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1

Lessons learned from past experience with intensive livestock management systems.  

PubMed

The main impetus for 'modern' intensive animal production occurred after the Second World War, when Western governments developed policies to increase the availability of cheap, safe food for their populations. Livestock benefit under intensive husbandry by protection from environmental extremes and predators, and better nutritional and health management. Nevertheless, there are costs to the animal, such as impaired social behaviour, limited choice of living environment or pen mates, poor environmental stimulation and behavioural restrictions. The rapid progress in genetic selection of production traits has also, in some cases, adversely affected welfare by creating anatomical and metabolic problems. Above all, the intensively housed animal is heavily reliant on the stockperson and, therefore, inadequate care and husbandry practices by the stockperson may be the largest welfare risk. In a future in which the food supply may be limited as the world's population grows and land availability shrinks, intensive animal production is likely to expand. At the same time, ethical considerations surrounding intensive farming practices may also become more prominent. Novel technologies provide the opportunity to enhance both the productivity and welfare of intensively kept animals. Developing countries are also establishing more intensive commercial systems to meet their growing need for animal protein. Intensive livestock production in such countries has the potential for major expansion, particularly if such developments address the key constraints of poor welfare, inadequate nutrition, poor reproduction, poor housing, and high mortality often seen with traditional systems, and if farmer access to emerging market opportunities is improved. However, as shown by previous experience, inadequate regulation and staff who lack the appropriate training to care for the welfare of intensively housed livestock can be major challenges to overcome. PMID:25000786

Cronin, G M; Rault, J L; Glatz, P C

2014-04-01

2

Biology and management of insect pests in North American intensively managed hardwood forest systems.  

SciTech Connect

Annu. Rev. Entomol. 50:1-29. Abstract Increasing demand for wood and wood products is putting stress on traditional forest production areas, leading to long-term economic and environmental concerns. Intensively managed hardwood forest systems (IMHFS), grown using conventional agricultural as well as forestry methods, can help alleviate potential problems in natural forest production areas. Although IMHFS can produce more biomass per hectare per year than natural forests, the ecologically simplified, monocultural systems may greatly increase the crops susceptibility to pests. Species in the genera Populus and Salix comprise the greatest acreage in IMHFS in North America, but other species, including Liquidambar styracifua and Platanus occidentalis, are also important. We discuss life histories, realized and potential damage, and management options for the most economically infuential pests that affect these hardwood species. The substantial inherent challenges associated with pest management in the monocultural environments created by IMHFS are reviewed. Finally, we discuss ways to design IMHFS that may reduce their susceptibility to pests, increase their growth and productivity potential, and create a more sustainable environment.

Coyle, David R.; Nebeker, T., E.; Hart, E., R.; Mattson, W., J.

2005-01-01

3

Database design of an intensive care unit patient data management system  

Microsoft Academic Search

A patient data management system (PDMS) developed for use in the intensive care unit (ICU) of the Montreal Children's Hospital is described. The PDMS acquires real-time patient data from a network of physiological bedside monitors, and facilitates the review and interpretation of this data by presenting it as graphical trends, charts, and plots on a color video display. The data

N. Fumai; C. Collet; M. Petroni; K. Roger; A. Lam; E. Saab; A. S. Malowany; F. A. Carnevale; R. D. Gottesman

1991-01-01

4

The design of a simulator for an intensive care unit patient data management system  

Microsoft Academic Search

A patient data management system (PDMS) for use in the intensive care unit (ICU) of the Montreal Children's Hospital is described. The PDMS acquires real-time patient data from a network of physiological bedside monitors and facilitates the review and interpretation of this data by presenting it as graphical trends, charts, and plots on a color video display. A patient data

N. Fumai; C. Collet; M. Petroni; A. S. Malowanyt; F. A. Carnevale; R. D. Gottesman; A. Rousseau

1990-01-01

5

Real-time trend analysis for an intensive care unit patient data management system  

Microsoft Academic Search

A real-time trend analysis module design which is currently being developed for the patient data management system (PDMS) at the pediatric intensive care unit of the Montreal Children's Hospital is discussed. The PDMS is based on a personal computer acquiring, in real time, patient data from a local area network of 14 bedside monitors, and displaying their trends graphically, among

C. Collet; L. Martini; M. Lovin; E. Massont; N. Fumai; M. Petroni; A. S. Malowany; F. A. Carnevale; R. D. Gottesman; A. Rousseau

1990-01-01

6

PanDA Beyond ATLAS : A Scalable Workload Management System For Data Intensive Science  

E-print Network

The LHC experiments are today at the leading edge of large scale distributed data-intensive computational science. The LHC's ATLAS experiment processes data volumes which are particularly extreme, over 140 PB to date, distributed worldwide at over of 120 sites. An important element in the success of the exciting physics results from ATLAS is the highly scalable integrated workflow and dataflow management afforded by the PanDA workload management system, used for all the distributed computing needs of the experiment. The PanDA design is not experiment specific and PanDA is now being extended to support other data intensive scientific applications. PanDA was cited as an example of "a high performance, fault tolerant software for fast, scalable access to data repositories of many kinds" during the "Big Data Research and Development Initiative" announcement, a 200 million USD U.S. government investment in tools to handle huge volumes of digital data needed to spur science and engineering discoveries. In this talk...

Borodin, M; The ATLAS collaboration; Jha, S; Golubkov, D; Klimentov, A; Maeno, T; Nilsson, P; Oleynik, D; Panitkin, S; Petrosyan, A; Schovancova, J; Vaniachine, A; Wenaus, T

2014-01-01

7

Solids management and removal for intensive land-based aquaculture production systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review aims to identify and examine realistic aquaculture waste solids management strategies. The main reason for treating solids to be discharged from flow-through systems is to reduce potential negative impacts on the surrounding aquatic environment. In reuse and recycle systems, solids management will be required to maintain culture water quality. In such cases, solids management will often be designed

Simon J. Cripps; Asbjųrn Bergheim

2000-01-01

8

[Quality management in intensive care medicine].  

PubMed

Treatment of critical ill patients in the intensive care unit is tantamount to well-designed risk or quality management. Several tools of quality management and quality assurance have been developed in intensive care medicine. In addition to external quality assurance by benchmarking with regard to the intensive care medicine, peer review procedures have been established for external quality assurance in recent years. In the process of peer review of an intensive care unit (ICU), external physicians and nurses visit the ICU, evaluate on-site proceedings, and discuss with the managing team of the ICU possibilities for optimization. Furthermore, internal quality management in the ICU is possible based on the 10 quality indicators of the German Interdisciplinary Society for Intensive Care Medicine (DIVI, "Deutschen Interdisziplinären Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin"). Thereby every ICU has numerous possibilities to improve their quality management system. PMID:24493011

Martin, J; Braun, J-P

2014-02-01

9

[Quality management in intensive care medicine].  

PubMed

Treatment of critical ill patients in the intensive care unit is tantamount to well-designed risk or quality management. Several tools of quality management and quality assurance have been developed in intensive care medicine. In addition to extern quality assurance by benchmarking with regard to the intensive care medicine, peer review procedures have been established for external quality assurance in recent years. In the process of peer review of an intensive care unit (ICU), external physicians and nurses visit the ICU, evaluate on-site proceedings, and discuss with the managing team of the ICU possibilities for optimization. Furthermore, internal quality management in the ICU is possible based on the 10 quality indicators of the German Interdisciplinary Society for Intensive Care Medicine (DIVI, "Deutschen Interdisziplinären Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin"). Thereby every ICU has numerous possibilities to improve their quality management system. PMID:23846174

Martin, J; Braun, J-P

2013-09-01

10

Risk Factors for Kid Mortality in West African Dwarf Goats Under an Intensive Management System in Ghana  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breeding records from 1997 to 2000 for West African Dwarf goats kept under an intensive management system on the National Breeding Station at Kintampo in Ghana were analysed for the effect on mortality of sex, season and type of birth, and birth weight. The pre-weaning and post-weaning mortalities were 10% (n = 390) and 23.1% (n = 351), respectively, while

P. K. Turkson; Y. K. Antiri; O. Baffuor-Awuah

2004-01-01

11

Grazing management strategies for the control of parasitic diseases in intensive sheep production systems.  

PubMed

The effect of forward (F) and lateral (L) creep grazing, as two possible management alternatives of intensive production systems, on the gastro-intestinal nematode epidemiology of ewes and lambs was studied. Two groups of Romanov x Rasa Aragonesa ewes rearing twins and maintained on an autumn-contaminated pasture at a mean stocking density of 35 ewes ha-1, were used. Measurements were made of the population of infective larvae on the pasture, level of serum pepsinogen, worm eggs in faeces of ewes and lambs, and lambs' growth rate. In addition, post-mortem worm counts from 'indicator' lambs were used to establish the level of infection at each rotational grazing cycle. Two different waves of nematode infection were identified. In both treatments, the over-wintering larvae were responsible for the first outbreak of parasitism which was particularly important for lambs on Treatment F. The second wave of infection apparently came up with several overlapped L3 generations and had different effects on the animals of each group. While early pasture contamination was suffered by the lambs of Treatment F, lambs on Treatment L were not seriously affected until the end of the third grazing cycle (end of May). The different grazing behaviour of lambs in both treatments appeared to be related to the outbreak of parasitism in lambs. The general pattern of liveweight gains was similar for both groups of animals. However, during the first 90 days on pasture lamb growth rate under Treatment L (193 g day-1) was significantly higher than that under Treatment F (164 g day-1). The serum pepsinogen values, worm burdens and liveweight gains indicate that under intensive systems where lateral creep grazing is allowed for lambs, the level of parasite infection is maintained within acceptable limits for the first 90 days on pasture with lambs' growth rate close to their potential. However, the parasitic consequences of grazing under a forward creeping system indicate that anthelmintic drenchings should be used at lambing and at 3-week intervals thereafter during the first 42 days on pasture, after which the risk of contamination from the over-wintering population is over. PMID:2267726

Uriarte, J; Valderrįbano, J

1990-11-01

12

Managing Intensively Grazed Pastures  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Forage production during periods of summer drought can be increased by including additional species in the pasture mixture, especially if those species have desirable attributes such as improved water use efficiency or deep root systems. Conversion of plowed fields to pasture also has the potential ...

13

Intensive dairy systems: health implications of confined housing and the influence of stress management on welfare  

Microsoft Academic Search

Regula et al. (2004) studied the effect of confinement on dairy cows kept in three intensive husbandry systems: tie stalls with regular exercise during summer but not during winter; tie stalls with regular exercise year-round; and loose-housing with regular outdoor access. The study showed that loose-housing and regular exercise throughout the year had a positive effect on lameness, teat injuries,

Sara Biasutti

14

A Catchment Systems Engineering (CSE) approach to managing intensively farmed land  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rural land management practices can have a significant impact on the hydrological and nutrient dynamics within a catchment which can dramatically alter the way it processes water, exacerbating nutrient losses from the system. A collaborative and holistic approach for managing potential conflicts between land management activity for food production alongside the aspiration to achieve good water quality and the need to make space for water can ensure the long-term sustainability of our agricultural catchments. Catchment System Engineering (CSE) is an interventionist approach to altering the catchment scale runoff regime through the manipulation of hydrological flow pathways throughout the catchment. By targeting hydrological flow pathways at source, such as overland flow, field drain and ditch function, a significant component of the runoff generation can be managed, greatly reducing erosive soil losses. Coupled with management of farm nutrients at source many runoff attenuation features or measures can be co-located to achieve benefits for water quality. Examples of community-led mitigation measures using the CSE approach will be presented from two catchments in Northumberland, Northern England, that demonstrate the generic framework for identification of multipurpose features that slow, store and filter runoff at strategic locations in the landscape. Measures include within-field barriers, edge of field traps and within-field sediment filters and sediment traps which demonstrate how sediment can be trapped locally (including silt and clay fractions) and be recovered for use back on the land. Deliverables from this CSE approach includes the reduction of downstream flood risk and capturing of sediment and associated nutrients. The CSE approach allows for a more natural flood and nutrient management approach which helps to restore vital catchment functions to re-establish a healthy catchment system.

Jonczyk, Jennine; Quinn, Paul; Barber, Nicholas; Wilkinson, Mark; ODonnell, Greg

2014-05-01

15

Reducing environmental risk by improving N management in intensive Chinese agricultural systems  

PubMed Central

Excessive N fertilization in intensive agricultural areas of China has resulted in serious environmental problems because of atmospheric, soil, and water enrichment with reactive N of agricultural origin. This study examines grain yields and N loss pathways using a synthetic approach in 2 of the most intensive double-cropping systems in China: waterlogged rice/upland wheat in the Taihu region of east China versus irrigated wheat/rainfed maize on the North China Plain. When compared with knowledge-based optimum N fertilization with 30–60% N savings, we found that current agricultural N practices with 550–600 kg of N per hectare fertilizer annually do not significantly increase crop yields but do lead to about 2 times larger N losses to the environment. The higher N loss rates and lower N retention rates indicate little utilization of residual N by the succeeding crop in rice/wheat systems in comparison with wheat/maize systems. Periodic waterlogging of upland systems caused large N losses by denitrification in the Taihu region. Calcareous soils and concentrated summer rainfall resulted in ammonia volatilization (19% for wheat and 24% for maize) and nitrate leaching being the main N loss pathways in wheat/maize systems. More than 2-fold increases in atmospheric deposition and irrigation water N reflect heavy air and water pollution and these have become important N sources to agricultural ecosystems. A better N balance can be achieved without sacrificing crop yields but significantly reducing environmental risk by adopting optimum N fertilization techniques, controlling the primary N loss pathways, and improving the performance of the agricultural Extension Service. PMID:19223587

Ju, Xiao-Tang; Xing, Guang-Xi; Chen, Xin-Ping; Zhang, Shao-Lin; Zhang, Li-Juan; Liu, Xue-Jun; Cui, Zhen-Ling; Yin, Bin; Christie, Peter; Zhu, Zhao-Liang; Zhang, Fu-Suo

2009-01-01

16

Strategies for the Management of Data-Intensive Safety-Related Systems Alastair Faulkner, M.Sc.; CSE International Ltd.; Flixborough, UK  

E-print Network

a number of options to exercise control over data integrity. One approach employs a common data dictionaryStrategies for the Management of Data-Intensive Safety-Related Systems Alastair Faulkner, M of Warwick; Coventry, UK Keywords: data, data-intensive, data-driven, safety-related systems, software

Storey, Neil

17

Precision livestock farming technologies for welfare management in intensive livestock systems.  

PubMed

The worldwide demand for meat and animal products is expected to increase by at least 40% in the next 15 years. The first question is how to achieve high-quality, sustainable and safe meat production that can meet this demand. At the same time, livestock production is currently facing serious problems. Concerns about animal health in relation to food safety and human health are increasing. The European Union wants improved animal welfare and has made a significant investment in it. At the same time, the environmental impact of the livestock sector is a major issue. Finally, it is necessary to ask how the farmer, who is the central figure in this process, will make a living from more sustainable livestock production systems. One tool that might provide real opportunities is precision livestock farming (PLF). In contrast to previous approaches, PLF systems aim to offer a real-time monitoring and management system that focuses on improving the life of the animals by warning when problems arise so that the farmer may take immediate action. Continuous, fully automatic monitoring and improvement of animal health and welfare, product yields and environmental impacts should become possible. This paper presents examples of systems that have already been developed in order to demonstrate the potential benefits of this technology. PMID:25000791

Berckmans, D

2014-04-01

18

Clinical Decision Support and Closed-Loop Control for Cardiopulmonary Management and Intensive Care Unit Sedation Using Expert Systems  

PubMed Central

Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) who require mechanical ventilation due to acute respiratory failure also frequently require the administration of sedative agents. The need for sedation arises both from patient anxiety due to the loss of personal control and the unfamiliar and intrusive environment of the ICU, and also due to pain or other variants of noxious stimuli. While physicians select the agent(s) used for sedation and cardiovascular function, the actual administration of these agents is the responsibility of the nursing staff. If clinical decision support systems and closed-loop control systems could be developed for critical care monitoring and lifesaving interventions as well as the administration of sedation and cardiopulmonary management, the ICU nurse could be released from the intense monitoring of sedation, allowing her/him to focus on other critical tasks. One particularly attractive strategy is to utilize the knowledge and experience of skilled clinicians, capturing explicitly the rules expert clinicians use to decide on how to titrate drug doses depending on the level of sedation. In this paper, we extend the deterministic rule-based expert system for cardiopulmonary management and ICU sedation framework presented in [1] to a stochastic setting by using probability theory to quantify uncertainty and hence deal with more realistic clinical situations. PMID:23620646

Gholami, Behnood; Bailey, James M.; Haddad, Wassim M.; Tannenbaum, Allen R.

2013-01-01

19

Performance of the Medtronic Sentrino continuous glucose management (CGM) system in the cardiac intensive care unit  

PubMed Central

Background Maintaining glucose in the target range, while avoiding hypoglycemia, is challenging in critically ill patients. We investigated the performance and safety of Medtronic Sentrino, a newly developed continuous glucose management (CGM) system for critically ill adults. Methods This was a prospective, single-center, single-arm, open-label study in adult patients with cardiac ICU admission. Sentrino subcutaneous glucose sensors were inserted into patients’ thigh with planned study participation of 72?h. Sensor glucose results were displayed, and the system's alerts and alarms fully enabled. Reference blood glucose was collected from central venous catheter and analyzed with a blood gas analyzer. Treatment decisions were made independently of sensor glucose values, according to the existing standard of care. Results A total of 21 patients were enrolled; all successfully completed the study. Sensor glucose values were displayed 96% of the time, and 870 paired blood glucose–sensor glucose points were analyzed. Overall mean absolute relative difference (MARD) was 12.8% (95% CI 11.9% to 13.6%). No clinically significant differences in accuracy were seen within subgroups of hemodynamic status (MARD 12.3% and 13.1% for compromised vs stable hemodynamics). Consensus grid analysis showed >99% of sensor glucose values within A/B zones. No device or study-related adverse events were reported. 100% of clinicians found Sentrino easy to use after two patients. Conclusions In our single-center experience, Sentrino CGM system demonstrated good accuracy and reliability, with no device-related adverse events in critically ill cardiac patients, and was easy to use and integrate in the cardiac ICU. Trial registration number NCT01763567. PMID:25452874

Kosiborod, Mikhail; Gottlieb, Rebecca K; Sekella, Julie A; Peterman, Diane; Grodzinsky, Anna; Kennedy, Paul; Borkon, Michael A

2014-01-01

20

Relative impacts of land-use, management intensity and fertilization on microbial community structure in agricultural systems  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Effects of agricultural land management practices on soil prokaryotic diversity have not been well described. Soil microbial communities under three agricultural management systems (conventionally tilled cropland, hayed pasture, and grazed pasture) and two fertilizer systems [inorganic fertilizer (I...

21

Impact of Intensive Case Management on Child Welfare System Involvement for Substance-Dependent Parenting Women on Public Assistance.  

PubMed

This study examined the impact of intensive case management (ICM) on decreasing child welfare system involvement in a sample of substance-dependent parenting women who participated in a welfare demonstration study comparing ICM to usual screen-and-refer models employed in welfare settings. Previous research established the effectiveness of ICM in both increasing engagement in substance abuse treatment and in promoting abstinence, and the current study tested whether ICM had downstream impacts on child welfare outcomes not directly targeted by the intervention. The sample included 302 mothers recruited from welfare offices and their 888 minor children. Child welfare outcomes were available from administrative records for four years following study entry and included incident reports and out-of-home child placements. An initial positive effect of ICM was found on child placements, but its impact lessened over time and was likely due to the increased contact with case managers that occurred early in the study. Overall, minimal benefits of ICM were found, suggesting that while ICM was effective in the areas of treatment engagement and abstinence, there were no downstream benefits for child welfare outcomes. Implications of findings in terms of increased need for cross-system collaboration are discussed. PMID:22661798

Dauber, Sarah; Neighbors, Charles; Dasaro, Chris; Riordan, Annette; Morgenstern, Jon

2012-07-01

22

Impact of Intensive Case Management on Child Welfare System Involvement for Substance-Dependent Parenting Women on Public Assistance  

PubMed Central

This study examined the impact of intensive case management (ICM) on decreasing child welfare system involvement in a sample of substance-dependent parenting women who participated in a welfare demonstration study comparing ICM to usual screen-and-refer models employed in welfare settings. Previous research established the effectiveness of ICM in both increasing engagement in substance abuse treatment and in promoting abstinence, and the current study tested whether ICM had downstream impacts on child welfare outcomes not directly targeted by the intervention. The sample included 302 mothers recruited from welfare offices and their 888 minor children. Child welfare outcomes were available from administrative records for four years following study entry and included incident reports and out-of-home child placements. An initial positive effect of ICM was found on child placements, but its impact lessened over time and was likely due to the increased contact with case managers that occurred early in the study. Overall, minimal benefits of ICM were found, suggesting that while ICM was effective in the areas of treatment engagement and abstinence, there were no downstream benefits for child welfare outcomes. Implications of findings in terms of increased need for cross-system collaboration are discussed. PMID:22661798

Dauber, Sarah; Neighbors, Charles; Dasaro, Chris; Riordan, Annette; Morgenstern, Jon

2012-01-01

23

Foundations of data-intensive science: Technology and practice for high throughput, widely distributed, data management and analysis systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Today's large-scale science projects involve world-wide collaborations depend on moving massive amounts of data from an instrument to potentially thousands of computing and storage systems at hundreds of collaborating institutions to accomplish their science. This is true for ATLAS and CMS at the LHC, and it is true for the climate sciences, Belle-II at the KEK collider, genome sciences, the SKA radio telescope, and ITER, the international fusion energy experiment. DOE's Office of Science has been collecting science discipline and instrument requirements for network based data management and analysis for more than a decade. As a result of this certain key issues are seen across essentially all science disciplines that rely on the network for significant data transfer, even if the data quantities are modest compared to projects like the LHC experiments. These issues are what this talk will address; to wit: 1. Optical signal transport advances enabling 100 Gb/s circuits that span the globe on optical fiber with each carrying 100 such channels; 2. Network router and switch requirements to support high-speed international data transfer; 3. Data transport (TCP is still the norm) requirements to support high-speed international data transfer (e.g. error-free transmission); 4. Network monitoring and testing techniques and infrastructure to maintain the required error-free operation of the many R&E networks involved in international collaborations; 5. Operating system evolution to support very high-speed network I/O; 6. New network architectures and services in the LAN (campus) and WAN networks to support data-intensive science; 7. Data movement and management techniques and software that can maximize the throughput on the network connections between distributed data handling systems, and; 8. New approaches to widely distributed workflow systems that can support the data movement and analysis required by the science. All of these areas must be addressed to enable large-scale, widely distributed data analysis systems, and the experience of the LHC can be applied to other scientific disciplines. In particular, specific analogies to the SKA will be cited in the talk.

Johnston, William; Ernst, M.; Dart, E.; Tierney, B.

2014-04-01

24

Scheduling fertilizer applications as a simple mitigation option for reducing N2O emission in intensively managed mown grassland systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A general principle in all proposed N2O mitigation options is the fertilization according to plants' requirements. Meanwhile the amount of N fertilization allowed is regulated in many countries. Due to the high pressure from food security and the need for economic efficiency the given limits are generally used up. In mown grassland systems a simple mitigation option is to optimize the timing of the fertilizer applications. Application of fertilizer, both organic manure and mineral fertilizer, is generally scheduled after each cut in a narrow time window. In practice, the delay between cut and fertilizer application is determined by weather conditions, management conditions and most important by the planning and experience of the individual farmer. Many field experiments have shown that enhanced N2O emissions tend to occur after cuts but before the application of fertilizer, especially when soils are characterized by a high WFPS. These findings suggest that the time of fertilizer application has an important implications for the N2O emission rate and that scheduling fertilization according to soil conditions might be a simple, cheap and efficient measure to mitigate N2O emissions. In this paper we report on results from a sensitivity analysis aiming at quantifying the effects of the timing of the fertilizer applications on N2O emissions from intensively managed, mown grasslands. Simulations for different time schedules were carried out with the comprehensive ecosystem model "ECOSYS" . To our knowledge this aspect has not been systematically investigated from a scientific point of view, but might have been always there within the experiences of attentive environmentally concerned farmers.

Neftel, Albrecht; Calanca, Pierluigi; Felber, Raphael; Grant, Robert; Conen, Franz

2014-05-01

25

Intensive case management for severe mental illness  

PubMed Central

Background Intensive Case Management (ICM) is a community based package of care, aiming to provide long term care for severely mentally ill people who do not require immediate admission. ICM evolved from two original community models of care, Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) and Case Management (CM), where ICM emphasises the importance of small caseload (less than 20) and high intensity input. Objectives To assess the effects of Intensive Case Management (caseload <20) in comparison with non-Intensive Case Management (caseload > 20) and with standard community care in people with severe mental illness. To evaluate whether the effect of ICM on hospitalisation depends on its fidelity to the ACT model and on the setting. Search methods For the current update of this review we searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (February 2009), which is compiled by systematic searches of major databases, hand searches and conference proceedings. Selection criteria All relevant randomised clinical trials focusing on people with severe mental illness, aged 18 to 65 years and treated in the community-care setting, where Intensive Case Management, non-Intensive Case Management or standard care were compared. Outcomes such as service use, adverse effects, global state, social functioning, mental state, behaviour, quality of life, satisfaction and costs were sought. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For binary outcomes we calculated relative risk (RR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI), on an intention-to-treat basis. For continuous data we estimated mean difference (MD) between groups and its 95% confidence interval (CI). We employed a random-effects model for analyses. We performed a random-effects meta-regression analysis to examine the association of the intervention’s fidelity to the ACT model and the rate of hospital use in the setting where the trial was conducted with the treatment effect. Main results We included 38 trials (7328 participants) in this review. The trials provided data for two comparisons: 1. ICM versus standard care, 2. ICM versus non-ICM. 1. ICM versus standard care Twenty-four trials provided data on length of hospitalisation, and results favoured Intensive Case Management (n=3595, 24 RCTs, MD ?0.86 CI ?1.37 to ?0.34). There was a high level of heterogeneity, but this significance still remained when the outlier studies were excluded from the analysis (n=3143, 20 RCTs, MD ?0.62 CI ?1.00 to ?0.23). Nine studies found participants in the ICM group were less likely to be lost to psychiatric services (n=1633, 9 RCTs, RR 0.43 CI 0.30 to 0.61, I2=49%, p=0.05). One global state scale did show an Improvement in global state for those receiving ICM, the GAF scale (n=818, 5 RCTs, MD 3.41 CI 1.66 to 5.16). Results for mental state as measured through various rating scales, however, were equivocal, with no compelling evidence that ICM was really any better than standard care in improving mental state. No differences in mortality between ICM and standard care groups occurred, either due to ’all causes’ (n=1456, 9 RCTs, RR 0.84 CI 0.48 to 1.47) or to ’suicide’ (n=1456, 9 RCTs, RR 0.68 CI 0.31 to 1.51). Social functioning results varied, no differences were found in terms of contact with the legal system and with employment status, whereas significant improvement in accommodation status was found, as was the incidence of not living independently, which was lower in the ICM group (n=1185, 4 RCTs, RR 0.65 CI 0.49 to 0.88). Quality of life data found no significant difference between groups, but data were weak. CSQ scores showed a greater participant satisfaction in the ICM group (n=423, 2 RCTs, MD 3.23 CI 2.31 to 4.14). 2. ICM versus non-ICM The included studies failed to show a significant advantage of ICM in reducing the average length of hospitalisation (n=2220, 21 RCTs, MD ?0.08 CI ?0.37 to 0.21). They did find ICM to be more advantageous than non-ICM in reducing rate of lost to follo

Dieterich, Marina; Irving, Claire B; Park, Bert; Marshall, Max

2014-01-01

26

Influence of dry period length on reproductive performance and productivity of Lacaune dairy sheep under an intensive management system.  

PubMed

Intensive management is almost the only way to ensure dairy farm profitability. The dry period length (DPL) is a key factor in the productivity and health of dairy cows, but whether the same is true of dairy sheep is unclear. This study investigated the effects of DPL on the performance of Lacaune sheep under intensive management. We recorded 8136 lactations from 4220 ewes on one farm for the period 2005-2010, and data from a total of 6762 complete lactations 1-4 were included in the study. The length of the dry period following the current lactation was studied. The larger the total milk yield (MY) and daily milk yield (DMY), the shorter was the DPL before the next lactation. DPL correlated with MY (r=-0·384), DMY (r=-0·277) and the lambing-to-conception interval (LC; r=0·201, P<0·0001) in the global analysis of all lactations (lactations 1-4). The influence of previous-DPL (P-DPL), or the length of the period prior to the start of the next lactation, was studied for 4318 lactations. P-DPL was classified into five intervals: very short (P-DPL-XS), 1-30 d; short (P-DPL-S), 31-60 d; medium (P-DPL-M), 61-90 d; long (P-DPL-L), 91-120 d; and very long (P-DPL-XL), >120 d. P-DPL positively correlated with lambing-to-next conception interval (LNC; r=0·095, P<0·0001) for lactations 1-4. LNC was significantly shorter for P-DPLs that were very short, short, or long (P-PDL-XS, 144·2±67·8 d; P-PDL-S, 149·1±57·2 d; P-PDL-L, 152·0±53·7 d) than for groups with very long or medium P-PDLs (P-DPL-XL, 161·5±62·9 d; P-DPL-M, 169·0±74·8 d; P<0·0001). Moreover, P-DPLs that were very short, long, or very long were associated with the lowest milk yields (P-PDL-XS, 377±215 l; P-PDL-l, 370±168 l; P-PDL-XL, 396±196 l). These yields were significantly lower than the yields for short and medium P-DPLs (P-DPL-S, 432±187 l; P-DPL-M, 436±191 l; P<0·0001) when averages of lactations 1-4 were analysed. These results indicate that lactations with larger MY are followed by a shorter dry period, and that a dry period of 30-90 d leads to larger yields in the next lactation. The best LNC was associated with the shortest Previous-DPL. Hence, 30-60 d should be the optimal dry period length for Lacaune sheep under intensive conditions. PMID:22850582

Hernandez, Fernando; Elvira, Laura; Gonzalez-Martin, Juan-Vicente; Astiz, Susana

2012-08-01

27

Managing malaria in the intensive care unit  

PubMed Central

The number of people travelling to malaria-endemic countries continues to increase, and malaria remains the commonest cause of serious imported infection in non-endemic areas. Severe malaria, mostly caused by Plasmodium falciparum, often requires intensive care unit (ICU) admission and can be complicated by cerebral malaria, respiratory distress, acute kidney injury, bleeding complications, and co-infection. The mortality from imported malaria remains significant. This article reviews the manifestations, complications and principles of management of severe malaria as relevant to critical care clinicians, incorporating recent studies of anti-malarial and adjunctive treatment. Effective management of severe malaria includes prompt diagnosis and early institution of effective anti-malarial therapy, recognition of complications, and appropriate supportive management in an ICU. All cases should be discussed with a specialist unit and transfer of the patient considered. PMID:24946778

Marks, M.; Gupta-Wright, A.; Doherty, J. F.; Singer, M.; Walker, D.

2014-01-01

28

Geostatistical approach for management of soil nutrients with special emphasis on different forms of potassium considering their spatial variation in intensive cropping system of West Bengal, India.  

PubMed

A large part of precision agriculture research in the developing countries is devoted towards precision nutrient management aspects. This has led to better economics and efficiency of nutrient use with off-farm advantages of environmental security. The keystone of precision nutrient management is analysis and interpretation of spatial variability of soils by establishing management zones. In this study, spatial variability of major soil nutrient contents was evaluated in the Ghoragacha village of North 24 Parganas district of West Bengal, India. Surface soil samples from 100 locations, covering different cropping systems of the village, was collected from 0 to 15 cm depth using 100?×?100 m grid system and analyzed in the laboratory to determine organic carbon (OC), available nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) contents of the soil as well as its water-soluble K (KWS), exchangeable K (KEX), and non-exchangeable forms of K (KNEX). Geostatistical analyses were performed to determine the spatial variation structure of each nutrient content within the village, followed by the generation of surface maps through kriging. Four commonly used semivariogram models, i.e., spherical, exponential, Gaussian, and linear models were fitted to each soil property, and the best one was used to prepare surface maps through krigging. Spherical model was found the best for available N and P contents, while linear and exponential model was the best for OC and available K, and for KWS and KNEK, Gausian model was the best. Surface maps of nutrient contents showed that N content (129-195 kg ha(-1)) was the most limiting factor throughout the village, while P status was generally very high ( 10-678 kg ha(-1)) in the soils of the present village. Among the different soil K fractions, KWS registered the maximum variability (CV 75 %), while the remaining soil K fractions showed moderate to high variation. Interestingly, KNEX content also showed high variability, which essentially indicates reserve native K exploitation under intensive cultivation. These maps highlight the necessity of estimating the other soil K fractions as well for better understanding of soil K supplying capacity and K fertilization strategy rather than the current recommendations, based on the plant-available K alone. In conclusion, the present study revealed that the variability of nutrient distribution was a consequence of complex interactions between the cropping system, nutrient application rates, and the native soil characteristics, and such interactions could be utilized to develop the nutrient management strategies for intensive small-holder system. PMID:25773896

Chatterjee, Sourov; Santra, Priyabrata; Majumdar, Kaushik; Ghosh, Debjani; Das, Indranil; Sanyal, S K

2015-04-01

29

Ongoing development of the Critical Care Information System: the collaborative approach to automating information management in an intensive care unit.  

