Science.gov

Sample records for inter-tropical convergence zone

  1. Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone Shifts During the Last Glacial Cycle Near the Line Islands Ridge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimi Sipala, M. A.; Marcantonio, F.

    2015-12-01

    This research focuses on the shift in the inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ) during the last glacial cycle. Deep sea sediments from the Central Equatorial Pacific (CEP) are used to quantify and isolate the sources and sinks of atmospheric dust. Dust records and influences climate affecting a wide range of process from Earth's Albedo to carbon export. Our aim is to determine the provenance of windblown dust deposited in the CEP near the Line Islands Ridge using radiogenic Nd and Pb isotopes, and to infer the location of the ITCZ and the changes of atmospheric transport through ice-age climate transitions. We focus on three cores from the CEP, along a meridional transect at approximately 160° W --- 0° 28' N (ML1208-17PC), 4° 41' N (ML1208-31BB), and 7 ° 2'N (ML1208-31BB). Radiogenic isotopes (Sr, Nd, Pb) have been successfully used to distinguish between different potential dust sources in the aluminosilicates fractions of Pacific Sediments. Our preliminary data suggest that the equatorial core (17PC) predominantly receives its dust from South America and South American volcanics South America (206Pb/204Pb = 18.62, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.63, 208Pb/204Pb = 38.62; ; ɛNd = ~ -5). The middle core, which more closely reflects the modern position of the ITCZ, has varied dust provenance through time, at times consistent with Asian Loess (average ratios are 206Pb/204Pb = 18.88, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.69, 208Pb/204Pb = 39.06; ɛNd = ~ -7) and Asian Volcanics (ɛNd = ~-1) suggesting a shift in the ITCZ south of 4N before the LGM. Our results for the most northern core are forthcoming. Prior to Holocene time, the changes in Pb isotope ratios in both cores appear to be in anti-phase; the northern core becomes less radiogenic up to the LGM, while the southern core becomes more radiogenic. This is potentially due to a weakening of the ITCZ during glacial times. A secondary aim of this work is to determine if the ITCZ migrated further south than core 17PC during Heinrich stage II.

  2. The Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone: A causal mechanism for Pb isotope cyclicity in Tropical Atlantic sediment cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouchami, W.; Zabel, M.

    2003-04-01

    Lead isotopic compositions of bulk sediment cores from the Tropical Atlantic can be used to infer variations in the provenance of terrigenous input to the Tropical Atlantic during Pleistocene climate cycles. Pb isotope data were obtained using the triple spike method (Galer, 1999) on bulk sediments cores and cover the last six Marine Isotope Stages. The 200-ka high precision (2σ ˜100 ppm) Pb isotope records of the Ceará Rise (Western Atlantic, core GeoB1523-1, 3^o49'N, 41^o37'W, 3292 m) and Sierra Leone Rise (Eastern Atlantic, core GeoB2910-1, 4^o50'N, 21^o03'W, 2703 m) cores show a clear glacial-interglacial cyclicity, reflected by alternating unradiogenic Pb and radiogenic Pb. Changes in the relative proportions of the glacial (unradiogenic) and interglacial (radiogenic) Pb source(s) can be explained by changes in the erosional regime (chemical vs. physical) as a function of prevailing climate, combined with different mechanisms of Pb transport to the oceans (predominantly eolian in the Eastern Atlantic vs. riverine in the Western Atlantic). We interpret these regional changes as reflecting shifts in the mean latitude of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone that affects the hydrological cycle over South America and the wind systems over Africa. Our results strongly favor an increase in winter wind transport (rather than glacial hyper aridity) as the cause of enhanced glacial terrigenous fluxes observed in the Tropical Atlantic (Ruddiman, 1997). The two Atlantic Pb isotopic records exhibit strong correlations with Pleistocene sea level fluctuations, providing evidence for global teleconnection between tropical records and high latitude climate. Galer, S.J.G. (1999). Optimal double and triple spiking for high precision lead isotopic measurements. Chem. Geol. 154, 255-274. Ruddiman, W. F. (1997). Tropical Atlantic terrigenous fluxes since 25,000 yrs B.P., Mar. Geol., 136, 189-207.

  3. Response of the Pacific inter-tropical convergence zone to global cooling and initiation of Antarctic glaciation across the Eocene Oligocene Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyeong, Kiseong; Kuroda, Junichiro; Seo, Inah; Wilson, Paul A.

    2016-08-01

    Approximately 34 million years ago across the Eocene–Oligocene transition (EOT), Earth’s climate tipped from a largely unglaciated state into one that sustained large ice sheets on Antarctica. Antarctic glaciation is attributed to a threshold response to slow decline in atmospheric CO2 but our understanding of the feedback processes triggered and of climate change on the other contents is limited. Here we present new geochemical records of terrigenous dust accumulating on the sea floor across the EOT from a site in the central equatorial Pacific. We report a change in dust chemistry from an Asian affinity to a Central-South American provenance that occurs geologically synchronously with the initiation of stepwise global cooling, glaciation of Antarctica and aridification on the northern continents. We infer that the inter-tropical convergence zone of intense precipitation extended to our site during late Eocene, at least four degrees latitude further south than today, but that it migrated northwards in step with global cooling and initiation of Antarctic glaciation. Our findings point to an atmospheric teleconnection between extratropical cooling and rainfall climate in the tropics and the mid-latitude belt of the westerlies operating across the most pivotal transition in climate state of the Cenozoic Era.

  4. Response of the Pacific inter-tropical convergence zone to global cooling and initiation of Antarctic glaciation across the Eocene Oligocene Transition

    PubMed Central

    Hyeong, Kiseong; Kuroda, Junichiro; Seo, Inah; Wilson, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 34 million years ago across the Eocene–Oligocene transition (EOT), Earth’s climate tipped from a largely unglaciated state into one that sustained large ice sheets on Antarctica. Antarctic glaciation is attributed to a threshold response to slow decline in atmospheric CO2 but our understanding of the feedback processes triggered and of climate change on the other contents is limited. Here we present new geochemical records of terrigenous dust accumulating on the sea floor across the EOT from a site in the central equatorial Pacific. We report a change in dust chemistry from an Asian affinity to a Central-South American provenance that occurs geologically synchronously with the initiation of stepwise global cooling, glaciation of Antarctica and aridification on the northern continents. We infer that the inter-tropical convergence zone of intense precipitation extended to our site during late Eocene, at least four degrees latitude further south than today, but that it migrated northwards in step with global cooling and initiation of Antarctic glaciation. Our findings point to an atmospheric teleconnection between extratropical cooling and rainfall climate in the tropics and the mid-latitude belt of the westerlies operating across the most pivotal transition in climate state of the Cenozoic Era. PMID:27507793

  5. Response of the Pacific inter-tropical convergence zone to global cooling and initiation of Antarctic glaciation across the Eocene Oligocene Transition.

    PubMed

    Hyeong, Kiseong; Kuroda, Junichiro; Seo, Inah; Wilson, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 34 million years ago across the Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT), Earth's climate tipped from a largely unglaciated state into one that sustained large ice sheets on Antarctica. Antarctic glaciation is attributed to a threshold response to slow decline in atmospheric CO2 but our understanding of the feedback processes triggered and of climate change on the other contents is limited. Here we present new geochemical records of terrigenous dust accumulating on the sea floor across the EOT from a site in the central equatorial Pacific. We report a change in dust chemistry from an Asian affinity to a Central-South American provenance that occurs geologically synchronously with the initiation of stepwise global cooling, glaciation of Antarctica and aridification on the northern continents. We infer that the inter-tropical convergence zone of intense precipitation extended to our site during late Eocene, at least four degrees latitude further south than today, but that it migrated northwards in step with global cooling and initiation of Antarctic glaciation. Our findings point to an atmospheric teleconnection between extratropical cooling and rainfall climate in the tropics and the mid-latitude belt of the westerlies operating across the most pivotal transition in climate state of the Cenozoic Era. PMID:27507793

  6. Twin Convergence Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's QuikSCAT satellite has confirmed a 30-year old largely unproven theory that there are two areas near the equator where the winds converge year after year and drive ocean circulation south of the equator. By analyzing winds, QuikSCAT has found a year-round southern and northern Intertropical Convergence Zone. This find is important to climate modelers and weather forecasters because it provides more detail on how the oceans and atmosphere interact near the equator. The Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is the region that circles the Earth near the equator, where the trade winds of both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres come together. North of the equator, strong sun and warm water of the equator heats the air in the ITCZ, drawing air in from north and south and causing the air to rise. As the air rises it cools, releasing the accumulated moisture in an almost perpetual series of thunderstorms. Satellite data, however, has confirmed that there is an ITCZ north of the equator and a parallel ITCZ south of the equator. Variation in the location of the ITCZ is important to people around the world because it affects the north-south atmospheric circulation, which redistributes energy. It drastically affects rainfall in many equatorial nations, resulting in the wet and dry seasons of the tropics rather than the cold and warm seasons of higher latitudes. Longer term changes in the ITCZ can result in severe droughts or flooding in nearby areas. 'The double ITCZ is usually only identified in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans on a limited and seasonal basis,' said Timothy Liu, of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif., and lead researcher on the project. In the eastern Pacific Ocean, the southern ITCZ is usually seen springtime. In the western Atlantic Ocean, the southern ITCZ was recently clearly identified only in the summertime. However, QuikSCAT's wind data has seen the southern ITCZ in all seasons across the

  7. The 1977 intertropical convergence zone experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppoff, I. G. (Editor); Page, W. A. (Editor); Margozzi, A. P. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Data are presented from the 1977 Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) Experiment conducted in the Panama Canal Zone in July 1977. Measurements were made daily over a 16-day period when the ITCZ moved across the Canal Zone. Two aircraft (Learjet and U-2) flew daily and provided data from horizontal traverses at several altitudes to 21.3 km of ozone, temperature, pressure, water vapor, aerosols, fluorocarbons, methane, nitrous oxide, nitric oxide, and nitric acid. Balloonsondes flown four times per day provided data on ozone, wind fields, pressure, temperature, and humidities to altitudes near 30 km. Rocketsondes provided daily data to altitudes near 69 km. Satellite photography provided detailed cloud information. Descriptions of individual experiments and detailed compilations of all results are provided.

  8. Stratospheric aerosols in the intertropical convergence zone, Panama Canal zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farlow, N. H.; Ferry, G. V.; Lem, H. Y.; Hayes, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    To investigate whether injection sources of the stratospheric aerosol layer could be detected in the tropical stratosphere, an examination of the aerosol vertical and horizontal size distribution around the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) at the Panama Canal Zone was performed during the summer of 1977. By comparing these data with similar measurements in temperate and polar regions, it was hoped to discover variations in particle size that would indicate whether a young aerosol is forming and entering the stratosphere at the ITCZ; where the aerosol matures; and finally, where it reenters the troposphere. The methods used in the investigations and the results obtained from the analyses are described.

  9. A Northward Shift of the North Atlantic Ocean Intertropical Convergence Zone in Response to Summertime Saharan Dust Outbreaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Eric M.; Lau, K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2010-01-01

    The influence on the summertime North Atlantic Ocean inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ) of Saharan dust outbreaks is explored using nine years of continuous satellite observations and atmospheric reanalysis products. During dust outbreak events rainfall along the ITCZ shifts northward by 1 to 4 degrees latitude. Dust outbreaks coincide with warmer lower-tropospheric temperatures compared to low dust conditions, which is attributable to advection of the warm Saharan Air Layer, enhanced subtropical subsidence, and radiative heating of dust. The enhanced positive meridional temperature gradient coincident with dust outbreaks is accompanied by an acceleration of the easterly winds on the n011h side of the African Easterly Jet (AEJ). The center of the positive vorticity region south of the AEJ moves north drawing the center of low-level convergence and ITCZ rainfall northward with it. The enhanced precipitation on the north side of the ITCZ occurs in spite of widespread sea surface temperature cooling north of the ITCZ owing to reduced surface solar insolation by dust scattering.

  10. Rainfall Morphology in Semi-Tropical Convergence Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall; Ferrier, Brad S.; Ray, Peter S.

    2000-01-01

    Central Florida is the ideal test laboratory for studying convergence zone-induced convection. The region regularly experiences sea breeze fronts and rainfall-induced outflow boundaries. The focus of this study is the common yet poorly-studied convergence zone established by the interaction of the sea breeze front and an outflow boundary. Previous studies have investigated mechanisms primarily affecting storm initiation by such convergence zones. Few have focused on rainfall morphology yet these storms contribute a significant amount precipitation to the annual rainfall budget. Low-level convergence and mid-tropospheric moisture have both been shown to correlate with rainfall amounts in Florida. Using 2D and 3D numerical simulations, the roles of low-level convergence and mid-tropospheric moisture in rainfall evolution are examined. The results indicate that time-averaged, vertical moisture flux (VMF) at the sea breeze front/outflow convergence zone is directly and linearly proportional to initial condensation rates. This proportionality establishes a similar relationship between VMF and initial rainfall. Vertical moisture flux, which encompasses depth and magnitude of convergence, is better correlated to initial rainfall production than surface moisture convergence. This extends early observational studies which linked rainfall in Florida to surface moisture convergence. The amount and distribution of mid-tropospheric moisture determines how rainfall associated with secondary cells develop. Rainfall amount and efficiency varied significantly over an observable range of relative humidities in the 850- 500 mb layer even though rainfall evolution was similar during the initial or "first-cell" period. Rainfall variability was attributed to drier mid-tropospheric environments inhibiting secondary cell development through entrainment effects. Observationally, 850-500 mb moisture structure exhibits wider variability than lower level moisture, which is virtually always

  11. Understanding the South Pacific Convergence Zone and Its Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Scott

    2011-02-01

    International Workshop on the South Pacific Convergence Zone; Apia, Samoa, 24-26 August 2010 ; During the Southern Hemisphere summer the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) in the southwestern Pacific Ocean produces the largest rainfall band in the world. The SPCZ tends to move northeast during southern winter and El Niño and move southwest during southern summer and La Niña. These changes in position have a profound influence on climate (e.g., rainfall, winds, and tropical cyclone frequencies) and life in most of the nations in the southwestern Pacific. Despite the importance of the SPCZ to the region and its prominence in the general circulation of the Southern Hemisphere, the SPCZ has been studied relatively little compared with convergence zones in the Northern Hemisphere. An international workshop on the SPCZ was held in Samoa and brought together 30 experts from Australia, the Cook Islands, Fiji, France, India, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Samoa, the Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, the United Kingdom, the United States, and Vanuatu.

  12. Migrations and dynamics of the intertropical convergence zone.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Tapio; Bischoff, Tobias; Haug, Gerald H

    2014-09-01

    Rainfall on Earth is most intense in the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ), a narrow belt of clouds centred on average around six degrees north of the Equator. The mean position of the ITCZ north of the Equator arises primarily because the Atlantic Ocean transports energy northward across the Equator, rendering the Northern Hemisphere warmer than the Southern Hemisphere. On seasonal and longer timescales, the ITCZ migrates, typically towards a warming hemisphere but with exceptions, such as during El Niño events. An emerging framework links the ITCZ to the atmospheric energy balance and may account for ITCZ variations on timescales from years to geological epochs. PMID:25186899

  13. Large deglacial shifts of the Pacific Intertropical Convergence Zone

    PubMed Central

    Jacobel, A. W.; McManus, J. F.; Anderson, R. F.; Winckler, G.

    2016-01-01

    The position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is sensitive to changes in the balance of heat between the hemispheres which has fundamental implications for tropical hydrology and atmospheric circulation. Although the ITCZ is thought to experience the largest shifts in position during deglacial stadial events, the magnitude of shifts has proven difficult to reconstruct, in part because of a paucity of high-resolution records, particularly those including spatial components. Here we track the position of the ITCZ from 150 to 110 ka at three sites in the central equatorial Pacific at sub-millennial time resolution. Our results provide evidence of large, abrupt changes in tropical climate during the penultimate deglaciation, coincident with North Atlantic Heinrich Stadial 11 (∼136–129 ka). We identify this event both as a Northern Hemisphere increase in aeolian dust and as a shift in the mean position of the ITCZ a minimum of 4° southwards at 160° W. PMID:26794654

  14. Regional climate model projections of the South Pacific Convergence Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. P.; Bormann, K.; Katzfey, J.; Dean, S.; Arritt, R.

    2016-08-01

    This study presents results from regional climate model (RCM) projections for the south-west Pacific Ocean. The regional models used bias corrected sea surface temperatures. Six global climate models (GCMs) were used to drive a global variable resolution model on a quasi-uniform 60 km grid. One of these simulations was used to drive three limited area regional models. Thus a four member ensemble was produced by different RCMs downscaling the same GCM (GFDL2.1), and a six member ensemble was produced by the same RCM (Conformal Cubic Atmospheric Model—CCAM) downscaling six different GCMs. Comparison of the model results with precipitation observations shows the differences to be dominated by the choice of RCM, with all the CCAM simulations performing similarly and generally having lower error than the other RCMs. However, evaluating aspects of the model representation of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) does not show CCAM to perform better in this regard. In terms of the future projections of the SPCZ for the December-January-February season, the ensemble showed no consensus change in most characteristics though a majority of the ensemble members project a decrease in the SPCZ strength. Thus, similar to GCM based studies, there is large uncertainty concerning future changes in the SPCZ and there is no evidence to suggest that future changes will be outside the natural variability. These RCM simulations do not support an increase in the frequency of zonal SPCZ events.

  15. Large deglacial shifts of the Pacific Intertropical Convergence Zone.

    PubMed

    Jacobel, A W; McManus, J F; Anderson, R F; Winckler, G

    2016-01-01

    The position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is sensitive to changes in the balance of heat between the hemispheres which has fundamental implications for tropical hydrology and atmospheric circulation. Although the ITCZ is thought to experience the largest shifts in position during deglacial stadial events, the magnitude of shifts has proven difficult to reconstruct, in part because of a paucity of high-resolution records, particularly those including spatial components. Here we track the position of the ITCZ from 150 to 110 ka at three sites in the central equatorial Pacific at sub-millennial time resolution. Our results provide evidence of large, abrupt changes in tropical climate during the penultimate deglaciation, coincident with North Atlantic Heinrich Stadial 11 (∼136-129 ka). We identify this event both as a Northern Hemisphere increase in aeolian dust and as a shift in the mean position of the ITCZ a minimum of 4° southwards at 160° W. PMID:26794654

  16. Regional climate model projections of the South Pacific Convergence Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. P.; Bormann, K.; Katzfey, J.; Dean, S.; Arritt, R.

    2015-10-01

    This study presents results from regional climate model (RCM) projections for the south-west Pacific Ocean. The regional models used bias corrected sea surface temperatures. Six global climate models (GCMs) were used to drive a global variable resolution model on a quasi-uniform 60 km grid. One of these simulations was used to drive three limited area regional models. Thus a four member ensemble was produced by different RCMs downscaling the same GCM (GFDL2.1), and a six member ensemble was produced by the same RCM (Conformal Cubic Atmospheric Model—CCAM) downscaling six different GCMs. Comparison of the model results with precipitation observations shows the differences to be dominated by the choice of RCM, with all the CCAM simulations performing similarly and generally having lower error than the other RCMs. However, evaluating aspects of the model representation of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) does not show CCAM to perform better in this regard. In terms of the future projections of the SPCZ for the December-January-February season, the ensemble showed no consensus change in most characteristics though a majority of the ensemble members project a decrease in the SPCZ strength. Thus, similar to GCM based studies, there is large uncertainty concerning future changes in the SPCZ and there is no evidence to suggest that future changes will be outside the natural variability. These RCM simulations do not support an increase in the frequency of zonal SPCZ events.

  17. Geophysical study of the structure and processes of the continental convergence zones: Alpine-Himalayan belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoz, M. N.; Molnar, P.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of the structure of the continental collision zones using seismic and body waves, theoretical modelling of the thermal regime of the convergence processes, and studies of earthquake mechanisms and deformation aspects of the model are covered.

  18. Architecture of orogenic belts and convergent zones in Western Ishtar Terra, Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, James W.; Vorderbruegge, R. W.; Crumpler, L. S.

    1989-01-01

    Linear mountain belts in Ishtar Terra were recognized from Pioneer-Venus topography, and later Arecibo images showed banded terrain interpreted to represent folds. Subsequent analyses showed that the mountains represented orogenic belts, and that each had somewhat different features and characteristics. Orogenic belts are regions of focused shortening and compressional deformation and thus provide evidence for the nature of such deformation, processes of crustal thickening (brittle, ductile), and processes of crustal loss. Such information is important in understanding the nature of convergent zones on Venus (underthrusting, imbrication, subduction), the implications for rates of crustal recycling, and the nature of environments of melting and petrogenesis. The basic elements of four convergent zones and orogenic belts in western Ishtar Terra are identified and examined, and then assess the architecture of these zones (the manner in which the elements are arrayed), and their relationships. The basic nomenclature of the convergent zones is shown.

  19. Dynamics of the intertropical convergence zone over the western Pacific during the Little Ice Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hong; Wei, Wei; Soon, Willie; An, Zhisheng; Zhou, Weijian; Liu, Zhonghui; Wang, Yuhong; Carter, Robert M.

    2015-04-01

    Precipitation in low latitudes is primarily controlled by the position of the intertropical convergence zone, which migrates from south to north seasonally. The Little Ice Age (defined as AD 1400-1850) was associated with low solar irradiance and high atmospheric aerosol concentrations as a result of several large volcanic eruptions. The mean position of the intertropical convergence zone over the western Pacific has been proposed to have shifted southwards during this interval, which would lead to relatively dry Little Ice Age conditions in the northern extent of the intertropical convergence zone and wet conditions around its southern limit. However, here we present a synthesis of palaeo-hydrology records from the Asian-Australian monsoon area that documents a rainfall distribution that distinctly violates the expected pattern. Our synthesis instead documents a synchronous retreat of the East Asian Summer Monsoon and the Australian Summer Monsoon into the tropics during the Little Ice Age, a pattern supported by the results of our climate model simulation of tropical precipitation over the past millennium. We suggest that this pattern over the western Pacific is best explained by a contraction in the latitudinal range over which the intertropical convergence zone seasonally migrates during the Little Ice Age. We therefore propose that rather than a strict north-south migration, the intertropical convergence zone in this region may instead expand and contract over decadal to centennial timescales in response to external forcing.

  20. Characteristics of the convergence zone at the eastern edge of the Pacific warm pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Christophe; Picaut, Joël; Kuroda, Yoshifumi; Ando, Kentaro

    2004-06-01

    The characteristics of the convergence zone at the eastern edge of the equatorial Pacific warm pool are studied using a compilation of in-situ current and salinity measurements during the period 1992-2001. The displacement of the convergence zone is observed, for the first time, as far west as 140°E in the far western Pacific, mainly during La Niña periods, and near 140°W in the central Pacific during the 1997-98 El Niño. The convergence zone may be associated with a salinity front dividing the fresh waters of the warm pool from the salty waters upwelled in the central equatorial Pacific. Despite a zonal displacement ranging over about one fifth of the equatorial circumference of the earth, the characteristics of the main parameters involved in the air-sea interactions are nearly constant on each side of the convergence zone/salinity front. These results suggest that coupled models used for El Niño research and forecasting should be able to reproduce these important features.

  1. Contraction of the Western Pacific Intertropical Convergence Zone During the Little Ice Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, H.; Wei, W.; Soon, W.; Zhou, W.; An, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Both palaeoclimate reconstructions and climate modeling have demonstrated thatprecipitation in low latitudes is primarily controlled by north- south migration of the globalIntertropical Convergence Zone on millennial to orbital timescales. These migrations areassociated with the occurrence of opposite rainfall variations between the twohemispheres. However, the pattern of rainfalls around the marine-continental tropicalwestern Pacific region over the last millennium remains unclear. Several recent studiessuggest a southward migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone during the Little IceAge (~AD 1400-1850). Concomitantly, dry Little Ice Age conditions should have occurred inthe northern extent of the Intertropical Convergence Zone and wet conditions around thesouthern limit. However, our synthesis of proxy hydrology records from the Asian-Australian monsoon area documents a distinctly different rainfall pattern that violates thisexpectation, suggesting instead the occurrence of synchronous retreat of the East AsianSummer Monsoon and the Australian Summer Monsoon during the Little Ice Age. Thus wepropose an alternative dynamic scenario: rather than strict north-south migration, theapparent mode of multi-decadal to centennial change for the western Pacific IntertropicalConvergence Zone is contraction/expansion in response to external forcings such as solarirradiance variation and large volcanic eruptions.

  2. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-09-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and

  3. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-09-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and

  4. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2004-12-01

    Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and data, video and data, private-line and virtual private-line, fixed and mobile, and local and long-haul services. These

  5. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-08-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and

  6. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-06-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and

  7. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-05-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and

  8. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-04-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and

  9. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-01-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence

    Guest Editors: Thomas E. Darcie, University of Victoria Robert Doverspike, AT&T Martin Zirngibl, Lucent Technologies

    Coordinating Associate Editor: Steven K. Korotky, Lucent Technologies

    The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly

  10. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2004-12-01

    Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and data, video and data, private-line and virtual private-line, fixed and mobile, and local and long-haul services. These

  11. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-03-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and data, video and data, private-line and virtual private-line, fixed and mobile, and local and

  12. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-02-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and data, video and data, private-line and virtual private-line, fixed and mobile, and local and

  13. Global tectonic significance of the Solomon Islands and Ontong Java Plateau convergent zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Paul; Taira, Asahiko

    2004-10-01

    Oceanic plateaus, areas of anomalously thick oceanic crust, cover about 3% of the Earth's seafloor and are thought to mark the surface location of mantle plume "heads". Hotspot tracks represent continuing magmatism associated with the remaining plume conduit or "tail". It is presently controversial whether voluminous and mafic oceanic plateau lithosphere is eventually accreted at subduction zones, and, therefore: (1) influences the eventual composition of continental crust and; (2) is responsible for significantly higher rates of continental growth than growth only by accretion of island arcs. The Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) of the southwestern Pacific Ocean is the largest and thickest oceanic plateau on Earth and the largest plateau currently converging on an island arc (Solomon Islands). For this reason, this convergent zone is a key area for understanding the fate of large and thick plateaus on reaching subduction zones. This volume consists of a series of four papers that summarize the results of joint US-Japan marine geophysical studies in 1995 and 1998 of the Solomon Islands-Ontong Java Plateau convergent zone. Marine geophysical data include single and multi-channel seismic reflection, ocean-bottom seismometer (OBS) refraction, gravity, magnetic, sidescan sonar, and earthquake studies. Objectives of this introductory paper include: (1) review of the significance of oceanic plateaus as potential contributors to continental crust; (2) review of the current theories on the fate of oceanic plateaus at subduction zones; (3) establish the present-day and Neogene tectonic setting of the Solomon Islands-Ontong Java Plateau convergent zone; (4) discuss the controversial sequence and timing of tectonic events surrounding Ontong Java Plateau-Solomon arc convergence; (5) present a series of tectonic reconstructions for the period 20 Ma (early Miocene) to the present-day in support of our proposed timing of major tectonic events affecting the Ontong Java Plateau

  14. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-01-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence

    Guest Editors: Thomas E. Darcie, University of Victoria Robert Doverspike, AT&T Martin Zirngibl, Lucent Technologies

    Coordinating Associate Editor: Steven K. Korotky, Lucent Technologies

    The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly

  15. Origin and fate of surface drift in the oceanic convergence zones of the eastern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Christophe; Blanke, Bruno; Martinez, Elodie

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the structure and intensity of the surface pathways connecting to and from the central areas of the large-scale convergence regions of the eastern Pacific Ocean. Surface waters are traced with numerical Lagrangian particles transported in the velocity field of three different ocean models with horizontal resolutions that range from ¼° to 1/32°. The connections resulting from the large-scale convergent Ekman dynamics agree qualitatively but are strongly modulated by eddy variability that introduces meridional asymmetry in the amplitude of transport. Lagrangian forward-in-time integrations are used to analyze the fate of particles originating from the central regions of the convergence zones and highlight specific outflows not yet reported for the southeastern Pacific when using the currents at the highest resolutions (1/12° and 1/32°). The meridional scales of these outflows are comparable to the characteristic width of the fine-scale striation of mean currents.

  16. Estimates of projection overlap and zones of convergence within frontal-striatal circuits.

    PubMed

    Averbeck, Bruno B; Lehman, Julia; Jacobson, Moriah; Haber, Suzanne N

    2014-07-16

    Frontal-striatal circuits underlie important decision processes, and pathology in these circuits is implicated in many psychiatric disorders. Studies have shown a topographic organization of cortical projections into the striatum. However, work has also shown that there is considerable overlap in the striatal projection zones of nearby cortical regions. To characterize this in detail, we quantified the complete striatal projection zones from 34 cortical injection locations in rhesus monkeys. We first fit a statistical model that showed that the projection zone of a cortical injection site could be predicted with considerable accuracy using a cross-validated model estimated on only the other injection sites. We then examined the fraction of overlap in striatal projection zones as a function of distance between cortical injection sites, and found that there was a highly regular relationship. Specifically, nearby cortical locations had as much as 80% overlap, and the amount of overlap decayed exponentially as a function of distance between the cortical injection sites. Finally, we found that some portions of the striatum received inputs from all the prefrontal regions, making these striatal zones candidates as information-processing hubs. Thus, the striatum is a site of convergence that allows integration of information spread across diverse prefrontal cortical areas. PMID:25031393

  17. Geophysical study of the structure and processes of the continental convergence zones: Alpine-Himalayan Belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoez, M. N.

    1981-01-01

    The seismic wave velocity structure in the crust and upper mantle region beneath the Tibetan plateau was studied in detail. Also, a preliminary study of the uppermost mantle P wave velocity beneath Iran and Turkey was carried out, and the results are compared with those for the Tibetan plateau. These two studies compose the bulk of the efforts on the observational aspects of continental collision zones in addition to satellite derived data. On the theoretical aspects the thermal evolution of converging plate boundaries was explored using a finite difference scheme.

  18. Influence of the inter tropical discontinuity on Harmattan dust deposition in Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyngsie, G.; Olsen, J. L.; Awadzi, T. W.; Fensholt, R.; Breuning-Madsen, H.

    2013-09-01

    The Harmattan is a dry dust-laden continental wind, and in the boreal winter Harmattan dust plumes affects many West African countries, including Ghana. When the Harmattan is strongest the southern part of Ghana is affected by the Inter Tropical Discontinuity (ITD). In this study, we investigate if the ITD functions as a barrier, preventing long transported Harmattan dust to settle south of, and below, it. This is done by analyzing a Harmattan dust outbreak, mapped using Earth observation (EO) data from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) onboard the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) platform, coupled with data from West African AERONET stations, and comparing these observations with wind data from NOAA's Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) program and the mineral suite of samples from seasonal dust deposits in north and south Ghana. In northern Ghana traces of minerals indicate a weak influence of particles from an arid environment, which is found consistent with the mapped dust plumes and NE wind directions. In southern Ghana the mineral composition show no sediments of an arid origin, the mapped dust plumes is less intense, and the surface wind directions and wind mass trajectories are more varying with lower wind speeds. Based on the results of this study it is concluded that dust deposited, or measured near ground, in the Harmattan period under the ITD, and south of it, does not contain material from the Chad Basin due to the local winds conditions.

  19. Atlanta ariejansseni, a new species of shelled heteropod from the Southern Subtropical Convergence Zone (Gastropoda, Pterotracheoidea).

    PubMed

    Wall-Palmer, Deborah; Burridge, Alice K; Peijnenburg, Katja T C A

    2016-01-01

    The Atlantidae (shelled heteropods) is a family of microscopic aragonite shelled holoplanktonic gastropods with a wide biogeographical distribution in tropical, sub-tropical and temperate waters. The aragonite shell and surface ocean habitat of the atlantids makes them particularly susceptible to ocean acidification and ocean warming, and atlantids are likely to be useful indicators of these changes. However, we still lack fundamental information on their taxonomy and biogeography, which is essential for monitoring the effects of a changing ocean. Integrated morphological and molecular approaches to taxonomy have been employed to improve the assessment of species boundaries, which give a more accurate picture of species distributions. Here a new species of atlantid heteropod is described based on shell morphology, DNA barcoding of the Cytochrome Oxidase I gene, and biogeography. All specimens of Atlanta ariejansseni sp. n. were collected from the Southern Subtropical Convergence Zone of the Atlantic and Indo-Pacific oceans suggesting that this species has a very narrow latitudinal distribution (37-48°S). Atlanta ariejansseni sp. n. was found to be relatively abundant (up to 2.3 specimens per 1000 m(3) water) within this narrow latitudinal range, implying that this species has adapted to the specific conditions of the Southern Subtropical Convergence Zone and has a high tolerance to the varying ocean parameters in this region. PMID:27551204

  20. Atlanta ariejansseni, a new species of shelled heteropod from the Southern Subtropical Convergence Zone (Gastropoda, Pterotracheoidea)

    PubMed Central

    Wall-Palmer, Deborah; Burridge, Alice K.; Peijnenburg, Katja T.C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Atlantidae (shelled heteropods) is a family of microscopic aragonite shelled holoplanktonic gastropods with a wide biogeographical distribution in tropical, sub-tropical and temperate waters. The aragonite shell and surface ocean habitat of the atlantids makes them particularly susceptible to ocean acidification and ocean warming, and atlantids are likely to be useful indicators of these changes. However, we still lack fundamental information on their taxonomy and biogeography, which is essential for monitoring the effects of a changing ocean. Integrated morphological and molecular approaches to taxonomy have been employed to improve the assessment of species boundaries, which give a more accurate picture of species distributions. Here a new species of atlantid heteropod is described based on shell morphology, DNA barcoding of the Cytochrome Oxidase I gene, and biogeography. All specimens of Atlanta ariejansseni sp. n. were collected from the Southern Subtropical Convergence Zone of the Atlantic and Indo-Pacific oceans suggesting that this species has a very narrow latitudinal distribution (37–48°S). Atlanta ariejansseni sp. n. was found to be relatively abundant (up to 2.3 specimens per 1000 m3 water) within this narrow latitudinal range, implying that this species has adapted to the specific conditions of the Southern Subtropical Convergence Zone and has a high tolerance to the varying ocean parameters in this region. PMID:27551204

  1. Tracking the extent of the South Pacific Convergence Zone since the early 1600s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsley, Braddock K.; Kaplan, Alexey; Gouriou, Yves; Salinger, Jim; Demenocal, Peter B.; Wellington, Gerard M.; Howe, Stephen S.

