 CFR 3019.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 3019.21 Section...3019.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2012-01-01

479

14 CFR 1273.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1273.20 Section...1273.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2013-01-01

480

10 CFR 600.220 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 600.220 Section...600.220 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2014-01-01

481

24 CFR 85.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 85.20 Section...85.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2012-04-01

482

49 CFR 18.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 18.20 Section...18.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2012-10-01

483

15 CFR 14.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 14.21 Section...14.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The Grants...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2011-01-01

484

36 CFR 1210.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2012-07-01 true Standards for financial management systems. 1210.21 Section...1210.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The NHPRC...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2013-07-01

485

28 CFR 70.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 70.21 Section...70.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems must provide...

2012-07-01

486

29 CFR 97.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2013-07-01 true Standards for financial management systems. 97.20 Section...97.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2014-07-01

487

38 CFR 49.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 49.21 Section...49.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2013-07-01

488

45 CFR 1157.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1157.20 Section...1157.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2014-10-01

489

13 CFR 143.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 143.20 Section...143.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2012-01-01

490

29 CFR 1470.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1470.20 Section...1470.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2012-07-01

491

29 CFR 97.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 97.20 Section...97.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2012-07-01

492

38 CFR 49.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 49.21 Section...49.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2011-07-01

493

22 CFR 145.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 145.21 Section...145.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The Department...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2012-04-01

494

29 CFR 97.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 97.20 Section...97.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2013-07-01

495

36 CFR 1207.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1207.20 Section...1207.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2014-07-01

496

28 CFR 66.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 66.20 Section...66.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2014-07-01

497

45 CFR 92.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

...2014-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 92.20 Section...92.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2014-10-01

498

45 CFR 92.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 92.20 Section...92.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

2012-10-01

499

28 CFR 70.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 70.21 Section...70.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems must provide...

2013-07-01

500

22 CFR 518.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2009-04-01 true Standards for financial management systems. 518.21 Section...518.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

2013-04-01