Science.gov

Sample records for intensive management system

  1. Hydrologic and Water Quality Assessment from an Intensively Managed Watershed Scale Turfgrass System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Managed turf accounts for approximately 17 million hectares of land in the U.S. and is the most intensively managed system in the urban landscape. The primary objective of this research effort was to assess the watershed scale hydrologic and surface water quality impact from a well managed golf cour...

  2. Biology and management of insect pests in North American intensively managed hardwood forest systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Coyle, David R.; Nebeker, T., E.; Hart, E., R.; Mattson, W., J.

    2005-01-01

    Annu. Rev. Entomol. 50:1-29. Abstract Increasing demand for wood and wood products is putting stress on traditional forest production areas, leading to long-term economic and environmental concerns. Intensively managed hardwood forest systems (IMHFS), grown using conventional agricultural as well as forestry methods, can help alleviate potential problems in natural forest production areas. Although IMHFS can produce more biomass per hectare per year than natural forests, the ecologically simplified, monocultural systems may greatly increase the crops susceptibility to pests. Species in the genera Populus and Salix comprise the greatest acreage in IMHFS in North America, but other species, including Liquidambar styracifua and Platanus occidentalis, are also important. We discuss life histories, realized and potential damage, and management options for the most economically infuential pests that affect these hardwood species. The substantial inherent challenges associated with pest management in the monocultural environments created by IMHFS are reviewed. Finally, we discuss ways to design IMHFS that may reduce their susceptibility to pests, increase their growth and productivity potential, and create a more sustainable environment.

  3. Evaluation of organic, conventional and intensive beef farm systems: health, management and animal production.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Penedo, I; López-Alonso, M; Shore, R F; Miranda, M; Castillo, C; Hernández, J; Benedito, J L

    2012-09-01

    The overall aim of the present study was to analyse and compare organic beef cattle farming in Spain with intensive and conventional systems. An on-farm study comparing farm management practices and animal health was carried out. The study also focussed on a slaughterhouse analysis by comparing impacts on the safety and quality of the cattle products. Twenty-four organic and 26 conventional farms were inspected, and farmers responded to a questionnaire that covered all basic data on their husbandry practices, farm management, veterinary treatments and reproductive performance during 2007. Furthermore, data on the hygiene and quality of 244, 2596 and 3021 carcasses of calves from organic, intensive and conventional farms, respectively, were retrieved from the official yearbook (2007) of a slaughterhouse. Differences found between organic and conventional farms across the farm analysis did not substantially reflect differences between both farm types in the predominant diseases that usually occur on beef cattle farms. However, calves reared organically presented fewer condemnations at slaughter compared with intensive and to a lesser extent with conventionally reared calves. Carcass performance also reflected differences between farm type and breed and was not necessarily better in organic farms. PMID:23031524

  4. PanDA Beyond ATLAS : A Scalable Workload Management System For Data Intensive Science

    E-print Network

    Borodin, M; The ATLAS collaboration; Jha, S; Golubkov, D; Klimentov, A; Maeno, T; Nilsson, P; Oleynik, D; Panitkin, S; Petrosyan, A; Schovancova, J; Vaniachine, A; Wenaus, T

    2014-01-01

    The LHC experiments are today at the leading edge of large scale distributed data-intensive computational science. The LHC's ATLAS experiment processes data volumes which are particularly extreme, over 140 PB to date, distributed worldwide at over of 120 sites. An important element in the success of the exciting physics results from ATLAS is the highly scalable integrated workflow and dataflow management afforded by the PanDA workload management system, used for all the distributed computing needs of the experiment. The PanDA design is not experiment specific and PanDA is now being extended to support other data intensive scientific applications. PanDA was cited as an example of "a high performance, fault tolerant software for fast, scalable access to data repositories of many kinds" during the "Big Data Research and Development Initiative" announcement, a 200 million USD U.S. government investment in tools to handle huge volumes of digital data needed to spur science and engineering discoveries. In this talk...

  5. Performance of an Electronic Diary System for Intensive Insulin Management in Global Diabetes Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyu; Mou, Jiani; Hackett, Andy P.; Raymond, Stephen A.; Chang, Annette M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: This report describes the performance of a wireless electronic diary (e-diary) system for data collection and enhanced patient–investigator interactions during intensive insulin management in diabetes clinical trials. Materials and Methods: We implemented a customized electronic communication system featuring an e-diary and a Web portal in three global, randomized, controlled Phase 3 clinical trials testing basal insulin peglispro compared with insulin glargine, both combined with prandial insulin lispro, in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and T2DM, respectively). We collected data during 28 weeks of study e-diary use for the report. Results: Patients (n=2,938) in 31 countries used e-diaries to transmit 2,439,087 blood glucose (BG) values, 96% of which were associated by the patient with a protocol time point during the 72-h response window. Of 208,192 hypoglycemia events captured, 96% had a BG value, and 95% had treatments and outcomes entered by patients within the 72-h window. Patients recorded administration of 1,964,477 insulin doses; 93% of basal insulin doses were adherent with the investigator prescription. Investigators adjusted 13 basal and 92 bolus insulin prescriptions per patient-year using the e-diary system. After 26 weeks of treatment and e-diary use in the combined study arms, hemoglobin A1c values decreased by 0.6% or 1.6% and fasting BG decreased by 7.8 or 28?mg/dL in patients with T1DM or T2DM, respectively. Conclusions: The e-diary system enabled comprehensive data collection and facilitated communication between investigators and patients for intensive insulin management in three global clinical trials testing basal insulins. PMID:25826466

  6. A Catchment Systems Engineering (CSE) approach to managing intensively farmed land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonczyk, Jennine; Quinn, Paul; Barber, Nicholas; Wilkinson, Mark; ODonnell, Greg

    2014-05-01

    Rural land management practices can have a significant impact on the hydrological and nutrient dynamics within a catchment which can dramatically alter the way it processes water, exacerbating nutrient losses from the system. A collaborative and holistic approach for managing potential conflicts between land management activity for food production alongside the aspiration to achieve good water quality and the need to make space for water can ensure the long-term sustainability of our agricultural catchments. Catchment System Engineering (CSE) is an interventionist approach to altering the catchment scale runoff regime through the manipulation of hydrological flow pathways throughout the catchment. By targeting hydrological flow pathways at source, such as overland flow, field drain and ditch function, a significant component of the runoff generation can be managed, greatly reducing erosive soil losses. Coupled with management of farm nutrients at source many runoff attenuation features or measures can be co-located to achieve benefits for water quality. Examples of community-led mitigation measures using the CSE approach will be presented from two catchments in Northumberland, Northern England, that demonstrate the generic framework for identification of multipurpose features that slow, store and filter runoff at strategic locations in the landscape. Measures include within-field barriers, edge of field traps and within-field sediment filters and sediment traps which demonstrate how sediment can be trapped locally (including silt and clay fractions) and be recovered for use back on the land. Deliverables from this CSE approach includes the reduction of downstream flood risk and capturing of sediment and associated nutrients. The CSE approach allows for a more natural flood and nutrient management approach which helps to restore vital catchment functions to re-establish a healthy catchment system.

  7. A Devoted Mini-Computer System for the Management of Clinical and Laboratory Data in an Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Shinozaki, Tamotsu; Deane, Robert S.; Mazuzan, John E.

    1982-01-01

    In order to handle a large amount of clinical, laboratory and physiological information in intensive care units, a prototype distributed computer system is used at the Medical Center Hospital of Vermont. The system enables us to do extra tasks without increasing clerical help, eg., a progress note for respiratory care, statistical data for unit management, computation of cardiac and pulmonary parameters, IV schedule for vasoactive drugs, daily compilation of TISS and APACHE scores, data collection for audits and special products. Special attention is paid to computer/user interaction.

  8. In-stream nitrate responses integrate human and climate systems in an intensively managed landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, A. S.; Davis, C. A.; Burgin, A. J.; Loecke, T.; Riveros-Iregui, D. A.; Schnoebelen, D. J.; Just, C. L.; Thomas, S. A.; Weber, L. J.; St Clair, M. A.; Spak, S.; Dalrymple, K. E.; Li, Y.; Prior, K.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilization is a cornerstone of modern agriculture, but the practice also leads to eutrophication, hypoxia, and harmful algal blooms in both inland and coastal waters. Several studies identify Iowa, Illinois and Indiana as major source areas of N discharged by the Mississippi River to the Gulf of Mexico where large-scale hypoxia develops annually. Continental-scale management of nitrogen requires a comprehensive understanding of watershed-specific hydrologic dynamics and their consequences for nitrate flushing from agricultural landscapes. Spatiotemporal variation in nitrate fluxes is inherently complex due to the broad range of physicochemical and hydraulic properties that influence N movement through soils, groundwater, and rivers. In-stream N fluxes respond to both short- and long-term climactic forcing interacting with the cumulative human modification to both physical and biogeochemical systems in agricultural catchments. Here, we synthesize results from three individual studies in the Iowa River watershed. First, we demonstrate significant inter- and intra-annual variability in stream responses to rainfall events as a function of antecedent moisture conditions in three nested catchments (first through third-order). This study highlights the use of in-situ, high temporal resolution sensor networks as an emerging tool. Next, we leverage a catchment-wide synoptic study repeated in 2013 to demonstrate the landscape-scale impact of climate dynamics interacting with management decisions on the landscape. This study highlights the role of changes in extreme event frequency on water quality in agricultural landscapes. Finally, we extend results onto the landscape, using a numerical model to quantify heterogeneity of key controlling variables within the landscape (e.g., soil texture) and N retention or mobilization. We compare variability in key controls with variability driven by climate over a 60-yr period of record.

  9. Relative impacts of land-use, management intensity and fertilization on microbial community structure in agricultural systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of agricultural land management practices on soil prokaryotic diversity have not been well described. Soil microbial communities under three agricultural management systems (conventionally tilled cropland, hayed pasture, and grazed pasture) and two fertilizer systems [inorganic fertilizer (I...

  10. Impact of Intensive Case Management on Child Welfare System Involvement for Substance-Dependent Parenting Women on Public Assistance.

    PubMed

    Dauber, Sarah; Neighbors, Charles; Dasaro, Chris; Riordan, Annette; Morgenstern, Jon

    2012-07-01

    This study examined the impact of intensive case management (ICM) on decreasing child welfare system involvement in a sample of substance-dependent parenting women who participated in a welfare demonstration study comparing ICM to usual screen-and-refer models employed in welfare settings. Previous research established the effectiveness of ICM in both increasing engagement in substance abuse treatment and in promoting abstinence, and the current study tested whether ICM had downstream impacts on child welfare outcomes not directly targeted by the intervention. The sample included 302 mothers recruited from welfare offices and their 888 minor children. Child welfare outcomes were available from administrative records for four years following study entry and included incident reports and out-of-home child placements. An initial positive effect of ICM was found on child placements, but its impact lessened over time and was likely due to the increased contact with case managers that occurred early in the study. Overall, minimal benefits of ICM were found, suggesting that while ICM was effective in the areas of treatment engagement and abstinence, there were no downstream benefits for child welfare outcomes. Implications of findings in terms of increased need for cross-system collaboration are discussed. PMID:22661798

  11. Does introduction of a Patient Data Management System (PDMS) improve the financial situation of an intensive care unit?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient Data Management Systems (PDMS) support clinical documentation at the bedside and have demonstrated effects on completeness of patient charting and the time spent on documentation. These systems are costly and raise the question if such a major investment pays off. We tried to answer the following questions: How do costs and revenues of an intensive care unit develop before and after introduction of a PDMS? Can higher revenues be obtained with improved PDMS documentation? Can we present cost savings attributable to the PDMS? Methods Retrospective analysis of cost and reimbursement data of a 25 bed Intensive Care Unit at a German University Hospital, three years before (2004–2006) and three years after (2007–2009) PDMS implementation. Results Costs and revenues increased continuously over the years. The profit of the investigated ICU was fluctuating over the years and seemingly depending on other factors as well. We found a small increase in profit in the year after the introduction of the PDMS, but not in the following years. Profit per case peaked at 1039 € in 2007, but dropped subsequently to 639 € per case. We found no clear evidence for cost savings after the PDMS introduction. Our cautious calculation did not consider additional labour costs for IT staff needed for system maintenance. Conclusions The introduction of a PDMS has probably minimal or no effect on reimbursement. In our case the observed increase in profit was too small to amortize the total investment for PDMS implementation. This may add some counterweight to the literature, where expectations for tools such as the PDMS can be quite unreasonable. PMID:24041117

  12. Foundations of data-intensive science: Technology and practice for high throughput, widely distributed, data management and analysis systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, William; Ernst, M.; Dart, E.; Tierney, B.

    2014-04-01

    Today's large-scale science projects involve world-wide collaborations depend on moving massive amounts of data from an instrument to potentially thousands of computing and storage systems at hundreds of collaborating institutions to accomplish their science. This is true for ATLAS and CMS at the LHC, and it is true for the climate sciences, Belle-II at the KEK collider, genome sciences, the SKA radio telescope, and ITER, the international fusion energy experiment. DOE's Office of Science has been collecting science discipline and instrument requirements for network based data management and analysis for more than a decade. As a result of this certain key issues are seen across essentially all science disciplines that rely on the network for significant data transfer, even if the data quantities are modest compared to projects like the LHC experiments. These issues are what this talk will address; to wit: 1. Optical signal transport advances enabling 100 Gb/s circuits that span the globe on optical fiber with each carrying 100 such channels; 2. Network router and switch requirements to support high-speed international data transfer; 3. Data transport (TCP is still the norm) requirements to support high-speed international data transfer (e.g. error-free transmission); 4. Network monitoring and testing techniques and infrastructure to maintain the required error-free operation of the many R&E networks involved in international collaborations; 5. Operating system evolution to support very high-speed network I/O; 6. New network architectures and services in the LAN (campus) and WAN networks to support data-intensive science; 7. Data movement and management techniques and software that can maximize the throughput on the network connections between distributed data handling systems, and; 8. New approaches to widely distributed workflow systems that can support the data movement and analysis required by the science. All of these areas must be addressed to enable large-scale, widely distributed data analysis systems, and the experience of the LHC can be applied to other scientific disciplines. In particular, specific analogies to the SKA will be cited in the talk.

  13. Risk factors for kid mortality in West African Dwarf goats under an intensive management system in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Turkson, P K; Antiri, Y K; Baffuor-Awuah, O

    2004-05-01

    Breeding records from 1997 to 2000 for West African Dwarf goats kept under an intensive management system on the National Breeding Station at Kintampo in Ghana were analysed for the effect on mortality of sex, season and type of birth, and birth weight. The pre-weaning and post-weaning mortalities were 10% (n = 390) and 23.1% (n = 351), respectively, while the overall mortality from birth up to 12 months of age was 30.8% (n = 390). The post-weaning period recorded significantly higher proportions of deaths in males, females, single-born and twins, during the rainy and dry seasons, and for kids with low or high birth weight, compared to the pre-weaning period. There was significantly higher mortality in male kids than in female kids. The odds and risks of death for male kids were about twice those for females at post-weaning and up to 1 year of age. At pre-weaning and up to 1 year of age, a higher proportion of the dead were twins. Twins had approximately 2.5 the risk of death at pre-weaning, compared to singles. Also, kids born in the rainy season had significantly higher mortality than those born in the dry season. Kids that died by the time of weaning were significantly lighter in weight at birth than those that survived. Male kids had significantly higher mean weights at birth and at weaning, but not at 12 months of age. The significance of these findings is discussed. PMID:15241969

  14. Intensive case management for severe mental illness

    PubMed Central

    Dieterich, Marina; Irving, Claire B; Park, Bert; Marshall, Max

    2014-01-01

    Background Intensive Case Management (ICM) is a community based package of care, aiming to provide long term care for severely mentally ill people who do not require immediate admission. ICM evolved from two original community models of care, Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) and Case Management (CM), where ICM emphasises the importance of small caseload (less than 20) and high intensity input. Objectives To assess the effects of Intensive Case Management (caseload <20) in comparison with non-Intensive Case Management (caseload > 20) and with standard community care in people with severe mental illness. To evaluate whether the effect of ICM on hospitalisation depends on its fidelity to the ACT model and on the setting. Search methods For the current update of this review we searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (February 2009), which is compiled by systematic searches of major databases, hand searches and conference proceedings. Selection criteria All relevant randomised clinical trials focusing on people with severe mental illness, aged 18 to 65 years and treated in the community-care setting, where Intensive Case Management, non-Intensive Case Management or standard care were compared. Outcomes such as service use, adverse effects, global state, social functioning, mental state, behaviour, quality of life, satisfaction and costs were sought. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For binary outcomes we calculated relative risk (RR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI), on an intention-to-treat basis. For continuous data we estimated mean difference (MD) between groups and its 95% confidence interval (CI). We employed a random-effects model for analyses. We performed a random-effects meta-regression analysis to examine the association of the intervention’s fidelity to the ACT model and the rate of hospital use in the setting where the trial was conducted with the treatment effect. Main results We included 38 trials (7328 participants) in this review. The trials provided data for two comparisons: 1. ICM versus standard care, 2. ICM versus non-ICM. 1. ICM versus standard care Twenty-four trials provided data on length of hospitalisation, and results favoured Intensive Case Management (n=3595, 24 RCTs, MD ?0.86 CI ?1.37 to ?0.34). There was a high level of heterogeneity, but this significance still remained when the outlier studies were excluded from the analysis (n=3143, 20 RCTs, MD ?0.62 CI ?1.00 to ?0.23). Nine studies found participants in the ICM group were less likely to be lost to psychiatric services (n=1633, 9 RCTs, RR 0.43 CI 0.30 to 0.61, I2=49%, p=0.05). One global state scale did show an Improvement in global state for those receiving ICM, the GAF scale (n=818, 5 RCTs, MD 3.41 CI 1.66 to 5.16). Results for mental state as measured through various rating scales, however, were equivocal, with no compelling evidence that ICM was really any better than standard care in improving mental state. No differences in mortality between ICM and standard care groups occurred, either due to ’all causes’ (n=1456, 9 RCTs, RR 0.84 CI 0.48 to 1.47) or to ’suicide’ (n=1456, 9 RCTs, RR 0.68 CI 0.31 to 1.51). Social functioning results varied, no differences were found in terms of contact with the legal system and with employment status, whereas significant improvement in accommodation status was found, as was the incidence of not living independently, which was lower in the ICM group (n=1185, 4 RCTs, RR 0.65 CI 0.49 to 0.88). Quality of life data found no significant difference between groups, but data were weak. CSQ scores showed a greater participant satisfaction in the ICM group (n=423, 2 RCTs, MD 3.23 CI 2.31 to 4.14). 2. ICM versus non-ICM The included studies failed to show a significant advantage of ICM in reducing the average length of hospitalisation (n=2220, 21 RCTs, MD ?0.08 CI ?0.37 to 0.21). They did find ICM to be more advantageous than non-ICM in reducing rate of lost to follo

  15. KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT FOR TERMINOLOGY-INTENSIVE APPLICATIONS: NEEDS AND TOOLS

    E-print Network

    KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT FOR TERMINOLOGY-INTENSIVE APPLICATIONS: NEEDS AND TOOLS lngrid Meyer required for producing high-quality terminology. This problem will become increasingly significant as term banks evolve into knowledge bases. Knowledge management for terminology-intensive activities

  16. Ongoing development of the Critical Care Information System: the collaborative approach to automating information management in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed Central

    Hravnak, M.; Stein, K. L.; Dale, B.; Hazy, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    Point-of-care (bedside) clinical information systems can fulfill a variety of functions. Included in these functions are: becoming receptacles for patient data and allowing data to be manipulated into formats that facilitate clinical decision making; functioning as sources for billing and auditing processes; interfacing to other hospital systems and bringing distant data to the bedside; and being a repository for information used in the development of hierarchical and/or relational databases. The initial and ongoing development of these systems in a dynamic clinical environment requires the construction of processes and work pathways to ensure that the needs and requirements of myriad personnel, departments and agencies within the health center milieu are addressed. PMID:1482885

  17. Management intensity alters decomposition via biological pathways

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wickings, Kyle; Grandy, A. Stuart; Reed, Sasha; Cleveland, Cory

    2011-01-01

    Current conceptual models predict that changes in plant litter chemistry during decomposition are primarily regulated by both initial litter chemistry and the stage-or extent-of mass loss. Far less is known about how variations in decomposer community structure (e.g., resulting from different ecosystem management types) could influence litter chemistry during decomposition. Given the recent agricultural intensification occurring globally and the importance of litter chemistry in regulating soil organic matter storage, our objectives were to determine the potential effects of agricultural management on plant litter chemistry and decomposition rates, and to investigate possible links between ecosystem management, litter chemistry and decomposition, and decomposer community composition and activity. We measured decomposition rates, changes in litter chemistry, extracellular enzyme activity, microarthropod communities, and bacterial versus fungal relative abundance in replicated conventional-till, no-till, and old field agricultural sites for both corn and grass litter. After one growing season, litter decomposition under conventional-till was 20% greater than in old field communities. However, decomposition rates in no-till were not significantly different from those in old field or conventional-till sites. After decomposition, grass residue in both conventional- and no-till systems was enriched in total polysaccharides relative to initial litter, while grass litter decomposed in old fields was enriched in nitrogen-bearing compounds and lipids. These differences corresponded with differences in decomposer communities, which also exhibited strong responses to both litter and management type. Overall, our results indicate that agricultural intensification can increase litter decomposition rates, alter decomposer communities, and influence litter chemistry in ways that could have important and long-term effects on soil organic matter dynamics. We suggest that future efforts to more accurately predict soil carbon dynamics under different management regimes may need to explicitly consider how changes in litter chemistry during decomposition are influenced by the specific metabolic capabilities of the extant decomposer communities.

  18. Building dependability arguments for software intensive systems

    E-print Network

    Seater, Robert Morrison

    2009-01-01

    A method is introduced for structuring and guiding the development of end-to-end dependability arguments. The goal is to establish high-level requirements of complex software-intensive systems, especially properties that ...

  19. Maximizing Conservation and Production with Intensive Forest Management: It's All About Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tittler, Rebecca; Filotas, Élise; Kroese, Jasmin; Messier, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Functional zoning has been suggested as a way to balance the needs of a viable forest industry with those of healthy ecosystems. Under this system, part of the forest is set aside for protected areas, counterbalanced by intensive and extensive management of the rest of the forest. Studies indicate this may provide adequate timber while minimizing road construction and favoring the development of large mature and old stands. However, it is unclear how the spatial arrangement of intensive management areas may affect the success of this zoning. Should these areas be agglomerated or dispersed throughout the forest landscape? Should managers prioritize (a) proximity to existing roads, (b) distance from protected areas, or (c) site-specific productivity? We use a spatially explicit landscape simulation model to examine the effects of different spatial scenarios on landscape structure, connectivity for native forest wildlife, stand diversity, harvest volume, and road construction: (1) random placement of intensive management areas, and (2-8) all possible combinations of rules (a)-(c). Results favor the agglomeration of intensive management areas. For most wildlife species, connectivity was the highest when intensive management was far from the protected areas. This scenario also resulted in relatively high harvest volumes. Maximizing distance of intensive management areas from protected areas may therefore be the best way to maximize the benefits of intensive management areas while minimizing their potentially negative effects on forest structure and biodiversity.

  20. Maximizing Conservation and Production with Intensive Forest Management: It's All About Location.

    PubMed

    Tittler, Rebecca; Filotas, Élise; Kroese, Jasmin; Messier, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Functional zoning has been suggested as a way to balance the needs of a viable forest industry with those of healthy ecosystems. Under this system, part of the forest is set aside for protected areas, counterbalanced by intensive and extensive management of the rest of the forest. Studies indicate this may provide adequate timber while minimizing road construction and favoring the development of large mature and old stands. However, it is unclear how the spatial arrangement of intensive management areas may affect the success of this zoning. Should these areas be agglomerated or dispersed throughout the forest landscape? Should managers prioritize (a) proximity to existing roads, (b) distance from protected areas, or (c) site-specific productivity? We use a spatially explicit landscape simulation model to examine the effects of different spatial scenarios on landscape structure, connectivity for native forest wildlife, stand diversity, harvest volume, and road construction: (1) random placement of intensive management areas, and (2-8) all possible combinations of rules (a)-(c). Results favor the agglomeration of intensive management areas. For most wildlife species, connectivity was the highest when intensive management was far from the protected areas. This scenario also resulted in relatively high harvest volumes. Maximizing distance of intensive management areas from protected areas may therefore be the best way to maximize the benefits of intensive management areas while minimizing their potentially negative effects on forest structure and biodiversity. PMID:26076893

  1. IML-CZO: Critical Zone Observatory for Intensively Managed Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Praveen; Papanicolaou, Thanos

    2014-05-01

    Intensively managed landscapes, regions of significant land use change, serve as a cradle for economic prosperity. However, the intensity of change is responsible for unintended deterioration of our land and water environments. By understanding present day dynamics in the context of long-term co-evolution of the Critical Zone comprising of the landscape, soil and biota, IML-CZO aims to support the assessment of short- and long-term resilience of the crucial ecological, hydrological and climatic services provided by the Critical Zone. An observational network of three sites in Illinois, Iowa, and Minnesota that capture the geological diversity of the low relief, glaciated, and tile-drained landscape will drive novel scientific and technological advances. IML-CZO will provide leadership in developing the next generation of scientists and practitioners, and informing management strategies aimed at reducing the vulnerability of the system to present and emerging trends in human activities. IML-CZO, one of the nine observatories funded by the United States National Science Foundation (NSF), consists of two core sites: the 3,690- sq. km. Upper Sangamon River Basin in Illinois and 270-sq. km. Clear Creek Watershed in Iowa, along with the 44,000- sq. km. Minnesota River Basin as third participating site. These sites together are characterized by low-relief landscapes with poorly drained soils and represent a broad range of physiographic variations found throughout the glaciated Midwest, and thereby provide an opportunity to advance understanding of the CZO in this important region. Through novel measurements, analysis and modeling, IML-CZO aims to address the following questions: • How do different time scales of geologic evolution and anthropogenic influence interact to determine the trajectory of CZ structure and function? • How is the co-evolution of biota, consisting of both vegetation and microbes, and soil affected due to intensive management? • How have dynamic patterns of connectivity, which link across transition zones and heterogeneity, changed by anthropogenic impacts? • How do these changes affect residence times and aggregate fluxes of water, carbon, nutrients, and sediment? IML-CZO will use historical data, existing observational networks, new instruments, remote sensing, sampling and laboratory analyses, and novel sensing technologies using open hardware and unmanned vehicles to study a number of variables related to climate and weather, hydrology, geology, geomorphology, soils, water chemistry, biogeochemistry, ecology, and land management. Additional details are available at imlczo.org.

  2. The residence time of intensively managed agricultural landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowling, Laura; Cherkauer, Keith; Chiu, Chun-mei; Rahman, Sanoar

    2015-04-01

    Much of the agricultural landscape across the Midwestern United States is intensively managed through numerous surface and subsurface drainage improvements, and the growing extraction of groundwater resources. The relatively recent glaciation of the North Central region means that the landscape is less dissected and hydrologically connected than older till areas. Low topographic gradients and underlying dense till which restricts vertical water movement, as well as kettle depressions, have led to poorly drained soils and extensive wetlands within the landscape. Large areas of this land could only be farmed once the excess water was removed through artificial surface and subsurface drainage. Conventional wisdom in the region maintains that subsurface tile drainage reduces the occurrence of peak flow events by increasing soil water storage capacity. At the watershed scale, this view does not take into account the coincident increase in surface drainage and reduction in residence time in surface depressions. This paper explores to what degree water management and irrigation has changed surface and subsurface water storage and residence time over the last century and how this has impacted flow duration throughout the Wabash River system in Indiana, USA. The effects of subsurface tile drains, wetlands and aquifer storage are explicitly represented within the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) macroscale hydrology model. We maintain a focus on the entire Wabash River, a river system of historic importance that is also representative of many similar areas in the till plain region of the agricultural Midwest, which contribute to water quality and flood dynamics of the Mississippi river system. By lowering the water table, surface and subsurface drainage improvements have increased the subsurface storage capacity at the beginning of rain events, but this is overwhelmed by the decrease in surface storage capacity for intermediate to large events, decreasing the current residence time of water relative to pre-settlement conditions.

  3. Difficult airway management from Emergency Department till Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Debasis; Bhattacharyya, Prithwis

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of “can ventilate but can’t intubate” situation which was successfully managed in the Emergency Department and Intensive Care Unit by the use of ProSeal laryngeal mask airway and Frova Intubating Introducer as bridging rescue devices. Use of appropriate technique while strictly following the difficult airway algorithm is the mainstay of airway management in unanticipated difficult airway situations. Although the multiple airway devices were used but each step took not more than 2 min and “don’t struggle, skip to the next step principle” was followed. With the availability of many advanced airway management tools, the intensivists should have a training and experience along with preparedness in order to perform such lifesaving airway managements. PMID:26430345

  4. Energy resource management for energy-intensive manufacturing industries

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, C.W.; Levangie, J.

    1981-10-01

    A program to introduce energy resource management into an energy-intensive manufacturing industry is presented. The food industry (SIC No. 20) was chosen and 20 companies were selected for interviews, but thirteen were actually visited. The methodology for this program is detailed. Reasons for choosing the food industry are described. The substance of the information gained and the principal conclusions drawn from the interviews are given. Results of the model Energy Resource Management Plan applied to three companies are compiled at length. Strategies for dissemination of the information gained are described. (MCW)

  5. Enhancing the Biodiversity of Ditches in Intensively Managed UK Farmland

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Rosalind F.; Johnson, Paul J.; Macdonald, David W.; Feber, Ruth E.

    2015-01-01

    Drainage ditches, either seasonally flooded or permanent, are commonly found on intensively managed lowland farmland in the UK. They are potentially important for wetland biodiversity but, despite their ubiquity, information on their biodiversity and management in the wider countryside is scarce. We surveyed 175 ditches for their physical and chemical characteristics, spatial connectivity, plant communities and aquatic invertebrates in an area of intensively managed farmland in Oxfordshire, UK and collected information on ditch management from farmer interviews. Water depth and shade had a small impact on the diversity of plant and invertebrate communities in ditches. Increased shade over the ditch channel resulted in reduced taxonomic richness of both channel vegetation and aquatic invertebrates and channel vegetation cover was lower at shaded sites. Invertebrate taxonomic richness was higher when water was deeper. Spatial connectivity had no detectable impact on the aquatic invertebrate or plant communities found in ditches. The number of families within the orders Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera (EPT), which contain many pollution-sensitive species, declined with decreasing pH of ditch water. As time since dredging increased, the number of EPT families increased in permanent ditches but decreased in temporary ditches. Whether or not a ditch was in an agri-environment scheme had little impact on the reported management regime or biodiversity value of the ditch. Measures for increasing the amount of water in ditches, by increasing the water depth or promoting retention of water in ditches, could increase the biodiversity value of ditches in agricultural land. Some temporary ditches for specialised species should be retained. Reducing the amount of shade over narrow ditches by managing adjacent hedgerows is also likely to increase the species diversity of plant and invertebrate communities within the ditch. We recommend that to preserve or enhance the biodiversity value of ditches, and improve their ecosystem service delivery, management prescriptions for hedgerows adjacent to ditches should differ from those aimed at hedgerows only. PMID:26445146

  6. Landmark NIH Study Shows Intensive Blood Pressure Management May Save Lives

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2015 Landmark NIH study shows intensive blood pressure management may save lives Lower blood pressure target greatly ... complications and deaths in older adults. More intensive management of high blood pressure, below a commonly recommended ...

  7. The impact of intensive forest management on carbon stores in forest ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Krankina, O.N.; Harmon, M.E. . Dept. of Forest Science)

    1994-06-01

    The expansion of intensive management of forest resources for timber production with the human population growth may have a profound effect on the role forests play in the global carbon cycle. First, the transition from old-growth to intensively managed second-growth forest with short rotations entails major long-term ecosystems changes including the reduction of total woody biomass. Although the biomass of living trees can be restored within a relatively short period of time, dead wood biomass takes considerably longer to reach pre-harvest levels; therefore commonly used rotations are too short for the latter part of ecosystem to recover fully. As dead trees account for 14--18% of the total woody biomass stores in a natural forest, a considerable amount of carbon can be released if this material is not replaced. Second, economically efficient, intensive forest management systems that include commercial thinning and wood salvage can further reduce the total biomass loading of second-growth forests. Long-term study of live and dead wood in thinning trials in the Pacific Northwest and in northwestern Russia suggest that intensive practices can reduce total woody biomass averaged over rotation to 10--25% that found in a natural old-growth forest. Therefore intensive forest management practices may maximize the supply of raw materials, but they may also generate a major carbon flux into the atmosphere. This flux may be significant despite the fact the land-use type remains the same. Effect of intensive forest management practices should be included in future carbon budgets and in developing forest management strategies aimed at increasing carbon storage in forest ecosystems.