    2006-05-01

    The South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) is the largest and most persistent spur of the Intertropical Convergence Zone. At the southeastern edge of the SPCZ near 170°W and 15°-20°S a surface ocean salinity frontal zone exists that separates fresher Western Pacific Warm Pool water from saltier and cooler waters in the east. This salinity front is known to shift east and west with the phase of the El Niño Southern Oscillation. We have generated subannually resolved and replicated coral oxygen isotopic time series from Fiji (17°S, 179°E) and Rarotonga (21.5°S, 160°W) that have recorded interannual displacements of the salinity front over the last 380 years and also indicate that at lower frequencies the decadal mean position of the salinity front, and eastern extent of the SPCZ, has shifted east-west through 10° to 20° of longitude three times during this interval. The most recent and largest shift began in the mid 1800s as the salinity front progressively moved eastward and salinity decreased at both sites. Our results suggest that sea surface salinity at these sites is now at the lowest levels recorded and is evidence for an unprecedented expansion of the SPCZ since the mid 1800s. The expansion of the SPCZ implies a gradual change in the South Pacific to more La Niña-like long-term mean conditions. This observation is consistent with the ocean thermostat mechanism for the Pacific coupled ocean-atmosphere system, whereby exogenous heating of the atmosphere would result in greater warming in the western Pacific and a greater east-west surface temperature gradient.

  2. Spatial evolution of Zagros collision zone in Kurdistan, NW Iran: constraints on Arabia-Eurasia oblique convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Shahriar; Yassaghi, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Stratigraphy, detailed structural mapping and a crustal-scale cross section across the NW Zagros collision zone provide constraints on the spatial evolution of oblique convergence of the Arabian and Eurasian plates since the Late Cretaceous. The Zagros collision zone in NW Iran consists of the internal Sanandaj-Sirjan, Gaveh Rud and Ophiolite zones and the external Bisotoun, Radiolarite and High Zagros zones. The Main Zagros Thrust is the major structure of the Zagros suture zone. Two stages of oblique deformation are recognized in the external part of the NW Zagros in Iran. In the early stage, coexisting dextral strike-slip and reverse dominated domains in the Radiolarite zone developed in response to deformation partitioning due to oblique convergence. Dextral-reverse faults in the Bisotoun zone are also compatible with oblique convergence. In the late stage, deformation partitioning occurred during southeastward propagation of the Zagros orogeny towards its foreland resulting in synchronous development of orogen-parallel strike-slip and thrust faults. It is proposed that the first stage was related to Late Cretaceous oblique obduction, while the second stage resulted from Cenozoic collision. The Cenozoic orogen-parallel strike-slip component of Zagros oblique convergence is not confined to the Zagros suture zone (Main Recent Fault) but also occurred in the external part (Marekhil-Ravansar fault system). Thus, it is proposed that oblique convergence of Arabian and Eurasian plates in Zagros collision zone initiated with oblique obduction in the Late Cretaceous followed by oblique collision in the late Tertiary, consistent with global plate reconstructions.

  3. Features of the Caucasian segment of the Alpine-Himalayan-Indonesian Convergence Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkov, E.

    2012-04-01

    The Caucasus Mountain System is a part of the Cenozoic Alpine-Himalayan-Indonesian Convergence Zone (AHICZ) which lasted throughout Eurasia from Western Mediterranean to Western Pacific. This belt has been formed after closure of the Mesozoic Tethys and is marked by mountains building processes, appearance of riftogenic structures, numerous late Cenozoic basaltic plateaus, and chain of often within-continental andesite-latite volcanic arcs, which trace suture zones of the continental plates collision. Caucasus Mountains are located in eastern part of the proper Alpine Zone in zone of Arabian-Eurasian syntaxis and appeared as a result of submeridional pressure which generated by oncoming moving of these plates. The Great Caucasus is represent the south border of the Eurasian plate, uplifted along the Main Caucasian Fault (Thrust). The latter is a part of super-regional deep-seated fault ranged from the Kopetdag through Caspian Sea, Caucasus and Crimea; very likely, that its further continuation is Tornquist-Teisseyre Zone. This superfault separates areas of Alpine convergence from Eurasian plate sensu stricto. The Caucasus occurred between Black and Caspian seas with passive margins and oceanic crust, covered by sediments of 10-15 km thick. Depressions of the seas form large "downfall", or caldrons which cut off pre-Pliocene structures of Caucasus and Kopetdag. These seas are, probably, small remnants of the Tethys which gradually shallowing in the Miocene (Zonenshain, Le Pichon, 1986). New essential deepening of the Black Sea and South-Caspian deep began in the Pliocene- Quaternary; it occurred simultaneously with uprising of Crimea and Caucasus, which were not marked in relief before (Grachev, 2000). Large positive isostatic anomaly beneath the Trans-Caucasian Transverse Uplift (TCTU) of the Great Caucasus and Lesser Caucasus, which stretch out to Arabian plate, occurred between "subsides" Black and especially Caspian seas with neutral to negative isostatic

  4. Tracking the extent of the South Pacific Convergence Zone since 1619 AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsley, B. K.; Kaplan, A.; Gouriou, Y.; Salinger, J.; Demenocal, P. B.; Wellington, G. M.; Howe, S. S.

    2005-12-01

    Enhanced convection and rainfall in the oceanic sectors of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is one of the predicted outcomes of increasing greenhouse gas emissions and rising average global temperatures. However due to the current limited understanding of the past extent and variability of the convergence zones prior to ~1900, it has not been possible to determine pre-anthropogenic ``baseline'' convergence zone variability in order to test these predictions. Here we examine the past extent and variability of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), the largest and most persistent spur of the ITCZ, using multiple cores from massive coral colonies extending back to 1619. At the southeastern edge of the SPCZ near 170°W and 15°-20°S a surface ocean salinity frontal zone exists that separates fresher Western Pacific Warm Pool water from saltier and cooler waters in the east. Previous analysis of instrumental sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface salinity (SSS), and precipitation records in the SPCZ - SSS front region beginning in 1976 indicate that the amplitudes of the interannual signals in SST and precipitation are an order of magnitude less than the amplitude of the seasonal cycle, whereas for SSS, the interannual signal of 1 to 1.5 p.s.u. is double the amplitude of the seasonal signal. This analysis confirms that in the SPCZ region, SSS is higher and SST and precipitation are lower during El Niño events. The opposite occurs during La Niña events. We have generated sub-annually resolved and replicated coral oxygen isotopic time-series from Fiji (17°S, 179°E) and Rarotonga (21.5°S, 160°W) that record this same relationship between annual SST and interannual SSS. Calibration of the trends in these oxygen isotope records against instrumental SST and coral Sr/Ca from Fiji demonstrates that at lower frequencies the decadal mean position of the salinity front, and eastern extent of the SPCZ, has shifted east-west through 10° to 20° of longitude

  5. Sahelian dust lifting in the inter-tropical discontinuity region: Lidar observations and mesoscale modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bou Karam, D.; Flamant, C.; Tulet, P.; Chaboureau, J.; Dabas, A.; Chong, M.; Reitebuch, O.

    2007-12-01

    Airbone lidar observations acquired with the LEANDRE 2 system during 3 flights of the SAFIRE Falcon 20 in the framework of the AMMA Special Observing Period (SOP) 2a1 (July 2006) over western Niger, revealed the existence of desert dust uptakes in the region of the inter-tropical discontinuity (ITD) in the morning hours. Complementary observations provided by dropsondes released from the same platform as well as airborne wind measurements made from another platform (the DLR Falcon 20, flying in coordination with the SAFIRE Falcon 20) evidenced that the lifting was associated with the leading edge of the monsoon low level jet, and to be transported southward by the harmattan, above the monsoon layer. A 10-day numerical simulation, using the mesoscale model Meso-NH (including the dust emission box Dust Entrainment And Deposition model), was conducted to assess the representativity of the observed phenomenon as well as the mechanisms associated with the Sahelian dust emissions. The Meso-NH simulation (initialized by and nudged with ECMWF analyses) was carried out on a 2000 km x 2000 km domain (20-km horizontal resolution) centered at 20°N and 7°E, that included the Falcons flight track, as well as numerous AMMA-related ground-based measurement sites (Tamanrasset, Agadez, Niamey/Banizoumbou, etc..) for validation purposes. In the simulation, large dust uptakes associated with the leading edge of the monsoon flow, with a dust concentration reaching 2000μg/m3, and to be transported southward by the harmattan, above the monsoon layer, were well reproduced. On the other hand, the simulation suggested the existence of dust emissions associated with the harmattan flow which were not observed by airborne lidar measurements. The reason for the discrepancy between the model results and the lidar observations is investigated.

  6. Spatial evolution of Zagros collision zone in Kurdistan - NW Iran, constraints for Arabia-Eurasia oblique convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, S.; Yassaghi, A.

    2015-09-01

    Stratigraphy, detailed structural mapping and crustal scale cross section of the NW Zagros collision zone evolved during convergence of the Arabian and Eurasian plates were conducted to constrain the spatial evolution of the belt oblique convergence since Late Cretaceous. Zagros orogeny in NW Iran consists of the Sanandaj-Sirjan, Gaveh Rud and ophiolite zones as internal, and Bisotoun, Radiolarite and High Zagros zones as external parts. The Main Zagros Thrust is known as major structures of the Zagros suture zone. Two stages of deformation are recognized in the external parts of Zagros. In the early stage, presence of dextrally deformed domains beside the reversely deformed domains in the Radiolarite zone as well as dextral-reverse faults in both Bisotoun and Radiolarite zones demonstrates partitioning of the dextral transpression. In the late stage, southeastward propagation of the Zagros orogeny towards its foreland resulted in synchronous development of orogen-parallel strike-slip and pure thrust faults. It is proposed that the first stage related to the late Cretaceous oblique obduction, and the second stage is resulted from Cenozoic collision. Cenozoic orogen-parallel strike-slip component of Zagros oblique faulting is not confined to the Zagros suture zone (Main Recent) but also occurred in the more external part (Marekhil-Ravansar fault system). Thus, it is proposed that oblique convergence of Arabia-Eurasia plates occurred in Zagros collision zone since the Late Cretaceous.

  7. Evidence for self-refraction in a convergence zone: NPE (Nonlinear progressive wave equation) model results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, B. Edward; Plante, Daniel R.

    1989-01-01

    The nonlinear progressive wave equation (NPE) model was developed by the Naval Ocean Research and Development Activity during 1982 to 1987 to study nonlinear effects in long range oceanic propagation of finite amplitude acoustic waves, including weak shocks. The NPE model was applied to propagation of a generic shock wave (initial condition provided by Sandia Division 1533) in a few illustrative environments. The following consequences of nonlinearity are seen by comparing linear and nonlinear NPE results: (1) a decrease in shock strength versus range (a well-known result of entropy increases at the shock front); (2) an increase in the convergence zone range; and (3) a vertical meandering of the energy path about the corresponding linear ray path. Items (2) and (3) are manifestations of self-refraction.

  8. Obliquity pacing of the western Pacific Intertropical Convergence Zone over the past 282,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Lo, Li; Shi, Zhengguo; Wei, Kuo-Yen; Chou, Chien-Ju; Chen, Yi-Chi; Chuang, Chih-Kai; Wu, Chung-Che; Mii, Horng-Sheng; Peng, Zicheng; Amakawa, Hiroshi; Burr, George S.; Lee, Shih-Yu; Delong, Kristine L.; Elderfield, Henry; Shen, Chuan-Chou

    2015-11-01

    The Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) encompasses the heaviest rain belt on the Earth. Few direct long-term records, especially in the Pacific, limit our understanding of long-term natural variability for predicting future ITCZ migration. Here we present a tropical precipitation record from the Southern Hemisphere covering the past 282,000 years, inferred from a marine sedimentary sequence collected off the eastern coast of Papua New Guinea. Unlike the precession paradigm expressed in its East Asian counterpart, our record shows that the western Pacific ITCZ migration was influenced by combined precession and obliquity changes. The obliquity forcing could be primarily delivered by a cross-hemispherical thermal/pressure contrast, resulting from the asymmetric continental configuration between Asia and Australia in a coupled East Asian-Australian circulation system. Our finding suggests that the obliquity forcing may play a more important role in global hydroclimate cycles than previously thought.

  9. Obliquity pacing of the western Pacific Intertropical Convergence Zone over the past 282,000 years

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Lo, Li; Shi, Zhengguo; Wei, Kuo-Yen; Chou, Chien-Ju; Chen, Yi-Chi; Chuang, Chih-Kai; Wu, Chung-Che; Mii, Horng-Sheng; Peng, Zicheng; Amakawa, Hiroshi; Burr, George S.; Lee, Shih-Yu; DeLong, Kristine L.; Elderfield, Henry; Shen, Chuan-Chou

    2015-01-01

    The Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) encompasses the heaviest rain belt on the Earth. Few direct long-term records, especially in the Pacific, limit our understanding of long-term natural variability for predicting future ITCZ migration. Here we present a tropical precipitation record from the Southern Hemisphere covering the past 282,000 years, inferred from a marine sedimentary sequence collected off the eastern coast of Papua New Guinea. Unlike the precession paradigm expressed in its East Asian counterpart, our record shows that the western Pacific ITCZ migration was influenced by combined precession and obliquity changes. The obliquity forcing could be primarily delivered by a cross-hemispherical thermal/pressure contrast, resulting from the asymmetric continental configuration between Asia and Australia in a coupled East Asian–Australian circulation system. Our finding suggests that the obliquity forcing may play a more important role in global hydroclimate cycles than previously thought. PMID:26602034

  10. Response of the intertropical convergence zone to zonally asymmetric subtropical surface forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Tiffany A.; Voigt, Aiko; Kang, Sarah M.; Seo, Jeongbin

    2015-11-01

    The energetic framework predicts no shift of the zonal mean Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) in response to zonally asymmetric forcings (zonal warming and cooling regions with zero zonal mean) assuming radiative feedbacks are linear. Here we show the ITCZ shifts southward in response to a zonally asymmetric forcing in the Northern Hemisphere subtropics in a slab ocean aquaplanet model. The southward shift is consistent with decreased zonal mean energy input to the atmosphere due to cloud radiative effect changes in the cooling region. When cloud-radiative feedbacks are disabled the ITCZ shifts northward consistent with changes in the warming region where increased energy input via surface heat fluxes and stationary Rossby-wave transport dominate. Competition between cooling and warming regions leads to changes in gross moist stability. Our results show rectification of zonally asymmetric forcings play an important role in zonal mean ITCZ dynamics and highlight the importance of assessing the momentum budget when interpreting ITCZ shifts.

  11. A Case Study of Mesoscale Cyclonic Vortices Associated with the South Atlantic Convergence Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal de Quadro, M. F.; Faus da Silva Dias, M. A.; Herdies, D. L.; Goncalves, L.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this work is to study the behavior of mesoscale cyclonic vortices (MCVs) over South America, principally those that form in association with the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ), with a view toward identifying the basic characteristics of the formation of these MCVs. Two case studies were conducted over the Continental Amazonia Zone, simulated using the BRAMS model, showing the relationship between the mesovortices formation and the convective activity near its formation region. A thermodynamic analysis of two selected MCVs, embedded in the SACZ, highlights some salient features of these intense MCVs. Both systems are associated with strong upward vertical motion throughout practically the whole troposphere, before and during formation. This motion creates a transport of moisture into the upper troposphere and the surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat are reduced when the MCVs are operating. These systems that form in more than one level in the troposphere are more intense and are associated with greater precipitation rates (over 150 mm). Another striking feature is that these systems dissipate quickly. With respect to the horizontal wind, there is no similarity in pattern between the two cases. The first case, where the base of the vortex formed at 925 hPa and extended to 875 hPa, was characterized by convergence of winds from the south - west of the vortex - with winds from the north - east of the vortex. In the second case, which extended from 800 hPa to 775 hPa, we can clearly see the motion, originating in central Brazil, transporting moisture toward the vortex and certainly serving as a local factor contributing significantly to the moisture balance in the region.

  12. Aqua-planet simulations of the formation of the South Atlantic convergence zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieto Ferreira, Rosana; Chao, Winston C.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of Amazon Basin convection and cold fronts on the formation and maintenance of the South Atlantic convergence zone (SACZ) is studied using aqua-planet simulations with a general circulation model. In the model, a circular patch of warm sea-surface temperature (SST) is used to mimic the effect of the Amazon Basin on South American monsoon convection. The aqua-planet simulations were designed to study the effect of the strength and latitude of Amazon Basin convection on the formation of the SACZ. The simulations indicate that the strength of the SACZ increases as the Amazon convection intensifies and is moved away from the equator. Of the two controls studied here, the latitude of the Amazon convection exerts the strongest effect on the strength of the SACZ. An analysis of the synoptic-scale variability in the simulations shows the importance of frontal systems in the formation of the aqua-planet SACZ. Composite time series of frontal systems that occurred in the simulations show that a robust SACZ occurs when fronts penetrate into the subtropics and become stationary there as they cross eastward of the longitude of the Amazon Basin. Moisture convergence associated with these frontal systems produces rainfall not along the model SACZ region and along a large portion of the northern model Amazon Basin. Simulations in which the warm SST patch was too weak or too close to the equator did not produce frontal systems that extended into the tropics and became stationary, and did not form a SACZ. In the model, the SACZ forms as Amazon Basin convection strengthens and migrates far enough southward to allow frontal systems to penetrate into the tropics and stall over South America. This result is in agreement with observations that the SACZ tends to form after the onset of the monsoon season in the Amazon Basin.

  13. Characterization of the variability of the South Pacific Convergence Zone using satellite and reanalysis wind products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidwell, Autumn; Lee, Tong; Jo, Young-Heon; Yan, Xiao-hai

    2016-04-01

    The South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), the largest rain band worldwide during austral summer, is important to atmospheric circulation (including cyclone genesis) and ocean circulation. Previous studies of the SPCZ have focused on parameters such as outgoing longwave radiation or precipitation. However, wind convergence is fundamental causing the variations of these parameters. In this study, the SPCZ variability is examined using ocean surface wind products derived from NASA's QuickSCAT (1999-2009) and ESA's ASCAT (2007 onward) satellite scatterometers and ERA-Interim atmospheric reanalysis (1981 onward). From these products, indices were developed to characterize the SPCZ strength, area, and centroid location. Excellent agreement is found in terms of the temporal variations of the indices derived from the satellites and reanalysis wind products, despite some small differences in the time-mean SPCZ strength. The SPCZ strength, area, and centroid latitude have a dominant seasonal cycle. In contrast, the SPCZ centroid longitude is dominated by intraseasonal variability due to the influence by the Madden-Julian Oscillation. The SPCZ indices are all correlated with El Niño-Southern Oscillation indices. Interannual and intraseasonal variations of SPCZ strength during strong El Niño are approximately twice as large as the respective seasonal variations. SPCZ strength depends more on the intensity of El Niño rather than the central- vs. eastern-Pacific type. The longer ERA-Interim product is also used to examine decadal variations of the SPCZ indices. The change from positive to negative Pacific Decadal Oscillation phase around 1999 resulted in a westward shift of the SPCZ centroid longitude, much smaller interannual swing in centroid latitude, and a decrease in SPCZ area. This study improves the understanding of the variations of the SPCZ on multiple time scales and reveals the variations of SPCZ strength not reported previously. The diagnostics analyses can be

  14. Factors controlling the position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone on an aquaplanet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MöBis, Benjamin; Stevens, Bjorn

    2012-04-01

    Aqua planet experiments performed with fixed sea surface temperatures (SST) using the ECHAM6 GCM are studied to understand properties that influence the position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). A single ITCZ develops when using the Nordeng scheme and a double ITCZ when using the Tiedtke scheme. The position of the ITCZ is found to depend on a feedback loop process wherein convective heating drives pressure gradients and winds, which determine the rate of surface evaporation, which influences the boundary layer moist static energy, which finally couples back to the pattern of convective heating. This feedback loop process is sensitive to the SST profile and the choice of the convection scheme. However SSTs are only important in so far as they control the boundary layer moist static energy. The feed-back loop can be broken by specifying the wind used to calculate surface fluxes, in so doing it is possible to control the magnitude of boundary layer moist static energy and hence the position of the ITCZ. The cloud top height and therefore the convective heating decisively depends on the entrainment rates and the free tropospheric humidity. In the double ITCZ case the humidity in the lower free troposphere is higher on the equatorward side of the double ITCZ compared to the poleward side. Therefore an increase of the entrainment rates favor convection on the equatorward side. This explains why the Nordeng scheme produces a single ITCZ, although the Tiedtke scheme produces a double ITCZ.

  15. The intertropical convergence zone modulates intense hurricane strikes on the western North Atlantic margin.

    PubMed

    van Hengstum, Peter J; Donnelly, Jeffrey P; Fall, Patricia L; Toomey, Michael R; Albury, Nancy A; Kakuk, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Most Atlantic hurricanes form in the Main Development Region between 9°N to 20°N along the northern edge of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Previous research has suggested that meridional shifts in the ITCZ position on geologic timescales can modulate hurricane activity, but continuous and long-term storm records are needed from multiple sites to assess this hypothesis. Here we present a 3000 year record of intense hurricane strikes in the northern Bahamas (Abaco Island) based on overwash deposits in a coastal sinkhole, which indicates that the ITCZ has likely helped modulate intense hurricane strikes on the western North Atlantic margin on millennial to centennial-scales. The new reconstruction closely matches a previous reconstruction from Puerto Rico, and documents a period of elevated intense hurricane activity on the western North Atlantic margin from 2500 to 1000 years ago when paleo precipitation proxies suggest that the ITCZ occupied a more northern position. Considering that anthropogenic warming is predicted to be focused in the northern hemisphere in the coming century, these results provide a prehistoric analog that an attendant northern ITCZ shift in the future may again return the western North Atlantic margin to an active hurricane interval. PMID:26906670

  16. The intertropical convergence zone modulates intense hurricane strikes on the western North Atlantic margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hengstum, Peter J.; Donnelly, Jeffrey P.; Fall, Patricia L.; Toomey, Michael R.; Albury, Nancy A.; Kakuk, Brian

    2016-02-01

    Most Atlantic hurricanes form in the Main Development Region between 9°N to 20°N along the northern edge of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Previous research has suggested that meridional shifts in the ITCZ position on geologic timescales can modulate hurricane activity, but continuous and long-term storm records are needed from multiple sites to assess this hypothesis. Here we present a 3000 year record of intense hurricane strikes in the northern Bahamas (Abaco Island) based on overwash deposits in a coastal sinkhole, which indicates that the ITCZ has likely helped modulate intense hurricane strikes on the western North Atlantic margin on millennial to centennial-scales. The new reconstruction closely matches a previous reconstruction from Puerto Rico, and documents a period of elevated intense hurricane activity on the western North Atlantic margin from 2500 to 1000 years ago when paleo precipitation proxies suggest that the ITCZ occupied a more northern position. Considering that anthropogenic warming is predicted to be focused in the northern hemisphere in the coming century, these results provide a prehistoric analog that an attendant northern ITCZ shift in the future may again return the western North Atlantic margin to an active hurricane interval.

  17. Factors Affecting the Latitudinal Location of the Intertropical Convergence Zone in a GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Winston C.; Chen, Baode

    2002-01-01

    The dominant role of the latitudinal peak of the sea surface temperature (SST) in determining the latitudinal location of the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) is well-known. However, the roles of the other factors are less well-known and are the topic of this study. These other factors include the inertial stability, the interaction between convection and surface fluxes and the interaction between convection and radiation. Since these interactions involve convection, in a model they involve the cumulus parameterization scheme. These factors are studied with a general circulation model with uniform SST and solar angle. Under the aforementioned model settings, the latitudinal location of the ITCZ is the latitude where the balance of two types of attraction on the ITCZ, both due to earth's rotation, exists. Directly related to the Coriolis parameter, the first type pulls the ITCZ toward the equator and is not sensitive to model design changes. Related to the convective circulation, the second type pulls the ITCZ poleward and is sensitive to model design changes. Due to the shape and the magnitude of the attractors, the balance of the two types of attractions is reached either at the equator or more than 10 degrees away from the equator. The former case results in a single ITCZ over the equator and the latter case a double ITCZ straddling the equator.

  18. Diabatic heating profiles over the continental convergence zone during the monsoon active spells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Rajib; Sur, Sharmila; Joseph, Susmitha; Sahai, A. K.

    2013-07-01

    The present paper aims to bring out the robust common aspects of spatio-temporal evolution of diabatic heating during the monsoon intraseasonal active phases over the continental tropical convergence zone (CTCZ). The robustness of spatio-temporal features is determined by comparing the two state-of-the art reanalyses: NCEP Climate Forecast System reanalysis and Modern ERA Retrospective Analysis. The inter-comparison is based on a study period of 26 years (1984-2009). The study confirms the development of deep heating over the CTCZ region during the active phase and is consistent between the two datasets. However, the detailed temporal evolution of the vertical structure (e.g., vertical tilts) of heating differs at times. The most important common feature from both the datasets is the significant vertical redistribution of heating with the development of shallow (low level) heating and circulation over the CTCZ region 3-7 days after the peak active phase. The shallow circulation is found to be associated with increased vertical shear and relative vorticity over certain regions in the subcontinent. This increased vertical shear and relative vorticity in the lower levels could be crucial in the sustenance of rainfall after the peak active phase. Model experiments with linear dynamics affirm the role of shallow convection in increasing the lower level circulation as observed.

  19. Century-scale movement of the Atlantic Intertropical Convergence Zone linked to solar variability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poore, R.Z.; Quinn, T.M.; Verardo, S.

    2004-01-01

    The abundance of the planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides sacculifer in Gulf of Mexico (GOM) sediments is a proxy for the influx of Caribbean surface waters (the Loop Current) into the GOM. Penetration of the Loop Current into the GOM is related to the position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ): northward migration of the ITCZ results in increased incursion of the Loop Current into the GOM; southward migration of the ITCZ results in decreased penetration of the Loop Current into the GOM. Abundance variations of G. sacculifer in a sediment core from the Pigmy Basin in the GOM show distinct century-scale cyclicity over the last 5,000 years. The periodicity of these abundance variations is similar to the century-scale periodicity observed in proxy records of solar variability, which suggests that the average position of the ITCZ and thus Holocene century-scale variability in the Caribbean-GOM region is linked to solar variability. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. The intertropical convergence zone modulates intense hurricane strikes on the western North Atlantic margin

    PubMed Central

    van Hengstum, Peter J.; Donnelly, Jeffrey P.; Fall, Patricia L.; Toomey, Michael R.; Albury, Nancy A.; Kakuk, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Most Atlantic hurricanes form in the Main Development Region between 9°N to 20°N along the northern edge of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Previous research has suggested that meridional shifts in the ITCZ position on geologic timescales can modulate hurricane activity, but continuous and long-term storm records are needed from multiple sites to assess this hypothesis. Here we present a 3000 year record of intense hurricane strikes in the northern Bahamas (Abaco Island) based on overwash deposits in a coastal sinkhole, which indicates that the ITCZ has likely helped modulate intense hurricane strikes on the western North Atlantic margin on millennial to centennial-scales. The new reconstruction closely matches a previous reconstruction from Puerto Rico, and documents a period of elevated intense hurricane activity on the western North Atlantic margin from 2500 to 1000 years ago when paleo precipitation proxies suggest that the ITCZ occupied a more northern position. Considering that anthropogenic warming is predicted to be focused in the northern hemisphere in the coming century, these results provide a prehistoric analog that an attendant northern ITCZ shift in the future may again return the western North Atlantic margin to an active hurricane interval. PMID:26906670

  1. Coral oxygen isotope records of interdecadal climate variations in the South Pacific Convergence Zone region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnato, Stefan; Linsley, Braddock K.; Howe, Stephen S.; Wellington, Gerard M.; Salinger, Jim

    2005-06-01

    The South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), a region of high rainfall, is a major feature of subtropical Southern Hemisphere climate and contributes to and interacts with circulation features across the Pacific, yet its past temporal variability and forcing remain only partially understood. Here we compare coral oxygen isotopic (δ18O) series (spanning A.D. 1997-1780 and A.D. 2001-1776) from two genera of hermatypic corals in Fiji, located within the SPCZ, to examine the fidelity of these corals in recording climate change and SPCZ interdecadal dynamics. One of these coral records is a new 225-year subannually resolved δ18O series from the massive coral Diploastreaheliopora. Diploastrea's use in climate reconstructions is still relatively new, but this coral has shown encouragingly similar interannual variability to Porites, the coral genus most commonly used in Pacific paleoclimate studies. In Fiji we observe that interdecadal δ18O variance is also similar in these two coral genera, and Diploastrea contains a larger-amplitude interdecadal signal that more closely tracks instrumental-based indices of Pacific interdecadal climate change and the SPCZ than Porites. Both coral δ18O series record greater interdecadal variability from ˜1880 to 1950, which is consistent with the observations of Folland et al. (2002), who reported higher variability in SPCZ position before 1945. These observations indicate that Diploastrea will likely provide a significant new source of long-term climate information from the SPCZ region.

  2. Exploring Coral Reconstructions of Intertropical Convergence Zone Oscillations over Central America During the Common Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, L. D.; Linsley, B. K.; Dassie, E. P.; Dunbar, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    A thorough understanding of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), visible as a band of clouds where the northeastern and southeastern trade winds converge near the equator, is a crucial pillar in supplementing regional climate models. These types of models are used for the creation of comprehensive water management policies, as well as flood prediction and remediation programs. Seasonal and interannual shifts in the position of the ITCZ control precipitation throughout much of the tropics. However, lower frequency decadal and century variability of the ITCZ remains poorly constrained and understood. We sampled a Porites sp. coral head off the northeast coast of Coiba Island, Pacific side of Panamá (7°25'58.80'N, 81°45'57.60'W), and conducted both stable isotope (δ18O and δ13C) and trace element (Sr/Ca) analysis. The δ18O record from the Coiba Island coral (IC4A-2) suggests that changes in the amount of precipitation, which regulate the sea surface salinity (SSS) at this location, are the dominant factors modulating the various periodicities in this coral stable isotope record. Instrumental gridded sea surface temperature (SST) data from the region portray an irregular and small (2°C) annual cycle, supported by the Sr/Ca record, which mirrors the 2°C envelope. From these analyses we were able to reconstruct precipitation and SST history over this area and therefore the variability of the ITCZ at this location. While the majority of the variability (>50%) in the δ18O record is owed to the seasonal cycle, a decadal signal accounts for a significant portion of the remaining total variance (~10%). There is no similar decadal cycle apparent in the instrumental SSTs from the area or the IC4A-2 Sr/Ca record, suggesting that the proxy history is dominated by precipitation fluctuations. Furthermore, El Niño Southern Oscillation (3-8yr cycle) appears as a meager component in the total variance, also supported by earlier work from nearby Secas Island, which

  3. A coral-based reconstruction of Intertropical Convergence Zone variablity over Central America since 1707

    SciTech Connect

    Linsley, B.K.; Dunbar, R.B.; Mucciarone, D.A.; Wellington, G.M.

    1994-05-15

    Seasonal movements of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) control precipitation patterns and cloud cover throughout the tropics. In this study the authors have reconstructed seasonal and interannual variability of the eastern Pacific ITCZ from 1984 to 1707 using subseasonal {delta}{sup 18}O analyses on a massive coral from Secas Island (7{degrees}59{prime}N, 82{degrees}3{prime}W) in the Gulf of Chiriqui, Panama. The land area that drains into the Gulf of Chiriqui has served to amplify the rainfall effect on nearshore surface waters and coral {delta}{sup 18}O{sub ppt} composition. During the protracted wet season in Panama, the {delta}{sup 18}O of precipitation ({delta}{sup 18}O{sub ppt}) is reduced on average by 10{per_thousand} and sea surface salinity (SSS) along the western coast is reduced up to 11{per_thousand}. Calibration of the coral {delta}{sup 18}O{sub ppt} from Secas Island against instrumental sea surface temperature (SST), SSS, precipitation and {delta}{sup 18}O{sub ppt} data indicate that seasonal rainfall induced variations in seawater {delta}{sup 18}O are responsible for {approximately}80% of the annual {delta}{sup 18}O variance. The regularity of the reconstructed seasonal ITCZ cycle indicates that over the length of the record the zone of maximum rainfall in the eastern Pacific has always expanded north to at least Panama in every northern hemisphere summer. Significant interannual and interdecadal {delta}{sup 18}O oscillations occur at average periods near 9, 3-7 (ENSO band), 17 and 33 years (listed in order of decreasing variance). As the Gulf of Chiriqui coral {delta}{sup 18}O time series is the first paleoclimatic record of past variations in the ITCZ, other seasonal-resolution reconstructions of the past behavior of the ITCZ are required to test whether the interannual and long-term variability observed in the eastern Pacific ITCZ is more than regional in scale. 79 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Intraseasonal variability of the Atlantic Intertropical Convergence Zone during austral summer and winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaziello, Ana Carolina Nóbile; Carvalho, Leila M. V.; Gandu, Adilson W.