PubMed

Point-of-care (bedside) clinical information systems can fulfill a variety of functions. Included in these functions are: becoming receptacles for patient data and allowing data to be manipulated into formats that facilitate clinical decision making; functioning as sources for billing and auditing processes; interfacing to other hospital systems and bringing distant data to the bedside; and being a repository for information used in the development of hierarchical and/or relational databases. The initial and ongoing development of these systems in a dynamic clinical environment requires the construction of processes and work pathways to ensure that the needs and requirements of myriad personnel, departments and agencies within the health center milieu are addressed. PMID:1482885

Hravnak, M; Stein, K L; Dale, B; Hazy, J C

1992-01-01

30

Management intensity alters decomposition via biological pathways  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Current conceptual models predict that changes in plant litter chemistry during decomposition are primarily regulated by both initial litter chemistry and the stage-or extent-of mass loss. Far less is known about how variations in decomposer community structure (e.g., resulting from different ecosystem management types) could influence litter chemistry during decomposition. Given the recent agricultural intensification occurring globally and the importance of litter chemistry in regulating soil organic matter storage, our objectives were to determine the potential effects of agricultural management on plant litter chemistry and decomposition rates, and to investigate possible links between ecosystem management, litter chemistry and decomposition, and decomposer community composition and activity. We measured decomposition rates, changes in litter chemistry, extracellular enzyme activity, microarthropod communities, and bacterial versus fungal relative abundance in replicated conventional-till, no-till, and old field agricultural sites for both corn and grass litter. After one growing season, litter decomposition under conventional-till was 20% greater than in old field communities. However, decomposition rates in no-till were not significantly different from those in old field or conventional-till sites. After decomposition, grass residue in both conventional- and no-till systems was enriched in total polysaccharides relative to initial litter, while grass litter decomposed in old fields was enriched in nitrogen-bearing compounds and lipids. These differences corresponded with differences in decomposer communities, which also exhibited strong responses to both litter and management type. Overall, our results indicate that agricultural intensification can increase litter decomposition rates, alter decomposer communities, and influence litter chemistry in ways that could have important and long-term effects on soil organic matter dynamics. We suggest that future efforts to more accurately predict soil carbon dynamics under different management regimes may need to explicitly consider how changes in litter chemistry during decomposition are influenced by the specific metabolic capabilities of the extant decomposer communities.

Wickings, Kyle; Grandy, A. Stuart; Reed, Sasha; Cleveland, Cory

2011-01-01

31

Effects of summer cover crop and residue management on cucumber growth in intensive Chinese production systems: soil nutrients, microbial properties and nematodes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Yield increases of cucumber following cover crops in a rotation system have been previously reported for intensive Chinese\\u000a agricultural production. However, little information is available as to how this system affects soil microbial properties\\u000a and nematodes. A 4-year field experiment on a greenhouse cucumber double-cropping system was conducted to investigate the\\u000a effects of four different summer cover crops on cucumber

Yongqiang Tian; Xueyan Zhang; Jun Liu; Lihong Gao

2011-01-01

32

Data-intensive management and analysis for scientifc simulations.  

SciTech Connect

Scientific simulations can produce enormous amounts of data, making the analysis of results and management of files a difficult task for scientists. The simulation management and analysis system (Smaash) described here is designed to allow scientists to easily capture, store, organize, monitor, and analyze simulation results. The system is automatic, standardized, and secure. Smaash was built using open-source tools and modularized to be independent of the scientific simulation. The web-based front-end allows the scientist to easily interact with the data, and has proved its usefulness in improving the efficiency of a scientific team's workflow. High performance parallel computing allows scientists to solve complex physical problems through computer simulation. However, the massive amounts of data generated and the complex computing environment can create additional complications. A recent review by Ludaescher et al.(2009) describes how scientific workflows can assist scientists in extracting knowledge from these data-intensive operations by automating components within pipelines. Within the fusion community, Klasky et al.(2008) and colleagues have developed a system that handles the storage management, data movement, metadata generation and management, and a means to analyze the results. In response to scientists needs, a simulation management and analysis system (Smaash) was developed at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory (USA). Smaash provides an integrated way to monitor simulations and analyze computational results; catalog, store, and retrieve simulations; and prepare output for publications. The system is independent of the particular simulation code, accessible from many HPC and browser-based platforms, and built around open-source software tools. Data security and provenance is considered throughout. The analysis components are hidden behind a web-based front end, enabling scientists to focus on their results and not get bogged down by information overload.

Hudson, R.; Norris, J.; Reid, L. B.; Cal Jordan IV, G.; Weide, K.; Papka, M. E. (CLS-CI); ( MCS); (Western Australian Geothemal Centre of Excellence, CSIRO); (School of Environmental Systems Engineering, University of Western Australia)

2011-01-01

33

LRRB Pavement Management Systems Pavement Management Systems  

E-print Network

LRRB Pavement Management Systems Pavement Management Systems Presented by: Michael Marti SRF devoted to local road research § Research is: · Managed by the LRRB · Conducted by DOT, U of M, Mn for implementing and monitoring research results (RIC) #12;LRRB Pavement Management Systems LRRB Structure LRRB

Minnesota, University of

34

Intensive care management of ischemic stroke  

Microsoft Academic Search

The practice of neurointensive care was initially developed to manage postoperative neurosurgical patients and expanded thereafter\\u000a to the management of patients with primary head trauma, intracranial hemorrhage, vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage,\\u000a elevated intracranial pressure, and unstable pulmonary or cardiovascular medical conditions in neurologic patients. Can neurointensive\\u000a care with its advanced medical and neurologic resources improve the outcome of the ischemic

Thanh Nguyen; Walter J. Koroshetz

2003-01-01

35

Does neonatal pain management in intensive care units differ between  

E-print Network

Does neonatal pain management in intensive care units differ between night and day Babak Khoshnood,1 Ricardo Carbajal1,2,18 To cite: Guedj R, Danan C, Daoud P, et al. Does neonatal pain: To determine whether analgesic use for painful procedures performed in neonates in the neonatal intensive care

36

Supporting human-intensive systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Executing critical systems often rely on humans to make important and sometimes life-critical decisions. As such systems become more complex, the potential for human error to lead to system failures also increases. In the medical domain, for example, sophisticated technology has been introduced in the last decade without adequately considering the impact and role of the medical professionals. This is

Lori A. Clarke; Leon J. Osterweil; George S. Avrunin

2010-01-01

37

Management of phosphorus, potassium, and sulfur in intensive, irrigated lowland rice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Management of soil phosphorus (P), potassium (K) and sulfur (S) resources in intensive, irrigated rice systems has received less attention than increasing cropping intensity and yields with new cultivars, irrigation, and fertilizer N. Crop requirements, input-output balance, and soil supplying capacity of P, K and S in irrigated lowland rice are reviewed. Based on projected rice production requirements, we estimate

A. Dobermann; K. G. Cassman; C. P. Mamaril; J. E. Sheehy

1998-01-01

38

Intensive management of a critically endangered species: the kakapo  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since a review of the management of the critically endangered kakapo (Strigops habroptilus) in 1994, management of this species has become more intensive. This paper reports on new developments in the supplementary feeding of kakapo, continuous monitoring and protection of nests from predators, translocations of kakapo between islands, and artificial incubation of eggs and hand-raising of chicks. Supplementary feeding probably

Graeme P Elliott; Don V Merton; Paul W Jansen

2001-01-01

39

IML-CZO: Critical Zone Observatory for Intensively Managed Landscapes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Intensively managed landscapes, regions of significant land use change, serve as a cradle for economic prosperity. However, the intensity of change is responsible for unintended deterioration of our land and water environments. By understanding present day dynamics in the context of long-term co-evolution of the Critical Zone comprising of the landscape, soil and biota, IML-CZO aims to support the assessment of short- and long-term resilience of the crucial ecological, hydrological and climatic services provided by the Critical Zone. An observational network of three sites in Illinois, Iowa, and Minnesota that capture the geological diversity of the low relief, glaciated, and tile-drained landscape will drive novel scientific and technological advances. IML-CZO will provide leadership in developing the next generation of scientists and practitioners, and informing management strategies aimed at reducing the vulnerability of the system to present and emerging trends in human activities. IML-CZO, one of the nine observatories funded by the United States National Science Foundation (NSF), consists of two core sites: the 3,690- sq. km. Upper Sangamon River Basin in Illinois and 270-sq. km. Clear Creek Watershed in Iowa, along with the 44,000- sq. km. Minnesota River Basin as third participating site. These sites together are characterized by low-relief landscapes with poorly drained soils and represent a broad range of physiographic variations found throughout the glaciated Midwest, and thereby provide an opportunity to advance understanding of the CZO in this important region. Through novel measurements, analysis and modeling, IML-CZO aims to address the following questions: • How do different time scales of geologic evolution and anthropogenic influence interact to determine the trajectory of CZ structure and function? • How is the co-evolution of biota, consisting of both vegetation and microbes, and soil affected due to intensive management? • How have dynamic patterns of connectivity, which link across transition zones and heterogeneity, changed by anthropogenic impacts? • How do these changes affect residence times and aggregate fluxes of water, carbon, nutrients, and sediment? IML-CZO will use historical data, existing observational networks, new instruments, remote sensing, sampling and laboratory analyses, and novel sensing technologies using open hardware and unmanned vehicles to study a number of variables related to climate and weather, hydrology, geology, geomorphology, soils, water chemistry, biogeochemistry, ecology, and land management. Additional details are available at imlczo.org.

Kumar, Praveen; Papanicolaou, Thanos

2014-05-01

40

Distributed Storage Systems for Data Intensive Computing  

SciTech Connect

In this chapter, the authors present an overview of the utility of distributed storage systems in supporting modern applications that are increasingly becoming data intensive. Their coverage of distributed storage systems is based on the requirements imposed by data intensive computing and not a mere summary of storage systems. To this end, they delve into several aspects of supporting data-intensive analysis, such as data staging, offloading, checkpointing, and end-user access to terabytes of data, and illustrate the use of novel techniques and methodologies for realizing distributed storage systems therein. The data deluge from scientific experiments, observations, and simulations is affecting all of the aforementioned day-to-day operations in data-intensive computing. Modern distributed storage systems employ techniques that can help improve application performance, alleviate I/O bandwidth bottleneck, mask failures, and improve data availability. They present key guiding principles involved in the construction of such storage systems, associated tradeoffs, design, and architecture, all with an eye toward addressing challenges of data-intensive scientific applications. They highlight the concepts involved using several case studies of state-of-the-art storage systems that are currently available in the data-intensive computing landscape.

Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S [ORNL; Butt, Ali R [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Ma, Xiaosong [ORNL

2012-01-01

41

Building dependability arguments for software intensive systems  

E-print Network

A method is introduced for structuring and guiding the development of end-to-end dependability arguments. The goal is to establish high-level requirements of complex software-intensive systems, especially properties that ...

Seater, Robert Morrison

2009-01-01

42

Requirements Analysis for Information-Intensive Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Report discusses role of requirements analysis in development of information-intensive systems. System examined from variety of human viewpoints during design, development, and implementation. Such examination, called requirements analysis, ensures system simultaneously meets number of distinct but interacting needs. Viewpoints defined and integrated to help attain objectives.

Callender, E. D.; Hartsough, C.; Morris, R. V.; Yamamoto, Y.

1986-01-01

43

Assessing Resilience of Intensively Managed Landscapes through Feedbacks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Intensively managed landscapes such as those of the United States agricultural Midwest are hypothesized to be on a different trajectory than natural landscapes in terms of ecosystem processes and landscape evolution. Process networks provide a method to analyze system states as patterns of couplings and feedbacks. It has been shown using FLUXNET data that variables such as precipitation, soil temperature, soil moisture, latent heat flux, and net ecosystem exchange may exhibit synchronized relationships, time-lagged forcing behavior, or feedbacks. The strength of these couplings weakens or breaks down with environmental extremes such as drought. This study compares couplings in measured fluxes observed using a process network approach with couplings of modeled ecohydrological variables. MLCan is a multi-layer canopy-air exchange model that uses FLUXNET tower climate and flux data as input to simulate leaf uptake, stomatal conductance, photosynthesis, soil hydrology, and other descriptors of ecosystem state. This model has been used to assess vegetation acclimation to climate change, altered hydrology due to biofuel crops, and root hydraulic redistribution in different ecosystems. For this study, MLCan is used to simulate conditions for the 2005 growing season at the location of the Bondville, IL flux tower. A process network is defined with nodes representing key measured and simulated variables including streamflow at a nearby gage, precipitation, radiation, soil moisture, leaf uptake, and nutrient fluxes. Couplings are identified using mutual information and transfer entropy statistics. This study effectively validates whether simulated ecosystem state variables demonstrate information flow to the same extent as measured data. The inclusion of streamflow introduces a spatial element to the process network approach that begins to link processes with topography and land use in the watershed. Analysis of coupling types and strengths can be applied to assess resilience characteristics of intensively managed versus natural landscapes.

Goodwell, A. E.; Kumar, P.

2013-12-01

44

Telemedicine as a tool for intensive management of diabetes: the DIABTel experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the current features of the DIABTel telemedicine system and the evaluation outcomes of its use in clinical routine. This telemedicine system is designed to complement the daily care and intensive management of diabetic patients through telemonitoring and telecare services. The system comprises a patient unit (PU) used by patients in their day-to-day activities and a Medical Workstation

Enrique J. Gómez; M. Elena Hernando; A. Garcķa; Francisco Del Pozo; J. Cermeńo; R. Corcoy; Eulalia Brugués; Alberto De Leiva

2002-01-01

45

Specifying Intensive Case Management: A Multiple Perspective Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intensive case management” (ICM) programs for people with serious mental illness are found widely throughout the United States. However, there is no standard definition or conceptualization of ICM. Despite these differences, ICM aspires to a set of common principles and core functions derived from the concept of continuity of care. This study attempted to identify the elements of ICM program

Richard W. Schaedle; Irwin Epstein

2000-01-01

46

A clinical decision support system prototype for cardiovascular intensive care  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the development and validation of a decision-support system prototype that can help manage hypovolemic\\u000a hypotension in the Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit (CVICU). The prototype uses physiologic pattern-matching, therapeutic\\u000a protocols, computational drug-dosage response modeling and expert reasoning heuristics in its selection of intervention strategies\\u000a and choices. As part of model testing, the prototype simulated real-time operation by processing

Francis Lau

1994-01-01

47

Energy resource management for energy-intensive manufacturing industries  

SciTech Connect

A program to introduce energy resource management into an energy-intensive manufacturing industry is presented. The food industry (SIC No. 20) was chosen and 20 companies were selected for interviews, but thirteen were actually visited. The methodology for this program is detailed. Reasons for choosing the food industry are described. The substance of the information gained and the principal conclusions drawn from the interviews are given. Results of the model Energy Resource Management Plan applied to three companies are compiled at length. Strategies for dissemination of the information gained are described. (MCW)

Brenner, C.W.; Levangie, J.

1981-10-01

48

Towards Ethical Decision Support and Knowledge Management in Neonatal Intensive Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent studies in neonatal medicine, clinical nursing, and cognitive psychology have indicated the need to augment current decision-making practice in neonatal intensive care units with computerized, intelligent decision support systems. Rapid progress in artificial intelligence and knowledge management facilitates the design of collaborative ethical decision-support tools that allow clinicians to provide better support for parents facing inherently difficult choices, such

L. Yang; M. Frize; R. C. Walker; C. Catley

2004-01-01

49

Identification of irrigation and N management practices that contribute to nitrate leaching loss from an intensive vegetable production system by use of a comprehensive survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Considerable NO3? contamination of underlying aquifers is associated with greenhouse-based vegetable production in south-eastern Spain, where 80% of cropping occurs in soil. To identify management factors likely to contribute to NO3? leaching from soil-based cropping, a survey of irrigation and N management practices was conducted in 53 commercial greenhouses. For each greenhouse: (i) a questionnaire of general irrigation and N

R. B. Thompson; C. Martķnez-Gaitan; M. Gallardo; C. Giménez; M. D. Fernįndez

2007-01-01

50

NASA's Risk Management System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Leadership is key to success. Phased-approach for implementation of risk management is necessary. Risk management system will be simple, accessible and promote communication of information to all relevant stakeholders for optimal resource allocation and risk mitigation. Risk management should be used by all team members to manage risks -- risk office personnel. Each group is assigned Risk Integrators who are facilitators for effective risk management. Risks will be managed at the lowest-level feasible, elevate only those risks that require coordination or management from above. Risk reporting and communication is an essential element of risk management and will combine both qualitative and quantitative elements. Risk informed decision making should be introduced to all levels of management. Provide necessary checks and balances to insure that risks are caught/identified and dealt with in a timely manner. Many supporting tools, processes & training must be deployed for effective risk management implementation. Process improvement must be included in the risk processes.

Perera, Jeevan S.

2011-01-01

51

The UltraLight Project: The Network as an Integrated and Managed Resource in Grid Systems for High Energy Physics and Data Intensive Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe the NSF-funded UltraLight project. The project's goal is to meet the data-intensive computing challenges of the next generation of particle physics experiments with a comprehensive, network-focused agenda. In particular we argue that instead of treating the network traditionally, as a static, unchanging and unmanaged set of inter-computer links, we instead will use it as a dynamic, configurable, and

Harvey Newman; Julian Bunn; Richard Cavanaugh; Iosif Legrand; Steven Low; Shawn McKee; Dan Nae; Sylvain Ravot; Conrad Steenberg; Xun Su; Michael Thomas; Frank van Lingen; Yang Xia

52

The Benefits of Designing a Stratification System for New York City Pediatric Intensive Care Units for Use in Regional Surge Capacity Planning and Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Accurate assessment of New York City (NYC) pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) resources and the ability to surge them during\\u000a a disaster has been recognized as an important citywide emergency preparedness activity. However, while NYC hospitals with\\u000a PICUs may be expected to surge in a disaster, few of them have detailed surge capacity plans. This will likely make it difficult

Christiana Campbell

2010-01-01

53

Operating System Resource Management  

E-print Network

Operating System Resource Management Date: Monday, September 27, 2010 Time: 2:00 ­ 3:00 pm Location Sciences Seminar Series presents Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Resource management is the dynamic as to optimize responsiveness subject to the finite resources available. Historically, resource management

54

Package Management Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

A package management system organizes and simplifies the installation and maintenance of software by standardizing and organizing the production and consumption of software collections. As a software developer, you can benefit from package managers in two ways: through a rich and stable development environment and through friction-free reuse. Promisingly, the structure that package managers bring both to the tools we

Diomidis Spinellis

2012-01-01

55

NASA's Risk Management System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Phased-approach for implementation of risk management is necessary. Risk management system will be simple, accessible and promote communication of information to all relevant stakeholders for optimal resource allocation and risk mitigation. Risk management should be used by all team members to manage risks - not just risk office personnel. Each group/department is assigned Risk Integrators who are facilitators for effective risk management. Risks will be managed at the lowest-level feasible, elevate only those risks that require coordination or management from above. Risk informed decision making should be introduced to all levels of management. ? Provide necessary checks and balances to insure that risks are caught/identified and dealt with in a timely manner. Many supporting tools, processes & training must be deployed for effective risk management implementation. Process improvement must be included in the risk processes.

Perera, Jeevan S.

2013-01-01

56

Intensity-Modulated and 3D-Conformal Radiotherapy for Whole-Ventricular Irradiation as Compared With Conventional Whole-Brain Irradiation in the Management of Localized Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumors  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To compare the sparing potential of cerebral hemispheres with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for whole-ventricular irradiation (WVI) and conventional whole-brain irradiation (WBI) in the management of localized central nervous system germ cell tumors (CNSGCTs). Methods and Materials: Ten cases of patients with localized CNSGCTs and submitted to WVI by use of IMRT with or without a 'boost' to the primary lesion were selected. For comparison purposes, similar treatment plans were produced by use of 3D-CRT (WVI with or without boost) and WBI (opposed lateral fields with or without boost), and cerebral hemisphere sparing was evaluated at dose levels ranging from 2 Gy to 40 Gy. Results: The median prescription dose for WVI was 30.6 Gy (range, 25.2-37.5 Gy), and that for the boost was 16.5 Gy (range, 0-23.4 Gy). Mean irradiated cerebral hemisphere volumes were lower for WVI with IMRT than for 3D-CRT and were lower for WVI with 3D-CRT than for WBI. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was associated with the lowest irradiated volumes, with reductions of 7.5%, 12.2%, and 9.0% at dose levels of 20, 30, and 40 Gy, respectively, compared with 3D-CRT. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy provided statistically significant reductions of median irradiated volumes at all dose levels (p = 0.002 or less). However, estimated radiation doses to peripheral areas of the body were 1.9 times higher with IMRT than with 3D-CRT. Conclusions: Although IMRT is associated with increased radiation doses to peripheral areas of the body, its use can spare a significant amount of normal central nervous system tissue compared with 3D-CRT or WBI in the setting of CNSGCT treatment.

Chen, Michael Jenwei, E-mail: michaelchen@einstein.b [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Silva Santos, Adriana da; Sakuraba, Roberto Kenji; Lopes, Cleverson Perceu; Goncalves, Vinicius Demanboro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Weltman, Eduardo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ferrigno, Robson; Cruz, Jose Carlos [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

2010-02-01

57

Managing oncology neutropenia and sepsis in the intensive care unit.  

PubMed

Neutropenic sepsis results as a post-cancer treatment complications and is considered an oncologic emergency. Neutropenic sepsis can result in mortality, especially if it is not identified at an early stage. Septic syndrome is the leading cause of nonrelapse mortality in patients with hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. Therefore, intensive care unit (ICU) nurses must possess a thorough understanding of cancer treatments, hematopoiesis, neutropenia, sepsis, risk factors, and the ability to perform a comprehensive assessment of the oncology patient. Each of these components plays a vital role in the patient's overall management following treatments with chemotherapy, radiation, and stem cell transplantation. The ICU nurse who encompasses this understanding will be able to identify neutropenic sepsis in a timely manner. The early identification of neutropenic sepsis will enable the ICU nurse to expeditiously implement preventive treatment and management to prevent mortality. PMID:25741957

Vioral, Anna N; Wentley, Dawn

2015-01-01

58

MARGINAL ABATEMENT COSTS OF REDUCING GROUNDWATER-N POLLUTION WITH INTENSIVE AND EXTENSIVE FARM MANAGEMENT CHOICES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cost-effectiveness is an important consideration in evaluating choices for meeting environmental quality objectives. Estimated crop yield response functions and the associated groundwater-nitrate pollution production functions were used to evaluate the optimal N fertilization and on-farm abatement costs for alternative cropping systems, with management choices at both the intensive and extensive margins. The cost-effective corn production system, which meets the Health

Emmanuel K. Yiridoe; Alfons Weersink

1998-01-01

59

Global Energy Management System  

E-print Network

exist to improve energy efficiency in process units, major equipment, utilities systems, and project design. Everyone has a role to play ? from plant managers, to process engineers and equipment specialists, to console operators. Detailed plans... Management System GEMS MEASUREMENT Corporate and Plant Management Business Teams Process Engineers Equipment Specialists Shift Supervision Console Operators Field Operators Plant / Site Energy Index Energy Expense Profitability Unit / Equipment Targets...

Eidt, B. D.

2005-01-01

60

Waste management system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The function of the waste management system was to control the disposition of solid and liquid wastes and waste stowage gases. The waste management system consisting of a urine subsystem and a fecal subsystem is described in detail and its overall performance is evaluated. Recommendations for improvement are given.

Sauer, R. L.; Jorgensen, G. K.

1975-01-01

61

Management Systems in Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Management systems have been adapted for educational administration in response to the need for quality of educational opportunity, collective bargaining, school district consolidation, decreasing enrollments, accountability laws, limited financial resources, and participatory decision-making. Management systems adapted, not adopted, from business…

Wagner, Ivan D.

62

Medical Information Management System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On-line interactive information processing system easily and rapidly handles all aspects of data management related to patient care. General purpose system is flexible enough to be applied to other data management situations found in areas such as occupational safety data, judicial information, or personnel records.

Alterescu, S.; Hipkins, K. R.; Friedman, C. A.

1979-01-01

63

Lithium battery management system  

DOEpatents

Provided is a system for managing a lithium battery system having a plurality of cells. The battery system comprises a variable-resistance element electrically connected to a cell and located proximate a portion of the cell; and a device for determining, utilizing the variable-resistance element, whether the temperature of the cell has exceeded a predetermined threshold. A method of managing the temperature of a lithium battery system is also included.

Dougherty, Thomas J. (Waukesha, WI)

2012-05-08

64

Effect of Management Systems on Semen Quality of Muscovy Drakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Semen quality of muscovy drakes was studied in a randomized complete block design (RCBD) under semi-intensive management system (SI), intensive system with wallow (IW) and intensive system without wallow (IO) using 12 active drakes in plot containing 60 female Ducklings. Semen collected by manual massage method 3 times at 5 days intervals beginning from week 33 showed that semen volume,

2006-01-01

65

Operations management system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of an operations management system is to provide an orderly and efficient method to operate and maintain aerospace vehicles. Concepts are described for an operations management system and the key technologies are highlighted which will be required if this capability is brought to fruition. Without this automation and decision aiding capability, the growing complexity of avionics will result in an unmanageable workload for the operator, ultimately threatening mission success or survivability of the aircraft or space system. The key technologies include expert system application to operational tasks such as replanning, equipment diagnostics and checkout, global system management, and advanced man machine interfaces. The economical development of operations management systems, which are largely software, will require advancements in other technological areas such as software engineering and computer hardware.

Brandli, A. E.; Eckelkamp, R. E.; Kelly, C. M.; Mccandless, W.; Rue, D. L.

1990-01-01

66

[Management of quality in an Intensive Care Unit: implementation of ISO 9001:2008 international standard].  

PubMed

The Quality Management Systems make it possible to prioritize actions to maintain the safety and efficacy of health technologies. The Intensive Care Unit of our hospital has implemented a quality management plan, which has obtained accreditation as "Service Certificate that manages its activities according to UNE-EN ISO 9001:2008" standard. With the application of quality management system, it has been possible to detect the needs that the Service can cover in order to obtain the satisfaction of the patient, relative or health personnel of the other services of the hospital, to improve communications inside and outside of service, to secure greater understanding of the processes of the organization and control of risk, to delimit responsibilities clearly to all the personnel, to make better use of the time and resources and, finally, to improve the motivation of the personnel. PMID:20822737

Lorenzo Torrent, R; Sįnchez Palacios, M; Santana Cabrera, L; Cobian Martinez, J L; Garcķa del Rosario, C

2010-10-01

67

Systems engineering management plans.  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) is a comprehensive and effective tool used to assist in the management of systems engineering efforts. It is intended to guide the work of all those involved in the project. The SEMP is comprised of three main sections: technical project planning and control, systems engineering process, and engineering specialty integration. The contents of each section must be tailored to the specific effort. A model outline and example SEMP are provided. The target audience is those who are familiar with the systems engineering approach and who have an interest in employing the SEMP as a tool for systems management. The goal of this document is to provide the reader with an appreciation for the use and importance of the SEMP, as well as provide a framework that can be used to create the management plan.

Rodriguez, Tamara S.

2009-10-01

68

Building waste management core indicators through Spatial Material Flow Analysis: net recovery and transport intensity indexes.  

PubMed

In this paper, the material and spatial characterization of the flows within a municipal solid waste (MSW) management system are combined through a Network-Based Spatial Material Flow Analysis. Using this information, two core indicators are developed for the bio-waste fraction, the Net Recovery Index (NRI) and the Transport Intensity Index (TII), which are aimed at assessing progress towards policy-related sustainable MSW management strategies and objectives. The NRI approaches the capacity of a MSW management system for converting waste into resources through a systematic metabolic approach, whereas the TII addresses efficiency in terms of the transport requirements to manage a specific waste flow throughout the entire MSW management life cycle. Therefore, both indicators could be useful in assessing key MSW management policy strategies, such as the consecution of higher recycling levels (sustainability principle) or the minimization of transport by locating treatment facilities closer to generation sources (proximity principle). To apply this methodological approach, the bio-waste management system of the region of Catalonia (Spain) has been chosen as a case study. Results show the adequacy of both indicators for identifying those points within the system with higher capacity to compromise its environmental, economic and social performance and therefore establishing clear targets for policy prioritization. Moreover, this methodological approach permits scenario building, which could be useful in assessing the outcomes of hypothetical scenarios, thus proving its adequacy for strategic planning. PMID:22819043

Font Vivanco, David; Puig Ventosa, Ignasi; Gabarrell Durany, Xavier

2012-12-01

69

Establishing a Regional Nitrogen Management Approach to Mitigate Greenhouse Gas Emission Intensity from Intensive Smallholder Maize Production  

PubMed Central

The overuse of Nitrogen (N) fertilizers on smallholder farms in rapidly developing countries has increased greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and accelerated global N consumption over the past 20 years. In this study, a regional N management approach was developed based on the cost of the agricultural response to N application rates from 1,726 on-farm experiments to optimize N management across 12 agroecological subregions in the intensive Chinese smallholder maize belt. The grain yield and GHG emission intensity of this regional N management approach was investigated and compared to field-specific N management and farmers' practices. The regional N rate ranged from 150 to 219 kg N ha?1 for the 12 agroecological subregions. Grain yields and GHG emission intensities were consistent with this regional N management approach compared to field-specific N management, which indicated that this regional N rate was close to the economically optimal N application. This regional N management approach, if widely adopted in China, could reduce N fertilizer use by more than 1.4 MT per year, increase maize production by 31.9 MT annually, and reduce annual GHG emissions by 18.6 MT. This regional N management approach can minimize net N losses and reduce GHG emission intensity from over- and underapplications, and therefore can also be used as a reference point for regional agricultural extension employees where soil and/or plant N monitoring is lacking. PMID:24875747

Wu, Liang; Chen, Xinping; Cui, Zhenling; Zhang, Weifeng; Zhang, Fusuo

2014-01-01

70

PanDA Beyond ATLAS: Workload Management for Data Intensive Science  

E-print Network

The PanDA Production ANd Distributed Analysis system has been developed by ATLAS to meet the experiment's requirements for a data-driven workload management system for production and distributed analysis processing capable of operating at LHC data processing scale. After 7 years of impressively successful PanDA operation in ATLAS there are also other experiments which can benefit from PanDA in the Big Data challenge, with several at various stages of evaluation and adoption. The new project "Next Generation Workload Management and Analysis System for Big Data" is extending PanDA to meet the needs of other data intensive scientific applications in HEP, astro-particle and astrophysics communities, bio-informatics and other fields as a general solution to large scale workload management. PanDA can utilize dedicated or opportunistic computing resources such as grids, clouds, and High Performance Computing facilities, and is being extended to leverage next generation intelligent networks in automated workflow mana...

Schovancova, J; The ATLAS collaboration; Klimentov, A; Maeno, T; Nilsson, P; Oleynik, D; Panitkin, S; Petrosyan, A; Vaniachine, A; Wenaus, T; Yu, D

2013-01-01

71

Redundant data management system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Redundant data management system solves problem of operating redundant equipment in real time environment where failures are detected, isolated, and switched in simple manner. System consists of quadruply-redundant computer, input/output control units, and data buses. System inherently contains failure detection, isolation, and switching function.

Hall, J. R.

1972-01-01

72

Database Management System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In 1981 Wayne Erickson founded Microrim, Inc, a company originally focused on marketing a microcomputer version of RIM (Relational Information Manager). Dennis Comfort joined the firm and is now vice president, development. The team developed an advanced spinoff from the NASA system they had originally created, a microcomputer database management system known as R:BASE 4000. Microrim added many enhancements and developed a series of R:BASE products for various environments. R:BASE is now the second largest selling line of microcomputer database management software in the world.

1990-01-01

73

Duke University Office of Continuing Studies Nonprofit Management Intensive Track Program  

E-print Network

Duke University Office of Continuing Studies offers the Nonprofit Management Intensive Track. The Nonprofit Management Intensive Track Program is designed to offer students skills needed to succeed in the nonprofit sector. Explore eight (8) key areas of nonprofit management through courses taught by established

Zhou, Pei

74

Integrated work management system.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories develops technologies to: (1) sustain, modernize, and protect our nuclear arsenal (2) Prevent the spread of weapons of mass destruction; (3) Provide new capabilities to our armed forces; (4) Protect our national infrastructure; (5) Ensure the stability of our nation's energy and water supplies; and (6) Defend our nation against terrorist threats. We identified the need for a single overarching Integrated Workplace Management System (IWMS) that would enable us to focus on customer missions and improve FMOC processes. Our team selected highly configurable commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) software with out-of-the-box workflow processes that integrate strategic planning, project management, facility assessments, and space management, and can interface with existing systems, such as Oracle, PeopleSoft, Maximo, Bentley, and FileNet. We selected the Integrated Workplace Management System (IWMS) from Tririga, Inc. Facility Management System (FMS) Benefits are: (1) Create a single reliable source for facility data; (2) Improve transparency with oversight organizations; (3) Streamline FMOC business processes with a single, integrated facility-management tool; (4) Give customers simple tools and real-time information; (5) Reduce indirect costs; (6) Replace approximately 30 FMOC systems and 60 homegrown tools (such as Microsoft Access databases); and (7) Integrate with FIMS.

Williams, Edward J., Jr.; Henry, Karen Lynne

2010-06-01

75

Oil field management system  

DOEpatents

Oil field management systems and methods for managing operation of one or more wells producing a high void fraction multiphase flow. The system includes a differential pressure flow meter which samples pressure readings at various points of interest throughout the system and uses pressure differentials derived from the pressure readings to determine gas and liquid phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flow. One or both of the gas and liquid phase mass flow rates are then compared with predetermined criteria. In the event such mass flow rates satisfy the predetermined criteria, a well control system implements a correlating adjustment action respecting the multiphase flow. In this way, various parameters regarding the high void fraction multiphase flow are used as control inputs to the well control system and thus facilitate management of well operations.

Fincke, James R.

2003-09-23

76

Computer assisted data analysis in intensive care: the ICDEV project-development of a scientific database system for intensive care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: Patient Data Management Systems (PDMS) for ICUs collect, present and store clinical data. Various intentions\\u000a make analysis of those digitally stored data desirable, such as quality control or scientific purposes. The aim of the Intensive\\u000a Care Data Evaluation project (ICDEV), was to provide a database tool for the analysis of data recorded at various ICUs at\\u000a the University Clinics

Ph. G. H. Metnitz; P. Laback; C. Popow; O. Laback; K. Lenz; M. Hiesmayr

1995-01-01

77

Steam System Data Management  

E-print Network

? Fabrication Training (Six Year Training) ? Welding Certifications ?Retired From Chevron After 25 Years ? Established A Steam System Program ? Planner For Routine Maintenance Work ? Planner For Steam System Improvements ? Wal-Tech Valve, Inc. ? Purchased... Wal-Tech Valve, Inc. In 2007 ? Implemented Safety, Quality Control, And Management Processes ? Established A Steam System Department ? Improved Computer Systems And Software ESL-IE-13-05-35 Proceedings of the Thrity-Fifth Industrial Energy...

Roberts, D.

2013-01-01

78

Managing the Management: CORBAbased Instrumentation of Management Systems  

E-print Network

Managing the Management: CORBAĀ­based Instrumentation of Management Systems A. Keller Munich Network Management Team Department of Computer Science, TU MĖ? unchen Arcisstr. 21, DĀ­80333 Munich, Germany akeller@ieee.org Proceedings of the Sixth IFIP/IEEE International Symposium on Integrated Network Management (IM'99), Boston

79

Data Grid Management Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The "Grid" is an emerging infrastructure for coordinating access across autonomous organizations to distributed, heterogeneous computation and data resources. Data grids are being built around the world as the next generation data handling systems for sharing, publishing, and preserving data residing on storage systems located in multiple administrative domains. A data grid provides logical namespaces for users, digital entities and storage resources to create persistent identifiers for controlling access, enabling discovery, and managing wide area latencies. This paper introduces data grids and describes data grid use cases. The relevance of data grids to digital libraries and persistent archives is demonstrated, and research issues in data grids and grid dataflow management systems are discussed.