  8. Intensity-Modulated and 3D-Conformal Radiotherapy for Whole-Ventricular Irradiation as Compared With Conventional Whole-Brain Irradiation in the Management of Localized Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Michael Jenwei; Silva Santos, Adriana da; Sakuraba, Roberto Kenji; Lopes, Cleverson Perceu; Goncalves, Vinicius Demanboro; Weltman, Eduardo; Ferrigno, Robson; Cruz, Jose Carlos

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the sparing potential of cerebral hemispheres with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for whole-ventricular irradiation (WVI) and conventional whole-brain irradiation (WBI) in the management of localized central nervous system germ cell tumors (CNSGCTs). Methods and Materials: Ten cases of patients with localized CNSGCTs and submitted to WVI by use of IMRT with or without a 'boost' to the primary lesion were selected. For comparison purposes, similar treatment plans were produced by use of 3D-CRT (WVI with or without boost) and WBI (opposed lateral fields with or without boost), and cerebral hemisphere sparing was evaluated at dose levels ranging from 2 Gy to 40 Gy. Results: The median prescription dose for WVI was 30.6 Gy (range, 25.2-37.5 Gy), and that for the boost was 16.5 Gy (range, 0-23.4 Gy). Mean irradiated cerebral hemisphere volumes were lower for WVI with IMRT than for 3D-CRT and were lower for WVI with 3D-CRT than for WBI. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was associated with the lowest irradiated volumes, with reductions of 7.5%, 12.2%, and 9.0% at dose levels of 20, 30, and 40 Gy, respectively, compared with 3D-CRT. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy provided statistically significant reductions of median irradiated volumes at all dose levels (p = 0.002 or less). However, estimated radiation doses to peripheral areas of the body were 1.9 times higher with IMRT than with 3D-CRT. Conclusions: Although IMRT is associated with increased radiation doses to peripheral areas of the body, its use can spare a significant amount of normal central nervous system tissue compared with 3D-CRT or WBI in the setting of CNSGCT treatment.

  9. NASA's Risk Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perera, Jeevan S.

    2011-01-01

    Leadership is key to success. Phased-approach for implementation of risk management is necessary. Risk management system will be simple, accessible and promote communication of information to all relevant stakeholders for optimal resource allocation and risk mitigation. Risk management should be used by all team members to manage risks -- risk office personnel. Each group is assigned Risk Integrators who are facilitators for effective risk management. Risks will be managed at the lowest-level feasible, elevate only those risks that require coordination or management from above. Risk reporting and communication is an essential element of risk management and will combine both qualitative and quantitative elements. Risk informed decision making should be introduced to all levels of management. Provide necessary checks and balances to insure that risks are caught/identified and dealt with in a timely manner. Many supporting tools, processes & training must be deployed for effective risk management implementation. Process improvement must be included in the risk processes.

  10. NASA's Risk Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perera, Jeevan S.

    2013-01-01

    Phased-approach for implementation of risk management is necessary. Risk management system will be simple, accessible and promote communication of information to all relevant stakeholders for optimal resource allocation and risk mitigation. Risk management should be used by all team members to manage risks - not just risk office personnel. Each group/department is assigned Risk Integrators who are facilitators for effective risk management. Risks will be managed at the lowest-level feasible, elevate only those risks that require coordination or management from above. Risk informed decision making should be introduced to all levels of management. ? Provide necessary checks and balances to insure that risks are caught/identified and dealt with in a timely manner. Many supporting tools, processes & training must be deployed for effective risk management implementation. Process improvement must be included in the risk processes.

  11. Metadata management staging system

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-08-01

    Django application providing a user-interface for building a file and metadata management system. An evolution of our Node.js and CouchDb metadata management system. This one focuses on server functionality and uses a well-documented, rational and REST-ful API for data access.

  12. Waste management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, R. L.; Jorgensen, G. K.

    1975-01-01

    The function of the waste management system was to control the disposition of solid and liquid wastes and waste stowage gases. The waste management system consisting of a urine subsystem and a fecal subsystem is described in detail and its overall performance is evaluated. Recommendations for improvement are given.

  13. Medical Information Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterescu, S.; Hipkins, K. R.; Friedman, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    On-line interactive information processing system easily and rapidly handles all aspects of data management related to patient care. General purpose system is flexible enough to be applied to other data management situations found in areas such as occupational safety data, judicial information, or personnel records.

  14. Lithium battery management system

    DOEpatents

    Dougherty, Thomas J. (Waukesha, WI)

    2012-05-08

    Provided is a system for managing a lithium battery system having a plurality of cells. The battery system comprises a variable-resistance element electrically connected to a cell and located proximate a portion of the cell; and a device for determining, utilizing the variable-resistance element, whether the temperature of the cell has exceeded a predetermined threshold. A method of managing the temperature of a lithium battery system is also included.

  15. Building waste management core indicators through Spatial Material Flow Analysis: net recovery and transport intensity indexes.

    PubMed

    Font Vivanco, David; Puig Ventosa, Ignasi; Gabarrell Durany, Xavier

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, the material and spatial characterization of the flows within a municipal solid waste (MSW) management system are combined through a Network-Based Spatial Material Flow Analysis. Using this information, two core indicators are developed for the bio-waste fraction, the Net Recovery Index (NRI) and the Transport Intensity Index (TII), which are aimed at assessing progress towards policy-related sustainable MSW management strategies and objectives. The NRI approaches the capacity of a MSW management system for converting waste into resources through a systematic metabolic approach, whereas the TII addresses efficiency in terms of the transport requirements to manage a specific waste flow throughout the entire MSW management life cycle. Therefore, both indicators could be useful in assessing key MSW management policy strategies, such as the consecution of higher recycling levels (sustainability principle) or the minimization of transport by locating treatment facilities closer to generation sources (proximity principle). To apply this methodological approach, the bio-waste management system of the region of Catalonia (Spain) has been chosen as a case study. Results show the adequacy of both indicators for identifying those points within the system with higher capacity to compromise its environmental, economic and social performance and therefore establishing clear targets for policy prioritization. Moreover, this methodological approach permits scenario building, which could be useful in assessing the outcomes of hypothetical scenarios, thus proving its adequacy for strategic planning. PMID:22819043

  16. PanDA Beyond ATLAS: Workload Management for Data Intensive Science

    E-print Network

    Schovancova, J; The ATLAS collaboration; Klimentov, A; Maeno, T; Nilsson, P; Oleynik, D; Panitkin, S; Petrosyan, A; Vaniachine, A; Wenaus, T; Yu, D

    2013-01-01

    The PanDA Production ANd Distributed Analysis system has been developed by ATLAS to meet the experiment's requirements for a data-driven workload management system for production and distributed analysis processing capable of operating at LHC data processing scale. After 7 years of impressively successful PanDA operation in ATLAS there are also other experiments which can benefit from PanDA in the Big Data challenge, with several at various stages of evaluation and adoption. The new project "Next Generation Workload Management and Analysis System for Big Data" is extending PanDA to meet the needs of other data intensive scientific applications in HEP, astro-particle and astrophysics communities, bio-informatics and other fields as a general solution to large scale workload management. PanDA can utilize dedicated or opportunistic computing resources such as grids, clouds, and High Performance Computing facilities, and is being extended to leverage next generation intelligent networks in automated workflow mana...

  17. Project Management Plan Resident Management System

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Project Management Plan For Resident Management System (RMS) U.S. Army Corps of Engineers: Resident Management System Project Working Title: RMS Prepared by: Richard Alvarez Office Symbol: CESPL.C.Dalton@usace.army.mil RMS Project Manager Thomas Weber 760-247-0217 x 34 Thomas.A.Weber@usace.army.mil Contract Specialist

  18. Operations management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandli, A. E.; Eckelkamp, R. E.; Kelly, C. M.; Mccandless, W.; Rue, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of an operations management system is to provide an orderly and efficient method to operate and maintain aerospace vehicles. Concepts are described for an operations management system and the key technologies are highlighted which will be required if this capability is brought to fruition. Without this automation and decision aiding capability, the growing complexity of avionics will result in an unmanageable workload for the operator, ultimately threatening mission success or survivability of the aircraft or space system. The key technologies include expert system application to operational tasks such as replanning, equipment diagnostics and checkout, global system management, and advanced man machine interfaces. The economical development of operations management systems, which are largely software, will require advancements in other technological areas such as software engineering and computer hardware.

  19. Systems engineering management plans.

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Tamara S.

    2009-10-01

    The Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) is a comprehensive and effective tool used to assist in the management of systems engineering efforts. It is intended to guide the work of all those involved in the project. The SEMP is comprised of three main sections: technical project planning and control, systems engineering process, and engineering specialty integration. The contents of each section must be tailored to the specific effort. A model outline and example SEMP are provided. The target audience is those who are familiar with the systems engineering approach and who have an interest in employing the SEMP as a tool for systems management. The goal of this document is to provide the reader with an appreciation for the use and importance of the SEMP, as well as provide a framework that can be used to create the management plan.

  20. Global Energy Management System 

    E-print Network

    Eidt, B. D.

    2005-01-01

    - saving the cumulative equivalent of 1.8 billion barrels of oil and reducing carbon dioxide emissions by over 200 million tonnes. In 2000, we redoubled our efforts with deployment of our Global Energy Management System (GEMS), which utilizes international...

  1. Intranet Document Management Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wen, H. Joseph; Yen, David C.; Lin, Binshan

    1998-01-01

    Explains how intranets facilitate documentation availability within a company at substantial cost savings. Topics include intranet document management systems (IDMS); publication costs for printed materials; hardware and software specifications; performance; and security. (Author/LRW)

  2. Automotive energy management system

    SciTech Connect

    Shiber, S.

    1980-09-23

    A hydromechanical/hydrostatic automotive energy management system is described that is comprised of two hydraulic units, the system adapted to provide: an efficient, continuously variable optimal transmission ratio, an intermittent optimal engine operation in city traffic and regenerative braking, thereby, the system is able to reduce a car's fuel consumption by as much as one half while improving drivability.

  3. Phase Diagram and Scattering Intensity of Binary Amphiphilic Systems

    E-print Network

    Schwarz, Ulrich

    Phase Diagram and Scattering Intensity of Binary Amphiphilic Systems G. Gompper and Ulrich S parameter, which describe the con- centration and orientation of the amphiphile, respectively, is used to study the phase diagram and the scattering intensity of binary amphiphilic systems. With increasing

  4. Database Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    In 1981 Wayne Erickson founded Microrim, Inc, a company originally focused on marketing a microcomputer version of RIM (Relational Information Manager). Dennis Comfort joined the firm and is now vice president, development. The team developed an advanced spinoff from the NASA system they had originally created, a microcomputer database management system known as R:BASE 4000. Microrim added many enhancements and developed a series of R:BASE products for various environments. R:BASE is now the second largest selling line of microcomputer database management software in the world.

  5. Intensive olive orchards on sloping land: good water and pest management are essential.

    PubMed

    Metzidakis, I; Martinez-Vilela, A; Castro Nieto, G; Basso, B

    2008-11-01

    There is intensive cultivation of olives on sloping land in Jaen-Granada (Spain), Basilicata (Italy) and Western Crete (Greece). The intensive olive groves here are characterised by a tree density of about 250treesha(-1), yearly fertilisation and pruning, several chemical sprays for pest control, soil tillage once to thrice per year and irrigation up to 2700m3ha(-1)yr(-1). Intensive management results in high yields of 3600-6500kgha(-1) but also higher labour costs of 1154-1590euroha(-1)yr(-1), varying per area. The major environmental concerns in this system are related to chemical residues in the fruit, the extinction of useful insects, the depletion of groundwater resources, the pollution of soil and water and the erosion of soil. This paper describes the impact of intensive orchard management on natural resources and gives recommendations for soil and water conservation, reduction of chemicals use and biodiversity enhancement. The specific recommendations for the relevant stakeholders--farmers, technicians, agricultural services and policy makers--are based on the experimental evaluation of different agricultural practices and a socio-economic analysis of local and global production and markets. PMID:17923248

  6. Integrated work management system.

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Edward J., Jr.; Henry, Karen Lynne

    2010-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories develops technologies to: (1) sustain, modernize, and protect our nuclear arsenal (2) Prevent the spread of weapons of mass destruction; (3) Provide new capabilities to our armed forces; (4) Protect our national infrastructure; (5) Ensure the stability of our nation's energy and water supplies; and (6) Defend our nation against terrorist threats. We identified the need for a single overarching Integrated Workplace Management System (IWMS) that would enable us to focus on customer missions and improve FMOC processes. Our team selected highly configurable commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) software with out-of-the-box workflow processes that integrate strategic planning, project management, facility assessments, and space management, and can interface with existing systems, such as Oracle, PeopleSoft, Maximo, Bentley, and FileNet. We selected the Integrated Workplace Management System (IWMS) from Tririga, Inc. Facility Management System (FMS) Benefits are: (1) Create a single reliable source for facility data; (2) Improve transparency with oversight organizations; (3) Streamline FMOC business processes with a single, integrated facility-management tool; (4) Give customers simple tools and real-time information; (5) Reduce indirect costs; (6) Replace approximately 30 FMOC systems and 60 homegrown tools (such as Microsoft Access databases); and (7) Integrate with FIMS.

  7. Oil field management system

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-09-23

    Oil field management systems and methods for managing operation of one or more wells producing a high void fraction multiphase flow. The system includes a differential pressure flow meter which samples pressure readings at various points of interest throughout the system and uses pressure differentials derived from the pressure readings to determine gas and liquid phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flow. One or both of the gas and liquid phase mass flow rates are then compared with predetermined criteria. In the event such mass flow rates satisfy the predetermined criteria, a well control system implements a correlating adjustment action respecting the multiphase flow. In this way, various parameters regarding the high void fraction multiphase flow are used as control inputs to the well control system and thus facilitate management of well operations.

  8. Surgical Management of Severe Colitis in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Halaweish, Ihab; Alam, Hasan B

    2015-12-01

    Severe colitis, an umbrella encompassing several entities, is one of the most common acute gastrointestinal disorders resulting in critical illness. Clostridium difficile infection is responsible for the majority of nosocomial diarrhea with fulminant C difficile colitis (CDC) carrying a high mortality. Optimal outcomes can be achieved by early identification and treatment of fulminant CDC, with appropriate surgical intervention when indicated. Ischemic colitis, on the other hand, is uncommon with a range of etiological factors including abdominal aortic surgery, inotropic drugs, rheumatoid diseases, or often no obvious triggering factor. Most cases resolve with nonsurgical management; however, prompt recognition of full-thickness necrosis and gangrene is crucial for good patient outcomes. Fulminant colitis is a severe disease secondary to progressive ulcerative colitis with systemic deterioration. Surgical intervention is indicated for hemorrhage, perforation, or peritonitis and failure of medical therapy to control the disease. Although, failure of medical management is the most common indication, it can be difficult to define objectively and requires a collaborative multidisciplinary approach. This article proposes some simple management algorithms for these clinical entities, with a focus on critically ill patients. PMID:24859995

  9. Building waste management core indicators through Spatial Material Flow Analysis: Net recovery and transport intensity indexes

    SciTech Connect

    Font Vivanco, David; Puig Ventosa, Ignasi; Gabarrell Durany, Xavier

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sustainability and proximity principles have a key role in waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Core indicators are needed in order to quantify and evaluate them. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A systematic, step-by-step approach is developed in this study for their development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transport may play a significant role in terms of environmental and economic costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Policy action is required in order to advance in the consecution of these principles. - Abstract: In this paper, the material and spatial characterization of the flows within a municipal solid waste (MSW) management system are combined through a Network-Based Spatial Material Flow Analysis. Using this information, two core indicators are developed for the bio-waste fraction, the Net Recovery Index (NRI) and the Transport Intensity Index (TII), which are aimed at assessing progress towards policy-related sustainable MSW management strategies and objectives. The NRI approaches the capacity of a MSW management system for converting waste into resources through a systematic metabolic approach, whereas the TII addresses efficiency in terms of the transport requirements to manage a specific waste flow throughout the entire MSW management life cycle. Therefore, both indicators could be useful in assessing key MSW management policy strategies, such as the consecution of higher recycling levels (sustainability principle) or the minimization of transport by locating treatment facilities closer to generation sources (proximity principle). To apply this methodological approach, the bio-waste management system of the region of Catalonia (Spain) has been chosen as a case study. Results show the adequacy of both indicators for identifying those points within the system with higher capacity to compromise its environmental, economic and social performance and therefore establishing clear targets for policy prioritization. Moreover, this methodological approach permits scenario building, which could be useful in assessing the outcomes of hypothetical scenarios, thus proving its adequacy for strategic planning.

  10. Data Grid Management Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Reagan W.; Jagatheesan, Arun; Rajasekar, Arcot; Wan, Michael; Schroeder, Wayne

    2004-01-01

    The "Grid" is an emerging infrastructure for coordinating access across autonomous organizations to distributed, heterogeneous computation and data resources. Data grids are being built around the world as the next generation data handling systems for sharing, publishing, and preserving data residing on storage systems located in multiple administrative domains. A data grid provides logical namespaces for users, digital entities and storage resources to create persistent identifiers for controlling access, enabling discovery, and managing wide area latencies. This paper introduces data grids and describes data grid use cases. The relevance of data grids to digital libraries and persistent archives is demonstrated, and research issues in data grids and grid dataflow management systems are discussed.

  11. Computer memory management system

    DOEpatents

    Kirk, III, Whitson John (Greenwood, MO)

    2002-01-01

    A computer memory management system utilizing a memory structure system of "intelligent" pointers in which information related to the use status of the memory structure is designed into the pointer. Through this pointer system, The present invention provides essentially automatic memory management (often referred to as garbage collection) by allowing relationships between objects to have definite memory management behavior by use of coding protocol which describes when relationships should be maintained and when the relationships should be broken. In one aspect, the present invention system allows automatic breaking of strong links to facilitate object garbage collection, coupled with relationship adjectives which define deletion of associated objects. In another aspect, The present invention includes simple-to-use infinite undo/redo functionality in that it has the capability, through a simple function call, to undo all of the changes made to a data model since the previous `valid state` was noted.

  12. Purge water management system

    DOEpatents

    Cardoso-Neto, Joao E. (North Augusta, SC); Williams, Daniel W. (Aiken, SC)

    1996-01-01

    A purge water management system for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

  13. Purge water management system

    DOEpatents

    Cardoso-Neto, J.E.; Williams, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    A purge water management system is described for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

  14. Very high intensity fiber transmission systems

    SciTech Connect

    Setchell, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    Various applications are currently motivating interest in the transmission of very high laser intensities through optical fibers. As intensities within a fiber are increased, however, laser breakdown or laser-induced fiber damage will eventually occur and interrupt fiber transmission. For a number of years we have been studying these effects during the transmission of Q-switched, Nd/YAG laser pulses through step-index, multimode, fused-silica fiber. We have found that fiber transmission is often limited by a plasma-forming breakdown occurring at the fiber entrance face. This breakdown results in subtle surface modifications that can leave the surface more resistant to further breakdown or damage events. Catastrophic fiber damage can also occur as a result of a number of different mechanisms, with damage appearing at fiber end faces, within the initial ``entry`` segment of the fiber path, and at other internal sites due to effects related to the particular fiber routing. An overview of these past observations is presented, and issues requiring further study are identified.

  15. Management Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    New Automated Management Information Center (AMIC) employs innovative microcomputer techniques to create color charts, viewgraphs, or other data displays in a fraction of the time formerly required. Developed under Kennedy Space Center's contract by Boeing Services International Inc., Seattle, WA, AMIC can produce an entirely new informational chart in 30 minutes, or an updated chart in only five minutes. AMIC also has considerable potential as a management system for business firms.

  16. AJAA P17-02 The Adoption and Impact of Management Intensive Rotational

    E-print Network

    Foltz, Jeremy D.

    profitability to Northeastern dairy farms. Management intensive rotational grazing (MIRG) incorporates recentAJAA P17-02 The Adoption and Impact of Management Intensive Rotational Grazing (MIRG) on Connecticut Dairy Farms Jeremy Foltz and Gillis Lang* Address for Correspondence: Jeremy Foltz Dept. of Ag

  17. Distributed, Robust Auto-Scaling Policies for Power Management in Compute Intensive Server Farms

    E-print Network

    Harchol-Balter, Mor

    Distributed, Robust Auto-Scaling Policies for Power Management in Compute Intensive Server Farms and Robust Auto-Scaling policies (DRAS policies), for power management in compute intensive server farms Labs Pittsburgh Abstract--Server farms today often over-provision resources to handle peak demand

  18. Managing the Management: CORBAbased Instrumentation of Management Systems

    E-print Network

    Managing the Management: CORBA­based Instrumentation of Management Systems A. Keller Munich Network Management Team Department of Computer Science, TU MË? unchen Arcisstr. 21, D­80333 Munich, Germany akeller@ieee.org Proceedings of the Sixth IFIP/IEEE International Symposium on Integrated Network Management (IM'99), Boston

  19. Root Zone Sensors for Irrigation Management in Intensive Agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Pardossi, Alberto; Incrocci, Luca; Incrocci, Giorgio; Malorgio, Fernando; Battista, Piero; Bacci, Laura; Rapi, Bernardo; Marzialetti, Paolo; Hemming, Jochen; Balendonck, Jos

    2009-01-01

    Crop irrigation uses more than 70% of the world’s water, and thus, improving irrigation efficiency is decisive to sustain the food demand from a fast-growing world population. This objective may be accomplished by cultivating more water-efficient crop species and/or through the application of efficient irrigation systems, which includes the implementation of a suitable method for precise scheduling. At the farm level, irrigation is generally scheduled based on the grower’s experience or on the determination of soil water balance (weather-based method). An alternative approach entails the measurement of soil water status. Expensive and sophisticated root zone sensors (RZS), such as neutron probes, are available for the use of soil and plant scientists, while cheap and practical devices are needed for irrigation management in commercial crops. The paper illustrates the main features of RZS’ (for both soil moisture and salinity) marketed for the irrigation industry and discusses how such sensors may be integrated in a wireless network for computer-controlled irrigation and used for innovative irrigation strategies, such as deficit or dual-water irrigation. The paper also consider the main results of recent or current research works conducted by the authors in Tuscany (Italy) on the irrigation management of container-grown ornamental plants, which is an important agricultural sector in Italy. PMID:22574047

  20. Managing Conflict in Temporary Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilemon, David L.

    1973-01-01

    As organizational tasks have grown more complex, several innovative temporary management systems such as matrix management have been developed. The Apollo space program has been an important contribution to the development of matrix management techniques. Discusses the role of conflict within the matrix, its determinants, and the process of…

  1. Software Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A software management system, originally developed for Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) by Century Computing, Inc. has evolved from a menu and command oriented system to a state-of-the art user interface development system supporting high resolution graphics workstations. Transportable Applications Environment (TAE) was initially distributed through COSMIC and backed by a TAE support office at GSFC. In 1993, Century Computing assumed the support and distribution functions and began marketing TAE Plus, the system's latest version. The software is easy to use and does not require programming experience.

  2. Managing Complex Dynamical Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, John C.; Webster, Robert L.; Curry, Jeanie A.; Hammond, Kevin L.

    2011-01-01

    Management commonly engages in a variety of research designed to provide insight into the motivation and relationships of individuals, departments, organizations, etc. This paper demonstrates how the application of concepts associated with the analysis of complex systems applied to such data sets can yield enhanced insights for managerial action.

  3. Management Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finlayson, Jean, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This collection of papers addresses key questions facing college managers and others choosing, introducing, and living with big, complex computer-based systems. "What Use the User Requirement?" (Tony Coles) stresses the importance of an information strategy driven by corporate objectives, not technology. "Process of Selecting a Computerised MIS in…

  4. Analytical Services Management System

    SciTech Connect

    2005-03-30

    Analytical Services Management System (ASMS) provides sample management services. Sample management includes sample planning for analytical requests, sample tracking for shipping and receiving by the laboratory, receipt of the analytical data deliverable, processing the deliverable and payment of the laboratory conducting the analyses. ASMS is a web based application that provides the ability to manage these activities at multiple locations for different customers. ASMS provides for the assignment of single to multiple samples for standard chemical and radiochemical analyses. ASMS is a flexible system which allows the users to request analyses by line item code. Line item codes are selected based on the Basic Ordering Agreement (BOA) format for contracting with participating laboratories. ASMS also allows contracting with non-BOA laboratories using a similar line item code contracting format for their services. ASMS allows sample and analysis tracking from sample planning and collection in the field through sample shipment, laboratory sample receipt, laboratory analysis and submittal of the requested analyses, electronic data transfer, and payment of the laboratories for the completed analyses. The software when in operation contains business sensitive material that is used as a principal portion of the Kaiser Analytical Management Services business model. The software version provided is the most recent version, however the copy of the application does not contain business sensitive data from the associated Oracle tables such as contract information or price per line item code.

  5. Analytical Services Management System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-03-30

    Analytical Services Management System (ASMS) provides sample management services. Sample management includes sample planning for analytical requests, sample tracking for shipping and receiving by the laboratory, receipt of the analytical data deliverable, processing the deliverable and payment of the laboratory conducting the analyses. ASMS is a web based application that provides the ability to manage these activities at multiple locations for different customers. ASMS provides for the assignment of single to multiple samples for standardmore »chemical and radiochemical analyses. ASMS is a flexible system which allows the users to request analyses by line item code. Line item codes are selected based on the Basic Ordering Agreement (BOA) format for contracting with participating laboratories. ASMS also allows contracting with non-BOA laboratories using a similar line item code contracting format for their services. ASMS allows sample and analysis tracking from sample planning and collection in the field through sample shipment, laboratory sample receipt, laboratory analysis and submittal of the requested analyses, electronic data transfer, and payment of the laboratories for the completed analyses. The software when in operation contains business sensitive material that is used as a principal portion of the Kaiser Analytical Management Services business model. The software version provided is the most recent version, however the copy of the application does not contain business sensitive data from the associated Oracle tables such as contract information or price per line item code.« less

  6. Comparison of net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity affected by management practices in two dryland cropping sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the effect of management practices on net global warming potential (GWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) that account for all sources and sinks of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in dryland cropping systems. The objective of this study was to compare the effect of a combinat...

  7. Air System Information Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filman, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    I flew to Washington last week, a trip rich in distributed information management. Buying tickets, at the gate, in flight, landing and at the baggage claim, myriad messages about my reservation, the weather, our flight plans, gates, bags and so forth flew among a variety of travel agency, airline and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) computers and personnel. By and large, each kind of information ran on a particular application, often specialized to own data formats and communications network. I went to Washington to attend an FAA meeting on System-Wide Information Management (SWIM) for the National Airspace System (NAS) (http://www.nasarchitecture.faa.gov/Tutorials/NAS101.cfm). NAS (and its information infrastructure, SWIM) is an attempt to bring greater regularity, efficiency and uniformity to the collection of stovepipe applications now used to manage air traffic. Current systems hold information about flight plans, flight trajectories, weather, air turbulence, current and forecast weather, radar summaries, hazardous condition warnings, airport and airspace capacity constraints, temporary flight restrictions, and so forth. Information moving among these stovepipe systems is usually mediated by people (for example, air traffic controllers) or single-purpose applications. People, whose intelligence is critical for difficult tasks and unusual circumstances, are not as efficient as computers for tasks that can be automated. Better information sharing can lead to higher system capacity, more efficient utilization and safer operations. Better information sharing through greater automation is possible though not necessarily easy.

  8. Data System Architectures: Recent Experiences from Data Intensive Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanisamy, G.; Frame, M. T.; Boden, T.; Devarakonda, R.; Zolly, L.; Hutchison, V.; Latysh, N.; Krassovski, M.; Killeffer, T.; Hook, L.

    2014-12-01

    U.S. Federal agencies are frequently trying to address new data intensive projects that require next generation of data system architectures. This presentation will focus on two new such architectures: USGS's Science Data Catalog (SDC) and DOE's Next Generation Ecological Experiments - Arctic Data System. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed a Science Data Catalog (data.usgs.gov) to include records describing datasets, data collections, and observational or remotely-sensed data. The system was built using service oriented architecture and allows USGS scientists and data providers to create and register their data using either a standards-based metadata creation form or simply to register their already-created metadata records with the USGS SDC Dashboard. This dashboard then compiles the harvested metadata records and sends them to the post processing and indexing service using the JSON format. The post processing service, with the help of various ontologies and other geo-spatial validation services, auto-enhances these harvested metadata records and creates a Lucene index using the Solr enterprise search platform. Ultimately, metadata is made available via the SDC search interface. DOE's Next Generation Ecological Experiments (NGEE) Arctic project deployed a data system that allows scientists to prepare, publish, archive, and distribute data from field collections, lab experiments, sensors, and simulated modal outputs. This architecture includes a metadata registration form, data uploading and sharing tool, a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) tool, a Drupal based content management tool (http://ngee-arctic.ornl.gov), and a data search and access tool based on ORNL's Mercury software (http://mercury.ornl.gov). The team also developed Web-metric tools and a data ingest service to visualize geo-spatial and temporal observations.

  9. Power management system

    DOEpatents

    Algrain, Marcelo C. (Peoria, IL); Johnson, Kris W. (Washington, IL); Akasam, Sivaprasad (Peoria, IL); Hoff, Brian D. (East Peoria, IL)

    2007-10-02

    A method of managing power resources for an electrical system of a vehicle may include identifying enabled power sources from among a plurality of power sources in electrical communication with the electrical system and calculating a threshold power value for the enabled power sources. A total power load placed on the electrical system by one or more power consumers may be measured. If the total power load exceeds the threshold power value, then a determination may be made as to whether one or more additional power sources is available from among the plurality of power sources. At least one of the one or more additional power sources may be enabled, if available.

  10. Avian Species Richness in Relation to Intensive Forest Management Practices in Early Seral Tree Plantations

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jay E.; Kroll, Andrew J.; Giovanini, Jack; Duke, Steven D.; Ellis, Tana M.; Betts, Matthew G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Managers of landscapes dedicated to forest commodity production require information about how practices influence biological diversity. Individual species and communities may be threatened if management practices truncate or simplify forest age classes that are essential for reproduction and survival. For instance, the degradation and loss of complex diverse forest in young age classes have been associated with declines in forest-associated Neotropical migrant bird populations in the Pacific Northwest, USA. These declines may be exacerbated by intensive forest management practices that reduce hardwood and broadleaf shrub cover in order to promote growth of economically valuable tree species in plantations. Methodology and Principal Findings We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to evaluate relationships between avian species richness and vegetation variables that reflect stand management intensity (primarily via herbicide application) on 212 tree plantations in the Coast Range, Oregon, USA. Specifically, we estimated the influence of broadleaf hardwood vegetation cover, which is reduced through herbicide applications, on bird species richness and individual species occupancy. Our model accounted for imperfect detection. We used average predictive comparisons to quantify the degree of association between vegetation variables and species richness. Both conifer and hardwood cover were positively associated with total species richness, suggesting that these components of forest stand composition may be important predictors of alpha diversity. Estimates of species richness were 35–80% lower when imperfect detection was ignored (depending on covariate values), a result that has critical implications for previous efforts that have examined relationships between forest composition and species richness. Conclusion and Significance Our results revealed that individual and community responses were positively associated with both conifer and hardwood cover. In our system, patterns of bird community assembly appear to be associated with stand management strategies that retain or increase hardwood vegetation while simultaneously regenerating the conifer cover in commercial tree plantations. PMID:22905249

  11. Mastering the management system.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Robert S; Norton, David P

    2008-01-01

    Companies have always found it hard to balance pressing operational concerns with long-term strategic priorities. The tension is critical: World-class processes won't lead to success without the right strategic direction, and the best strategy in the world will get nowhere without strong operations to execute it. In this article, Kaplan, of Harvard Business School, and Norton, founder and director of the Palladium Group, explain how to effectively manage both strategy and operations by linking them tightly in a closed-loop management system. The system comprises five stages, beginning with strategy development, which springs from a company's mission, vision, and value statements, and from an analysis of its strengths, weaknesses, and competitive environment. In the next stage, managers translate the strategy into objectives and initiatives with strategy maps, which organize objectives by themes, and balanced scorecards, which link objectives to performance metrics. Stage three involves creating an operational plan to accomplish the objectives and initiatives; it includes targeting process improvements and preparing sales, resource, and capacity plans and dynamic budgets. Managers then put plans into action, monitoring their effectiveness in stage four. They review operational, environmental, and competitive data; assess progress; and identify barriers to execution. In the final stage, they test the strategy, analyzing cost, profitability, and correlations between strategy and performance. If their underlying assumptions appear faulty, they update the strategy, beginning another loop. The authors present not only a comprehensive blueprint for successful strategy execution but also a managerial tool kit, illustrated with examples from HSBC Rail, Cigna Property and Casualty, and Store 24. The kit incorporates leading management experts' frameworks, outlining where they fit into the management cycle. PMID:18271319

  12. A system management methodology for building successful resource management systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornstein, Rhoda Shaller; Willoughby, John K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a system management methodology for building successful resource management systems that possess lifecycle effectiveness. This methodology is based on an analysis of the traditional practice of Systems Engineering Management as it applies to the development of resource management systems. The analysis produced fifteen significant findings presented as recommended adaptations to the traditional practice of Systems Engineering Management to accommodate system development when the requirements are incomplete, unquantifiable, ambiguous and dynamic. Ten recommended adaptations to achieve operational effectiveness when requirements are incomplete, unquantifiable or ambiguous are presented and discussed. Five recommended adaptations to achieve system extensibility when requirements are dynamic are also presented and discussed. The authors conclude that the recommended adaptations to the traditional practice of Systems Engineering Management should be implemented for future resource management systems and that the technology exists to build these systems extensibly.

  13. CAN INTENSIVE MANAGEMENT INCREASE CARBON STORAGE IN FORESTS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    A possible response to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration is to attempt to increase the amount of carbon stored in terrestrial vegetation. ne approach to increasing the size of the terrestrial carbon sink is to increase the growth of forests by utilizing intensive forest ma...

  14. Data Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    CENTRA 2000 Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Auto-trol technology, obtained permission to use software originally developed at Johnson Space Center for the Space Shuttle and early Space Station projects. To support their enormous information-handling needs, a product data management, electronic document management and work-flow system was designed. Initially, just 33 database tables comprised the original software, which was later expanded to about 100 tables. This system, now called CENTRA 2000, is designed for quick implementation and supports the engineering process from preliminary design through release-to-production. CENTRA 2000 can also handle audit histories and provides a means to ensure new information is distributed. The product has 30 production sites worldwide.