    2015-12-01

    The Atlantic Intertropical Convergence Zone (A-ITCZ) exhibits variations on several time-scales and plays a crucial role in precipitation regimes of northern South America and western Africa. Here we investigate the variability of the A-ITCZ on intraseasonal time-scales during austral summer (November-March) and winter (May-September) based on a multivariate index that describes the main atmospheric features of the A-ITCZ and retains its variability on interannual, semiannual, and intraseasonal time-scales. This index is the time coefficient of the first combined empirical orthogonal function mode of anomalies (annual cycle removed) of precipitation, and zonal and meridional wind components at 850 hPa from the climate forecast system reanalysis (1979-2010). We examine associations between the intraseasonal variability of the A-ITCZ and the activity of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO). We show that during austral summer intraseasonal variability of the A-ITCZ is associated with a Rossby wave train in the Northern Hemisphere. In austral winter this variability is associated with the propagation of a Rossby wave in the Southern Hemisphere consistent with the Pacific-South American pattern. Moreover, we show that intense A-ITCZ events on intraseasonal time-scales are more frequent during the phase of MJO characterized by convection over western Pacific and suppression over the Indian Ocean. These teleconnection patterns induce anomalies in the trade winds and upper level divergence over the equatorial Atlantic that modulate the intensity of the A-ITCZ.

  5. Influence of high latitude ice cover on the marine Intertropical Convergence Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, John C. H.; Bitz, Cecilia M.

    2005-10-01

    We investigate the causes for a strong high latitude imposed ice (land or sea) influence on the marine Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) in the Community Climate Model version 3 coupled to a 50-m slab ocean. The marine ITCZ in all the ocean basins shift meridionally away from the hemisphere with an imposed added ice cover, altering the global Hadley circulation with an increased tropical subsidence in the hemisphere with imposed ice and uplift in the other. The effect appears to be independent of the longitudinal position of imposed ice. The anomalous ice induces a rapid cooling and drying of the air and surface over the entire high- and midlatitudes; subsequent progression of cold anomalies occurs in the Pacific and Atlantic northeasterly trade regions, where a wind-evaporation-sea surface temperature (SST) feedback initiates progression of a cold SST ‘front’ towards the ITCZ latitudes. Once the cooler SST reaches the ITCZ latitude, the ITCZ shifts southwards, aided by positive feedbacks associated with the displacement. The ITCZ displacement transports moisture away from the colder and drier hemisphere into the other hemisphere, resulting in a pronounced hemispheric asymmetric response in anomalous specific humidity; we speculate that the atmospheric humidity plays a central role in the hemispheric asymmetric nature of the climate response to high latitude ice cover anomalies. From an energy balance viewpoint, the increased outgoing radiative flux at the latitudes of the imposed ice is compensated by an increased radiative energy flux at the tropical latitudes occupied by the displaced ITCZ, and subsequently transported by the altered Hadley and eddy circulations to the imposed ice latitudes. The situation investigated here may be applicable to past climates like the Last Glacial Maximum where hemispheric asymmetric changes to ice cover occurred. Major caveats to the conclusions drawn include omission of interactive sea ice physics and ocean dynamical

  6. More extreme swings of the South Pacific convergence zone due to greenhouse warming.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wenju; Lengaigne, Matthieu; Borlace, Simon; Collins, Matthew; Cowan, Tim; McPhaden, Michael J; Timmermann, Axel; Power, Scott; Brown, Josephine; Menkes, Christophe; Ngari, Arona; Vincent, Emmanuel M; Widlansky, Matthew J

    2012-08-16

    The South Pacific convergence zone (SPCZ) is the Southern Hemisphere's most expansive and persistent rain band, extending from the equatorial western Pacific Ocean southeastward towards French Polynesia. Owing to its strong rainfall gradient, a small displacement in the position of the SPCZ causes drastic changes to hydroclimatic conditions and the frequency of extreme weather events--such as droughts, floods and tropical cyclones--experienced by vulnerable island countries in the region. The SPCZ position varies from its climatological mean location with the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), moving a few degrees northward during moderate El Niño events and southward during La Niña events. During strong El Niño events, however, the SPCZ undergoes an extreme swing--by up to ten degrees of latitude toward the Equator--and collapses to a more zonally oriented structure with commensurately severe weather impacts. Understanding changes in the characteristics of the SPCZ in a changing climate is therefore of broad scientific and socioeconomic interest. Here we present climate modelling evidence for a near doubling in the occurrences of zonal SPCZ events between the periods 1891-1990 and 1991-2090 in response to greenhouse warming, even in the absence of a consensus on how ENSO will change. We estimate the increase in zonal SPCZ events from an aggregation of the climate models in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phases 3 and 5 (CMIP3 and CMIP5) multi-model database that are able to simulate such events. The change is caused by a projected enhanced equatorial warming in the Pacific and may lead to more frequent occurrences of extreme events across the Pacific island nations most affected by zonal SPCZ events. PMID:22895343

  7. Numerical simulation of formation of cyclone vortex flows in the intratropical zone of convergence and their early detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingalev, I. V.; Astaf'eva, N. M.; Orlov, K. G.; Chechetkin, V. M.; Mingalev, V. S.; Mingalev, O. V.

    2012-05-01

    Mechanisms of formation of cyclonic vortices in the tropical atmosphere of the Earth are investigated in the intratropical zone of convergence using numerical simulation made with the complete system of equations of gas dynamics taking into account transport of infrared radiation, phase transitions of water vapor into microdrops of water and ice particles, and sedimentation of these drops and ice particles in the field of gravity force. Observational data on the structure of dominant air streams, which are formed in the intratropical zone of convergence over the North Atlantic in the periods of its highest thermodynamic intensity and instability, are used in the initial and boundary conditions of the model. Formation of cyclonic vortex flows is obtained numerically at sufficiently strong bending of the intratropical zone of convergence. The results of numerical modeling are compared with the data of satellite microwave monitoring: global radio thermal fields of the Earth from the electronic collection GLOBAL-Field allowing one to study the structure of atmospheric motions in a wide range of space-time scales.

  8. A Coupled GCM Intercomparison Study of the South Pacific Convergence Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, S. K.; Luo, J.; Takahashi, K.; Yamagata, T.

    2007-12-01

    The South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) is an important component of seasonal climate variations in the Southern Hemisphere. Though several associated processes are already discussed using observational data, the SPCZ is yet to be resolved properly in global general circulation models (GCMs). Particularly, the ocean- atmosphere coupled GCMs often fail to simulate the correct orientation and the zonal extent of the SPCZ. Most of these models replicate an east-west zonally oriented ITCZ similar to that in the Northern Hemisphere giving rise to the so-called double ITCZ problem. In this study simulation results from a variety of models are used to understand model biases in resolving the temporal and spatial distribution of the SPCZ. These models range from standalone atmospheric GCMs to the state of the art ocean-atmosphere coupled GCMs. It is found that the seasonal SPCZ in standalone atmospheric GCM results is better represented than that in the coupled GCM with an identical atmospheric component and a spatial resolution of about 100 km. The dry zone to the east of the SPCZ is not well-formed in coupled GCMs, particularly in austral summer when the SPCZ is pronounced. This is related to the model biases of the sea surface temperature, which is warmer in eastern Pacific in coupled GCM than the observation. The bias is not as clearly manifested in a spatially higher resolution coupled GCM in which the eastern Pacific SST is better simulated. The increase in model horizontal resolution helps in resolving the local air-sea interactions, the cross- equatorial winds and the local circulation cells. The dry zone is also improved in another experiment in which the improvement in model coupling physics improved the bias in equatorial cold tongue. It is also found that the SPCZ simulation is not improved by just increasing the vertical resolution in coupled GCM. This also imply that a proper representation of the boundary layer and the associated physics is more important

  9. Climatological mean tropical Atlantic surface wind convergence : analysis of the drivers in reanalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diakhaté, Moussa; lazar, Alban; De Coëtlogon, Gaelle; Gaye, Amadou

    2016-04-01

    Using atmosphere mixed layer models, satellites data and the Climate Forecast System Reanalyses datasets over the 2000-2009 decade, we provide an analysis of the monthly-mean climatological surface wind convergence budget over the tropical Atlantic, as well as its month to moth variations. Relative influence of Sea Surface Temperature relative to free troposphere is particularly examined. Regarding the monthly-mean budget, the marine Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) appears to be split into two parts. There is an "oceanic part" (defined as the region between 10-50°W), with north and south sides largely controlled by surface pressure driven convergence, to the opposite to the center dominated by free troposphere forces. East and west stands a "coastal part" (African and Northeastern Brazilian coasts), where horizontal advection and pressure contributions control surface wind convergence, with the pressure beeing the first order driver. This pressure contribution is largely dominated by horizontal gradients within the surface boundary layer, likely closely related to SST. On the other hand, month-to-month changes are controlled by geostrophic balance dominated by the free troposphere, with likely less influence of SST changes.

  10. A study of the dynamics of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) in a symmetric atmosphere-ocean model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charney, J. G.; Kalnay, E.; Schneider, E.; Shukla, J.

    1988-01-01

    A numerical model of the circulation of a coupled axisymmetric atmosphere-ocean system was constructed to investigate the physical factors governing the location and intensity of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) over oceans and over land. The results of several numerical integrations are presented to illustrate the interaction of the individual atmospheric and oceanic circulations. It is shown that the ITCA cannot be located at the equator because the atmosphere-ocean system is unstable for lateral displacements of the ITCA from an equilibrium position at the equator.

  11. Response of the South Pacific Convergence Zone to imposed circulation and moisture perturbations in an intermediate level complexity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niznik, M. J.; Lintner, B. R.

    2014-12-01

    Previous research has identified a connection between the strength of low-level trade wind inflow from the relatively dry southeastern Pacific basin and the position of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). This circulation-precipitation relationship has been noted in composite analysis applied to reanalysis data as well as to output from current generation climate models, although the causality is ambiguous. Additionally, given that prior studies exhibit deep vertical structures associated with changes to low-level inflow east of the SPCZ, the relationship between low-level inflow variability and the propagation of upper level mid-latitude synoptic disturbances into the SPCZ remains unclear. Thus, forcing models with prescribed circulation and moisture anomalies may be instructive for untangling the dynamic and thermodynamic contributions to such interactions, as well as their potential causality. To that end, we use the Quasi-equilibrium Tropical Circulation Model 2 (QTCM2), an intermediate complexity model with a separate boundary layer of fixed height imposed at the base of the free troposphere, to explore the response of the SPCZ, and more broadly convection across the South Pacific, to perturbed low- and upper-level circulation and moisture fields east of its climatological position. Preliminary results suggest a strong precipitation response to strengthened low-level trade wind inflow, hypothesized to be the result of increased convergence in the climatological SPCZ, with an associated decrease in Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) precipitation. Conversely, there is a limited precipitation response to weakened low-level trade wind inflow despite a notable (2-3 g kg-1) increase in specific humidity, suggesting the climatological low-level inflow is already associated with the necessary moisture threshold for deep convection. Ultimately, these results suggest dynamics play a stronger role than thermodynamics in the interaction as modeled by QTCM2.

  12. Idealized Simulations of the Effects of Amazon Convection and Baroclinic Waves on the South Atlantic Convergence Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferreira, Rosana Nieto; Suarez, Max J.; Nigam, Sumant; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ) is a NW-SE oriented, stationary region of enhanced convergence and convection that extends southeastward from the ITCZ convection anchored over the Amazon region. On daily satellite images each SACZ episode is seen as a progression of one or several midlatitude cold fronts that intrude into the subtropics and tropics, becoming stationary over southeastern Brazil for a few days. Previous studies have shown that while Amazon convection plays a fundamental role in the formation of the SACZ, Atlantic sea surface temperatures and the Andes Mountains play a relatively minor role in the strength and location of the SACZ. The role of interactions between Amazon convection and midlatitude baroclinic waves in establishing the origin, position, and maintenance of the SACZ is studied here using idealized dry, multilayer global model simulations that do not include the effects of topography. The model simulations produce SACZ-like regions of low-level convergence in the presence of Amazon convection embedded in a mean-flow that contains propagating baroclinic waves. The results of these simulations indicate that Amazon convection plays two fundamental roles in the formation and location of the SACZ. First, it produces a NW-SE oriented region of low-level convergence to the SE of Amazon convection. Second, it produces a storm-track region and accompanying stronger midlatitude baroclinic waves in the region of the SACZ. It is suggested that in the presence of moist effects, the 'seedling' SACZ regions produced in these simulations can be enhanced to produce the observed SACZ.

  13. Stem tilting in the inter-tropical cactus Echinocactus platyacanthus: an adaptive solution to the trade-off between radiation acquisition and temperature control.

    PubMed

    Herce, M F; Martorell, C; Alonso-Fernandez, C; Boullosa, L F V V; Meave, J A

    2014-05-01

    While plants require radiation for photosynthesis, radiation in warm deserts can have detrimental effects from high temperatures. This dilemma may be solved through plant morphological attributes. In cold deserts, stem tilting keeps reproductive organs warm by increasing radiation interception at the cost of decreased annual light interception. Conversely, little is known about stem tilting in warm deserts. We hypothesised that stem tilting in Echinocactus platyacanthus prevents high temperatures near the apex, where reproduction occurs. The study was conducted in the warm, inter-tropical portion of the Chihuahuan Desert, Mexico. We found that cacti preferentially tilted towards the south, which reduced temperatures of reproductive organs during the hot season, but increased total annual near-apex PAR interception. Tilting also maximised reproduction, a likely consequence of temperature control but perhaps also of the difficulty in translocating photosynthates in cacti; therefore, annual energy acquisition near floral meristems may be largely allocated to reproduction. Unlike plants of higher latitudes, in inter-tropical deserts sunlight at noon comes either from the north or the south, depending on the season, and thus stem tilting may more strongly affect total annual radiation received in different portions of the stem. Inter-tropical cacti can synchronise reproduction with irradiance peaks if flowering occurs in a specific (north or south) portion of the stem; also, they effectively solve the conflict between maximising annual PAR interception and minimising temperature at the hottest time of day. Notably, the two inter-tropical cacti in which stem tilting has been studied successfully solve this conflict. PMID:23992581

  14. Balloon-borne ozonesonde and rocket temperature and wind data gathered during the July 1977 intertropical convergence zone experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidlin, F. J.; Kloos, G.

    1979-01-01

    In middle latitudes, it is possible for large concentrations of stratospheric air to be brought down to the tropopause through folds or breaks in the tropopause. The exchange of air from the tropopause into higher altitudes is not well understood. Thus, the ITCZ (Intertropical Convergence Zone) experiment, conducted from July 16 through July 31, 1977, included a series of balloon-borne ozone soundings. The results of these soundings are presented and explain in the vertical exchange of air and provide information on the short vertical scales-of-motion. Rocketsonde data was also gathered in the ITCZ experiment in support of a stratospheric scales-of-motion study. The investigation was to determine whether rocketsonde and satellite information currently used yield information on the stratospheric horizontal wave spectrum and its importance with respect to tropospheric and mesospheric interaction and transport.

  15. Elastic thickness structure of the Andaman subduction zone: Implications for convergence of the Ninetyeast Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratheesh Kumar, R. T.; Windley, B. F.; Rajesh, V. J.; Santosh, M.

    2013-12-01

    We use the Bouguer coherence (Morlet isostatic response function) technique to compute the spatial variation of effective elastic thickness (Te) of the Andaman subduction zone. The recovered Te map resolves regional-scale features that correlate well with known surface structures of the subducting Indian plate and the overriding Burma plate. The major structure on the India plate, the Ninetyeast Ridge (NER), exhibits a weak mechanical strength, which is consistent with the expected signature of an oceanic ridge of hotspot origin. However, a markedly low strength (0 < Te < 3 km) in that region, where the NER is close to the Andaman trench (north of 10°N), receives our main attention in this study. The subduction geometry derived from the Bouguer gravity forward modeling suggests that the NER has indented beneath the Andaman arc. We infer that the bending stresses of the viscous plate, which were reinforced within the subducting oceanic plate as a result of the partial subduction of the NER buoyant load, have reduced the lithospheric strength. The correlation, Te < Ts (seismogenic thickness) reveals that the upper crust is actively deforming beneath the frontal arc Andaman region. The occurrence of normal-fault earthquakes in the frontal arc, low Te zone, is indicative of structural heterogeneities within the subducting plate. The fact that the NER along with its buoyant root is subducting under the Andaman region is inhibiting the subduction processes, as suggested by the changes in trench line, interrupted back-arc volcanism, variation in seismicity mechanism, slow subduction, etc. The low Te and thinned crustal structure of the Andaman back-arc basin are attributed to a thermomechanically weakened lithosphere. The present study reveals that the ongoing back-arc spreading and strike-slip motion along the West Andaman Fault coupled with the ridge subduction exerts an important control on the frequency and magnitude of seismicity in the Andaman region.

  16. Thermodynamic and kinematic characteristics of low-level convergent zones observed by the mobile integrated profiling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karan, Haldun

    Thermodynamic and kinematic characteristics of convergent boundary zones (CBZs) over various geographic regions in a broad range of environmental conditions are investigated through analysis of the Mobile Integrated Profiling System (MIPS), Doppler radar, atmospheric sounding, and surface data. The MIPS sensors provide very fine temporal kinematic and thermodynamic profiles of the atmospheric boundary layer ( ABL) and CBZ properties, including enhanced 915 MHz backscatter within the CBZ, an increase in integrated water vapor within the updrafts of the CBZ, variations in file convective boundary layer depth, and increases in ceilometer backscatter that are typically coincident with the arrival of cooler, moister air when the CBZs are associated with gust fronts, retrograding drylines, and shallow cold fronts. An analysis of over 50 gust frontal passages reveals that morphological structures and dynamical properties of gust fronts resemble laboratory simulated density currents and numerical simulations of outflow boundaries. Characteristics of a retrograding dryline and a shallow cold front sampled during IHOP 2002 project suggest a close resemblance to density currents. Gust frontal updrafts appear to be greatly affected by the adjacent boundary layer stability and interaction between the ambient shear and gust frontal circulation. Gust frontal updrafts were stronger and more vertically oriented when gust fronts were moving against the ambient flow. Interaction between gust fronts and horizontal convective rolls are investigated through radar derived wind field, Z reflectivity factors, and MIPS data sets. Convective initiation occurs more efficiently at intersection points between horizontal convective rolls and gust fronts when the HCR axes intersect the gust front at a large angle. In contrast, convection initiation was absent when HCRs were parallel to an approaching gust front which systematically encountered roll updrafts and downdrafts. A collision of two

  17. Fractionation of trace elements by subduction-zone metamorphism — effect of convergent-margin thermal evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebout, Gray E.; Ryan, Jeffrey G.; Leeman, William P.; Bebout, Ann E.

    1999-08-01

    Differential chemical/isotopic alteration during forearc devolatilization can strongly influence the cycling of volatile components, including some trace elements, in subduction zones. The nature and magnitude of this devolatilization effect are likely to be strongly dependent on the thermal structure of individual convergent margins. A recent model for metamorphism of the Catalina Schist, involving progressive underplating (at ≤45 km depths) of rock packets metamorphosed along successively lower- T prograde P-T paths in a rapidly cooling, newly initiated subduction zone, affords a unique evaluation of the effects of varying prograde P-T paths on the magnitudes of devolatilization and chemical/isotopic alteration of subducting rocks. In the Catalina Schist, the most extensive devolatilization occurred in metasedimentary rocks which experienced prograde P-T paths encountering the epidote-blueschist facies (>350°C at 9 to 12 kbar) or higher- T conditions; such rocks are depleted in 'fluid-mobile' elements such as N, B, Cs, As, and Sb relative to protoliths. Removal of these elements resulted in changes in B/(Be, Li, La, Zr), Cs/Th, Rb/Cs, As/Ce, Sb/Ce, and C reduced/N, and increases in δ 15N and δ 13C. The relative susceptibilities of the "fluid-mobile" elements to loss along increasingly higher- T P-T paths can be categorized. Boron and Cs show the greatest susceptibility to low- T removal by fluids, showing >50% depletion in even lawsonite-blueschist-facies metasedimentary rocks which experienced relatively low- T prograde metamorphic paths. In rocks which experienced higher- T paths, As and Sb (likely in sulfides) show the greatest depletions (>90%); N, Cs, and B (largely in micas) occur at ˜25% of protolith contents in even partially melted amphibolite-facies rocks. Variations in B/Be, Cs/Th, As/Ce, and Sb/Ce among arcs from differing convergent-margin thermal regimes, and conceivably some cross-arc declines in these ratios, are compatible with evidence

  18. Oligocene-Miocene magnetostratigraphy and magnetic anisotropy of the Baxbulak section from the Pamir-Tian Shan convergence zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zihua; Dong, Xinxin; Wang, Xu; Ding, Zhongli

    2015-10-01

    As the northernmost part of the Indo-Eurasian collision belt, the Pamir-Tian Shan convergence zone (PTCZ) is a strategic location for understanding intracontinental deformation. Here we present a magnetostratigraphic investigation of a continuous section from the Baxbulak region, to better constrain regional tectonic history. Rock magnetic analyses indicate that hematite and magnetite are the main carriers of characteristic remanent magnetization. The resulting polarity sequence allows a distinct correlation to the geomagnetic polarity time scale, showing that the section spans the interval of 29.1-20.7 Ma. Rock magnetic results further suggest that paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic minerals dominantly contribute to anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) of the sequence. Thus, the AMS would indicate the preferred orientations of the mineral grains that are sensitive to tectonic strain. At around 26 Ma, the grouped principal minimum perpendicular to the bedding diverts to a girdle distribution in a N-S direction, demonstrating the overprint of tectonic fabric to previous weakly deformed sedimentary fabric. This would be interpreted as a marked increase in tectonic strain, consistent with various evidence from the Pamir and the neighboring basin that show the Pamir began to migrate northward. Moreover, the coincident changes in distribution of AMS principal axes, in both direction and magnitude, are comparable to the regional counterclockwise rotations observed from paleomagnetic data, likely related to orogenesis.

  19. Correlation between the global occurrences of ionospheric irregularities and deep atmospheric convective clouds in the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Shin-Yi; Wu, Chung Lung; Liu, Chao Han

    2014-12-01

    To study the seeding mechanism of ionospheric irregularity occurrences, a correlation study has been carried out between the global monthly/latitudinal (m/l) distributions of irregularity occurrences and the deep atmospheric convective clouds in the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) indicated by the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) measurements. Seven longitude sectors - the African, Indian, West Pacific, Central Pacific, East Pacific, South American, and Atlantic sectors - are selected to study the correlations between the two distributions. The results indicate that good correlations exist only in the South American sector and to some extent in the African sector. For the other five sectors, no correlations are found in the m/l distributions between the irregularities and OLRs. This implies that the gravity wave induced in the ITCZ cannot be the sole seeding agent for the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in the global irregularity occurrences every season. We suspect that the post-sunset ionospheric electrodynamic perturbations could be the prevailing seeds for the RT instability globally year long. Together with the favorable post-sunset ionospheric condition, the global m/l distributions of irregularity occurrences could be adequately explained.

  20. Persistent decadal-scale rainfall variability in the tropical South Pacific Convergence Zone through the past six centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maupin, C. R.; Partin, J. W.; Shen, C.-C.; Quinn, T. M.; Lin, K.; Taylor, F. W.; Banner, J. L.; Thirumalai, K.; Sinclair, D. J.

    2014-07-01

    Modern Pacific decadal variability (PDV) has global impacts; hence records of PDV from the pre-instrumental period are needed to better inform models that are used to project future climate variability. We focus here on reconstructing rainfall in the western tropical Pacific (Solomon Islands; ~ 9.5° S, ~160° E), a region directly influenced by PDV, using cave deposits (stalagmite). A relationship is developed between δ18O variations in the stalagmite and local rainfall amount to produce a 600 yr record of rainfall variability from the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). We present evidence for large (~1.5 m), abrupt, and periodic changes in total annual rainfall amount on decadal to multidecadal timescales since 1423 ± 5 CE (Common Era) in the Solomon Islands. The timing of the decadal changes in rainfall inferred from the 20th century portion of the stalagmite δ18O record coincides with previously identified decadal shifts in PDV-related Pacific ocean-atmosphere behavior (Clement et al., 2011; Deser et al., 2004). The Solomons record of PDV is not associated with variations in external forcings, but rather results from internal climate variability. The 600 yr Solomon Islands stalagmite δ18O record indicates that decadal oscillations in rainfall are a persistent characteristic of SPCZ-related climate variability.

  1. Combined obliquity and precession pacing of western Pacific Intertropical Convergence Zone over the past 282,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, C. C.; Yi, L.; Lo, L.; Shi, Z.; Wei, K. Y.; Chou, C. J.; Chen, Y. C.; Chuang, C. K.; WU, C. C.; Mii, H. S.; Amakawa, H.; Burr, G.; Lee, S. Y.; DeLong, K. L.; Elderfield, H.

    2015-12-01

    The Intertropical convergence Zone (ITCZ) encompasses the heaviest rain belt on Earth. Few direct long-term records, especially in the Pacific, limit our understanding of long-term natural variability necessary to predict future ITCZ changes. Here we present a tropical precipitation record from the Southern Hemisphere covering the past 282,000 years, inferred from of rare earth elements (REEs) to Ca ratios in the planktonic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber shell calcite, of a marine sedimentary core MD05-2925 (9o20.60'S, 151o27.54'E; water depth 1661 m), collected off the eastern coast of Papua New Guinea. Unlike the precession paradigm expressed in its East Asian counterpart, our record shows that the western Pacific ITCZ migration was influenced by combined precession and obliquity changes. This obliquity forcing could be primarily delivered by a cross-hemispherical thermal/pressure contrast, resulting from the asymmetric continental configuration between Asia and Australia in a coupled East Asian-Australian circulation system, supported by model simulations. Our finding suggests that the obliquity forcing may play a more important role in global hydroclimate cycles than previously thought.

  2. Active flexural-slip faulting: A study from the Pamir-Tian Shan convergent zone, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Chen, Jie; Thompson, Jessica A.; Burbank, Douglas W.; Yang, Xiaodong

    2015-06-01

    The flexural-slip fault (FSF), a type of secondary fault generated by bed-parallel slip, occurs commonly and plays an important role in accommodating fold growth. Although the kinematics and mechanics of FSFs are well studied, relatively few field observations or geometric models explore its geomorphic expression. In the Pamir-Tian Shan convergent zone, NW China, suites of well-preserved FSF scarps displace fluvial terraces in the Mingyaole and Wulagen folds. Integrating interpretations of Google Earth images, detailed geologic and geomorphic mapping, and differential GPS measurements of terrace surfaces, we summarize geomorphic features that typify these faults and create kinematic models of active flexural-slip faulting. Our study indicates the following: (i) FSF scarps commonly occur near synclinal hinges, irrespective of whether (a) the dip direction of beds on either side of the hinge is unidirectional or in opposite directions, (b) the hinge is migrating or fixed, or (c) the hinge shape is narrow and angular or wide and curved. (ii) Active FSFs are likely to produce higher scarps on steeper beds, whereas lower or no topographic scarps typify gentler beds. (iii) Tilt angles of the terrace surface displaced above FSFs progressively decrease farther away from the hinge, with abrupt changes in slope coinciding with FSF scarps; the changes in tilt angle and scarp height have a predictable geometric relationship. (iv) Active FSFs can accommodate a significant fraction of total slip and play a significant role in folding deformation. (v) Active FSFs may be used to assess seismic hazards associated with active folds and associated blind thrusts.

  3. Investigating Rainfall Variability in the South Pacific Convergence Zone using the Geochemistry of Stalagmites from the Solomon Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhon, N.; Quinn, T. M.; Partin, J. W.; Edwards, R. L.; Cheng, H.

    2015-12-01

    The South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), which extends southeastward from New Guinea to Tahiti, is the largest perennial rainfall feature in the Southern Hemisphere. The position of the SPCZ and its associated rainfall varies significantly on multidecadal timescales, as documented by instrumental and climate proxy data. For example, stalagmite δ18O records (rainfall proxy) from Espiritu Santo, Vanuatu (Partin et al., 2013) and Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands (Maupin et al., 2014), document large (~1‰), abrupt changes in stalagmite δ18O on multidecadal timescales over the past 600 years that arise from internal variability in the climate system. The proxy data agree with the type of rainfall changes observed in the instrumental record, such as the change across 1976/77, but the older changes are larger in relative magnitude. We expand on these earlier studies of rainfall variability in the SPCZ system using stable isotope variations in stalagmites from two other locations in the Solomon Islands (Munda, New Georgia, 8.3°S, 157.3°E; Suku, Nggela Pile (9.8° S, 160.2° E). These stalagmites range in age from about 400 CE to 1850 CE, based on U-Th dating, and have relatively fast growth rates (60 to 300 µm/yr). Stalagmite δ18O time series were generated from sub-samples milled every 500 µm, or approximately 1 to 8 years per data point. Initial results from these two new Solomon Island stalagmites not only confirm the presence of multidecadal variability in stalagmite δ18O identified in previous studies, but suggest that the same amplitude of variability has occurred over several windows of time during the past 1600 years. When complete, these new proxy rainfall records from Munda and Suku will further constrain the pattern and mechanism of SPCZ rainfall variability in western tropical Pacific region.

  4. Comparative analysis of geodynamic activity of the Caucasian and Eastern Mediterranean segments of the Alpine-Himalayan convergence zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelidze, Tamaz; Eppelbaum, Lev

    2013-04-01

    The Alpine-Himalayan convergence zone (AHCZ) underwent recent transverse shortening under the effect of collisional compression. The process was accompanied by rotation of separate microplates. The Caucasian and Eastern Mediterranean regions are segments of the of the AHCZ and are characterized by intensive endogenous and exogenous geodynamic processes, which manifest themselves in occurrence of powerful (with magnitude of 8-9) earthquakes accompanied by development of secondary catastrophic processes. Large landslides, rock falls, avalanches, mud flows, etc. cause human deaths and great material losses. The development of the aforesaid endogenous processes is set forth by peculiarities of the deep structure of the region and an impact of deep geological processes. The Caucasus is divided into several main tectonic terranes: platform (sub-platform, quasi-platform) and fold-thrust units. Existing data enable to perform a division of the Caucasian region into two large-scale geological provinces: southern Tethyan and northern Tethyan located to the south of and to the north of the Lesser Caucasian ophiolite suture, respectively. The recent investigations show that the assessments of the seismic hazard in these regions are not quite correct - for example in the West Caucasus the seismic hazard can be significantly underestimated, which affects the corresponding risk assessments. Integrated analysis of gravity, magnetic, seismic and thermal data enables to refine the assessment of the seismic hazard of the region, taking into account real rates of the geodynamic movements. Important role play the last rheological constructions. According to Reilinger et al. (2006) tectonic scheme, the West flanking of the Arabian Plate manifests strike-slip motion, when the East Caucasian block is converging and shortening. The Eastern Mediterranean is a tectonically complex region located in the midst of the progressive Afro-Eurasian collision. The recent increasing geotectonic

  5. The Asian Monsoon Links to Solar Changes and the Intertropical Convergence Zone and 1300 Years of Chinese Human Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, E.; Hsu, Y.; Lee, T.

    2011-12-01

    Here we present a new paleoclimatic record from a sediment core recovered in Lake Liyutan in central Taiwan over the last 1300 years. The age model is based on 2 AMS 14C dates. Adjustments of age were using the well-dated records from a near by lake sediment core. The Lake Liyutan sediments record the strength of the summer monsoon in two independent ways: (1) the magnetic parameters (ARM/χ, ARM, anhysteresis remenent magnetization; χ, Volume susceptibility) and magnetic susceptibility, and (2) total organic carbon content, organic C/N elemental ratio and δ13Corg of the sediments as a result of changes in different organic matter origins and terrigenous detritus dilution due to precipitation. All the proxy records are 10 to 30- year-resolution. Weaker summer monsoon phases reconstructed from the Lake Liyutan correlate with higher δ18O at Dongge and Hulu caves, which indicates lower summer precipitation rates. Moreover, it is interesting to find that the strong winter monsoon from the Lake Huguang Maar records show a synchronous relationship with weaker summer monsoon from the caves and the Lake Liyutan. From the coincidence in timing, these records were explained by migrations in the intertropical convergence zone. In addition, the weak Asian summer monsoon in the Lake Liyutan corresponds with lowering Northern Hemisphere summer insolation recorded at Dongge cave. Climate variations influenced the agricultural productivity, health risk, and conflict level of preindustrial societies. We note that, on the basis of our new lake record, major changes in Chinese dynasties occurred when the summer monsoon strength was weaker and rainfall was reduced. The Tang dynasty began to ebb in the eighth century, and it fully collapsed in AD907, then the dynastic transitions to the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. The weak summer monsoon and reduced rainfall was indicated in the coincidence in timing of the sediment core LYT-3A from Lake Liyutan during 1100 - 1000BP. In

  6. Effects of tilt angle of mirror-lamp system on shape of solid-liquid interface of silicon melt during floating zone growth using infrared convergent heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Mukter; Watauchi, Satoshi; Nagao, Masanori; Tanaka, Isao

    2016-01-01

    The tilt effects of the mirror-lamp (M-L) system on the shape of the interface of the silicon molten zone formed during growth using the infrared convergent heating floating zone method were studied at various positions of the M-L system. The stability and the interfaces of the molten zone formed in the tilted condition were compared with those in the no tilt condition. The molten zone appeared to be more stabilized in the tilted condition than in the no tilt condition. However, the conventional parameters characterizing the interface shape such as convexities (h/r), gap and zone length (L) were almost independent of the tilt angle (θ) of the M-L system and insufficient to discuss the tilting effects on the molten zone shape. The curvature of the solid-liquid interface was affected by the θ. New characterizing parameters such as the growth interface and triple point angles (δ and TPA, respectively) were effective to quantitatively describe the tilting effects on the interface shape. With increase of the θ, the δ was decreased and the TPA was increased in both the feed and crystal sides. A silicon crystal of 45 mm in diameter was grown successfully in the tilted condition.