Moore, Reagan W.; Jagatheesan, Arun; Rajasekar, Arcot; Wan, Michael; Schroeder, Wayne

2004-01-01

80

Computer memory management system  

DOEpatents

A computer memory management system utilizing a memory structure system of "intelligent" pointers in which information related to the use status of the memory structure is designed into the pointer. Through this pointer system, The present invention provides essentially automatic memory management (often referred to as garbage collection) by allowing relationships between objects to have definite memory management behavior by use of coding protocol which describes when relationships should be maintained and when the relationships should be broken. In one aspect, the present invention system allows automatic breaking of strong links to facilitate object garbage collection, coupled with relationship adjectives which define deletion of associated objects. In another aspect, The present invention includes simple-to-use infinite undo/redo functionality in that it has the capability, through a simple function call, to undo all of the changes made to a data model since the previous `valid state` was noted.

Kirk, III, Whitson John (Greenwood, MO)

2002-01-01

81

Purge water management system  

DOEpatents

A purge water management system for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

Cardoso-Neto, Joao E. (North Augusta, SC); Williams, Daniel W. (Aiken, SC)

1996-01-01

82

Using energy management systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article shows how energy savings are possible for all types of buildings in diverse climates through proper application and use of energy management systems (EMS). It is emphasized that making the decision about what type of systems best suits the needs of the individual facility calls for thorough analysis. It is pointed out that once the decision is made,

Caffrey

1983-01-01

83

Beyond Management Information Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conventional management information systems attempt to aid deci sion making by providing administrators with all of the potentially rele vant data. The critique of this approach is theoretical (from information theory) and practical (from the characteristics of organizational decision makers). An alternative approach, based on general systems theory con siderations, is presented.Barry Clemson is an Assistant Professor in the Department

Barry Clemson

1978-01-01

84

Equipment management system (EMS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Equipment Management System (EMS) is a software tool used to monitor and track equipment states, restrictions and PM schedules in real time. EMS has been designed and customized to support the MOS-2 die production facility. The system provides graphical representation of the entire factory. Color coded icons represent equipment's current state (i.e. qualification, production, unscheduled maintenance, etc.). Preventative maintenance schedules

T. Yurtsever; M. Comerford

1995-01-01

85

Purge water management system  

DOEpatents

A purge water management system is described for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

Cardoso-Neto, J.E.; Williams, D.W.

1995-01-01

86

/Processes, Systems & Performance Manager 5 / / -  

E-print Network

/Processes, Systems & Performance Manager://jobs.teva.co.il/pos5935?referrerId=439 Processes, Systems & Performance Manager-" HTTP://jobs.teva.co.il/pos5917?referrer; / / : - CRO. . . , , . : / ( ) / -3 -data management - / CRO

Pinsky, Ross

87

Management Information System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

New Automated Management Information Center (AMIC) employs innovative microcomputer techniques to create color charts, viewgraphs, or other data displays in a fraction of the time formerly required. Developed under Kennedy Space Center's contract by Boeing Services International Inc., Seattle, WA, AMIC can produce an entirely new informational chart in 30 minutes, or an updated chart in only five minutes. AMIC also has considerable potential as a management system for business firms.

1984-01-01

88

Guiding requirements engineering for software-intensive embedded systems in the automotive industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past decade, a dramatic increase of functionality, quantity, size, and complexity of software-intensive embedded\\u000a systems in the automotive industry can be observed. In particular, the growing complexity drives current requirements engineering\\u000a practices to the limits. In close cooperation between partners from industry and academia, the recently completed REMsES (Requirements Engineering and Management for software-intensive Embedded Systems) project has

Peter Braun; Manfred Broy; Frank Houdek; Matthias Kirchmayr; Mark Müller; Birgit Penzenstadler; Klaus Pohl; Thorsten Weyer

89

Supporting Human-Intensive Systems Lori A. Clarke  

E-print Network

to make important and sometimes life-critical decisions. As such systems become more complex important, and sometime life-critical, decisions. This position paper argues that human-intensive systems Terms Documentation, Design, Verification. Keywords Human-intensive systems, process improvement, life-critical

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

90

Managing Conflict in Temporary Management Systems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As organizational tasks have grown more complex, several innovative temporary management systems such as matrix management have been developed. The Apollo space program has been an important contribution to the development of matrix management techniques. Discusses the role of conflict within the matrix, its determinants, and the process of…

Wilemon, David L.

1973-01-01

91

Building waste management core indicators through Spatial Material Flow Analysis: Net recovery and transport intensity indexes  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sustainability and proximity principles have a key role in waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Core indicators are needed in order to quantify and evaluate them. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A systematic, step-by-step approach is developed in this study for their development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transport may play a significant role in terms of environmental and economic costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Policy action is required in order to advance in the consecution of these principles. - Abstract: In this paper, the material and spatial characterization of the flows within a municipal solid waste (MSW) management system are combined through a Network-Based Spatial Material Flow Analysis. Using this information, two core indicators are developed for the bio-waste fraction, the Net Recovery Index (NRI) and the Transport Intensity Index (TII), which are aimed at assessing progress towards policy-related sustainable MSW management strategies and objectives. The NRI approaches the capacity of a MSW management system for converting waste into resources through a systematic metabolic approach, whereas the TII addresses efficiency in terms of the transport requirements to manage a specific waste flow throughout the entire MSW management life cycle. Therefore, both indicators could be useful in assessing key MSW management policy strategies, such as the consecution of higher recycling levels (sustainability principle) or the minimization of transport by locating treatment facilities closer to generation sources (proximity principle). To apply this methodological approach, the bio-waste management system of the region of Catalonia (Spain) has been chosen as a case study. Results show the adequacy of both indicators for identifying those points within the system with higher capacity to compromise its environmental, economic and social performance and therefore establishing clear targets for policy prioritization. Moreover, this methodological approach permits scenario building, which could be useful in assessing the outcomes of hypothetical scenarios, thus proving its adequacy for strategic planning.

Font Vivanco, David, E-mail: font@cml.leidenuniv.nl [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Puig Ventosa, Ignasi [ENT Environment and Management, Carrer Sant Joan 39, First Floor, 08800 Vilanova i la Geltru, Barcelona (Spain); Gabarrell Durany, Xavier [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

2012-12-15

92

Carbon mineralization in the soils under different cover crops and residue management in an intensive protected vegetable cultivation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Continuous cropping under plastic greenhouses, a common practice in intensive Chinese vegetable production systems, has led to the decline of soil productivity and crop yields. A 4-year greenhouse experiment on cucumber double-cropping systems was conducted in Changping country, Beijing, China, to investigate the effects of summer cover crops and residue management on soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC), C mineralization and

Yongqiang Tian; Juan Liu; Xuhui Wang; Lihong Gao

2011-01-01

93

Management control system description  

SciTech Connect

This Management Control System (MCS) description describes the processes used to manage the cost and schedule of work performed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) for the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), Richland, Washington. Westinghouse Hanford will maintain and use formal cost and schedule management control systems, as presented in this document, in performing work for the DOE-RL. This MCS description is a controlled document and will be modified or updated as required. This document must be approved by the DOE-RL; thereafter, any significant change will require DOE-RL concurrence. Westinghouse Hanford is the DOE-RL operations and engineering contractor at the Hanford Site. Activities associated with this contract (DE-AC06-87RL10930) include operating existing plant facilities, managing defined projects and programs, and planning future enhancements. This document is designed to comply with Section I-13 of the contract by providing a description of Westinghouse Hanford's cost and schedule control systems used in managing the above activities. 5 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

Bence, P. J.

1990-10-01

94

DLR PSP system intensity and lifetime measurements  

Microsoft Academic Search

DLR started at 1995 with there own PSP activities. A phase of extensive exploration of hard- and software components followed and internal measurements using the intensity and lifetime method which includes spectra, calibration curves, etc. were performed. A repeatability study was made on the DASA HYTEX model, comparing the Inteco OPMS measurements from 1992\\/94 with the now existing DLR PSP

R. H. Engler; C. Klein

1997-01-01

95

Management Information Systems Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Management Information Systems Manual for the Illinois Community College Board (ICCB) provides basic information for submitting data to the ICCB. The manual is published every two years, and an addendum is published in the off years. It highlights and summarizes information from other documents, without being meant to replace those documents.…

Illinois Community Coll. Board, Springfield.

96

Management Information Systems.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of papers addresses key questions facing college managers and others choosing, introducing, and living with big, complex computer-based systems. "What Use the User Requirement?" (Tony Coles) stresses the importance of an information strategy driven by corporate objectives, not technology. "Process of Selecting a Computerised MIS in…

Finlayson, Jean, Ed.

1989-01-01

97

Content Management Systems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the authors provide a guide in acquiring content management system. They conducted a vendor survey that covers four areas: (1) general information about the product (including standards supported); (2) administration of the product; (3) functionality; and (4) contact information for readers who want to know more. A list of product…

Wisniewski, Jeff; Stenstrom, Cheryl

2007-01-01

98

Building an intelligent camera management system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Given rapid improvements in storage devices, network infrastructure and streaming-media technologies, a large number of corporations and universities are recording lectures and making them available online for anytime, anywhere access. However, producing high-quality lecture videos is still labor intensive and expensive. Fortunately, recent technology advances are making it feasible to build automated camera management systems to capture lectures. In this

Yong Rui; Li-wei He; Anoop Gupta; Qiong Liu

2001-01-01

99

Use of the male effect to induce reproductive activity in ovine intensive breeding systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The presence of the male effect and its importance in the reproductive management of Columbia ewes was evaluated during a comparative study between a herd of ewes subjected to an annual breeding system with services in November (AS) and another herd subjected to an intensive system with breeding periods in November, July and March (IS). The two herds were kept

José De Lucas Tron; Luis Alberto Zarco Quintero; Carlos Vįsquez Pelįez

100

Phase Diagram and Scattering Intensity of Binary Amphiphilic Systems  

E-print Network

Phase Diagram and Scattering Intensity of Binary Amphiphilic Systems G. Gompper and Ulrich S parameter, which describe the con- centration and orientation of the amphiphile, respectively, is used to study the phase diagram and the scattering intensity of binary amphiphilic systems. With increasing

Schwarz, Ulrich

101

Root zone sensors for irrigation management in intensive agriculture.  

PubMed

Crop irrigation uses more than 70% of the world's water, and thus, improving irrigation efficiency is decisive to sustain the food demand from a fast-growing world population. This objective may be accomplished by cultivating more water-efficient crop species and/or through the application of efficient irrigation systems, which includes the implementation of a suitable method for precise scheduling. At the farm level, irrigation is generally scheduled based on the grower's experience or on the determination of soil water balance (weather-based method). An alternative approach entails the measurement of soil water status. Expensive and sophisticated root zone sensors (RZS), such as neutron probes, are available for the use of soil and plant scientists, while cheap and practical devices are needed for irrigation management in commercial crops. The paper illustrates the main features of RZS' (for both soil moisture and salinity) marketed for the irrigation industry and discusses how such sensors may be integrated in a wireless network for computer-controlled irrigation and used for innovative irrigation strategies, such as deficit or dual-water irrigation. The paper also consider the main results of recent or current research works conducted by the authors in Tuscany (Italy) on the irrigation management of container-grown ornamental plants, which is an important agricultural sector in Italy. PMID:22574047

Pardossi, Alberto; Incrocci, Luca; Incrocci, Giorgio; Malorgio, Fernando; Battista, Piero; Bacci, Laura; Rapi, Bernardo; Marzialetti, Paolo; Hemming, Jochen; Balendonck, Jos

2009-01-01

102

Root Zone Sensors for Irrigation Management in Intensive Agriculture  

PubMed Central

Crop irrigation uses more than 70% of the world’s water, and thus, improving irrigation efficiency is decisive to sustain the food demand from a fast-growing world population. This objective may be accomplished by cultivating more water-efficient crop species and/or through the application of efficient irrigation systems, which includes the implementation of a suitable method for precise scheduling. At the farm level, irrigation is generally scheduled based on the grower’s experience or on the determination of soil water balance (weather-based method). An alternative approach entails the measurement of soil water status. Expensive and sophisticated root zone sensors (RZS), such as neutron probes, are available for the use of soil and plant scientists, while cheap and practical devices are needed for irrigation management in commercial crops. The paper illustrates the main features of RZS’ (for both soil moisture and salinity) marketed for the irrigation industry and discusses how such sensors may be integrated in a wireless network for computer-controlled irrigation and used for innovative irrigation strategies, such as deficit or dual-water irrigation. The paper also consider the main results of recent or current research works conducted by the authors in Tuscany (Italy) on the irrigation management of container-grown ornamental plants, which is an important agricultural sector in Italy. PMID:22574047

Pardossi, Alberto; Incrocci, Luca; Incrocci, Giorgio; Malorgio, Fernando; Battista, Piero; Bacci, Laura; Rapi, Bernardo; Marzialetti, Paolo; Hemming, Jochen; Balendonck, Jos

2009-01-01

103

Air System Information Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

I flew to Washington last week, a trip rich in distributed information management. Buying tickets, at the gate, in flight, landing and at the baggage claim, myriad messages about my reservation, the weather, our flight plans, gates, bags and so forth flew among a variety of travel agency, airline and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) computers and personnel. By and large, each kind of information ran on a particular application, often specialized to own data formats and communications network. I went to Washington to attend an FAA meeting on System-Wide Information Management (SWIM) for the National Airspace System (NAS) (http://www.nasarchitecture.faa.gov/Tutorials/NAS101.cfm). NAS (and its information infrastructure, SWIM) is an attempt to bring greater regularity, efficiency and uniformity to the collection of stovepipe applications now used to manage air traffic. Current systems hold information about flight plans, flight trajectories, weather, air turbulence, current and forecast weather, radar summaries, hazardous condition warnings, airport and airspace capacity constraints, temporary flight restrictions, and so forth. Information moving among these stovepipe systems is usually mediated by people (for example, air traffic controllers) or single-purpose applications. People, whose intelligence is critical for difficult tasks and unusual circumstances, are not as efficient as computers for tasks that can be automated. Better information sharing can lead to higher system capacity, more efficient utilization and safer operations. Better information sharing through greater automation is possible though not necessarily easy.

Filman, Robert E.

2004-01-01

104

Power management system  

DOEpatents

A method of managing power resources for an electrical system of a vehicle may include identifying enabled power sources from among a plurality of power sources in electrical communication with the electrical system and calculating a threshold power value for the enabled power sources. A total power load placed on the electrical system by one or more power consumers may be measured. If the total power load exceeds the threshold power value, then a determination may be made as to whether one or more additional power sources is available from among the plurality of power sources. At least one of the one or more additional power sources may be enabled, if available.

Algrain, Marcelo C. (Peoria, IL); Johnson, Kris W. (Washington, IL); Akasam, Sivaprasad (Peoria, IL); Hoff, Brian D. (East Peoria, IL)

2007-10-02

105

Petascale system management experiences.  

SciTech Connect

Petascale High-Performance Computing (HPC) systems are among the largest systems in the world. Intrepid, one such system, is a 40,000 node, 556 teraflop Blue Gene/P system that has been deployed at Argonne National Laboratory. In this paper, we provide some background about the system and our administration experiences. In particular, due to the scale of the system, we have faced a variety of issues, some surprising to us, that are not common in the commodity world. We discuss our expectations, these issues, and approaches we have used to address them. HPC systems are a bellwether for computing systems at large, in multiple regards. HPC users are motivated by the need for absolute performance; this results in two important pushes. HPC users are frequently early adopters of new technologies and techniques. Successful technologies, like Infiniband, prove their value in HPC before gaining wider adoption. Unfortunately, this early adoption alone is not sufficient to achieve the levels of performance required by HPC users; parallelism must also be harnessed. Over the last 15 years, beowulf clustering has provided amazing accessibility to non-HPC-savvy and even non-technical audiences. During this time, substantial adoption of clustering has occurred in many market segments unrelated to computational science. A simple trend has emerged: the scale and performance of high-end HPC systems are uncommon at first, but become commonplace over the course of 3-5 years. For example, in early 2003, several systems on the Top500 list consisted of either 1024 nodes or 4096-8192 cores. In 2008, such systems are commonplace. The most recent generation of high-end HPC systems, so called petascale systems, are the culmination of years of research and development in research and academia. Three such systems have been deployed thus far. In addition to the 556 TF Intrepid system at Argonne National Laboratory, a 596 TF Blue Gene/L-based system has been deployed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and a 504 TF Opteron-based system has been deployed at Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC). Intrepid is comprised of 40,960 nodes with a total of 163,840 cores. While systems like these are uncommon now, we expect them to become more widespread in the coming years. The scale of these large systems impose several requirements upon system architecture. The need for scalability is obvious, however, power efficiency and density constraints have become increasingly important in recent years. At the same time, because the size of administrative staff cannot grow linearly with the system size, more efficient system management techniques are needed. In this paper we will describe our experiences administering Intrepid. Over the last year, we have experienced a number of interesting challenges in this endeavor. Our initial expectation was for scalability to be the dominant system issue. This expectation was not accurate. Several issues expected to have minor impact have played a much greater role in system operations. Debugging, due to the large numbers of components used in scalable system operations, has become a much more difficult endeavor. The system has a sophisticated monitoring system, however, the analysis of this data has been problematic. These issues are not specific to HPC workloads in any way, so we expect them to be of general interest. This paper consists of three major parts. First, we will provide a detailed overview of several important aspects of Intrepid's hardware and software. In this, we will highlight aspects that have featured prominently in our system management experiences. Next, we will describe our administration experiences in detail. Finally, we will draw some conclusions based on these experiences. In particular, we will discuss the implications for the non-HPC world, system managers, and system software developers.

Desai, N.; Bradshaw, R.; Lueninghoener, C.; Cherry, A.; Coghlan, S.; Scullin, W. (LCF); ( MCS)

2008-01-01

106

A system management methodology for building successful resource management systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents a system management methodology for building successful resource management systems that possess lifecycle effectiveness. This methodology is based on an analysis of the traditional practice of Systems Engineering Management as it applies to the development of resource management systems. The analysis produced fifteen significant findings presented as recommended adaptations to the traditional practice of Systems Engineering Management to accommodate system development when the requirements are incomplete, unquantifiable, ambiguous and dynamic. Ten recommended adaptations to achieve operational effectiveness when requirements are incomplete, unquantifiable or ambiguous are presented and discussed. Five recommended adaptations to achieve system extensibility when requirements are dynamic are also presented and discussed. The authors conclude that the recommended adaptations to the traditional practice of Systems Engineering Management should be implemented for future resource management systems and that the technology exists to build these systems extensibly.

Hornstein, Rhoda Shaller; Willoughby, John K.

1989-01-01

107

Disney's Enterprise Energy Management Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Disney's Enterprise Energy Management Systems integrates commercial energy management systems with custom web-based energy information systems. This technology-based solution is used throughout the Walt Disney World Resort organization by administrative managers, engineering, operations and maintenance staff, and cast members. Using Disney's energy information system, each Disney business unit's energy usage is continually measured using a “utility report card.” This special

Paul J. Allen

2007-01-01

108

Project Management vs. Systems Engineering Management: A Practitioners' View on  

E-print Network

Project Management vs. Systems Engineering Management: A Practitioners' View on Integrating Engineering and Management, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000, Israel 2 EngineeringPROJECT MANAGEMENT VS. SYSTEMS ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT Received 3 August 2010; Revised 18 December 2010

de Weck, Olivier L.

109

Intensive management in grasslands causes diffuse water pollution at the farm scale.  

PubMed

Arable land use is generally assumed to be the largest contributor to agricultural diffuse pollution. This study adds to the growing evidence that conventional temperate intensively managed lowland grasslands contribute significantly to soil erosion and diffuse pollution rates. This is the first grassland study to monitor hydrological characteristics and multiple pollutant fluxes (suspended sediment [SS] and the macronutrients: total oxidized nitrogen-N [TON], total phosphorus [TP], and total carbon [TC]) at high temporal resolution (monitoring up to every 15 min) over 1 yr. Monitoring was conducted across three fields (6.5-7.5 ha) on the North Wyke Farm Platform, UK. The estimated annual erosion rates (up to 527.4 kg ha), TP losses (up to 0.9 kg ha), and TC losses (up to 179 kg ha) were similar to or exceeded the losses reported for other grassland, mixed land-use, and arable sites. Annual yields of TON (up to 3 kg ha) were less than arable land-use fluxes and earlier grassland N studies, an important result as the study site is situated within a Nitrate Vulnerable Zone. The high-resolution monitoring allowed detailed "system's functioning" understanding of hydrological processes, mobilization- transport pathways of individual pollutants, and the changes of the relative importance of diffuse pollutants through flow conditions and time. Suspended sediment and TP concentrations frequently exceeded water quality guidelines recommended by the European Freshwater Fisheries Directive (25 mg L) and the European Water Framework Directive (0.04 mg soluble reactive P L), suggesting that intensively managed grasslands pose a significant threat to receiving surface waters. Such sediment and nutrient losses from intensively managed grasslands should be acknowledged in land management guidelines and advice for future compliance with surface water quality standards. PMID:25602218

Peukert, Sabine; Griffith, Bruce A; Murray, Phillip J; Macleod, Christopher J A; Brazier, Richard E

2014-11-01

110

Data Management System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

CENTRA 2000 Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Auto-trol technology, obtained permission to use software originally developed at Johnson Space Center for the Space Shuttle and early Space Station projects. To support their enormous information-handling needs, a product data management, electronic document management and work-flow system was designed. Initially, just 33 database tables comprised the original software, which was later expanded to about 100 tables. This system, now called CENTRA 2000, is designed for quick implementation and supports the engineering process from preliminary design through release-to-production. CENTRA 2000 can also handle audit histories and provides a means to ensure new information is distributed. The product has 30 production sites worldwide.

1997-01-01

111

Management systems research study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development of a Monte Carlo simulation of procurement activities at the NASA Ames Research Center is described. Data cover: simulation of the procurement cycle, construction of a performance evaluation model, examination of employee development, procedures and review of evaluation criteria for divisional and individual performance evaluation. Determination of the influences and apparent impact of contract type and structure and development of a management control system for planning and controlling manpower requirements.

Bruno, A. V.

1975-01-01

112

A guideline management system.  

PubMed

This paper describes the architecture of NewGuide, a guide-line management system for handling the whole life cycle of a computerized clinical practice guideline. NewGuide components are organized in a distributed architecture: an editor to formalize guidelines, a repository to store them, an inference engine to implement guidelines instances in a multi-user environment, and a reporting system storing the guidelines logs in order to be able to completely trace any individual physician guideline-based decision process. There is a system "central level" that maintains official versions of the guidelines, and local Healthcare Organizations may download and implement them according to their needs. The architecture has been implemented using the Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) platform. Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) and a set of con-tracts are the key factors for the integration of NewGuide with healthcare legacy systems. They allow maintaining unchanged legacy user interfaces and connecting the system with what-ever electronic patient record. The system functionality will be illustrated in three different contexts: homecare-based pressure ulcer prevention, acute ischemic stroke treatment and heart failure management by general practitioners. PMID:15360768

Ciccarese, Paolo; Caffi, Ezio; Boiocchi, Lorenzo; Quaglini, Silvana; Stefanelli, Mario

2004-01-01

113

Training Management Information System  

SciTech Connect

The Training Management Information System (TMIS) is an integrated information system for all training related activities. TMIS is at the leading edge of training information systems used in the nuclear industry. The database contains all the necessary records to confirm the department's adherence to accreditation criteria and houses all test questions, student records and information needed to evaluate the training process. The key to the TMIS system is that the impact of any change (i.e., procedure change, new equipment, safety incident in the commercial nuclear industry, etc.) can be tracked throughout the training process. This ensures the best training can be performed that meets the needs of the employees. TMIS is comprised of six functional areas: Job and Task Analysis, Training Materials Design and Development, Exam Management, Student Records/Scheduling, Evaluation, and Commitment Tracking. The system consists of a VAX 6320 Cluster with IBM and MacIntosh computers tied into an ethernet with the VAX. Other peripherals are also tied into the system: Exam Generation Stations to include mark sense readers for test grading, Production PC's for Desk-Top Publishing of Training Material, and PC Image Workstations. 5 figs.

Rackley, M.P.

1989-01-01

114

Quantifying grazing intensities using geographic information systems and satellite remote sensing in the Xilingol steppe region, Inner Mongolia, China  

Microsoft Academic Search

Satellite remote sensing can be used to assess grazing intensities and provide information on grassland management. A methodology was developed for quantifying the effects of grazing intensities (GI) using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) obtained by the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) on-board the earth observing system (EOS) terra satellite. A combination of GPS (global positioning system) and GIS

Kensuke Kawamura; Tsuyoshi Akiyama; Hiro-omi Yokota; Michio Tsutsumi; Taisuke Yasuda; Osamu Watanabe; Shiping Wang

2005-01-01

115

Resources Management System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Delta Data Systems, Inc. was originally formed by NASA and industry engineers to produce a line of products that evolved from ELAS, a NASA-developed computer program. The company has built on that experience, using ELAS as the basis for other remote sensing products. One of these is AGIS, a computer package for geographic and land information systems. AGIS simultaneously processes remotely sensed and map data. The software is designed to operate on a low cost microcomputer, putting resource management tools within reach of small operators.

1993-01-01

116

The social embedding of management control in knowledge-intensive firms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The management and the control of knowledge-intensive organizations have recently been subject to empirical studies. Much of the literature suggests that management control, defined and operationalized in a variety of ways and examined within different traditions, in essence affects co-workers negatively. On the other hand, proponents of management control practices such as consultants stress the positive and productive

Mats Edenius; Alexander Styhre

2009-01-01

117

Choosing & Using Assessment Management Systems  

E-print Network

. Smith, Peter. "Assessment Data Management System and Introduction to Library Strategies." PaperChoosing & Using Assessment Management Systems: What Librarians Need to Know Jackie Belanger (Univ 6. Repository capacity 7. Data management 8. System integration 9. Support services 10. Reporting 11

Oakleaf, Megan

118

Avian Species Richness in Relation to Intensive Forest Management Practices in Early Seral Tree Plantations  

PubMed Central

Background Managers of landscapes dedicated to forest commodity production require information about how practices influence biological diversity. Individual species and communities may be threatened if management practices truncate or simplify forest age classes that are essential for reproduction and survival. For instance, the degradation and loss of complex diverse forest in young age classes have been associated with declines in forest-associated Neotropical migrant bird populations in the Pacific Northwest, USA. These declines may be exacerbated by intensive forest management practices that reduce hardwood and broadleaf shrub cover in order to promote growth of economically valuable tree species in plantations. Methodology and Principal Findings We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to evaluate relationships between avian species richness and vegetation variables that reflect stand management intensity (primarily via herbicide application) on 212 tree plantations in the Coast Range, Oregon, USA. Specifically, we estimated the influence of broadleaf hardwood vegetation cover, which is reduced through herbicide applications, on bird species richness and individual species occupancy. Our model accounted for imperfect detection. We used average predictive comparisons to quantify the degree of association between vegetation variables and species richness. Both conifer and hardwood cover were positively associated with total species richness, suggesting that these components of forest stand composition may be important predictors of alpha diversity. Estimates of species richness were 35–80% lower when imperfect detection was ignored (depending on covariate values), a result that has critical implications for previous efforts that have examined relationships between forest composition and species richness. Conclusion and Significance Our results revealed that individual and community responses were positively associated with both conifer and hardwood cover. In our system, patterns of bird community assembly appear to be associated with stand management strategies that retain or increase hardwood vegetation while simultaneously regenerating the conifer cover in commercial tree plantations. PMID:22905249

Jones, Jay E.; Kroll, Andrew J.; Giovanini, Jack; Duke, Steven D.; Ellis, Tana M.; Betts, Matthew G.

2012-01-01

119

Managing the management: CORBA-based instrumentation of management systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

In liberalized (tele)communication markets, the goal of integrated management has become particularly demanding because now an arbitrary number of service providers need to dynamically exchange customer- and technology-related data. In this context, management systems are crucial for seamless interworking because they contain the management information that has to be shared between service providers: on the one hand, different service providers

A. Keller

1999-01-01

120

Kepler + Hadoop: a general architecture facilitating data-intensive applications in scientific workflow systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

MapReduce provides a parallel and scalable programming model for data-intensive business and scientific applications. MapReduce and its de facto open source project, called Hadoop, support parallel processing on large datasets with capabilities including automatic data partitioning and distribution, load balancing, and fault tolerance management. Meanwhile, scientific workflow management systems, e.g., Kepler, Taverna, Triana, and Pegasus, have demonstrated their ability to

Jianwu Wang; Daniel Crawl; Ilkay Altintas

2009-01-01

121

NET GLOBAL WARMING POTENTIAL AND GREENHOUSE GAS INTENSITY IN IRRIGATED CROPPING SYSTEMS IN NORTHEASTERN COLORADO  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The impact of management on global warming potential (GWP), crop production, and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) in irrigated agriculture is not well documented. A no-till (NT) cropping systems study initiated in 1999 to evaluate soil organic C (SOC) sequestration potential in irrigated agriculture...

122

Management issues for high performance storage systems  

SciTech Connect

Managing distributed high-performance storage systems is complex and, although sharing common ground with traditional network and systems management, presents unique storage-related issues. Integration technologies and frameworks exist to help manage distributed network and system environments. Industry-driven consortia provide open forums where vendors and users cooperate to leverage solutions. But these new approaches to open management fall short addressing the needs of scalable, distributed storage. We discuss the motivation and requirements for storage system management (SSM) capabilities and describe how SSM manages distributed servers and storage resource objects in the High Performance Storage System (HPSS), a new storage facility for data-intensive applications and large-scale computing. Modem storage systems, such as HPSS, require many SSM capabilities, including server and resource configuration control, performance monitoring, quality of service, flexible policies, file migration, file repacking, accounting, and quotas. We present results of initial HPSS SSM development including design decisions and implementation trade-offs. We conclude with plans for follow-on work and provide storage-related recommendations for vendors and standards groups seeking enterprise-wide management solutions.

Louis, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Burris, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-03-01

123

Environmental Management System Plan  

SciTech Connect

Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management establishes the policy that Federal agencies conduct their environmental, transportation, and energy-related activities in a manner that is environmentally, economically and fiscally sound, integrated, continually improving, efficient, and sustainable. The Department of Energy (DOE) has approved DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program and DOE Order 430.2B, Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy and Transportation Management as the means of achieving the provisions of this Executive Order. DOE Order 450.1A mandates the development of Environmental Management Systems (EMS) to implement sustainable environmental stewardship practices that: (1) Protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources potentially impacted by facility operations; (2) Meet or exceed applicable environmental, public health, and resource protection laws and regulations; and (3) Implement cost-effective business practices. In addition, the DOE Order 450.1A mandates that the EMS must be integrated with a facility's Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) established pursuant to DOE P 450.4, 'Safety Management System Policy'. DOE Order 430.2B mandates an energy management program that considers energy use and renewable energy, water, new and renovated buildings, and vehicle fleet activities. The Order incorporates the provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. The Order also includes the DOE's Transformational Energy Action Management initiative, which assures compliance is achieved through an Executable Plan that is prepared and updated annually by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL, Berkeley Lab, or the Laboratory) and then approved by the DOE Berkeley Site Office. At the time of this revision to the EMS plan, the 'FY2009 LBNL Sustainability Executable Plan' represented the most current Executable Plan. These DOE Orders and associated policies establish goals and sustainable stewardship practices that are protective of environmental, natural, and cultural resources, and take a life cycle approach that considers aspects such as: (1) Acquisition and use of environmentally preferable products; (2) Electronics stewardship; (3) Energy conservation, energy efficiency, and renewable energy; (4) Pollution prevention, with emphasis on toxic and hazardous chemical and material reduction; (5) Procurement of efficient energy and water consuming materials and equipment; (6) Recycling and reuse; (7) Sustainable and high-performance building design; (8) Transportation and fleet management; and (9) Water conservation. LBNL's approach to sustainable environmental stewardship required under Order 450.1A poses the challenge of implementing its EMS in a compliance-based, performance-based, and cost-effective manner. In other words, the EMS must deliver real and tangible business value at a minimal cost. The purpose of this plan is to describe Berkeley Lab's approach for achieving such an EMS, including an overview of the roles and responsibilities of key Laboratory parties. This approach begins with a broad-based environmental policy consistent with that stated in Chapter 11 of the LBNL Health and Safety Manual (PUB-3000). This policy states that Berkeley Lab is committed to the following: (1) Complying with applicable environmental, public health, and resource conservation laws and regulations. (2) Preventing pollution, minimizing waste, and conserving natural resources. (3) Correcting environmental hazards and cleaning up existing environmental problems, and (4) Continually improving the Laboratory's environmental performance while maintaining operational capability and sustaining the overall mission of the Laboratory. A continual cycle of planning, implementing, evaluating, and improving processes will be performed to achieve goals, objectives, and targets that will help LBNL carry out this policy. Each year, environmental aspects will be identified and their impacts to the environm

Fox, Robert; Thorson, Patrick; Horst, Blair; Speros, John; Rothermich, Nancy; Hatayama, Howard

2009-03-24

124

Intensive Care Management of the Patient With Cystic Fibrosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cystic fibrosis was previously thought to be a disease of childhood. With a better understanding of this condition along with improvements in therapy, patients with cystic fibrosis are now living well into adulthood. The aim of this article is to familiarize the intensive care unit physician with cystic fibrosis care, to discuss complications associated with cystic fibrosis specifically related to

Ted M. Kremer; Robert G. Zwerdling; Peter H. Michelson; Brian P. OSullivan

2008-01-01

125

NWCG Publication Management System  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This portal provides links to documents produced by the National Wildfire Coordinating Group (NWCG), a group consisting of agencies of the Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Fish and Wildlife Service, and the National Association of State Foresters. Materials accessible here include NWCG qualifications documents, information on prescribed fires, training courses, job aids, and other training materials and forms. Users can also access and download the Fire Behavior Prediction and Fuel Modeling System (BEHAVE), a software package designed to model the behavior of wildfires.

2002-10-14

126

Environmental management system.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) Environmental Management System (EMS) is identification of environmental consequences from SNL/NM activities, products, and/or services to develop objectives and measurable targets for mitigation of any potential impacts to the environment. This Source Document discusses the annual EMS process for analysis of environmental aspects and impacts and also provides the fiscal year (FY) 2010 analysis. Further information on the EMS structure, processes, and procedures are described within the programmatic EMS Manual (PG470222).