  15. A guideline management system.

    PubMed

    Ciccarese, Paolo; Caffi, Ezio; Boiocchi, Lorenzo; Quaglini, Silvana; Stefanelli, Mario

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the architecture of NewGuide, a guide-line management system for handling the whole life cycle of a computerized clinical practice guideline. NewGuide components are organized in a distributed architecture: an editor to formalize guidelines, a repository to store them, an inference engine to implement guidelines instances in a multi-user environment, and a reporting system storing the guidelines logs in order to be able to completely trace any individual physician guideline-based decision process. There is a system "central level" that maintains official versions of the guidelines, and local Healthcare Organizations may download and implement them according to their needs. The architecture has been implemented using the Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) platform. Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) and a set of con-tracts are the key factors for the integration of NewGuide with healthcare legacy systems. They allow maintaining unchanged legacy user interfaces and connecting the system with what-ever electronic patient record. The system functionality will be illustrated in three different contexts: homecare-based pressure ulcer prevention, acute ischemic stroke treatment and heart failure management by general practitioners. PMID:15360768

  16. Training Management Information System

    SciTech Connect

    Rackley, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    The Training Management Information System (TMIS) is an integrated information system for all training related activities. TMIS is at the leading edge of training information systems used in the nuclear industry. The database contains all the necessary records to confirm the department's adherence to accreditation criteria and houses all test questions, student records and information needed to evaluate the training process. The key to the TMIS system is that the impact of any change (i.e., procedure change, new equipment, safety incident in the commercial nuclear industry, etc.) can be tracked throughout the training process. This ensures the best training can be performed that meets the needs of the employees. TMIS is comprised of six functional areas: Job and Task Analysis, Training Materials Design and Development, Exam Management, Student Records/Scheduling, Evaluation, and Commitment Tracking. The system consists of a VAX 6320 Cluster with IBM and MacIntosh computers tied into an ethernet with the VAX. Other peripherals are also tied into the system: Exam Generation Stations to include mark sense readers for test grading, Production PC's for Desk-Top Publishing of Training Material, and PC Image Workstations. 5 figs.

  17. Management systems research study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, A. V.

    1975-01-01

    The development of a Monte Carlo simulation of procurement activities at the NASA Ames Research Center is described. Data cover: simulation of the procurement cycle, construction of a performance evaluation model, examination of employee development, procedures and review of evaluation criteria for divisional and individual performance evaluation. Determination of the influences and apparent impact of contract type and structure and development of a management control system for planning and controlling manpower requirements.

  18. Chemical Management System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-10-30

    CMS provides an inventory of all chemicals on order or being held in the laboratory, to provide a specific location for all chemical containers, to ensure that health and safety regulatory codes are being upheld, and to provide PNNL staff with hazardous chemical information to better manage their inventories. CMS is comprised of five major modules: 1) chemical purchasing, 2) chemical inventory, 3) chemical names, properties, and hazard groups, 4) reporting, and 5) system administration.

  19. Management of Acute Right Ventricular Failure in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Ventetuolo, Corey E.

    2014-01-01

    Right ventricular (RV) failure occurs when the RV fails to maintain enough blood flow through the pulmonary circulation to achieve adequate left ventricular filling. This can occur suddenly in a previously healthy heart due to massive pulmonary embolism or right-sided myocardial infarction, but many cases encountered in the intensive care unit involve worsening of compensated RV failure in the setting of chronic heart and lung disease. Management of RV failure is directed at optimizing right-sided filling pressures and reducing afterload. Due to a lower level of vascular tone, vasoactive medications have less salient effects on reducing vascular resistance in the pulmonary than in the systemic circulation. Successful management requires reversal of any conditions that heighten pulmonary vascular tone and the use of selective pulmonary vasodilators at doses that do not induce systemic hypotension or worsening of oxygenation. Systemic systolic arterial pressure should be kept close to RV systolic pressure to maintain RV perfusion. When these efforts fail, the judicious use of inotropic agents may help improve RV contractility enough to maintain cardiac output. Extracorporeal life support is increasingly being used to support patients with acute RV failure who fail to respond to medical management while the underlying cause of their RV failure is addressed. PMID:24828526

  20. Project Management vs. Systems Engineering Management: A Practitioners' View on

    E-print Network

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Project Management vs. Systems Engineering Management: A Practitioners' View on IntegratingPROJECT MANAGEMENT VS. SYSTEMS ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT Received 3 August 2010; Revised 18 December 2010 use some subset of traditional Project Management (PM) methods and tools, the actual practice

  1. Resources Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Delta Data Systems, Inc. was originally formed by NASA and industry engineers to produce a line of products that evolved from ELAS, a NASA-developed computer program. The company has built on that experience, using ELAS as the basis for other remote sensing products. One of these is AGIS, a computer package for geographic and land information systems. AGIS simultaneously processes remotely sensed and map data. The software is designed to operate on a low cost microcomputer, putting resource management tools within reach of small operators.

  2. Closed-loop control for cardiopulmonary management and intensive care unit sedation using digital imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, Behnood

    This dissertation introduces a new problem in the delivery of healthcare, which could result in lower cost and a higher quality of medical care as compared to the current healthcare practice. In particular, a framework is developed for sedation and cardiopulmonary management for patients in the intensive care unit. A method is introduced to automatically detect pain and agitation in nonverbal patients, specifically in sedated patients in the intensive care unit, using their facial expressions. Furthermore, deterministic as well as probabilistic expert systems are developed to suggest the appropriate drug dose based on patient sedation level. Patients in the intensive care unit who require mechanical ventilation due to acute respiratory failure also frequently require the administration of sedative agents. The need for sedation arises both from patient anxiety due to the loss of personal control and the unfamiliar and intrusive environment of the intensive care unit, and also due to pain or other variants of noxious stimuli. In this dissertation, we develop a rule-based expert system for cardiopulmonary management and intensive care unit sedation. Furthermore, we use probability theory to quantify uncertainty and to extend the proposed rule-based expert system to deal with more realistic situations. Pain assessment in patients who are unable to verbally communicate is a challenging problem. The fundamental limitations in pain assessment stem from subjective assessment criteria, rather than quantifiable, measurable data. The relevance vector machine (RVM) classification technique is a Bayesian extension of the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm which achieves comparable performance to SVM while providing posterior probabilities for class memberships and a sparser model. In this dissertation, we use the RVM classification technique to distinguish pain from non-pain as well as assess pain intensity levels. We also correlate our results with the pain intensity assessed by expert and non-expert human examiners. Next, we consider facial expression recognition using an unsupervised learning framework. We show that different facial expressions reside on distinct subspaces if the manifold is unfolded. In particular, semi-definite embedding is used to reduce the dimensionality and unfold the manifold of facial images. Next, generalized principal component analysis is used to fit a series of subspaces to the data points and associate each data point to a subspace. Data points that belong to the same subspace are shown to belong to the same facial expression. In clinical intensive care unit practice sedative/analgesic agents are titrated to achieve a specific level of sedation. The level of sedation is currently based on clinical scoring systems. Examples include the motor activity assessment scale (MAAS), the Richmond agitation-sedation scale (RASS), and the modified Ramsay sedation scale (MRSS). In general, the goal of the clinician is to find the drug dose that maintains the patient at a sedation score corresponding to a moderately sedated state. In this research, we use pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling to find an optimal drug dosing control policy to drive the patient to a desired MRSS score. Atrial fibrillation, a cardiac arrhythmia characterized by unsynchronized electrical activity in the atrial chambers of the heart, is a rapidly growing problem in modern societies. One treatment, referred to as catheter ablation, targets specific parts of the left atrium for radio frequency ablation using an intracardiac catheter. As a first step towards the general solution to the computer-assisted segmentation of the left atrial wall, we use shape learning and shape-based image segmentation to identify the endocardial wall of the left atrium in the delayed-enhancement magnetic resonance images. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  3. Effects of Coffee Management Intensity on Composition, Structure, and Regeneration Status of Ethiopian Moist Evergreen Afromontane Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hundera, Kitessa; Aerts, Raf; Fontaine, Alexandre; Van Mechelen, Maarten; Gijbels, Pieter; Honnay, Olivier; Muys, Bart

    2013-03-01

    The effect of arabica coffee management intensity on composition, structure, and regeneration of moist evergreen Afromontane forests was studied in three traditional coffee-management systems of southwest Ethiopia: semiplantation coffee, semiforest coffee, and forest coffee. Vegetation and environmental data were collected in 84 plots from forests varying in intensity of coffee management. After controlling for environmental variation (altitude, aspect, slope, soil nutrient availability, and soil depth), differences in woody species composition, forest structure, and regeneration potential among management systems were compared using one way analysis of variance. The study showed that intensification of forest coffee cultivation to maximize coffee production negatively affects diversity and structure of Ethiopian moist evergreen Afromontane forests. Intensification of coffee productivity starts with the conversion of forest coffee to semiforest coffee, which has significant negative effects on tree seedling abundance. Further intensification leads to the conversion of semiforest to semiplantation coffee, causing significant diversity losses and the collapse of forest structure (decrease of stem density, basal area, crown closure, crown cover, and dominant tree height). Our study underlines the need for shade certification schemes to include variables other than canopy cover and that the loss of species diversity in intensively managed coffee systems may jeopardize the sustainability of coffee production itself through the decrease of ecosystem resilience and disruption of ecosystem services related to coffee yield, such as pollination and pest control.

  4. Spatial intensity profiling of an industrial laser welding system

    SciTech Connect

    Milewski, J.O.

    1991-12-31

    A investigation was conducted to devise a method to sense the laser beam intensity profile of an industrial laser welding system. The research focuses on monitoring methods and assessing locations within the system where data can be taken which reveal the relationship between the laser beam intensity profile and the input system parameters of the laser beam welding process. Emphasis has been placed on the configuration of a distributed computing environment to acquire, analyze and display the results of the sensed beam profile. Conventional image processing techniques are demonstrated. It was found that a distributed computing environment was useful for processing the large volumes of data generated by this process characterization method, and the distributed computing environment provided the computing power required for computationally intensive analysis and display techniques. The mathematical techniques used to discriminate one data set from another and relate the results to processing conditions are discussed.

  5. Stream Channel Change in an Intensively Managed Agricultural Landscape: Implications for Critical Zone Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Q. W.; Rhoads, B. L.; Andresen, W.

    2014-12-01

    During the Anthropocene, humans have had a substantial impact on fluvial systems throughout the world. Perhaps nowhere is the human imprint on stream systems more pronounced than in the intensively managed agriculture landscapes of the midwestern United States. This study examines changes in the structure of the stream network and in the planform dynamics of stream channels within the upper Sangamon River basin in Illinois - a watershed that is part of a new Critical Zone Observatory focusing on intensively managed landscapes (IML-CZO). The research explores changes in network structure as the landscape changed from prairie and forest into drained farmland dominated by row crop agriculture. It also documents the planform dynamics of stream and river channels over the past 80 to 100 years. Results show that the spatial extent of channels within the stream network expanded greatly as land was cleared and drained for agriculture. Expansion of the network into headwater portions of the watershed occurred through the construction of drainage ditches that serve as outlets for tile drainage systems underlying relatively flat, poorly drained farmland. Analysis of planform dynamics reveals that most of these drainage ditches have not changed alignment since initial construction. Although drainage ditches are maintained by local drainage districts, these human-created channels also are remarkably resistant to change in planform over time. The major type of planform change in headwater streams involves artificial straightening of meandering channels to expand the extent of drainage channels. Many sections of the meandering Sangamon River are heavily forested and exhibit little or no planform change over the past 80-100 years. Sections that are most active tend to occur where forest cover is less prevalent due to clearing of trees for pasture or cropland. Overall, the results demonstrate the pronounced imprint of humans on the structure and planform dynamics of a fluvial system in an intensively managed watershed. Undoubtedly this imprint has an important influence on downstream fluxes of water, nutrients, and sediment, which are a primary focus of ongoing process-based research in the IML-CZO.

  6. Management issues for high performance storage systems

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, S.; Burris, R.

    1995-03-01

    Managing distributed high-performance storage systems is complex and, although sharing common ground with traditional network and systems management, presents unique storage-related issues. Integration technologies and frameworks exist to help manage distributed network and system environments. Industry-driven consortia provide open forums where vendors and users cooperate to leverage solutions. But these new approaches to open management fall short addressing the needs of scalable, distributed storage. We discuss the motivation and requirements for storage system management (SSM) capabilities and describe how SSM manages distributed servers and storage resource objects in the High Performance Storage System (HPSS), a new storage facility for data-intensive applications and large-scale computing. Modem storage systems, such as HPSS, require many SSM capabilities, including server and resource configuration control, performance monitoring, quality of service, flexible policies, file migration, file repacking, accounting, and quotas. We present results of initial HPSS SSM development including design decisions and implementation trade-offs. We conclude with plans for follow-on work and provide storage-related recommendations for vendors and standards groups seeking enterprise-wide management solutions.

  7. Dynamic light intensity detection system of aerodrome assistance light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jianshu; Song, Jiye; Yu, Zhijing; Chen, Fei; Shi, Xudong; Gao, Qingji

    2007-11-01

    The techniques used in dynamic detection of airfield lighting intensity are introduced in this paper. These techniques can take place of the old method of checking all manually, and the system can detect the lights intensity online quickly and exactly, so as to find out the light faults and ensure the safety of planes taking off, landing and slipping. The system uses a car with a string of sensors which have been cosine calibrated and v(?) calibrated to detect the light intensity. When the car is moving, the sensors can detect the lights' horizontal section. To accurately measure the distance from the measured aerodrome assistance light to the moving car, and then calculate the light intensity and protract the iso-candela curve, the Doppler ranging radar system is used. To guarantee the dependability of the system and the measurement precision, a video monitoring and guiding system is used to assure the car to run along the airfield lights line, then light orientation sensors are used to eliminate the radar's cumulating errors. The experiment indicates that this system is feasible and has high detecting precision.

  8. Environmental Management System Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Robert; Thorson, Patrick; Horst, Blair; Speros, John; Rothermich, Nancy; Hatayama, Howard

    2009-03-24

    Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management establishes the policy that Federal agencies conduct their environmental, transportation, and energy-related activities in a manner that is environmentally, economically and fiscally sound, integrated, continually improving, efficient, and sustainable. The Department of Energy (DOE) has approved DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program and DOE Order 430.2B, Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy and Transportation Management as the means of achieving the provisions of this Executive Order. DOE Order 450.1A mandates the development of Environmental Management Systems (EMS) to implement sustainable environmental stewardship practices that: (1) Protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources potentially impacted by facility operations; (2) Meet or exceed applicable environmental, public health, and resource protection laws and regulations; and (3) Implement cost-effective business practices. In addition, the DOE Order 450.1A mandates that the EMS must be integrated with a facility's Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) established pursuant to DOE P 450.4, 'Safety Management System Policy'. DOE Order 430.2B mandates an energy management program that considers energy use and renewable energy, water, new and renovated buildings, and vehicle fleet activities. The Order incorporates the provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. The Order also includes the DOE's Transformational Energy Action Management initiative, which assures compliance is achieved through an Executable Plan that is prepared and updated annually by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL, Berkeley Lab, or the Laboratory) and then approved by the DOE Berkeley Site Office. At the time of this revision to the EMS plan, the 'FY2009 LBNL Sustainability Executable Plan' represented the most current Executable Plan. These DOE Orders and associated policies establish goals and sustainable stewardship practices that are protective of environmental, natural, and cultural resources, and take a life cycle approach that considers aspects such as: (1) Acquisition and use of environmentally preferable products; (2) Electronics stewardship; (3) Energy conservation, energy efficiency, and renewable energy; (4) Pollution prevention, with emphasis on toxic and hazardous chemical and material reduction; (5) Procurement of efficient energy and water consuming materials and equipment; (6) Recycling and reuse; (7) Sustainable and high-performance building design; (8) Transportation and fleet management; and (9) Water conservation. LBNL's approach to sustainable environmental stewardship required under Order 450.1A poses the challenge of implementing its EMS in a compliance-based, performance-based, and cost-effective manner. In other words, the EMS must deliver real and tangible business value at a minimal cost. The purpose of this plan is to describe Berkeley Lab's approach for achieving such an EMS, including an overview of the roles and responsibilities of key Laboratory parties. This approach begins with a broad-based environmental policy consistent with that stated in Chapter 11 of the LBNL Health and Safety Manual (PUB-3000). This policy states that Berkeley Lab is committed to the following: (1) Complying with applicable environmental, public health, and resource conservation laws and regulations. (2) Preventing pollution, minimizing waste, and conserving natural resources. (3) Correcting environmental hazards and cleaning up existing environmental problems, and (4) Continually improving the Laboratory's environmental performance while maintaining operational capability and sustaining the overall mission of the Laboratory. A continual cycle of planning, implementing, evaluating, and improving processes will be performed to achieve goals, objectives, and targets that will help LBNL carry out this policy. Each year, environmental aspects will be identified and their impacts to the environm

  9. Environmental management system.

    SciTech Connect

    Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) Environmental Management System (EMS) is identification of environmental consequences from SNL/NM activities, products, and/or services to develop objectives and measurable targets for mitigation of any potential impacts to the environment. This Source Document discusses the annual EMS process for analysis of environmental aspects and impacts and also provides the fiscal year (FY) 2010 analysis. Further information on the EMS structure, processes, and procedures are described within the programmatic EMS Manual (PG470222).

  10. Effects of Intensive Forest Management Practices on Insect Infestation Levels and Loblolly Pine Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, J.T.; Berisford, C.W.

    2000-04-01

    This study investigates the relationship between intensive management practices and insect infestation, maximum growth potential studies of loblolly pine over four years using different levels of cultural treatments. Results indicate tree fertilization can increase coneworm infestation and demonstrated that tip moth management can improve initial tree growth.

  11. Integrated fuel management system

    SciTech Connect

    Barbeau, D.E.

    1987-09-29

    An aircraft fuel management system to regulate fuel from an airframe reservoir is described. The system comprises: an aircraft turbine engine having a combustor providing propulsion for the aircraft; a fuel pump receiving fuel from the reservoir and supplying fuel to the turbine engine; a motor controlling the pump so as to provide fuel to the turbine engine; means for sensing at least one engine condition; means responsive to the sensing means for controlling fuel flow to the turbine engine, and wherein the pump and the motor are of the constant speed type and further comprising valve means for controlling the fuel flow rate to the turbine engine and wherein the controlling means modulates the position of the valve means.

  12. Discrepancy Reporting Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Tonja M.; Lin, James C.; Chatillon, Mark L.

    2004-01-01

    Discrepancy Reporting Management System (DRMS) is a computer program designed for use in the stations of NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) to help establish the operational history of equipment items; acquire data on the quality of service provided to DSN customers; enable measurement of service performance; provide early insight into the need to improve processes, procedures, and interfaces; and enable the tracing of a data outage to a change in software or hardware. DRMS is a Web-based software system designed to include a distributed database and replication feature to achieve location-specific autonomy while maintaining a consistent high quality of data. DRMS incorporates commercial Web and database software. DRMS collects, processes, replicates, communicates, and manages information on spacecraft data discrepancies, equipment resets, and physical equipment status, and maintains an internal station log. All discrepancy reports (DRs), Master discrepancy reports (MDRs), and Reset data are replicated to a master server at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory; Master DR data are replicated to all the DSN sites; and Station Logs are internal to each of the DSN sites and are not replicated. Data are validated according to several logical mathematical criteria. Queries can be performed on any combination of data.

  13. The large-scale structure of software-intensive systems

    PubMed Central

    Booch, Grady

    2012-01-01

    The computer metaphor is dominant in most discussions of neuroscience, but the semantics attached to that metaphor are often quite naive. Herein, we examine the ontology of software-intensive systems, the nature of their structure and the application of the computer metaphor to the metaphysical questions of self and causation. PMID:23386964

  14. Supporting Human-Intensive Systems Lori A. Clarke

    E-print Network

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    the earliest stages of development, carefully considering the interactions and constraints between humans for the development and improvement of human-intensive systems that is driven by a detailed understanding these coordinating process models are software too [11], we believe that the study of the development, evaluation

  15. ASCOT data base management system

    SciTech Connect

    Barbieri, J.; Nyholm, R.; Castro, C.; Hill, K.

    1980-07-01

    The ASCOT data base management system is designed to handle the data produced by both the experimental and theoretical efforts of the DOE Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) project. The data base envisioned is hierarchically structured, sparse, and compact. Information concerning any given data file is stored in a directory file. The data base management system uses a relational data management approach. Presently three management schema are being developed for use with the data base. 5 figures.

  16. Carbon dynamics of intensively managed forest along a full rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreaux, V.; Bosc, A.; Bonnefond, J.; Burlett, R.; Lamaud, E.; Sartore, M.; Trichet, P.; Chipeaux, C.; Lambrot, C.; Kowalski, A. S.; Loustau, D.

    2012-12-01

    Temperate and tropical forests are increasingly exploited for wood and biomass extraction and only one third of forest area was considered as primary in the recent FRA in 2010. Management practices affect the soil-forest-atmosphere continuum through various effects on soil and surface properties. They result ultimately in either positive or negative changes in the biomass and soil carbon pools but, if any, few datasets or modeling tools are available for quantifying their impacts on the net carbon balance of forest stands. To analyse these effects, the net half-hourly fluxes of CO2, water vapour and heat exchanges were monitored for 23 years in two closed stands of maritime pines in southwestern France. Carbon content of the aboveground biomass was measured annually and soil pools 10-early in the younger stand and 5-yearly in the mature stand. For analysing the data collected and disentangling the climate and management effects, we used the three components process-based model GRAECO+ (Loustau et al. this session) linking a 3D radiative transfer and photosynthesis model, MAESTRA, a soil carbon model adapted from ROTH-C and a plant growth model. Eddy flux data were processed, gapfilled and partitioned using the methodological recommendations (Aubinet et al. 2000, Adv. Eco. Res:30, 114-173, Falge et al. 2001, Agr. For. Meteo. : 107, 43-69, Reichstein et al. 2005, Glob. Change Biol., 11:1424-1439). Analysis of the sequence showed that, whether by an increased sensitivity to soil drought compared to the pines or by a rapid re-colonization of the inter-row after understorey removal and plowing, the weeded vegetation contributed to create specific intra-annual dynamics of the fluxes and therefore, controls the dynamics of carbon balance of the stand. After three growing seasons, the stand was already a carbon sink, but the impact of thinning and weeded vegetation removal at the age of 5-year brought the balance to almost neutral. We interpret this change as the combined effects of the reduction of the LAI, the enhancement of the heterotrophic respiration related to the decomposition of dead materials and the improvement of the mineralization of the large stock of soil organic matter by tillage. At the mature stage, the stand remains consistently a carbon sink and CO2 fluxes were insensitive to thinning. Conversely, the carbon balance was sensitive to climate effects as evidenced by repeated drastic reductions in NEP caused by soil drought. Our data underlines the importance of disturbances linked to forest management for the forest carbon balance during the early stage of tree growth. Since management intensification tends to shorten the forest life cycle and enhance the share of the young stages, our results confirm that the consequence of management operations on the carbon cycle in forest may revert intensified forest stands from a net sink to a source and should be accounted for carefully.

  17. Systems management techniques and problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Report is reviewed which discusses history and trends of systems management, its basic principles, and nature of problems that lend themselves to systems approach. Report discusses systems engineering as applied to weapons acquisition, ecology, patient monitoring, and retail merchandise operations.

  18. Cryptographic Key Management System

    SciTech Connect

    No, author

    2014-02-21

    This report summarizes the outcome of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contract DE-OE0000543, requesting the design of a Cryptographic Key Management System (CKMS) for the secure management of cryptographic keys for the energy sector infrastructure. Prime contractor Sypris Electronics, in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL), Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Valicore Technologies, and Purdue University's Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security (CERIAS) and Smart Meter Integration Laboratory (SMIL), has designed, developed and evaluated the CKMS solution. We provide an overview of the project in Section 3, review the core contributions of all contractors in Section 4, and discuss bene#12;ts to the DOE in Section 5. In Section 6 we describe the technical construction of the CKMS solution, and review its key contributions in Section 6.9. Section 7 describes the evaluation and demonstration of the CKMS solution in different environments. We summarize the key project objectives in Section 8, list publications resulting from the project in Section 9, and conclude with a discussion on commercialization in Section 10 and future work in Section 11.

  19. Computerized training management system

    DOEpatents

    Rice, H.B.; McNair, R.C.; White, K.; Maugeri, T.

    1998-08-04

    A Computerized Training Management System (CTMS) is disclosed for providing a procedurally defined process that is employed to develop accreditable performance based training programs for job classifications that are sensitive to documented regulations and technical information. CTMS is a database that links information needed to maintain a five-phase approach to training-analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation independent of training program design. CTMS is designed using R-Base{trademark}, an-SQL compliant software platform. Information is logically entered and linked in CTMS. Each task is linked directly to a performance objective, which, in turn, is linked directly to a learning objective; then, each enabling objective is linked to its respective test items. In addition, tasks, performance objectives, enabling objectives, and test items are linked to their associated reference documents. CTMS keeps all information up to date since it automatically sorts, files and links all data; CTMS includes key word and reference document searches. 18 figs.

  20. Computerized training management system

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Harold B. (Franklin Furnace, OH); McNair, Robert C. (East Setauket, NY); White, Kenneth (Shirley, NY); Maugeri, Terry (Wading River, NY)

    1998-08-04

    A Computerized Training Management System (CTMS) for providing a procedurally defined process that is employed to develop accreditable performance based training programs for job classifications that are sensitive to documented regulations and technical information. CTMS is a database that links information needed to maintain a five-phase approach to training-analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation independent of training program design. CTMS is designed using R-Base.RTM., an-SQL compliant software platform. Information is logically entered and linked in CTMS. Each task is linked directly to a performance objective, which, in turn, is linked directly to a learning objective; then, each enabling objective is linked to its respective test items. In addition, tasks, performance objectives, enabling objectives, and test items are linked to their associated reference documents. CTMS keeps all information up to date since it automatically sorts, files and links all data; CTMS includes key word and reference document searches.

  1. Supplier Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, Eric; Gutheinz, Sandy; Brison, James; Ho, Anita; Allen, James; Ceritelli, Olga; Tobar, Claudia; Nguyen, Thuykien; Crenshaw, Harrel; Santos, Roxann

    2008-01-01

    Supplier Management System (SMS) allows for a consistent, agency-wide performance rating system for suppliers used by NASA. This version (2.0) combines separate databases into one central database that allows for the sharing of supplier data. Information extracted from the NBS/Oracle database can be used to generate ratings. Also, supplier ratings can now be generated in the areas of cost, product quality, delivery, and audit data. Supplier data can be charted based on real-time user input. Based on these individual ratings, an overall rating can be generated. Data that normally would be stored in multiple databases, each requiring its own log-in, is now readily available and easily accessible with only one log-in required. Additionally, the database can accommodate the storage and display of quality-related data that can be analyzed and used in the supplier procurement decision-making process. Moreover, the software allows for a Closed-Loop System (supplier feedback), as well as the capability to communicate with other federal agencies.

  2. Fluid management system technology discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symons, E. Patrick

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on fluid management system technology discipline for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: subcritical cryogenic storage and transfer; fluid handling; and components and instrumentation.

  3. Integrated Management Tracking System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2000-03-30

    The Integrated Management Tracking System (IMTS) is a "Web Enabled" Client/Server Business application that provides for the Identification and Resolution of commitments, situations, events and problems. The IMTS engine is written with Microsoft Active Server Pages (ASP) for IIS4. The system provides for reporting, entering, editing, closing and administration over a Intranet, Extranet or Internet. This Application facilitates: Electronic assignment, acceptance and tracking to completion. Email notifications of assigned action. Establishment of Due Dates. Electronicmore »search and retrieval based on keywords in combination with user specified database parameters (Document Type, Date Ranges, etc.). Coded for Trending and Reporting. User selected reports. Various levels of access for reports and administration. The "Server" side of this application consists of a Microsoft Access database running on a NT Server with Internet Information Server (IIS). As the "Client" side of the application runs on any Web browser, this solution is a cost effective, user friendly application that lends itself to organizations not physically colocated in one location providing information immediately available to everyone at once.« less

  4. [Systemic amyloidosis revealed by an intense nephrotic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Sanmartin, Nancy; Janvier, Frédéric; Chianea, Denis; Fagot, Thierry; Renard, Christophe; Vest, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome which is caused by a renal amyloidosis. This clinical case is characterized by intensity of clinicals and biologicals abnormalities and by its uncommun cause. We also review current data on the nephrotic syndrome as well as on the systemic amyloidosis and to evoke the indications of the immunoglobulin free-light-chains quantification in the diagnostic approach. PMID:21464002

  5. Performance of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source Accelerator System

    SciTech Connect

    Brumwell, F.; Potts, C.; Rauchas, A.; Stipp, V.; Volk, G.

    1986-09-22

    The performance of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) Accelerator System is reported, including an increase in average beam current to 13.4 microamperes and increased reliability to 93.2%. Brief discussions are given for the performance of the major accelerator subsystems, including the H/sup -/ ion source and preaccelerator, the 50 MeV linac, and the synchrotron and its subsystems. (LEW)

  6. FAILSAFE Health Management for Embedded Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Gregory A.; Wagner, David A.; Wen, Hui Ying; Barry, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    The FAILSAFE project is developing concepts and prototype implementations for software health management in mission- critical, real-time embedded systems. The project unites features of the industry-standard ARINC 653 Avionics Application Software Standard Interface and JPL s Mission Data System (MDS) technology (see figure). The ARINC 653 standard establishes requirements for the services provided by partitioned, real-time operating systems. The MDS technology provides a state analysis method, canonical architecture, and software framework that facilitates the design and implementation of software-intensive complex systems. The MDS technology has been used to provide the health management function for an ARINC 653 application implementation. In particular, the focus is on showing how this combination enables reasoning about, and recovering from, application software problems.

  7. 4GL ward management system.

    PubMed Central

    Brandejs, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    After many years of extensive research of computerized information systems for nursing, inpatient care, clinics and HMOs, laboratories, diagnostic imaging, pharmacy and other services, an integrated Ward Patient Management system was developed. A mature, relational data base management system (RDBMS) ORACLE was selected as the design tool. The system is running under VMS, DOS and UNIX operating systems and ORACLE version 6 on nearly all computer platforms, although multiprocessors are preferred. A host of potentials and pitfalls is associated with the implementation of this new approach to Patient Management. PMID:1807662

  8. Organizational structure : management techniques and lessons learned in aligning technical and program management resources in engineering-intensive organizations

    E-print Network

    Siddiqui, Talha, 1969-

    2005-01-01

    The roles of systems engineering, program and project management, and engineering management are continuously blurred and challenged in complex engineering organizations. The demands made of each of these functions can ...

  9. The influence of abiotic controls and management intensity on phosphorus cycling in established grassland and forest ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alt, F.; Oelmann, Y.; Wilcke, W.

    2011-12-01

    It is commonly assumed that the bioavailability and cycling of phosphorus (P) is mainly controlled by abiotic soil properties including soil pH and the concentrations and reactivities of clay minerals, CaCO3 and Al/Fe oxides In managed ecosystems, kind, timing and duration of P additions and type and amount of harvested biomass are the major input and output fluxes. Our objective was to disentangle the effects of abiotic controls, and type and intensity of management on the P cycle in soils of temperate grasslands and forests of different management intensity in three regions across Germany in the frame of the Biodiversity Exploratories project. The pH value was the most important variable explaining P concentrations and partitioning in soil and changes in pH are the main mechanism how land-use is affecting the P cycle. However, after the influence of pH was accounted for in a sequential statistical approach, land-use intensity, classified according to the extent of annual biomass removal, explained a significant (P < 0.05) part of the variance in the contributions of several P fractions to total P (TP) among all studied regions and land-use types. In grassland soils of highly diverse systems (up to 57 plant species) in one of the study regions, the Schwäbische Alb, a mid-range mountain area on limestone where soils showed a limited variation in pH in the carbonate buffer range, pedogenic Fe oxide concentrations, fertilizer-P application rates, and TP concentrations in soil explained more than half of the variation in bioavailable inorganic (Pi) concentrations extracted with NaHCO3 in soil. Our results demonstrate that mainly soil pH and mineralogical composition, and intensity of management of the managed ecosystems are significant controls of the P cycle determining the size of bioavailable P pool in soil.

  10. Fuel cell gas management system

    DOEpatents

    DuBose, Ronald Arthur (Marietta, GA)

    2000-01-11

    A fuel cell gas management system including a cathode humidification system for transferring latent and sensible heat from an exhaust stream to the cathode inlet stream of the fuel cell; an anode humidity retention system for maintaining the total enthalpy of the anode stream exiting the fuel cell equal to the total enthalpy of the anode inlet stream; and a cooling water management system having segregated deionized water and cooling water loops interconnected by means of a brazed plate heat exchanger.

  11. Lighting system with thermal management system

    DOEpatents

    Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton Earl; Stecher, Thomas Elliot; Seeley, Charles Erklin; Kuenzler, Glenn Howard; Wolfe, Jr., Charles Franklin; Utturkar, Yogen Vishwas; Sharma, Rajdeep; Prabhakaran, Satish; Icoz, Tunc

    2015-08-25

    Lighting systems having unique configurations are provided. For instance, the lighting system may include a light source, a thermal management system and driver electronics, each contained within a housing structure. The light source is configured to provide illumination visible through an opening in the housing structure. The thermal management system is configured to provide an air flow, such as a unidirectional air flow, through the housing structure in order to cool the light source. The driver electronics are configured to provide power to each of the light source and the thermal management system.

  12. Lighting system with thermal management system

    DOEpatents

    Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton Earl; Stecher, Thomas Elliot; Seeley, Charles Erklin; Kuenzler, Glenn Howard; Wolfe, Jr., Charles Franklin; Utturkar, Yogen Vishwas; Sharma, Rajdeep; Prabhakaran, Satish; Icoz, Tunc

    2015-02-24

    Lighting systems having unique configurations are provided. For instance, the lighting system may include a light source, a thermal management system and driver electronics, each contained within a housing structure. The light source is configured to provide illumination visible through an opening in the housing structure. The thermal management system is configured to provide an air flow, such as a unidirectional air flow, through the housing structure in order to cool the light source. The driver electronics are configured to provide power to each of the light source and the thermal management system.