  7. Model Investigation of the use of Altimetry Data from the Polar Ground-Track Convergence Zone for Monitoring ICESat-2 Performance Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunt, K. M.; Neumann, T.; Markus, T.; Shuman, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) is a NASA follow-on mission to ICESat (2003-2009), which is currently scheduled to launch in 2016. The primary goals of the ICESat-2 mission are to collect precise altimetry data of the Earth's surface, optimized to measure: ice sheet elevation change, sea ice thickness, and global vegetation biomass. The instrument onboard ICESat-2 that addresses these goals is the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS), which is a micropulse, multibeam, photon-counting laser altimeter with a 10 m footprint, sampling every 70 cm along track. ICESat-2 will orbit in an inclination of 92°, leaving a data void poleward of the 88° line of latitude. At the 88° line of latitude, in the zone of ground-track convergence, ATLAS data density will be greatest. In the Antarctic, the ground-track convergence zone is exclusively on the ice sheet, outside of the influence of the Transantarctic Mountains. Horizontal ice-flow velocities near this region are generally very low (< 1 m/yr). Dynamic vertical velocities (dh/dt) near this region are also generally very low (< 1 cm/yr), but may exhibit temperature-driven seasonal variation. Here, we present a model that determines whether data from the ground-track convergence zone could be used to monitor changes in ICESat-2 instrumentation that would contribute to changes in measurement bias or precision. The model simulates data collection rates, variable dh/dt rates, and seasonal variation of dh/dt rates in the ground-track convergence zone and then forces this system with changes associated with instrument performance. We show that based on the data density and the near-constant data acquisition, small changes in bias (including the onset of a steady bias-drift) are detectable even over very short sampling intervals. Ultimately, bias-change detection proves to be sensitive to ATLAS measurement precision, but is insensitive to variable dh/dt rates and the seasonal variation of dh

  8. Fluid budgets at convergent plate margins: Implications for the extent and duration of fault-zone dilation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saffer, D.M.; Bekins, B.A.

    1999-01-01

    Faults at convergent plate boundaries are important conduits for fluid escape, and recent evidence suggests that fluid expulsion along them is both transient and heterogeneous. For the Nankai and Barbados convergent margins, we have used numerical models to investigate the long-term partitioning of expelled fluids between diffuse flow and flow along connected high-permeability fault conduits. For a simple case of spatial heterogeneity, we estimated the extent of high-permeability conduits necessary to maintain a balance between incoming and expelled fluids. For the case of transient expulsion, we constrained the duration of elevated permeability required to balance the fluid budgets. Comparison of modeled and observed geochemical profiles suggests that the initiation of connected flow conduits is delayed with respect to the time of accretion into each accretionary complex and may be related to burial below a critical depth, either where the overlying wedge is sufficiently thick to prevent fluid escape to the sea floor or where sediments behave brittlely.

  9. Age, tectonic evolution and origin of the Aswa Shear Zone in Uganda: Activation of an oblique ramp during convergence in the East African Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalmann, K.; Mänttäri, I.; Nyakecho, C.; Isabirye, E.

    2016-05-01

    . Early Aswa Shear Zone activation is linked to underthrusting of the Congo Craton and coeval high-grade metamorphism and intense deformation in the orogen interior. During E-W convergence between ca. 690 and 650 Ma, the NE-dipping ASZ was activated as an oblique ramp leading to deflection of the transport direction and concentration of non-coaxial strain and sinistral shear along the shear zone system. During progressive convergence, between ca. 645 and 620 Ma, sinistral shearing along ASZ changed to ductile-brittle deformation mechanisms, while thrusting took place in Pan-African belts in eastern and western Uganda. Late-orogenic brittle sinistral reactivation of the ASZ can be regarded as the result of continent collision and closure of the Mozambique ocean further to the east, that potentially caused lateral escape manifested in NW-SE striking sinistral shear zones in Kenya and the southern Arabina-Nubian Shield between 620 and 570 Ma.

  10. Age, tectonic evolution and origin of the Aswa Shear Zone in Uganda: Activation of an oblique ramp during convergence in the East African Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalmann, K.; Mänttäri, I.; Nyakecho, C.; Isabirye, E.

    2016-05-01

    Shear Zone activation is linked to underthrusting of the Congo Craton and coeval high-grade metamorphism and intense deformation in the orogen interior. During E-W convergence between ca. 690 and 650 Ma, the NE-dipping ASZ was activated as an oblique ramp leading to deflection of the transport direction and concentration of non-coaxial strain and sinistral shear along the shear zone system. During progressive convergence, between ca. 645 and 620 Ma, sinistral shearing along ASZ changed to ductile-brittle deformation mechanisms, while thrusting took place in Pan-African belts in eastern and western Uganda. Late-orogenic brittle sinistral reactivation of the ASZ can be regarded as the result of continent collision and closure of the Mozambique ocean further to the east, that potentially caused lateral escape manifested in NW-SE striking sinistral shear zones in Kenya and the southern Arabina-Nubian Shield between 620 and 570 Ma.

  11. Evolution and timing of tectonic events in the Arabia-Eurasia convergence zone as inferred from igneous geochemistry from the EarthChem database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieu, W. K.; Stern, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    The timing of tectonic events in the Anatolia-Iranian region can be inferred from analysis of igneous rocks. Magmatic activities in the region are generally associated with the convergence of the African-Arabian and Eurasian plates and the subduction of the Neotethys Ocean. Ancillary processes such as subduction of continental crust, delamination of upper plate lithosphere or lower crust, or asthenospheric decompression accompanying post-collisional relaxation also contribute to the composition of igneous rocks. Here we use geochemical data gathered from the EarthChem database to assess broad chemical implications of Cenozoic tectonic activities of the convergence region. We search for geochemical signal of the timing of first contact of the subducting Arabian and overriding Eurasian continental crust. Of particular interest is how igneous rock compositions vary during the transition from pre- to post-contact of the continental crusts. Also, is there a geographic variation along the convergence zone during this tectonic transition? We generate maps and geochemical plots for four different epochs and two different regions since Cenozoic time: Iran and Anatolia in the Eocene, Oligocene, Miocene and Plio-Quaternary. This board, region-scaled analysis of major and trace element patterns suggests the following tectonic events: Subduction-related medium K calc-alkaline igneous rocks reflect Eocene subduction of the Neo-Tethys oceanic lithosphere. Oligocene igneous rocks are characterized by K2O-SiO2 trends scattering to higher silica and alkaline content, which may reflect subduction of stretched continental margin lithosphere and sediments. A bimodal pattern of potash-silica trends during Miocene time may mark the transition from subduction-related to intra-plate magmatism, perhaps signaling contact between the continental crust of Arabia-Africa with Eurasia. Pliocene and younger igneous rocks show an intra-plate and ocean island basalt trend, as the region's activities

  12. Variability of the Tropical Atlantic and Pacific SSS Minimum Zones and Their Relations to the ITCZ and SPCZ (1979-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcroix, Thierry; Tchilibou, Michel; Alory, Gael; Reverdin, Gilles; Arnault, Sabine

    2015-04-01

    This study focuses on the time-space variability of the low Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) waters located from the West to the East within about 2N-12N in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans and within about 6S-16S in the western Pacific. The analysis is based on a combination of in situ SSS observations collected in the last 3.5 decades from voluntary observing ships, TAO/TRITON and PIRATA moorings, Argo floats and (few) CTD profiles. We show that the mean positions of the Atlantic and Pacific low SSS waters are tightly related to the local minimum in Evaporation minus Precipitation (E-P) budget linked to the Inter Tropical Convergence Zones (ITCZ) and South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). We also show that the meridional position of the SSS minima varies both at seasonal time scale, with an overall poleward displacement in summer (or winter in the western Pacific ITCZ), and at interannual time scale in relation with ENSO and the Atlantic meridional mode, with however subtle differences in timing between the western, central and eastern basins. The role of the ITCZ- and SPCZ-related E-P budget in these seasonal and interannual changes is examined. We further document long-term meridional migrations of these low SSS waters in the last 3.5 decades and discuss whether or not they are consistent with documented decadal variability and/or expected global change effects.

  13. Convergence Insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Terms Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Convergence Insufficiency En Español Read in Chinese What is convergence insufficiency? Convergence insufficiency is the ...

  14. Neotectonics and seismicity of a slowly deforming segment of the Adria-Europe convergence zone - the northern Dinarides fold-and-thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustaszewski, Kamil; Herak, Marijan; Tomljenović, Bruno; Herak, Davorka; Matej, Srebrenka

    2014-05-01

    With GPS-derived shortening rates of c. 3-5 mm/a, the Adria-Europe convergence zone across the fold-and-thrust belt of the Dinarides (Balkan Peninsula) is a slowly deforming plate boundary by global standards. We have analysed the active tectonics and instrumental seismicity of the northernmost segment of this fold-and-thrust belt at its border to the Pannonian Basin. This area hosts a Maastrichtian collisional suture formed by closure of Mesozoic fragments of the Neotethys, overprinted by Miocene back-arc extension, which led to the exhumation of greenschist- to amphibolite-grade rocks in several core complexes. Geological, geomorphological and reflection seismic data provide evidence for a compressive or transpressive reactivation of extensional faults after about 5 Ma. The study area represents the seismically most active region of the Dinarides apart from the Adriatic Sea coast and the area around Zagreb. The strongest instrumentally recorded earthquake (27 October 1969) affected the city of Banja Luka (northern Bosnia and Herzegovina). Fault plane solutions for the main shock (ML 6.4) and its largest foreshock (ML 6.0) indicate reverse faulting along ESE-WNW-striking nodal planes and generally N-S trending pressure axes. The spatial distribution of epicentres and focal depths, analyses of the macroseismic field and fault-plane solutions for several smaller events suggest on-going shortening in the internal Dinarides. Our results therefore imply that current Adria-Europe convergence is widely distributed across c. 300 km, rendering the entire Dinarides fold-and-thrust belt a slowly deforming plate boundary.

  15. Real-time three-dimensional color doppler evaluation of the flow convergence zone for quantification of mitral regurgitation: Validation experimental animal study and initial clinical experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitges, Marta; Jones, Michael; Shiota, Takahiro; Qin, Jian Xin; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Bauer, Fabrice; Kim, Yong Jin; Agler, Deborah A.; Cardon, Lisa A.; Zetts, Arthur D.; Panza, Julio A.; Thomas, James D.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pitfalls of the flow convergence (FC) method, including 2-dimensional imaging of the 3-dimensional (3D) geometry of the FC surface, can lead to erroneous quantification of mitral regurgitation (MR). This limitation may be mitigated by the use of real-time 3D color Doppler echocardiography (CE). Our objective was to validate a real-time 3D navigation method for MR quantification. METHODS: In 12 sheep with surgically induced chronic MR, 37 different hemodynamic conditions were studied with real-time 3DCE. Using real-time 3D navigation, the radius of the largest hemispherical FC zone was located and measured. MR volume was quantified according to the FC method after observing the shape of FC in 3D space. Aortic and mitral electromagnetic flow probes and meters were balanced against each other to determine reference MR volume. As an initial clinical application study, 22 patients with chronic MR were also studied with this real-time 3DCE-FC method. Left ventricular (LV) outflow tract automated cardiac flow measurement (Toshiba Corp, Tokyo, Japan) and real-time 3D LV stroke volume were used to quantify the reference MR volume (MR volume = 3DLV stroke volume - automated cardiac flow measurement). RESULTS: In the sheep model, a good correlation and agreement was seen between MR volume by real-time 3DCE and electromagnetic (y = 0.77x + 1.48, r = 0.87, P <.001, delta = -0.91 +/- 2.65 mL). In patients, real-time 3DCE-derived MR volume also showed a good correlation and agreement with the reference method (y = 0.89x - 0.38, r = 0.93, P <.001, delta = -4.8 +/- 7.6 mL). CONCLUSIONS: real-time 3DCE can capture the entire FC image, permitting geometrical recognition of the FC zone geometry and reliable MR quantification.

  16. Southward shift of the Intertropical Convergence Zone in the western Pacific during the late Tertiary: Evidence from ferromanganese crusts on seamounts west of the Marshall Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jonguk; Hyeong, Kiseong; Jung, Hoi-Soo; Moon, Jai-Woon; Kim, Ki-Hyune; Lee, Insung

    2006-12-01

    Hydrogenetic ferromanganese crusts were dredged from four seamounts in the western Pacific, OSM7, OSM2, Lomilik, and Lemkein, aligned in a NW-SE direction parallel to Pacific Plate movement. The crusts consist of four well-defined layers with distinct textural and geochemical properties. The topmost layer 1 is relatively enriched in Mn, Co, Ni, and Mo compared to the underlying layer 2, which is relatively enriched in Al, Ti, K, and Rb and Cu, Zn, and excess Ba. Textural and geochemical properties of layer 2 suggest growth conditions under high biogenic and detrital flux. Such conditions are met in the equatorial Pacific (i.e., between the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and equatorial high-productivity zone). Layer 2 likely formed when each seamount was beneath the equatorial Pacific along its back track path. On the other hand, layer 1 probably started to grow after seamounts moved northwest from the ITCZ. This interpretation is consistent with the thickness of layer 1 across the four crusts, which increases to the northwest. Ages of the layer 1-layer 2 boundary in each crust, a potential proxy for northern margin of the ITCZ, also increase to the northwest at 17, 11, 8, and 5 Ma for OSM7, OSM2, Lomilik, and Lemkein, respectively. Assuming Pacific Plate motion of 0.3°/Myr, the seamounts were located at 12°N, 11°N, 9°N, and 8°N at the time of boundary formation. This result suggests that the north edge of the ITCZ has shifted south since the middle Miocene in the western Pacific, which agrees with information from the eastern Pacific.

  17. Phase lag between Intertropical Convergence Zone migration and subtropical monsoon onset over the northwestern Indian Ocean during Marine Isotopic Substage 6.5 (MIS 6.5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaizé, B.; Joly, C.; VéNec-Peyré, M.-T.; Bassinot, F.; Caillon, N.; Charlier, K.

    2006-12-01

    High-resolution faunal and isotopic analyses of foraminifera were performed on core MD96-2073 (10°94'N, 52°62'E, 3142 m depth), located close to Socotra Island in the upwelling area of the Somali Basin (NW Indian Ocean). This work focuses on Marine Isotopic Stage 6.5 in order to reconstruct paleo-upwelling changes and their links with the Arabian Sea summer monsoon and the migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Correspondence and cluster analyses of planktonic foraminiferal abundances, partly controlled by temperature and water mass productivity, together with an upwelling intensification index, show the occurrence of a strong upwelling between 176 and 165 ka. This upwelling intensification responds to a northward migration of the ITCZ. An isotopic depletion in the planktonic foraminifera δ18O records occurring between 180 and 167 ka is interpreted as proof of a large salinity decrease in the surface waters, probably linked to a strong input of fresh rainfall waters induced by an intense monsoon activity. The lag between the onset of upwelling intensification and the strong monsoonal impact over the same area suggests a decoupling between both phenomena. The migration of the ITCZ is influenced by obliquity and precessional forcing, while the Arabian Sea summer monsoon precipitation depends only on precessional forcing.

  18. Modern Spatial Rainfall Rate is well Correlated with Coretop δ2Hdinosterol in the South Pacific Convergence Zone: A Tool for Quantitative Reconstructions of Rainfall Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sear, D. A.; Maloney, A. E.; Nelson, D. B.; Sachs, J. P.; Hassall, J. D.; Langdon, P. G.; Prebble, M.; Richey, J. N.; Schabetsberger, R.; Sichrowsky, U.; Hope, G.

    2015-12-01

    The South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) is the Southern Hemisphere's most prominent precipitation feature extending southeastward 3000 km from Papua New Guinea to French Polynesia. Determining how the SPCZ responded to climate variations before the instrumental record requires the use of indirect indicators of rainfall. The link between the hydrogen isotopic composition of fluxes of water though the hydrologic cycle, lake water, and molecular fossil 2H/1H ratios make hydrogen isotopes a promising tool for improving our understanding of this important climate feature. An analysis of coretop sediment from freshwater lakes in the SPCZ region indicates that there is a strong spatial relationship between δ2Hdinosterol and mean annual precipitation rate. The objectives of this research are to use 2H/1H ratios of the biomarker dinosterol to develop an empirical relationship between δ2Hdinosterol and modern environmental rainfall rates so that we may quantitatively reconstruct several aspects of the SPCZ's hydrological system during the late Holocene. The analysis includes lake sediment coretops from the Solomon Islands, Wallis Island, Vanuatu, Tahiti, Samoa, New Caledonia, and the Cook Islands. These islands span range of average modern precipitation rates from 3 to 7 mm/day and the coretop sediment δ2Hdinosterol values range from -240‰ to -320‰. Applying this regional coretop calibration to dated sediment cores reveals that the mean annual position and/or intensity of the SPCZ has not been static during the past 2000 years.

  19. Interhemispheric Orbital-Scale Asymmetry of the Intertropical Convergence Zone Movement at the Asia-Pacific Realm over the Past 3 Glacial-Interglacial Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, L.; Shen, C. C.; Lo, L.; Shi, Z.; Wei, K. Y.; Chou, C. J.; WU, C. C.; Mii, H. S.; Chuang, C. K.; Amakawa, H.; Burr, G. S.; Chen, Y. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Intertropical convergence Zone (ITCZ) is the heaviest rain belt on earth and provides global water-resources for human populations around the world. Here we present a tropical precipitation record from the Southern Hemisphere covering the past 284,000 years, inferred from a marine sedimentary sequence of planktonic foraminifera collected off the eastern coast of Papua New Guinea (PNG). The foraminiferal tests of Globigerinoides ruber were sampled from a marine sediment core MD05-2925 (9o20.60'S, 151o27.54'E; water depth 1661 m). Using inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometric (ICP-SF-MS) techniques with 2s precision of 2-6%, we measured rare earth elements (REEs) to Ca ratios in the planktonic foraminifer to reconstruct precipitation and make inferences about the orbital-timescale evolution of the Pacific ITCZ. In addition to precessional feature, which is expressed in the East Asian counterpart, our record shows that the Pacific ITCZ migration was dominantly influenced by obliquity changes. Model simulations suggest that this obliquity forcing could be primarily delivered by a meridional thermal/pressure contrast, resulting from the asymmetric continental configuration between Asia and Australia in a coupled East Asian-Australian circulation system.

  20. Sediment dispersal system in the Taiwan-South China Sea collision zone along a convergent margin in the perspective of source to sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiung, K.; Yu, H.

    2011-12-01

    Through a large-scale examination of the morpho-sedimentary features on seafloor in the Taiwan-Luzon convergent margin, we determined the main sediment dispersal system which stretches from 23°N to 20°N and displays as an aligned linear sediment pathway, consisting of the Penghu Canyon, the deep-sea Penghu Channel and northern Manila Trench. The seafloor of South China Sea (SCS) north of 21°N are underlain by a triangle-shaped collision basin, resulting from oblique collision between the Luzon Arc and Chinese margin, and is mainly occupied by two juxtaposed slopes, the SCS and Kaoping slopes. The Penghu Canyon is located along the tilting basin axis where is the physiographic boundary separating the SCS and Kaoping slopes. Progressive subsidence of the basin floor from this nearby uplifted Taiwan orogen results in the linear basin axis deepening and tilting towards the open SCS, serving as a longitudinal sediment conduit. Two major tributary canyons of the Formosa and Kaoping and small channels and gullies on both slopes join into the axial Penghu Canyon and form a dendritic canyon drainage system in this collision basin. The canyon drainage system is characteristic of lateral sediment supply from flank slopes and axial sediment transport down-canyon following the tilting basin axis. The significance of the collision basin in term of source to sink is that terrestrial and shallow marine sediments derived from nearby Taiwan orogen, Chinese margin and the Taiwan Strait are transported to and accumulated in the collision basin, serving as a temporary sediment sink and the major marine transport route along the basin axis. The multi-sourced sediments in the collision basin are then delivered down-dip via the Penghu Canyon to the deep-sea Penghu Channel and ultimately to the final destination of the Manila Trench, representing a regional longitudinal sediment dispersal route along the convergent margin between Taiwan and Luzon. A comparison with other examples is a

  1. Sediment dispersal system in the Taiwan-South China Sea collision zone along a convergent margin: A comparison with the Papua New Guinea collision zone of the western Solomon Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiung, Kan-Hsi; Yu, Ho-Shing

    2013-01-01

    Through a large-scale examination of the morpho-sedimentary features on sea floors in the Taiwan-Luzon convergent margin, we determined the main sediment dispersal system which stretches from 23°N to 20°N and displays as an aligned linear sediment pathway, consisting of the Penghu Canyon, the deep-sea Penghu Channel and northern Manila Trench. The seafloor of South China Sea north of 21°N are underlain by a triangle-shaped collision marine basin, resulting from oblique collision between the Luzon Arc and Chinese margin, and are mainly occupied by two juxtaposed slopes, the South China Sea and Kaoping Slopes, and a southward tilting basin axis located along the Penghu Canyon. Two major tributary canyons of the Formosa and Kaoping and small channels and gullies on both slopes join into the axial Penghu Canyon and form a dendritic canyon drainage system in this collision marine basin. The canyon drainage system is characteristic of lateral sediment supply from flank slopes and axial sediment transport down-canyon following the tilting basin axis. The significance of the collision marine basin in term of source to sink is that sediments derived from nearby orogen and continental margins are transported to and accumulated in the collision basin, serving as a temporary sediment sink and major marine transport route along the basin axis. The comparison of the Taiwan-South China Sea collision zone with the Papua New Guinea collision zone of the western Solomon Sea reveals remarkable similarities in tectonic settings and sedimentary processes that have resulted in similar sediment dispersal systems consisting of (1) a canyon drainage network mainly in the collision basin and (2) a longitudinal sediment transport system comprising a linear connection of submarine canyon, deep-sea channel and oceanic trench beyond the collision marine basin.

  2. Overriding plate structure of the Nicaragua convergent margin: Constraints on the limits of the seismogenic zone and the 1992 tsunami earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallarès, V.; Meléndez, A.; Prada, M.; Ranero, C. R.; McIntosh, K.; Grevemeyer, I.

    2012-04-01

    We present 2D P-wave velocity models of the Nicaragua convergent margin along two perpendicular wide-angle seismic profiles acquired in the rupture area of the 1992 tsunami earthquake. The models focus on the structure of the overriding plate and the geometry of the inter-plate boundary. In the trench-perpendicular profile, the basement shows increasing velocity reflecting a progressive decrease in the degree of rock fracturing of the igneous basement. Upper mantle-like velocities are obtained at a depth of ~10 km beneath the fore-arc Sandino basin, indicating that the mantle wedge is shallow and located close to the trench. A mismatch between the inter-plate reflector in the velocity models and along coincident multi-channel seismic profiles is best explained by a ~15% velocity anisotropy, suggesting locally-enhanced rock fracturing which is related with the presence of a prominent subducted seamount. The frontal part of the overriding plate is probably too fractured to store elastic energy, unless the presence of local asperities such as the subducted seamount makes it conditionally stable by locally increasing the normal stress. The downdip limit of the seismogenic zone occurs near the tip of the mantle wedge, indicating that it is probably controlled by the presence of a weak, serpentinized mantle wedge beneath the Sandino basin. The hypocenter of the 1992 main shock is not particularly shallow (20-22 km), but seismological data indicate that it triggered sub-events near the trench, the main of which coincides with the subducted seamount. We show that the slow propagation velocity and long duration of the 1992 earthquake could be explained by rupture propagating within the fractured basement rocks and not into the sediments.

  3. Partitioning of oblique convergence in the Northern Andes subduction zone: Migration history and the present-day boundary of the North Andean Sliver in Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, A.; Audin, L.; Nocquet, J. M.; Jaillard, E.; Mothes, P.; Jarrín, P.; Segovia, M.; Rolandone, F.; Cisneros, D.

    2016-05-01

    Along the Ecuadorian margin, oblique subduction induces deformation of the overriding continental plate. For the last 15 Ma, both exhumation and tectonic history of Ecuador suggest that the northeastward motion of the North Andean Sliver (NAS) was accompanied by an eastward migration of its eastern boundary and successive progressively narrowing restraining bends. Here we present geologic data, earthquake epicenters, focal mechanisms, GPS results, and a revised active fault map consistent with this new kinematic model. All data sets concur to demonstrate that active continental deformation is presently localized along a single major fault system, connecting fault segments from the Gulf of Guayaquil to the eastern Andean Cordillera. Although secondary faults are recognized within the Cordillera, they accommodate a negligible fraction of relative motion compared to the main fault system. The eastern limit is then concentrated rather than distributed as first proposed, marking a sharp boundary between the NAS, the Inca sliver, and the Subandean domain overthrusting the South American craton. The NAS limit follows a northeast striking right-lateral transpressional strike-slip system from the Gulf of Guayaquil (Isla Puná) to the Andean Cordillera and with the north-south striking transpressive faults along the eastern Andes. Eastward migration of the restraining belt since the Pliocene, abandonment of the sutures and reactivation of north-south striking ancient fault zones lead to the final development of a major tectonic boundary south and east of the NAS, favoring its extrusion as a continental sliver, accommodating the oblique convergence of the Nazca oceanic plate toward South America.

  4. Interdecadal-decadal climate variability from multicoral oxygen isotope records in the South Pacific Convergence Zone region since 1650 A.D.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsley, Braddock K.; Zhang, Peipei; Kaplan, Alexey; Howe, Stephen S.; Wellington, Gerard M.

    2008-06-01

    In the South Pacific, interdecadal-decadal oceanic and atmospheric variability, referred to as the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO), is most pronounced in the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) salinity front region. Here we have used annual average oxygen isotope (δ18O) time series from five coral cores collected from Fiji and Tonga in this region to construct a Fiji-Tonga Interdecadal-Decadal Pacific Oscillation (F-T IDPO) index of low-frequency (>9 and <55 years) climate variability back to 1650 A.D. We first demonstrate the consistency between this F-T IDPO index and a mean sea level (MSL) pressure-based SPCZ position index (SPI) (1891-2000), thus verifying the ability of coral δ18O to record past interdecadal-decadal climatic variations in this region back to 1891. The F-T IDPO index is then shown to be synchronous with the IPO index (1856-2000), suggesting that this coral-based index effectively represents the interdecadal-decadal scale climate variance back to 1650. The regularity of the F-T IDPO index indicates that interdecadal-decadal variability in the SPCZ region has been relatively constant over the past 350 years with a mean frequency of ˜20 years (variance peaks near 11 and 35 years). There is a consistent antiphase correlation of the F-T IDPO index and the interdecadal-decadal components in equatorial Pacific coral δ18O series from Maiana and Palmyra. This observation indicates that the eastward expansion (westward contraction) of the eastern salinity front of the Western Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP) occurs simultaneously (±<1 year) with the westward (eastward) shift of the SPCZ salinity front during positive IPO (negative IPO) phases. This is the same relationship observed during the phases of the El Niño Southern Oscillation.

  5. Convergence Insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... insufficiency? Symptoms of convergence insufficiency include diplopia (double vision) and headaches when reading. Many patients will complain that they have difficulty concentrating on near work (computer, reading, etc.) and that the written word blurs ...

  6. Variability of the Tropical Atlantic and Pacific SSS Minimum Zones in the Last Three Decades and Their Relations to the ITCZ and NECC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcroix, T. C.; Tchilibou, M. L.; Alory, G.; Reverdin, G. P.; Arnault, S.

    2014-12-01

    This study focuses on the time-space variability of the low Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) waters located from the West to the East within about 2°N-12°N in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. The analysis is based on a combination of in situ SSS observations collected in the last three decades from voluntary observing ships, TAO/TRITON and PIRATA moorings, Argo floats and (few) CTD profiles. We show that the mean position of the Atlantic and Pacific low SSS waters is tightly related to the local minimum in Evaporation minus Precipitation (E-P) budget linked to the Inter Tropical Convergence Zones (ITCZ) and to salt transport by the eastward flowing North Equatorial Counter Current (NECC). We also show via EOF analyses that the meridional position of this SSS minimum varies both at seasonal time scale, with a northernmost position in boreal summer, and at interannual time scale in relation with ENSO and the Atlantic meridional mode, with however subtle differences in timing between the western, central and eastern basins. The role of the ITCZ-related E-P budget and NECC-related salt advection in these seasonal and interannual changes is examined. We further document the long-term meridional migration of these low SSS waters in the last three decades and discuss whether or not it is consistent with the expected global change effects.

  7. Variations of the tropical Atlantic and Pacific SSS minimum zones and their relations to the ITCZ and SPCZ rain bands (1979-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchilibou, M.; Delcroix, T.; Alory, G.; Arnault, S.; Reverdin, G.

    2015-07-01

    This study focuses on the time-space variability of the low Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) waters extending zonally within 2°N-12°N in the Atlantic and Pacific and within 6°S-16°S in the western third of the Pacific. The analysis is based on a combination of in situ SSS observations collected in the last three decades from voluntary observing ships, TAO/TRITON and PIRATA moorings, Argo floats, and (few) CTD profiles. The mean latitudes of the Atlantic and Pacific low SSS waters appear 1°-3° further poleward than the Evaporation minus Precipitation (E-P) minima linked to the Inter Tropical Convergence Zones (ITCZ) and South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). At the seasonal time scale, the E-P minima migrate poleward in summer hemispheres, leading the migration of the SSS minima by 2-3 months in the Atlantic ITCZ, Pacific SPCZ, and in the eastern part of the Pacific ITCZ. On the other hand, the seasonal displacements of E-P and SSS minima are in antiphase in the central and western parts of the Pacific ITCZ. At the interannual time scale, the E-P and SSS minima migrate poleward during La Nina events in the Pacific and during the positive phase of the Atlantic Meridional Dipole (AMD) in the Atlantic (and vice versa during El Nino and the negative phase of the AMD). We further document long-term (1979-2009) meridional migrations of the E-P and SSS minima, especially in the SPCZ region, and discuss whether or not they are consistent with documented SST and wind stress trends.

  8. Why does continental convergence stop

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, A.

    1985-01-01

    Convergence between India and Asia slowed at 45 Ma when they collided, but continues today. This requires that substantial proportions of the Indian and/or Asian lithospheric mantle are still being subducted. The resulting slab-pull is probably comparable with that from complete lithospheric slabs and may promote continued continental convergence even after collision. Since descending lithospheric slabs are present at all collision zones at the time of collision such continued convergence may be general after continental collisions. It may cease only when there is a major (global) plate reorganization which results in new forces on the convergent continents that may counteract the slab-pull. These inferences may be tested on the late Paleozoic collision between Gondwanaland and Laurasia. This is generally considered to have been complete by mid-Permian time (250 Ma). However, this may be only the time of docking of Gondwanaland with North America, not that of the cessation of convergence. Paleomagnetic polar-wander paths for the Gondwanide continents exhibit consistently greater latitudinal shifts from 250 Ma to 200 Ma than those of Laurasia when corrected for post-Triassic drift, suggesting that convergence continued through late Permian well into the Triassic. It may have been accommodated by crustal thickening under what is now the US Coastal Plain, or by strike-slip faulting. Convergence may have ceased only when Pangea began to fragment again, in which case the cause for its cessation may be related to the cause of continental fragmentation.

  9. Do convergent developmental mechanisms underlie convergent phenotypes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wray, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    Convergence is a pervasive evolutionary process, affecting many aspects of phenotype and even genotype. Relatively little is known about convergence in developmental processes, however, nor about the degree to which convergence in development underlies convergence in anatomy. A switch in the ecology of sea urchins from feeding to nonfeeding larvae illustrates how convergence in development can be associated with convergence in anatomy. Comparisons to more distantly related taxa, however, suggest that this association may be limited to relatively close phylogenetic comparisons. Similarities in gene expression during development provide another window into the association between convergence in developmental processes and convergence in anatomy. Several well-studied transcription factors exhibit likely cases of convergent gene expression in distantly related animal phyla. Convergence in regulatory gene expression domains is probably more common than generally acknowledged, and can arise for several different reasons. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Convergence of Newton's method for a single real equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    Newton's method for finding the zeroes of a single real function is investigated in some detail. Convergence is generally checked using the Contraction Mapping Theorem which yields sufficient but not necessary conditions for convergence of the general single point iteration method. The resulting convergence intervals are frequently considerably smaller than actual convergence zones. For a specific single point iteration method, such as Newton's method, better estimates of regions of convergence should be possible. A technique is described which, under certain conditions (frequently satisfied by well behaved functions) gives much larger zones where convergence is guaranteed.

  11. Evidence for the development of a convergent setting in the Southern Alps domain during the early Mesozoic: insights from the Finero Complex (Ivrea-Verbano Zone)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovanardi, T.; Zanetti, A.; Mazzucchelli, M.; Tiepolo, M.; Vannucci, R.; Morishita, T.