Salinas, Stephanie A.

2010-08-01

127

Computer Systems and Network Manager  

E-print Network

Computer Systems and Network Manager Fort Collins, Colorado POSITION A Computers Systems activities. RESPONSIBILITIES The successful candidate will perform computer systems and network administration, including computer hardware, systems software, applications software, and all configurations

128

Research Strategies for Increasing Productivity of Intensively Managed  

E-print Network

are sustainably managed and that environmental values are protected. These demands are prompting formal adoption 20, 2009; accepted April 16, 2010. Eric D. Vance (evance@ncasi.org) is principal scientist, National

129

Influence of management intensity on the productivity of early successional Acadian stands in eastern Maine  

E-print Network

in the forests of northeastern North America. Substantial improvements in the composition and growth stand development to improve growth and the longer term composition. Introduction Early successionalInfluence of management intensity on the productivity of early successional Acadian stands

Wagner, Robert G.

130

Effects of Coffee Management Intensity on Composition, Structure, and Regeneration Status of Ethiopian Moist Evergreen Afromontane Forests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effect of arabica coffee management intensity on composition, structure, and regeneration of moist evergreen Afromontane forests was studied in three traditional coffee-management systems of southwest Ethiopia: semiplantation coffee, semiforest coffee, and forest coffee. Vegetation and environmental data were collected in 84 plots from forests varying in intensity of coffee management. After controlling for environmental variation (altitude, aspect, slope, soil nutrient availability, and soil depth), differences in woody species composition, forest structure, and regeneration potential among management systems were compared using one way analysis of variance. The study showed that intensification of forest coffee cultivation to maximize coffee production negatively affects diversity and structure of Ethiopian moist evergreen Afromontane forests. Intensification of coffee productivity starts with the conversion of forest coffee to semiforest coffee, which has significant negative effects on tree seedling abundance. Further intensification leads to the conversion of semiforest to semiplantation coffee, causing significant diversity losses and the collapse of forest structure (decrease of stem density, basal area, crown closure, crown cover, and dominant tree height). Our study underlines the need for shade certification schemes to include variables other than canopy cover and that the loss of species diversity in intensively managed coffee systems may jeopardize the sustainability of coffee production itself through the decrease of ecosystem resilience and disruption of ecosystem services related to coffee yield, such as pollination and pest control.

Hundera, Kitessa; Aerts, Raf; Fontaine, Alexandre; Van Mechelen, Maarten; Gijbels, Pieter; Honnay, Olivier; Muys, Bart

2013-03-01

131

Effects of coffee management intensity on composition, structure, and regeneration status of ethiopian moist evergreen afromontane forests.  

PubMed

The effect of arabica coffee management intensity on composition, structure, and regeneration of moist evergreen Afromontane forests was studied in three traditional coffee-management systems of southwest Ethiopia: semiplantation coffee, semiforest coffee, and forest coffee. Vegetation and environmental data were collected in 84 plots from forests varying in intensity of coffee management. After controlling for environmental variation (altitude, aspect, slope, soil nutrient availability, and soil depth), differences in woody species composition, forest structure, and regeneration potential among management systems were compared using one way analysis of variance. The study showed that intensification of forest coffee cultivation to maximize coffee production negatively affects diversity and structure of Ethiopian moist evergreen Afromontane forests. Intensification of coffee productivity starts with the conversion of forest coffee to semiforest coffee, which has significant negative effects on tree seedling abundance. Further intensification leads to the conversion of semiforest to semiplantation coffee, causing significant diversity losses and the collapse of forest structure (decrease of stem density, basal area, crown closure, crown cover, and dominant tree height). Our study underlines the need for shade certification schemes to include variables other than canopy cover and that the loss of species diversity in intensively managed coffee systems may jeopardize the sustainability of coffee production itself through the decrease of ecosystem resilience and disruption of ecosystem services related to coffee yield, such as pollination and pest control. PMID:23180249

Hundera, Kitessa; Aerts, Raf; Fontaine, Alexandre; Van Mechelen, Maarten; Gijbels, Pieter; Honnay, Olivier; Muys, Bart

2013-03-01

132

Safety and Software Intensive Systems: Challenges Old and New  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is an increased use of software in safety-critical systems; a trend that is likely to continue in the future. Although traditional system safety techniques are applicable to software intensive systems, there are new challenges emerging. In this report we will address four issues we believe will pose challenges in the future. First, the nature of safety is continuing to

Mats P. E. Heimdahl

2007-01-01

133

Safety and Software Intensive Systems: Challenges Old and New  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is an increased use of software in safety-critical systems; a trend that is likely to continue in the future. Although traditional system safety techniques are applica- ble to software intensive systems, there are new challenges emerging. In this report we will address four issues we be- lieve will pose challenges in the future. First, the nature of safety is

Mats Per Erik Heimdahl

2007-01-01

134

Managing Intrastate Low-Intensity Armed Conflict 1993–2004: A New Dataset  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents a new event dataset covering third-party measures in intrastate low-intensity conflict dyads for the period 1993–2004, Managing Low-Intensity Intrastate Conflict (MILC). The rationale behind MILC is to enable the systematic study of third-party conflict management activities that might contribute to preventing these minor conflicts from escalating to the level of full-scale war. Intrastate armed conflict dyads are

Erik Melander; Frida Möller; Magnus Öberg

2009-01-01

135

Changes in soil properties after afforestation of former intensively managed soils with oak and Norway spruce  

Microsoft Academic Search

In many European countries, surplus agricultural production and ecological problems due to intensive soil cultivation have increased the interest in afforestation of arable soils. Many environmental consequences which might rise from this alternative land-use are only known from forest establishment on less intensively managed or marginal soils. The present study deals with changes in soil properties following afforestation of nutrient-rich

Eva Ritter; Lars Vesterdal; Per Gundersen

2003-01-01

136

Closed-loop control for cardiopulmonary management and intensive care unit sedation using digital imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation introduces a new problem in the delivery of healthcare, which could result in lower cost and a higher quality of medical care as compared to the current healthcare practice. In particular, a framework is developed for sedation and cardiopulmonary management for patients in the intensive care unit. A method is introduced to automatically detect pain and agitation in nonverbal patients, specifically in sedated patients in the intensive care unit, using their facial expressions. Furthermore, deterministic as well as probabilistic expert systems are developed to suggest the appropriate drug dose based on patient sedation level. Patients in the intensive care unit who require mechanical ventilation due to acute respiratory failure also frequently require the administration of sedative agents. The need for sedation arises both from patient anxiety due to the loss of personal control and the unfamiliar and intrusive environment of the intensive care unit, and also due to pain or other variants of noxious stimuli. In this dissertation, we develop a rule-based expert system for cardiopulmonary management and intensive care unit sedation. Furthermore, we use probability theory to quantify uncertainty and to extend the proposed rule-based expert system to deal with more realistic situations. Pain assessment in patients who are unable to verbally communicate is a challenging problem. The fundamental limitations in pain assessment stem from subjective assessment criteria, rather than quantifiable, measurable data. The relevance vector machine (RVM) classification technique is a Bayesian extension of the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm which achieves comparable performance to SVM while providing posterior probabilities for class memberships and a sparser model. In this dissertation, we use the RVM classification technique to distinguish pain from non-pain as well as assess pain intensity levels. We also correlate our results with the pain intensity assessed by expert and non-expert human examiners. Next, we consider facial expression recognition using an unsupervised learning framework. We show that different facial expressions reside on distinct subspaces if the manifold is unfolded. In particular, semi-definite embedding is used to reduce the dimensionality and unfold the manifold of facial images. Next, generalized principal component analysis is used to fit a series of subspaces to the data points and associate each data point to a subspace. Data points that belong to the same subspace are shown to belong to the same facial expression. In clinical intensive care unit practice sedative/analgesic agents are titrated to achieve a specific level of sedation. The level of sedation is currently based on clinical scoring systems. Examples include the motor activity assessment scale (MAAS), the Richmond agitation-sedation scale (RASS), and the modified Ramsay sedation scale (MRSS). In general, the goal of the clinician is to find the drug dose that maintains the patient at a sedation score corresponding to a moderately sedated state. In this research, we use pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling to find an optimal drug dosing control policy to drive the patient to a desired MRSS score. Atrial fibrillation, a cardiac arrhythmia characterized by unsynchronized electrical activity in the atrial chambers of the heart, is a rapidly growing problem in modern societies. One treatment, referred to as catheter ablation, targets specific parts of the left atrium for radio frequency ablation using an intracardiac catheter. As a first step towards the general solution to the computer-assisted segmentation of the left atrial wall, we use shape learning and shape-based image segmentation to identify the endocardial wall of the left atrium in the delayed-enhancement magnetic resonance images. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

Gholami, Behnood

137

Discrepancy Reporting Management System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Discrepancy Reporting Management System (DRMS) is a computer program designed for use in the stations of NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) to help establish the operational history of equipment items; acquire data on the quality of service provided to DSN customers; enable measurement of service performance; provide early insight into the need to improve processes, procedures, and interfaces; and enable the tracing of a data outage to a change in software or hardware. DRMS is a Web-based software system designed to include a distributed database and replication feature to achieve location-specific autonomy while maintaining a consistent high quality of data. DRMS incorporates commercial Web and database software. DRMS collects, processes, replicates, communicates, and manages information on spacecraft data discrepancies, equipment resets, and physical equipment status, and maintains an internal station log. All discrepancy reports (DRs), Master discrepancy reports (MDRs), and Reset data are replicated to a master server at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory; Master DR data are replicated to all the DSN sites; and Station Logs are internal to each of the DSN sites and are not replicated. Data are validated according to several logical mathematical criteria. Queries can be performed on any combination of data.

Cooper, Tonja M.; Lin, James C.; Chatillon, Mark L.

2004-01-01

138

Temporal Yield Variability under Conventional and Alternative Management Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Year to year variation in yield is an inherent risk associated with crop production and many growers rely on intensive mechanical or chemical inputs to preserve crop yield in the face of fluctuating envi- ronmental conditions. However, as interest grows in alternative crop management systems which depend less on external inputs, determin- ing the degree to which management systems can

Richard G. Smith; Fabian D. Menalled; G. P. Robertson

2007-01-01

139

Advances in Energy Management Systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper is one of the series prepared for a special session to be held at PICA 85. The objective is to review the advances that have been made in Energy Management Systems and to obtain a more common agreement as to the usefulness and future of such systems. The paper contains a summary of five discussions of Energy Management Systems. These discussions focus on the major components of an Energy Management System and address important questions as to the usefulness, past developments, the current state-of-the-art, and needs in Energy Management Systems. Each author provides a different perspective of these systems. The discussions are intended to provide insight into Energy Management Systems, to solicit discussions, and to provide a forum for discussions of Energy Management System's developments and future needs.

Horton, J.S.; Prince, B.; Sasson, A.M.; Wynne, W.T.; Trefny, F.; Cleveland, F.

1986-08-01

140

Management of Patients with HIV in the Intensive Care Unit  

PubMed Central

Because there are more than one million Americans with HIV, intensive care units continue to see frequent patients with HIV infection. In the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy, clinicians must be aware of drug toxicities and drug interactions. They must also recognize traditional opportunistic infections, as well as newer syndromes such as immune reconstitution syndrome, multicentric Castleman's disease, and primary pleural cell lymphoma. PMID:16493156

Masur, Henry

2006-01-01

141

Mapping Policies to Management Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Policies have been identified as one possible way to specify to management systems the operational constraints of a system or systems being managed. Such policies, often characterized as event-triggered condition actions rules, are frequently defined via policy languages and or user interface tools in order to simplify their expression and understanding by system administrators. The underlying assumption is that these

Abdelnasser Ouda; Hanan Lutfiyya; Michael A. Bauer

2009-01-01

142

Manpower management information system /MIS/  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

System of programs capable of building and maintaining data bank provides all levels of management with regular manpower evaluation reports and data source for special management exercises on manpower.

Gravette, M. C.; King, W. L.

1971-01-01

143

Intentional Systems Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conservation of biodiversity provides for economic, social, and environmental sustainability. Intentional management is designed to manage conflicts among groups with conflicting interests. Our goal was to ascertain if intentional management and principles of conservation of biodiversity could be combined into upland and riparian forest management strategies that would be applicable to various land ownerships and, consequently, help resolve land allocation

Andrew B. Carey; Bruce R. Lippke; John Sessions

1999-01-01

144

Utilization and environmental management of residues from intensive animal production  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Animal manures are traditional sources of nutrients in agriculture. Under proper management, manures provide nutrients to soil, reducing or eliminating the use of commercial fertilizers, as well as organic carbon that improves soil physical properties and soil health. However, excessive application ...

145

Year in review 2007: Critical Care – intensive care unit management  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the development of new technologies and drugs, health care is becoming increasisngly complex and expensive. Governments and health care providers around the world devote a large proportion of their budgets to maintaining quality of care. During 2007, Critical Care published several papers that highlight important aspects of critical care management, which can be subdivided into structure, processes and outcomes,

Clayton Barbieri; Shannon S Carson; André Carlos Amaral

2008-01-01

146

Project portfolio management applied to building energy projects management system  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is based on the project portfolio management technology to introduce a new energy projects management system. For the increasingly complex of current Chinese energy project management, and traditional project management system not being very good for energy projects in regulated status, this thesis put forward an energy portfolio management system using energy portfolio management technology combined with the

Yunna Wu; Jiangshuai Li; Jiali Wang; Yong Huang

147

Cryptographic Key Management System  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the outcome of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contract DE-OE0000543, requesting the design of a Cryptographic Key Management System (CKMS) for the secure management of cryptographic keys for the energy sector infrastructure. Prime contractor Sypris Electronics, in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL), Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Valicore Technologies, and Purdue University's Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security (CERIAS) and Smart Meter Integration Laboratory (SMIL), has designed, developed and evaluated the CKMS solution. We provide an overview of the project in Section 3, review the core contributions of all contractors in Section 4, and discuss bene#12;ts to the DOE in Section 5. In Section 6 we describe the technical construction of the CKMS solution, and review its key contributions in Section 6.9. Section 7 describes the evaluation and demonstration of the CKMS solution in different environments. We summarize the key project objectives in Section 8, list publications resulting from the project in Section 9, and conclude with a discussion on commercialization in Section 10 and future work in Section 11.

No, author

2014-02-21

148

Computerized training management system  

DOEpatents

A Computerized Training Management System (CTMS) is disclosed for providing a procedurally defined process that is employed to develop accreditable performance based training programs for job classifications that are sensitive to documented regulations and technical information. CTMS is a database that links information needed to maintain a five-phase approach to training-analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation independent of training program design. CTMS is designed using R-Base{trademark}, an-SQL compliant software platform. Information is logically entered and linked in CTMS. Each task is linked directly to a performance objective, which, in turn, is linked directly to a learning objective; then, each enabling objective is linked to its respective test items. In addition, tasks, performance objectives, enabling objectives, and test items are linked to their associated reference documents. CTMS keeps all information up to date since it automatically sorts, files and links all data; CTMS includes key word and reference document searches. 18 figs.

Rice, H.B.; McNair, R.C.; White, K.; Maugeri, T.

1998-08-04

149

Computerized training management system  

DOEpatents

A Computerized Training Management System (CTMS) for providing a procedurally defined process that is employed to develop accreditable performance based training programs for job classifications that are sensitive to documented regulations and technical information. CTMS is a database that links information needed to maintain a five-phase approach to training-analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation independent of training program design. CTMS is designed using R-Base.RTM., an-SQL compliant software platform. Information is logically entered and linked in CTMS. Each task is linked directly to a performance objective, which, in turn, is linked directly to a learning objective; then, each enabling objective is linked to its respective test items. In addition, tasks, performance objectives, enabling objectives, and test items are linked to their associated reference documents. CTMS keeps all information up to date since it automatically sorts, files and links all data; CTMS includes key word and reference document searches.

Rice, Harold B. (Franklin Furnace, OH); McNair, Robert C. (East Setauket, NY); White, Kenneth (Shirley, NY); Maugeri, Terry (Wading River, NY)

1998-08-04

150

Supplier Management System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Supplier Management System (SMS) allows for a consistent, agency-wide performance rating system for suppliers used by NASA. This version (2.0) combines separate databases into one central database that allows for the sharing of supplier data. Information extracted from the NBS/Oracle database can be used to generate ratings. Also, supplier ratings can now be generated in the areas of cost, product quality, delivery, and audit data. Supplier data can be charted based on real-time user input. Based on these individual ratings, an overall rating can be generated. Data that normally would be stored in multiple databases, each requiring its own log-in, is now readily available and easily accessible with only one log-in required. Additionally, the database can accommodate the storage and display of quality-related data that can be analyzed and used in the supplier procurement decision-making process. Moreover, the software allows for a Closed-Loop System (supplier feedback), as well as the capability to communicate with other federal agencies.

Ramirez, Eric; Gutheinz, Sandy; Brison, James; Ho, Anita; Allen, James; Ceritelli, Olga; Tobar, Claudia; Nguyen, Thuykien; Crenshaw, Harrel; Santos, Roxann

2008-01-01

151

User Oriented Financial Management System.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The School of Chemical Sciences at the University of Illinois has developed a user-oriented financial management system to meet the needs of project managers for financial reporting that were not met by the central accounting system. The system presents detailed budget obligations and expenditures data needed to plan and monitor daily research…

Hess, Larry G.; Waters, James M.

1979-01-01

152

Extensible USN Metadata Management System  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper proposes a technology for management of extensible metadata for the ubiquitous sensor network. There are a lot of challenges in establishing USN system which is based ubiquitous and is using various sensors and communication technology to give human comfortable life. USN metadata management and service system is necessary for more convenient development of USN system. However, USN metadata

Chul-Su Kim; Yong-Jun Lee; Jun-Seok Hwang

2008-01-01

153

Information Systems for Risk Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Risk management information systems are designed to overcome the problem of aggregating data across diverse trading units. The design of an information system depends on the risk measurement methodology that a firm chooses. Inherent in the design of both a risk management information system and a risk measurement methodology is a tradeoff between the accuracy of the resulting measures of

Michael S. Gibson

2000-01-01

154

Information systems for risk management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Risk management information systems are designed to overcome the problem of aggregating data across diverse trading units. The design of an information system depends on the risk measurement methodology that a firm chooses. Inherent in the design of both a risk management information system and a risk measurement methodology is a tradeoff between the accuracy of the resulting measures of

Michael S. Gibson

1997-01-01

155

a Study of Urban Intensive Land Evaluating System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The contradiction of land supply and demand is becoming increasingly prominent in China. The increasing efficiency of land use is an important means to resolve the conflict. We propose a scientific approach for promoting the urban intensive land use. In this paper, an evaluation system of urban intensive land use is programmed. It is designed to change the manual way of collecting index data and building index system to a dynamical way. The system improves the efficiency and accuracy of the evaluation of urban intensive land use. It achieves intensive evaluation on three scales: macro-level, medium-level and micro-level. We build two data extraction methods. One is XML-based meta-data exchange method that obtains index data from the cadastral database. Another is data monitoring method that writes the index data to the evaluation database at real time. Database technologies are used to calculate index values and build index systems dynamically. GIS technologies are use to achieve three scales evaluation of urban intensive land use.

Jiang, L.; Gu, J.; Chen, X.; You, Y.; Tang, Q.

2012-07-01

156

Hyperbaric critical care patient data management system.  

PubMed

A patient data management system (PDMS) has been used for years in the intensive care unit (ICU) at the Karolinska University Hospital to provide bedside or remote clinical patient documentation and information. Data from monitors, mechanical ventilators and syringe pumps are fed into a central clinical information management system to monitor, display trends and record data of vital parameters, ventilator settings and drugs. In order to continue routine critical care monitoring and recording during hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), without endangering the safety demands of hyperbaric procedures, we have modified the PDMS system for hyperbaric use. Via an ethernet box placed inside the chamber, data are transmitted to the Clinisoft™ system through the local area network. By standardised risk-analysis procedures, in close cooperation between the hyperbaric and biomedical engineering departments, the chamber producer and the notifying body (Germanischer Lloyd), the ethernet box was modified to receive full safety approval by all parties. The PDMS is now functioning routinely during HBOT for intensive care patients so that data can be seen bedside and followed on-line in the ICU. Data are also continuously stored on the clinical information management system for later clinical or research purposes. Work continues to obtain CE approval for hyperbaric use for modern syringe pumps and mechanical ventilators connected to the PDMS system. Improved documentation of ICU care will improve quality of care during HBOT and facilitate research and development in hyperbaric medicine. PMID:22828816

Kronlund, Peter; Lind, Folke; Olsson, Daniel

2012-06-01

157

Specific intensive care management of patients with traumatic brain injury: Present and future  

PubMed Central

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major global problem and affects approximately 10 million peoples annually; therefore has a substantial impact on the health-care system throughout the world. In this article, we have summarized various aspects of specific intensive care management in patients with TBI including the emerging evidence mainly after the Brain Trauma Foundation (BTF) 2007 and also highlighted the scope of the future therapies. This review has involved the relevant clinical trials and reviews (from 1 January 2007 to 31 March 2013), which specifically discussed about the topic. Though, BTF guideline based management strategies could provide standardized protocols for the management of patients with TBI and have some promising effects on mortality and morbidity; there is still need of inclusion of many suggestions based on various published after 2007. The main focus of majority of these trials remained to prevent or to treat the secondary brain injury. The future therapy will be directed to treat injured neurons and may benefit the outcome. There is also urgent need to develop some good prognostic indicators as well. PMID:24843345

Chowdhury, Tumul; Kowalski, Stephen; Arabi, Yaseen; Dash, Hari Hara

2014-01-01

158

Spatial intensity profiling of an industrial laser welding system  

SciTech Connect

A investigation was conducted to devise a method to sense the laser beam intensity profile of an industrial laser welding system. The research focuses on monitoring methods and assessing locations within the system where data can be taken which reveal the relationship between the laser beam intensity profile and the input system parameters of the laser beam welding process. Emphasis has been placed on the configuration of a distributed computing environment to acquire, analyze and display the results of the sensed beam profile. Conventional image processing techniques are demonstrated. It was found that a distributed computing environment was useful for processing the large volumes of data generated by this process characterization method, and the distributed computing environment provided the computing power required for computationally intensive analysis and display techniques. The mathematical techniques used to discriminate one data set from another and relate the results to processing conditions are discussed.

Milewski, J.O.

1991-12-31

159

Spatial intensity profiling of an industrial laser welding system  

SciTech Connect

A investigation was conducted to devise a method to sense the laser beam intensity profile of an industrial laser welding system. The research focuses on monitoring methods and assessing locations within the system where data can be taken which reveal the relationship between the laser beam intensity profile and the input system parameters of the laser beam welding process. Emphasis has been placed on the configuration of a distributed computing environment to acquire, analyze and display the results of the sensed beam profile. Conventional image processing techniques are demonstrated. It was found that a distributed computing environment was useful for processing the large volumes of data generated by this process characterization method, and the distributed computing environment provided the computing power required for computationally intensive analysis and display techniques. The mathematical techniques used to discriminate one data set from another and relate the results to processing conditions are discussed.

Milewski, J.O.

1991-01-01

160

Carbon dynamics of intensively managed forest along a full rotation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Temperate and tropical forests are increasingly exploited for wood and biomass extraction and only one third of forest area was considered as primary in the recent FRA in 2010. Management practices affect the soil-forest-atmosphere continuum through various effects on soil and surface properties. They result ultimately in either positive or negative changes in the biomass and soil carbon pools but, if any, few datasets or modeling tools are available for quantifying their impacts on the net carbon balance of forest stands. To analyse these effects, the net half-hourly fluxes of CO2, water vapour and heat exchanges were monitored for 23 years in two closed stands of maritime pines in southwestern France. Carbon content of the aboveground biomass was measured annually and soil pools 10-early in the younger stand and 5-yearly in the mature stand. For analysing the data collected and disentangling the climate and management effects, we used the three components process-based model GRAECO+ (Loustau et al. this session) linking a 3D radiative transfer and photosynthesis model, MAESTRA, a soil carbon model adapted from ROTH-C and a plant growth model. Eddy flux data were processed, gapfilled and partitioned using the methodological recommendations (Aubinet et al. 2000, Adv. Eco. Res:30, 114-173, Falge et al. 2001, Agr. For. Meteo. : 107, 43-69, Reichstein et al. 2005, Glob. Change Biol., 11:1424-1439). Analysis of the sequence showed that, whether by an increased sensitivity to soil drought compared to the pines or by a rapid re-colonization of the inter-row after understorey removal and plowing, the weeded vegetation contributed to create specific intra-annual dynamics of the fluxes and therefore, controls the dynamics of carbon balance of the stand. After three growing seasons, the stand was already a carbon sink, but the impact of thinning and weeded vegetation removal at the age of 5-year brought the balance to almost neutral. We interpret this change as the combined effects of the reduction of the LAI, the enhancement of the heterotrophic respiration related to the decomposition of dead materials and the improvement of the mineralization of the large stock of soil organic matter by tillage. At the mature stage, the stand remains consistently a carbon sink and CO2 fluxes were insensitive to thinning. Conversely, the carbon balance was sensitive to climate effects as evidenced by repeated drastic reductions in NEP caused by soil drought. Our data underlines the importance of disturbances linked to forest management for the forest carbon balance during the early stage of tree growth. Since management intensification tends to shorten the forest life cycle and enhance the share of the young stages, our results confirm that the consequence of management operations on the carbon cycle in forest may revert intensified forest stands from a net sink to a source and should be accounted for carefully.

Moreaux, V.; Bosc, A.; Bonnefond, J.; Burlett, R.; Lamaud, E.; Sartore, M.; Trichet, P.; Chipeaux, C.; Lambrot, C.; Kowalski, A. S.; Loustau, D.

2012-12-01

161

Networked inventory management information systems: materializing supply chain management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims to explain the driving forces for networked inventory management. Discusses major developments with respect to customer requirements, networked organizations and networked inventory management. Presents high level specifications of networked inventory management information systems (NIMISs). Reviews some decision systems for inventory management, and compares traditional inventory management to networked inventory management. Uses these insights to outline NIMISs for several types

Martin Verwijmeren; Piet van der Vlist; Karel van Donselaar

1996-01-01

162

Flexible data-management system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Combined ASRDI Data-Management and Analysis Technique (CADMAT) is system of computer programs and procedures that can be used to conduct data-management tasks. System was developed specifically for use by scientists and engineers who are confronted with management and analysis of large quantities of data organized into records of events and parametric fields. CADMAT is particularly useful when data are continually accumulated, such as when the need of retrieval and analysis is ongoing.

Pelouch, J. J., Jr.

1977-01-01

163

Management of pulmonary hypertension and right heart failure in the intensive care unit.  

PubMed

Management of acute right ventricular failure, both with and without coexisting pulmonary hypertension, is a common challenge encountered in the intensive care setting. Both right ventricular dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension portend a poor prognosis, regardless of the underlying cause and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The right ventricle is embryologically distinct from the left ventricle and has unique morphologic and functional properties. Management of right ventricular failure and pulmonary hypertension in the intensive care setting requires tailored hemodynamic management, pharmacotherapy, and often mechanical circulatory support. Unfortunately, our understanding of the management of right ventricular failure lags behind that of the left ventricle. In this review, we will explore the underlying pathophysiology of the failing right ventricle and pulmonary vasculature in patients with and without pulmonary hypertension and discuss management strategies based on evidence-based studies as well as our current understanding of the underlying physiology. PMID:25833459

Grinstein, Jonathan; Gomberg-Maitland, Mardi

2015-05-01

164

The Legion Resource Management System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent technological developments, including gigabit networkingtechnology and low-cost, high-performance microprocessors, have givenrise to metacomputing environments. Metacomputing environments combinehosts from multiple administrative domains via transnational andworld-wide networks. Managing the resources in such a system is a complextask, but is necessary to efficiently and economically execute userprograms. The Legion resource management system is flexible both in itssupport...

Steve J. Chapin; Dimitrios Katramatos; John F. Karpovich; Andrew S. Grimshaw

1999-01-01

165

FAILSAFE Health Management for Embedded Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The FAILSAFE project is developing concepts and prototype implementations for software health management in mission- critical, real-time embedded systems. The project unites features of the industry-standard ARINC 653 Avionics Application Software Standard Interface and JPL s Mission Data System (MDS) technology (see figure). The ARINC 653 standard establishes requirements for the services provided by partitioned, real-time operating systems. The MDS technology provides a state analysis method, canonical architecture, and software framework that facilitates the design and implementation of software-intensive complex systems. The MDS technology has been used to provide the health management function for an ARINC 653 application implementation. In particular, the focus is on showing how this combination enables reasoning about, and recovering from, application software problems.

Horvath, Gregory A.; Wagner, David A.; Wen, Hui Ying; Barry, Matthew

2010-01-01

166

Time is traded for intensity in the bat's auditory system.  

PubMed

Disparities in time and intensity are the two chief cues animals use for localizing a sound source in space. Echolocating bats belonging to the family Molossidae emit brief, ultrasonic signals for orientation that sweep downward about an octave over the duration of the pulse. Due to acoustic shadowing and the directional properties of the ears, pronounced interaural intensity disparities are created that vary as a function of azimuth. However, due to the small headwidth of these animals, azimuthal changes create small interaural time disparities that are at most 30 microseconds. The experiments in this report are concerned with the binaural processing of time and intensity disparities using brief FM signals that simulate the animal's natural echolocation calls. Binaural neurons receiving excitation from one ear and inhibition from the other (E-I neurons) were recorded from the inferior colliculus of Mexican free-tailed bats. The majority of units sampled were highly sensitive for temporal disparities of 100-300 microseconds, and a few had significant changes in discharge probability when interaural time was changed by 10-20 microseconds. However, all E-I neurons were also sensitive to intensity disparities. With only one exception, all E-I neurons traded time for intensity. On the average, each decibel difference in intensity could be compensated for by advancing or delaying the inhibitory sound by 47 microseconds. The main conclusion is that the auditory system processes interaural disparities by transforming level differences at the two ears into latency differences. Thus the discharge probability of each binaural neuron is determined largely by the arrival times of the discharges from the excitatory and inhibitory ears. In view of the substantial time-intensity trading ratios, the small interaural time disparities produced by azimuthal locations off the midline play no role in shaping the response properties of these neurons. Specific examples of how time-intensity trades can translate into a high spatial selectivity are presented. PMID:3209486

Pollak, G D

1988-11-01

167

Fuel cell gas management system  

DOEpatents

A fuel cell gas management system including a cathode humidification system for transferring latent and sensible heat from an exhaust stream to the cathode inlet stream of the fuel cell; an anode humidity retention system for maintaining the total enthalpy of the anode stream exiting the fuel cell equal to the total enthalpy of the anode inlet stream; and a cooling water management system having segregated deionized water and cooling water loops interconnected by means of a brazed plate heat exchanger.

DuBose, Ronald Arthur (Marietta, GA)

2000-01-11

168

Fault management for data systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Issues related to automating the process of fault management (fault diagnosis and response) for data management systems are considered. Substantial benefits are to be gained by successful automation of this process, particularly for large, complex systems. The use of graph-based models to develop a computer assisted fault management system is advocated. The general problem is described and the motivation behind choosing graph-based models over other approaches for developing fault diagnosis computer programs is outlined. Some existing work in the area of graph-based fault diagnosis is reviewed, and a new fault management method which was developed from existing methods is offered. Our method is applied to an automatic telescope system intended as a prototype for future lunar telescope programs. Finally, an application of our method to general data management systems is described.

Boyd, Mark A.; Iverson, David L.; Patterson-Hine, F. Ann

1993-01-01

169

Anaerobic digestion of sludge from intensive recirculating aquaculture systems: Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intensive recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) produce high volumes of biosolid waste which is a potential source of pollution if not properly treated. A reduction in sludge-mass would therefore minimize the potential environmental hazard and economic burden stemming from its disposal. Recently, anaerobic digestion was suggested as an alternative to aquaculture sludge digestion and stabilization in RAS. This practice results not

Natella Mirzoyan; Yossi Tal; Amit Gross

2010-01-01

170

The large-scale structure of software-intensive systems  

PubMed Central

The computer metaphor is dominant in most discussions of neuroscience, but the semantics attached to that metaphor are often quite naive. Herein, we examine the ontology of software-intensive systems, the nature of their structure and the application of the computer metaphor to the metaphysical questions of self and causation. PMID:23386964

Booch, Grady

2012-01-01

171

An Architectural Style for Process-Intensive Web Information Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

REpresentational State Transfer (REST) (8) is the architecture style behind the World Wide Web (WWW). REST is responsible for many of the desirable quality attributes achieved, such as adaptability and interoperability. However, many existing process-intensive Web information systems (especially engineered by directly using Service Oriented Architecture) break these principles, which are detrimental to the quality attributes. The architectural style -

Xiwei Xu; Liming Zhu; Udo Kannengiesser; Yan Liu

2010-01-01

172

Lighting system with thermal management system  

DOEpatents

Lighting systems having unique configurations are provided. For instance, the lighting system may include a light source, a thermal management system and driver electronics, each contained within a housing structure. The light source is configured to provide illumination visible through an opening in the housing structure. The thermal management system is configured to provide an air flow, such as a unidirectional air flow, through the housing structure in order to cool the light source. The driver electronics are configured to provide power to each of the light source and the thermal management system.

Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton; Stecher, Thomas; Seeley, Charles; Kuenzler, Glenn; Wolfe, Jr., Charles; Utturkar, Yogen; Sharma, Rajdeep; Prabhakaran, Satish; Icoz, Tunc

2013-05-07

173

Energy management systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Utility costs have increased over 300% in the last decade. According to a recent Building Owners and Managers Association study, energy is the single largest building operating expense in many commercial buildings. Energy management is an essential cost control method. A key to the success of business today is the diversion of wasted energy dollars into profitable investments.