  13. Lighting system with thermal management system

    DOEpatents

    Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton; Stecher, Thomas; Seeley, Charles; Kuenzler, Glenn; Wolfe, Jr., Charles; Utturkar, Yogen; Sharma, Rajdeep; Prabhakaran, Satish; Icoz, Tunc

    2013-05-07

    Lighting systems having unique configurations are provided. For instance, the lighting system may include a light source, a thermal management system and driver electronics, each contained within a housing structure. The light source is configured to provide illumination visible through an opening in the housing structure. The thermal management system is configured to provide an air flow, such as a unidirectional air flow, through the housing structure in order to cool the light source. The driver electronics are configured to provide power to each of the light source and the thermal management system.

  14. Historical changes in channel network extent and channel planform in an intensively managed landscape: Natural versus human-induced effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoads, Bruce L.; Lewis, Quinn W.; Andresen, William

    2016-01-01

    Humans have become major geomorphological agents, effecting substantial change in the characteristics of Earth's physical landscapes. The agricultural Midwest of the United States is a region marked by pronounced human influence at the landscape scale. Humans undoubtedly have strongly influenced critical zone processes, including fluvial processes, in intensively managed agricultural landscapes, yet the exact nature of human alteration of these processes is unknown. This study documents historical changes in the extent of the stream channel network and in channel planform within the upper Sangamon River basin - an intensively managed agricultural watershed in Illinois. Results indicate that the modern channel network is nearly three times more extensive than the channel network in the 1820s. Most change in drainage density has occurred in headwater portions of the basin where numerous drainage ditches have been added to the network to drain flat uplands. No detectable change in channel position is evident between 1940 and 2012 along about 60% of the total length of the Sangamon River and its major tributaries. Nearly 30% of the total length exhibits change related to meander dynamics (cutoffs and lateral migration), whereas about 8% has changed as a result of channelization. Channelized sections typically remain straight for decades following human modification, supporting the notion that humans produce long-lasting catastrophic change in channel planform in this region. The findings confirm that humans are effective agents of morphological change in fluvial systems in this intensively managed watershed. Documenting human-induced versus natural changes in fluvial systems is important for evaluating how other critical zone processes in intensively managed landscapes have been affected by these changes. Human-induced changes in channel extent and planform most likely have altered this landscape from one dominated by biogeochemical transformations and storage of water and sediment prior to agricultural development into one now characterized by enhanced fluxes of water, sediment, and nutrients.

  15. Fault management for data systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Mark A.; Iverson, David L.; Patterson-Hine, F. Ann

    1993-01-01

    Issues related to automating the process of fault management (fault diagnosis and response) for data management systems are considered. Substantial benefits are to be gained by successful automation of this process, particularly for large, complex systems. The use of graph-based models to develop a computer assisted fault management system is advocated. The general problem is described and the motivation behind choosing graph-based models over other approaches for developing fault diagnosis computer programs is outlined. Some existing work in the area of graph-based fault diagnosis is reviewed, and a new fault management method which was developed from existing methods is offered. Our method is applied to an automatic telescope system intended as a prototype for future lunar telescope programs. Finally, an application of our method to general data management systems is described.

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT AND SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS THEORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental Systems Management is the management of environmental problems at the systems level fully accounting for the multi-dimensional nature of the environment. This includes socio-economic dimensions as well as the usual physical and life science aspects. This is importa...

  17. Efficient Evaluation System for Learning Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavus, Nadire

    2009-01-01

    A learning management system (LMS) provides the platform for web-based learning environment by enabling the management, delivery, tracking of learning, testing, communication, registration process and scheduling. There are many LMS systems on the market that can be obtained for free or through payment. It has now become an important task to choose…

  18. Workflow management systems in radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendler, Thomas; Meetz, Kirsten; Schmidt, Joachim

    1998-07-01

    In a situation of shrinking health care budgets, increasing cost pressure and growing demands to increase the efficiency and the quality of medical services, health care enterprises are forced to optimize or complete re-design their processes. Although information technology is agreed to potentially contribute to cost reduction and efficiency improvement, the real success factors are the re-definition and automation of processes: Business Process Re-engineering and Workflow Management. In this paper we discuss architectures for the use of workflow management systems in radiology. We propose to move forward from information systems in radiology (RIS, PACS) to Radiology Management Systems, in which workflow functionality (process definitions and process automation) is implemented through autonomous workflow management systems (WfMS). In a workflow oriented architecture, an autonomous workflow enactment service communicates with workflow client applications via standardized interfaces. In this paper, we discuss the need for and the benefits of such an approach. The separation of workflow management system and application systems is emphasized, and the consequences that arise for the architecture of workflow oriented information systems. This includes an appropriate workflow terminology, and the definition of standard interfaces for workflow aware application systems. Workflow studies in various institutions have shown that most of the processes in radiology are well structured and suited for a workflow management approach. Numerous commercially available Workflow Management Systems (WfMS) were investigated, and some of them, which are process- oriented and application independent, appear suitable for use in radiology.

  19. Management intensive grazing and continuous grazing of hill pasture by beef cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Management Intensive Grazing (MIG) is an increasingly used practice that can offer producers many benefits including higher profit. The main objective of this study was to compare MIG and Continuous Grazing (CG)practices on pastures in Appalachian Ohio. The study was conducted at the North Appalac...

  20. Ultimate biochemical oxygen demand in semi-intensively managed shrimp pond waters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three independent studies were conducted to quantified ultimate biochemical oxygen demand (UBOD) and the corresponding decomposition rate constant for production pond (average 21.5 ha each) waters and effluents on six semi-intensively managed marine shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) farms in Honduras. S...

  1. An Analysis of Intensive Mode Pedagogy in Management Education in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Sita; Nargundkar, Rajendra

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Management education is at its peak in India. But pedagogy and modes of delivery are not always innovative compared to top international Business Schools. It is through experimentation that the paper may be able to discover what works best in our context. The purpose of this paper is to determine the effectiveness of intensive mode of…

  2. Autonomously managed electrical power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callis, Charles P.

    1986-01-01

    The electric power systems for future spacecraft such as the Space Station will necessarily be more sophisticated and will exhibit more nearly autonomous operation than earlier spacecraft. These new power systems will be more reliable and flexible than their predecessors offering greater utility to the users. Automation approaches implemented on various power system breadboards are investigated. These breadboards include the Hubble Space Telescope power system test bed, the Common Module Power Management and Distribution system breadboard, the Autonomusly Managed Power System (AMPS) breadboard, and the 20 kilohertz power system breadboard. Particular attention is given to the AMPS breadboard. Future plans for these breadboards including the employment of artificial intelligence techniques are addressed.

  3. Medical-Information-Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterescu, Sidney; Friedman, Carl A.; Frankowski, James W.

    1989-01-01

    Medical Information Management System (MIMS) computer program interactive, general-purpose software system for storage and retrieval of information. Offers immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases required. User quickly and efficiently extracts, displays, and analyzes data. Used in management of medical data and handling all aspects of data related to care of patients. Other applications include management of data on occupational safety in public and private sectors, handling judicial information, systemizing purchasing and procurement systems, and analyses of cost structures of organizations. Written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77.

  4. Intelligent Integrated System Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Intelligent Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) is the management of data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) with the purposeful objective of determining the health of a system (Management: storage, distribution, sharing, maintenance, processing, reasoning, and presentation). Presentation discusses: (1) ISHM Capability Development. (1a) ISHM Knowledge Model. (1b) Standards for ISHM Implementation. (1c) ISHM Domain Models (ISHM-DM's). (1d) Intelligent Sensors and Components. (2) ISHM in Systems Design, Engineering, and Integration. (3) Intelligent Control for ISHM-Enabled Systems

  5. Memory intensive functional architecture for distributed computer control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dimmler, D.G.

    1983-10-01

    A memory-intensive functional architectue for distributed data-acquisition, monitoring, and control systems with large numbers of nodes has been conceptually developed and applied in several large-scale and some smaller systems. This discussion concentrates on: (1) the basic architecture; (2) recent expansions of the architecture which now become feasible in view of the rapidly developing component technologies in microprocessors and functional large-scale integration circuits; and (3) implementation of some key hardware and software structures and one system implementation which is a system for performing control and data acquisition of a neutron spectrometer at the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. The spectrometer is equipped with a large-area position-sensitive neutron detector.

  6. A relative-intensity two-color phosphor thermography system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merski, N. Ronald

    1991-01-01

    The NASA LaRC has developed a relative-intensity two-color phosphor thermography system. This system has become a standard technique for acquiring aerothermodynamic data in LaRC Hypersonic Facilities Complex (HFC). The relative intensity theory and its application to the LaRC phosphor thermography system is discussed along with the investment casting technique which is critical to the utilization of the phosphor method for aerothermodynamic studies. Various approaches to obtaining quantitative heat transfer data using thermographic phosphors are addressed and comparisons between thin-film data and thermographic phosphor data on an orbiter-like configuration are presented. In general, data from these two techniques are in good agreement. A discussion is given on the application of phosphors to integration heat transfer data reduction techniques (the thin film method) and preliminary heat transfer data obtained on a calibration sphere using thin-film equations are presented. Finally, plans for a new phosphor system which uses target recognition software are discussed.

  7. Management of severe sepsis in patients admitted to Asian intensive care units: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To assess the compliance of Asian intensive care units and hospitals to the Surviving Sepsis Campaign’s resuscitation and management bundles. Secondary objectives were to evaluate the impact of compliance on mortality and the organisational characteristics of hospitals that were associated with higher compliance. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting 150 intensive care units in 16 Asian countries. Participants 1285 adult patients with severe sepsis admitted to these intensive care units in July 2009. The organisational characteristics of participating centres, the patients’ baseline characteristics, the achievement of targets within the resuscitation and management bundles, and outcome data were recorded. Main outcome measure Compliance with the Surviving Sepsis Campaign’s resuscitation (six hours) and management (24 hours) bundles. Results Hospital mortality was 44.5% (572/1285). Compliance rates for the resuscitation and management bundles were 7.6% (98/1285) and 3.5% (45/1285), respectively. On logistic regression analysis, compliance with the following bundle targets independently predicted decreased mortality: blood cultures (achieved in 803/1285; 62.5%, 95% confidence interval 59.8% to 65.1%), broad spectrum antibiotics (achieved in 821/1285; 63.9%, 61.3% to 66.5%), and central venous pressure (achieved in 345/870; 39.7%, 36.4% to 42.9%). High income countries, university hospitals, intensive care units with an accredited fellowship programme, and surgical intensive care units were more likely to be compliant with the resuscitation bundle. Conclusions While mortality from severe sepsis is high, compliance with resuscitation and management bundles is generally poor in much of Asia. As the centres included in this study might not be fully representative, achievement rates reported might overestimate the true degree of compliance with recommended care and should be interpreted with caution. Achievement of targets for blood cultures, antibiotics, and central venous pressure was independently associated with improved survival. PMID:21669950

  8. Quality assurance and quality control of an intensive care unit picture archiving and communication system.

    PubMed

    Tucker, D M; McEachern, M

    1995-11-01

    Most radiology departments have established quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) programs for conventional film-based image management systems. At many institutions, digital image management systems, or picture archiving and communication systems (PACS), are replacing part or all of the film management system. In these situations, it is important to control the quality of the digital images that are produced. The observed frequency of eight types of image-related errors occurring on an image viewing station located in a medical intensive care unit is reported. Images on the viewing station were checked for 12 consecutive weeks. Film images available in the radiology reading room and digital images on the viewing station were compared with a list of completed examinations produced by the radiological information system. Overall, 1,082 patient examinations were encountered. Seventy-six images (7.02% of all images) were observed with errors. In addition, four previously unencountered types of errors were observed in 11 images (1.01% of all images). The majority of the errors are attributed to interfaces either between information systems or between the PACS and the user. It is concluded that QA-QC procedures are necessary for PACS, and that good interfaces, both between information systems and between humans and computer systems, are essential for successful PACS implementations. PMID:8573625

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (EIMS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Information Management System (EIMS) organizes descriptive information (metadata) for data sets, databases, documents, models, projects, and spatial data. The EIMS design provides a repository for scientific documentation that can be easily accessed with standar...

  10. System Wide Information Management (SWIM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hritz, Mike; McGowan, Shirley; Ramos, Cal

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation lists questions regarding the implementation of System Wide Information Management (SWIM). Some of the questions concern policy issues and strategies, technology issues and strategies, or transition issues and strategies.

  11. Integrated Learning Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Sharon; Cossarin, Mary; Doxsee, Harry; Schwartz, Linda

    2004-01-01

    Four integrated learning management packages were reviewed: "CentraOne", "IntraLearn", "Lyceum", and "Silicon Chalk". These products provide different combinations of synchronous and asynchronous tools. The current report examines the products in relation to their specific value for distance educators and students.

  12. Data management system technology discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Harry F.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on data management system technology discipline for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: systems technology area needs; storage technology area needs; processor technology area needs; communications technology area needs; software system technology area needs; human interface technology area needs; software development and verification; and onboard communications.

  13. Dual Wavelength Intensity Modulated Optical Fibre Sensor System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senior, John M.; Murtaza, G.; Stirling, Anthony I.; Wainwright, Geoffrey H.

    1989-10-01

    A novel dual wavelength intensity modulated optical fibre displacement sensor system is described which employs a single Graded Index (GRIN) rod lensed fibre together with an interference filter and moving mirror element in the sensing head. The dual wavelength approach essentially utilises two spectral slices for a single LED transmission spectrum to provide the measurand and reference signals. In this way the sensor system is fully referenced for all major common-mode variations that may be present within the system components. The terminal transceiver unit is also discussed together with a specially designed LED coupler and demultiplexer device which enables the system to operate with a single fibre connection. The performance characteristics of the prototype dual wavelength sensor system are reported showing a linear displacement range over some 20 mm. In addition the coupling of the sensing head to a Bourdon tube is described which provides accurate pressure measurement over a range 3-15 psi. Finally an initial investigation of the immunity of the system to common-mode variations is presented using the mechanism of fibre bend loss.

  14. RIMS: Resource Information Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symes, J.

    1983-01-01

    An overview is given of the capabilities and functions of the resource management system (RIMS). It is a simple interactive DMS tool which allows users to build, modify, and maintain data management applications. The RIMS minimizes programmer support required to develop/maintain small data base applications. The RIMS also assists in bringing the United Information Services (UIS) budget system work inhouse. Information is also given on the relationship between the RIMS and the user community.

  15. [Energy flux and energy balance closure of intensively managed lei bamboo forest ecosystem].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-fei; Jiang, Hong; Zhou, Guo-mo; Sun, Cheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-04-01

    By using open-path eddy covariance system and meteorological instruments, an observation was conducted on the sensitive heat flux, latent heat flux, net radiation, soil heat flux, air temperature, ground temperature, and precipitation in a intensively managed Lei bamboo forest ecosystem in 2011, with the diurnal and monthly variations of energy flux as well as the distribution pattern of each energy component analyzed, and the Bowen ratio and energy balance closure calculated. The yearly net radiation of the forest ecosystem was 2928. 92 MJ m-2, and the latent heat flux, sensitive heat flux, and soil heat flux were 1384.90, 927.54, and -28.27 MJ m-2, respectively. Both the daily and the monthly variations of the energy components showed a single peak curve. The sensible and latent heat fluxes were 31.7% and 47.3% of the net radiation, respectively, indicating that latent heat flux was the main form of energy loss. The Bowen ratio followed the "U"-shaped pattern, and fluctuated from 0. 285 to 2. 062, suggesting that soil was a heat source. The yearly energy balance closure of the forest ecosystem was 0. 782, and the monthly average was 0.808. PMID:23898666

  16. Interconnecting heterogeneous database management systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gligor, V. D.; Luckenbaugh, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that there is still a great need for the development of improved communication between remote, heterogeneous database management systems (DBMS). Problems regarding the effective communication between distributed DBMSs are primarily related to significant differences between local data managers, local data models and representations, and local transaction managers. A system of interconnected DBMSs which exhibit such differences is called a network of distributed, heterogeneous DBMSs. In order to achieve effective interconnection of remote, heterogeneous DBMSs, the users must have uniform, integrated access to the different DBMs. The present investigation is mainly concerned with an analysis of the existing approaches to interconnecting heterogeneous DBMSs, taking into account four experimental DBMS projects.

  17. Real-time estimation system for seismic-intensity exposed-population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoi, S.; Nakamura, H.; Kunugi, T.; Suzuki, W.; Fujiwara, H.

    2013-12-01

    For an appropriate first-action to an earthquake, risk (damage) information evaluated in real-time are important as well as hazard (ground motion) information. To meet this need, we are developing real-time estimation system (J-RISQ) for exposed population and earthquake damage on buildings. We plan to open the web page of estimated exposed population to the public from autumn. When an earthquake occurs, seismic intensities are calculated at each observation station and sent to the DMC (Data Management Center) in different timing. For rapid estimation, the system does not wait for the data from all the stations but begins the first estimation when the number of the stations observing the seismic intensity of 2.5 or larger exceeds the threshold amount. Estimations are updated several times using all the available data at that moment. Spatial distribution of seismic intensity in 250 m meshes is estimated by the site amplification factor of surface layers and the observed data. By using this intensity distribution, the exposed population is estimated using population data of each mesh. The exposed populations for municipalities and prefectures are estimated by summing-up the exposures of included meshes for the area and are appropriately rounded taking estimation precision into consideration. The estimated intensities for major cities are shown by the histograms, which indicate the variation of the estimated values in the city together with the observed maximum intensity. The variation is mainly caused by the difference of the site amplification factors. The intensities estimated for meshes with large amplification factor are sometimes larger than the maximum value observed in the city. The estimated results are seen on the web site just after the earthquake. The results of the past earthquakes can be easily searched by keywords such as date, magnitudes, seismic intensities and source areas. The summary of the results in the one-page report of Portable Document Format is also available. This system has been experimentally operated since 2010 and has performed the estimations in real-time for more than 670 earthquakes by July of 2012. For about 75 % of these earthquakes, it takes less than one minute to send the e-mail of first estimation after receiving data from the first triggered station, and therefore, the rapidity of the system is satisfactory. To upload a PDF report form to the web site, it takes approximately additional 30 second.

  18. Breeding bird community response to establishing intercropped switchgrass in intensively-managed pine stands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loman, Zachary G.; Riffell, Samuel K.; Wheat, Bradley R.; Miller, Darrin A.; Martin, James A.; Vilella, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Intercropping switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) between tree rows within young pine (Pinus spp.) plantations is a potential method to generate lignocellulosic biofuel feedstocks within intensively managed forests. Intensively managed pine supports a diverse avian assemblage potentially affected by establishment and maintenance of an annual biomass feedstock via changes in plant communities, dead wood resources, and habitat structure. We sought to understand how establishing switchgrass on an operational scale affects bird communities within intercropped plantations as compared to typical intensively managed loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) forest. We conducted breeding bird point counts using distance sampling for three years (2011–2013) following establishment of intercropped switchgrass stands (6 replicates), traditionally-managed pine plantations, and switchgrass-only plots (0.1 km2 minimum) in Kemper Co., MS. We detected 59 breeding bird species from 11,195 detections. Neotropical migrants and forest-edge associated species were less abundant in intercropped plots than controls the first two years after establishment and more abundant in year three. Short distance migrants and residents were scarce in intercropped and control plots initially, and did not differ between these two treatments in any year. Species associated with pine-grass habitat structure were less abundant initially in intercropped plots, but converged with pine controls in subsequent years. Switchgrass monocultures provided minimal resources for birds. If songbird conservation is a management priority, managers should consider potential reductions of some breeding birds for one to two years following intercropping. It is unclear how these relationships may change outside the breeding season and as stands age.

  19. Resource Management for Distributed Parallel Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuman, B. Clifford; Rao, Santosh

    1993-01-01

    Multiprocessor systems should exist in the the larger context of distributed systems, allowing multiprocessor resources to be shared by those that need them. Unfortunately, typical multiprocessor resource management techniques do not scale to large networks. The Prospero Resource Manager (PRM) is a scalable resource allocation system that supports the allocation of processing resources in large networks and multiprocessor systems. To manage resources in such distributed parallel systems, PRM employs three types of managers: system managers, job managers, and node managers. There exist multiple independent instances of each type of manager, reducing bottlenecks. The complexity of each manager is further reduced because each is designed to utilize information at an appropriate level of abstraction.

  20. Challenges in management of blast injuries in Intensive Care Unit: Case series and review

    PubMed Central

    Samra, Tanvir; Pawar, Mridula; Kaur, Jasvinder

    2014-01-01

    Blast injuries are rare, but life-threatening medical emergencies. We report the clinical presentation and management of four bomb blast victims admitted in Intensive Care Unit of Trauma center of our hospital in 2011. Three of them had lung injury; hemothorax (2) and pneumothorax (1). Traumatic brain injury was present in only one. Long bone fractures were present in all the victims. Presence of multiple shrapnels was a universal finding. Two blast victims died (day 7 and day 9); cause of death was multi-organ failure and septic shock. Issues relating to complexity of injuries, complications, management, and outcome are discussed. PMID:25538416

  1. Managing Hardware Configurations and Data Products for the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hincks, A. D.; Shaw, J. R.; Chime Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) is an ambitious new radio telescope project for measuring cosmic expansion and investigating dark energy. Keeping good records of both physical configuration of its 1280 antennas and their analogue signal chains as well as the ˜100 TB of data produced daily from its correlator will be essential to the success of CHIME. In these proceedings we describe the database-driven software we have developed to manage this complexity.

  2. PPPL Project Management System Page 1 of 111 PPPL Project Management System Description Rev-01

    E-print Network

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    PPPL Project Management System Page 1 of 111 PPPL Project Management System Description Rev-01 Project Management System Description (PMSD) Revision 1 June 2011 Prepared by: ___________________________________ Date: ________________ Tim Stevenson Head, Project Management Office Approved by

  3. Demil planning and management system

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, C.C.; Bormet, S.M.; Whitfield, R.G.; Bowen, M.; Chun, K.C.; Golden, R.E.; Fuller, R.

    1997-08-01

    The National Maintenance Point (NMP) Branch of the US Army Industrial Operations Command (IOC) serves as the Single Manager for Conventional Ammunition (SMCA) agent for managing the renovation, modification, recycling, and disposal of conventional ammunition, thereby improving readiness. The mission of the NMP includes program management for demilitarization (demil) activities, ammunition maintenance, and ammunition peculiar equipment (APE) projects. Through an Interagency Agreement between the US Army and the US Department of Energy, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing an integrated data management system, called the Demil Planning and Management System (DPMS), for IOC. DPMS is intended to help NMP efficiently manage information on ongoing demil project activities and asset inventories, plan future projects, and allocate budgets. This system, when fully implemented, will also make it possible for the user community to interactively access the DPMS database; perform data entry and queries; and run reports through network, modem, and Internet access to the system. This paper describes the principal components of the DPMS, current capabilities, and planned enhancements.

  4. HIERARCHICAL MANAGEMENT OF BATTLEFIELD NETWORKS WITH THE SHAMAN MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    E-print Network

    Sethi, Adarshpal

    HIERARCHICAL MANAGEMENT OF BATTLEFIELD NETWORKS WITH THE SHAMAN MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Adarshpal S Architecture for MANagement) is a novel management framework developed at the University of Delaware as a part of the research in network management sponsored by the ATIRP Consortium. SHAMAN extends the traditional flat SNMP

  5. Automated plant, production management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenova, V. I.; Belov, V. I.

    1984-12-01

    The development of a complex of tasks for the operational management of production (OUP) within the framework of an automated system for production management (ASUP) shows that it is impossible to have effective computations without reliable initial information. The influence of many factors involving the production and economic activity of the entire enterprise upon the plan and course of production are considered. It is suggested that an adequate model should be available which covers all levels of the hierarchical system: workplace, section (bridgade), shop, enterprise, and the model should be incorporated into the technological sequence of performance and there should be provisions for an adequate man machine system.

  6. The power management reporting system

    SciTech Connect

    Gunn, B.L. )

    1992-01-01

    There is no simple way to accomplish the placement of remote Energy Management System (EMS) consoles, considering the design of the current EMS. The proposed replacement EMS will provide remote console capability, however the new system is several years away. A cost effective means of providing the company with the needed data in the interim is via the corporate mainframe computer. The data is readily available anywhere there exists a mainframe terminal. PSI spent considerable time migrating both the EMS and the corporate mainframe to an environment capable of data transfer. All required technology is now in place to facilitate transfers of this nature. Management and various technical groups now use EMS data as a decision making and analysis tool. The project was a joint effort with Information Systems. Without their cooperation, the corporation could not benefit from the use of timely EMS information. This paper discusses the design and operation of what is known as the Power Management Reporting System (PMR).

  7. XCPU2 process management system

    SciTech Connect

    Ionkov, Latchesar; Van Hensbergen, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Xcpu2 is a new process management system that allows the users to specify custom file system for a running job. Most cluster management systems enforce single software distribution running on all nodes. Xcpu2 allows programs running on the cluster to work in environment identical to the user's desktop, using the same versions of the libraries and tools the user installed locally, and accessing the configuration file in the same places they are located on the desktop. Xcpu2 builds on our earlier work with the Xcpu system. Like Xcpu, Xcpu2's process management interface is represented as a set of files exported by a 9P file server. It supports heterogeneous clusters and multiple head nodes. Unlike Xcpu, it uses pull instead of push model. In this paper we describe the Xcpu2 clustering model, its operation and how the per-job filesystem configuration can be used to solve some of the common problems when running a cluster.

  8. Campus Telephone Systems: Managing Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of College and University Business Officers, Washington, DC.

    Issues facing a college or university that seeks to change its telephone system are raised in seven chapters. Major topics addressed by this resource guide are: telephone deregulation and changes in the telephone industry, the new technology available, how to manage a system, consultants, financing options, and institutional case studies. Specific…

  9. Steam System Data Management 

    E-print Network

    Roberts, D.

    2013-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-IE-13-05-35.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 5953 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IE-13-05-35.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Steam System Data... Certifications ?Retired From Chevron After 25 Years ? Established A Steam System Program ? Planner For Routine Maintenance Work ? Planner For Steam System Improvements ? Wal-Tech Valve, Inc. ? Purchased Wal-Tech Valve, Inc. In 2007 ? Implemented Safety...

  10. A systems engineering management approach to resource management applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornstein, Rhoda Shaller

    1989-01-01

    The author presents a program management response to the following question: How can the traditional practice of systems engineering management, including requirements specification, be adapted, enhanced, or modified to build future planning and scheduling systems for effective operations? The systems engineering management process, as traditionally practiced, is examined. Extensible resource management systems are discussed. It is concluded that extensible systems are a partial solution to problems presented by requirements that are incomplete, partially immeasurable, and often dynamic. There are positive indications that resource management systems have been characterized and modeled sufficiently to allow their implementation as extensible systems.

  11. RHEED intensities from two-dimensional heteroepitaxial nanoscale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniluk, Andrzej

    2014-11-01

    A practical computing algorithm has been developed for calculating the reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) from the molecular beam epitaxy growing surface. The calculations are based on the use of the dynamical diffraction theory in which the electrons are taken to be diffracted by a potential, which is periodic in the dimension perpendicular to the surface. The computer program presented in this paper enables calculations for three basic types of diffuse potential for crystalline heteroepitaxial structures, including the possible existence of various diffuse scattering models through the layer parallel to the surface. Catalogue identifier: AETW_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETW_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 68483 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 480831 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: Intel i7-based PC. Operating system: Windows, Linux. RAM: The presented algorithm belongs to the linear memory class of the computational complexity O(n). Word size: 64 bits Classification: 4.6, 6.2, 7.2. Nature of problem: RHEED rocking curves (the specular beam intensities versus the glancing angle) recorded from heteroepitaxial layers are used for the non-destructive evaluation of epilayer thickness and composition with a high degree of accuracy. Rocking curves from such heterostructures are often very complex because the thickness fringes from every layer beat together. Simulations based on the dynamical diffraction theory are generally used to interpret the rocking curves of such structures from which very small changes in thickness and composition can be obtained. Rocking curves are also used to determine the level of strain and its relaxation mechanism in a lattice-mismatched system. Solution method: RHEED intensities are calculated within the framework of the general matrix formulation described in Ref. [1] under the one-beam condition [2,3]. The dynamical diffraction calculations presented in this paper utilize the systematic reflection case in RHEED, in which the atomic potential in the planes parallel to the surface are projected onto the surface normal, so that the results are insensitive to the atomic arrangement in the layers parallel to the surface. In this paper, an approach in which oscillating changes in the intensity appear as a combined effect of changes in the refraction conditions and changes in diffuse scattering for different models of the scattering potential is implemented. Running time: Numerically, the problem of calculating the changes in RHEED oscillation intensity from growing layers is an NP problem. The time computational complexity of the presented algorithm depends on the number of layers for both the substrate and the growing layers included in the calculations. The time-computational complexity of the presented solution is O(n2), where n is the total number of layers used in the calculations. A. Daniluk, Comput. Phys. Commun. 166 (2005) 123. L.M. Peng, M.J. Whelan, Surf. Sci. Lett. 238 (1990) L446. Y. Horio, A. Ichimiya, Japan. J. Appl. Phys. 33 (1994) L377.

  12. Information Security Management - Part Of The Integrated Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, Constantin Adrian

    2015-07-01

    The international management standards allow their integrated approach, thereby combining aspects of particular importance to the activity of any organization, from the quality management systems or the environmental management of the information security systems or the business continuity management systems. Although there is no national or international regulation, nor a defined standard for the Integrated Management System, the need to implement an integrated system occurs within the organization, which feels the opportunity to integrate the management components into a cohesive system, in agreement with the purpose and mission publicly stated. The issues relating to information security in the organization, from the perspective of the management system, raise serious questions to any organization in the current context of electronic information, reason for which we consider not only appropriate but necessary to promote and implement an Integrated Management System Quality - Environment - Health and Operational Security - Information Security

  13. The CMS Data Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giffels, M.; Guo, Y.; Kuznetsov, V.; Magini, N.; Wildish, T.

    2014-06-01

    The data management elements in CMS are scalable, modular, and designed to work together. The main components are PhEDEx, the data transfer and location system; the Data Booking Service (DBS), a metadata catalog; and the Data Aggregation Service (DAS), designed to aggregate views and provide them to users and services. Tens of thousands of samples have been cataloged and petabytes of data have been moved since the run began. The modular system has allowed the optimal use of appropriate underlying technologies. In this contribution we will discuss the use of both Oracle and NoSQL databases to implement the data management elements as well as the individual architectures chosen. We will discuss how the data management system functioned during the first run, and what improvements are planned in preparation for 2015.

  14. Integrated Systems Health Management for Intelligent Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Melcher, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of an integrated system health management (ISHM) capability is fundamentally linked to the management of data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) with the purposeful objective of determining the health of a system. It is akin to having a team of experts who are all individually and collectively observing and analyzing a complex system, and communicating effectively with each other in order to arrive at an accurate and reliable assessment of its health. In this paper, concepts, procedures, and approaches are presented as a foundation for implementing an intelligent systems ]relevant ISHM capability. The capability stresses integration of DIaK from all elements of a system. Both ground-based (remote) and on-board ISHM capabilities are compared and contrasted. The information presented is the result of many years of research, development, and maturation of technologies, and of prototype implementations in operational systems.

  15. The Cheetah Data Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, P.F. ); Word, G.B. . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-03-01

    Cheetah is a data management system based on the C programming language. The premise of Cheetah is that the banks' of FORTRAN based systems should be structures' as defined by the C language. Cheetah is a system to mange these structures, while preserving the use of the C language in its native form. For C structures managed by Cheetah, the user can use Cheetah utilities such as reading and writing, in a machine independent form, both binary and text files to disk or over a network. Files written by Cheetah also contain a dictionary describing in detail the data contained in the file. Such information is intended to be used by interactive programs for presenting the contents of the file. Such information is intended to be used by interactive programs for presenting the contents of file. Cheetah has been ported to many different operating systems with no operating system dependent switches.

  16. Risk-Informed Safety Assurance and Probabilistic Assessment of Mission-Critical Software-Intensive Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guarro, Sergio B.

    2010-01-01

    This report validates and documents the detailed features and practical application of the framework for software intensive digital systems risk assessment and risk-informed safety assurance presented in the NASA PRA Procedures Guide for Managers and Practitioner. This framework, called herein the "Context-based Software Risk Model" (CSRM), enables the assessment of the contribution of software and software-intensive digital systems to overall system risk, in a manner which is entirely compatible and integrated with the format of a "standard" Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), as currently documented and applied for NASA missions and applications. The CSRM also provides a risk-informed path and criteria for conducting organized and systematic digital system and software testing so that, within this risk-informed paradigm, the achievement of a quantitatively defined level of safety and mission success assurance may be targeted and demonstrated. The framework is based on the concept of context-dependent software risk scenarios and on the modeling of such scenarios via the use of traditional PRA techniques - i.e., event trees and fault trees - in combination with more advanced modeling devices such as the Dynamic Flowgraph Methodology (DFM) or other dynamic logic-modeling representations. The scenarios can be synthesized and quantified in a conditional logic and probabilistic formulation. The application of the CSRM method documented in this report refers to the MiniAERCam system designed and developed by the NASA Johnson Space Center.