    2012-04-01

    The Finero Mafic-Ultramafic Complex is located in the northernmost sector of the Ivrea-Verbano Zone (hereafter IVZ, Southern Alps). It consists of a pervasively metasomatized dunitic-harzburgitic phlogopite-amphibole-rich mantle unit surrounded by a layered and strongly hydrous mafic-ultramafic pluton (the Finero Mafic Complex) that underplated the lower crust of the Adria plate. A number of different geodynamic scenarios, among which i) aborted rifting processes, ii) mantle plume activity and iii) development of a subduction zone, have been proposed to account for the mantle metasomatism and the melts intrusion in the Finero area. All these scenarios, however, are commonly considered from pre-Hercynian to Permian in age, in analogy with the petrogenetic processes which occurred in the central and southern sectors of IVZ. In this contribution, new geochronological and petrochemical data are presented, along with a review of the literature age determinations, which suggest that the metasomatic events of the Finero mantle unit, as well as the emplacement of the layered intrusion, occurred over a time span covering Middle Triassic to Lower Jurassic. Trace element and isotopic evidence point to the occurrence of large amount of crustal component in the melts migrating through the mantle unit, which, consistently with regional structural features, has been proposed to be related development of roll-back subduction during the early Mesozoic. In this scenario, the intrusion of the Finero Mafic Complex predates the mantle metasomatism and occurred during Upper Anisian-Ladinian, as a consequence of the uprising of melts produced by large degrees of fluid-assisted partial melting in a supra-subduction regime. The mantle unit and the mafic-ultramafic complex were tectonically juxtaposed later on, possibly during the opening of the Middle Jurassic Neo-Tethys.

  12. Cumulative right-lateral fault slip rate across the Zagros-Makran transfer zone: role of the Minab-Zendan fault system in accommodating Arabia-Eurasia convergence in southeast Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regard, V.; Bellier, O.; Thomas, J.-C.; Bourlès, D.; Bonnet, S.; Abbassi, M. R.; Braucher, R.; Mercier, J.; Shabanian, E.; Soleymani, Sh.; Feghhi, Kh.

    2005-07-01

    The Zendan-Minab zone is the transition zone between the Zagros collision to the west and Makran subduction to the east. It is also linked to the north with the Nayband-Gowk fault system that bounds the Lut Block to the east. The total convergence rate between Arabia and Eurasia is estimated to range between 23 and 35 mm yr-1 in a NNE-trending direction. The deformation through the Minab-Zendan system is accommodated within two fault systems, the western N160°E-trending Minab-Zendan fault system and the eastern north-south Sabzevaran-Jiroft fault system. The study area is characterized by a well-defined succession of Quaternary deposit levels. The age of these deposits was estimated by archaeological data, regional palaeoclimate correlations and constrained by additional in situ10Be dating in another paper in this study. These deposits exhibit offsets, both lateral and vertical, that are evaluated by satellite image analysis and GPS profiles. Thanks to offsets and ages the strike-slip rates associated with the Minab-Zendan and the Sabzevaran-Jiroft fault systems are calculated to be 5.1 +/- 1.3 or 6.6 +/- 1.5, and 6.2 +/- 0.7 mm yr-1, respectively. These results allow an evaluation of the velocity vector of the Musandam Peninsula (Oman) with respect to the Lut Block of 11.4 +/- 2.0 or 12.9 +/- 2.2 mm yr-1 in a N10 +/- 15°E direction, close to the GPS estimates. This study also constrains the in-plane slip rates for each fault. Previous works indicate that the Zagros accommodates only 10 mm yr-1 of shortening, while 10 mm yr-1 should be accommodated by the Alborz mountains in northern Iran. This last 10 mm yr-1 may be accommodated through the Nayband-Gowk system and the East Iranian ranges, implying that the two fault systems constituting the Zagros-Makran transfer zone have different geodynamic roles. The western Minab-Zendan fault system links the Makran and Zagros deforming zones, whereas the northwestern Jiroft-Sabzevaran fault system is transmitting the

  13. Decadal and lower frequency changes in the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) salinity front gradient over the last 210 years and relationship to Pacific-wide climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsley, B. K.; Dassie, E. P.; Wu, H. C.; Wellington, G. M.

    2010-12-01

    Along the southeastern edge of the SPCZ near 170°W and 15°-20°S a surface ocean salinity frontal zone exists that separates fresher water under the SPCZ from significantly saltier and cooler waters to the east in the South Pacific central gyre. Instrumental sea surface salinity (SSS) data from this region indicate that temporal variability in the SSS difference between Fiji and Tonga is closely coupled to the phase of ENSO. The SSS difference increases by 1.0 to 1.5 p.s.s. during La Niña events and decreases by a comparable magnitude to no difference (0.0 p.s.s.) during El Niño events. The cause of this gradient change is directly related to the position of the salinity front. During La Niña events the salinity front shifts SE as the S. Equatorial Current (SEC) weakens and the zone of maximum rainfall in the SPCZ moves over Fiji, making Fiji fresher than Tonga. During El Niño events, the SEC advects higher salinity water from the east and the SPCZ shifts NE making the SSS difference between Fiji and Tonga close to zero. Using replicated coral δ18O and SSS records over the last 50 years, (Dassie et al., 2010, this meeting) demonstrate that Porites corals from Fiji and Tonga accurately record interannual changes in this SSS difference across the salinity front. Here we evaluate decadal-scale and lower frequency changes in the coral δ18O difference between Fiji and Tonga using replicated Porites coral δ18O records from Fiji (Savusavu Bay, n=2; Vanua Balavu (200km E. of Savusavu Bay, n=2) and Tonga (n=2). Our previous work with coral δ18O records from the region indicates that interannual and lower frequency changes in δ18O are predominantly driven by changes in SSS (Linsley et al., 2006, G^3). Earlier evidence from instrumental salinity data and coral δ18O records indicate that the SPCZ has been expanding SE since the mid 19th century. Our new coral δ18O reconstruction of the SSS gradient provides more details and indicates a reduced or non

  14. Imaging the structure of the Northern Lesser Antilles (Guadeloupe - Virgin Island) to assess the tectonic and thermo-mechanical behavior of an arcuate subduction zone that undergoes increasing convergence obliquity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurencin, M.; Marcaillou, B.; Klingelhoefer, F.; Jean-Frederic, L.; Graindorge, D.; Bouquerel, H.; Conin, M.; Crozon, J.; De Min, L.; De Voogd, B.; Evain, M.; Heuret, A.; Laigle, M.; Lallemand, S.; Lucazeau, F.; Pichot, T.; Prunier, C.; Rolandone, F.; Rousset, D.; Vitard, C.

    2015-12-01

    Paradoxically, the Northern Lesser Antilles is the less-investigated and the most tectonically and seismically complex segment of the Lesser Antilles subduction zone: - The convergence obliquity between the North American and Caribbean plates increases northward from Guadeloupe to Virgin Islands raising questions about the fore-arc tectonic partitioning. - The margin has undergone the subduction of the rough sediment-starved Atlantic Ocean floor spiked with ridges as well as banks docking, but the resulting tectonic deformation remains hypothetical in the absence of a complete bathymetry and of any seismic line. - Recent geodetic data and low historical seismic activity suggest a low interplate coupling between Saint-Martin and Anegada, but the sparse onshore seismometers located far from source zone cast doubt on this seismic gap. To shed new light on these questions, the ANTITHESIS project, 5 Marine Geophysical legs totaling 72 days, aims at recording a complete bathymetric map, deep and shallow seismic reflexion lines, wide-angle seismic data, heat-flow measurements and the seismic activity with a web of sea-bottom seismometers. Our preliminary results suggest that: - A frontal sliver of accretionary prism is stretched and expulsed northward by 50km along the left-lateral Bunce fault that limits the prism from the margin basement as far southward as 18.5°N. So far, this structure is the only interpreted sign of tectonic partitioning in the fore-arc. - The Anegada Passage extends eastward to the accretionary prism through strike-slip faults and pull-apart basins that possibly form a lef-lateral poorly-active system inherited from a past tectonic phase, consistently with geodetic and seismologic data. - The anomalously cold interplate contact, consistent with a low interseismic coupling, is possibly due to fluid circulation within the shallow crustal aquifer or a depressed thermal structure of the oceanic crust related to the slow-spreading at the medio

  15. Variability in warm-season atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns over subtropical South America: relationships between the South Atlantic convergence zone and large-scale organized convection over the La Plata basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattingly, Kyle S.; Mote, Thomas L.

    2016-03-01

    Warm-season precipitation variability over subtropical South America is characterized by an inverse relationship between the South Atlantic convergence zone (SACZ) and precipitation over the central and western La Plata basin of southeastern South America. This study extends the analysis of this "South American Seesaw" precipitation dipole to relationships between the SACZ and large, long-lived mesoscale convective systems (LLCSs) over the La Plata basin. By classifying SACZ events into distinct continental and oceanic categories and building a logistic regression model that relates LLCS activity across the region to continental and oceanic SACZ precipitation, a detailed account of spatial variability in the out-of-phase coupling between the SACZ and large-scale organized convection over the La Plata basin is provided. Enhanced precipitation in the continental SACZ is found to result in increased LLCS activity over northern, northeastern, and western sections of the La Plata basin, in association with poleward atmospheric moisture flux from the Amazon basin toward these regions, and a decrease in the probability of LLCS occurrence over the southeastern La Plata basin. Increased oceanic SACZ precipitation, however, was strongly related to reduced atmospheric moisture and decreased probability of LLCS occurrence over nearly the entire La Plata basin. These results suggest that continental SACZ activity and large-scale organized convection over the northern and eastern sections of the La Plata basin are closely tied to atmospheric moisture transport from the Amazon basin, while the warm coastal Brazil Current may also play an important role as an evaporative moisture source for LLCSs over the central and western La Plata basin.

  16. A Fiji multi-coral δ18O composite approach to obtaining a more accurate reconstruction of the last two-centuries of the ocean-climate variability in the South Pacific Convergence Zone region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dassié, Emilie P.; Linsley, Braddock K.; Corrège, Thierry; Wu, Henry C.; Lemley, Gavin M.; Howe, Steve; Cabioch, Guy

    2014-12-01

    The limited availability of oceanographic data in the tropical Pacific Ocean prior to the satellite era makes coral-based climate reconstructions a key tool for extending the instrumental record back in time, thereby providing a much needed test for climate models and projections. We have generated a unique regional network consisting of five Porites coral δ18O time series from different locations in the Fijian archipelago. Our results indicate that using a minimum of three Porites coral δ18O records from Fiji is statistically sufficient to obtain a reliable signal for climate reconstruction, and that application of an approach used in tree ring studies is a suitable tool to determine this number. The coral δ18O composite indicates that while sea surface temperature (SST) variability is the primary driver of seasonal δ18O variability in these Fiji corals, annual average coral δ18O is more closely correlated to sea surface salinity (SSS) as previously reported. Our results highlight the importance of water mass advection in controlling Fiji coral δ18O and salinity variability at interannual and decadal time scales despite being located in the heavy rainfall region of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). The Fiji δ18O composite presents a secular freshening and warming trend since the 1850s coupled with changes in both interannual (IA) and decadal/interdecadal (D/I) variance. The changes in IA and D/I variance suggest a re-organization of climatic variability in the SPCZ region beginning in the late 1800s to period of a more dominant interannual variability, which could correspond to a southeast expansion of the SPCZ.

  17. Convergence Is Real

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enyeart, Mike; Staman, E. Michael; Valdes, Jose J., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The concept of convergence has evolved significantly during recent years. Today, "convergence" refers to the integration of the communications and computing resources and services that seamlessly traverse multiple infrastructures and deliver content to multiple platforms or appliances. Convergence is real. Those in higher education, and especially…

  18. Convergent flow stove

    SciTech Connect

    Engblom, D.W.

    1986-02-25

    An apparatus for burning combustible solid organic material such as wood is described in a environment in which combustion is directed downwardly. The apparatus consists of: A. A fuel chamber having a closed upper portion and a major dimension in the vertical direction such that the fuel chamber is generally upright, B. A combustion zone in the lower portion of the fuel chamber defined by a convergent outflow passage at the bottom of the fuel chamber and a pair of walls on opposite sides of the lower portion, the walls being sloped inwardly toward one another at the outflow passage, and the outflow passage comprising a gap between the walls, C. A Hearth element forming each the sloping wall, the hearth element including I. At least one row of spaced slots extending into the interior of the hearth element and a lateral air inlet channel connected to the slots of each row and a source of combustion air, and II. A flue outlet communicating with the outflow passage, the flue outlet including spaced, parallel tubes in the hearth element, with the tubes being juxtaposed the slots and extending perpendicular to the air inlet channels, D. Means connected to the flue outlet to permit exhaustion of flue gases from the apparatus, and E. means for loading fuel into the fuel chamber.

  19. Chemical transport to the seafloor of the equatorial Pacific Ocean across a latitudinal transect at 135°W: Tracking sedimentary major, trace, and rare earth element fluxes at the Equator and the Intertropical Convergence Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Richard W.; Leinen, Margaret

    1993-09-01

    We have analyzed the major, trace, and rare earth element composition of surface sediments collected from a transect across the Equator at 135°W longitude in the Pacific Ocean. Comparing the behavior of this suite of elements to the CaCO 3, opal, and C org fluxes (which record sharp maxima at the Equator, previously documented at the same sampling stations) enables us to assess the relative significance of the various pathways by which trace elements are transported to the equatorial Pacific seafloor. The (1) high biogenic source at the Equator, associated with equatorial divergence of surface water and upwelling of nutrient-rich water, and (2) high aluminosilicate flux at 4°N, associated with increased terrigenous input from elevated rainfall at the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) of the tradewinds, are the two most important fluxes with which elemental transport is affiliated. The biogenic flux at the Equator transports Ca and Sr structurally bound to carbonate tests and Mn primarily as an adsorbed component. Trace elements such as Cr, As, Pb, and the REEs are also influenced by the biogenic flux at the Equator, although this affiliation is not regionally dominant. Normative calculations suggest that extremely large fluxes of Ba and P at the Equator are carried by only small proportions of barite and apatite phases. The high terrigenous flux at the ITCZ has a profound effect on chemical transport to the seafloor, with elemental fluxes increasing tremendously and in parallel with Ti. Normative calculations, however, indicate that these fluxes are far in excess of what can be supplied by lattice-bound terrigenous phases. The accumulation of Ba is greater than is affiliated with biogenic transport at the Equator, while the P flux at the ITCZ is only 10% less than at the Equator. This challenges the common view that Ba and P are essentially exclusively associated with biogenic fluxes. Many other elements (including Mn, Pb, As, and REEs) also record greater

  20. Mnemonic convergence in the human hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Backus, Alexander R; Bosch, Sander E; Ekman, Matthias; Grabovetsky, Alejandro Vicente; Doeller, Christian F

    2016-01-01

    The ability to form associations between a multitude of events is the hallmark of episodic memory. Computational models have espoused the importance of the hippocampus as convergence zone, binding different aspects of an episode into a coherent representation, by integrating information from multiple brain regions. However, evidence for this long-held hypothesis is limited, since previous work has largely focused on representational and network properties of the hippocampus in isolation. Here we identify the hippocampus as mnemonic convergence zone, using a combination of multivariate pattern and graph-theoretical network analyses of functional magnetic resonance imaging data from humans performing an associative memory task. We observe overlap of conjunctive coding and hub-like network attributes in the hippocampus. These results provide evidence for mnemonic convergence in the hippocampus, underlying the integration of distributed information into episodic memory representations. PMID:27325442

  1. Mnemonic convergence in the human hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Backus, Alexander R.; Bosch, Sander E.; Ekman, Matthias; Grabovetsky, Alejandro Vicente; Doeller, Christian F.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to form associations between a multitude of events is the hallmark of episodic memory. Computational models have espoused the importance of the hippocampus as convergence zone, binding different aspects of an episode into a coherent representation, by integrating information from multiple brain regions. However, evidence for this long-held hypothesis is limited, since previous work has largely focused on representational and network properties of the hippocampus in isolation. Here we identify the hippocampus as mnemonic convergence zone, using a combination of multivariate pattern and graph-theoretical network analyses of functional magnetic resonance imaging data from humans performing an associative memory task. We observe overlap of conjunctive coding and hub-like network attributes in the hippocampus. These results provide evidence for mnemonic convergence in the hippocampus, underlying the integration of distributed information into episodic memory representations. PMID:27325442

  2. Latitudinal variations in intermediate depth ventilation and biological production over northeastern Pacific Oxygen Minimum Zones during the last 60 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartapanis, Olivier; Tachikawa, Kazuyo; Bard, Edouard

    2012-10-01

    of the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Latitudinal variations of the OMZ intensity reflected the relative influence of the northern and southern intermediate water masses whose oxygenation was driven by high latitude climates and productivity over the intermediate water pathway.

  3. Convergence in Multispecies Interactions.

    PubMed

    Bittleston, Leonora S; Pierce, Naomi E; Ellison, Aaron M; Pringle, Anne

    2016-04-01

    The concepts of convergent evolution and community convergence highlight how selective pressures can shape unrelated organisms or communities in similar ways. We propose a related concept, convergent interactions, to describe the independent evolution of multispecies interactions with similar physiological or ecological functions. A focus on convergent interactions clarifies how natural selection repeatedly favors particular kinds of associations among species. Characterizing convergent interactions in a comparative context is likely to facilitate prediction of the ecological roles of organisms (including microbes) in multispecies interactions and selective pressures acting in poorly understood or newly discovered multispecies systems. We illustrate the concept of convergent interactions with examples: vertebrates and their gut bacteria; ectomycorrhizae; insect-fungal-bacterial interactions; pitcher-plant food webs; and ants and ant-plants. PMID:26858111

  4. Development of the Scale for "Convergence Thinking" in Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Sungmi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to define the concept of "convergence thinking" as a trading zone for knowledge fusion in the engineering field, and develops its measuring scale. Design/ Methodology/Approach: Based on results from literature review, this study clarifies a theoretical ground for "convergence thinking."…

  5. Converging shear rheometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Hyung M.; Mix, Adam W.; Giacomin, A. Jeffrey

    2014-05-01

    For highly viscous fluids that slip in parallel sliding plate rheometers, we want to use a slightly converging flow to suppress this wall slip. In this work, we first attack the steady shear flow of a highly viscous Newtonian fluid between two gently converging plates with no slip boundaries using the equation of motion in cylindrical coordinates, which yields no analytical solution. Then we treat the same problem using the lubrication approximation in Cartesian coordinates to yield exact, explicit solutions for dimensionless velocity, pressure and shear stress. This work deepens our understanding of a drag flow through a gently converging slit of arbitrary convergence angle. We also employ the corotational Maxwell model to explore the role of viscoelasticity in this converging shear flow. We then compare these analytical solutions to finite element calculations for both Newtonian and corotational Maxwell cases. A worked example for determining the Newtonian viscosity using a converging shear rheometer is also included. With this work, we provide the framework for exploring other constitutive equations or other boundary conditions in future work. Our results can also be used to design the linear bearings used for the parallel sliding plate rheometer (SPR). This work can also be used to evaluate the error in the shear stress that is caused by bearing misalignment and specify the parallelism tolerance for the linear bearings incorporated into a SPR.

  6. The Convergence Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolodzy, Janet; Grant, August E.; DeMars, Tony R.; Wilkinson, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of the Internet, social media, and digital technologies in the twenty-first century accelerated an evolution in journalism and communication that fit under the broad term of convergence. That evolution changed the relationship between news producers and consumers. It broke down the geographical boundaries in defining our communities,…

  7. Converging or Diverging Lens?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branca, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Why does a lens magnify? Why does it shrink objects? Why does this happen? The activities that we propose here are useful in helping us to understand how lenses work, and they show that the same lens can have different magnification capabilities. A converging lens can also act as a diverging lens. (Contains 4 figures.)

  8. Convergence of Arnoldi method

    SciTech Connect

    Nevanlinna, O.

    1994-12-31

    This note summarizes some results on (a monitored version of) the Arnoldi method in Hilbert spaces. The interest in working in infinite dimensional spaces comes partly from the fact that only then can one have meaningful asymptotical statements (which hopefully give some light to the convergence of Arnoldi in large dimensional problems with iteration indices far less than the dimension).

  9. Knowledge Convergence and Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeong, Heisawn; Chi, Michelene T. H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper operationalized the notion of knowledge convergence and assessed quantitatively how much knowledge convergence occurred during collaborative learning. Knowledge convergence was defined as an increase in common knowledge where common knowledge referred to the knowledge that all collaborating partners had. Twenty pairs of college students…

  10. Homology, convergence and parallelism.

    PubMed

    Ghiselin, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    Homology is a relation of correspondence between parts of parts of larger wholes. It is used when tracking objects of interest through space and time and in the context of explanatory historical narratives. Homologues can be traced through a genealogical nexus back to a common ancestral precursor. Homology being a transitive relation, homologues remain homologous however much they may come to differ. Analogy is a relationship of correspondence between parts of members of classes having no relationship of common ancestry. Although homology is often treated as an alternative to convergence, the latter is not a kind of correspondence: rather, it is one of a class of processes that also includes divergence and parallelism. These often give rise to misleading appearances (homoplasies). Parallelism can be particularly hard to detect, especially when not accompanied by divergences in some parts of the body. PMID:26598721

  11. Series that Converge Absolutely but Don't Converge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantrowitz, Robert; Schramm, Michael

    2012-01-01

    If a series of real numbers converges absolutely, then it converges. The usual proof requires completeness in the form of the Cauchy criterion. Failing completeness, the result is false. We provide examples of rational series that illustrate this point. The Cantor set appears in connection with one of the examples.

  12. Some Observations on Grid Convergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, manuel D.

    2006-01-01

    It is claimed that current practices in grid convergence studies, particularly in the field of external aerodynamics, are flawed. The necessary conditions to properly establish grid convergence are presented. A theoretical model and a numerical example are used to demonstrate these ideas.

  13. Convergent ablator performance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, D. G.; Spears, B. K.; Braun, D. G.; Olson, R. E.; Sorce, C. M.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.

    2010-10-01

    The velocity and remaining ablator mass of an imploding capsule are critical metrics for assessing the progress toward ignition of an inertially confined fusion experiment. These and other convergent ablator performance parameters have been measured using a single streaked x-ray radiograph. Traditional Abel inversion of such a radiograph is ill-posed since backlighter intensity profiles and x-ray attenuation by the ablated plasma are unknown. To address this we have developed a regularization technique which allows the ablator density profile ρ(r ) and effective backlighter profile I0(y) at each time step to be uniquely determined subject to the constraints that ρ(r ) is localized in radius space and I0(y) is delocalized in object space. Moments of ρ(r ) then provide the time-resolved areal density, mass, and average radius (and thus velocity) of the remaining ablator material. These results are combined in the spherical rocket model to determine the ablation pressure and mass ablation rate during the implosion. The technique has been validated on simulated radiographs of implosions at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] and implemented on experiments at the OMEGA laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)].

  14. Convergent ablator performance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, D. G.; Spears, B. K.; Braun, D. G.; Sorce, C. M.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Olson, R. E.

    2010-10-15

    The velocity and remaining ablator mass of an imploding capsule are critical metrics for assessing the progress toward ignition of an inertially confined fusion experiment. These and other convergent ablator performance parameters have been measured using a single streaked x-ray radiograph. Traditional Abel inversion of such a radiograph is ill-posed since backlighter intensity profiles and x-ray attenuation by the ablated plasma are unknown. To address this we have developed a regularization technique which allows the ablator density profile {rho}(r) and effective backlighter profile I{sub 0}(y) at each time step to be uniquely determined subject to the constraints that {rho}(r) is localized in radius space and I{sub 0}(y) is delocalized in object space. Moments of {rho}(r) then provide the time-resolved areal density, mass, and average radius (and thus velocity) of the remaining ablator material. These results are combined in the spherical rocket model to determine the ablation pressure and mass ablation rate during the implosion. The technique has been validated on simulated radiographs of implosions at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] and implemented on experiments at the OMEGA laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)].

  15. Giant lobelias exemplify convergent evolution

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Giant lobeliads on tropical mountains in East Africa and Hawaii have highly unusual, giant-rosette growth forms that appear to be convergent on each other and on those of several independently evolved groups of Asteraceae and other families. A recent phylogenetic analysis by Antonelli, based on sequencing the widest selection of lobeliads to date, raises doubts about this paradigmatic example of convergent evolution. Here I address the kinds of evidence needed to test for convergent evolution and argue that the analysis by Antonelli fails on four points. Antonelli's analysis makes several important contributions to our understanding of lobeliad evolution and geographic spread, but his claim regarding convergence appears to be invalid. Giant lobeliads in Hawaii and Africa represent paradigmatic examples of convergent evolution. PMID:20074322

  16. Creating Concepts from Converging Features in Human Cortex.

    PubMed

    Coutanche, Marc N; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L

    2015-09-01

    To make sense of the world around us, our brain must remember the overlapping features of millions of objects. Crucially, it must also represent each object's unique feature-convergence. Some theories propose that an integration area (or "convergence zone") binds together separate features. We report an investigation of our knowledge of objects' features and identity, and the link between them. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to record neural activity, as humans attempted to detect a cued fruit or vegetable in visual noise. Crucially, we analyzed brain activity before a fruit or vegetable was present, allowing us to interrogate top-down activity. We found that pattern-classification algorithms could be used to decode the detection target's identity in the left anterior temporal lobe (ATL), its shape in lateral occipital cortex, and its color in right V4. A novel decoding-dependency analysis revealed that identity information in left ATL was specifically predicted by the temporal convergence of shape and color codes in early visual regions. People with stronger feature-and-identity dependencies had more similar top-down and bottom-up activity patterns. These results fulfill three key requirements for a neural convergence zone: a convergence result (object identity), ingredients (color and shape), and the link between them. PMID:24692512

  17. The Convergence of Intelligences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, Joachim

    Minsky (1985) argued an extraterrestrial intelligence may be similar to ours despite very different origins. ``Problem- solving'' offers evolutionary advantages and individuals who are part of a technical civilisation should have this capacity. On earth, the principles of problem-solving are the same for humans, some primates and machines based on Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques. Intelligent systems use ``goals'' and ``sub-goals'' for problem-solving, with memories and representations of ``objects'' and ``sub-objects'' as well as knowledge of relations such as ``cause'' or ``difference.'' Some of these objects are generic and cannot easily be divided into parts. We must, therefore, assume that these objects and relations are universal, and a general property of intelligence. Minsky's arguments from 1985 are extended here. The last decade has seen the development of a general learning theory (``computational learning theory'' (CLT) or ``statistical learning theory'') which equally applies to humans, animals and machines. It is argued that basic learning laws will also apply to an evolved alien intelligence, and this includes limitations of what can be learned efficiently. An example from CLT is that the general learning problem for neural networks is intractable, i.e. it cannot be solved efficiently for all instances (it is ``NP-complete''). It is the objective of this paper to show that evolved intelligences will be constrained by general learning laws and will use task-decomposition for problem-solving. Since learning and problem-solving are core features of intelligence, it can be said that intelligences converge despite very different origins.

  18. Atmospheric convergence feedback in a simple model for El Nino

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebiak, S. E.

    1986-01-01

    A parameterization is developed for the feedback between dynamics and heating associated with moisture convergence in the tropical atmospheric boundary layer. The feedback improves the ability of a simple model to simulate observed anomalies of the tropical atmosphere during El Nino events. In particular, two features of the observations are reproduced by including the feedback process: the smaller scale of atmospheric anomalies as compared to SST anomalies, and the focusing of the anomalies in the vicinity of the mean convergence zones. The principal remaining shortcomings of the model are discussed.

  19. South Pacific convergence zone and global-scale circulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Dayton G.

    1991-01-01

    The major goals of the research can be classified under three categories: (1) heat and moisture budget studies in the tropics; (2) the role of tropical forcing on subtropical wind maxima in the Southern Hemisphere; and (3) general circulation modeling of low latitude circulations. Research related to the first goal included budget estimates of precipitation, as well as a comparison to rainfall rates observed at numerous island stations. It also included a comparison between observed and satellite estimates of precipitable water. Results and methods used to achieve this goal are given. Included in the second research goal were diagnostic studies of the intraseasonal oscillation which is known to be an important component of organized tropical convection. Also, the role of extratropical forcing on subtropical wind maxima was examined through the use of Eliassen-Palm (EP) fluxes. Again, results and procedural details are discussed in section 3. To accomplish the third research goal, the GLA general circulation model (GCM) was ported to Purdue University and successfully used in a number of control and experimental runs to investigate the significance of tropical heating on subtropical and extratropical circulation features. As with the first two research goals, results and methodology are detailed. Documentation of publications, theses, conference preprint papers, and other scientific information relevant to the research results and significant accomplishments achieved under the contract are given. Finally, the conclusions of the sponsored research are given.

  20. Trophic convergence drives morphological convergence in marine tetrapods.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Neil P; Motani, Ryosuke

    2015-01-01

    Marine tetrapod clades (e.g. seals, whales) independently adapted to marine life through the Mesozoic and Caenozoic, and provide iconic examples of convergent evolution. Apparent morphological convergence is often explained as the result of adaptation to similar ecological niches. However, quantitative tests of this hypothesis are uncommon. We use dietary data to classify the feeding ecology of extant marine tetrapods and identify patterns in skull and tooth morphology that discriminate trophic groups across clades. Mapping these patterns onto phylogeny reveals coordinated evolutionary shifts in diet and morphology in different marine tetrapod lineages. Similarities in morphology between species with similar diets-even across large phylogenetic distances-are consistent with previous hypotheses that shared functional constraints drive convergent evolution in marine tetrapods. PMID:25631228

  1. Trophic convergence drives morphological convergence in marine tetrapods

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Neil P.; Motani, Ryosuke

    2015-01-01

    Marine tetrapod clades (e.g. seals, whales) independently adapted to marine life through the Mesozoic and Caenozoic, and provide iconic examples of convergent evolution. Apparent morphological convergence is often explained as the result of adaptation to similar ecological niches. However, quantitative tests of this hypothesis are uncommon. We use dietary data to classify the feeding ecology of extant marine tetrapods and identify patterns in skull and tooth morphology that discriminate trophic groups across clades. Mapping these patterns onto phylogeny reveals coordinated evolutionary shifts in diet and morphology in different marine tetrapod lineages. Similarities in morphology between species with similar diets—even across large phylogenetic distances—are consistent with previous hypotheses that shared functional constraints drive convergent evolution in marine tetrapods. PMID:25631228

  2. Convergent Creativity: From Arthur Cropley (1935-) Onwards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Ai-Girl

    2015-01-01

    Arthur Cropley's view on convergent thinking is reviewed, with reflections on the relations of divergent and convergent processes and the roles of knowledge and convergent creativity. While divergence is about considering and generating multiplicity, possibility, difference, originality, and so on; convergence is about relating, associating,…

  3. Convergence demands by spectacle magnifiers.

    PubMed

    Katz, M

    1996-08-01

    A general equation, c delta = k1b + k2sF, for finding the binocular convergence demands by spectacle magnifiers to view images at any distance is presented. Factor k1 in the equation yields the accommodative demand to view the image; factor k2 determines the actual reduction in convergence demand provided by the vendors' incorporation of base-in prism. When magnifiers from virtual images at finite distances, such as at the least distance of distinct vision or 25 cm, the interpupiliary distance (b), the separation between the lenses and the eyes (d), and the distance between the optical centers of the lenses (s) are basic quantities, according to this equation. The fundamental datum that the vendors should specify is the distance (s) between the optical centers of the lenses, rather than base-in prism. The specification of base-in prism is unrellable when images are formed at finite distances and the frame PD is not equal to the distance IPD. When the image is formed at infinity, that is when the angular magnification M = F/4, the convergence demand by spectacle magnifiers only depends on the separation between the optical centers of the lenses and the lens power, that is, c delta = sF. It is independent of the interpupillary distance (b) and the separation between the lenses and the eyes (d). We also present an equation, to find the disparity of the accommodative/convergence relation caused by spectacle magnifiers. Knowing the demands on convergence and accommodation, the practitioner can probably evaluate the potential for successful adaptation to spectacle magnifiers from routine measurements of positive and negative relative convergence and accommodation. PMID:8869985

  4. Evolution: convergence in dinosaur crests.

    PubMed

    Hone, David W E

    2015-06-15

    The horned, ceratopsid dinosaurs can be easily split into two major groups based on their cranial structures, but now a new discovery shows that at least one genus 'switched sides' and convergently evolved the form of the other clade. PMID:26079078

  5. Initiation of deep convection along boundary layer convergence lines in a semitropical environment

    SciTech Connect

    Fankhauser, J.C.; Crook, N.A.; Tuttle, J.; Miller, L.J.; Wade, C.G.

    1995-02-01

    The initiation of deep convection through forcing along boundary layer convergence lines is examined using observations from the Convection and Precipitation/Electrification (CaPE) Experiment conducted in east-central Florida during the summer of 1991. The study is concerned with the evolution and interaction of two converging air masses that were initially separated by an intervening boundary layer characterized by neutral stability and horizontal convective rolls. As anticipated, major thunderstorms erupt when the east coast breeze eventually collides with thunderstorm outflows from the west, but unexpected convection takes place prior to their merger along a well-defined confluence zone associated with a persistent quasi-stationary roll vortex signature. In this study, complementary interactions between roll vortex convergence lines and the sea-breeze front are not sufficient to trigger deep convection. However, organized convergence along the eastward-spreading thunderstorm outflows did interact periodically with roll vortex convergence maxima to initiate a new series of new storms. Results from two-dimensional numerical model simulations replicate many of the observed boundary layer features. Surface heating produces circulations similar to sea-breeze frontal zones that appear near the coastlines and progress steadily toward each other as the interior boundary layer deepens. Vertical velocity maxima develop over the associated convergence zones, but weaker periodic maxima also occur within the interior air mass at intervals similar to the spacing of observed horizontal roll vortices.