2009-01-01

174

Intensive Care Unit–Acquired Weakness: Implications for Physical Therapist Management  

PubMed Central

Patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) can develop a condition referred to as “ICU-acquired weakness.” This condition is characterized by profound weakness that is greater than might be expected to result from prolonged bed rest. Intensive care unit–acquired weakness often is accompanied by dysfunction of multiple organ systems. Individuals with ICU-acquired weakness typically have significant activity limitations, often requiring physical assistance for even the most basic activities associated with bed mobility. Many of these individuals have activity limitations months to years after hospitalization. The purpose of this article is to review evidence that guides physical rehabilitation of people with ICU-acquired weakness. Included are diagnostic criteria, medical management, and prognostic indicators, as well as criteria for beginning physical rehabilitation, with an emphasis on patient safety. Data are presented indicating that rehabilitation can be implemented with very few adverse effects. Evidence is provided for appropriate measurement approaches and for physical intervention strategies. Finally, some of the key issues are summarized that should be investigated to determine the best intervention guidelines for individuals with ICU-acquired weakness. PMID:22282769

Moss, Marc; Quan, Dianna; Schenkman, Margaret

2012-01-01

175

Efficient Evaluation System for Learning Management Systems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A learning management system (LMS) provides the platform for web-based learning environment by enabling the management, delivery, tracking of learning, testing, communication, registration process and scheduling. There are many LMS systems on the market that can be obtained for free or through payment. It has now become an important task to choose…

Cavus, Nadire

2009-01-01

176

ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT AND SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS THEORY  

EPA Science Inventory

Environmental Systems Management is the management of environmental problems at the systems level fully accounting for the multi-dimensional nature of the environment. This includes socio-economic dimensions as well as the usual physical and life science aspects. This is importa...

177

Organizational structure : management techniques and lessons learned in aligning technical and program management resources in engineering-intensive organizations  

E-print Network

The roles of systems engineering, program and project management, and engineering management are continuously blurred and challenged in complex engineering organizations. The demands made of each of these functions can ...

Siddiqui, Talha, 1969-

2005-01-01

178

Intelligent Integrated System Health Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Intelligent Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) is the management of data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) with the purposeful objective of determining the health of a system (Management: storage, distribution, sharing, maintenance, processing, reasoning, and presentation). Presentation discusses: (1) ISHM Capability Development. (1a) ISHM Knowledge Model. (1b) Standards for ISHM Implementation. (1c) ISHM Domain Models (ISHM-DM's). (1d) Intelligent Sensors and Components. (2) ISHM in Systems Design, Engineering, and Integration. (3) Intelligent Control for ISHM-Enabled Systems

Figueroa, Fernando

2012-01-01

179

Medical-Information-Management System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Medical Information Management System (MIMS) computer program interactive, general-purpose software system for storage and retrieval of information. Offers immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases required. User quickly and efficiently extracts, displays, and analyzes data. Used in management of medical data and handling all aspects of data related to care of patients. Other applications include management of data on occupational safety in public and private sectors, handling judicial information, systemizing purchasing and procurement systems, and analyses of cost structures of organizations. Written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77.

Alterescu, Sidney; Friedman, Carl A.; Frankowski, James W.

1989-01-01

180

Autonomously managed electrical power systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The electric power systems for future spacecraft such as the Space Station will necessarily be more sophisticated and will exhibit more nearly autonomous operation than earlier spacecraft. These new power systems will be more reliable and flexible than their predecessors offering greater utility to the users. Automation approaches implemented on various power system breadboards are investigated. These breadboards include the Hubble Space Telescope power system test bed, the Common Module Power Management and Distribution system breadboard, the Autonomusly Managed Power System (AMPS) breadboard, and the 20 kilohertz power system breadboard. Particular attention is given to the AMPS breadboard. Future plans for these breadboards including the employment of artificial intelligence techniques are addressed.

Callis, Charles P.

1986-01-01

181

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (MIS) CONCENTRATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES  

E-print Network

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (MIS) CONCENTRATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES The management information 4170 Data Resource Management MGMT 4150 IT Project Management Optional MIS Concentration Courses MGMT become business or systems analysts, information architects, social media consultants, database

Salama, Khaled

182

Computer assisted management of information in an intensive care unit.  

PubMed

In order to use the capability of computers for handling large amounts of information, we developed a program for the acquisition, handling, storage and retrieval of administrative and clinical information generated in the 20 bedded multidisciplinary critical care unit of a University Hospital. At an initial phase a personal computer (PC) was used to collect information from 4362 patients, that included registration data, coded admission problems, techniques and special treatments, and final diagnosis. This information combined with free text provided a discharge report. Complementary programs allowed calculation and storage of hemodynamic and gas exchange parameters. This experience led to a second phase in which a computer with microprocessor Intel 80386 at 25 MHz, 8 MB RAM, 310 MB hard disk and a streamer for 150 MB cartridge tape back up, using UNIX operating system, permitted multiple users working simultaneously through 1 central console and 7 ASCII terminals. Data input included demographic data, previous and admission problems in coded form, present history and physical examination in free text, list of present problems in coded form, comments on evolution, record of special techniques and treatments, laboratory data, treatment, final diagnosis and facility for using all the information to elaborate the final report. Side modules provide help for drugs dosing, protocols for specific conditions and clerical routines. The system is open for connection to other areas of the Hospital. Data from more than 2000 patients have been included so far.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1447538

Cereijo, E

1992-10-01

183

Intensity approximation of random fluctuation in complex systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Markov and non-Markov processes in complex systems are examined with the help of dynamical information Shannon entropy method. Here we consider the essential role of two mutually independent channels of entropy involving creation of correlation and annihilation of correlation. The developed method has been used to analyze the intensity fluctuation of the complex systems of various nature: in psychology (to analyze numerical and pattern short-time human memory, to study the effect of stress on the parameters of the dynamical taping-test) and in cardiology (to analyze the random dynamics of RR-intervals in human ECG's and to diagnose various diseases of human cardiovascular systems). The received results show that the application of intensity approximation allows to improve essentially the diagnostics of parameters in the evolution of human dynamic states.

Yulmetyev, R. M.; Gafarov, F. M.; Yulmetyeva, D. G.; Emeljanova, N. A.

2002-01-01

184

The CMS workload management system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CMS has started the process of rolling out a new workload management system. This system is currently used for reprocessing and Monte Carlo production with tests under way using it for user analysis. It was decided to combine, as much as possible, the production/processing, analysis and T0 codebases so as to reduce duplicated functionality and make best use of limited developer and testing resources. This system now includes central request submission and management (Request Manager); a task queue for parcelling up and distributing work (WorkQueue) and agents which process requests by interfacing with disparate batch and storage resources (WMAgent).

Cinquilli, M.; Evans, D.; Foulkes, S.; Hufnagel, D.; Mascheroni, M.; Norman, M.; Maxa, Z.; Melo, A.; Metson, S.; Riahi, H.; Ryu, S.; Spiga, D.; Vaandering, E.; Wakefield, S.; Wilkinson, R.

2012-12-01

185

The influence of abiotic controls and management intensity on phosphorus cycling in established grassland and forest ecosystems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is commonly assumed that the bioavailability and cycling of phosphorus (P) is mainly controlled by abiotic soil properties including soil pH and the concentrations and reactivities of clay minerals, CaCO3 and Al/Fe oxides In managed ecosystems, kind, timing and duration of P additions and type and amount of harvested biomass are the major input and output fluxes. Our objective was to disentangle the effects of abiotic controls, and type and intensity of management on the P cycle in soils of temperate grasslands and forests of different management intensity in three regions across Germany in the frame of the Biodiversity Exploratories project. The pH value was the most important variable explaining P concentrations and partitioning in soil and changes in pH are the main mechanism how land-use is affecting the P cycle. However, after the influence of pH was accounted for in a sequential statistical approach, land-use intensity, classified according to the extent of annual biomass removal, explained a significant (P < 0.05) part of the variance in the contributions of several P fractions to total P (TP) among all studied regions and land-use types. In grassland soils of highly diverse systems (up to 57 plant species) in one of the study regions, the Schwäbische Alb, a mid-range mountain area on limestone where soils showed a limited variation in pH in the carbonate buffer range, pedogenic Fe oxide concentrations, fertilizer-P application rates, and TP concentrations in soil explained more than half of the variation in bioavailable inorganic (Pi) concentrations extracted with NaHCO3 in soil. Our results demonstrate that mainly soil pH and mineralogical composition, and intensity of management of the managed ecosystems are significant controls of the P cycle determining the size of bioavailable P pool in soil.

Alt, F.; Oelmann, Y.; Wilcke, W.

2011-12-01

186

Workflow management systems: a survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Workflow management systems can help business goals to be achieved with high efficiency by means of sequencing work activities and invoking appropriate human and\\/or information resources associated with these activities. As computer networks are used more and more widely in daily work, workflow management attracts more and more attention from both industry and research communities. This paper summarizes the state

Shi Meilin; Yang Guangxin; Xiang Yong; Wu Shangguang

1998-01-01

187

Towards consistent performance management systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Performance indicators (PIs) and performance measurement are popular topics in management literature nowadays. However, hardly ever is attention paid to the consequences of the relationships that often exist between the different PIs for designing effective, consistent performance management systems for organizations as a whole. Presents a concrete method for constructing a consistent set of PIs forming the basis of a

Simme Douwe P. Flapper; Leonard Fortuin; Paul P. M. Stoop

1996-01-01

188

Accurate mathematical models to describe the lactation curve of Lacaune dairy sheep under intensive management.  

PubMed

Although the intensive production system of Lacaune dairy sheep is the only profitable method for producers outside of the French Roquefort area, little is known about this type of systems. This study evaluated yield records of 3677 Lacaune sheep under intensive management between 2005 and 2010 in order to describe the lactation curve of this breed and to investigate the suitability of different mathematical functions for modeling this curve. A total of 7873 complete lactations during a 40-week lactation period corresponding to 201 281 pieces of weekly yield data were used. First, five mathematical functions were evaluated on the basis of the residual mean square, determination coefficient, Durbin Watson and Runs Test values. The two better models were found to be Pollott Additive and fractional polynomial (FP). In the second part of the study, the milk yield, peak of milk yield, day of peak and persistency of the lactations were calculated with Pollot Additive and FP models and compared with the real data. The results indicate that both models gave an extremely accurate fit to Lacaune lactation curves in order to predict milk yields (P = 0.871), with the FP model being the best choice to provide a good fit to an extensive amount of real data and applicable on farm without specific statistical software. On the other hand, the interpretation of the parameters of the Pollott Additive function helps to understand the biology of the udder of the Lacaune sheep. The characteristics of the Lacaune lactation curve and milk yield are affected by lactation number and length. The lactation curves obtained in the present study allow the early identification of ewes with low milk yield potential, which will help to optimize farm profitability. PMID:23257242

Elvira, L; Hernandez, F; Cuesta, P; Cano, S; Gonzalez-Martin, J-V; Astiz, S

2013-06-01

189

14 CFR 1212.704 - System manager.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false System manager. 1212.704 Section 1212.704 Aeronautics...Authority and Responsibilities § 1212.704 System manager. (a) Each system manager is responsible for the following with...

2010-01-01

190

DEPARTMENT CHAIR Engineering Management & Systems Engineering Department  

E-print Network

DEPARTMENT CHAIR Engineering Management & Systems Engineering Department Old Dominion University invites application for the position of Department Chair, Department of Engineering Management and Systems leading to doctoral and masters degrees in Engineering Management and Systems Engineering as well

191

Secure, Efficient Data Transport and Replica Management for High-Performance Data-Intensive Computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

After studying data-intensive, high-performance computing applications such as high- energy physics and climate modeling, we conclude that these applications require two fundamental data management services: secure, reliable, efficient transfer of data in wide area environments and the ability to register and locate multiple copies of data sets. In this paper, we present our design of these services in the Globus

William E. Allcock; Joseph Bester; John Bresnahan; Ann L. Chervenak; Ian T. Foster; Carl Kesselman; Sam Meder; Veronika Nefedova; Darcy Quesnel; Steven Tuecke

2001-01-01

192

Seasonal Habitat Selection by Raccoons (Procyon lotor) in Intensively Managed Pine Forests of Central Mississippi  

Microsoft Academic Search

Raccoons (Procyon lotor) are ecological generalists, existing in diverse land- scapes. Although general habitat use patterns of raccoons have been extensively described, little research has examined raccoon habitat selection within landscapes managed intensively for wood fiber production. Furthermore, no published studies using radio-telemetry have detailed raccoon habitat selection at multiple spatial scales. We monitored 31 raccoons on a 2000 ha

MICHAEL J. CHAMBERLAIN; L. MIKE CONNER; BRUCE D. LEOPOLD

2002-01-01

193

Effect of drainage on CO2 exchange patterns in an intensively managed peat pasture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eddy correlation measurements of CO2 exchange were made in intensively managed peat pastures at 2 different groundwater tables during most of a growing season. F was separated into a respiratory and an assimilatory CO2 flux. The fit of the Arrhenius temperature response to Fr showed that Fr was generally higher at low groundwater tables. The fit of a hyperbolic irradiance

B. O. M. Dirks; A. Hensen; J. Goudriaan

2000-01-01

194

Effects of ecological compensation meadows on arthropod diversity in adjacent intensively managed grassland  

Microsoft Academic Search

An important goal of ecological compensation areas (ECAs) is to increase biodiversity in adjacent intensively managed farmland and the agricultural landscape at large. We tested whether this goal can be achieved in the case of the agri-environmental restoration scheme implemented for Swiss grassland using five large arthropod taxa (bees, true bugs, orthopterans, ground beetles and spiders) representing different ecological and

Matthias Albrecht; Bernhard Schmid; Martin K. Obrist; Beatrice Schüpbach; David Kleijn; Peter Duelli

2010-01-01

195

System Wide Information Management (SWIM)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation lists questions regarding the implementation of System Wide Information Management (SWIM). Some of the questions concern policy issues and strategies, technology issues and strategies, or transition issues and strategies.

Hritz, Mike; McGowan, Shirley; Ramos, Cal

2004-01-01

196

ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (EIMS)  

EPA Science Inventory

The Environmental Information Management System (EIMS) organizes descriptive information (metadata) for data sets, databases, documents, models, projects, and spatial data. The EIMS design provides a repository for scientific documentation that can be easily accessed with standar...

197

BIOSOLIDS DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (BDMS)  

EPA Science Inventory

Resource Purpose: see hard copy attachment "EPA's Biosolids Data Management System and Plans for Evaluating Biosolids Quality" Legislation/Enabling Authority: CWA Section 402 Supported Program: OW, OWM, OECA, ORD, OSW, Regions 1-10, states, local facilitie...

198

Computerized energy management systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Presents an overview of types and capabilities plus guidelines on selection, installation, and use. A complete plant energy conservation package begins with proper architectural planning for new facilities and includes energyefficient building construction, sufficient insulation for building shells, and energy conservation awareness programs for employees. Equally important is the use of energy management technology to reduce consumption in heating, ventilation,

Meinhold

1982-01-01

199

Computerized energy management systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

A complete plant energy conservation package begins with proper architectural planning for new facilities and includes energy-efficient building construction, sufficient insulation for building shells, and energy conservation awareness programs for employees. Equally important is the use of energy management technology to reduce consumption in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment, lighting, and energy-related plant processes. Properly selected, installed, and

Meinhold

1982-01-01

200

Integrated Learning Management Systems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four integrated learning management packages were reviewed: "CentraOne", "IntraLearn", "Lyceum", and "Silicon Chalk". These products provide different combinations of synchronous and asynchronous tools. The current report examines the products in relation to their specific value for distance educators and students.

Clark, Sharon; Cossarin, Mary; Doxsee, Harry; Schwartz, Linda

2004-01-01

201

Bench-to-bedside review: Leadership and conflict management in the intensive care unit  

PubMed Central

In the management of critical care units, leadership and conflict management are vital areas for the successful performance of the unit. In this article a practical approach to define competencies for leadership and principles and practices of conflict management are offered. This article is, by lack of relevant intensive care unit (ICU) literature, not evidence based, but it is the result of personal experience and a study of literature on leadership as well on conflicts and negotiations in non-medical areas. From this, information was selected that was recognisable to the authors and, thus, also seems to be useful knowledge for medical doctors in the ICU environment. PMID:18086322

Strack van Schijndel, Rob JM; Burchardi, Hilmar

2007-01-01

202

RIMS: Resource Information Management System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overview is given of the capabilities and functions of the resource management system (RIMS). It is a simple interactive DMS tool which allows users to build, modify, and maintain data management applications. The RIMS minimizes programmer support required to develop/maintain small data base applications. The RIMS also assists in bringing the United Information Services (UIS) budget system work inhouse. Information is also given on the relationship between the RIMS and the user community.

Symes, J.

1983-01-01

203

Data management system technology discipline  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Viewgraphs on data management system technology discipline for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: systems technology area needs; storage technology area needs; processor technology area needs; communications technology area needs; software system technology area needs; human interface technology area needs; software development and verification; and onboard communications.

Benz, Harry F.

1990-01-01

204

Systems, Inc. Manufacturing Program Manager  

E-print Network

Advanced Energy Systems, Inc. A. Burger Manufacturing Program Manager Final Design Review Approach - Second Year Ā·Manufacturing Schedule Assessment -Top Level Phase II #12;Advanced Energy Systems and manufacturing producibility. #12;Advanced Energy Systems, Inc. Accomplishments Phase I -Completed Mechanical

205

Digital-log management system  

SciTech Connect

Digital-log data is essential to any petrophysical and log-correlation software package. Gathering of such data, however, is often painstaking and laborious. A significant portion of the interpreter`s valuable time is spent in data compilation and verification. In response to this data management need in Conoco, the digital-log management system (called LMS) was developed. The LMS uses existing data-storage standards and stable technology to implement a common digital-log management solution throughout the company. To achieve system portability, LMS is delivered with a stable well-data model and a comprehensive log catalogue maintained in a relational database.

Tan, A.A.; Potts, J.K.

1995-08-01

206

Interconnecting heterogeneous database management systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It is pointed out that there is still a great need for the development of improved communication between remote, heterogeneous database management systems (DBMS). Problems regarding the effective communication between distributed DBMSs are primarily related to significant differences between local data managers, local data models and representations, and local transaction managers. A system of interconnected DBMSs which exhibit such differences is called a network of distributed, heterogeneous DBMSs. In order to achieve effective interconnection of remote, heterogeneous DBMSs, the users must have uniform, integrated access to the different DBMs. The present investigation is mainly concerned with an analysis of the existing approaches to interconnecting heterogeneous DBMSs, taking into account four experimental DBMS projects.

Gligor, V. D.; Luckenbaugh, G. L.

1984-01-01

207

Knowledge management in knowledge-intensive service networks : A strategic management approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The main purpose of this paper is to analyze knowledge management in service networks. It analyzes the knowledge management process and identifies related challenges. The authors take a strategic management approach instead of a more technology-oriented approach, since it is believed that managerial problems still remain after technological problems are solved. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper explores the literature

Heiner Evanschitzky; Dieter Ahlert; Günther Blaich; Peter Kenning

2007-01-01

208

Resource Management for Distributed Parallel Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Multiprocessor systems should exist in the the larger context of distributed systems, allowing multiprocessor resources to be shared by those that need them. Unfortunately, typical multiprocessor resource management techniques do not scale to large networks. The Prospero Resource Manager (PRM) is a scalable resource allocation system that supports the allocation of processing resources in large networks and multiprocessor systems. To manage resources in such distributed parallel systems, PRM employs three types of managers: system managers, job managers, and node managers. There exist multiple independent instances of each type of manager, reducing bottlenecks. The complexity of each manager is further reduced because each is designed to utilize information at an appropriate level of abstraction.

Neuman, B. Clifford; Rao, Santosh

1993-01-01

209

Progress and challenges to the global waste management system.  

PubMed

Rapid economic growth, urbanization and increasing population have caused (materially intensive) resource consumption to increase, and consequently the release of large amounts of waste to the environment. From a global perspective, current waste and resource management lacks a holistic approach covering the whole chain of product design, raw material extraction, production, consumption, recycling and waste management. In this article, progress and different sustainability challenges facing the global waste management system are presented and discussed. The study leads to the conclusion that the current, rather isolated efforts, in different systems for waste management, waste reduction and resource management are indeed not sufficient in a long term sustainability perspective. In the future, to manage resources and wastes sustainably, waste management requires a more systems-oriented approach that addresses the root causes for the problems. A specific issue to address is the development of improved feedback information (statistics) on how waste generation is linked to consumption. PMID:24938296

Singh, Jagdeep; Laurenti, Rafael; Sinha, Rajib; Frostell, Björn

2014-09-01

210

Application of risk management to the production chain of intensively reared fish.  

PubMed

Principles of risk management, as a part of risk analysis, are described with respect to their application to the production chain of intensively reared fish. According to the outcomes of the FAO/WHO Expert consultation on the Application of Risk Management (Rome, 1997), there are four steps: risk evaluation, risk management option assessment, implementation of management decisions, and monitoring and review. There is a lack of information on risk assessment for farmed fish though, regarding bacteriological hazards, the data on farmed fish pathology and microbiology suggest a potential prevalence of Vibrio spp. and Aeromonas spp. Other bacterial contaminants could be introduced on handling during selection and packaging of products. On the basis of the above qualitative risk evaluation, risk management options have been individuated. These concern the monitoring of the health status of fish during the fattening period, harvest parameters, hygiene of selection and packaging, and storage characteristics. PMID:14535456

Giuffrida, A

2003-09-01

211

Integration of quality and environmental management systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Discusses quality and environmental management systems integration. Concepts of a system and a “system of systems” are addressed, followed by a description of different management systems, and their interrelations and integration. Subsequently, strategies for integration of the quality system based on the ISO 9001 standard and the ISO 14001 environmental management system are presented. The harmonization of related audit sub-systems,

Stanislav Karapetrovic; Walter Willborn

1998-01-01

212

HIERARCHICAL MANAGEMENT OF BATTLEFIELD NETWORKS WITH THE SHAMAN MANAGEMENT SYSTEM  

E-print Network

HIERARCHICAL MANAGEMENT OF BATTLEFIELD NETWORKS WITH THE SHAMAN MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Adarshpal S Architecture for MANagement) is a novel management framework developed at the University of Delaware as a part of the research in network management sponsored by the ATIRP Consortium. SHAMAN extends the traditional flat SNMP

Sethi, Adarshpal

213

PPPL Project Management System Page 1 of 111 PPPL Project Management System Description Rev-01  

E-print Network

PPPL Project Management System Page 1 of 111 PPPL Project Management System Description Rev-01 Project Management System Description (PMSD) Revision 1 June 2011 Prepared by: ___________________________________ Date: ________________ Tim Stevenson Head, Project Management Office Approved by

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

214

Management Information and Library Management Systems: An Overview.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides an overview of the facilities for management information in library management systems. Highlights include the relationship between transaction processing systems, management information systems, and decision support systems; a review of previous work; enquiries and standard reports relating to library operations; report generators; and…

Fisher, Shelagh; Rowley, Jennifer

1994-01-01

215

Intentional Systems Management: Managing Forests for Biodiversity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conservation of biodiversity provides for economic, social, and environmental sustainability. Intentional management is designed to manage conflicts among groups with conflicting interests. Our goal was to ascertain if intentional management and principles of conservation of biodiversity could be combined into upland and riparian forest management strategies that would be applicable to various land ownerships and, consequently, help resolve land allocation

Andrew B. Carey; Bruce R. Lippke; John Sessions

1999-01-01

216

Influence of surgical treatment timing on mortality from necrotizing soft tissue infections requiring intensive care management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Surgical treatment is crucial in the management of necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTIs). The aim of this study was to\\u000a determine the influence of surgical procedure timing on hospital mortality in severe NSTI.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A retrospective study including 106 patients was conducted in a medical intensive care unit equipped with a hyperbaric chamber.\\u000a Data regarding pre-existing conditions, intensive care and surgical

Alexandre Boyer; Frederic Vargas; Fanny Coste; Elodie Saubusse; Yves Castaing; Georges Gbikpi-Benissan; Gilles Hilbert; Didier Gruson

2009-01-01

217

Energy management systems go modular  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports that following the oil embargoes of 1973 and 1979, energy management systems for buildings flooded a market hungry for any method of conserving resources, which Americans were being told might run out at any minute. The systems were designed to regulate heating, air conditioning, lighting, and other energy-consuming functions more effectively by using centralized controls. Although complex

Eisenstein

1987-01-01

218

Evaluation of management information systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The economic evaluation of Management Information Systems may be based on the following theories and techniques: Control Theory, System Dynamics, (discrete-event) simulation, and gaming. Applications of these approaches are summarized. Advantages and disadvantages of the various approaches are presented.

J. P. C. Kleijnen

1979-01-01

219

Campus Telephone Systems: Managing Change.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Issues facing a college or university that seeks to change its telephone system are raised in seven chapters. Major topics addressed by this resource guide are: telephone deregulation and changes in the telephone industry, the new technology available, how to manage a system, consultants, financing options, and institutional case studies. Specific…

National Association of College and University Business Officers, Washington, DC.

220

High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Tumor Therapy System and Its Application  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At the end of last century, a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) tumor therapy system was successfully developed and manufactured in China, which has been already applied to clinical therapy. This article aims to discuss the HIFU therapy system and its application. Detailed research includes the following: power amplifiers for high-power ultrasound, ultrasound transducers with large apertures, accurate 3-D mechanical drives, a software control system (both high-voltage control and low-voltage control), and the B-mode ultrasonic diagnostic equipment used for treatment monitoring. Research on the dosage of ultrasound required for tumour therapy in multiple human cases has made it possible to relate a dosage formula, presented in this paper, to other significant parameters such as the volume of thermal tumor solidification, the acoustic intensity (I), and the ultrasound emission time (tn). Moreover, the HIFU therapy system can be applied to the clinical treatment of both benign and malignant tumors in the pelvic and abdominal cavity, such as uterine fibroids, liver cancer and pancreatic carcinoma.

Sun, Fucheng; He, Ye; Li, Rui

2007-05-01

221

A relative-intensity two-color phosphor thermography system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA LaRC has developed a relative-intensity two-color phosphor thermography system. This system has become a standard technique for acquiring aerothermodynamic data in LaRC Hypersonic Facilities Complex (HFC). The relative intensity theory and its application to the LaRC phosphor thermography system is discussed along with the investment casting technique which is critical to the utilization of the phosphor method for aerothermodynamic studies. Various approaches to obtaining quantitative heat transfer data using thermographic phosphors are addressed and comparisons between thin-film data and thermographic phosphor data on an orbiter-like configuration are presented. In general, data from these two techniques are in good agreement. A discussion is given on the application of phosphors to integration heat transfer data reduction techniques (the thin film method) and preliminary heat transfer data obtained on a calibration sphere using thin-film equations are presented. Finally, plans for a new phosphor system which uses target recognition software are discussed.

Merski, N. Ronald

1991-01-01

222

Bachelor of Science in Management Information Systems  

E-print Network

communication and negotiation, international human resource management, formulating and implementing global in the nation. Careers in Management Information Systems Graduates work in corporate, industrialBachelor of Science in Management Information Systems As businesses and governments strive

O'Toole, Alice J.

223

Operating system support for database management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several operating system services are examined with a view toward their applicability to support of database management functions. These services include buffer pool management; the file system; scheduling, process management, and interprocess communication; and consistency control.

Michael Stonebraker

1981-01-01

224

Site systems engineering: Systems engineering management plan  

SciTech Connect

The Site Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) is the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) implementation document for the Hanford Site Systems Engineering Policy, (RLPD 430.1) and Systems Engineering Criteria Document and Implementing Directive, (RLID 430.1). These documents define the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) processes and products to be used at Hanford to implement the systems engineering process at the site level. This SEMP describes the products being provided by the site systems engineering activity in fiscal year (FY) 1996 and the associated schedule. It also includes the procedural approach being taken by the site level systems engineering activity in the development of these products and the intended uses for the products in the integrated planning process in response to the DOE policy and implementing directives. The scope of the systems engineering process is to define a set of activities and products to be used at the site level during FY 1996 or until the successful Project Hanford Management Contractor (PHMC) is onsite as a result of contract award from Request For Proposal DE-RP06-96RL13200. Following installation of the new contractor, a long-term set of systems engineering procedures and products will be defined for management of the Hanford Project. The extent to which each project applies the systems engineering process and the specific tools used are determined by the project`s management.

Grygiel, M.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-05-03

225

The restoration and re-creation of species-rich lowland grassland on land formerly managed for intensive agriculture in the UK  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intensive agriculture has resulted in the loss of biodiversity and the specialist flora and fauna associated with the semi-natural grasslands of low-intensity pastoral systems throughout northwest Europe. Techniques employed to restore and re-create these grasslands on agricultural land in the UK are reviewed. Extensive cutting and grazing management have been shown to diversify improved swards and facilitate re-colonisation on ex-arable

Kevin J. Walker; Paul A. Stevens; David P. Stevens; J. Owen Mountford; Sarah J. Manchester; Richard F. Pywell

2004-01-01

226

A systems engineering management approach to resource management applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author presents a program management response to the following question: How can the traditional practice of systems engineering management, including requirements specification, be adapted, enhanced, or modified to build future planning and scheduling systems for effective operations? The systems engineering management process, as traditionally practiced, is examined. Extensible resource management systems are discussed. It is concluded that extensible systems are a partial solution to problems presented by requirements that are incomplete, partially immeasurable, and often dynamic. There are positive indications that resource management systems have been characterized and modeled sufficiently to allow their implementation as extensible systems.

Hornstein, Rhoda Shaller

1989-01-01

227

The CMS Data Management System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The data management elements in CMS are scalable, modular, and designed to work together. The main components are PhEDEx, the data transfer and location system; the Data Booking Service (DBS), a metadata catalog; and the Data Aggregation Service (DAS), designed to aggregate views and provide them to users and services. Tens of thousands of samples have been cataloged and petabytes of data have been moved since the run began. The modular system has allowed the optimal use of appropriate underlying technologies. In this contribution we will discuss the use of both Oracle and NoSQL databases to implement the data management elements as well as the individual architectures chosen. We will discuss how the data management system functioned during the first run, and what improvements are planned in preparation for 2015.

Giffels, M.; Guo, Y.; Kuznetsov, V.; Magini, N.; Wildish, T.

2014-06-01

228

Challenges in management of blast injuries in Intensive Care Unit: Case series and review  

PubMed Central

Blast injuries are rare, but life-threatening medical emergencies. We report the clinical presentation and management of four bomb blast victims admitted in Intensive Care Unit of Trauma center of our hospital in 2011. Three of them had lung injury; hemothorax (2) and pneumothorax (1). Traumatic brain injury was present in only one. Long bone fractures were present in all the victims. Presence of multiple shrapnels was a universal finding. Two blast victims died (day 7 and day 9); cause of death was multi-organ failure and septic shock. Issues relating to complexity of injuries, complications, management, and outcome are discussed. PMID:25538416

Samra, Tanvir; Pawar, Mridula; Kaur, Jasvinder

2014-01-01

229

Challenges in management of blast injuries in Intensive Care Unit: Case series and review.  

PubMed

Blast injuries are rare, but life-threatening medical emergencies. We report the clinical presentation and management of four bomb blast victims admitted in Intensive Care Unit of Trauma center of our hospital in 2011. Three of them had lung injury; hemothorax (2) and pneumothorax (1). Traumatic brain injury was present in only one. Long bone fractures were present in all the victims. Presence of multiple shrapnels was a universal finding. Two blast victims died (day 7 and day 9); cause of death was multi-organ failure and septic shock. Issues relating to complexity of injuries, complications, management, and outcome are discussed. PMID:25538416

Samra, Tanvir; Pawar, Mridula; Kaur, Jasvinder

2014-12-01

230

On the Need of Data Management in Automotive Systems  

E-print Network

Abstract: In the last decade, automotive systems changed from traditional mechanical or mechatronical systems towards software intensive systems, because more and more functionality has been implemented by software. Currently, this trend is still ongoing. Due to this increased use of software, more and more data accumulates and thus, has to be handled. Since it was no subject up to now to manage this data with software separatly, we think that it is indispensable to establish a data management system in automotive systems. In this paper we point out the necessity of data management, supported by exemplary scenarios, in order to overcome disadvantages of current solutions. Further, we discuss main aspects of data management in automotive systems and how it could be realized with respect to the very special restrictions and requirements within such a system. 1

Ro Schulze; Mario Pukall; Gunter Saake; Jana Dittmann

231

Energy management and control systems handbook  

Microsoft Academic Search

The cost-effective energy management and control systems explained in this book have had successful application at Veteran's Administration hospitals, a record which is partly due to VA management's awareness of latent problems and an ability to handle energy management technology. Early chapters present material that will help engineers and managers understand the principles of energy management and control systems, why

1984-01-01

232

Policy Driven Management for Distributed Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Separating management policy from the automated managers which interpret the policy facilitates the dynamic change of behaviour of a distributed management system. This permits it to adapt to evolutionary changes in the system being managed and to new application requirements. Changing the behaviour of automated managers can be achieved by changing the policy without have to reimplement them - this

Morris Sloman

1994-01-01

233

Health Care System Distrust in the Intensive Care Unit  

PubMed Central

Purpose To examine the performance and properties of the revised Health Care System Distrust scale among surrogates in the intensive care unit. Materials and Methods Pilot, prospective cohort study of 50 surrogates of adult, mechanically-ventilated patients surveyed on days 1, 3 and 7 of ICU admission. Results Responses on the Health Care System Distrust scale on day 1 ranged from 9 to 34 (possible range 9–45 with higher scores indicating more distrust), with a mean and standard deviation of 20.3 ± 6.9. Factor analysis demonstrated a 2-factor structure, corresponding to the domains of values and competence. Cronbach’s alpha for the overall scale was 0.83, for the competence subscale 0.76 and for the values subscale 0.74. Health care system distrust was inversely correlated with trust in ICU physicians (Pearson coefficient: ?0.63). When evaluated over the course of each patient’s ICU stay, health care system distrust ratings decreased by 0.31 per patient-day (95% CI .55-.06; p=.015). Correlation between health care system distrust and trust in ICU physicians decreased slightly over time. Conclusions Among surrogates in the ICU, the Health Care System Distrust scale has high internal consistency and convergent validity. There was substantial variability in surrogates’ trust in the health care system. PMID:21715134

Schenker, Yael; White, Douglas B.; Asch, David A.; Kahn, Jeremy M.

2011-01-01

234

Integrated Systems Health Management for Intelligent Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The implementation of an integrated system health management (ISHM) capability is fundamentally linked to the management of data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) with the purposeful objective of determining the health of a system. It is akin to having a team of experts who are all individually and collectively observing and analyzing a complex system, and communicating effectively with each other in order to arrive at an accurate and reliable assessment of its health. In this paper, concepts, procedures, and approaches are presented as a foundation for implementing an intelligent systems ]relevant ISHM capability. The capability stresses integration of DIaK from all elements of a system. Both ground-based (remote) and on-board ISHM capabilities are compared and contrasted. The information presented is the result of many years of research, development, and maturation of technologies, and of prototype implementations in operational systems.