  17. Management issues in systems engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shishko, Robert; Chamberlain, Robert G.; Aster, Robert; Bilardo, Vincent; Forsberg, Kevin; Mooz, Hal; Polaski, Lou; Wade, Ron

    1993-01-01

    When applied to a system, the doctrine of successive refinement is a divide-and-conquer strategy. Complex systems are sucessively divided into pieces that are less complex, until they are simple enough to be conquered. This decomposition results in several structures for describing the product system and the producing system. These structures play important roles in systems engineering and project management. Many of the remaining sections in this chapter are devoted to describing some of these key structures. Structures that describe the product system include, but are not limited to, the requirements tree, system architecture and certain symbolic information such as system drawings, schematics, and data bases. The structures that describe the producing system include the project's work breakdown, schedules, cost accounts and organization.

  18. Integrated Computer System of Management in Logistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chwesiuk, Krzysztof

    2011-06-01

    This paper aims at presenting a concept of an integrated computer system of management in logistics, particularly in supply and distribution chains. Consequently, the paper includes the basic idea of the concept of computer-based management in logistics and components of the system, such as CAM and CIM systems in production processes, and management systems for storage, materials flow, and for managing transport, forwarding and logistics companies. The platform which integrates computer-aided management systems is that of electronic data interchange.

  19. Integrated therapy safety management system

    PubMed Central

    Podtschaske, Beatrice; Fuchs, Daniela; Friesdorf, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Aims The aim is to demonstrate the benefit of the medico-ergonomic approach for the redesign of clinical work systems. Based on the six layer model, a concept for an ‘integrated therapy safety management’ is drafted. This concept could serve as a basis to improve resilience. Methods The concept is developed through a concept-based approach. The state of the art of safety and complexity research in human factors and ergonomics forms the basis. The findings are synthesized to a concept for ‘integrated therapy safety management’. The concept is applied by way of example for the ‘medication process’ to demonstrate its practical implementation. Results The ‘integrated therapy safety management’ is drafted in accordance with the six layer model. This model supports a detailed description of specific work tasks, the corresponding responsibilities and related workflows at different layers by using the concept of ‘bridge managers’. ‘Bridge managers’ anticipate potential errors and monitor the controlled system continuously. If disruptions or disturbances occur, they respond with corrective actions which ensure that no harm results and they initiate preventive measures for future procedures. The concept demonstrates that in a complex work system, the human factor is the key element and final authority to cope with the residual complexity. The expertise of the ‘bridge managers’ and the recursive hierarchical structure results in highly adaptive clinical work systems and increases their resilience. Conclusions The medico-ergonomic approach is a highly promising way of coping with two complexities. It offers a systematic framework for comprehensive analyses of clinical work systems and promotes interdisciplinary collaboration. PMID:24007448

  20. Managing complexity of aerospace systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaskar, Shashank

    Growing complexity of modern aerospace systems has exposed the limits of conventional systems engineering tools and challenged our ability to design them in a timely and cost effective manner. According to the US Government Accountability Office (GAO), in 2009 nearly half of the defense acquisition programs are expecting 25% or more increase in unit acquisition cost. Increase in technical complexity has been identified as one of the primary drivers behind cost-schedule overruns. Thus to assure the affordability of future aerospace systems, it is increasingly important to develop tools and capabilities for managing their complexity. We propose an approach for managing the complexity of aerospace systems to address this pertinent problem. To this end, we develop a measure that improves upon the state-of-the-art metrics and incorporates key aspects of system complexity. We address the problem of system decomposition by presenting an algorithm for module identification that generates modules to minimize integration complexity. We demonstrate the framework on diverse spacecraft and show the impact of design decisions on integration cost. The measure and the algorithm together help the designer track and manage complexity in different phases of system design. We next investigate how complexity can be used as a decision metric in the model-based design (MBD) paradigm. We propose a framework for complexity enabled design space exploration that introduces the idea of using complexity as a non-traditional design objective. We also incorporate complexity with the component based design paradigm (a sub-field of MBD) and demonstrate it on several case studies. The approach for managing complexity is a small but significant contribution to the vast field of complexity management. We envision our approach being used in concert with a suite of complexity metrics to provide an ability to measure and track complexity through different stages of design and development. This will not only lead to simpler designs but also help the designers calculate the impact of their design decisions on integration cost.

  1. Hydrologic response of northern wetlands to silvicultural water management systems

    SciTech Connect

    Trettin, C.C.

    1994-09-01

    Two types of water management systems are used to ameliorate saturated soil conditions which limit silvicultural operations and site productivity in northern wetlands. The pattern ditch system is an intensive drainage network designed to regulate water table depth in peat soils. The prescription drainage system is a low-intensity drainage system that is used to develop apparent drainage patterns in mineral and histic-mineral soils. These water management systems may either increase or decrease peak flow, base flow, and the duration of peak flow events, depending on drainage system design, climate, season, site characteristics, and land use. The most common hydrologic response to drainage is an increase in peak flow and base flow, and an increase in annual runoff. The effect of wetland drainage on watershed hydrology depends on the proportion of the watershed drained. Drainage may also affect water quality, nutrient cycling, vegetation composition and structure.

  2. Atomizer for thermal management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, Charles L. (Inventor); Weiler, Jeff (Inventor); Palmer, Randal T. (Inventor); Appel, Philip W. (Inventor); Knight, Paul A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An atomizer for thermal management system for efficiently thermally managing one or more heat producing devices. The atomizer for thermal management system includes a housing having a coolant passage and a dispensing end, an orifice within the dispensing end, and an actuator manipulating a plunger within the housing. The plunger includes a head that is sealable within a recessed portion of the orifice to open or close the orifice. The coolant passes through the coolant passage into the orifice for spraying upon a heat producing device. The actuator may reciprocate so that the coolant spray emitted through the orifice is pulsating. The pulsing frequency may be increased to increase cooling or decreased to decrease cooling of the heat producing device.

  3. Thermal management systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Gering, Kevin L.; Haefner, Daryl R.

    2006-12-12

    A thermal management system for a vehicle includes a heat exchanger having a thermal energy storage material provided therein, a first coolant loop thermally coupled to an electrochemical storage device located within the first coolant loop and to the heat exchanger, and a second coolant loop thermally coupled to the heat exchanger. The first and second coolant loops are configured to carry distinct thermal energy transfer media. The thermal management system also includes an interface configured to facilitate transfer of heat generated by an internal combustion engine to the heat exchanger via the second coolant loop in order to selectively deliver the heat to the electrochemical storage device. Thermal management methods are also provided.

  4. Regional anesthesia for management of acute pain in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    De Pinto, Mario; Dagal, Armagan; O’Donnell, Brendan; Stogicza, Agnes; Chiu, Sheila; Edwards, William Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a major problem for Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients. Despite numerous improvements it is estimated that as many as 70% of the patients experience moderate-to-severe postoperative pain during their stay in the ICU. Effective pain management means not only decreasing pain intensity, but also reducing the opioids’ side effects. Minimizing nausea, vomiting, urinary retention, and sedation may indeed facilitate patient recovery and it is likely to shorten the ICU and hospital stay. Adequate postoperative and post-trauma pain management is also crucial for the achievement of effective rehabilitation. Furthermore, recent studies suggest that effective acute pain management may be helpful in reducing the development of chronic pain. When used appropriately, and in combination with other treatment modalities, regional analgesia techniques (neuraxial and peripheral nerve blocks) have the potential to reduce or eliminate the physiological stress response to surgery and trauma, decreasing the possibility of surgical complications and improving the outcomes. Also they may reduce the total amount of opioid analgesics necessary to achieve adequate pain control and the development of potentially dangerous side effects. PMID:26557482

  5. Seasonal nitrous oxide flux from an intensively managed pasture in a humid subtropical ecosystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brams, Eugene A.; Anthony, W. H.; Hutchinson, G. L.; Livingston, G. P.

    1989-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) flux from vented chambers was measured over intensively and minimally managed bermuda grass hay meadows in a humid, subtropical ecosystem for several years during scheduled sampling protocol following harvest, fertilization and rainfall events while measuring diel N2O emissions once during each of 5 seasonal day growth cycles which divided each calendar year. Soil pools of nitrite NO2(-), nitrate NO3(-), and ammonia (NH3) were measured in soil samples taken at 2 and 10 cm depths during each emission collection to determine transformations of the nitrogen pools coupled with N2O emissions. The highest diel N2O emission occur midday in the Spring cycle, measuring 9.0 g N/ha/d only for several weeks, while emissions dropped to less than 1.0 g N/ha/day during hot, dry, and colder months. Intensively managed meadows (4 fertilizations and harvests per year plus pest management) induced higher seasonal N2O emissions than minimal treatment (1 fertilization and harvest) averaging 2.75 and 5.97 g N/ha/day. Nitrous oxide emission data as responses to soil parameters and environmental parameters were also measured where air temperature, soil moisture, and fertilization were the most powerful factors.

  6. BIOSOLIDS DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (BDMS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose:see hard copy attachment "EPA's Biosolids Data Management System and Plans for Evaluating Biosolids Quality"
    Legislation/Enabling Authority:CWA Section 402
    Supported Program:OW, OWM, OECA, ORD, OSW, Regions 1-10, states, local facilitie...

  7. Applying Management Information Systems to Staffing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    After reviewing some concepts and principles for effective data management, the author applies the concepts to nurse staffing systems for the management of human resources. He defines a seven-step process for establishing a management information system, from defining the management objective to implementing the system. (Author/CT)

  8. Configuration Management File Manager Developed for Numerical Propulsion System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Follen, Gregory J.

    1997-01-01

    One of the objectives of the High Performance Computing and Communication Project's (HPCCP) Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) is to provide a common and consistent way to manage applications, data, and engine simulations. The NPSS Configuration Management (CM) File Manager integrated with the Common Desktop Environment (CDE) window management system provides a common look and feel for the configuration management of data, applications, and engine simulations for U.S. engine companies. In addition, CM File Manager provides tools to manage a simulation. Features include managing input files, output files, textual notes, and any other material normally associated with simulation. The CM File Manager includes a generic configuration management Application Program Interface (API) that can be adapted for the configuration management repositories of any U.S. engine company.

  9. Hybrid Power Management System and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A system and method for hybrid power management. The system includes photovoltaic cells, ultracapacitors, and pulse generators. In one embodiment, the hybrid power management system is used to provide power for a highway safety flasher.

  10. Hybrid power management system and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A system and method for hybrid power management. The system includes photovoltaic cells, ultracapacitors, and pulse generators. In one embodiment, the hybrid power management system is used to provide power for a highway safety flasher.

  11. OSPACS: Ultrasound image management system

    PubMed Central

    Stott, Will; Ryan, Andy; Jacobs, Ian J; Menon, Usha; Bessant, Conrad; Jones, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Background Ultrasound scanning uses the medical imaging format, DICOM, for electronically storing the images and data associated with a particular scan. Large health care facilities typically use a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) for storing and retrieving such images. However, these systems are usually not suitable for managing large collections of anonymized ultrasound images gathered during a clinical screening trial. Results We have developed a system enabling the accurate archiving and management of ultrasound images gathered during a clinical screening trial. It is based upon a Windows application utilizing an open-source DICOM image viewer and a relational database. The system automates the bulk import of DICOM files from removable media by cross-validating the patient information against an external database, anonymizing the data as well as the image, and then storing the contents of the file as a field in a database record. These image records may then be retrieved from the database and presented in a tree-view control so that the user can select particular images for display in a DICOM viewer or export them to external media. Conclusion This system provides error-free automation of ultrasound image archiving and management, suitable for use in a clinical trial. An open-source project has been established to promote continued development of the system. PMID:18570637

  12. Development of a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Hydrophone System

    SciTech Connect

    Schafer, Mark E.; Gessert, James

    2009-04-14

    The growing clinical use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has driven a need for reliable, reproducible measurements of HIFU acoustic fields. We have previously presented data on a reflective scatterer approach, incorporating several novel features for improved bandwidth, reliability, and reproducibility [Proc. 2005 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium, 1739-1742]. We now report on several design improvements which have increase the signal to noise ratio of the system, and potentially reduced the cost of implementation. For the scattering element, we now use an artificial sapphire material to provide a more uniform radiating surface. The receiver is a segmented, truncated spherical structure with a 10 cm radius; the scattering element is positioned at the center of the sphere. The receiver is made from 25 micron thick, biaxially stretched PVDF, with a Pt-Au electrode on the front surface. In the new design, a specialized backing material provides the stiffness required to maintain structural stability, while at the same time providing both electrical shielding and ultrasonic absorption. Compared with the previous version, the new receiver design has improved the noise performance by 8-12 dB; the new scattering sphere has reduced the scattering loss by another 14 dB, producing an effective sensitivity of -298 dB re 1 microVolt/Pa. The design trade-off still involves receiver sensitivity with effective spot size, and signal distortion from the scatter structure. However, the reduced cost and improved repeatability of the new scatter approach makes the overall design more robust for routine waveform measurements of HIFU systems.

  13. Successful nonsurgical management of post-orthodontic gingival enlargement with intensive cause-related periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Kwon, TaeHyun; Kim, David M; Levin, Liran

    2015-03-01

    Successful nonsurgical management of severe postorthodontic gingival enlargement and erythema in a 24-year-old male is presented. The patient received an intensive cause-related periodontal therapy, consisting of oral hygiene instruction, scaling and root planing, and weekly recall visits. At week five, complete resolution of the lesions was achieved. By targeting the primary etiologic factor, i.e., plaque, periodontal health was restored without needing surgical intervention. Reducing the bacterial load will give the biologic natural healing capacity of the body the opportunity to stabilize the periodontal condition and, thus, should be considered as the first line of intervention before a surgical approach is taken. PMID:25928969

  14. Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) System Manager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiff, Conrad; Maher, Francis Alfred; Henely, Sean Philip; Rand, David

    2014-01-01

    The Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) mission is an ambitious NASA space science mission in which 4 spacecraft are flown in tight formation about a highly elliptical orbit. Each spacecraft has multiple instruments that measure particle and field compositions in the Earths magnetosphere. By controlling the members relative motion, MMS can distinguish temporal and spatial fluctuations in a way that a single spacecraft cannot.To achieve this control, 2 sets of four maneuvers, distributed evenly across the spacecraft must be performed approximately every 14 days. Performing a single maneuver on an individual spacecraft is usually labor intensive and the complexity becomes clearly increases with four. As a result, the MMS flight dynamics team turned to the System Manager to put the routine or error-prone under machine control freeing the analysts for activities that require human judgment.The System Manager is an expert system that is capable of handling operations activities associated with performing MMS maneuvers. As an expert system, it can work off a known schedule, launching jobs based on a one-time occurrence or on a set reoccurring schedule. It is also able to detect situational changes and use event-driven programming to change schedules, adapt activities, or call for help.

  15. Automated Car Park Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabros, J. P.; Tabañag, D.; Espra, A.; Gerasta, O. J.

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to develop a prototype for an Automated Car Park Management System that will increase the quality of service of parking lots through the integration of a smart system that assists motorist in finding vacant parking lot. The research was based on implementing an operating system and a monitoring system for parking system without the use of manpower. This will include Parking Guidance and Information System concept which will efficiently assist motorists and ensures the safety of the vehicles and the valuables inside the vehicle. For monitoring, Optical Character Recognition was employed to monitor and put into list all the cars entering the parking area. All parking events in this system are visible via MATLAB GUI which contain time-in, time-out, time consumed information and also the lot number where the car parks. To put into reality, this system has a payment method, and it comes via a coin slot operation to control the exit gate. The Automated Car Park Management System was successfully built by utilizing microcontrollers specifically one PIC18f4550 and two PIC16F84s and one PIC16F628A.

  16. Integrated Systems Health Management for Intelligent Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Melcher, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of an integrated system health management (ISHM) capability is fundamentally linked to the management of data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) with the purposeful objective of determining the health of a system. Management implies storage, distribution, sharing, maintenance, processing, reasoning, and presentation. ISHM is akin to having a team of experts who are all individually and collectively observing and analyzing a complex system, and communicating effectively with each other in order to arrive at an accurate and reliable assessment of its health. In this chapter, concepts, procedures, and approaches are presented as a foundation for implementing an ISHM capability relevant to intelligent systems. The capability stresses integration of DIaK from all elements of a system, emphasizing an advance toward an on-board, autonomous capability. Both ground-based and on-board ISHM capabilities are addressed. The information presented is the result of many years of research, development, and maturation of technologies, and of prototype implementations in operational systems.

  17. The Cheetah data management system

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, P.F.; Word, G.B.

    1992-09-01

    Cheetah is a data management system based on the C programming language, with support for other languages. Its main goal is to transfer data between memory and I/O steams in a general way. The streams are either associated with disk files or are network data stems. Cheetah provides optional convenience functions to assist in the management of C structures. Cheetah steams are self-describing so that general purpose applications can fully understand an incoming steam. This information can be used to display the data in an incoming steam to the user of an interactive general application, complete with variable names and optional comments.

  18. Energy Management and Information Systems 

    E-print Network

    Conraud, J.

    2013-01-01

    ?audits,?HVAC?upgrades,? heat?recovery,?etc. Improve?operations processes?and?day?to?day? operations,?retro? commissioning ENERGY?MANAGEMENT?INFORMATION?SYSTEM the?project Hardware ? $3.0?million?investment ? 400+?meters?installed electricity...?and?temperature? set?points?through?retro? commissioning ? Better?predict?steam?and?power? demand ? Peak?shaving?and?load?shedding ? Continuous?building? optimization? thank?you Jerome?Conraud Eng.,?MASc.,?CEM Energy?Manager Utilities?&?Energy?Mgmt Mc...

  19. Intensive care unit without walls: seeking patient safety by improving the efficiency of the system.

    PubMed

    Gordo, F; Abella, A

    2014-10-01

    The term "ICU without walls" refers to innovative management in Intensive Care, based on two key elements: (1) collaboration of all medical and nursing staff involved in patient care during hospitalization and (2) technological support for severity early detection protocols by identifying patients at risk of deterioration throughout the hospital, based on the assessment of vital signs and/or laboratory test values, with the clear aim of improving critical patient safety in the hospitalization process. At present, it can be affirmed that there is important work to be done in the detection of severity and early intervention in patients at risk of organ dysfunction. Such work must be adapted to the circumstances of each center and should include training in the detection of severity, multidisciplinary work in the complete patient clinical process, and the use of technological systems allowing intervention on the basis of monitored laboratory and physiological parameters, with effective and efficient use of the information generated. Not only must information be generated, but also efficient management of such information must also be achieved. It is necessary to improve our activity through innovation in management procedures that facilitate the work of the intensivist, in collaboration with other specialists, throughout the hospital environment. Innovation is furthermore required in the efficient management of the information generated in hospitals, through intelligent and directed usage of the new available technology. PMID:24661919

  20. Crop manuring and intensive land management by Europe’s first farmers

    PubMed Central

    Bogaard, Amy; Fraser, Rebecca; Heaton, Tim H. E.; Wallace, Michael; Vaiglova, Petra; Charles, Michael; Jones, Glynis; Evershed, Richard P.; Styring, Amy K.; Andersen, Niels H.; Arbogast, Rose-Marie; Bartosiewicz, László; Gardeisen, Armelle; Kanstrup, Marie; Maier, Ursula; Marinova, Elena; Ninov, Lazar; Schäfer, Marguerita; Stephan, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    The spread of farming from western Asia to Europe had profound long-term social and ecological impacts, but identification of the specific nature of Neolithic land management practices and the dietary contribution of early crops has been problematic. Here, we present previously undescribed stable isotope determinations of charred cereals and pulses from 13 Neolithic sites across Europe (dating ca. 5900–2400 cal B.C.), which show that early farmers used livestock manure and water management to enhance crop yields. Intensive manuring inextricably linked plant cultivation and animal herding and contributed to the remarkable resilience of these combined practices across diverse climatic zones. Critically, our findings suggest that commonly applied paleodietary interpretations of human and herbivore ?15N values have systematically underestimated the contribution of crop-derived protein to early farmer diets. PMID:23858458

  1. PROMIS (Procurement Management Information System)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The PROcurement Management Information System (PROMIS) provides both detailed and summary level information on all procurement actions performed within NASA's procurement offices at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). It provides not only on-line access, but also schedules procurement actions, monitors their progress, and updates Forecast Award Dates. Except for a few computational routines coded in FORTRAN, the majority of the systems is coded in a high level language called NATURAL. A relational Data Base Management System called ADABAS is utilized. Certain fields, called descriptors, are set up on each file to allow the selection of records based on a specified value or range of values. The use of like descriptors on different files serves as the link between the falls, thus producing a relational data base. Twenty related files are currently being maintained on PROMIS.

  2. Metrics for border management systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, Ruth Ann

    2009-07-01

    There are as many unique and disparate manifestations of border systems as there are borders to protect. Border Security is a highly complex system analysis problem with global, regional, national, sector, and border element dimensions for land, water, and air domains. The complexity increases with the multiple, and sometimes conflicting, missions for regulating the flow of people and goods across borders, while securing them for national security. These systems include frontier border surveillance, immigration management and customs functions that must operate in a variety of weather, terrain, operational conditions, cultural constraints, and geopolitical contexts. As part of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project 08-684 (Year 1), the team developed a reference framework to decompose this complex system into international/regional, national, and border elements levels covering customs, immigration, and border policing functions. This generalized architecture is relevant to both domestic and international borders. As part of year two of this project (09-1204), the team determined relevant relative measures to better understand border management performance. This paper describes those relative metrics and how they can be used to improve border management systems.

  3. MIMS - MEDICAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankowski, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    MIMS, Medical Information Management System is an interactive, general purpose information storage and retrieval system. It was first designed to be used in medical data management, and can be used to handle all aspects of data related to patient care. Other areas of application for MIMS include: managing occupational safety data in the public and private sectors; handling judicial information where speed and accuracy are high priorities; systemizing purchasing and procurement systems; and analyzing organizational cost structures. Because of its free format design, MIMS can offer immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases is required. File structures, data categories, field lengths and formats, including alphabetic and/or numeric, are all user defined. The user can quickly and efficiently extract, display, and analyze the data. Three means of extracting data are provided: certain short items of information, such as social security numbers, can be used to uniquely identify each record for quick access; records can be selected which match conditions defined by the user; and specific categories of data can be selected. Data may be displayed and analyzed in several ways which include: generating tabular information assembled from comparison of all the records on the system; generating statistical information on numeric data such as means, standard deviations and standard errors; and displaying formatted listings of output data. The MIMS program is written in Microsoft FORTRAN-77. It was designed to operate on IBM Personal Computers and compatibles running under PC or MS DOS 2.00 or higher. MIMS was developed in 1987.

  4. Health Disaster Humanitarian Systems Management Operations

    E-print Network

    Li, Mo

    Health Disaster Humanitarian Systems Management Operations Models and intervention strategies Professional Certificate program in Health & Humanitarian Supply Chain Management HHS@isye.gatech.edu HHSGATech Professional Certificate program in Health & Humanitarian Supply Chain Management Annual International

  5. Effect of Intensity Modulator Extinction on Practical Quantum Key Distribution System

    E-print Network

    Jing-Zheng Huang; Zhen-Qiang Yin; Shuang Wang; Hong-Wei Li; Wei Chen; Zheng-Fu Han

    2012-06-28

    We study how the imperfection of intensity modulator effects on the security of a practical quantum key distribution system. The extinction ratio of the realistic intensity modulator is considered in our security analysis. We show that the secret key rate increases, under the practical assumption that the indeterminable noise introduced by the imperfect intensity modulator can not be controlled by the eavesdropper.

  6. Effect of 26 years of intensively managed Carya cathayensis stands on soil organic carbon and fertility.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiasen; Huang, Jianqin; Liu, Dan; Li, Jianwu; Zhang, Jinchi; Wang, Hailong

    2014-01-01

    Chinese hickory (Carya cathayensis), a popular nut food tree species, is mainly distributed in southeastern China. A field study was carried out to investigate the effect of long-term intensive management on fertility of soils under a C. cathayensis forest. Results showed that after 26 years' intensive management, the soil organic carbon (SOC) content of the A and B horizons reduced by 19% and 14%, respectively. The reduced components of SOC are mainly the alkyl C and O-alkyl C, whereas the aromatic C and carbonyl C remain unchanged. The reduction of active organic matter could result in degradation of soil fertility. The pH value of soil in the A horizon had dropped by 0.7 units on average. The concentrations of the major nutrients also showed a decreasing trend. On average the concentrations of total nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) of tested soils dropped by 21.8%, 7.6%, and 13.6%, respectively, in the A horizon. To sustain the soil fertility and C. cathayensis production, it is recommended that more organic fertilizers (manures) should be used together with chemical fertilizers. Lime should also be applied to reduce soil acidity. PMID:24558339

  7. A survey of the management of needlestick injuries from incapacitated patients in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Burrows, L A; Padkin, A

    2010-09-01

    The Human Tissue Act 2004 and Mental Capacity Act 2005 resulted in a change in the management of needlestick injuries sustained from incapacitated patients. It appears unlawful to test for blood-borne viruses without a patient's consent for the sole benefit of the healthcare worker. This survey of intensive care units within England, Wales and Northern Ireland investigated how needlestick injuries from incapacitated patients had been managed within the previous year. Of the 225 intensive care units surveyed, 99 (44%) responded. Sixty-two (62.6%) reported a needlestick injury to a healthcare worker from an incapacitated patient. Thirty-six (64.3%) patients were tested for blood-borne viruses without consent. Sixteen (25.8%) patients tested positive for blood-borne viruses. Only 19 (30.6%) healthcare workers took post-exposure prophylaxis following the injury. These results show that needlestick injuries from incapacitated patients are common and that the majority of patients were tested for blood-borne viruses without consent. PMID:21198483

  8. 14 CFR 1212.705 - System manager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false System manager. 1212.705 Section 1212.705 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT-NASA REGULATIONS NASA Authority and Responsibilities § 1212.705 System manager. (a) Each system manager is responsible for the following with regard to the system...

  9. Alert Management Systems: A Quick Introduction

    E-print Network

    Grossman, Robert

    and events. These types of systems are becoming known as alert management systems (AMS). We give some and functionality. Keywords: data mining, alert management systems, events, pro- files, alerts 1 Introduction cited above. 3 Events, Profiles, and Updates Alert management systems are based upon three primitive

  10. Improved Heat Transfer and Performance of High Intensity Combustion Systems for Reformer Furnace Applications 

    E-print Network

    Williams, F. D. M.; Kondratas, H. M.

    1983-01-01

    Developments over the past fifteen years have evolved new short flame, high intensity (1,000,000 BTU/HR/ft3 ) combustion systems for industrial uses. Such systems produce a more uniform and higher heat flux than conventional low intensity systems...

  11. 5 CFR 9701.405 - Performance management system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE...PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Performance Management §...

  12. 5 CFR 9701.405 - Performance management system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE...PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Performance Management §...

  13. ISO 9000 Quality Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjicostas, Evsevios

    The ISO 9000 series describes a quality management system applicable to any organization. In this chapter we present the requirements of the standard in a way that is as close as possible to the needs of analytical laboratories. The sequence of the requirements follows that in the ISO 9001:2008 standard. In addition, the guidelines for performance improvement set out in the ISO 9004 are reviewed. Both standards should be used as a reference as well as the basis for further elaboration.

  14. Automated Platform Management System Scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Larry G.

    1990-01-01

    The Platform Management System was established to coordinate the operation of platform systems and instruments. The management functions are split between ground and space components. Since platforms are to be out of contact with the ground more than the manned base, the on-board functions are required to be more autonomous than those of the manned base. Under this concept, automated replanning and rescheduling, including on-board real-time schedule maintenance and schedule repair, are required to effectively and efficiently meet Space Station Freedom mission goals. In a FY88 study, we developed several promising alternatives for automated platform planning and scheduling. We recommended both a specific alternative and a phased approach to automated platform resource scheduling. Our recommended alternative was based upon use of exactly the same scheduling engine in both ground and space components of the platform management system. Our phased approach recommendation was based upon evolutionary development of the platform. In the past year, we developed platform scheduler requirements and implemented a rapid prototype of a baseline platform scheduler. Presently we are rehosting this platform scheduler rapid prototype and integrating the scheduler prototype into two Goddard Space Flight Center testbeds, as the ground scheduler in the Scheduling Concepts, Architectures, and Networks Testbed and as the on-board scheduler in the Platform Management System Testbed. Using these testbeds, we will investigate rescheduling issues, evaluate operational performance and enhance the platform scheduler prototype to demonstrate our evolutionary approach to automated platform scheduling. The work described in this paper was performed prior to Space Station Freedom rephasing, transfer of platform responsibility to Code E, and other recently discussed changes. We neither speculate on these changes nor attempt to predict the impact of the final decisions. As a consequence some of our work and results may be outdated when this paper is published.

  15. Platform Management System (PMS) evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilley, Mike; Hartley, Jonathan

    1990-01-01

    In fiscal year 1988 a study was begun to define the platform management system (PMS) functions required for the mature platform operations era. The objectives of the task include: (1) defining how to increase the operational productivity of the platform by providing enhanced capability for responding to changing events, (2) influencing the initial PMS design by identifying required 'hooks and scars', and (3) evaluation potential automation techniques that are appropriate given predicted onboard computing resources. Initial platform operations scenarios were defined. The focus was on PMS-related functions where operations enhancements are likely to occur. Operations productivity was defined in terms of scientific productivity of the platform as well as the level of automation of the ground system. The Platform Operations Productivity Enhancement Report was completed earlier this year documenting system enhancements to increase science productivity and ground system automation. Using the baseline PMS defined in the PMS Definition Document as a starting point, the resulting PMS-specific enhancements were molded into a sequence of progressively more sophisticated operations management capabilities. This sequence of upgrades to the PMS has been documented in a PMS Evolution Plan. The plan includes enhancements in the areas of resources scheduling, resource modeling, system and payload anomaly management, and transaction sequence interpretation. A plan for migration of functions from the ground portion of the PMS to the flight portion is also included. The impacts of this plan on the platform are now being documented to ensure that the required 'hooks and scars' are included in the baseline system. Future plans include a prototype of some of the PMS enhancements to address the feasibility of and techniques for implementing these enhancements in the onboard computing environment.

  16. The effect of off-resonant excitation on intensity-intensity correlation spectra in three-level, lambda systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diloreto, Christopher; Rangan, Chitra

    2015-05-01

    Developing methods for the detection of single molecules interacting with the environment has been a large area of research. These methods are quite varied in their execution and include antigen binding, surface plasmon resonance and fluorescence among many others. These methods all take advantage of the fact that molecular processes often change how a substrate interacts with light when a certain molecule is bound to it. With this in mind, we investigate if energy level changes of a fluorescent molecule due to ambient interactions can be detected by monitoring the two-time intensity-intensity correlation spectrum of the molecule when driven by electromagnetic waves. As these correlations depend on the severity of the off-resonance driving excitation, if the two-time intensity-intensity correlation spectrum were to be continuously monitored for a target transition in a three-level system, any changes that occur in the correlation spectrum could used to determine if the energy levels have changed and if any interactions have taken place.

  17. Cosmic ray intensity gradients in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckibben, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    Recent progress in the determination of cosmic-ray intensity gradients is reviewed. Direct satellite measurements of the integral gradient are described together with various types of indirect measurements, including measurements of the Ar-37/Ar-39 ratio in samples from the Lost City meteorite, studies of anisotropies in neutron-monitor counting rates, and analysis of the sidereal diurnal anisotropy observed at a single point on earth. Nucleonic radial gradients and electron gradients measured by satellites in differential energy windows are discussed, and theoretical studies of the physical processes involved in these gradients are summarized. Observations of intensity gradients in heliographic latitude are reported.

  18. Case study: applying management policies to manage distributed queuing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumair, Bernhard; Wies, René

    1996-06-01

    The increasing deployment of workstations and high performance endsystems in addition to the operation of mainframe computers leads to a situation where many companies can no longer afford for their expensive workstations to run idle for long hours during the night or with little load during daytime. Distributed queuing systems and batch systems (DQSs) provide an efficient basis to make use of these unexploited resources and allow corporations to replace expensive supercomputers with clustered workstations running DQSs. To employ these innovative DQSs on a large scale, the management policies for scheduling jobs, configuring queues, etc must be integrated in the overall management process for the IT infrastructure. For this purpose, the concepts of application management and management policies are introduced and discussed. The definition, automatic transformation, and implementation of policies on management platforms to effectively manage DQSs will show that policy-based application management is already possible using the existing management functionality found in today's systems.

  19. Data management system DIU test system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    An operational and functional description is given of the data management system. Descriptions are included for the test control unit, analog stimulus panel, discrete stimulus panel, and the precision source. The mechanical configuration is defined and illustrated to provide card and component location for modification or repair. The unit level interfaces are mirror images of the DIU interfaces and are described in the Final Technical Report for NASA-MSFC contract NAS8-29155.