  6. Trace gas concentrations, intertropical convergence, atmospheric fronts, and ocean currents in the tropical Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkniss, P. E.; Rodgers, E. B.; Swinnerton, J. W.; Larson, R. E.; Lamontagne, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Descriptions of the intertropical convergence zones (ITCZ) in the tropical Pacific have been obtained from shipboard measurements of Rn-222, CO, and CH4 in combination with conventional meteorological data and satellite images. The intertropical convergence zone is marked by light shifting waves near an area of heavy cloud cover and precipitation, and appears to be located north and south of the south equatorial current. A 'second' ITCZ with the same atmospheric features was encountered just north of the south equatorial current in the Southern Hemisphere. Atmospheric Rn-222 increases north of the ITCZ and serves as a sensitive indicator for this atmospheric boundary.

  7. Converging shocks for DSD modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matignon, Christophe

    2013-06-01

    Modelling of pyrotechnic systems requires both, a good understanding and precise prediction capabilities of the dynamics of detonation. When using insensitive high explosives IHE (such as TATB-based explosives) the interaction of the detonation front with the confinement can lead to very different detonation velocities. One of the most popular engineering tools used to model this behaviour is the Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD). In the DSD assumption, the detonation front propagates at a normal shock velocity (Dn) which depends only on its local curvature (κ). For divergent detonations, the DSD limit is very well established both experimentally and theoretically and one can easily propose a model (which obeys the 1D quasi-steady weakly curved detonation theory) to reproduce this behavior. We propose to extend the DSD theory to slightly convergent detonation fronts and to validate it against experimental data. Two series of experiments were carried out. The first series was designed to collect precise information regarding converging detonation. Usually, in such configurations, the detonation is non steady, making precise and simultaneous measurements of velocity and curvature difficult to achieve. The originality of the proposed setup is to drive a self similar convergent detonation at constant speed in an IHE rod by an external explosive tube of greater detonation velocity (allowing an accurate recording of both velocity and curvature). A wide range EOS/reaction rate model (inspired from previous works of Wescott et al.) was then calibrated to reproduce both the strong shock initiation and the newly extended (Dn- κ) law. This model can be used to perform either direct numerical simulation (DNS) on fine resolved mesh grid, or its reduced PZR model (DSD based) on a much coarser grid. This model was then successfully validated against the second series of experiments involving a detonation propagating around an obstacle and exhibiting a non steady converging front

  8. Convergence analysis of combinations of different methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.

    1994-12-31

    This paper provides a convergence analysis for combinations of different numerical methods for solving systems of differential equations. The author proves that combinations of two convergent linear multistep methods or Runge-Kutta methods produce a new convergent method of which the order is equal to the smaller order of the two original methods.

  9. "Nanoselves": NBIC and the Culture of Convergence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venkatesan, Priya

    2010-01-01

    The subject of this essay is NBIC convergence (nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology and cognitive science convergence). NBIC convergence is a recurring trope that is dominated by the paradigm of integration of the sciences. It is largely influenced by the considerations of social and economic impact, and it assumes positivism in…

  10. Convergent Plate Boundary Processes in the Archean: Evidence from Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polat, A.

    2014-12-01

    The structural, magmatic and metamorphic characteristics of Archean greenstone belts and associated TTG (tonalite, trondhjemite and granodiorite) gneisses in southern West Greenland are comparable to those of Phanerozoic convergent plate margins, suggesting that Archean continents grew mainly at subduction zones. These greenstone belts are composed mainly of tectonically juxtaposed fragments of oceanic crust including mafic to ultramafic rocks, with minor sedimentary rocks. Volcanic rocks in the greenstone belts are characterized mainly by island arc tholeiitic basalts, picrites, and boninites. The style of deformation and geometry of folds in 10 cm to 5 m wide shear zones are comparable to those occur on 1 to 50 km scale in the greenstone belts and TTG gneisses, suggesting that compressional tectonic processes operating at convergent plate boundaries were the driving force of Archean crustal accretion and growth. Field observations and trace element data suggest that Archean continental crust grew through accretion of mainly island arcs and melting of metamorphosed mafic rocks (amphibolites) in thickened arcs during multiple tectonothermal events. Fold patterns on cm to km scale are consistent with at least three phases of deformation and multiple melting events generating TTG melts that intruded mainly along shear zones in accretionary prism and magmatic arcs. It is suggested that Archean TTGs were produced by three main processes: (1) melting of thickened oceanic island arcs; (2) melting of subducted oceanic crust; and (3) differentiation of basaltic melts originating from metasomatized sub-arc mantle wedge peridotites.

  11. Global Warming Attenuates the Tropical Atlantic-Pacific Teleconnection

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Fan; Wu, Lixin; Gan, Bolan; Cai, Wenju

    2016-01-01

    Changes in global sea surface temperature (SST) since the end of last century display a pattern of widespread warming intercepted by cooling in the eastern equatorial Pacific and western coasts of the American continent. Studies have suggested that the cooling in the eastern equatorial Pacific may be partly induced by warming in the North Atlantic. However, it remains unknown how stable this inter-tropical teleconnection will be under global warming. Here we show that the inter-tropical teleconnection from the tropical Atlantic to Pacific weakens substantially as the CO2 concentration increases. This reduced impact is related to the El Niño-like warming of the tropical Pacific mean state, which leads to limited seasonal migration of the Pacific inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ) and weakened ocean heat transport. A fast decay of the tropical Atlantic SST anomalies in a warmer climate also contributes to the weakened teleconnection. Our study suggests that as greenhouse warming continues, the trend in the tropical Pacific as well as the development of ENSO will be less frequently interrupted by the Atlantic because of this attenuation. The weakened teleconnection is also supported by CMIP5 models, although only a few of these models can capture this inter-tropical teleconnection. PMID:26838053

  12. Global Warming Attenuates the Tropical Atlantic-Pacific Teleconnection.

    PubMed

    Jia, Fan; Wu, Lixin; Gan, Bolan; Cai, Wenju

    2016-01-01

    Changes in global sea surface temperature (SST) since the end of last century display a pattern of widespread warming intercepted by cooling in the eastern equatorial Pacific and western coasts of the American continent. Studies have suggested that the cooling in the eastern equatorial Pacific may be partly induced by warming in the North Atlantic. However, it remains unknown how stable this inter-tropical teleconnection will be under global warming. Here we show that the inter-tropical teleconnection from the tropical Atlantic to Pacific weakens substantially as the CO2 concentration increases. This reduced impact is related to the El Niño-like warming of the tropical Pacific mean state, which leads to limited seasonal migration of the Pacific inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ) and weakened ocean heat transport. A fast decay of the tropical Atlantic SST anomalies in a warmer climate also contributes to the weakened teleconnection. Our study suggests that as greenhouse warming continues, the trend in the tropical Pacific as well as the development of ENSO will be less frequently interrupted by the Atlantic because of this attenuation. The weakened teleconnection is also supported by CMIP5 models, although only a few of these models can capture this inter-tropical teleconnection. PMID:26838053

  13. Global Warming Attenuates the Tropical Atlantic-Pacific Teleconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Fan; Wu, Lixin; Gan, Bolan; Cai, Wenju

    2016-02-01

    Changes in global sea surface temperature (SST) since the end of last century display a pattern of widespread warming intercepted by cooling in the eastern equatorial Pacific and western coasts of the American continent. Studies have suggested that the cooling in the eastern equatorial Pacific may be partly induced by warming in the North Atlantic. However, it remains unknown how stable this inter-tropical teleconnection will be under global warming. Here we show that the inter-tropical teleconnection from the tropical Atlantic to Pacific weakens substantially as the CO2 concentration increases. This reduced impact is related to the El Niño-like warming of the tropical Pacific mean state, which leads to limited seasonal migration of the Pacific inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ) and weakened ocean heat transport. A fast decay of the tropical Atlantic SST anomalies in a warmer climate also contributes to the weakened teleconnection. Our study suggests that as greenhouse warming continues, the trend in the tropical Pacific as well as the development of ENSO will be less frequently interrupted by the Atlantic because of this attenuation. The weakened teleconnection is also supported by CMIP5 models, although only a few of these models can capture this inter-tropical teleconnection.

  14. Seismotectonic constraints on the convergence rate between the Rivera and North American plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostoglodov, Vladimir; Bandy, William

    1995-09-01

    There are two significantly different types of models for the convergence rate between the Rivera and North American plates. The first type, the high-rate model (Bandy, 1992), predicts convergence rates of approximately 5.0 cm/yr near the southern end of the Rivera-North America subduction zone and between 2.0 and 3.0 cm/yr at its northern end. In contrast, the second type, the low-rate model (e.g., DeMets and Stein, 1990), predicts convergence rates of between 2.0 and 3.3 cm/yr near the southern end of the Rivera-North America subduction zone and between 0.6 and 1.7 cm/yr at its northern end. Seismotectonic relationships, which relate seismic characteristics of subduction zones (maximum magnitudes, maximum seismic depths, etc.) to plate tectonic parameters (convergence rates, age of the oceanic lithosphere, etc.) provide a means of distinguishing between the two different models. Three such relationships suggest that the Rivera-North American and Cocos-North American convergence rates should be roughly equal across the Rivera-Cocos plate boundary, favoring the high-rate model. Employing the high-rate model, one can evaluate the magnitude and distribution of the strike-slip component of forearc motion, Vss, produced by oblique convergence between the Rivera and North American plates. The analysis indicates both a progressive increase and clockwise reorientation of Vss northwestward along the plate contact zone of the Rivera-North America subduction zone. Such a distribution in Vss should produce a northwestward movement of and NW-SE oriented extension within the interior of the Jalisco Block, consistent with previous proposals of Jalisco Block motions. Also, such a distribution in Vss should produce a slight clockwise rotation of the Jalisco Block in the vicinity of Bahia de Banderas, consistent with paleomagnetic data.

  15. Ecomorphological convergence in planktivorous surgeonfishes.

    PubMed

    Friedman, S T; Price, S A; Hoey, A S; Wainwright, P C

    2016-05-01

    Morphological convergence plays a central role in the study of evolution. Often induced by shared ecological specialization, homoplasy hints at underlying selective pressures and adaptive constraints that deterministically shape the diversification of life. Although midwater zooplanktivory has arisen in adult surgeonfishes (family Acanthuridae) at least four independent times, it represents a clearly specialized state, requiring the capacity to swiftly swim in midwater locating and sucking small prey items. Whereas this diet has commonly been associated with specific functional adaptations in fishes, acanthurids present an interesting case study as all nonplanktivorous species feed by grazing on benthic algae and detritus, requiring a vastly different functional morphology that emphasizes biting behaviours. We examined the feeding morphology in 30 acanthurid species and, combined with a pre-existing phylogenetic tree, compared the fit of evolutionary models across two diet regimes: zooplanktivores and nonzooplanktivorous grazers. Accounting for phylogenetic relationships, the best-fitting model indicates that zooplanktivorous species are converging on a separate adaptive peak from their grazing relatives. Driving this bimodal landscape, zooplanktivorous acanthurids tend to develop a slender body, reduced facial features, smaller teeth and weakened jaw adductor muscles. However, despite these phenotypic changes, model fitting suggests that lineages have not yet reached the adaptive peak associated with plankton feeding even though some transitions appear to be over 10 million years old. These findings demonstrate that the selective demands of pelagic feeding promote repeated - albeit very gradual - ecomorphological convergence within surgeonfishes, while allowing local divergences between closely related species, contributing to the overall diversity of the clade. PMID:26809907

  16. Weak {}^* convergence of operator means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanov, Alexandr V.

    2011-12-01

    For a linear operator U with \\Vert U^n\\Vert \\le \\operatorname{const} on a Banach space X we discuss conditions for the convergence of ergodic operator nets T_\\alpha corresponding to the adjoint operator U^* of U in the {W^*O}-topology of the space \\operatorname{End} X^*. The accumulation points of all possible nets of this kind form a compact convex set L in \\operatorname{End} X^*, which is the kernel of the operator semigroup G=\\overline{\\operatorname{co}}\\,\\Gamma_0, where \\Gamma_0=\\{U_n^*, n \\ge 0\\}. It is proved that all ergodic nets T_\\alpha weakly {}^* converge if and only if the kernel L consists of a single element. In the case of X=C(\\Omega) and the shift operator U generated by a continuous transformation \\varphi of a metrizable compactum \\Omega we trace the relationships among the ergodic properties of U, the structure of the operator semigroups L, G and \\Gamma=\\overline{\\Gamma}_0, and the dynamical characteristics of the semi-cascade (\\varphi,\\Omega). In particular, if \\operatorname{card}L=1, then a) for any \\omega \\in\\Omega the closure of the trajectory \\{\\varphi^n\\omega, n \\ge 0\\} contains precisely one minimal set m, and b) the restriction (\\varphi,m) is strictly ergodic. Condition a) implies the {W^*O}-convergence of any ergodic sequence of operators T_n \\in \\operatorname{End} X^* under the additional assumption that the kernel of the enveloping semigroup E(\\varphi,\\Omega) contains elements obtained from the `basis' family of transformations \\{\\varphi^n, n \\ge 0\\} of the compact set \\Omega by using some transfinite sequence of sequential passages to the limit.

  17. Multimedia Delivery of Coastal Zone Management Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, M. J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes Coastal Zone Management (CZM) multimedia course modules, educational software written by the GeoData Institute at the University of Southamptom for an environmental management undergraduate course. Examines five elements that converge to create CZM multimedia teaching: course content, source material, a hardware/software delivery system,…

  18. Convergent Validity of the PUTS.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Valerie Cathérine; Beck, Christian; Sajin, Valeria; Anders, Silke; Münchau, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Premonitory urges are a cardinal feature in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. Severity of premonitory urges can be assessed with the "Premonitory Urge for Tic Disorders Scale" (PUTS). However, convergent validity of the measure has been difficult to assess due to the lack of other urge measures. We investigated the relationship between average real-time urge intensity assessed by an in-house developed real-time urge monitor (RUM), measuring urge intensity continuously for 5 min on a visual analog scale, and general urge intensity assessed by the PUTS in 22 adult Tourette patients (mean age 29.8 ± 10.3 SD, 19 males). Additionally, underlying factors of premonitory urges assessed by the PUTS were investigated in the adult sample using factor analysis and were replicated in 40 children and adolescents diagnosed with Tourette syndrome (mean age 12.05 ± 2.83 SD, 31 males). Cronbach's α for the PUTS 10 was acceptable (α = 0.79) in the adult sample. Convergent validity between average real-time urge intensity scores (as assessed with the RUM) and the 10-item version of the PUTS (r = 0.64) and the 9-item version of the PUTS (r = 0.66) was good. A factor analysis including the 10 items of the PUTS and average real-time urge intensity scores revealed three factors. One factor included the average real-time urge intensity score and appeared to measure urge intensity, whereas the other two factors can be assumed to reflect the (sensory) quality of urges and subjective control, respectively. The factor structure of the 10 PUTS items alone was replicated in a sample of children and adolescents. The results indicate that convergent validity between the PUTS and the real-time urge assessment monitor is good. Furthermore, the results suggest that the PUTS might assess more than one dimension of urges, and it may be worthwhile developing different subscales of the PUTS assessing premonitory urges in terms of intensity and quality, as well as subjectively

  19. Convergent Validity of the PUTS

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Valerie Cathérine; Beck, Christian; Sajin, Valeria; Anders, Silke; Münchau, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Premonitory urges are a cardinal feature in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. Severity of premonitory urges can be assessed with the “Premonitory Urge for Tic Disorders Scale” (PUTS). However, convergent validity of the measure has been difficult to assess due to the lack of other urge measures. We investigated the relationship between average real-time urge intensity assessed by an in-house developed real-time urge monitor (RUM), measuring urge intensity continuously for 5 min on a visual analog scale, and general urge intensity assessed by the PUTS in 22 adult Tourette patients (mean age 29.8 ± 10.3 SD, 19 males). Additionally, underlying factors of premonitory urges assessed by the PUTS were investigated in the adult sample using factor analysis and were replicated in 40 children and adolescents diagnosed with Tourette syndrome (mean age 12.05 ± 2.83 SD, 31 males). Cronbach’s α for the PUTS 10 was acceptable (α = 0.79) in the adult sample. Convergent validity between average real-time urge intensity scores (as assessed with the RUM) and the 10-item version of the PUTS (r = 0.64) and the 9-item version of the PUTS (r = 0.66) was good. A factor analysis including the 10 items of the PUTS and average real-time urge intensity scores revealed three factors. One factor included the average real-time urge intensity score and appeared to measure urge intensity, whereas the other two factors can be assumed to reflect the (sensory) quality of urges and subjective control, respectively. The factor structure of the 10 PUTS items alone was replicated in a sample of children and adolescents. The results indicate that convergent validity between the PUTS and the real-time urge assessment monitor is good. Furthermore, the results suggest that the PUTS might assess more than one dimension of urges, and it may be worthwhile developing different subscales of the PUTS assessing premonitory urges in terms of intensity and quality, as well as

  20. Cosmic Convergence: Art and Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Elizabeth A.; Zisholtz, E.; Hilton, H.

    2010-01-01

    The I.P. Stanback Museum and Planetarium is a major educational and teaching resource for South Carolina State University, K-12 schools, other universities and the community of Orangeburg and well beyond. The concept of creating a museum with a planetarium on the campus of SC State was ahead of its time. Today scholars are writing about the unity of creative disciplines. Through its integration of the arts, humanities and sciences, the Stanback, the only art museum with a planetarium at any of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities and one of the few in the nation, stands in the forefront of modern thinking. Cosmic Convergence: Art and Science, opening at the I.P. Stanback Museum and Planetarium in February 2010, will feature the works of Mildred Thompson (1936-2003), a prominent African American artist who worked in the media of painting, drawing, print making, sculpture, and photography. Thompson’s artwork shows the strong influences of her interest in physics, astronomy, and metaphysics as well as music and spiritualism. “My work in the visual arts is, and has always been, a continuous search for understanding. It is an expression of purpose and reflects a personal interpretation of the Universe.” Cosmic Convergence will explore the meeting of Art and Science through Mildred Thompson's work and the scientific basis of that work. The paintings and sculptures of the exhibit will be combined with astronomical images showing both the reality and interpretation of the surrounding Universe. Support for this work was provided by the NSF PAARE program to South Carolina State University under award AST-0750814.

  1. Mosaic Convergence of Rodent Dentitions

    PubMed Central

    Lazzari, Vincent; Charles, Cyril; Tafforeau, Paul; Vianey-Liaud, Monique; Aguilar, Jean-Pierre; Jaeger, Jean-Jacques; Michaux, Jacques; Viriot, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    Background Understanding mechanisms responsible for changes in tooth morphology in the course of evolution is an area of investigation common to both paleontology and developmental biology. Detailed analyses of molar tooth crown shape have shown frequent homoplasia in mammalian evolution, which requires accurate investigation of the evolutionary pathways provided by the fossil record. The necessity of preservation of an effective occlusion has been hypothesized to functionally constrain crown morphological changes and to also facilitate convergent evolution. The Muroidea superfamily constitutes a relevant model for the study of molar crown diversification because it encompasses one third of the extant mammalian biodiversity. Methodology/Principal Findings Combined microwear and 3D-topographic analyses performed on fossil and extant muroid molars allow for a first quantification of the relationships between changes in crown morphology and functionality of occlusion. Based on an abundant fossil record and on a well resolved phylogeny, our results show that the most derived functional condition associates longitudinal chewing and non interlocking of cusps. This condition has been reached at least 7 times within muroids via two main types of evolutionary pathways each respecting functional continuity. In the first type, the flattening of tooth crown which induces the removal of cusp interlocking occurs before the rotation of the chewing movement. In the second type however, flattening is subsequent to rotation of the chewing movement which can be associated with certain changes in cusp morphology. Conclusion/Significance The reverse orders of the changes involved in these different pathways reveal a mosaic evolution of mammalian dentition in which direction of chewing and crown shape seem to be partly decoupled. Either can change in respect to strong functional constraints affecting occlusion which thereby limit the number of the possible pathways. Because convergent

  2. Convergence of large-deviation estimators.

    PubMed

    Rohwer, Christian M; Angeletti, Florian; Touchette, Hugo

    2015-11-01

    We study the convergence of statistical estimators used in the estimation of large-deviation functions describing the fluctuations of equilibrium, nonequilibrium, and manmade stochastic systems. We give conditions for the convergence of these estimators with sample size, based on the boundedness or unboundedness of the quantity sampled, and discuss how statistical errors should be defined in different parts of the convergence region. Our results shed light on previous reports of "phase transitions" in the statistics of free energy estimators and establish a general framework for reliably estimating large-deviation functions from simulation and experimental data and identifying parameter regions where this estimation converges. PMID:26651644

  3. Mobilization of beryllium in the sedimentary column at convergent margins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    You, C.-F.; Morris, J.D.; Gieskes, J.M.; Rosenbauer, R.; Zheng, S.H.; Xu, X.; Ku, T.-L.; Bischoff, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Studies of Be distributions in subduction zone sediments will help to understand questions regarding the enrichments of cosmogenic Be-10 in arc volcanic rocks. Analyses of Be-10 and Be-9 in sediments of Ocean Drilling Program Site 808, Nankai Trough and Be-9 in porewaters of Site 808 and Sites 671 and 672, Barbados ridge complex, show significant decreases in solid phase Be-10 and large increases of porewater Be-9 at the location of the de??collement zone and below or at potential flow conduits. These data imply the potential mobilization of Be during pore fluid expulsion upon sediment burial. Experiments involving reaction between a de??collement sediment and a synthetic NaCl-CaCl2 solution at elevated pressure and temperatures were conducted in an attempt to mimic early subduction zone processes. The results demonstrate that Be is mobilized under elevated pressure and temperature with a strong pH dependence. The Be mobilization provides an explanation of Be-10 enrichment in arc volcanic rocks and supports the argument of the importance of the fluid processes in subduction zones at convergent margins. ?? 1994.

  4. Geophysical constraints on geodynamic processes at convergent margins: A global perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans; Shulgin, Alexey

    2016-04-01

    Convergent margins, being the boundaries between colliding lithospheric plates, form the most disastrous areas in the world due to intensive, strong seismicity and volcanism. We review global geophysical data in order to illustrate the effects of the plate tectonic processes at convergent margins on the crustal and upper mantle structure, seismicity, and geometry of subducting slab. We present global maps of free-air and Bouguer gravity anomalies, heat flow, seismicity, seismic Vs anomalies in the upper mantle, and plate convergence rate, as well as 20 profiles across different convergent margins. A global analysis of these data for three types of convergent margins, formed by ocean-ocean, ocean-continent, and continent-continent collisions, allows us to recognize the following patterns. (1) Plate convergence rate depends on the type of convergent margins and it is significantly larger when, at least, one of the plates is oceanic. However, the oldest oceanic plate in the Pacific ocean has the smallest convergence rate. (2) The presence of an oceanic plate is, in general, required for generation of high-magnitude (M N 8.0) earthquakes and for generating intermediate and deep seismicity along the convergent margins. When oceanic slabs subduct beneath a continent, a gap in the seismogenic zone exists at depths between ca. 250 km and 500 km. Given that the seismogenic zone terminates at ca. 200 km depth in case of continent-continent collision, we propose oceanic origin of subducting slabs beneath the Zagros, the Pamir, and the Vrancea zone. (3) Dip angle of the subducting slab in continent-ocean collision does not correlate neither with the age of subducting oceanic slab, nor with the convergence rate. For ocean-ocean subduction, clear trends are recognized: steeply dipping slabs are characteristic of young subducting plates and of oceanic plates with high convergence rate, with slab rotation towards a near-vertical dip angle at depths below ca. 500 km at very high

  5. The Convergence of European Business Cycles 1980--2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormerod, P.

    2005-09-01

    The degree of convergence of the business cycles of the economies of the European Union is a key policy issue. In particular, a substantial degree of convergence is needed if the European Central Bank is to be capable of setting a monetary policy which is appropriate to the stage of the cycle of the Euro zone economies. I consider the annual rates of real GDP growth on a quarterly basis in the main economies of the EU (France, Germany, Italy, UK, Spain, Belgium and the Netherlands) over the period 1980Q1--2004Q4. An important empirical question is the degree to which the correlations between these growth rates contain true information rather than noise. The technique of random matrix theory is able to answer this question, and has been applied successfully in the physics journals to financial markets data. I find that the correlations between the growth rates of most of the core EU economies contain substantial amounts of true information, and exhibit considerable stability over time. Even in the late 1970s and early 1980s, these economies moved together closely over the course of the business cycle. There was a slight loosening at the time of German re-unification, but the economies have moved back into close synchronisation. The same result holds when Spain is added to the group of core EU countries. However, the problems of the German economy which arose from the early 1990s onwards has led to Germany becoming increasingly less synchronised with the rest of the core EU. Further, the results obtained with a data set of the converged EU core plus the UK show no real convergence between the UK and this group of economies.

  6. The transpressional strain model applied to strike-slip, oblique-convergent and oblique-divergent deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krantz, R. W.

    1995-08-01

    Zones of distributed shear deformation associated with strike-slip and oblique-convergent or oblique-divergent systems accommodate complex three-dimensional strains. Current models suggest that structural orientations within the zones depend on not only the magnitude of shear strain but also the degree of convergence or divergence. The transpressional strain model of Sanderson and Marchini is further developed here, and this study also focuses on relating structural orientations in map view to the magnitude of shear and the degree of convergence or divergence, and to the magnitudes of horizontal and vertical strains. Results include both the mathematical derivation and a set of nomograms relating the model parameters. Applications of the model to field examples and laboratory analogs show how the model can be used to determine the degree of convergence or divergence, and to calculate strain parameters. The model provides geologists with a method to evaluate and predict structural orientations, and to test map and cross-section interpretations.

  7. New concurrent iterative methods with monotonic convergence

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Qingchuan

    1996-12-31

    This paper proposes the new concurrent iterative methods without using any derivatives for finding all zeros of polynomials simultaneously. The new methods are of monotonic convergence for both simple and multiple real-zeros of polynomials and are quadratically convergent. The corresponding accelerated concurrent iterative methods are obtained too. The new methods are good candidates for the application in solving symmetric eigenproblems.

  8. Information and Communication: The New Convergence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beniger, James R.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the isolation of the field of communications from other disciplines and the inattention of communications to the increasing convergence on information and communication in other disciplines. Maps the convergence by surveying the authors commonly cited in the fields of cognitive science, humanities, and semiotics. (MS)

  9. Converging finite-strength shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axford, R. A.; Holm, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    The converging shock problem was first solved by Guderley and later by Landau and Stanyukovich for infinitely strong shocks in an ideal gas with spherical and cylindrical symmetry. This problem is solved herein for finite-strength shocks and a non-ideal-gas equation of state with an adiabatic bulk modulus of the type Bs= {- v∂ p}/{∂ v| s} = ( p +B) f( v) , where B is a constant with the dimensions of pressure, and f(v) is an arbitrary function of the specific volume. Self-similar profiles of the particle velocity and thermodynamic variables are studied explicitly for two cases with constant specific heat at constant volume; the Tait-Kirkwood-Murnaghan equation, f(v) = constant, and the Walsh equation, f(v) = v/A, where A = constant. The first case reduces to the ideal gas when B = 0. In both cases the flow behind the shock front exhibits an unbalanced buoyant force instability at a critical Mach number which depends upon equation-of-state parameters.

  10. Formation of polarity convergences underlying shoot outgrowths.

    PubMed

    Abley, Katie; Sauret-Güeto, Susanna; Marée, Athanasius Fm; Coen, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    The development of outgrowths from plant shoots depends on formation of epidermal sites of cell polarity convergence with high intracellular auxin at their centre. A parsimonious model for generation of convergence sites is that cell polarity for the auxin transporter PIN1 orients up auxin gradients, as this spontaneously generates convergent alignments. Here we test predictions of this and other models for the patterns of auxin biosynthesis and import. Live imaging of outgrowths from kanadi1 kanadi2 Arabidopsis mutant leaves shows that they arise by formation of PIN1 convergence sites within a proximodistal polarity field. PIN1 polarities are oriented away from regions of high auxin biosynthesis enzyme expression, and towards regions of high auxin importer expression. Both expression patterns are required for normal outgrowth emergence, and may form part of a common module underlying shoot outgrowths. These findings are more consistent with models that spontaneously generate tandem rather than convergent alignments. PMID:27478985

  11. Measuring phonetic convergence in speech production

    PubMed Central

    Pardo, Jennifer S.

    2013-01-01

    Phonetic convergence is defined as an increase in the similarity of acoustic-phonetic form between talkers. Previous research has demonstrated phonetic convergence both when a talker listens passively to speech and while talkers engage in social interaction. Much of this research has focused on a diverse array of acoustic-phonetic attributes, with fewer studies incorporating perceptual measures of phonetic convergence. The current paper reviews research on phonetic convergence in both non-interactive and conversational settings, and attempts to consolidate the diverse array of findings by proposing a paradigm that models perceptual and acoustic measures together. By modeling acoustic measures as predictors of perceived phonetic convergence, this paradigm has the potential to reconcile some of the diverse and inconsistent findings currently reported in the literature. PMID:23986738

  12. Data Convergence - An Australian Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, S. S.; Howell, B.

    2012-12-01

    Coupled numerical physical, biogeochemical and sediment models are increasingly being used as integrators to help understand the cumulative or far field effects of change in the coastal environment. This reliance on modeling has forced observations to be delivered as data streams ingestible by modeling frameworks. This has made it easier to create near real-time or forecasting models than to try to recreate the past, and has lead in turn to the conversion of historical data into data streams to allow them to be ingested by the same frameworks. The model and observation frameworks under development within Australia's Commonwealth and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) are now feeding into the Australian Ocean Data Network's (AODN's) MARine Virtual Laboratory (MARVL) . The sensor, or data stream, brokering solution is centred around the "message" and all data flowing through the gateway is wrapped as a message. Messages consist of a topic and a data object and their routing through the gateway to pre-processors and listeners is determined by the topic. The Sensor Message Gateway (SMG) method is allowing data from different sensors measuring the same thing but with different temporal resolutions, units or spatial coverage to be ingested or visualized seamlessly. At the same time the model output as a virtual sensor is being explored, this again being enabled by the SMG. It is only for two way communications with sensor that rigorous adherence to standards is needed, by accepting existing data in less than ideal formats, but exposing them though the SMG we can move a step closer to the Internet Of Things by creating an Internet of Industries where each vested interest can continue with business as usual, contribute to data convergence and adopt more open standards when investment seems appropriate to that sector or business.Architecture Overview

  13. Anomalously fast convergence of India and Eurasia caused by double subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagoutz, Oliver; Royden, Leigh; Holt, Adam F.; Becker, Thorsten W.

    2015-06-01

    Before its collision with Eurasia, the Indian Plate moved rapidly, at rates exceeding 140 mm yr-1 for a period of 20 million years. This motion is 50 to 100% faster than the maximum sustained rate of convergence of the main tectonic plates today. The cause of such high rates of convergence is unclear and not reproduced by numerical models. Here we show that existing geological data support the existence of two, almost parallel, northward dipping subduction zones between the Indian and Eurasian plates, during the Early Cretaceous period. We use a quantitative model to show that the combined pull of two subducting slabs can generate anomalously rapid convergence between India and Eurasia. Furthermore, in our simulations a reduction in length of the southern subduction system, from about 10,000 to 3,000 km between 90 and 80 million years ago, reduced the viscous pressure between the subducting slabs and created a threefold increase in plate convergence rate between 80 and 65 million years ago. Rapid convergence ended 50 million years ago, when the Indian Plate collided with the southern subduction system. Collision of India with Eurasia and the northern subduction system had little effect on plate convergence rates before 40 million years ago. We conclude that the number and geometry of subduction systems has a strong influence on plate migration rates.

  14. On the Local Convergence of Pattern Search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, Elizabeth D.; Lewis, Robert Michael; Torczon, Virginia; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We examine the local convergence properties of pattern search methods, complementing the previously established global convergence properties for this class of algorithms. We show that the step-length control parameter which appears in the definition of pattern search algorithms provides a reliable asymptotic measure of first-order stationarity. This gives an analytical justification for a traditional stopping criterion for pattern search methods. Using this measure of first-order stationarity, we analyze the behavior of pattern search in the neighborhood of an isolated local minimizer. We show that a recognizable subsequence converges r-linearly to the minimizer.

  15. Transition from convergence to escape: Field evidence from the West Carpathians

    SciTech Connect

    Nemcok, M. ); Fleischmann, K.H.; Keith, J.F. Jr )

    1991-03-01

    A large data base of gravimetric, magnetic, seismic, paleomagnetic, lithostratigraphic, sedimentologic, fission-track, bore-hole, and structural information has been used to analyze the structural development of the West Carpathians. These data support a structural model for the evolution of this orogen from convergence to tectonic escape. The West Carpathians resulted from Cretaceous-Miocene convergence of the European and Apulian plates. Paleocene convergence was northeast directed. With progressive deformation, the central mountain front encountered a shallow wedge-shaped portion of the subducted European plate, which caused a sinistral deflection of convergence trajectories in the western portion of the chain. Beginning with Egerian/Eggenburgian collision and continuing to the present time, the orogen has consisted of two zones: a frontal shortening zone and an internal extensional/strike-slip zone. A cycle of deformation patterns is recognized along the frontal part of the orogen in which {sigma}{sub 1} remained normal to the West Carpathian front: orogen-vergent thrusting, intermediate back-thrusting, and strike-slip faulting. Tectonic escape along strike-slip fault sets oriented sub-parallel to the suture zone begun in early Badenian time in the westernmost West Carpathians. The final phase of thrusting becomes younger to the east. The principal compressive stress orientations in areas affected by escape were sub-horizontal and pointed to the location of the last thrust movements along the orogen front. With increased distance from the active collision-suture zone, the principal compressive stress orientations plunged more steeply, indicating a continuous change from a transtensional to an extensional stress regime.