Figueroa, Fernando; Melcher, Kevin

2011-01-01

235

Saproxylic beetle assemblages related to silvicultural management intensity and stand structures in a beech forest in Southern Germany  

Microsoft Academic Search

Compared to agricultural land and spruce plantations, central European beech-oak forests are often relatively close to natural\\u000a conditions. However, forest management may alter these conditions. In Steigerwald, southern Germany, a large beech-dominated\\u000a forest area, three management intensities were applied during the past 30–70 years. Here, we examined the influence of management\\u000a intensity on saproxylic beetles in >100-year old mature stands at

Jörg Müller; Heinz Bußler; Thomas Kneib

2008-01-01

236

Operational Management System for Regulated Water Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most of the Dutch large rivers, canals and lakes are controlled by the Dutch water authorities. The main reasons concern safety, navigation and fresh water supply. Historically the separate water bodies have been controlled locally. For optimizating management of these water systems an integrated approach was required. Presented is a platform which integrates data from all control objects for monitoring and control purposes. The Operational Management System for Regulated Water Systems (IWP) is an implementation of Delft-FEWS which supports operational control of water systems and actively gives advice. One of the main characteristics of IWP is that is real-time collects, transforms and presents different types of data, which all add to the operational water management. Next to that, hydrodynamic models and intelligent decision support tools are added to support the water managers during their daily control activities. An important advantage of IWP is that it uses the Delft-FEWS framework, therefore processes like central data collection, transformations, data processing and presentation are simply configured. At all control locations the same information is readily available. The operational water management itself gains from this information, but it can also contribute to cost efficiency (no unnecessary pumping), better use of available storage and advise during (water polution) calamities.

van Loenen, A.; van Dijk, M.; van Verseveld, W.; Berger, H.

2012-04-01

237

Information Security Management System for Microsoft's Cloud Infrastructure  

E-print Network

Information Security Management System for Microsoft's Cloud Infrastructure Online Services ......................................................................................................................................................................................1 Information Security Management System.......................................................................................................................7 Information Security Management Forum

Chaudhuri, Surajit

238

Management intensity and vegetation complexity affect web-building spiders and their prey.  

PubMed

Agricultural management and vegetation complexity affect arthropod diversity and may alter trophic interactions between predators and their prey. Web-building spiders are abundant generalist predators and important natural enemies of pests. We analyzed how management intensity (tillage, cutting of the vegetation, grazing by cattle, and synthetic and organic inputs) and vegetation complexity (plant species richness, vegetation height, coverage, and density) affect rarefied richness and composition of web-building spiders and their prey with respect to prey availability and aphid predation in 12 habitats, ranging from an uncut fallow to a conventionally managed maize field. Spiders and prey from webs were collected manually and the potential prey were quantified using sticky traps. The species richness of web-building spiders and the order richness of prey increased with plant diversity and vegetation coverage. Prey order richness was lower at tilled compared to no-till sites. Hemipterans (primarily aphids) were overrepresented, while dipterans, hymenopterans, and thysanopterans were underrepresented in webs compared to sticky traps. The per spider capture efficiency for aphids was higher at tilled than at no-till sites and decreased with vegetation complexity. After accounting for local densities, 1.8 times more aphids were captured at uncut compared to cut sites. Our results emphasize the functional role of web-building spiders in aphid predation, but suggest negative effects of cutting or harvesting. We conclude that reduced management intensity and increased vegetation complexity help to conserve local invertebrate diversity, and that web-building spiders at sites under low management intensity (e.g., semi-natural habitats) contribute to aphid suppression at the landscape scale. PMID:23494286

Diehl, Eva; Mader, Viktoria L; Wolters, Volkmar; Birkhofer, Klaus

2013-10-01

239

Configuration Management File Manager Developed for Numerical Propulsion System Simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One of the objectives of the High Performance Computing and Communication Project's (HPCCP) Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) is to provide a common and consistent way to manage applications, data, and engine simulations. The NPSS Configuration Management (CM) File Manager integrated with the Common Desktop Environment (CDE) window management system provides a common look and feel for the configuration management of data, applications, and engine simulations for U.S. engine companies. In addition, CM File Manager provides tools to manage a simulation. Features include managing input files, output files, textual notes, and any other material normally associated with simulation. The CM File Manager includes a generic configuration management Application Program Interface (API) that can be adapted for the configuration management repositories of any U.S. engine company.

Follen, Gregory J.

1997-01-01

240

Management issues in systems engineering  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

When applied to a system, the doctrine of successive refinement is a divide-and-conquer strategy. Complex systems are sucessively divided into pieces that are less complex, until they are simple enough to be conquered. This decomposition results in several structures for describing the product system and the producing system. These structures play important roles in systems engineering and project management. Many of the remaining sections in this chapter are devoted to describing some of these key structures. Structures that describe the product system include, but are not limited to, the requirements tree, system architecture and certain symbolic information such as system drawings, schematics, and data bases. The structures that describe the producing system include the project's work breakdown, schedules, cost accounts and organization.

Shishko, Robert; Chamberlain, Robert G.; Aster, Robert; Bilardo, Vincent; Forsberg, Kevin; Mooz, Hal; Polaski, Lou; Wade, Ron

1993-01-01

241

Dual Wavelength Intensity Modulated Optical Fibre Sensor System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A novel dual wavelength intensity modulated optical fibre displacement sensor system is described which employs a single Graded Index (GRIN) rod lensed fibre together with an interference filter and moving mirror element in the sensing head. The dual wavelength approach essentially utilises two spectral slices for a single LED transmission spectrum to provide the measurand and reference signals. In this way the sensor system is fully referenced for all major common-mode variations that may be present within the system components. The terminal transceiver unit is also discussed together with a specially designed LED coupler and demultiplexer device which enables the system to operate with a single fibre connection. The performance characteristics of the prototype dual wavelength sensor system are reported showing a linear displacement range over some 20 mm. In addition the coupling of the sensing head to a Bourdon tube is described which provides accurate pressure measurement over a range 3-15 psi. Finally an initial investigation of the immunity of the system to common-mode variations is presented using the mechanism of fibre bend loss.

Senior, John M.; Murtaza, G.; Stirling, Anthony I.; Wainwright, Geoffrey H.

1989-10-01

242

Development of a low intensity current monitor system  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the development of a current transformer system used to measure pulsed ion beam currents with a wide dynamic intensity range (nA to mA, and factor of 10{sup 6}). Peak beam currents at the LAMPF accelerator typically range from 100 to nA to 40 mA with pulse widths varying from 30 to 1000 {mu}s. Signal conditioning of the peak current output provides an average current readout with a range of 1 nA to 2 mA, noise of approximately {plus minus}0.5 nA, and accuracy of {plus minus}0.1%. Since the system has proved stable and highly reliable, calibration is performed yearly. The prototype unit was built in 1985 and the final production unit was completed in early 1989. 5 refs., 14 figs.

Gallegos, F.R.

1991-01-01

243

Atomizer for thermal management system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An atomizer for thermal management system for efficiently thermally managing one or more heat producing devices. The atomizer for thermal management system includes a housing having a coolant passage and a dispensing end, an orifice within the dispensing end, and an actuator manipulating a plunger within the housing. The plunger includes a head that is sealable within a recessed portion of the orifice to open or close the orifice. The coolant passes through the coolant passage into the orifice for spraying upon a heat producing device. The actuator may reciprocate so that the coolant spray emitted through the orifice is pulsating. The pulsing frequency may be increased to increase cooling or decreased to decrease cooling of the heat producing device.

Tilton, Charles L. (Inventor); Weiler, Jeff (Inventor); Palmer, Randal T. (Inventor); Appel, Philip W. (Inventor); Knight, Paul A. (Inventor)

2008-01-01

244

Thermal management systems and methods  

DOEpatents

A thermal management system for a vehicle includes a heat exchanger having a thermal energy storage material provided therein, a first coolant loop thermally coupled to an electrochemical storage device located within the first coolant loop and to the heat exchanger, and a second coolant loop thermally coupled to the heat exchanger. The first and second coolant loops are configured to carry distinct thermal energy transfer media. The thermal management system also includes an interface configured to facilitate transfer of heat generated by an internal combustion engine to the heat exchanger via the second coolant loop in order to selectively deliver the heat to the electrochemical storage device. Thermal management methods are also provided.

Gering, Kevin L.; Haefner, Daryl R.

2006-12-12

245

PhD IN MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SySTEMS  

E-print Network

PhD IN MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING FINANCE MARKETING MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SySTEMS ORGANIZATIONAL BEhAVIOR submissions before their comprehensive exams. ORGANIZATIONAL BEhAVIOR/ LEADERShIP Organizationalbehavior / LEADERShIP SUPPLy ChAIN MANAGEMENT School of Management #12;ADMISSION POLICy Admission to the PhD program

Suzuki, Masatsugu

246

Real-time estimation system for seismic-intensity exposed-population  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For an appropriate first-action to an earthquake, risk (damage) information evaluated in real-time are important as well as hazard (ground motion) information. To meet this need, we are developing real-time estimation system (J-RISQ) for exposed population and earthquake damage on buildings. We plan to open the web page of estimated exposed population to the public from autumn. When an earthquake occurs, seismic intensities are calculated at each observation station and sent to the DMC (Data Management Center) in different timing. For rapid estimation, the system does not wait for the data from all the stations but begins the first estimation when the number of the stations observing the seismic intensity of 2.5 or larger exceeds the threshold amount. Estimations are updated several times using all the available data at that moment. Spatial distribution of seismic intensity in 250 m meshes is estimated by the site amplification factor of surface layers and the observed data. By using this intensity distribution, the exposed population is estimated using population data of each mesh. The exposed populations for municipalities and prefectures are estimated by summing-up the exposures of included meshes for the area and are appropriately rounded taking estimation precision into consideration. The estimated intensities for major cities are shown by the histograms, which indicate the variation of the estimated values in the city together with the observed maximum intensity. The variation is mainly caused by the difference of the site amplification factors. The intensities estimated for meshes with large amplification factor are sometimes larger than the maximum value observed in the city. The estimated results are seen on the web site just after the earthquake. The results of the past earthquakes can be easily searched by keywords such as date, magnitudes, seismic intensities and source areas. The summary of the results in the one-page report of Portable Document Format is also available. This system has been experimentally operated since 2010 and has performed the estimations in real-time for more than 670 earthquakes by July of 2012. For about 75 % of these earthquakes, it takes less than one minute to send the e-mail of first estimation after receiving data from the first triggered station, and therefore, the rapidity of the system is satisfactory. To upload a PDF report form to the web site, it takes approximately additional 30 second.

Aoi, S.; Nakamura, H.; Kunugi, T.; Suzuki, W.; Fujiwara, H.

2013-12-01

247

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM CAD STANDARDS  

E-print Network

1 FACILITIES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Ā· CAD STANDARDS Ā· REVISION: July 2007 #12;2 University of California, Riverside CAD Standards April 12, 2007 Introduction The Purpose of this document is to define the Computer Aided Design (CAD) drawing standards for the University of California, Riverside (UCR). The standards

Mills, Allen P.

248

Building Knowledge Base Management Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Advanced applications in elds such as CAD, software engineering, real-time process control, corporate repositories and digital libraries require the construction, ef- cient access and management of large, shared knowledge bases. Such knowledge bases cannot be built using exist- ing tools such as expert system shells, because these do not scale up, nor can they be built in terms of existing

John Mylopoulos; Vinay K. Chaudhri; Dimitris Plexousakis; Adel Shrufi; Thodoros Topaloglou

1996-01-01

249

Hierarchical storage management system evaluation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program at NASA Ames Research Center has been developing a hierarchical storage management system, NAStore, for some 6 years. This evaluation compares functionality, performance, reliability, and other factors of NAStore and three commercial alternatives. FileServ is found to be slightly better overall than NAStore and DMF. UniTree is found to be severely lacking in comparison.

Woodrow, Thomas S.

1993-01-01

250

Creating a Performance Management System.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors demonstrate the comprehensiveness of a performance management system and why it isn't just performance appraisal anymore. They discuss choosing performance appraisal measures and standards, communicating performance expectations, planning for performance, monitoring and controlling performance, appraising performance, providing…

Schneier, Craig Eric; And Others

1986-01-01

251

Remotely Accessible Management System (RAMS).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oakland Schools, an Intermediate School District for Administration, operates a Remotely Accessible Management System (RAMS). RAMS is composed of over 100 computer programs, each of which performs procedures on the files of the 28 local school districts comprising the constituency of Oakland Schools. This regional service agency covers 900 square…

Wood, Rex

252

Data management system performance modeling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper discusses analytical techniques that have been used to gain a better understanding of the Space Station Freedom's (SSF's) Data Management System (DMS). The DMS is a complex, distributed, real-time computer system that has been redesigned numerous times. The implications of these redesigns have not been fully analyzed. This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages for static analytical techniques such as Rate Monotonic Analysis (RMA) and also provides a rationale for dynamic modeling. Factors such as system architecture, processor utilization, bus architecture, queuing, etc. are well suited for analysis with a dynamic model. The significance of performance measures for a real-time system are discussed.

Kiser, Larry M.

1993-01-01

253

Undo in Workflow Management Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Workflow Management Systems are one of the main technology for supporting Business Processes and they need to be as flexible\\u000a as possible. One relevant issue arising from integration between WfMSs and corporate Information Systems is that of undo strategies,\\u000a policies and mechanisms. In this paper the state of the art for the undo problem and the solution adopted in the

Alessandra Agostini; Giorgio De Michelis; Marco Loregian

2003-01-01

254

General Module Design of Management Information Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

?Abstract?With the research of management information systems,the design andim plementation ofge neral module of management information systemsis produced. The general module of management information systems’idea and method of implementation are used to settlethe problemo f management information systems’ growing,requirement and,the commonness of management information systems by constituting the trade’s flow. The general module of enterprise information systemsis made up of

ZHAO Guo-an; WANG Xiao-jun; LIU Xing-miao; ZHAO Xiu-li

2008-01-01

255

The performance of intensive care units: does good management make a difference?  

PubMed

A significant portion of health care resources are spent in intensive care units with, historically, up to two-fold variation in risk-adjusted mortality. Technological, demographic, and social forces are likely to lead to an increased volume of intensive care in the future. Thus, it is important to identify ways of more efficiently managing intensive care units and reducing the variation in patient outcomes. Based on data collected from 17,440 patients across 42 ICUs, the present study examines the factors associated with risk-adjusted mortality, risk-adjusted average length of stay, nurse turnover, evaluated technical quality of care, and evaluated ability to meet family member needs. Using the Apache III methodology for risk-adjustment, findings reveal that: 1) technological availability is significantly associated with lower risk-adjusted mortality (beta = -.42); 2) diagnostic diversity is significantly associated with greater risk-adjusted mortality (beta = .46); and 3) caregiver interaction comprising the culture, leadership, coordination, communication, and conflict management abilities of the unit is significantly associated with lower risk-adjusted length of stay (beta = .34), lower nurse turnover (beta = -.36), higher evaluated technical quality of care (beta = .81), and greater evaluated ability to meet family member needs (beta = .74). Furthermore, units with greater technological availability are significantly more likely to be associated with hospitals that are more profitable, involved in teaching activities, and have unit leaders actively participating in hospital-wide quality improvement activities. The findings hold a number of important managerial and policy implications regarding technological adoption, specialization, and the quality of interaction among ICU team members. They suggest intervention "leverage points" for care givers, managers, and external policy makers in efforts to continuously improve the outcomes of intensive care. PMID:8182978

Shortell, S M; Zimmerman, J E; Rousseau, D M; Gillies, R R; Wagner, D P; Draper, E A; Knaus, W A; Duffy, J

1994-05-01

256

Hydrologic response of northern wetlands to silvicultural water management systems  

SciTech Connect

Two types of water management systems are used to ameliorate saturated soil conditions which limit silvicultural operations and site productivity in northern wetlands. The pattern ditch system is an intensive drainage network designed to regulate water table depth in peat soils. The prescription drainage system is a low-intensity drainage system that is used to develop apparent drainage patterns in mineral and histic-mineral soils. These water management systems may either increase or decrease peak flow, base flow, and the duration of peak flow events, depending on drainage system design, climate, season, site characteristics, and land use. The most common hydrologic response to drainage is an increase in peak flow and base flow, and an increase in annual runoff. The effect of wetland drainage on watershed hydrology depends on the proportion of the watershed drained. Drainage may also affect water quality, nutrient cycling, vegetation composition and structure.

Trettin, C.C.

1994-09-01

257

Integrated soil–crop system management for food security  

PubMed Central

China and other rapidly developing economies face the dual challenge of substantially increasing yields of cereal grains while at the same time reducing the very substantial environmental impacts of intensive agriculture. We used a model-driven integrated soil–crop system management approach to develop a maize production system that achieved mean maize yields of 13.0 t ha?1 on 66 on-farm experimental plots—nearly twice the yield of current farmers’ practices—with no increase in N fertilizer use. Such integrated soil–crop system management systems represent a priority for agricultural research and implementation, especially in rapidly growing economies. PMID:21444818

Chen, Xin-Ping; Cui, Zhen-Ling; Vitousek, Peter M.; Cassman, Kenneth G.; Matson, Pamela A.; Bai, Jin-Shun; Meng, Qing-Feng; Hou, Peng; Yue, Shan-Chao; Römheld, Volker; Zhang, Fu-Suo

2011-01-01

258

Integrated soil-crop system management for food security.  

PubMed

China and other rapidly developing economies face the dual challenge of substantially increasing yields of cereal grains while at the same time reducing the very substantial environmental impacts of intensive agriculture. We used a model-driven integrated soil-crop system management approach to develop a maize production system that achieved mean maize yields of 13.0 t ha(-1) on 66 on-farm experimental plots--nearly twice the yield of current farmers' practices--with no increase in N fertilizer use. Such integrated soil-crop system management systems represent a priority for agricultural research and implementation, especially in rapidly growing economies. PMID:21444818

Chen, Xin-Ping; Cui, Zhen-Ling; Vitousek, Peter M; Cassman, Kenneth G; Matson, Pamela A; Bai, Jin-Shun; Meng, Qing-Feng; Hou, Peng; Yue, Shan-Chao; Römheld, Volker; Zhang, Fu-Suo

2011-04-19

259

Rectourethral fistula secondary to a bowel management system.  

PubMed

A 67-year-old Caucasian male was admitted under the vascular team with critical lower limb ischaemia. Bypass surgery was performed and he was admitted to the intensive care unit post-operatively. The patient experienced a turbulent post-operative recovery complicated by pneumonia, poor respiratory wean and faecal incontinence. A bowel management system was inserted but after 18 days it was reported faecal matter was bypassing his catheter. A CT scan demonstrated an area of necrosis where the bowel management system had been sited which formed a rectourethral fistula. Bowel management systems are frequently used in intensive care unit settings where a high proportion of patients suffer from faecal incontinence. If used correctly they can reduce skin contamination, infection and maintain patient hygiene. However, appropriate assessment and investigations should be addressed before inserting such devices. This case report highlights serious adverse effects of these devices and describes the first documented case of these devices causing a rectourethral fistula. PMID:24457039

A'Court, Jamie; Yiannoullou, Petros; Pearce, Lyndsay; Hill, James; Donnelly, David; Murray, David

2014-08-01

260

PROMIS (Procurement Management Information System)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The PROcurement Management Information System (PROMIS) provides both detailed and summary level information on all procurement actions performed within NASA's procurement offices at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). It provides not only on-line access, but also schedules procurement actions, monitors their progress, and updates Forecast Award Dates. Except for a few computational routines coded in FORTRAN, the majority of the systems is coded in a high level language called NATURAL. A relational Data Base Management System called ADABAS is utilized. Certain fields, called descriptors, are set up on each file to allow the selection of records based on a specified value or range of values. The use of like descriptors on different files serves as the link between the falls, thus producing a relational data base. Twenty related files are currently being maintained on PROMIS.

1987-01-01

261

Metrics for border management systems.  

SciTech Connect

There are as many unique and disparate manifestations of border systems as there are borders to protect. Border Security is a highly complex system analysis problem with global, regional, national, sector, and border element dimensions for land, water, and air domains. The complexity increases with the multiple, and sometimes conflicting, missions for regulating the flow of people and goods across borders, while securing them for national security. These systems include frontier border surveillance, immigration management and customs functions that must operate in a variety of weather, terrain, operational conditions, cultural constraints, and geopolitical contexts. As part of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project 08-684 (Year 1), the team developed a reference framework to decompose this complex system into international/regional, national, and border elements levels covering customs, immigration, and border policing functions. This generalized architecture is relevant to both domestic and international borders. As part of year two of this project (09-1204), the team determined relevant relative measures to better understand border management performance. This paper describes those relative metrics and how they can be used to improve border management systems.

Duggan, Ruth Ann

2009-07-01

262

MIMS - MEDICAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

MIMS, Medical Information Management System is an interactive, general purpose information storage and retrieval system. It was first designed to be used in medical data management, and can be used to handle all aspects of data related to patient care. Other areas of application for MIMS include: managing occupational safety data in the public and private sectors; handling judicial information where speed and accuracy are high priorities; systemizing purchasing and procurement systems; and analyzing organizational cost structures. Because of its free format design, MIMS can offer immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases is required. File structures, data categories, field lengths and formats, including alphabetic and/or numeric, are all user defined. The user can quickly and efficiently extract, display, and analyze the data. Three means of extracting data are provided: certain short items of information, such as social security numbers, can be used to uniquely identify each record for quick access; records can be selected which match conditions defined by the user; and specific categories of data can be selected. Data may be displayed and analyzed in several ways which include: generating tabular information assembled from comparison of all the records on the system; generating statistical information on numeric data such as means, standard deviations and standard errors; and displaying formatted listings of output data. The MIMS program is written in Microsoft FORTRAN-77. It was designed to operate on IBM Personal Computers and compatibles running under PC or MS DOS 2.00 or higher. MIMS was developed in 1987.

Frankowski, J. W.

1994-01-01

263

Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) System Manager  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) mission is an ambitious NASA space science mission in which 4 spacecraft are flown in tight formation about a highly elliptical orbit. Each spacecraft has multiple instruments that measure particle and field compositions in the Earths magnetosphere. By controlling the members relative motion, MMS can distinguish temporal and spatial fluctuations in a way that a single spacecraft cannot.To achieve this control, 2 sets of four maneuvers, distributed evenly across the spacecraft must be performed approximately every 14 days. Performing a single maneuver on an individual spacecraft is usually labor intensive and the complexity becomes clearly increases with four. As a result, the MMS flight dynamics team turned to the System Manager to put the routine or error-prone under machine control freeing the analysts for activities that require human judgment.The System Manager is an expert system that is capable of handling operations activities associated with performing MMS maneuvers. As an expert system, it can work off a known schedule, launching jobs based on a one-time occurrence or on a set reoccurring schedule. It is also able to detect situational changes and use event-driven programming to change schedules, adapt activities, or call for help.

Schiff, Conrad; Maher, Francis Alfred; Henely, Sean Philip; Rand, David

2014-01-01

264

Integrated Systems Health Management for Intelligent Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The implementation of an integrated system health management (ISHM) capability is fundamentally linked to the management of data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) with the purposeful objective of determining the health of a system. Management implies storage, distribution, sharing, maintenance, processing, reasoning, and presentation. ISHM is akin to having a team of experts who are all individually and collectively observing and analyzing a complex system, and communicating effectively with each other in order to arrive at an accurate and reliable assessment of its health. In this chapter, concepts, procedures, and approaches are presented as a foundation for implementing an ISHM capability relevant to intelligent systems. The capability stresses integration of DIaK from all elements of a system, emphasizing an advance toward an on-board, autonomous capability. Both ground-based and on-board ISHM capabilities are addressed. The information presented is the result of many years of research, development, and maturation of technologies, and of prototype implementations in operational systems.

Figueroa, Fernando; Melcher, Kevin

2011-01-01

265

Fungal Infections in Intensive Care Unit: Challenges in Diagnosis and Management  

PubMed Central

Infections have almost become an inseparable part of the intensive care units throughout the globe in spite of numerous advancements in diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. With advances in critical care medicine and introduction of broad-spectrum antibiotics, the incidence of invasive fungal infections in intensive care is on the rise, especially in patients with immunosuppression. The aim of this review is to collect recent information about various types of invasive fungal infections prevalent in the intensive care unit, the problems in their diagnosis and recent trends in their management. A thorough literature search was made in PubMed and Google using the following keywords for our search: Invasive fungal infection, antifungal therapy in intensive care unit, candidiasis. The major fungi implicated worldwide are Candida and Aspergillus spp., followed by Cryptococcus, Histoplasma, etc., in endemic areas. These produce a wide variety of infections that are difficult to diagnose as most of the diagnosing tests are non-specific and the culture takes a long time. An early suspicion of fungal infection with institution of appropriate antifungal therapy is mandatory for a positive outcome and to prevent development of invasive fungal infection. PMID:23919197

Bajwa, SJ; Kulshrestha, A

2013-01-01

266

Separating key management from file system security  

Microsoft Academic Search

No secure network file system has ever grown to span the Internet. Existing systems all lack adequate key management for security at a global scale. Given the diversity of the Internet, any particular mechanism a file system employs to manage keys will fail to support many types of use.We propose separating key management from file system security, letting the world

David Mazičres; Michael Kaminsky; M. Frans Kaashoek; Emmett Witchel

1999-01-01

267

5 CFR 9701.405 - Performance management system requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Performance Management...

2010-01-01

268

Issues in Public Management Information Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

What are the key issues facing information systems managers in the public sector? Most public IS managers surveyed show more concern for agency-wide management issues than for technical ones. They care about what information systems can do for their agencies. They want people in their agencies to understand the importance of managing information and information technology effectively.

John W. Swain; Jay D. White; Elice D. Hubbert

1995-01-01

269

The importance of management information systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Presents a discussion on the importance of management information systems in management. It explains the role of information, as an essential tool for managers in planning and decision making. It describes MIS as a well co-ordinated information system, a database that is to provide management with needed information to plan and make decisions. Modern technology has further made the resort

W. B. Adeoti-Adekeye

1997-01-01

270

MIT System Design and Management Program  

E-print Network

Sloan School of Management and MIT School of Engineering and resides within the MIT Engineering Systems, engineering, and designing complex products and systems and to give them the leadership and management skills of Management and the MIT School of Engineering. It provides technical/engineering depth and management breadth

Gabrieli, John

271

RHEED intensities from two-dimensional heteroepitaxial nanoscale systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A practical computing algorithm has been developed for calculating the reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) from the molecular beam epitaxy growing surface. The calculations are based on the use of the dynamical diffraction theory in which the electrons are taken to be diffracted by a potential, which is periodic in the dimension perpendicular to the surface. The computer program presented in this paper enables calculations for three basic types of diffuse potential for crystalline heteroepitaxial structures, including the possible existence of various diffuse scattering models through the layer parallel to the surface. Catalogue identifier: AETW_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETW_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 68483 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 480831 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: Intel i7-based PC. Operating system: Windows, Linux. RAM: The presented algorithm belongs to the linear memory class of the computational complexity O(n). Word size: 64 bits Classification: 4.6, 6.2, 7.2. Nature of problem: RHEED rocking curves (the specular beam intensities versus the glancing angle) recorded from heteroepitaxial layers are used for the non-destructive evaluation of epilayer thickness and composition with a high degree of accuracy. Rocking curves from such heterostructures are often very complex because the thickness fringes from every layer beat together. Simulations based on the dynamical diffraction theory are generally used to interpret the rocking curves of such structures from which very small changes in thickness and composition can be obtained. Rocking curves are also used to determine the level of strain and its relaxation mechanism in a lattice-mismatched system. Solution method: RHEED intensities are calculated within the framework of the general matrix formulation described in Ref. [1] under the one-beam condition [2,3]. The dynamical diffraction calculations presented in this paper utilize the systematic reflection case in RHEED, in which the atomic potential in the planes parallel to the surface are projected onto the surface normal, so that the results are insensitive to the atomic arrangement in the layers parallel to the surface. In this paper, an approach in which oscillating changes in the intensity appear as a combined effect of changes in the refraction conditions and changes in diffuse scattering for different models of the scattering potential is implemented. Running time: Numerically, the problem of calculating the changes in RHEED oscillation intensity from growing layers is an NP problem. The time computational complexity of the presented algorithm depends on the number of layers for both the substrate and the growing layers included in the calculations. The time-computational complexity of the presented solution is O(n2), where n is the total number of layers used in the calculations. A. Daniluk, Comput. Phys. Commun. 166 (2005) 123. L.M. Peng, M.J. Whelan, Surf. Sci. Lett. 238 (1990) L446. Y. Horio, A. Ichimiya, Japan. J. Appl. Phys. 33 (1994) L377.

Daniluk, Andrzej

2014-11-01

272

A holistic life cycle analysis of waste management scenarios at increasing source segregation intensity: the case of an Italian urban area.  

PubMed

Life cycle analysis of several waste management scenarios for an Italian urban area was performed on the basis of different source segregation collection (SS) intensities from 0% up to 52%. Source segregated waste was recycled and or/recovered by composting. Residual waste management options were by landfilling, incineration with energy recovery or solid recovered fuel (SRF) production to substitute for coal. The increase in fuel and materials consumption due to increase in SS had negligible influence on the environmental impact of the system. Recycling operations such as incineration and SRF were always advantageous for impact reduction. There was lower impact for an SS of 52% even though the difference with the SS intensity of 35% was quite limited, about 15%. In all the configurations analyzed, the best environmental performance was achieved for the management system producing SRF by the biodrying process. PMID:25008299

Di Maria, Francesco; Micale, Caterina

2014-11-01

273

Automated Platform Management System Scheduling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Platform Management System was established to coordinate the operation of platform systems and instruments. The management functions are split between ground and space components. Since platforms are to be out of contact with the ground more than the manned base, the on-board functions are required to be more autonomous than those of the manned base. Under this concept, automated replanning and rescheduling, including on-board real-time schedule maintenance and schedule repair, are required to effectively and efficiently meet Space Station Freedom mission goals. In a FY88 study, we developed several promising alternatives for automated platform planning and scheduling. We recommended both a specific alternative and a phased approach to automated platform resource scheduling. Our recommended alternative was based upon use of exactly the same scheduling engine in both ground and space components of the platform management system. Our phased approach recommendation was based upon evolutionary development of the platform. In the past year, we developed platform scheduler requirements and implemented a rapid prototype of a baseline platform scheduler. Presently we are rehosting this platform scheduler rapid prototype and integrating the scheduler prototype into two Goddard Space Flight Center testbeds, as the ground scheduler in the Scheduling Concepts, Architectures, and Networks Testbed and as the on-board scheduler in the Platform Management System Testbed. Using these testbeds, we will investigate rescheduling issues, evaluate operational performance and enhance the platform scheduler prototype to demonstrate our evolutionary approach to automated platform scheduling. The work described in this paper was performed prior to Space Station Freedom rephasing, transfer of platform responsibility to Code E, and other recently discussed changes. We neither speculate on these changes nor attempt to predict the impact of the final decisions. As a consequence some of our work and results may be outdated when this paper is published.

Hull, Larry G.

1990-01-01

274

The Janus system manager's guide  

SciTech Connect

This guide describes the steps necessary to fully install and maintain the Janus combat simulation on a Digital Equipment Corp. (DEC) VAX computer. It is designed to familiarize System Managers with the operational concepts associated with the Janus package. This guide will not describe how to run the model itself. For information regarding the Janus simulation, or its associated utilities, please refer to the Janus documentation set.

Pimper, J.E.; Calloway, D.R.; Elko, S.D.; Rhodes, J.J.; Uzelac, M.J.; Wilson, J.

1989-09-01

275

Productivity of F b1 sAngus-Jersey cows compared with Hereford cows under intensive and extensive management conditions  

E-print Network

PRODUCTIVITY OF Fl ANGUS-JERSEY COWS COMPARED WITH HEREFORD COWS UNDER INTENSIVE AND EXTENSIVE MANAGEMENT CONDITIONS A Thesis by Daniel Richard Ellison Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OE SCIENCE May 1974 Ma)or Sub)ect: Animal Breeding PRODUCTIVITY OF F ANGUS-JERSEY COWS COMPARED WITH HEREFORD l COWS UNDER INTENSIVE AND EXTENSIVE MANAGEMENT CONDITIONS A Thesis By DANIEL RICHARD ELLISON Approved...

Ellison, Daniel Richard

1974-01-01

276

Revised June 2014 Training Management System (TMS)  

E-print Network

Revised June 2014 Training Management System (TMS) User Manual Contents Accessing the TMS.................................................................................................................15 #12;2 Accessing the TMS Before accessing the Training Management System you must know your Harvard

Heller, Eric

277

Patient data management systems in critical care.  

PubMed

Electronic patient data management systems (PDMS) were clinically used for the first time in the 1970s. Their purpose was to automatically document vital parameters sampled by monitors and to replace handwritten medical files. Because of the continuous development of computer technology, however, demands on PDMS have increased immensely. PDMS are currently expected to assist clinicians at every level of intensive care, i.e., at the strategic level of physicians' orders and prescriptions, at the operational level, and at the administrative level. In 1994, a PDMS (CareVue; Agilent Technologies) was installed and further developed in the anesthesiologic intensive care unit of the university hospital in Tübingen. The goals of this article were to describe the current demands on PDMS, to communicate our experiences in implementing a PDMS, to list the costs of purchasing and maintaining the system, and to report on the acceptance among physicians and nursing personnel. This article may assist new users in planning for, purchasing, and implementing a PDMS. PMID:11251038

Fretschner, R; Bleicher, W; Heininger, A; Unertl, K

2001-02-01

278

Risk-Informed Safety Assurance and Probabilistic Assessment of Mission-Critical Software-Intensive Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report validates and documents the detailed features and practical application of the framework for software intensive digital systems risk assessment and risk-informed safety assurance presented in the NASA PRA Procedures Guide for Managers and Practitioner. This framework, called herein the "Context-based Software Risk Model" (CSRM), enables the assessment of the contribution of software and software-intensive digital systems to overall system risk, in a manner which is entirely compatible and integrated with the format of a "standard" Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), as currently documented and applied for NASA missions and applications. The CSRM also provides a risk-informed path and criteria for conducting organized and systematic digital system and software testing so that, within this risk-informed paradigm, the achievement of a quantitatively defined level of safety and mission success assurance may be targeted and demonstrated. The framework is based on the concept of context-dependent software risk scenarios and on the modeling of such scenarios via the use of traditional PRA techniques - i.e., event trees and fault trees - in combination with more advanced modeling devices such as the Dynamic Flowgraph Methodology (DFM) or other dynamic logic-modeling representations. The scenarios can be synthesized and quantified in a conditional logic and probabilistic formulation. The application of the CSRM method documented in this report refers to the MiniAERCam system designed and developed by the NASA Johnson Space Center.