  20. Design and implementation of a real-time clinical alerting system for intensive care unit.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsiao-Ting; Ma, Wun-Chun; Liou, Der Ming

    2002-01-01

    Nowadays many hospitals use clinical information systems (CIS) to improve patient health care and information management. CIS retrieves and manages patient information such as patient administration, laboratory data and medications. Specialized CIS, especially Intensive Care Unit (ICU) CIS, needs to handle more additional information. How to process and make use of this enormous amount of physiologic data generated by ICU is a significant topic in CIS design. We have designed and implemented a real-time clinical alerting system for ICU, which executes alert algorithms on the database records of 63 ICU physiologic parameters. The user can create various alert rules with our rule editor to supervise the values or trends of these parameters. When an alert condition on a specific patient is detected, the system notices the clinicians in charge with mobile phones or pagers. With this functionality, up-to-date patient information is provided for clinicians inverted exclamation mark | use in judging the patient inverted exclamation mark |s condition and making treatment decisions. PMID:12463801

  1. Electric vehicle energy management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaoui, Chakib

    This thesis investigates and analyzes novel strategies for the optimum energy management of electric vehicles (EVs). These are aimed to maximize the useful life of the EV batteries and make the EV more practical in order to increase its acceptability to market. The first strategy concerns the right choice of the batteries for the EV according to the user's driving habits, which may vary. Tests conducted at the University of Massachusetts Lowell battery lab show that the batteries perform differently from one manufacturer to the other. The second strategy was to investigate the fast chargeability of different batteries, which leads to reduce the time needed to recharge the EV battery pack. Tests were conducted again to prove that only few battery types could be fast charged. Test data were used to design a fast battery charger that could be installed in an EV charging station. The third strategy was the design, fabrication and application of an Electric Vehicle Diagnostic and Rejuvenation System (EVDRS). This system is based on Mosfet Controlled Thyristors (MCTs). It is capable of quickly identifying any failing battery(s) within the EV pack and rejuvenating the whole battery pack without dismantling them and unloading them. A novel algorithm to rejuvenate Electric Vehicle Sealed Lead Acid Batteries is described. This rejuvenation extends the useful life of the batteries and makes the EV more competitive. The fourth strategy was to design a thermal management system for EV, which is crucial to the safe operation, and the achievement of normal/optimal performance of, electric vehicle (EV) batteries. A novel approach for EV thermal management, based on Pettier-Effect heat pumps, was designed, fabricated and tested in EV. It shows the application of this type of technology for thermal management of EVs.

  2. Evaluation of High-intensity and Low-intensity Preconditioning Systems 

    E-print Network

    Orsak, Andrew Nathan

    2012-02-14

    Steer calves n = 345 (year 1 n = 183; 253 ± 35 kg, year 2 n = 162; 241 ± 36 kg initial BW) were used to evaluate 56-d preconditioning systems in each of two years. Angus- and Charolais-sired calves out of crossbred dams ...

  3. System safety management lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Piatt, J.A.

    1989-05-01

    The Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research, Development and Acquisition directed the Army Safety Center to provide an audit of the causes of accidents and safety of use restrictions on recently fielded systems by tracking residual hazards back through the acquisition process. The objective was to develop ''lessons learned'' that could be applied to the acquisition process to minimize mishaps in fielded systems. System safety management lessons learned are defined as Army practices or policies, derived from past successes and failures, that are expected to be effective in eliminating or reducing specific systemic causes of residual hazards. They are broadly applicable and supportive of the Army structure and acquisition objectives. 29 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Integrated Building Management System (IBMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Anita Lewis

    2012-07-01

    This project provides a combination of software and services that more easily and cost-effectively help to achieve optimized building performance and energy efficiency. Featuring an open-platform, cloud- hosted application suite and an intuitive user experience, this solution simplifies a traditionally very complex process by collecting data from disparate building systems and creating a single, integrated view of building and system performance. The Fault Detection and Diagnostics algorithms developed within the IBMS have been designed and tested as an integrated component of the control algorithms running the equipment being monitored. The algorithms identify the normal control behaviors of the equipment without interfering with the equipment control sequences. The algorithms also work without interfering with any cooperative control sequences operating between different pieces of equipment or building systems. In this manner the FDD algorithms create an integrated building management system.

  5. Computer system for equipment management.

    PubMed

    Whelpton, D; Cooke, D K

    1990-05-01

    A computer system has been developed to meet the requirements of equipment management. The system was originally developed to run on personal computers, but has been upgraded to provide true multiuser facilities and more advanced program capabilities. This has been achieved using improved hardware and a relational database. The manner in which the software operates is described, with some examples examined in more detail. The system provides a wide range of information, including inventory data, repair costs and time as well as service records and worksheets. In addition it meets the other basic requirements of the department, including wordprocessing, budgetary control and stock control. The system also provides an immediate and rapid overview of the repair state of all equipment whilst reducing administration time for many aspects of the service. Emphasis has been placed on the integrity of the data and ease of entry of additional data. PMID:2348714

  6. Microcomputer Database Management Systems for Bibliographic Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard, Richard

    1986-01-01

    Discusses criteria for evaluating microcomputer database management systems (DBMS) used for storage and retrieval of bibliographic data. Two popular types of microcomputer DBMS--file management systems and relational database management systems--are evaluated with respect to these criteria. (Author/MBR)

  7. Forests may need centuries to recover their original productivity after continuous intensive management: an example from Douglas-fir stands.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Juan A

    2012-10-15

    How long would it take for forests to recover their original productivity following continuous intensive management if they are left untouched? This issue was explored using the model FORECAST, calibrated and validated for coastal Douglas-fir stands on Vancouver Island (western Canada). Three types of forest management (production of timber, pulp, and biomass) were simulated, being different in utilization level and rotation length (stem-only and 75-year rotation for timber production, whole-tree and 30-year rotation for pulp/fiber, and whole-tree and 15-year rotations for biomass production). Management was simulated for 150 years, followed by several cycles of natural growth without management ending with a stand-replacing windstorm with a return time of 200 years. Productivity-related ecological variables in previously managed stands were compared to natural forests. Stands developed after management for timber would quickly reach values similar to non-managed forests for tree and understory total biomass, stored carbon, available nitrogen and soil organic matter (SOM). However, intensive management regimes designed for fiber and biomass production would cause a decrease in SOM and nutrient availability, increasing understory biomass. As a consequence, stands recovering from intensive management would need at least two stand-replacing events (400 years) to reach a productivity status similar to non-managed stands. Stands developed after management for biomass would take much longer, up to 600 or 800 years to recover similar values of SOM and understory biomass, respectively. Current fertilization prescriptions will likely be not enough to stop a quick drop in forest productivity associated with intensive management. Intensifying forest management to achieve short-term objectives could produce a reduction of stand productivity that would influence tree growth for very long time (up to several centuries), if such management is continuously implemented at the same stand. Some of these effects could be reduced if one rotation of intensive management (for pulp or bioenergy) is followed by a rotation of management for timber, or by leaving the forest without management for an equivalent time. PMID:22917531

  8. Combat Agility Management System (CAMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skow, Andrew; Porada, William

    1994-01-01

    The proper management of energy becomes a complex task in fighter aircraft which have high angle of attack (AOA) capability. Maneuvers at high AOA are accompanied by high bleed rates (velocity decrease), a characteristic that is usually undesirable in a typical combat arena. Eidetics has developed under NASA SBIR Phase 1 and NAVAIR SBIR Phase 2 contracts a system which allows a pilot to more easily and effectively manage the trade-off of energy (airspeed or altitude) for turn rate while not imposing hard limits on the high AOA nose pointing capability that can be so important in certain air combat maneuver situations. This has been accomplished by incorporating a two-stage angle of attack limiter into the flight control laws. The first stage sets a limit on AOA to achieve a limit on the maximum bleed rate (selectable) by limiting AOA to values which are dependent on the aircraft attitude and dynamic pressure (or flight path, velocity, and altitude). The second stage sets an AOA limit near the AOA for C(sub l max). One of the principal benefits of such a system is that it enables a low-experience pilot to become much more proficient at managing his energy. The Phase 2 simulation work is complete, and an exploratory flight test on the F-18 HARV is planned for the Fall of 1994 to demonstrate/validate the concept.

  9. [Changes in soil organic carbon and soil microbial functional diversity of Carya cathayensis plantations under intensive managements].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia-Sen; Qian, Jin-Fang; Tong, Zhi-Peng; Huang, Jian-Qin; Zhao, Ke-Li

    2014-09-01

    The change characteristics of soil organic carbon and microbial function diversity in Chinese hickory Carya cathayensis stands with different intensive-management durations (5, 10, 15 and 20 years) were studied. The results showed that soil total organic carbon (TOC), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) decreased significantly, while the stability of soil C pool increased significantly after the conversion from evergreen and deciduous broadleaf forest to intensively-managed forest (IMF). TOC, MBC and WSOC in the hickory forest soil decreased by 28.4%, 34.1% and 53.3% with 5-year intensive management, and by 38.6%, 48.9% and 64.1% with 20-year intensive management, respectively. The proportions of carboxyl C, phenolic C and aromatic C in the hickory forest soil all increased significantly, and the aromaticity of soil organic C increased by 23.0%. Soil microbial functional diversity decreased greatly af- ter intensive management of Chinese hickory forest. Significant differences in average well color development (AWCD) were found between the 0- and 5-year treatments and the 10-, 15- and 20- year treatments. The microbial diversity indexes (H) and evenness indexes (E) in the 0- and 5-year treatments were much greater than in the 10- and 20-year treatments. Correlation analysis showed that there were significant correlations among soil TOC, WSOC, MBC, AWCD, H and E. PMID:25757296

  10. Fluid management systems technology summaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, J. A.; Blatt, M. H.; Bennett, F. O., Jr.; Campbell, B. J.

    1974-01-01

    A summarization and categorization of the pertinent literature associated with fluid management systems technology having potential application to in-orbit fluid transfer and/or associated storage are presented. A literature search was conducted to obtain pertinent documents for review. Reports determined to be of primary significance were summarized in the following manner: (1) report identification, (2) objective(s) of the work, (3) description of pertinent work performed, (4) major results, and (5) comments of the reviewer. Pertinent figures are presented on a single facing page separate from the text. Specific areas covered are: fluid line dynamics and thermodynamics, low-g mass gauging, other instrumentation, stratification/pressurization, low-g vent systems, fluid mixing refrigeration and reliquefaction, and low-g interface control and liquid acquisition systems. Reports which were reviewed and not summarized, along with reasons for not summarizing, are also listed.

  11. Habitat restoration promotes pollinator persistence and colonization in intensively managed agriculture.

    PubMed

    M'Gonigle, Leithen K; Ponisio, Lauren C; Cutler, Kerry; Kremen, Claire

    2015-09-01

    Widespread evidence of pollinator declines has led to policies supporting habitat restoration including in agricultural landscapes. Yet, little is yet known about the effectiveness of these restoration techniques for promoting stable populations and communities of pollinators, especially in intensively managed agricultural landscapes. Introducing floral resources, such as flowering hedgerows, to enhance intensively cultivated agricultural landscapes is known to increase the abundances of native insect pollinators in and around restored areas. Whether this is a result of local short-term concentration at flowers or indicative of true increases in the persistence and species richness of these communities remains unclear. It is also unknown whether this practice supports species of conservation concern (e.g., those with more specialized dietary requirements). Analyzing occupancies of native bees and syrphid flies from 330 surveys across 15 sites over eight years, we found that hedgerow restoration promotes rates of between-season persistence and colonization as compared with unrestored field edges. Enhanced persistence and colonization, in turn, led to the formation of more species-rich communities. We also find that hedgerows benefit floral resource specialists more than generalists, emphasizing the value of this restoration technique for conservation in agricultural landscapes. PMID:26552264

  12. 21 CFR 880.6315 - Remote Medication Management System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Remote Medication Management System. 880.6315... Remote Medication Management System. (a) Identification...A remote medication management system is a device composed of clinical and communications...

  13. 21 CFR 880.6315 - Remote Medication Management System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Remote Medication Management System. 880.6315... Remote Medication Management System. (a) Identification...A remote medication management system is a device composed of clinical and communications...

  14. Managing Soil Properties through Dryland Cropping System Intensities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modification of soil functioning/quality parameters (i.e., organic matter content) is important to improve the capacity of soil as a water storage-reservoir for crop production in dryland. A long-term dryland cropping research study was established at the USDA-ARS farm near Lubbock, Texas in 2003, ...

  15. Managing soil properties through dryland cropping system intensities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transition from irrigated to dryland production is imminent for the Southern High Plains region due to the minimum recharge occurring to the Ogallala aquifer. Thus, a long-term dryland study was established on USDA-ARS farmland near Lubbock, Texas in 2003 to evaluate the ability of different cr...

  16. Industrial Application of High Combustion Intensity Systems and Energy Conservation Implications 

    E-print Network

    Williams, F. D. M.; Anderson, L. E.

    1982-01-01

    process are quantified for vortex stabilized systems. Design analyses of the fuel injectors used with gaseous, liquid and pulverized coal fuels are also presented. The resulting high intensity combustion systems evolved are illustrated with photographs...

  17. Design and Data Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messer, Elizabeth; Messer, Brad; Carter, Judy; Singletary, Todd; Albasini, Colby; Smith, Tammy

    2007-01-01

    The Design and Data Management System (DDMS) was developed to automate the NASA Engineering Order (EO) and Engineering Change Request (ECR) processes at the Propulsion Test Facilities at Stennis Space Center for efficient and effective Configuration Management (CM). Prior to the development of DDMS, the CM system was a manual, paper-based system that required an EO or ECR submitter to walk the changes through the acceptance process to obtain necessary approval signatures. This approval process could take up to two weeks, and was subject to a variety of human errors. The process also requires that the CM office make copies and distribute them to the Configuration Control Board members for review prior to meetings. At any point, there was a potential for an error or loss of the change records, meaning the configuration of record was not accurate. The new Web-based DDMS eliminates unnecessary copies, reduces the time needed to distribute the paperwork, reduces time to gain the necessary signatures, and prevents the variety of errors inherent in the previous manual system. After implementation of the DDMS, all EOs and ECRs can be automatically checked prior to submittal to ensure that the documentation is complete and accurate. Much of the configuration information can be documented in the DDMS through pull-down forms to ensure consistent entries by the engineers and technicians in the field. The software also can electronically route the documents through the signature process to obtain the necessary approvals needed for work authorization. The workflow of the system allows for backups and timestamps that determine the correct routing and completion of all required authorizations in a more timely manner, as well as assuring the quality and accuracy of the configuration documents.

  18. Telemedicine in the intensive care unit: its role in emergencies and disaster management.

    PubMed

    Rolston, Daniel M; Meltzer, Joseph S

    2015-04-01

    Disasters and emergencies lead to an overburdened health care system after the event, so additional telemedicine support can improve patient outcomes. If telemedicine is going to become an integral part of disaster response, there needs to be improved preparation for the use of telemedicine technologies. Telemedicine can improve patient triage, monitoring, access to specialists, health care provider burnout, and disaster recovery. However, the evidence for telemedicine and tele-intensive care in the disaster setting is limited, and it should be further studied to identify situations in which it is the most clinically effective and cost-effective. PMID:25814452

  19. A Lightweight, High-performance I/O Management Package for Data-intensive Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun

    2011-06-22

    Our group has been working with ANL collaborators on the topic â??bridging the gap between parallel file system and local file systemâ? during the course of this project period. We visited Argonne National Lab -- Dr. Robert Rossâ??s group for one week in the past summer 2007. We looked over our current project progress and planned the activities for the incoming years 2008-09. The PI met Dr. Robert Ross several times such as HEC FSIO workshop 08, SCâ??08 and SCâ??10. We explored the opportunities to develop a production system by leveraging our current prototype to (SOGP+PVFS) a new PVFS version. We delivered SOGP+PVFS codes to ANL PVFS2 group in 2008.We also talked about exploring a potential project on developing new parallel programming models and runtime systems for data-intensive scalable computing (DISC). The methodology is to evolve MPI towards DISC by incorporating some functions of Google MapReduce parallel programming model. More recently, we are together exploring how to leverage existing works to perform (1) coordination/aggregation of local I/O operations prior to movement over the WAN, (2) efficient bulk data movement over the WAN, (3) latency hiding techniques for latency-intensive operations. Since 2009, we start applying Hadoop/MapReduce to some HEC applications with LANL scientists John Bent and Salman Habib. Another on-going work is to improve checkpoint performance at I/O forwarding Layer for the Road Runner super computer with James Nuetz and Gary Gridder at LANL. Two senior undergraduates from our research group did summer internships about high-performance file and storage system projects in LANL since 2008 for consecutive three years. Both of them are now pursuing Ph.D. degree in our group and will be 4th year in the PhD program in Fall 2011 and go to LANL to advance two above-mentioned works during this winter break. Since 2009, we have been collaborating with several computer scientists (Gary Grider, John bent, Parks Fields, James Nunez, Hsing-Bung Chen, etc) from HPC5 and James Ahrens from Advanced Computing Laboratory in Los Alamos National Laboratory. We hold a weekly conference and/or video meeting on advancing works at two fronts: the hardware/software infrastructure of building large-scale data intensive cluster and research publications. Our group members assist in constructing several onsite LANL data intensive clusters. Two parties have been developing software codes and research papers together using both sidesâ?? resources.

  20. Evidence and consensus based guideline for the management of delirium, analgesia, and sedation in intensive care medicine. Revision 2015 (DAS-Guideline 2015) – short version

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Ralf; Binder, Andreas; Biniek, Rolf; Braune, Stephan; Buerkle, Hartmut; Dall, Peter; Demirakca, Sueha; Eckardt, Rahel; Eggers, Verena; Eichler, Ingolf; Fietze, Ingo; Freys, Stephan; Fründ, Andreas; Garten, Lars; Gohrbandt, Bernhard; Harth, Irene; Hartl, Wolfgang; Heppner, Hans-Jürgen; Horter, Johannes; Huth, Ralf; Janssens, Uwe; Jungk, Christine; Kaeuper, Kristin Maria; Kessler, Paul; Kleinschmidt, Stefan; Kochanek, Matthias; Kumpf, Matthias; Meiser, Andreas; Mueller, Anika; Orth, Maritta; Putensen, Christian; Roth, Bernd; Schaefer, Michael; Schaefers, Rainhild; Schellongowski, Peter; Schindler, Monika; Schmitt, Reinhard; Scholz, Jens; Schroeder, Stefan; Schwarzmann, Gerhard; Spies, Claudia; Stingele, Robert; Tonner, Peter; Trieschmann, Uwe; Tryba, Michael; Wappler, Frank; Waydhas, Christian; Weiss, Bjoern; Weisshaar, Guido

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, under the guidance of the DGAI (German Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine) and DIVI (German Interdisciplinary Association for Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine), twelve German medical societies published the “Evidence- and Consensus-based Guidelines on the Management of Analgesia, Sedation and Delirium in Intensive Care”. Since then, several new studies and publications have considerably increased the body of evidence, including the new recommendations from the American College of Critical Care Medicine (ACCM) in conjunction with Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) and American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) from 2013. For this update, a major restructuring and extension of the guidelines were needed in order to cover new aspects of treatment, such as sleep and anxiety management. The literature was systematically searched and evaluated using the criteria of the Oxford Center of Evidence Based Medicine. The body of evidence used to formulate these recommendations was reviewed and approved by representatives of 17 national societies. Three grades of recommendation were used as follows: Grade “A” (strong recommendation), Grade “B” (recommendation) and Grade “0” (open recommendation). The result is a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, evidence and consensus-based set of level 3 guidelines. This publication was designed for all ICU professionals, and takes into account all critically ill patient populations. It represents a guide to symptom-oriented prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of delirium, anxiety, stress, and protocol-based analgesia, sedation, and sleep-management in intensive care medicine. PMID:26609286

  1. Lion (Panthera leo) populations are declining rapidly across Africa, except in intensively managed areas.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Hans; Chapron, Guillaume; Nowell, Kristin; Henschel, Philipp; Funston, Paul; Hunter, Luke T B; Macdonald, David W; Packer, Craig

    2015-12-01

    We compiled all credible repeated lion surveys and present time series data for 47 lion (Panthera leo) populations. We used a Bayesian state space model to estimate growth rate-? for each population and summed these into three regional sets to provide conservation-relevant estimates of trends since 1990. We found a striking geographical pattern: African lion populations are declining everywhere, except in four southern countries (Botswana, Namibia, South Africa, and Zimbabwe). Population models indicate a 67% chance that lions in West and Central Africa decline by one-half, while estimating a 37% chance that lions in East Africa also decline by one-half over two decades. We recommend separate regional assessments of the lion in the World Conservation Union (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species: already recognized as critically endangered in West Africa, our analysis supports listing as regionally endangered in Central and East Africa and least concern in southern Africa. Almost all lion populations that historically exceeded ?500 individuals are declining, but lion conservation is successful in southern Africa, in part because of the proliferation of reintroduced lions in small, fenced, intensively managed, and funded reserves. If management budgets for wild lands cannot keep pace with mounting levels of threat, the species may rely increasingly on these southern African areas and may no longer be a flagship species of the once vast natural ecosystems across the rest of the continent. PMID:26504235

  2. School Management Information Systems in Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demir, Kamile

    2006-01-01

    Developments in information technologies have been impacting upon educational organizations. Principals have been using management information systems to improve the efficiency of administrative services. The aim of this research is to explore principals' perceptions about management information systems and how school management information…

  3. First on-line isotopic characterization of N2O above intensively managed grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, B.; Merbold, L.; Decock, C.; Tuzson, B.; Harris, E.; Six, J.; Emmenegger, L.; Mohn, J.

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of the four main isotopic N2O species (14N14N16O, 14N15N16O, 15N14N16O, 14N14N18O) and especially the intramolecular distribution of 15N ("site preference", SP) has been suggested as a tool to distinguish source processes and to help constrain the global N2O budget. However, current studies suffer from limited spatial and temporal resolution capabilities due to the combination of discrete flask sampling with subsequent laboratory-based mass-spectrometric analysis. Quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS) allows the selective high-precision analysis of N2O isotopic species at trace levels and is suitable for in situ measurements. Here, we present results from the first field campaign, conducted on an intensively managed grassland site in central Switzerland. N2O mole fractions and isotopic composition were determined in the atmospheric surface layer (at 2.2 m height) at a high temporal resolution with a modified state-of-the-art laser spectrometer connected to an automated N2O preconcentration unit. The analytical performance was determined from repeated measurements of a compressed air tank and resulted in measurement repeatability of 0.20, 0.12 and 0.11‰ for ?15N?, ?15N? and ?18O, respectively. Simultaneous eddy-covariance N2O flux measurements were used to determine the flux-averaged isotopic signature of soil-emitted N2O. Our measurements indicate that, in general, nitrifier-denitrification and denitrification were the prevalent sources of N2O during the campaign and that variations in isotopic composition were due to alterations in the extent to which N2O was reduced to N2 rather than to other pathways, such as hydroxylamine oxidation. Management and rewetting events were characterized by low values of the intramolecular 15N site preference (SP), ?15Nbulk and ?18O, suggesting that nitrifier-denitrification and incomplete heterotrophic bacterial denitrification responded most strongly to the induced disturbances. The flux-averaged isotopic composition of N2O from intensively managed grassland was 6.9 ± 4.3, -17.4 ± 6.2 and 27.4 ± 3.6‰ for SP, ?15Nbulk and ?18O, respectively. The approach presented here is capable of providing long-term data sets also for other N2O-emitting ecosystems, which can be used to further constrain global N2O inventories.

  4. First on-line isotopic characterization of N2O emitted from intensively managed grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, B.; Merbold, L.; Decock, C.; Tuzson, B.; Harris, E.; Six, J.; Emmenegger, L.; Mohn, J.

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of the four main isotopic N2O species (14N14N16O, 14N15N16O, 15N14N16O, 14N14N18O) and especially the intramolecular distribution of 15N (site preference, SP) has been suggested as a tool to distinguish source processes and to help constrain the global N2O budget. However, current studies suffer from limited spatial and temporal resolution capabilities due to the combination of discrete flask sampling with subsequent laboratory-based mass spectrometric analysis. Quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS) allows selective high-precision analysis of N2O isotopic species at trace levels and is suitable for in situ measurements. Here, we present results from the first field campaign, conducted on an intensively managed grassland in central Switzerland. N2O mole fractions and isotopic composition were determined in the atmospheric surface layer (2 m height) at high temporal resolution with a modified state-of-the-art laser spectrometer connected to an automated N2O preconcentration unit. The analytical performance was determined from repeated measurements of a compressed air tank and resulted in measurement repeatability of 0.20, 0.12 and 0.11‰ for ?15N?, ?15N? and ?18O, respectively. Simultaneous eddy-covariance N2O flux measurements were used to determine the flux-averaged isotopic signature of soil-emitted N2O. Our measurements indicate that in general, nitrifier-denitrification and denitrification were the prevalent sources of N2O during the campaign, and that variations in isotopic composition were rather due to alterations in the extent to which N2O was reduced to N2, than other pathways such as hydroxylamine oxidation. Management and rewetting events were characterized by low values of the intra-molecular 15N site preference (SP), ?15Nbulk and ?18O, suggesting nitrifier denitrification and incomplete heterotrophic bacterial denitrification responded most strongly to the induced disturbances. Flux-averaged isotopic composition of N2O from intensively managed grassland was 6.9 ± 4.3, -17.4 ± 6.2 and 27.4 ± 3.6‰ for SP, ?15Nbulk and ?18O, respectively. The approach presented here is capable of providing long-term datasets also for other N2O emitting ecosystems, which can be used to further constrain global N2O inventories.

  5. Optimal Multi-scale Demand-side Management for Continuous Power-Intensive Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sumit

    With the advent of deregulation in electricity markets and an increasing share of intermittent power generation sources, the profitability of industrial consumers that operate power-intensive processes has become directly linked to the variability in energy prices. Thus, for industrial consumers that are able to adjust to the fluctuations, time-sensitive electricity prices (as part of so-called Demand-Side Management (DSM) in the smart grid) offer potential economical incentives. In this thesis, we introduce optimization models and decomposition strategies for the multi-scale Demand-Side Management of continuous power-intensive processes. On an operational level, we derive a mode formulation for scheduling under time-sensitive electricity prices. The formulation is applied to air separation plants and cement plants to minimize the operating cost. We also describe how a mode formulation can be used for industrial combined heat and power plants that are co-located at integrated chemical sites to increase operating profit by adjusting their steam and electricity production according to their inherent flexibility. Furthermore, a robust optimization formulation is developed to address the uncertainty in electricity prices by accounting for correlations and multiple ranges in the realization of the random variables. On a strategic level, we introduce a multi-scale model that provides an understanding of the value of flexibility of the current plant configuration and the value of additional flexibility in terms of retrofits for Demand-Side Management under product demand uncertainty. The integration of multiple time scales leads to large-scale two-stage stochastic programming problems, for which we need to apply decomposition strategies in order to obtain a good solution within a reasonable amount of time. Hence, we describe two decomposition schemes that can be applied to solve two-stage stochastic programming problems: First, a hybrid bi-level decomposition scheme with novel Lagrangean-type and subset-type cuts to strengthen the relaxation. Second, an enhanced cross-decomposition scheme that integrates Benders decomposition and Lagrangean decomposition on a scenario basis. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our developed methodology, we provide several industrial case studies throughout the thesis.

  6. ["Symptomatic Treatment of Delirium, Anxiety and Stress, and Protocol Based Analgesia, Sedation and Management of Sleep in Intensive Care Patients"].

    PubMed

    Müller, Anika; Weiß, Björn; Spies, Claudia D

    2015-11-01

    Critically ill patients suffer from anxiety, stress, pain, sleep disturbance and delirium. The updated version of the German evidence and consensus based guideline "Analgesia, Sedation and Delirium management in Intensive Care - DAS 2015" contributes an improved therapeutic management and is aimed to improve clinical outcome based on the current state of evidence. The task force members were representatives from 17 national medical societies therefore have consented following guiding principle in common: "Patients in intensive care shall be awake, alert and free of pain, anxiety and delirium, to be able to participate in the healing process actively." PMID:26650949

  7. Development of Intensity-Duration-Frequency curves at ungauged sites: risk management under changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, San Chuin; Raghavan, Srivatsan V.; Liong, Shie-Yui

    2014-12-01

    The impact of a changing climate is already being felt on several hydrological systems both on a regional and sub-regional scale of the globe. Southeast Asia is one of the regions strongly affected by climate change. With climate change, one of the anticipated impacts is an increase in the intensity and frequency of extreme rainfall which further increase the region's flood catastrophes, human casualties and economic loss. Optimal mitigation measures can be undertaken only when stormwater systems are designed using rainfall Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) curves derived from a long and good quality rainfall data. Developing IDF curves for the future climate can be even more challenging especially for ungauged sites. The current practice to derive current climate's IDF curves for ungauged sites is, for example, to `borrow' or `interpolate' data from regions of climatologically similar characteristics. Recent measures to derive IDF curves for present climate was performed by extracting rainfall data from a high spatial resolution Regional Climate Model driven by ERA-40 reanalysis dataset. This approach has been demonstrated on an ungauged site (Java, Indonesia) and the results were quite promising. In this paper, the authors extend the application of the approach to other ungauged sites particularly in Peninsular Malaysia. The results of the study undoubtedly have significance contribution in terms of local and regional hydrology (Malaysia and Southeast Asian countries). The anticipated impacts of climate change especially increase in rainfall intensity and its frequency appreciates the derivation of future IDF curves in this study. It also provides policy makers better information on the adequacy of storm drainage design, for the current climate at the ungauged sites, and the adequacy of the existing storm drainage to cope with the impacts of climate change.

  8. Integrated Energy and Greenhouse Gas Management System 

    E-print Network

    Spates, C. N.

    2010-01-01

    Management Strategies- a winning approach to meet the challenge; Turn a potential cost of compliance into a new cash flow source; Leveraging Energy Management Systems to optimize savings; Navigating through the new Greenhouse Gas reporting requirements...

  9. Training Management System (TRAMS) Concept Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Informatics, Inc., Rockville, MD.

    The objective of the Marine Corps Training Management System (TRAMS) is to assist Headquarters Marine Corps staff agencies in the planning and management functions related to the Marine Corps 'training line'. (Author)

  10. The role of metrics and measurements in a software intensive total quality management environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Charles B.

    1992-01-01

    Paramax Space Systems began its mission as a member of the Rockwell Space Operations Company (RSOC) team which was the successful bidder on a massive operations consolidation contract for the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) at JSC. The contract awarded to the team was the Space Transportation System Operations Contract (STSOC). Our initial challenge was to accept responsibility for a very large, highly complex and fragmented collection of software from eleven different contractors and transform it into a coherent, operational baseline. Concurrently, we had to integrate a diverse group of people from eleven different companies into a single, cohesive team. Paramax executives recognized the absolute necessity to develop a business culture based on the concept of employee involvement to execute and improve the complex process of our new environment. Our executives clearly understood that management needed to set the example and lead the way to quality improvement. The total quality management policy and the metrics used in this endeavor are presented.

  11. Tank waste remediation system configuration management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Vann, J.M.

    1998-01-08

    The configuration management program for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project Mission supports management of the project baseline by providing the mechanisms to identify, document, and control the functional and physical characteristics of the products. This document is one of the tools used to develop and control the mission and work. It is an integrated approach for control of technical, cost, schedule, and administrative information necessary to manage the configurations for the TWRS Project Mission. Configuration management focuses on five principal activities: configuration management system management, configuration identification, configuration status accounting, change control, and configuration management assessments. TWRS Project personnel must execute work in a controlled fashion. Work must be performed by verbatim use of authorized and released technical information and documentation. Application of configuration management will be consistently applied across all TWRS Project activities and assessed accordingly. The Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) configuration management requirements are prescribed in HNF-MP-013, Configuration Management Plan (FDH 1997a). This TWRS Configuration Management Plan (CMP) implements those requirements and supersedes the Tank Waste Remediation System Configuration Management Program Plan described in Vann, 1996. HNF-SD-WM-CM-014, Tank Waste Remediation System Configuration Management Implementation Plan (Vann, 1997) will be revised to implement the requirements of this plan. This plan provides the responsibilities, actions and tools necessary to implement the requirements as defined in the above referenced documents.

  12. Hospital information management system: an evolutionary knowledge management perspective.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, S; Saxena, Avneet; Wadhwa, Bharat

    2007-01-01

    The evolving paradigm shift resulting from IT, social and technological changes has created a need for developing an innovative knowledge-based healthcare system, which can effectively meet global healthcare system demands and also cater to future trends. The Hospital Information Management System (HIMS) is developed with this sole aim in mind, which helps in processing and management of hospital information not only inside the boundary, but also beyond the hospital boundary, e.g., telemedicine or e-healthcare. The purpose of this paper is to present such kind of functional HIMS, which can efficiently satisfy the current and future system requirements by using Knowledge Management (KM) and data management systems. The HIMS is developed in a KM context, wherein users can share and use the knowledge more effectively. The proposed system is fully compatible with future technical, social, managerial and economical requirements. PMID:18048272

  13. Knowledge Management: A System Dynamics Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saurabh, Kumar

    2005-01-01

    In the present day market scenario of intense competition, organizations need to know what they know and be able to leverage on its knowledge base to gain competitive advantage. In this knowledge era, organisations can create and sustain competitive advantage through initiation of appropriate knowledge management processes. The organisations that…

  14. The Dark Energy Survey Data Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, Joseph J.; Barkhouse, Wayne; Beldica, Cristina; Bertin, Emmanuel; Dora Cai, Y.; Nicolaci da Costa, Luiz A.; Darnell, J.Anthony; Daues, Gregory E.; Jarvis, Michael; Gower, Michelle; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab /Rio de Janeiro Observ.

    2008-07-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) collaboration will study cosmic acceleration with a 5000 deg2 griZY survey in the southern sky over 525 nights from 2011-2016. The DES data management (DESDM) system will be used to process and archive these data and the resulting science ready data products. The DESDM system consists of an integrated archive, a processing framework, an ensemble of astronomy codes and a data access framework. We are developing the DESDM system for operation in the high performance computing (HPC) environments at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) and Fermilab. Operating the DESDM system in an HPC environment offers both speed and flexibility. We will employ it for our regular nightly processing needs, and for more compute-intensive tasks such as large scale image coaddition campaigns, extraction of weak lensing shear from the full survey dataset, and massive seasonal reprocessing of the DES data. Data products will be available to the Collaboration and later to the public through a virtual-observatory compatible web portal. Our approach leverages investments in publicly available HPC systems, greatly reducing hardware and maintenance costs to the project, which must deploy and maintain only the storage, database platforms and orchestration and web portal nodes that are specific to DESDM. In Fall 2007, we tested the current DESDM system on both simulated and real survey data. We used TeraGrid to process 10 simulated DES nights (3TB of raw data), ingesting and calibrating approximately 250 million objects into the DES Archive database. We also used DESDM to process and calibrate over 50 nights of survey data acquired with the Mosaic2 camera. Comparison to truth tables in the case of the simulated data and internal crosschecks in the case of the real data indicate that astrometric and photometric data quality is excellent.