  16. Seismic coupling and uncoupling at subduction zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, L.; Kanamori, H.

    1983-01-01

    Some of the correlations concerning the properties of subduction zones are reviewed. A quantitative global comparison of many subduction zones reveals that the largest earthquakes occur in zones with young lithosphere and fast convergence rates. Maximum earthquake size is directly related to the asperity distribution on the fault plane. This observation can be translated into a simple model of seismic coupling where the horizontal compressive stress between two plates is proportional to the ratio of the summed asperity area to the total area of the contact surface. Plate age and rate can control asperity distribution directly through the horizontal compressive stress associated with the vertical and horizontal velocities of subducting slabs. The basalt to eclogite phase change in the down-going oceanic crust may be largely responsible for the uncoupling of subduction zones below a depth of about 40 km.

  17. Strain accumulation along the Cascadia Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Mark H.; Lisowski, Michael

    2000-11-01

    We combine triangulation, trilateration, and GPS observations to determine horizontal strain rates along the Cascadia subduction zone from Cape Mendocino to the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Shear-strain rates are significantly greater than zero (95% confidence) in all forearc regions (26-167 nanoradians/yr), and are not significant in the arc and backarc regions. The deformation is primarily uniaxial contraction nearly parallel to Juan de Fuca-North America plate convergence (N55°-80°E). The strain rates are consistent with an elastic dislocation model for interseismic slip with a shallow 100-km wide locked zone and a deeper 75-km transition zone along the entire megathrust, except along the central Oregon coast where relatively lower strain rates are consistent with 30-40 km wide locked and transition zones.

  18. Morphological and molecular convergences in mammalian phylogenetics.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zhengting; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic trees reconstructed from molecular sequences are often considered more reliable than those reconstructed from morphological characters, in part because convergent evolution, which confounds phylogenetic reconstruction, is believed to be rarer for molecular sequences than for morphologies. However, neither the validity of this belief nor its underlying cause is known. Here comparing thousands of characters of each type that have been used for inferring the phylogeny of mammals, we find that on average morphological characters indeed experience much more convergences than amino acid sites, but this disparity is explained by fewer states per character rather than an intrinsically higher susceptibility to convergence for morphologies than sequences. We show by computer simulation and actual data analysis that a simple method for identifying and removing convergence-prone characters improves phylogenetic accuracy, potentially enabling, when necessary, the inclusion of morphologies and hence fossils for reliable tree inference. PMID:27585543

  19. Acceleration of convergence of vector sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidi, A.; Ford, W. F.; Smith, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    A general approach to the construction of convergence acceleration methods for vector sequence is proposed. Using this approach, one can generate some known methods, such as the minimal polynomial extrapolation, the reduced rank extrapolation, and the topological epsilon algorithm, and also some new ones. Some of the new methods are easier to implement than the known methods and are observed to have similar numerical properties. The convergence analysis of these new methods is carried out, and it is shown that they are especially suitable for accelerating the convergence of vector sequences that are obtained when one solves linear systems of equations iterative. A stability analysis is also given, and numerical examples are provided. The convergence and stability properties of the topological epsilon algorithm are likewise given.

  20. Acceleration of convergence of vector sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidi, A.; Ford, W. F.; Smith, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    A general approach to the construction of convergence acceleration methods for vector sequence is proposed. Using this approach, one can generate some known methods, such as the minimal polynomial extrapolation, the reduced rank extrapolation, and the topological epsilon algorithm, and also some new ones. Some of the new methods are easier to implement than the known methods and are observed to have similar numerical properties. The convergence analysis of these new methods is carried out, and it is shown that they are especially suitable for accelerating the convergence of vector sequences that are obtained when one solves linear systems of equations iteratively. A stability analysis is also given, and numerical examples are provided. The convergence and stability properties of the topological epsilon algorithm are likewise given.

  1. Low-Convergence Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutz, Stephen; Vesey, Roger; Sinars, Daniel; Sefkow, Adam

    2013-10-01

    Numerical simulations indicate that pulsed-power driven liner-implosions could produce substantial fusion yields if the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel is first magnetized and preheated [S.A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)]. As with all inertial fusion, the implosions could be degraded by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Since highly convergent implosions are more susceptible to this instability, we have explored the necessary conditions to obtain significant fusion yield with low-convergence liner-implosions. Such low-convergence implosions can be obtained if the fuel is sufficiently preheated and magnetized. We present analytic and numerical studies of laser plasma heating, which indicate that low convergence implosions should be possible with sufficient laser energy. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contra.

  2. Speeding Convergence In Simulations Of Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, J.; Cheung, S.; Cheer, A.; Hafez, M.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes study aimed at accelerating rates of convergence of iterative schemes for numerical integration of equations of hypersonic flow of viscous and inviscid fluids. Richardson-type overrelaxation method applied.

  3. New convergence estimates for multigrid algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, J.H.; Pasciak, J.E.

    1987-10-01

    In this paper, new convergence estimates are proved for both symmetric and nonsymmetric multigrid algorithms applied to symmetric positive definite problems. Our theory relates the convergence of multigrid algorithms to a ''regularity and approximation'' parameter ..cap alpha.. epsilon (0, 1) and the number of relaxations m. We show that for the symmetric and nonsymmetric ..nu.. cycles, the multigrid iteration converges for any positive m at a rate which deteriorates no worse than 1-cj/sup -(1-//sup ..cap alpha..//sup )///sup ..cap alpha../, where j is the number of grid levels. We then define a generalized ..nu.. cycle algorithm which involves exponentially increasing (for example, doubling) the number of smoothings on successively coarser grids. We show that the resulting symmetric and nonsymmetric multigrid iterations converge for any ..cap alpha.. with rates that are independent of the mesh size. The theory is presented in an abstract setting which can be applied to finite element multigrid and finite difference multigrid methods.

  4. On Convergent Probability of a Random Walk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Y.-F.; Ching, W.-K.

    2006-01-01

    This note introduces an interesting random walk on a straight path with cards of random numbers. The method of recurrent relations is used to obtain the convergent probability of the random walk with different initial positions.

  5. Interplay of plate convergence and arc migration in the central Mediterranean (Sicily and Calabria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijholt, Nicolai; Govers, Rob; Wortel, Rinus

    2016-04-01

    Key components in the current geodynamic setting of the central Mediterranean are continuous, slow Africa-Eurasia plate convergence (~5 mm/yr) and arc migration. This combination encompasses roll-back, tearing and detachment of slabs, and leads to back-arc opening and orogeny. Since ~30 Ma the Apennnines-Calabrian and Gibraltar subduction zones have shaped the western-central Mediterranean region. Lithospheric tearing near slab edges and the accompanying surface expressions (STEP faults) are key in explaining surface dynamics as observed in geologic, geophysical and geodetic data. In the central Mediterranean, both the narrow Calabrian subduction zone and the Sicily-Tyrrhenian offshore thrust front show convergence, with a transfer (shear) zone connecting the distinct SW edge of the former with the less distinct, eastern limit of the latter (similar, albeit on a smaller scale, to the situation in New Zealand with oppositely verging subduction zones and the Alpine fault as the transfer shear zone). The ~NNW-SSE oriented transfer zone (Aeolian-Sisifo-Tindari(-Ionian) fault system) shows transtensive-to-strike slip motion. Recent seismicity, geological data and GPS vectors in the central Mediterranean indicate that the region can be subdivided into several distinct domains, both on- and offshore, delineated by deformation zones and faults. However, there is discussion about the (relative) importance of some of these faults on the lithospheric scale. We focus on finding the best-fitting assembly of faults for the transfer zone connecting subduction beneath Calabria and convergence north of Sicily in the Sicily-Tyrrhenian offshore thrust front. This includes determining whether the Alfeo-Etna fault, Malta Escarpment and/or Ionian fault, which have all been suggested to represent the STEP fault of the Calabrian subduction zone, are key in describing the observed deformation patterns. We first focus on the present-day. We use geodynamic models to reproduce observed GPS

  6. International Convergence on Geoscience Cyberinfrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, M. L.; Atkinson, R.; Arctur, D. K.; Cox, S.; Jackson, I.; Nativi, S.; Wyborn, L. A.

    2012-04-01

    There is growing international consensus on addressing the challenges to cyber(e)-infrastructure for the geosciences. These challenges include: Creating common standards and protocols; Engaging the vast number of distributed data resources; Establishing practices for recognition of and respect for intellectual property; Developing simple data and resource discovery and access systems; Building mechanisms to encourage development of web service tools and workflows for data analysis; Brokering the diverse disciplinary service buses; Creating sustainable business models for maintenance and evolution of information resources; Integrating the data management life-cycle into the practice of science. Efforts around the world are converging towards de facto creation of an integrated global digital data network for the geosciences based on common standards and protocols for data discovery and access, and a shared vision of distributed, web-based, open source interoperable data access and integration. Commonalities include use of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) and ISO specifications and standardized data interchange mechanisms. For multidisciplinarity, mediation, adaptation, and profiling services have been successfully introduced to leverage the geosciences standards which are commonly used by the different geoscience communities -introducing a brokering approach which extends the basic SOA archetype. Principal challenges are less technical than cultural, social, and organizational. Before we can make data interoperable, we must make people interoperable. These challenges are being met by increased coordination of development activities (technical, organizational, social) among leaders and practitioners in national and international efforts across the geosciences to foster commonalities across disparate networks. In doing so, we will 1) leverage and share resources, and developments, 2) facilitate and enhance emerging technical and structural advances, 3) promote

  7. Efficient Controls for Finitely Convergent Sequential Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Herman, Gabor T.

    2010-01-01

    Finding a feasible point that satisfies a set of constraints is a common task in scientific computing: examples are the linear feasibility problem and the convex feasibility problem. Finitely convergent sequential algorithms can be used for solving such problems; an example of such an algorithm is ART3, which is defined in such a way that its control is cyclic in the sense that during its execution it repeatedly cycles through the given constraints. Previously we found a variant of ART3 whose control is no longer cyclic, but which is still finitely convergent and in practice it usually converges faster than ART3 does. In this paper we propose a general methodology for automatic transformation of finitely convergent sequential algorithms in such a way that (i) finite convergence is retained and (ii) the speed of convergence is improved. The first of these two properties is proven by mathematical theorems, the second is illustrated by applying the algorithms to a practical problem. PMID:20953327

  8. Fixing convergence of Gaussian belief propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jason K; Bickson, Danny; Dolev, Danny

    2009-01-01

    Gaussian belief propagation (GaBP) is an iterative message-passing algorithm for inference in Gaussian graphical models. It is known that when GaBP converges it converges to the correct MAP estimate of the Gaussian random vector and simple sufficient conditions for its convergence have been established. In this paper we develop a double-loop algorithm for forcing convergence of GaBP. Our method computes the correct MAP estimate even in cases where standard GaBP would not have converged. We further extend this construction to compute least-squares solutions of over-constrained linear systems. We believe that our construction has numerous applications, since the GaBP algorithm is linked to solution of linear systems of equations, which is a fundamental problem in computer science and engineering. As a case study, we discuss the linear detection problem. We show that using our new construction, we are able to force convergence of Montanari's linear detection algorithm, in cases where it would originally fail. As a consequence, we are able to increase significantly the number of users that can transmit concurrently.

  9. Origin of production gases from convergent plate margins

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey, A.W.A.; Poreda, R.J.; Gwilliam, W.J.; Kaplan, I.R.; Craig, H.

    1987-05-01

    Molecular and isotopic composition of hydrocarbon production gases from four convergent plate margins have been measured. New Zealand is represented by two gases from the Taranaki basin in the back arc of the active Tonga-Kermadec subduction system. Gases from Barbados and Taiwan are from forearc locations in the active Lesser Antilles system and relict northern Manila Trench system. Philippine gases from offshore Palawan are associated with the Palawan Trough. Gases from Taiwan, the Maiu field in New Zealand, and the Nido field in Palawan have very high /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratios, indicating considerable mantle input of helium to the gas reservoirs. Variations in /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratios in neighboring fields are quite striking and suggest localized sources for the mantle components. Possible sources include shallow igneous bodies and fractures or faults tapping a direct mantle source. Measurements of helium isotope ratios in hydrocarbon production gases have been compiled and show a striking association of mantle helium with gases from subduction zones in contrast to deep subsided or rifted sedimentary basins. The dynamics of the subduction process, involving the interaction of upper mantle and crustal rocks, is apparently responsible for the injection of volatile mantle components into reservoired gases. Current exploration techniques are based on maturation and gas migration theories developed from the study of subsiding sedimentary basins. At convergent margins, such technique may have to be amended to include the effects of subduction dynamics on the source, maturation, and migration of hydrocarbons.

  10. Convergence of gut microbiomes in myrmecophagous mammals.

    PubMed

    Delsuc, Frédéric; Metcalf, Jessica L; Wegener Parfrey, Laura; Song, Se Jin; González, Antonio; Knight, Rob

    2014-03-01

    Mammals have diversified into many dietary niches. Specialized myrmecophagous (ant- and termite-eating) placental mammals represent a textbook example of evolutionary convergence driven by extreme diet specialization. Armadillos, anteaters, aardvarks, pangolins and aardwolves thus provide a model system for understanding the potential role of gut microbiota in the convergent adaptation to myrmecophagy. Here, we expand upon previous mammalian gut microbiome studies by using high-throughput barcoded Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene to characterize the composition of gut microbiota in 15 species representing all placental myrmecophagous lineages and their close relatives from zoo- and field-collected samples. We confirm that both diet and phylogeny drive the evolution of mammalian gut microbiota, with cases of convergence in global composition, but also examples of phylogenetic inertia. Our results reveal specialized placental myrmecophages as a spectacular case of large-scale convergence in gut microbiome composition. Indeed, neighbour-net networks and beta-diversity plots based on UniFrac distances show significant clustering of myrmecophagous species (anteaters, aardvarks and aardwolves), even though they belong to phylogenetically distant lineages representing different orders. The aardwolf, which diverged from carnivorous hyenas only in the last 10 million years, experienced a convergent shift in the composition of its gut microbiome to become more similar to other myrmecophages. These results confirm diet adaptation to be a major driving factor of convergence in gut microbiome composition over evolutionary timescales. This study sets the scene for future metagenomic studies aiming at evaluating potential convergence in functional gene content in the microbiomes of specialized mammalian myrmecophages. PMID:24118574

  11. Numerical Convergence In Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qirong; Hernquist, Lars; Li, Yuexing

    2015-02-01

    We study the convergence properties of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) using numerical tests and simple analytic considerations. Our analysis shows that formal numerical convergence is possible in SPH only in the joint limit N → ∞, h → 0, and Nnb → ∞, where N is the total number of particles, h is the smoothing length, and Nnb is the number of neighbor particles within the smoothing volume used to compute smoothed estimates. Previous work has generally assumed that the conditions N → ∞ and h → 0 are sufficient to achieve convergence, while holding Nnb fixed. We demonstrate that if Nnb is held fixed as the resolution is increased, there will be a residual source of error that does not vanish as N → ∞ and h → 0. Formal numerical convergence in SPH is possible only if Nnb is increased systematically as the resolution is improved. Using analytic arguments, we derive an optimal compromise scaling for Nnb by requiring that this source of error balance that present in the smoothing procedure. For typical choices of the smoothing kernel, we find Nnb vpropN 0.5. This means that if SPH is to be used as a numerically convergent method, the required computational cost does not scale with particle number as O(N), but rather as O(N 1 + δ), where δ ≈ 0.5, with a weak dependence on the form of the smoothing kernel.

  12. Grid Convergence for Turbulent Flows(Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Schwoppe, Axel

    2015-01-01

    A detailed grid convergence study has been conducted to establish accurate reference solutions corresponding to the one-equation linear eddy-viscosity Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model for two dimensional turbulent flows around the NACA 0012 airfoil and a flat plate. The study involved three widely used codes, CFL3D (NASA), FUN3D (NASA), and TAU (DLR), and families of uniformly refined structured grids that differ in the grid density patterns. Solutions computed by different codes on different grid families appear to converge to the same continuous limit, but exhibit different convergence characteristics. The grid resolution in the vicinity of geometric singularities, such as a sharp trailing edge, is found to be the major factor affecting accuracy and convergence of discrete solutions, more prominent than differences in discretization schemes and/or grid elements. The results reported for these relatively simple turbulent flows demonstrate that CFL3D, FUN3D, and TAU solutions are very accurate on the finest grids used in the study, but even those grids are not sufficient to conclusively establish an asymptotic convergence order.

  13. Formation of polarity convergences underlying shoot outgrowths

    PubMed Central

    Abley, Katie; Sauret-Güeto, Susanna; Marée, Athanasius FM; Coen, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    The development of outgrowths from plant shoots depends on formation of epidermal sites of cell polarity convergence with high intracellular auxin at their centre. A parsimonious model for generation of convergence sites is that cell polarity for the auxin transporter PIN1 orients up auxin gradients, as this spontaneously generates convergent alignments. Here we test predictions of this and other models for the patterns of auxin biosynthesis and import. Live imaging of outgrowths from kanadi1 kanadi2 Arabidopsis mutant leaves shows that they arise by formation of PIN1 convergence sites within a proximodistal polarity field. PIN1 polarities are oriented away from regions of high auxin biosynthesis enzyme expression, and towards regions of high auxin importer expression. Both expression patterns are required for normal outgrowth emergence, and may form part of a common module underlying shoot outgrowths. These findings are more consistent with models that spontaneously generate tandem rather than convergent alignments. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18165.001 PMID:27478985

  14. Strong convergence for reduced free products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisier, Gilles

    2016-06-01

    Using an inequality due to Ricard and Xu, we give a different proof of Paul Skoufranis’s recent result showing that the strong convergence of possibly non-commutative random variables X(k) → X is stable under reduced free product with a fixed non-commutative random variable Y. In fact we obtain a more general fact: assuming that the families X(k) = {X i(k)} and Y(k) = {Y j(k)} are ∗-free as well as their limits (in moments) X = {Xi} and Y = {Yj}, the strong convergences X(k) → X and Y(k) → Y imply that of {X(k),Y(k)} to {X,Y }. Phrased in more striking language: the reduced free product is “continuous” with respect to strong convergence. The analogue for weak convergence (i.e. convergence of all moments) is obvious. Our approach extends to the amalgamated free product, left open by Skoufranis.

  15. Application of Convergence Confinement Analysis to the study of preceding displacement of a squeezing rock tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, T.; Kumeta, T.; Ichizyo, T.; Soga, S.; Sato, M.; Yasukawa, M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper deals with a study on the geomechanical behavior of the rock mass around the tunnel. The Convergence Confinement Analysis is one of the most appropriate way to estimate this behavior. Elasto-plastic models proposed by Hoek and Brown, Egger and Kastner were adopted in this study. Measurements of the preceding displacement were performed in a road tunnel in Japan, the geology of which is Neogene squeezing mudstone. The measured data was compared with the results of Convergence Confinement Analysis. The preceding displacement was about 40% against the upper bench face converged displacement and 17% against the final converged displacement. Meanwhile, it increased drastically in lower bench excavation step. Back analysis was also executed to calculate the extension of the plastic zone of the rock mass, which was half of that estimated by Convergence Confinement Analysis in upper bench excavation step. But, in lower bench excavation step, the results of the two analyses were very similar. The support pressure and support stiffness were also calculated.

  16. Multicloud: Multigrid convergence with a meshless operator

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Aaron Jameson, Antony

    2009-08-01

    The primary objective of this work is to develop and test a new convergence acceleration technique we call multicloud. Multicloud is well-founded in the mathematical basis of multigrid, but relies on a meshless operator on coarse levels. The meshless operator enables extremely simple and automatic coarsening procedures for arbitrary meshes using arbitrary fine level discretization schemes. The performance of multicloud is compared with established multigrid techniques for structured and unstructured meshes for the Euler equations on two-dimensional test cases. Results indicate comparable convergence rates per unit work for multicloud and multigrid. However, because of its mesh and scheme transparency, multicloud may be applied to a wide array of problems with no modification of fine level schemes as is often required with agglomeration techniques. The implication is that multicloud can be implemented in a completely modular fashion, allowing researchers to develop fine level algorithms independent of the convergence accelerator for complex three-dimensional problems.

  17. Convergence studies in meshfree peridynamic simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Seleson, Pablo; Littlewood, David J.

    2016-04-15

    Meshfree methods are commonly applied to discretize peridynamic models, particularly in numerical simulations of engineering problems. Such methods discretize peridynamic bodies using a set of nodes with characteristic volume, leading to particle-based descriptions of systems. In this article, we perform convergence studies of static peridynamic problems. We show that commonly used meshfree methods in peridynamics suffer from accuracy and convergence issues, due to a rough approximation of the contribution to the internal force density of nodes near the boundary of the neighborhood of a given node. We propose two methods to improve meshfree peridynamic simulations. The first method uses accuratemore » computations of volumes of intersections between neighbor cells and the neighborhood of a given node, referred to as partial volumes. The second method employs smooth influence functions with a finite support within peridynamic kernels. Numerical results demonstrate great improvements in accuracy and convergence of peridynamic numerical solutions, when using the proposed methods.« less

  18. Convergence Estimates for Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arian, Eyal

    1997-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of coupling between systems of equations is introduced. This analysis is then applied to problems in multidisciplinary analysis, sensitivity, and optimization. For the sensitivity and optimization problems both multidisciplinary and single discipline feasibility schemes are considered. In all these cases a "convergence factor" is estimated in terms of the Jacobians and Hessians of the system, thus it can also be approximated by existing disciplinary analysis and optimization codes. The convergence factor is identified with the measure for the "coupling" between the disciplines in the system. Applications to algorithm development are discussed. Demonstration of the convergence estimates and numerical results are given for a system composed of two non-linear algebraic equations, and for a system composed of two PDEs modeling aeroelasticity.

  19. Testing Convergence Versus History: Convergence Dominates Phenotypic Evolution for over 150 Million Years in Frogs.

    PubMed

    Moen, Daniel S; Morlon, Hélène; Wiens, John J

    2016-01-01

    Striking evolutionary convergence can lead to similar sets of species in different locations, such as in cichlid fishes and Anolis lizards, and suggests that evolution can be repeatable and predictable across clades. Yet, most examples of convergence involve relatively small temporal and/or spatial scales. Some authors have speculated that at larger scales (e.g., across continents), differing evolutionary histories will prevent convergence. However, few studies have compared the contrasting roles of convergence and history, and none have done so at large scales. Here we develop a two-part approach to test the scale over which convergence can occur, comparing the relative importance of convergence and history in macroevolution using phylogenetic models of adaptive evolution. We apply this approach to data from morphology, ecology, and phylogeny from 167 species of anuran amphibians (frogs) from 10 local sites across the world, spanning ~160 myr of evolution. Mapping ecology on the phylogeny revealed that similar microhabitat specialists (e.g., aquatic, arboreal) have evolved repeatedly across clades and regions, producing many evolutionary replicates for testing for morphological convergence. By comparing morphological optima for clades and microhabitat types (our first test), we find that convergence associated with microhabitat use dominates frog morphological evolution, producing recurrent ecomorphs that together encompass all sampled species in each community in each region. However, our second test, which examines whether and how much species differ from their inferred optima, shows that convergence is incomplete: that is, phenotypes of most species are still somewhat distant from the estimated optimum for each microhabitat, seemingly because of insufficient time for more complete adaptation (an effect of history). Yet, these effects of history are related to past ecologies, and not clade membership. Overall, our study elucidates the dominant drivers of

  20. Experience and convergence in spiritual direction.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jean

    2015-02-01

    The practice of spiritual direction concerns the human experience of God. As praxis, spiritual direction has a long tradition in Western Christianity. It is a process rooted in spirituality with theology as its foundation. This paper explores the convergences between aspects of philosophy (contemplative awareness), psychology (Rogerian client-centered approach) and phenomenology. There are significant points of convergence between phenomenology and spiritual direction: first, in Ignatius of Loyola's phenomenological approach to his religious experience; second, in the appropriation by spiritual directors of concepts of epochē and empathy; third, in the process of "unpacking" religious experience within a spiritual direction interview. PMID:24469918

  1. Deterministic convergence in iterative phase shifting

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, Esteban; Salas, Luis; Sohn, Erika; Ruiz, Elfego; Nunez, Juan M.; Herrera, Joel

    2009-03-10

    Previous implementations of the iterative phase shifting method, in which the phase of a test object is computed from measurements using a phase shifting interferometer with unknown positions of the reference, do not provide an accurate way of knowing when convergence has been attained. We present a new approach to this method that allows us to deterministically identify convergence. The method is tested with a home-built Fizeau interferometer that measures optical surfaces polished to {lambda}/100 using the Hydra tool. The intrinsic quality of the measurements is better than 0.5 nm. Other possible applications for this technique include fringe projection or any problem where phase shifting is involved.

  2. Rheological controls on the development of the convergent margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, Evgueni; Francois, Thomas; Duretz, Thibault; Agard, Philippe; Meyer, Bertrand; Yamato, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    continent-continent convergence settings, formation of high plateaux instead of rather narrow mountain ranges is conditioned by the degree of locking of the subduction channel, slow-down of the convergence causing slab retreat and by the rheological structure of both the upper and lower plates. Similarly, obduction and the associated exhumation processes appear to be largely dependent on the rheological properties of both the continental and oceanic crust, so that obduction is only possible for very specific combinations of rheological properties, requiring, in particular, relatively weak lower crust of the continental counterpart and presence of a weak serpentinized layer between the oceanic crust and mantle. These conditions drastically narrow the range of the rheological parameters compatible with tectonically realistic scenario of evolution of convergent zones allowing us to put a number of quantified constraints on the ductile rheology laws for crustal and mantle materials, and hence providing new possibilities for extrapolation of laboratory based rheology laws to geodynamic spatial and temporal scales.

  3. Zone separator for multiple zone vessels

    DOEpatents

    Jones, John B.

    1983-02-01

    A solids-gas contact vessel, having two vertically disposed distinct reaction zones, includes a dynamic seal passing solids from an upper to a lower zone and maintaining a gas seal against the transfer of the separate treating gases from one zone to the other, and including a stream of sealing fluid at the seal.

  4. GPS Monitoring of Subduction Zone Deformation in Costa Rica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The subduction of the Cocos plate beneath Costa Rica is among the highest convergence rates in the world. The high subduction rate and nearness of the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica to the Middle America Trench (MAT) provide a unique opportunity to map variations in interseismic strain of the crust above the seismogenic zone in response to variations in seismic coupling.

  5. Professionalization in Universities and European Convergence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vivas, Amparo Jimenez; Hevia, David Menendez Alvarez

    2009-01-01

    The constant assessment of the quality of higher education within the framework of European convergence is a challenge for all those universities that wish their degrees and diplomas to reflect a unified Europe. As is the case in any assessment, change and review process, the quest to improve quality implies measuring achievement of the objectives…

  6. Converging Oceaniac Internal Waves, Somalia, Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The arculate fronts of these apparently converging internal waves off the northeast coast of Somalia (11.5N, 51.5E) probably were produced by interaction with two parallel submarine canyons off the Horn of Africa. Internal waves are packets of tidally generated waves traveling within the ocean at varying depths and are not detectable by any surface disturbance.

  7. Convergence as a Mechanism of Language Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backus, Ad

    2004-01-01

    This issue of "Bilingualism: Language and Cognition" is about convergence, a type of language change that is contact-induced and results in greater similarity between two languages that are in contact with each other. In Backus (forthcoming), I have attempted an overview of contact-induced language change, focusing on causal factors, on mechanisms…

  8. Culture and Social Psychology: Converging Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimaggio, Paul; Markus, Hazel Rose

    2010-01-01

    Views of culture in psychology and sociology have converged markedly in the past two decades. Both have rejected what Adams and Markus (2004) refer to as the "entity" conception of culture--the view that culture is coherent, stable, and located in the heads of collectivities' members--in favor of more supple and dynamic constructs. Culture, in…

  9. Governance Challenges of Technological Systems Convergence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitman, Jim

    2006-01-01

    The convergence of several technological systems (especially nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology, and robotics) has now been adopted as a strategic goal by several countries, most notably the United States and those of the European Union. The anticipated benefits and related fears of competitive disadvantage have brought together…

  10. Phonological Convergence in a Contracting Language Variety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullock, Barbara E.; Gerfen, Chip

    2004-01-01

    Most work investigating the role of convergence in situations of language attrition has focused on the morpho-syntactic restructuring of the dying language variety. A central concern of such research has been untangling the factors driving the restructuring with an eye towards establishing whether the changes observed are best viewed as externally…

  11. The Convergence Coefficient across Political Systems

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, Norman

    2013-01-01

    Formal work on the electoral model often suggests that parties or candidates should locate themselves at the electoral mean. Recent research has found no evidence of such convergence. In order to explain nonconvergence, the stochastic electoral model is extended by including estimates of electoral valence. We introduce the notion of a convergence coefficient, c. It has been shown that high values of c imply that there is a significant centrifugal tendency acting on parties. We used electoral surveys to construct a stochastic valence model of the the elections in various countries. We find that the convergence coefficient varies across elections in a country, across countries with similar regimes, and across political regimes. In some countries, the centripetal tendency leads parties to converge to the electoral mean. In others the centrifugal tendency dominates and some parties locate far from the electoral mean. In particular, for countries with proportional electoral systems, namely, Israel, Turkey, and Poland, the centrifugal tendency is very high. In the majoritarian polities of the United States and Great Britain, the centrifugal tendency is very low. In anocracies, the autocrat imposes limitations on how far from the origin the opposition parties can move. PMID:24385886

  12. Another Perspective: A Response to "Toward Convergence"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regelski, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    This response by Thomas A. Regelski was solicited to complement the lead article in this issue, "Toward Convergence: Adapting Music Education to Contemporary Society and Participatory Culture" by Evan S. Tobias. The author notes that many interesting and vital questions and alternatives that are often studiously ignored, overlooked, or taken for…

  13. Convergence behavior of a new DSMC algorithm.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Rader, Daniel John; Torczynski, John Robert; Bird, Graeme A.

    2008-10-01

    The convergence rate of a new direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, termed 'sophisticated DSMC', is investigated for one-dimensional Fourier flow. An argon-like hard-sphere gas at 273.15K and 266.644Pa is confined between two parallel, fully accommodating walls 1mm apart that have unequal temperatures. The simulations are performed using a one-dimensional implementation of the sophisticated DSMC algorithm. In harmony with previous work, the primary convergence metric studied is the ratio of the DSMC-calculated thermal conductivity to its corresponding infinite-approximation Chapman-Enskog theoretical value. As discretization errors are reduced, the sophisticated DSMC algorithm is shown to approach the theoretical values to high precision. The convergence behavior of sophisticated DSMC is compared to that of original DSMC. The convergence of the new algorithm in a three-dimensional implementation is also characterized. Implementations using transient adaptive sub-cells and virtual sub-cells are compared. The new algorithm is shown to significantly reduce the computational resources required for a DSMC simulation to achieve a particular level of accuracy, thus improving the efficiency of the method by a factor of 2.

  14. Collaborative Instructional Strategies to Enhance Knowledge Convergence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Darryl C.

    2015-01-01

    To promote knowledge convergence through collaborative learning activities in groups, this qualitative case study involved a layered approach for the design and delivery of a highly collaborative learning environment incorporating various instructional technologies grounded in learning theory. In a graduate-level instructional technology course,…

  15. A Monotonically Convergent Algorithm for FACTALS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiers, Henk A. L.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A new procedure is proposed for handling nominal variables in the analysis of variables of mixed measurement levels, and a procedure is developed for handling ordinal variables. Using these procedures, a monotonically convergent algorithm is constructed for the FACTALS method for any mixture of variables. (SLD)

  16. NUMERICAL CONVERGENCE IN SMOOTHED PARTICLE HYDRODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Qirong; Li, Yuexing; Hernquist, Lars

    2015-02-10

    We study the convergence properties of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) using numerical tests and simple analytic considerations. Our analysis shows that formal numerical convergence is possible in SPH only in the joint limit N → ∞, h → 0, and N{sub nb} → ∞, where N is the total number of particles, h is the smoothing length, and N{sub nb} is the number of neighbor particles within the smoothing volume used to compute smoothed estimates. Previous work has generally assumed that the conditions N → ∞ and h → 0 are sufficient to achieve convergence, while holding N{sub nb} fixed. We demonstrate that if N{sub nb} is held fixed as the resolution is increased, there will be a residual source of error that does not vanish as N → ∞ and h → 0. Formal numerical convergence in SPH is possible only if N{sub nb} is increased systematically as the resolution is improved. Using analytic arguments, we derive an optimal compromise scaling for N{sub nb} by requiring that this source of error balance that present in the smoothing procedure. For typical choices of the smoothing kernel, we find N{sub nb} ∝N {sup 0.5}. This means that if SPH is to be used as a numerically convergent method, the required computational cost does not scale with particle number as O(N), but rather as O(N {sup 1} {sup +} {sup δ}), where δ ≈ 0.5, with a weak dependence on the form of the smoothing kernel.

  17. Diurnal cycle in convergence patterns in the boundary layer east of the Andes and convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolini, Matilde; Skabar, Yanina García

    2011-06-01

    . Mesoscale circulations are altered (still effecting mean divergence in the domain, which exhibits a diurnal oscillation) upon the initiation of deep convective circulations in the evening in an increasingly convectively unstable atmosphere driven by a persistent horizontal advection of heat and moisture at low levels and forced by convergence generated by the low-level jet and the presence of a frontal zone. Convection intensifies at night when its related convergence over the plains comes in phase with the convergence related to the nocturnal maximum in the low-level jet.