Guarro, Sergio B.

2010-01-01

279

Crop manuring and intensive land management by Europe’s first farmers  

PubMed Central

The spread of farming from western Asia to Europe had profound long-term social and ecological impacts, but identification of the specific nature of Neolithic land management practices and the dietary contribution of early crops has been problematic. Here, we present previously undescribed stable isotope determinations of charred cereals and pulses from 13 Neolithic sites across Europe (dating ca. 5900–2400 cal B.C.), which show that early farmers used livestock manure and water management to enhance crop yields. Intensive manuring inextricably linked plant cultivation and animal herding and contributed to the remarkable resilience of these combined practices across diverse climatic zones. Critically, our findings suggest that commonly applied paleodietary interpretations of human and herbivore ?15N values have systematically underestimated the contribution of crop-derived protein to early farmer diets. PMID:23858458

Bogaard, Amy; Fraser, Rebecca; Heaton, Tim H. E.; Wallace, Michael; Vaiglova, Petra; Charles, Michael; Jones, Glynis; Evershed, Richard P.; Styring, Amy K.; Andersen, Niels H.; Arbogast, Rose-Marie; Bartosiewicz, Lįszló; Gardeisen, Armelle; Kanstrup, Marie; Maier, Ursula; Marinova, Elena; Ninov, Lazar; Schäfer, Marguerita; Stephan, Elisabeth

2013-01-01

280

Intensity-based fibre-optic sensing system using contrast modulation of subcarrier interference pattern  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A novel technique to compensate for unwanted intensity losses in a fiber-optic sensing system is described. The technique involves a continuous sinusoidal modulation of the light source intensity at radio frequencies and an intensity sensor placed in an unbalanced interferometer. The system shows high sensitivity and stability.

Adamovsky, G.; Sherer, T. N.; Maitland, D. J.

1989-01-01

281

Towards CORBAbased Enterprise Management: Managing CORBAbased Systems with SNMP Platforms  

E-print Network

@informatik.uniĀ­muenchen.de Proceedings of the Second International Enterprise Distributed Object Computing Workshop: EDOC'98 , San Diego1 Towards CORBAĀ­based Enterprise Management: Managing CORBAĀ­based Systems with SNMP Platforms and control management agents via CORBA are still hard to find on the market while SNMPĀ­ based platforms

282

Energy management systems: no longer a luxury  

Microsoft Academic Search

The selection, maintenance, and problems of building energy management systems are discussed. Available controls range from microprocessor-based load schedulers that sell for less than $1000 to computer-based facility management systems that cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. The facility management systems control energy consumption, optimize comfort, interface with human operators, and provide automatic data analysis and reporting and fire, smoke

Ebisch

1981-01-01

283

Towards a smart project management information system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The focus in this work is on the creation of a new generation project management information system, which the authors have dubbed: Smart Project Management Information System (SPMIS). As the projects and their environments get more complex, subject to uncertainty, time and money pressures, the need for a really helpful and smart system to support the decision making and manage

Ali Jaafari; Kitsana Manivong

1998-01-01

284

CQ5 Training Content Management System (CMS)  

E-print Network

1 CQ5 Training Content Management System (CMS) released: 01/10 This system allows users without technical knowledge to update, manage and maintain sites. Though there are other content management systems: * Scalability * Workflow * Integrated with LDAP * Centrally located hardware * Web-based * Campus Media Library

Oklahoma, University of

285

Microcomputer Database Management Systems for Bibliographic Data.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses criteria for evaluating microcomputer database management systems (DBMS) used for storage and retrieval of bibliographic data. Two popular types of microcomputer DBMS--file management systems and relational database management systems--are evaluated with respect to these criteria. (Author/MBR)

Pollard, Richard

1986-01-01

286

Scheduling in HPC Resource Management Systems  

E-print Network

Scheduling in HPC Resource Management Systems: Queuing vs. Planning Matthias Hovestadt1 , Odej Kao1 systems are operated by resource management systems based on the queuing approach. With the increas- ing acceptance of grid middleware like Globus, new requirements for the underlying local resource management

Feitelson, Dror

287

System safety management lessons learned  

SciTech Connect

The Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research, Development and Acquisition directed the Army Safety Center to provide an audit of the causes of accidents and safety of use restrictions on recently fielded systems by tracking residual hazards back through the acquisition process. The objective was to develop ''lessons learned'' that could be applied to the acquisition process to minimize mishaps in fielded systems. System safety management lessons learned are defined as Army practices or policies, derived from past successes and failures, that are expected to be effective in eliminating or reducing specific systemic causes of residual hazards. They are broadly applicable and supportive of the Army structure and acquisition objectives. 29 refs., 7 figs.

Piatt, J.A.

1989-05-01

288

Integrated Building Management System (IBMS)  

SciTech Connect

This project provides a combination of software and services that more easily and cost-effectively help to achieve optimized building performance and energy efficiency. Featuring an open-platform, cloud- hosted application suite and an intuitive user experience, this solution simplifies a traditionally very complex process by collecting data from disparate building systems and creating a single, integrated view of building and system performance. The Fault Detection and Diagnostics algorithms developed within the IBMS have been designed and tested as an integrated component of the control algorithms running the equipment being monitored. The algorithms identify the normal control behaviors of the equipment without interfering with the equipment control sequences. The algorithms also work without interfering with any cooperative control sequences operating between different pieces of equipment or building systems. In this manner the FDD algorithms create an integrated building management system.

Anita Lewis

2012-07-01

289

Combat Agility Management System (CAMS)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The proper management of energy becomes a complex task in fighter aircraft which have high angle of attack (AOA) capability. Maneuvers at high AOA are accompanied by high bleed rates (velocity decrease), a characteristic that is usually undesirable in a typical combat arena. Eidetics has developed under NASA SBIR Phase 1 and NAVAIR SBIR Phase 2 contracts a system which allows a pilot to more easily and effectively manage the trade-off of energy (airspeed or altitude) for turn rate while not imposing hard limits on the high AOA nose pointing capability that can be so important in certain air combat maneuver situations. This has been accomplished by incorporating a two-stage angle of attack limiter into the flight control laws. The first stage sets a limit on AOA to achieve a limit on the maximum bleed rate (selectable) by limiting AOA to values which are dependent on the aircraft attitude and dynamic pressure (or flight path, velocity, and altitude). The second stage sets an AOA limit near the AOA for C(sub l max). One of the principal benefits of such a system is that it enables a low-experience pilot to become much more proficient at managing his energy. The Phase 2 simulation work is complete, and an exploratory flight test on the F-18 HARV is planned for the Fall of 1994 to demonstrate/validate the concept.

Skow, Andrew; Porada, William

1994-01-01

290

Intensive Technical Assistance Assessment Tool. Community Systems Edition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Intensive Technical Assistance Assessment Tool was originally developed for use in states and communities participating in Smart Start's National Technical Assistance Center's intensive technical assistance program. It is designed to identify specific areas where technical assistance will be of benefit. Assessment results are used to develop…

Sotolongo, Joy

2004-01-01

291

Effect of 26 Years of Intensively Managed Carya cathayensis Stands on Soil Organic Carbon and Fertility  

PubMed Central

Chinese hickory (Carya cathayensis), a popular nut food tree species, is mainly distributed in southeastern China. A field study was carried out to investigate the effect of long-term intensive management on fertility of soils under a C. cathayensis forest. Results showed that after 26 years' intensive management, the soil organic carbon (SOC) content of the A and B horizons reduced by 19% and 14%, respectively. The reduced components of SOC are mainly the alkyl C and O-alkyl C, whereas the aromatic C and carbonyl C remain unchanged. The reduction of active organic matter could result in degradation of soil fertility. The pH value of soil in the A horizon had dropped by 0.7 units on average. The concentrations of the major nutrients also showed a decreasing trend. On average the concentrations of total nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) of tested soils dropped by 21.8%, 7.6%, and 13.6%, respectively, in the A horizon. To sustain the soil fertility and C. cathayensis production, it is recommended that more organic fertilizers (manures) should be used together with chemical fertilizers. Lime should also be applied to reduce soil acidity. PMID:24558339

Wu, Jiasen; Huang, Jianqin; Liu, Dan; Li, Jianwu; Zhang, Jinchi; Wang, Hailong

2014-01-01

292

Clevidipine: a review of its use for managing blood pressure in perioperative and intensive care settings.  

PubMed

The ultrashort-acting dihydropyridine calcium channel antagonist clevidipine (Cleviprex(®)) has a rapid onset and offset of effect and reduces blood pressure (BP) by decreasing arteriolar resistance without affecting venous capacitance vessels. This article reviews the clinical efficacy and tolerability of intravenous clevidipine when used to manage BP in perioperative and intensive care settings, as well as summarizing its pharmacological properties. Intravenous clevidipine effectively treated preoperative and postoperative hypertension in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, according to the results of the randomized, multicentre, double-blind, phase III ESCAPE-1 and ESCAPE-2 trials. The randomized, open-label, multicentre, phase III ECLIPSE trials indicated that in terms of keeping systolic BP within the target range, clevidipine was more effective than nitroglycerin or sodium nitroprusside perioperatively and had similar efficacy to nicardipine postoperatively in cardiac surgery patients. In small, double-blind trials in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery, perioperative clevidipine was noninferior to nitroglycerin, and postoperative clevidipine had similar efficacy to sodium nitroprusside. Noncomparative studies demonstrated that clevidipine provided rapid BP control in patients with acute neurological injuries (including intracerebral haemorrhage, subarachnoid haemorrhage and acute ischaemic stroke), and was not associated with 'overshoot' in the vast majority of patients. Intravenous clevidipine was generally well tolerated and was usually associated with no reflex tachycardia or only very modest increases in heart rate. In conclusion, intravenous clevidipine is a valuable agent for the management of BP in perioperative and intensive care settings. PMID:25312594

Keating, Gillian M

2014-10-01

293

A survey of the management of needlestick injuries from incapacitated patients in intensive care units.  

PubMed

The Human Tissue Act 2004 and Mental Capacity Act 2005 resulted in a change in the management of needlestick injuries sustained from incapacitated patients. It appears unlawful to test for blood-borne viruses without a patient's consent for the sole benefit of the healthcare worker. This survey of intensive care units within England, Wales and Northern Ireland investigated how needlestick injuries from incapacitated patients had been managed within the previous year. Of the 225 intensive care units surveyed, 99 (44%) responded. Sixty-two (62.6%) reported a needlestick injury to a healthcare worker from an incapacitated patient. Thirty-six (64.3%) patients were tested for blood-borne viruses without consent. Sixteen (25.8%) patients tested positive for blood-borne viruses. Only 19 (30.6%) healthcare workers took post-exposure prophylaxis following the injury. These results show that needlestick injuries from incapacitated patients are common and that the majority of patients were tested for blood-borne viruses without consent. PMID:21198483

Burrows, L A; Padkin, A

2010-09-01

294

Effect of 26 years of intensively managed Carya cathayensis stands on soil organic carbon and fertility.  

PubMed

Chinese hickory (Carya cathayensis), a popular nut food tree species, is mainly distributed in southeastern China. A field study was carried out to investigate the effect of long-term intensive management on fertility of soils under a C. cathayensis forest. Results showed that after 26 years' intensive management, the soil organic carbon (SOC) content of the A and B horizons reduced by 19% and 14%, respectively. The reduced components of SOC are mainly the alkyl C and O-alkyl C, whereas the aromatic C and carbonyl C remain unchanged. The reduction of active organic matter could result in degradation of soil fertility. The pH value of soil in the A horizon had dropped by 0.7 units on average. The concentrations of the major nutrients also showed a decreasing trend. On average the concentrations of total nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) of tested soils dropped by 21.8%, 7.6%, and 13.6%, respectively, in the A horizon. To sustain the soil fertility and C. cathayensis production, it is recommended that more organic fertilizers (manures) should be used together with chemical fertilizers. Lime should also be applied to reduce soil acidity. PMID:24558339

Wu, Jiasen; Huang, Jianqin; Liu, Dan; Li, Jianwu; Zhang, Jinchi; Wang, Hailong

2014-01-01

295

Outpatient Management Following Intensive Induction or Salvage Chemotherapy for Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

PubMed Central

Adults with newly diagnosed or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) commonly receive intensive chemotherapy to achieve disease remission. In the United States and many other countries, it is standard practice that these patients remain hospitalized “preemptively” until blood count recovery due to the risk for overwhelming infections and bleeding during pancytopenia. This care policy requires hospitalization for an average of 3–4 weeks after completion of chemotherapy. However, highly effective oral prophylactic antimicrobials are now available, and transfusion support of outpatients has become routine in recent years. As a result, the care of patients with hematologic malignancies treated with other intensive modalities is increasingly shifting from inpatient to outpatient settings. Benefits of this shift could include reduced need for medical resources such as transfusions or intravenous antimicrobial therapy, improved quality of life (QOL), decreased rates of nosocomial infections, and lower cost. Increasing evidence indicates that selected AML patients undergoing intensive remission induction or salvage chemotherapy can be discharged early after completion of chemotherapy and followed closely in a well-equipped and –staffed outpatient facility safely and less costly. Further demonstration that the current approach of “preemptive” hospitalization is medically unjustified, economically more burdensome, and adversely affects health-related QOL would very likely change the management of these patients throughout this country and elsewhere and establish a new standard practice that improves cancer care. PMID:24518520

Walter, Roland B.; Taylor, Lenise R.; Gardner, Kelda M.; Dorcy, Kathleen Shannon; Vaughn, Jennifer E.; Estey, Elihu H.

2014-01-01

296

Management System for Engineering Ethics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the context of independent profession based societies, ethics charter/codes of professional bodies have significant influence on the conduct of engineers. Contrarily in Japan, most of active engineers are in-house and feel immediate identity as the member of firm or institution, rather than professional bodies. Therefore, establishment and operation of engineering ethics management system (E2ms) is essential for incentive to make innovative and ethical decision with confidence. The paper introduces the outline of the educational kit for E2ms developed by the author. The kit aims to enhance ability of management relevant to E2ms. The kit also involves ten cases for case method teaching. The test use of the kit indicates the potential to create satisfactory educational achievement.

Yashiro, Tomonari

297

Intensive care unit without walls: seeking patient safety by improving the efficiency of the system.  

PubMed

The term "ICU without walls" refers to innovative management in Intensive Care, based on two key elements: (1) collaboration of all medical and nursing staff involved in patient care during hospitalization and (2) technological support for severity early detection protocols by identifying patients at risk of deterioration throughout the hospital, based on the assessment of vital signs and/or laboratory test values, with the clear aim of improving critical patient safety in the hospitalization process. At present, it can be affirmed that there is important work to be done in the detection of severity and early intervention in patients at risk of organ dysfunction. Such work must be adapted to the circumstances of each center and should include training in the detection of severity, multidisciplinary work in the complete patient clinical process, and the use of technological systems allowing intervention on the basis of monitored laboratory and physiological parameters, with effective and efficient use of the information generated. Not only must information be generated, but also efficient management of such information must also be achieved. It is necessary to improve our activity through innovation in management procedures that facilitate the work of the intensivist, in collaboration with other specialists, throughout the hospital environment. Innovation is furthermore required in the efficient management of the information generated in hospitals, through intelligent and directed usage of the new available technology. PMID:24661919

Gordo, F; Abella, A

2014-10-01

298

Scoring systems in the intensive care unit: A compendium  

PubMed Central

Severity scales are important adjuncts of treatment in the intensive care unit (ICU) in order to predict patient outcome, comparing quality-of-care and stratification for clinical trials. Even though disease severity scores are not the key elements of treatment, they are however, an essential part of improvement in clinical decisions and in identifying patients with unexpected outcomes. Prediction models do face many challenges, but, proper application of these models helps in decision making at the right time and in decreasing hospital cost. In fact, they have become a necessary tool to describe ICU populations and to explain differences in mortality. However, it is also important to note that the choice of the severity score scale, index, or model should accurately match the event, setting or application; as mis-application, of such systems can lead to wastage of time, increased cost, unwarranted extrapolations and poor science. This article provides a brief overview of ICU severity scales (along with their predicted death/survival rate calculations) developed over the last 3 decades including several of them which has been revised accordingly. PMID:24872651

Rapsang, Amy Grace; Shyam, Devajit C.

2014-01-01

299

49 CFR 19.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Standards for financial management systems. 19...AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION... Standards for financial management systems. (a...b) Recipients' financial management systems shall...

2010-10-01

300

43 CFR 12.921 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Standards for financial management systems. 12...Agreements With Institutions of Higher Education... Standards for financial management systems. (a...b) Recipients' financial management systems shall...

2010-10-01

301

7 CFR 277.6 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Standards for financial management systems. (a...standards for financial management systems in administering...Responsibilities. Financial management systems for program...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays and...

2011-01-01

302

7 CFR 277.6 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Standards for financial management systems. (a...standards for financial management systems in administering...Responsibilities. Financial management systems for program...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays and...

2014-01-01

303

7 CFR 277.6 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Standards for financial management systems. (a...standards for financial management systems in administering...Responsibilities. Financial management systems for program...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays and...

2013-01-01

304

7 CFR 277.6 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Standards for financial management systems. (a...standards for financial management systems in administering...Responsibilities. Financial management systems for program...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays and...

2010-01-01

305

7 CFR 277.6 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Standards for financial management systems. (a...standards for financial management systems in administering...Responsibilities. Financial management systems for program...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays and...

2012-01-01

306

Database Management Systems 3ed, R. Ramakrishnan and J. Gehrke 1 Database Management Systems  

E-print Network

Database Management Systems 3ed, R. Ramakrishnan and J. Gehrke 1 Database Management Systems Chapter 2 Part 1 Introduction to Database Design Database Management Systems 3ed, R. Ramakrishnan and J Design (performance tuning). Application and Security Design. #12;Database Management Systems 3ed, R

Li, Yanjun "Lisa"

307

Fluid management systems technology summaries  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A summarization and categorization of the pertinent literature associated with fluid management systems technology having potential application to in-orbit fluid transfer and/or associated storage are presented. A literature search was conducted to obtain pertinent documents for review. Reports determined to be of primary significance were summarized in the following manner: (1) report identification, (2) objective(s) of the work, (3) description of pertinent work performed, (4) major results, and (5) comments of the reviewer. Pertinent figures are presented on a single facing page separate from the text. Specific areas covered are: fluid line dynamics and thermodynamics, low-g mass gauging, other instrumentation, stratification/pressurization, low-g vent systems, fluid mixing refrigeration and reliquefaction, and low-g interface control and liquid acquisition systems. Reports which were reviewed and not summarized, along with reasons for not summarizing, are also listed.

Stark, J. A.; Blatt, M. H.; Bennett, F. O., Jr.; Campbell, B. J.

1974-01-01

308

Energy management systems: are they cost effective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Examines how computerized energy management systems (EMS) can lead to energy savings through 7 basic building monitoring and control functions: HVAC energy management, lighting energy management, security protection, fire protection, industrial process control, maintenance scheduling, and management reports. Focuses on how HVAC energy savings are possible through different EMS options (e.g. start\\/stop operation) because approximately 70% of all EMS are

Guntermann

1982-01-01

309

Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS) Configuration Management Plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the Software Configuration Management (SCM) approach and procedures to be utilized in developing and maintaining the Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS). The configuration management procedures are necessary to ensure that any changes made to software and related documentation are consistent with ATMS goals and contained securely in a central library. This plan applies to all software and associated documentation used in producing ATMS V1.0 and ATMS V2.0 system.

Weidert, R.S.

1994-01-01

310

Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Using the HI-ART II Helical Tomotherapy System  

SciTech Connect

The highly integrated adaptive radiation therapy (HI-ART II) helical tomotherapy unit is a new radiotherapy machine designed to achieve highly precise and accurate treatments at all body sites. The precision and accuracy of the HI-ART II is similar to that provided by stereotactic radiosurgery systems, hence the historical distinction between external beam radiotherapy and stereotactic procedures based on differing precision requirements is removed for this device. The objectives of this work are: (1) to describe stereotactic helical tomotherapy processes (SRS, SBRT); (2) to show that the precision and accuracy of the HI-ART meet the requirements defined for SRS and SBRT; and (3) to describe the clinical implementation of a stereotactic image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) system that incorporates optical motion management.

Holmes, Timothy W. [St. Agnes Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Integrated Medical Technologies, Troy, NY (United States)], E-mail: tholmes@stagnes.org; Hudes, Richard; Dziuba, Sylwester; Kazi, Abdul; Hall, Mark; Dawson, Dana [St. Agnes Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Integrated Medical Technologies, Troy, NY (United States)

2008-07-01

311

A Component Model for Control-Intensive Distributed Embedded Systems 1  

E-print Network

A Component Model for Control-Intensive Distributed Embedded Systems 1 SĀ´everine Sentilles, Aneta class of embedded systems are control-intensive distributed systems which can be found in many products is also an important aspect. The architecture of the electronic systems is distributed all over

Becker, Steffen

312

On Management Myth-Information Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes some key defining characteristics of a special class of information systems known as Management Myth-Information Systems (MMIS) or story-telling information systems. MMIS are information systems [Mason, Richard O., Ian I. Mitroff. 1973. A program for research on management information systems. Management Sci. 19 (5, January) 475-487.] which present information to a decision-maker by means of stories. In

Ian I. Mitroff; John Nelson; Richard O. Mason

1974-01-01

313

Design and Data Management System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Design and Data Management System (DDMS) was developed to automate the NASA Engineering Order (EO) and Engineering Change Request (ECR) processes at the Propulsion Test Facilities at Stennis Space Center for efficient and effective Configuration Management (CM). Prior to the development of DDMS, the CM system was a manual, paper-based system that required an EO or ECR submitter to walk the changes through the acceptance process to obtain necessary approval signatures. This approval process could take up to two weeks, and was subject to a variety of human errors. The process also requires that the CM office make copies and distribute them to the Configuration Control Board members for review prior to meetings. At any point, there was a potential for an error or loss of the change records, meaning the configuration of record was not accurate. The new Web-based DDMS eliminates unnecessary copies, reduces the time needed to distribute the paperwork, reduces time to gain the necessary signatures, and prevents the variety of errors inherent in the previous manual system. After implementation of the DDMS, all EOs and ECRs can be automatically checked prior to submittal to ensure that the documentation is complete and accurate. Much of the configuration information can be documented in the DDMS through pull-down forms to ensure consistent entries by the engineers and technicians in the field. The software also can electronically route the documents through the signature process to obtain the necessary approvals needed for work authorization. The workflow of the system allows for backups and timestamps that determine the correct routing and completion of all required authorizations in a more timely manner, as well as assuring the quality and accuracy of the configuration documents.

Messer, Elizabeth; Messer, Brad; Carter, Judy; Singletary, Todd; Albasini, Colby; Smith, Tammy

2007-01-01

314

Forests may need centuries to recover their original productivity after continuous intensive management: an example from Douglas-fir stands.  

PubMed

How long would it take for forests to recover their original productivity following continuous intensive management if they are left untouched? This issue was explored using the model FORECAST, calibrated and validated for coastal Douglas-fir stands on Vancouver Island (western Canada). Three types of forest management (production of timber, pulp, and biomass) were simulated, being different in utilization level and rotation length (stem-only and 75-year rotation for timber production, whole-tree and 30-year rotation for pulp/fiber, and whole-tree and 15-year rotations for biomass production). Management was simulated for 150 years, followed by several cycles of natural growth without management ending with a stand-replacing windstorm with a return time of 200 years. Productivity-related ecological variables in previously managed stands were compared to natural forests. Stands developed after management for timber would quickly reach values similar to non-managed forests for tree and understory total biomass, stored carbon, available nitrogen and soil organic matter (SOM). However, intensive management regimes designed for fiber and biomass production would cause a decrease in SOM and nutrient availability, increasing understory biomass. As a consequence, stands recovering from intensive management would need at least two stand-replacing events (400 years) to reach a productivity status similar to non-managed stands. Stands developed after management for biomass would take much longer, up to 600 or 800 years to recover similar values of SOM and understory biomass, respectively. Current fertilization prescriptions will likely be not enough to stop a quick drop in forest productivity associated with intensive management. Intensifying forest management to achieve short-term objectives could produce a reduction of stand productivity that would influence tree growth for very long time (up to several centuries), if such management is continuously implemented at the same stand. Some of these effects could be reduced if one rotation of intensive management (for pulp or bioenergy) is followed by a rotation of management for timber, or by leaving the forest without management for an equivalent time. PMID:22917531

Blanco, Juan A

2012-10-15

315

FISHERY MANAGEMENT STUDIES ON MADISON RIVER SYSTEM  

E-print Network

^o ^A^- / -v' ( FISHERY MANAGEMENT STUDIES ON MADISON RIVER SYSTEM IN YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK-60217 Library of Congress [2] 11 #12;CONTENTS Page Introduction 1 Acknowledgments 1 Management history 1 are substantially underfished. XV #12;FISHERY MANAGEMENT STUDIES ON THE MADISON RIVER SYSTEM IN YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL

316

School Management Information Systems in Primary Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developments in information technologies have been impacting upon educational organizations. Principals have been using management information systems to improve the efficiency of administrative services. The aim of this research is to explore principals' perceptions about management information systems and how school management information…

Demir, Kamile

2006-01-01

317

Effects of management intensity and season on arboreal ant diversity and abundance in  

E-print Network

intensification decreases arthropod predator diversity, abundance and population stability, and may affect management intensification (reduction or removal of shade trees) reduces diversity of arthropod predators in maintaining arthropod predator diversity, and point to one model system in which we may effectively test how

318

Effect of Intensity Modulator Extinction on Practical Quantum Key Distribution System  

E-print Network

We study how the imperfection of intensity modulator effects on the security of a practical quantum key distribution system. The extinction ratio of the realistic intensity modulator is considered in our security analysis. We show that the secret key rate increases, under the practical assumption that the indeterminable noise introduced by the imperfect intensity modulator can not be controlled by the eavesdropper.

Jing-Zheng Huang; Zhen-Qiang Yin; Shuang Wang; Hong-Wei Li; Wei Chen; Zheng-Fu Han

2012-06-28

319

Evaluation of High-intensity and Low-intensity Preconditioning Systems  

E-print Network

Steer calves n = 345 (year 1 n = 183; 253 ± 35 kg, year 2 n = 162; 241 ± 36 kg initial BW) were used to evaluate 56-d preconditioning systems in each of two years. Angus- and Charolais-sired calves out of crossbred dams were assigned to systems...

Orsak, Andrew Nathan

2012-02-14

320

Library shelf management system using RFID technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper present the library shelf management system. The system was developed using Radio Frequency Identification (RFID). The research was developed in integrating the RFID system and the creation of Graphical User Interface (GUI) at the host PC. The scope of work of the research is to develop an automatic library shelf management system to assist the librarians for more

Ahmad Tarmizi Bin Abdullah; Ismarani Binti Ismail; Azlina Binti Ibrahim; Mohd Zikrul Hakim Bin Noor

2011-01-01

321

Michigan School District Buys Energy Management System.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the aid of a federal grant for energy conservation, the Warren Consolidated School System (Michigan) will purchase a Margaux 6400 Building Management system to manage energy usage in 35 district buildings. Reasons for selecting the system and system capabilities are briefly discussed. (Author/JN)

Technological Horizons in Education, 1982

1982-01-01

322

An Introduction to Database Management Systems.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Description of database management systems for microcomputers highlights system features and factors to consider in microcomputer system selection. A method for ranking database management systems is explained and applied to a defined need, i.e., software support for indexing a weekly newspaper. A glossary of terms and 32-item bibliography are…

Warden, William H., III; Warden, Bette M.

1984-01-01

323

CIS 330: Database Management Systems Course Number & Title (A.1) CIS 330: Database Management Systems  

E-print Network

CIS 330: Database Management Systems Course Number & Title (A.1) CIS 330: Database Management & Johannes Gehrke, Database Management Systems (third edition), McGraw Hill. Additional materials as handouts, e.g., research papers Catalog Description (A.5a) Introduction to database management systems

Plotkin, Joshua B.

324

Integrated Energy and Greenhouse Gas Management System  

E-print Network

Management Strategies- a winning approach to meet the challenge; Turn a potential cost of compliance into a new cash flow source; Leveraging Energy Management Systems to optimize savings; Navigating through the new Greenhouse Gas reporting requirements...

Spates, C. N.

2010-01-01

325

Security in the management of information systems.  

PubMed

Although security technology exists in abundance in health information management systems, the implementation of that technology is often lacking. This lack of implementation can be heavily affected by the attitudes and perceptions of users and management, the "people part" of systems. Particular operational, organizational, and economic factors must be addressed along with employment of security objectives and accountability. Unique threats, as well as controls, pervade the use of microcomputer-based systems as these systems permeate health care information management. PMID:10179427

Huston, T L; Huston, J L

1998-06-01

326

[Changes in soil organic carbon and soil microbial functional diversity of Carya cathayensis plantations under intensive managements].  

PubMed

The change characteristics of soil organic carbon and microbial function diversity in Chinese hickory Carya cathayensis stands with different intensive-management durations (5, 10, 15 and 20 years) were studied. The results showed that soil total organic carbon (TOC), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) decreased significantly, while the stability of soil C pool increased significantly after the conversion from evergreen and deciduous broadleaf forest to intensively-managed forest (IMF). TOC, MBC and WSOC in the hickory forest soil decreased by 28.4%, 34.1% and 53.3% with 5-year intensive management, and by 38.6%, 48.9% and 64.1% with 20-year intensive management, respectively. The proportions of carboxyl C, phenolic C and aromatic C in the hickory forest soil all increased significantly, and the aromaticity of soil organic C increased by 23.0%. Soil microbial functional diversity decreased greatly af- ter intensive management of Chinese hickory forest. Significant differences in average well color development (AWCD) were found between the 0- and 5-year treatments and the 10-, 15- and 20- year treatments. The microbial diversity indexes (H) and evenness indexes (E) in the 0- and 5-year treatments were much greater than in the 10- and 20-year treatments. Correlation analysis showed that there were significant correlations among soil TOC, WSOC, MBC, AWCD, H and E. PMID:25757296

Wu, Jia-Sen; Qian, Jin-Fang; Tong, Zhi-Peng; Huang, Jian-Qin; Zhao, Ke-Li

2014-09-01

327

Managed care, technology adoption, and health care: the adoption of neonatal intensive care.  

PubMed

Managed care may influence technology diffusion in health care. This article empirically examines the relationship between HMO market share and the diffusion of neonatal intensive care units. Higher HMO market share is associated with slower adoption of mid-level units, but not with adoption of the most advanced high-level units. Opposite the common supposition that slowing technology growth will harm patients, results suggest that health outcomes for seriously ill newborns are better in higher-level units and that reduced availability of mid-level units may increase their chance of receiving care in a high-level center, so that slower mid-level growth could have benefitted patients. PMID:12585306

Baker, Laurence C; Phibbs, Ciaran S

2002-01-01

328

Improved Heat Transfer and Performance of High Intensity Combustion Systems for Reformer Furnace Applications  

E-print Network

Developments over the past fifteen years have evolved new short flame, high intensity (1,000,000 BTU/HR/ft3 ) combustion systems for industrial uses. Such systems produce a more uniform and higher heat flux than conventional low intensity systems...

Williams, F. D. M.; Kondratas, H. M.

1983-01-01

329

Implementing and project managing a new library management system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Follows on from an earlier article (Business Information Review, 16 (4) 1999, pp. 197–202), which described the process used by the Economist Intelligence Unit when choosing a new library management system (LMS) to replace their existing, non-Year 2000 compliant (Y2K) system. Focuses on the issues involved in implementing a new system in terms of project management. Sets out the basic

Paul Pedley

2000-01-01

330

A multi-taxon approach reveals the effect of management intensity on biodiversity in Alpine larch grasslands.  

PubMed

In the Alps, larch grasslands form one of the most pleasing aspects of the landscape. However, their effectiveness in contributing to biodiversity conservation may depend on the intensity of their management. We used a multi-taxon approach to evaluate the effects of the intensification of management practices and those of abandonment on the biodiversity of the main autotrophic organisms hosted in this habitat, including vascular plants, bryophytes, and lichens. The study was carried out in the eastern part of South Tyrol, in the Italian Alps, where the diversity patterns of these three organismal groups were compared among intensively managed, extensively managed, and abandoned stands. The management intensity was found to strongly influence the biodiversity of the organisms, with a general pattern indicating the best conditions in extensively managed stands. Both abandonment and management intensification were detrimental to biodiversity through different mechanisms that led to species loss or to major shifts in species composition. However, the most negative effects were related to management intensification, mainly due to the high nitrogen supply, providing evidence for the increasing impact of eutrophication on Alpine environments. PMID:24784735

Nascimbene, Juri; Fontana, Veronika; Spitale, Daniel

2014-07-15

331

Managing geometric information with a data base management system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The strategies for managing computer based geometry are described. The computer model of geometry is the basis for communication, manipulation, and analysis of shape information. The research on integrated programs for aerospace-vehicle design (IPAD) focuses on the use of data base management system (DBMS) technology to manage engineering/manufacturing data. The objectives of IPAD is to develop a computer based engineering complex which automates the storage, management, protection, and retrieval of engineering data. In particular, this facility must manage geometry information as well as associated data. The approach taken on the IPAD project to achieve this objective is discussed. Geometry management in current systems and the approach taken in the early IPAD prototypes are examined.

Dube, R. P.

1984-01-01

332

AOIPS water resources data management system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A geocoded data management system applicable for hydrological applications was designed to demonstrate the utility of the Atmospheric and Oceanographic Information Processing System (AOIPS) for hydrological applications. Within that context, the geocoded hydrology data management system was designed to take advantage of the interactive capability of the AOIPS hardware. Portions of the Water Resource Data Management System which best demonstrate the interactive nature of the hydrology data management system were implemented on the AOIPS. A hydrological case study was prepared using all data supplied for the Bear River watershed located in northwest Utah, southeast Idaho, and western Wyoming.

Merritt, E. S.; Shotwell, R. L.; Place, M. C.; Belknap, N. J.

1976-01-01

333

Managing soil properties through dryland cropping system intensities  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The transition from irrigated to dryland production is imminent for the Southern High Plains region due to the minimum recharge occurring to the Ogallala aquifer. Thus, a long-term dryland study was established on USDA-ARS farmland near Lubbock, Texas in 2003 to evaluate the ability of different cr...