  15. High-Intensity Radiated Field Fault-Injection Experiment for a Fault-Tolerant Distributed Communication System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Amy M.; Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo; Malekpour, Mahyar R.; Gonzalez, Oscar R.; Gray, W. Steven

    2010-01-01

    Safety-critical distributed flight control systems require robustness in the presence of faults. In general, these systems consist of a number of input/output (I/O) and computation nodes interacting through a fault-tolerant data communication system. The communication system transfers sensor data and control commands and can handle most faults under typical operating conditions. However, the performance of the closed-loop system can be adversely affected as a result of operating in harsh environments. In particular, High-Intensity Radiated Field (HIRF) environments have the potential to cause random fault manifestations in individual avionic components and to generate simultaneous system-wide communication faults that overwhelm existing fault management mechanisms. This paper presents the design of an experiment conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center's HIRF Laboratory to statistically characterize the faults that a HIRF environment can trigger on a single node of a distributed flight control system.

  16. AOIPS water resources data management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, E. S.; Shotwell, R. L.; Place, M. C.; Belknap, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    A geocoded data management system applicable for hydrological applications was designed to demonstrate the utility of the Atmospheric and Oceanographic Information Processing System (AOIPS) for hydrological applications. Within that context, the geocoded hydrology data management system was designed to take advantage of the interactive capability of the AOIPS hardware. Portions of the Water Resource Data Management System which best demonstrate the interactive nature of the hydrology data management system were implemented on the AOIPS. A hydrological case study was prepared using all data supplied for the Bear River watershed located in northwest Utah, southeast Idaho, and western Wyoming.

  17. Knowledge-based systems for power management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lollar, L. F.

    1992-01-01

    NASA-Marshall's Electrical Power Branch has undertaken the development of expert systems in support of further advancements in electrical power system automation. Attention is given to the features (1) of the Fault Recovery and Management Expert System, (2) a resource scheduler or Master of Automated Expert Scheduling Through Resource Orchestration, and (3) an adaptive load-priority manager, or Load Priority List Management System. The characteristics of an advisory battery manager for the Hubble Space Telescope, designated the 'nickel-hydrogen expert system', are also noted.

  18. LIGHT INTENSITY AFFECTS DISTRIBUTION OF ATTACKING PSEUDACTEON CURVATUS (DIPTERA: PHORIDAE) IN A LABORATORY REARING SYSTEM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Distribution of attacking phorid flies (Pseudacteon curvatus Borgmeier) in a laboratory rearing system was tested for dependence on light intensity under 2 different light regimes. Light intensity (range, approx. 220-340 Lux) influenced fly distribution in light regime 1; in the second light regime...

  19. Managing Space System Faults: Coalescing NASA's Views

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muirhead, Brian; Fesq, Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    Managing faults and their resultant failures is a fundamental and critical part of developing and operating aerospace systems. Yet, recent studies have shown that the engineering "discipline" required to manage faults is not widely recognized nor evenly practiced within the NASA community. Attempts to simply name this discipline in recent years has been fraught with controversy among members of the Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM), Fault Management (FM), Fault Protection (FP), Hazard Analysis (HA), and Aborts communities. Approaches to managing space system faults typically are unique to each organization, with little commonality in the architectures, processes and practices across the industry.

  20. An Analysis of the Environments of Intense Convective Systems in West Africa in 2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholls, Stephen D.; Mohr, Karen I.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the local- and regional-scale thermodynamical and dynamical environments associated with intense convective systems in West Africa during 2003. We identified convective system cases from TRMM microwave imagery, classifying each case by the system minimum 85-GHz brightness temperature and by the estimated elapsed time of propagation from high terrain. The speed of the mid-level jet, the magnitude of the low-level shear, and the surface equivalent potential temperature (theta(sub e)) were greater for the intense cases compared to the non-intense cases, although the differences between the means tended to be small, less than 3K for surface theta(sub e). Hypothesis testing of a series of commonly used intensity prediction metrics resulted in significant results only for low-level metrics such as convective available potential energy and not for any of the mid- or upper-level metrics such as 700-hPa theta(sub e). None of the environmental variables or intensity metrics by themselves or in combination appeared to be reliable direct predictors of intensity. In the regional scale analysis, the majority of intense convective systems occurred in the surface baroclinic zone where surface theta(sub e) exceeded 344 K and the 700-hPa zonal wind speeds were less than -6/ms. Fewer intense cases compared to non-intense cases were associated with African easterly wave troughs. Fewer than 25% of our cases occurred in environments with detectable Saharan dust loads, and the results for intense and non-intense cases were similar. Our results for the regional analysis were consistent with the seasonal movement of the WAM and the intertropical front, regional differences in topography, and AEW energetics.

  1. Managing geometric information with a data base management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dube, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    The strategies for managing computer based geometry are described. The computer model of geometry is the basis for communication, manipulation, and analysis of shape information. The research on integrated programs for aerospace-vehicle design (IPAD) focuses on the use of data base management system (DBMS) technology to manage engineering/manufacturing data. The objectives of IPAD is to develop a computer based engineering complex which automates the storage, management, protection, and retrieval of engineering data. In particular, this facility must manage geometry information as well as associated data. The approach taken on the IPAD project to achieve this objective is discussed. Geometry management in current systems and the approach taken in the early IPAD prototypes are examined.

  2. Single System Image Cluster Management

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-02-13

    Cluster computing has quickly proven itself to be a capable workhorse for a wide variety of production computing tasks; however, setting up and maintaining a cluster still requires significantly more effort than administrating just a single machine. As computing hardware descreases in price and cluster sizes grow, it is becoming increasingly important to manage clusters cleverly so that a system administration effort can "scale" as well. To ease the task of mananging many machines, administratorsmore »often deploy an environment that is homogeneous across all nodes of a cluster, and maintain a snapshot of the filesystem as a 'master image'. However due to operational, behavioral, and physical constraints, many nodes often require numerous deviations from the master image in order to operate as desired.« less

  3. Business Management System Support Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, Jay

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to develop a searchable database compiled with internal and external audit findings/observations. The data will correspond to the findings and observations from the date of Center-wide implementation of the ISO 9001-2000 standard to the present (2003-2008). It was derived and extracted from several sources and was in multiple formats. Once extracted, categorization of the findings/observations would be possible. The final data was mapped to the ISO 9001-2000 standard with the understanding that it will be displayed graphically. The data will be used to verify trends, associate risks, and establish timelines to identify strengths and weaknesses to determine areas of improvement in the Kennedy Space Center Business Management System Internal Audit Program.

  4. Assessing waste management systems using reginalt software

    SciTech Connect

    Meshkov, N.K.; Camasta, S.F.; Gilbert, T.L.

    1988-03-01

    A method for assessing management systems for low-level radioactive waste is being developed for US Department of Energy. The method is based on benefit-cost-risk analysis. Waste management is broken down into its component steps, which are generation, treatment, packaging, storage, transportation, and disposal. Several different alternatives available for each waste management step are described. A particular waste management system consists of a feasible combination of alternatives for each step. Selecting an optimal waste management system would generally proceed as follows: (1) qualitative considerations are used to narrow down the choice of waste management system alternatives to a manageable number; (2) the costs and risks for each of these system alternatives are evaluated; (3) the number of alternatives is further reduced by eliminating alternatives with similar risks but higher costs, or those with similar costs but higher risks; (4) a trade-off factor between cost and risk is chosen and used to compute the objective function (sum of the cost and risk); and (5) the selection of the optimal waste management system among the remaining alternatives is made by choosing the alternative with the smallest value for the objective function. The authors propose that the REGINALT software system, developed by EG and G Idaho, Inc., as an acid for managers of low-level commerical waste, be augmented for application to the managment of DOE-generated waste. Specific recommendations for modification of the REGINALT system are made. 51 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. 5 CFR 9701.405 - Performance management system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Performance...

  6. 5 CFR 9701.405 - Performance management system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Performance...

  7. 5 CFR 9701.405 - Performance management system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Performance...

  8. Management and Safety of Transportation Systems

    E-print Network

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    Management and Safety of Transportation Systems University Transportation Center for Alabama A N N and direction for activities. Management and Safety of Transportation Systems In allocating UTCA funding. Theme The theme reflects the capabilities of UA System faculty members, and of the transportation needs

  9. Management Systems in Education. Professional Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montello, Paul A.; Wimberly, Charles A.

    This book provides a brief review of many concepts and practices that are currently being explored and utilized in educational management systems. It is intended to aid teachers and administrators who seek a general understanding of management systems, as well as school board members and laymen who are interested in the systems approach to…

  10. A model for international border management systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, Ruth Ann

    2008-09-01

    To effectively manage the security or control of its borders, a country must understand its border management activities as a system. Using its systems engineering and security foundations as a Department of Energy National Security Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories has developed such an approach to modeling and analyzing border management systems. This paper describes the basic model and its elements developed under Laboratory Directed Research and Development project 08-684.

  11. Management system, organizational climate and performance relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, B. D.

    1979-01-01

    Seven aerospace firms were investigated to determine if a relationship existed among management systems, organizational climate, and organization performance. Positive relationships were found between each of these variables, but a statistically significant relationship existed only between the management system and organizational climate. The direction and amount of communication and the degree of decentralized decision-making, elements of the management system, also had a statistically significant realtionship with organization performance.

  12. Automated transportation management system (ATMS) software project management plan (SPMP)

    SciTech Connect

    Weidert, R.S., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-20

    The Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS) Software Project Management plan (SPMP) is the lead planning document governing the life cycle of the ATMS and its integration into the Transportation Information Network (TIN). This SPMP defines the project tasks, deliverables, and high level schedules involved in developing the client/server ATMS software.

  13. Kentico Content Management System (CMS) Managing Financial Assistance Content

    E-print Network

    Artemov, Sergei N.

    Kentico Content Management System (CMS) Managing Financial Assistance Content I. Introduction The Kentico CMS provides brand new process to enter Financial Assistance items. This feature conveniently allows website visitors to easily find Financial Assistance packages available to them. A. Where Visitors

  14. Protocol-Based Care versus Individualized Management of Patients in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Siner, Jonathan M; Connors, Geoffrey R

    2015-12-01

    The delivery of evidence-based care in the high-acuity environment of the intensive care unit can be challenging. In an effort to help turn guidelines and standards of care into consistent and uniform practice, physicians and hospitals turn toward protocol-based medical care. A protocol can help guide a practitioner to make correct interventions, at the right time, and in the proper order when managing a given disease. But to be considered a success, a protocol must meet several standards. A protocol must facilitate consistent practice, guiding the practitioner to deliver care more consistently than without the protocol. A good protocol must also be in alignment with the provider's general practice and beliefs to assure wide adoption and complete penetrance. Finally, the protocol must deliver the most medically correct care-neither simplifying nor overcomplicating health care delivery. In addition to the care the protocol delivers, it must overcome other barriers to gain acceptance. These include concerns about protocol usage among medical trainees, physician concern regarding loss of autonomy, and the ceiling effect protocol-driven care places on expert practitioners, among other concerns. The aim of this article is to critically appraise what it means for a protocol to be considered successful with an aim toward improving protocol design and implementation in the future. PMID:26595047

  15. A Computer System for Mission Managers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolchin, Robert; Achar, Sathy; Yang, Tina; Lee, Tom

    1987-01-01

    Mission Managers' Workstation (MMW) is personal-computer-based system providing data management and reporting functions to assist Space Shuttle mission managers. Allows to relate events and stored data in timely and organized fashion. Using MMW, standard reports formatted, generated, edited, and electronically communicated with minimum clerical help. Written in PASCAL, BASIC, and assembler.

  16. Intensive Eucalyptus plantation management in Brazil: Long-term effects on soil carbon dynamics across 300 sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, R. L.; Stape, J.; Binkley, D.

    2011-12-01

    Intensively managed forest plantations now cover more than 6 million hectares in Brazil, and another 20 million hectares in other tropical regions. Although aboveground biomass, and therefore carbon, is well monitored due to commercial interest, the belowground carbon dynamics and site sustainability remain poorly understood. So, how does intensive silviculture change the storage of carbon in soils? Trends in soil organic carbon from land-use change indicate that conversion from pastures to Eucalyptus plantations should maintain soil carbon stocks. However, comprehensive, long-term studies are needed to understand the variability in these trends to better manage these systems for sustainable productivity across a highly variable landscape, as well as to understand the role that soils may play in sequestering carbon for climate change mitigation. In this unique, long-term soil study, soil samples were collected in the 1980s/90s, 2001, and 2010 across 300 intensively managed Eucalyptus plantation sites located in the states of Bahia, Espirito Santo, and Sao Paulo, Brazil. Natural ecosystems for these states include Savannah-Dry Forest, Atlantic Forest, and Savanna, respectively. The sampling covered at least three complete rotations of Eucalyptus at each site; climate, past land use, productivity, and soil characteristics vary across this geographic gradient. Across the two periods, both Espirito Santo (P<0.001) and Bahia (P=0.05) showed a decrease in soil carbon concentrations, while Sao Paulo saw no change over time. For the 0-30 cm layer, plantations in Espirito Santo state had the largest decrease in soil carbon concentration up to 2001, decreasing soil carbon stocks at an average rate of 1.3 Mg C ha-1 year-1. This, however, was followed by no significant change from 2001 to 2010 which may indicate stabilization of soil carbon stocks under the new land use. The Eucalyptus in Bahia created no change in the first sampling period, but saw a decline of 0.35 Mg C ha-1year-1 in soil carbon in the second sampling period from 2001-2010. Initial results show that, across the regions, sites that had higher soil carbon stocks tended to lose more soil carbon under intensive silviculture. In all three regions, clay content related strongly to soil carbon concentrations. However, the clay did not have a consistent relationship with the rates of change in soil carbon concentration, varying among regions, with negative, positive, and no relationship for the 2001-2010 time period. Further investigation will determine relationships with temperature and precipitation, past land use history, and Eucalyptus productivity. These results will be essential in evaluating the effects on soil organic carbon dynamics due to conversion to short-rotation Eucalyptus plantations in the tropics across a broad and variable landscape.

  17. The LSST Data Management System

    E-print Network

    Juri?, Mario; Lim, K-T; Lupton, Robert H; Dubois-Felsmann, Gregory; Jenness, Tim; Axelrod, Tim S; Aleksi?, Jovan; Allsman, Roberta A; AlSayyad, Yusra; Alt, Jason; Armstrong, Robert; Basney, Jim; Becker, Andrew C; Becla, Jacek; Bickerton, Steven J; Biswas, Rahul; Bosch, James; Boutigny, Dominique; Kind, Matias Carrasco; Ciardi, David R; Connolly, Andrew J; Daniel, Scott F; Daues, Gregory E; Economou, Frossie; Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Fausti, Angelo; Fisher-Levine, Merlin; Freemon, D Michael; Gee, Perry; Gris, Philippe; Hernandez, Fabio; Hoblitt, Joshua; Ivezi?, Željko; Jammes, Fabrice; Jevremovi?, Darko; Jones, R Lynne; Kalmbach, J Bryce; Kasliwal, Vishal P; Krughoff, K Simon; Lang, Dustin; Lurie, John; Lust, Nate B; Mullally, Fergal; MacArthur, Lauren A; Melchior, Peter; Moeyens, Joachim; Nidever, David L; Owen, Russell; Parejko, John K; Peterson, J Matt; Petravick, Donald; Pietrowicz, Stephen R; Price, Paul A; Reiss, David J; Shaw, Richard A; Sick, Jonathan; Slater, Colin T; Strauss, Michael A; Sullivan, Ian S; Swinbank, John D; Van Dyk, Schuyler; Vuj?i?, Veljko; Withers, Alexander; Yoachim, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is a large-aperture, wide-field, ground-based survey system that will image the sky in six optical bands from 320 to 1050 nm, uniformly covering approximately $18,000$deg$^2$ of the sky over 800 times. The LSST is currently under construction on Cerro Pach\\'on in Chile, and expected to enter operations in 2022. Once operational, the LSST will explore a wide range of astrophysical questions, from discovering "killer" asteroids to examining the nature of Dark Energy. The LSST will generate on average 15 TB of data per night, and will require a comprehensive Data Management system to reduce the raw data to scientifically useful catalogs and images with minimum human intervention. These reductions will result in a real-time alert stream, and eleven data releases over the 10-year duration of LSST operations. To enable this processing, the LSST project is developing a new, general-purpose, high-performance, scalable, well documented, open source data processing software st...

  18. Electrofluidic systems for contrast management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebello, Keith J.; Maranchi, Jeffrey P.; Tiffany, Jason E.; Brown, Christopher Y.; Maisano, Adam J.; Hagedon, Matthew A.; Heikenfeld, Jason C.

    2012-06-01

    Operating in dynamic lighting conditions and in greatly varying backgrounds is challenging. Current paints and state-ofthe- art passive adaptive coatings (e.g. photochromics) are not suitable for multi- environment situations. A semi-active, low power, skin is needed that can adapt its reflective properties based on the background environment to minimize contrast through the development and incorporation of suitable pigment materials. Electrofluidic skins are a reflective display technology for electronic ink and paper applications. The technology is similar to that in E Ink but makes use of MEMS based microfluidic structures, instead of simple black and white ink microcapsules dispersed in clear oil. Electrofluidic skin's low power operation and fast switching speeds (~20 ms) are an improvement over current state-ofthe- art contrast management technologies. We report on a microfluidic display which utilizes diffuse pigment dispersion inks to change the contrast of the underlying substrate from 5.8% to 100%. Voltage is applied and an electromechanical pressure is used to pull a pigment dispersion based ink from a hydrophobic coated reservoir into a hydrophobic coated surface channel. When no voltage is applied, the Young-Laplace pressure pushes the pigment dispersion ink back down into the reservoir. This allows the pixel to switch from the on and off state by balancing the two pressures. Taking a systems engineering approach from the beginning of development has enabled the technology to be integrated into larger systems.

  19. Gregorian optical system with non-linear optical technology for protection against intense optical transients

    DOEpatents

    Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Diels, Jean-Claude M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-06-26

    An optical system comprising a concave primary mirror reflects light through an intermediate focus to a secondary mirror. The secondary mirror re-focuses the image to a final image plane. Optical limiter material is placed near the intermediate focus to optically limit the intensity of light so that downstream components of the optical system are protected from intense optical transients. Additional lenses before and/or after the intermediate focus correct optical aberrations.

  20. 23 CFR 970.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 970.204 Section...FEDERAL LANDS HIGHWAYS NATIONAL PARK SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS National Park Service Management Systems § 970.204 Management...

  1. 48 CFR 45.105 - Contractors' property management system compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... management system compliance. 45.105 Section 45.105 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY General 45.105 Contractors' property management... the contractor's property management policies, procedures, practices, and systems. This analysis...

  2. Waste Management Information System (WMIS) User Guide

    SciTech Connect

    R. E. Broz

    2008-12-22

    This document provides the user of the Waste Management Information System (WMIS) instructions on how to use the WMIS software. WMIS allows users to initiate, track, and close waste packages. The modular design supports integration and utilization of data throuh the various stages of waste management. The phases of the waste management work process include generation, designation, packaging, container management, procurement, storage, treatment, transportation, and disposal.

  3. Training Issues Associated with COTS-based Information Intensive Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farr, John V.; Verma, Dinesh

    2002-01-01

    A literature review and survey responses from 194 information technology and aerospace contractors identified methods and outcomes of training delivery. Results were used to develop a framework for evaluating and selecting commercial off-the-shelf systems (COTS) for operations and maintenance training. (Contains 11 references.) (SK)

  4. Web-Based Evaluation System for Learning Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Momani, Alaa

    2010-01-01

    E-learning systems have become an issue in recent years. A learning management system (LMS) is an electronic environment helps the educational society to communicate, exchange information, manage, and schedule the learning process. This study has provided a web-based evaluation system that may help the users to choose the convenient system…

  5. Determination of atmospheric nitrogen deposition to a semi-natural peat bog site in an intensively managed agricultural landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurkuck, Miriam; Brümmer, Christian; Mohr, Karsten; Grünhage, Ludger; Flessa, Heinz; Kutsch, Werner L.

    2014-11-01

    Rising levels of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition have been found to affect the primary productivity and species composition of most terrestrial ecosystems. Highly vulnerable ecosystems such as nutrient-poor bogs are expected to respond to increasing N input rates with a decrease in plant species diversity. Our study site - a moderately drained raised bog and one of only very few remaining protected peatland areas in Northwestern Germany - is surrounded by highly fertilised agricultural land and intensive livestock production. We quantified the annual deposition of atmospheric N over a period of two years. Dry deposition rates of different N species and their reactants were calculated from day and night-time concentrations measured by a KAPS denuder filter system. Dry N deposition amounted to 10.9 ± 1.0 kg N ha-1 yr-1 (year 1) and 10.5 ± 1.0 kg N ha-1 yr-1 (year 2). More than 80% of total deposited N was attributed to ammonia (NH3). A strong seasonality in NH3 concentrations and depositions could be observed. Day and night-time concentrations and depositions, however, did not differ significantly. Total N deposition including bulk N deposition resulted in about 25 kg N ha-1 yr-1. Our results suggest that the intensive agricultural land management of surrounding areas and strongly emitting animal husbandry lead to N inputs into the protected peatland area that exceed the ecosystem's specific critical load up to fivefold. This gives rise to the assumption that a further shift in plant species composition with a subsequent alteration of the local hydrological regime can be expected.

  6. Real-time analysis for intensive care: development and deployment of the artemis analytic system.

    PubMed

    Blount, Marion; Ebling, Maria R; Eklund, J Mikael; James, Andrew G; McGregor, Carolyn; Percival, Nathan; Smith, Kathleen P; Sow, Daby

    2010-01-01

    The lives of many thousands of children born premature or ill at term around the world have been saved by those who work within neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Modern-day neonatologists, together with nursing staff and other specialists within this domain, enjoy modern technologies for activities such as financial transactions, online purchasing, music, and video on demand. Yet, when they move into their workspace, in many cases, they are supported by nearly the same technology they used 20 years ago. Medical devices provide visual displays of vital signs through physiological streams such as electrocardiogram (ECG), heart rate, blood oxygen saturation (SpO(2)), and respiratory rate. Electronic health record initiatives around the world provide an environment for the electronic management of medical records, but they fail to support the high-frequency interpretation of streaming physiological data. We have taken a collaborative research approach to address this need to provide a flexible platform for the real-time online analysis of patients' data streams to detect medically significant conditions that precede the onset of medical complications. The platform supports automated or clinician-driven knowledge discovery to discover new relationships between physiological data stream events and latent medical conditions as well as to refine existing analytics. Patients benefit from the system because earlier detection of signs of the medical conditions may lead to earlier intervention that may potentially lead to improved patient outcomes and reduced length of stays. The clinician benefits from a decision support tool that provides insight into multiple streams of data that are too voluminous to assess with traditional methods. The remainder of this article summarizes the strengths of our research collaboration and the resulting environment known as Artemis, which is currently being piloted within the NICU of The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Although the discussion in this article focuses on a NICU, the technologies can be applied to any intensive care environment. PMID:20659848

  7. Software for Intelligent System Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis C.

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the characteristics and advantages of autonomy and artificial intelligence in systems health monitoring. The presentation lists technologies relevant to Intelligent System Health Management (ISHM), and some potential applications.

  8. A Blood Bank Information Management System

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, James J.

    1982-01-01

    A computerized Blood Bank Management system is described. Features include product oriented data input, inventory control reports, product utilization reports, rapid retrieval of individual patient reports. Relative benefits of the system are discussed.

  9. University Program Management Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA' objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data.

  10. University Program Management Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gans, Gary (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA's objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well-being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data. This report was prepared by the Education Division/FE, Office of Human Resources and Education.

  11. University Program Management Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gans, Gary (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA's objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data.

  12. Decision support system for nursing management control

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, C.J.

    1983-01-01

    A knowledge representation approach for expert systems supporting decision processes in business is proposed. A description of a knowledge representation schema using a logic programming metalanguage is described, then the role of such a schema in a management expert system is demonstrated through the problem of nursing management control in hospitals. 18 references.

  13. WEED MANAGEMENT IN CONSERVATION CROP PRODUCTION SYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Information on weed management in conservation crop production systems is needed as adoption of practices such as reduced tillage and cover crops become more widespread. This review summarizes recent research on weed management aspects in these systems. Changes in soil environment and patterns of t...

  14. Electronic Resource Management Systems in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grogg, Jill E.

    2008-01-01

    Electronic resource management (ERM) systems have inundated the library marketplace. Both integrated library systems (ILS) vendors and subscription agents are now offering products and service enhancements that claim to help libraries efficiently manage their electronic resources. Additionally, some homegrown and open-source solutions have emerged…

  15. 14 CFR 1212.704 - System manager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 CFR 1212.203. This includes records disclosed pursuant to any computer matching programs; (13... managers on implementation of this part. When furnishing information for required reports, the system... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false System manager. 1212.704 Section...

  16. Bilingual Account Manager Trainee Systems Sales

    E-print Network

    dealer system solutions product line and sales strategy, preparing you to eventually cultivate and manage. Enthusiasm, commitment, adaptability, and self-motivation. Excellent customer relationship skillsBilingual Account Manager Trainee Systems Sales Are you a recent or soon-to-be grad with a passion

  17. Study of a final focus system for high intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, Enrique; Eylon, Shmuel; Roy, Prabir K.; Yu, Simon S.; Bieniosek, Frank M.; Shuman, Derek B.; Waldron, William L.

    2004-06-01

    The NTX experiment at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high perveance heavy ion beams. The final focus scenario in an HIF driver consists of several large aperture quadrupole magnets followed by a drift section in which the beam space charge is neutralized by a plasma. This beam is required to hit a millimeter-sized target spot at the end of the drift section. The objective of the NTX experiments and associated theory and simulations is to study the various physical mechanisms that determine the final spot size (radius r{sub s}) at a given distance (f) from the end of the last quadrupole. In a fusion driver, f is the standoff distance required to keep the chamber wall and superconducting magnets properly protected. The NTX final quadrupole focusing system produces a converging beam at the entrance to the neutralized drift section where it focuses to a small spot. The final spot is determined by the conditions of the beam entering the quadrupole section, the beam dynamics in the magnetic lattice, and the plasma neutralization dynamics in the drift section. The main issues are the control of emittance growth due to high order fields from magnetic multipoles and image fields. In this paper, we will describe the theoretical and experimental aspects of the beam dynamics in the quadrupole lattice, and how these physical effects influence the final beam size. In particular, we present theoretical and experimental results on the dependence of final spot size on geometric aberrations and perveance.

  18. [Scoring systems in intensive care medicine : principles, models, application and limits].

    PubMed

    Fleig, V; Brenck, F; Wolff, M; Weigand, M A

    2011-10-01

    Scoring systems are used in all diagnostic areas of medicine. Several parameters are evaluated and rated with points according to their value in order to simplify a complex clinical situation with a score. The application ranges from the classification of disease severity through determining the number of staff for the intensive care unit (ICU) to the evaluation of new therapies under study conditions. Since the introduction of scoring systems in the 1980's a variety of different score models has been developed. The scoring systems that are employed in intensive care and are discussed in this article can be categorized into prognostic scores, expenses scores and disease-specific scores. Since the introduction of compulsory recording of two scoring systems for accounting in the German diagnosis-related groups (DRG) system, these tools have gained more importance for all intensive care physicians. Problems remain in the valid calculation of scores and interpretation of the results. PMID:21997474

  19. TUBERCULOSIS INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (TIMS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    TIMS is a Windows-based client/server application that assists health departments and other facilities to manage TB patients, to conduct TB surveillance activities, and to manage TB programs overall. TIMS provides for electronic transmission of TB surveillance data (OMB No. 0920-...

  20. Greenhouse gas budget (CO2, CH4 and N2O) of intensively managed grassland following restoration.

    PubMed

    Merbold, Lutz; Eugster, Werner; Stieger, Jacqueline; Zahniser, Mark; Nelson, David; Buchmann, Nina

    2014-06-01

    The first full greenhouse gas (GHG) flux budget of an intensively managed grassland in Switzerland (Chamau) is presented. The three major trace gases, carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) were measured with the eddy covariance (EC) technique. For CO2 concentrations, an open-path infrared gas analyzer was used, while N2O and CH4 concentrations were measured with a recently developed continuous-wave quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer (QCLAS). We investigated the magnitude of these trace gas emissions after grassland restoration, including ploughing, harrowing, sowing, and fertilization with inorganic and organic fertilizers in 2012. Large peaks of N2O fluxes (20-50 nmol m(-2) s(-1) compared with a <5 nmol m(-2) s(-1) background) were observed during thawing of the soil after the winter period and after mineral fertilizer application followed by re-sowing in the beginning of the summer season. Nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes were controlled by nitrogen input, plant productivity, soil water content and temperature. Management activities led to increased variations of N2O fluxes up to 14 days after the management event as compared with background fluxes measured during periods without management (<5 nmol m(-2) s(-1)). Fluxes of CO2 remained small until full plant development in early summer 2012. In contrast, methane emissions showed only minor variations over time. The annual GHG flux budget was dominated by N2O (48% contribution) and CO2 emissions (44%). CH4 flux contribution to the annual budget was only minor (8%). We conclude that recently developed multi-species QCLAS in an EC system open new opportunities to determine the temporal variation of N2O and CH4 fluxes, which further allow to quantify annual emissions. With respect to grassland restoration, our study emphasizes the key role of N2O and CO2 losses after ploughing, changing a permanent grassland from a carbon sink to a significant carbon source. PMID:24395474

  1. Information Systems Coordinate Emergency Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    The rescue crews have been searching for the woman for nearly a week. Hurricane Katrina devastated Hancock County, the southernmost point in Mississippi, and the woman had stayed through the storm in her beach house. There is little hope of finding her alive; the search teams know she is gone because the house is gone. Late at night in the art classroom of the school that is serving as the county s emergency operations center, Craig Harvey is discussing the search with the center s commander. Harvey is the Chief Operating Officer of a unique company called NVision Solutions Inc., based at NASA s Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, only a couple of miles away. He and his entire staff have set up a volunteer operation in the art room, supporting the emergency management efforts using technology and capabilities the company developed through its NASA partnerships. As he talks to the commander, Harvey feels an idea taking shape that might lead them to the woman s location. Working with surface elevation data and hydrological principles, Harvey creates a map showing how the floodwaters from the storm would have flowed along the topography of the region around the woman s former home. Using the map, search crews find the woman s body in 15 minutes. Recovering individuals who have been lost is a sad reality of emergency management in the wake of a disaster like Hurricane Katrina in 2005. But the sooner answers can be provided, the sooner a community s overall recovery can take place. When damage is extensive, resources are scattered, and people are in dire need of food, shelter, and medical assistance, the speed and efficiency of emergency operations can be the key to limiting the impact of a disaster and speeding the process of recovery. And a key to quick and effective emergency planning and response is geographic information. With a host of Earth-observing satellites orbiting the globe at all times, NASA generates an unmatched wealth of data about our ever-changing planet. This information can be captured, analyzed, and visualized by geographic information systems (GIS) to produce maps, charts, and other tools that can reveal information essential to a wide variety of applications including emergency management. Knowing precise, real-time information about the size, location, environmental conditions, and resulting damage of an event like a flood or wildfire as well as the location and numbers of emergency responders and other resources contributes directly to the effectiveness of disaster mitigation. The need for such information is also evident when responding to homeland security threats, such as a terrorist attack. Recognizing the value of its geospatial information resources for this and other purposes, in 1998 Stennis and the state of Mississippi partnered to form what became the Enterprise for Innovative Geospatial Solutions (EIGS) industry cluster, supporting the growth of remote sensing and GIS-based research and business. As part of EIGS, several companies partnered with NASA through dual use and Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts. Among those was NVision.

  2. 23 CFR 972.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... WILDLIFE SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Fish and Wildlife Service Management Systems § 972.204 Management... systems will use databases with a geographical reference system that can be used to geolocate all...

  3. 23 CFR 972.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... WILDLIFE SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Fish and Wildlife Service Management Systems § 972.204 Management... systems will use databases with a geographical reference system that can be used to geolocate all...

  4. 23 CFR 972.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... WILDLIFE SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Fish and Wildlife Service Management Systems § 972.204 Management... systems will use databases with a geographical reference system that can be used to geolocate all...

  5. 23 CFR 972.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...LANDS HIGHWAYS FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Fish and Wildlife Service Management Systems...systems and their associated databases; and (5) A process...management systems will use databases with a geographical...

  6. 23 CFR 972.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...LANDS HIGHWAYS FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Fish and Wildlife Service Management Systems...systems and their associated databases; and (5) A process...management systems will use databases with a geographical...

  7. 23 CFR 972.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...LANDS HIGHWAYS FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Fish and Wildlife Service Management Systems...systems and their associated databases; and (5) A process...management systems will use databases with a geographical...

  8. 23 CFR 972.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...LANDS HIGHWAYS FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Fish and Wildlife Service Management Systems...systems and their associated databases; and (5) A process...management systems will use databases with a geographical...

  9. 23 CFR 972.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...LANDS HIGHWAYS FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Fish and Wildlife Service Management Systems...systems and their associated databases; and (5) A process...management systems will use databases with a geographical...

  10. Relative Importance of Nitrous Oxide Vs. Nitric Oxide Emissions from Soils Across a Management Intensity and Biodiversity Gradient.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfand, I.; Gallagher, C.; Moneymaker, B. C. G.; Robertson, G. P.