  18. Converging structural and functional connectivity of orbitofrontal, dorsolateral prefrontal, and posterior parietal cortex in the human striatum.

    PubMed

    Jarbo, Kevin; Verstynen, Timothy D

    2015-03-01

    Modification of spatial attention via reinforcement learning (Lee and Shomstein, 2013) requires the integration of reward, attention, and executive processes. Corticostriatal pathways are an ideal neural substrate for this integration because these projections exhibit a globally parallel (Alexander et al., 1986), but locally overlapping (Haber, 2003), topographical organization. Here we explore whether there are unique striatal regions that exhibit convergent anatomical connections from orbitofrontal cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and posterior parietal cortex. Deterministic fiber tractography on diffusion spectrum imaging data from neurologically healthy adults (N = 60) was used to map frontostriatal and parietostriatal projections. In general, projections from cortex were organized according to both a medial-lateral and a rostral-caudal gradient along the striatal nuclei. Within rostral aspects of the striatum, we identified two bilateral convergence zones (one in the caudate nucleus and another in the putamen) that consisted of voxels with unique projections from orbitofrontal cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and parietal regions. The distributed cortical connectivity of these striatal convergence zones was confirmed with follow-up functional connectivity analysis from resting state fMRI data, in which a high percentage of structurally connected voxels also showed significant functional connectivity. The specificity of this convergent architecture to these regions of the rostral striatum was validated against control analysis of connectivity within the motor putamen. These results delineate a neurologically plausible network of converging corticostriatal projections that may support the integration of reward, executive control, and spatial attention that occurs during spatial reinforcement learning. PMID:25740516

  19. Converging Structural and Functional Connectivity of Orbitofrontal, Dorsolateral Prefrontal, and Posterior Parietal Cortex in the Human Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Jarbo, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Modification of spatial attention via reinforcement learning (Lee and Shomstein, 2013) requires the integration of reward, attention, and executive processes. Corticostriatal pathways are an ideal neural substrate for this integration because these projections exhibit a globally parallel (Alexander et al., 1986), but locally overlapping (Haber, 2003), topographical organization. Here we explore whether there are unique striatal regions that exhibit convergent anatomical connections from orbitofrontal cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and posterior parietal cortex. Deterministic fiber tractography on diffusion spectrum imaging data from neurologically healthy adults (N = 60) was used to map frontostriatal and parietostriatal projections. In general, projections from cortex were organized according to both a medial–lateral and a rostral–caudal gradient along the striatal nuclei. Within rostral aspects of the striatum, we identified two bilateral convergence zones (one in the caudate nucleus and another in the putamen) that consisted of voxels with unique projections from orbitofrontal cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and parietal regions. The distributed cortical connectivity of these striatal convergence zones was confirmed with follow-up functional connectivity analysis from resting state fMRI data, in which a high percentage of structurally connected voxels also showed significant functional connectivity. The specificity of this convergent architecture to these regions of the rostral striatum was validated against control analysis of connectivity within the motor putamen. These results delineate a neurologically plausible network of converging corticostriatal projections that may support the integration of reward, executive control, and spatial attention that occurs during spatial reinforcement learning. PMID:25740516

  20. Rift basins of ocean-continent convergent margins

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, R.D.; Newcomb, K.R.

    1986-05-01

    Modern and ancient circum-Pacific convergent margins contain many examples of forearc basins where subsidence, occurring simultaneously with subduction of oceanic lithosphere, is controlled by rifting transverse to the margin. The elongate axes of these deep and narrow basins jut obliquely from the plate margin into the interior of the forearc. Similar to aulacogens, faulting and related subsidence appear greatest at their seaward limits and decreases inland. Examples from eastern Pacific forearcs suggest that localized rifting accommodates margin-parallel extension of forearc blocks that are kinetically linked to motions along major margin-parallel strike-slip fault systems. The most prominent examples of modern forearc rift basins are the Sanak and East Sanak basins of the western Alaska Peninsula subduction zone. In this region, the continental shelf is being rifted apart by a series of northwest- and northeast-trending faults. Basement-activated normal faults bounding the basins have listric geometries. Seismostratigraphic relationships within the basins indicate the protracted, synsedimentary, and active nature of faulting and basin subsidence. Along the Peru-Chile trench, two prominent rifted basins also occur: the Gulf of Guayaquil and the Gulf of Penas-Taitao basin of southern Chile. There, margin-parallel rifting controls subsidence in localized basins at the southern terminus to margin-parallel dextral fault systems. These and other examples suggest that strike-slip motion and transverse rifting of forearcs is a common phenomenon inadequately described by existing two-dimensional models of forearcs. Margin-parallel motions of forearc blocks can be related not only to oblique plate convergence, but also to the geometric and compositional nature of the overriding and subducted plates.

  1. A Numerical Study of Strain Partitioning and the Development of Forearc Slivers at Obliquely Convergent Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koster, K. L.; Haq, S. S.; Flesch, L. M.

    2012-12-01

    Oblique relative plate motion is common at convergent margins, often with a significant component of margin-parallel motion. At such margins, relative plate motion is often accommodated as spatially distinct margin-normal thrusting and margin-parallel shear, leading to the development of fore-arc slivers. These crustal slivers are bounded trench-ward by thrust faults and arc-ward by a well developed margin-parallel strike-slip fault and are observed in about half of all modern convergent boundaries. Some modestly oblique convergent settings are known to develop fore-arc slivers while some higher obliquity margins fail to effectively partition the margin-parallel component of plate motion in a distinct zone. Analog modeling has shown that pure frictional wedges only produce fore-arc like sliver motion at very high obliquities, however, the presence of ductile layers at depth can localize shear at lower obliquities. We have performed finite-element numerical simulations of oblique convergent wedges, over a wide range of obliquities, governed by viscous behavior at depth in which we solve force-balance equations for Stokes flow using COMSOL Multiphysics to quantify the magnitude and style of stress. Our numerical models reproduce topographic profiles and surface velocity fields of similarly parameterized analog experiments and demonstrate a progressive localization of margin-parallel shear with wedge growth. We also observe the onset and localization of shear in all wedges of non-zero obliquity, which we quantify by comparing the magnitudes of principal compressional and extensional stress tensor axes to constrain the timing of the transition between intermediate and high partitioning of strain in evolving wedges. These results suggest, in conjunction with analog models, that viscous behavior at depth and increase in topography during convergence both work to localize margin-parallel shear in obliquely convergent wedges and gives a mechanism for the development of

  2. Contamination-free high capacity converging waves sonoreactors for the chemical industry.

    PubMed

    Dion, Jean-Luc

    2009-02-01

    A new sonoreactor technology is presented here which should give a decisive impulse to sonochemistry in various areas of chemical processing. These exclusive systems use high power converging acoustic waves in a tube to produce a relatively large volume confined acoustic cavitation zone in flowing liquid reagents under pressure. It is well known that numerous chemical reactions are strongly accelerated when they take place inside such a zone. The new cylindrical sonoreactors do not contaminate the processed liquids with erosion products as most other devices do since the cavitation zone is maintained away from the wall of the tube. The processing conditions can be widely varied with pressure, power, temperature, and flow rate. The processing capacity of the largest models may be up to several tons per hour, depending on the required cavitation energy per unit volume to produce the desired process enhancement, using an electric power input of about 50 kW. PMID:18789748

  3. On domains of convergence in optimization problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz, Alejandro R.; Shaw, Steven S.; Pan, Jian

    1990-01-01

    Numerical optimization algorithms require the knowledge of an initial set of design variables. Starting from an initial design x(sup 0), improved solutions are obtained by updating the design iteratively in a way prescribed by the particular algorithm used. If the algorithm is successful, convergence is achieved to a local optimal solution. Let A denote the iterative procedure that characterizes a typical optimization algorithm, applied to the problem: Find x belonging to R(sup n) that maximizes f(x) subject to x belonging to Omega contained in R(sup n). We are interested in problems with several local maxima (x(sub j))(sup *), j=1, ..., m, in the feasible design space Omega. In general, convergence of the algorithm A to a specific solution (x(sub j))(sup *) is determined by the choice of initial design x(sup 0). The domain of convergence D(sub j) of A associated with a local maximum (x(sub j))(sup *) is a subset of initial designs x(sup 0) in Omega such that the sequence (x(sup k)), k=0,1,2,... defined by x(sup k+1) = A(x(sup k)), k=0,1,... converges to (x(sub j))(sup *). The set D(sub j) is also called the basin of attraction of (x(sub j))(sup *). Cayley first proposed the problem of finding the basin of attraction for Newton's method in 1897. It has been shown that the basin of attraction for Newton's method exhibits chaotic behavior in problems with polynomial objective. This implies that there may be regions in the feasible design space where arbitrarily close starting points will converge to different local optimal solutions. Furthermore, the boundaries of the domains of convergence may have a very complex, even fractal structure. In this paper we show that even simple structural optimization problems solved using standard gradient based (first order) algorithms exhibit similar features.

  4. The convergence of European business cycles 1978-2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormerod, Paul; Mounfield, Craig

    2002-05-01

    The degree of convergence of the business cycles of the economies of the European Union (EU) is a key policy issue. In particular, a substantial degree of convergence is needed if the European Central Bank is to be capable of setting a monetary policy which is appropriate to the stage of the cycle of the Euro zone economies. We consider the annual rates of real GDP growth on a quarterly basis in the large core economies of the EU (France, Germany and Italy, plus The Netherlands) over the period 1978Q1-2000Q3. An important empirical question is the degree to which the correlations between these growth rates contain true information rather than noise. The technique of random matrix theory is able to answer this question, and has been recently applied successfully in the physics journals to financial markets data. We find that the correlations between the growth rates of the core EU economies contain substantial amounts of true information, and exhibit considerable stability over time. Even in the late 1970s and early 1980s, these economies moved together closely over the course of the business cycle. There was a slight loosening at the time of German re-unification, but the economies are now, if anything, even more closely correlated. As a benchmark for comparison, we add a series to the EU core data set which by construction is uncorrelated with these business cycles. We then analyse the EU core plus Spain, a country which has attached great importance to greater integration with Europe. In the early part of the period examined, the results are very similar to those obtained with the data set of the EU core plus the random series. However, there is a clear trend in the results, which provide strong evidence to support the view that the Spanish economy has now become closely converged with the core EU economies in terms of its movements over the business cycle. In contrast, the results obtained with a data set of the EU core plus the UK show no such trend. In the

  5. Stability of spherical converging shock wave

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, M.; Sanz, J.; Iwamoto, Y.

    2015-07-15

    Based on Guderley's self-similar solution, stability of spherical converging shock wave is studied. A rigorous linear perturbation theory is developed, in which the growth rate of perturbation is given as a function of the spherical harmonic number ℓ and the specific heats ratio γ. Numerical calculation reveals the existence of a γ-dependent cut-off mode number ℓ{sub c}, such that all the eigenmode perturbations for ℓ > ℓ{sub c} are smeared out as the shock wave converges at the center. The analysis is applied to partially spherical geometries to give significant implication for different ignition schemes of inertial confinement fusion. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations are performed to verify the theory.

  6. Molecular mechanisms involved in convergent crop domestication.

    PubMed

    Lenser, Teresa; Theißen, Günter

    2013-12-01

    Domestication has helped to understand evolution. We argue that, vice versa, novel insights into evolutionary principles could provide deeper insights into domestication. Molecular analyses have demonstrated that convergent phenotypic evolution is often based on molecular changes in orthologous genes or pathways. Recent studies have revealed that during plant domestication the causal mutations for convergent changes in key traits are likely to be located in particular genes. These insights may contribute to defining candidate genes for genetic improvement during the domestication of new plant species. Such efforts may help to increase the range of arable crops available, thus increasing crop biodiversity and food security to help meet the predicted demands of the continually growing global population under rapidly changing environmental conditions. PMID:24035234

  7. Non-surgical interventions for convergence insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Scheiman, Mitchell; Gwiazda, Jane; Li, Tianjing

    2014-01-01

    Background Convergence insufficiency is a common eye muscle co-ordination problem in which the eyes have a strong tendency to drift outward (exophoria) when reading or doing close work. Symptoms may include eye strain, headaches, double vision, print moving on the page, frequent loss of place when reading, inability to concentrate, and short attention span. Objectives To systematically assess and synthesize evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effectiveness of non-surgical interventions for convergence insufficiency. Search strategy We searched The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index, the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com) and ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) on 7 October 2010. We manually searched reference lists and optometric journals. Selection criteria We included RCTs examining any form of non-surgical intervention against placebo, no treatment, sham treatment, or each other. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed eligibility, risk of bias, and extracted data. We performed meta-analyses when appropriate. Main results We included six trials (three in children, three in adults) with a total of 475 participants. We graded four trials at low risk of bias. Evidence from one trial (graded at low risk of bias) suggests that base-in prism reading glasses was no more effective than placebo reading glasses in improving clinical signs or symptoms in children. Evidence from one trial (graded at high risk of bias) suggests that base-in prism glasses using a progressive addition lens design was more effective than progressive addition lens alone in decreasing symptoms in adults. At three weeks of therapy, the mean difference in Convergence Insufficiency Symptoms Survey (CISS) score was −10.24 points (95% confidence interval (CI) −15.45 to −5.03). Evidence from two trials (graded at low risk of bias) suggests that outpatient (or office-based as used in the

  8. The genetic causes of convergent evolution.

    PubMed

    Stern, David L

    2013-11-01

    The evolution of phenotypic similarities between species, known as convergence, illustrates that populations can respond predictably to ecological challenges. Convergence often results from similar genetic changes, which can emerge in two ways: the evolution of similar or identical mutations in independent lineages, which is termed parallel evolution; and the evolution in independent lineages of alleles that are shared among populations, which I call collateral genetic evolution. Evidence for parallel and collateral evolution has been found in many taxa, and an emerging hypothesis is that they result from the fact that mutations in some genetic targets minimize pleiotropic effects while simultaneously maximizing adaptation. If this proves correct, then the molecular changes underlying adaptation might be more predictable than has been appreciated previously. PMID:24105273

  9. Stability of spherical converging shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, M.; Sanz, J.; Iwamoto, Y.

    2015-07-01

    Based on Guderley's self-similar solution, stability of spherical converging shock wave is studied. A rigorous linear perturbation theory is developed, in which the growth rate of perturbation is given as a function of the spherical harmonic number ℓ and the specific heats ratio γ. Numerical calculation reveals the existence of a γ-dependent cut-off mode number ℓc, such that all the eigenmode perturbations for ℓ > ℓc are smeared out as the shock wave converges at the center. The analysis is applied to partially spherical geometries to give significant implication for different ignition schemes of inertial confinement fusion. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations are performed to verify the theory.

  10. Convergent strand array liquid pumping system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A surface-tension liquid pumping system is provided by one or more arrays of converging solid monofilament fibers or metal wires (strands) spaced apart at an input end to gather liquid, and gathered close together at the opposite end where menisci forms between wetted strands to force liquid in the direction of convergence of the strands. The liquid pumping system is independent of gravity. It is illustrated as being used in a heat pump having a heating box to vaporize the liquid and a condensing chamber. Condensed liquid is returned by the pumping system to the heating box where it is again vaporized. A vapor tube carries the vapor to the condensing chamber. In that way, a closed system pumps heat from the heating box to the evaporating chamber and from there radiated to the atmosphere.

  11. Technologies for convergence in the metro network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankel, Michael Y.

    2005-02-01

    Traditional metro network architectures comprise multiple layers of networking equipment supporting a wide array of services and packet-oriented applications. Among others, these include WDM, SDH, ATM, Ethernet and IP, each requiring its own network elements and associated management solutions to perform its own independent networking functions. While these work well individually, the combined network is cumbersome and inefficient. Recent advancements in network technologies are now changing the way metro networks are designed. Multi-functional consolidation through technology integration and the standardization of protocol inter-networking methods are leading to a converged network solution in support of a diverse set of packet-aware service offerings. This presentation will explore new technologies that are enabling convergence in the metro network, both across layers and across services.

  12. Antibiotics From Microbes: Converging To Kill

    PubMed Central

    Fischbach, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary As genetically encoded small molecules, antibiotics are phenotypes that have resulted from mutation and natural selection. Advances in genetics, biochemistry, and bioinformatics have connected hundreds of antibiotics to the gene clusters that encode them, allowing these molecules to be analyzed using the tools of evolutionary biology. This review surveys examples of convergent evolution from microbially produced antibiotics, including the convergence of distinct gene clusters on similar phenotypes and the merger of distinct gene clusters into a single functional unit. Examining antibiotics through an evolutionary lens highlights the versatility of biosynthetic pathways, reveals lessons for combating antibiotic resistance, and provides an entry point for studying the natural roles of these natural products. PMID:19695947

  13. Metabolic Potential of the Deep Subseafloor at Selected Convergent Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardace, D.; Amend, J. P.; Morris, J. D.

    2005-12-01

    The cold subseafloor is an extreme environment in which microbial metabolism appears to operate slowly but persistently over space and time. At convergent margins, subseafloor microbial communities experience diffuse flow of aqueous fluids through sediment interstices and variable flow of deeply sourced, advecting fluids. When these fluids mix, geochemical disequilibria are established, and may serve as energy sources in microbial metabolism. This study contrasts the metabolic potential of four near trench sedimentary environments associated with the Costa Rica, Cascadia, Nankai, and Izu-Bonin-Marianas subduction zones, which span much of the global range of water depths (~ 2500 to ~ 5800 m) and thermal structure (heat flow at seafloor ~ 15 to ~ 140 mW/m2) outboard of subduction zones. Geochemical data (pH, NH4+, Na+, K+, Fe2+, Ca2+, Mg2+, HCO3-, Cl-, SO42-, SiO2 (aq), CH4 (aq), H2 (aq), PO43-, HS-, and CH3COO-) collected during Ocean Drilling Program Legs 146, 170, 185, 190, and 201 are used in Gibbs free energy minimization calculations to model the bioenergetic potential of key metabolic reactions. At the four sites, pH values are 7.3-8.2, alkalinity values are 1 to 24 mM, and sulfate values are 0 to 30 mM. Notable site-specific differences exist in NH4+ (ranging two orders of magnitude in concentration) and salinity (with reported values up to 40 psu at Izu). The specific reactions considered are: (1) CO2 driven methanogenesis, (2) acetate driven methanogenesis, (3) methanotrophy coupled to sulfate reduction, (4) acetate oxidation coupled to sulfate reduction, (5) acetate oxidation coupled with nitrate reduction, (6) acetate oxidation coupled with ferric iron reduction. The standard Gibbs free energies are combined with the in situ geochemical parameters to calculate overall Gibbs free energies in deep subseafloor environments. In all cases, ferric iron reduction coupled with acetate oxidation yields the greatest energy (~-1600 kJ/mol), followed by nitrate

  14. Vadose zone microbiology

    SciTech Connect

    Kieft, Thomas L.; Brockman, Fred J.

    2001-01-17

    The vadose zone is defined as the portion of the terrestrial subsurface that extends from the land surface downward to the water table. As such, it comprises the surface soil (the rooting zone), the underlying subsoil, and the capillary fringe that directly overlies the water table. The unsaturated zone between the rooting zone and the capillary fringe is termed the "intermediate zone" (Chapelle, 1993). The vadose zone has also been defined as the unsaturated zone, since the sediment pores and/or rock fractures are generally not completely water filled, but instead contain both water and air. The latter characteristic results in the term "zone of aeration" to describe the vadose zone. The terms "vadose zone," "unsaturated zone", and "zone of aeration" are nearly synonymous, except that the vadose zone may contain regions of perched water that are actually saturated. The term "subsoil" has also been used for studies of shallow areas of the subsurface immediately below the rooting zone. This review focuses almost exclusively on the unsaturated region beneath the soil layer since there is already an extensive body of literature on surface soil microbial communities and process, e.g., Paul and Clark (1989), Metting (1993), Richter and Markowitz, (1995), and Sylvia et al. (1998); whereas the deeper strata of the unsaturated zone have only recently come under scrutiny for their microbiological properties.

  15. Convergence acceleration of viscous flow computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    A multiple-grid convergence acceleration technique introduced for application to the solution of the Euler equations by means of Lax-Wendroff algorithms is extended to treat compressible viscous flow. Computational results are presented for the solution of the thin-layer version of the Navier-Stokes equations using the explicit MacCormack algorithm, accelerated by a convective coarse-grid scheme. Extensions and generalizations are mentioned.

  16. Sequences of Rational Numbers Converging to Surds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Rodney

    2010-01-01

    In this sequence 1/1, 7/5, 41/29, 239/169 and so on, Thomas notes that the sequence converges to square root of 2. By observation, the sequence of numbers in the numerator of the above sequence, have a pattern of generation which is the same as that in the denominator. That is, the next term is found by multiplying the previous term by six and…

  17. Arieti and Bowlby: convergence and direct influence.

    PubMed

    Bacciagaluppi, Marco

    2015-09-01

    Arieti was a great specialist of schizophrenia and Bowlby was the initiator of attachment theory. Working independently on the two sides of the Atlantic, they converged on a range of topics, such as evolutionary theory, mourning, trauma, violence, and therapy as art and science. Later, Bowlby exerted a direct influence on Arieti, which Arieti acknowledged in his Love Can Be Found. Finally, the two authors cooperated in the second edition of the American Handbook of Psychiatry. PMID:26356777

  18. Guaranteed convergence of the Hough transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soffer, Menashe; Kiryati, Nahum

    1995-01-01

    The straight-line Hough Transform using normal parameterization with a continuous voting kernel is considered. It transforms the colinearity detection problem to a problem of finding the global maximum of a two dimensional function above a domain in the parameter space. The principle is similar to robust regression using fixed scale M-estimation. Unlike standard M-estimation procedures the Hough Transform does not rely on a good initial estimate of the line parameters: The global optimization problem is approached by exhaustive search on a grid that is usually as fine as computationally feasible. The global maximum of a general function above a bounded domain cannot be found by a finite number of function evaluations. Only if sufficient a-priori knowledge about the smoothness of the objective function is available, convergence to the global maximum can be guaranteed. The extraction of a-priori information and its efficient use are the main challenges in real global optimization problems. The global optimization problem in the Hough Transform is essentially how fine should the parameter space quantization be in order not to miss the true maximum. More than thirty years after Hough patented the basic algorithm, the problem is still essentially open. In this paper an attempt is made to identify a-priori information on the smoothness of the objective (Hough) function and to introduce sufficient conditions for the convergence of the Hough Transform to the global maximum. An image model with several application dependent parameters is defined. Edge point location errors as well as background noise are accounted for. Minimal parameter space quantization intervals that guarantee convergence are obtained. Focusing policies for multi-resolution Hough algorithms are developed. Theoretical support for bottom- up processing is provided. Due to the randomness of errors and noise, convergence guarantees are probabilistic.

  19. Design Calculations For NIF Convergent Ablator Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R E; Hicks, D G; Meezan, N B; Callahan, D A; Landen, O L; Jones, O S; Langer, S H; Kline, J L; Wilson, D C; Rinderknecht, H; Zylstra, A; Petrasso, R D

    2011-10-25

    The NIF convergent ablation tuning effort is underway. In the early experiments, we have discovered that the design code simulations over-predict the capsule implosion velocity and shock flash rhor, but under-predict the hohlraum x-ray flux measurements. The apparent inconsistency between the x-ray flux and radiography data implies that there are important unexplained aspects of the hohlraum and/or capsule behavior.

  20. The role of near-trench extension at convergent plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannucchi, P.

    2009-04-01

    Knowledge of how convergent plate boundary coupling in the seismogenic zone controls the nucleation of subduction zone earthquakes is fundamental to assess seismic risks. Increased data at convergent margins has revealed the complexity of the earthquake cycle through the detection of strain-release processes like episodic tremors and slip events, low frequency earthquakes, afterslip, slip heterogeneity along the fault plane. The processes controlling the earthquake cycle and their interactions are still far from being understood; improved understanding will require better characterization of the fault zone. Here we compare in-situ observations from two major subduction zones drilled by ODP and IODP (Costa Rica Trench and Nankai Trough) with a well-preserved fossil convergent plate boundary zone in the Northern Apennines of Italy. At all three sites, deformation in the region above and at the updip limit of the seismogenic zone is dominated by extension and normal faulting (i.e. maximum principal stress is oriented sub-vertically). Episodes of reverse shearing are also present, but occur with less intensity, alternating with extension. Ocean Drilling Program Legs 170 and 205 offshore Costa Rica provide structural observations of the frontal part of the upper plate and décollement at about 2 km from the trench. Analysis of drilled cores reveals the presence of normal faults cutting the frontal part of the upper plate. Normal faults are also seen from seismic reflection to develop along all the forearc (about 60 km from the trench). The décollement damage zone is a few tens of meters in width; it develops mainly within frontal prism material. A clear cm-thick fault core is observed 1.6 km from the trench. Both the upper plate and the décollement damage zone show the co-existence of two distinct fracturing processes in which extension fracturing is frequent in the upper part of the damage zone farthest from the fault core, while both extension and shear fracturing

  1. Convergent Coarseness Regulation for Segmented Images

    SciTech Connect

    Paglieroni, D W

    2004-05-27

    In segmentation of remotely sensed images, the number of pixel classes and their spectral representations are often unknown a priori. Even with prior knowledge, pixels with spectral components from multiple classes lead to classification errors and undesired small region artifacts. Coarseness regulation for segmented images is proposed as an efficient novel technique for handling these problems. Beginning with an over-segmented image, perceptually similar connected regions are iteratively merged using a method reminiscent of region growing, except the primitives are regions, not pixels. Interactive coarseness regulation is achieved by specifying the area {alpha} of the largest region eligible for merging. A region with area less than {alpha} is merged with the most spectrally similar connected region, unless the regions are perceived as spectrally dissimilar. In convergent coarseness regulation, which requires no user interaction, {alpha} is specified as the total number of pixels in the image, and the coarseness regulation output converges to a steady-state segmentation that remains unchanged as {alpha} is further increased. By applying convergent coarseness regulation to AVIRIS, IKONOS and DigitalGlobe images, and quantitatively comparing computer-generated segmentations to segmentations generated manually by a human analyst, it was found that the quality of the input segmentations was consistently and dramatically improved.

  2. Disparity and convergence in bipedal archosaur locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Bates, K. T.; Schachner, E. R.

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to investigate functional disparity in the locomotor apparatus of bipedal archosaurs. We use reconstructions of hindlimb myology of extant and extinct archosaurs to generate musculoskeletal biomechanical models to test hypothesized convergence between bipedal crocodile-line archosaurs and dinosaurs. Quantitative comparison of muscle leverage supports the inference that bipedal crocodile-line archosaurs and non-avian theropods had highly convergent hindlimb myology, suggesting similar muscular mechanics and neuromuscular control of locomotion. While these groups independently evolved similar musculoskeletal solutions to the challenges of parasagittally erect bipedalism, differences also clearly exist, particularly the distinct hip and crurotarsal ankle morphology characteristic of many pseudosuchian archosaurs. Furthermore, comparative analyses of muscle design in extant archosaurs reveal that muscular parameters such as size and architecture are more highly adapted or optimized for habitual locomotion than moment arms. The importance of these aspects of muscle design, which are not directly retrievable from fossils, warns against over-extrapolating the functional significance of anatomical convergences. Nevertheless, links identified between posture, muscle moments and neural control in archosaur locomotion suggest that functional interpretations of osteological changes in limb anatomy traditionally linked to postural evolution in Late Triassic archosaurs could be constrained through musculoskeletal modelling. PMID:22112652

  3. Non-LTE radiative transfer with lambda-acceleration - Convergence properties using exact full and diagonal lambda-operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macfarlane, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    We investigate the convergence properties of Lambda-acceleration methods for non-LTE radiative transfer problems in planar and spherical geometry. Matrix elements of the 'exact' A-operator are used to accelerate convergence to a solution in which both the radiative transfer and atomic rate equations are simultaneously satisfied. Convergence properties of two-level and multilevel atomic systems are investigated for methods using: (1) the complete Lambda-operator, and (2) the diagonal of the Lambda-operator. We find that the convergence properties for the method utilizing the complete Lambda-operator are significantly better than those of the diagonal Lambda-operator method, often reducing the number of iterations needed for convergence by a factor of between two and seven. However, the overall computational time required for large scale calculations - that is, those with many atomic levels and spatial zones - is typically a factor of a few larger for the complete Lambda-operator method, suggesting that the approach should be best applied to problems in which convergence is especially difficult.

  4. On lacunary statistical convergence of order α in probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Işık, Mahmut; Et, Kübra Elif

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we examine the concepts of lacunary statistical convergence of order α in probability and Nθ—convergence of order α in probability. We give some relations connected to these concepts.

  5. Volcanism and aseismic slip in subduction zones

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, H.

    1981-01-10

    The spatial and temporal relationship of volcanism to the occurrence of large earthquakes and convergent plate motion is examined. The number of volcanic eruptions per year in a convergent zone is found to be linearly related to the aseismic slip component of plate motion. If the aseismic slip rate is low (coupling between converging plates is strong), then the primary manifestation of tectonic activity is the occurrence of large earthquakes with only infrequent volcanic activity. If, however, the aseismic slip rate is high (coupling is weak), then there are few large earthquakes, and volcanism is the principal manifestation of tectonic activity. This model is consistent with the spatial distribution of large earthquakes and active volcanoes in the circum-Pacific area. It is tested by examining the extent of volcanic activity in the rupture zones of the 1952--1973 sequence of earthquakes in the Japan--Kurile Islands area. The number of volcanic euptions along these zones during the interval between large earthquakes is used to compute the aseismic slip rates for these segments, based on the relationship developed in this study. The aseismic slip rates so computed agree with those determined from the earthquake history of the area and rates of plate motion. The agreement suggests that in the interval between large earthquakes, the aseismic plate motion is manifested in a specific number of volcanic eruptions. Therefore in areas with adequate historial data it should be possible to use the model developed in this study to monitor volcanic eruptions for long-term prediction of large earthquakes.

  6. The Record of Collision and Accretion in the History of a Convergent Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, L. N.; Betts, P. G.; Miller, M. S.; Cayley, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    Convergent margins become congested when they try to swallow buoyant, exotic crust or an oceanic swell associated with anomalously buoyant plume material. Mountain belts (orogens) that form at these convergent plate margins are the sites of significant lateral continental growth. Modern examples of accretionary margins are the North American Cordillera and southwest Pacific. The geologic record is riddled with accretionary orogens, such as the Tasmanides along the eastern margin of the supercontinent Gondwana and the Altaides that formed on the southern margin of Laurasia. In modern and ancient examples of long lived accretionary orogens, the overriding plate is subjected to episodes of crustal extension and back arc basin development, often related to subduction roll back and transient episodes of orogenesis and crustal shortening, coincident with accretion of exotic crust. In previous work, (Mason et al, 2010), we found that buoyant material ingested by a subduction zone produces a relative advance of the local region of the trench (either reduced rollback or absolute advance) naturally leading to the characteristic indentation of the plate boundary by the plateau. Depending on the strength and buoyancy of the incoming anomaly relative to the oceanic lithosphere, it may be subducted or it may be accreted with the associated formation of a slab window. Extending this model to ocean-continent convergent zones (Moresi et al, 2014), we show how the indentation of buoyant exotic material also dominates terrane accretion. When large blocks of material congest a subduction zone, the subduction zone needs to undergo signficiant re-arrangement for convergence to continue. We have modelled this process and observe characteristic patterns in the deformation of the over-riding plate, in the timing of the escape of material from behind the indenter, and in the oroclinal geometry that remains once the collision has completed. References Mason, W. G., Moresi, L., Betts, P. G

  7. Independent molecular basis of convergent highland adaptation in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Convergent evolution is the independent evolution of similar traits in different species or lineages of the same species; this often is a result of adaptation to similar environments, a process referred to as convergent adaptation. We investigate here the molecular basis of convergent adaptation in ...

  8. Convergent and Divergent Thinking in the Context of Narrative Mysteries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenzel, William G.; Gerrig, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    This project demonstrates how narrative mysteries provide a context in which readers engage in creative cognition. Drawing on the concepts of convergent and divergent thinking, we wrote stories that had either convergent or divergent outcomes. For example, one story had a character give his girlfriend a ring (a convergent outcome), whereas the…

  9. Plate convergence, transcurrent faults and internal deformation adjacent to Southeast Asia and the western Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitch, T. J.

    1971-01-01

    A model for oblique convergence between plates of lithosphere is proposed in which at least a fraction of slip parallel to the plate margin results in transcurrent movements on a nearly vertical fault which is located on the continental side of a zone of plate consumption. In an extreme case of complete decoupling only the component of slip normal to the plate margin can be inferred from underthrusting. Recent movements in the western Sunda region provide the most convincing evidence for decoupling of slip, which in this region is thought to be oblique to the plate margin. A speculative model for convergence along the margins of the Philippine Sea is constructed from an inferred direction of oblique slip in the Philippine region. This model requires that the triple point formed by the junction of the Japanese and Izu-Bonin trenches and the Nankai trough migrate along the Sagami trough.

  10. Criteria for the numerical convergence of quench simulations in CICC’S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottura, L.; Heller, R.

    2006-07-01

    Quench initiation and evolution in force-flow cooled conductors is a non-linear phenomenon that leads to a thermal runaway from a metastable situation. Because of the high degree of non-linearity associated with the expulsion of the helium coolant and the change of material properties in the wide range of temperature spanned, the analysis of quench mostly resorts on numerical simulation. In this paper, we show that there are specific situations in which the numerical analysis has problems in reaching convergence. The result is a large overestimation of critical parameters such as normal zone propagation velocity and maximum pressure. Based on established results, we give criteria for the selection of suitable space and time steps to obtain numerically converged and physically sound results.