334

System Management for Grid-Enabling a Vibroacoustic Analysis Application  

Microsoft Academic Search

System management aspects are described for the process of grid-enabling a vibroacoustic analysis application using the Globus Toolkit 3.2.1. This is the first step in a project intended to grid-enable a suite of tools being developed as a service-oriented enterprise architecture for spacecraft telemetry analysis. Many of the applications in the suite are compute intensive and would benefit from significantly

Brian Bentow; Jonathan Dodge; Aaron Homer; Christopher D. Moore; Robert M. Keller; Matthew Presley; Robert Davis; Jorge Seidel; Craig Lee; Joseph Betser

2006-01-01

335

22 CFR 518.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Standards for financial management systems. 518...AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION...Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 518.21 Standards for financial management systems....

2010-04-01

336

38 CFR 49.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Standards for financial management systems. 49...AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION...Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 49.21 Standards for financial management systems....

2010-07-01

337

45 CFR 2543.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Standards for financial management systems. 2543...AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION...Requirements Financial and Program Management § 2543.21 Standards for financial management systems....

2010-10-01

338

28 CFR 70.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Standards for financial management systems. 70...SUBAWARDS) WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION...Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 70.21 Standards for financial management systems....

2010-07-01

339

24 CFR 84.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Standards for financial management systems. 84...AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION...Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 84.21 Standards for financial management systems....

2010-04-01

340

32 CFR 32.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Standards for financial management systems. 32...AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION...Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 32.21 Standards for financial management systems....

2010-07-01

341

29 CFR 95.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Standards for financial management systems. 95...AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION...Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 95.21 Standards for financial management systems....

2010-07-01

342

34 CFR 74.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Standards for financial management systems. 74...AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION...Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 74.21 Standards for financial management systems....

2010-07-01

343

36 CFR 1210.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Standards for financial management systems. 1210...AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION...Requirements Financial and Program Management § 1210.21 Standards for financial management systems....

2010-07-01

344

15 CFR 14.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Standards for financial management systems. 14...AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION...Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 14.21 Standards for financial management systems....

2010-01-01

345

22 CFR 145.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Standards for financial management systems. 145...AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION...Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 145.21 Standards for financial management systems....

2010-04-01

346

40 CFR 30.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Standards for financial management systems. 30...AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION...Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 30.21 Standards for financial management systems....

2010-07-01

347

48 CFR 45.105 - Contractors' property management system compliance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Contractors' property management system compliance...contractor's property management policies, procedures, practices, and...accordance with agency procedures. (b) The property...contractor's property management system...

2010-10-01

348

49 CFR 18.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2014-10-01

349

29 CFR 97.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2012-07-01

350

21 CFR 1403.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2013-04-01

351

28 CFR 66.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2010-07-01

352

45 CFR 1183.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2012-10-01

353

36 CFR 1207.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2013-07-01

354

10 CFR 600.220 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2013-01-01

355

14 CFR 1273.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2012-01-01

356

32 CFR 33.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2012-07-01

357

45 CFR 1157.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-10-01

358

14 CFR 1273.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2013-01-01

359

28 CFR 66.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2013-07-01

360

10 CFR 600.220 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2012-01-01

361

45 CFR 2541.200 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-10-01

362

24 CFR 85.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-04-01

363

29 CFR 1470.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2013-07-01

364

45 CFR 1183.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2013-10-01

365

34 CFR 80.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2014-07-01

366

38 CFR 43.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2014-07-01

367

43 CFR 12.60 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2012-10-01

368

14 CFR 1273.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2014-01-01

369

40 CFR 31.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2014-07-01

370

45 CFR 2541.200 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2013-10-01

371

29 CFR 1470.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-07-01

372

13 CFR 143.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2010-01-01

373

45 CFR 1183.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-10-01

374

40 CFR 31.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2012-07-01

375

45 CFR 92.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2012-10-01

376

24 CFR 85.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2013-04-01

377

43 CFR 12.60 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2014-10-01

378

45 CFR 602.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2012-10-01

379

32 CFR 33.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2014-07-01

380

14 CFR 1273.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-01-01

381

44 CFR 13.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-10-01

382

38 CFR 43.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-07-01

383

36 CFR 1207.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2014-07-01

384

22 CFR 135.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2013-04-01

385

7 CFR 3016.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-01-01

386

29 CFR 97.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2014-07-01

387

45 CFR 1174.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2014-10-01

388

21 CFR 1403.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2012-04-01

389

29 CFR 1470.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2012-07-01

390

13 CFR 143.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2013-01-01

391

45 CFR 92.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2014-10-01

392

21 CFR 1403.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2014-04-01

393

34 CFR 80.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2012-07-01

394

24 CFR 85.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2012-04-01

395

28 CFR 66.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2014-07-01

396

45 CFR 92.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2013-10-01

397

44 CFR 13.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2014-10-01

398

28 CFR 66.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2012-07-01

399

10 CFR 600.220 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2014-01-01

400

45 CFR 1174.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2013-10-01

401

49 CFR 18.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-10-01

402

45 CFR 1157.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2014-10-01

403

45 CFR 1174.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2010-10-01

404

22 CFR 135.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2012-04-01

405

20 CFR 437.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2013-04-01

406

43 CFR 12.60 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-10-01

407

15 CFR 24.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2014-01-01

408

36 CFR 1207.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2010-07-01

409

7 CFR 3016.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2012-01-01

410

36 CFR 1207.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2012-07-01

411

44 CFR 13.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2012-10-01

412

15 CFR 24.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-01-01

413

22 CFR 135.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-04-01

414

13 CFR 143.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-01-01

415

15 CFR 24.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2012-01-01

416

29 CFR 97.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2013-07-01

417

13 CFR 143.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2012-01-01

418

24 CFR 85.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2014-04-01

419

45 CFR 1157.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2013-10-01

420

7 CFR 3016.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2013-01-01

421

10 CFR 600.220 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-01-01

422

45 CFR 2541.200 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2012-10-01

423

49 CFR 18.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2013-10-01

424

34 CFR 80.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-07-01

425

38 CFR 43.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2012-07-01

426

22 CFR 135.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2014-04-01

427

13 CFR 143.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2014-01-01

428

34 CFR 80.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2013-07-01

429

40 CFR 31.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-07-01

430

20 CFR 437.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-04-01

431

40 CFR 31.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2013-07-01

432

36 CFR 1207.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-07-01

433

45 CFR 92.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-10-01

434

32 CFR 33.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-07-01

435

20 CFR 437.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2012-04-01

436

20 CFR 437.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2014-04-01

437

44 CFR 13.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2013-10-01

438

49 CFR 18.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2012-10-01

439

38 CFR 43.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2013-07-01

440

45 CFR 1183.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2014-10-01

441

45 CFR 602.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-10-01

442

15 CFR 24.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2013-01-01

443

45 CFR 602.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2013-10-01

444

21 CFR 1403.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-04-01

445

32 CFR 33.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2013-07-01

446

45 CFR 1157.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2012-10-01

447

7 CFR 3016.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2014-01-01

448

45 CFR 602.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2014-10-01

449

45 CFR 1174.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-10-01

450

29 CFR 1470.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2014-07-01

451

45 CFR 2541.200 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2014-10-01

452

45 CFR 1174.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2012-10-01

453

28 CFR 66.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-07-01

454

21 CFR 1403.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2010-04-01

455

43 CFR 12.60 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2013-10-01

456

14 CFR 1273.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2010-01-01

457

29 CFR 97.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for financial management systems...The financial management systems of other...unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays or...property, and other assets. Grantees and... (7) Cash management....

2011-07-01

458

28 CFR 70.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Financial and Program Management § 70.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...development unit cost information whenever practical...Recipients' financial management systems must provide...

2013-07-01

459

28 CFR 70.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Financial and Program Management § 70.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...development unit cost information whenever practical...Recipients' financial management systems must provide...

2012-07-01

460

28 CFR 70.21 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Financial and Program Management § 70.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...development unit cost information whenever practical...Recipients' financial management systems must provide...

2014-07-01

461

48 CFR 245.105 - Contractors' property management system compliance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Contractors' property management system compliance. 245.105...DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY General 245.105 Contractors' property management system compliance. (a)...

2013-10-01

462

48 CFR 245.105 - Contractors' property management system compliance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... false Contractors' property management system compliance. 245.105...DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY General 245.105 Contractors' property management system compliance. (a)...

2012-10-01

463

48 CFR 245.105 - Contractors' property management system compliance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... false Contractors' property management system compliance. 245.105...DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY General 245.105 Contractors' property management system compliance. (a)...

2014-10-01

464

Model Point-of-Care Ultrasound Curriculum in an Intensive Care Unit Fellowship Program and Its Impact on Patient Management  

PubMed Central

Objectives. This study was designed to assess the clinical applicability of a Point-of-Care (POC) ultrasound curriculum into an intensive care unit (ICU) fellowship program and its impact on patient care. Methods. A POC ultrasound curriculum for the surgical ICU (SICU) fellowship was designed and implemented in an urban, academic tertiary care center. It included 30 hours of didactics and hands-on training on models. Minimum requirement for each ICU fellow was to perform 25–50 exams on respective systems or organs for a total not less than 125 studies on ICU. The ICU fellows implemented the POC ultrasound curriculum into their daily practice in managing ICU patients, under supervision from ICU staff physicians, who were instructors in POC ultrasound. Impact on patient care including finding a new diagnosis or change in patient management was reviewed over a period of one academic year. Results. 873 POC ultrasound studies in 203 patients admitted to the surgical ICU were reviewed for analysis. All studies included were done through the POC ultrasound curriculum training. The most common exams performed were 379 lung/pleural exams, 239 focused echocardiography and hemodynamic exams, and 237 abdominal exams. New diagnosis was found in 65.52% of cases (95% CI 0.590, 0.720). Changes in patient management were found in 36.95% of cases (95% CI 0.303, 0.435). Conclusions. Implementation of POC ultrasound in the ICU with a structured fellowship curriculum was associated with an increase in new diagnosis in about 2/3 and change in management in over 1/3 of ICU patients studied. PMID:25478217

Killu, Keith; Coba, Victor; Mendez, Michael; Reddy, Subhash; Adrzejewski, Tanja; Huang, Yung; Ede, Jessica; Horst, Mathilda

2014-01-01

465

Model Point-of-Care Ultrasound Curriculum in an Intensive Care Unit Fellowship Program and Its Impact on Patient Management.  

PubMed

Objectives. This study was designed to assess the clinical applicability of a Point-of-Care (POC) ultrasound curriculum into an intensive care unit (ICU) fellowship program and its impact on patient care. Methods. A POC ultrasound curriculum for the surgical ICU (SICU) fellowship was designed and implemented in an urban, academic tertiary care center. It included 30 hours of didactics and hands-on training on models. Minimum requirement for each ICU fellow was to perform 25-50 exams on respective systems or organs for a total not less than 125 studies on ICU. The ICU fellows implemented the POC ultrasound curriculum into their daily practice in managing ICU patients, under supervision from ICU staff physicians, who were instructors in POC ultrasound. Impact on patient care including finding a new diagnosis or change in patient management was reviewed over a period of one academic year. Results. 873 POC ultrasound studies in 203 patients admitted to the surgical ICU were reviewed for analysis. All studies included were done through the POC ultrasound curriculum training. The most common exams performed were 379 lung/pleural exams, 239 focused echocardiography and hemodynamic exams, and 237 abdominal exams. New diagnosis was found in 65.52% of cases (95% CI 0.590, 0.720). Changes in patient management were found in 36.95% of cases (95% CI 0.303, 0.435). Conclusions. Implementation of POC ultrasound in the ICU with a structured fellowship curriculum was associated with an increase in new diagnosis in about 2/3 and change in management in over 1/3 of ICU patients studied. PMID:25478217

Killu, Keith; Coba, Victor; Mendez, Michael; Reddy, Subhash; Adrzejewski, Tanja; Huang, Yung; Ede, Jessica; Horst, Mathilda

2014-01-01

466

Greenhouse gas budget (CO2, CH4 and N2O) of intensively managed grassland following restoration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The first full greenhouse gas (GHG) flux budget of an intensively managed grassland in Switzerland (Chamau) is presented. The three major trace gases, carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) were measured with the eddy covariance (EC) technique. For CO2 concentrations, an open-path infrared gas analyzer was used, while N2O and CH4 concentrations were measured with a recently developed continuous-wave quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer (QCLAS). We investigated the magnitude of these trace gas emissions after grassland restoration, including ploughing, harrowing, sowing and fertilization with inorganic and organic fertilizers in 2012. Large peaks of N2O fluxes (20 - 50 nmol m-2 s-1 compared to a < 5 nmol m-2 s-1 background) were observed during thawing of the soil after the winter period and after mineral fertilizer application followed by re-sowing in the beginning of the summer season. N2O fluxes were controlled by nitrogen input, plant productivity, soil water content and temperature. Management activities led to increased variations of N2O fluxes up to 14 days after the management event as compared to background fluxes measured during periods without management (< 5nmol m-2 s-1). Fluxes of CO2 remained small until full plant development in early summer 2012. In contrast methane emissions showed only minor variations over time. The annual GHG flux budget was dominated by N2O (48 % contribution) and CO2 emissions (44 %). CH4 flux contribution to the annual budget was only minor (8 %). We conclude that recently developed multi-species QCLAS in an EC system open new opportunities to determine the temporal variation of N2O and CH4 fluxes, which further allow to quantify annual emissions. With respect to grassland restoration, our study emphasizes the key role of N2O and CO2 losses after ploughing, changing a permanent grassland from a carbon sink to a significant carbon source.

Merbold, Lutz; Eugster, Werner; Stieger, Jacqueline; Zahniser, Mark; Nelson, David; Buchmann, Nina

2014-05-01

467

The Dark Energy Survey Data Management System  

SciTech Connect

The Dark Energy Survey (DES) collaboration will study cosmic acceleration with a 5000 deg2 griZY survey in the southern sky over 525 nights from 2011-2016. The DES data management (DESDM) system will be used to process and archive these data and the resulting science ready data products. The DESDM system consists of an integrated archive, a processing framework, an ensemble of astronomy codes and a data access framework. We are developing the DESDM system for operation in the high performance computing (HPC) environments at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) and Fermilab. Operating the DESDM system in an HPC environment offers both speed and flexibility. We will employ it for our regular nightly processing needs, and for more compute-intensive tasks such as large scale image coaddition campaigns, extraction of weak lensing shear from the full survey dataset, and massive seasonal reprocessing of the DES data. Data products will be available to the Collaboration and later to the public through a virtual-observatory compatible web portal. Our approach leverages investments in publicly available HPC systems, greatly reducing hardware and maintenance costs to the project, which must deploy and maintain only the storage, database platforms and orchestration and web portal nodes that are specific to DESDM. In Fall 2007, we tested the current DESDM system on both simulated and real survey data. We used TeraGrid to process 10 simulated DES nights (3TB of raw data), ingesting and calibrating approximately 250 million objects into the DES Archive database. We also used DESDM to process and calibrate over 50 nights of survey data acquired with the Mosaic2 camera. Comparison to truth tables in the case of the simulated data and internal crosschecks in the case of the real data indicate that astrometric and photometric data quality is excellent.

Mohr, Joseph J.; /Illinois U., Urbana, Astron. Dept. /Illinois U., Urbana; Barkhouse, Wayne; /North Dakota U.; Beldica, Cristina; /Illinois U., Urbana; Bertin, Emmanuel; /Paris, Inst. Astrophys.; Dora Cai, Y.; /NCSA, Urbana; Nicolaci da Costa, Luiz A.; /Rio de Janeiro Observ.; Darnell, J.Anthony; /Illinois U., Urbana, Astron. Dept.; Daues, Gregory E.; /NCSA, Urbana; Jarvis, Michael; /Pennsylvania U.; Gower, Michelle; /NCSA, Urbana; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab /Rio de Janeiro Observ.

2008-07-01

468

Business Management System Support Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this research project was to develop a searchable database compiled with internal and external audit findings/observations. The data will correspond to the findings and observations from the date of Center-wide implementation of the ISO 9001-2000 standard to the present (2003-2008). It was derived and extracted from several sources and was in multiple formats. Once extracted, categorization of the findings/observations would be possible. The final data was mapped to the ISO 9001-2000 standard with the understanding that it will be displayed graphically. The data will be used to verify trends, associate risks, and establish timelines to identify strengths and weaknesses to determine areas of improvement in the Kennedy Space Center Business Management System Internal Audit Program.

Parikh, Jay

2008-01-01

469

Optimal Multi-scale Demand-side Management for Continuous Power-Intensive Processes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the advent of deregulation in electricity markets and an increasing share of intermittent power generation sources, the profitability of industrial consumers that operate power-intensive processes has become directly linked to the variability in energy prices. Thus, for industrial consumers that are able to adjust to the fluctuations, time-sensitive electricity prices (as part of so-called Demand-Side Management (DSM) in the smart grid) offer potential economical incentives. In this thesis, we introduce optimization models and decomposition strategies for the multi-scale Demand-Side Management of continuous power-intensive processes. On an operational level, we derive a mode formulation for scheduling under time-sensitive electricity prices. The formulation is applied to air separation plants and cement plants to minimize the operating cost. We also describe how a mode formulation can be used for industrial combined heat and power plants that are co-located at integrated chemical sites to increase operating profit by adjusting their steam and electricity production according to their inherent flexibility. Furthermore, a robust optimization formulation is developed to address the uncertainty in electricity prices by accounting for correlations and multiple ranges in the realization of the random variables. On a strategic level, we introduce a multi-scale model that provides an understanding of the value of flexibility of the current plant configuration and the value of additional flexibility in terms of retrofits for Demand-Side Management under product demand uncertainty. The integration of multiple time scales leads to large-scale two-stage stochastic programming problems, for which we need to apply decomposition strategies in order to obtain a good solution within a reasonable amount of time. Hence, we describe two decomposition schemes that can be applied to solve two-stage stochastic programming problems: First, a hybrid bi-level decomposition scheme with novel Lagrangean-type and subset-type cuts to strengthen the relaxation. Second, an enhanced cross-decomposition scheme that integrates Benders decomposition and Lagrangean decomposition on a scenario basis. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our developed methodology, we provide several industrial case studies throughout the thesis.

Mitra, Sumit

470

First on-line isotopic characterization of N2O emitted from intensively managed grassland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The analysis of the four main isotopic N2O species (14N14N16O, 14N15N16O, 15N14N16O, 14N14N18O) and especially the intramolecular distribution of 15N (site preference, SP) has been suggested as a tool to distinguish source processes and to help constrain the global N2O budget. However, current studies suffer from limited spatial and temporal resolution capabilities due to the combination of discrete flask sampling with subsequent laboratory-based mass spectrometric analysis. Quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS) allows selective high-precision analysis of N2O isotopic species at trace levels and is suitable for in situ measurements. Here, we present results from the first field campaign, conducted on an intensively managed grassland in central Switzerland. N2O mole fractions and isotopic composition were determined in the atmospheric surface layer (2 m height) at high temporal resolution with a modified state-of-the-art laser spectrometer connected to an automated N2O preconcentration unit. The analytical performance was determined from repeated measurements of a compressed air tank and resulted in measurement repeatability of 0.20, 0.12 and 0.11‰ for ?15N?, ?15N? and ?18O, respectively. Simultaneous eddy-covariance N2O flux measurements were used to determine the flux-averaged isotopic signature of soil-emitted N2O. Our measurements indicate that in general, nitrifier-denitrification and denitrification were the prevalent sources of N2O during the campaign, and that variations in isotopic composition were rather due to alterations in the extent to which N2O was reduced to N2, than other pathways such as hydroxylamine oxidation. Management and rewetting events were characterized by low values of the intra-molecular 15N site preference (SP), ?15Nbulk and ?18O, suggesting nitrifier denitrification and incomplete heterotrophic bacterial denitrification responded most strongly to the induced disturbances. Flux-averaged isotopic composition of N2O from intensively managed grassland was 6.9 ± 4.3, -17.4 ± 6.2 and 27.4 ± 3.6‰ for SP, ?15Nbulk and ?18O, respectively. The approach presented here is capable of providing long-term datasets also for other N2O emitting ecosystems, which can be used to further constrain global N2O inventories.

Wolf, B.; Merbold, L.; Decock, C.; Tuzson, B.; Harris, E.; Six, J.; Emmenegger, L.; Mohn, J.

2015-01-01

471

PV integration by building Energy Management System  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper focuses on Energy Management System (EMS) applied to the residential sector. The EMS architecture is proposed. It is composed on three layers: anticipation, reactive and device (local) layers. However, to validate global control algorithms, a simulator capable of interoperating with energy management systems must be used. This work presents a solution for real-time simulation with a networked system

Rim. Missaoui; Ghaith. Warkozek; Seddik. Bacha; Stephane. Ploix

2011-01-01

472

ULTRAflow - A Lightweight Workflow Management System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Workflow management systems usually use a graphical notation to define workflows, often based on Petri nets or specialized workflow graphs. (3, 4) lists the most important patterns for the specification of workflows and evaluates various commercial workflow management systems w.r.t. their support of these patterns. It turns out that most systems have to struggle with some fundamental problems: The exact

Alfred Fent; Burkhard Freitag

2001-01-01

473

Agent based micro grid management system  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a micro grid management system developed using agent based technologies and its application to the effective management of generation and storage devices connected to a LV network forming a micro grid. The micro grid is defined as a set of generation, storage and load systems electrically connected and complemented by a communication system to enable control actions

J. Oyarzabal; J. Jimeno; J. Ruela; A. Engler; C. Hardt

2005-01-01

474

Alert Management Systems: A Quick Introduction  

E-print Network

Alert Management Systems: A Quick Introduction Robert Grossman University of Illinois at Chicago to screen events, build profiles associated with the events, and send alerts based upon the profiles and events. These types of systems are becoming known as alert management systems (AMS). We give some

Grossman, Robert

475

Seminar 10! Project Management & System Design!  

E-print Network

://www.princeton.edu/~stengel/FRS.html! Project Management & System Design: ! [Fundamentals of Space Systems] Ch. 1 (ER); [Digital Apollo] Ch 5 of a firecracker": Apollo Guidance" Mindell, D., Digital Apollo, Ch. 5! !# Designing the Project" !# The LORSeminar 10! Project Management & System Design! Spacecraft Guidance! FRS 104, Princeton University

Stengel, Robert F.

476

Management system, organizational climate and performance relationships  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Seven aerospace firms were investigated to determine if a relationship existed among management systems, organizational climate, and organization performance. Positive relationships were found between each of these variables, but a statistically significant relationship existed only between the management system and organizational climate. The direction and amount of communication and the degree of decentralized decision-making, elements of the management system, also had a statistically significant realtionship with organization performance.

Davis, B. D.

1979-01-01

477

Energy management systems: no longer a luxury  

SciTech Connect

The selection, maintenance, and problems of building energy management systems are discussed. Available controls range from microprocessor-based load schedulers that sell for less than $1000 to computer-based facility management systems that cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. The facility management systems control energy consumption, optimize comfort, interface with human operators, and provide automatic data analysis and reporting and fire, smoke and security control. (MJF)

Ebisch, R.

1981-06-01

478

Construction of Library Management Information System  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Library management information system construction of China’s starts late, and made certain achievements in the same time,\\u000a but there are also many problems. In this paper, the author pointed out existing problems of the library management information\\u000a system in China’s current situation and so improving the management of library information system.

Lian-feng Zhang; Rui-jin Zhou; Li-ping Sui; Guo-qing Wu

479

A Lightweight, High-performance I/O Management Package for Data-intensive Computing  

SciTech Connect

Our group has been working with ANL collaborators on the topic ā??bridging the gap between parallel file system and local file systemā?¯ during the course of this project period. We visited Argonne National Lab -- Dr. Robert Rossā??s group for one week in the past summer 2007. We looked over our current project progress and planned the activities for the incoming years 2008-09. The PI met Dr. Robert Ross several times such as HEC FSIO workshop 08, SCā??08 and SCā??10. We explored the opportunities to develop a production system by leveraging our current prototype to (SOGP+PVFS) a new PVFS version. We delivered SOGP+PVFS codes to ANL PVFS2 group in 2008.We also talked about exploring a potential project on developing new parallel programming models and runtime systems for data-intensive scalable computing (DISC). The methodology is to evolve MPI towards DISC by incorporating some functions of Google MapReduce parallel programming model. More recently, we are together exploring how to leverage existing works to perform (1) coordination/aggregation of local I/O operations prior to movement over the WAN, (2) efficient bulk data movement over the WAN, (3) latency hiding techniques for latency-intensive operations. Since 2009, we start applying Hadoop/MapReduce to some HEC applications with LANL scientists John Bent and Salman Habib. Another on-going work is to improve checkpoint performance at I/O forwarding Layer for the Road Runner super computer with James Nuetz and Gary Gridder at LANL. Two senior undergraduates from our research group did summer internships about high-performance file and storage system projects in LANL since 2008 for consecutive three years. Both of them are now pursuing Ph.D. degree in our group and will be 4th year in the PhD program in Fall 2011 and go to LANL to advance two above-mentioned works during this winter break. Since 2009, we have been collaborating with several computer scientists (Gary Grider, John bent, Parks Fields, James Nunez, Hsing-Bung Chen, etc) from HPC5 and James Ahrens from Advanced Computing Laboratory in Los Alamos National Laboratory. We hold a weekly conference and/or video meeting on advancing works at two fronts: the hardware/software infrastructure of building large-scale data intensive cluster and research publications. Our group members assist in constructing several onsite LANL data intensive clusters. Two parties have been developing software codes and research papers together using both sidesā?? resources.

Wang, Jun

2011-06-22

480

The alfalfa leafcutting bee, Megachile rotundata: the world's most intensively managed solitary bee.  

PubMed

The alfalfa leafcutting bee (ALCB), Megachile rotundata F. (Megachildae), was accidentally introduced into the United States by the 1940s. Nest management of this Eurasian nonsocial pollinator transformed the alfalfa seed industry in North America, tripling seed production. The most common ALCB management practice is the loose cell system, in which cocooned bees are removed from nesting cavities for cleaning and storage. Traits of ALCBs that favored their commercialization include gregarious nesting; use of leaves for lining nests; ready acceptance of affordable, mass-produced nesting materials; alfalfa pollination efficacy; and emergence synchrony with alfalfa bloom. The ALCB became a commercial success because much of its natural history was understood, targeted research was pursued, and producer ingenuity was encouraged. The ALCB presents a model system for commercializing other solitary bees and for advancing new testable hypotheses in diverse biological disciplines. PMID:20809804

Pitts-Singer, Theresa L; Cane, James H

2011-01-01

481

The role of metrics and measurements in a software intensive total quality management environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Paramax Space Systems began its mission as a member of the Rockwell Space Operations Company (RSOC) team which was the successful bidder on a massive operations consolidation contract for the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) at JSC. The contract awarded to the team was the Space Transportation System Operations Contract (STSOC). Our initial challenge was to accept responsibility for a very large, highly complex and fragmented collection of software from eleven different contractors and transform it into a coherent, operational baseline. Concurrently, we had to integrate a diverse group of people from eleven different companies into a single, cohesive team. Paramax executives recognized the absolute necessity to develop a business culture based on the concept of employee involvement to execute and improve the complex process of our new environment. Our executives clearly understood that management needed to set the example and lead the way to quality improvement. The total quality management policy and the metrics used in this endeavor are presented.

Daniels, Charles B.

1992-01-01

482

Open Source Course Management and Assessment System  

E-print Network

LON-CAPA: Open Source Course Management and Assessment System Gerd Kortemeyer Michigan State, homework problems) is a lot of work Ā· Doing so for use in just one course is a waste of time and effort Assembly Course Management Resource Assembly Course Management #12;Campus A Campus B Resource Assembly

483

Computer network and system remote management  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article contains information about computer network and system remote management technologies such as SNMP, DMI and WBM, including an architectural overview and mutual comparison. There is also a look in a practical usage of these technologies as well as in management problems. In the main, it describes the author's provided management mechanism based on SNMP modifications. Finally, several pieces

I. Peksens; V. Zagursky

2003-01-01

484

Maya™ Assets: A Shot Content Management System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Systems for effective management of shot content data are critical to the support of any large-scale digital production. In regards to the data's structure, there are a variety of advantages in maintaining and managing data in a granular form, as a collection of separable data assets. Two key abilities afforded through data management in a granular form are 1) an

Greg Brentin; Greg Heflin

2004-01-01

485

Workflow Management: Models, Methods, and Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This book offers a comprehensive introduction to workflow management, the management of business processes with information technology. By defining, analyzing, and redesigning an organization's resources and operations, workflow management systems ensure that the right information reaches the right person or computer application at the right time. The book provides a basic overview of workflow terminology and organization, as well as

Wil M. P. Van Der Aalst; Kees M. Van Hee

2002-01-01

486

System approach to distributed sensor management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since 2003, the US Army's RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision Electronic Sensor Directorate (NVESD) has been developing a distributed Sensor Management System (SMS) that utilizes a framework which demonstrates application layer, net-centric sensor management. The core principles of the design support distributed and dynamic discovery of sensing devices and processes through a multi-layered implementation. This results in a sensor management layer

Gregory Mayott; Gordon Miller; John Harrell; Jared Hepp; Mid Self

2010-01-01

487

MIT System Design and Management Program  

E-print Network

and management skills necessary to work successfully across organizations. SDM, a program within the Engineering Systems Division, is jointly sponsored by MIT Sloan School of Management and the MIT School of Engineering. It provides technical/engineering depth and management breadth, and leads to an MS in Engineering

Gabrieli, John

488

The Troll HSE Risk Management System  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Act and Internal Control regulations in Norway lay down requirements for how HSE shall be Managed and documented. To comply with the Norwegian legislation the Troll Project has developed an HSE Risk Management System (RMS) structured around Hazards and Effects Management. The resulting quality, technical and operating integrity, and HSE performance are an endorsement of the power of RMS.

Wiig, E.; Berthelsen, I.; Donovan, K.

1996-12-31

489

7 CFR 550.20 - Standards for financial management systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Standards for financial management systems. 550.20 Section 550...POLICY FOR NON-ASSISTANCE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS Management of...Standards for financial management systems. (a) REE agencies shall...Cooperators' financial management systems shall provide for the...

2010-01-01

490

Electrofluidic systems for contrast management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Operating in dynamic lighting conditions and in greatly varying backgrounds is challenging. Current paints and state-ofthe- art passive adaptive coatings (e.g. photochromics) are not suitable for multi- environment situations. A semi-active, low power, skin is needed that can adapt its reflective properties based on the background environment to minimize contrast through the development and incorporation of suitable pigment materials. Electrofluidic skins are a reflective display technology for electronic ink and paper applications. The technology is similar to that in E Ink but makes use of MEMS based microfluidic structures, instead of simple black and white ink microcapsules dispersed in clear oil. Electrofluidic skin's low power operation and fast switching speeds (~20 ms) are an improvement over current state-ofthe- art contrast management technologies. We report on a microfluidic display which utilizes diffuse pigment dispersion inks to change the contrast of the underlying substrate from 5.8% to 100%. Voltage is applied and an electromechanical pressure is used to pull a pigment dispersion based ink from a hydrophobic coated reservoir into a hydrophobic coated surface channel. When no voltage is applied, the Young-Laplace pressure pushes the pigment dispersion ink back down into the reservoir. This allows the pixel to switch from the on and off state by balancing the two pressures. Taking a systems engineering approach from the beginning of development has enabled the technology to be integrated into larger systems.

Rebello, Keith J.; Maranchi, Jeffrey P.; Tiffany, Jason E.; Brown, Christopher Y.; Maisano, Adam J.; Hagedon, Matthew A.; Heikenfeld, Jason C.

2012-06-01

491

Waste Management Information System (WMIS) User Guide  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the user of the Waste Management Information System (WMIS) instructions on how to use the WMIS software. WMIS allows users to initiate, track, and close waste packages. The modular design supports integration and utilization of data throuh the various stages of waste management. The phases of the waste management work process include generation, designation, packaging, container management, procurement, storage, treatment, transportation, and disposal.

R. E. Broz

2008-12-22

492

Towards Content-Oriented Integration for Process-Centric Knowledge Management Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Workflow management system (WfMS) which focuses on controlling, monitoring, optimizing and supporting business processes management is extensively used in knowledge management systems (KMS). But traditional WfMS only work with complete processes on the basis of process models and therefore fail to support a large class of knowledge intensive business processes such as content-oriented integration. In this paper, a service-oriented framework

Ming Gao; Jichen Jiang

2009-01-01

493

Designing, managing and improving the operative and intensive care in polytrauma  

PubMed Central

Background and Context: Polytrauma is a leading cause of mortality in the developing countries and efforts from various quarters are required to deal with this increasing menace. Aims and Objectives: An attempt has been made by the coordinated efforts of the intensive care and trauma team of a newly established tertiary care institute in designing and improving the trauma care services to realign its functions with national policies by analyzing the profile of polytrauma victims and successfully managing them. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was carried out among the 531 polytrauma admissions in the emergency department. The information pertaining to age and gender distribution, locality, time to trauma and initial resuscitation, cause of injury, type of injury, influence of alcohol, drug addiction, presenting clinical picture, Glasgow Coma score on admission and few other variables were also recorded. The indications for various operative interventions and intensive care unit (ICU) admissions were analyzed thoroughly with a concomitant improvement of our trauma care services and thereby augmenting the national policies and programs. A statistical analysis was carried out with chi-square and analysis of variance ANOVA tests, using SPSS software version 10.0 for windows. The value of P<0.05 was considered significant and P<0.0001 as highly significant. Results: Majority of the 531 polytrauma patients hailed from rural areas (63.65%), riding on the two wheelers (38.23%), and predominantly comprised young adult males. Fractures of long bones and head injury was the most common injury pattern (37.85%) and 51.41% of the patients presented with shock and hemorrhage. Airway management and intubation became necessary in 42.93% of the patients, whereas 52.16% of the patients were operated within the first 6 hours of admission for various indications. ICU admission was required for 45.76% of the patients because of their deteriorating clinical condition, and overall,ionotropic support was administered in 55.93% of the patients for successful resuscitation. Conclusions: There is an urgent need for proper implementation ofpre-hospital and advanced trauma life support measures at grass-root level. Analyzing the profile of polytrauma victims at a national level and simultaneously improving the trauma care services at every health center are very essential to decrease the mortality and morbidity. The improvement can be augmented further by strengthening the rural health infrastructure, strict traffic rules, increasing public awareness and participation and coordination among the various public and private agencies in dealing with polytrauma. PMID:22090744

Bajwa, Sukhminderjit Singh; Kaur, Jasbir; Bajwa, Sukhwinder Kaur; Kaur, Gagandeep; Singh, Amarjit; Parmar, S S; Kapoor, Vinod

2011-01-01

494

Web-Based Evaluation System for Learning Management Systems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

E-learning systems have become an issue in recent years. A learning man