    2014-12-01

    Soil emissions of nitrous (N2O) and nitric (NO) oxides contribute to both greenhouse gases balance and ozone production and destruction in the atmosphere. Understanding the controls on soil fluxes of these gases is vital for the development of mitigation opportunities and for understanding their impact on atmospheric chemistry. We measured soil N2O and NO emissions from 9 ecosystems across management intensity and biodiversity gradient using semi-continuous automatic chambers over 2 years. The fluxes were measured 4 times a day in: two continuous corn systems, a monoculture without cover crops (CC) and with cover crops (CCcc), a corn-soybean rotation with cover crops (CScc), switchgrass (SWG), miscanthus (MIS); Poplar (POP), successional community (SUC), a native grasses mix (NGM), and a native prairie (NP) ecosystem with 20 different plant species. All ecosystems except NP were fertilized. Cumulative soil emissions of N2O and NO from the ecosystems decreased with increasing biodiversity and reduced management. The highest fluxes were measured in the CC and the lowest fluxes in the NP ecosystems. Within annual ecosystems the addition of cover crops reduced cumulative soil N2O emissions by 50%: from 1140 to 620 g N ha-1 y-1. Fertilized perennial grasses exhibited 3 - 8 times higher cumulative N2O fluxes then those from fertilized NGM, SUC, and POP ecosystems: 870 and 450 g N ha-1 y-1in SWG and MIS ecosystems, respectively. Native prairie exhibited a cumulative flux close to nil. Cumulative NO emissions from the annual ecosystems were also reduced by 50 - 90% by cover crops: fluxes were 254, 103, and 30 g N ha-1 y-1 in CC, CScc, and CCcc ecosystems, respectively. In all other studied ecosystems NO emissions did not exceed 16 g N ha-1 y-1 and decreased with increasing biodiversity and reduced management. Overall, NO emissions contributed up to 18% to cumulative N2O and NO emissions from the studied ecosystems. Temporal variability of hourly N2O fluxes was lower in perennial than in annual ecosystems, while soil emissions of NO exhibited the opposite dynamics and were more variable in perennial than in annual ecosystems. Soil temperature was a poor predictor of hourly N2O and NO emissions from annual systems, but explained up to 20% of emissions variability in perennial ecosystems.

  11. Software configuration management plan for HANDI 2000 business management system

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.

    1998-08-25

    The Software Configuration Management Plan (SCMP) describes the configuration management and control environment for HANDI 2000 for the PP and PS software as well as any custom developed software. This plan establishes requirements and processes for uniform documentation control, system change control, systematic evaluation and coordination of HANDI 2000. This SCMP becomes effective as this document is acceptance and will provide guidance through implementation efforts.

  12. 7 CFR 550.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 550.20 Section 550...AGREEMENTS Management of Agreements Financial Management § 550.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) REE agencies...

  13. 7 CFR 550.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 550.20 Section 550...AGREEMENTS Management of Agreements Financial Management § 550.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) REE agencies...

  14. 7 CFR 550.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 550.20 Section 550...AGREEMENTS Management of Agreements Financial Management § 550.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) REE agencies...

  15. 7 CFR 550.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 550.20 Section 550...AGREEMENTS Management of Agreements Financial Management § 550.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) REE agencies...

  16. 7 CFR 550.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 550.20 Section 550...AGREEMENTS Management of Agreements Financial Management § 550.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) REE agencies...

  17. Integrated System Health Management Development Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Jorge; Smith, Harvey; Morris, Jon

    2009-01-01

    This software toolkit is designed to model complex systems for the implementation of embedded Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) capability, which focuses on determining the condition (health) of every element in a complex system (detect anomalies, diagnose causes, and predict future anomalies), and to provide data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) to control systems for safe and effective operation.

  18. Wheel speed management control system for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodzeit, Neil E. (Inventor); Linder, David M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A spacecraft attitude control system uses at least four reaction wheels. In order to minimize reaction wheel speed and therefore power, a wheel speed management system is provided. The management system monitors the wheel speeds and generates a wheel speed error vector. The error vector is integrated, and the error vector and its integral are combined to form a correction vector. The correction vector is summed with the attitude control torque command signals for driving the reaction wheels.

  19. Improvements to information management systems simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilek, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    The performance of personnel in the augmentation and improvement of the interactive IMSIM information management simulation model is summarized. With this augmented model, NASA now has even greater capabilities for the simulation of computer system configurations, data processing loads imposed on these configurations, and executive software to control system operations. Through these simulations, NASA has an extremely cost effective capability for the design and analysis of computer-based data management systems.

  20. 23 CFR 972.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 972.204 Section 972.204... WILDLIFE SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Fish and Wildlife Service Management Systems § 972.204 Management systems requirements. (a) The FWS shall develop, establish and implement the management systems...

  1. 23 CFR 971.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... requirements of this subpart consistent with 23 CFR 660.105(b). The management systems may be tailored to meet... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 971.204 Section 971.204... MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Forest Highway Program Management Systems § 971.204 Management systems requirements....

  2. 23 CFR 970.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 970.204 Section 970.204... SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS National Park Service Management Systems § 970.204 Management systems requirements. (a) The NPS shall develop, establish and implement the management systems as described in...

  3. 23 CFR 971.204 - Management systems requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... requirements of this subpart consistent with 23 CFR 660.105(b). The management systems may be tailored to meet... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Management systems requirements. 971.204 Section 971.204... MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Forest Highway Program Management Systems § 971.204 Management systems requirements....

  4. PARTICLE PRODUCTION OF A GRAPHITE TARGET SYSTEM FOR THE INTENSITY FRONTIER

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    PARTICLE PRODUCTION OF A GRAPHITE TARGET SYSTEM FOR THE INTENSITY FRONTIER (WEPJE010, IPAC15, May 6 the carbon target. The beam dump must be inside the target system. The beam dump for the graphite target can consist of 2 additional graphite rods, with radii of 2.4 cm. This beam dump intercepts about two

  5. PARTICLE PRODUCTION OF A GRAPHITE TARGET SYSTEM FOR THE INTENSITY FRONTIER*

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    PARTICLE PRODUCTION OF A GRAPHITE TARGET SYSTEM FOR THE INTENSITY FRONTIER* X. Ding, UCLA, LosDonald, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA Abstract A solid graphite target system is considered study is to use a 6.75-GeV proton driver with beam power of 1 MW [1] interacting with a graphite target

  6. Paul Trap Simulator Experiment to Model Intense-Beam Propagation in Alternating-Gradient Transport Systems

    E-print Network

    Gilson, Erik

    Paul Trap Simulator Experiment to Model Intense-Beam Propagation in Alternating-Gradient Transport with a model, equally applicable to both PTSX and AG systems. The PTSX device confines one-component cesium ion Systems Erik P. Gilson,* Ronald C. Davidson, Philip C. Efthimion, and Richard Majeski Plasma Physics

  7. Integrated safety management system verification: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, R.F.

    1998-08-10

    Department of Energy (DOE) Policy (P) 450.4, Safety Management System Policy, commits to institutionalization of an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) throughout the DOE complex. The DOE Acquisition Regulations (DEAR, 48 CFR 970) requires contractors to manage and perform work in accordance with a documented Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS). Guidance and expectations have been provided to PNNL by incorporation into the operating contract (Contract DE-ACM-76FL0 1830) and by letter. The contract requires that the contractor submit a description of their ISMS for approval by DOE. PNNL submitted their proposed Safety Management System Description for approval on November 25,1997. RL tentatively approved acceptance of the description pursuant to a favorable recommendation from this review. The Integrated Safety Management System Verification is a review of the adequacy of the ISMS description in fulfilling the requirements of the DEAR and the DOE Policy. The purpose of this review is to provide the Richland Operations Office Manager with a recommendation for approval of the ISMS description of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory based upon compliance with the requirements of 49 CFR 970.5204(-2 and -78); and to verify the extent and maturity of ISMS implementation within the Laboratory. Further the review will provide a model for other DOE laboratories managed by the Office of Assistant Secretary for Energy Research.

  8. Management of a patient with Opalski's syndrome in intensive care unit and mini review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Aslanidis, T; Chytas, I; Kontos, A; Giannakou-Peftoulidou, M

    2012-01-01

    Stroke syndromes include a variety of syndromes with often overlapping clinical presentations. When ipsilateral hemiplegia is associated with symptoms of a lateral medullary syndrome, it corresponds to the submedullary syndrome of Opalski. A 72-year-old woman presented with sudden onset of headache, gait disturbance, and recurrent vomiting. Her clinical status gradually deteriorated and she was admitted to the intensive care unit where a variety of problems, related to her diagnosis (Opalski syndrome), were managed. PMID:23935321

  9. A multifunctional rotary photoelectric encoder management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zunzhong; Ying, Yibin

    2005-11-01

    The rotary photoelectric encoder can be used in many fields, such as robot research, fruit assembly lines, and so on. If there have many photoelectric encoders in one system, it's difficult to manage them and acquire the right pulse number. So it's important to design a multifunctional management system. It includes a powerful microchip with high processing speed, assuring the acquisition precision of rotary pulse. It uses a special method to judge the rotary direction and will be competent for many occasions which rotary direction changes quickly. Considering encoder data transmission, the management system provides a serial port using RS-485 protocol to transmit current pulse data and rotary direction. It allows linking a maximum of 100 management systems using only two communication lines to up-systems and also configing the encoder counting pattern locally (using the keyboard) or remotely (through the computer).

  10. Development of a change management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, Cathy Bonifas

    1993-01-01

    The complexity and interdependence of software on a computer system can create a situation where a solution to one problem causes failures in dependent software. In the computer industry, software problems arise and are often solved with 'quick and dirty' solutions. But in implementing these solutions, documentation about the solution or user notification of changes is often overlooked, and new problems are frequently introduced because of insufficient review or testing. These problems increase when numerous heterogeneous systems are involved. Because of this situation, a change management system plays an integral part in the maintenance of any multisystem computing environment. At the NASA Ames Advanced Computational Facility (ACF), the Online Change Management System (OCMS) was designed and developed to manage the changes being applied to its multivendor computing environment. This paper documents the research, design, and modifications that went into the development of this change management system (CMS).

  11. [The influence of different management systems on the infection level of some gastrointestinal parasites in sheep in southern Poland].

    PubMed

    Nowosad, B; Malczewski, A; Skalska, M; Fudalewicz-Niemczyk, W; Gawor, J

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of the fecal egg counts, larval cultures and necropsies the infection of coccidia, tapeworms and gastrointestinal nematodes in dams and lambs under extensive and intensive management systems were estimated. During 1994 and 1995 total of 1740 coproscopic analyses were done. It was state, that in extensive farms the prevalence and EPG of gastrointestinal nematodes was higher in comparison with intensive management system (38.2-86% and 13.9-71.9% and 105-355 EPG and 33-131 EPG respectively). Similarly prevalence of tapeworms 0-18.2% and 1.3-8.3% respectively. Prevalence and intensity of coccidia was lower in extensive farms (20-78,5% and 83-482 OPG) comparing with intensive management system (38.2-88% and 139-2846 OPG). Predominant nematode species in both management systems were those from genes Haemonchus, Teladorsagia, Trichostrongylus, Cooperia and Nematodirus. One species--Nematodirus battus was found new for Poland. PMID:16886344

  12. Effective maintenance practices to manage system aging

    SciTech Connect

    Chockie, A.; Bjorkelo, K.

    1992-01-01

    For a variety of economic and technical reasons, there has been a growing concern with the aging of complex systems and components and the role that maintenance can play in reducing this degradation. A study for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission was recently undertaken to identify effective maintenance practices that could be adapted by the nuclear industry in the United States to assist in managing the aging degradation of plant systems and components. Four organizations were examined to assess the influence that their maintenance programs have on their ability to address the systems and component aging degradation issues. An effective maintenance program was found to be essential to the management of system and component aging. The four key elements of an effective maintenance program that are important to an aging management program were identified. These are: the selection of critical systems and components; the development of an understanding of aging through the collection and analysis of equipment performance information; the development of appropriate preventive and predictive maintenance tasks to manage equipment and system aging degradation; the use of feedback mechanisms to continuously improve the management of aging systems and components. These elements were found to be common to all four organizations. In examining how the four organizations have structured their maintenance programs to include these key elements provides valuable lessons not only for the nuclear power industry, but also for any industrial organization that is concerned with the management of system and component aging degradation. This document provides detail, of these studies.

  13. Issue Management Risk Ranking Systems

    SciTech Connect

    F. M. Marshall; G. M. Grant; H. M. Stromberg; S. D. Novack

    1999-06-01

    Thousands of safety issues have been collected on-line at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) as part of the Issue Management Plan. However, there has been no established approach to prioritize collected and future issues. The authors developed a methodology, based on hazards assessment, to identify and risk rank over 5000 safety issues collected at INEEL. This approach required that it was easily applied and understandable for site adaptation and commensurate with the Integrated Safety Plan. High-risk issues were investigated and mitigative/preventive measures were suggested and ranked based on a cost-benefit scheme to provide risk-informed safety measures. This methodology was consistent with other integrated safety management goals and tasks providing a site-wide risk-informed decision tool to reduce hazardous conditions and focus resources on high-risk safety issues. As part of the issue management plan, this methodology was incorporated at the issue collection level and training was provided to management to better familiarize decision-makers with concepts of safety and risk. This prioritization methodology and issue dissemination procedure will be discussed. Results of issue prioritization and training efforts will be summarized. Difficulties and advantages of the process will be reported. Development and incorporation of this process into INEEL's lessons learned reporting and the site-wide integrated safety management program will be shown with an emphasis on establishing self reliance and ownership of safety issues.

  14. Issue Management Risk Ranking Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Novack, Steven David; Marshall, Frances Mc Clellan; Stromberg, Howard Merion; Grant, Gary Michael

    1999-06-01

    Thousands of safety issues have been collected on-line at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) as part of the Issue Management Plan. However, there has been no established approach to prioritize collected and future issues. The authors developed a methodology, based on hazards assessment, to identify and risk rank over 5000 safety issues collected at INEEL. This approach required that it was easily applied and understandable for site adaptation and commensurate with the Integrated Safety Plan. High-risk issues were investigated and mitigative/preventive measures were suggested and ranked based on a cost-benefit scheme to provide risk-informed safety measures. This methodology was consistent with other integrated safety management goals and tasks providing a site-wide risk informed decision tool to reduce hazardous conditions and focus resources on high-risk safety issues. As part of the issue management plan, this methodology was incorporated at the issue collection level and training was provided to management to better familiarize decision-makers with concepts of safety and risk. This prioritization methodology and issue dissemination procedure will be discussed. Results of issue prioritization and training efforts will be summarized. Difficulties and advantages of the process will be reported. Development and incorporation of this process into INEELs lessons learned reporting and the site-wide integrated safety management program will be shown with an emphasis on establishing self reliance and ownership of safety issues.

  15. Mul$-scale Demand-Side Management for Con$nuous Power-intensive Processes

    E-print Network

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Residen$al (incl. electric cars) Commercial Industrial (power-intensive) Demand, energy security, economics "Smart grid" Customers/Demand Electricity ((me-dependent) Load Informa(on Electricity ((me-dependent) Load Informa(on Transmission, Distribu

  16. Business School's Performance Management System Standards Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azis, Anton Mulyono; Simatupang, Togar M.; Wibisono, Dermawan; Basri, Mursyid Hasan

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to compare various Performance Management Systems (PMS) for business school in order to find the strengths of each standard as inputs to design new model of PMS. There are many critical aspects and gaps notified for new model to improve performance and even recognized that self evaluation performance management is not well…

  17. Distributed Energy Management for Electric Power Systems

    E-print Network

    Distributed Energy Management for Electric Power Systems Gabriela Hug, ghug@ece.cmu.edu Soummya Kar Theory Power flow control Consensus + Innovation Approach Theory Energy Management Conclusions 2 #12 Consensus: agreement on price Innovation: power balance Generator Load Storage 9 #12;Energy Dispatch

  18. RICE UNIVERSITY Context for System Resource Management

    E-print Network

    Zhong, Lin

    RICE UNIVERSITY Context for System Resource Management: An Application in Wireless Data Management my advisor, Dr. Lin Zhong, for his guidance and support throughout my academic life at Rice of my teachers from friends. Special thanks to my professors at Rice and Sharif, my teachers at Allameh

  19. Agricultural Drainage Management Systems Task Force (ADMSTF)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Agricultural Drainage Management Systems (ADMS) Task Force was initiated during a Charter meeting in the fall of 2002 by dedicated professional employees of Federal, State, and Local Government Agencies and Universities. The Agricultural Drainage Management (ADM) Coalition was established in 200...

  20. Implementation of Integrated System Fault Management Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Schmalzel, John; Morris, Jon; Smith, Harvey; Turowski, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Fault Management to support rocket engine test mission with highly reliable and accurate measurements; while improving availability and lifecycle costs. CORE ELEMENTS: Architecture, taxonomy, and ontology (ATO) for DIaK management. Intelligent Sensor Processes; Intelligent Element Processes; Intelligent Controllers; Intelligent Subsystem Processes; Intelligent System Processes; Intelligent Component Processes.

  1. A method for optimizing integrated system health management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jambor, Bruno; Rouch, Robin L.; Eger, George W.; Black, Stephen T.

    1996-03-01

    The cost of operating the existing fleet of launch vehicles, both expendable and reusable, is too high. The high cost is attributable to two primary sources: people-intensive checkout procedures and delayed launches. This latter has cost impacts on both launch procedures and other launch operations through ripple-down effects. Without significant changes in how the launch vehicle community does business, the next generation of vehicles shall be burdened by the same high costs. By integrating system health management into the next generation, Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) operations costs can be reduced. A method for optimizing Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) is being developed under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC). This paper describes the work currently underway at LMC. ISHM shall be implemented on the prototype vehicle X-33 in order to demonstrate its usefulness for RLV.

  2. ADAMS: AIRLAB data management system user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, C. L.; Ingogly, W. F.; Lauterbach, L. A.

    1986-01-01

    The AIRLAB Data Management System (ADAMS) is an online environment that supports research at NASA's AIRLAB. ADAMS provides an easy to use interactive interface that eases the task of documenting and managing information about experiments and improves communication among project members. Data managed by ADAMS includes information about experiments, data sets produced, software and hardware available in AIRLAB as well as that used in a particular experiment, and an on-line engineer's notebook. The User's Guide provides an overview of the ADAMS system as well as details of the operations available within ADAMS. A tutorial section takes the user step-by-step through a typical ADAMS session. ADAMS runs under the VAX/VMS operating system and uses the ORACLE database management system and DEC/FMS (the Forms Management System). ADAMS can be run from any VAX connected via DECnet to the ORACLE host VAX. The ADAMS system is designed for simplicity, so interactions within the underlying data management system and communications network are hidden from the user.

  3. Automated Traffic Management System and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, Brian J. (Inventor); Spirkovska, Liljana (Inventor); McDermott, William J. (Inventor); Reisman, Ronald J. (Inventor); Gibson, James (Inventor); Iverson, David L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A data management system and method that enables acquisition, integration, and management of real-time data generated at different rates, by multiple heterogeneous incompatible data sources. The system achieves this functionality by using an expert system to fuse data from a variety of airline, airport operations, ramp control, and air traffic control tower sources, to establish and update reference data values for every aircraft surface operation. The system may be configured as a real-time airport surface traffic management system (TMS) that electronically interconnects air traffic control, airline data, and airport operations data to facilitate information sharing and improve taxi queuing. In the TMS operational mode, empirical data shows substantial benefits in ramp operations for airlines, reducing departure taxi times by about one minute per aircraft in operational use, translating as $12 to $15 million per year savings to airlines at the Atlanta, Georgia airport. The data management system and method may also be used for scheduling the movement of multiple vehicles in other applications, such as marine vessels in harbors and ports, trucks or railroad cars in ports or shipping yards, and railroad cars in switching yards. Finally, the data management system and method may be used for managing containers at a shipping dock, stock on a factory floor or in a warehouse, or as a training tool for improving situational awareness of FAA tower controllers, ramp and airport operators, or commercial airline personnel in airfield surface operations.

  4. Building network management system for video conference system in intranet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Bai, Lin; Ji, Yuefeng

    2004-04-01

    To provide visual communication over enterprise Intranet, the video conference system in H.323 has been proposed as a suitable architecture to take the place of circuit-switched telephony model. However, managing video conference system will be complicated due to the real-time monitoring and reporting. This paper presents some research on the network management of H.323 Video conference system, and introduces the standards about this system, such as ITU-T H.341 and H.350 recommendation, and then gives some advices on network management design for video conference system with the considering of the real-time feature.

  5. 77 FR 44144 - National Forest System Land Management Planning; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-27

    ...0596-AD02 National Forest System Land Management Planning; Correction AGENCY: Forest...a National Forest System land management planning rule in the Federal Register...National Forest System Land Management Planning (36 CFR part 219,...

  6. 46 CFR 16.500 - Management Information System requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 false Management Information System requirements. 16.500 Section 16...SEAMEN CHEMICAL TESTING Management Information System § 16.500 Management Information System requirements. (a) Data...

  7. 45 CFR 1183.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Standards for financial management systems. 1183.20 Section 1183...HUMANITIES INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE...Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State must...The financial management systems of other grantees and...

  8. 45 CFR 1183.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Standards for financial management systems. 1183.20 Section 1183...HUMANITIES INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE...Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State must...The financial management systems of other grantees and...

  9. 45 CFR 1183.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Standards for financial management systems. 1183.20 Section 1183...HUMANITIES INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE...Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State must...The financial management systems of other grantees and...

  10. 45 CFR 1183.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Standards for financial management systems. 1183.20 Section 1183...HUMANITIES INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE...Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State must...The financial management systems of other grantees and...

  11. 45 CFR 1183.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Standards for financial management systems. 1183.20 Section 1183...HUMANITIES INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE...Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State must...The financial management systems of other grantees and...

  12. 20 CFR 435.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 435.21 Section...435.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Introduction...requirements. Recipients' financial management systems must provide...

  13. 22 CFR 518.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2009-04-01 true Standards for financial management systems. 518.21 Section...518.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  14. 15 CFR 24.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 24.20 Section...24.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  15. 13 CFR 143.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 143.20 Section...143.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  16. 20 CFR 437.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 437.20 Section...437.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  17. 32 CFR 33.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 33.20 Section...33.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  18. 45 CFR 1174.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1174.20 Section...1174.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  19. 28 CFR 66.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 66.20 Section...66.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  20. 10 CFR 600.311 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 600.311 Section...600.311 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...encouraged to use existing financial management systems to the...

  1. 10 CFR 600.220 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 600.220 Section...600.220 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  2. 10 CFR 600.121 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 600.121 Section...600.121 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...600.181, recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  3. 20 CFR 435.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 435.21 Section...435.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Introduction...requirements. Recipients' financial management systems must provide...

  4. 10 CFR 600.220 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 600.220 Section...600.220 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  5. 36 CFR 1210.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1210.21 Section...1210.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The NHPRC...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  6. 32 CFR 34.11 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 34.11 Section...34.11 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...encouraged to use existing financial management systems...

  7. 20 CFR 435.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 435.21 Section...435.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Introduction...requirements. Recipients' financial management systems must provide...

  8. 7 CFR 3019.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 3019.21 Section...3019.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  9. 10 CFR 600.311 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 600.311 Section...600.311 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...encouraged to use existing financial management systems to the...

  10. 45 CFR 1157.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1157.20 Section...1157.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  11. 7 CFR 3016.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 3016.20 Section...3016.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  12. 20 CFR 435.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 435.21 Section...435.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Introduction...requirements. Recipients' financial management systems must provide...

  13. 22 CFR 135.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 135.20 Section...135.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  14. 29 CFR 1470.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1470.20 Section...1470.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  15. 2 CFR 215.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 215.21 Section...215.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  16. 29 CFR 97.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 97.20 Section...97.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  17. 15 CFR 24.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 24.20 Section...24.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  18. 14 CFR 1273.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 true Standards for financial management systems. 1273.20 Section...1273.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  19. 24 CFR 84.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 84.21 Section...84.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) HUD shall...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  20. 38 CFR 43.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 43.20 Section...43.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  1. 36 CFR 1210.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 true Standards for financial management systems. 1210.21 Section...1210.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The NHPRC...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  2. 21 CFR 1403.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1403.20 Section...1403.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  3. 15 CFR 24.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 24.20 Section...24.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  4. 45 CFR 602.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 602.20 Section...602.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  5. 32 CFR 33.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 33.20 Section...33.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  6. 15 CFR 24.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 24.20 Section...24.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  7. 34 CFR 80.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 80.20 Section...80.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  8. 14 CFR 1273.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1273.20 Section...1273.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  9. 45 CFR 602.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 602.20 Section...602.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  10. 45 CFR 2541.200 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 2541.200 ...2541.200 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  11. 13 CFR 143.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 143.20 Section...143.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  12. 22 CFR 135.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 135.20 Section...135.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  13. 32 CFR 34.11 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 34.11 Section...34.11 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...encouraged to use existing financial management systems...

  14. 40 CFR 31.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 31.20 Section...31.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  15. 36 CFR 1207.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 true Standards for financial management systems. 1207.20 Section...1207.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  16. 45 CFR 1174.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1174.20 Section...1174.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  17. 28 CFR 70.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 70.21 Section...70.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems must provide...

  18. 29 CFR 1470.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1470.20 Section...1470.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  19. 45 CFR 2543.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 2543.21 Section...2543.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  20. 34 CFR 80.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 80.20 Section...80.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  1. 45 CFR 74.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 74.21 Section...74.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...appropriate. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  2. 10 CFR 600.311 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 600.311 Section...600.311 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...encouraged to use existing financial management systems to the...

  3. 40 CFR 35.6270 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 35.6270 Section...35.6270 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Accounting...review of the adequacy of the financial management system as described in...

  4. 29 CFR 97.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 true Standards for financial management systems. 97.20 Section...97.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  5. 49 CFR 18.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 18.20 Section...18.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  6. 32 CFR 33.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 33.20 Section...33.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  7. 40 CFR 31.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 31.20 Section...31.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  8. 34 CFR 80.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 80.20 Section...80.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  9. 45 CFR 92.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 92.20 Section...92.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  10. 29 CFR 95.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 95.21 Section...95.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  11. 45 CFR 92.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 92.20 Section...92.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  12. 34 CFR 74.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 74.21 Section...74.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  13. 21 CFR 1403.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1403.20 Section...1403.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  14. 38 CFR 43.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 43.20 Section...43.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  15. 34 CFR 80.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 80.20 Section...80.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  16. 28 CFR 66.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 66.20 Section...66.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  17. 22 CFR 145.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 145.21 Section...145.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The Department...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  18. 32 CFR 34.11 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 34.11 Section...34.11 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...encouraged to use existing financial management systems...

  19. 40 CFR 35.6270 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 35.6270 Section...35.6270 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Accounting...review of the adequacy of the financial management system as described in...

  20. 22 CFR 145.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 145.21 Section...145.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The Department...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  1. 21 CFR 1403.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1403.20 Section...1403.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  2. 45 CFR 74.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 74.21 Section...74.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...appropriate. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  3. 29 CFR 97.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 97.20 Section...97.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  4. 36 CFR 1207.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1207.20 Section...1207.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  5. 36 CFR 1210.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1210.21 Section...1210.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The NHPRC...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  6. 45 CFR 92.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 92.20 Section...92.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  7. 32 CFR 32.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 32.21 Section...32.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) DoD Components...information. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  8. 29 CFR 95.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 true Standards for financial management systems. 95.21 Section...95.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  9. 32 CFR 32.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 32.21 Section...32.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) DoD Components...information. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  10. 29 CFR 95.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 95.21 Section...95.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  11. 29 CFR 1470.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1470.20 Section...1470.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  12. 22 CFR 518.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2009-04-01 true Standards for financial management systems. 518.21 Section...518.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  13. 15 CFR 24.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 24.20 Section...24.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  14. 43 CFR 12.60 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 12.60 Section...12.60 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  15. 24 CFR 84.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 84.21 Section...84.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) HUD shall...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  16. 34 CFR 74.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 74.21 Section...74.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  17. 22 CFR 226.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 226.21 Section...226.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  18. 22 CFR 135.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 135.20 Section...135.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  19. 40 CFR 30.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 30.21 Section...30.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) EPA shall...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  20. 44 CFR 13.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 true Standards for financial management systems. 13.20 Section...13.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  1. 22 CFR 226.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 226.21 Section...226.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  2. 22 CFR 145.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 145.21 Section...145.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The Department...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  3. 45 CFR 92.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 92.20 Section...92.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  4. 49 CFR 18.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 18.20 Section...18.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  5. 28 CFR 70.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 70.21 Section...70.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems must provide...

  6. 29 CFR 95.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 true Standards for financial management systems. 95.21 Section...95.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  7. 2 CFR 215.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 215.21 Section...215.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  8. 45 CFR 74.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 74.21 Section...74.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...appropriate. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  9. 34 CFR 74.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 74.21 Section...74.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  10. 45 CFR 1174.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1174.20 Section...1174.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  11. 45 CFR 1174.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1174.20 Section...1174.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  12. 40 CFR 31.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 31.20 Section...31.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  13. 44 CFR 13.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 13.20 Section...13.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  14. 44 CFR 13.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 13.20 Section...13.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  15. 45 CFR 602.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 602.20 Section...602.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  16. 38 CFR 49.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 49.21 Section...49.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  17. 24 CFR 84.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 84.21 Section...84.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) HUD shall...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  18. 45 CFR 1157.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1157.20 Section...1157.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  19. 32 CFR 33.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 33.20 Section...33.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  20. 40 CFR 35.6270 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 35.6270 Section...35.6270 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Accounting...review of the adequacy of the financial management system as described in...

  1. 10 CFR 600.121 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 600.121 Section...600.121 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...600.181, recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  2. 24 CFR 85.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 85.20 Section...85.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  3. 40 CFR 30.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 30.21 Section...30.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) EPA shall...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  4. 20 CFR 435.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 435.21 Section...435.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Introduction...requirements. Recipients' financial management systems must provide...

  5. 45 CFR 92.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 92.20 Section...92.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  6. 32 CFR 32.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 32.21 Section...32.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) DoD Components...information. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  7. 38 CFR 49.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 49.21 Section...49.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  8. 22 CFR 226.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 226.21 Section...226.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  9. 49 CFR 18.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 18.20 Section...18.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  10. 38 CFR 43.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 43.20 Section...43.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  11. 45 CFR 1157.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1157.20 Section...1157.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  12. 7 CFR 3019.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 3019.21 Section...3019.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  13. 45 CFR 602.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 602.20 Section...602.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  14. 21 CFR 1403.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1403.20 Section...1403.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  15. 28 CFR 70.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 70.21 Section...70.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems must provide...

  16. 38 CFR 43.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 43.20 Section...43.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  17. 32 CFR 34.11 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 34.11 Section...34.11 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...encouraged to use existing financial management systems...

  18. 28 CFR 70.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 70.21 Section...70.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems must provide...

  19. 13 CFR 143.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 143.20 Section...143.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  20. 40 CFR 30.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 30.21 Section...30.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) EPA shall...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  1. 22 CFR 518.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 518.21 Section...518.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  2. 7 CFR 3016.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 3016.20 Section...3016.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  3. 22 CFR 135.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 135.20 Section...135.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  4. 14 CFR 1273.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1273.20 Section...1273.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  5. 24 CFR 85.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 85.20 Section...85.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  6. 22 CFR 226.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 226.21 Section...226.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  7. 45 CFR 74.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 74.21 Section...74.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...appropriate. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  8. 10 CFR 600.220 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 600.220 Section...600.220 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  9. 10 CFR 600.311 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 600.311 Section...600.311 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...encouraged to use existing financial management systems to the...

  10. 36 CFR 1207.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1207.20 Section...1207.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  11. 43 CFR 12.60 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 true Standards for financial management systems. 12.60 Section...12.60 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  12. 29 CFR 1470.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1470.20 Section...1470.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  13. 40 CFR 31.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 31.20 Section...31.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  14. 7 CFR 3019.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 3019.21 Section...3019.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  15. 29 CFR 1470.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1470.20 Section...1470.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  16. 40 CFR 30.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 30.21 Section...30.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) EPA shall...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  17. 34 CFR 74.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 74.21 Section...74.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  18. 7 CFR 3016.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 3016.20 Section...3016.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  19. 24 CFR 84.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 84.21 Section...84.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) HUD shall...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  20. 40 CFR 30.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 30.21 Section...30.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) EPA shall...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  1. 45 CFR 1157.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 1157.20 Section...1157.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  2. 43 CFR 12.60 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 12.60 Section...12.60 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  3. 28 CFR 70.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 70.21 Section...70.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems must provide...

  4. 15 CFR 14.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 14.21 Section...14.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The Grants...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  5. 10 CFR 600.121 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 600.121 Section...600.121 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...600.181, recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  6. 15 CFR 14.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 14.21 Section...14.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The Grants...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  7. 34 CFR 74.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 74.21 Section...74.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  8. 20 CFR 437.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 437.20 Section...437.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  9. 15 CFR 14.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 14.21 Section...14.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The Grants...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  10. 34 CFR 80.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 80.20 Section...80.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  11. 45 CFR 2543.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 2543.21 Section...2543.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  12. 29 CFR 97.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 true Standards for financial management systems. 97.20 Section...97.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  13. 24 CFR 85.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 85.20 Section...85.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  14. 13 CFR 143.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 143.20 Section...143.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  15. 45 CFR 2543.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 2543.21 Section...2543.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  16. 10 CFR 600.311 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 600.311 Section...600.311 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...encouraged to use existing financial management systems to the...

  17. 22 CFR 226.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 226.21 Section...226.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  18. 28 CFR 66.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 66.20 Section...66.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...

  19. 22 CFR 518.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2009-04-01 true Standards for financial management systems. 518.21 Section...518.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Federal...practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide...

  20. 24 CFR 85.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 85.20 Section...85.20 Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State...applicable statutes. (b) The financial management systems of other...